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Sample records for 241-sy-101 mixer pump

  1. 241-SY-101 mixer pump lifetime expectancy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, C.P.

    1995-12-08

    The purpose of WHC-SD-WM-TI-726, Rev. 0 241-SY-101 Mixer Pump Lifetime Expectancy is to determine a best estimate of the mean lifetime of non-repairable (located in the waste) essential features of the hydrogen mitigation mixer pump presently installed in 101-SY. The estimated mean lifetime is 9.1 years. This report does not demonstrate operation of the entire pump assembly within the Tank Farm ``safety envelope``. It was recognized by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) this test pump was not specifically designed for long term service in tank 101-SY. In June 95 the DNFSB visited Hanford and ask the question, ``how long will this test pump last and how will the essential features fail?`` During the 2 day meeting with the DNFSB it was discussed and defined within the meeting just exactly what essential features of the pump must operate. These essential features would allow the pump to operate for the purpose of extending the window for replacement. Operating with only essential features would definitely be outside the operating safety envelope and would require a waiver. There are three essential features: 1. The pump itself (i.e. the impeller and motor) must operate 2. Nozzles and discharges leg must remain unplugged 3. The pump can be re-aimed, new waste targeted, even if manually.

  2. Quarterly review of 241-SY-101 mixer pump data: January - March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1999-07-22

    This report presents data obtained on 241-SY-101 pump performance. The period covered is January 1 through March 31, 1999. During the quarter: There were changes in pumping parameters. Both the pump volute pressure and amperage decreased during the quarter. It is not clear whether this was due to changes in waste properties (due to less solids or more entrained gas) or due to degradation of the pump. There was an indication of a 7.5-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1 A, and an average growth rate of 0.082 inches per day. There was an indication of a 5.7-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1C. This riser was flushed with water several times, which would lower the level of the crust at this location. Gases continued to be released at less than the pre-pump installation baseline rate, indicating a decrease in the gas generation rate, or an increase in gas retention, or both. The release rate was about 78 percent of the rate in the previous few quarters, and only 34 percent of the generation rate calculated prior to mixer pump installation in 1993. Key controls exist for waste temperature, gas concentration, pump parameters, and long-term waste behavior associated with the safe operation of the mixer pump that mitigates the buoyant displacement gas release event behavior of 241-SY-101. Table 1-1 compares the key controls and the current state of the waste as of March 3 1. 1999. The pump was run 28 times between January 1 and March 31, 1999. All of the pump runs were intended to be normal 25-minute, 1000-rpm excavation runs performed to mix the waste and release gas. Because of the pump oil often reached the high temperature alarm setpoint of 190 F, many of the runs were shortened (by as many as 8 minutes). This phenomenon was identified in November 1998, but got progressively worse over the quarter. The pump schedule was nominally three runs per week. However, core sampling activities interrupted the usual pump schedule several times during the quarter

  3. Effects of Crust Ingestion on Mixer Pump Performance in Tank 241-SY-101: Workshop Results

    SciTech Connect

    Brennen, C.E.; Stewart, C.W.; Meyer, P.A.

    1999-10-20

    In August 1999, a workshop was held at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to discuss the effects of crust ingestion on mixer pump performance in Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101. The main purpose of the workshop was to evaluate the potential for crust ingestion to degrade mixing and/or damage the mixer pump. The need for a previously determined 12-inch separation between the top of the mixer pump inlet and the crust base was evaluated. Participants included a representative from the pump manufacturer, an internationally known expert in centrifugal pump theory, Hanford scientists and engineers, and operational specialists representing relevant fields of expertise. The workshop focused on developing an understanding of the pump design, addressing the physics of entrainment of solids and gases into the pump, and assessing the effects of solids and gases on pump performance. The major conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) Entrainment of a moderate amount of solids or gas from the crust should not damage the pump or reduce its lifetime, though mixing effectiveness will be somewhat reduced. (2) Air binding should not damage the pump. Vibrations due to ingestion of gas, solids, and objects potentially could cause radial loads that might reduce the lifetime of bearings and seals. However, significant damage would require extreme conditions not associated with the small bubbles, fine solids, and chunks of relatively weak material typical of the crust. (3) The inlet duct extension opening, 235 inches from the tank bottom, should be considered the pump inlet, not the small gap at 262 inches. (4) A suction vortex exists at the inlet of all pumps. The characteristics of the inlet suction vortex in the mixer pump are very hard to predict, but its effects likely extend upward several feet. Because of this, the current 12-inch limit should be replaced with criteria based on actual monitored pump performance. The most obvious criterion (in addition to current operational

  4. Analysis of the 241SY101 pump removal trailer and the 241SY101 strongback

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdell, B.L.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of the calculations contained in the attached appendix is to determine the vibrational stability of the following combination (The Combination); shipping container, strongback and trailer. The vibrational stability of The Combination will be determined with the shipping container and strongback in the upright position. If the natural frequency of The Combination coincides with the input frequency and no damping is present, resonance will occur. The result of this is that the natural frequency of the Combination must be calculated as well as the input frequency. The input frequency in this case is caused by wind. Due to their geometrical complexity the upper and lower hydraulic clevises were analyzed for structural adequacy by using finite-element analysis (FEA). The FEA software COSMOS/M version 1.70 was used to model the upper and lower hydraulic clevis. All designs are in accordance with Standard Architectural-Civil Design Criteria, Design Loads for Facilities (DOE-RL 1989) and are safety class 3. The design and fabrication of each component is in accordance with American Institute of Steel Construction, Manual of Steel Construction, (AISC, 1989). The analyses contained in this document reflects the as-built condition of the 241SY101 hydraulic trailer.

  5. Type B Investigation Report for 241-SY-101 Pump Start and 241-C-106 Pit Cleanout

    SciTech Connect

    Ewalt, J.R.

    1993-09-01

    In accordance with the direction of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manager, Richland Operations Office, a Type ``B`` investigation in accordance with the DOE Order 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements, has been conducted. The scope of the investigation included two events: The ``Inadvertent Mixer Pump Operation at 241-SY-101`` (RL-WHC-TANK FARM-1993-069); ``Inadequate Work Control Results in Personnel Skin Contamination at 241-C-106, Pit B`` (RL-WHC-TANK FARM-1993-071) events. Additionally, at the request of the President of the WHC, a broader investigation into Waste Tank Farm ``safety practices`` and ``Conduct of Operations`` was also conducted. The review was focused on (1) WHC organizations performing operations, maintenance, and radiological safety tasks; and (2) KEH organizations performing major maintenance tasks.

  6. Mitigation of Tank 241-SY-101 by pump mixing: Results of testing phases A and B

    SciTech Connect

    Allemann, R.T.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Chvala, W.D.; Friley, J.R.; Gregory, W.B.; Hudson, J.D.; Michener, T.E.; Panisko, F.E.; Stewart, C.W.; Wise, B.M.; Efferding, L.E.; Fadeff, J.G.; Irwin, J.J.; Kirch, N.W.

    1994-03-01

    A spare mixing pump from the Hanford Grout Program was installed in Hanford double-shell waste Tank 241-SY-101 on July 3, 1993, after being modified to take advantage of waste stratification. It was anticipated that pump mixing would prevent large episodic flammable gas releases that had been occurring about every 100-150 days. A cautious initial test plan, called Phase A, was run to find how the pump and tank would behave in response to very brief and gentle pump operation. No large gas releases were triggered, and the pump performed well except for two incidents of nozzle plugging. On October 21, 1993, the next test series, Phase B, began, and the pump was applied more aggressively to mix the tank contents and mitigate uncontrolled gas releases. Orienting the pump in new directions released large volumes of gas and reduced the waste level to a near-record low. Results of the entire period from pump installation to the end of Phase B on December 17, 1993, are presented in detail in this document. Though long-term effects require further evaluation, we conclude from these data that the jet mixer pump is an effective means of controlling flammable gas release and that it has met the success criteria for mitigation in this tank.

  7. Mitigation of tank 241-SY-101 by pump mixing: Results of full-scale testing

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Hudson, J.D.; Friley, J.R.; Panisko, F.E.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Irwin, J.J.; Fadeff, J.G.; Efferding, L.F.; Michener, T.E.; Kirch, N.W.

    1994-06-01

    The Full-Scale Mixer Pump Test Program was performed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 from February 4 to April 13, 1994, to confirm the long-term operational strategy for flammable gas mitigation and to demonstrate that mixing can control the gas release and waste level. Since its installation on July 3, 1993, the current pump, operating only a few hours per week, has proved capable of mixing the waste sufficiently to release gas continuously instead of in large episodic events. The results of Full-Scale Testing demonstrated that the pump can control gas release and waste level for long-term mitigation, and the four test sequences formed the basis for the long-term operating schedule. The last test sequence, jet penetration tests, showed that the current pump jet creates flow near the tank wall and that it can excavate portions of the bottom sludge layer if run at maximum power. Pump mixing has altered the {open_quote}normal{close_quote} configuration of the waste; most of the original nonconvective sludge has been mixed with the supernatant liquid into a mobile convective slurry that has since been maintained by gentle pump operation and does not readily return to sludge.

  8. 241-SY-101 Pump Decon System Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Talachy, S.A.; Cleveland, K.J.

    1995-04-12

    The SY-101 Pump Decon System has components that consist of the water filter skid to assembly operation, the pump pit flooding system, and the system set up using air blow the water out of the decon hose. The Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) consists of four parts. The first part will calibrate water and flow meters. The second part will determine the pressure loss on the water traveling through the filter skid at various flow rates. The third part will determine the length of time it takes to drain 1350 gallons of water out of a tank through 300 feet of discharge hose. The fourth part will verify that the calculated air volume and pressure in an air receiver is adequate to blow all the water out of a 2 inch diameter water hose.

  9. 241-SY-101 data acquisition and control system (DACS) remote operator interface operational test report

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    1999-06-24

    The readiness of the upgraded 241-SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide proper control and monitoring of the mixer pump and instrumentation in tank 241-SY-101 was evaluated by the performance of OTP-440-001. Results of the OTP are reported here.

  10. A safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-SY-101: Hanford Site,Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lentsch, J.W.

    1996-07-01

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101,which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  11. Process Control Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-09-28

    The tank 241-SY-101 transfer system was conceived and designed to address the immediate needs presented by rapidly changing waste conditions in tank 241-SY-101. Within the last year or so, the waste in this tank has exhibited unexpected behavior (Rassat et al. 1999) in the form of rapidly increasing crust growth. This growth has been brought about by a rapidly increasing rate of gas entrapment within the crust. It has been conceived that the lack of crust agitation beginning upon the advent of mixer pump operations may have set-up a more consolidated, gas impermeable barrier when compared to a crust regularly broken up by the prior buoyant displacement events within the tank. As a result, a series of level-growth remediation activities have been developed for tank 241-SY-101. The initial activities are also known as near-term crust mitigation. The first activity of near-term mitigation is to perform the small transfer of convective waste from tank 241-SY-101 into tank 241-SY-102. A 100 kgal transfer represents about a 10% volume reduction allowing a 10% water in-tank dilution. Current thinking holds that this should be enough to dissolve nitrite solids in the crust and perhaps largely eliminate gas retention problem in the crust (Raymond 1999).

  12. The behavior, quantity, and location of undissolved gas in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, M.E.; Gallagher, N.B.; Hudson, J.D.; Stewart, C.W.

    1995-10-01

    Mitigation of episodic flammable gas releases from Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101 was accomplished in July 1993 with the installation of a mixer pump that prevents gas retention. But is has not been possible until recently to measure the effects of mixing on the waste or how much gas remains and where it is located. Direct measurements of the void fraction and rheology of the mixed waste by the void fraction instrument (VFI) and ball rheometer along with previous data provide estimates of the location, quantity, and behavior of undissolved gas in the tank. This report documents the compilation and integration of the information that enables this understanding.

  13. Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 3 testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, G.A.

    1995-02-06

    This document summarizes the results of the phase 3 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the sealing integrity of the FRS to ensure that the release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from Tank 241-SY-101. The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the mixer pump. This acceptance test was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 area from January 10, 1995 to January 17, 1995. The Phase 3 test consisted of two parts. Part one was a water leak test of the seal between the blast shield and mock load distribution frame (LDF) to ensure that significant contamination of the pump pit and waste interaction with the aluminum impact-limiting material under the LDF are prevented during the pump removal operation. The second part of this acceptance test was an air leak test of the assembled flexible receiver system. The purpose of this test was to verify that the release of hazardous aerosols will be minimized if the tank dome pressure becomes slightly positive during the decontamination of the mixer pump.

  14. Operability test procedure [Tank] 241-SY-101 equipment removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, J.C.

    1994-12-08

    The 241-SY-101 equipment removal system (ERS) consists of components, equipment, instrumentation and procedures that will provide the means to disconnect, retrieve, contain, load and transport the Mitigation Pump Assembly (MPA) from waste Tank 241-SY-101 to the Central Waste Complex (CWC). The Operability Test Procedure (OTP) will test the interfaces between ERS components and will rehearse the procedure for MPA removal and transportation to the extent they can be mocked-up at the CTF (Cold Test Facility). At the conclusion of the OTP, the ERS components and equipment will be removed from the CTF, entered into the Component Based Recall System (CBRS), and stored until needed for actual MPA removal and transportation.

  15. In situ determination of rheological properties and void fraction in Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Shepard, C.L.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Stokes, T.I.; Terrones, G.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the results of the operation of the void fraction instrument (VFI) and ball rheometer in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101, which contains approximately one million gallons of radioactive waste. These instruments provided the first direct assay of the waste condition in the tank after more than a year of mixer pump operation. The two instruments were deployed in the tank in late 1994 and early 1995 to gather much-needed data on the effect prolonged mixer pump operation has on gas retention in the waste. The information supplied by these instruments has filled a great gap in the quantitative knowledge of the waste condition. The results show that the solids are well-mixed by the current mixer pump to within less than a meter of the tank bottom. Undisturbed sludge remains only on the lowest 10--30 cm and contains 10--12% void. The mixed slurry above contains less than 1% void and has no measurable yield strength and a shear-thinning viscosity of approximately 6 Poise at 1 sec{sup {minus}1}. Estimating the gas volumes in each of the four layers based on VFI data yields a total of 221 {+-} 57 m{sup 3} (7,800 {+-} 2,000 SCF) of gas at 1 atmosphere. Given the current waste level of 10.2 m (400 inches), the degassed waste level would be 9.8 m (386 inches). These results confirm that the mixer pump in Tank 241-SY-101 has performed the job it was installed to do--thoroughly mix the waste to release stored gas and prevent gas accumulation.

  16. Process Control Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-11-01

    The tank 241-SY-101 transfer system was conceived and designed to address the immediate needs presented by rapidly changing waste conditions in tank 241-SY-101. Within approximately the last year, the waste in this tank has exhibited unexpected behavior (Rassat et al. 1999) in the form of rapidly increasing crust growth. This growth has been brought about by a rapidly increasing rate of gas entrapment within the crust. It has been conceived that the lack of crust agitation beginning upon the advent of mixer pump operations may have set-up a more consolidated, gas impermeable barrier when compared to a crust regularly broken up by the prior buoyant displacement events within the tank. The interim goals of the project are to: (1) protect the mixer pump operability (2) begin releasing gas from the crust, and (3) begin dissolving the crust and solids in the slurry layer. The final goals of the project (Final State) are to solve both the level growth and BD-GRE safety issues in this tank by achieving a condition of the waste such that no active measures are required to safely store the waste, i.e., crust and non convective layer are mostly dissolved, and therefore the mixer pump will no longer be needed to prevent BD-GREs in excess of 100% LFL. Transfers (which are designed to create space in the tank) and dilution (which will dissolve the solids) will accomplish this. Dissolution of solids will result in a release of gas retained by those solids and remove that volume of solids as a future retention site.

  17. Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 2 testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, G.A.

    1995-02-06

    This document summarizes the results of the Phase 2 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the test mixer pump currently installed in Tank 241-SY-101. The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the strength of the containment bag and bag bottom cinching mechanism. It is postulated that 68 gallons of waste could be trapped inside the pump internals. The bag must be capable of supporting this waste if it shakes loose and drains to the bottom of the bag after the bag bottom has been cinched closed. This acceptance test was performed at the Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) Facility in the 400 area on January 23, 1995. The bag assembly supported the weight of 920 kg (2,020 lbs) of water with no leakage or damage to the bag. This value meets the acceptance criteria of 910 kg of water and therefore the results were found to be acceptable. The maximum volume of liquid expected to be held up in the pump internals is 258 L (68 gallons), which corresponds to 410 kg. This test weight gives just over a safety factor of 2. The bag also supported a small shock load while it was filled with water when the crane hoisted the bag assembly up and down. Based on the strength rating of the bag components, the bag assembly should support 2--3 times the test weight of 910 kg.

  18. Analysis of several hazardous conditions for large transfer and back-dilution sequences in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    CW Stewart; LA Mahoney; WB Barton

    2000-01-28

    The first transfer of 89 kgal of waste and back-dilution of 61 kgal of water in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 was accomplished December 18--20, 1999. Limits were placed on the transfer and back-dilution volumes because of concerns about potential gas release, crust sinking, and degradation of mixer pump performance. Additional transfers and back-dilutions are being planned that will bring the total to 500 kgal, which should dissolve a large fraction of the solids in the tank and dilute it well beyond the point where significant gas retention can occur. This report provides the technical bases for removing the limits on transfer and back-dilution volume by evaluating the potential consequences of several postulated hazardous conditions in view of the results of the first campaign and results of additional analyses of waste behavior.

  19. Acceptance test procedure, 241-SY-101/241-C-106 shot loading system

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrom, M.J.

    1994-11-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure is for the 241-SY-101/241-C-106 Shot Loading System. The procedure will test the components of the Shot Loading System and its capability of adequately loading shot into the annular space of the Container. The loaded shot will provide shielding as required for transporting and storage of a contaminated pump after removal from the tank. This test serves as verification that the SLS is acceptable for use in the pump removal operations for Tanks 241-SY-101, 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. The pump removal operation for these three tanks will be performed by two different organizations with different equipment, but the Shot Loading System will be compatible between the two operations.

  20. Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    1999-04-05

    Tank 241-SY-101 waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY-102. The results of the hazards evaluation were compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. Revision 1 of this document deletes hazardous conditions no longer applicable to the current waste transfer design and incorporates hazardous conditions related to the use of an above ground pump pit and overground transfer line. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting authorization of the activity; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The AB Control Decision process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  1. Buoyant Response of the Tank 241-SY-101 Crust to Transfer and Back-Dilution

    SciTech Connect

    CW Stewart

    1999-11-08

    The mixer pump installed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) in July 1993 has prevented the large buoyant displacement gas release events (BD GRE) it has historically exhibited. But the absence of periodic disruption from GREs and the action of mixing have allowed the crust to grow. The accelerated gas retention has resulted in over 30 inches of waste level growth and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from below the crust, SY-101 will be diluted in the fall of 1999 to dissolve a large fraction of the solids in the tank. The plan is to transfer waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps of about 100,000 gallons each. Back-dilution water may be added at the transfer pump inlet, the base of the mixer pump, and on top of the crust. The mixer pump will continue to be required to prevent formation of a deep nonconnective layer and resumption of BD GREs. Therefore, it is vital to ensure that the transfer and back-dilution processes do not significantly degrade the pump's effectiveness. Part of the strategy to avoid mixer pump degradation is to keep the base of the crust layer well above the pump inlet, which is 236 inches above the tank bottom. The maximum transfer for which an equal back-dilution is possible without sinking the crust is 90 kgal if water is injected at the 96-inch transfer pump inlet and 120 kgal for injection at the 9-inch mixer pump burrowing ring. To keep the crust base above the lowest observed elevation of 295 inches, transfer and back-dilution must be limited to 143 kgal and 80 kgal, respectively, for the 96-inch back-dilution and 175 kgal with a 112 kgal back-dilution using the 9-inch back-dilution elevation. These limits can be avoided by adding water to the top of the crust to dissolve the negatively buoyant layers. If 20 kgal of water is placed on top of the crust and the rest of the back-dilution is placed

  2. Numerical simulation of Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 jet initiated fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, D.S.; Michener, T.E.

    1994-12-31

    The episodic Gas Release Events (GREs) that have characterized the behavior of Hanford tank 241-SY-101 for the past several years are thought to result from the entrapment of gases generated in the settled solids, i.e., sludge, layer of the tank. Gases consisting of about 36% hydrogen by volume, which are generated by complicated and poorly understood radiological and chemical processes, are apparently trapped in the settled solids layer until their accumulation initiates a buoyant upset of this layer, abruptly releasing large quantities of gas. Once concept for preventing the gas accumulation is to mobilize the settled materials with jet mixing. It is suggested that continual agitation of the settled solids using a mixer pump would free the gas bubbles so that they could continually escape, thus mitigating the potential for accumulation of flammable concentrations of hydrogen in the tank dome space following a GRE. A pump test is planned to evaluate the effectiveness of the jet mixing mitigation concept. The pump will circulate liquid from the upper layer of the tank, discharging it through two horizontal jets located approximately 2{1/2} ft above the tank floor. To prepare for start-up of this pump test, technical, operation, and safety questions concerning an anticipated gas release were addressed by numerical simulation using the TEMPEST computer code. Simulations of the pump initiated gas release revealed that the amount of gas that could potentially be released to the tank dome space is very sensitive to the initial conditions assumed for the amount and distribution of gas in the sludge layer. Calculations revealed that within the assumptions regarding gas distribution and content, the pump might initiate a rollover--followed by a significant gas release--if the sludge layer contains more than about 13 to 14% gas distributed with constant volume fraction.

  3. Potential for Waste Stratification from Back-Dilution in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.; Meyer, P.A.

    1999-10-20

    Since late 1997, the floating crust layer in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) has grown about two meters by gas accumulation. To reverse crust growth and reduce its retained gas volume, the waste in SY-101 will be diluted by transferring at least 300,000 gal of waste out of the tank and replacing it with water. In the fall of 1999, approximately 100,000 gal of this waste will be transferred into Tank SY-102; within a few days of that initial transfer, approximately 100,000 gal of water will be added to SY-101. This initial back-dilution is being planned to ensure that the base of the floating crust layer will be lifted away from the mixer pump inlet with minimal effect on the crust itself. The concern is that the added water will pool under the crust, so the resulting fluid mixture will be too light to lift the crust away from the mixer pump and dissolution at the crust base could cause unwanted gas release. To ensure sufficient mixing to prevent such stratification, water will be added near the tank bottom either through an existing sparge ring on the base of the mixer pump or through the dilution line at the inlet of the transfer pump. A number of simulations using the TEMPEST code showed that the mixing of the water and waste by this method is rapid, and the water does not pool under the crust. Although a density gradient is present, its magnitude is small compared with the difference between the slurry and water density. The result is essentially the same whether water is introduced at the base of the mixer pump or at the transfer pump. There is little effect of water flowrate up to the 500 gpm studied. In all cases, the minimum density remained above that required to float the crust and well above the density of saturated liquid. This indicates that the base of the crust will rise during back-dilution and there will be little or no dissolution of the crust base because the water will be close to saturation from the dissolution of solids in the mixed slurry.

  4. Status of tank 241-SY-101 data analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Anantatmula, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    The Waste Tank Flammable Gas Stabilization Program was established in 1990 to provide for resolution of a major safety issue identified for 23 of the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The safety issue involves the production, accumulation, and periodic release from these tanks of flammable gases in concentrations exceeding the lower flammability limits. This document deals primarily with tank 241-SY-101 from the SY Tank Farm. The flammable gas condition has existed for this tank since the tank was first filled in the time period from 1977 to 1980. During a general review of waste tank chemical stability in 1988--1989, this situation was re-examined and, in March 1990, the condition was declared to be an unreviewed safety question. Tank 241-SY-101 was placed under special operating restrictions, and a program of investigation was begun to evaluate the condition and determine appropriate courses of action. This report summarizes the data that have become available on tank 241-SY-101 since it was declared as an unreviewed safety question and updates the information reported in an earlier document (WHC-EP-0517). The report provides a technical basis for use in the evaluation of safety risks of the tank and subsequent resolution of the unreviewed safety question.

  5. Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    1999-02-12

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from SY-101 to 241-SY-102 (SY-102). The results of the hazards evaluation will be compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. This document is not intended to authorize the activity or determine the adequacy of controls; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  6. Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    SD Rassat; CW Stewart; BE Wells; WL Kuhn; ZI Antoniak; JM Cuta; KP Recknagle; G Terrones; VV Viswanathan; JH Sukamto; DP Mendoza

    2000-01-26

    Due primarily to an increase in floating crust layer thickness, the waste level in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) has grown appreciably, and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a potential hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from the nonconnective layer at the bottom of the tank, SY-101 will be diluted to dissolve a large fraction of the solids that allow the waste to retain gas. In this work we develop understanding of the state of the tank waste and some of its physical properties, investigate how added water will be distributed in the tank and affect the waste, and use the information to evaluate mechanisms and rates of waste solids dissolution and gas release. This work was completed to address these questions and in support of planning and development of controls for the SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation Project. Particular emphasis is given to dissolution of and gas release from the crust, although the effects of back-dilution on all waste layers are addressed. The magnitude and rates of plausible gas release scenarios are investigated, and it is demonstrated that none of the identified mechanisms of continuous (dissolution-driven) or sudden gas release, even with conservative assumptions, lead to domespace hydrogen concentrations exceeding the lower flammability limit. This report documents the results of studies performed in 1999 to address the issues of the dynamics, of crust dissolution and gas release in SY-101. It contains a brief introduction to the issues at hand; a summary of our knowledge of the SY-101 crust and other waste properties, including gas fractions, strength and volubility; a description of the buoyancy and dissolution models that are applied to predict the crust response to waste transfers and back dilution; and a discussion of the effectiveness of mixing for water added below the crust and the limited potential for significant stratification

  7. Buoyancy and Dissolution of the Floating Crust Layer in Tank 241-SY-101 During Transfer and Back-Dilution

    SciTech Connect

    CW Stewart; JH Sukamto; JM Cuta; SD Rassat

    1999-11-22

    To remediate gas retention in the floating crust layer and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from below the crust, waste will be transferred out of Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) in the fall of 1999 and back-diluted with water in several steps of about 100,000 gallons each. To evaluate the effects of back-dilution on the crust a static buoyancy model is derived that predicts crust and liquid surface elevations as a function of mixing efficiency and volume of water added during transfer and back-dilution. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the basic physics involved and verify the operation of the models. A dissolution model is also developed to evaluate the effects of dissolution of solids on crust flotation. The model includes dissolution of solids suspended in the slurry as well as in the crust layers. The inventory and location of insoluble solids after dissolution of the soluble fraction are also tracked. The buoyancy model is applied to predict the crust behavior for the first back-dilution step in SY-101. Specific concerns addressed include conditions that could cause the crust to sink and back-dilution requirements that keep the base of the crust well above the mixer pump inlet.

  8. Structural analysis and evaluation of the 241SY101 tank annulus heat-up

    SciTech Connect

    Ziada, H.H.

    1994-10-19

    This document provides the structural analysis (static and thermal loads) of the 241SY101 tank to determine the maximum allowable temperature and rate of heating that could be applied to tank 241SY101 through annulus air heating without detrimental effects to the structural integrity of the concrete and steel liner of the tank.

  9. 241-SY-101 DACS High hydrogen abort limit reduction (SCR 473) acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    1999-09-09

    The capability of the 241-SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) computer system to provide proper control and monitoring of the 241-SY-101 underground storage tank hydrogen monitoring system utilizing the reduced hydrogen abort limit of 0.69% was systematically evaluated by the performance of ATP HNF-4927. This document reports the results of the ATP.

  10. Acceptance test report for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver Gamma Detector System

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, J.L.

    1995-02-17

    This Acceptance Test Report is for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver Gamma Detector System. This test verified that the data logger and data converter for the gamma detector system functions as intended.

  11. Assessment of gas accumulation and retention -- Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, R.T.; Burke, T.M.; Reynolds, D.A.; Simpson, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    An approximate analysis has been carried out to assess and estimate the maximum quantity of gas that is likely to be accumulated within waste tank 241-SY-101, and the maximum quantity which is likely to be retained after gas release events (GRE). According to the phenomenological models used for this assessment, based on interpretation of current and recent operational data, the estimated gas generation rate in the tank is approximately 4 m{sup 3}/day (147 ft{sup 3}/day). About half of this gas is released as it is generated, which is (essentially) continuously. The remainder is accumulated within the slurry layer of settled solids at the bottom of the tank, and released episodically in GREs, known as ``burps,`` that are induced by unstable buoyant conditions which develop when sufficient gas accumulates in the slurry. Calculations based on gas volumes to cause neutral buoyancy in the slurry predict the following: the maximum gas accumulation (at 1 atm pressure) that can occur without triggering a GRE is in the range of 606 to 1,039 m{sup 3} (21,400 to 36,700 ft{sup 3}); and the maximum gas retention immediately after a GRE is equal to the maximum accumulation minus the gas released in the GRE. GREs do not necessarily involve all of the slurry. In the largest GREs, which are assumed to involve all of the slurry, the minimum gas release (at 1 atm pressure) is calculated to be in the range of 193 to 328 m{sup 3} (6,800 to 11,600 ft{sup 3}). The corresponding maximum gas retention would be 413 to 711 m{sup 3} (14,600 to 25,100 ft{sup 3}).

  12. Probabilistic safety assessment for Hanford high-level waste tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, D.R.; Bott, T.F.; Brown, L.F.; Stack, D.W.; Kindinger, J.; Deremer, R.K.; Medhekar, S.R.; Mikschl, T.J.

    1994-05-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) is performing a comprehensive probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), which will include consideration of external events for the 18 tank farms at the Hanford Site. This effort is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE/EM, EM-36). Even though the methodology described herein will be applied to the entire tank farm, this report focuses only on the risk from the weapons-production wastes stored in tank number 241-SY-101, commonly known as Tank 101-SY, as configured in December 1992. This tank, which periodically releases ({open_quotes}burps{close_quotes}) a gaseous mixture of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and nitrogen, was analyzed first because of public safety concerns associated with the potential for release of radioactive tank contents should this gas mixture be ignited during one of the burps. In an effort to mitigate the burping phenomenon, an experiment is being conducted in which a large pump has been inserted into the tank to determine if pump-induced circulation of the tank contents will promote a slow, controlled release of the gases. At the Hanford Site there are 177 underground tanks in 18 separate tank farms containing accumulated liquid/sludge/salt cake radioactive wastes from 50 yr of weapons materials production activities. The total waste volume is about 60 million gal., which contains approximately 120 million Ci of radioactivity.

  13. Results of Waste Transfer and Back-Dilution in Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    LA Mahoney; ZI Antoniak; WB Barton; JM Conner; NW Kirch; CW Stewart; BE Wells

    2000-07-26

    This report chronicles the process of remediation of the flammable gas hazard in Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) by waste transfer and back-dilution from December 18, 1999 through April 2, 2000. A brief history is given of the development of the flammable gas retention and release hazard in this tank, and the transfer and dilution systems are outlined. A detailed narrative of each of the three transfer and dilution campaigns is given to provide structure for the balance of the report. Details of the behavior of specific data are then described, including the effect of transfer and dilution on the waste levels in Tanks SY-101 and SY-102, data from strain gauges on equipment suspended from the tank dome, changes in waste configuration as inferred from neutron and gamma logs, headspace gas concentrations, waste temperatures, and the mixerpump operating performance. Operating data and performance of the transfer pump in SY-101 are also discussed.

  14. An assessment of the dilution required to mitigate Hanford tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Felmy, A.R.; Stewart, C.W.; Tingey, J.M.; Trent, D.S.; Barney, G.S.; Herting, D.L.; Larrick, A.P.; Reynolds, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    A group of experts from PNL and WHC convened November 2 and 3, 1994, to screen the current state of knowledge about dilution and reach a consensus on the minimum dilution ratio that will achieve passive mitigation of Tank 241-SY-101 wastes and the dilution ratio that would satisfy the given cross-site transfer criteria with reasonable assurance. The panel evaluated the effects of dilution on the parameters important in gas generation, retention, and release and reached the following conclusions, which are deduced from the existing body of data, experience, and analyses: (1) Dissolution of solids is the single most important aspect of mitigation by dilution. We are confident that diluting until nitrates, nitrites, and aluminum salts are dissolved will mitigate Hanford flammable gas tanks; (2) Sufficient solids dissolution can be achieved in Tank 241-SY-101 at a dilution ratio of 1:1, which will result in a average specific gravity of approximately 1.35. It is likely that a 0.5:1 dilution will also mitigate 241-SY-101, but the current uncertainty is too high to recommend this dilution ratio; (3) The recommended dilution requires a diluent with at least 2 molar free hydroxide, because aluminum probably precipitates at lower hydroxide concentrations. The transfer criteria for Tank 241-SY-101 waste were also evaluated. These criteria have been specified as solids content {<=}30% (volume), viscosity {<=}30% cP and density <1.5 g/mL. (1) Solids content is the limiting criterion if it is defined as volume fraction of settled solids. A 1:1 dilution will satisfy this criterion at nominal premixing conditions in Tank 241-SY-101; however, analysis of Window E core samples suggests that up to 1.5:1 might be required. If the solids content is interpreted simply as solids volume fraction no further dilution is necessary, because Tank 241-SY-101 waste (excluding the crust) is already below 30%; (2) Bulk density is the next limiting criterion and is met at 0.4:1 dilution.

  15. Historical trends in tank 241-SY-101 waste temperatures and levels

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1993-09-01

    The gas release and fluctuating level of the waste in tank 241-SY-101 have prompted more detailed interest in its historical behavior, in hopes of achieving a better understanding of its current status. To examine the historical behavior, essentially all of the tank waste temperature and level data record has been retrieved, examined, and plotted in various ways. To aid in interpreting the data, the depth of the non-convective waste layer was estimated by using a least-squares Chebyshev approximation to the temperatures. This report documents the retrieval critical examination, and graphic presentation of 241-SY-101 temperature and waste level histories. The graphic presentations clearly indicate a tank cooling trend that has become precipitous since late 1991. The plots also clearly show the decreasing frequency of waste gas release events, increasing height of the non-convective layer, and larger level drops per event.

  16. Process control plan for tank 241-SY-101 surface level rise remediation

    SciTech Connect

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-06-29

    The tank 241-SY-101 transfer system was conceived and designed to address the immediate needs presented by rapidly changing waste conditions in tank 241-SY-101. Within the past year or so, the waste in this tank has exhibited unexpected behavior in the form of rapidly increasing crust growth. The Process Control Plan (PCP), HNF-4264, was written to translate high-level guidance and regulatory criteria and express it in terms of operating instructions for the waste transfer system. These controls include: (1) Tank Farm Operations Administrative Controls developed in response to DOE-ORP direction reg,arding supplemental controls placed upon tank 241-SY-101 surface level rise remediation activities specifically involving waste transfer activities. (2) Authorization Basis controls (Basis for Interim Operation (BIO)/Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs)) and supplemental DOE direction. (3) Environmental, Industrial Hygiene and Safety controls. (4) Operating Specification Document (OSD) controls. (5) Good operating practices. Included in the document are descriptions of tank conditions, waste conditions, major equipment, and a high-level overview of the system and the line-ups in which it operates. Primarily, the PCP addresses how the waste transfer will be managed, defining the monitoring and control methods including material balances to determine the progress and to define completion criteria for the transfer. The actual plant modifications and waste transfer will be authorized and controlled by plant procedures.

  17. Human-machine interface (HMI) report for 241-SY-101 data acquisition [and control] system (DACS) upgrade study

    SciTech Connect

    Truitt, R.W.

    1997-10-22

    This report provides an independent evaluation of information for a Windows based Human Machine Interface (HMI) to replace the existing DOS based Iconics HMI currently used in the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used at Tank 241-SY-101. A fundamental reason for this evaluation is because of the difficulty of maintaining the system with obsolete, unsupported software. The DACS uses a software operator interface (Genesis for DOS HMI) that is no longer supported by its manufacturer, Iconics. In addition to its obsolescence, it is complex and difficult to train additional personnel on. The FY 1997 budget allocated $40K for phase 1 of a software/hardware upgrade that would have allowed the old DOS based system to be replaced by a current Windows based system. Unfortunately, budget constraints during FY 1997 has prompted deferral of the upgrade. The upgrade needs to be performed at the earliest possible time, before other failures render the system useless. Once completed, the upgrade could alleviate other concerns: spare pump software may be able to be incorporated into the same software as the existing pump, thereby eliminating the parallel path dilemma; and the newer, less complex software should expedite training of future personnel, and in the process, require that less technical time be required to maintain the system.

  18. Neutron and Gamma Probe Application to Hanford Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    CANNON, N.S.

    2000-02-01

    A neutron (moisture-sensitive) and gamma (in-situ radiation) probe technique has been utilized at a number of Hanford radioactive waste tanks for many years. This technology has been adapted for use in tank 241-SY-101's two Multifunction Instrument Trees (MITs) which have a hollow dry-well center opening two inches (51 cm) in diameter. These probes provide scans starting within a few inches of the tank bottom and traversing up through the top of the tank revealing a variety of waste features as a function of tank elevation. These features have been correlated with void fraction data obtained independently from two other devices, the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) and the Void Fraction Instrument (VFI). The MIT probes offer the advantage of nearly continuous count-rate versus elevation scans and they can be operated significantly more often and at lower cost than temperature probes or the RGS or VFI devices while providing better depth resolution. The waste level in tank 241-SY-101 had been rising at higher rates than expected during 1998 and early 1999 indicating an increasing amount of trapped gas in the waste. The use of the MIT probes has assisted in evaluating changes in crust thickness and level and also in estimating relative changes in gas stored in the crust. This information is important in assuring that the tank remains in a safe configuration and will support safe waste transfer when those operations take place.

  19. Numerical simulation of jet mixing concepts in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, D.S.; Michener, T.E.

    1993-03-01

    The episodic gas release events (GRES) that have characterized the behavior of Tank 241-SY-101 for the past several years are thought to result from gases generated by the waste material in it that become trapped in the layer of settled solids at the bottom of the tank. Several concepts for mitigating the GREs have been proposed. One concept involves mobilizing the solid particles with mixing jets. The rationale behind this idea is to prevent formation of a consolidated layer of settled solids at the bottom of the tank, thus inhibiting the accumulation of gas bubbles in this layer. Numerical simulations were conducted using the TEMPEST computer code to assess the viability and effectiveness of the proposed jet discharge concepts and operating parameters. Before these parametric studies were commenced, a series of turbulent jet studies were conducted that established the adequacy of the TEMPEST code for this application. Configurations studied for Tank 241-SY-101 include centrally located downward discharging jets, draft tubes, and horizontal jets that are either stationary or rotating. Parameter studies included varying the jet discharge velocity, jet diameter, discharge elevation, and material properties. A total of 18 simulations were conducted and are reported in this document. The effect of gas bubbles on the mixing dynamics was not included within the scope of this study.

  20. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-101. Examination Completed March 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2004-07-22

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic nondestructive examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-101. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-SY-101 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning, pitting, or cracks that might be present in the wall of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP-17750 (Jensen 2003) and summarized on page 1 of this document, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided to PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations.

  1. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-101. Examination Completed March 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2004-05-25

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic nondestructive examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-101. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-SY-101 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning, pitting, or cracks that might be present in the wall of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP-17750 (Jensen 2003) and summarized on page 1 of this document, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided to PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations.

  2. A survey of available information on gas generation in tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M. ); Reynolds, D.A. ); Siemer, D.D. ); Wallace, R.W. )

    1991-03-01

    As a result of a concerted effort to determine the chemical and physical mechanisms underlying the generation and episodic release of gases from tank 241-SY-101, more commonly known as tank 101-SY, the Tank Waste Science Panel has been established at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Four of the members of this panel met to screen the available information on tank 101-SY and provide to the remaining members a shortened list of references that could be used to assess the mechanisms underlying the generation and episodic release of gases from tank 101-SY. This document is the result of this preliminary screening of information for the Tank Waste Science Panel and was provided to the Panel members at their first meeting. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Level sensor replacement/sampling of Tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for management and storage of waste accumulated from the processing of defense reactor irradiated fuels for plutonium recovery at the Hanford Site. DOE is proposing to remove three level detectors from Tank 241-SY-101 and analyze the waste that is presently encrusted on the detectors. The proposed sampling is less intrusive than core sampling and will provide data regarding characterization of the crust to support future core sampling. The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to provide information about the proposed action such that a decision can be made on whether a Finding of No Significant Impact should be issued or an environmental impact statement should be prepared. Therefore, this EA evaluates the proposed action and the no action alternative, in keeping with requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality, Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, parts 1500--1508. 6 refs.

  4. Simulation and rheological analysis of Hanford Tank 241-SY-101. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, E.C.; Tennant, R.A.; Piccola, J.P. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    Rheological characterization and small scale simulation of Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 has been initiated to aid in the remediation efforts for the Department of Energy Hanford Site. The study has been initiated in response to growing concerns about the potential flammability hazard pertaining to the periodic release of up to 10,000 cubic feet of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia gases. Various stimulants emulating the radioactive waste stored in this tank have been used to ascertain the rheological parameters of the waste, simulate the ongoing processes of gas generation and release phenomenon inside the tank, and determine the feasibility of jet mixing to achieve a controlled release of the gas mixture.

  5. Structural analysis of multiport riser 5A installation on tank 241SY101

    SciTech Connect

    Strehlow, J.P.

    1994-09-16

    The Tank 101-SY multiport riser assembly in the 241-SY-101 waste tank will replace the existing 42 inch riser with four smaller ports. Each smaller port can be used independently to access the tank interior with equipment and instruments needed to mitigate the concentration of hydrogen in the tank. This document provides a design report on the structural evaluation of the multiport riser assembly as well as its anchorage. The multiport riser assembly is a steel structure installed directly above the 42-inch riser and sealed at the existing riser flange. The assembly is structurally supported by the concrete pad placed around the 42 inch riser. The multiport riser assembly will provide two 8-inch penetrations, one 12-inch penetration and one 24-inch penetration. Each penetration will have a shielding plate. These penetrations will be used to insert equipment such as a sonic probe into the tank. In addition to normal loads, non-reactor Safety Class 1 structures, systems and components are to withstand the effects of extreme environmental loads including Design Basis Earthquake (DBE), Design Basis Wind (DBW), Design Basis Flood, Volcanic Eruptions and other abnormal loads considered on a case by case basis. Non-reactor Safety Class 2, 3 and 4 structures, systems and components are those that are not Safety Class 1 and are respectively specified as onsite safety related, occupational safety related and non-safety related items. The 241-SY-101 tank is considered as a non-reactor Safety Class 1 structure. The multiport riser assembly is considered as a non-reactor Safety Class 2 structure since it serves to contain the radioactive and toxic materials under normal operating conditions. However, the pressure relief doors provided on the assembly are considered as Safety Class 1 structures.

  6. 241-SY-101 strain concentration factor development via nonlinear analysis. Volume 1 of 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The 241-SY-101 waste storage tank at the Hanford-Site has been known to accumulate and release significant quantities of hydrogen gas. An analysis was performed to assess the tank`s structural integrity when subjected to postulated hydrogen deflagration loads. The analysis addressed many nonlinearities and appealed to a strain-based failure criteria. The model used to predict the global response of the tank was not refined enough to confidently predict local peak strains. Strain concentration factors were applied at structural discontinuities that were based on steel-lined reinforced-concrete containment studies. The discontinuities included large penetrations, small penetrations, springline geometries, stud/liner connections, and the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch liner thickness transition. The only tank specific strain concentration factor applied in the evaluation was for the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch liner thickness change in the dome. Review of the tank drawings reveals the possibility that a 4 inches Sch. 40 pipe penetrates the dome thickness transition region. It is not obvious how to combine the strain concentration factors for a small penetration with that of a thickness transition to arrive at a composite strain concentration factor. It is the goal of this effort to make an approximate determination of the relative significance of the 4 inch penetration and the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch thickness transition in the 241-SY-101 dome geometry. This is accomplished by performing a parametric study with three general finite-element models. The first represents the thickness transition only, the second represents a 4 inch penetration only, and the third combines the thickness transition with a penetration model.

  7. Assessment of Tank 241-S-112 Liquid Waste Mixing in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Trent, Donald S.; Wells, Beric E.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2003-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate mixing of liquid waste from Tank 241-S-112 with waste in Tank 241-SY-101 and to determine the properties of the resulting waste for the cross-site transfer to avoid potential double-shell tank corrosion and pipeline plugging. We applied the time-varying, three-dimensional computer code TEMPEST to Tank SY-101 as it received the S-112 liquid waste. The model predicts that temperature variations in Tank SY-101 generate a natural convection flow that is very slow, varying from about 7 x 10{sup -5} to 1 x 10{sup -3} ft/sec (0.3 to about 4 ft/hr) in most areas. Thus, natural convection would eventually mix the liquid waste in SY-101 but would be very slow to achieve nearly complete mixing. These simulations indicate that the mixing of S-112 and SY-101 wastes in Tank SY-101 is a very slow process, and the density difference between the two wastes would further limit mixing. It is expected to take days or weeks to achieve relatively complete mixing in Tank SY-101.

  8. Thermal reactivity of mixtures of VDDT lubricant and simulated Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 waste

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Panisko, F.E.; Sell, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    To predict whether the Polywater G lubricant residue remaining in the velocity, density, and temperature tree (VDTT) and the waste in Tank 241-SY-101 (101SY) will be chemically compatible with wastes in 101SY when two VDTTs are removed from 101SY, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory measured the thermal reaction sensitivity of the lubricant residue. This residue is a simulated 101SY waste containing the organic surrogate trisodium hydroxyethyl-ethylenediaminetriacetate (Na{sub 3}HEDTA) and two simulated potential waste and lubricant residue mixtures containing 10 and 90 percent lubricant residue. These studies using accelerating rate calorimetry found that the residue did not react at a rate exceeding 0.1 J/min/g mixture up to 190 degrees C with simulated 101SY waste containing Na{sub 3}HEDTA as the organic surrogate. Also, the dried lubricant residue did not decompose exothermically at a rate exceeding 0.1 J/min/g. Using guidelines used by the chemical industry, these results indicate that the lubricant residue should not react as a significant rate with the waste in 101SY when added to the waste at 60 degrees C or when the mixture cools to the waste`s temperature of 48 degrees C.

  9. Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Rassat, Scot D.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Kuhn, William L.; Antoniak, Zenen I.; Cuta, Judith M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Terrones, Guillermo; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Sukamto, Johanes H.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2000-01-24

    Due primarily to an increase in floating crust thickness, the waste level in Tank 241-SY-101 has grown appreciably and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a potential hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from the nonconvective layer at the bottom of the tank, SY-101 will be diluted to dissolve a large fraction of the solids that allow the waste to retain gas. The plan is to transfer some waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps. In this work, mechanisms and rates of waste solids dissolution and gas releases are evaluated theoretically and experimentally. Particular emphasis is given to crust dissolution processes and associated gas releases, although dissolution and gas release from the mixed-slurry and nonconvective layers are also considered. The release of hydrogen gas to the tank domespace is modeled for a number of scenarios. Under the tank conditions expected at the time of back-dilution, no plausible continuous or sudden gas release scenarios resulting in flammable hydrogen concentrations were identified.

  10. Laboratory testing of ozone oxidation of Hanford Site waste from Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Stubbs, A.M.; Bolling, S.D.

    1993-12-14

    Ozone was investigated as a reagent to oxidize and destroy organic species present in simulated and genuine waste from Hanford Site Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY). Two high-shear mixing apparatus were tested to perform the gas-to-solution mass transfer necessary to achieve efficient use of the ozone reagent. Oxidations of nitrite (to form nitrate) and organic species were observed. The organics oxidized to form carbonate and oxalate as well as nitrate and nitrogen gas from nitrogen associated with the organic. oxidations of metal species also were observed directly or inferred by solubilities. The chemical reaction stoichiometries were consistent with reduction of one oxygen atom per ozone molecule. Acetate, oxalate, and formate were found to comprise about 40% of the genuine waste`s total organic carbon (TOC) concentration. Ozonation was found to be chemically feasible for destroying organic species (except oxalate) present in the wastes in Tank 101-SY. The simulated waste formulation used in these studies credibly modelled the ozonation behavior of the genuine waste.

  11. Evaluation of the generation and release of flammable gases in tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Babad, H.; Johnson, G.D.; Lechelt, J.A.; Reynolds, D.A. ); Pederson, L.R.; Strachan, D.M. ); Meisel, D.; Jonah, C. ); Ashby, E.C. )

    1991-11-01

    Tank 241-SY-101 is a double shell, high-level waste tank located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This tank contains about 1 million gallons of waste that was concentrated at the 242-S Evaporator. Shortly after the waste was put in the tank, the waste began to expand because the generation of gases. In 1990 this tank was declared to have an unreviewed safety question because of the periodic release of hydrogen and nitrous oxide. A safety program was established to conduct a characterization of the waste and vented gases and to determine an effective means to prevent the accumulation of flammable gases in the tank dome space and ventilation system. Results of the expanded characterization conducted in fiscal year 1991 are presented. The use of gas chromatographs, mass spectrometers, and hydrogen-specific monitors provided a greater understanding of the vented gases. Additional instrumentation placed in the tank also helped to provide more detailed information on tank temperatures, gas pressure, and gas flow rates. An extensive laboratory study involving the Westinghouse Hanford Company, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and the Georgia Institute of Technology was initiated for the purpose of determining the mechanisms responsible for the generation of various gases. These studies evaluate both radiolytic and thermochemical processes. Results of the first series of experiments are described.

  12. 1/12-scale physical modeling experiments in support of tank 241-SY- 101 hydrogen mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, J.A.; Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M.; Enderlin, C.W.; Elmore, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Hanford tank 241-SY-101 is a 75-ft-dia double-shell tank that contains approximately 1.1 M gal of radioactive fuel reprocessing waste. Core samples have shown that the tank contents are separated into two main layers, a article laden supernatant liquid at the top of the tank and a more dense slurry on the bottom. Two additional layers may be present, one being a potentially thick sludge lying beneath the slurry at the bottom of the tank and the other being the crust that has formed on the surface of the supernatant liquid. The supernatant is more commonly referred to as the convective layer and the slurry as the non-convective layer. Accumulation of gas (partly hydrogen) in the non-convective layer is suspected to be the key mechanism behind the gas burp phenomena, and several mitigation schemes are being developed to encourage a more uniform gas release rate (Benegas 1992). To support the full-scale hydraulic mitigation test, scaled experiments were performed to satisfy two objectives: 1. provide an experimental database for numerical- model validation; 2. establish operating parameter values required to mobilize the settled solids and maintain the solids in suspension.

  13. Chemical and physical processes in Tank 241-SY-101: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    Since 1942, chemical and radioactive waste have been stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. In March 1981 one of the double shell tanks, 241-SY-101 (called 101-SY), began venting large quantities of gas, primarily hydrogen and nitrous oxide. Because of the potential for explosion Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy realized the need for knowledge about the processes occurring in this tank that lead to generation of the gases. In June 1990, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory began assembling a Tank Waste Science Panel to develop a better understanding of the processes occurring the Tank 101-SY. This knowledge is necessary to provide a technically defensible basis for the safety analyses, which will allow the tank contents to be sampled, as well as for the future remediation of the tank and its contents. The Panel concluded that the data available on Tank 101-SY are insufficient to allow the critical chemical and physical processes giving rise to gas formation and release to be unambiguously identified. To provide the needed information the Panel recommends that Tank 101-SY by physically and chemically characterized as fully as possible and as expeditiously as safety considerations allow, and laboratory studies and modeling efforts be undertaken the chemical and physical processes involved in gas generation and release. Finally, the Panel recommends that no remediation steps be taken until there is a better understanding of the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in Tank 101-SY. Premature remediation steps may only serve to compound the problem. Furthermore, such steps may change the chemical and physical characteristics of the tank and prevent a true understanding of the phenomena involved. As a consequence, similar problems in other tanks on the site may not be adequately addressed. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Effects of oxygen cover gas and NaOH dilution on gas generation in tank 241-SY-101 waste

    SciTech Connect

    Person, J.C.

    1996-05-30

    Laboratory studies are reported of gas generation in heated waste from tank 241-SY-101. The rates of gas generation and the compositions of product gas were measured. Three types of tests are compared. The tests use: undiluted waste, waste diluted by a 54% addition of 2.5 M NaOH, and undiluted waste with a reactive cover gas of 30% Oxygen in He. The gas generation rate is reduced by dilution, increased by higher temperatures (which determines activation energies), and increased by reactions of Oxygen (these primarily produce H{sub 2}). Gases are generated as reduction products oxidation of organic carbon species by nitrite and oxygen.

  15. Transport of Tank 241-SY-101 Waste Slurry: Effects of Dilution and Temperature on Critical Pipeline Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    KP Recknagle; Y Onishi

    1999-06-15

    This report presents the methods and results of calculations performed to predict the critical velocity and pressure drop required for the two-inch pipeline transfer of solid/liquid waste slurry from underground waste storage Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY- 102 at the Hanford Site. The effects of temperature and dilution on the critical velocity were included in the analysis. These analyses show that Tank 241-SY-101 slurry should be diluted with water prior to delivery to Tank 241-SY-102. A dilution ratio of 1:1 is desirable and would allow the waste to be delivered at a critical velocity of 1.5 ft/sec. The system will be operated at a flow velocity of 6 ft/sec or greater therefore, this velocity will be sufficient to maintain a stable slurry delivery through the pipeline. The effect of temperature on the critical velocity is not a limiting factor when the slurry is diluted 1:1 with water. Pressure drop at the critical velocity would be approximately two feet for a 125-ft pipeline (or 250-ft equivalent straight pipeline). At 6 ft/sec, the pressure drop would be 20 feet over a 250-ft equivalent straight pipeline.

  16. Soil structure interaction analysis for the Hanford Site 241-SY-101 double-shell waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Giller, R.A.; Weiner, E.O.

    1991-09-01

    The 241-SY-101 tank is a double-shell waste storage tank buried in the 241-SY tank farm in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This analysis addresses the effects of seismic soil-structure interaction on the tank structure and includes a parametric soil-structure interaction study addressing three configurations: two-dimensional soil structure, a two-dimensional structure-soil-structure, and a three-dimensional soil-structure interaction. This study was designed to determine an optimal method for addressing seismic-soil effects on underground storage tanks. The computer programs calculate seismic-soil pressures on the double-shell tank walls and and seismic acceleration response spectra in the tank. The results of this soil-structure interaction parametric study as produced by the computer programs are given in terms of seismic soil pressures and response spectra. The conclusions of this soil-structure interaction evaluation are that dynamically calculated soil pressures in the 241-SY-101 tank are significantly reduce from those using standard hand calculation methods and that seismic evaluation of underground double-shell waste storage tanks must consider soil-structure interaction effects in order to predict conservative structural response. Appendixes supporting this study are available in Volume 2 of this report.

  17. Ion exchange removal of cesium from simulated and actual supernate from Hanford tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.N.; Bontha, J.R.; Carlson, C.D.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in conjunction with the Process Chemistry and Statistics Section of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), conducted this study as part of the Supernatant Treatment Development Task for the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM) Applied Engineering Project. The study assesses the performance of the CS-100 ion exchange material for removing cesium from simulated and actual alkaline supernate from Hanford tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103. The objective of these experiments is to compare the cesium ion exchange loading and elution profiles of actual and simulated wastes. Specific experimental objectives include (1) demonstration of decontamination factors (DF) for cesium removal, 92) verification of simulant performance, (3) investigation of waste/exchanger chemistry, and (4) determination of the radionuclide content of the regenerated CS-100 resin prior to disposal.

  18. In Situ Void Fraction and Gas Volume in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 as Measured with the Void Fraction Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    CW Stewart; G Chen; JM Alzheimer; PA Meyer

    1998-11-10

    The void fraction instrument (WI) was deployed in Tank 241-SY-101 three times in 1998 to confm and locate the retained gas (void) postulated to be causing the accelerating waste level rise observed since 1995. The design, operation, and data reduction model of the WI are described along with validation testing and potential sources of uncertainty. The test plans, field observations and void measurements are described in detail, including the total gas volume calculations and the gas volume model. Based on 1998 data, the void fraction averaged 0.013 i 0.001 in the mixed slurry and 0.30 ~ 0.04 in the crust. This gives gas volumes (at standard pressure and temperature) of 87 t 9 scm in the slurry and 138 ~ 22 scm in the crust for a total retained gas volume of221 *25 scm. This represents an increase of about 74 scm in the crust and a decrease of about 34 scm in the slurry from 1994/95 results. The overall conclusion is that the gas retention is occurring mainly in the crust layer and there is very little gas in the mixed slurry and loosely settled layers below. New insights on crust behavior are also revealed.

  19. Waste tank 241-SY-101 dome airspace and ventilation system response to a flammable gas plume burn

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, F.J.

    1995-11-01

    A series of flammable gas plume burn and transient pressure analyses have been completed for a nuclear waste tank (241-SY-101) and associated tank farm ventilation system at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford facility. The subject analyses were performed to address issues concerning the effects of transient pressures resulting from igniting a small volume of concentrated flammable gas just released from the surface of the waste as a plume and before the flammable gas concentration could be reduced by mixing with the dome airspace by local convection and turbulent diffusion. Such a condition may exist as part of an in progress episode gas release (EGR) or gas plume event. The analysis goal was to determine the volume of flammable gas that if burned within the dome airspace would result in a differential pressure, after propagating through the ventilation system, greater than the current High Efficiency Particulate Filter (HEPA) limit of 2.49 KPa (10 inches of water or 0. 36 psi). Such a pressure wave could rupture the tank ventilation system inlet and outlet HEPA filters leading to a potential release of contaminants to the environment

  20. Similarity analysis applied to the design of scaled tests of hydraulic mitigation methods for Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Liljegren, L.M.

    1993-02-01

    The episodic gas releases from Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) pose a potential safety hazard. It is thought that gas releases occur because gases are generated and trapped in layers of settled solids located at the bottom of the tank. This document focuses on issues associated with testing of hydraulic mitigation technologies proposed for SY-101. The basic assumption underlying the concept of hydraulic mitigation is that mobilization or maintained suspension of the solids settled in the bottom of the tank wig prevent gas accumulation. Engineering of hydraulic technologies will require testing to determine the operating parameters required to mobilize the solids and to maintain these solids in suspension. Because full scale testing is extremely expensive (even when possible), scaled tests are needed to assess the merit of the proposed technologies and to provide data for numerical or analytical modeling. This research is conducted to support testing and evaluation of proposed hydraulic mitigation concepts only. The work here is oriented towards determining the jet velocities, nozzle sizes, and other operating parameters required to mobilize the settled solids in SY- 101 and maintain them in suspension.

  1. 1/12-scale physical modeling experiments in support of tank 241-SY- 101 hydrogen mitigation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, J.A.; Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M.; Enderlin, C.W.; Elmore, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Hanford tank 241-SY-101 is a 75-ft-dia double-shell tank that contains approximately 1.1 M gal of radioactive fuel reprocessing waste. Core samples have shown that the tank contents are separated into two main layers, a article laden supernatant liquid at the top of the tank and a more dense slurry on the bottom. Two additional layers may be present, one being a potentially thick sludge lying beneath the slurry at the bottom of the tank and the other being the crust that has formed on the surface of the supernatant liquid. The supernatant is more commonly referred to as the convective layer and the slurry as the non-convective layer. Accumulation of gas (partly hydrogen) in the non-convective layer is suspected to be the key mechanism behind the gas burp phenomena, and several mitigation schemes are being developed to encourage a more uniform gas release rate (Benegas 1992). To support the full-scale hydraulic mitigation test, scaled experiments were performed to satisfy two objectives: 1. provide an experimental database for numerical- model validation; 2. establish operating parameter values required to mobilize the settled solids and maintain the solids in suspension.

  2. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    SciTech Connect

    Guardiani, Richard F.; Pollick, Richard D.

    1997-01-01

    A mixer pump used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump.

  3. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.

    1997-10-07

    A mixer pump is described used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump. 10 figs.

  4. Work plan, AP-102 mixer pump removal and pump replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, R.F.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this work plan is to plan the steps and estimate the costs required to remove the failed AP-102 mixer pump, and to plan and estimate the cost of the necessary design and specification work required to order a new, but modified, mixer pump including the pump and pump pit energy absorbing design. The main hardware required for the removal of the mixer is as follows: a flexible receiver and blast shield; a metal container for the pulled mixer pump; and a trailer and strongback to haul and manipulate the container. Additionally: a gamma scanning device will be needed to detect the radioactivity emanating from the mixer as it is pulled from the tank; a water spray system will be required to remove tank waste from the surface of the mixer as it is pulled from the AP-102 tank; and a lifting yoke to lift the mixer from the pump pit (the SY-101 Mixer Lifting Yoke will be used). A ``green house`` will have to be erected over the AP-102 pump pit and an experienced Hoisting and Rigging crew must be assembled and trained in mixer pump removal methods before the actual removal is undertaken.

  5. Heat Balance Study for Submersible Mixer Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    2003-07-21

    A transient heat balance model was developed to assess the impact of a Submersible Mixer Pump (SMP) on waste temperature during the process of waste mixing and removal for the Type-I SRS tanks. The model results will be mainly used to determine the SMP design impacts on the waste tank temperature during operations and to develop a specification for a new SMP design to replace existing long-shaft mixer pumps used during waste removal. The model will also be used to provide input to the operation planning. This planning will be used as input to pump run duration in order to maintain temperature requirements within the tank during SMP operation.

  6. Mixer pump test plan for double shell tank AZ-101

    SciTech Connect

    STAEHR, T.W.

    1999-05-12

    Mixer pump systems have been chosen as the method for retrieval of tank wastes contained in double shell tanks at Hanford. This document describes the plan for testing and demonstrating the ability of two 300 hp mixer pumps to mobilize waste in tank AZ-101. The mixer pumps, equipment and instrumentation to monitor the test were installed by Project W-151.

  7. Waste characterization of the 101-SY hydrogen mitigation mixing pump shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Gedeon, S.R.

    1995-05-19

    The Hydrogen Mitigation Mixing Pump (HMMP) in Tank 241-SY-101 will need to be removed at some point. At that time, the HMMP will be placed in a shipping container and transferred to a designated onsite location depending on waste classification. This report shows how the radioactive material content of shipping container will be determined. Once the radioactive material loading is known, the waste classification of the container may be determined in accordance with established procedures.

  8. Safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-101-SY: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lentsch, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101, which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  9. Acceptance test report: Field test of mixer pump for 241-AN-107 caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1997-05-16

    The field acceptance test of a 75 HP mixer pump (Hazleton serial number N-20801) installed in Tank 241-AN-107 was conducted from October 1995 thru February 1996. The objectives defined in the acceptance test were successfully met, with two exceptions recorded. The acceptance test encompassed field verification of mixer pump turntable rotation set-up and operation, verification that the pump instrumentation functions within established limits, facilitation of baseline data collection from the mixer pump mounted ultrasonic instrumentation, verification of mixer pump water flush system operation and validation of a procedure for its operation, and several brief test runs (bump) of the mixer pump.

  10. Advanced Design Mixer Pump Tank 18 Design Modifications Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, B.J.

    2002-12-03

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is preparing to retrieve high level waste (HLW) from Tank 18 in early FY03 to provide feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and to support tank closure in FY04. As part of the Tank 18 project, WSRC will install a single Advanced Design Mixer Pump (ADMP) in the center riser of Tank 18 to mobilize, suspend, and mix radioactive sludge in preparation for transfer to Tank 7. The use of a single ADMP is a change to the current baseline of four (4) standard slurry pumps used during previous waste retrieval campaigns. The ADMP was originally conceived by Hanford and supported by SRS to provide a more reliable and maintainable mixer pump for use throughout the DOE complex. The ADMP underwent an extensive test program at SRS between 1998 and 2002 to assess reliability and hydraulic performance. The ADMP ran for approximately 4,200 hours over the four-year period. A detailed tear down and inspection of the pump following the 4,2 00-hour run revealed that the gas mechanical seals and anti-friction bearings would need to be refurbished/replaced prior to deployment in Tank 18. Design modifications were also needed to meet current Authorization Basis safety requirements. This report documents the modifications made to the ADMP in support of Tank 18 deployment. This report meets the requirements of Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Milestone 3591.4-1, ''Issue Report on Modifications Made to the ADMP,'' contained in Technical Task Plan (TTP) SR16WT51, ''WSRC Retrieval and Closure.''

  11. SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR TANK 241-AZ-101 MIXER PUMP PROCESS TEST

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMOND DM; HARRIS JP; MOUETTE P

    1997-06-09

    This document contains the completed safety analysis which establishes the safety envelope for performing the mixer pump process test in Tank 241-AZ-101. This process test is described in TF-210-OTP-001. All equipment necessary for the mixer pump test has been installed by Project W-151. The purpose of this document is to describe and analyze the mixer pump test for Aging Waste Facility (AWF) Tank 241-AZ-101 and to address the 'yes/maybe' responses marked for evaluation questions identified in Unreviewed Safety Question Evaluation (USQE) TF-94-0266. The scope of this document is limited to the performance of the mixer pump test for Tank 241-AZ-101. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination (USQD) TF-96-0018 verified that the installation of two mixer pumps into Tank 241-AZ-101 was within the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Authorization Basis. USQDs TF-96-0461, TF-96-0448, and TF-96-0805 verified that the installation of the in-tank video camera, thermocouples, and Ultrasonic Interface Level Analyzer (URSILLA), respectively, were within the current TWRS Authorization Basis. USQD TF-96-1041 verified that the checkout testing of the installed equipment was within the current TWRS Authorization Basis. Installation of the pumps and equipment has been completed. An evaluation of safety considerations associated with operation of the mixer pumps for the mixer pump test is provided in this document. This document augments the existing AWF authorization basis as defined in the Interim Safety Basis (Stahl 1997), and as such, will use the existing Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSRs) of Heubach 1996 to adequately control the mixer pump test. The hazard and accident analysis is limited to the scope and impact of the mixer pump test, and therefore does not address hazards already addressed by the current AWF authorization basis. This document does not evaluate removal of the mixer pumps. Safety considerations for removal of the pumps will be addressed by

  12. Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-03-01

    This sludge mixing/mobilization system was developed in Russia. A prototype system was evaluated by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) and Industry and University Programs (INDP). The Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump showed promise for mixing highly viscous sludges. This project is to refine the system design (especially the control subsystem) and manufacture the system in Russia in accordance with quality standards required for deployment in radioactive waste storage tanks. Specifications and requirements are being developed by the TFA and INDP. The requirements may call for two or three of the sludge mixing systems to be delivered to Oak Ridge. DOE-Oak Ridge and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will deploy the pulsating mixing pump system in their Gunite Tanks. These tanks are being emptied and cleaned prior to closure. Oak Ridge has deployed a number of innovative technologies in these efforts. If successful at Oak Ridge, the pulsating mixing pump system has potential application at several other DOE sites, including Savannah River, Hanford, and Idaho.

  13. Optimal Elevation and Configuration of Hanford's Double-Shell Tank Waste Mixer Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Majumder, Catherine A.

    2002-05-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the mixing performance of the Lawrence pump, which has injection nozzles at the top, with an alternative pump that has injection nozzles at the bottom, and to determine the optimal elevation for the alternative pump. Sixteen cases were evaluated: two sludge thicknesses at eight levels. A two-step evaluation approach was used: Step 1 to evaluate all 16 cases with the non-rotating mixer pump model and Step 2 to further evaluate four of those cases with the more realistic rotating mixer pump model. The TEMPEST code was used.

  14. Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    2000-03-06

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of mixer pumps in tank 241-AZ-101. The primary purpose of the mixer pump test (MPT) is to demonstrate that the two 300 horsepower mixer pumps installed in tank 241-AZ-101 can mobilize the settled sludge so that it can be retrieved for treatment and vitrification. Sampling will be performed in accordance with Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999) and Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis (Mulkey 1999). The sampling will verify if current air emission estimates used in the permit application are correct and provide information for future air permit applications.

  15. Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    2000-04-10

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of mixer pumps in tank 241-AZ-101. The primary purpose of the mixer pump test (MPT) is to demonstrate that the two 300 horsepower mixer pumps installed in tank 241-AZ-101 can mobilize the settled sludge so that it can be retrieved for treatment and vitrification. Sampling will be performed in accordance with Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999) and Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis (Mulkey 1999). The sampling will verify if current air emission estimates used in the permit application are correct and provide information for future air permit applications.

  16. Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    2000-01-31

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for vapor samples obtained during the operation of mixer pumps in tank 241-AZ-101. The primary purpose of the mixer pump test (MPT) is to demonstrate that the two 300 horsepower mixer pumps installed in tank 241-AZ-101 can mobilize the settled sludge so that it can be retrieved for treatment and vitrification Sampling will be performed in accordance with Tank 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999) and Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis (Mulkey 1999). The sampling will verify if current air emission estimates used in the permit application are correct and provide information for future air permit applications.

  17. Structural evaluation of mixer pump installed in Tank 241-AN-107 for caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1995-06-16

    This report documents the structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump and caustic addition system to be used in Tank 107-AN. This pump will be installed in the central pump pit of this double- shell tank for the purpose of bringing the hydroxide ion concentration into compliance with Tank Farm operating specifications.

  18. Safety basis for the 241-AN-107 mixer pump installation and caustic addition

    SciTech Connect

    Van Vleet, R.J.

    1994-10-05

    This safety Basis was prepared to determine whether or not the proposed activities of installing a 76 HP jet mixer pump and the addition of approximately 50,000 gallons of 19 M (50:50 wt %) aqueous caustic are within the safety envelope as described by Tank Farms (chapter six of WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001, Rev. 0). The safety basis covers the components, structures and systems for the caustic addition and mixer pump installation. These include: installation of the mixer pump and monitoring equipment; operation of the mixer pump, process monitoring equipment and caustic addition; the pump stand, caustic addition skid, the electrical skid, the video camera system and the two densitometers. Also covered is the removal and decontamination of the mixer pump and process monitoring system. Authority for this safety basis is WHC-IP-0842 (Waste Tank Administration). Section 15.9, Rev. 2 (Unreviewed Safety Questions) of WHC-IP-0842 requires that an evaluation be performed for all physical modifications.

  19. Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump Deployment in the Gunite and Associated Tanks at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Lewis, Ben; Johnson, Marshall A.; Randolph, J. G.

    2001-03-01

    In FY 1998, Pulsating Mixer Pump (PMP) technology, consisting of a jet mixer powered by a reciprocating air supply, was selected for deployment in one of the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to mobilize settled solids. The pulsating mixer pump technology was identified during FY 1996 and FY 1997 technical exchanges between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Tanks Focus Area Retrieval and Closure program, the DOE Environmental Management International Programs, and delegates from Russia as a promising technology that could be implemented in the DOE complex. During FY 1997, the pulsating mixer pump technology, provided by the Russian Integrated Mining Chemical Company, was tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to observe its ability to suspend settled solids. Based on the results of this demonstration, ORNL and DOE staff determined that a modified pulsating mixer pump would meet project needs for remote sludge mobilization of Gunite tank sludge and reduce the cost of operation and maintenance of more expensive mixing systems. The functions and requirements of the system were developed by combining the results and recommendations from the pulsating mixer pump demonstration at PNNL with the requirements identified by staff at ORNL involved with the remediation of the Gunite and Associated Tanks. The PMP is comprised of a pump chamber, check valve, a working gas supply pipe, a discharge manifold, and four jet nozzles. The pump uses two distinct cycles, fill and discharge, to perform its mixing action. During the fill cycle, vacuum is applied to the pump chamber by an eductor, which draws liquid into the pump. When the liquid level inside the chamber reaches a certain level, the chamber is pressurized with compressed air to discharge the liquid through the jet nozzles and back into the tank to mobilize sludge and settled solids.

  20. Acceptance test report for the 241-AN-107 caustic addition mixer pump data logger

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, J.L.

    1996-04-05

    The Acceptance Test Procedure for the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition Mixer Pump Data logger, WHC-SD-WM-ATP-149, was started on September 25, 1995, and completed November 13, 1995. K.G. Carothers of Tank Waste Remediation Engineering requested the test procedure and ICF Kaiser Control Systems Engineering group wrote the test procedure and executed it at the 305 building in 300 area and at the 241-AN Tank Farm in 200 East area. The purpose of this report is to document that the Caustic addition Mixer Pump Data logger, functioned as intended as installed at 241-AN-107 tank farm.

  1. Retrieval Pump Flexible Suction Hose Dynamic Response Induced by Impact of a Mixer Pump Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Enderlin, C.W.; Terrones, G.; Bamberger, J.A.; White, M.; Combs, W.H.

    1999-10-07

    Experiments were conducted to investigate whether it may be feasible to simultaneously mix and retrieve radioactive waste slurries that are stored in million-gallon, double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Oscillating mixer pumps, located near the floor of these tanks, are used to mobilize and mix the slurry prior to retrieval. Operational scenarios that may be beneficial for retrieval may require simultaneous operation of a decant/transfer pump and the jet mixer pumps. The effects of jet-induced agitation and jet impingement upon the decant/transfer pump's flexible suction hose have not previously been experimentally evaluated. Possible effects of the jet impacting the hose include hose fatigue, hose collision or entanglement with other structures, and induced static and dynamic loads on the decant/transfer pump equipment. The objective of this work was to create operating conditions in a test tank that produce a dynamic response (in the flexible suction hose upon impingement from an above-floor jet) that is similar to that anticipated in the actual tank. A scaling analysis was conducted to define the interactions between the jet, the tank floor and the suction hose. The complexity of scaling the multi-layer flexible hose (matching its hydroelastic parameters at full and 1/4-scale) led to an alternate approach, that of matching the expected full-scale forces on the full-scale hose in the scaled tank. Two types of tests were conducted: characterization of the jet velocity profile in the test tank at two axial locations from the nozzle and observation of the motion induced in the flexible retrieval hose from impact by the jet. The velocity profile of the jet in the test tank was measured to compare the measured profiles with profile predictions for an above-floor jet. These data were used to obtain a refined estimate of the velocity profile and therefore, the force acting upon the test article at a particular location in the tank. The hose

  2. Structural design and analysis of a mixer pump for beyond-design- basis load

    SciTech Connect

    Rezvani, M.A.; Strehlow, J.P.; Baliga, R.; Kok, S.B.

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents the results of the structural evaluation of a mixer pump for a postulated drop accident. The mixer pump will be installed in a double-shell tank at the Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. This tank has a 1,000,000-gallon (3,785,000 liter) capacity and is used to store radioactive waste before final disposal. The beyond-design-basis load case presented here is a postmulated drop of the pump during installation or removal. It is assumed that the pump assembly might be dropped approximateely 140 ft (15 m) from a height at which the bottom of the pump assembly is slightly above the top of the access riser to the bottom of the tank. The acceptance criterion for this load case is that the pump assembly shall not penetrate the primary tank liner. To ensure the integrity of the liner, the kinetic energy (developed in the pump drop) must be absorbed by some means to limit the impact force on the tank dome and thereby keep the pump from contacting the bottom of the tank. The limited clearance near the mounting assembly warranted an innovative two-step design of the energy absorbing system to limit the impact force on the tank dome to an acceptable value. This innovative design incorporates two energy absorbers in a unique series arrangement, one with the pump assembly and tile other in the pump pit.

  3. Feasibility Study on Using Two Mixer Pumps for Tank 241-AY-102 Waste Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Wells, Beric E.

    2004-08-30

    The current waste retrieval plan at Hanford calls for using two mixer pumps to mix the waste stored in double-shell Tank 214-AY-102. The objective of this evaluation was to determine whether two rotating 300-hp mixer pumps placed 22 ft (6.7 m) off-center in the tank could adequately mix the AY-102 waste. The tank currently contains high-level waste that is 248 inches (6.3 m) deep, comprising 62 inches (1.58 m) of sludge and 186 inches (4.72 m) of supernatant liquid (Galbraith et al. 2002). Based on the available data, AY-102 waste properties were determined, including the densities of liquid and agglomerated settled solids and crystals, the volume fraction of settled solids, the solid particle size distribution, the liquid and slurry viscosities, and the yield stress in shear (shear strength) of the settled solids layer. To evaluate the likely and bounding cases of AY-102 waste mixing, sludge erosion modeling was performed with a median value of 1,090 Pa (likely condition) and a conservative (more difficult to erode) 97.5 percentile value of 2,230 Pa for shear strength. According to model predictions, the two rotating mixer pumps would erode 89% of the sludge with shear strength of 1,090 Pa. They would erode sludge up to 41 ft (12.5 m) away from the mixer pumps but would not mobilize the bottom 2.5 inches (0.06-m) of sludge or sludge in the areas next to the tank wall, more than 26 ft (7.9 m) away. Once the sludge is mobilized, the solids were predicted to be uniformly suspended within the tank within a 1-vol% concentration variation except those in few inches at the bottom. With shear strength of 2,230 Pa, the two pumps would erode 85% of the sludge, slightly less than the 1,090-Pa shear strength case. In this case, the pump jets would mobilize the sludge up to 38 ft (11.6 m), except the bottom 2.5 inches of sludge. The mixer pumps would also leave the sludge at the tank wall, which is 20 ft or more from the pumps. Similar to the 1,090 Pa case, the solids were

  4. Safety Evaluation for Packaging 101-SY Hydrogen Mitigation Mixer Pump package

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstrom, R.F.

    1994-10-05

    This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) provides analysis and considered necessary to approve a one-time transfer of the 101-SY Hydrogen Mitigation Mixer Pump (HMMP). This SEP will demonstrate that the transfer of the HMMP in a new shipping container will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by packages meeting US Department of Transportation (DOT)/US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements. This fulfills onsite, transportation requirements implemented by WHC-CM-2-14.

  5. AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration and Tests Data Management Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    DOUGLAS, D.G.

    2000-02-22

    This document provides a plan for the analysis of the data collected during the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration and Tests. This document was prepared after a review of the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test Plan (Revision 4) [1] and other materials. The plan emphasizes a structured and well-ordered approach towards handling and examining the data. This plan presumes that the data will be collected and organized into a unified body of data, well annotated and bearing the date and time of each record. The analysis of this data will follow a methodical series of steps that are focused on well-defined objectives. Section 2 of this plan describes how the data analysis will proceed from the real-time monitoring of some of the key sensor data to the final analysis of the three-dimensional distribution of suspended solids. This section also identifies the various sensors or sensor systems and associates them with the various functions they serve during the test program. Section 3 provides an overview of the objectives of the AZ-101 test program and describes the data that will be analyzed to support that test. The objectives are: (1) to demonstrate that the mixer pumps can be operated within the operating requirements; (2) to demonstrate that the mixer pumps can mobilize the sludge in sufficient quantities to provide feed to the private contractor facility, and (3) to determine if the in-tank instrumentation is sufficient to monitor sludge mobilization and mixer pump operation. Section 3 also describes the interim analysis that organizes the data during the test, so the analysis can be more readily accomplished. Section 4 describes the spatial orientation of the various sensors in the tank. This section is useful in visualizing the relationship of the Sensors in terms of their location in the tank and how the data from these sensors may be related to the data from other sensors. Section 5 provides a summary of the various analyses that will be performed on the data during the test

  6. Numerical analysis and characterization of a Wankel pump as a miniaturized mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Stephen; Huanming, Xia; Kumar, Pankaj

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, particle track simulations of inert particles belonging to two species (binary mixing), carried out using a commercially available CFD code indicate that pumps based on Wankel type geometries (Wankel pumps) are capable of functioning as mixers, as well as pumps; and hence such devices could also drive a semi-batch micro-reactor system. The numerical results reveal that mixing quality improves as the particles loop through the pump cavity and then saturates after a time, and that mixing rate increases with rotor speed. Examination of the structure of the flow-field suggests that the underlying mechanism of mixing is a combination of the stretching (resulting in particle dispersion) and folding of streamlines into Taylor-like vortex pairs, accounting for the vertical symmetry in the particle distributions. Differences in the flow structure, detected by plots of fluid velocity components, could account for differences in particle distributions generated for various rotor speeds.

  7. Use of Buckling Instabilities in Micro Pumps, Valves, and Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakol, Behrouz; Chawan, Aschvin; Holmes, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    We use the buckling of thin, flexible plates for pumping fluids, controlling the flow rate, and mixing different media within a microfluidic channel. A dielectric elastomeric film with a confined geometry buckles out of the plane when exposed to an electric field. Solid or grease electrodes have traditionally been used as conductive materials to aid in voltage application to both sides of the film. In this work, we use an electrolytic fluid solution as the electrode to enable buckling at relatively low voltages, and to enhance the rate of deformation. We show that this mechanism can be implemented as a microvalve that controls flow rate, or as a micropump that operates over a range of frequencies. A similar mechanism can be used to aid diffusion between two adjacent laminar streams and improve mixing. These low-cost micropumps, microvalves, and micromixers rely on the reversible buckling of thin plates, are easily embeddable in a microfluidic chip, and can potentially be used in variety of applications to accurately control and manipulate fluid flow in a microchannel.

  8. 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test Gamma Cart Acceptance Test Procedure and Quality Test Plan (ATP and QTP)

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, D.A.

    2000-03-01

    Shop Test of the Gamma Cart System to be used in the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test. Tests hardware and software. This procedure involves testing the Instrumentation involved with the Gamma Cart System, local and remote, including: depth indicators, speed controls, interface to data acquisition software and the raising and lowering functions. This Procedure will be performed twice, once for each Gamma Cart System. This procedure does not test the accuracy of the data acquisition software.

  9. 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test Gamma Cart Acceptance Test Procedure and Quality Test Plan (ATP and QTP)

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, D.A.

    2000-01-27

    Shop test of the sludge mobilization cart system to be used in the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test Tests hardware and software. This procedure involves testing the Instrumentation involved with the Gamma Cart System, local and remote, including depth indicators, speed controls, interface to data acquisition software and the raising and lowering functions. This Procedure will be performed twice, once for each Gamma Cart System. This procedure does not test the accuracy of the data acquisition software.

  10. Tank 241-SY-101 surface level rise remediation test and evaluation plan for transfer system

    SciTech Connect

    BAUER, R.E.

    1999-07-14

    The purpose of this testing and evaluation plan (TEP) is to provide the high level guidance on testing requirements for ensuring that the equipment and systems to be implemented for remediation of the SY-101 waste level rise USQ are effective.

  11. Safety equipment list for the 241-SY-101 RAPID mitigation project

    SciTech Connect

    MORRIS, K.L.

    1999-06-29

    This document provides the safety classification for the safety (safety class and safety RAPID Mitigation Project. This document is being issued as the project SEL until the supporting authorization basis documentation, this document will be superseded by the TWRS SEL (LMHC 1999), documentation istlralized. Upon implementation of the authorization basis significant) structures, systems, and components (SSCS) associated with the 241-SY-1O1 which will be updated to include the information contained herein.

  12. Thermocouple module halt acceptance test report for tank 241-SY-101 DACS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D.C.

    1998-03-10

    Testing was started on February 24, 1998 and completed on February 25, 1998. The completed procedure consists of 4 acceptance test sections, 6.1 through 6.4. Three test exceptions were identified during the procedure. The first test exception was determined to be unrelated to the ATP and unfortunate that the instrument failed during the ATP. The next two test exceptions were disposition as acceptable because the alarming functions worked correctly in identifying a problem when software communications were interrupted. The test was completed satisfactorily over 2 days. The remainder of the acceptance test report is the completed test procedure.

  13. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction 241-SY-101 crust growth near term mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    HOMAN, N.A.

    1999-04-12

    The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health, Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of the information listed in Appendix A.'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-110), lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide less than 0.1 mrem/year total effective dose equivalent to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual, and commencement is needed within a short time frame. Therefore, this application is also intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of this 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1) notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2), will be provided at a later date.

  14. Pipeline Cross-Site Transfer Assessment for Tank 241-SY-101 Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Wells, Beric E.; Hartley, Stacey A.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2002-02-20

    This study evaluated the feasibility of transferring waste now stored in Tank SY-101 in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site to a storage tank in 200 East Area through a 6.2-mile-long, 3-inch-diameter stainless steel pipeline. Using the Wasp slurry transport model, the critical velocity and expected pressure drop were calculated to determine 1) whether current SY-101 waste can be transferred through the existing cross-site transfer pipeline without additional dilution and, if it is not possible, how much dilution is needed.

  15. Physical Properties of Kaolin/Sand Slurry Used During Submersible Mixer Pump Tests at TNX

    SciTech Connect

    HANSEN, ERICHK.

    2004-08-18

    The purpose of this task is to characterize the physical properties of kaolin/sand slurry used to test the performance of a new submersible mixer pump which is undergoing performance testing at the TNT Waste Tank mockup facility. Three different sample locations, the SMP cooling water exit, the SMP fluid flow field, and SMP effective cleaning radius were used for sampling over the seven day test. The physical properties determinations for the kaolin/sand slurry samples include rheology, weight percent total solids (wt TS), density, and particle size distribution were requested, though not all these determinations were performed on all the samples. The physical properties determinations are described in more detail in section 1.0. Measurements were performed at Savannah River National Laboratory in accordance with the Technical Assistance Request (TAR)1. The data, average of two measurements, is shown in the table below. This data clearly shows that the SMP-CWE samples contained more so lids than those at other sample locations for a given sample day. The SMP-FFF and SMP-ECR were similar in solids content. The rheology of the samples is dependent on the wt solids concentration and are all within the bounds stated in the TAR.

  16. An ultra-broadband distributed passive gate-pumped mixer in 0.18 μm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenxing, Yu; Jun, Feng

    2013-08-01

    A broadband distributed passive gate-pumped mixer (DPGM) using standard 0.18 μm CMOS technology is presented. By employing distributed topology, the mixer can operate at a wide frequency range. In addition, a fourth-order low pass filter is applied to improve the port-to-port isolation. This paper also analyzes the impedance match and conversion loss of the mixer, which consumes zero dc power and exhibits a measured conversion loss of 9.4-17 dB from 3 to 40 GHz with a compact size of 0.78 mm2. The input referred 1 dB compression point is higher than 4 dBm at a fixed IF frequency of 500 MHz and RF frequency of 23 GHz, and the measured RF-to-LO, RF-to-IF and LO-to-IF isolations are better than 21, 38 and 45 dB, respectively. The mixer is suitable for WLAN, UWB, Wi-Max, automotive radar systems and other millimeter-wave radio applications.

  17. A Unique 520-590 GHz Biased Subharmonically-pumped Schottky Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlecht, Erich; Gill, John; Dengler, Robert; Lin, Robert; Tsang, Ray; Mehdi, Imran

    2007-01-01

    We report on the design and performance of a novel broadband, biased, subharmonic 520-590 GHz fix-tuned frequency mixer that utilizes planar Schottky diodes. The suspended stripline circuit is fabricated on a GaAs membrane mounted in a split waveguide block. The chip is supported by thick beam leads that are also used to provide precise radio frequency (RF) grounding, RF coupling and dc/intermediate frequency connections. At room temperature, the mixer has a measured double sideband noise temperature of 3000 to 4000 K across the design band.

  18. Safety evaluation for adding water to tank 101-SY

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, R.

    1994-12-09

    This document provides a new water limit for Tank 241-SY-101. The original limit was set at 9600 gallons. The new limit is now 20,000 gallons. There are various activities that require the use of additional water to the tank. The main activity is the removal of the temporary mixer pump. This requires a large amount of water which will exceed the original limit. Also, other activities such as flushing, adding a viscometer, and adding a void fraction meter requires additional water. The new limit safely incorporates these activities and allows room for more future activities.

  19. Cold Testing of a Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, BE

    2002-01-29

    Russian pulsating mixer pump (PMP) technology was identified in FY 1996 during technical exchanges between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Tanks Focus Area Retrieval and Closure program, the DOE Environmental Management International Programs, and delegates from Russia as a technology that could be implemented in tank waste retrieval operations in the United States. The PMP is basically a jet mixer powered by a pressure/vacuum supply system. A prototype PMP was provided by the Russian Mining and Chemical Combine and evaluated as a potential retrieval tool in FY 1997 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Based on this evaluation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and DOE staff determined that a modified PMP would meet project needs for bulk mobilization of sludge from one or more of the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) at ORNL. In FY 1998, PMP technology was selected for deployment in one of the GAAT to mobilize settled solids. Deployment of the PMP was expected to reduce operation and maintenance costs required to utilize more expensive retrieval systems. The following series of cold tests and inspections were conducted on one of the three PMP units provided to verify the acceptability and readiness of the mixing system for operation in the GAATs at ORNL: (1) Inspections and measurements designed to evaluate the integrity of the equipment: Fabrication shop inspections, Equipment inspections, Vibration/oscillation measurements, Hydrostatic pressure tests. (2) Functionality of the system components: Tank riser interface functionality, Decontamination spray ring (DSR) functionality, Valves, actuator, sensors, and control system functionality, Support fixture tests; and Contamination control assessment. (3) Mixing and operational performance of the PMP system: DSR performance, PMP debris tolerance, PMP performance with water only, PMP cleaning radius determination, and PMP performance with sludge surrogates. The results from these tests indicate

  20. Computational design of mixers and pumps for microfluidic systems, based on electrochemically-active conducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Kannappan, Karthik; Bogle, Gib; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Williams, David E

    2011-03-28

    We present a theoretical description of the propagation of composition waves along a strip of electrochemically-active conducting polymer, upon electrochemical stimulation. We develop an efficient solution of the electro-neutral Nernst-Plank equations in 2-D for electromigration and diffusional transport in the solution based on an extension of the methods of Scharfetter and Gummel [D. L. Scharfetter and H. K. Gummel, IEEE Trans. Electron Devices, 1969, ED16, 64-77.] and of Cohen and Cooley [H. Cohen and J. W. Cooley, Biophys. J., 1965, 5, 145-162.], and demonstrate important effects of the geometry of the cell. Under some circumstances, waves reflecting back from the end of the strip are predicted. We then demonstrate theoretically how such waves, associated as they are with expansion of the polymer, could be employed to enhance mixing or induce pumping in microfluidic systems.

  1. Extended Cold Testing of a Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, BE

    2002-12-23

    The effectiveness of a mixer is dependent on the size of the tank to be mixed, the characteristics of the waste, and the operating conditions. Waste tanks throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex require mixing and mobilization systems capable of (1) breaking up and suspending materials that are difficult to mix and pump, without introducing additional liquids into the tank; (2) complementing and augmenting the performance of other remotely operated and/or robotic waste retrieval systems; and (3) operating in tanks with various quantities of waste. The Oak Ridge Russian pulsating mixer pump (PMP) system was designed with the flexibility to permit deployment in a variety of cylindrical tanks. The PMP was installed at the Tanks Technology Cold Test Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assess the performance of the system over an extended range of operating conditions, including supply pressures up to 175 psig. Previously conducted cold tests proved the applicability of the PMP for deployment in ORNL gunite tank TH-4. The previous testing and hot demonstrations had been limited to operating at air supply pressures of <100 psig. The extended cold testing of the Russian PMP system showed that the system was capable of mobilizing waste simulants in tanks in excess of 20-ft diam. The waste simulant used in these tests was medium-grain quartz sand. The system was successfully installed, checked out, and operated for 406 pulse discharge cycles. Only minor problems (i.e., a sticking air distributor valve and a few system lockups) were noted. Some improvements to the design of the air distributor valve may be needed to improve reliability. The air supply requirements of the PMP during the discharge cycle necessitated the operation of the system in single pulse discharge cycles to allow time for the air supply reservoir to recharge to the required pressure. During the test program, the system was operated with sand depths of 2, 4, and 4.5 in.; at

  2. Type C investigation report of crane two-blocking event at 241-SY-101 double-shell waste tank

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a joint Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and Kaiser Engineers Hanford (KEH) investigation into the June 22, 1993 crane event in SY tank farm. The direct cause of the two-block event was operator error; the operator`s concentration was distracted from the area of primary responsibility, which was crane operation. Poor work planning and equipment design were contributing factors in the event. Lack of an adequate supply of rope to use as a tag line added increased complexity to the task. This complexity, in the absence of operator aids or designed interlocks to prevent two-blocking the crane, contributed to the event. The timeliness of event reporting issue appears to center on the completeness of event reporting to the line organization responsible for the facility. The causes of this were inadequate training of the designated person-in-charge (PIC) and no formal requirement for external contractors to notify the facility owner of the event.

  3. BIB mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    We have determined that the multi-pin 'microprocessor style' packages in which current Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) devices are mounted will not meet our IF bandwidth spec of greater than 2 GHz for a practical mixer. Hence we have started to repackage the Ga:Ge BIB devices in new microwave compatible packages. The smaller size of the microwave package mount necessitates cutting the BIB array down to include only the 3 smallest detectors: 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 mm sq. A FIR beam incident at f/1.5 can be focussed on the smallest element for wavelengths shorter than 100 microns. A more typical (easier) beam convergence of f/3 will require 0.4 mm elements at 100 microns and 0.6 mm elements at 170 microns wavelength. Since the device capacitance (parasitic loss) scales with detector size, there is a tradeoff of speed of response and optical convenience. Our existing optics produce only the slower convergence beam, so we need to redesign the optical layout and are looking at long focal length all-reflective microscope objectives. BIB detectors and the edge-coupled microbolometers have restricted IF bandwidths, an order of magnitude less than what is possible with the Schottky-diode mixers we currently use for astronomical observations. Consequently the frequencies of the FIR laser lines must be close to the astronomical line of interest to be an effective Local Oscillator (LO). We have therefore begun a coordinated effort to discover and measure new FIR laser transition lines in close frequency coincidence with important astrophysical lines. Most of this effort involves pumping isotopic variants of known good laser molecules with laser lines from isotopic variants of CO2. We have been most successful in detecting new FIR lines in deuterated ammonia. One line in particular is very close to the frequency of HD rotational line at 2675 GHz.

  4. Assessment of alternative mitigation concepts for Hanford flammable gas tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Schienbein, L.A.; Hudson, J.D.; Eschbach, E.J.; Lessor, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    This report provides a review and assessment of four selected mitigation concepts: pump jet mixing, sonic vibration, dilution, and heating. Though the relative levels of development of these concepts are quite different, some definite conclusions are made on their comparative feasibility. Key findings of this report are as follows. A mixer pump has proven to be a safe and effective active mitigation method in Tank 241-SY-101, and the authors are confident that mixer pumps will effectively mitigate other tanks with comparable waste configurations and properties. Low-frequency sonic vibration is also predicted to be effective for mitigation. Existing data cannot prove that dilution can mitigate gas release event (GRE) behavior. However, dilution is the only concept of the four that potentially offers passive mitigation. Like dilution, heating the waste cannot be proven with available information to mitigate GRE behavior. The designs, analyses, and data from which these conclusions are derived are presented along with recommendations.

  5. Solids Mobilization and Suspension by Dual Opposed Mixing Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Fort, James A.; Enderlin, Carl W.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were performed to support understanding mixing of radioactive waste stored in Tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Site in Washington State. These experiments were conducted at 1/12 scale and modeled the tank and proposed mixing pump. The tests investigated solids mobilization and suspension for jets rotated in fixed increments about the tank centerline. Flow visualization tests showed that the supernatant layer was generally too cloudy for effective visualization. Observations of the settled solids interface during a start-up transient showed that the mixing action was always confined within the slurry layer. A 4.57-m/s (15-ft/s) jet velocity was not capable of clearing settled sludge off the tank floor all the way to the tank wall and produced a stratified flow field at steady state; 7.62-m/s (25-ft/s) and higher jet velocities always circulated solids to the tank surface. During the operating parameter tests with jets rotated at fixed increments, the slurry interface rose more slowly than for the fixed location jets. Solids suspension was more effective for the rotated jets than for the fixed location jets. Percent solids suspended with a 7.62-m/s (25-ft/s) jet was 66 to 72% in the high viscosity simulant and 59 to 67% in the low viscosity simulant. Percent solids suspended with a 15.2 m/s (50-ft/s) jet was 74 to 81% in the low viscosity simulant. A 7.62 m/s (25-ft/s) jet velocity was adequate to clear settled solids from the tank floor to the tank wall for both the low and high viscosity simulant.

  6. Demystifying Mixers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Douglas Earl

    2012-01-01

    Using music technology is a daily reality for music educators. The task may be as simple as readying a CD player for use in an elementary classroom or as complex as setting up a complete sound system--including microphones, mixer, amplifier, and speakers--for a live music production. One piece of music technology music educators constantly…

  7. Data Observations on Double Shell Tank (DST) Flammable Gas Watch List Tank Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-09-28

    This report provides the data from the retained gas sampler, void fraction instrument, ball rheometer, standard hydrogen monitoring system, and other tank data pertinent to gas retention and release behavior in the waste stored in double-shelled Flammable Gas Watch List tanks at Hanford. These include tanks 241-AN-103,241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, 241-SY-101, and 241-SY-103. The tanks and the waste they contain are described in terms of fill history and chemistry. The results of mixer pump operation and recent waste transfers and back-dilution in SY-101 are also described. In-situ measurement and monitoring systems are described and the data are summarized under the categories of thermal behavior, waste configuration and properties, gas generation and composition, gas retention and historical gas release behavior.

  8. Set point calculations for RAPID project

    SciTech Connect

    HICKMAN, G.L.

    1999-10-18

    The Respond and Pump in Days (RAPID) project was initiated to pump part of the contents of tank 241-SY-101 into tank 241-SY-102. This document establishes the basis for all set points and ranges used in the RAPID project.

  9. Set Point Calculations for RAPID Project [Removal of Hold for HNF-5087 and HNF-5088 and HNF-5089

    SciTech Connect

    HICKMAN, G.L.

    1999-09-02

    The Respond and Pump in Days (RAPID) project was initiated to pump part of the contents of tank 241-SY-101 into tanks 241-SY-102. This document establishes the basis for all set points and ranges used in the RAPID project.

  10. 1/12-Scale mixing interface visualization and buoyant particle release tests in support of Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Eschbach, E.J.; Enderlin, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In support of tank waste safety programs, visualization tests were performed in the 1/12-scale tank facility, using a low-viscosity simulant. The primary objective of the tests was to obtain video records of the transient jet-sludge interaction. The intent is that these videos will provide useful qualitative data for comparison with model predictions. Two tests were initially planned: mixing interface visualization (MIV) and buoyant particle release (BPR). Completion of the buoyant particle release test was set aside in order to complete additional MIV tests. Rheological measurements were made on simulant samples before testing, and the simulant was found to exhibit thixotropic behavior. Shear vane measurements were also made on an in-situ analog of the 1/12-scale tank simulant. Simulant shear strength has been observed to be time dependent. The primary objective of obtaining video records of jet-sludge interaction was satisfied, and the records yielded jet location information which may be of use in completing model comparisons. The modeling effort is not part of this task, but this report also discusses test specific instrumentation, visualization techniques, and shear vane instrumentation which would enable improved characterization of jet-sludge interaction and simulant characteristics.

  11. Video requirements plan for the HMT equipment removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, G.F. Jr.

    1995-02-01

    This document is the plan defining the video coverage requirements for the equipment removal event of the Hydrogen Mitigation Test (HMT) mixer pump currently installed in high level nuclear waste storage Tank 241-SY-101. When the mixer pump fails the removal and installation of a spare pump will be a time critical event. Since the success of the HMT mixer pump has resolved the DOE safety issue it is absolutely essential that mixing be restored to the tank in a short as time possible. Therefore, the removal of the failed pump and the installation of the spare pump must be anticipated and planned well in advance. The removal, containment, transporting, and storage of the failed pump is a very complex and hazardous task. The successful completion of this task will require careful planning and monitoring. Certain events, during the removal and subsequent installation of the new pump, will require video observation and storage for safety, documenting, training, and promotional use. Furthermore, certain events will require close monitoring and observation by the event directors and key supervisory personnel for the execution of specific tasks during the equipment removal event.

  12. System design description for ``Mini-DACS`` data acquisition and control system

    SciTech Connect

    Ermi, A.M.

    1996-10-01

    This document describes the computer software design and associated hardware for the Mini-DACS (Data Acquisition and Control System) in support of testing the second spare pump (HMR-3) for tank 241SY101. The testing of HMR-3 was conducted at the Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF).

  13. On the feasibility of constructing an imaging array of slot-antennas integrated with SIS mixers. [radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, D.; Mcgrath, W. R.; Nilsson, B.; Claeson, T.; Johansson, J.; Kollberg, E.; Yngvesson, K. S.; Rudner, S.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype 700 GHz subharmonically pumped superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer integrated with a tapered slot antenna on a silicon substrate is described. Imaging using integrated SIS-mixer-antenna chips is discussed.

  14. 35. JL photographer, summer 1978, general view of chemical mixer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. JL photographer, summer 1978, general view of chemical mixer Baldwin Filtration plant - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. 41. JL photographer, summer 1978, view of chemical mixer from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. JL photographer, summer 1978, view of chemical mixer from atop chemical spray nozzels. - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. High pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, Christian G.; Sakaji, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A gradient mixer which effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum "band-broadening".

  17. High-pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, C.G.; Sakaji, R.H.

    1982-09-08

    A gradient mixer effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum band-broadening.

  18. Terahertz radiation mixer

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.; Allen, S. James; Lee, Mark

    2008-05-20

    A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

  19. Level maintenance for Tank 101-SY mitigation-by-mixing test. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D.C.

    1994-09-28

    The Phase A, Phase B and Full Scale testing portions of the Mitigation-By-Mixing Test have demonstrated the effectiveness of the Mixer Pump to maintain the waste in tank 101-SY in the desired mitigated state. The operation of the 101-SY Mixer Pump for short periods of time results in a controlled release of hydrogen gas in concentrations well below the established safety limits. Additionally, it has been shown that operation of the pump on a regular schedule minimizes the historical generation rate of hydrogen inventory in the waste. Generation of hydrogen inventory is exhibited by waste level growth. The primary objective of this procedure is to maintain the waste level in tank 241-SY-101 within the safe operating range as defined by the Safety Assessment and the Test Plan. The secondary objective is to operate the pump on a schedule that maximizes its useful lifespan and prevents the formation of obstructions in the normal flow path of the pump.

  20. Quantum limited quasiparticle mixers at 100 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A; Hu, Qing; Richards, P.L. ); Worsham, A.H.; Prober, D.E. . Dept. of Applied Physics); Raeisaenen, A.V. . Radio Lab.)

    1990-09-01

    We have made accurate measurements of the noise and gain of superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) mixers employing small area (1{mu}m{sup 2}) Ta/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Pb{sub 0.9}Bi{sub 0.1} tunnel junctions. We have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 +/{minus} 0.31 quanta at 95.0 GHz, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit of 0.5 quanta. We have carried out a detailed comparison between theoretical predictions of the quantum theory of mixing and experimentally measured noise and gain. We used the shapes of I-V curves pumped at the upper and lower sideband frequencies to deduce values of the embedding admittances at these frequencies. Using these admittances, the mixer noise and gain predicted by quantum theory are in excellent agreement with experiment. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  1. AEA Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-01

    AEA's Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer was developed to mix and maintain the suspension of solids and to blend process liquids. The mixer can be used to combine a tank's available supernate with the sludge into a slurry that is suitable for pumping. The system uses jet nozzles in the tank coupled to a charge vessel. Then, a jet pump creates a partial vacuum in the charge vessel allowing it to be filled with waste. Next, air pressure is applied to the charge vessel, forcing sludge back into the tank and mixing it with the liquid waste. When the liquid waste contains 10% solids, a batch is pumped out of the tank.

  2. Planar doped barrier subharmonic mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T. H.; East, J. R.; Haddad, G. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Planar Doped Barrier (PDB) diode is a device consisting of a p(+) doping spike between two intrinsic layers and n(+) ohmic contacts. This device has the advantages of controllable barrier height, diode capacitance and forward to reverse current ratio. A symmetrically designed PDB has an anti-symmetric current vs. voltage characteristic and is ideal for use as millimeter wave subharmonic mixers. We have fabricated such devices with barrier heights of 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 volts from GaAs and InGaAs using a multijunction honeycomb structure with junction diameters between one and ten microns. Initial RF measurements are encouraging. The 0.7 volt barrier height 4 micron GaAs devices were tested as subharmonic mixers at 202 GHz with an IF frequency of 1 GHz and had 18 dB of conversion loss. The estimated mismatch loss was 7 dB and was due to higher diode capacitance. The LO frequency was 100.5 GHz and the pump power was 8 mW.

  3. Rheology and retained gas measurements in Hanford tank 101-SY

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, C.L.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Terrones, G.

    1995-12-31

    Several high-level radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford site are known to produce flammable gases. The best known of these tanks is tank 241-SY-101, and to mitigate the safety concerns associated with flammable gas release from this tank, a mixer pump was installed in mid-1993 to mix the waste contents and thereby eliminate or reduce the capability of the waste to retain gas. The mixer pump has proven very effective and only needs to be operated for 30 min about every other day. Large periodic gas release events no longer occur in this tank. However, specific information about the Theological character of the mixed waste and the amount of retained gas has been lacking. In order to determine the amount of gas still retained in the waste and the rheology of the mixed fluid, which is important in establishing the capability of the waste for retaining gas, two instruments were developed to probe the waste in situ. These instruments were the ball rheometer and the void fraction instrument (VFI).

  4. Forced mixer lobes in ejector designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presz, W. M., Jr.; Morin, B. L.; Gousy, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    Forced mixer lobes in augmentor primary ejectors obtain a 100-percent increase in pumping over conventional design, together with nearly complete mixing in very short mixing ducts, through the generation of large scale axial vorticity in the mixing duct. The vorticity causes rapid mixing of the primary and secondary flows with low losses; since mixing length is minimized, wall friction losses are reduced, allowing more secondary flow to be pumped for a given total pressure in the primary flow. Analytical results are presented that are judged to have significant implications for future ejector test work.

  5. Optimization of SIS mixer elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) quantum mixers provide an approach to millimeter wave mixing - potentially offering conversion gain, a low local oscillator power demand, and potential mixer noise temperatures near the quantum limit. The development of a reliable fabrication technology for producing such high quality SIS devices for mixer applications in radio astronomy is the focus of the work.

  6. Forced Mixer Nozzle Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheoran, Yogi; Hoover, Robert; Schuster, William; Anderson, Morris; Weir, Donald S.

    1999-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) and computational acoustic analyses (CAA) were performed for a TFE731-40 compound nozzle, a TFE731-60 mixer nozzle and an Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) mixer nozzle for comparison with available data. The CFD analyses were performed with a three dimensional, Navier-Stokes solution of the flowfield on an unstructured grid using the RAMPANT program. The CAA analyses were performed with the NASA Glenn MGB program using a structured grid. A successful aerodynamic solution for the TFE731-40 compound nozzle operating statically was obtained, simulating an engine operating on a test stand. Analysis of the CFD results of the TFE731-40 with the MGB program produced predicted sound power levels that agree quite well with the measured data front full-scale static engine tests. Comparison of the predicted sound pressure with the data show good agreement near the jet axis, but the noise levels are overpredicted at angles closer to the inlet. The predicted sound power level for the TFE731-60 did not agree as well with measured static engine data as the TFE731-40. Although a reduction in the predicted noise level due to the mixed flow was observed, the reduction was not as significant as the measured data. The analysis of the V2 mixer from the E(sup 3) study showed that peak temperatures predicted in the mixer exit flowfield were within 5 percent of the values measured by the exit probes. The noise predictions of the V2 mixer nozzle tended to be 3-5 dB higher in peak noise level than the measurements. In addition, the maximum frequency of the noise was also overpredicted. An analysis of the 3 candidate mixer nozzle configurations demonstrated the feasibility of using centerbody lobes and porosity to improve mixing efficiency. A final configuration was designed with a predicted thermal mixing efficiency that was 5 percent higher than the 3 candidate mixers. The results of the MGB noise calculations show that the final design will exceed the

  7. Axial static mixer

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, H.E.

    1982-05-06

    Static axial mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The axial mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.

  8. Design and development of liquid hydrogen mixer unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. W.; Wuertz, K.; Rudich, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    A dc brushless motor driven mixer unit (a vaneaxial fan) was designed and evaluated for use in cryogenic fluids (liquids and gases). It was found to operate well in all fluids in which it was tested. The test fluids were liquid and gaseous helium, hydrogen in the liquid phase gas phase and mixtures of the two phases, and liquid nitrogen. It operated for over 100 hr at cryogenic temperatures without damage to the bearings and at the conclusion of testing the condition of the bearings was such that an operational life of 5000 hr appeared possible. The unit demonstrated that (with the brushless dc motor principle) useful pumping of cryogenic fluids could be accomplished with very small power inputs to the mixer motor. During test, the motor input power varied from approximately 0.5 W to 2.5 W, depending on fluid density. The high power input produced a mixer efficiency of over 49 percent. In an earlier program (see NASA Report CR-72365), a mixer using an ac induction motor demonstrated an efficiency of 17.7 percent under the same conditions, illustrating the advantage of the dc brushless motor driven unit. The mixer also demonstrated its ability to automatically vary speed as a function of the density of the fluid being pumped. This causes the unit to deliver higher volumetric flow rates as fluid density decreases.

  9. PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  10. Data acquisition and control system for the High-Level Waste Tank Farm at Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Hoida, H.W.; Hatcher, C.R.; Trujillo, L.T.; Holt, D.H.; Vargo, G.F.; Martin, J.; Stastny, G.; Echave, R.; Eldridge, K.

    1993-08-01

    The High-Level Nuclear Waste Storage Tank 241-SY-101 periodically releases flammable gasses. Mitigation experiments to release the gasses continuously to avoid a catastrophic build-up are planned for FY93 and beyond. Los Alamos has provided a data acquisition and control system (DACS) to monitor and control mitigation experiments on SY-101. The DACS consists of a data acquisition trailer to house the electronic components and computers in a friendly environment, a computer system running process control software for monitoring and controlling the tests, signal conditioners to convert the instrument signals to a usable form for the DACS, programmable logic controllers to process sensor signals and take action quickly, a fast data acquisition system for recording transient data, and a remote monitoring system to monitor the progress of the experiment. Equipment to monitor the release of the gasses was also provided. The first experiment involves a mixer pump to mix the waste and allow the gasses to be released at the surface of the liquid as the gas is being formed. The initial tests are scheduled for July 1993.

  11. 101-SY waste sample speed of sound/rheology testing for sonic probe program

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.

    1994-07-25

    One problem faced in the clean-up operation at Hanford is that a number of radioactive waste storage tanks are experiencing a periodic buildup and release of potentially explosive gases. The best known example is Tank 241-SY-101 (commonly referred to as 101-SY) in which hydrogen gas periodically built up within the waste to the point that increased buoyancy caused a roll-over event, in which the gas was suddenly released in potentially explosive concentrations (if an ignition source were present). The sonic probe concept is to generate acoustic vibrations in the 101-SY tank waste at nominally 100 Hz, with sufficient amplitude to cause the controlled release of hydrogen bubbles trapped in the waste. The sonic probe may provide a potentially cost-effective alternative to large mixer pumps now used for hydrogen mitigation purposes. Two important parameters needed to determine sonic probe effectiveness and design are the speed of sound and yield stress of the tank waste. Tests to determine these parameters in a 240 ml sample of 101-SY waste (obtained near the tank bottom) were performed, and the results are reported.

  12. Ammonia in simulated Hanford double-shell tank wastes: Solubility and effects on surface tension

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, J.D.; Pederson, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Radioactive and wastes left from defense materials production activities are temporarily stored in large underground tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State (Tank Waste Science Panel 1991). Some of these wastes are in the form of a thick slurry (``double-shell slurry``) containing sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium aluminate, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, organic complexants and buffering agents, complexant fragments and other minor components (Herting et al. 1992a; Herting et al. 1992b; Campbell et al. 1994). As a result of thermal and radiolytic processes, a number of gases are known to be produced by some of these stored wastes, including ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, hydrogen, and methane (Babad et al. 1991; Ashby et al. 1992; Meisel et al. 1993; Ashby et al. 1993; Ashby et al. 1994; Bryan et al. 1993; US Department of Energy 1994). Before the emplacement of a mixer pump, these gases were retained in and periodically released from Tank 241-SY-101, a double-shell tank at the Hanford Site (Babad et al. 1992; US Department of Energy 1994). Gases are believed to be retained primarily in the form of bubbles attached to solid particles (Bryan, Pederson, and Scheele 1992), with very little actually dissolved in the liquid. Ammonia is an exception. The relation between the concentration of aqueous ammonia in such concentrated, caustic mixtures and the ammonia partial pressure is not well known, however.

  13. Zero gravity liquid mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Bruce, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus for mixing liquids under conditions of zero gravity is disclosed. The apparatus is comprised of a closed reservoir for the liquids, with a means for maintaining a positive pressure on the liquids in the reservoir. A valved liquid supply line is connected to the reservoir for supplying the reservoir with the liquids to be mixed in the reservoir. The portion of the reservoir containing the liquids to be mixed is in communication with a pump which alternately causes a portion of the liquids to flow out of the pump and into the reservoir to mix the liquids. The fluids in the reservoir are in communication through a conduit with the pump which alternately causes a portion of the fluids to flow out of the pump and into the sphere. The conduit connecting the pump and sphere may contain a nozzle or other jet-forming structure such as a venturi for further mixing the fluids.

  14. Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, and nitrogen in the gas phase; comparison of gas generation rates in supernate and solid fractions of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes progress made in evaluating me by which flammable gases are generated in Hanford double-shell tank wastes, based on the results of laboratory tests using simulated waste mixtures. Work described in this report. was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies being performed at Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), under subcontract to PNL, using simulated wastes, and to studies being performed at VMC using actual wastes.

  15. MM wave quasioptical SIS mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qing; Mears, C.A.; Richards, P.L.; Lloyd, F.L.

    1988-08-01

    We have tested the performance of planar SIS mixers with log-periodic antennas at near millimeter and submillimeter wave frequencies from 90 to 360 GHz. The large ..omega..R/sub N/C product (/approximately/10 at 90 GHz) of our Nb/NbO/sub x//Pb-In-Au junctions requires an integrated inductive tuning element to resonate the junction capacitance at the operating frequencies. We have used two types of integrated tuning element, which were designed with the aid of measurements using a Fourier transform spectrometer. Preliminary results indicate that the tuning elements can give very good mixer performance up to at least 200 GHz. An inductive wire in parallel with a 5-junction array gives a minimum mixer noise temperature of 115K (DSB) at 90 GHz with a FWHM bandwidth of 8 GHz. An open-ended microstrip stub in parallel with a single junction, gives minimum mixer noise temperatures of 150 and 200K (DSB) near 90 and 180 GHz with FWHM bandwidths of 4 and 3 GHz, respectively. The relatively high mixer noise temperatures compared to those of waveguide SIS mixers in a similar frequency range are attributed mainly to the losses in our optical system, which is being improved. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. MM wave quasioptical SIS mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q.; Mears, C.A.; Richards, P.L.; Lloyd, F.L.

    1989-03-01

    The authors have tested the performance of planar SIS mixers with log-periodic antennas at near millimeter and submillimeter wave frequencies from 90 to 360 GHz. The large --R/sub N/C product (--10 at 90 GHz,) of our Nb/NbO/sub x//Pb-In-Au junctions requires an integrated inductive tuning element to resonate the junction capacitance at the operating frequencies. They used two types of integrated tuning element, which were designed with the aid of measurements using a Fourier transform spectrometer. Preliminary results indicate that the tuning elements can give very good mixer performance up to at least 200GHz. An inductive wire in parallel with a 5-junction array gives a minimum mixer noise temperature of 115K (DSB) at 90GHz with a FWHM bandwidth of 8GHz. An open-ended microstrip stub in parallel with a single junction, gives minimum mixer noise temperatures of 150 and 200K (DSB) near 90 and 180GHz with FWHM bandwidths of 4 and 3GHz respectively. The relatively high mixer noise temperatures compared to those of waveguide SIS mixers in a similar frequency range are attributed mainly to the losses in our optical system, which is being improved.

  17. Energy Efficient Engine Exhaust Mixer Model Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Larkin, M.

    1981-01-01

    An exhaust mixer test program was conducted to define the technology required for the Energy Efficient Engine Program. The model configurations of 1/10 scale were tested in two phases. A parametric study of mixer design options, the impact of residual low pressure turbine swirl, and integration of the mixer with the structural pylon of the nacelle were investigated. The improvement of the mixer itself was also studied. Nozzle performance characteristics were obtained along with exit profiles and oil smear photographs. The sensitivity of nozzle performance to tailpipe length, lobe number, mixer penetration, and mixer modifications like scalloping and cutbacks were established. Residual turbine swirl was found detrimental to exhaust system performance and the low pressure turbine system for Energy Efficient Engine was designed so that no swirl would enter the mixer. The impact of mixer/plug gap was also established, along with importance of scalloping, cutbacks, hoods, and plug angles on high penetration mixers.

  18. Static mixer improves desalting efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    An in-line static mixer has increased salt removal from crude oil at a large West Coast refinery, says the mixer supplier, Komax Systems Inc. The mixer was installed at a 150,000 b/d crude distillation unit's desalter. Crude at this refinery is a mixture of local production and imports from Indonesia and Alaska. In the past, the refiner used a typical globe-type mix valve to mix fresh water with crude at the desalters. The crude is heated to 300/sup 0/F., mixed with 5% fresh water, and then fed to the desalters. Chemical and electrostatic treatment is used in the desalters to remove salt and water from the crude.

  19. Progress on millimeter wave Josephson junction mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taur, Y.; Kerr, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Preset, recyclable Nb point contacts are tested as low-noise Josephson mixers at a signal frequency of 115 GHz. The best result achieved is a mixer noise temperature (single sideband) of 120 K with unity conversion efficiency (SSB) for a junction at 6 K. Variation of mixer properties with temperature and other parameters is presented.

  20. Mixer Assembly for a Gas Turbine Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Zhongtao (Inventor); Cohen, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Fotache, Catalin G. (Inventor); Smith, Lance L. (Inventor); Hautman, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A mixer assembly for a gas turbine engine is provided, including a main mixer with fuel injection holes located between at least one radial swirler and at least one axial swirler, wherein the fuel injected into the main mixer is atomized and dispersed by the air flowing through the radial swirler and the axial swirler.

  1. Liquid/Gas Flow Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabris, Gracio

    1994-01-01

    Improved devices mix gases and liquids into bubbly or foamy flows. Generates flowing, homogeneous foams or homogeneous dispersions of small, noncoalescing bubbles entrained in flowing liquids. Mixers useful in liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic electric-power generator, froth flotation in mining industry, wastewater treatment, aerobic digestion, and stripping hydrocarbon contaminants from ground water.

  2. Ganged series potentiometer mixer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A ganged potentiometer with the interesting property of a constant 10k ohm or greater series impedance for all rotations of the shaft was rediscovered. The device provided a versatile passive mixer circuit when used with most signal sources and can be used as a variable series input summing resistor in operational amplifier networks. The potentiometer gave simple solutions to missing problems with a single control knob.

  3. Frequency mixer having ferromagnetic film

    DOEpatents

    Khitun, Alexander; Roshchin, Igor V.; Galatsis, Kosmas; Bao, Mingqiang; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-03-29

    A frequency conversion device, which may include a radiofrequency (RF) mixer device, includes a substrate and a ferromagnetic film disposed over a surface of the substrate. An insulator is disposed over the ferromagnetic film and at least one microstrip antenna is disposed over the insulator. The ferromagnetic film provides a non-linear response to the frequency conversion device. The frequency conversion device may be used for signal mixing and amplification. The frequency conversion device may also be used in data encryption applications.

  4. 670-GHz Schottky Diode-Based Subharmonic Mixer with CPW Circuits and 70-GHz IF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Schlecht, Erich T.; Lee, Choonsup; Lin, Robert H.; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran; Sin, Seth; Deal, William; Loi, Kwok K.; Nam, Peta; Rodriguez, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    GaAs-based, sub-harmonically pumped Schottky diode mixers offer a number of advantages for array implementation in a heterodyne receiver system. Since the radio frequency (RF) and local oscillator (LO) signals are far apart, system design becomes much simpler. A proprietary planar GaAs Schottky diode process was developed that results in very low parasitic anodes that have cutoff frequencies in the tens of terahertz. This technology enables robust implementation of monolithic mixer and frequency multiplier circuits well into the terahertz frequency range. Using optical and e-beam lithography, and conventional epitaxial layer design with innovative usage of GaAs membranes and metal beam leads, high-performance terahertz circuits can be designed with high fidelity. All of these mixers use metal waveguide structures for housing. Metal machined structures for RF and LO coupling hamper these mixers to be integrated in multi-pixel heterodyne array receivers for spectroscopic and imaging applications. Moreover, the recent developments of terahertz transistors on InP substrate provide an opportunity, for the first time, to have integrated amplifiers followed by Schottky diode mixers in a heterodyne receiver at these frequencies. Since the amplifiers are developed on a planar architecture to facilitate multi-pixel array implementation, it is quite important to find alternative architecture to waveguide-based mixers.

  5. Mixing characteristics of mixers in flow analysis. Application to two-dimensional detection in ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hongzhu; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Srinivasan, Kannan; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Three mixer designs, a back-flow tee mixer (BT), an end-blocked membrane tee mixer (EMT), and a tubular membrane mixer (TM), were fabricated and compared to three commercially available mixers, Visco-Jet Micro mixer (VJM) and HS binary tee mixer with 2 and 10 μL volume (HS-2 and HS-10) mixing cartridges. Internal volumes ranged from 8.3 to 20.3 μL. Performance characteristics were evaluated by the Villermaux-Dushman reaction, noise in baseline conductance upon mixing an electrolyte solution with water, and dispersion/relative dispersion of an injected solute. No single characteristic would uniquely qualify a particular device. In typical postcolumn use when a small reagent flow is added to a principal flow stream using a low-pulsation high-end chromatographic pump, with the worst of these mixers, imperfect mixing accounted for 99.6% of the observed noise. EMT, BT, and TM with asymmetric inlets provided better mixing performances relative to VJM, HS-2, and HS-10 with symmetric inlet ports, especially when the secondary liquid flow rate was much lower than the principal stream-flow rate. Dispersion per unit residence time was singularly large for HS-2. Based on its mixing efficiency and small dispersion, the BT design was found to be the best for practicing postcolumn reaction. As an illustrative application, this was then used to introduce electrogenerated LiOH in a suppressed ion chromatography system to perform sensitive detection of weak acids in a second dimension. PMID:25426864

  6. Evaluation of static mixer flow enhancements for cryogenic viscous compressor prototype for ITER vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C.; Baylor, Larry R.; Meitner, Steven J.; Combs, Stephen K.; Ha, Tam; Morrow, Michael; Biewer, T.; Rasmussen, David A.; Hechler, Michael P.; Pearce, Robert J. H.; Dremel, Mattias; Boissin, J.-C.

    2014-01-29

    As part of the U.S. ITER contribution to the vacuum systems for the ITER fusion project, a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed and fabricated to cryopump hydrogenic gases in the torus and neutral beam exhaust streams and to regenerate the collected gases to controlled pressures such that they can be mechanically pumped with controlled flows to the tritium reprocessing facility. One critical element of the CVC design that required additional investigation was the determination of flow rates of the low pressure (up to 1000 Pa) exhaust stream that would allow for complete pumping of hydrogenic gases while permitting trace levels of helium to pass through the CVC to be pumped by conventional vacuum pumps. A sub-scale prototype test facility was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a static mixer pump tube concept, which consisted of a series of rotated twisted elements brazed into a 2-mm thick, 5-cm diameter stainless steel tube. Cold helium gas flow provided by a dewar and helium transfer line was used to cool the exterior of the static mixer pump tube. Deuterium gas was mixed with helium gas through flow controllers at different concentrations while the composition of the exhaust gas was monitored with a Penning gauge and optical spectrometer to determine the effectiveness of the static mixer. It was found that with tube wall temperatures between 6 K and 9 K, the deuterium gas was completely cryopumped and only helium passed through the tube. These results have been used to design the cooling geometry and the static mixer pump tubes in the full-scale CVC prototype.

  7. Evaluation of Static Mixer Flow Enhancements for Cryogenic Viscous Compressor Prototype for ITER Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C; Baylor, Larry R; Meitner, Steven J; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Ha, Tam T; Morrow, Michael; Biewer, Theodore M; Rasmussen, David A; Hechler, Michael P; Pearce, R.J.H.; Dremel, M.; Boissin, Jean Claude

    2014-01-01

    As part of the U.S. ITER contribution to the vacuum systems for the ITER fusion project, a cryogenic viscous compressor (CVC) is being designed and fabricated to cryopump hydrogenic gases in the torus and neutral beam exhaust streams and to regenerate the collected gases to controlled pressures such that they can be mechanically pumped with controlled flows to the tritium reprocessing facility. One critical element of the CVC design that required additional investigation was the determination of flow rates of the low pressure (50 to 1000 Pa) exhaust stream that would allow for complete pumping of hydrogenic gases while permitting trace levels of helium to pass through the CVC to be pumped by conventional vacuum pumps. A sub-scale prototype test facility was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a static mixer pump tube concept, which consisted of a series of rotated twisted elements brazed into a 2-mm thick, 5-cm diameter stainless steel tube. Cold helium gas flow provided by a dewar and helium transfer line was used to cool the exterior of the static mixer pump tube. Deuterium gas was mixed with helium gas through flow controllers at different concentrations while the composition of the exhaust gas was monitored with a Penning gauge and optical spectrometer to determine the effectiveness of the static mixer. It was found that with tube wall temperatures between 6 K and 9 K, the deuterium gas was completely cryopumped and only helium passed through the tube. These results have been used to design the cooling geometry and the static mixer pump tubes in the full-scale CVC prototype

  8. Flashback resistant pre-mixer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Laster, Walter R.; Gambacorta, Domenico

    2012-02-14

    A pre-mixer assembly associated with a fuel supply system for mixing of air and fuel upstream from a main combustion zone in a gas turbine engine. The pre-mixer assembly includes a swirler assembly disposed about a fuel injector of the fuel supply system and a pre-mixer transition member. The swirler assembly includes a forward end defining an air inlet and an opposed aft end. The pre-mixer transition member has a forward end affixed to the aft end of the swirler assembly and an opposed aft end defining an outlet of the pre-mixer assembly. The aft end of the pre-mixer transition member is spaced from a base plate such that a gap is formed between the aft end of the pre-mixer transition member and the base plate for permitting a flow of purge air therethrough to increase a velocity of the air/fuel mixture exiting the pre-mixer assembly.

  9. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of shear flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  10. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of sheer flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  11. An Integrated 520-600 GHz Sub-Harmonic Mixer and Tripler Combination Based on GaAs MMIC Membrane Planar Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, B.; Gill, J.; Maestrini, A.; Lee, C.; Lin, R.; Sin, S.; Peralta, A.; Mehdi, I.

    2011-01-01

    We present here the design, development and test of an integrated sub-millimeter front-end featuring a 520-600 GHz sub-harmonic mixer and a 260-300 GHz frequency tripler in a single cavity. Both devices used GaAs MMIC membrane planar Schottky diode technology. The sub-harmonic mixer/tripler circuit has been tested using conventional machined as well as silicon micro-machined blocks. Measurement results on the metal block give best DSB mixer noise temperature of 2360 K and conversion losses of 7.7 dB at 520 GHz. Preliminary results on the silicon micro-machined blocks give a DSB mixer noise temperature of 4860 K and conversion losses of 12.16 dB at 540 GHz. The LO input power required to pump the integrated tripler/sub-harmonic mixer for both packages is between 30 and 50 mW

  12. An Integrated 520-600 GHz Sub-Harmonic Mixer and Tripler Combination Based on GaAs MMIC Membrane Planar Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, B.; Gill, J.; Maestrini, A.; Lee, C.; Lin, R.; Sin, S.; Peralta, A.; Mehdi, I.

    2010-01-01

    We present here the design, development and test of an integrated sub-millimeter front-end featuring a 520-600 GHz sub-harmonic mixer and a 260-300 GHz frequency tripler in a single cavity. Both devices used GaAs MMIC membrane planar Schottky diode technology. The sub-harmonic mixer/tripler circuit has been tested using conventional machined as well as silicon micro-machined blocks. Measurement results on the metal block give best DSB mixer noise temperature of 2360 K and conversion losses of 7.7 dB at 520 GHz. Preliminary results on the silicon micro-machined blocks give a DSB mixer noise temperature of 4860 K and conversion losses of 12.16 dB at 540 GHz. The LO input power required to pump the integrated tripler/sub-harmonic mixer for both packages is between 30 and 50 mW.

  13. Mixer assembly for a gas turbine engine having a pilot mixer with a corner flame stabilizing recirculation zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Zhongtao (Inventor); Cohen, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Fotache, Catalin G. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A mixer assembly for a gas turbine engine is provided, including a main mixer, and a pilot mixer having an annular housing in which a corner is formed between an aft portion of the housing and a bulkhead wall in which a corner recirculation zone is located to stabilize and anchor the flame of the pilot mixer. The pilot mixer can further include features to cool the annular housing, including in the area of the corner recirculation zone.

  14. Plutonium flowsheet development in miniature mixer-settlers

    SciTech Connect

    Hannaford, B.A.; Davis, G.D.

    1981-05-01

    Initial runs were completed in a new solvent extraction facility that has been built for testing coprocessing flowsheets with simulated LWR and FBR fuel solutions. The equipment, which is assembled in glove boxes, includes three 16-stage miniature mixer-settler banks with associated in-line monitors, pumping equipment, and sampling apparatus. Following shakedown runs with solutions containing uranium only, two flowsheet test runs were made with a simulated LWR fuel solution (U/Pu = 100). The solution was fed to an extraction-scrub bank, where 30% tributyl phosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent was used to coextract uranium and plutonium. The extract was fed to a second mixer-settler bank, where all of the plutonium was stripped into an aqueous product stream using hydroxylamine nitrate for plutonium reduction; a controlled fraction of the uranium was simultaneously stripped to produce a U/Pu ratio of {similar_to}2. The amount of the uranium stripped with the plutonium was regulated by careful control of an organic backscrub stream. Finally, the residual uranium in the solvent was stripped in the third mixer-settler bank. The success of the experiments depended on precise control of very low liquid flow rates, and on in-line monitors which indicated the uranium or total heavy-metal concentrations. The most useful in-line device was the Mettler-Paar density meter, from which metal concentrations could be determined to within {similar_to}1 g/L. A miniature spectrophotometer also gave promising results for uranium analysis. Preliminary use of a Hewlett-Packard data acquisition system was satisfactory; recorded variables were temperature, solution density, liquid flow rates, and liquid levels.

  15. Thrust Augmentation with Mixer/Ejector Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presz, Walter M., Jr.; Reynolds, Gary; Hunter, Craig

    2002-01-01

    Older commercial aircraft often exceed FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) sideline noise regulations. The major problem is the jet noise associated with the high exhaust velocities of the low bypass ratio engines on such aircraft. Mixer/ejector exhaust systems can provide a simple means of reducing the jet noise on these aircraft by mixing cool ambient air with the high velocity engine gases before they are exhausted to ambient. This paper presents new information on thrust performance predictions, and thrust augmentation capabilities of mixer/ejectors. Results are presented from the recent development program of the patented Alternating Lobe Mixer Ejector Concept (ALMEC) suppressor system for the Gulfstream GII, GIIB and GIII aircraft. Mixer/ejector performance procedures are presented which include classical control volume analyses, compound compressible flow theory, lobed nozzle loss correlations and state of the art computational fluid dynamic predictions. The mixer/ejector thrust predictions are compared to subscale wind tunnel test model data and actual aircraft flight test measurements. The results demonstrate that a properly designed mixer/ejector noise suppressor can increase effective engine bypass ratio and generate large thrust gains at takeoff conditions with little or no thrust loss at cruise conditions. The cruise performance obtained for such noise suppressor systems is shown to be a strong function of installation effects on the aircraft.

  16. Electrochemical cell apparatus having an integrated reformer-mixer nozzle-mixer diffuser

    DOEpatents

    Shockling, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical apparatus (10) is made having a generator section (22) containing electrochemical cells (16), a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet (28), a gaseous feed oxidant inlet (30), and at least one hot gaseous spent fuel recirculation channel (46), where the spent fuel recirculation channel (46), passes from the generator chamber (22) to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet (28) to form a reformable mixture, where a reforming chamber (54) contains an outer portion containing reforming material (56), an inner portion preferably containing a mixer nozzle (50) and a mixer-diffuser (52), and a middle portion (64) for receiving spent fuel, where the mixer nozzle (50) and mixer-diffuser (52) are preferably both within the reforming chamber (54) and substantially exterior to the main portion of the apparatus, where the reformable mixture flows up and then backward before contacting the reforming material (56), and the mixer nozzle (50) can operate below 400.degree. C.

  17. Electrochemical cell apparatus having an integrated reformer-mixer nozzle-mixer diffuser

    DOEpatents

    Shockling, L.A.

    1991-09-10

    An electrochemical apparatus is made having a generator section containing electrochemical cells, a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet, a gaseous feed oxidant inlet, and at least one hot gaseous spent fuel recirculation channel, where the spent fuel recirculation channel, passes from the generator chamber to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet to form a reformable mixture, where a reforming chamber contains an outer portion containing reforming material, an inner portion preferably containing a mixer nozzle and a mixer-diffuser, and a middle portion for receiving spent fuel, where the mixer nozzle and mixer-diffuser are preferably both within the reforming chamber and substantially exterior to the main portion of the apparatus, where the reformable mixture flows up and then backward before contacting the reforming material, and the mixer nozzle can operate below 400 C. 1 figure.

  18. INTERIOR VIEW OF MIXER LOCATED ON SECOND FLOOR OF BATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF MIXER LOCATED ON SECOND FLOOR OF BATCH PLANT. RECENTLY PURCHASED TO REPLACE OLD MIXER. USED TO MIX THE BATCH - Chambers-McKee Window Glass Company, Batch Plant, Clay Avenue Extension, Jeannette, Westmoreland County, PA

  19. Electrochemical cell apparatus having an exterior fuel mixer nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip; Doshi, Vinod B.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical apparatus (10) is made having a generator section (22) containing electrochemical cells (16), a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet (28), a gaseous feed oxidant inlet (30), and at least one hot gaseous spent fuel recirculation channel (46), where the spent fuel recirculation channel (46), a portion of which is in contact with the outside of a mixer chamber (52), passes from the generator chamber (22) to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet (28) at the entrance to the mixer chamber, and a mixer nozzle (50) is located at the entrance to the mixer chamber, where the mixer chamber (52) connects with the reforming chamber (54), and where the mixer-diffuser chamber (52) and mixer nozzle (50) are exterior to and spaced apart from the combustion chamber (24), and the generator chamber (22), and the mixer nozzle (50) can operate below 400.degree. C.

  20. Electrochemical cell apparatus having an exterior fuel mixer nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, P.; Doshi, V.B.

    1992-12-08

    An electrochemical apparatus is made having a generator section containing electrochemical cells, a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet, a gaseous feed oxidant inlet, and at least one hot gaseous spent fuel recirculation channel, where the spent fuel recirculation channel, a portion of which is in contact with the outside of a mixer chamber, passes from the generator chamber to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet at the entrance to the mixer chamber, and a mixer nozzle is located at the entrance to the mixer chamber, where the mixer chamber connects with the reforming chamber, and where the mixer-diffuser chamber and mixer nozzle are exterior to and spaced apart from the combustion chamber, and the generator chamber, and the mixer nozzle can operate below 400 C. 2 figs.

  1. New trends in millimeter-wave mixer technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, J.; Kung, J.

    1980-05-01

    The paper is concerned with the new millimeter-wave mixer technologies under active consideration for the frequency range 60-340 GHz. First are examined three types of GaAs Schottky barrier mixer diodes: honeycomb, notch front and beam lead. Then are presented four types of mixers involving different circuit technologies: waveguide, suspended stripline, dielectric guide and quasi-optical. The design and performance of both mixer circuits and diodes are analyzed as a function of frequency and instantaneous bandwidth.

  2. Formal design review report project W-151 mixer pump procurement

    SciTech Connect

    Crass, D.W.

    1997-01-21

    A formal design review for WHC-S-0040 was held on January 21, 1993. The review was completed January 29, 1993. No outstanding action items existed. Comments were recorded on Record Comment Record (RCR) forms and incorporated into the specification. The specification was considered acceptable, approved and issued as WHC-S-0040, Rev. 0 on March 4, 1993.

  3. PDMS-based turbulent microfluidic mixer.

    PubMed

    You, Jae Bem; Kang, Kyowon; Tran, Thanh Tinh; Park, Hongkeun; Hwang, Wook Ryol; Kim, Ju Min; Im, Sung Gap

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decade, homogeneous mixing in microfluidic devices has been a critical challenge, because of the inherently low flow rates in microfluidic channels. Although several mixer designs have been suggested to achieve efficient mixing, most of them involve intricate structures requiring a series of laborious fabrication processes. Operation at high flow rates can greatly enhance mixing by induction of turbulence, but devices that can resist such a high pressure drop to induce turbulence in microfluidic channels are difficult to fabricate, especially for commonly used poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices. We have developed a Y-shaped, turbulent microfluidic mixer made of PDMS and a glass substrate by strong bonding of the substrates to a nanoadhesive layer deposited via initiated chemical vapor deposition. The high bonding strength of the nanoadhesive layer enables safe operation of the PDMS/glass turbulent microfluidic mixer at a total water flow rate of 40 mL min(-1), corresponding to a Reynolds number, Re, of ~4423, one of the highest values achieved in a microfluidic channel. The turbulence generated as a result of the high Re allows rapid mixing of the input fluids on contact. Image analysis showed that mixing started as soon as the fluids were introduced into the mixer. The experimental results matched the numerical predictions well, demonstrating that convective mixing was dominant as a result of turbulence induced in the microfluidic channel. Using the turbulent microfluidic mixer, we have demonstrated high throughput formation of emulsions with narrower size distribution. It was shown that as the flow rate increases inside the microfluidic channel, the size distribution of resulting emulsions decreases owing to the increase in the turbulent energy dissipation. The turbulent microfluidic mixer developed in this work not only enables rapid mixing of streams, but also increases throughputs of microfluidic reactors.

  4. A user oriented computer program for the analysis of microwave mixers, and a study of the effects of the series inductance and diode capacitance on the performance of some simple mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, P. H.; Kerr, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    A user oriented computer program for analyzing microwave and millimeter wave mixers with a single Schottky barrier diode of known I-V and C-V characteristics is described. The program first performs a nonlinear analysis to determine the diode conductance and capacitance waveforms produced by the local oscillator. A small signal linear analysis is then used to find the conversion loss, port impedances, and input noise temperature of the mixer. Thermal noise from the series resistance of the diode and shot noise from the periodically pumped current in the diode conductance are considered. The effects of the series inductance and diode capacitance on the performance of some simple mixer circuits using a conventional Schottky diode, a Schottky diode in which there is no capacitance variation, and a Mott diode are studied. It is shown that the parametric effects of the voltage dependent capacitance of a conventional Schottky diode may be either detrimental or beneficial depending on the diode and circuit parameters.

  5. 21 CFR 888.4210 - Cement mixer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement mixer for clinical use. 888.4210 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4210 Cement mixer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A cement mixer for clinical use is a device consisting of a container intended for use in...

  6. 21 CFR 888.4210 - Cement mixer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cement mixer for clinical use. 888.4210 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4210 Cement mixer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A cement mixer for clinical use is a device consisting of a container intended for use in...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer. (a) Identification. A breathing gas mixer is a device intended for use in conjunction with a respiratory...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer. (a) Identification. A breathing gas mixer is a device intended for use in conjunction with a respiratory...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer. (a) Identification. A breathing gas mixer is a device intended for use in conjunction with a respiratory...

  10. Quasi-Optical SIS Mixer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1997-01-01

    This grant supported our ongoing development of sensitive quasi-optical SIS mixers for the submillimeter band. The technology developed under this grant is now being applied to NASA missions, including the NASA/USRA SOFIA airborne observatory and and the ESA/NASA FIRST/Herschel space astronomy mission.

  11. 7 CFR 58.515 - Mixers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixers. 58.515 Section 58.515 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE...

  12. 7 CFR 58.515 - Mixers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixers. 58.515 Section 58.515 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE...

  13. Slot antenna SIS mixers for submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Leduc, Henry G.; Stern, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing improved versions of a slot antenna SIS mixer which we have previously described. The initial work demonstrated a double sideband noise temperature of 420 K for a 500 GHz quasi-optical SIS mixer employing a twin-slot antenna on a quartz dielectric substrate. A quartz hyperhemispherical lens is used to focus the incoming radiation onto the twin-slot antenna. The advantages of a twin-slot antenna include a low impedance (35 omega) and a clean, symmetric beam pattern into the dielectric with a 70 percent efficiency. In our original mixer, the radiation was coupled from the two slot antennas onto superconducting microstrip lines which fed the SIS junction. By performing an impedance transformation using tapered lines and by feeding the radiation from the two slots to the junction in parallel, the effective (real) impedance seen by the junction was reduced to just 4 omega. This very low impedance allowed a junction area of 2.3 sq micron to be used at 500 GHz, which was manufactured using optical lithography. However, no attempt was made to tune out the junction capacitance. We estimate that this capacitance reduces the impedance coupling efficiency to eta(sub Z) approx. equals 0.23, for our junction with omega R(sub N) C = 5.3 at 500 GHz. The recent development of techniques using electron-beam lithography to manufacture junctions with very small areas (approx. equals 0.1 sq microns) now allows considerably more flexibility in the design of SIS mixer circuits. We have redesigned the slot-antenna mixer to take advantage of this possibility. In particular, we have included a novel circuit which allows the junction capacitance to be tune out over a broad bandwidth. For instance, mixers designed for 800 GHz using NbN/MgO/NbN junctions with realistic parameters achieve a 3 dB impedance bandwidth of nearly 400 GHz. Furthermore, our circuit uses only short lengths of microstrip and should be less sensitive to RF losses than other designs. The improved

  14. Development of SIS Mixers for 1 THz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.; Kooi, J.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.; Stern, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    SIS heterodyne mixer technology based on niobium tunnel junctions has now been pushed to frequencies over 1 THz, clearly demonstrating that the SIS junctions are capable of mixing at frequencies up to twice the energy gap frequency (4 Delta/h). However, the performance degrades rapidly above the gap frequency of niobium (2 Delta/h approx. 700 GHz) due to substantial ohmic losses in the on-chip tuning circuit. To solve this problem, the tuning circuit should be fabricated using a superconducting film with a larger energy gap, such as NbN; unfortunately, NbN films often have a substantial excess surface resistance in the submillimeter band. In contrast, the SIS mixer measurements we present in this paper indicate that the losses for NbTiN thin films can be quite low.

  15. Study on installation of the submersible mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, F.; Shi, W. D.; He, X. H.; Jiang, H.; Xu, Y. H.

    2013-12-01

    Study on installation of the submersible mixer for sewage treatment has been limited. In this article, large-scale computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT6.3 was adopted. ICEM software was used to build an unstructured grid of sewage treatment pool. After that, the sewage treatment pool was numerically simulated by dynamic coordinate system technology and RNG k-ε turbulent model and PIOS algorithm. Agitation pools on four different installation location cases were simulated respectively, and the external characteristic of the submersible mixer and the velocity cloud of the axial section were respectively comparatively analyzed. The best stirring effect can be reached by the installation location of case C, which is near the bottom of the pool 600 mm and blade distance the bottom at least for 200 mm wide and wide edge and narrow edge distance by 4:3. The conclusion can guide the engineering practice.

  16. Matlab GUI for a Fluid Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, Enrique

    2005-01-01

    The Test and Engineering Directorate at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center developed an interest to study the modeling, evaluation, and control of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) and gas hydrogen (GH2) mixer subsystem of a ground test facility. This facility carries out comprehensive ground-based testing and certification of liquid rocket engines including the Space Shuttle Main engine. A software simulation environment developed in MATLAB/SIMULINK (M/S) will allow NASA engineers to test rocket engine systems at relatively no cost. In the progress report submitted in February 2004, we described the development of two foundation programs, a reverse look-up application using various interpolation algorithms, a variety of search and return methods, and self-checking methods to reduce the error in returned search results to increase the functionality of the program. The results showed that these efforts were successful. To transfer this technology to engineers who are not familiar with the M/S environment, a four-module GUI was implemented allowing the user to evaluate the mixer model under open-loop and closed-loop conditions. The progress report was based on an udergraduate Honors Thesis by Ms. Jamie Granger Austin in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Tulane University, during January-May 2003, and her continued efforts during August-December 2003. In collaboration with Dr. Hanz Richter and Dr. Fernando Figueroa we published these results in a NASA Tech Brief due to appear this year. Although the original proposal in 2003 did not address other components of the test facility, we decided in the last few months to extend our research and consider a related pressurization tank component as well. This report summarizes the results obtained towards a Graphical User Interface (GUI) for the evaluation and control of the hydrogen mixer subsystem model and for the pressurization tank each taken individually. Further research would combine the two

  17. Temperature automation for a propellant mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, T. L.; Wilson, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis and installation of an automatic temperature controller on a propellant mixer is presented. Ultimately, the entire mixing process will come under automation, but since precise adherence to the temperature profile is very difficult to sustain manually, this was the first component to be automated. Automation is not only important for producing a uniform product, but it is necessary for envisioned space-based propellant production.

  18. Applying Hanford Tank Mixing Data to Define Pulse Jet Mixer Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Minette, Michael J.; Holton, Langdon K.

    2015-12-07

    Pulse jet mixed (PJM) process vessels are being developed for storing, blending, and chemical processing of nuclear waste slurries at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to be built at Hanford, Washington. These waste slurries exhibit variable process feed characteristics including Newtonian to non-Newtonian rheologies over a range of solids loadings. Waste feed to the WTP from the Hanford Tank Farms will be accomplished via the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) system which includes million-gallon underground storage double-shell tanks (DSTs) with dual-opposed jet mixer pumps. Experience using WFD type jet mixer pumps to mobilize actual Hanford waste in DSTs may be used to establish design threshold criteria of interest to pulse jet mixed process vessel operation. This paper describes a method to evaluate the pulse jet mixed vessel capability to process waste based on information obtained during mobilizing and suspending waste by the WFD system jet mixer pumps in a DST. Calculations of jet velocity and wall shear stress in a specific pulse jet mixed process vessel were performed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The CFD-modelled process vessel consists of a 4.9-m- (16-ft-) diameter tank with a 2:1 semi-elliptical head, a single, 10-cm (4-in.) downward facing 60-degree conical nozzle, and a 0.61-m (24-in.) inside diameter PJM. The PJM is located at 70% of the vessel radius with the nozzle stand-off-distance 14 cm (6 in.) above the vessel head. The CFD modeled fluid velocity and wall shear stress can be used to estimate vessel waste-processing performance by comparison to available actual WFD system process data. Test data from the operation of jet mixer pumps in the 23-m (75-ft) diameter DSTs have demonstrated mobilization, solid particles in a sediment matrix were moved from their initial location, and suspension, mobilized solid particles were moved to a higher elevation in the vessel than their initial location, of waste solids

  19. SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) mixer research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, M. J.

    1987-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental research has been conducted to elucidate the basic physics behind the properties of superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction receiving devices. The quantum theory of mixing was employed to calculate the saturation behavior of the SIS mixer and the SIS direct detector. The direct detector was found to saturate at far higher powers than previously believed, permitting practical application of this device. Experiments verified the saturation theory. The mixer saturation expression led to the formulation of frequency scaling regions. The origin of quantum noise sources is completely minimized. The mixer quantum noise limit was shown to be reached in only two special cases. Computer calculations determined that the behavior of SIS receivers divides into two regimes, low and high frequencies, the cross-over frequency depending upon junction quality. The properties of these two regimes were delineated. All previous SIS receivers have operated in the low frequency regime. Plasma-etched niobium nitride edge junctions have been fabricated using a novel barrier formation process. These junctions have excellent current-voltage characteristics.

  20. Lobed Mixer Optimization for Advanced Ejector Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A.

    1996-01-01

    The overall objectives are: 1) to pursue analytical, computational, and experimental studies that enhance basic understanding of forced mixing phenomena relevant to supersonic jet noise reduction, and 2) to integrate this enhanced understanding (analytical, computational, and empirical) into a design-oriented model of a mixer-ejector noise suppression system. The work is focused on ejector geometries and flow conditions typical of those being investigated in the NASA High Speed Research Program (HSRP). The research will be carried out in collaboration with the NASA HSRP Nozzle Integrated Technology Development (ITD) Team, and will both contribute to, and benefit from, the results of other HSRP research. The noise suppressor system model that is being developed under this grant is distinct from analytical tools developed by industry because it directly links details of lobe geometry to mixer-ejector performance. In addition, the model provides a 'technology road map to define gaps in the current understanding of various phenomena related to mixer-ejector design and to help prioritize research areas. This report describes research completed in the past year, as well as work proposed for the following year.

  1. Aeroacoustic Characteristics of a Rectangular Multi-Element Supersonic Jet Mixer-Ejector Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Taghavi, Ray

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides a unique, detailed evaluation of the acoustics and aerodynamics of a rectangular multi-element supersonic jet mixer-ejector noise suppressor. The performance of such mixer-ejectors is important in aircraft engine application for noise suppression and thrust augmentation. In contrast to most prior experimental studies on ejectors that reported either aerodynamic or acoustic data, our work documents both types of data. We present information on the mixing, pumping, ejector wall pressure distribution, thrust augmentation and noise suppression characteristics of four simple, multi-element, jet mixer-ejector configurations. The four configurations included the effect of ejector area ratio (AR = ejector area/primary jet area) and the effect of non-parallel ejector walls. We also studied in detail the configuration that produced the best noise suppression characteristics. Our results show that ejector configurations that produced the maximum maximum pumping (entrained flow per secondary inlet area) also exhibited the lowest wall pressures in the inlet region, and the maximum thrust augmentation. When cases having the same total mass flow were compared, we found that noise suppression trends corresponded with those for pumping. Surprisingly, the mixing (quantified by the peak Mach number, and flow uniformity) at the ejector exit exhibited no relationship to the noise suppression at moderate primary jet fully expanded Mach numbers (Mj is less than 1.4). However, the noise suppression dependence on the mixing was apparent at higher Mj. The above observations are justified by noting that the mixing at the ejector exit is ot a strong factor in determining the radiated noise when noise produced internal to the ejector dominates the noise field outside the ejector.

  2. Microfluidic Mixers for Studying Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Waldauer, Steven A.; Wu, Ling; Yao, Shuhuai; Bakajin, Olgica; Lapidus, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    The process by which a protein folds into its native conformation is highly relevant to biology and human health yet still poorly understood. One reason for this is that folding takes place over a wide range of timescales, from nanoseconds to seconds or longer, depending on the protein1. Conventional stopped-flow mixers have allowed measurement of folding kinetics starting at about 1 ms. We have recently developed a microfluidic mixer that dilutes denaturant ~100-fold in ~8 μs2. Unlike a stopped-flow mixer, this mixer operates in the laminar flow regime in which turbulence does not occur. The absence of turbulence allows precise numeric simulation of all flows within the mixer with excellent agreement to experiment3-4. Laminar flow is achieved for Reynolds numbers Re ≤100. For aqueous solutions, this requires micron scale geometries. We use a hard substrate, such as silicon or fused silica, to make channels 5-10 μm wide and 10 μm deep (See Figure 1). The smallest dimensions, at the entrance to the mixing region, are on the order of 1 μm in size. The chip is sealed with a thin glass or fused silica coverslip for optical access. Typical total linear flow rates are ~1 m/s, yielding Re~10, but the protein consumption is only ~0.5 nL/s or 1.8 μL/hr. Protein concentration depends on the detection method: For tryptophan fluorescence the typical concentration is 100 μM (for 1 Trp/protein) and for FRET the typical concentration is ~100 nM. The folding process is initiated by rapid dilution of denaturant from 6 M to 0.06 M guanidine hydrochloride. The protein in high denaturant flows down a central channel and is met on either side at the mixing region by buffer without denaturant moving ~100 times faster (see Figure 2). This geometry causes rapid constriction of the protein flow into a narrow jet ~100 nm wide. Diffusion of the light denaturant molecules is very rapid, while diffusion of the heavy protein molecules is much slower, diffusing less than 1 μm in 1 ms

  3. Three-Dimensional CFD FLYGT Mixer Model and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.

    2002-04-16

    The main objectives of the present work are to examine detailed flow performance of the Tank 19 FLYGT mixer improved by the previous work, to conduct sensitivity analysis for a wide range of possible boundary conditions, and to investigate transient flow behavior and loading of the FLYGT mixer. For the present study, a flow simulation method is developed to calculate the flow around a marine-type propeller configuration of the FLYGT mixer.

  4. Experimental evaluation of exhaust mixers for an Energy Efficient Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Kraft, G.

    1980-01-01

    Static scale model tests were conducted to evaluate exhaust system mixers for a high bypass ratio engine as part of the NASA sponsored Energy Efficient program. Gross thrust coefficients were measured for a series of mixer configurations which included variations in the number of mixer lobes, tailpipe length, mixer penetration, and length. All of these parameters have a significant impact on exhaust system performance. In addition, flow visualization pictures and pressure/temperature traverses were obtained for selected configurations. Parametric performance trends are discussed and the results considered relative to the Energy Efficient Engine program goals.

  5. Skid-mounted self-leveling mixer apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Stegemoeller, C.L.; Davis, G.F.; Walker, L.R.

    1989-07-25

    This patent describes a self-leveling mixer apparatus. It comprises: a transportable skid frame; a mixing tube supported from the frame in a manner such that the tub is movable between first and second positions relative to the frame. The tub having a tub fluid outlet defined in a lower portion thereof; suction conduit means, supported from the skid frame for transport therewith. Aid conduit means including: a manifold inlet means for connection to a fluid source located separate from the skid frame; a manifold outlet means for connection to a suction of a pump located separate from the skid frame; and a tub outlet conduit portion located upstream of the manifold outlet and connected to the tub fluid outlet; leveling valve means, disposed in the suction conduit means upstream of the manifold outlet, for controlling a level of fluid in the tub; and connector means, operably associated with the tub and the leveling valve means, for adjusting the leveling valve means in response to movement of the tub relative to the skid frame.

  6. Turbofan forced mixer lobe flow modeling. 2: Three-dimensional inviscid mixer analysis (FLOMIX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional potential analysis (FLOMIX) was formulated and applied to the inviscid flow over a turbofan foced mixer. The method uses a small disturbance formulation to analytically uncouple the circumferential flow from the radial and axial flow problem, thereby reducing the analysis to the solution of a series of axisymmetric problems. These equations are discretized using a flux volume formulation along a Cartesian grid. The method extends earlier applications of the Cartesian method to complex cambered geometries. The effects of power addition are also included within the potential formulation. Good agreement is obtained with an alternate small disturbance analysis for a high penetration symmetric mixer in a planar duct. In addition, calculations showing pressure distributions and induced secondary vorticity fields are presented for practical trubofan mixer configurations, and where possible, comparison was made with available experimental data. A detailed description of the required data input and coordinate definition is presented along with a sample data set for a practical forced mixer configuration. A brief description of the program structure and subroutines is also provided.

  7. Superconducting Mixers for Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.; Grossman, E. R.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ono, R. H.; Gerecht, E.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project was to fabricate and test planar arrays of superconducting mixers for the 2-6 THz band. The technology is intended for multi-beam receivers aboard Explorer-class missions and the SOFIA Airborne Observatory. The mixer technology is the superconducting transition-edge microbolometer, which is more commonly known as the Hot-Electron micro-Bolometer (HEB). As originally proposed, two superconducting technologies were to be developed: (1) low-Tc niobium HEBs which could approach quantum-noise-limited sensitivities but require cooling to 2- 4 K, and (2) high-Tc YBCO HEBs with sensitivities 10 times worse but with a relaxed cooling requirement of 30-60 K. The low-Tc devices would be best for astronomy applications on SOFIA, whereas the high-Tc devices would be more suitable for planetary missions using systems without stored cryogens. The work plan called for planar micro-fabrication and initial testing of HEB devices at the NIST Boulder clean-room facility. Subsequent assembly and RF testing of selected devices would be done at the CASA laboratory at U. Colorado. Approximately 1-year after work began on this project, Dr. Eyal Gerecht joined the NIST group, and assumed day-to-day responsibility for Nb-HEB development at NIST outside of micro-fabrication. The YBCO-HEB work was to be guided by Dr. Ron Ono, who was the NIST expert in YBCO technology. Unfortunately, recurrent health problems limited the time Ron could devote to the project in its first year. These problems became aggravated in early 2001, and sadly led to Ron's death in October, 2001. His loss was not only a blow to his friends and associates at NIST, but was mounted by the US superconductivity community at large. With his passing, work on high-Tc HEBs ceased at NIST. There was no one to replace him or his expertise. Our work subsequently shifted solely to Nb-HEB devices. In the sections which follow, our progress in the development of diffusion-cooled Nb-HEB mixers is detailed. To

  8. PULSED MIXER-SETTLER SOLVENT EXTRACTION CONTACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Figg, W.S.

    1958-08-12

    A mixer-settler extractor is described for contacting immiscible liquids having different specific gravities in order to withdraw one or more components from one liquid with the aid of the other liquid. The extractor consists of a hollow column, a rotary drive shafi extending : through the column with a number of impellers spaced thereon, an equal nunnber of separator plate sets each consisting of one fluorothene and one stainless steel plate with peripheral recesses and flow slots mounted on the column, and a pulse generator. This apparatus is particularly useful in solvent extraction processes for recovering plutonium from aqueous acidic solutions of irradiated uranium.

  9. Biasable, Balanced, Fundamental Submillimeter Monolithic Membrane Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Peter; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran; Gill, John; Velebir, James; Tsang, Raymond; Dengler, Robert; Lin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This device is a biasable, submillimeter-wave, balanced mixer fabricated using JPL s monolithic membrane process a simplified version of planar membrane technology. The primary target application is instrumentation used for analysis of atmospheric constituents, pressure, temperature, winds, and other physical and chemical properties of the atmospheres of planets and comets. Other applications include high-sensitivity gas detection and analysis. This innovation uses a balanced configuration of two diodes allowing the radio frequency (RF) signal and local oscillator (LO) inputs to be separated. This removes the need for external diplexers that are inherently narrowband, bulky, and require mechanical tuning to change frequency. Additionally, this mixer uses DC bias-ability to improve its performance and versatility. In order to solve problems relating to circuit size, the GaAs membrane process was created. As much of the circuitry as possible is fabricated on-chip, making the circuit monolithic. The remainder of the circuitry is precision-machined into a waveguide block that holds the GaAs circuit. The most critical alignments are performed using micron-scale semiconductor technology, enabling wide bandwidth and high operating frequencies. The balanced mixer gets superior performance with less than 2 mW of LO power. This can be provided by a simple two-stage multiplier chain following an amplifier at around 90 GHz. Further, the diodes are arranged so that they can be biased. Biasing pushes the diodes closer to their switching voltage, so that less LO power is required to switch the diodes on and off. In the photo, the diodes are at the right end of the circuit. The LO comes from the waveguide at the right into a reduced-height section containing the diodes. Because the diodes are in series to the LO signal, they are both turned on and off simultaneously once per LO cycle. Conversely, the RF signal is picked up from the RF waveguide by the probe at the left, and flows

  10. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer....

  11. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer....

  12. Suspending Insoluble Solids Waste Tanks with Shrouded Axial Impeller Mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    1998-11-09

    The Savannah River Site is in the process of removing waste (sludge and salt cake) from million gallon waste tanks. The authors are conducted a test program to determine mixer requirements for suspending sludge heels using shrouded axial impeller mixers. The authors will present and discuss the data generated during the tests.

  13. Effect of Installation of Mixer/Ejector Nozzles on the Core Flow Exhaust of High-Bypass-Ratio Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Douglas E.

    1998-01-01

    The aerospace industry is currently investigating the effect of installing mixer/ejector nozzles on the core flow exhaust of high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. This effort includes both full-scale engine tests at sea level conditions and subscale tests in static test facilities. Subscale model tests are to be conducted prior to full-scale testing. With this approach, model results can be analyzed and compared with analytical predications. Problem areas can then be identified and design changes made and verified in subscale prior to committing to any final design configurations for engine ground tests. One of the subscale model test programs for the integrated mixer/ejector development was a joint test conducted by the NASA Lewis Research Center and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. This test was conducted to study various mixer/ejector nozzle configurations installed on the core flow exhaust of advanced, high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines for subsonic, commercial applications. The mixer/ejector concept involves the introduction of largescale, low-loss, streamwise vortices that entrain large amounts of secondary air and rapidly mix it with the primary stream. This results in increased ejector pumping relative to conventional ejectors and in more complete mixing within the ejector shroud. The latter improves thrust performance through the efficient energy exchange between the primary and secondary streams. This experimental program was completed in April 1997 in Lewis' CE-22 static test facility. Variables tested included the nozzle area ratio (A9/A8), which ranged from 1.6 to 3.0. This ratio was varied by increasing or decreasing the nozzle throat area, A8. Primary nozzles tested included both lobed mixers and conical primaries. These configurations were tested with and without an outer shroud, and the shroud position was varied by inserting spacers in it. In addition, data were acquired with and without secondary flow.

  14. Demonstration of An Image Rejection Mixer for High Frequency Applications (26-36 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, Cheryl D.; Carlstrom, John E.

    1999-01-01

    A new high frequency image-rejection mixer was successfully tested in a 26-36 GHz band receiver. This paper briefly describes the motivation for implementation of an image rejection mixer in a receiver system, the basic operation of an image rejection mixer, and the development and testing of an image rejection mixer for a high frequency, cryogenic receiver system.

  15. Diffusion-Cooled Tantalum Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalare, Anders; McGrath, William; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry

    2004-01-01

    A batch of experimental diffusion-cooled hot-electron bolometers (HEBs), suitable for use as mixers having input frequencies in the terahertz range and output frequencies up to about a gigahertz, exploit the superconducting/normal-conducting transition in a thin strip of tantalum. The design and operation of these HEB mixers are based on mostly the same principles as those of a prior HEB mixer that exploited the superconducting/normal- conducting transition in a thin strip of niobium and that was described elsewhere.

  16. Introduction of electrodehydrators with built-in jet mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Gershuni, S.S.; Baimbetov, A.M.; Idrisova, T.S.; Makhov, A.F.

    1985-09-01

    This paper describes an effective technique of crude oil desalting which is recirculation of water within the electrodehydrator by means of built-in jet mixers. Vertical electrodehydrators with built-in jet mixers have been tested and approved at the Novo-Ufa refinery. Design and operation of the vessel is described. Results from analyses of the oil during the test period are summarized. Retrofitting of electrodehydrators with built-in jet mixers proved increased capacity and the consumption of water and electric power in desalting was cut in half while oil loss in the electric desalting units was reduced substantially.

  17. Development of Submillimeter SIS Mixers and Broadband HEMT Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a new generation of superconducting tunnel junction (SIS) receivers with extremely wide instantaneous (intermediate-frequency, or IF) bandwidths, of order 12 GHz. Such mixers would allow rapid submillimeter wavelength spectral line surveys to be carried out with SOFIA, and could potentially be used for future submillimeter space missions such as SAFIR. There are two major components which are being developed: (1) SIS mixers with broad (12 GHz) IF bandwidths; and (2) low-noise, broadband microwave, (6-18 GHz) amplifiers, which amplify the IF output from the SIS mixer. The work on these components is discussed in two sections

  18. Effect of static mixer geometry on flow mixing and pressure drop in marine scr applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taewha; Sung, Yonmo; Kim, Taekyung; Lee, Inwon; Choi, Gyungmin; Kim, Duckjool

    2014-03-01

    Flow mixing and pressure drop characteristics for marine selective catalytic reduction applications were investigated numerically to develop an efficient static mixer. Two different mixers, line- and swirl-type, were considered. The effect of vane angles on the relative intensity, uniformity index, and pressure drop was investigated in a swirl-type mixer; these parameters are dramatically affected by the mixer geometry. The presence of a mixer, regardless of the mixer type, led to an improvement of approximately 20% in the mixing performance behind the mixer in comparison to not having a mixer. In particular, there was a tradeoff relationship between the uniformity and the pressure drop. Con­sidering the mixing performance and the pressure drop, the swirl-type mixer was more suitable than the line-type mixer in this study.

  19. Test Procedure - pumping system for caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1994-10-01

    This test procedure provides the requirements for sub-system testing and integrated operational testing of the submersible mixer pump and caustic addition equipment by WHC and Kaiser personnel at the Rotating Equipment Shop run-in pit (Bldg. 272E).

  20. Challenges and methodology for safety analysis of a high-level waste tank with large periodic releases of flammable gas

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.N.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; White, J.R.; Stewart, C.W.

    1994-07-01

    Tank 241-SY-101, located at the Department of Energy Hanford Site, has periodically released up to 10,000 ft{sup 3} of flammable gas. This release has been one of the highest-priority DOE operational safety problems. The gases include hydrogen and ammonia (fuels) and nitrous oxide (oxidizer). There have been many opinions regarding the controlling mechanisms for these releases, but demonstrating an adequate understanding of the problem, selecting a mitigation methodology, and preparing the safety analysis have presented numerous new challenges. The mitigation method selected for the tank was to install a pump that would mix the tank contents and eliminate the sludge layer believed to be responsible for the gas retention and periodic releases. This report will describe the principal analysis methodologies used to prepare the safety assessment for the installation and operation of the pump, and because this activity has been completed, it will describe the results of pump operation.

  1. Nonlinear Modeling and Control of a Propellant Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, Enrique; Richter, Hanz; Figueroa, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    A mixing chamber used in rocket engine combustion testing at NASA Stennis Space Center is modeled by a second order nonlinear MIMO system. The mixer is used to condition the thermodynamic properties of cryogenic liquid propellant by controlled injection of the same substance in the gaseous phase. The three inputs of the mixer are the positions of the valves regulating the liquid and gas flows at the inlets, and the position of the exit valve regulating the flow of conditioned propellant. The outputs to be tracked and/or regulated are mixer internal pressure, exit mass flow, and exit temperature. The outputs must conform to test specifications dictated by the type of rocket engine or component being tested downstream of the mixer. Feedback linearization is used to achieve tracking and regulation of the outputs. It is shown that the system is minimum-phase provided certain conditions on the parameters are satisfied. The conditions are shown to have physical interpretation.

  2. FRONT (SOUTH) ELEVATION, MIXER RUINS (CENTER) WITH STACKS (LEFT) AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT (SOUTH) ELEVATION, MIXER RUINS (CENTER) WITH STACKS (LEFT) AND POWER HOUSE (RIGHT). - Tennessee Coal & Iron Company, Ensley Works, Open Hearth Furnace (Ruins), West of Ensley commercial & residential districts, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. FRONT (SOUTH) ELEVATION, MIXER RUINS (CENTER) WITH STACKS (LEFT) AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT (SOUTH) ELEVATION, MIXER RUINS (CENTER) WITH STACKS (LEFT) AND POWER HOUSE (RIGHT - Tennessee Coal & Iron Company, Ensley Works, Open Hearth Furnace (Ruins), West of Ensley commercial & residential districts, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Biasable Subharmonic Membrane Mixer for 520 to 600 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlecht, Erich; Siegel, Peter; Mehdi, Imran; Gill, John; Velebir, James; Peralta, Alejandro; Tsang, Raymond; Oswald, John; Dengler, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The figure shows a biasable subharmonic mixer designed to operate in the frequency range from 520 to 600 GHz. This mixer is a prototype of low-power mixers needed for development of wideband, high-resolution spectrometers for measuring spectra of molecules in the atmospheres of Earth, other planets, and comets in the frequency range of 400 to 700 GHz. Three considerations dictated the main features of the design: It is highly desirable to operate the spectrometers at or slightly below room temperature. This consideration is addressed by choosing Schottky diodes as the frequency-mixing circuit elements because of all mixer diodes, Schottky diodes are the best candidates for affording sufficient sensitivity at or slightly below room-temperature range. The short wavelengths in the intended operating-frequency range translate to stringent requirements for precision of fabrication and assembly of the circuits; these requirements are even more stringent for wide-bandwidth circuits. This consideration is addressed in two ways: (1) As much as possible of the mixer circuitry is fabricated in the form of a monolithic integrated circuit on a GaAs membrane, employing a modified version of a process used previously to fabricate a non-subharmonic mixer for a frequency of 2.5 THz and frequency multipliers for frequencies up to 2 THz. (2) The remainder of the circuitry is precision machined into a waveguide block that holds the GaAs integrated circuit.

  5. Sub-Micron Long HTS Ho Electron Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harnack, 0.; Karasik, B. S.; McGrath, W. R.; Kleinsasser, A. W.; Barner, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    The hot-electron bolometer mixer made from a high-T, superconductor (HTS) was introduced recently as an alternative to a Schottky mixer at THz frequencies. The performance of the mixer depends on the total thermal conductance for heat removal from the phonon sub-system due to either length-dependent phonon diffusion or phonon escape to the substrate. We have measured both the length and temperature dependencies of the IF bandwidth of the mixers fabricated from 25-35 mn thick YBCO films on MgO and sapphire substrates. The films were grown by a laser deposition technique and electron-beam lithography was used to define bridge lengths down to 50 nm. Mixer measurements were done using signal frequencies in the range of 1-100 GHz. For 50 nm and 400 nm long devices on MgO, the 3-dB bandwidth was about 100 MHz. At temperatures below 60 K, the hot-electron plateau was clearly seen starting around 2-3 GHz. At temperatures above 70 K, the flux-flow effects begin to dominate and the IF bandwidth increases to 1-8 GHz, while the conversion efficiency drops by several dB. This temperature dependence of the IF bandwidth can account for previously reported unexpectedly high bandwidth of HTS mixers.

  6. Concrete Mixing Methods and Concrete Mixers: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, C F

    2001-01-01

    As for all materials, the performance of concrete is determined by its microstructure. Its microstructure is determined by its composition, its curing conditions, and also by the mixing method and mixer conditions used to process the concrete. This paper gives an overview of the various types of mixing methods and concrete mixers commercially available used by the concrete industry. There are two main types of mixers used: batch mixers and continuous mixers. Batch mixers are the most common. To determine the mixing method best suited for a specific application, factors to be considered include: location of the construction site (distance from the batching plant), the amount of concrete needed, the construction schedule (volume of concrete needed per hour), and the cost. Ultimately, the quality of the concrete produced determines its performance after placement. An important measure of the quality is the homogeneity of the material after mixing. This paper will review mixing methods in regards to the quality of the concrete produced. Some procedures used to determine the effectiveness of the mixing will be examined.

  7. Terahertz-frequency waveguide HEB mixers for spectral line astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussaha, Faouzi; Kawamura, Jonathan; Stern, Jeffery; Jung, Cecile; Skalare, Anders; White, Victor

    2012-09-01

    We report on the development of waveguide-based mixers for operation beyond 2 THz. The mixer element is a superconducting hot-electron bolometer (HEB) fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. Because it is beyond the capability of conventional machining techniques to produce the fine structures required for the waveguide embedding circuit for use at such high frequencies, we employ two lithography-based approaches to produce the waveguide circuit: a metallic micro-plating process akin to 3-D printing and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) silicon micromachining. Various mixer configurations have been successfully produced using these approaches. A single-ended mixer produced by the metal plating technique has been demonstrated with a receiver noise temperature of 970 K (DSB) at a localoscillator frequency of 2.74 THz. A similar mixer, produced using a silicon-based micro-machining technique, has a noise temperature of 2000 K (DSB) at 2.56 THz. In another example, we have successfully produced a waveguide RF hybrid for operation at 2.74 THz. This is a key component in a balanced mixer, a configuration that efficiently utilizes local oscillator power, which is scarce at these frequencies. In addition to allowing us to extend the frequency of operation of waveguide-based receivers beyond 2 THz, these technologies we employ here are amenable to the production of large array receivers, where numerous copies of the same circuit, precisely the same and aligned to each other, are required.

  8. Concrete Mixing Methods and Concrete Mixers: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Chiara F.

    2001-01-01

    As for all materials, the performance of concrete is determined by its microstructure. Its microstructure is determined by its composition, its curing conditions, and also by the mixing method and mixer conditions used to process the concrete. This paper gives an overview of the various types of mixing methods and concrete mixers commercially available used by the concrete industry. There are two main types of mixers used: batch mixers and continuous mixers. Batch mixers are the most common. To determine the mixing method best suited for a specific application, factors to be considered include: location of the construction site (distance from the batching plant), the amount of concrete needed, the construction schedule (volume of concrete needed per hour), and the cost. Ultimately, the quality of the concrete produced determines its performance after placement. An important measure of the quality is the homogeneity of the material after mixing. This paper will review mixing methods in regards to the quality of the concrete produced. Some procedures used to determine the effectiveness of the mixing will be examined. PMID:27500029

  9. A 0.2-0.5 THz single-band heterodyne receiver based on a photonic local oscillator and a superconductor-insulator-superconductor mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Maezawa, Masaaki; Furuta, Tomofumi; Wakatsuki, Atsushi; Ito, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Naofumi; Nagatsuma, Tadao; Kado, Yuichi

    2008-09-01

    We have demonstrated that a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer pumped by a photonic local oscillator (LO) covers the whole frequency range of 0.2-0.5THz. In the bandwidth of 74% of the center frequency, this single-band receiver exhibits noise temperature of TRX⩽20hf/kB, where h is Planck's constant, f is the frequency, and kB is Boltzmann's constant. Resultant TRX is almost equal to TRX of the identical SIS mixer pumped by three conventional frequency-multiplier-based LOs which share the 0.2-0.5THz band. This technique will contribute to simple, wide-band, and low-noise heterodyne receivers in the terahertz region.

  10. A Matlab-Based Graphical User Interface for Simulation and Control Design of a Hydrogen Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Hanz; Figueroa, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    A Graphical User Interface (GUI) that facilitates prediction and control design tasks for a propellant mixer is described. The Hydrogen mixer is used in rocket test stand operations at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center. The mixer injects gaseous hydrogen (GH2) into a stream of liquid hydrogen (LH2) to obtain a combined flow with desired thermodynamic properties. The flows of GH2 and LH2 into the mixer are regulated by two control valves, and a third control valve is installed at the exit of the mixer to regulate the combined flow. The three valves may be simultaneously operated in order to achieve any desired combination of total flow, exit temperature and mixer pressure within the range of operation. The mixer, thus, constitutes a three-input, three-output system. A mathematical model of the mixer has been obtained and validated with experimental data. The GUI presented here uses the model to predict mixer response under diverse conditions.

  11. Integrated planar gallium arsenide Schottky mixers for submillimeter wavelength receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marazita, Steven Michael

    1999-11-01

    Two integration technologies have been investigated. The first is the quartz upside-down inverted device (QUID) technology invented at JPL. Through this research QUID mixers operating at 240 GHz were fabricated and tested, thereby demonstrating the technology using UVa fabrication equipment and processes. A major drawback of the QUID integration process is that a layer of epoxy is used to adhere the diodes an metal films to the quartz. This epoxy is lossy and suffers from reliability concerns related to long term robustness and out-gassing. Through this research, the QUID process was extended to include a new etch step which removes the epoxy from all areas of circuit except between the quartz substrate and the attached layers. This resulted in the best published planar mixer sensitivity in the 200 to 300 GHz frequency range. This process was also transferred to JPL, where it helped improve the bandwidth of their 640 GHz mixers to meet the requirements of NASA's EOS-MLS mission. The new etch process does not remove the layer of epoxy that is trapped in the critical region between the anode/finger and the quartz substrate. To avoid this concern, a new fabrication process was developed. The Method of Adhesion by Spin-on-dielectric Temperature Enhanced Reflow (MASTER) uses a novel semiconductor to substrate bonding process to eliminate the necessity of epoxy bonding. This process was fully developed and integrated mixers were fabricated for 585 GHz, 640 GHz, and 1 THz. The 585 GHz mixers were fully designed using computer modeling tools, were extremely easy to assemble, and most importantly exhibited record performance, Tsys = 1631 K, T mix = 1135 K, Lmix = 6.5 dB (all DSB). This result was accomplished without the use of mechanical tuning elements and was consistent for four assembled mixers, showing an unprecedented level of repeatability. Through this dissertation research a new semiconductor on quartz integration technology has been created. This technology was

  12. Evaluation of the mixing effectiveness of a new powder mixer.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, G F; Lovato, D; Marchitto, L; Zanchetta, A; Martelli, S

    1998-01-01

    The effectiveness of the new powder mixer Canguro J tumbler was evaluated using lactose, microcrystalline cellulose, and salicylic acid as chemical indicator with the ratio 88:10:2 (w/w). The mixing time, the speed of the tumbler (rpm), its inclination, and filling percentage were varied in order to assess the limits of the mixer and the best parameters to use for obtaining a mixture as uniform as possible. The same experiments were then repeated after addition of 1% (w/w) magnesium stearate to the mixture of powders. The efficiency in the distribution of this lubricant was estimated by the progressive hardness reduction of the tablets derived from the compression of the powders, at a constant applied force. Finally, a comparison between Canguro J and a very efficient V-shaped mixer of the same capacity was performed. The results show that all investigated parameters influenced the mixing capability of Canguro J. The best effectiveness of the mixer occurred at the filling rate of 50% and a rotation speed of 20 rpm; in this case, Canguro J is even a little more effective than the V-shaped mixer. However, even at the filling rate of 70%, the same distribution uniformity of the powders can be obtained after a mixing time protraction of a few minutes. PMID:15605601

  13. Design of Balanced Mixers for ALMA Band-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitov, Sergey V.; Koryukin, Oleg V.; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Noguchi, Takashi; Uvarov, Andrey V.; Bukovski, Maksim A.; Cohn, Ilya A.

    2007-06-01

    Two variants of balanced mixer employing twin-SIS structure are under development for 787-950 GHz frequency range. Easy-to-use Geometry Transformation method for modeling of superconducting microstrips is developed, compared to referenced methods and used for design of the mixers. Lens-antenna mixer is based on cross-slot antenna; it does not need any intervening optics between its lens and sub-reflector of ALMA telescope; simple yet efficient composition of lens-antenna cartridge is suggested. Compact single-chamber balanced waveguide mixer employs two SIS chips and capacitive probe for LO injection; coupling above -3 dB and signal loss below -20 dB are expected. Need in shifting of resonance frequency of twin-SIS mixer towards top of the frequency band is predicted using Tucker's theory in large-signal approximation. TRX considerably below 200 K (DSB) is simulated using high-quality hybrid SIS junction for NbTiN/Nb - AlOx - Nb/Al for Jc = 12 kA/cm2.

  14. Study on velocity distribution in a pool by submersible mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, F.; Shi, W. D.; Jiang, H.; Lu, X. N.; Chen, B.

    2012-11-01

    To study the distribution of submersible mixers and agitating effect in the sewage treatment pool, Pro/E software was utilized to build the three-dimensional model. Then, the large-scale computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT6.3 was used. ICEM software was used to build unstructured grid of sewage treatment pool. After that, the sewage treatment pool was numerically simulated by dynamic coordinate system technology and RNG k-ε turbulent model and PIOS algorithm. The macro fluid field and each section velocity flow field distribution were analyzed to observe the efficiency of each submersible mixer. The average velocity and mixing area in the sewage pool were studied simultaneously. Results show that: the preferred project B, two submersible mixers speed is 980 r/min, and setting angles are all 30°. Fluid mixing area in the pool has reached more than 95%. Under the action of two mixers, the fluid in the sewage pool form a continuous circulating water flow. The fluid is mixed adequately and average velocity of fluid in the pool is at around 0.241m/s, which agreed with the work requirements. Consequently it can provide a reference basis for practical engineering application of submersible mixers by using this method.

  15. A Peristaltic Meso-Scale Mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Haim; Yi, Mingqiang; Hu, Howard H.

    2000-11-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in developing minute laboratories on a "chip". Often, in order to facilitate chemical and biological reactions, one needs to mix various reagents and chemicals. Although the characteristic lengths associated with micro-devices are small, typically on the order of 100mm, in the case of large molecules, diffusion alone does not provide a sufficiently rapid means for mixing. Recent experimental[1] and theoretical[2] studies suggested the use of surface waves to induce peristaltic motion and enhance fluid stirring. We considered incompressible, viscous fluid confined in a rectangular cavity. One or two of the cavity walls were made of a thin membrane. Electric conductors were printed on the membrane. By passing appropriately phased alternating electric currents through these conductors in the presence of a magnetic field, relatively large amplitude travelling waves could be transmitted in cavity's walls and induce peristaltic motion. We describe the results of a theoretical study. We extended Selverov and Stone[2] theory to account for the presence of lateral boundaries. The induced velocity profiles were determined analytically for small amplitude waves (e) and numerically for waves of arbitrary amplitude. The effect of the peristaltic motion on the stretching and deformation of material lines were quantified. The work was supported, in part, by DARPA through grant N66001-97-1-8911 to the University of Pennsylvania. [1] Moroney, R. M., White, R., M., Howe, R., T., 1991, Ultrasonically Induced Microtransport, Proceedings IEEE Workshop Micro Electro Mechanical Systems, MEMS 95 Amsterdam, 277-282. [2] Selverov, K., and Stone, H., A., 2000, Peristaltically Driven Flows for Micro Mixers, to appear in Physics of Fluids.

  16. Reciprocating flow-based centrifugal microfluidics mixer.

    PubMed

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Pan, Hansheng; Bartolome, Christian; Princevac, Marko; Zoval, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2009-07-01

    Proper mixing of reagents is of paramount importance for an efficient chemical reaction. While on a large scale there are many good solutions for quantitative mixing of reagents, as of today, efficient and inexpensive fluid mixing in the nanoliter and microliter volume range is still a challenge. Complete, i.e., quantitative mixing is of special importance in any small-scale analytical application because the scarcity of analytes and the low volume of the reagents demand efficient utilization of all available reaction components. In this paper we demonstrate the design and fabrication of a novel centrifugal force-based unit for fast mixing of fluids in the nanoliter to microliter volume range. The device consists of a number of chambers (including two loading chambers, one pressure chamber, and one mixing chamber) that are connected through a network of microchannels, and is made by bonding a slab of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to a glass slide. The PDMS slab was cast using a SU-8 master mold fabricated by a two-level photolithography process. This microfluidic mixer exploits centrifugal force and pneumatic pressure to reciprocate the flow of fluid samples in order to minimize the amount of sample and the time of mixing. The process of mixing was monitored by utilizing the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. A time series of high resolution images of the mixing chamber were analyzed for the spatial distribution of light intensities as the two fluids (suspension of red fluorescent particles and water) mixed. Histograms of the fluorescent emissions within the mixing chamber during different stages of the mixing process were created to quantify the level of mixing of the mixing fluids. The results suggest that quantitative mixing was achieved in less than 3 min. This device can be employed as a stand alone mixing unit or may be integrated into a disk-based microfluidic system where, in addition to mixing, several other sample preparation steps may be

  17. Improving Phase Measurement Procedures for Pump-Probe Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Cara P.; /Merrimack Coll. /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    Pump-probe experiments use a visible laser to excite an atom or molecule, while an X-ray pulse measures its shape. The phases and pulse times of each beam are used to calculate the object's positing at a given time - a moving picture of the chemical reaction. Currently, the fastest X-ray pulses can travel a time-length of five femtoseconds. However, present-day phase measurements can only be done as quickly as 50 femtoseconds. The purpose of this research is to explore ways in which phase-timing measurements can be improved. Three experiments are undergone to find the key factors in phase-timing. Different frequency mixers, the radio frequency (RF) components used for phase measurement, are tested for the highest sensitivity. These same mixers are then tested using two different power splitters for the lowest noise-to-sensitivity ratio. Lastly, the temperature dependency of phase is explored by testing each component at a range of temperatures to see how the phase is affected. This research demonstrated that certain mixers were more sensitive than others; on average, one mixer performed the best with a sensitivity of 0.0230 V/ps. The results also showed that same mixer combined with one splitter gave the best noise-to-sensitivity ratio overall with an average of 6.95E-04 fs/{radical}(Hz). All the components tested exhibited a temperature-dependent phase change (ranging from 1.69 to 81.6 fs/{sup o}C); the same mixer that performed at the highest sensitivity with the least noise had a significantly greater phase change than the other two. In conclusion, the experiments showed that a temperature-controlled environment is most appropriate for phase measurement. They also demonstrated that mixers are not significantly noisy and that certain types of mixers may perform better than others, which could be accounted for in their construction. The results of this research encourage further investigation into the study of different mixers and other RF components used in pump

  18. An X-Band Mixer Engineered for 77 K Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    An X-band Si-diode singly balanced mixer developed specifically for cryogenic operation is presented. In order to reduce thermal demands on a mechanical cooler, the mixer was designed to operate with a minimum of local oscillator (LO) power. That is, since the LO had to be cooled to reduce phase noise, it was desirable to minimize the LO drive. Novel embedding circuit strategy was responsible for nearly theoretical performance. The signal-matching circuit simultaneously provided a reactive termination to the image, sum, and first, second, and third LO harmonic frequencies. A conversion loss of 3.2 dB at 77 K with an LO drive of +1 dBm was measured. This loss included IF filter, dc block, and hybrid coupler losses. Mixer conversion loss is shown to be consistent with the theoretical performance limit expected from the intrinsic diode. The relationship among junction capacitance, flat-band potential, and conversion loss is examined.

  19. Stable Lobed Mixer With Combustion Demonstrated and Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center collaborated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on an experiment to study the use of lobed mixers to improve the fuel-air mixing process and increase combustion intensity in combustors with minimal pressure loss. This experiment is the first known stable combusting flow studied for this device, and the data show a much faster and much more uniform combustion process than for flat-plate mixers. Several potential benefits may be realized from this study in future combustors, including a reduction in NO_x emissions because of the more uniform temperature distribution. The experiment was done in Lewis' Planar Reacting Shear Layer facility, which was adapted to accept a lobed mixer in addition to the original planar tip. A graduate student at MIT provided the mixer design concept, and Lewis provided the engineering, operations, and research expertise. The experiment used hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures to react with vitiated hot air at 920 K. A flow speed of about 120 m/sec and a speed ratio of 0.5 were used. Flow diagnostics consisted of traversing fine-wire thermocouples and pitot probes for flow mapping. Supplementary fluorescence images were taken with a charged coupled device (CCD) camera to show the location and temporal behavior of the reaction zone. The data showed that the lobed mixer consumed the reactants between 3 to 10 times faster than a corresponding planar shear layer. The figure shows the dramatic difference in the measured temperature distribution with and without the lobed mixer. The increased mixing rate was due to a larger interfacial area as well as to the secondary flow from the streamwise vortices off the tips of the lobes. In addition, the fluorescence images showed that the lobes acted as flame stabilizers.

  20. Planar Submillimeter-Wave Mixer Technology with Integrated Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Gautam; Mehdi, Imran; Gill, John J.; Lee, Choonsup; lombart, Muria L.; Thomas, Betrand

    2010-01-01

    High-performance mixers at terahertz frequencies require good matching between the coupling circuits such as antennas and local oscillators and the diode embedding impedance. With the availability of amplifiers at submillimeter wavelengths and the need to have multi-pixel imagers and cameras, planar mixer architecture is required to have an integrated system. An integrated mixer with planar antenna provides a compact and optimized design at terahertz frequencies. Moreover, it leads to a planar architecture that enables efficient interconnect with submillimeter-wave amplifiers. In this architecture, a planar slot antenna is designed on a thin gallium arsenide (GaAs) membrane in such a way that the beam on either side of the membrane is symmetric and has good beam profile with high coupling efficiency. A coplanar waveguide (CPW) coupled Schottky diode mixer is designed and integrated with the antenna. In this architecture, the local oscillator (LO) is coupled through one side of the antenna and the RF from the other side, without requiring any beam sp litters or diplexers. The intermediate frequency (IF) comes out on a 50-ohm CPW line at the edge of the mixer chip, which can be wire-bonded to external circuits. This unique terahertz mixer has an integrated single planar antenna for coupling both the radio frequency (RF) input and LO injection without any diplexer or beamsplitters. The design utilizes novel planar slot antenna architecture on a 3- mthick GaAs membrane. This work is required to enable future multi-pixel terahertz receivers for astrophysics missions, and lightweight and compact receivers for planetary missions to the outer planets in our solar system. Also, this technology can be used in tera hertz radar imaging applications as well as for testing of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs).

  1. 180-GHz I-Q Second Harmonic Resistive Mixer MMIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Lai, Richard; Mei, Xiaobing

    2010-01-01

    An indium phosphide MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) mixer was developed, processed, and tested in the NGC 35-nm-gate-length HEMT (high electron mobility transistor) process. This innovation is very compact in size and operates with very low LO power. Because it is a resistive mixer, this innovation does not require DC power. This is an enabling technology for the miniature receiver modules for the GeoSTAR instrument, which is the only viable option for the NRC decadal study mission PATH.

  2. A corner-reflector mixer mount for far infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Zmuidzinas, J; Betz, A L; Boreiko, R T

    1989-01-01

    A new type of corner-reflector mixer mount, which has the advantages of ease of fabrication and assembly as well as frequency versatility, has been designed and constructed. The mixer works with arbitrary antenna lengths > or = 4 lambda with the reflector to antenna spacing adjusted to give a strong and symmetric central lobe. The predicted response patterns have been experimentally verified for various antenna lengths and operating frequencies between 800 and 2000 GHz. An important design feature is the incorporation of a microstrip matching network which eliminates IF impedance mismatch and provides mechanical isolation of the whisker antenna. PMID:11539754

  3. 11. VIEW OF HORIZONTAL MIXER (GedgeGray Co., Lockland, Ohio), LOCATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF HORIZONTAL MIXER (Gedge-Gray Co., Lockland, Ohio), LOCATED IN THE BASEMENT, MIXED ANIMAL FEED TO ORDER. THE WATER-POWERED MIXER WAS SUPERSEDED BY TWO ELECTRIC-POWERED VERTICAL MIXERS, ADDED IN THE 1940S. Photographer: Louise Taft Cawood, July 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. PUMP CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Strickland, G.; Horn, F.L.; White, H.T.

    1960-09-27

    A pump which utilizes the fluid being pumped through it as its lubricating fluid is described. This is achieved by means of an improved bearing construction in a pump of the enclosed or canned rotor type. At the outlet end of the pump, adjacent to an impeller mechanism, there is a bypass which conveys some of the pumped fluid to a chamber at the inlet end of the pump. After this chamber becomes full, the pumped fluid passes through fixed orifices in the top of the chamber and exerts a thrust on the inlet end of the pump rotor. Lubrication of the rotor shaft is accomplished by passing the pumped fluid through a bypass at the outlet end of the rotor shaft. This bypass conveys Pumped fluid to a cooling means and then to grooves on the surface of the rotor shait, thus lubricating the shaft.

  5. CHEMICAL INDUCTION MIXER VERIFICATION - ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Wet-Weather Flow Technologies Pilot of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program, which is supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and facilitated by NSF International, has recently evaluated the performance of chemical induction mixers used for di...

  6. Point to Point Control of the Hydrogen Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, Enrique; Richter, Hanz; Figueroa, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    We continue to build on the theoretical modelling of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) and gas hydrogen (GH2) mixer subsystem. The mixer described in this work is responsible for combining high pressure LH2 and GH2 to produce a hydrogen flow that meets certain thermodynamic properties. The desired properties are maintained by precise control of the LH2 and GH2 flows. The mixer is modelled as a general multi-flow lumped volume for single constituent fluids using density and internal energy as states. The set of nonlinear differential equations is modelled in the SIMULINK environment including a table look-up feature of the fluid thermodynamic properties. A small signal (linear) model is developed based on the nonlinear model and simulated as well. Pulse disturbances are introduced to the valve positions and the quality of the linear model is ascertained by comparing its behavior against the nonlinear model simulations. Valve control strategies that simulate an operator-in-the-loop scenario are then explored demonstrating the need for automatic feedback control. Finally, optimal single-output and multi-output Proportional/Integral controllers are designed based on the linear model and applied to the nonlinear model with excellent results to track simultaneous, constant setpoint changes in desired exit flow, exit temperature, and mixer pressure, as well as to reject unmeasureable but bounded additive step perturbations in the valve positions.

  7. GUI for Computational Simulation of a Propellant Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Richter, Hanz; Barbieri, Enrique; Granger, Jamie

    2005-01-01

    Control Panel is a computer program that generates a graphical user interface (GUI) for computational simulation of a rocket-test-stand propellant mixer in which gaseous hydrogen (GH2) is injected into flowing liquid hydrogen (LH2) to obtain a combined flow having desired thermodynamic properties. The GUI is used in conjunction with software that models the mixer as a system having three inputs (the positions of the GH2 and LH2 inlet valves and an outlet valve) and three outputs (the pressure inside the mixer and the outlet flow temperature and flow rate). The user can specify valve characteristics and thermodynamic properties of the input fluids via userfriendly dialog boxes. The user can enter temporally varying input values or temporally varying desired output values. The GUI provides (1) a set-point calculator function for determining fixed valve positions that yield desired output values and (2) simulation functions that predict the response of the mixer to variations in the properties of the LH2 and GH2 and manual- or feedback-control variations in valve positions. The GUI enables scheduling of a sequence of operations that includes switching from manual to feedback control when a certain event occurs.

  8. Superconducting Nb DHEB Mixer Arrays for Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerecht, E.; Reintsema, C. D.; Grossman, E. N.; Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.

    2001-12-01

    We are developing a heterodyne focal plane array with up to eight elements to study lines of the interstellar medium and planetary atmospheres with frequencies of 2 THz and above. Our fabrication process utilizes selective ion milling techniques to produce Nb Diffusion-Cooled Hot Electron Bolometric (DHEB) mixers from a bilayer thin film of Au/Nb deposited on a silicon substrate. A micro-bridge of 10 nm thick Nb forms the HEB device. The first generation of devices with lateral dimensions of 100 nm by 80 nm were fabricated at the feed of a broadband spiral antenna with a frequency response designed for up to 16 THz. Harmonic multiplier sources becoming available within the next few years should have sufficient power to provide a local-oscillator source for small-format, quasi-optically coupled arrays of these mixers. First generation devices measured at our laboratory have demonstrated a critical temperature (Tc) of 4.8 K with a 0.5 K transition width. These DHEB mixers are expected to have an optimum operational temperature of 1.8-2.0 K. The current four element array mixer block will ultimately be replaced by a dual polarization slot-ring array configuration with up to eight elements.

  9. Numerical study of fluid motion in bioreactor with two mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Zheleva, I.; Lecheva, A.

    2015-10-28

    Numerical study of hydrodynamic laminar behavior of a viscous fluid in bioreactor with multiple mixers is provided in the present paper. The reactor is equipped with two disk impellers. The fluid motion is studied in stream function-vorticity formulation. The calculations are made by a computer program, written in MATLAB. The fluid structure is described and numerical results are graphically presented and commented.

  10. A 640 GHz Planar-Diode Fundamental Mixer/Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, P.; Mehdi, I.; Dengler, R.; Lee, T.; Humphrey, D.; Pease, A.

    1998-01-01

    The design and performance of a 640 GHz solid-state receiver using a fundamental planar-Schottky-diode mixer, InP Gunn diode oscillator, whisker-contacted Schottky-varactor-diode sextupler and folded-Fabry-Perot diplexer are reported.

  11. Double-Balanced Graphene Integrated Mixer with Outstanding Linearity.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Hongming; Wu, Huaqiang; Liu, Jinbiao; Lu, Qi; Zhang, Jinyu; Wu, Xiaoming; Li, Junfeng; Ma, Teng; Niu, Jiebin; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Huiming; Yu, Zhiping; Qian, He

    2015-10-14

    A monolithic double-balanced graphene mixer integrated circuit (IC) has been successfully designed and fabricated. The IC adopted the cross-coupled resistive mixer topology, integrating four 500 nm-gate-length graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs), four on-chip inductors, and four on-chip capacitors. Passive-first-active-last fabrication flow was developed on 200 mm CMOS wafers. CMOS back-end-of-line processes were utilized to realize most fabrication steps followed by GFET-customized processes. Test results show excellent output spectrum purity with suppressed radio frequency (RF) and local oscillation (LO) signals feedthroughs, and third-order input intercept (IIP3) reaches as high as 21 dBm. The results are compared with a fabricated single-GEFT mixer, which generates IIP3 of 16.5 dBm. Stand-alone 500 nm-gate-length GFETs feature cutoff frequency 22 GHz and maximum oscillation frequency 20.7 GHz RF performance. The double-balanced mixer IC operated with off-chip baluns realizing a print-circuit-board level electronic system. It demonstrates graphene's potential to compete with other semiconductor technologies in RF front-end applications.

  12. Double-Balanced Graphene Integrated Mixer with Outstanding Linearity.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Hongming; Wu, Huaqiang; Liu, Jinbiao; Lu, Qi; Zhang, Jinyu; Wu, Xiaoming; Li, Junfeng; Ma, Teng; Niu, Jiebin; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Huiming; Yu, Zhiping; Qian, He

    2015-10-14

    A monolithic double-balanced graphene mixer integrated circuit (IC) has been successfully designed and fabricated. The IC adopted the cross-coupled resistive mixer topology, integrating four 500 nm-gate-length graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs), four on-chip inductors, and four on-chip capacitors. Passive-first-active-last fabrication flow was developed on 200 mm CMOS wafers. CMOS back-end-of-line processes were utilized to realize most fabrication steps followed by GFET-customized processes. Test results show excellent output spectrum purity with suppressed radio frequency (RF) and local oscillation (LO) signals feedthroughs, and third-order input intercept (IIP3) reaches as high as 21 dBm. The results are compared with a fabricated single-GEFT mixer, which generates IIP3 of 16.5 dBm. Stand-alone 500 nm-gate-length GFETs feature cutoff frequency 22 GHz and maximum oscillation frequency 20.7 GHz RF performance. The double-balanced mixer IC operated with off-chip baluns realizing a print-circuit-board level electronic system. It demonstrates graphene's potential to compete with other semiconductor technologies in RF front-end applications. PMID:26378374

  13. A multichannel dual-mixer stability analyzer: progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, C. A.; Kirk, A.; Stevens, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    A stability analyzer is being developed for frequency standards in JPL's Deep Space Network. Prototype hardware and software have been built. Initial tests on 100-MHz sources show an Allan deviation noise floor of about 7 X 10(sup -15) at 1 second for a dual-mixer channel.

  14. Influence of particle wall adhesion on particle electrification in mixers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kewu; Tan, Reginald B H; Chen, Fengxi; Ong, Kunn Hadinoto; Heng, Paul W S

    2007-01-01

    In this work, particle electrification in the Turbula and horizontally oscillating mixers were investigated for adipic acid, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), and glycine particles. MCC and glycine particles acquired positive electrostatic charges, while adipic acid particles attained negative charges in both mixers. Adipic acid (of sieved size larger than 500 microm), MCC, and glycine particles were monotonically charged to saturated values, and had negligible wall adhesion. On the contrary, the adipic acid particles, both unsieved and sieved but of smaller sieved size fraction, exhibited very different charging kinetics in the horizontally oscillating mixer. These adipic acid particles firstly acquired charges up to a maximum value, and then the charges slowly reduced to a lower saturated value with increasing mixing time. Furthermore, these particles were found to adhere to the inner wall of the mixer, and the adhesion increased with mixing time. Surface specific charge densities for adipic acid particles were estimated based on particle size distribution, and were found to increase with particle mean diameters under the conditions investigated. The results obtained from the current work suggested that electrostatic force enhanced particle-wall adhesion, and the adhered particles can have a significant impact on particle electrification. PMID:16930881

  15. Numerical study of fluid motion in bioreactor with two mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheleva, I.; Lecheva, A.

    2015-10-01

    Numerical study of hydrodynamic laminar behavior of a viscous fluid in bioreactor with multiple mixers is provided in the present paper. The reactor is equipped with two disk impellers. The fluid motion is studied in stream function-vorticity formulation. The calculations are made by a computer program, written in MATLAB. The fluid structure is described and numerical results are graphically presented and commented.

  16. Superconducting Nb DHEB Mixer Arrays for Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerecht, E.; Reintsema, C. D.; Grossman, E. N.; Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    We are developing a heterodyne focal plane array with up to eight elements to study lines of the interstellar medium and planetary atmospheres with frequencies of 2 THz and above. Our fabrication process utilizes selective ion milling techniques to produce Nb Diffusion-Cooled Hot Electron Bolometric (DHEB) mixers from a bilayer thin film of Au/Nb deposited on a silicon substrate. A micro-bridge of 10 nm thick Nb forms the HEB device. The first generation of devices with lateral dimensions of 100 nm by 80 nm were fabricated at the feed of a broadband spiral antenna with a frequency response designed for up to 16 THz. Harmonic multiplier sources becoming available within the next few years should have sufficient power to provide a local-oscillator source for small-format, quasi-optically coupled arrays of these mixers. First generation devices measured at our laboratory have demonstrated a critical temperature (Tc) of 4.8 K with a 0.5 K transition width. These DHEB mixers are expected to have an optimum operational temperature of 1.8-2.0 K. The current four element array mixer block will ultimately be replaced by a dual polarization slot-ring array configuration with up to eight elements.

  17. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Mixer-Ejector Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Eric, S.; Seidel, Jonathan, A.

    2012-01-01

    The design of an engine for a civil supersonic aircraft presents a difficult multidisciplinary problem to propulsion system engineers. There are numerous competing requirements for the engine, such as to be efficient during cruise while yet quiet enough at takeoff to meet airport noise regulations. The use of mixer-ejector nozzles presents one possible solution to this challenge. However, designing a mixer-ejector which will successfully address both of these concerns is a difficult proposition. Presented in this paper is an integrated multidisciplinary approach to the analysis and design of these systems. A process that uses several low-fidelity tools to evaluate both the performance and acoustics of mixer-ejectors nozzles is described. This process is further expanded to include system-level modeling of engines and aircraft to determine the effects on mission performance and noise near airports. The overall process is developed in the OpenMDAO framework currently being developed by NASA. From the developed process, sample results are given for a notional mixer-ejector design, thereby demonstrating the capabilities of the method.

  18. Reduced T(sub c) Niobium Superconducting HEB Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siddiqi, I.; Prober, D. E.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2001-01-01

    A reduction in the mixer noise is expected when using superconductors with a lower transition temperature (T(sub c)) since the thermal noise components of the mixer noise should scale with T(sub c). Also, the local oscillator (LO) power required for a diffusion-cooled device should decrease as T(sub c) when T(sub bath) << T(sub c). We previously studied mixing in aluminum based hot-electron bolometers (HEBs) at microwave frequencies (approximately 30 GHz), and observed a significant improvement in noise performance, and a reduction in LO power as predicted. However, the bias voltage range over which good mixer performance was observed was approximately 5 - 10 microV. These devices are thus susceptible to saturation effects, in particular output saturation. In the present work, we have investigated Nb HEBs whose T(sub c) is lowered by applying a magnetic field. The goal is to study a case intermediate between Nb and Al, and hopefully to find properties that will allow use in practical receivers. A 15 kOe perpendicular magnetic field was applied to a Nb HEB (L = 0.16 micrometers, W = 0.08 micrometers, R(sub N) = 90 ohms) to reduce T(sub c) from 5.2 K to 2.4 K. The mixer noise, as inferred from the output noise and the conversion efficiency, decreased from 390 K, DSB to 171 K, DSB. The LO power required for near optimum mixer conversion efficiency (eta(sub mixer) = -9 dB in this device) was 8 nW in zero field, and approximately 2 nW when T(sub c) was reduced to 2.4 K. T(sub bath) = 0.22 K. The conversion bandwidth was previously measured to be 2.4 GHz and the same bandwidth was observed in the presence of a magnetic field. By lowering T(sub c), the voltage range over which good mixing was observed also decreased. However, even with T(sub c) reduced to 2.4 K, the conversion efficiency dropped by 3 dB from its maximum value only when the bias voltage was changed by approximately 90 microV. Saturation effects should thus be much less of a concern in these devices than in

  19. Magnetocaloric pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1973-01-01

    Very cold liquids and gases such as helium, neon, and nitrogen can be pumped by using magnetocaloric effect. Adiabatic magnetization and demagnetization are used to alternately heat and cool slug of pumped fluid contained in closed chamber.

  20. Casing pump

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, H.E.; Bass, R.E.

    1987-09-29

    A natural gas operated pump is described for use in the casing of an oil well, comprising: a tubular pump body having an open lower end for admitting well fluids to the interior of the pump body and an open upper end, wherein a downwardly facing seating surface is formed on the inner periphery of the pump body adjacent the upper end thereof; means for forming a seal between the pump body and the casing of the well; a rod extending longitudinally through the seating surface formed in the pump body and protruding from the upper end of the pump body; a valve member mounted on the rod below the seating surface and shaped to mate with the seating surface; and means for vertically positioning the rod in proportion to fluid pressure within the pump body.

  1. ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Pulley, O.O.

    1954-08-17

    This patent reiates to electromagnetic pumps for electricity-conducting fluids and, in particular, describes several modifications for a linear conduction type electromagnetic interaction pump. The invention resides in passing the return conductor for the current traversing the fiuid in the duct back through the gap in the iron circuit of the pump. Both the maximum allowable pressure and the efficiency of a linear conduction electromagnetic pump are increased by incorporation of the present invention.

  2. Ionic electroactive polymer actuators as active microfluidic mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Meis, Catherine; Montazami, Reza; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2015-11-06

    On-chip sample processing is integral to the continued development of lab-on-a-chip devices for various applications. An active microfluidic mixer prototype is proposed using ionic electroactive polymer actuators (IEAPAs) as artificial cilia. A proof-of-concept experiment was performed in which the actuators were shown to produce localized flow pattern disruptions in the laminar flow regime. Suggestions for further engineering and optimization of a scaled-down, complete device are provided. Furthermore, the device in its current state of development necessitates further engineering, the use of IEAPAs addresses issues currently associated with the use of electromechanical actuators as active microfluidic mixers and may prove to be a useful alternative to other similar materials.

  3. Ionic electroactive polymer actuators as active microfluidic mixers

    DOE PAGES

    Meis, Catherine; Montazami, Reza; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2015-11-06

    On-chip sample processing is integral to the continued development of lab-on-a-chip devices for various applications. An active microfluidic mixer prototype is proposed using ionic electroactive polymer actuators (IEAPAs) as artificial cilia. A proof-of-concept experiment was performed in which the actuators were shown to produce localized flow pattern disruptions in the laminar flow regime. Suggestions for further engineering and optimization of a scaled-down, complete device are provided. Furthermore, the device in its current state of development necessitates further engineering, the use of IEAPAs addresses issues currently associated with the use of electromechanical actuators as active microfluidic mixers and may prove tomore » be a useful alternative to other similar materials.« less

  4. Optimization of Integrated Impeller Mixer via Radiotracer Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Othman, N.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Takriff, M. S.; Rosli, M. I.; Engku Chik, E. M. F.; Adnan, M. A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotracer experiments are carried out in order to determine the mean residence time (MRT) as well as percentage of dead zone, Vdead (%), in an integrated mixer consisting of Rushton and pitched blade turbine (PBT). Conventionally, optimization was performed by varying one parameter and others were held constant (OFAT) which lead to enormous number of experiments. Thus, in this study, a 4-factor 3-level Taguchi L9 orthogonal array was introduced to obtain an accurate optimization of mixing efficiency with minimal number of experiments. This paper describes the optimal conditions of four process parameters, namely, impeller speed, impeller clearance, type of impeller, and sampling time, in obtaining MRT and Vdead (%) using radiotracer experiments. The optimum conditions for the experiments were 100 rpm impeller speed, 50 mm impeller clearance, Type A mixer, and 900 s sampling time to reach optimization. PMID:24741344

  5. Mixing Study in a Multi-dimensional Motion Mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, R.; Manickam, S. S.; Tomei, J.; Bergman, T. L.; Chaudhuri, B.

    2009-06-01

    Mixing is an important but poorly understood aspect in petrochemical, food, ceramics, fertilizer and pharmaceutical processing and manufacturing. Deliberate mixing of granular solids is an essential operation in the production of industrial powder products usually constituted from different ingredients. The knowledge of particle flow and mixing in a blender is critical to optimize the design and operation. Since performance of the product depends on blend homogeneity, the consequence of variability can be detrimental. A common approach to powder mixing is to use a tumbling blender, which is essentially a hollow vessel horizontally attached to a rotating shaft. This single axis rotary blender is one of the most common batch mixers among in industry, and also finds use in myriad of application as dryers, kilns, coaters, mills and granulators. In most of the rotary mixers the radial convection is faster than axial dispersion transport. This slow dispersive process hinders mixing performance in many blending, drying and coating applications. A double cone mixer is designed and fabricated which rotates around two axes, causing axial mixing competitive to its radial counterpart. Discrete Element Method (DEM) based numerical model is developed to simulate the granular flow within the mixer. Digitally recorded mixing states from experiments are used to fine tune the numerical model. Discrete pocket samplers are also used in the experiments to quantify the characteristics of mixing. A parametric study of the effect of vessel speeds, relative rotational speed (between two axes of rotation), on the granular mixing is investigated by experiments and numerical simulation. Incorporation of dual axis rotation enhances axial mixing by 60 to 85% in comparison to single axis rotation.

  6. OSCILLATORY PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, N.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to a pump suitable fur pumping highly corrosive gases wherein no lubricant is needed in the pumping chamber thus eliminating possible contamination sources. The chamber contains a gas inlet and outlet in each side, with a paddle like piston suspended by a sylphon seal between these pcrts. An external arrangement causes the paddle to oscillate rapidly between the ports, alternately compressing and exhausting the gas trapped on each side of the paddle. Since the paddle does nnt touch the chamber sides at any point, no lubricant is required. This pump is useful for pumping large quantities of uranium hexafluorine.

  7. Subsonic Jet Noise Reduced With Improved Internal Exhaust Gas Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Aircraft noise pollution is becoming a major environmental concern for the world community. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is responding to this concern by imposing more stringent noise restrictions for aircraft certification then ever before to keep the U.S. industry competitive with the rest of the world. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, attempts are underway to develop noise-reduction technology for newer engines and for retrofitting existing engines so that they are as quiet as (or quieter than) required. Lewis conducted acoustic and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) tests using Pratt & Whitney's Internal Exhaust Gas Mixers (IEGM). The IEGM's mix the core flow with the fan flow prior to their common exhaust. All tests were conducted in Lewis' Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory--a semihemispheric dome open to the ambient atmosphere. This was the first time Laser Doppler Velocimetry was used in such a facility at Lewis. Jet exhaust velocity and turbulence and the internal velocity fields were detailed. Far-field acoustics were also measured. Pratt & Whitney provided 1/7th scale model test hardware (a 12-lobe mixer, a 20-lobe mixer, and a splitter) for 1.7 bypass ratio engines, and NASA provided the research engineers, test facility, and test time. The Pratt & Whitney JT8D-200 engine power conditions were used for all tests.

  8. Modeling and Validation of a Propellant Mixer for Controller Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Hanz; Barbieri, Enrique; Figueroa, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    A mixing chamber used in rocket engine testing at the NASA Stennis Space Center is modelled by a system of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The mixer is used to condition the thermodynamic properties of cryogenic liquid propellant by controlled injection of the same substance in the gaseous phase. The three inputs of the mixer are the positions of the valves regulating the liquid and gas flows at the inlets, and the position of the exit valve regulating the flow of conditioned propellant. Mixer operation during a test requires the regulation of its internal pressure, exit mass flow, and exit temperature. A mathematical model is developed to facilitate subsequent controller designs. The model must be simple enough to lend itself to subsequent feedback controller design, yet its accuracy must be tested against real data. For this reason, the model includes function calls to thermodynamic property data. Some structural properties of the resulting model that pertain to controller design, such as uniqueness of the equilibrium point, feedback linearizability and local stability are shown to hold under conditions having direct physical interpretation. The existence of fixed valve positions that attain a desired operating condition is also shown. Validation of the model against real data is likewise provided.

  9. Topics in the optimization of millimeter-wave mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, P. H.; Kerr, A. R.; Hwang, W.

    1984-01-01

    A user oriented computer program for the analysis of single-ended Schottky diode mixers is described. The program is used to compute the performance of a 140 to 220 GHz mixer and excellent agreement with measurements at 150 and 180 GHz is obtained. A sensitivity analysis indicates the importance of various diode and mount characteristics on the mixer performance. A computer program for the analysis of varactor diode multipliers is described. The diode operates in either the reverse biased varactor mode or with substantial forward current flow where the conversion mechanism is predominantly resistive. A description and analysis of a new H-plane rectangular waveguide transformer is reported. The transformer is made quickly and easily in split-block waveguide using a standard slitting saw. It is particularly suited for use in the millimeter-wave band, replacing conventional electroformed stepped transformers. A theoretical analysis of the transformer is given and good agreement is obtained with measurements made at X-band.

  10. Qualification test of the Ross Double Planetary Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueders, Kurt F.

    1993-01-01

    This test report describes the qualification test of the Ross Double Planetary Mixer used to mix room temperature vulcanized (RTV) silicone (Dow Corning 90-006-2) for the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) nozzle joints. Testing was completed 18 June 1993 in the M-113A Nozzle Fabrication Facility at Thiokol Corporation, Space Operations, Brigham City, Utah. The Ross mixer provides better mixing and better control on temperature and humidity, resulting in better quality RTV and a longer usable pot life. The test began on 3 May 1993 and was stopped due to operator error during the tensile strength and elongation testing. Specimens were ruined without gathering any useful data. A 'no test' was declared, the problem was remedied, and the test was re-run with MSFC approval. The test was run and all pass/fail criteria were met, most with a considerable margin. The Ross Double Planetary Mixer met all certification objectives and is recommended for immediate use for mixing RTV silicone for RSRM nozzle joints.

  11. Low-noise THz MgB2 Josephson mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunnane, Daniel; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; Acharya, Narendra; Wolak, Matthäus A.; Xi, X. X.; Karasik, Boris S.

    2016-09-01

    The potential applications for high frequency operation of the Josephson effect in MgB2 include THz mixers, direct detectors, and digital circuits. Here we report on MgB2 weak links which exhibit the Josephson behavior up to almost 2 THz and using them for low-noise heterodyne detection of THz radiation. The devices are made from epitaxial film grown in the c-axis direction by the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition method. The current in the junctions travels parallel to the surface of the film, thus making possible a large contribution of the quasi-two-dimensional σ-gap in transport across the weak link. These devices are connected to a planar spiral antenna with a dielectric substrate lens to facilitate coupling to free-space radiation for use as a detector. The IcRn product of the junction is 5.25 mV, giving confirmation of a large gap parameter. The sensitivity of the mixer was measured from 0.6 THz to 1.9 THz. At a bath temperature of over 20 K, a mixer noise temperature less than 2000 K (DSB) was measured near 0.6 THz.

  12. Enhanced dissolution of oxcarbazepine microcrystals using a static mixer process.

    PubMed

    Douroumis, D; Fahr, A

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to form micronized powders of Oxcarbazepine (OXC), a poorly water-soluble drug, using a static mixer technique to enhance the dissolution rate. Controlled precipitation was achieved injecting the organic OXC solution rapidly into an aqueous methylcellulose (MC) protective solution by means of a static mixer thus providing turbulent and homogeneous mixing. Furthermore, a factorial design was implemented for data analysis. The physicochemical properties of the freeze-dried dispersions were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Drug microcrystals showed a narrow size distribution with approximately 2 microm mean particle size and high drug loading. DSC and FTIR studies revealed that the drug remained in crystalline state and no drug-polymer interaction occurred. The dissolution studies showed enhanced dissolution of OXC microcrystals compared to the pure drug. The static mixer technique was proved capable for micro-sized polymeric particles. This is an inexpensive, less time consuming and fully scalable process for development of poorly soluble drugs. PMID:17588726

  13. A general numerical analysis program for the superconducting quasiparticle mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. G.; Feldman, M. J.; Kerr, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    A user-oriented computer program SISCAP (SIS Computer Analysis Program) for analyzing SIS mixers is described. The program allows arbitrary impedance terminations to be specified at all LO harmonics and sideband frequencies. It is therefore able to treat a much more general class of SIS mixers than the widely used three-frequency analysis, for which the harmonics are assumed to be short-circuited. An additional program, GETCHI, provides the necessary input data to program SISCAP. The SISCAP program performs a nonlinear analysis to determine the SIS junction voltage waveform produced by the local oscillator. The quantum theory of mixing is used in its most general form, treating the large signal properties of the mixer in the time domain. A small signal linear analysis is then used to find the conversion loss and port impedances. The noise analysis includes thermal noise from the termination resistances and shot noise from the periodic LO current. Quantum noise is not considered. Many aspects of the program have been adequately verified and found accurate.

  14. Low-noise submillimeter-wave NbTiN superconducting tunnel junction mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Jonathan; Chen, Jian; Miller, David; Kooi, Jacob; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.; Stern, Jeff A.

    1999-12-01

    We have developed a low-noise 850 GHz superconductor-insulator-superconductor quasiparticle mixer with NbTiN thin-film microstrip tuning circuits and hybrid Nb/AlN/NbTiN tunnel junctions. The mixer uses a quasioptical configuration with a planar twin-slot antenna feeding a two-junction tuning circuit. At 798 GHz, we measured an uncorrected double-sideband receiver noise temperature of TRX=260 K at 4.2 K bath temperature. This mixer outperforms current Nb SIS mixers by a factor of nearly 2 near 800 GHz. The high-gap frequency and low loss at 800 GHz make NbTiN an attractive material with which to fabricate tuning circuits for SIS mixers. NbTiN mixers can potentially operate up to the gap frequency, 2Δ/h˜1.2 THz.

  15. Low-Noise Submillimeter-Wave NbTiN Superconducting Tunnel Junction Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, J.; Chen, J.; Miller, D.; Kooi, J.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.; Stern, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a low-noise 850 GHz superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) quasi-particle mixer with NbTiN thin-film microstrip tuning circuits and hybrid Nb/AlN/NbTiN tunnel junctions. The mixer uses a quasioptical configuration with a planar twin-slot antenna feeding a two-junction tuning circuit. At 798 GHz, we measured an uncorrected double-sideband receiver noise temperature of T(sub RX) = 260 K at 4.2 K bath temperature. This mixer outperforms current Nb SIS mixers by a factor of nearly 2 near 800 GHz. The high gap frequency and low loss at 800 GHz make NbTiN an attractive material with which to fabricate tuning circuits for SIS mixers. NbTiN mixers can potentially operate up to the gap frequency, 2(delta)/h is approximately 1.2THz.

  16. Self-anchoring mast for deploying a high-speed submersible mixer in a tank

    DOEpatents

    Cato, Jr., Joseph E.; Shearer, Paul M.; Rodwell, Philip O.

    2004-10-12

    A self-anchoring mast for deploying a high-speed submersible mixer in a tank includes operably connected first and second mast members (20, 22) and a foot member 46 operably connected to the second mast member for supporting the mast in a tank. The second mast member includes a track (36, 38) for slidably receiving a bearing of the mixer to change the orientation of the mixer in the tank.

  17. Self-Anchoring Mast for Deploying a High-Speed Submersible Mixer in a Tank

    SciTech Connect

    Cato, Joseph E. Jr.; Shearer, Paul M.; Rodwell, Philip 0.

    2004-10-12

    A self-anchoring mast for deploying a high-speed submersible mixer in a tank includes operably connected first and second mast members (20, 22) and a foot member 46 operably connected to the second mast member for supporting the mast in a tank. The second mast member includes a track (36, 38) for slidably receiving a bearing of the mixer to change the orientation of the mixer in the tank.

  18. An integrated membrane sub-harmonic Schottky diode mixers at 340GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Dabao; Xing, Dong; Liang, Shixiong; Zhang, Lisen; Zhao, Xiangyang; Feng, Zhihong

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a sub-harmonic mixer operating over the spectral band 332-348 GHz. The mixers employ integrated GaAs membrane Schottky diode technology. The simulated results show that the conversion loss of the mixer is below dB in the band from 333 GHz to 347 GHz with a local oscillator power requirement of 5mW.The minimum is 8.2dB at 344GHz.

  19. MICROFLUIDIC MIXERS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, A; Hertzog, D; Baumgartel, P; Lengefeld, J; Horsley, D; Schuler, B; Bakajin, O

    2006-03-20

    The purpose of this study is to design, fabricate and optimize microfluidic mixers to investigate the kinetics of protein secondary structure formation with Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy. The mixers are designed to rapidly initiate protein folding reaction through the dilution of denaturant. The devices are fabricated out of fused silica, so that they are transparent in the UV. We present characterization of mixing in the fabricated devices, as well as the initial SRCD data on proteins inside the mixers.

  20. Confocal microscopic evaluation of mixing performance for three-dimensional microfluidic mixer.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Takao; Omoto, Yusuke; Osato, Keiko; Kaji, Noritada; Suzuki, Norikazu; Naito, Toyohiro; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tokeshi, Manabu; Shamoto, Eiji; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2012-01-01

    We developed a confocal microscopic method for a quantitative evaluation of the mixing performance of a three-dimensional microfluidic mixer. We fabricated a microfluidic baker's transformation (MBT) mixer as a three-dimensional passive-type mixer for the efficient mixing of solutions. Although the MBT mixer is one type of ideal mixers, it is hard to evaluate its mixing performance, since the MBT mixer is based on several cycles of complicated three-dimensional microchannel structures. We applied the method developed here to evaluate the mixing of water and a fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC; diffusion coefficient, 4.9 × 10(-10) m(2) s(-1)) solution by the MBT mixer. This method enables us to capture vertical section images for the fluid distributions of FITC and water at different three-dimensional microchannel structures of the MBT device. These images are in good agreement with those of mixing images based on numerical simulations. The mixing ratio could be calculated by the fluorescence intensity at each pixel of the vertical section image; complete mixing is recognized by a mixing ratio of more than 90%. The mixing ratios are measured at different cycles of the MBT mixer by changing the flow rate; the mixing performance is evaluated by comparisons with the mixing ratio of the straight microchannel without the MBT mixer.

  1. Move difficult solids-bearing fluids with submersible pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Pastore, P.R.

    1993-09-01

    This article describes how, alone or combined with versatile horizontal mixers, the submersible pump has significant advantages when the worst powerplant slurries have to be moved. The ever-growing need to deal with slurries and other solids-bearing liquids has directed attention to the pumping systems necessary to deal with the high diversity and large volumes of what are often wastes. Many powerplant services and locations, including coalpiles, sumps, and ash handling, call for pumping of solids-bearing liquids. In nearly every case, the wastes are not directly connected with the plant's economic function of power generation but nevertheless consume power and call for heavy capital and maintenance sums. For this reason, powerplants benefit from improved handling of these materials. There are basic differences between pumping of the two-phase slurries and wastes, especially when open reservoirs are part of the flowpaths, and pumping of the traditional, comparatively clean, single-phase liquids of the powerplant. Supply of liquid to the pump is one significant differences. Placement of conventional pumps for slurry service is another problem. Pumping from a closed system, such as a tank, can call for extra space, with a dry pit to hold a lineshaft pump. A conventional pump motor at a low level in a pit is in danger of flooding. An alternative solution to the problem of pump and drive type for the powerplant's difficult solids-bearing liquids is the submersible pump. This type has an entirely sealed motor and can be easily moved and reset advantageously for pumping at any time. Designed to operate with pump and motor fully submerged for long periods, the submersible pump can nevertheless also be mounted in a dry well next to a tank. The pump's ability to run submerged protects the system if the dry well should become flooded.

  2. Insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Pickup, J

    2010-02-01

    Insulin pump therapy is now more than 30 years old, and is an established part of the routine care of selected people with type 1 diabetes. Nevertheless, there are still significant areas of concern, particularly how pumps compare with modern injection therapy, whether the increasingly sophisticated pump technologies like onboard calculators and facility for computer download offer any real benefit, and whether we have a consensus on the clinical indications. The following papers offer some insight into these and other current questions.

  3. System Design Description for the SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    2000-01-24

    This document describes the hardware and software of the computer subsystems for the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

  4. Modeling, Simulation and Control of a Propellant Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Hanz; Barbieri, Enrique; Figueroa, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses some modeling and control issues for a mixing chamber used in rocket engine testing at NASA Stennis Space Center. The mixer must combine high pressure liquid hydrogen (LH2) and gaseous hydrogen (GH2) to produce and output flow that meets certain thermodynamic properties before it is fed into a test article. More precisely, this paper considers that the quantities to be tracked and/or regulated are mixer internal pressure, exit mass flow, and exit temperature. The available control inputs are given by three value positions, namely those of the GH2, LH2 and exit valves. The mixer is modelled by a system of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations having density and internal energy as states. The model must be simple enough to lend itself to subsequent feedback controller design, yet its accuracy must be tested against real data. For this reason, the model includes function calls to thermodynamic property data. Some structural properties of the resulting model that pertain to controller design, such as controllability and uniqueness of the equilibrium point are shown to hold. Validation of the model against real data is also provided. As a first control approach, a small-signal (linear) model is developed based on the nonlinear model and simulated as well. Pulse disturbances are introduced to the valve positions and the quality of the linear model is ascertained by comparing its behavior against the nonlinear model simulations. Valve control strategies that simulate an operator-in-the-loop scenario are then explored demonstrating the need for automatic feedback control. Classical optimal single-output and multi-output Proportional/Integral controllers are designed based on the linear model and applied to the nonlinear model with excellent results to track simultaneous, constant setpoint changes in desired exit flow, exit temperature, and mixer pressure, as well as to reject unmeasurable but bounded additive step perturbations in the valve

  5. Ferroelectric Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A ferroelectric pump has one or more variable volume pumping chambers internal to a housing. Each chamber has at least one wall comprising a dome shaped internally prestressed ferroelectric actuator having a curvature and a dome height that varies with an electric voltage applied between an inside and outside surface of the actuator. A pumped medium flows into and out of each pumping chamber in response to displacement of the ferroelectric actuator. The ferroelectric actuator is mounted within each wall and isolates each ferroelectric actuator from the pumped medium, supplies a path for voltage to be applied to each ferroelectric actuator, and provides for positive containment of each ferroelectric actuator while allowing displacement of the entirety of each ferroelectric actuator in response to the applied voltage.

  6. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  7. Airfoil-shaped micro-mixers for reducing fouling on membrane surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Clifford K; Altman, Susan J; Clem, Paul G; Hibbs, Michael; Cook, Adam W

    2012-10-23

    An array of airfoil-shaped micro-mixers that enhances fluid mixing within permeable membrane channels, such as used in reverse-osmosis filtration units, while minimizing additional pressure drop. The enhanced mixing reduces fouling of the membrane surfaces. The airfoil-shaped micro-mixer can also be coated with or comprised of biofouling-resistant (biocidal/germicidal) ingredients.

  8. AZ-101 Mixer Pump Test MT Fury Suspended Solids Profiler Application and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    MACLEAN, G.T.

    2000-01-06

    Describes the radiation testing and calibration of the AZ-101 tank suspended solids profiler unit mounted on 6 tank riser 24A. The Mt. Fury Suspended Solids Profiler (SSP) is a microprocessor-controlled instrument that measures the turbidity of solid-liquid suspensions and sludges. The profiler is used commercially for the monitoring and control of clarifiers and thickeners in waste treatment, mining, pulp and paper, and other industrial processing facilities. The instrument includes a three inch diameter probe, a Kynar coated coaxial cable, a reel assembly with a clutch and drive shaft, a stepper motor, and electronics. The instrument measures insoluble or suspended solids content in liquids by transmitting infrared energy at a wavelength of 935 nm and measuring the extent of backscatter. This frequency is not affected by solution color. There are two detectors that allow the instrument to operate over a broad range of concentrations, from clear liquids to light sludges.

  9. Low-noise 1 THz niobium superconducting tunnel junction mixer with a normal metal tuning circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, M.; Gaidis, M. C.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Phillips, T. G.; LeDuc, H. G.

    1996-03-01

    We describe a 1 THz quasioptical SIS mixer which uses a twin-slot antenna, an antireflection-coated silicon hyperhemispherical lens, Nb/Al-oxide/Nb tunnel junctions, and an aluminum normal-metal tuning circuit in a two-junction configuration. Since the mixer operates substantially above the gap frequency of niobium (ν≳2Δ/h˜700 GHz), a normal metal is used in the tuning circuit in place of niobium to reduce the Ohmic loss. The frequency response of the device was measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer and agrees reasonably well with the theoretical prediction. At 1042 GHz, the uncorrected double-sideband receiver noise temperature is 840 K when the physical temperature of the mixer is 2.5 K. This is the first SIS mixer which outperforms GaAs Schottky diode mixers by a large margin at 1 THz.

  10. A 100 GHz Josephson mixer using resistively-shunted Nb tunnel junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoelkopf, R. J.; Phillips, T. G.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe preliminary mixer results using resistively shunted Nb/AlO(x)/Nb tunnel junctions in a 100-GHz waveguide mixer mount. The mixer utilizes robust, lithographically defined devices which have nonhysteretic I-V curves. A receiver temperature of 390 K (DSB) has been obtained with a conversion loss of -6.5 dB. The receiver's behavior agrees qualitatively with the behavior predicted by the resistively shunted junction model. Substantial improvements in performance are expected with the use of better-optimized shunted junctions, and numerical simulations suggest that, if devices with higher ICRN (critical current-normal state resistance) products can be obtained, Josephson effect mixers could be competitive with SIS mixers at high frequencies.

  11. 26 CFR 48.4061-1 - Temporary regulations with respect to floor stock refunds or credits on cement mixers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... stock refunds or credits on cement mixers. 48.4061-1 Section 48.4061-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... § 48.4061-1 Temporary regulations with respect to floor stock refunds or credits on cement mixers. (a... of tax on motor vehicles) on the sale of a cement mixer after June 30, 1968, and before January...

  12. Submersible pump

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, D. B.

    1985-08-27

    A method and apparatus for using a submersible pump to lift reservoir fluids in a well while having the tubing/casing annulus isolated from the produced fluids. The apparatus allows the submersible pump to be positioned above the annular packoff device. The apparatus comprises an outer shield that encloses the pump and can be attached to the production tubing. The lower end of the shield attaches to a short tubing section that seals with the annular packoff device or a receptacle above the annular packoff device.

  13. ION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1961-01-01

    An ion pump and pumping method are given for low vacuum pressures in which gases introduced into a pumping cavity are ionized and thereafter directed and accelerated into a quantity of liquid gettering metal where they are absorbed. In the preferred embodiment the metal is disposed as a liquid pool upon one electrode of a Phillips ion gauge type pump. Means are provided for continuously and remotely withdrawing and degassing the gettering metal. The liquid gettering metal may be heated if desired, although various combinations of gallium, indium, tin, bismuth, and lead, the preferred metals, have very low melting points. A background pressure of evaporated gettering metal may be provided by means of a resistance heated refractory metal wick protruding from the surface of the pcol of gettering metal.

  14. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Kamlesh D.

    2007-11-20

    A method for altering the surface properties of a particle bed. In application, the method pertains particularly to an electrokinetic pump configuration where nanoparticles are bonded to the surface of the stationary phase to alter the surface properties of the stationary phase including the surface area and/or the zeta potential and thus improve the efficiency and operating range of these pumps. By functionalizing the nanoparticles to change the zeta potential the electrokinetic pump is rendered capable of operating with working fluids having pH values that can range from 2-10 generally and acidic working fluids in particular. For applications in which the pump is intended to handle highly acidic solutions latex nanoparticles that are quaternary amine functionalized can be used.

  15. Evaluation Of Saltstone Mixer Paddle Configuration For Improved Wear Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M. M.; Fowley, M. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

    2012-09-27

    A soft metal with low wear resistance (6000 series aluminum), was used to minimize run time while maximizing wear rate. Two paddle configurations were tested, with the first four paddles after the augers replaced by the wear paddles. The first configuration was all flat paddles, with the first paddle not aligned with the augers and is consistent with present SPF mixer. The second configuration had helical paddles for the first three stages after the augers and a flat paddle at the fourth stage. The first helical paddle was aligned with the auger flight for the second configuration. The all flat paddle configuration wear rate was approximately double the wear rate of the helical paddles for the first two sets of paddles after the augers. For both configurations, there was little or no wear on the third and fourth paddle sets based on mass change, indicating that the fully wetted premix materials are much less abrasive than the un-wetted or partially wetted premix. Additionally, inspection of the wear surface of the paddles at higher magnification showed the flat paddles were worn much more than the helical and is consistent with the wear rates. Aligning the auger discharge flight with the first set of helical paddles was effective in reducing the wear rate as compared to the flat paddle configuration. Changing the paddle configuration from flat to helical resulted in a slight increase in rheological properties. Although, both tests produced grout-like material that is within the processing rage of the SPF, it should be noted that cement is not included in the premix and water was used rather than salt solution, which does affect the rheology of the fresh grout. The higher rheological properties from the helical wear test are most likely due to the reduced number of shearing paddles in the mixer. In addition, there is variation in the rheological data for each wear test. This is most likely due to the way that the dry feeds enter the mixer from the dry feeder. The

  16. Development of Submillimeter SIS Mixers and Broadband HEMT Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    2004-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA grant NAG5-9493. entitled "Development of Submillimeter SIS Mixers and Broadband HEMT Amplifiers". The goal of this project was to develop and demonstrate a new generation of superconducting tunnel junction (SIS) receivers with extremely wide instantaneous (intermediate-frequency, or IF) bandwidths. of order 12 GHz. along with the wideband low-noise microwave HEMT (high electron mobility transistor) amplifiers which follow the SIS mixer. These wideband SIS/HEMT receivers would allow rapid submillimeter wavelength spectral line surveys to be carried out, for instance with the NASA airborne observatory SOFIA. and could potentially be useful for future submillimeter space missions such as SAFIR. In addition, there are potential NASA earth science applications. such as the monitoring of the distribution of chemical species in the stratosphere and troposphere using the limb-sounding technique. The overall goals of this project have been achieved: a broadband 200-300 SIS receiver was designed and constructed, and was demonstrated in the field through a test run at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea. HI. The technical details are described in the appendices. which are primarily conference publications. but Appendix A also includes an unpublished summary of the latest results. The work on the SIS mixer design are described in the conference publications (appendices B and C). The "Supermix" software package that was developed at Caltech and used for the SIS design is also described in two conference papers, but has been substantially revised, debugged. and extended as part of the work completed for this grant. The Supermix package is made available to the community at no charge. The electromagnetic design of a radial waveguide probe similar to the one used in this work is described in a journal publication. Details of the novel fabrication procedure used for producing the SIS devices at JPL are also given in an

  17. EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATION OF SALTSTONE MIXER AUGER/PADDLES MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION FOR IMPROVED WEAR RESISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Torres, R.

    2012-08-15

    Wear and corrosion testing were conducted to evaluate alternate materials of construction for the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles. These components have been degraded by wear from the slurry processed in the mixer. Material test options included PVD coatings (TiN, TiCN, and ZrN), weld overlays (Stellite 12 and Ultimet) and higher hardness steels and carbides (D2 and tungsten carbide). The corrosion testing demonstrated that the slurry is not detrimental to the current materials of construction or the new candidates. The ASTM G75 Miller wear test showed that the high hardness materials and the Stellite 12 weld overlay provide superior wear relative to the Astralloy and CF8M stainless steel, which are the current materials of construction, as well as the PVD coatings and Ultimet. The following recommendations are made for selecting new material options and improving the overall wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer components: A Stellite 12 weld overlay or higher hardness steel (with toughness equivalent to Astralloy) be used to improve the wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer paddles; other manufacturing specifications for the mixer need to be considered in this selection. The current use of the Stellite 12 weld overlay be evaluated so that coverage of the 316 auger can be optimized for improved wear resistance of the auger. The wear surfaces of the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles be evaluated so that laboratory data can be better correlated to actual service. The 2-inch Saltstone mixer prototype be used to verify material performance.

  18. Credit BG. This view looks northwest (290°) in the mixer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. This view looks northwest (290°) in the mixer room at the 30-gallon Baker-Perkins model 121/2 PVM mixer and its associated equipment. The hopper in the left background feeds ingredients to the mixing pot when the hopper is mounted on the mixer frame; the hoist overhead is used to mount the hopper. The mixing pot is in its lowered position beneath the mixer blades. The pot is normally raised and secured to the upper half of the mixer, and a vacuum is applied during mixing operations to prevent the entrainment of air bubbles in the mix. A second mixing pot appears in the right background, and a pot vacuum lid appears in the extreme right foreground. The equipment on the palette in the left foreground is not related to the mixer. Note the explosion-proof fluorescent lighting fixtures suspended from the ceiling. The floor has an electrically conductive coating to dissipate static electrical charges - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Mixer & Casting Building, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. Sandwich-format 3D printed microfluidic mixers: a flexible platform for multi-probe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kise, Drew P.; Reddish, Michael J.; Dyer, R. Brian

    2015-12-01

    We report on a microfluidic mixer fabrication platform that increases the versatility and flexibility of mixers for biomolecular applications. A sandwich-format design allows the application of multiple spectroscopic probes to the same mixer. A polymer spacer is ‘sandwiched’ between two transparent windows, creating a closed microfluidic system. The channels of the mixer are defined by regions in the polymer spacer that lack material and therefore the polymer need not be transparent in the spectral region of interest. Suitable window materials such as CaF2 make the device accessible to a wide range of optical probe wavelengths, from the deep UV to the mid-IR. In this study, we use a commercially available 3D printer to print the polymer spacers to apply three different channel designs into the passive, continuous-flow mixer, and integrated them with three different spectroscopic probes. All three spectroscopic probes are applicable to each mixer without further changes. The sandwich-format mixer coupled with cost-effective 3D printed fabrication techniques could increase the applicability and accessibility of microfluidic mixing to intricate kinetic schemes and monitoring chemical synthesis in cases where only one probe technique proves insufficient.

  20. Three-dimensional measurement of the laminar flow field inside a static mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speetjens, Michel; Jilisen, Rene; Bloemen, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Static mixers are widely used in industry for laminar mixing of viscous fluids as e.g. polymers and food stuffs. Moreover, given the similarities in flow regime, static mixers often serve as model for compact mixers for process intensification and even for micro-mixers. This practical relevance has motivated a host of studies on the mixing characteristics of static mixers and their small-scale counterparts. However, these studies are primarily theoretical and numerical. Experimental studies, in contrast, are relatively rare and typically restricted to local 2D flow characteristics or integral quantities (pressure drop, residence-time distributions). The current study concerns 3D measurements on the laminar flow field inside a static mixer using 3D Particle-Tracking Velocimetry (3D-PTV) Key challenges to the 3D-PTV image-processing procedure are the optical distortion and degradation of the particle imagery due to light refraction and reflection caused by the cylindrical boundary and the internal elements. Ways to tackle these challenges are discussed and first successful 3D measurements in an actual industrial static mixer are presented.

  1. Sandwich-format 3D printed microfluidic mixers: a flexible platform for multi-probe analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kise, Drew P; Reddish, Michael J; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-01-01

    We report on a microfluidic mixer fabrication platform that increases the versatility and flexibility of mixers for biomolecular applications. A sandwich-format design allows the application of multiple spectroscopic probes to the same mixer. A polymer spacer is ‘sandwiched’ between two transparent windows, creating a closed microfluidic system. The channels of the mixer are defined by regions in the polymer spacer that lack material and therefore the polymer need not be transparent in the spectral region of interest. Suitable window materials such as CaF2 make the device accessible to a wide range of optical probe wavelengths, from the deep UV to the mid-IR. In this study, we use a commercially available 3D printer to print the polymer spacers to apply three different channel designs into the passive, continuous-flow mixer, and integrated them with three different spectroscopic probes. All three spectroscopic probes are applicable to each mixer without further changes. The sandwich-format mixer coupled with cost-effective 3D printed fabrication techniques could increase the applicability and accessibility of microfluidic mixing to intricate kinetic schemes and monitoring chemical synthesis in cases where only one probe technique proves insufficient. PMID:26855478

  2. Hydrodynamics of CNT dispersion in high shear dispersion mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Min; Lee, Dong Hyun; Hwang, Wook Ryol; Lee, Sang Bok; Jung, Seung-Il

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the carbon nanotube (CNT) fragmentation mechanism and dispersion in high shear homogenizers as a plausible dispersion technique, correlating with device geometries and processing conditions, for mass production of CNT-aluminum composites for automobile industries. A CNT dispersion model has been established in a turbulent flow regime and an experimental method in characterizing the critical yield stress of CNT flocs are presented. Considering CNT dispersion in ethanol as a model system, we tested two different geometries of high shear mixers — blade-stirrer type and rotor-stator type homogenizers — and reported the particle size distributions in time and the comparison has been made with the modeling approach and partly with the computational results.

  3. A chemical mixer with dark-green nails.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lawrence K; Harding, John

    2015-01-01

    Nails are integral extensions of the skin and they together form the largest organ of the human body. Changes in nail appearance can be due to external insults or internal pathologies, and nail signs have to be interpreted in light of a good history. We present an interesting case of a man who developed dark-green discolouration of his nails over a short period of time. His work as a chemical mixer rendered him susceptible to hazardous chemical exposure. A notification was filed and the local Occupational Health Department discovered insufficient protective gear and lack of protocols regarding hazards of isocyanate-based resin. The patient also reported washing utensils with bare hands. Based on the meniscal demarcation borders between the discoloured and normal areas, plus a positive bacterial culture from nail clippings, the final diagnosis of isocyanate-resin-induced onycholysis with secondary Pseudomonas infection remained as the most likely clinical diagnosis. PMID:26040827

  4. A chemical mixer with dark-green nails.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lawrence K; Harding, John

    2015-06-03

    Nails are integral extensions of the skin and they together form the largest organ of the human body. Changes in nail appearance can be due to external insults or internal pathologies, and nail signs have to be interpreted in light of a good history. We present an interesting case of a man who developed dark-green discolouration of his nails over a short period of time. His work as a chemical mixer rendered him susceptible to hazardous chemical exposure. A notification was filed and the local Occupational Health Department discovered insufficient protective gear and lack of protocols regarding hazards of isocyanate-based resin. The patient also reported washing utensils with bare hands. Based on the meniscal demarcation borders between the discoloured and normal areas, plus a positive bacterial culture from nail clippings, the final diagnosis of isocyanate-resin-induced onycholysis with secondary Pseudomonas infection remained as the most likely clinical diagnosis.

  5. 670 GHz Schottky Diode Based Subharmonic Mixer with CPW Circuits and 70 GHz IF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Schlecht, Erich T. (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Lin, Robert H. (Inventor); Gill, John J. (Inventor); Sin, Seth (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A coplanar waveguide (CPW) based subharmonic mixer working at 670 GHz using GaAs Schottky diodes. One example of the mixer has a LO input, an RF input and an IF output. Another possible mixer has a LO input, and IF input and an RF output. Each input or output is connected to a coplanar waveguide with a matching network. A pair of antiparallel diodes provides a signal at twice the LO frequency, which is then mixed with a second signal to provide signals having sum and difference frequencies. The output signal of interest is received after passing through a bandpass filter tuned to the frequency range of interest.

  6. Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a reactor with mechanical mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Lecheva, A.; Zheleva, I.

    2015-10-28

    Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a cylindrical reactor with mechanical mixing is studied and numerical results are presented in this article. The model area is complex because of the presence of convex corners of the mixer in the fluid flow. Proper boundary conditions for the vorticity calculated on the base of the stream function values near solid boundaries of the examined area are presented. The boundary value problem of motion of swirling incompressible viscous fluid in a vertical tank reactor with a mixer is solved numerically. The calculations are made by a computer code, written in MATLAB. The complex structure of the flow around the mixing disk is described and commented.

  7. Turbofan forced mixer-nozzle internal flowfield. Volume 1: A benchmark experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paterson, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow field within a model turbofan forced mixer nozzle is described. Velocity and thermodynamic state variable data for use in assessing the accuracy and assisting the further development of computational procedures for predicting the flow field within mixer nozzles are provided. Velocity and temperature data suggested that the nozzle mixing process was dominated by circulations (secondary flows) of a length scale on the order the lobe dimensions which were associated with strong radial velocities observed near the lobe exit plane. The 'benchmark' model mixer experiment conducted for code assessment purposes is discussed.

  8. Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a reactor with mechanical mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecheva, A.; Zheleva, I.

    2015-10-01

    Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a cylindrical reactor with mechanical mixing is studied and numerical results are presented in this article. The model area is complex because of the presence of convex corners of the mixer in the fluid flow. Proper boundary conditions for the vorticity calculated on the base of the stream function values near solid boundaries of the examined area are presented. The boundary value problem of motion of swirling incompressible viscous fluid in a vertical tank reactor with a mixer is solved numerically. The calculations are made by a computer code, written in MATLAB. The complex structure of the flow around the mixing disk is described and commented.

  9. Alternate paddle configuration for improved wear resistance in the saltstone mixer

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Fowley, M.

    2013-09-23

    The Saltstone Production Facility has a 10-inch Readco-Kurimoto continuous mixer that mixes the premix dry feeds and low-level waste salt solution to make fresh (uncured) saltstone. Inspection of the mixer in January 2013 showed significant wear on the third, fourth and fifth paddle pairs after the conveying augers. A 2-inch Readco-Kurimoto continuous mixer was used to test alternate paddle configurations for use in the 10-inch mixer to decrease the wear rate on the paddles. Two wear tests were conducted to investigate a method of reducing wear on the mixer paddles. The first test (wear test 2a) had a paddle configuration similar to the currently installed 10-inch mixer in the SPF. This test established baseline wear. The second test (wear test 2b) had a reconfigured paddle arrangement that replaced the flat paddles with helical paddles for paddle pairs 2 - 6 and aligned paddle pair 1 with the augers. The intent of the reconfiguration was to more effectively convey the partially wetted dry feeds through the transition region and into the liquid feed where paddle wear is reduced due to dry feeds and salt solution being mixed at the intended water to premix ratio. The design of the helical paddles provides conveyance through the transition region to the liquid feed inlet. The alignment with the auger is aimed to provide a smoother transition (minimizing the discontinuity between the auger and paddle pair 1) into the downstream paddles. A soft metal with low wear resistance (6000 series aluminum) was used for the wear testing paddles to determine wear patterns while minimizing run time and maximizing wear rate. For the two paddle configurations tested using the scaled 2-inch Readco-Kurimoto continuous mixer, with the first six paddles after the augers replaced by the wear paddles and the remaining paddles were stainless steel. Since the 10-inch SPF mixer is designed with the liquid inlet centered over paddle pairs 5 and 6, the scaled 2-inch mixer was configured the

  10. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  11. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth R.; Sartor, George B.

    2004-08-03

    An electrokinetic pump in which the porous dielectric medium of conventional electrokinetic pumps is replaced by a patterned microstructure. The patterned microstructure is fabricated by lithographic patterning and etching of a substrate and is formed by features arranged so as to create an array of microchannels. The microchannels have dimensions on the order of the pore spacing in a conventional porous dielectric medium. Embedded unitary electrodes are vapor deposited on either end of the channel structure to provide the electric field necessary for electroosmotic flow.

  12. 26. JUNCTION STRUCTURE. WATER LEVEL 1190FT, INNER RING MIXER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. JUNCTION STRUCTURE. WATER LEVEL 1190FT, INNER RING MIXER OF STATE AND COLORADO, WATER EXITS THROUGH OUTER RING. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. Quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yong; Potter, Kent A.; Rutledge, David B.

    A new quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies is presented. In the design, antenna and mixer are combined into an entity, based on the technology in which millimeter-wave horn antenna arrays have been fabricated in silicon wafers. It consists of a set of forward- and backward-looking horns made with a set of silicon wafers. The front side is used to receive incoming signal, and the back side is used to feed local oscillator signal. Intermediate frequency is led out from the side of the array. Signal received by the horn array is picked up by antenna probes suspended on thin silicon-oxynitride membranes inside the horns. Mixer diodes will be located on the membranes inside the horns. Modeling of such an antenna-mixer-array design is done on a scaled model at microwave frequencies. The impedance matching, RF and LO isolation, and patterns of the array have been tested and analyzed.

  14. Quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yong; Potter, Kent A.; Rutledge, David B.

    1992-01-01

    A new quasi-optical antenna-mixer-array design for terahertz frequencies is presented. In the design, antenna and mixer are combined into an entity, based on the technology in which millimeter-wave horn antenna arrays have been fabricated in silicon wafers. It consists of a set of forward- and backward-looking horns made with a set of silicon wafers. The front side is used to receive incoming signal, and the back side is used to feed local oscillator signal. Intermediate frequency is led out from the side of the array. Signal received by the horn array is picked up by antenna probes suspended on thin silicon-oxynitride membranes inside the horns. Mixer diodes will be located on the membranes inside the horns. Modeling of such an antenna-mixer-array design is done on a scaled model at microwave frequencies. The impedance matching, RF and LO isolation, and patterns of the array have been tested and analyzed.

  15. Mixing effectiveness test of an exhaust gas mixer in a high bypass turbofan at altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullom, R. R.; Bobula, G. A.; Burkardt, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal mixing effectiveness characteristics of an eighteen lobe, scalloped and unscalloped, partial, forced mixer were measured in a high-bypass turbofan engine. Data were also obtained without the mixer installed, i.e., free mixing. Tests were conducted at four combinations of simulated flight conditions from 0.3 to 0.8 Mach number and from 6,096 meters (20,000 ft) to 13,715 m (45,000 ft) altitude, mixing chamber lengths of L/D=0.52 and 0.65 were tested. For this range of test conditions and mixer configurations, the forced mixing effectiveness varied from 59 to 68 percent. Values of mixing effectiveness and total pressure loss were calculated from temperature and pressure data obtained at the mixer inlet and exhaust nozzle exit.

  16. VERIFICATION TESTING OF HIGH-RATE MECHANICAL INDUCTION MIXERS FOR CHEMICAL DISINFECTANTS, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the results of verification testing of mechanical induction mixers for dispersion of chemical disinfectants in wet-weather flow (WWF) conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) WWF Pilot Program. Th...

  17. VERIFICATION TESTING OF HIGH-RATE MECHANICAL INDUCTION MIXERS FOR CHEMICAL DISINFECTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the results of verification testing of mechanical induction mixers for dispersion of chemical disinfectants in wet-weather flow (WWF) conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) WWF Pilot Program. Th...

  18. Pump jack

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, G. E.

    1985-02-26

    A pump jack of the type comprising a rocker arm pivotably mounted intermediate its ends on a support member, said rocker arm being divided by said pivot mounting into a sucker-rod limb and a drive limb wherein the improvement comprises a pneumatic motor pivotably attached to the drive support member and further pivotably attached to the mounting base of the pump jack to provide the power to reciprocate the pump jack. The working fluid of said pneumatic motor being natural gas which is available from the well casing of the well without any interference with the flow of the oil in the oil tube of the well thereby making use of an energy source available at any oil well without having to provide gasoline to drive a rotating type gasoline engine or electricity to drive an electric motor usually of the rotating variety. Also the stroke of a pneumatic cylinder inherently smooths out and eliminates the shock loading at the extremes of motion at the piston mounted to the sucker rods of such pump jack at the bottom of the well.

  19. QCGAT mixer compound exhaust system design and static big model test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, W. L.; Thompson, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    A mixer exhaust system was designed to meet the proposed performance and exhaust jet noise goals for the AiResearch QCGAT engine. Some 0.35 scale models of the various nozzles were fabricated and aerodynamically and acoustically tested. Preliminary optimization, engine cycle matching, model test data and analysis are presented. A final mixer exhaust system is selected for optimum performance for the overall flight regime.

  20. Low-noise Josephson mixers at 115 GHz using recyclable point contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taur, Y.; Kerr, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermally recyclable Nb point-contact Josephson junctions are investigated as low-noise mixers with an external local oscillator at 115 GHz. The best single sideband mixer noise temperature achieved is 140 (+ or - 20) K with a single sideband conversion loss of 2.4 (+ or - 0.5) dB. Such rugged junctions are suitable for use in practical receivers and should give unprecedented sensitivity at the shorter millimeter wavelengths.

  1. Silicon microring-based wavelength converter with integrated pump and signal suppression.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jun Rong; Kumar, Ranjeet; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2014-08-01

    We fabricate a two-stage wavelength converter in silicon by cascading a microring wavelength mixer with a five-ring coupled-resonator filter. A p-i-n diode is incorporated into the microring for electronic carrier sweep-out, and microheaters are incorporated into the filter for tunability. The generated idler wavelength is effectively separated from the input pump and signal, with nearly 50 dB of suppression.

  2. A Dual Polarized Quasi-Optical SIS Mixer at 550-GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Miller, David; LeDuc, Henry G.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and the performance of a low-noise dual-polarized quasi-optical superconductor insulator superconductor (SIS) mixer at 550 GHz. The mixer utilizes a novel cross-slot antenna on a hyperhemispherical substrate lens, two junction tuning circuits, niobium trilayer junctions, and an IF circuit containing a lumped element 180 deg hybrid. The antenna consists of an orthogonal pair of twin-slot antennas, and has four feed points, two for each polarization. Each feed point is coupled to a two-junction SIS mixer. The 180 deg IF hybrid is implemented using a lumped element/microstrip circuit located inside the mixer block. Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) measurements of the mixer frequency response show good agreement with computer simulations. The measured co-polarized and cross-polarized patterns for both polarizations also agree with the theoretical predictions. The noise performance of the dual-polarized mixer is excellent, giving uncorrected receiver noise temperature of better than 115 K (DSB) at 528 GHz for both the polarizations.

  3. Noise Reduction with Lobed Mixers: Nozzle-Length and Free-Jet Speed Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Dalton, William N.; Bridges, James C.; Boyd, Kathy C.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic test results are presented for 1/4th-scaled nozzles with internal lobed mixers used for reduction of subsonic jet noise of turbofan engines with bypass ratio above 5 and jet speeds up to 830 ft/s. One coaxial and three forced lobe mixers were tested with variations in lobe penetration, cut-outs in lobe-sidewall, lobe number and nozzle-length. Measured exit flow profiles and thrusts are used to assist the inferences from acoustic data. It is observed that lobed mixers reduce the low-frequency noise due to more uniformly mixed exit flow; but they may also increase the high-frequency noise at peak perceived noise (PNL) angle and angles upstream of it due to enhanced mixing inside the nozzle. Cut-outs and low lobe penetration reduce the annoying portion of the spectrum but lead to less uniform exit flow. Due to the dominance of internal duct noise in unscalloped, high-penetration mixers their noise is not reduced as much with increase in free-jet speed as that of coaxial or cut-out lobed mixers. The latter two mixers also show no change in PNL over the wide range of nozzle-lengths tested because most of their noise sources are outside the nozzle; whereas, the former show an increase in noise with decrease in nozzle-length.

  4. Hot-electron bolometer terahertz mixers for the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherednichenko, Sergey; Drakinskiy, Vladimir; Berg, Therese; Khosropanah, Pourya; Kollberg, Erik

    2008-03-01

    We report on low noise terahertz mixers (1.4-1.9THz) developed for the heterodyne spectrometer onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The mixers employ double slot antenna integrated superconducting hot-electron bolometers (HEBs) made of thin NbN films. The mixer performance was characterized in terms of detection sensitivity across the entire rf band by using a Fourier transform spectrometer (from 0.5to2.5THz, with 30GHz resolution) and also by measuring the mixer noise temperature at a limited number of discrete frequencies. The lowest mixer noise temperature recorded was 750K [double sideband (DSB)] at 1.6THz and 950K DSB at 1.9THz local oscillator (LO) frequencies. Averaged across the intermediate frequency band of 2.4-4.8GHz, the mixer noise temperature was 1100K DSB at 1.6THz and 1450K DSB at 1.9THz LO frequencies. The HEB heterodyne receiver stability has been analyzed and compared to the HEB stability in the direct detection mode. The optimal local oscillator power was determined and found to be in a 200-500nW range.

  5. Sandwich mixer-reactor: influence of the diffusion coefficient and flow rate ratios.

    PubMed

    Abonnenc, Mélanie; Josserand, Jacques; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-02-01

    A sandwich mixer consists of mixing two solutions in a channel, one central laminar flow being sandwiched between two outer flow solutions. The present numerical study considers the convection-diffusion of two reacting species A and B, provided respectively by the two incoming solutions. The simulations show how the diffusion coefficient, flow rate and species concentration ratios influence, via the transversal diffusion length and reaction kinetics, the reaction extent at the end of the sandwich mixer. First, this extent can be enhanced up to 60% if the species with the lowest diffusion coefficient is located in the outer solutions where the flow velocity is small compared to that of the central part (higher residence time). Secondly, decreasing the outer flow rates (to confine the reaction close to the walls) and increasing the local concentration to keep the same flux ratio improve the extent by 300%. Comparison with a bi-lamination passive mixer, with an ideal mixer and an electro-osmotic driven flow mixer is presented. These conclusions are also demonstrated for consecutive reactions, showing an amplification of the effects described above. The results are also presented versus the residence time in the mixer-reactor to show the time window for which the gain is appreciable.

  6. Hot-electron bolometer terahertz mixers for the Herschel Space Observatory.

    PubMed

    Cherednichenko, Sergey; Drakinskiy, Vladimir; Berg, Therese; Khosropanah, Pourya; Kollberg, Erik

    2008-03-01

    We report on low noise terahertz mixers (1.4-1.9 THz) developed for the heterodyne spectrometer onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The mixers employ double slot antenna integrated superconducting hot-electron bolometers (HEBs) made of thin NbN films. The mixer performance was characterized in terms of detection sensitivity across the entire rf band by using a Fourier transform spectrometer (from 0.5 to 2.5 THz, with 30 GHz resolution) and also by measuring the mixer noise temperature at a limited number of discrete frequencies. The lowest mixer noise temperature recorded was 750 K [double sideband (DSB)] at 1.6 THz and 950 K DSB at 1.9 THz local oscillator (LO) frequencies. Averaged across the intermediate frequency band of 2.4-4.8 GHz, the mixer noise temperature was 1100 K DSB at 1.6 THz and 1450 K DSB at 1.9 THz LO frequencies. The HEB heterodyne receiver stability has been analyzed and compared to the HEB stability in the direct detection mode. The optimal local oscillator power was determined and found to be in a 200-500 nW range.

  7. 18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps in background formerly drew water from the clear well. They went out of service when use of the beds was discontinued. Pumps in the foreground provide high pressure water to Hamden. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Armory Street Pumphouse, North side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  8. Theoretical SIS mixer research. Final technical report, 1 June 1990-30 November 1992. [SIS (superconductor-insulator-superconductor)

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    Theoretical research has been conducted to elucidate the basic physics behind the properties of superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction receiving devices. The properties of SIS mixers using nonideal junctions and finite LO power, were determined by analytic expansion of the equations of the quantum theory of mixing, and also by computer simulations of SIS receivers over the entire range of experimental parameters. The result is a new coherent and intuitive picture of SIS mixer behavior. Many of the outstanding mysteries and questions about SIS receivers are resolved, and this contributes greatly to the design and interpretation of SIS mixer experiments. Other calculations show how to achieve sub-quantum noise temperatures in the phase sensitive SIS mixer, an important step towards realization of ultra-low-noise detectors. A simplified model casts doubt on the superlative experimental results reported for the rf-series dc-parallel biased array SIS mixer. Superconductivity; SIS mixer; Submillimeter-wave detection.

  9. Progress on a Multichannel, Dual-Mixer Stability Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Albert; Cole, Steven; Stevens, Gary; Tucker, Blake; Greenhall, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Several documents describe aspects of the continuing development of a multichannel, dual-mixer system for simultaneous characterization of the instabilities of multiple precise, low-noise oscillators. One of the oscillators would be deemed to be a reference oscillator, its frequency would be offset by an amount (100 Hz) much greater than the desired data rate, and each of the other oscillators would be compared with the frequency-offset signal by operation of a combination of hardware and software. A high-rate time-tag counter would collect zero-crossing times of the approximately equal 100-Hz beat notes. The system would effect a combination of interpolation and averaging to process the time tags into low-rate phase residuals at the desired grid times. Circuitry that has been developed since the cited prior article includes an eight-channel timer board to replace an obsolete commercial time-tag counter, plus a custom offset generator, cleanup loop, distribution amplifier, zero-crossing detector, and frequency divider.

  10. Volumetric dilutor: design and testing of a passive mixer

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J.R.; Nye, R.A.

    1985-09-01

    The performance of a mixing volume is improved dramatically by dividing it into a series of equal subvolumes. Five to 20 divisions is optimum in terms of minimizing concentration ripple and response time. Such a serial mixer makes practical the operation of a volumetric gas dilutor based on the periodic injection of a known volume into a constantly flowing diluent. The minimum dilution factor for such an apparatus is determined by the volume of diluent needed to sweep the injection volume and should correspond roughly to 3. On the other hand, a dilution factor of 10/sup 7/ could be readily achievable. A standard gas chromatographic valve could inject 0.25 ..mu..L of pure gas four times per minute into a carrier gas flowing at 10 cm/sup 3/ min/sup -1/. Pulses are averaged in a 10-cm/sup 3/ column containing five plates, followed by dilution with 10 L min/sup -1/. If the sample is a pure gas, the resulting diluted gas is 0.10 ppmv with a ripple of 0.1%.

  11. Micro mixer based on surface acoustic wave driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guan; Li, Yigui; Zhang, Junfeng; Yang, Chunshen; Liu, Jingquan

    2010-08-01

    A resonance frequency of 8.9MHz copper Interdigital Transducer (IDT) is fabricated on a 127.8°YX type LiNbO3 substrate by lift-off process and the rapid droplet mixing is experimentally realized using the surface acoustic wave(SAW). The droplet mixing principle and the manufacturing process of the mixer are illustrated in detail. The droplet generates one swirl when only portion of the droplet is located on the saw propagating surface. The droplet generates two swirls when the whole of droplet is located on the saw propagating surface. The mixing between red particles with an average diameter of 1.5μm and a droplet with a volume of 3 μl is successfully implemented. No matter the droplet covers whole or just partly the saw propagating surface, the mixing process can be completed in one second when the applied driving power is 9W. The applications of SAW micro fluidics should be greatly enhanced using the rapid mixing process proposed in this paper.

  12. Performance analysis of vortex based mixers for confined flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschhagen, Timo

    The hybrid rocket is still sparsely employed within major space or defense projects due to their relatively poor combustion efficiency and low fuel grain regression rate. Although hybrid rockets can claim advantages in safety, environmental and performance aspects against established solid and liquid propellant systems, the boundary layer combustion process and the diffusion based mixing within a hybrid rocket grain port leaves the core flow unmixed and limits the system performance. One principle used to enhance the mixing of gaseous flows is to induce streamwise vorticity. The counter-rotating vortex pair (CVP) mixer utilizes this principle and introduces two vortices into a confined flow, generating a stirring motion in order to transport near wall media towards the core and vice versa. Recent studies investigated the velocity field introduced by this type of swirler. The current work is evaluating the mixing performance of the CVP concept, by using an experimental setup to simulate an axial primary pipe flow with a radially entering secondary flow. Hereby the primary flow is altered by the CVP swirler unit. The resulting setup therefore emulates a hybrid rocket motor with a cylindrical single port grain. In order to evaluate the mixing performance the secondary flow concentration at the pipe assembly exit is measured, utilizing a pressure-sensitive paint based procedure.

  13. Office of River Protection (ORP) Monthly Performance Report for September 2000

    SciTech Connect

    WAGNILD, K.J.

    2000-11-21

    CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) had an outstanding year. The most significant accomplishments that occurred throughout fiscal year (FY) 2000 include the following: On April 24,2000, DOE ORP received BNFL Inc. B-1 deliverables and CHG completed Phase 1 Part B-2 Readiness-to-Proceed (RTP), to demonstrate the ability to provide waste feed to be treated/stored in a long-term disposal facility. The RTP consisted of key enabling assumptions, critical risks, waste handling actions, financial and schedule risk analysis, staffing plans, a project execution plan, and a resource loaded schedule. The Department determined that the BNFL Inc. proposal was unacceptable in many areas and essentially shifted the financial risk from BNFL Inc. back to the Federal government; thus a key benefit of privatization was lost. On May 8,2000, the Secretary announced that the privatization contract be terminated. In the interim, the Department directed the onsite Tank Farm Contractor, CHG, to continue the design work scope for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant until a new waste treatment contract is awarded. DOE ORP released its request for proposals (RFP) for a new Waste Treatment and Immobilization contractor on August 31,2000 and is on schedule to meet award of the contract by January 15,2000. CHG successfully reached 1,000,000 safe work hours without a lost workday injury or illness on Wednesday, September 23,2000. The record was initiated on May 23,2000 and took 114 days to achieve. All Tri-Party Agreement and Consent Decree milestones scheduled for the fiscal year were completed. Along with meeting all enforceable agreement milestones, nineteen out of twenty Performance Incentives (PIS) were successfully completed. The 20 PIS comprised of 114 specific deliverables, of which 107 were met. In addition to the 20 scheduled PIS, six accelerated activities were completed. Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen generation was successfully mitigated this fiscal year, including a series of

  14. Analysis of Fuel Vaporization, Fuel-Air Mixing, and Combustion in Integrated Mixer-Flame Holders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deur, J. M.; Cline, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    Requirements to limit pollutant emissions from the gas turbine engines for the future High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) have led to consideration of various low-emission combustor concepts. One such concept is the Integrated Mixer-Flame Holder (IMFH). This report describes a series of IMFH analyses performed with KIVA-II, a multi-dimensional CFD code for problems involving sprays, turbulence, and combustion. To meet the needs of this study, KIVA-II's boundary condition and chemistry treatments are modified. The study itself examines the relationships between fuel vaporization, fuel-air mixing, and combustion. Parameters being considered include: mixer tube diameter, mixer tube length, mixer tube geometry (converging-diverging versus straight walls), air inlet velocity, air inlet swirl angle, secondary air injection (dilution holes), fuel injection velocity, fuel injection angle, number of fuel injection ports, fuel spray cone angle, and fuel droplet size. Cases are run with and without combustion to examine the variations in fuel-air mixing and potential for flashback due to the above parameters. The degree of fuel-air mixing is judged by comparing average, minimum, and maximum fuel/air ratios at the exit of the mixer tube, while flame stability is monitored by following the location of the flame front as the solution progresses from ignition to steady state. Results indicate that fuel-air mixing can be enhanced by a variety of means, the best being a combination of air inlet swirl and a converging-diverging mixer tube geometry. With the IMFH configuration utilized in the present study, flashback becomes more common as the mixer tube diameter is increased and is instigated by disturbances associated with the dilution hole flow.

  15. Spectral linewidth preservation in parametric frequency combs seeded by dual pumps.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhi; Wiberg, Andreas O J; Myslivets, Evgeny; Kuo, Bill P P; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2012-07-30

    We demonstrate new technique for generation of programmable-pitch, wideband frequency combs with low phase noise. The comb generation was achieved using cavity-less, multistage mixer driven by two tunable continuous-wave pump seeds. The approach relies on phase-correlated continuous-wave pumps in order to cancel spectral linewidth broadening inherent to parametric comb generation. Parametric combs with over 200-nm bandwidth were obtained and characterized with respect to phase noise scaling to demonstrate linewidth preservation over 100 generated tones.

  16. Spectral linewidth preservation in parametric frequency combs seeded by dual pumps.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhi; Wiberg, Andreas O J; Myslivets, Evgeny; Kuo, Bill P P; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2012-07-30

    We demonstrate new technique for generation of programmable-pitch, wideband frequency combs with low phase noise. The comb generation was achieved using cavity-less, multistage mixer driven by two tunable continuous-wave pump seeds. The approach relies on phase-correlated continuous-wave pumps in order to cancel spectral linewidth broadening inherent to parametric comb generation. Parametric combs with over 200-nm bandwidth were obtained and characterized with respect to phase noise scaling to demonstrate linewidth preservation over 100 generated tones. PMID:23038314

  17. Fabrication of an implantable stretchable electro-osmosis pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanshahi, A.; Axisa, F.; Vanfleteren, J.

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of an implantable, low voltage driven microfluidic pump to deliver drugs. The micro pump has a high degree of biocompatibility and mechanical deformation capability, thanks to the use of elastic silicone elastomers (PDMS) for integration and embedding of the pump. We are using the new method of transverse DC electro-osmosis, which is demonstrated already in the literature. The method uses the fabrication of periodic grooves on top of the micro channel and the application of a DC voltage across the channel. In this contribution, for the first time the production and operation of soft elastic versions of such a pump, compatible with body tissue, is demonstrated. For the interconnects, gold is selectively electro-deposited on Cu-foil and is transferred to PDMS layer. Having only gold as the interconnect ascertains the high degree of bio-compatibility of the device. This pump works with voltages about 10V and produces mean flow speeds of about 60μm/s. The flow has also a helical profile which is a very good advantage to use this pump as a mixer for micro fluidic applications. Flow rate is measured by introducing dyed micro particles along with the liquid inside the channel.

  18. Well pump

    DOEpatents

    Ames, Kenneth R.; Doesburg, James M.

    1987-01-01

    A well pump includes a piston and an inlet and/or outlet valve assembly of special structure. Each is formed of a body of organic polymer, preferably PTFE. Each includes a cavity in its upper portion and at least one passage leading from the cavity to the bottom of the block. A screen covers each cavity and a valve disk covers each screen. Flexible sealing flanges extend upwardly and downwardly from the periphery of the piston block. The outlet valve block has a sliding block and sealing fit with the piston rod.

  19. Well pump

    SciTech Connect

    Page, J.S.

    1983-03-08

    Well fluid pumping apparatus comprises: (A) body structure defining an upright plunger bore, (B) a plunger reciprocable in that bore, (C) the body structure also defining a chamber sidewardly offset from an axis defined by the plunger bore and communicating with the bore, and (D) valving carried by the body structure to pass intake fluid via the chamber into the plunger bore in response to stroking of the plunger in one direction in the bore, and to pass discharge fluid from the plunger bore into and from the chamber in response to stroking of the plunger in the opposite direction in the bore.

  20. Far-field beam-pattern of a twin-slot HEB mixer at 600GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kangmin; Delorme, Yan; Lefevre, Roland; Dauplay, Frederic; Feret, Alexandre; Vacelet, Thibaut; Lou, Zheng; Shi, Sheng-Cai

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we report on the measured and simulated far-field beam-patterns of a quasi-optical NbN superconducting hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixer at 600GHz. This superconducting HEB mixer consists of an extended hemispherical lens with a diameter of 12.7mm and an extension length of 2.45mm, a twin-slot planar antenna (two slots measuring 148.5μm × 10.4μm with a separation of 78.98μm) and a 5.5-nm thick NbN thin-film micro-bridge with an area of 2μm × 0.2μm . The far-field beam pattern of this mixer is measured by a direct-detection technique with a dynamic range of nearly 25dB, showing an FWHM beam angle of 2.7° and -18dB level of the first side-lobe. The measured beam of the quasi-optical mixer is nearly collimated and has good Gaussian beam efficiency. In addition, the far-field beam-pattern is measured at different DC bias voltages of the superconducting HEB mixer and at different bath temperatures. The measured results are compared with the ones simulated by two different methods. Detailed measurement and simulation results will be presented.

  1. Development of Phonon-Cooled NbTiN HEB Heterodyne Mixers for GREAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedorf, S.; Muñoz, P.; Tils, T.; Honingh, C. E.; Jacobs, K.

    2005-05-01

    The current development status of Niobium-Titanium Nitride (NbTiN) HEB mixers, for example for the GREAT receiver on SOFIA, is presented for both waveguide and quasi-optical mixers for 0.8, 1.9 and 2.7 THz LO frequency. For the waveguide mixers at 0.8 and 1.9 THz the HEBs are made on 2μm thick silicon nitride membranes which are suspended in a substrate channel perpendicular to the waveguide. For the quasi-optical mixer at 2.7 THz the devices are fabricated on Si-substrates and are integrated into spiral- and double-slot antennas and used with an extended hemispherical silicon lens. Our measurements show that the waveguide/membrane mixers work well at both 800 GHz and 1.9 THz. To increase the required IF bandwidth we are developing thin NbN films. The first results of the NbN thin film development are presented in the paper.

  2. Doubling of sensitivity and bandwidth in phonon-cooled hot-electron bolometer mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselmans, Jochem J. A.; Hajenius, Merlijn; Gao, Jianrong; Korte, Piet d.; Klapwijk, Teun M.; Voronov, Boris; Gol'tsman, Gregory

    2004-10-01

    NbN hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixers are at this moment the best heterodyne detectors for frequencies above 1 THz. However, the fabrication procedure of these devices is such that the quality of the interface between the NbN superconducting film and the contact structure is not under good control. This results in a contact resistance between the NbN bolometer and the contact pad. We compare identical bolometers, with different NbN - contact pad interfaces, coupled with a spiral antenna. We find that cleaning the NbN interface and adding a thin additional superconductor prior to the gold contact deposition improves the noise temperature and the bandwidth of the HEB mixers with more than a factor of 2. We obtain a DSB noise temperature of 950 K at 2.5 THz and a Gain bandwidth of 5-6 GHz. For use in real receiver systems we design small volume (0.15x1 micron) HEB mixers with a twin slot antenna. We find that these mixers combine good sensitivity (900 K at 1.6 THz) with low LO power requirement, which is 160 - 240 nW at the Si lens of the mixer. This value is larger than expected from the isothermal technique and the known losses in the lens by a factor of 3-3.5.

  3. Lobed Mixer Design for Noise Suppression Acoustic and Aerodynamic Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Dalton, William N.; Boyd, Kathleen (Technical Monitor); Bridges, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database for the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several model-scale lobe mixers of bypass ratio 5 to 6 has been created for mixed jet speeds up to 1080 ft/s at typical take-off (TO) conditions of small-to-medium turbofan engines. The flight effect was simulated for Mach numbers up to 0.3. The static thrust performance and plume data were also obtained at typical TO and cruise conditions. The tests were done at NASA Lewis anechoic dome and ASK's FluiDyne Laboratories. The effect of several lobe mixer and nozzle parameters, such as, lobe scalloping, lobe count, lobe penetration and nozzle length was examined in terms of flyover noise at constant altitude. Sound in the nozzle reference frame was analyzed to understand the source characteristics. Several new concepts, mechanisms and methods are reported for such lobed mixers, such as, "boomerang" scallops, "tongue" mixer, detection of "excess" internal noise sources, and extrapolation of flyover noise data from one flight speed to different flight speeds. Noise reduction of as much as 3 EPNdB was found with a deeply scalloped mixer compared to annular nozzle at net thrust levels of 9500 lb for a 29 in. diameter nozzle after optimizing the nozzle length.

  4. Design of turbulent tangential micro-mixers that mix liquids on the nanosecond time scale.

    PubMed

    Mitic, Sandra; van Nieuwkasteele, Jan W; van den Berg, Albert; de Vries, Simon

    2015-01-15

    Unravelling (bio)chemical reaction mechanisms and macromolecular folding pathways on the (sub)microsecond time scale is limited by the time resolution of kinetic instruments for mixing reactants and observation of the progress of the reaction. To improve the mixing time resolution, turbulent four- and two-jet tangential micro-mixers were designed and characterized for their mixing and (unwanted) premixing performances employing acid-base reactions monitored by a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye. The mixing performances of the micro-mixers were determined after the mixing chamber in a free-flowing jet. The premixing behavior in the vortex chamber was assessed in an optically transparent glass-silicon replica of a previously well-characterized stainless-steel four-jet tangential micro-mixer. At the highest flow rates, complete mixing was achieved in 160ns with only approximately 9% premixing of the reactants. The mixing time of 160ns is at least 50 times shorter than estimated for other fast mixing devices. Key aspects to the design of ultrafast turbulent micro-mixers are discussed. The integration of these micro-mixers with an optical flow cell would enable the study of the very onset of chemical reactions in general and of enzyme catalytic reactions in particular.

  5. Phased-Array Study of Dual-Flow Jet Noise: Effect of Nozzles and Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soo Lee, Sang; Bridges, James

    2006-01-01

    A 16-microphone linear phased-array installed parallel to the jet axis and a 32-microphone azimuthal phased-array installed in the nozzle exit plane have been applied to identify the noise source distributions of nozzle exhaust systems with various internal mixers (lobed and axisymmetric) and nozzles (three different lengths). Measurements of velocity were also obtained using cross-stream stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV). Among the three nozzle lengths tested, the medium length nozzle was the quietest for all mixers at high frequency on the highest speed flow condition. Large differences in source strength distributions between nozzles and mixers occurred at or near the nozzle exit for this flow condition. The beamforming analyses from the azimuthal array for the 12-lobed mixer on the highest flow condition showed that the core flow and the lobe area were strong noise sources for the long and short nozzles. The 12 noisy spots associated with the lobe locations of the 12-lobed mixer with the long nozzle were very well detected for the frequencies 5 KHz and higher. Meanwhile, maps of the source strength of the axisymmetric splitter show that the outer shear layer was the most important noise source at most flow conditions. In general, there was a good correlation between the high turbulence regions from the PIV tests and the high noise source regions from the phased-array measurements.

  6. A Low-Noise NbTiN Hot Electron Bolometer Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. Edward; Stern, Jeffrey; Megerian, Krikor; LeDuc, Henry; Sridharan, T. K.; Gibson, Hugh; Blundell, Raymond

    2001-01-01

    Hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixer elements, based on niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN) thin film technology, have been fabricated on crystalline quartz substrates over a 20 nm thick AlN buffer layer. The film was patterned by optical lithography, yielding bolometer elements that measure about 1 micrometer long and between 2 and 12 micrometers wide. These mixer chips were mounted in a fixed-tuned waveguide mixer block, and tested in the 600 and 800 GHz frequency range. The 3-dB output bandwidth of these mixers was determined to be about 2.5 GHz and we measured a receiver noise temperature of 270 K at 630 GHz using an intermediate frequency of 1.5 GHz. The receiver has excellent amplitude stability and the noise temperature measurements are highly repeatable. An 800 GHz receiver incorporating one of these mixer chips has recently been installed at the Sub-Millimeter Telescope in Arizona for field test and for astronomical observations.

  7. Pump apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kime, J.A.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a gas-oil well production system for pumping formation fluid wherein a down hole pump is provided having a barrel including a barrel fluid inlet, a barrel fluid outlet, a barrel chamber, and a plunger mounted in the barrel chamber having a plunger chamber. The plunger is reciprocally driven between an upper terminal position at the end of the plunger upstroke and a lower terminal position at the end of the plunger downstroke. The method for removing developed gaseous fluids in the formation fluid from the barrel chamber comprises: drawing formation fluid into the barrel chamber during the plunger upstroke; providing gas port means in the barrel; expelling the developed gaseous fluids from the barrel chamber through the gas port means during the occurrence of that portion of the plunger downstroke from the upper terminal position of the gas port means; and substantially blocking the gas port means and moving formation fluid into the plunger chamber during the occurrence of that portion of the plunger downstroke from below the gas port means to the lower terminal position.

  8. Evaluation of Shear Strength Threshold of Concern for Retrieval of Interim-Stored K-Basin Sludge in the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-11-01

    K-Basin sludge will be recovered into the Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSCs) and will be stored in the T Plant for interim storage (at least 10 years). Long-term sludge storage tests conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show that high uranium content K Basin sludge can self-cement and form a strong sludge with a bulk shear strength of up to 65 kPa. Some of this sludge has "paste" and "chunks" with shear strengths of approximately 3~5 kPa and 380 ~ 770 kPa, respectively. High uranium content sludge samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (e.g., 185°C, 10 h) have been observed to form agglomerates with a shear strength up to 170 kPa. After interim storage at T Plant, the sludge in the STSCs will be mobilized by water jets impinging the sludge. The objective of the evaluation was to determine the range of sludge shear strength for which there is high confidence that a water-jet retrieval system can mobilize stored K-Basin sludge from STSCs. The shear strength at which the sludge can be retrieved is defined as the "shear strength threshold of concern." If the sludge shear strength is greater than the value of the shear strength threshold of concern, a water-jet retrieval system will be unlikely to mobilize the sludge up to the container’s walls. The shear strength threshold of concern can be compared with the range of possible shear strengths of K-Basin stored sludge to determine if the current post interim-storage, water-jet retrieval method is adequate. Fourteen effective cleaning radius (ECR) models were reviewed, and their validity was examined by applying them to Hanford 241-SY-101 and 241-AZ-101 Tanks to reproduce the measured ECR produced by the mixer pumps. The validation test identified that the Powell-3 and Crowe-2 ECR models are more accurate than other ECR models reviewed. These ECR models were used to address a question as to whether the effective cleaning radius of a water jet is sufficient or if it can be readily expanded

  9. The evaluation of a metered mixer for RTV silicone for RSRM nozzle backfill operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardell, T. C.

    1989-01-01

    Metered mixing specifically for the RSRM backfill operation was investigated. Projected advantages were the elimination of waste RTV silicone produced in the operation and the elimination of entrapped air during the mix. Although metered mixing proved to be a viable method for mixing the Dow Corning DC 90-0006 rubber with its catalyst, applying the technology to the RSRM backfill operation has several disadvantages that are decisive. Use of a metered mixer would increase the amount of material that was being scraped for each backfill and increase the amount of time required to clean up the equipment after each operation. Therefore, use of metered static mixers is not recommended for use in the RSRM nozzle backfill operations. Because metered mixers proved to have significant disadvantages other methods of mixing and dispensing the RTV during the backfill operation are being investigated, and will be reported in a separate document.

  10. Compact terahertz passive spectrometer with wideband superconductor-insulator-superconductor mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Kohjiro, S.; Yamada, T.; Shimizu, N.; Wakatsuki, A.

    2012-02-01

    We developed a compact terahertz (THz) spectrometer with a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer, aiming to realize a portable and highly sensitive spectrometer to detect dangerous gases at disaster sites. The receiver cryostat which incorporates the SIS mixer and a small cryocooler except for a helium compressor has a weight of 27 kg and dimensions of 200 mm × 270 mm × 690 mm. In spite of the small cooling capacity of the cryocooler, the SIS mixer is successfully cooled lower than 4 K, and the temperature variation is suppressed for the sensitive measurement. By adopting a frequency sweeping system using photonic local oscillator, we demonstrated a spectroscopic measurement of CH3CN gas in 0.2-0.5 THz range.

  11. Compact terahertz passive spectrometer with wideband superconductor-insulator-superconductor mixer.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, K; Kohjiro, S; Yamada, T; Shimizu, N; Wakatsuki, A

    2012-02-01

    We developed a compact terahertz (THz) spectrometer with a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer, aiming to realize a portable and highly sensitive spectrometer to detect dangerous gases at disaster sites. The receiver cryostat which incorporates the SIS mixer and a small cryocooler except for a helium compressor has a weight of 27 kg and dimensions of 200 mm × 270 mm × 690 mm. In spite of the small cooling capacity of the cryocooler, the SIS mixer is successfully cooled lower than 4 K, and the temperature variation is suppressed for the sensitive measurement. By adopting a frequency sweeping system using photonic local oscillator, we demonstrated a spectroscopic measurement of CH(3)CN gas in 0.2-0.5 THz range.

  12. Small Signal Modeling and Control of the Hydrogen Mixer for Facility E1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, Enrique

    2001-01-01

    We have undertaken the theoretical modelling of an existing liquid hydrogen (LH2) and gas hydrogen (GH2) mixer subsystem of the E1 Ground Test Facility at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center. The E1 test facility carries out comprehensive ground-based testing and certification of various liquid rocket engines and their components. The mixer described in this work is responsible for combining high pressure before it is fed into a test article. The desired properties are maintained by precise control of the mixture of LH2 and GH2 flows. The mixer is modelled as a general multi-flow lumped volume for single constituent fluids using density and internal energy as states. The set of nonlinear differential equations is linearized about an equilibrium point and the resulting two-state, 3-input linear model is analyzed as a possible candidate for control design.

  13. Gen 2.0 Mixer/Ejector Nozzle Test at LSAF June 1995 to July 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arney, L. D.; Sandquist, D. L.; Forsyth, D. W.; Lidstone, G. L.; Long-Davis, Mary Jo (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Testing of the HSCT Generation 2.0 nozzle model hardware was conducted at the Boeing Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility, LSAF. Concurrent measurements of noise and thrust were made at critical takeoff design conditions for a variety of mixer/ejector model hardware. Design variables such as suppressor area ratio, mixer area ratio, liner type and thickness, ejector length, lobe penetration, and mixer chute shape were tested. Parallel testing was conducted at G.E.'s Cell 41 acoustic free jet facility to augment the LSAF test. The results from the Gen 2.0 testing are being used to help shape the current nozzle baseline configuration and guide the efforts in the upcoming Generation 2.5 and 3.0 nozzle tests. The Gen 2.0 results have been included in the total airplane system studies conducted at MDC and Boeing to provide updated noise and thrust performance estimates.

  14. Small Signal Modelling and Control of the Hydrogen Mixer for Facility E1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    We have undertaken the theoretical modelling of an existing liquid hydrogen (LH2) and gas hydrogen (GH2) mixer subsystem of the E1 Ground Test Facility at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center. The E1 test facility carries out comprehensive ground-based testing and certification of various liquid rocket engines and their components. The mixer described in this work is responsible for combining high pressure LH2 and GH2 to produce a hydrogen flow that meets certain thermodynamic properties before it is fed into a test article. The desired properties are maintained by precise control of the mixture of LH2 and GH2 flows. The mixer is modelled as a general multi-flow lumped volume for single constituent fluids using density and internal energy as states. The set of nonlinear differential equations is linearized about an equilibrium point and the resulting two-state, 3-input linear model is analyzed as a possible candidate for control design.

  15. Superconductive hot-electron-bolometer mixer receiver for 800-GHz operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, J.; Blundell, R.; Tong, C.-Y. E.; Papa, D. C.; Hunter, T. R.; Paine, S. N.; Patt, F.; Gol'Tsman, G.; Cherednichenko, S.; Voronov, B.; Gershenzon, E.

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a superconductive hot-electron-bolometer mixer receiver designed to operate in the partially transmissive 350-μm atmospheric window. The receiver employs an NbN thin-film microbridge as the mixer element, in which the main cooling mechanism of the hot electrons is through electron-phonon interaction. At a local-oscillator frequency of 808 GHz, the measured double-sideband receiver noise temperature is Trx=970 K, across a 1-GHz intermediate-frequency bandwidth centered at 1.8 GHz. We have measured the linearity of the receiver and the amount of local-oscillator power incident on the mixer for optimal operation, which is PLO ≈ 1 microwatt. This receiver was used in making observations as a facility instrument at the Heinrich Hertz Telescope, Mt. Graham, AZ, during the 1998-1999 winter observing season.

  16. Quantum-limited operation of balanced mixer homodyne and heterodyne receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Susumu; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    1986-05-01

    In the GaAs semiconductor laser balanced mixer heterodyne receiver of Abbas and Chan (1983), the photocurrent fluctuation due to local oscillator wave intensity noise was suppressed, but the absolute quantum noise level calibration was not clarified. In this paper, the results of experimental calibration of the quantum noise level were obtained using two different methods: photocurrent spectral density measurement and photoelectron counting. The noise of a balanced mixer operation was confirmed to be truly quantum limited; the photocurrent fluctuation spectral density measured with a spectrum analyzer agreed with the quantum noise spectral density. The deviations from the absolute quantum noise level were within + or -0.02 dB. Complete suppression of local oscillator excess noise was demonstrated in the 0-1.5 GHz frequency region. Uses of balanced mixers for observing the squeezing phenomenon and quantum nondemolition measurement is mentioned.

  17. A three-dimensional turbulent compressible flow model for ejector and fluted mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushmore, W. L.; Zelazny, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    A three dimensional finite element computer code was developed to analyze ejector and axisymmetric fluted mixer systems whose flow fields are not significantly influenced by streamwise diffusion effects. A two equation turbulence model was used to make comparisons between theory and data for various flow fields which are components of the ejector system, i.e., (1) turbulent boundary layer in a duct; (2) rectangular nozzle (free jet); (3) axisymmetric nozzle (free jet); (4) hypermixing nozzle (free jet); and (5) plane wall jet. Likewise, comparisons of the code with analytical results and/or other numerical solutions were made for components of the axisymmetric fluted mixer system. These included: (1) developing pipe flow; (2) developing flow in an annular pipe; (3) developing flow in an axisymmetric pipe with conical center body and no fluting and (4) developing fluted pipe flow. Finally, two demonstration cases are presented which show the code's ability to analyze both the ejector and axisymmetric fluted mixers.

  18. Effect of mixing time and speed on experimental baking and dough testing with a 200g pin-mixer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Under mixing or over mixing the dough results in varied experimental loaf volumes. Bread preparation requires a trained baker to evaluate dough development and determine stop points of mixer. Instrumentation and electronic control of the dough mixer would allow for automatic mixing. This study us...

  19. Magnetically driven agitation in a tube mixer affords clog-resistant fast mixing independent of linear velocity.

    PubMed

    Dolman, Sarah J; Nyrop, Jason L; Kuethe, Jeffrey T

    2011-02-01

    An economical and simple flow mixer based on magnetically driven agitation in a tube (MDAT) is reported. Mixing via MDAT compared favorably to both Tee and multilaminar mixers at low flow and was successfully used to screen and optimize two challenging organometallic reactions at low temperature without clogging or the need for high dilution. PMID:21235265

  20. A compact design for the Josephson mixer: The lumped element circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Pillet, J.-D.; Flurin, E.; Mallet, F. Huard, B.

    2015-06-01

    We present a compact and efficient design in terms of gain, bandwidth, and dynamical range for the Josephson mixer, the superconducting circuit performing three-wave mixing at microwave frequencies. In an all lumped-element based circuit with galvanically coupled ports, we demonstrate nondegenerate amplification for microwave signals over a bandwidth up to 50 MHz for a power gain of 20 dB. The quantum efficiency of the mixer is shown to be about 70%, and its saturation power reaches −112 dBm.

  1. A terahertz monolithic integrated resonant tunneling diode oscillator and mixer circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, Sebastian; Tsuruda, Kazuisao; Kim, Jae-Young; Mukai, Toshikazu; Fujita, Masayuki; Nagatsuma, Tadao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the monolithic integration of two resonant tunneling diodes (RTD) to make a THz mixer circuit. The circuit uses two RTDs, which are integrated in one carrier substrate. The RTDs are biased independently. The fist RTD operates as an oscillator and provides the local oscillator signal for the second RTD operating as a mixer. The measurements demonstrate that a monolithic integration of several RTDs in one substrate is feasible. This offers new possibilities for RTD based wireless communication and sensing systems.

  2. A User's Guide for the Differential Reduced Ejector/Mixer Analysis "DREA" Program. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeChant, Lawrence J.; Nadell, Shari-Beth

    1999-01-01

    A system of analytical and numerical two-dimensional mixer/ejector nozzle models that require minimal empirical input has been developed and programmed for use in conceptual and preliminary design. This report contains a user's guide describing the operation of the computer code, DREA (Differential Reduced Ejector/mixer Analysis), that contains these mathematical models. This program is currently being adopted by the Propulsion Systems Analysis Office at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A brief summary of the DREA method is provided, followed by detailed descriptions of the program input and output files. Sample cases demonstrating the application of the program are presented.

  3. Formation and Fluorimetric Characterization of Micelles in a Micro-flow Through System with Static Micro Mixer

    PubMed Central

    Schuch, Michael; Gross, G. Alexander; Köhler, J. Michael

    2007-01-01

    The formation and behaviour of micelles of sodium dodecylsulfate in water by use of a static micro mixer were studied. Trisbipyridylruthenium(II) was applied as indicator dye, 9-methylanthracene was used for fluorescence quenching. All experiments were carried out by a micro fluid arrangement with three syringe pumps, a 2+1 two-step static micro mixer (IPHT Jena) and a on-line micro fluorimetry including a luminescence diode for excitation, a blue glass filter (BG 7, Linos), two edge filters (RG 630, Linos) and a photo counting module (MP 900, Perkin Elmer). It was possible to measure the fluorescence inside the PTFE tube (inner diameter 0.5 mm) directly. A linear dependence of fluorescence intensity from dye concentration was observed in absence of quencher and surfactant as expected. An aggregation number of about 62 was found in the flow rate range between 300 and 800 μL/min. The fluorescence intensity increases slightly, but significant with increasing flow rate, if no quencher is present. In the presence of quencher, the fluorescence intensity decreases with decreasing surfactant concentration and with enhanced flow rate. The strength of the flow rate effect on the fluorescence increases with decreasing surfactant concentration. The size of micelles was determined in micro channels by the micro fluorimetric method in analogy to the conventional system. The micelles extract the quencher from the solution and lower, this way, the quenching effect. The size of micelles was estimated and it could be shown, that the flow rate has only low effect on the aggregation number at the investigated flow rates. The effect of flow rate and surfactant concentration on the fluorescence in the presence of quencher was interpreted as a shift in the micelle concentration due to the shear forces. It is expected, that the fluorescence intensity is lowered, if more quencher molecules are molecular disperse distributed inside the solution. Obviously, the lowered fluorescence

  4. LMFBR with booster pump in pumping loop

    DOEpatents

    Rubinstein, H.J.

    1975-10-14

    A loop coolant circulation system is described for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) utilizing a low head, high specific speed booster pump in the hot leg of the coolant loop with the main pump located in the cold leg of the loop, thereby providing the advantages of operating the main pump in the hot leg with the reliability of cold leg pump operation.

  5. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, Gerald B.; Brynsvold, Glen V.; Jahns, Thomas M.

    1989-01-01

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium is disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet.

  6. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, G.B.; Brynsvold, G.V.; Jahns, T.M.

    1989-08-22

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium are disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet. 4 figs.

  7. Liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.

    1982-01-01

    The liquid metal pump comprises floating seal rings and attachment of the pump diffuser to the pump bowl for isolating structural deflections from the pump shaft bearings. The seal rings also eliminate precision machining on large assemblies by eliminating the need for a close tolerance fit between the mounting surfaces of the pump and the seals. The liquid metal pump also comprises a shaft support structure that is isolated from the pump housing for better preservation of alignment of shaft bearings. The shaft support structure also allows for complete removal of pump internals for inspection and repair.

  8. Pump Jet Mixing and Pipeline Transfer Assessment for High-Activity Radioactive Wastes in Hanford Tank 241-AZ-102

    SciTech Connect

    Y Onishi; KP Recknagle; BE Wells

    2000-08-09

    The authors evaluated how well two 300-hp mixer pumps would mix solid and liquid radioactive wastes stored in Hanford double-shell Tank 241-AZ-102 (AZ-102) and confirmed the adequacy of a three-inch (7.6-cm) pipeline system to transfer the resulting mixed waste slurry to the AP Tank Farm and a planned waste treatment (vitrification) plant on the Hanford Site. Tank AZ-102 contains 854,000 gallons (3,230 m{sup 3}) of supernatant liquid and 95,000 gallons (360 m{sup 3}) of sludge made up of aging waste (or neutralized current acid waste). The study comprises three assessments: waste chemistry, pump jet mixing, and pipeline transfer. The waste chemical modeling assessment indicates that the sludge, consisting of the solids and interstitial solution, and the supernatant liquid are basically in an equilibrium condition. Thus, pump jet mixing would not cause much solids precipitation and dissolution, only 1.5% or less of the total AZ-102 sludge. The pump jet mixing modeling indicates that two 300-hp mixer pumps would mobilize up to about 23 ft (7.0 m) of the sludge nearest the pump but would not erode the waste within seven inches (0.18 m) of the tank bottom. This results in about half of the sludge being uniformly mixed in the tank and the other half being unmixed (not eroded) at the tank bottom.

  9. Hydraulic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, P.R.; Jantzen, D.E.

    1984-05-15

    This invention relates to an improved pump jack characterized by a hollow piston rod which telescopes down over the sucker rod to which it is clamped for reciprocating motion. The cylinder, in turn, is fastened in fixed position directly to the upper exposed end of the well casing. As fluid is introduced into the lower end of the cylinder it raises the piston into engagement with a pushrod housed in the upper cylinder head that lifts switch-actuating means associated therewith into a position operative to actuate a switch located adjacent thereto thereby causing the latter to change state and actuate a multi-function solenoid valve so as to cut off fluid flow to the cylinder. As gravity lowers the sucker rod and piston exhausting the hydraulic fluid therebeneath, an adjustable stop engages the pushrod from above so as to return it together with the switch-actuating means associated therewith to their original positions thereby resetting the switch to complete the operating cycle.

  10. Work plan for SY Farm Integrated Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-2a)

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, R.P.; Katz, R.S.

    1994-10-17

    The SY Farm currently has a temporary Data Acquisition & Control System (DACS) housed in a mobile trailer. The system is currently referred to as DACS-1. It was designed and configured to support engineers and scientists conducting the special performance evaluation and testing program for the safety mitigation test equipment located in waste tank 241-SY-101 (101-SY). It is currently being maintained and utilized by engineering personnel to monitor and control the 101-SY mitigation pump activities. Based upon the results of the mitigation testing program, some of the temporary test mitigation equipment (such as mixing pump) will be replaced with longer-term ``operational`` mitigation equipment. This is resulting in new requirements for the Data Acquisition and Control System which will be full-filled by a newer control facility referred to as the DACS-2. A teaming between Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been established for the SY farm mitigation program in order to develop and implement the ``next generation`` of the data acquisition and control system for the mitigation pump operations. The new system will be configured for use by the tank farm operational personnel. It will support the routine operations necessary for safety mitigation and the future waste retrieval of Project W-211. It is intended to replace the existing DACS-1 and provide the necessary control room space for future integration of W-211.

  11. A "twisted" microfluidic mixer suitable for a wide range of flow rate applications.

    PubMed

    Sivashankar, Shilpa; Agambayev, Sumeyra; Mashraei, Yousof; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T; Salama, Khaled Nabil

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new "twisted" 3D microfluidic mixer fabricated by a laser writing/microfabrication technique. Effective and efficient mixing using the twisted micromixers can be obtained by combining two general chaotic mixing mechanisms: splitting/recombining and chaotic advection. The lamination of mixer units provides the splitting and recombination mechanism when the quadrant of circles is arranged in a two-layered serial arrangement of mixing units. The overall 3D path of the microchannel introduces the advection. An experimental investigation using chemical solutions revealed that these novel 3D passive microfluidic mixers were stable and could be operated at a wide range of flow rates. This micromixer finds application in the manipulation of tiny volumes of liquids that are crucial in diagnostics. The mixing performance was evaluated by dye visualization, and using a pH test that determined the chemical reaction of the solutions. A comparison of the tornado-mixer with this twisted micromixer was made to evaluate the efficiency of mixing. The efficiency of mixing was calculated within the channel by acquiring intensities using ImageJ software. Results suggested that efficient mixing can be obtained when more than 3 units were consecutively placed. The geometry of the device, which has a length of 30 mm, enables the device to be integrated with micro total analysis systems and other lab-on-chip devices.

  12. INTERIOR VIEW WITH MIXER TO LADLE TRANSFER. CRANE OPERATOR, M.L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH MIXER TO LADLE TRANSFER. CRANE OPERATOR, M.L. BROWN; SWITCHER, BILL CLARK; DESULPHUR OPERATORS, CHARLIE WILLIAMS AND TIM BUSH. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Q-Bop Furnace, North of Valley Road & West of Ensley, Pleasant Grove Road, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  13. INTERIOR VIEW WITH MIXER TO LADLE TRANSFER. CRANE OPERATOR, M.L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH MIXER TO LADLE TRANSFER. CRANE OPERATOR, M.L. BROWN; SWITCHER, BILL CLARK; DESULPHUR OPERATORS, CHARLIE WILLIAMS AND TIM BUSH - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Q-Bop Furnace, North of Valley Road & West of Ensley, Pleasant Grove Road, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  14. A reconfigurable passive mixer for multimode multistandard receivers in 0.18 μm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiangning, Fan; Jian, Tao; Kuan, Bao; Zhigong, Wang

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a reconfigurable quadrature passive mixer for multimode multistandard receivers. By using controllable transconductor and transimpedance-amplifier stages, the voltage conversion gain of the mixer is reconfigured according to the requirement of the selected communication standard Other characteristics such as noises figure, linearity and power consumption are also reconfigured consequently. The design concept is verified by implementing a quadrature passive mixer in 0.18 μm CMOS technology. On wafer measurement results show that, with the input radio frequency ranges from 700 MHz to 2.3 GHz, the mixer achieves a controllable voltage conversion gain from 4 to 22 dB with a step size of 6 dB. The measured maximum IIP3 is 8.5 dBm and the minimum noise figure is 8.0 dB. The consumed current for a single branch (I or Q) ranges from 3.1 to 5.6 mA from a 1.8 V supply voltage. The chip occupies an area of 0.71 mm2 including pads. Project supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2010CB327404).

  15. On-chip recalcification of citrated whole blood using a microfluidic herringbone mixer.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Marcus; Wallbank, Alison M; Dennis, Kimberly A; Wufsus, Adam R; Davis, Kara M; Rana, Kuldeepsinh; Neeves, Keith B

    2015-11-01

    In vitro assays of platelet function and coagulation are typically performed in the presence of an anticoagulant. The divalent cation chelator sodium citrate is among the most common because its effect on coagulation is reversible upon reintroduction of divalent cations. Adding divalent cations into citrated blood by batch mixing leads to platelet activation and initiation of coagulation after several minutes, thus limiting the time blood can be used before spontaneously clotting. In this work, we describe a herringbone microfluidic mixer to continuously introduce divalent cations into citrated blood. The mixing ratio, defined as the ratio of the volumetric flow rates of citrated blood and recalcification buffer, can be adjusted by changing the relative inlet pressures of these two solutions. This feature is useful in whole blood assays in order to account for differences in hematocrit, and thus viscosity. The recalcification process in the herringbone mixer does not activate platelets. The advantage of this continuous mixing approach is demonstrated in microfluidic vascular injury model in which platelets and fibrin accumulate on a collagen-tissue factor surface under flow. Continuous recalcification with the herringbone mixer allowed for flow assay times of up to 30 min, more than three times longer than the time achieved by batch recalcification. This continuous mixer allows for measurements of thrombus formation, remodeling, and fibrinolysis in vitro over time scales that are relevant to these physiological processes. PMID:26634014

  16. Nanosizing of poorly water soluble compounds using rotation/revolution mixer.

    PubMed

    Takatsuka, Takayuki; Endo, Tomoko; Jianguo, Yao; Yuminoki, Kayo; Hashimoto, Naofumi

    2009-10-01

    In this study, nanoparticles of various poorly water soluble compounds were prepared by wet milling that was carried out using a rotation/revolution mixer and zirconia balls. To be compared with Beads mill, rotation/revolution mixer has superior in very quick process (5 min) and needs very few amounts of zirconia balls (2.4 g) for pulverizing drugs to nanometer range. Phenytoin, indomethacin, nifedipine, danazol, and naproxen were selected as the standard poorly water soluble compounds. Various parameters of the rotation/revolution mixer were studied to decide the optimal pulverization conditions for the production of nanoparticles of the abovementioned compounds. The rotation/revolution speed, shape of the mixing vessel, amount of zirconia balls, and volume of the vehicle (methylcellulose solution) mainly affected the pulverization of the compounds. Using the mixer, phenytoin could be pulverized to nanoparticles within a few minutes. The particle size was confirmed by using a scanning electron microscope and a particle size analyzer. The crystallinity of the pulverized phenytoin particles was confirmed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was observed that the pulverized phenytoin particles retained their crystallinity, and amorphous phenytoin was not detected. Particles of other poorly water soluble compounds were also reduced to the nanometer range by using this method. PMID:19801859

  17. Vortical and turbulent structure of a lobed mixer free shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, D. C.; Bennett, J. C., Jr.

    1994-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the vortical and turbulent structure in a free shear layer downstream of a lobed mixer has been conducted. Pulsed-laser flow visualization with smoke and three-dimensional velocity measurements with hot-film anemometry were obtained for a lobed-mixer configuration and a baseline, planar configuration. Laminar and turbulent initial boundary-layer conditions were documented for both cases. The main result of this investigation is that a new vortex structure was confirmed to exist for the lobed mixer in addition to the well-known streamwise vortex array, consistent with the work of Manning. The normal vortex (due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) sheds periodically from the convoluted trailing edge of the lobed mixer and plays a major part in the enhanced mixing process in combination with the streamwise vorticity. The streamwise vorticity deforms the normal vortex into a pinched-off structure that is unstable and creates intense small-scale turbulence and mixing.

  18. 7 CFR 58.228 - Dump hoppers, screens, mixers and conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dump hoppers, screens, mixers and conveyors. 58.228 Section 58.228 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED)...

  19. Nanosizing of poorly water soluble compounds using rotation/revolution mixer.

    PubMed

    Takatsuka, Takayuki; Endo, Tomoko; Jianguo, Yao; Yuminoki, Kayo; Hashimoto, Naofumi

    2009-10-01

    In this study, nanoparticles of various poorly water soluble compounds were prepared by wet milling that was carried out using a rotation/revolution mixer and zirconia balls. To be compared with Beads mill, rotation/revolution mixer has superior in very quick process (5 min) and needs very few amounts of zirconia balls (2.4 g) for pulverizing drugs to nanometer range. Phenytoin, indomethacin, nifedipine, danazol, and naproxen were selected as the standard poorly water soluble compounds. Various parameters of the rotation/revolution mixer were studied to decide the optimal pulverization conditions for the production of nanoparticles of the abovementioned compounds. The rotation/revolution speed, shape of the mixing vessel, amount of zirconia balls, and volume of the vehicle (methylcellulose solution) mainly affected the pulverization of the compounds. Using the mixer, phenytoin could be pulverized to nanoparticles within a few minutes. The particle size was confirmed by using a scanning electron microscope and a particle size analyzer. The crystallinity of the pulverized phenytoin particles was confirmed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was observed that the pulverized phenytoin particles retained their crystallinity, and amorphous phenytoin was not detected. Particles of other poorly water soluble compounds were also reduced to the nanometer range by using this method.

  20. Design of a novel mixer with high gain and linearity improvement for DRM/DAB applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiqiang, Wu; Zhigong, Wang; Jian, Xu; Jian, Wang; Ouli, Zhang; Lu, Tang

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on a new design of a down-conversion mixer for a low-IF wideband receiver. Based on the folded structure and differential multiple gated transistor (DMGTR) technique, a novel quadrature mixer with a high conversion gain, a moderate linearity, and a moderate NF is proposed. The mixer is designed and implemented in a 0.18-μm CMOS process, and can operate in a frequency range from 150 kHz to 1.5 GHz. The circuit performance is confirmed by both simulation and measurement results. The measurement results exhibit a peak conversion gain of 13.35 dB, a high third order input referred intercept point of 14.85 dBm, and a moderate single side band noise figure of 10.67 dB. Moreover, the whole quadrature mixer core occupies a compact die area of 0.122 mm2. It consumes a current of 3.96 mA (excluding the output buffers) under a single supply voltage of 1.8 V.

  1. A “twisted” microfluidic mixer suitable for a wide range of flow rate applications

    PubMed Central

    Sivashankar, Shilpa; Agambayev, Sumeyra; Mashraei, Yousof; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.; Salama, Khaled Nabil

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new “twisted” 3D microfluidic mixer fabricated by a laser writing/microfabrication technique. Effective and efficient mixing using the twisted micromixers can be obtained by combining two general chaotic mixing mechanisms: splitting/recombining and chaotic advection. The lamination of mixer units provides the splitting and recombination mechanism when the quadrant of circles is arranged in a two-layered serial arrangement of mixing units. The overall 3D path of the microchannel introduces the advection. An experimental investigation using chemical solutions revealed that these novel 3D passive microfluidic mixers were stable and could be operated at a wide range of flow rates. This micromixer finds application in the manipulation of tiny volumes of liquids that are crucial in diagnostics. The mixing performance was evaluated by dye visualization, and using a pH test that determined the chemical reaction of the solutions. A comparison of the tornado-mixer with this twisted micromixer was made to evaluate the efficiency of mixing. The efficiency of mixing was calculated within the channel by acquiring intensities using ImageJ software. Results suggested that efficient mixing can be obtained when more than 3 units were consecutively placed. The geometry of the device, which has a length of 30 mm, enables the device to be integrated with micro total analysis systems and other lab-on-chip devices. PMID:27453767

  2. A "twisted" microfluidic mixer suitable for a wide range of flow rate applications.

    PubMed

    Sivashankar, Shilpa; Agambayev, Sumeyra; Mashraei, Yousof; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T; Salama, Khaled Nabil

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new "twisted" 3D microfluidic mixer fabricated by a laser writing/microfabrication technique. Effective and efficient mixing using the twisted micromixers can be obtained by combining two general chaotic mixing mechanisms: splitting/recombining and chaotic advection. The lamination of mixer units provides the splitting and recombination mechanism when the quadrant of circles is arranged in a two-layered serial arrangement of mixing units. The overall 3D path of the microchannel introduces the advection. An experimental investigation using chemical solutions revealed that these novel 3D passive microfluidic mixers were stable and could be operated at a wide range of flow rates. This micromixer finds application in the manipulation of tiny volumes of liquids that are crucial in diagnostics. The mixing performance was evaluated by dye visualization, and using a pH test that determined the chemical reaction of the solutions. A comparison of the tornado-mixer with this twisted micromixer was made to evaluate the efficiency of mixing. The efficiency of mixing was calculated within the channel by acquiring intensities using ImageJ software. Results suggested that efficient mixing can be obtained when more than 3 units were consecutively placed. The geometry of the device, which has a length of 30 mm, enables the device to be integrated with micro total analysis systems and other lab-on-chip devices. PMID:27453767

  3. Turbofan forced mixer lobe flow modeling. 1: Experimental and analytical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T.; Paterson, R. W.; Skebe, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    A joint analytical and experimental investigation of three-dimensional flowfield development within the lobe region of turbofan forced mixer nozzles is described. The objective was to develop a method for predicting the lobe exit flowfield. In the analytical approach, a linearized inviscid aerodynamical theory was used for representing the axial and secondary flows within the three-dimensional convoluted mixer lobes and three-dimensional boundary layer analysis was applied thereafter to account for viscous effects. The experimental phase of the program employed three planar mixer lobe models having different waveform shapes and lobe heights for which detailed measurements were made of the three-dimensional velocity field and total pressure field at the lobe exit plane. Velocity data was obtained using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and total pressure probing and hot wire anemometry were employed to define exit plane total pressure and boundary layer development. Comparison of data and analysis was performed to assess analytical model prediction accuracy. As a result of this study a planar mixed geometry analysis was developed. A principal conclusion is that the global mixer lobe flowfield is inviscid and can be predicted from an inviscid analysis and Kutta condition.

  4. AlGaAs/GaAs quasi-bulk effect mixers: Analysis and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yngvesson, K. S.; Yang, J.-X.; Agahi, F.; Dai, D.; Musante, C.; Grammer, W.; Lau, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    The lowest noise temperature for any receiver in the 0.5 to 1 THz range has been achieved with the bulk InSb hot electron mixer, which unfortunately suffers from the problem of having a very narrow bandwidth (1-2 MHz). We have demonstrated a three order of magnitude improvement in the bandwidth of hot electron mixers, by using the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) medium at the hetero-interface between AlGaAs and GaAs. We have tested both inhouse MOCVD-grown material, and MBE materials, with similar results. The conversion loss (L(sub c)) at 94 GHz is presently 18 dB for a mixer operating at 20 K, and calculations indicate that L(sub c) can be decreased to about 10 dB in future devices. Calculated and measured curves of L(sub c), versus PLO and IDC, respectively, agree well. We argue that there are several different configurations of hot electron mixers, which will also show wide bandwidth, and that these devices are likely to become important as low-noise THz receivers in the future.

  5. Using students' misconceptions of primary coloured lights to design a hands-on coloured light mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Chitaree, Ratchapak

    2009-06-01

    A surface mount typed multi-coloured Light-Emitting Diode (LED) is used as a light source for the hands-on coloured light mixer. The LED consists of red, green and blue tiny sources but the mixer is designed to have four switches corresponding to red, green, blue and yellow light. These colours correspond to students' misconceptions of primary coloured lights; they realize that the primary colours and the rules for lights mixing are the same as those of paints. To generate a yellow light, a microcontroller placed between four input switches and the LED operates both a red and green tiny sources. In addition, the microcontroller is employed to eliminate some combinations of coloured light mixing to simplify the experiment (basic mode) for non advanced students. If the mixer is used with more advanced students, a number of combinations will increase and students need more analytical skills to find out the primary coloured lights (the coloured lights that can not be produced by the mixing of any other coloured lights). Therefore, the mixer is able to use with more advanced and non advanced students depending on the program in the microcontroller and some modifications of the circuit. Furthermore, to introduce students an idea that other hues or shades can be generated by mixing of these three primary coloured lights of different intensities, a tuning circuit is integrated to vary an intensity of the green light source.

  6. Selective mixer for solar pond and method of using same

    SciTech Connect

    Assaf, G.

    1982-06-29

    The density profile of a halocline, which increases monotonically with depth, is modified by drawing water from different levels of the halocline (And therefore of different densities) into a mixing chamber, mixing the water in the mixing chamber and discharging the water in the mixing chamber into the halocline intermediate the levels from which the water is drawn. In one technique, a closed chamber is inserted into the halocline , the chamber having a vertically oriented slot defining a preselected layer of the halocline. The contents of the chamber are mixed to establish a uniform density equal to the average density of the water in the preselected layer. As a consequence, the vertical variation in density across the slot between the water inside and outside the chamber establishes a static pressure differential which causes water in the layer to flow into and out of the chamber until the density of the layer is uniform. In another technique, water is pumped into a mixing chamber from two different levels in the halocline and discharged into the halocline intermediate the levels from which the water is drawn. With this arrangement, the density of the water in the mixing chamber can be adjusted in accordance with the relative amount of water pumped from each level.

  7. Development of hot-electron THz bolometric mixers using MgB2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunnane, Daniel; Kawamura, Jonathan; Karasik, Boris S.; Wolak, Matthaeus A.; Xi, X. X.

    2014-07-01

    Terahertz high-resolution spectroscopy of interstellar molecular clouds greatly relies on hot-electron superconducting bolometric (HEB) mixers. Current state-of-the-art receivers use mixer devices made from ultrathin (~ 3-5 nm) films of NbN with critical temperature ~ 9-11 K. Such mixers have been deployed on a number of groundbased, suborbital, and orbital platforms including the HIFI instrument on the Hershel Space Observatory. Despite its good sensitivity and well-established fabrication process, the NbN HEB mixer suffers from the narrow intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidth ~ 2-3 GHz and is limited to operation at liquid Helium temperature. As the heterodyne receivers are now trending towards "high THz" frequencies, the need in a larger IF bandwidth becomes more pressing since the same velocity resolution for a Doppler shifted line at 5 THz requires a 5-times greater IF bandwidth than at 1 THz. Our work is focusing on the realization of practical HEB mixers using ultrathin (10-20 nm) MgB2 films. They are prepared using a Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) process yielding ultrathin films with critical temperature ~ 37-39 K. The expectation is that the combination of small thickness, high acoustic phonon transparency at the interface with the substrate, and very short electron-phonon relaxation time may lead to IF bandwidth ~ 10 GHz or even higher. SiC continues to be the most favorable substrate for MgB2 growth and as a result, a study has been conducted on the transparency of SiC at THz frequencies. FTIR measurements show that semi-insulating SiC substrates are at least as transparent as Si up to 2.5 THz. Currently films are passivated using a thin (10 nm) SiO2 layer which is deposited ex-situ via RF magnetron sputtering. Micron-sized spiral antenna-coupled HEB mixers have been fabricated using MgB2 films as thin as 10 nm. Fabrication was done using contact UV lithography and Ar Ion milling, with E-beam evaporated Au films deposited for the

  8. Multiple pump housing

    DOEpatents

    Donoho, II, Michael R.; Elliott; Christopher M.

    2010-03-23

    A fluid delivery system includes a first pump having a first drive assembly, a second pump having a second drive assembly, and a pump housing. At least a portion of each of the first and second pumps are located in the housing.

  9. Commercial Submersible Mixing Pump For SRS Tank Waste Removal - 15223

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Mike; Herbert, James E.; Scheele, Patrick W.

    2015-01-12

    The Savannah River Site Tank Farms have 45 active underground waste tanks used to store and process nuclear waste materials. There are 4 different tank types, ranging in capacity from 2839 m3 to 4921 m3 (750,000 to 1,300,000 gallons). Eighteen of the tanks are older style and do not meet all current federal standards for secondary containment. The older style tanks are the initial focus of waste removal efforts for tank closure and are referred to as closure tanks. Of the original 51 underground waste tanks, six of the original 24 older style tanks have completed waste removal and are filled with grout. The insoluble waste fraction that resides within most waste tanks at SRS requires vigorous agitation to suspend the solids within the waste liquid in order to transfer this material for eventual processing into glass filled canisters at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). SRS suspends the solid waste by use of recirculating mixing pumps. Older style tanks generally have limited riser openings which will not support larger mixing pumps, since the riser access is typically 58.4 cm (23 inches) in diameter. Agitation for these tanks has been provided by four long shafted standard slurry pumps (SLP) powered by an above tank 112KW (150 HP) electric motor. The pump shaft is lubricated and cooled in a pressurized water column that is sealed from the surrounding waste in the tank. Closure of four waste tanks has been accomplished utilizing long shafted pump technology combined with heel removal using multiple technologies. Newer style waste tanks at SRS have larger riser openings, allowing the processing of waste solids to be accomplished with four large diameter SLPs equipped with 224KW (300 HP) motors. These tanks are used to process the waste from closure tanks for DWPF. In addition to the SLPs, a 224KW (300 HP) submersible mixer pump (SMP) has also been developed and deployed within older style tanks. The SMPs are product cooled and

  10. Submillimeter SIS Mixers Using High Current Density Nb/AIN/Nb Tunnel Junctions and NbTiN Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, J.; Miller, D.; Chen, J.; Kooi, J.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Bumble, B.; Leduc, H.; Stern, J.

    1999-03-01

    We are currently exploring ways to improve the performance of SIS mixers above 700 GHz. One approach is to use NbTiN in place of Nb for all or some of the mixer circuitry. With its high gap frequency and low losses demonstrated up to 800 GHz, it should be possible to fabricate an all-NbTiN SIS mixer with near quantum-limited noise performance up to 1.2 THz. Using a quasioptical twin-slot two-junction mixer with NbTiN ground plane and wiring and hybrid Nb/A1N/NbTiN junctions, we measured an uncorrected receiver noise temperature of TRx ~ 500 K across 790-850 GHz at 4.2 K bath temperature. Our second approach is to reduce the RC product of the mixer by employing very high current density Nb/A1N/Nb junctions. By using these we will greatly relax the requirement on tuning circuits, which is where substantial losses occur in mixers operating above the Nb gap frequency. These junctions have resistance-area products of R_N*A ~ 5.6 Ohm um2, good subgap to normal resistance ratios, R_sg/R_N ~ 10, and good run-to-run reproducibility. From FTS measurements we infer that omega*R_N*C = 1 at 270 GHz in these junctions. This is a substantial improvement over that available using Nb/Al0x/Nb technology. The sensitivity of a receiver incorporating these high current density mixers is T_Rx = 110 K at 533 GHz using a design for lower J_c mixers, which is close to the best we have measured with lower J_c Nb/Al0x/Nb mixers.

  11. Development of a Fast Microfluidic Mixer for Studies of Protein Folding KineticsFinal Report Cover Page

    SciTech Connect

    Bakajin, O

    2005-02-10

    We designed and fabricated mixing devices that will help us elucidate the mechanisms of protein folding through measurements of folding reaction rates. These devices can be used in studying of other biological systems and are compatible with various spectroscopic observation methods. The project involved development of fabrication processes and setup of a laboratory for assembly and characterization of microfluidic devices, as well as measurements of protein folding kinetics. We produced three variants of the mixer: (1) The ultra fast mixer for Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer measurements (described by Anal. Chem. Article UCRL-JRNL-206676) and MicroTAS Conference Proceedings article (UCRL-JC-153057 ) included in the report; (2) The ultra fast mixer for UV measurements (described by the poster presented at MicroTAS conference (UCRL-POST-207476) included in the report); and (3) The mixer for single molecule measurements (described by the Science article UCRL-JC-153057) included in the report. In these mixers, the channels are narrow, ranging from a few to hundreds of {micro}m, so that the flow is laminar and all of the mixing is achieved through diffusion. Our goal is to develop robust microfluidic mixer with at least 100 times lower consumption rate, shorter dead time and time resolution than commercially available mixers that would be compatible with most commonly used spectroscopic methods. We are also developing mixers that can be used in combination with single molecule spectroscopy. The mixers are used to study kinetics of fast protein folding reactions using bulk fluorescence and single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques. Capabilities for microfluidic have been developed at BSNL that will be useful for studies of interactions of DNA with proteins and other projects such as the single molecule detector for detection of low concentration of toxins.

  12. High density 3D printed microfluidic valves, pumps, and multiplexers.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hua; Woolley, Adam T; Nordin, Gregory P

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that 3D printing with a digital light processor stereolithographic (DLP-SLA) 3D printer can be used to create high density microfluidic devices with active components such as valves and pumps. Leveraging our previous work on optical formulation of inexpensive resins (RSC Adv., 2015, 5, 106621), we demonstrate valves with only 10% of the volume of our original 3D printed valves (Biomicrofluidics, 2015, 9, 016501), which were already the smallest that have been reported. Moreover, we show that incorporation of a thermal initiator in the resin formulation along with a post-print bake can dramatically improve the durability of 3D printed valves up to 1 million actuations. Using two valves and a valve-like displacement chamber (DC), we also create compact 3D printed pumps. With 5-phase actuation and a 15 ms phase interval, we obtain pump flow rates as high as 40 μL min(-1). We also characterize maximum pump back pressure (i.e., maximum pressure the pump can work against), maximum flow rate (flow rate when there is zero back pressure), and flow rate as a function of the height of the pump outlet. We further demonstrate combining 5 valves and one DC to create a 3-to-2 multiplexer with integrated pump. In addition to serial multiplexing, we also show that the device can operate as a mixer. Importantly, we illustrate the rapid fabrication and test cycles that 3D printing makes possible by implementing a new multiplexer design to improve mixing, and fabricate and test it within one day.

  13. High density 3D printed microfluidic valves, pumps, and multiplexers.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hua; Woolley, Adam T; Nordin, Gregory P

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that 3D printing with a digital light processor stereolithographic (DLP-SLA) 3D printer can be used to create high density microfluidic devices with active components such as valves and pumps. Leveraging our previous work on optical formulation of inexpensive resins (RSC Adv., 2015, 5, 106621), we demonstrate valves with only 10% of the volume of our original 3D printed valves (Biomicrofluidics, 2015, 9, 016501), which were already the smallest that have been reported. Moreover, we show that incorporation of a thermal initiator in the resin formulation along with a post-print bake can dramatically improve the durability of 3D printed valves up to 1 million actuations. Using two valves and a valve-like displacement chamber (DC), we also create compact 3D printed pumps. With 5-phase actuation and a 15 ms phase interval, we obtain pump flow rates as high as 40 μL min(-1). We also characterize maximum pump back pressure (i.e., maximum pressure the pump can work against), maximum flow rate (flow rate when there is zero back pressure), and flow rate as a function of the height of the pump outlet. We further demonstrate combining 5 valves and one DC to create a 3-to-2 multiplexer with integrated pump. In addition to serial multiplexing, we also show that the device can operate as a mixer. Importantly, we illustrate the rapid fabrication and test cycles that 3D printing makes possible by implementing a new multiplexer design to improve mixing, and fabricate and test it within one day. PMID:27242064

  14. Continuously pumping and reactivating gas pump

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.; Call, Wayne R.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for continuous pumping using cycling cyropumping panels. A plurality of liquid helium cooled panels are surrounded by movable nitrogen cooled panels the alternatively expose or shield the helium cooled panels from the space being pumped. Gases condense on exposed helium cooled panels until the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to isolate the helium cooled panels. The helium cooled panels are incrementally warmed, causing captured gases to accumulate at the base of the panels, where an independent pump removes the gases. After the helium cooled panels are substantially cleaned of condensate, the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to expose the helium cooled panels to the space being pumped.

  15. Continuously pumping and reactivating gas pump

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    Apparatus for continuous pumping using cycling cryopumping panels. A plurality of liquid helium cooled panels are surrounded by movable nitrogen cooled panels that alternatively expose or shield the helium cooled panels from the space being pumped. Gases condense on exposed helium cooled panels until the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to isolate the helium cooled panels. The helium cooled panels are incrementally warmed, causing captured gases to accumulate at the base of the panels, where an independant pump removes the gases. After the helium cooled panels are substantially cleaned of condensate, the nitrogen cooled panels are positioned to expose the helium cooled panels to the space being pumped.

  16. Alternative backing up pump for turbomolecular pumps

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2003-04-22

    As an alternative to the use of a mechanical backing pump in the application of wide range turbomolecular pumps in ultra-high and extra high vacuum applications, palladium oxide is used to convert hydrogen present in the evacuation stream and related volumes to water with the water then being cryo-pumped to a low pressure of below about 1.e.sup.-3 Torr at 150.degree. K. Cryo-pumping is achieved using a low cost Kleemenco cycle cryocooler, a somewhat more expensive thermoelectric cooler, a Venturi cooler or a similar device to achieve the required minimization of hydrogen partial pressure.

  17. Tritium gas transfer pump development

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    Non-lubricated, hermetically sealed pumps for tritium service have been selected to replace Sprengel pumps in the existing Tritium Facility. These pumps will be the primary gas-transfer pumps in the planned Replacement Tritium Facility. The selected pumps are Metal Bellows Corporation's bellows pumps and Normetex scroll pumps. Pumping range for a Normetex/Metal Bellows system is from 0.01 torr suction to 2300 torr discharge. Performance characteristics of both pumps are presented. 10 figs.

  18. HgCdTe Photoconductive Mixers for 2-8 THz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.; Sivananthan, S.; Ashokan, R.

    2001-01-01

    Heterodyne spectroscopy has been taken to wavelengths as short as 63 micrometers with Schottky-diode mixers. Schottkys, however, are relatively insensitive compared to superconducting mixers such as the hot-electron microbolometer (HEB), which has an effective quantum efficiency of 3% at 120 micrometers (2.5 THz). Although HEB sensitivities are bound to improve, there will always be losses associated with antenna coupling of radiation into sub-micron size devices. Another approach to far infrared (FIR) mixer design is to use a photoconductive device which can be made much larger than a wavelength, and thus act as its own antenna. For example, HgCdTe photodiodes have been used as mixers in the lambda = 10 micrometers band for over 25 years, with sensitivities now only a factor of 2 from the quantum-noise-limit. HgCdTe can also be applied at FIR wavelengths, but surprisingly little work has been done to date. The exception is the pioneering work of Spears and Kostiuk and Spears, who developed HgCdTe photomixers for the 20-120 micrometer region. The spectral versatility of the HgCdTe alloy is well recognized for wavelengths as long as 8-20 micrometers. What is not so recognized, however, is that theoretically there is no long wavelength limit for appropriately composited HgCdTe. Although Spears successfully demonstrated a photoconductive response from HgCdTe at 120 micrometers, this initial effort was apparently never followed up, in part because of the difficulty of controlling the HgCdTe alloy composition with liquid-phase-epitaxy (LPE) techniques. With the availability of precise molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) since the early 1990's, it is now appropriate to reconsider HgCdTe for detector applications longward of lambda = 20 micrometers. We recently initiated an effort to fabricate detectors and mixers using II-VI materials for FIR wavelengths. Of particular interest are device structures called superlattices, which offer a number of advantages for high sensitivity

  19. Design of a mixer for the thrust-vectoring system on the high-alpha research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahle, Joseph W.; Bundick, W. Thomas; Yeager, Jessie C.; Beissner, Fred L., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    One of the advanced control concepts being investigated on the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) is multi-axis thrust vectoring using an experimental thrust-vectoring (TV) system consisting of three hydraulically actuated vanes per engine. A mixer is used to translate the pitch-, roll-, and yaw-TV commands into the appropriate TV-vane commands for distribution to the vane actuators. A computer-aided optimization process was developed to perform the inversion of the thrust-vectoring effectiveness data for use by the mixer in performing this command translation. Using this process a new mixer was designed for the HARV and evaluated in simulation and flight. An important element of the Mixer is the priority logic, which determines priority among the pitch-, roll-, and yaw-TV commands.

  20. Oxide_Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Exhaust Mixer Development in the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiser, James D.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Szelagowski, J.; Sokhey, J.; Heffernan, T.; Clegg, J.; Pierluissi, A.; Riedell, J.; Atmur, S.; Wyen, T.; Ursic, J.

    2015-01-01

    Rolls-Royce North American Technologies, Inc. (LibertyWorksLW) began considering the development of CMC exhaust forced mixers in 2008, as a means of obtaining reduced weight and hotter operating temperature capability, while minimizing shape distortion during operation, which would improve mixing efficiency and reduce fuel burn. Increased component durability, enhanced ability to fabricate complex-shaped components, and engine noise reduction are other potential advantages of CMC mixers (compared to metallic mixers). In 2010, NASA was pursuing the reduction of NOx emissions, fuel burn, and noise from turbine engines in Phase I of the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project. ERA subtasks, including those focused on CMC components, were formulated with the goal of maturing technology from proof of concept validation (TRL 3) to a systemsubsystem or prototype demonstration in a relevant environment (TRL 6). In April 2010, the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and LibertyWorks jointly initiated a CMC Exhaust System Validation Program within the ERA Project, teaming on CMC exhaust mixer development for subsonic jet engines capable of operating with increased performance. Our initial focus was on designing, fabricating, and characterizing the thrust and acoustic performance of a roughly quarter-scale 16-lobe oxide oxide CMC mixer and tail cone along with a conventional low bypass exhaust nozzle. Support Services, LLC (Allendale, MI) and ATK COI Ceramics, Inc. (COIC, in San Diego, CA) supported the design of a subscale nozzle assembly that consisted of an oxide oxide CMC mixer and center body, with each component mounted on a metallic attachment ring. That design was based upon the operating conditions a mixer would experience in a turbofan engine. Validation of the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the subscale mixer via testing and the achievement of TRL 4 encouraged the NASALWCOIC team to move to the next phase where a full scale CMC mixer sized for a RR

  1. Gas pump with movable gas pumping panels

    DOEpatents

    Osher, J.L.

    Apparatus for pumping gas continuously a plurality of articulated panels of getter material, each of which absorbs gases on one side while another of its sides is simultaneously reactivated in a zone isolated by the panels themselves from a working space being pumped.

  2. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  3. Insulin pump (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted through a needle into the abdominal ... with diabetes. Dosage instructions are entered into the pump's small computer and the appropriate amount of insulin ...

  4. A Low-noise Micromachined Millimeter-Wave Heterodyne Mixer using Nb Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLange, Gert; Jacobson, Brian R.; Hu, Qing

    1996-01-01

    A heterodyne mixer with a micromachined horn antenna and a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction as mixing element is tested in the W-band (75-115 GHz) frequency range. Micromachined integrated horn antennas consist of a dipole antenna suspended on a thin Si3N4 dielectric membrane inside a pyramidal cavity etched in silicon. The mixer performance is optimized by using a backing plane behind the dipole antenna to tune out the capacitance of the tunnel junction. The lowest receiver noise temperature of 30 +/- 3 K (without any correction) is measured at 106 GHz with a 3-dB bandwidth of 8 GHz. This sensitivity is comparable to the state-of-the-art waveguide and quasi-optical SIS receivers, showing the potential use of micromachined horn antennas in imaging arrays.

  5. Slot Antenna Coupled YBa2Cu3O7-δ Josephson Mixers for Millimeter Wave Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Akihisa; Uchida, Takashi; Yasuoka, Yoshizumi

    1999-12-01

    The antenna structure and the direction of the irradiated signal wave were investigated in order to improve the responsivity of a slot antenna coupled YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) Josephson mixer. The slot antenna coupled Josephson mixer consists of a thin-film slot antenna on a fused quartz substrate and a YBCO Josephson junction on a MgO substrate. It was found that maximum responsivity was obtained by letting the thickness of the MgO substrate be odd multiples of λd/4 (λd: wavelength in the substrate) and irradiating the electromagnetic wave through the MgO substrate. Furthermore, the device with the optimized structure improved the responsivity in the third-harmonic mixing by 7 dB compared to the device without a slot antenna in the harmonicmixing at 48 GHz.

  6. Frequency-Domain Analysis of Diffusion-Cooled Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalare, A.; McGrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    1998-01-01

    A new theoretical model is introduced to describe heterodyne mixer conversion efficiency and noise (from thermal fluctuation effects) in diffusion-cooled superconducting hot-electron bolometers. The model takes into account the non-uniform internal electron temperature distribution generated by Wiedemann-Franz heat conduction, and accepts for input an arbitrary (analytical or experimental) superconducting resistance-versus- temperature curve. A non-linear large-signal solution is solved iteratively to calculate the temperature distribution, and a linear frequency-domain small-signal formulation is used to calculate conversion efficiency and noise. In the small-signal solution the device is discretized into segments, and matrix algebra is used to relate the heating modulation in the segments to temperature and resistance modulations. Matrix expressions are derived that allow single-sideband mixer conversion efficiency and coupled noise power to be directly calculated. The model accounts for self-heating and electrothermal feedback from the surrounding bias circuit.

  7. Photovoltaic pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klockgether, J.; Kiessling, K. P.

    1983-09-01

    Solar pump systems for the irrigation of fields and for water supply in regions with much sunshine are discussed. For surface water and sources with a hoisting depth of 12 m, a system with immersion pumps is used. For deep sources with larger hoisting depths, an underwater motor pump was developed. Both types of pump system meet the requirements of simple installation and manipulation, safe operation, maintenance free, and high efficiency reducing the number of solar cells needed.

  8. Turbofan forced mixer-nozzle internal flowfield. Volume 2: Computational fluid dynamic predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werle, M. J.; Vasta, V. N.

    1982-01-01

    A general program was conducted to develop and assess a computational method for predicting the flow properties in a turbofan forced mixed duct. The detail assessment of the resulting computer code is presented. It was found that the code provided excellent predictions of the kinematics of the mixing process throughout the entire length of the mixer nozzle. The thermal mixing process between the hot core and cold fan flows was found to be well represented in the low speed portion of the flowfield.

  9. An All-Optical Microwave Mixer with 8db RF Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, W.; Yao, S. X.; Lutes, G.; Maleki, L.

    1997-01-01

    An all-optical microwave mixer with an 8dB RF gain is demonstrated by using a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). 6GHz RF signal on a 1312 nm optical carrier is up-converted and down-converted to 1GHZ and 11 GHz by a 5GHz local oscillation (LO) signal on a 1320 nm optical carrier. Such a carrier could readily extend to millimeter wave range.

  10. Generation of wideband frequency combs by continuous-wave seeding of multistage mixers with synthesized dispersion.

    PubMed

    Myslivets, Evgeny; Kuo, Bill P P; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2012-01-30

    We numerically and experimentally demonstrate efficient generation of an equalized optical comb with 150-nm bandwidth. The comb was generated by low-power, continuous-wave seeds, eliminating the need for pulsed laser sources. The new architecture relies on efficient creation of higher-order mixing tones in phase-matched nonlinear fiber stages separated by a linear compressor. Wideband generation was enabled by precise dispersion engineering of multiple-stage parametric mixers.

  11. Tank 241-AZ-101 criticality assessment resulting from pump jet mixing: Sludge mixing simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Recknagle, K.

    1997-04-01

    Tank 241-AZ-101 (AZ-101) is one of 28 double-shell tanks located in the AZ farm in the Hanford Site`s 200 East Area. The tank contains a significant quantity of fissile materials, including an estimated 9.782 kg of plutonium. Before beginning jet pump mixing for mitigative purposes, the operations must be evaluated to demonstrate that they will be subcritical under both normal and credible abnormal conditions. The main objective of this study was to address a concern about whether two 300-hp pumps with four rotating 18.3-m/s (60-ft/s) jets can concentrate plutonium in their pump housings during mixer pump operation and cause a criticality. The three-dimensional simulation was performed with the time-varying TEMPEST code to determine how much the pump jet mixing of Tank AZ-101 will concentrate plutonium in the pump housing. The AZ-101 model predicted that the total amount of plutonium within the pump housing peaks at 75 g at 10 simulation seconds and decreases to less than 10 g at four minutes. The plutonium concentration in the entire pump housing peaks at 0.60 g/L at 10 simulation seconds and is reduced to below 0.1 g/L after four minutes. Since the minimum critical concentration of plutonium is 2.6 g/L, and the minimum critical plutonium mass under idealized plutonium-water conditions is 520 g, these predicted maximums in the pump housing are much lower than the minimum plutonium conditions needed to reach a criticality level. The initial plutonium maximum of 1.88 g/L still results in safety factor of 4.3 in the pump housing during the pump jet mixing operation.

  12. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Kirol, Lance D.

    1988-01-01

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation.

  13. Multiwell pumping device

    SciTech Connect

    Dysarz, E.D.

    1987-06-30

    This patent describes a balanced pumping apparatus for pumping two laterally spaced wells comprising: a left conductor on a left well; a right conductor on a right the well; a left pump casing inside the well conductor; a right pump casing inside the right well conductor; a left sucker rod inside the left pump casing; a right sucker rod inside the right pump casing; flexible linkage means for attachment to the top ends of the right sucker rod and left sucker rod; a drive motor with a rotating shaft; a drive sprocket rotatably engaging the flexible linkage means; a separate pump casing flange attached to the upper section of each well conductors; a separate upper flange attached to the upper section of each pump casing and positioned at an axial location above the point attached to the pump casing; a separate transition piece attached to the top of each pump casing flange; a separate pump support attached to the top of each transition piece; a plate-like structural support means placed in a vertical plane above the well conductors and supporting the drive motor, the drive sprocket, the flexible linkage means, and the sucker rods; a structural load transfer means connecting the plate-like structural support means to the well conductors; a motor control unit for supporting itself and controlling the drive motor; and a separate shaft extending across each pump support.

  14. Types of Breast Pumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... uses batteries or a cord plugged into an electrical outlet to power a small motorized pump that creates suction to ... pumping. Because these breast pumps rely on a power source, women who use ... situations when electricity or extra batteries may not be available. If ...

  15. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Kirol, L.D.

    1987-02-11

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation. 5 figs.

  16. Pump for Saturated Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Boiling liquids pumped by device based on proven components. Expanding saturated liquid in nozzle and diverting its phases along separate paths in liquid/vapor separator raises pressure of liquid. Liquid cooled in process. Pump makes it unnecessary to pressurize cryogenic liquids in order to pump them. Problems of introducing noncondensable pressurizing gas avoided.

  17. Green pumped Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, Jerry W.; Brown, David C.

    2005-04-01

    Initial experiments with pulsed and CW pumping an alexandrite laser rod at 532 nm are presented. This pumping architecture holds promise for the production of scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  18. Investigation of the steady engulfment regime in a three-dimensional T-mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fani, Andrea; Camarri, Simone; Salvetti, Maria Vittoria

    2013-06-01

    The steady engulfment regime in a fully three-dimensional micro T-mixer is investigated. This regime is of significant interest for applications since it implies high mixing between the flow streams entering the device. Direct numerical simulations are first used to characterize this regime. In particular, the main vortical structures typical of the engulfment regime and their effects on mixing are investigated. Three-dimensional linear stability analysis is successively applied to the characterization of the instability leading to the engulfment regime. The critical Reynolds number and the global unstable mode are first computed for a configuration characterized by fully-developed inlet velocity conditions. The sensitivity of this instability to a generic modification of the base flow is then investigated, thanks to the computation of the mode adjoint to the direct unstable one. Finally, this kind of analysis is specialized to investigate the effect of a perturbation of the velocity distribution at the inlet of the T-mixer. Sensitivity analysis shows that non-fully developed inlet velocity conditions lead to an increase of the critical Reynolds number. More generally, the sensitivity maps can be used for the design of control strategies aimed at promoting or inhibiting the engulfment. An example is provided for a control based on blowing/suction through the mixer walls.

  19. Small Signal Point-to-Point Tracking of a Propellant Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, Enrique; Richter, Hanz; Figueroa, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses some theoretical modelling and control issues for a mixing chamber used in rocket engine testing at NASA Stennis Space Center. The mixer is responsible for combining high pressure LH2 and GH2 to produce a hydrogen flow that meets certain thermodynamic properties before it is fed into a test article. The desired properties are maintained by precise control of the LH2 and GH2 flows. The mixer is modelled as a general multi-flow lumped volume for single constituent fluids using density and internal energy as states. The set of nonlinear differential equations is modelled in the SIMULINK environment including a table look-up feature of the fluid thermodynamic properties. a small-signal (linear) model is developed based on the nonlinear model and simulated as well. Pulse disturbances are introduced to the valve positions and the quality of the linear model is ascertained by comparing its behavior against the nonlinear model simulations. Valve control strategies that simulate an operator-in-the-loop scenario are then explored demonstrating the need for automatic feedback control. Finally, classical optimal single-output and multi-output Proportional/Integral controllers are designed based on the linear model and applied to the nonlinear model with excellent results to track simultaneous, constant setpoint changes in desired exit flow, exit temperature, and mixer pressure, as well as to reject unmeasurable but bounded additive step perturbations in the valve positions.

  20. IF impedance and mixer gain of NbN hot electron bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, J. W.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Hajenius, M.; Gao, J. R.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Dieleman, P.; Baryshev, A.; de Lange, G.

    2007-02-01

    The intermediate frequency (IF) characteristics, the frequency dependent IF impedance, and the mixer conversion gain of a small area hot electron bolometer (HEB) have been measured and modeled. The device used is a twin slot antenna coupled NbN HEB mixer with a bridge area of 1×0.15μm2, and a critical temperature of 8.3K. In the experiment the local oscillator frequency was 1.300THz, and the (IF) 0.05-10GHz. We find that the measured data can be described in a self-consistent manner with a thin film model presented by Nebosis et al. [Proceedings of the Seventh International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology, Charlottesville, VA, 1996 (unpublished), pp. 601-613], that is based on the two temperature electron-phonon heat balance equations of Perrin-Vanneste [J. Phys. (Paris) 48, 1311 (1987)]. From these results the thermal time constant, governing the gain bandwidth of HEB mixers, is observed to be a function of the electron-phonon scattering time, phonon escape time, and the electron temperature. From the developed theory the maximum predicted gain bandwidth for a NbN HEB is found to be 5.5-6GHz. In contrast, the gain bandwidth of the device under discussion was measured to be ˜2.3GHz which, consistent with the outlined theory, is attributed to a somewhat low critical temperature and nonoptimal film thickness (6nm).

  1. Mixing behaviour of cohesive and non-cohesive particle mixtures in a ribbon mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musha, H.; Dong, K.; Chandratilleke, G. R.; Bridgwater, J.; Yu, A. B.

    2013-06-01

    Ribbon mixers are used in a wide range of applications involving pharmaceuticals, ceramics and cosmetics, to name a few. Here, the discrete element method is used to investigate the effect of impeller speed on the mixing behaviours of cohesive as well as non-cohesive particle mixtures in a ribbon mixer, which has a horizontal cylindrical vessel. The mixing behaviours are characterized by particle-scale and macroscopic mixing indexes. Simulations show that the mixing rate increases with the impeller speed for both the cohesive and non-cohesive mixtures up to a certain speed, beyond which it showed a reduction. There is a possibility that the mixture quality becomes poorer at higher impeller speeds for the non-cohesive particles, but it was not the case with the cohesive particles. Inspection of velocity fields shows that many local recirculation regions exist in the case of non-cohesive particle mixing, preventing the overall mixing. By contrast, in the case of the cohesive mixture, there exists a circumferential motion about the shaft and a convective motion in the horizontal axial direction, improving the particle mixing. Force analyses are also carried out, which show that the particle contact forces increase with the impeller speed for non-cohesive particles, but in the case of cohesive particles, they increase initially with the impeller speed, and then show a reduction after a certain speed. The results will be useful in selecting operation conditions of a ribbon mixer.

  2. SIS (superconductor-insulator-superconductor) mixer research. Final report, 15 November 1985-14 November 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.J.

    1987-03-17

    Theoretical and experimental research has been conducted to elucidate the basic physics behind the properties of superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction receiving devices. The quantum theory of mixing was employed to calculate the saturation behavior of the SIS mixer and the SIS direct detector. The direct detector was found to saturate at far higher powers than previously believed, allowing the possibility of practical application of this device. Experiments verified the saturation theory. The mixer saturation expression led to the formulation of frequency-scaling regions. The origin of quantum noise sources are completely minimized. The mixer quantum-noise limit was shown to be reached in only two special cases. Computer calculations determined that the behavior of SIS receivers divides into two regimes, low and high frequencies, the cross-over frequency depending upon junction quality. The properties of these two regimes were delineated. All previous SIS receivers have operated in the low-frequency regime. Plasma-etched niobium nitride edge junctions were fabricated using a novel barrier-formation process. These junctions have excellent current-voltage characteristics, but their precise physical nature has not yet been determined.

  3. The Increasing of Air and Biogas Mixer Instrument for Generating Friendly Environmental Electricity Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketut Lasmi, Ni; Singarimbun, Alamta; Srigutomo, Wahyu

    2016-08-01

    The abolition of BBM Subsidize by the government causes increasing of its price, so a solution is necessary to find an alternative energy that is relatively cheap, environmentally friendly and affordable by all layers of society. Biogas is one of the renewable energy resources that are potential to be developed, especially in a farming area, because up until now, animal's excrement is not yet optimally used and it causes problem to environment. In response to this, one innovation to do is to make an instrument which is able to mix biogas and air by venture pipe using the basic theory of fluid mechanic, in order to raise the use of biogas as electricity source. Biogas conversion is done by changing fuel in benzene 5 kilowatt genset to biogas so it becomes a biogas genset. The biogas pressure is controlled when it enters the mixer instrument so that the velocity of biogas when it enters and it comes out the mixer is the same, and it will gain different pressure between biogas and air. By the pressure difference between biogas in the mixer instrument, biogas goes to the burning room so that the conversion of mechanical energy biogas to electricity will happen, and it will be applied as light and society's needs.

  4. Chaotic mixer using electro-osmosis at finite Péclet number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2010-03-01

    Two pressure-driven streams of two miscible liquids can only mix by diffusion in microfluidic channels because of the low Reynolds number. We present an idea to generate mixing by “chaotic advection” in microscale geometries. That is, we consider using induced-charge electro-osmosis to generate a second flow and then modulate between the pressure-driven and induced-charge flows. By using the combined method consisting of the boundary element method, the Lagrangian particle tracking method, and the random-walk method, we analyze mixing efficiency, mixing time, and mixing length, with the effects of modulation frequency and molecular diffusivity, and compare our proposed mixer with other mixers. By this analysis, we find that chaotic mixing can be produced efficiently in a microfluidic channel by switching between pressure-driven and induced-charge flows in a wide range of Péclet number under the specific condition of Strouhal number. By using our proposed mixer, we can expect to realize efficient chaotic mixing with minimum voltage in an ordinary flow channel with a simple structure without an oblique electric field even at large Péclet number.

  5. Design of Interactively Time-Pulsed Microfluidic Mixers in Microchips using Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lung-Ming; Tsai, Chien-Hsiung

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel technique in which driving voltages are applied interactively to the respective inlet fluid flows of three configurations of a microfluidic device, namely T-shaped, double-T-shaped, and double-cross-shaped configurations, to induce electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity variations in such a way as to develop a rapid mixing effect in the microchannel. In these configurations a microfluidic mixer apply only one electrokinetic driving force, which drives the sample fluids and simultaneously produces a periodic switching frequency. It requires no other external driving force to induce perturbations to the flow field. The effects of the main applied electric field, the interactive frequency, and the pullback electric field on the mixing performance are thoroughly examined numerically. The optimal interactive frequency range for a given set of micromixer parameters is identified for each type of control mode. The numerical results confirm that micromixers operating at an optimal interactive frequency are capable of delivering a significantly enhanced mixing performance. Furthermore, it is shown that the optimal interactive frequency depends upon the magnitude of the main applied electric field. The interactively pulsed mixers developed in this study have a strong potential for use in lab-on-a-chip systems. They involve a simpler fabrication process than either passive or active on-chip mixers and require less human intervention in operation than their bulky external counterparts.

  6. Performance comparison of a lobed-daisy mixer nozzle with a convergent nozzle at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation to determine the performance, in terms of thrust minus nozzle axial force, of a lobed-daisy mixer nozzle has been conducted in a 16-foot transonic tunnel at static conditions and at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 0.90 at angles of attack from 4 minus to 8. Jet-total-pressure ratio was varied from about 1.2 to 2.0. The performance of a reference convergent nozzle with a similar nozzle throat area and length was used as a base line to evaluate the performance of the lobed-daisy mixer nozzle. The results of this investigation indicate that with no external airflow (Mach number M of 0), and at values of jet-total-pressure ratio between 1.2 and 2.0, the static thrust exerted by the lobed-daisy mixer nozzle is less than that of the convergent nozzle by about 10 percent of ideal gross thrust. About 3.4 percent of the thrust loss was attributed to an unintentional internal area expansion in the fan passage.

  7. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  8. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Andraka, Charles E.; Lukens, Laurance L.; Moreno, James B.

    1992-01-01

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  9. Hand-Portable Gradient Capillary Liquid Chromatography Pumping System.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sonika; Plistil, Alex; Barnett, Hal E; Tolley, H Dennis; Farnsworth, Paul B; Stearns, Stanley D; Lee, Milton L

    2015-10-20

    In this work, a novel splitless nanoflow gradient generator integrated with a stop-flow injector was developed and evaluated using an on-column UV-absorption detector. The gradient pumping system consisted of two nanoflow pumps controlled by micro stepper motors, a mixer connected to a serpentine tube, and a high-pressure valve. The gradient system weighed only 4 kg (9 lbs) and could generate up to 55 MPa (8000 psi) pressure. The system could operate using a 24 V DC battery and required 1.2 A for operation. The total volume capacity of the pump was 74 μL, and a sample volume of 60 nL could be injected. The system provided accurate nanoflow rates as low as 10 nL/min without employing a splitter, making it ideal for capillary column use. The gradient dwell volume was calculated to be 1.3 μL, which created a delay of approximately 4 min with a typical flow rate of 350 nL/min. Gradient performance was evaluated for gradient step accuracy, and excellent reproducibility was obtained in day-to-day experiments (RSD < 1.2%, n = 4). Linear gradient reproducibility was tested by separating a three-component pesticide mixture on a poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) monolithic column. The retention time reproducibility was very good in run-to-run experiments (RSD < 1.42%, n = 4). Finally, excellent separation of five phenols was demonstrated using the nanoflow gradient system.

  10. Pump isolation valve

    DOEpatents

    Kinney, Calvin L.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-08-02

    The pump isolation valve provides a means by which the pump may be selectively isolated from the remainder of the coolant system while being compatible with the internal hydraulic arrangement of the pump during normal operation of the pump. The valve comprises a valve cylinder disposed around the pump and adjacent to the last pump diffuser with a turning vane attached to the lower end of the valve cylinder in a manner so as to hydraulically match with the discharge diffuser. The valve cylinder is connected to a drive means for sliding the valve cylinder relative to the diffuser support cylinder so as to block flow in either direction through the discharge diffuser when the valve is in the closed position and to aid in the flow of the coolant from the discharge diffuser by means of the turning vane when the valve is in the open position.

  11. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Greg S. (Inventor); Vandamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A rotary blood pump is presented. The pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial, and radial clearances of the blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion, and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with crosslinked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  12. DIRECT CURRENT ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, A.H.

    1957-11-01

    An improved d-c electromagnetic pump is presented in which the poles, and consequently the magetic gap at the poles, are tapered to be wider at the upstream end. In addition, the cross section of the tube carryiQ the liquid metal is tapered so that the velocity of the pumped liquid increases in the downstream direction at a rate such that the counter-induced voltage in the liquid metal remains constant as it traverses the region between the poles. This configuration compensates for the distortion of the magnetic field caused by the induced voltage that would otherwise result in the lowering of the pumping capacity. This improved electromagnetic pump as practical application in the pumping of liquid metal coolants for nuclear reactors where conventional positive displacement pumps have proved unsatisfactory due to the high temperatures and the corrosive properties of the liquid metals involved.

  13. Electrokinetic pumps and actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip M. Paul

    2000-03-01

    Flow and ionic transport in porous media are central to electrokinetic pumping as well as to a host of other microfluidic devices. Electrokinetic pumping provides the ability to create high pressures (to over 10,000 psi) and high flow rates (over 1 mL/min) with a device having no moving parts and all liquid seals. The electrokinetic pump (EKP) is ideally suited for applications ranging from a high pressure integrated pump for chip-scale HPLC to a high flow rate integrated pump for forced liquid convection cooling of high-power electronics. Relations for flow rate and current fluxes in porous media are derived that provide a basis for analysis of complex microfluidic systems as well as for optimization of electrokinetic pumps.

  14. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W.

    1995-08-01

    This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented.

  15. Submersible sodium pump

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, G.V.; Lopez, J.T.; Olich, E.E.; West, C.W.

    1989-11-21

    An electromagnetic submerged pump has an outer cylindrical stator with an inner cylindrical conductive core for the submerged pumping of sodium in the cylindrical interstitial volume defined between the stator and core. The cylindrical interstitial volume is typically vertically oriented, and defines an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top. The outer stator generates upwardly conveyed toroidal magnetic fields, which fields convey preferably from the bottom of the pump to the top of the pump liquid sodium in the cold leg of a sodium cooled nuclear reactor. The outer cylindrical stator has a vertically disposed duct surrounded by alternately stacked layers of coil units and laminates. 14 figs.

  16. Submersible sodium pump

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Lopez, John T.; Olich, Eugene E.; West, Calvin W.

    1989-01-01

    An electromagnetic submerged pump has an outer cylindrical stator with an inner cylindrical conductive core for the submerged pumping of sodium in the cylindrical interstitial volume defined between the stator and core. The cylindrical interstitial volume is typically vertically oriented, and defines an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top. The outer stator generates upwardly conveyed toroidal magnetic fields, which fields convey preferably from the bottom of the pump to the top of the pump liquid sodium in the cold leg of a sodium cooled nuclear reactor. The outer cylindrical stator has a vertically disposed duct surrounded by alternately stacked layers of coil units and laminates.

  17. Champagne Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    2004-01-01

    The term champagne heat pump denotes a developmental heat pump that exploits a cycle of absorption and desorption of carbon dioxide in an alcohol or other organic liquid. Whereas most heat pumps in common use in the United States are energized by mechanical compression, the champagne heat pump is energized by heating. The concept of heat pumps based on other absorption cycles energized by heat has been understood for years, but some of these heat pumps are outlawed in many areas because of the potential hazards posed by leakage of working fluids. For example, in the case of the water/ammonia cycle, there are potential hazards of toxicity and flammability. The organic-liquid/carbon dioxide absorption/desorption cycle of the champagne heat pump is similar to the water/ammonia cycle, but carbon dioxide is nontoxic and environmentally benign, and one can choose an alcohol or other organic liquid that is also relatively nontoxic and environmentally benign. Two candidate nonalcohol organic liquids are isobutyl acetate and amyl acetate. Although alcohols and many other organic liquids are flammable, they present little or no flammability hazard in the champagne heat pump because only the nonflammable carbon dioxide component of the refrigerant mixture is circulated to the evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, which are the only components of the heat pump in direct contact with air in habitable spaces.

  18. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.

    1995-04-01

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous special vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Pump head and flow rate are also monitored, per code requirements. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition; advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed.

  19. Wind pumping: A handbook

    SciTech Connect

    van Meel, J.; Smulders, P.

    1989-01-01

    The handbook is meant to provide energy and water-supply professionals and economists as well as field officers with an easily accessible source of information on wind pumping. It consolidates information acquired by institutions, professionals, and research centers in an easily extractable form. An overview of the characteristics of the technology is provided. The techniques for sizing of wind pumps and the sizing of alternative small pumps is discussed. Guidelines for financial and economic assessment of wind pumping are given. Particulars on installation, maintenance, and other logistical matters are also given. Several annexes provide supporting details and examples.

  20. Analysis on flow field of the valveless piezoelectric pump with two inlets and one outlet and a rotating unsymmetrical slopes element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qixiao; Zhang, Jianhui; Lei, Hong; Cheng, Wei

    2012-05-01

    Typically, liquid pump and liquids mixer are two separate devices. The invention of piezoelectric pump makes it possible to integrate the two devices. Hower, the existing piezoelectric mixing-pumps are larger because the need the space outside the chamber, and another shortcome of them is that they cannot adjust the mixing ratio of two liquids. In this paper, a new piezoelectric pump being capable of integrating mixer and pump is presented, based on the theory of the piezoelectric pump with the unsymmetrical slopes element (USE). Besides the features of two inlets and one outlet, the piezoelectric pump has a rotatable unsymmetrical slopes element(RUSE). When the pump works, two fluids flow into the inlet channels respectively. Then the RUSE controls the ratio of the two flows by adjusting the flow resistances of the two inlet channels. The fluids form a net flow due to the USE principle, while they are mixed into a homogeneous solution due to strong turbulence flow field and complex vortices generated by RUSE in the chamber. And then the solution flows through the outlet. Firstly, the theoretical analysis on this pump is performed. Meanwhile, the flow field in the chamber is calculated and simulated. And then, the relationship between the flows of the two channels and the rotating angle of the RUSE is set up and analyzed. Finally, experiment with the proposed pump is carried out to verify the numerical results. A RUSE with 20° slope angle is used in the experiment. Four sets of data are tested with the RUSE at the rotating angles of 0°, 6°, 11°, and 16°, respectively, corresponding to the numerical models. The experimental results show that the empirical data and the theoretical data share the same trend. The maximum error between the theoretical flow and the experimental flow is 11.14%, and the maximum error between the theoretical flow ratio of the two inlets and the experimental one is 2.5%. The experiment verified the theoretical analysis. The proposed

  1. An unsteady microfluidic T-form mixer perturbed by hydrodynamic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanbao; Sun, Chien-Pin; Fields, Michael; Li, Yang; Haake, David A; Churchill, Bernard M; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2009-01-01

    An unsteady microfluidic T-form mixer driven by pressure disturbances was designed and investigated. The performance of the mixer was examined both through numerical simulation and experimentation. Linear Stokes equations were used for these low Reynolds number flows. Unsteady mixing in a micro-channel of two aqueous solutions differing in concentrations of chemical species was described using a convection-dominated diffusion equation. The task was greatly simplified by employing linear superimposition of a velocity field for solving a scalar species concentration equation. Low-order-based numerical codes were found not to be suitable for simulation of a convection-dominated mixing process due to erroneous computational dissipation. The convection-dominated diffusion problem was addressed by designing a numerical algorithm with high numerical accuracy and computational-cost effectiveness. This numerical scheme was validated by examining a test case prior to being applied to the mixing simulation. Parametric analysis was performed using this newly developed numerical algorithm to determine the best mixing conditions. Numerical simulation identified the best mixing condition to have a Strouhal number (St)of 0.42. For a T-junction mixer (with channel width = 196 μm), about 75% mixing can be finished within a mixing distance of less than 3 mm (i.e. 15 channel width) at St = 0.42 for flow with a Reynolds number less than 0.24. Numerical results were validated experimentally by mixing two aqueous solutions containing yellow and blue dyes. Visualization of the flow field under the microscope revealed a high level of agreement between numerical simulation and experimental results. PMID:19177174

  2. Effects of molecular confinement and crowding on horseradish peroxidase kinetics using a nanofluidic gradient mixer.

    PubMed

    Wichert, William R A; Han, Donghoon; Bohn, Paul W

    2016-03-01

    The effects of molecular confinement and crowding on enzyme kinetics were studied at length scales and under conditions similar to those found in biological cells. These experiments were carried out using a nanofluidic network of channels constituting a nanofluidic gradient mixer, providing the basis for measuring multiple experimental conditions simultaneously. The 100 nm × 40 μm nanochannels were wet etched directly into borosilicate glass, then annealed and characterized with fluorescein emission prior to kinetic measurements. The nanofluidic gradient mixer was then used to measure the kinetics of the conversion of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed conversion of non-fluorescent Amplex Red (AR) to the fluorescent product resorufin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The design of the gradient mixer allows reaction kinetics to be studied under multiple (five) unique solution compositions in a single experiment. To characterize the efficiency of the device the effects of confinement on HRP-catalyzed AR conversion kinetics were studied by varying the starting ratio of AR : H2O2. Equimolar concentrations of Amplex Red and H2O2 yielded the highest reaction rates followed by 2 : 1, 1 : 2, 5 : 1, and finally 1 : 5 [AR] : [H2O2]. Under all conditions, initial reaction velocities were decreased by excess H2O2. Crowding effects on kinetics were studied by increasing solution viscosity in the nanochannels in the range 1.0-1.6 cP with sucrose. Increasing the solution viscosities in these confined geometries decreases the initial reaction velocity at the highest concentration from 3.79 μM min(-1) at 1.00 cP to 0.192 μM min(-1) at 1.59 cP. Variations in reaction velocity are interpreted in the context of models for HRP catalysis and for molecular crowding. PMID:26792298

  3. Making Wide-IF SIS Mixers with Suspended Metal-Beam Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama; Bumble, Bruce; Lee, Karen; LeDuc, Henry; Rice, Frank; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    A process that employs silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates and silicon (Si) micromachining has been devised for fabricating wide-intermediate-frequency-band (wide-IF) superconductor/insulator/superconductor (SIS) mixer devices that result in suspended gold beam leads used for radio-frequency grounding. The mixers are formed on 25- m-thick silicon membranes. They are designed to operate in the 200 to 300 GHz frequency band, wherein wide-IF receivers for tropospheric- chemistry and astrophysical investigations are necessary. The fabrication process can be divided into three sections: 1. The front-side process, in which SIS devices with beam leads are formed on a SOI wafer; 2. The backside process, in which the SOI wafer is wax-mounted onto a carrier wafer, then thinned, then partitioned into individual devices; and 3. The release process, in which the individual devices are separated using a lithographic dicing technique. The total thickness of the starting 4-in. (10.16-cm)-diameter SOI wafer includes 25 m for the Si device layer, 0.5 m for the buried oxide (BOX) layer, and 350 m the for Si-handle layer. The front-side process begins with deposition of an etch-stop layer of SiO2 or AlN(x), followed by deposition of a Nb/Al- AlN(x) /Nb trilayer in a load-locked DC magnetron sputtering system. The lithography for four of a total of five layers is performed in a commercial wafer-stepping apparatus. Diagnostic test dies are patterned concurrently at certain locations on the wafer, alongside the mixer devices, using a different mask set. The conventional, self-aligned lift-off process is used to pattern the SIS devices up to the wire level.

  4. Numerical Simulation of the Oscillations in a Mixer: An Internal Aeroacoustic Feedback System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Loh, Ching Y.

    2004-01-01

    The space-time conservation element and solution element method is employed to numerically study the acoustic feedback system in a high temperature, high speed wind tunnel mixer. The computation captures the self-sustained feedback loop between reflecting Mach waves and the shear layer. This feedback loop results in violent instabilities that are suspected of causing damage to some tunnel components. The computed frequency is in good agreement with the available experimental data. The physical phenomena are explained based on the numerical results.

  5. Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, D; Ito, N; Nagayama, Y; Yoshinaga, T; Yamaguchi, S; Yoshikawa, M; Kohagura, J; Sugito, S; Kogi, Y; Mase, A

    2014-11-01

    A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array.

  6. High-T{sub c} superconducting Josephson mixers for terahertz heterodyne detection

    SciTech Connect

    Malnou, M.; Feuillet-Palma, C.; Olanier, L.; Lesueur, J.; Bergeal, N.; Ulysse, C.; Faini, G.; Febvre, P.; Sirena, M.

    2014-08-21

    We report on an experimental and theoretical study of the high-frequency mixing properties of ion-irradiated YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} Josephson junctions embedded in THz antennas. We investigated the influence of the local oscillator power and frequency on the device performances. The experimental data are compared with theoretical predictions of the general three-port model for mixers in which the junction is described by the resistively shunted junction model. A good agreement is obtained for the conversion efficiency in different frequency ranges, spanning above and below the characteristic frequencies f{sub c} of the junctions.

  7. All optical wavelength multicaster and regenerator based on four-mode phase-sensitive parametric mixer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lan; Temprana, Eduardo; Ataie, Vahid; Wiberg, Andreas O J; Kuo, Bill P-P; Myslivets, Evgeny; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2015-11-30

    Four-mode phase-sensitive (4MPS) process has been employed in a parametric mixer based wavelength multicaster, enhancing the multicasting conversion efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the 4MPS parametric multicaster is an outstanding candidate for all-optical regeneration, owing to its inherent capabilities to clamp amplitude fluctuations by the saturated parametric effect and to squeeze phase distortions by the phase sensitive process. The investigation in this paper focuses on the 4MPS multicaster operated in the saturation gain regime, including theoretical simulations and experimental demonstrations on amplitude and phase noise regeneration over 20 multicasting signal copies. PMID:26698727

  8. Modeling the flow of liquid-metal coolant in the T-shaped mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinsky, O. N.; Lobanov, P. D.; Kurdyumov, A. S.; Pribaturin, N. A.

    2016-05-01

    The results of experimental studies on the structure of the temperature field in the tube cross section at the flow of liquid-metal coolant in a T-shaped mixer are presented. Experiments were carried out using the Rose alloy as the working fluid. To determine temperature distribution on the test section wall, infrared thermography was used; to determine temperature distribution in the channel cross section, a mobile thermocouple was used. Considerable temperature maldistribution in the mixing zone of liquid flows with different temperatures on the tube wall and in the coolant melt is shown.

  9. Nonlinear modeling of GaAs pHEMTs for millimeter-wave mixer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crupi, Giovanni; Raffo, Antonio; Avolio, Gustavo; Bosi, Gianni; Sivverini, Giuseppe; Palomba, Francesco; Caddemi, Alina; Schreurs, Dominique M. M.-P.; Vannini, Giorgio

    2015-02-01

    The present paper was focused on the extraction of a GaAs pHEMT nonlinear model meant for mixer design. The model is based on an equivalent circuit that is analytically extracted from DC and multi-bias S-parameter measurements. The look-up table approach is used to implement the model in a nonlinear RF circuit simulator. The model accuracy is extensively verified by comparing device measurements and simulations under a wide range of operating conditions. Furthermore, to corroborate the validity of the model, the design of a Q-band up-converter is considered.

  10. Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, D.; Ito, N.; Nagayama, Y.; Yoshinaga, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Sugito, S.; Kogi, Y.; Mase, A.

    2014-11-15

    A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array.

  11. A low-noise double-dipole antenna SIS mixer at 1 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitov, S. V.; Jackson, B. D.; Baryshev, A. M.; Markov, A. V.; Iosad, N. N.; Gao, J.-R.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2002-08-01

    A quasi-optical mixer employing a Nb/Al/AlO x/Nb twin-SIS junction with a NbTiN/SiO 2/Al microstrip coupling circuit is tested at 800-1000 GHz. The receiver noise temperature TRX=250 K (DSB) is measured at 935 GHz for the bath temperature 2 K at IF=1.5 GHz; TRX remains below 350 K within the frequency range 850-1000 GHz. The integrated lens-antenna demonstrated good beam symmetry with sidelobes below -16 dB.

  12. A multi-purpose ultrasonic streaming mixer for integrated magnetic bead ELISAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandhoff, Lukas; Zirath, Helene; Salas, Mariugenia; Haller, Anna; Peham, Johannes; Wiesinger-Mayr, Herbert; Spittler, Andreas; Schnetz, Guntram; Lang, Walter; Vellekoop, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    We present an ultrasonic streaming mixer for disposable and on-chip magnetic bead ELISAs. The ultrasonic transducer is placed at system-level to keep cost per chip as low as possible, and is coupled to the chip by means of a solid ultrasonic horn. The system provides mixing of liquids, as well as dispersion of the superparamagnetic beads in the ELISA. Additionally it can be used clean the chamber surface from nonspecifically bound proteins during the washing steps in the ELISA protocol. Using our system the time for the ELISA protocol has been greatly reduced down to 30 min.

  13. Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, D; Ito, N; Nagayama, Y; Yoshinaga, T; Yamaguchi, S; Yoshikawa, M; Kohagura, J; Sugito, S; Kogi, Y; Mase, A

    2014-11-01

    A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array. PMID:25430218

  14. Liquid pump for astronaut cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo portable life support system water-recirculation pump used for astronaut cooling is described. The problems associated with an early centrifugal pump and how these problems were overcome by the use of a new diaphragm pump are discussed. Performance comparisons of the two pump designs are given. Developmental problems and flight results with the diaphragm pump are discussed.

  15. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  16. Gastrostomy feeding tube - pump - child

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - gastrostomy tube - pump; G-tube - pump; Gastrostomy button - pump; Bard Button - pump; MIC-KEY - pump ... Your child has a gastrostomy tube (G-tube). This is a soft, plastic tube placed into your child's stomach. It delivers nutrition (food) and medicines until your ...

  17. Turbofan forced mixer-nozzle internal flowfield. Volume 3: A computer code for 3-D mixing in axisymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreskovsky, J. P.; Briley, W. R.; Mcdonald, H.

    1982-01-01

    A finite difference method is developed for making detailed predictions of three dimensional subsonic turbulent flow in turbofan lobe mixers. The governing equations are solved by a forward-marching solution procedure which corrects an inviscid potential flow solution for viscous and thermal effects, secondary flows, total pressure distortion and losses, internal flow blockage and pressure drop. Test calculations for a turbulent coaxial jet flow verify that the turbulence model performs satisfactorily for this relatively simple flow. Lobe mixer flows are presented for two geometries typical of current mixer design. These calculations included both hot and cold flow conditions, and both matched and mismatched Mach number and total pressure in the fan and turbine streams.

  18. Low-noise room-temperature and cryogenic mixers for 80-120 GHz. [design for use on radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of two new mixers designed to operate in the 80-120-GHz range on 36-ft radio telescope. It is shown that for a hard-driven diode the parasitic resistance and capacitance are the primary factors influencing the design of the diode mount. A room-temperature mixer is described which achieves a single-sideband (SSB) conversion loss (L) of 5.5 dB, and a SSB noise temperature (Tm) of 500 K (excluding the IF contribution) with a 1.4-GHz IF. A cryogenically cooled version, using a quartz structure to support the diode chip and contact whisker, achieves values of L = 5.8 dB and Tm = 300 K with a 4.75-GHz IF. The mixers use high-quality Schottky-barrier diodes in a one-quarter-height waveguide mount.

  19. Full-scale altitude engine test of a turbofan exhaust-gas-forced mixer to reduce thrust specific fuel consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullom, R. R.; Johnson, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The specific fuel consumption of a low-bypass-ratio, confluent-flow, turbofan engine was measured with and without a mixer installed. Tests were conducted for flight Mach numbers from 0.3 to 1.4 and altitudes from 10,670 to 14,630 meters (35,000 to 48,000 ft) for core-stream-to-fan-stream temperature ratios of 2.0 and 2.5 and mixing-length-to-diameter ratios of 0.95 and 1.74. For these test conditions, the reduction in specific fuel consumption varied from 2.5 percent to 4.0 percent. Pressure loss measurements as well as temperature and pressure surveys at the mixer inlet, the mixer exit, and the nozzle inlet were made.

  20. 33. PLAN OF DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION SHOWING EXISTING PUMPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. PLAN OF DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION SHOWING EXISTING PUMPING PLAN AND LOCATION OF PROPOSED ADDITIONS, METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD, METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS, JULY 1908. Aperture card 6417. - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  1. 32. PLAN OF DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION SHOWING EXISTING PUMPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. PLAN OF DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION SHOWING EXISTING PUMPING PLANT AND LOCATION OF PROPOSED ADDITIONS, JULY 1898 SHEET NO. 1. Aperture card 4966-1 - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  2. Looking south at boiler feedwater pumps (steam turbine pump on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking south at boiler feedwater pumps (steam turbine pump on left, electric motor pump on right). - Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporation, Allenport Works, Boiler House, Route 88 on West bank of Monongahela River, Allenport, Washington County, PA

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Cobb, W.G.

    1959-06-01

    A reactor fuel pump is described which offers long life, low susceptibility to radiation damage, and gaseous fission product removal. An inert-gas lubricated bearing supports a journal on one end of the drive shsft. The other end has an impeller and expansion chamber which effect pumping and gas- liquid separation. (T.R.H.)

  4. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    SciTech Connect

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  5. Cryogenic Vacuum Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachman, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    System provides high pumping capacity even for noble gases. First stage, removes water and CO2 from input gas. Second stage, removes noble gases except helium and some lighter gases not trapped by first stage. Third stage, traps all remaining gases. All three stages mounted inside liquid-nitrogen Dewar that cools first stage. Pump small enough for general laboratory use.

  6. Water Treatment Technology - Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on pumps provides instructional materials for three competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: types of pumps in plant and distribution systems, pump…

  7. Micromachined peristaltic pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Micromachined pumps including a channel formed between a first membrane and a substrate or between first and second flexible membranes. A series of electrically conductive strips is applied to a surface of the substrate or one of the membranes. Application of a sequential voltage to the series of strips causes a region of closure to progress down the channel to achieve a pumping action.

  8. A Shocking New Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Hydro Dynamics, Inc. received a technical helping hand from NASA that made their Hydrosonic Pump (HPump) a reality. Marshall engineers resolved a bearing problem in the rotor of the pump and recommended new bearings, housings and mounting hardware as a solution. The resulting HPump is able to heat liquids with greater energy efficiency using shock waves to generate heat.

  9. Magnetic heat pump design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirol, L. D.; Dacus, M. W.

    1988-03-01

    Heat pumps utilizing the magnetocaloric effect offer a potentially attractive alternative to conventional heat pumps and refrigerators. Many physical configurations of magnetic heat pumps are possible. Major classes include those requiring electrical energy input and those with mechanical energy input. Mechanical energy is used to move magnets, working material, or magnetic shielding. Each type of mechanical magnetic heat pump can be built in a rotary (recuperative) or reciprocal (regenerative) configuration. Machines with electrical energy input utilize modulation of the magnetic field to cause working material to execute the desired thermodynamic cycle, and can also be recuperative or regenerative. Recuperative rotary heat pumps in which working material is moved past stationary magnets is the preferred configuration. Regenerative devices suffer performance degradation from temperature change of regenerator material and mixing and conduction in the regenerator. Field modulated cycles are not practical due to ac losses in superconducting magnets. Development of methods for recuperator fluid pumping is the major challenge in design of rotary recuperative devices. Several pumping options are presented, and the design of a bench scale heat pump described.

  10. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.

    1994-12-31

    There are a variety of stressors that can affect the operation of centrifugal pumps. Although these general stressors are active in essentially all centrifugal pumps, the stressor level and the extent of wear and degradation can vary greatly. Parameters that affect the extent of stressor activity are manifold. In order to assure the long-term operational readiness of a pump, it is important to both understand the nature and magnitude of the specific degradation mechanisms and to monitor the performance of the pump. The most commonly applied method of monitoring the condition of not only pumps, but rotating machinery in general, is vibration analysis. Periodic or continuous spectral vibration analysis is a cornerstone of most pump monitoring programs. In the nuclear industry, non-spectral vibration monitoring of safety-related pumps is performed in accordance with the ASME code. Although vibration analysis has dominated the condition monitoring field for many years, there are other measures that have been historically used to help understand pump condition: advances in historically applied technologies and developing technologies offer improved monitoring capabilities. The capabilities of several technologies (including vibration analysis, dynamic pressure analysis, and motor power analysis) to detect the presence and magnitude of both stressors and resultant degradation are discussed.

  11. Normetex Pump Alternatives Study

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    2013-04-25

    A mainstay pump for tritium systems, the Normetex scroll pump, is currently unavailable because the Normetex company went out of business. This pump was an all-metal scroll pump that served tritium processing facilities very well. Current tritium system operators are evaluating replacement pumps for the Normetex pump and for general used in tritium service. An all-metal equivalent alternative to the Normetex pump has not yet been identified. 1. The ideal replacement tritium pump would be hermetically sealed and contain no polymer components or oils. Polymers and oils degrade over time when they contact ionizing radiation. 2. Halogenated polymers (containing fluorine, chlorine, or both) and oils are commonly found in pumps. These materials have many properties that surpass those of hydrocarbon-based polymers and oils, including thermal stability (higher operating temperature) and better chemical resistance. Unfortunately, they are less resistant to degradation from ionizing radiation than hydrocarbon-based materials (in general). 3. Polymers and oils can form gaseous, condensable (HF, TF), liquid, and solid species when exposed to ionizing radiation. For example, halogenated polymers form HF and HCl, which are extremely corrosive upon reaction with water. If a pump containing polymers or oils must be used in a tritium system, the system must be designed to be able to process the unwanted by-products. Design features to mitigate degradation products include filters and chemical or physical traps (eg. cold traps, oil traps). 4. Polymer components can work in tritium systems, but must be replaced regularly. Polymer components performance should be monitored or be regularly tested, and regular replacement of components should be viewed as an expected normal event. A radioactive waste stream must be established to dispose of used polymer components and oil with an approved disposal plan developed based on the facility location and its regulators. Polymers have varying

  12. Deep well solar pump

    SciTech Connect

    Vanek, J.

    1990-02-06

    This patent describes, in a pump having a source of gas under pressure, and a gas operated pump, a mechanism periodically injecting gas from the source of gas into the gas operated pump. It comprises: a long period pendulum turning towards a first position by gravity, an injection valve connected between the source of gas under pressure and the gas operated pump, a linkage between the pendulum and the injection valve. The linkage opening the injection valve when the pendulum is in the first position, an impulse tube connected between the injection valve and the gas operated pump, a member having a surface adjacent to the first position of the pendulum, and an elastic impulse bladder connected to the impulse tube adjacent to the surface so that inflation of the impulse bladder on the opening of the injection valve forces the impulse bladder against the pendulum urging the pendulum against the force of gravity toward a second position.

  13. Rotary Blood Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George A. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  14. Ultra-low-voltage CMOS-based current bleeding mixer with high LO-RF isolation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Gim Heng; Sidek, Roslina Mohd; Ramiah, Harikrishnan; Chong, Wei Keat; Lioe, De Xing

    2014-01-01

    This journal presents an ultra-low-voltage current bleeding mixer with high LO-RF port-to-port isolation, implemented on 0.13 μm standard CMOS technology for ZigBee application. The architecture compliments a modified current bleeding topology, consisting of NMOS-based current bleeding transistor, PMOS-based switching stage, and integrated inductors achieving low-voltage operation and high LO-RF isolation. The mixer exhibits a conversion gain of 7.5 dB at the radio frequency (RF) of 2.4 GHz, an input third-order intercept point (IIP3) of 1 dBm, and a LO-RF isolation measured to 60 dB. The DC power consumption is 572 µW at supply voltage of 0.45 V, while consuming a chip area of 0.97 × 0.88 mm(2). PMID:25197694

  15. Mechanism of amorphisation of micro-particles of griseofulvin during powder flow in a mixer.

    PubMed

    Pazesh, Samaneh; Höckerfelt, Mina Heidarian; Berggren, Jonas; Bramer, Tobias; Alderborn, Göran

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of the research was to investigate the degree of solid-state amorphisation during powder flow and to propose a mechanism for this transformation. Micro-particles of griseofulvin (about 2 μm in diameter) were mixed in a shear mixer under different conditions to influence the inter-particulate collisions during flow, and the degree of amorphisation was determined by micro-calorimeter. The amorphisation of griseofulvin particles (GPs) during repeated compaction was also determined. The GPs generally became disordered during mixing in a range from about 6% to about 86%. The degree of amorphisation increased with increased mixing time and increased batch size of the mixer, whereas the addition of a lubricant to the blend reduced the degree of amorphisation. Repeated compaction using the press with ejection mode gave limited amorphisation, whereas repeated compaction without an ejection process gave minute amorphisation. It is concluded that during powder flow, the most important inter-particulate contact process that cause the transformation of a crystalline solid into an amorphous state is sliding. On the molecular scale, this amorphisation is proposed to be caused by vitrification, that is the melting of a solid because of the generation of heat during sliding followed by solidification into an amorphous phase.

  16. Optimization of a continuous hybrid impeller mixer via computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Othman, N; Kamarudin, S K; Takriff, M S; Rosli, M I; Engku Chik, E M F; Meor Adnan, M A K

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary steps required for conducting experiments to obtain the optimal operating conditions of a hybrid impeller mixer and to determine the residence time distribution (RTD) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In this paper, impeller speed and clearance parameters are examined. The hybrid impeller mixer consists of a single Rushton turbine mounted above a single pitched blade turbine (PBT). Four impeller speeds, 50, 100, 150, and 200 rpm, and four impeller clearances, 25, 50, 75, and 100 mm, were the operation variables used in this study. CFD was utilized to initially screen the parameter ranges to reduce the number of actual experiments needed. Afterward, the residence time distribution (RTD) was determined using the respective parameters. Finally, the Fluent-predicted RTD and the experimentally measured RTD were compared. The CFD investigations revealed that an impeller speed of 50 rpm and an impeller clearance of 25 mm were not viable for experimental investigations and were thus eliminated from further analyses. The determination of RTD using a k-ε turbulence model was performed using CFD techniques. The multiple reference frame (MRF) was implemented and a steady state was initially achieved followed by a transient condition for RTD determination. PMID:25170524

  17. Silicon Carbide Mixers Demonstrated to Improve the Interference Immunity of Radio-Based Aircraft Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1998-01-01

    Concern over the interference of stray radiofrequency (RF) emissions with key aircraft avionics is evident during takeoff and landing of every commercial flight when the flight attendant requests that all portable electronics be switched off. The operation of key radio-based avionics (such as glide-slope and localizer approach instruments) depends on the ability of front-end RF receivers to detect and amplify desired information signals while rejecting interference from undesired RF sources both inside and outside the aircraft. Incidents where key navigation and approach avionics malfunction because of RF interference clearly represent an increasing threat to flight safety as the radio spectrum becomes more crowded. In an initial feasibility experiment, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the NASA Lewis Research Center recently demonstrated the strategic use of silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor components to significantly reduce the susceptibility of an RF receiver circuit to undesired RF interference. A pair of silicon carbide mixer diodes successfully reduced RF interference (intermodulation distortion) in a prototype receiver circuit by a factor of 10 (20 dB) in comparison to a pair of commercial silicon-based mixer diodes.

  18. Cross-Stream PIV Measurements of Jets With Internal Lobed Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    With emphasis being placed on enhanced mixing of jet plumes for noise reduction and on predictions of jet noise based upon turbulent kinetic energy, unsteady measurements of jet plumes are a very important part of jet noise studies. Given that hot flows are of most practical interest, optical techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are applicable. When the flow has strong azimuthal features, such as those generated by chevrons or lobed mixers, traditional PIV, which aligns the measurement plane parallel to the dominant flow direction is very inefficient, requiring many planes of data to be acquired and stacked up to produce the desired flow cross-sections. This paper presents PIV data acquired in a plane normal to the jet axis, directly measuring the cross-stream gradients and features of an internally mixed nozzle operating at aircraft engine flow conditions. These nozzle systems included variations in lobed mixer penetration, lobe count, lobe scalloping, and nozzle length. Several cases validating the accuracy of the PIV data are examined along with examples of its use in answering questions about the jet noise generation processes in these nozzles. Of most interest is the relationship of low frequency aft-directed noise with turbulence kinetic energy and mean velocity.

  19. PARC Analysis of the NASA/GE 2D NRA Mixer/Ejector Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Interest in developing a new generation supersonic transport has increased in the past several years. Current projections indicate this aircraft would cruise at approximately Mach 2.4, have a range of 5000 nautical miles and carry at least 250 passengers. A large market for such an aircraft will exist in the next century due to a predicted doubling of the demand for long range air transportation by the end of the century and the growing influence of the Pacific Rim nations. Such a proposed aircraft could more than halve the flying time from Los Angeles to Tokyo. However, before a new economically feasible supersonic transport can be built, many key technologies must be developed. Among these technologies is noise suppression. Propulsion systems for a supersonic transport using current technology would exceed acceptable noise levels. All new aircraft must satisfy FAR 36 Stage III noise regulations. The largest area of concern is the noise generated during takeoff. A concerted effort under NASA's High Speed Research (HSR) program has begun to address the problem of noise suppression. One of the most promising concepts being studied in the area of noise suppression is the mixer/ejector nozzle. This study analyzes a typical noise suppressing mixer ejector nozzle at take off conditions, using a Full Navier-Stokes (FNS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code.

  20. Parametric Study of a Mixer/Ejector Nozzle with Mixing Enhancement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DalBello, T.; Steffen, C. J., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    A numerical study employing a simplified model of the High Speed Civil Transport mixer/ejector nozzle has been conducted to investigate the effect of tabs (vortex generators) on the mixing process. More complete mixing of the primary and secondary flows within the confined ejector lowers peak exit velocity resulting in reduced jet noise. Tabs were modeled as vortex pairs and inserted into the computational model. The location, size, and number of tabs were varied and its effect on the mixing process is presented here both quantitatively and qualitatively. A baseline case (no tabs) along with six other cases involving two different vortex strengths at three different orientations have been computed and analyzed. The case with the highest vorticity (six vortices representing large tabs) gives the best mixing. It is shown that the influence of the vorticity acts primarily in the forward or middle portions of the duct, significantly alters the flow structure, and promotes some mixing in the lateral direction. Unmixed pockets were found at the top and bottom of the lobe, and more clever placement of tabs improved mixing in the vertical direction. The technique of replacing tabs with vortices shows promise as an efficient tool for quickly optimizing tab placement in lobed mixers.

  1. Mechanism of amorphisation of micro-particles of griseofulvin during powder flow in a mixer.

    PubMed

    Pazesh, Samaneh; Höckerfelt, Mina Heidarian; Berggren, Jonas; Bramer, Tobias; Alderborn, Göran

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of the research was to investigate the degree of solid-state amorphisation during powder flow and to propose a mechanism for this transformation. Micro-particles of griseofulvin (about 2 μm in diameter) were mixed in a shear mixer under different conditions to influence the inter-particulate collisions during flow, and the degree of amorphisation was determined by micro-calorimeter. The amorphisation of griseofulvin particles (GPs) during repeated compaction was also determined. The GPs generally became disordered during mixing in a range from about 6% to about 86%. The degree of amorphisation increased with increased mixing time and increased batch size of the mixer, whereas the addition of a lubricant to the blend reduced the degree of amorphisation. Repeated compaction using the press with ejection mode gave limited amorphisation, whereas repeated compaction without an ejection process gave minute amorphisation. It is concluded that during powder flow, the most important inter-particulate contact process that cause the transformation of a crystalline solid into an amorphous state is sliding. On the molecular scale, this amorphisation is proposed to be caused by vitrification, that is the melting of a solid because of the generation of heat during sliding followed by solidification into an amorphous phase. PMID:23996413

  2. Melt granulation of pharmaceutical powders: a comparison of high-shear mixer and fluidised bed processes.

    PubMed

    Passerini, Nadia; Calogerà, Giacomo; Albertini, Beatrice; Rodriguez, Lorenzo

    2010-05-31

    The main aim of this research was to compare in situ melt granulation process in high-shear mixers and fluidised bed equipments with particular attention to the final properties of granules. In addition, the study evaluated the suitability of melt granulation in fluidised bed for improving the dissolution rate of drugs. Agglomerates having identical composition (10%, w/w, of ibuprofen or ketoprofen, 20%, w/w, of PEG 6000 and 70%, w/w, of lactose monohydrate) were produced using both equipments and their morphology, particle size, flowability, friability, drug loading, dissolution behaviors at pH 1.2 and 7.4 and physicochemical properties (DSC and XRD analysis) have been evaluated and compared. The results showed that melt granulation can be successfully performed in both granulators. The utilization of a different equipment had strong impact on the particle size distribution of the granules and on their morphology, while the effect on others physical properties was little, as all the granules possess low friability and excellent flowability. Moreover both the solid state characteristics of the products and the dissolution behaviors of ibuprofen and ketoprofen granules were found to be practically independent of the equipment and all granules showed a significant increase of the drug dissolution rate in acidic conditions. In conclusion in situ melt granulation in fluidised beds could be considered a suitable alternative to the melt granulation in high-shear mixers. PMID:20214959

  3. Laser direct writing 3D structures for microfluidic channels: flow meter and mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Liu, Yi-Jui; Lin, Zheng-Da; Wu, Bo-Long; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Shin, Chow-Shing; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2015-03-01

    The 3D laser direct-writing technology is aimed at the modeling of arbitrary three-dimensional (3D) complex microstructures by scanning a laser-focusing point along predetermined trajectories. Through the perspective technique, the details of designed 3D structures can be properly fabricated in a microchannel. This study introduces a direct reading flow meter and a 3D passive mixer fabricated by laser direct writing for microfluidic applications. The flow meter consists of two rod-shaped springs, a pillar, an anchor, and a wedge-shaped indicator, installed inside a microfluidic channel. The indicator is deflected by the flowing fluid while restrained by the spring to establish an equilibrium indication according to the flow rate. The measurement is readily carried out by optical microscopy observation. The 3D passive Archimedes-screw-shaped mixer is designed to disturb the laminar flow 3D direction for enhancing the mixing efficiency. The simulation results indicate that the screw provides 3D disturbance of streamlines in the microchannel. The mixing demonstration for fluids flowing in the micrchannel approximately agrees with the simulation result. Thanks to the advantage of the laser direct writing technology, this study performs the ingenious applications of 3D structures for microchannels.

  4. The effect of particle shape on mixing in a high shear mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, Matthew D.; Cleary, Paul W.

    2016-11-01

    Discrete element method modelling is used to study the effect of particle shape on the flow dynamics and mixing in a high shear mixer. The blade generates strong flow over its top surface while compacting and pushing forward particles that are directly in front of the blade. A complex three dimensional flow is established with vertical and radial flow components that are shape dependent and which control the nature of the mixing. Mixing was found to be fast in the azimuthal direction, of intermediate speed in the vertical direction and comparatively slow in the radial mixing. Diffusive mixing is characterised using the granular temperature which shows that the regions of higher granular temperature are larger for round particles than non-round ones leading to stronger diffusive mixing. The spatial distribution of the convective component of mixing is identified using novel calculation of shear strain rate. This size and shape of the high shear region is found to be only slightly sensitive to the particle shape indicating that the convective mixing is relatively independent of shape, except in the middle of the mixer. The blockiness of the particles has the strongest impact on flow and mixing while the mixing has only a weak dependence on the particle aspect ratio.

  5. 100-GHz Phase Switch/Mixer Containing a Slot-Line Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Wells, Mary; Dawson, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    A circuit that can function as a phase switch, frequency mixer, or frequency multiplier operates over a broad frequency range in the vicinity of 100 GHz. Among the most notable features of this circuit is a grounded uniplanar transition (in effect, a balun) between a slot line and one of two coplanar waveguides (CPWs). The design of this circuit is well suited to integration of the circuit into a microwave monolithic integrated circuit (MMIC) package. One CPW is located at the input end and one at the output end of the top side of a substrate on which the circuit is fabricated (see Figure 1). The input CPW feeds the input signal to antiparallel flip-chip Schottky diodes connected to the edges of the slot line. Phase switching is effected by the combination of (1) the abrupt transition from the input CPW to the slot line and (2) CPW ground tuning effected by switching of the bias on the diodes. Grounding of the slot metal to the bottom metal gives rise to a frequency cutoff in the slot. This cutoff is valuable for separating different frequency components when the circuit is used as a mixer or multiplier. Proceeding along the slot line toward the output end, one encounters the aforementioned transition, which couples the slot line to the output CPW. Impedance tuning of the transition is accomplished by use of a high-impedance section immediately before the transition.

  6. The effect of particle shape on mixing in a high shear mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, Matthew D.; Cleary, Paul W.

    2015-09-01

    Discrete element method modelling is used to study the effect of particle shape on the flow dynamics and mixing in a high shear mixer. The blade generates strong flow over its top surface while compacting and pushing forward particles that are directly in front of the blade. A complex three dimensional flow is established with vertical and radial flow components that are shape dependent and which control the nature of the mixing. Mixing was found to be fast in the azimuthal direction, of intermediate speed in the vertical direction and comparatively slow in the radial mixing. Diffusive mixing is characterised using the granular temperature which shows that the regions of higher granular temperature are larger for round particles than non-round ones leading to stronger diffusive mixing. The spatial distribution of the convective component of mixing is identified using novel calculation of shear strain rate. This size and shape of the high shear region is found to be only slightly sensitive to the particle shape indicating that the convective mixing is relatively independent of shape, except in the middle of the mixer. The blockiness of the particles has the strongest impact on flow and mixing while the mixing has only a weak dependence on the particle aspect ratio.

  7. Optimization of a Continuous Hybrid Impeller Mixer via Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Othman, N.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Takriff, M. S.; Rosli, M. I.; Engku Chik, E. M. F.; Meor Adnan, M. A. K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary steps required for conducting experiments to obtain the optimal operating conditions of a hybrid impeller mixer and to determine the residence time distribution (RTD) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In this paper, impeller speed and clearance parameters are examined. The hybrid impeller mixer consists of a single Rushton turbine mounted above a single pitched blade turbine (PBT). Four impeller speeds, 50, 100, 150, and 200 rpm, and four impeller clearances, 25, 50, 75, and 100 mm, were the operation variables used in this study. CFD was utilized to initially screen the parameter ranges to reduce the number of actual experiments needed. Afterward, the residence time distribution (RTD) was determined using the respective parameters. Finally, the Fluent-predicted RTD and the experimentally measured RTD were compared. The CFD investigations revealed that an impeller speed of 50 rpm and an impeller clearance of 25 mm were not viable for experimental investigations and were thus eliminated from further analyses. The determination of RTD using a k-ε turbulence model was performed using CFD techniques. The multiple reference frame (MRF) was implemented and a steady state was initially achieved followed by a transient condition for RTD determination. PMID:25170524

  8. Unsteady engulfment regime in a three dimensional T-mixer: stability and sensitivity analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarri, Simone; Fani, Andrea; Salvetti, Maria Vittoria

    2013-11-01

    Micro T-mixers are important devices in microfluidics; for instance, they are often used as junction elements in complex micro-systems. Most of the studies in the literature focused their attention on the steady engulfment regime, characterized by a loss of the flow symmetries in the outflow channel which in turn leads to a considerable increase of the mixing efficiency. It has been recently observed that if the Reynolds number is increased beyond the steady engulfment critical value, the flow may become unsteady with a periodic pulsating behavior and this regime corresponds to a significant further increase of mixing compared to the steady one. We consider a given T-mixer geometry and we combine direct numerical simulations with fully 3D linear stability and sensitivity analyses to characterize the unsteady engulfment regime in terms of critical Reynolds number, characteristic time frequencies and flow dynamics. The unsteadiness seems to be triggered by a critical value for the intensity and orientation of vortices at the confluence in the mixing channel; the instability core is indeed located in the center of these vortices. The sensitivity to a generic modification of the base-flow is investigated, to obtain indications on possible control strategies.

  9. Lobed Mixer Design for Noise Suppression: Plume, Aerodynamic and Acoustic Data. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Baker, V. David; Dalton, William N.; Bridges, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database for the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several model-scale lobe mixers of bypass ratio 5 to 6 has been created for mixed jet speeds up to 1080 ft per s at typical take-off (TO) conditions of small-to-medium turbofan engines. The flight effect was simulated for Mach numbers up to 0.3. The static thrust performance and plume data were also obtained at typical TO and cruise conditions. The tests were done at NASA Lewis anechoic dome and ASE's FluiDyne Laboratories. The effect of several lobe mixer and nozzle parameters, such as, lobe scalloping, lobe count, lobe penetration and nozzle length was examined in terms of flyover noise at constant altitude and also noise in the reference frame of the nozzle. This volume is divided into three parts: in the first two parts, we collate the plume survey data in graphical form (line, contour and surface plots) and analyze it; in part 3, we tabulate the aerodynamic data for the acoustics tests and the acoustic data in one-third octave band levels.

  10. Ultra-Low-Voltage CMOS-Based Current Bleeding Mixer with High LO-RF Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Gim Heng; Sidek, Roslina Mohd; Chong, Wei Keat; Lioe, De Xing

    2014-01-01

    This journal presents an ultra-low-voltage current bleeding mixer with high LO-RF port-to-port isolation, implemented on 0.13 μm standard CMOS technology for ZigBee application. The architecture compliments a modified current bleeding topology, consisting of NMOS-based current bleeding transistor, PMOS-based switching stage, and integrated inductors achieving low-voltage operation and high LO-RF isolation. The mixer exhibits a conversion gain of 7.5 dB at the radio frequency (RF) of 2.4 GHz, an input third-order intercept point (IIP3) of 1 dBm, and a LO-RF isolation measured to 60 dB. The DC power consumption is 572 µW at supply voltage of 0.45 V, while consuming a chip area of 0.97 × 0.88 mm2. PMID:25197694

  11. Conversion gain and noise of niobium superconducting hot-electron-mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstrom, Hans; Karasik, Boris S.; Kollberg, Erik L.; Yngvesson, Sigfrid

    1995-01-01

    A study has been done of microwave mixing at 20 GHz using the nonlinear (power dependent) resistance of thin niobium strips in the resistive state. Our experiments give evidence that electron-heating is the main cause of the nonlinear phenomenon. Also a detailed phenomenological theory for the determination of conversion properties is presented. This theory is capable of predicting the frequency-conversion loss rather accurately for arbitrary bias by examining the I-V-characteristic. Knowing the electron temperature relaxation time, and using parameters derived from the I-V-characteristic also allows us to predict the -3 dB IF bandwidth. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. The requirements on the mode of operation and on the film parameters for minimizing the conversion loss (and even achieving conversion gain) are discussed in some detail. Our measurements demonstrate an intrinsic conversion loss as low as 1 dB. The maximum IF frequency defined for -3 dB drop in conversion gain, is about 80 MHz. Noise measurements indicate a device output noise temperature of about 50 K and SSB mixer noise temperature below 250 K. This type of mixer is considered very promising for use in low-noise heterodyne receivers at THz frequencies.

  12. Apparatus for Pumping a Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boeyen, Robert Van; Reeh, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A fluid pump has been developed for mechanically pumped fluid loops for spacecraft thermal control. Lynntech's technology utilizes a proprietary electrochemically driven pumping mechanism. Conventional rotodynamic and displacement pumps typically do not meet the stringent power and operational reliability requirements of space applications. Lynntech's developmental pump is a highly efficient solid-state pump with essentially no rotating or moving components (apart from metal bellows).

  13. Pressure charged airlift pump

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Gene K.

    1983-01-01

    A pumping system is described for pumping fluids, such as water with entrained mud and small rocks, out of underground cavities such as drilled wells, which can effectively remove fluids down to a level very close to the bottom of the cavity and which can operate solely by compressed air pumped down through the cavity. The system utilizes a subassembly having a pair of parallel conduit sections (44, 46) adapted to be connected onto the bottom of a drill string utilized for drilling the cavity, the drill string also having a pair of coaxially extending conduits. The subassembly includes an upper portion which has means for connection onto the drill string and terminates the first conduit of the drill string in a plenum (55). A compressed air-driven pump (62) is suspended from the upper portion. The pump sucks fluids from the bottom of the cavity and discharges them into the second conduit. Compressed air pumped down through the first conduit (46) to the plenum powers the compressed air-driven pump and aerates the fluid in the second conduit to lift it to the earth's surface.

  14. Deep well pump

    SciTech Connect

    Downen, J.L.; Sutliff, W.N.

    1981-06-16

    A pump barrel open at its lower end is coupled at its upper end by a tubular adapter assembly to the lower end of a pump tubing string. This assembly presents an internal bevelled sealing latching annulus, an axially bored pump head being radially expansively spring latched in a fixed axial sealed relation with the annulus to seal the upper end of the pump barrel from the adapter assembly to form a pump compression chamber surrounding a hollow polish rod extending upwardly from a plunger mounted on the lower end of the polish rod for reciprocation in the pump barrel. The plunger carries tandem travelling valves close beneath its connection with the polish rod. The lower valve opening to receive oil through the barrel and plunger on the down stroke and concurrently delivering such oil into the compression chamber. The upper valve closes on the down stroke and opening on the up stroke during which the lower valve closes to expel oil trapped in the compression chamber upward through the upper valve into the lower end of the hollow polish rod which oil is discharged at the upper end thereof into the pump tubing string through the fitting adapting the polish rod to the lower end of the sucker rod.

  15. Performance of mosquito's pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji

    2005-11-01

    The flow of human blood in Mosquito's proboscis on Hagen-Poiseuille flow is investigated by using micro PIV system to apply mosquito's sucking system for micro-TAS devises. We want to know how high the power of Mosquito's pump is and how small the resistance in a proboscis is, a structure of Mosquito's sucking pump, and its characteristics as mechanical pump. We made the mosquito suck blood of our arm to obtain the average value, made many slices of a mosquito with 2μm thickness after fixed by wax. We anatomized the mosquito's head and picked up the sucking pump under the microscope to know its volume. Mosquito's pump shows high performance compared with the artificial pumps. The surfaces of proboscis were taken by using SEM, AFM because it is important factor for interaction between flow and its wall. Visualization of the blood flows near the tip of and inside proboscis are taken by micro PIV system to know the flow rate. We estimate the power of pump and the friction drag of proboscis by using these data.

  16. Fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Iiyama, A.; Nishimura, T.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a fuel injection pump comprising: (a) engageable first and second cam members, the first cam member reciprocating axially as the first cam member moves angularly relative to the second cam member when the first and second cam members are in engagement; (b) means for urging the first cam member toward the second cam member to engage the first and second cam members; (c) a plunger connected to the first cam member for reciprocation with the first cam member, the plunger defining at least a part of a pumping chamber, the pumping chamber contracting and expanding as the plunger reciprocates; (d) means for allowing fuel to move into the pumping chamber as the pumping chamber expands in a fuel intake stroke; (e) means for allowing the fuel to move out of the pumping chamber as the pumping chamber contracts in a fuel compression stroke; and (f) means for resisting movement of the plunger in at least part of the fuel compression stroke and relieving resistance to the movement of the plunger in the fuel intake stroke wherein the resisting means comprises a piston slidably mounted on the plunger, a spring urging the piston to seat the piston on a shoulder on the plunger so that the piston reciprocates as the plunger reciprocates, wherein the piston is seated on the shoulder in the fuel compression stroke and separates from the shoulder against the force of the spring in the fuel intake stroke, a second fluid chamber at least partially defined by the piston.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT PERFORMANCE OF INDUCTION MIXERS FOR DISINFECTION OF WET WEATHER FLOWS, GAS MASTRRR SERIES 32 SUBMERSIBLE CHEMICAL INDUCTION MIXERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Wet-Weather Flow Technologies Pilot of the EPA's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program under a partnership with NSF International has verified the performance of the GAS MASTRRR Series 32 Submersible Chemical Induction Mixers used for disinfection of wet-weather...

  18. RENEWABLE LIQUID GETTERING PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.

    1962-08-21

    A method and structure were developed for pumping gases by simple absorption into a liquid gettering material. The invention comprises means ror continuously pumping a liquid getterrng material from a reservoir to the top of a generally vertical surface disposed in a vacuum pumping chamber to receive gaseous and other particles in the liquid gettering material which continuously flows downward over the vertical suiface. Means are provided for continuous removal, degassing, and return of a portion of the liquid gettering material from the reservoir connected with collectrng means at the base of the generally vertical plate. (AEC)

  19. A 1.5 THz hot-electron bolometer mixer operated by a planar diode based local oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. Y. E.; Meledin, D.; Blundell, R.; Erickson, N.; Mehdi, I.; Goltsman, G.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a 1.5 THz superconducting NbN Hot-Electron Bolometer mixer. It is oprated by an all-solid-state Local Oscillator comprising of a cascade of 4 planar doublers following an MMIC based W-band power amplifier.

  20. Influence of Geometry and Flow Variations on NO Formation in the Quick Mixer of a Staged Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, M. S.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Staged combustion, such as Rich-Burn/Quick-Mix/Lean-Burn (RQL), is a viable strategy to meet nitric oxide (NO) emission goals for both stationary and propulsion gas turbine engines. A critical element of the design is the quick mixer section where the potential for NO production is high. While numerical calculations of the quick mixer under reacting conditions have been conducted, the hostile environment and lack of appropriate diagnostics have, to date, precluded experimental probing of the reacting case. As an alternative to understanding the effect of geometry and flow variations on the production of NO in the quick mixer, the present paper presents (1) a series of non-reacting parametric studies, and (2) a computational method to extrapolate the results of the non-reacting experiments to reacting conditions. The results show that the rate of NO production is highest in the immediate vicinity of the injection plane. For a given momentum flux ratio between the jets and mainstream, the most effective mixing geometry is that which mixes effectively in both (1) the plane of injection, and (2) the wall regions downstream of the plan of injection. The tailoring of the mixing is key to minimize the NO formed. As a result, the best overall mixer with respect to the minimization of NO production may depend on the system specific characteristics of the particular application.

  1. Phase locking of 2.324 and 2.959 terahertz quantum cascade lasers using a Schottky diode harmonic mixer.

    PubMed

    Danylov, Andriy; Erickson, Neal; Light, Alexander; Waldman, Jerry

    2015-11-01

    The 23rd and 31st harmonics of a microwave signal generated in a novel THz balanced Schottky diode mixer were used as a frequency stable reference source to phase lock solid-nitrogen-cooled 2.324 and 2.959 THz quantum cascade lasers. Hertz-level frequency stability was achieved, which was maintained for several hours. PMID:26512526

  2. Phase locking of 2.324 and 2.959 terahertz quantum cascade lasers using a Schottky diode harmonic mixer.

    PubMed

    Danylov, Andriy; Erickson, Neal; Light, Alexander; Waldman, Jerry

    2015-11-01

    The 23rd and 31st harmonics of a microwave signal generated in a novel THz balanced Schottky diode mixer were used as a frequency stable reference source to phase lock solid-nitrogen-cooled 2.324 and 2.959 THz quantum cascade lasers. Hertz-level frequency stability was achieved, which was maintained for several hours.

  3. A Handheld LED Coloured-Light Mixer for Students to Learn Collaboratively the Primary Colours of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Chitaree, Ratchapak; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    To overcome students' inaccurate prior knowledge on primary additive colours, a coloured-light mixer has been constructed to enable students to observe directly the colours produced and reach the conclusion by themselves that the three primary colours of light are red, green, and blue (NOT red, yellow, and blue). Three closely packed tiny…

  4. An inverted micro-mixer based on a magnetically-actuated cilium made of Fe doped PDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fengli; Zhang, Jun; Alici, Gursel; Yan, Sheng; Mutlu, Rahim; Li, Weihua; Yan, Tianhong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report a new micromixer based on a flexible artificial cilium activated by an external magnetic field. The cilium is fabricated from Polydimethylsiloxane doped with Fe microparticles. The fabrication method is based on the standard sacrificial layer technology. The cilium was built on a glass slide, and then was bonded on the top of the micro-mixer chamber in a microfluidic chip. This fabrication process for the miniaturized active mixers is simple and cost effective. An electromagnetic system was used to drive the cilium and induce strong convective flows of the fluid in the chamber. In the presence of an alternating magnetic field, the cilium applied a corresponding alternating force on the surrounding fluids. The performance of the electromagnetically activated cilium was quantified and optimized in order to obtain maximum mixing performance. In addition, the mixing performance of the cilium in a circular micro-chamber was compared with pure diffusion. Up to 80% of a 60 ul liquid in the chamber can be fully mixed after 2 min using a cilium mixer under a magnetic flux density of 22 mT in contrast to the 20 min which were needed to obtain the same mixing percentage under pure diffusion. Furthermore, for a mixing degree of 80%, the mixing speed for the cilia micromixer proposed in this study was 9 times faster than that of the diffusion-based micro-mixers reported in the literature.

  5. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  6. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  7. Keeping Hearts Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A collaboration between NASA, Dr. Michael DeBakey, Dr. George Noon, and MicroMed Technology, Inc., resulted in a life-saving heart pump for patients awaiting heart transplants. The MicroMed DeBakey VAD functions as a "bridge to heart transplant" by pumping blood throughout the body to keep critically ill patients alive until a donor heart is available. Weighing less than 4 ounces and measuring 1 inch by 3 inches, the pump is approximately one-tenth the size of other currently marketed pulsatile VADs. This makes it less invasive and ideal for smaller adults and children. Because of the pump's small size, less than 5 percent of the patients implanted developed device-related infections. It can operate up to 8 hours on batteries, giving patients the mobility to do normal, everyday activities.The MicroMed DeBakey VAD is a registered trademark of MicroMed Technology, Inc.

  8. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  9. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  10. GAS METERING PUMP

    DOEpatents

    George, C.M.

    1957-12-31

    A liquid piston gas pump is described, capable of pumping minute amounts of gas in accurately measurable quantities. The pump consists of a flanged cylindrical regulating chamber and a mercury filled bellows. Sealed to the ABSTRACTS regulating chamber is a value and having a gas inlet and outlet, the inlet being connected by a helical channel to the bellows. A gravity check valve is in the gas outlet, so the gas passes through the inlet and the helical channel to the bellows where the pumping action as well as the metering is accomplished by the actuation of the mercury filled bellows. The gas then flows through the check valve and outlet to any associated apparatus.

  11. Direct nuclear pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Miley, George H.; Wells, William E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

  12. 670-GHz Down- and Up-Converting HEMT-Based Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlecht, Enrich T.; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Lin, Robert H.; Sin, Seth; Deal, William; Rodriquez, Bryan; Bayuk, Brian; Leong, Kevin; Mei, Gerry

    2012-01-01

    A large category of scientific investigation takes advantage of the interactions of signals in the frequency range from 300 to 1,000 GHz and higher. This includes astronomy and atmospheric science, where spectral observations in this frequency range give information about molecular abundances, pressures, and temperatures of small-sized molecules such as water. Additionally, there is a minimum in the atmospheric absorption at around 670 GHz that makes this frequency useful for terrestrial imaging, radar, and possibly communications purposes. This is because 670 GHz is a good compromise for imaging and radar applications between spatial resolution (for a given antenna size) that favors higher frequencies, and atmospheric losses that favor lower frequencies. A similar trade-off applies to communications link budgets: higher frequencies allow smaller antennas, but incur a higher loss. All of these applications usually require converting the RF (radio frequency) signal at 670 GHz to a lower IF (intermediate frequency) for processing. Further, transmitting for communication and radar generally requires up-conversion from IF to the RF. The current state-of-the-art device for performing the frequency conversion is based on Schottky diode mixers for both up and down conversion in this frequency range for room-temperature operation. Devices that can operate at room temperature are generally required for terrestrial, military, and planetary applications that cannot tolerate the mass, bulk, and power consumption of cryogenic cooling. The technology has recently advanced to the point that amplifiers in the region up to nearly 1,000 GHz are feasible. Almost all of these have been based on indium phosphide pseudomorphic high-electron mobility transistors (pHEMTs), in the form of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs). Since the processing of HEMT amplifiers is quite differ en t from that of Schottky diodes, use of Schottky mixers requires separate MMICs for the mixers

  13. Measurement and Computation of Supersonic Flow in a Lobed Diffuser-Mixer for Trapped Vortex Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brankovic, Andreja; Ryder, Robert C., Jr.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Gallagher, John R.; Shouse, Dale T.; Roquemore, W. Melvyn; Cooper, Clayton S.; Burrus, David L.; Hendricks, John A.

    2002-01-01

    The trapped vortex combustor (TVC) pioneered by Air Force Research Laboratories (AFRL) is under consideration as an alternative to conventional gas turbine combustors. The TVC has demonstrated excellent operational characteristics such as high combustion efficiency, low NO(x) emissions, effective flame stabilization, excellent high-altitude relight capability, and operation in the lean-burn or rich burn-quick quench-lean burn (RQL) modes of combustion. It also has excellent potential for lowering the engine combustor weight. This performance at low to moderate combustor mach numbers has stimulated interest in its ability to operate at higher combustion mach number, and for aerospace, this implies potentially higher flight mach numbers. To this end, a lobed diffuser-mixer that enhances the fuel-air mixing in the TVC combustor core was designed and evaluated, with special attention paid to the potential shock system entering the combustor core. For the present investigation, the lobed diffuser-mixer combustor rig is in a full annular configuration featuring sixfold symmetry among the lobes, symmetry within each lobe, and plain parallel, symmetric incident flow. During hardware cold-flow testing, significant discrepancies were found between computed and measured values for the pitot-probe-averaged static pressure profiles at the lobe exit plane. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were initiated to determine whether the static pressure probe was causing high local flow-field disturbances in the supersonic flow exiting the diffuser-mixer and whether shock wave impingement on the pitot probe tip, pressure ports, or surface was the cause of the discrepancies. Simulations were performed with and without the pitot probe present in the modeling. A comparison of static pressure profiles without the probe showed that static pressure was off by nearly a factor of 2 over much of the radial profile, even when taking into account potential axial displacement of the

  14. Lunar Base Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Fischbach, D.; Tetreault, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to investigate the feasibility of constructing a heat pump suitable for use as a heat rejection device in applications such as a lunar base. In this situation, direct heat rejection through the use of radiators is not possible at a temperature suitable for lde support systems. Initial analysis of a heat pump of this type called for a temperature lift of approximately 378 deg. K, which is considerably higher than is commonly called for in HVAC and refrigeration applications where heat pumps are most often employed. Also because of the variation of the rejection temperature (from 100 to 381 deg. K), extreme flexibility in the configuration and operation of the heat pump is required. A three-stage compression cycle using a refrigerant such as CFC-11 or HCFC-123 was formulated with operation possible with one, two or three stages of compression. Also, to meet the redundancy requirements, compression was divided up over multiple compressors in each stage. A control scheme was devised that allowed these multiple compressors to be operated as required so that the heat pump could perform with variable heat loads and rejection conditions. A prototype heat pump was designed and constructed to investigate the key elements of the high-lift heat pump concept. Control software was written and implemented in the prototype to allow fully automatic operation. The heat pump was capable of operation over a wide range of rejection temperatures and cooling loads, while maintaining cooling water temperature well within the required specification of 40 deg. C +/- 1.7 deg. C. This performance was verified through testing.

  15. Remotely Adjustable Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouns, H. H.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    Outlet pressure adjusted to match varying loads. Electrohydraulic servo has positioned sleeve in leftmost position, adjusting outlet pressure to maximum value. Sleeve in equilibrium position, with control land covering control port. For lowest pressure setting, sleeve shifted toward right by increased pressure on sleeve shoulder from servovalve. Pump used in aircraft and robots, where hydraulic actuators repeatedly turned on and off, changing pump load frequently and over wide range.

  16. Lunar base heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Jeffrey H.; Tetreault, R.; Fischbach, D.; Walker, D.

    1994-01-01

    A heat pump is a device which elevates the temperature of a heat flow by a means of an energy input. By doing this, the heat pump can cause heat to transfer faster from a warm region to a cool region, or it can cause heat to flow from a cool region to a warmer region. The second case is the one which finds vast commercial applications such as air conditioning, heating, and refrigeration. Aerospace applications of heat pumps include both cases. The NASA Johnson Space Center is currently developing a Life Support Systems Integration Facility (LSSIF, previously SIRF) to provide system-level integration, operational test experience, and performance data that will enable NASA to develop flight-certified hardware for future planetary missions. A high lift heat pump is a significant part of the TCS hardware development associated with the LSSIF. The high lift heat pump program discussed here is being performed in three phases. In Phase 1, the objective is to develop heat pump concepts for a lunar base, a lunar lander, and for a ground development unit for the SIRF. In Phase 2, the design of the SIRF ground test unit is being performed, including identification and evaluation of safety and reliability issues. In Phase 3, the SIRF unit will be manufactured, tested, and delivered to the NASA Johnson Space Center.

  17. Hydraulic well pump

    SciTech Connect

    Dollison, W.W.

    1987-09-08

    This patent describes a system for operating a sucker rod string connected with a well pump comprising: a double-acting fluid cylinder having opposing power ends; means for connecting the cylinder with the sucker rod string for raising and lowering the string to operate the pump; hydraulic pump means for supplying pressurized fluid alternately to the cylinder ends including a direction control movable between extend and retract conditions to extend and retract the cylinder; drive means for shifting the direction control; control means for operating the drive means responsive to the extend and retract movements of the cylinder; and means for applying a fluid counterbalancing force into the cylinder for offsetting the combined weights of the sucker rod string. A production fluid column in a well bore above the pump, and movable surface equipment supported on the cylinder include an accumulator connected with the hydraulic pump means and the direction control for supercharging the intake of the pump during the extend movement of the cylinder and for applying an opposing hydraulic force to the cylinder during the retract movement.

  18. Smart'' pump and treat

    SciTech Connect

    Isherwood, W.; Rice, D. Jr.; Ziagos, J. ); Nichols, E. )

    1991-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is approaching the final phase of the Superfund decision-making process for site restoration and will soon initiate full scale cleanup. Despite some well-publicized failings of the pump and treat approach, we have concluded that intelligent application of this strategy if the best choice for ground water restoration at LLNL. Our proposed approach differs sufficiently from the pump and treat methods implemented at other sites that we call it smart'' pump and treat. Smart pump and treat consists of four distinct, but interrelated, elements: three preremediation strategies and one modification to pump and treat itself. Together, these techniques are an integrated program that utilizes an understanding of crucial aspects of contaminant flow and transport to speed up the remediation of contaminated aquifers. The four elements are: (1) a spatially detailed site characterization, linked with regional hydrogeologic models; (2) directed extraction, where the extraction and recharge locations are controlled by field-determined hydrogeologic parameters; (3) field-validated modeling that the matches the complexity of the collected data; and (4) adaptive pumping, whose pattern varies with time. Together, these techniques minimize the cost and the time to reach regulatory directed cleanup goals and maximize the rate of contaminant removal. 8 refs.

  19. Rotary blood pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor); Kiris, Cetin (Inventor); Kwak, Dochan (Inventor); Rosenbaum, Bernard J. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); DeBakey, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A blood pump that comprises a pump housing having a blood flow path therethrough, a blood inlet, and a blood outlet; a stator mounted to the pump housing, the stator having a stator field winding for producing a stator magnetic field; a flow straightener located within the pump housing, and comprising a flow straightener hub and at least one flow straightener blade attached to the flow straightener hub; a rotor mounted within the pump housing for rotation in response to the stator magnetic field, the rotor comprising an inducer and an impeller; the inducer being located downstream of the flow straightener, and comprising an inducer hub and at least one inducer blade attached to the inducer hub; the impeller being located downstream of the inducer, and comprising an impeller hub and at least one impeller blade attached to the impeller hub; and preferably also comprising a diffuser downstream of the impeller, the diffuser comprising a diffuser hub and at least one diffuser blade. Blood flow stagnation and clot formation within the pump are minimized by, among other things, providing the inducer hub with a diameter greater than the diameter of the flow straightener hub; by optimizing the axial spacing between the flow straightener hub and the inducer hub, and between the impeller hub and the diffuser hub; by optimizing the inlet angle of the diffuser blades; and by providing fillets or curved transitions between the upstream end of the inducer hub and the shaft mounted therein, and between the impeller hub and the shaft mounted therein.

  20. Auxiliary lubrication pump apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Glesmann, H.C.; Thomas, R.G.

    1987-02-10

    This patent describes an auxiliary lubrication pump apparatus for use with a towing vehicle having an engine switch, a battery, and an interior compartment, and a towed vehicle having an automatic transmission which requires forced lubrication while being towed. The apparatus comprises: (a) a lubrication pump; (b) a transmission to pump hose connected between the automatic transmission and the lubrication pump; (c) a valve having at least one signal output and two inputs: (d) a hose means for connecting an output of the lubrication pump to one of the inputs of the valve; (e) a first outflow hose for connecting the automatic transmission to another input of the valve; (f) a second output hose for connecting the output of the valve to the automatic transmission; (g) pressure sensing means positioned to sense pressure as regards the second outflow hose; and (h) control means responsive to the pressure sensing means and having switch means for providing electricity to the lubrication pump and to provide an alarm whenever the control means detects through the pressure sensing means that inadequate pressure exists.