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Sample records for 241-sy-101 surface level

  1. 6430.1A Compliance Matrix for 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect

    ERHART, M.F.

    1999-08-18

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) has recently exhibited a steady waste surface level growth. A path forward to mitigate the SY-101 surface level growth issue has been developed. The project has been directed to install the necessary equipment to transfer 380-570m{sup 3} (100,000-150,000 gallons) of waste from SY-101 to SY-102 before the waste elevation reached the region of the tank where the transition from a double to a single shell tank occurs. The purpose of this document is to record the design attributes of the RAPID mitigation system which fulfill the requirements specified in DOE order 6430.1A as it relates to the 241-SY-101 RAPID Mitigation System.

  2. Process control plan for tank 241-SY-101 surface level rise remediation

    SciTech Connect

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-06-29

    The tank 241-SY-101 transfer system was conceived and designed to address the immediate needs presented by rapidly changing waste conditions in tank 241-SY-101. Within the past year or so, the waste in this tank has exhibited unexpected behavior in the form of rapidly increasing crust growth. The Process Control Plan (PCP), HNF-4264, was written to translate high-level guidance and regulatory criteria and express it in terms of operating instructions for the waste transfer system. These controls include: (1) Tank Farm Operations Administrative Controls developed in response to DOE-ORP direction reg,arding supplemental controls placed upon tank 241-SY-101 surface level rise remediation activities specifically involving waste transfer activities. (2) Authorization Basis controls (Basis for Interim Operation (BIO)/Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs)) and supplemental DOE direction. (3) Environmental, Industrial Hygiene and Safety controls. (4) Operating Specification Document (OSD) controls. (5) Good operating practices. Included in the document are descriptions of tank conditions, waste conditions, major equipment, and a high-level overview of the system and the line-ups in which it operates. Primarily, the PCP addresses how the waste transfer will be managed, defining the monitoring and control methods including material balances to determine the progress and to define completion criteria for the transfer. The actual plant modifications and waste transfer will be authorized and controlled by plant procedures.

  3. Process Control Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-09-28

    The tank 241-SY-101 transfer system was conceived and designed to address the immediate needs presented by rapidly changing waste conditions in tank 241-SY-101. Within the last year or so, the waste in this tank has exhibited unexpected behavior (Rassat et al. 1999) in the form of rapidly increasing crust growth. This growth has been brought about by a rapidly increasing rate of gas entrapment within the crust. It has been conceived that the lack of crust agitation beginning upon the advent of mixer pump operations may have set-up a more consolidated, gas impermeable barrier when compared to a crust regularly broken up by the prior buoyant displacement events within the tank. As a result, a series of level-growth remediation activities have been developed for tank 241-SY-101. The initial activities are also known as near-term crust mitigation. The first activity of near-term mitigation is to perform the small transfer of convective waste from tank 241-SY-101 into tank 241-SY-102. A 100 kgal transfer represents about a 10% volume reduction allowing a 10% water in-tank dilution. Current thinking holds that this should be enough to dissolve nitrite solids in the crust and perhaps largely eliminate gas retention problem in the crust (Raymond 1999).

  4. Process Control Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-11-01

    The tank 241-SY-101 transfer system was conceived and designed to address the immediate needs presented by rapidly changing waste conditions in tank 241-SY-101. Within approximately the last year, the waste in this tank has exhibited unexpected behavior (Rassat et al. 1999) in the form of rapidly increasing crust growth. This growth has been brought about by a rapidly increasing rate of gas entrapment within the crust. It has been conceived that the lack of crust agitation beginning upon the advent of mixer pump operations may have set-up a more consolidated, gas impermeable barrier when compared to a crust regularly broken up by the prior buoyant displacement events within the tank. The interim goals of the project are to: (1) protect the mixer pump operability (2) begin releasing gas from the crust, and (3) begin dissolving the crust and solids in the slurry layer. The final goals of the project (Final State) are to solve both the level growth and BD-GRE safety issues in this tank by achieving a condition of the waste such that no active measures are required to safely store the waste, i.e., crust and non convective layer are mostly dissolved, and therefore the mixer pump will no longer be needed to prevent BD-GREs in excess of 100% LFL. Transfers (which are designed to create space in the tank) and dilution (which will dissolve the solids) will accomplish this. Dissolution of solids will result in a release of gas retained by those solids and remove that volume of solids as a future retention site.

  5. Tank 241-SY-101 surface level rise remediation test and evaluation plan for transfer system

    SciTech Connect

    BAUER, R.E.

    1999-07-14

    The purpose of this testing and evaluation plan (TEP) is to provide the high level guidance on testing requirements for ensuring that the equipment and systems to be implemented for remediation of the SY-101 waste level rise USQ are effective.

  6. Historical trends in tank 241-SY-101 waste temperatures and levels

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1993-09-01

    The gas release and fluctuating level of the waste in tank 241-SY-101 have prompted more detailed interest in its historical behavior, in hopes of achieving a better understanding of its current status. To examine the historical behavior, essentially all of the tank waste temperature and level data record has been retrieved, examined, and plotted in various ways. To aid in interpreting the data, the depth of the non-convective waste layer was estimated by using a least-squares Chebyshev approximation to the temperatures. This report documents the retrieval critical examination, and graphic presentation of 241-SY-101 temperature and waste level histories. The graphic presentations clearly indicate a tank cooling trend that has become precipitous since late 1991. The plots also clearly show the decreasing frequency of waste gas release events, increasing height of the non-convective layer, and larger level drops per event.

  7. Level sensor replacement/sampling of Tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for management and storage of waste accumulated from the processing of defense reactor irradiated fuels for plutonium recovery at the Hanford Site. DOE is proposing to remove three level detectors from Tank 241-SY-101 and analyze the waste that is presently encrusted on the detectors. The proposed sampling is less intrusive than core sampling and will provide data regarding characterization of the crust to support future core sampling. The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to provide information about the proposed action such that a decision can be made on whether a Finding of No Significant Impact should be issued or an environmental impact statement should be prepared. Therefore, this EA evaluates the proposed action and the no action alternative, in keeping with requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality, Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, parts 1500--1508. 6 refs.

  8. Probabilistic safety assessment for Hanford high-level waste tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, D.R.; Bott, T.F.; Brown, L.F.; Stack, D.W.; Kindinger, J.; Deremer, R.K.; Medhekar, S.R.; Mikschl, T.J.

    1994-05-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) is performing a comprehensive probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), which will include consideration of external events for the 18 tank farms at the Hanford Site. This effort is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE/EM, EM-36). Even though the methodology described herein will be applied to the entire tank farm, this report focuses only on the risk from the weapons-production wastes stored in tank number 241-SY-101, commonly known as Tank 101-SY, as configured in December 1992. This tank, which periodically releases ({open_quotes}burps{close_quotes}) a gaseous mixture of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and nitrogen, was analyzed first because of public safety concerns associated with the potential for release of radioactive tank contents should this gas mixture be ignited during one of the burps. In an effort to mitigate the burping phenomenon, an experiment is being conducted in which a large pump has been inserted into the tank to determine if pump-induced circulation of the tank contents will promote a slow, controlled release of the gases. At the Hanford Site there are 177 underground tanks in 18 separate tank farms containing accumulated liquid/sludge/salt cake radioactive wastes from 50 yr of weapons materials production activities. The total waste volume is about 60 million gal., which contains approximately 120 million Ci of radioactivity.

  9. Status of tank 241-SY-101 data analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Anantatmula, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    The Waste Tank Flammable Gas Stabilization Program was established in 1990 to provide for resolution of a major safety issue identified for 23 of the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The safety issue involves the production, accumulation, and periodic release from these tanks of flammable gases in concentrations exceeding the lower flammability limits. This document deals primarily with tank 241-SY-101 from the SY Tank Farm. The flammable gas condition has existed for this tank since the tank was first filled in the time period from 1977 to 1980. During a general review of waste tank chemical stability in 1988--1989, this situation was re-examined and, in March 1990, the condition was declared to be an unreviewed safety question. Tank 241-SY-101 was placed under special operating restrictions, and a program of investigation was begun to evaluate the condition and determine appropriate courses of action. This report summarizes the data that have become available on tank 241-SY-101 since it was declared as an unreviewed safety question and updates the information reported in an earlier document (WHC-EP-0517). The report provides a technical basis for use in the evaluation of safety risks of the tank and subsequent resolution of the unreviewed safety question.

  10. Compressed air piping, 241-SY-101 hydraulic pump retrieval trailer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.R.

    1994-12-12

    The following Design Analysis was prepared by the Westinghouse Hanford Company to determine pressure losses in the compressed air piping installed on the hydraulic trailer for the 241-SY-101 pump retrieval mission.

  11. The effects of heating and dilution on the rheological and physical properties of Tank 241-SY-101 waste

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, J.M.; Bredt, P.R.; Shade, E.H.

    1994-10-01

    Of the 177 high-level waste underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site, 25 have been identified as being potentially capable of generating and releasing flammable gas. Tank 241-SY-101 has exhibited periodic releases of gas, and in some cases the gas released has exceeded the lower flammable gas limit. The components of the released gas from Tank 241-SY-101 are hydrogen, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, ammonia, carbon monoxide, and methane. A mitigation strategy that may effectively reduce the retention and release of these gases and the release of flammable gases is dilution coupled with eating of the tank wastes. The purpose of this work was to determine changes in rheological and physical properties caused by heating and dilution of actual 241-SY-101 waste. In May and December 1991, following periodic gas releases, samples of the waste in Tank 241-SY-101 were obtained. Current work quantified the effects of heating coupled with NaOH dilution of a combination of waste samples from Tank 241-SY-101 characteristic of a non-convective layer. The experimental approach and results of this heating and dilution study on Tank 241-SY-101 waste samples are described in Sections 2 and 3, respectively. In Section 3.1, a discussion of the rheological properties of the waste as a function of shearing forces, volume percent dilution, and temperature is presented. In Section 3.2, the physical properties of the waste dilutions are described, including the densities of the slurry, filtered solids, and filtrate; the settling behavior; and the percent filtered solids in the composite sample and each of the composite dilutions. A brief discussion of the results and uncertainties is given is Section 3.3. The conclusions of this investigation are reported in Section 4.

  12. Analysis of the 241SY101 pump removal trailer and the 241SY101 strongback

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdell, B.L.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of the calculations contained in the attached appendix is to determine the vibrational stability of the following combination (The Combination); shipping container, strongback and trailer. The vibrational stability of The Combination will be determined with the shipping container and strongback in the upright position. If the natural frequency of The Combination coincides with the input frequency and no damping is present, resonance will occur. The result of this is that the natural frequency of the Combination must be calculated as well as the input frequency. The input frequency in this case is caused by wind. Due to their geometrical complexity the upper and lower hydraulic clevises were analyzed for structural adequacy by using finite-element analysis (FEA). The FEA software COSMOS/M version 1.70 was used to model the upper and lower hydraulic clevis. All designs are in accordance with Standard Architectural-Civil Design Criteria, Design Loads for Facilities (DOE-RL 1989) and are safety class 3. The design and fabrication of each component is in accordance with American Institute of Steel Construction, Manual of Steel Construction, (AISC, 1989). The analyses contained in this document reflects the as-built condition of the 241SY101 hydraulic trailer.

  13. Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    1999-04-05

    Tank 241-SY-101 waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY-102. The results of the hazards evaluation were compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. Revision 1 of this document deletes hazardous conditions no longer applicable to the current waste transfer design and incorporates hazardous conditions related to the use of an above ground pump pit and overground transfer line. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting authorization of the activity; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The AB Control Decision process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  14. Operability test procedure [Tank] 241-SY-101 equipment removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, J.C.

    1994-12-08

    The 241-SY-101 equipment removal system (ERS) consists of components, equipment, instrumentation and procedures that will provide the means to disconnect, retrieve, contain, load and transport the Mitigation Pump Assembly (MPA) from waste Tank 241-SY-101 to the Central Waste Complex (CWC). The Operability Test Procedure (OTP) will test the interfaces between ERS components and will rehearse the procedure for MPA removal and transportation to the extent they can be mocked-up at the CTF (Cold Test Facility). At the conclusion of the OTP, the ERS components and equipment will be removed from the CTF, entered into the Component Based Recall System (CBRS), and stored until needed for actual MPA removal and transportation.

  15. Progress toward mitigation of flammable gas Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Lentsch, J.W.; Babad, H.; Hanson, C.E.; Kirch, N.W.

    1994-01-01

    The mixing pump installed in Hanford Site tank 241-SY-101 has been shown to be effective in releasing flammable gases in a controlled manner. This controlled release of gas prevents the accumulation and episodic release above flammable limits. More work needs to be done to optimize the pumping operation, and to evaluate the long-term effects of mixing so as to assure that no undesirable changes have occurred to the waste. Other alternative mitigation concepts are still being evaluated as a backup to mixing.

  16. Quarterly review of 241-SY-101 mixer pump data: October - December, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1999-05-11

    This report presents data obtained on 241-SY-101 pump performance. The period covered is October 1 through December 31, 1998. During the quarter: (1) There was an indication of a 7.0-inch increase in the waste level at riser lA, and an average growth rate of 0.076 inches per day. (2) There was an indication of a 2.3-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1C. This riser was flushed with water several times, which would lower the level of the crust at this location. (3) Gases continued to be released at less than the pre-pump installation baseline rate, indicating a decrease in the gas generation rate, or an increase in gas retention, or both. The release rate was about 60 percent of the rate in the previous few quarters, and only 44 percent of the pre-pump release rate. (4) There was no change in the parameters that monitor pump performance. Key controls exist for waste temperature, gas concentration, pump parameters, and long-term waste behavior associated with the safe operation of the mixer pump that mitigates the buoyant displacement gas release event behavior of 241-SY-101. Table 1-1 compares the key controls and the current state of the waste as of December 31, 1998.

  17. Neutron and Gamma Probe Application to Hanford Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    CANNON, N.S.

    2000-02-01

    A neutron (moisture-sensitive) and gamma (in-situ radiation) probe technique has been utilized at a number of Hanford radioactive waste tanks for many years. This technology has been adapted for use in tank 241-SY-101's two Multifunction Instrument Trees (MITs) which have a hollow dry-well center opening two inches (51 cm) in diameter. These probes provide scans starting within a few inches of the tank bottom and traversing up through the top of the tank revealing a variety of waste features as a function of tank elevation. These features have been correlated with void fraction data obtained independently from two other devices, the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) and the Void Fraction Instrument (VFI). The MIT probes offer the advantage of nearly continuous count-rate versus elevation scans and they can be operated significantly more often and at lower cost than temperature probes or the RGS or VFI devices while providing better depth resolution. The waste level in tank 241-SY-101 had been rising at higher rates than expected during 1998 and early 1999 indicating an increasing amount of trapped gas in the waste. The use of the MIT probes has assisted in evaluating changes in crust thickness and level and also in estimating relative changes in gas stored in the crust. This information is important in assuring that the tank remains in a safe configuration and will support safe waste transfer when those operations take place.

  18. Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    1999-02-12

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from SY-101 to 241-SY-102 (SY-102). The results of the hazards evaluation will be compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. This document is not intended to authorize the activity or determine the adequacy of controls; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  19. Structural analysis and evaluation of the 241SY101 tank annulus heat-up

    SciTech Connect

    Ziada, H.H.

    1994-10-19

    This document provides the structural analysis (static and thermal loads) of the 241SY101 tank to determine the maximum allowable temperature and rate of heating that could be applied to tank 241SY101 through annulus air heating without detrimental effects to the structural integrity of the concrete and steel liner of the tank.

  20. 241-SY-101 DACS High hydrogen abort limit reduction (SCR 473) acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    1999-09-09

    The capability of the 241-SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) computer system to provide proper control and monitoring of the 241-SY-101 underground storage tank hydrogen monitoring system utilizing the reduced hydrogen abort limit of 0.69% was systematically evaluated by the performance of ATP HNF-4927. This document reports the results of the ATP.

  1. Miscellaneous component design for Tank 241SY101 pump removal

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.H.

    1995-03-02

    A mixer pump has been used to mitigate the hydrogen build-up in tank 241SY101 (SY101), located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. New equipment is being prepared for the removal, transport, storage, and disposal of the test pump. The disposal equipment for the test pump now in tank SY101 includes a shipping container, a strong back, a lifting beam, a test weight, container support stands, a modified mock-up pump, a flexible receiver blast shield, a lifting yoke, and a yoke brace. The structural evaluations of container and strong back are detailed in another supporting document (WHC 1994a), the engineering analyses of flexible receiver blast shield/lifting yoke and yoke brace are given in other supporting documents (WHC 1994b, WHC 1994c), respectively. Engineering tasks that were contracted to Advanced Engineering Consultants (AEC) include the design and analysis of the following. Two spreader-beam lifting devices. a Container test weight. Container support saddles. Mock-up pump modification. This report documents the work description, design basis, assumptions, and design calculations provided by AEC for the above components. All AEC documents appear in Appendix A. Additional work conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) on the modified container test weight, modification to the mock-up pump, the removable support for the transport assembly, and saddle modification for air pallets also are included in this document.

  2. 241-SY-101 mixer pump lifetime expectancy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, C.P.

    1995-12-08

    The purpose of WHC-SD-WM-TI-726, Rev. 0 241-SY-101 Mixer Pump Lifetime Expectancy is to determine a best estimate of the mean lifetime of non-repairable (located in the waste) essential features of the hydrogen mitigation mixer pump presently installed in 101-SY. The estimated mean lifetime is 9.1 years. This report does not demonstrate operation of the entire pump assembly within the Tank Farm ``safety envelope``. It was recognized by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) this test pump was not specifically designed for long term service in tank 101-SY. In June 95 the DNFSB visited Hanford and ask the question, ``how long will this test pump last and how will the essential features fail?`` During the 2 day meeting with the DNFSB it was discussed and defined within the meeting just exactly what essential features of the pump must operate. These essential features would allow the pump to operate for the purpose of extending the window for replacement. Operating with only essential features would definitely be outside the operating safety envelope and would require a waiver. There are three essential features: 1. The pump itself (i.e. the impeller and motor) must operate 2. Nozzles and discharges leg must remain unplugged 3. The pump can be re-aimed, new waste targeted, even if manually.

  3. In situ determination of rheological properties and void fraction in Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Shepard, C.L.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Stokes, T.I.; Terrones, G.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the results of the operation of the void fraction instrument (VFI) and ball rheometer in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101, which contains approximately one million gallons of radioactive waste. These instruments provided the first direct assay of the waste condition in the tank after more than a year of mixer pump operation. The two instruments were deployed in the tank in late 1994 and early 1995 to gather much-needed data on the effect prolonged mixer pump operation has on gas retention in the waste. The information supplied by these instruments has filled a great gap in the quantitative knowledge of the waste condition. The results show that the solids are well-mixed by the current mixer pump to within less than a meter of the tank bottom. Undisturbed sludge remains only on the lowest 10--30 cm and contains 10--12% void. The mixed slurry above contains less than 1% void and has no measurable yield strength and a shear-thinning viscosity of approximately 6 Poise at 1 sec{sup {minus}1}. Estimating the gas volumes in each of the four layers based on VFI data yields a total of 221 {+-} 57 m{sup 3} (7,800 {+-} 2,000 SCF) of gas at 1 atmosphere. Given the current waste level of 10.2 m (400 inches), the degassed waste level would be 9.8 m (386 inches). These results confirm that the mixer pump in Tank 241-SY-101 has performed the job it was installed to do--thoroughly mix the waste to release stored gas and prevent gas accumulation.

  4. Closed out Tank 241-SY-101 DACS system change request {number_sign}1--100

    SciTech Connect

    Gauck, G.J.

    1995-03-07

    This report is a compilation of system change requests processed during the development of the Data Acquisition and Control System for the Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation project. Tank 241-SY-101 is on the Hydrogen Watch List. The disposition of the request, date the change was installed, date verified, and whether an Acceptance Test Procedure was required and completed are described for each request change.

  5. Assessment of gas accumulation and retention -- Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, R.T.; Burke, T.M.; Reynolds, D.A.; Simpson, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    An approximate analysis has been carried out to assess and estimate the maximum quantity of gas that is likely to be accumulated within waste tank 241-SY-101, and the maximum quantity which is likely to be retained after gas release events (GRE). According to the phenomenological models used for this assessment, based on interpretation of current and recent operational data, the estimated gas generation rate in the tank is approximately 4 m{sup 3}/day (147 ft{sup 3}/day). About half of this gas is released as it is generated, which is (essentially) continuously. The remainder is accumulated within the slurry layer of settled solids at the bottom of the tank, and released episodically in GREs, known as ``burps,`` that are induced by unstable buoyant conditions which develop when sufficient gas accumulates in the slurry. Calculations based on gas volumes to cause neutral buoyancy in the slurry predict the following: the maximum gas accumulation (at 1 atm pressure) that can occur without triggering a GRE is in the range of 606 to 1,039 m{sup 3} (21,400 to 36,700 ft{sup 3}); and the maximum gas retention immediately after a GRE is equal to the maximum accumulation minus the gas released in the GRE. GREs do not necessarily involve all of the slurry. In the largest GREs, which are assumed to involve all of the slurry, the minimum gas release (at 1 atm pressure) is calculated to be in the range of 193 to 328 m{sup 3} (6,800 to 11,600 ft{sup 3}). The corresponding maximum gas retention would be 413 to 711 m{sup 3} (14,600 to 25,100 ft{sup 3}).

  6. Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    SD Rassat; CW Stewart; BE Wells; WL Kuhn; ZI Antoniak; JM Cuta; KP Recknagle; G Terrones; VV Viswanathan; JH Sukamto; DP Mendoza

    2000-01-26

    Due primarily to an increase in floating crust layer thickness, the waste level in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) has grown appreciably, and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a potential hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from the nonconnective layer at the bottom of the tank, SY-101 will be diluted to dissolve a large fraction of the solids that allow the waste to retain gas. In this work we develop understanding of the state of the tank waste and some of its physical properties, investigate how added water will be distributed in the tank and affect the waste, and use the information to evaluate mechanisms and rates of waste solids dissolution and gas release. This work was completed to address these questions and in support of planning and development of controls for the SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation Project. Particular emphasis is given to dissolution of and gas release from the crust, although the effects of back-dilution on all waste layers are addressed. The magnitude and rates of plausible gas release scenarios are investigated, and it is demonstrated that none of the identified mechanisms of continuous (dissolution-driven) or sudden gas release, even with conservative assumptions, lead to domespace hydrogen concentrations exceeding the lower flammability limit. This report documents the results of studies performed in 1999 to address the issues of the dynamics, of crust dissolution and gas release in SY-101. It contains a brief introduction to the issues at hand; a summary of our knowledge of the SY-101 crust and other waste properties, including gas fractions, strength and volubility; a description of the buoyancy and dissolution models that are applied to predict the crust response to waste transfers and back dilution; and a discussion of the effectiveness of mixing for water added below the crust and the limited potential for significant stratification

  7. Quarterly review of 241-SY-101 mixer pump data: January - March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1999-07-22

    This report presents data obtained on 241-SY-101 pump performance. The period covered is January 1 through March 31, 1999. During the quarter: There were changes in pumping parameters. Both the pump volute pressure and amperage decreased during the quarter. It is not clear whether this was due to changes in waste properties (due to less solids or more entrained gas) or due to degradation of the pump. There was an indication of a 7.5-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1 A, and an average growth rate of 0.082 inches per day. There was an indication of a 5.7-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1C. This riser was flushed with water several times, which would lower the level of the crust at this location. Gases continued to be released at less than the pre-pump installation baseline rate, indicating a decrease in the gas generation rate, or an increase in gas retention, or both. The release rate was about 78 percent of the rate in the previous few quarters, and only 34 percent of the generation rate calculated prior to mixer pump installation in 1993. Key controls exist for waste temperature, gas concentration, pump parameters, and long-term waste behavior associated with the safe operation of the mixer pump that mitigates the buoyant displacement gas release event behavior of 241-SY-101. Table 1-1 compares the key controls and the current state of the waste as of March 3 1. 1999. The pump was run 28 times between January 1 and March 31, 1999. All of the pump runs were intended to be normal 25-minute, 1000-rpm excavation runs performed to mix the waste and release gas. Because of the pump oil often reached the high temperature alarm setpoint of 190 F, many of the runs were shortened (by as many as 8 minutes). This phenomenon was identified in November 1998, but got progressively worse over the quarter. The pump schedule was nominally three runs per week. However, core sampling activities interrupted the usual pump schedule several times during the quarter

  8. Quarterly Review of 241SY101 Mixer Pump Data 10/1998 Thru 12/1998

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1999-05-11

    This report presents data obtained on 241-SY-101 pump performance. The period covered is October 1 through December 31, 1998. During the quarter: (1) There was an indication of a 7.0-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1A, and an average growth rate of 0.076 inches per day; (2) There was an indication of a 2.3-inch increase in the waste level at riser 1C; (3) This riser was flushed with water several times, which would lower the level of the crust at this location; (4) Gases continued to be released at less than the pre-pump installation baseline rate, indicating a decrease in the gas generation rate, or an increase in gas retention, or both. The release rate was about 60 percent of the rate in the previous few quarters, and only 44 percent of the pre-pump release rate; and (5) There was no change in the parameters that monitor pump performance.

  9. 1/12-scale physical modeling experiments in support of tank 241-SY- 101 hydrogen mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, J.A.; Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M.; Enderlin, C.W.; Elmore, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Hanford tank 241-SY-101 is a 75-ft-dia double-shell tank that contains approximately 1.1 M gal of radioactive fuel reprocessing waste. Core samples have shown that the tank contents are separated into two main layers, a article laden supernatant liquid at the top of the tank and a more dense slurry on the bottom. Two additional layers may be present, one being a potentially thick sludge lying beneath the slurry at the bottom of the tank and the other being the crust that has formed on the surface of the supernatant liquid. The supernatant is more commonly referred to as the convective layer and the slurry as the non-convective layer. Accumulation of gas (partly hydrogen) in the non-convective layer is suspected to be the key mechanism behind the gas burp phenomena, and several mitigation schemes are being developed to encourage a more uniform gas release rate (Benegas 1992). To support the full-scale hydraulic mitigation test, scaled experiments were performed to satisfy two objectives: 1. provide an experimental database for numerical- model validation; 2. establish operating parameter values required to mobilize the settled solids and maintain the solids in suspension.

  10. Mitigation of tank 241-SY-101 by pump mixing: Results of full-scale testing

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Hudson, J.D.; Friley, J.R.; Panisko, F.E.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Irwin, J.J.; Fadeff, J.G.; Efferding, L.F.; Michener, T.E.; Kirch, N.W.

    1994-06-01

    The Full-Scale Mixer Pump Test Program was performed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 from February 4 to April 13, 1994, to confirm the long-term operational strategy for flammable gas mitigation and to demonstrate that mixing can control the gas release and waste level. Since its installation on July 3, 1993, the current pump, operating only a few hours per week, has proved capable of mixing the waste sufficiently to release gas continuously instead of in large episodic events. The results of Full-Scale Testing demonstrated that the pump can control gas release and waste level for long-term mitigation, and the four test sequences formed the basis for the long-term operating schedule. The last test sequence, jet penetration tests, showed that the current pump jet creates flow near the tank wall and that it can excavate portions of the bottom sludge layer if run at maximum power. Pump mixing has altered the {open_quote}normal{close_quote} configuration of the waste; most of the original nonconvective sludge has been mixed with the supernatant liquid into a mobile convective slurry that has since been maintained by gentle pump operation and does not readily return to sludge.

  11. Evaluation of the generation and release of flammable gases in tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Babad, H.; Johnson, G.D.; Lechelt, J.A.; Reynolds, D.A. ); Pederson, L.R.; Strachan, D.M. ); Meisel, D.; Jonah, C. ); Ashby, E.C. )

    1991-11-01

    Tank 241-SY-101 is a double shell, high-level waste tank located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This tank contains about 1 million gallons of waste that was concentrated at the 242-S Evaporator. Shortly after the waste was put in the tank, the waste began to expand because the generation of gases. In 1990 this tank was declared to have an unreviewed safety question because of the periodic release of hydrogen and nitrous oxide. A safety program was established to conduct a characterization of the waste and vented gases and to determine an effective means to prevent the accumulation of flammable gases in the tank dome space and ventilation system. Results of the expanded characterization conducted in fiscal year 1991 are presented. The use of gas chromatographs, mass spectrometers, and hydrogen-specific monitors provided a greater understanding of the vented gases. Additional instrumentation placed in the tank also helped to provide more detailed information on tank temperatures, gas pressure, and gas flow rates. An extensive laboratory study involving the Westinghouse Hanford Company, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and the Georgia Institute of Technology was initiated for the purpose of determining the mechanisms responsible for the generation of various gases. These studies evaluate both radiolytic and thermochemical processes. Results of the first series of experiments are described.

  12. Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Rassat, Scot D.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Kuhn, William L.; Antoniak, Zenen I.; Cuta, Judith M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Terrones, Guillermo; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Sukamto, Johanes H.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2000-01-24

    Due primarily to an increase in floating crust thickness, the waste level in Tank 241-SY-101 has grown appreciably and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a potential hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from the nonconvective layer at the bottom of the tank, SY-101 will be diluted to dissolve a large fraction of the solids that allow the waste to retain gas. The plan is to transfer some waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps. In this work, mechanisms and rates of waste solids dissolution and gas releases are evaluated theoretically and experimentally. Particular emphasis is given to crust dissolution processes and associated gas releases, although dissolution and gas release from the mixed-slurry and nonconvective layers are also considered. The release of hydrogen gas to the tank domespace is modeled for a number of scenarios. Under the tank conditions expected at the time of back-dilution, no plausible continuous or sudden gas release scenarios resulting in flammable hydrogen concentrations were identified.

  13. Acceptance test procedure, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase III testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, G.A.

    1994-11-21

    This Acceptance Test Procedure is for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase III Testing. This procedure will test the sealing integrity of the Flexible Receiver System to ensure that release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from tank SY-101.

  14. A discussion of certain safety issues associated with the Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation mixing test

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This paper addresses certain safety issues associated with the Hanford Tank 241-SY 101 hydrogen mitigation mixing test. Specifically, the study, is concerned with the effect of pump shearing, jet mixing, and piling-up on the following areas: Gas generation; gas retention; gas release (immediate); gas release (long-term); and saltcake. The findings for each issue area of concern are addressed.

  15. An assessment of the dilution required to mitigate Hanford tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Felmy, A.R.; Stewart, C.W.; Tingey, J.M.; Trent, D.S.; Barney, G.S.; Herting, D.L.; Larrick, A.P.; Reynolds, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    A group of experts from PNL and WHC convened November 2 and 3, 1994, to screen the current state of knowledge about dilution and reach a consensus on the minimum dilution ratio that will achieve passive mitigation of Tank 241-SY-101 wastes and the dilution ratio that would satisfy the given cross-site transfer criteria with reasonable assurance. The panel evaluated the effects of dilution on the parameters important in gas generation, retention, and release and reached the following conclusions, which are deduced from the existing body of data, experience, and analyses: (1) Dissolution of solids is the single most important aspect of mitigation by dilution. We are confident that diluting until nitrates, nitrites, and aluminum salts are dissolved will mitigate Hanford flammable gas tanks; (2) Sufficient solids dissolution can be achieved in Tank 241-SY-101 at a dilution ratio of 1:1, which will result in a average specific gravity of approximately 1.35. It is likely that a 0.5:1 dilution will also mitigate 241-SY-101, but the current uncertainty is too high to recommend this dilution ratio; (3) The recommended dilution requires a diluent with at least 2 molar free hydroxide, because aluminum probably precipitates at lower hydroxide concentrations. The transfer criteria for Tank 241-SY-101 waste were also evaluated. These criteria have been specified as solids content {<=}30% (volume), viscosity {<=}30% cP and density <1.5 g/mL. (1) Solids content is the limiting criterion if it is defined as volume fraction of settled solids. A 1:1 dilution will satisfy this criterion at nominal premixing conditions in Tank 241-SY-101; however, analysis of Window E core samples suggests that up to 1.5:1 might be required. If the solids content is interpreted simply as solids volume fraction no further dilution is necessary, because Tank 241-SY-101 waste (excluding the crust) is already below 30%; (2) Bulk density is the next limiting criterion and is met at 0.4:1 dilution.

  16. Results of Waste Transfer and Back-Dilution in Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    LA Mahoney; ZI Antoniak; WB Barton; JM Conner; NW Kirch; CW Stewart; BE Wells

    2000-07-26

    This report chronicles the process of remediation of the flammable gas hazard in Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) by waste transfer and back-dilution from December 18, 1999 through April 2, 2000. A brief history is given of the development of the flammable gas retention and release hazard in this tank, and the transfer and dilution systems are outlined. A detailed narrative of each of the three transfer and dilution campaigns is given to provide structure for the balance of the report. Details of the behavior of specific data are then described, including the effect of transfer and dilution on the waste levels in Tanks SY-101 and SY-102, data from strain gauges on equipment suspended from the tank dome, changes in waste configuration as inferred from neutron and gamma logs, headspace gas concentrations, waste temperatures, and the mixerpump operating performance. Operating data and performance of the transfer pump in SY-101 are also discussed.

  17. Acceptance test procedure, 241-SY-101/241-C-106 shot loading system

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrom, M.J.

    1994-11-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure is for the 241-SY-101/241-C-106 Shot Loading System. The procedure will test the components of the Shot Loading System and its capability of adequately loading shot into the annular space of the Container. The loaded shot will provide shielding as required for transporting and storage of a contaminated pump after removal from the tank. This test serves as verification that the SLS is acceptable for use in the pump removal operations for Tanks 241-SY-101, 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. The pump removal operation for these three tanks will be performed by two different organizations with different equipment, but the Shot Loading System will be compatible between the two operations.

  18. Acceptance and operational test procedure for neutron and gamma probe application to tank 241-SY-101 MITs

    SciTech Connect

    CANNON, N.S.

    1999-06-02

    This ATP/OTP provides procedures for testing to be performed to verify that newly procured neutron and gamma probes (reduced diameter design modifications) for operation in the Tank 241-SY-101 MlTs are compatible with existing LOW van instrumentation and hardware. A set of moisture data versus elevation will be obtained from the Tank 241-SY-101 MITs, and (optionally) from the Tank 241-AX-I01 LOW as part of this testing program.

  19. Acceptance and Operational Test Report for Neutron and Gamma Probe Application to Tank 241-SY-101 MITs

    SciTech Connect

    CANNON, N.S.

    1999-08-12

    This Operational Test Report (OTR) presents the results of the ATP/OTP testing performed to verify that newly procured neutron and gamma probes (reduced diameter design modifications) for operation in the Tank 241-SY-101 MITs are compatible with existing LOW van instrumentation and hardware. This verification was accomplished and a set of moisture data versus elevation were obtained from the Tank 241-SY-101 MITs as part of this testing program.

  20. Buoyant Response of the Tank 241-SY-101 Crust to Transfer and Back-Dilution

    SciTech Connect

    CW Stewart

    1999-11-08

    The mixer pump installed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) in July 1993 has prevented the large buoyant displacement gas release events (BD GRE) it has historically exhibited. But the absence of periodic disruption from GREs and the action of mixing have allowed the crust to grow. The accelerated gas retention has resulted in over 30 inches of waste level growth and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from below the crust, SY-101 will be diluted in the fall of 1999 to dissolve a large fraction of the solids in the tank. The plan is to transfer waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps of about 100,000 gallons each. Back-dilution water may be added at the transfer pump inlet, the base of the mixer pump, and on top of the crust. The mixer pump will continue to be required to prevent formation of a deep nonconnective layer and resumption of BD GREs. Therefore, it is vital to ensure that the transfer and back-dilution processes do not significantly degrade the pump's effectiveness. Part of the strategy to avoid mixer pump degradation is to keep the base of the crust layer well above the pump inlet, which is 236 inches above the tank bottom. The maximum transfer for which an equal back-dilution is possible without sinking the crust is 90 kgal if water is injected at the 96-inch transfer pump inlet and 120 kgal for injection at the 9-inch mixer pump burrowing ring. To keep the crust base above the lowest observed elevation of 295 inches, transfer and back-dilution must be limited to 143 kgal and 80 kgal, respectively, for the 96-inch back-dilution and 175 kgal with a 112 kgal back-dilution using the 9-inch back-dilution elevation. These limits can be avoided by adding water to the top of the crust to dissolve the negatively buoyant layers. If 20 kgal of water is placed on top of the crust and the rest of the back-dilution is placed

  1. Assessment of the potential for ammonium nitrate formation and reaction in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    Two principal scenarios by which ammonium nitrate may be formed were considered: (a) precipitation of ammonium nitrate in the waste, and (b) ammonium nitrate formation via the gas phase reaction of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The first of these can be dismissed because ammonium ions, which are necessary for ammonium nitrate precipitation, can exist only in negligibly small concentrations in strongly alkaline solutions. Gas phase reactions between ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor in the gas phase represent the most likely means by which ammonium nitrate aerosols could be formed in Tank 241-SY-101. Predicted ammonium nitrate formation rates are largely controlled by the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. This gas has not been detected among those gases vented from the wastes using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. While detection limits for nitrogen dioxide have not been established experimentally, the maximum concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase in Tank 241-SY-101 was estimated at 0.1 ppm based on calculations using the HITRAN data base and on FTIR spectra of gases vented from the wastes. At 50 C and with 100 ppm ammonia also present, less than one gram of ammonium nitrate per year is estimated to be formed in the tank. To date, ammonium nitrate has not been detected on HEPA filters in the ventilation system, so any quantity that has been formed in the tank must be quite small, in good agreement with rate calculations. The potential for runaway exothermic reactions involving ammonium nitrate in Tank 241-SY-101 is minimal. Dilution by non-reacting waste components, particularly water, would prevent hazardous exothermic reactions from occurring within the waste slurry, even if ammonium nitrate were present. 41 refs.

  2. Composition, preparation, and gas generation results from simulated wastes of Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1994-08-01

    This document reviews the preparation and composition of simulants that have been developed to mimic the wastes temporarily stored in Tank 241-SY-101 at Hanford. The kinetics and stoichiometry of gases that are generated using these simulants are also compared, considering the roles of hydroxide, chloride, and transition metal ions; the identities of organic constituents; and the effects of dilution, radiation, and temperature. Work described in this report was conducted for the Flammable Gas Safety Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, (a) whose purpose is to develop information that is necessary to mitigate potential safety hazards associated with waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The goal of this research and of related efforts at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is to determine the thermal and thermal/radiolytic mechanisms by which flammable and other gases are produced in Hanford wastes, emphasizing those stored in Tank 241-SY-101. A variety of Tank 241-SY-101 simulants have been developed to date. The use of simulants in laboratory testing activities provides a number of advantages, including elimination of radiological risks to researchers, lower costs associated with experimentation, and the ability to systematically alter simulant compositions to study the chemical mechanisms of reactions responsible for gas generation. The earliest simulants contained the principal inorganic components of the actual waste and generally a single complexant such as N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) or ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (EDTA). Both homogeneous and heterogeneous compositional forms were developed. Aggressive core sampling and analysis activities conducted during Windows C and E provided information that was used to design new simulants that more accurately reflected major and minor inorganic components.

  3. The behavior, quantity, and location of undissolved gas in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, M.E.; Gallagher, N.B.; Hudson, J.D.; Stewart, C.W.

    1995-10-01

    Mitigation of episodic flammable gas releases from Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101 was accomplished in July 1993 with the installation of a mixer pump that prevents gas retention. But is has not been possible until recently to measure the effects of mixing on the waste or how much gas remains and where it is located. Direct measurements of the void fraction and rheology of the mixed waste by the void fraction instrument (VFI) and ball rheometer along with previous data provide estimates of the location, quantity, and behavior of undissolved gas in the tank. This report documents the compilation and integration of the information that enables this understanding.

  4. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-101. Examination Completed March 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2004-05-25

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic nondestructive examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-101. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-SY-101 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning, pitting, or cracks that might be present in the wall of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP-17750 (Jensen 2003) and summarized on page 1 of this document, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided to PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations.

  5. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-101. Examination Completed March 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2004-07-22

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic nondestructive examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-SY-101. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-SY-101 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning, pitting, or cracks that might be present in the wall of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP-17750 (Jensen 2003) and summarized on page 1 of this document, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided to PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations.

  6. Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 3 testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, G.A.

    1995-02-06

    This document summarizes the results of the phase 3 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the sealing integrity of the FRS to ensure that the release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from Tank 241-SY-101. The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the mixer pump. This acceptance test was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 area from January 10, 1995 to January 17, 1995. The Phase 3 test consisted of two parts. Part one was a water leak test of the seal between the blast shield and mock load distribution frame (LDF) to ensure that significant contamination of the pump pit and waste interaction with the aluminum impact-limiting material under the LDF are prevented during the pump removal operation. The second part of this acceptance test was an air leak test of the assembled flexible receiver system. The purpose of this test was to verify that the release of hazardous aerosols will be minimized if the tank dome pressure becomes slightly positive during the decontamination of the mixer pump.

  7. 1/12-scale physical modeling experiments in support of tank 241-SY- 101 hydrogen mitigation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, J.A.; Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M.; Enderlin, C.W.; Elmore, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Hanford tank 241-SY-101 is a 75-ft-dia double-shell tank that contains approximately 1.1 M gal of radioactive fuel reprocessing waste. Core samples have shown that the tank contents are separated into two main layers, a article laden supernatant liquid at the top of the tank and a more dense slurry on the bottom. Two additional layers may be present, one being a potentially thick sludge lying beneath the slurry at the bottom of the tank and the other being the crust that has formed on the surface of the supernatant liquid. The supernatant is more commonly referred to as the convective layer and the slurry as the non-convective layer. Accumulation of gas (partly hydrogen) in the non-convective layer is suspected to be the key mechanism behind the gas burp phenomena, and several mitigation schemes are being developed to encourage a more uniform gas release rate (Benegas 1992). To support the full-scale hydraulic mitigation test, scaled experiments were performed to satisfy two objectives: 1. provide an experimental database for numerical- model validation; 2. establish operating parameter values required to mobilize the settled solids and maintain the solids in suspension.

  8. Buoyancy and Dissolution of the Floating Crust Layer in Tank 241-SY-101 During Transfer and Back-Dilution

    SciTech Connect

    CW Stewart; JH Sukamto; JM Cuta; SD Rassat

    1999-11-22

    To remediate gas retention in the floating crust layer and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from below the crust, waste will be transferred out of Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) in the fall of 1999 and back-diluted with water in several steps of about 100,000 gallons each. To evaluate the effects of back-dilution on the crust a static buoyancy model is derived that predicts crust and liquid surface elevations as a function of mixing efficiency and volume of water added during transfer and back-dilution. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the basic physics involved and verify the operation of the models. A dissolution model is also developed to evaluate the effects of dissolution of solids on crust flotation. The model includes dissolution of solids suspended in the slurry as well as in the crust layers. The inventory and location of insoluble solids after dissolution of the soluble fraction are also tracked. The buoyancy model is applied to predict the crust behavior for the first back-dilution step in SY-101. Specific concerns addressed include conditions that could cause the crust to sink and back-dilution requirements that keep the base of the crust well above the mixer pump inlet.

  9. Waste tank 241-SY-101 dome airspace and ventilation system response to a flammable gas plume burn

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, F.J.

    1995-11-01

    A series of flammable gas plume burn and transient pressure analyses have been completed for a nuclear waste tank (241-SY-101) and associated tank farm ventilation system at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford facility. The subject analyses were performed to address issues concerning the effects of transient pressures resulting from igniting a small volume of concentrated flammable gas just released from the surface of the waste as a plume and before the flammable gas concentration could be reduced by mixing with the dome airspace by local convection and turbulent diffusion. Such a condition may exist as part of an in progress episode gas release (EGR) or gas plume event. The analysis goal was to determine the volume of flammable gas that if burned within the dome airspace would result in a differential pressure, after propagating through the ventilation system, greater than the current High Efficiency Particulate Filter (HEPA) limit of 2.49 KPa (10 inches of water or 0. 36 psi). Such a pressure wave could rupture the tank ventilation system inlet and outlet HEPA filters leading to a potential release of contaminants to the environment

  10. In Situ Void Fraction and Gas Volume in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 as Measured with the Void Fraction Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    CW Stewart; G Chen; JM Alzheimer; PA Meyer

    1998-11-10

    The void fraction instrument (WI) was deployed in Tank 241-SY-101 three times in 1998 to confm and locate the retained gas (void) postulated to be causing the accelerating waste level rise observed since 1995. The design, operation, and data reduction model of the WI are described along with validation testing and potential sources of uncertainty. The test plans, field observations and void measurements are described in detail, including the total gas volume calculations and the gas volume model. Based on 1998 data, the void fraction averaged 0.013 i 0.001 in the mixed slurry and 0.30 ~ 0.04 in the crust. This gives gas volumes (at standard pressure and temperature) of 87 t 9 scm in the slurry and 138 ~ 22 scm in the crust for a total retained gas volume of221 *25 scm. This represents an increase of about 74 scm in the crust and a decrease of about 34 scm in the slurry from 1994/95 results. The overall conclusion is that the gas retention is occurring mainly in the crust layer and there is very little gas in the mixed slurry and loosely settled layers below. New insights on crust behavior are also revealed.

  11. Simulation and rheological analysis of Hanford Tank 241-SY-101. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, E.C.; Tennant, R.A.; Piccola, J.P. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    Rheological characterization and small scale simulation of Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 has been initiated to aid in the remediation efforts for the Department of Energy Hanford Site. The study has been initiated in response to growing concerns about the potential flammability hazard pertaining to the periodic release of up to 10,000 cubic feet of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia gases. Various stimulants emulating the radioactive waste stored in this tank have been used to ascertain the rheological parameters of the waste, simulate the ongoing processes of gas generation and release phenomenon inside the tank, and determine the feasibility of jet mixing to achieve a controlled release of the gas mixture.

  12. Type B Investigation Report for 241-SY-101 Pump Start and 241-C-106 Pit Cleanout

    SciTech Connect

    Ewalt, J.R.

    1993-09-01

    In accordance with the direction of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manager, Richland Operations Office, a Type ``B`` investigation in accordance with the DOE Order 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements, has been conducted. The scope of the investigation included two events: The ``Inadvertent Mixer Pump Operation at 241-SY-101`` (RL-WHC-TANK FARM-1993-069); ``Inadequate Work Control Results in Personnel Skin Contamination at 241-C-106, Pit B`` (RL-WHC-TANK FARM-1993-071) events. Additionally, at the request of the President of the WHC, a broader investigation into Waste Tank Farm ``safety practices`` and ``Conduct of Operations`` was also conducted. The review was focused on (1) WHC organizations performing operations, maintenance, and radiological safety tasks; and (2) KEH organizations performing major maintenance tasks.

  13. 241-SY-101 strain concentration factor development via nonlinear analysis. Volume 1 of 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The 241-SY-101 waste storage tank at the Hanford-Site has been known to accumulate and release significant quantities of hydrogen gas. An analysis was performed to assess the tank`s structural integrity when subjected to postulated hydrogen deflagration loads. The analysis addressed many nonlinearities and appealed to a strain-based failure criteria. The model used to predict the global response of the tank was not refined enough to confidently predict local peak strains. Strain concentration factors were applied at structural discontinuities that were based on steel-lined reinforced-concrete containment studies. The discontinuities included large penetrations, small penetrations, springline geometries, stud/liner connections, and the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch liner thickness transition. The only tank specific strain concentration factor applied in the evaluation was for the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch liner thickness change in the dome. Review of the tank drawings reveals the possibility that a 4 inches Sch. 40 pipe penetrates the dome thickness transition region. It is not obvious how to combine the strain concentration factors for a small penetration with that of a thickness transition to arrive at a composite strain concentration factor. It is the goal of this effort to make an approximate determination of the relative significance of the 4 inch penetration and the {1/2} inch to 3/8 inch thickness transition in the 241-SY-101 dome geometry. This is accomplished by performing a parametric study with three general finite-element models. The first represents the thickness transition only, the second represents a 4 inch penetration only, and the third combines the thickness transition with a penetration model.

  14. Structural analysis of multiport riser 5A installation on tank 241SY101

    SciTech Connect

    Strehlow, J.P.

    1994-09-16

    The Tank 101-SY multiport riser assembly in the 241-SY-101 waste tank will replace the existing 42 inch riser with four smaller ports. Each smaller port can be used independently to access the tank interior with equipment and instruments needed to mitigate the concentration of hydrogen in the tank. This document provides a design report on the structural evaluation of the multiport riser assembly as well as its anchorage. The multiport riser assembly is a steel structure installed directly above the 42-inch riser and sealed at the existing riser flange. The assembly is structurally supported by the concrete pad placed around the 42 inch riser. The multiport riser assembly will provide two 8-inch penetrations, one 12-inch penetration and one 24-inch penetration. Each penetration will have a shielding plate. These penetrations will be used to insert equipment such as a sonic probe into the tank. In addition to normal loads, non-reactor Safety Class 1 structures, systems and components are to withstand the effects of extreme environmental loads including Design Basis Earthquake (DBE), Design Basis Wind (DBW), Design Basis Flood, Volcanic Eruptions and other abnormal loads considered on a case by case basis. Non-reactor Safety Class 2, 3 and 4 structures, systems and components are those that are not Safety Class 1 and are respectively specified as onsite safety related, occupational safety related and non-safety related items. The 241-SY-101 tank is considered as a non-reactor Safety Class 1 structure. The multiport riser assembly is considered as a non-reactor Safety Class 2 structure since it serves to contain the radioactive and toxic materials under normal operating conditions. However, the pressure relief doors provided on the assembly are considered as Safety Class 1 structures.

  15. A discussion of certain safety issues associated with the Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation mixing test. Letter report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This paper addresses certain safety issues associated with the Hanford Tank 241-SY 101 hydrogen mitigation mixing test. Specifically, the study, is concerned with the effect of pump shearing, jet mixing, and piling-up on the following areas: Gas generation; gas retention; gas release (immediate); gas release (long-term); and saltcake. The findings for each issue area of concern are addressed.

  16. Acceptance test report for tank bottom thermocouples on Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Zuehlke, A.C.

    1994-12-01

    This test report documents testing performed per WHC-SD-WM-ATP-069, Rev. 2. The proper monitoring of the 241-SY-101 Tank Bottom and Side Thermocouples (TBSTC) by the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) will be tested to establish continued operability of the system. During this test, an end-to-end verification of all of the sensor circuits associated with the TBSTCs, which provide signals both to the DACS computer system and an installed temporary Data Logger, shall be performed by injecting a signal at the appropriate field terminal and verifying the circuit completely through the system to the computer in the DACS trailer and the computer monitor used to display the output of the Data Logger. Each injected signal will be adjusted for appropriate `near zero`, `mid range` and `near full scale` values for the sensor being tested. The TBSTC screen, which provides for operator interface with the TBSTCs, will be utilized to monitor testing at the DACS computers. Testing per this procedure shall be conducted after the installation of the temporary Data Logger for the TBSTCs is complete. The temporary Data Logger will be installed to monitor the temperature readings of 13 of the 26 Tank Bottom Thermocouples in support of SY-101 excavation testing.

  17. Laboratory testing of ozone oxidation of Hanford Site waste from Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Stubbs, A.M.; Bolling, S.D.

    1993-12-14

    Ozone was investigated as a reagent to oxidize and destroy organic species present in simulated and genuine waste from Hanford Site Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY). Two high-shear mixing apparatus were tested to perform the gas-to-solution mass transfer necessary to achieve efficient use of the ozone reagent. Oxidations of nitrite (to form nitrate) and organic species were observed. The organics oxidized to form carbonate and oxalate as well as nitrate and nitrogen gas from nitrogen associated with the organic. oxidations of metal species also were observed directly or inferred by solubilities. The chemical reaction stoichiometries were consistent with reduction of one oxygen atom per ozone molecule. Acetate, oxalate, and formate were found to comprise about 40% of the genuine waste`s total organic carbon (TOC) concentration. Ozonation was found to be chemically feasible for destroying organic species (except oxalate) present in the wastes in Tank 101-SY. The simulated waste formulation used in these studies credibly modelled the ozonation behavior of the genuine waste.

  18. Thermal reactivity of mixtures of VDDT lubricant and simulated Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 waste

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Panisko, F.E.; Sell, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    To predict whether the Polywater G lubricant residue remaining in the velocity, density, and temperature tree (VDTT) and the waste in Tank 241-SY-101 (101SY) will be chemically compatible with wastes in 101SY when two VDTTs are removed from 101SY, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory measured the thermal reaction sensitivity of the lubricant residue. This residue is a simulated 101SY waste containing the organic surrogate trisodium hydroxyethyl-ethylenediaminetriacetate (Na{sub 3}HEDTA) and two simulated potential waste and lubricant residue mixtures containing 10 and 90 percent lubricant residue. These studies using accelerating rate calorimetry found that the residue did not react at a rate exceeding 0.1 J/min/g mixture up to 190 degrees C with simulated 101SY waste containing Na{sub 3}HEDTA as the organic surrogate. Also, the dried lubricant residue did not decompose exothermically at a rate exceeding 0.1 J/min/g. Using guidelines used by the chemical industry, these results indicate that the lubricant residue should not react as a significant rate with the waste in 101SY when added to the waste at 60 degrees C or when the mixture cools to the waste`s temperature of 48 degrees C.

  19. Structural analysis: Flexible receiver yoke brace for the 241SY101 mixer pump

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.M.

    1994-09-09

    This report documents the structural analysis of the flexible-receiver yoke brace that will be used to maintain the mixer pump lifting yoke in a vertical position during the removal of the mixer pump from waste tank 241SY101. During the removal process, the crane is connected to a lifting yoke which is attached to the lifting on the mounting flange of the mixer pump. The pump then can be lifted from the tank. At one point in the removal procedure, the crane will be disconnected from the lifting yoke. At this time, it is possible for the lifting yoke to rotate around the pinned connection between it and the pump if it is subjected to a horizontal load. To prevent the rotation of the lifting yoke, the yoke brace was designed to maintain the yoke in a vertical position while it is disconnected from the crane. This analysis addressed the adequacy of the yoke brace to provide support for the lifting yoke during high winds and a seismic event. The results of this analysis show that, when subjected to a combined design wind and seismic load, the yoke brace design is acceptable to maintain the lifting yoke in a vertical position when the yoke is disconnected from the crane.

  20. Chemical and physical processes in Tank 241-SY-101: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    Since 1942, chemical and radioactive waste have been stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. In March 1981 one of the double shell tanks, 241-SY-101 (called 101-SY), began venting large quantities of gas, primarily hydrogen and nitrous oxide. Because of the potential for explosion Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy realized the need for knowledge about the processes occurring in this tank that lead to generation of the gases. In June 1990, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory began assembling a Tank Waste Science Panel to develop a better understanding of the processes occurring the Tank 101-SY. This knowledge is necessary to provide a technically defensible basis for the safety analyses, which will allow the tank contents to be sampled, as well as for the future remediation of the tank and its contents. The Panel concluded that the data available on Tank 101-SY are insufficient to allow the critical chemical and physical processes giving rise to gas formation and release to be unambiguously identified. To provide the needed information the Panel recommends that Tank 101-SY by physically and chemically characterized as fully as possible and as expeditiously as safety considerations allow, and laboratory studies and modeling efforts be undertaken the chemical and physical processes involved in gas generation and release. Finally, the Panel recommends that no remediation steps be taken until there is a better understanding of the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in Tank 101-SY. Premature remediation steps may only serve to compound the problem. Furthermore, such steps may change the chemical and physical characteristics of the tank and prevent a true understanding of the phenomena involved. As a consequence, similar problems in other tanks on the site may not be adequately addressed. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Effects of Crust Ingestion on Mixer Pump Performance in Tank 241-SY-101: Workshop Results

    SciTech Connect

    Brennen, C.E.; Stewart, C.W.; Meyer, P.A.

    1999-10-20

    In August 1999, a workshop was held at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to discuss the effects of crust ingestion on mixer pump performance in Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101. The main purpose of the workshop was to evaluate the potential for crust ingestion to degrade mixing and/or damage the mixer pump. The need for a previously determined 12-inch separation between the top of the mixer pump inlet and the crust base was evaluated. Participants included a representative from the pump manufacturer, an internationally known expert in centrifugal pump theory, Hanford scientists and engineers, and operational specialists representing relevant fields of expertise. The workshop focused on developing an understanding of the pump design, addressing the physics of entrainment of solids and gases into the pump, and assessing the effects of solids and gases on pump performance. The major conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) Entrainment of a moderate amount of solids or gas from the crust should not damage the pump or reduce its lifetime, though mixing effectiveness will be somewhat reduced. (2) Air binding should not damage the pump. Vibrations due to ingestion of gas, solids, and objects potentially could cause radial loads that might reduce the lifetime of bearings and seals. However, significant damage would require extreme conditions not associated with the small bubbles, fine solids, and chunks of relatively weak material typical of the crust. (3) The inlet duct extension opening, 235 inches from the tank bottom, should be considered the pump inlet, not the small gap at 262 inches. (4) A suction vortex exists at the inlet of all pumps. The characteristics of the inlet suction vortex in the mixer pump are very hard to predict, but its effects likely extend upward several feet. Because of this, the current 12-inch limit should be replaced with criteria based on actual monitored pump performance. The most obvious criterion (in addition to current operational

  2. Potential for Waste Stratification from Back-Dilution in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.; Meyer, P.A.

    1999-10-20

    Since late 1997, the floating crust layer in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) has grown about two meters by gas accumulation. To reverse crust growth and reduce its retained gas volume, the waste in SY-101 will be diluted by transferring at least 300,000 gal of waste out of the tank and replacing it with water. In the fall of 1999, approximately 100,000 gal of this waste will be transferred into Tank SY-102; within a few days of that initial transfer, approximately 100,000 gal of water will be added to SY-101. This initial back-dilution is being planned to ensure that the base of the floating crust layer will be lifted away from the mixer pump inlet with minimal effect on the crust itself. The concern is that the added water will pool under the crust, so the resulting fluid mixture will be too light to lift the crust away from the mixer pump and dissolution at the crust base could cause unwanted gas release. To ensure sufficient mixing to prevent such stratification, water will be added near the tank bottom either through an existing sparge ring on the base of the mixer pump or through the dilution line at the inlet of the transfer pump. A number of simulations using the TEMPEST code showed that the mixing of the water and waste by this method is rapid, and the water does not pool under the crust. Although a density gradient is present, its magnitude is small compared with the difference between the slurry and water density. The result is essentially the same whether water is introduced at the base of the mixer pump or at the transfer pump. There is little effect of water flowrate up to the 500 gpm studied. In all cases, the minimum density remained above that required to float the crust and well above the density of saturated liquid. This indicates that the base of the crust will rise during back-dilution and there will be little or no dissolution of the crust base because the water will be close to saturation from the dissolution of solids in the mixed slurry.

  3. Transport of Tank 241-SY-101 Waste Slurry: Effects of Dilution and Temperature on Critical Pipeline Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    KP Recknagle; Y Onishi

    1999-06-15

    This report presents the methods and results of calculations performed to predict the critical velocity and pressure drop required for the two-inch pipeline transfer of solid/liquid waste slurry from underground waste storage Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY- 102 at the Hanford Site. The effects of temperature and dilution on the critical velocity were included in the analysis. These analyses show that Tank 241-SY-101 slurry should be diluted with water prior to delivery to Tank 241-SY-102. A dilution ratio of 1:1 is desirable and would allow the waste to be delivered at a critical velocity of 1.5 ft/sec. The system will be operated at a flow velocity of 6 ft/sec or greater therefore, this velocity will be sufficient to maintain a stable slurry delivery through the pipeline. The effect of temperature on the critical velocity is not a limiting factor when the slurry is diluted 1:1 with water. Pressure drop at the critical velocity would be approximately two feet for a 125-ft pipeline (or 250-ft equivalent straight pipeline). At 6 ft/sec, the pressure drop would be 20 feet over a 250-ft equivalent straight pipeline.

  4. Soil structure interaction analysis for the Hanford Site 241-SY-101 double-shell waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Giller, R.A.; Weiner, E.O.

    1991-09-01

    The 241-SY-101 tank is a double-shell waste storage tank buried in the 241-SY tank farm in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This analysis addresses the effects of seismic soil-structure interaction on the tank structure and includes a parametric soil-structure interaction study addressing three configurations: two-dimensional soil structure, a two-dimensional structure-soil-structure, and a three-dimensional soil-structure interaction. This study was designed to determine an optimal method for addressing seismic-soil effects on underground storage tanks. The computer programs calculate seismic-soil pressures on the double-shell tank walls and and seismic acceleration response spectra in the tank. The results of this soil-structure interaction parametric study as produced by the computer programs are given in terms of seismic soil pressures and response spectra. The conclusions of this soil-structure interaction evaluation are that dynamically calculated soil pressures in the 241-SY-101 tank are significantly reduce from those using standard hand calculation methods and that seismic evaluation of underground double-shell waste storage tanks must consider soil-structure interaction effects in order to predict conservative structural response. Appendixes supporting this study are available in Volume 2 of this report.

  5. Ion exchange removal of cesium from simulated and actual supernate from Hanford tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.N.; Bontha, J.R.; Carlson, C.D.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in conjunction with the Process Chemistry and Statistics Section of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), conducted this study as part of the Supernatant Treatment Development Task for the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM) Applied Engineering Project. The study assesses the performance of the CS-100 ion exchange material for removing cesium from simulated and actual alkaline supernate from Hanford tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103. The objective of these experiments is to compare the cesium ion exchange loading and elution profiles of actual and simulated wastes. Specific experimental objectives include (1) demonstration of decontamination factors (DF) for cesium removal, 92) verification of simulant performance, (3) investigation of waste/exchanger chemistry, and (4) determination of the radionuclide content of the regenerated CS-100 resin prior to disposal.

  6. Similarity analysis applied to the design of scaled tests of hydraulic mitigation methods for Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Liljegren, L.M.

    1993-02-01

    The episodic gas releases from Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) pose a potential safety hazard. It is thought that gas releases occur because gases are generated and trapped in layers of settled solids located at the bottom of the tank. This document focuses on issues associated with testing of hydraulic mitigation technologies proposed for SY-101. The basic assumption underlying the concept of hydraulic mitigation is that mobilization or maintained suspension of the solids settled in the bottom of the tank wig prevent gas accumulation. Engineering of hydraulic technologies will require testing to determine the operating parameters required to mobilize the solids and to maintain these solids in suspension. Because full scale testing is extremely expensive (even when possible), scaled tests are needed to assess the merit of the proposed technologies and to provide data for numerical or analytical modeling. This research is conducted to support testing and evaluation of proposed hydraulic mitigation concepts only. The work here is oriented towards determining the jet velocities, nozzle sizes, and other operating parameters required to mobilize the settled solids in SY- 101 and maintain them in suspension.

  7. Human-machine interface (HMI) report for 241-SY-101 data acquisition [and control] system (DACS) upgrade study

    SciTech Connect

    Truitt, R.W.

    1997-10-22

    This report provides an independent evaluation of information for a Windows based Human Machine Interface (HMI) to replace the existing DOS based Iconics HMI currently used in the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used at Tank 241-SY-101. A fundamental reason for this evaluation is because of the difficulty of maintaining the system with obsolete, unsupported software. The DACS uses a software operator interface (Genesis for DOS HMI) that is no longer supported by its manufacturer, Iconics. In addition to its obsolescence, it is complex and difficult to train additional personnel on. The FY 1997 budget allocated $40K for phase 1 of a software/hardware upgrade that would have allowed the old DOS based system to be replaced by a current Windows based system. Unfortunately, budget constraints during FY 1997 has prompted deferral of the upgrade. The upgrade needs to be performed at the earliest possible time, before other failures render the system useless. Once completed, the upgrade could alleviate other concerns: spare pump software may be able to be incorporated into the same software as the existing pump, thereby eliminating the parallel path dilemma; and the newer, less complex software should expedite training of future personnel, and in the process, require that less technical time be required to maintain the system.

  8. A safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-SY-101: Hanford Site,Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lentsch, J.W.

    1996-07-01

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101,which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  9. Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, nitrogen, and ammonia in contact with tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1996-02-01

    Work described in this report was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. Described in this report are the results of tests to evaluate the rates of thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving flammable gases in the presence of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste. Flammable gases generated by the radiolysis of water and by the thermal and radiolytic decomposition of organic waste constituents may themselves participate in further reactions. Examples include the decomposition of nitrous oxide to yield nitrogen and oxygen, the reaction of nitrous oxide and hydrogen to produce nitrogen and water, and the reaction of nitrogen and hydrogen to produce ammonia. The composition of the gases trapped in bubbles in the wastes might therefore change continuously as a function of the time that the gas bubbles are retained.

  10. 241-SY-101 mulitport riser acceptance for beneficial use

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, R.E.

    1995-10-02

    This document formally demonstrates that the Acceptance for Beneficial USE (ABU) process for the SY tank farm Multiport Riser assembly has been properly completed in accordance with the ABU checklist. For each item required on the ABU checklist, a bibliography of the documentation prepared and released to satisfy the requirement is provided

  11. Maximum First Transfer and Dilution Volumes for 241SY101

    SciTech Connect

    BARTON, W.B.

    1999-10-28

    This report discusses the solution to the following problem: what is the maximum waste transfer and dilution quantities and locations which can be allowed in the first transfer of waste from SY-101 given the following constraints? (1) The crust must float on the submerged waste (waste becomes less dense when diluted, eventually allowing crust to sink); (2) No credit is taken for the top dilution; (3) Addition of water to the bulk slurry through the transfer pump must be able to refloat the crust base to above 295 inches; (4) The margin between refloating to 295 inches and crust sinking must be at least 10,000 gallons; (5) The crust can't be thinned to less than 60 inches thick.

  12. 241-SY-101 Pump Decon System Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Talachy, S.A.; Cleveland, K.J.

    1995-04-12

    The SY-101 Pump Decon System has components that consist of the water filter skid to assembly operation, the pump pit flooding system, and the system set up using air blow the water out of the decon hose. The Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) consists of four parts. The first part will calibrate water and flow meters. The second part will determine the pressure loss on the water traveling through the filter skid at various flow rates. The third part will determine the length of time it takes to drain 1350 gallons of water out of a tank through 300 feet of discharge hose. The fourth part will verify that the calculated air volume and pressure in an air receiver is adequate to blow all the water out of a 2 inch diameter water hose.

  13. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction 241-SY-101 crust growth near term mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    HOMAN, N.A.

    1999-04-12

    The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health, Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions & Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of the information listed in Appendix A.'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-110), lists the requirements that must be addressed. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide less than 0.1 mrem/year total effective dose equivalent to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual, and commencement is needed within a short time frame. Therefore, this application is also intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial startup in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of this 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1) notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2), will be provided at a later date.

  14. Pipeline Cross-Site Transfer Assessment for Tank 241-SY-101 Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Wells, Beric E.; Hartley, Stacey A.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2002-02-20

    This study evaluated the feasibility of transferring waste now stored in Tank SY-101 in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site to a storage tank in 200 East Area through a 6.2-mile-long, 3-inch-diameter stainless steel pipeline. Using the Wasp slurry transport model, the critical velocity and expected pressure drop were calculated to determine 1) whether current SY-101 waste can be transferred through the existing cross-site transfer pipeline without additional dilution and, if it is not possible, how much dilution is needed.

  15. Structural analysis of the equipment removal system for tank 241SY101

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, T.C.

    1995-03-02

    The calculations documented in this report show that the ERS major components are structurally qualified to complete the objective, i.e., to install the removed equipment into a shipping container and transport and store the container at the Central Waste Complex (CWC). The analysis for the structural members of the ERS components considers live load with an impact factor of 125 % added to dead load. An allowable stress of one-third yield is used for all structural components carrying the load based on DOE-RL-92-36. Adherence to DOE-RL-92-36 is not a code requirement. However, the loads considered make this factor of safety appropriate. The calculations meet the strength requirements of the American Institute for Steel Construction (ASIC 1989) for all non-critical structural elements.

  16. Safety equipment list for the 241-SY-101 RAPID mitigation project

    SciTech Connect

    MORRIS, K.L.

    1999-06-29

    This document provides the safety classification for the safety (safety class and safety RAPID Mitigation Project. This document is being issued as the project SEL until the supporting authorization basis documentation, this document will be superseded by the TWRS SEL (LMHC 1999), documentation istlralized. Upon implementation of the authorization basis significant) structures, systems, and components (SSCS) associated with the 241-SY-1O1 which will be updated to include the information contained herein.

  17. Evaluation of 241 AN tank farm flammable gas behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The 241 AN Tank Farm tanks 241-AN-103, -104, and 105 are Flammable Gas Watch List tanks. Characteristics exhibited by these tanks (i.e., surface level drops, pressure increases, and temperature profiles) are similar to those exhibited by tank 241-SY-101, which is also a Watch List tank. Although the characteristics exhibited by tank 241-SY-101 are also present in tanks 241-AN-103, -104, and 105, they are exhibited to a lesser degree in the AN Tank Farm tanks. The 241 AN Tank Farm tanks have only small surface level drops, and the pressure changes that occur are not sufficient to release an amount of gas that would cause the dome space to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) for hydrogen. Therefore, additional restrictions are probably unnecessary for working within the 241 AN Tank Farm, either within the dome space of the tanks or in the waste.

  18. Dome load control and crane land path evaluation for Tank 241-SY-101 during hydrogen mitigation pump removal and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, M.P.; Lawler, D.M.

    1994-08-01

    This report revisits and consolidates two analyses previously performed for the installation of the Hydrogen Mitigation Pump (HMT) pump. The first report determines, as a function of the crane-imposed dome load, the point to which the crane can encroach into the exclusion zone without exceeding the 50-ton limit. The second performs a load evaluation for the crane and the components in the load path (crane lift accessories and pump). In doing so, it determines the weakest component in the load path and the effect of this component on the allowable encroachment distance. Furthermore, the second report sets operational limits on the allowable load decrease (unload) during installation in the event the pump sticks in the riser. The analysis presented here expands on the latter subject by setting an operational limit on the amount of allowable load increase (overload) during pump removal in the event the pump sticks in the riser.

  19. Final report of the TWRS Plant Implementation Team to review potential reactive component in tank 241-T-111 and methane in tank 241-SY-101 gas release event

    SciTech Connect

    Engelman, D.B.

    1994-02-01

    This is the final report of the results of a Tank Waste Remediation Systems Plant Implementation Team chartered by TWRS Operations, in response to a potential Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) due to the discovery of a reactive component in waste tank 241-T-111 (T-111). Tank T-111, a non-Watch List single-shell tank, has no historical evidence of any potential safety problems. Core samples from tank T-111 were taken in 1991 and analyzed in 1992. The presence of uncharacterized exotherms was identified in the first three segments of two cores and reported to tank farm management in November 1993.

  20. 1/12-Scale mixing interface visualization and buoyant particle release tests in support of Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Eschbach, E.J.; Enderlin, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In support of tank waste safety programs, visualization tests were performed in the 1/12-scale tank facility, using a low-viscosity simulant. The primary objective of the tests was to obtain video records of the transient jet-sludge interaction. The intent is that these videos will provide useful qualitative data for comparison with model predictions. Two tests were initially planned: mixing interface visualization (MIV) and buoyant particle release (BPR). Completion of the buoyant particle release test was set aside in order to complete additional MIV tests. Rheological measurements were made on simulant samples before testing, and the simulant was found to exhibit thixotropic behavior. Shear vane measurements were also made on an in-situ analog of the 1/12-scale tank simulant. Simulant shear strength has been observed to be time dependent. The primary objective of obtaining video records of jet-sludge interaction was satisfied, and the records yielded jet location information which may be of use in completing model comparisons. The modeling effort is not part of this task, but this report also discusses test specific instrumentation, visualization techniques, and shear vane instrumentation which would enable improved characterization of jet-sludge interaction and simulant characteristics.

  1. Level maintenance for Tank 101-SY mitigation-by-mixing test. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D.C.

    1994-09-28

    The Phase A, Phase B and Full Scale testing portions of the Mitigation-By-Mixing Test have demonstrated the effectiveness of the Mixer Pump to maintain the waste in tank 101-SY in the desired mitigated state. The operation of the 101-SY Mixer Pump for short periods of time results in a controlled release of hydrogen gas in concentrations well below the established safety limits. Additionally, it has been shown that operation of the pump on a regular schedule minimizes the historical generation rate of hydrogen inventory in the waste. Generation of hydrogen inventory is exhibited by waste level growth. The primary objective of this procedure is to maintain the waste level in tank 241-SY-101 within the safe operating range as defined by the Safety Assessment and the Test Plan. The secondary objective is to operate the pump on a schedule that maximizes its useful lifespan and prevents the formation of obstructions in the normal flow path of the pump.

  2. Evaluation of high-level nuclear waste tanks having a potential flammable gas hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.D.; Barton, W.B.; Hill, R.C.; et al, Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-14

    In 1990 the U.S. Department of Energy declared an unreviewed safety question as a result of the behavior of tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gases that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-101 and the other tanks associated with a potential flammable gas hazard. This paper presents an overview of the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release and covers the results of direct sampling of the tanks to determine the gas composition and the amount of stored gas.

  3. Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, and nitrogen in the gas phase; comparison of gas generation rates in supernate and solid fractions of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes progress made in evaluating me by which flammable gases are generated in Hanford double-shell tank wastes, based on the results of laboratory tests using simulated waste mixtures. Work described in this report. was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies being performed at Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), under subcontract to PNL, using simulated wastes, and to studies being performed at VMC using actual wastes.

  4. The effect of dilution on the gas retention behavior of Tank 241-SY- 103 waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, P.R.; Tingey, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-five of the 177 underground waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site have been placed on the Flammable Gas watch list. These 25 tanks, containing high-level waste generated during plutonium and uranium processing, have been identified as potentially capable of accumulating flammable gases above the lower flammability limit (Babad et al. 1991). In the case of Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103, it has been proposed that diluting the tank waste may mitigate this hazard (Hudson et al. 1995; Stewart et al. 1994). The effect of dilution on the ability of waste from Tank 241-SY-103 to accumulate gas was studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A similar study has been completed for waste from Tank 241-SY-101 (Bredt et al. 1995). Because of the additional waste-storage volume available in Tank 241-SY-103 and because the waste is assumed to be similar to that currently in Tank 241-SY-101, Tank 241-SY-103 became the target for a demonstration of passive mitigation through in-tank dilution. In 1994, plans for the in-tank dilution demonstration were deferred pending a decision on whether to pursue dilution as a mitigation strategy. However, because Tank 241-SY-103 is an early retrieval target, determination of how waste properties vary with dilution will still be required.

  5. Level maintenance for Tank 101-SY mitigation-by-mixing test

    SciTech Connect

    Sobocinski, R.G.

    1994-11-16

    This document provides the procedure to be followed to implement the requirements of the Mixer Pump Long-Term Operations Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Mitigation, WHC-SD-WM-PLN-081. The test is divided into 2 distinct sequences, named Single Position Pump Run and Tank Sweep. Instructions for all sequences are defined within the procedure. All safety requirements as defined in LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-101-SY have been implemented into this procedure.

  6. Chemically Induced Surface Evolutions with Level Sets

    SciTech Connect

    2006-11-17

    ChISELS is used for the theoretical modeling of detailed surface chemistry and consomitant surface evolutions occurring during microsystem fabrication processes conducted at low pressures. Examples include physical vapor deposition (PVD), low pressure chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and plasma etching. Evolving interfaces are represented using the level-set method and the evolution equations time integrated using a Semi-Lagrangian approach. A Ballistic transport model is employed to solve for the fluxes incident on each of the surface elements. Surface chemistry leading to etching or deposition is computed by either coupling to Surface Chemkin (a commercially available code) or by providing user defined subroutines. The computational meshes used are quad-trees (2-D) and oct-trees (3-D), constructed such that grid refinement is localized to regions near the surface interfaces. As the interface evolves, the mesh is dynamically reconstructed as needed for the grid to remain fine only around the interface. For parallel computation, a domain decomposition scheme with dynamic load balancing is used to distribute the computational work across processors.

  7. Contraband drug surface chemistry at nanogram levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homstead, Juliana; Poziomek, Edward J.

    1997-02-01

    The surface chemistry of contraband drugs is very important in many detection techniques. It is also important in choosing materials for sampling and sample handling. The chemical nature of surfaces may facilitate drug decomposition or serve to stabilize the drugs. We have developed a simple technique to study the chemistry of contraband drugs such as cocaine HCl at nanogram levels. The normal operating modes of an IONSCAN 400 ion mobility spectrometer were adjusted to allow the chemistry of the drugs to be examined in the sample chamber of the spectrometer. For example, a membrane with deposited drug is held in the sample chamber at a specified temperature up to 20 seconds with no air flow. An ON-OFF valve was placed in- line just before the carrier gas enters the desorption chamber where samples are heated. This modification allows the gas flow to be manually turned off while the sample is being heated. We have used this technique to examine the pyrolysis of cocaine hydrochloride under a variety of conditions. At the end of the designated reaction time, the air flow is turned on allowing the reaction products and any starting materials to flow into the spectrometer for analysis. This technique has allowed studies of the stability of the drugs at various temperatures on different surfaces. For example, evidence was obtained of cocaine HCl decomposition at 75 degrees for 5 seconds using Teflon as the support material. The use of this technique has also assisted us in choosing materials for pyrolysis studies in which the goal is the decompose target drugs quickly and efficiently for detection applications.

  8. The world's highest levels of surface UV.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Raul R; Seckmeyer, Gunther; Damiani, Alessandro; Riechelmann, Stefan; Rayas, Juan; Labbe, Fernando; Laroze, David

    2014-01-01

    Chile's northern Atacama Desert has been pointed out as one of the places on earth where the world's highest surface ultraviolet (UV) may occur. This area is characterized by its high altitude, prevalent cloudless conditions and relatively low total ozone column. Aimed at detecting those peak UV levels, we carried out in January 2013 ground-based spectral measurements on the Chajnantor Plateau (5100 m altitude, 23°00'S, 67°45'W) and at the Paranal Observatory (2635 m altitude, 24°37'S, 70°24'W). The UV index computed from our spectral measurements peaked at 20 on the Chajnantor Plateau (under broken cloud conditions) and at 16 at the Paranal Observatory (under cloudless conditions). Spectral measurements carried out in June 2005 at the Izaña Observatory (2367 m altitude, 28°18'N, 16°30'W) were used for further comparisons. Due to the differences in sun-earth separation, total ozone column, altitude, albedo, aerosols and clouds, peak UV levels are expected to be significantly higher at southern hemisphere sites than at their northern hemisphere counterparts.

  9. New challenges in the safety analysis of DOE`s high-level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.N.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; White, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Tank 241-SY-101, located at the Department of Energy Hanford Site, has periodically released up to 283 m{sup 3} (10,000 ft{sup 3}) of flammable gas. This release has been one of the highest priority DOE operational safety problems because of potential consequences if the gas were ignited during one of these releases. The gases include hydrogen and ammonia (fuels) and nitrous oxide (oxidizer). There have been many opinions regarding the controlling mechanisms for these releases, but demonstrating an adequate understanding of the problem, selecting a mitigation methodology, and preparing the safety analysis have presented numerous new challenges. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the problem, the main issues, the method selected to mitigate this hazard, and the results of the mitigation program.

  10. Probing Surface Chemistry at the Nanoscale Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rene-Boisneuf, Laetitia

    Studies various nanostructured materials have gained considerable interest within the past several decades. This novel class of materials has opened up a new realm of possibilities, both for the fundamental comprehension of matter, but also for innovative applications. The size-dependent effect observed for these systems often lies in their interaction with the surrounding environment and understanding such interactions is the pivotal point for the investigations undertaken in this thesis. Three families of nanoparticles are analyzed: semiconductor quantum dots, metallic silver nanoparticles and rare-earth oxide nanomaterials. The radical scavenging ability of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO 2) is quite controversial since they have been labeled as both oxidizing and antioxidant species for biological systems. Here, both aqueous and organic stabilized nanoparticles are examined in straightforward systems containing only one reactive oxygen species to ensure a controlled release. The apparent absence of their direct radical scavenging ability is demonstrated despite the ease at which CeO2 nanoparticles generate stable surface Ce 3+ clusters, which is used to explain the redox activity of these nanomaterials. On the contrary, CeO2 nanoparticles are shown to have an indirect scavenging effect in Fenton reactions by annihilating the reactivity of Fe 2+ salts. Cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QD) constitute another highly appealing family of nanocolloids in part due to their tunable, size-dependent luminescence across the visible spectrum. The effect of elemental sulfur treatment is investigated to overcome one of the main drawbacks of CdSe QD: low fluorescence quantum yield. Herein, we report a constant and reproducible quantum yield of 15%. The effect of sulfur surface treatment is also assessed following the growth of a silica shell, as well as the response towards a solution quencher (4-amino-TEMPO). The sulfur treated QD is also tested for interaction with

  11. An alternative to reduction of surface pressure to sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deardorff, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The pitfalls of the present method of reducing surface pressure to sea level are reviewed, and an alternative, adjusted pressure, P, is proposed. P is obtained from solution of a Poisson equation over a continental region, using the simplest boundary condition along the perimeter or coastline where P equals the sea level pressure. The use of P would avoid the empiricisms and disadvantages of pressure reduction to sea level, and would produce surface pressure charts which depict the true geostrophic wind at the surface.

  12. MISR Level 3 Land Surface and Aerosol Versioning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-11-04

      MISR Level 3 Land Surface and Aerosol Versioning Component Global Land Surface Product (CGLS) and Component Global Aerosol Product (CGAS) - ... fields for netCDF files (even though there is only one time value). This was a change requested by data product users to integrate better ...

  13. Performance evaluation of the Enraf-Nonius Model 872 radar gage

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.J.; Park, W.R.

    1992-12-01

    There are indications that the Enraf-Nonius Radar Gage installed in Tank 241-SY-101 may not be providing an accurate reading of the true surface level in the waste tank. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) performed an initial study to determine the effect of the following items on the distance read by the gage: Tank riser; Material permittivity and conductivity Foam; Proportion of supernatant to solid material in the field of view of the instrument; Physical geometry of the supernatant and solid material changing in the field of view with respect to time; and Varying water content in the solid material. The results of the tests indicate that distance measured by the radar gage is affected by the permittivity, conductivity, and angle of the target surface. These parameters affect the complex input impedance of the signal received by the radar gage to measure the distance to the target. In Tank 101-SY, the radar gage is placed on top of a 12 in. diameter riser. The riser affects the field of view of the instrument, and a much smaller target surface is detected when the radar beam propagates through a riser. In addition, the riser acts as a waveguide, and standing waves are enhanced between the target surface and the radar gage. The result is a change in the level measured by the radar gage due to changing properties of the target surface even when the distance to the target does not change. The test results indicate that the radar will not detect dry crust or foam. However, if the crust or foam is stirred so that it becomes wet, then the crust or foam became detectable. The level read using the radar gage decreased as the moisture in the crust or foam evaporated.

  14. Performance evaluation of the Enraf-Nonius Model 872 radar gage

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.J.; Park, W.R.

    1992-12-01

    There are indications that the Enraf-Nonius Radar Gage installed in Tank 241-SY-101 may not be providing an accurate reading of the true surface level in the waste tank. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) performed an initial study to determine the effect of the following items on the distance read by the gage: Tank riser; Material permittivity and conductivity Foam; Proportion of supernatant to solid material in the field of view of the instrument; Physical geometry of the supernatant and solid material changing in the field of view with respect to time; and Varying water content in the solid material. The results of the tests indicate that distance measured by the radar gage is affected by the permittivity, conductivity, and angle of the target surface. These parameters affect the complex input impedance of the signal received by the radar gage to measure the distance to the target. In Tank 101-SY, the radar gage is placed on top of a 12 in. diameter riser. The riser affects the field of view of the instrument, and a much smaller target surface is detected when the radar beam propagates through a riser. In addition, the riser acts as a waveguide, and standing waves are enhanced between the target surface and the radar gage. The result is a change in the level measured by the radar gage due to changing properties of the target surface even when the distance to the target does not change. The test results indicate that the radar will not detect dry crust or foam. However, if the crust or foam is stirred so that it becomes wet, then the crust or foam became detectable. The level read using the radar gage decreased as the moisture in the crust or foam evaporated.

  15. The surface core level shift for lithium at the surface of lithium borate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, David; Ketsman, I.; Xiao, Jie; Losovyj, Ya. B.; Petrosky, J.; McClory, J.; Burak, Ya. V.; Adamiv, V. T.; Dowben, P. A.

    2010-01-01

    The shallow Li 1s core level exhibits a surface-to-bulk core level shift for the stoichiometric Li 2B 4O 7(1 1 0) surface. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy was used to indentify Li 1s bulk and surface core level components at binding energies -56.5±0.4 and -53.7±0.5 eV, respectively. We find photoemission evidence for surface states of Li 2B 4O 7(1 1 0) that exist in the gap of the projected bulk density of states. The existence of surface states is consistent with the large surface-to-bulk core level shift for the Li 1s core.

  16. Surface levelling of thermosetting powder coatings: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, D. C.; Hay, J. N.; Keddie, J. L.; Sear, R. P.; Yeates, S. G.

    2000-08-01

    The deposition of protective coatings from thermosetting polymer powders is an ecological, economic and energy-efficient technology. A frequent problem encountered with powder coatings is a rough surface (with undulations on a length scale much greater than the powder particle size) that detracts from the visual appearance. The levelling (i.e. flattening) of the surface of a polymer melt is driven by the minimization of the surface energy but opposed by the (possibly time-dependent) viscosity of the melt. We address the problem by developing a model of surface levelling to consider flow in two directions, building upon a one-dimensional model already in the literature. We have performed simulations to predict the final coating profiles starting with a Gaussian profile and using experimentally determined values of polymer viscosity. To compare to the simulations, we have measured experimentally the dimensions of surface undulations on coatings formed from thermosetting acrylic powder layers having purposely created features of known dimensions. There is good agreement between simulation and experiment. Both find that the levelling proceeds to a greater extent with increasing coating thickness and with decreasing lateral dimension of the surface undulation. Our results open up the possibility of predicting final surface topography given the rheological properties of a polymer.

  17. Beryllium surface levels in a military ammunition plant.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Wayne T; Leonard, Stephanie; Ott, Darrin; Fuortes, Laurence; Field, William

    2008-07-01

    This study evaluated the presence of beryllium surface contamination in a U.S. conventional munitions plant as an indicator of possible past beryllium airborne and skin exposure and used these measurements to classify job categories by potential level of exposure. Surface samples were collected from production and nonproduction areas of the plant and at regional industrial reference sites with no known history of beryllium use. Surface samples of premoistened wiping material were analyzed for beryllium mass content using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and results expressed as micrograms of beryllium per 100 square centimeters (micro g/100 cm(2)). Beryllium was detected in 87% of samples collected at the munitions plant and in 72% of the samples collected at regional reference sites. Two munitions plant samples from areas near sanders and grinders were above 3.0 micro g/100 cm(2) (U.S. Department of Energy surface contamination limit). The highest surface level found at the reference sites was 0.44 micro g/100 cm(2). Workers in areas where beryllium-containing alloy tools were sanded or ground, but not other work areas, may have been exposed to airborne beryllium concentrations above levels encountered in other industries where metal work is conducted. Surface sampling provided information useful for categorizing munitions plant jobs by level of past beryllium airborne and skin exposure and, subsequently, for identifying employees within exposure strata to be screened for beryllium sensitization.

  18. Doping level influence on chemical surface of diamond electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, A. F.; Baldan, M. R.; Ferreira, N. G.

    2013-04-01

    The modification of surface bond termination promoted by the doping level on diamond electrodes is analyzed. The films were prepared by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique using the standard mixture of H2/CH4 with an extra H2 flux passing through a bubbler containing different concentrations of B2O3 dissolved in methanol. Diamond morphology and quality were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy techniques while the changes in film surfaces were analyzed by contact angle, cyclic voltammetry and synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The boron-doped diamond (BDD) films hydrophobicity, reversibility, and work potential window characteristics were related to their physical properties and chemical surface, as a function of the doping level. From the Mott-Schottky plots (MSP) and XPS analyzes, for the lightly (1018 cm-3) and highly (1020 cm-3) BDD films, the relationship between the BDD electrochemical responses and their surface bond terminations is discussed.

  19. Confidence sets for optimal factor levels of a response surface.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fang; Liu, Wei; Bretz, Frank; Han, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Construction of confidence sets for the optimal factor levels is an important topic in response surfaces methodology. In Wan et al. (2015), an exact (1-α) confidence set has been provided for a maximum or minimum point (i.e., an optimal factor level) of a univariate polynomial function in a given interval. In this article, the method has been extended to construct an exact (1-α) confidence set for the optimal factor levels of response surfaces. The construction method is readily applied to many parametric and semiparametric regression models involving a quadratic function. A conservative confidence set has been provided as an intermediate step in the construction of the exact confidence set. Two examples are given to illustrate the application of the confidence sets. The comparison between confidence sets indicates that our exact confidence set is better than the only other confidence set available in the statistical literature that guarantees the (1-α) confidence level.

  20. A siphon gage for monitoring surface-water levels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCobb, T.D.; LeBlanc, D.R.; Socolow, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    A device that uses a siphon tube to establish a hydraulic connection between the bottom of an onshore standpipe and a point at the bottom of a water body was designed and tested for monitoring surface-water levels. Water is added to the standpipe to a level sufficient to drive a complete slug of water through the siphoning tube and to flush all air out of the system. The water levels in the standpipe and the water body equilibrate and provide a measurable static water surface in the standpipe. The siphon gage was designed to allow quick and accurate year-round measurements with minimal maintenance. Currently available devices for monitoring surface-water levels commonly involve time-consuming and costly installation and surveying, and the movement of reference points and the presence of ice cover in cold regions cause discontinuity and inaccuracy in the data collected. Installation and field testing of a siphon gage using 0.75-in-diameter polyethylene tubing at Ashumet Pond in Falmouth, Massachusetts, demonstrated that the siphon gage can provide long-term data with a field effort and accuracy equivalent to measurement of ground-water levels at an observation well.A device that uses a siphon tube to establish a hydraulic connection between the bottom of an onshore standpipe and a point at the bottom of a water body was designed and tested for monitoring surface-water levels. Water is added to the standpipe to a level sufficient to drive a complete slug of water through the siphoning tube and to flush all air out of the system. The water levels in the standpipe and the water body equilibrate and provide a measurable static water surface in the standpipe. The siphon gage was designed to allow quick and accurate year-round measurements with minimal maintenance. Currently available devices for monitoring surface-water levels commonly involve time-consuming and costly installation and surveying, and the movement of reference points and the presence of ice cover in cold

  1. Automatic Measurement of Low Level Contamination on Concrete Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, M.; Itoh, H.; Shimada, T.; Yanagihara, S.

    2002-02-28

    Automatic measurement of radioactivity is necessary for considering cost effectiveness in final radiological survey of building structures in decommissioning nuclear facilities. The RAPID (radiation measuring pilot device for surface contamination) was developed to be applied to automatic measurement of low level contamination on concrete surfaces. The RAPID has a capability to measure contamination with detection limit of 0.14 Bq/cm2 for 60Co in 30 seconds of measurement time and its efficiency is evaluated to be 5 m2/h in a normal measurement option. It was confirmed that low level contamination on concrete surfaces could be surveyed by the RAPID efficiently compared with direct measurement by workers through its actual application.

  2. Landau Levels on a Surface of Weak Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takane, Yositake

    2015-08-01

    A three-dimensional weak topological insulator (WTI), being equivalent to stacked layers of two-dimensional quantum spin-Hall insulators, accommodates massless Dirac electrons on its side surface. A notable feature of WTIs is that surface states typically consist of two Dirac cones in the reciprocal space. We study the Landau quantization of Dirac electrons of WTIs in a perpendicular magnetic field. It is shown that when the magnetic length lB is much larger than the interlayer distance a, surface electrons are quantized into Landau levels according to the ordinary quantization rule for Dirac electrons. It is also shown that, with decreasing lB toward a, each Landau level and its spin state become modulated in a nontrivial manner. We demonstrate that this is attributed to the mixing of two Dirac cones induced by the discreteness of the layered structure.

  3. SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, R.; De Lannoy, G.; Liu, Q.; Ardizzone, J.; Kimball, J.; Koster, R.

    2017-01-01

    The SMAP Level 4 soil moisture (L4_SM) product provides global estimates of surface and root zone soil moisture, along with other land surface variables and their error estimates. These estimates are obtained through assimilation of SMAP brightness temperature observations into the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) land surface model. The L4_SM product is provided at 9 km spatial and 3-hourly temporal resolution and with about 2.5 day latency. The soil moisture and temperature estimates in the L4_SM product are validated against in situ observations. The L4_SM product meets the required target uncertainty of 0.04 m(exp. 3)m(exp. -3), measured in terms of unbiased root-mean-square-error, for both surface and root zone soil moisture.

  4. BACE1 activity regulates cell surface contactin-2 levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although BACE1 is a major therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), potential side effects of BACE1 inhibition are not well characterized. BACE1 cleaves over 60 putative substrates, however the majority of these cleavages have not been characterized. Here we investigated BACE1-mediated cleavage of human contactin-2, a GPI-anchored cell adhesion molecule. Results Our initial protein sequence analysis showed that contactin-2 harbors a strong putative BACE1 cleavage site close to its GPI membrane linker domain. When we overexpressed BACE1 in CHO cells stably transfected with human contactin-2, we found increased release of soluble contactin-2 in the conditioned media. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition of BACE1 in CHO cells expressing human contactin-2 and mouse primary neurons decreased soluble contactin-2 secretion. The BACE1 cleavage site mutation 1008MM/AA dramatically impaired soluble contactin-2 release. We then asked whether contactin-2 release induced by BACE1 expression would concomitantly decrease cell surface levels of contactin-2. Using immunofluorescence and surface-biotinylation assays, we showed that BACE1 activity tightly regulates contactin-2 surface levels in CHO cells as well as in mouse primary neurons. Finally, contactin-2 levels were decreased in Alzheimer’s disease brain samples correlating inversely with elevated BACE1 levels in the same samples. Conclusion Our results clearly demonstrate that mouse and human contactin-2 are physiological substrates for BACE1. BACE1-mediated contactin-2 cleavage tightly regulates the surface expression of contactin-2 in neuronal cells. Given the role of contactin-2 in cell adhesion, neurite outgrowth and axon guidance, our data suggest that BACE1 may play an important role in these physiological processes by regulating contactin-2 surface levels. PMID:24405708

  5. Low level liquid scintillation counter performance in a low level surface laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaihola, L.; Kojola, H.; Kananen, R.

    1986-11-01

    A surface low level laboratory has been constructed where usage of special materials has reduced the gamma background to {1}/{20} of the standard laboratory, lowering the background in a low level liquid scintillation counter by 40 to 55% in C-14 window for sample volumes 15 to 3 ml.

  6. Interface Surface Area Tracking for the Conservative Level Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firehammer, Stephanie; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    One key question in liquid-gas flows is how to model the interface between phases in a way that is mass, momentum, and energy conserving. The accurate conservative level set (ACLS) method of Desjardins et al. provides a tool for tracking a liquid-gas interface with minimal mass conservation issues; however, it does not explicitly compute the interface surface area and thus nothing can be said a priori about the balance between kinetic energy and surface energy. This work examines an equation for the transport of interface surface area density, which can be written in terms of the gradient of the volume fraction. Furthermore this presentation will outline a numerical method for jointly transporting a conservative level set and surface area density. Finally, we will explore oppportunities for energy conservation via the accurate exchange of energy between the flow field and the interface through surface tension, with test cases to show the results of our extended ACLS method. Funding from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Ceramides modulate cell-surface acetylcholine receptor levels.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, C E; Pediconi, M F; Barrantes, F J

    2008-04-01

    The effects of ceramides (Cer) on the trafficking of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) to the plasma membrane were studied in CHO-K1/A5 cells, a clonal cell line that heterologously expresses the adult murine form of the receptor. When cells were incubated with short- (C6-Cer) or long- (brain-Cer) chain Cer at low concentrations, an increase in the number of cell-surface AChRs was observed concomitant with a decrease in intracellular receptor levels. The alteration in AChR distribution by low Cer treatment does not appear to be a general mechanism since the surface expression of the green fluorescent protein derivative of the vesicular stomatitis virus protein (VSVG-GFP) was not affected. High Cer concentrations caused the opposite effects, decreasing the number of cell-surface AChRs, which exhibited higher affinity for [125I]-alpha-bungarotoxin, and increasing the intracellular pool, which colocalized with trans-Golgi/TGN specific markers. The generation of endogenous Cer by sphingomyelinase treatment also decreased cell-surface AChR levels. These effects do not involve protein kinase C zeta or protein phosphatase 2A activation. Taken together, the results indicate that Cer modulate trafficking of AChRs to and stability at the cell surface.

  8. Surface ozone levels at Table Mountain during STOIC 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDermid, I. Stuart; Walsh, T. Daniel

    1995-01-01

    As a part of the routine operations of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory atmospheric measurements program at the Table Mountain Facility, the surface ozone concentration is continuously monitored using a Dasibi photometer. The influence of the Los Angeles basin to the southwest of the facility and the height of the inversion layer cause large fluctuations in the ozone concentration. Peaks as high as 200 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) were observed during the Stratospheric Ozone Intercomparison Campaign (STOIC) compared to a normal background level near 50 ppbv. These measurements, made during STOIC, were important in assessing the impact of the surface ozone concentration on the various instruments participating in the campaign.

  9. Design review report for the SY-101 RAPID mitigation system

    SciTech Connect

    SCHLOSSER, R.L.

    1999-05-24

    This report documents design reviews conducted of the SY-101 Respond And Pump In Days (RAPID) Mitigation System. As part of the SY-101 Surface-Level-Rise Remediation Project, the SY-101 WID Mitigation System will reduce the potential unacceptable consequences of crust growth in Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Projections of the crust growth rate indicate that the waste level in the tank may reach the juncture of the primary and secondary confinement structures of the tank late in 1999. Because of this time constraint, many design activities are being conducted in parallel and design reviews were conducted for system adequacy as well as design implementation throughout the process. Design implementation, as used in this design review report, is the final component selection (e.g., which circuit breaker, valve, or thermocouple) that meets the approved design requirements, system design, and design and procurement specifications. Design implementation includes the necessary analysis, testing, verification, and qualification to demonstrate compliance with the system design and design requirements. Design implementation is outside the scope of this design review. The design activities performed prior to detailed design implementation (i.e., system mission requirements, functional design requirements, technical criteria, system conceptual design, and where design and build contracts were placed, the procurement specification) have been reviewed and are within the scope of this design review report. Detailed design implementation will be controlled, reviewed, and where appropriate, approved in accordance with Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) engineering procedures. Review of detailed design implementation will continue until all components necessary to perform the transfer function are installed and tested.

  10. The effect of polarity and surface states on the Fermi level at III-nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P; Bryan, I; Bryan, Z; Guo, W; Hussey, L; Collazo, R; Sitar, Z

    2014-09-28

    Surface states and their influence on the Fermi level at the surface of GaN and AlN are studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of polarity on surface electronic properties was studied. Accurate modeling of the valence band edge and comparison with XPS data revealed the presence of donor surface states at 1.4 eV and acceptor states at energies > 2.7 eV from the valence band in GaN. Al polar AlN showed acceptor states at energies > 3.3 eV. Density of acceptor surface states was estimated to be between 10(13) and 10(14) eV(-1) cm(-2) in both GaN and AlN. The shift in charge neutrality levels and barrier heights due to polarity and the density of surface states on AlN and GaN were estimated from XPS measurements. Theoretical modeling and comparison with XPS data implied full compensation of spontaneous polarization charge by charged surface states. Barrier height measurements also reveal a dependence on polarity with phi(metal-polar)>phi(non-polar)>phi(nitrogen-polar) suggesting that the N-polar surface is the most suitable for Ohmic contacts. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  11. Context affects lightness at the level of surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Marianne; Wichmann, Felix A; Shapley, Robert

    2015-01-14

    Visual perception of object attributes such as surface lightness is crucial for successful interaction with the environment. How the visual system assigns lightness to image regions is not yet understood. It has been shown that the context in which a surface is embedded influences its perceived lightness, but whether that influence involves predominantly low-, mid-, or high-level visual mechanisms has not been resolved. To answer this question, we measured whether perceptual attributes of target image regions affected their perceived lightness when they were placed in different contexts. We varied the sharpness of the edge while keeping total target flux fixed. Targets with a sharp edge were consistent with the perceptual interpretation of a surface, and in that case, observers perceived significant brightening or darkening of the target. Targets with blurred edges rather appeared to be spotlights instead of surfaces; for targets with blurred edges, there was much less of a contextual effect on target lightness. The results indicate that the effect of context on the lightness of an image region is not fixed but is strongly affected by image manipulations that modify the perceptual attributes of the target, implying that a mid-level scene interpretation affects lightness perception.

  12. Trace-level mercury removal from surface water

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Bostick, D.T.

    1998-06-01

    Many sorbents have been developed for the removal of mercury and heavy metals from waters; however, most of the data published thus far do not address the removal of mercury to the target levels represented in this project. The application to which these sorbents are targeted for use is the removal of mercury from microgram-per-liter levels to low nanogram-per-liter levels. Sorbents with thiouronium, thiol, amine, sulfur, and proprietary functional groups were selected for these studies. Mercury was successfully removed from surface water via adsorption onto Ionac SR-4 and Mersorb resins to levels below the target goal of 12 ng/L in batch studies. A thiol-based resin performed the best, indicating that over 200,000 volumes of water could be treated with one volume of resin. The cost of the resin is approximately $0.24 per 1,000 gal of water.

  13. Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean

    PubMed Central

    Tamisiea, Mark E.; Hughes, Chris W.; Williams, Simon D. P.; Bingley, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records. Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level. Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates. Analysis of all of the data reveals the need for long-term and stable observation systems to assess accurately the regional changes as well as to improve our ability to estimate future changes in sea level. While information from many scientific disciplines is needed to understand sea-level change, this review focuses on contributions from geodesy and the role of the ocean's bounding surfaces: the sea surface and the Earth's crust. PMID:25157196

  14. Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

    PubMed

    Tamisiea, Mark E; Hughes, Chris W; Williams, Simon D P; Bingley, Richard M

    2014-09-28

    The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records. Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level. Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates. Analysis of all of the data reveals the need for long-term and stable observation systems to assess accurately the regional changes as well as to improve our ability to estimate future changes in sea level. While information from many scientific disciplines is needed to understand sea-level change, this review focuses on contributions from geodesy and the role of the ocean's bounding surfaces: the sea surface and the Earth's crust.

  15. Pacific Sea Level Rise Patterns and Global Surface Temperature Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Peyser, C.; Landerer, F. W.; Cole, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    During 1998-2012, climate change and sea level rise (SLR) exhibit two notable features: a slowdown of global surface warming (hiatus) and a rapid SLR in the tropical western Pacific. To quantify their relationship, we analyse the long-term control simulations of 38 climate models. We find a significant and robust correlation between the east-west contrast of dynamic sea level (DSL) in the Pacific and global mean surface temperature (GST) variability on both interannual and decadal time scales. Based on linear regression of the multi-model ensemble mean, the anomalously fast SLR in the western tropical Pacific observed during 1998-2012 indicates suppression of a potential global surface warming of 0.16o±0.06oC. In contrast, the Pacific contributed 0.29o±0.10oC to the significant interannual GST increase in 1997/98. The Pacific DSL anomalies observed in 2015 suggest that the strong El Niño in 2015/16 could lead to a 0.21o±0.07oC GST jump.

  16. Pacific sea level rise patterns and global surface temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyser, Cheryl E.; Yin, Jianjun; Landerer, Felix W.; Cole, Julia E.

    2016-08-01

    During 1998-2012, climate change and sea level rise (SLR) exhibit two notable features: a slowdown of global surface warming (hiatus) and a rapid SLR in the tropical western Pacific. To quantify their relationship, we analyze the long-term control simulations of 38 climate models. We find a significant and robust correlation between the east-west contrast of dynamic sea level (DSL) in the Pacific and global mean surface temperature (GST) variability on both interannual and decadal time scales. Based on linear regression of the multimodel ensemble mean, the anomalously fast SLR in the western tropical Pacific observed during 1998-2012 indicates suppression of a potential global surface warming of 0.16° ± 0.06°C. In contrast, the Pacific contributed 0.29° ± 0.10°C to the significant interannual GST increase in 1997/1998. The Pacific DSL anomalies observed in 2015 suggest that the strong El Niño in 2015/2016 could lead to a 0.21° ± 0.07°C GST jump.

  17. Surface ozone levels at Table Mountain during STOIC 1989

    SciTech Connect

    McDermid, I.S.; Walsh, T.D.

    1995-05-20

    As a part of the routine operations of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory atmospheric measurements program at the Table Mountain Facility, the surface ozone concentration is continuously monitored using a Dasibi photometer. The influence of the Los Angeles basin to the southwest of the facility and the height of the inversion layer cause large fluctuations in the ozone concentration. Peaks as high as 200 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) were observed during the Stratospheric Ozone Intercomparison Campaign (STOIC) compared to a normal background level near 50 ppbv. These measurements, made during STOIC, were important in assessing the impact of the surface ozone concentration on the various instruments participating in the campaign. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  18. The half-filled Landau level and topological insulator surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil, T.

    The metallic state of the half-filled Landau level - described originally in pioneering work by Halperin , Lee, and Read as a liquid of composite fermions - was proposed recently by Son to be described by a particle-hole symmetric effective field theory distinct from that in the prior literature. This talk will develop a simple picture of the particle-hole symmetric composite fermion through a modification of older pictures as electrically neutral ``dipolar'' particles. This picture, and the proposed particle-hole symmetric theory, will be further substantiated through a recently developed deep connection between the half-filled Landau level and correlated surface states of certain three dimensional topological insulators. The phenomenology of composite fermi liquids (with or without particle-hole symmetry) will be revisited. It will be shown that their heat/electrical transport dramatically violates the conventional Wiedemann-Franz law but satisfies a modified one. References: 1. Chong Wang and T. Senthil, ``Half-filled Landau Level, Topological Insulator Surfaces, and Three Dimensional Quantum Spin Liquids,'' cond-mat arXiv:1507.08290 (2015).

  19. Process for leveling film surfaces and products thereof

    DOEpatents

    Birkmire, R.W.; McCandless, B.E.

    1990-03-20

    Semiconductor films and photovoltaic devices prepared therefrom are provided wherein the semiconductor films have a specular surface with a texture less than about 0.25 micron greater than the average planar film surface and wherein the semiconductor films are surface modified by exposing the surface to an aqueous solution of bromine containing an acid or salt and continuing such exposure for a time sufficient to etch the surface. 8 figs.

  20. Process for levelling film surfaces and products thereof

    DOEpatents

    Birkmire, Robert W.; McCandless, Brian E.

    1990-03-20

    Semiconductor films and photovoltaic devices prepared therefrom are provided wherein the semiconductor films have a specular surface with a texture less than about 0.25 micron greater than the average planar film surface and wherein the semiconductor films are surface modified by exposing the surface to an aqueous solution of bromine containing an acid or salt and continuing such exposure for a time sufficient to etch the surface.

  1. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3

    SciTech Connect

    Berglin, B.G.

    1997-08-15

    This report will provide the findings of the demonstration test conducted on the Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 HMR Pump-3 in accordance with WHC-SDWM-TP-434 ``Test plan for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation/retrieval pump-3`` at the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building from 7 June 1996 through 30 July 1996 per work package 4A-96-92/W. The DST 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3 is a 200-HP submersible electric driven pump that has been modified for use in the DST 241-SY-101 containing mixed waste located in the 200W area. The pump has a motor driven rotation mechanism that allows the pump column to rotate through 355{degree}. Prior to operation, pre-operational checks were performed which included loop calibration grooming and alignment of instruments, learning how plumb HMR-3 assembly hung in a vertical position and bump test of the motor to determine rotation direction. The pump was tested in the MASF Large Diameter Cleaning Vessel (LDCV) with process water at controlled temperatures and levels. In addition, the water temperature of the cooling water to the motor oil heat exchanger was recorded during testing. A 480-volt source powered a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). The VFD powered the pump at various frequencies and voltages to control speed and power output of the pump. A second VFD powered the oil cooling pump. A third VFD was not available to operate the rotational drive motor during the 72 hour test, so it was demonstrated as operational before and after the test. A Mini Acquisition and Control System (Mini-DACS) controls pump functions and monitoring of the pump parameters. The Mini-DACS consists of three computers, software and some Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). Startup and shutdown of either the pump motor or the oil cooling pump can be accomplished by the Mini-DACS. When the pump was in operation, the Mini-DACS monitors automatically collects data electronically. However, some required data

  2. Underwater and surface strategies of 200 m world level swimmers.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Santiago; Roig, Andreu

    2016-01-01

    Pacing strategies of elite swimmers have been consistently characterised from the average lap velocities. In the present study, we examined the racing strategies of 200 m world class-level swimmers with regard to their underwater and surface lap components. The finals and semi-finals of the 200 m races at the 2013 World Swimming Championships (Barcelona, Spain) were analysed by an innovative image-processing system (InThePool® 2.0). Free swimming velocities of elite swimmers typically decreased throughout the 200 m race laps (-0.12 m · s(-1), 95% CI -0.11 to -0.14 m · s(-1), P = 0.001, η(2) = 0.81), whereas underwater velocities, which were faster than free swimming, were not meaningfully affected by the race progress (0.02 m · s(-1), -0.01 to 0.04 m · s(-1), P = 0.01, η(2) = 0.04). When swimming underwater, elite swimmers typically travelled less distance (-0.66 m, -0.83 to -0.49 m, P = 0.001, η(2) = 0.34) from the first to the third turn of the race, although underwater distances were maintained on the backstroke and butterfly races. These strategies allowed swimmers to maintain their average velocity in the last lap despite a decrease in the free swimming velocity. Elite coaches and swimmers are advised to model their racing strategies by considering both underwater and surface race components.

  3. Airborne Interferometry using GNSS Reflections for Surface Level Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmling, Maximilian; Beyerle, Georg; Schön, Steffen; Stosius, Ralf; Gerber, Thomas; Beckheinrich, Jamila; Markgraf, Markus; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The interferometric use of GNSS reflections for ocean altimetry can fill the gap in coverage of ocean observations. Today radar altimeters are used for large scale ocean observations to monitor e.g. global sea level change or circulation processes like El Niño. Spacial and temporal resolution of a single radar altimeter, however, is insufficient to observe mesoscale ocean phenomena like large oceanic eddies that are important indicators of climate change. The high coverage expected for a spaceborne altimeter based on GNSS reflections stimulated investigations on according interferometric methods. Several airborne experiments have been conducted using code observations. Carrier observations have a better precision but are severely affected by noise and have mostly been used in ground-based experiments. A new interferometric approach is presented using carrier observations for airborne application. Implementing a spectral retrieval noise reduction is achieved. A flight experiment was conducted with a Zeppelin airship on 2010/10/12 over Lake Constance at the border between Austria, Germany and Switzerland. The lake surface with an area of 536km2 is suitable for altimetric study as its decimeter range Geoid undulations are well-known. Three GNSS receiver were installed on the airship. A Javad Delta receiver recording direct signals for navigation. The DLR G-REX receiver recording reflected signals for scatterometry and the GORS (GNSS Occultation Reflectometry Scatterometry) receiver recording direct and reflected signals for interferometry. The airship's trajectory is determined from navigation data with a precision better than 10cm using regional augmentation. This presentation focuses on the interferometric analysis of GORS observations. Ray tracing calculations are used to model the difference of direct and reflected signals' path. Spectral retrieval is applied to determine Doppler residuals of modelled path difference and interferometric observations. Lake level

  4. Slurry growth, gas retention, and flammable gas generation by Hanford radioactive waste tanks: Synthetic waste studies, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Ryan, J.L.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

    1992-08-01

    Of 177 high-level waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site, 23 have been placed on a safety watch list because they are suspected of producing flammable gases in flammable or explosive concentrate. One tankin particular, Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY), has exhibited slow increases in waste volume followed by a rapid decrease accompanied by venting of large quantities of gases. The purpose of this study is to help determine the processes by which flammable gases are produced, retained, and eventually released from Tank 101-SY. Waste composition data for single- and double-shell waste tanks on the flammable gas watch listare critically reviewed. The results of laboratory studies using synthetic double-shell wastes are summarized, including physical and chemical properties of crusts that are formed, the stoichiometry and rate ofgas generation, and mechanisms responsible for formation of a floating crust.

  5. Assessment of alternative mitigation concepts for Hanford flammable gas tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Schienbein, L.A.; Hudson, J.D.; Eschbach, E.J.; Lessor, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    This report provides a review and assessment of four selected mitigation concepts: pump jet mixing, sonic vibration, dilution, and heating. Though the relative levels of development of these concepts are quite different, some definite conclusions are made on their comparative feasibility. Key findings of this report are as follows. A mixer pump has proven to be a safe and effective active mitigation method in Tank 241-SY-101, and the authors are confident that mixer pumps will effectively mitigate other tanks with comparable waste configurations and properties. Low-frequency sonic vibration is also predicted to be effective for mitigation. Existing data cannot prove that dilution can mitigate gas release event (GRE) behavior. However, dilution is the only concept of the four that potentially offers passive mitigation. Like dilution, heating the waste cannot be proven with available information to mitigate GRE behavior. The designs, analyses, and data from which these conclusions are derived are presented along with recommendations.

  6. A Molecular-Level Account of the Antigenic Hantaviral Surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sai; Rissanen, Ilona; Zeltina, Antra; Hepojoki, Jussi; Raghwani, Jayna; Harlos, Karl; Pybus, Oliver G.; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Bowden, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hantaviruses, a geographically diverse group of zoonotic pathogens, initiate cell infection through the concerted action of Gn and Gc viral surface glycoproteins. Here, we describe the high-resolution crystal structure of the antigenic ectodomain of Gn from Puumala hantavirus (PUUV), a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Fitting of PUUV Gn into an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of intact Gn-Gc spike complexes from the closely related but non-pathogenic Tula hantavirus localized Gn tetramers to the membrane-distal surface of the virion. The accuracy of the fitting was corroborated by epitope mapping and genetic analysis of available PUUV sequences. Interestingly, Gn exhibits greater non-synonymous sequence diversity than the less accessible Gc, supporting a role of the host humoral immune response in exerting selective pressure on the virus surface. The fold of PUUV Gn is likely to be widely conserved across hantaviruses. PMID:27117403

  7. The perception of surface layout during low level flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, John A.

    1991-01-01

    Although it is fairly well established that information about surface layout can be gained from motion cues, it is not so clear as to what information humans can use and what specific information they should be provided. Theoretical analyses tell us that the information is in the stimulus. It will take more experiments to verify that this information can be used by humans to extract surface layout from the 2D velocity flow field. The visual motion factors that can affect the pilot's ability to control an aircraft and to infer the layout of the terrain ahead are discussed.

  8. Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1995-09-08

    Flammable gases generated in radioactive liquids. Twenty-five high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks located underground at the Hanford Site are on a Flammable Gas Watch List because they contain waste which tends to retain the gases generated in it until rather large quantities are available for sudden release to the tank head space; if a tank is full it has little dome space, and a flammable concentration of gases could be produced--even if the tank is ventilated. If the waste has no tendency to retain gas generated in it then a continual flammable gas concentration in the tank dome space is established by the gas production rate and the tank ventilation rate (or breathing rate for unventilated tanks); this is also a potential problem for Flammable Gas Watch List tanks, and perhaps other Hanford tanks too. All Flammable Gas Watch List tanks will be fitted with Standard Hydorgen Monitoring Systems so that their behavior can be observed. In some cases, such as tank 241-SY-101, the data gathered from such observations will indicate that tank conditions need to be mitigated so that gas release events are either eliminated or rendered harmless. For example, a mixer pump was installed in tank 241-SY-101; operating the pump stirs the waste, replacing the large gas release events with small releases of gas that are kept below twenty-five percent of the lower flammability limit by the ventilation system. The concentration of hydrogen measured in Hanford waste tanks is greater than that of any other flammable gas. Hydrogen levels measured with a Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System in excess of 0.6 volume percent will cause Westinghouse Hanford Company to consider actions which will decrease the amount of flammable gas in the tank

  9. Contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument in Tank 241-AY-102

    SciTech Connect

    CONNER, J.M.

    1999-02-24

    High-heat producing sludge from tank 241-C-106 will be sluiced and transferred to tank 241-AY-102 beginning in October 1998. Safety analyses have postulated that after retrieval, the waste in 241-AY-102 may generate and retain unsafe levels of flammable gases (Noorani 1998, Pasamebmetoglu etal. 1997). Unsafe levels of retained gas are not expected, but cannot be ruled out because of the large uncertainty in the gas generation and retention rates. The Tank Waste Remediation System Basis for Interim Operation (Noorani 1998) identifies the need for a contingency plan to add void fraction monitoring to tank 241-AY-102 within 2 weeks of the identification of flammable gas buildup that would warrant monitoring. The Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Process Control Plan (Carothers et al. 1998) committed to providing a contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument (VFI) in tank 241-AY-102. The VFI determines the local void fraction of the waste by compressing a waste sample captured in a gas-tight test chamber. The sample chamber is mounted on the end of a 76-cm (2.5-ft) arm that can be rotated from vertical to horizontal when the instrument is deployed. Once in the waste, the arm can be positioned horizontally and rotated to sample in different areas below the riser. The VFI is deployed using a crane. The VFI has been deployed previously in 241-AW, 241-AN, and 241-SY tank farms, most recently in tank 241-SY-101 in June and July 1998. An additional test in tank 241-SY-101 is planned in September 1998. Operating instructions for the VFI are included in the Void Fraction Instrument Operation and Maintenance Manual (Pearce 1994).

  10. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Kazmerski, L.L.

    1995-08-22

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe. 8 figs.

  11. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L.

    1995-01-01

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe.

  12. Computer system design description for the spare pump mini-dacs data acquisition and control system

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, G.F. Jr.

    1994-09-29

    The attached document outlines the computer software design for the mini data acquisition and control system (DACS), that supports the testing of the spare pump for Tank 241-SY-101, at the maintenance and storage facility (MASF).

  13. System Design Description for the SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    2000-01-24

    This document describes the hardware and software of the computer subsystems for the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

  14. Effects of surface drag on upper-level frontogenesis within a developing baroclinic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Tan, Zhemin; Chu, Kekuan

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of surface drag on upper-level front with a three-dimensional nonhydrostatic mesoscale numerical model (MM5). To this end, a new and simple potential vorticity intrusion (PVI) index is proposed to quantitatively describe the extent and path that surface drag affects upper-level front. From a PV perspective, the formation of the upper-level front is illustrated as the tropopause folding happens from the stratosphere. The PVI index shows a good correlation with the minimum surface pressure, and tends to increase with the deepening of the surface cyclone and upper-level front. The surface drag acts to damp and delay the development of upper-level front, which could reduce the growth rate of the PVI index. However, the damping presents different effects in different development stages. It is the most significant during the rapid development stage of the surface cyclone. Compared with no surface drag cases, the tropopause is less inclined to intrude into the troposphere due to the surface drag. Positive feedback between the surface cyclone and upper-level front could accelerate the development of the frontal system.

  15. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration based on aerosol type classification and near-surface AOD over Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwanchul; Noh, Youngmin; Lee, Kwon H.

    2016-04-01

    Surface-level PM distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of aerosol type classification and near-surface AOD over Jeju, Korea. For this purpose, data from various instruments such as satellites, sunphotometer, and Micro-pulse Lidar (MPL) was used during March 2008 and October 2009. Initial analyses of comparison with sunphotometer AOD and PM concentration showed some relatively poor relationship over Jeju, Korea. Since the AERONET L2 data has significant number of observations with high AOT values paired to low surface-level PM values, which were believed to be the effect of long-rage transport aerosols like as Asian dust and biomass burning. Stronger correlations (exceeding R = 0.8) were obtained by screening long-rage transport aerosols and calculating near-surface AOT considering aerosol profiles data from MPL and HYSPLIT air mass trajectory. The relationship found between corrected satellite observed AOD and surface-level PM concentration over Jeju is very similar. An approach to reduce the discrepancy between satellite observed AOD and PM concentration is demonstrated by tuning thresholds used to detect aerosol type from sunphotometer inversion data. Finally, the satellite observed AOD-surface PM concentration correlation is significantly improved. Our study clearly demonstrates that satellite observed AOD is a good surrogate for monitoring PM air quality over Korea.

  16. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Adame, Maria Fernanda; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-02-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  17. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Fernanda Adame, Maria; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  18. Surface Landau levels and spin states in bismuth (111) ultrathin films

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongjian; Sun, Xia; Liu, Xiaogang; Wu, Xiaojun; Wang, Jufeng; Tian, Mingyang; Zhao, Aidi; Luo, Yi; Yang, Jinlong; Wang, Bing; Hou, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The development of next-generation electronics is much dependent on the discovery of materials with exceptional surface-state spin and valley properties. Because of that, bismuth has attracted a renewed interest in recent years. However, despite extensive studies, the intrinsic electronic transport properties of Bi surfaces are largely undetermined due to the strong interference from the bulk. Here we report the unambiguous determination of the surface-state Landau levels in Bi (111) ultrathin films using scanning tunnelling microscopy under magnetic fields perpendicular to the surface. The Landau levels of the electron-like and the hole-like carriers are accurately characterized and well described by the band structure of the Bi (111) surface from density functional theory calculations. Some specific surface spin states with a large g-factor are identified. Our findings shed light on the exploiting surface-state properties of Bi for their applications in spintronics and valleytronics. PMID:26964494

  19. Surface solar ultraviolet radiation for paleoatmospheric levels of oxygen and ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Many investigators have concluded that the level of solar ultraviolet radiation (200-300 nm) reaching the surface was a key parameter in the origin and evolution of life on earth. The level of solar ultraviolet radiation between 200 and 300 nm is controlled primarily by molecular absorption by ozone, whose presence is strongly coupled to the level of molecular oxygen. In this paper, a series of calculations is presented of the solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface for oxygen levels ranging from 0.0001 the present atmospheric level to the present level. The solar spectrum between 200 and 300 nm has been divided into 34 spectral intervals. For each spectral interval, the solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the earth's surface has been calculated by considering the attenuation of the incoming beam due to ozone and oxygen absorption. A one-dimensional photochemical model of the atmosphere was used for these calculations.

  20. Neuromuscular strategies for the transitions between level and hill surfaces during walking

    PubMed Central

    Gottschall, Jinger S.; Nichols, T. Richard

    2011-01-01

    Despite continual fluctuations in walking surface properties, humans and animals smoothly transition between terrains in their natural surroundings. Walking transitions have the potential to influence dynamic balance in both the anterior–posterior and medial–lateral directions, thereby increasing fall risk and decreasing mobility. The goal of the current manuscript is to provide a review of the literature that pertains to the topic of surface slope transitions between level and hill surfaces, as well as report the recent findings of two experiments that focus on the neuromuscular strategies of surface slope transitions. Our results indicate that in anticipation of a change in surface slope, neuromuscular patterns during level walking prior to a hill are significantly different from the patterns during level walking without the future change in surface. Typically, the changes in muscle activity were due to co-contraction of opposing muscle groups and these changes correspond to modifications in head pitch. In addition, further experiments revealed that the neck proprioceptors may be an initial source of feedback for upcoming surface slope transitions. Together, these results illustrate that in order to safely traverse varying surfaces, transitions strides are functionally distinct from either level walking or hill walking independently. PMID:21502127

  1. Chemical and reconstruction-induced surface core-level shifts: H on low-index W surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Riffe, D.M.; Wertheim, G.K.; Citrin, P.H. )

    1990-07-09

    The H-induced shift of the surface-atom core-level binding energy in W(110) is shown to arise from two distinct effects, one chemical in nature and the other structural. The structural shift supports a recently proposed (1{ital p}{times}1) reconstruction that turns on at {similar to}0.5 monolayer coverage. These new findings are used to provide a self-consistent interpretation of previously reported shifts from H-covered W(111) and W(100) surfaces.

  2. Direct Measurement of Core-Level Relaxation Dynamics on a Surface-Adsorbate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miaja-Avila, L.; Saathoff, G.; Mathias, S.; Yin, J.; La-O-Vorakiat, C.; Bauer, M.; Aeschlimann, M.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.

    2008-07-01

    The coupling between electronic states in a surface-adsorbate system is fundamental to the understanding of many surface interactions. In this Letter, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the lifetime of core-excited states of an atom adsorbed onto a surface. By comparing laser-assisted photoemission from a substrate with a delayed Auger decay process from an adsorbate, we measure the lifetime of the 4d-1 core level of xenon on Pt(111) to be 7.1±1.1fs. This result opens up time-domain measurements of surface dynamics where energy-resolved measurements may provide incomplete information.

  3. Fermi-level pinning and intrinsic surface states in cleaved GaP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaradia, P.; Fanfoni, M.; Nataletti, P.; de Padova, P.; Brillson, L. J.; Slade, M. L.; Viturro, R. E.; Kilday, D.; Margaritondo, G.

    1989-03-01

    We have performed photoelectron spectroscopy of the clean GaP(110) surface, obtained by cleaving n-type specimens. The results show that Fermi-level stabilization occurs in a wide range of positions. In some cases nearly flat bands were obtained. The surface Fermi-level position in n-type GaP(110) is then due to extrinsic surface states, probably cleavage defects, as in the case of p-type samples. The density of these extrinsic states depends upon the quality of the cleave. Previously the Fermi-level pinning in n-type GaP(110) surfaces instead was attributed to (empty) intrinsic surface states located at 1.6+/-0.1 eV above the valence band. GaP(110) was considered an exception among III-V compounds, since in general atomic relaxation removes intrinsic surface states from the fundamental gap. The present results set a lower bound for the energetic position of the empty surface states slightly below the bottom of the conduction band. Therefore GaP(110) exhibits a gap practically free from intrinsic surface states, like the other III-V compounds so far investigated. We have also performed a spectroscopic study of the empty (intrinsic) surface states on the same surface by measuring the absorption edge of the P 2p core level. The result shows that the wave functions of the empty dangling-bond states, mainly cationic in origin, have a sizable localization on the anion site as well.

  4. Analysis of sea level and sea surface temperature changes in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betul Avsar, Nevin; Jin, Shuanggen; Kutoglu, Hakan; Erol, Bihter

    2016-07-01

    The Black Sea is a nearly closed sea with limited interaction with the Mediterranean Sea through the Turkish Straits. Measurement of sea level change will provide constraints on the water mass balance and thermal expansion of seawaters in response to climate change. In this paper, sea level changes in the Black Sea are investigated between January 1993 and December 2014 using multi-mission satellite altimetry data and sea surface temperature (SST) data. Here, the daily Maps of Sea Level Anomaly (MSLA) gridded with a 1/8°x1/8° spatial resolution from AVISO and the NOAA 1/4° daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature (OISST) Anomaly data set are used. The annual cycles of sea level and sea surface temperature changes reach the maximum values in November and January, respectively. The trend is 3.16±0.77 mm/yr for sea level change and -0.06±0.01°C/yr for sea surface temperature during the same 22-year period. The observed sea level rise is highly correlated with sea surface warming for the same time periods. In addition, the geographical distribution of the rates of the Black Sea level and SST changes between January 1993 and December 2014 are further analyzed, showing a good agreement in the eastern Black Sea. The rates of sea level rise and sea surface warming are larger in the eastern part than in the western part except in the northwestern Black Sea. Finally, the temporal correlation between sea level and SST time series are presented based on the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis.

  5. Prediction of the mid-tracheal level using surface anatomical landmarks in adults

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Young-Eun; Kim, Eun-Hee; Song, In-Kyung; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Ryu, Ho-Geoul; Kim, Hee-Soo; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Endotracheal tube (ETT) should be placed at the optimal level to avoid single lung ventilation or accidental extubation. This study was performed to estimate the mid-tracheal level by using surface anatomical landmarks in adult patients. Neck computed tomography images of 329 adult patients between the ages of 16 and 79 years were reviewed. In the midline sagittal plane, the levels corresponding to the vocal cords, cricoid cartilage, suprasternal notch, manubriosternal junction, and carina were identified. The surface distances from the cricoid cartilage to the suprasternal notch (extCC-SSN) and that from the suprasternal notch to the manubriosternal junction (extSSN-MSJ) were measured. The relationship between mid-tracheal level and the surface distances was analyzed using Bland–Altman plot. The difference between the extCC-SSN and the mid-tracheal level was −6.6 (12.5) mm, and the difference between the extSSN-MSJ and the mid-tracheal level was −19.2 (6.1) mm. The difference between the extCC-SSN and the mid-tracheal level was smaller in females compared with males [−1.7 (11.7) mm vs −12.8 (10.7) mm; P < 0.001]. The mid-tracheal level, which is helpful in planning the insertion depth of an ETT, can be predicted by the surface distance between the cricoid cartilage and suprasternal notch in adults, especially in females. PMID:28328810

  6. Designing microelectromechanical systems-on-a-chip in a 5-level surface micromachine technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, M.S.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1998-05-01

    A new 5-level polysilicon surface micromachine process has been developed that offers significantly increased system complexity, while further promoting the manufacturability and reliability of microscopic mechanical systems. In general, as complexity increases, reliability suffers. This is not necessarily the case, however, with MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). In fact, utilizing additional levels of polysilicon in structures can greatly increase yield, reliability, and robustness. Surface micromachine devices are built thousands at a time using the infrastructure developed to support the incredibly reliable microelectronics industry, and the batch fabrication process utilized in the 5-level technology further increases reliability and reduces cost by totally eliminating post assembly.

  7. Fermi-level pinning and intrinsic surface states of Al1 -xInxN (10 1 ¯ 0 ) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portz, V.; Schnedler, M.; Lymperakis, L.; Neugebauer, J.; Eisele, H.; Carlin, J.-F.; Butté, R.; Grandjean, N.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.

    2017-01-01

    The electronic structure of Al1 -xInxN (10 1 ¯ 0 ) surfaces is investigated by cross-sectional scanning tunneling spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The surface exhibits empty Al and/or In-derived dangling bond states, which are calculated to be within the fundamental bulk band gap for In compositions smaller than 60%. The energy of the lowest empty In-derived surface state is extracted from the tunnel spectra for lattice-matched Al1-xInxN with In compositions of x = 0.19 and x = 0.20 to be EC - 1.82 ± 0.41 and EC - 1.80 ± 0.56 eV, respectively, in good agreement with the calculated energies. Under growth conditions, the Fermi level is hence pinned (unpinned) for In compositions smaller (larger) than 60%. The analysis of the tunnel spectra suggests an electron affinity of ˜3.5 eV for nonpolar lattice-matched Al1-xInxN cleavage surfaces, which is large compared to linearly interpolated values of polar AlN and InN (0001) surfaces.

  8. Multi-level polysilicon surface-micromachining technology: Applications and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.

    1996-08-01

    Polysilicon surface micromachining is a technology for manufacturing Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) which has, as its basis, the manufacturing methods and tool sets used to manufacture the integrated electronic circuit. This paper describes a three-level mechanical-polysilicon surface-micromachining technology and includes a discussion of the advantages of this level of process complexity along with issues which affect device fabrication and performance. Historically, the primary obstacles to multi-level polysilicon fabrication were related to the severe wafer topography generated by the repetition of film depositions and etching. The introduction of Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP) to surface micromachining has largely removed these issues and opened significant avenues for device complexity. Several examples of three-level devices with the benefits of CMP are presented. Of primary hindrance to the widespread use of polysilicon surface micromachining, and in particular microactuation mechanisms, are issues related to the device surfaces. The closing discussion examines the potential of several latter and post-fabrication processes to circumvent or to directly alleviate the surface problems.

  9. Hanford Tank Safety Project: Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting, February 7--8, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1991-06-01

    The Tank Waste Science Panel met February 7--8, 1991, to review the latest data from the analyses of the October 24, 1990, gas release from Tank 241-SY-101 (101-SY) at Hanford; discuss the results of work being performed in support of the Hanford Tank Safety Project; and be briefed on the ferrocyanide issues included in the expanded scope of the Science Panel. The shapes of the gas release curves from the past three events are similar and correlate well with changes in waste level, but the correlation between the released volume of gas and the waste height is not as good. An analysis of the kinetics of gas generation from waste height measurements in Tank 101-SY suggests that the reaction giving rise to the gases in the tank is independent of the gas pressure and independent of the physical processes that give rise to the episodic release of the gases. Tank waste height data were also used to suggest that a floating crust formed early in the history of the tank and that the current crust is being made thicker in the eastern sector of the tank by repeated upheaval of waste slurry onto the surface. The correlation between the N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} generated in the October release appears to be 1:1, suggesting a single mechanistic pathway. Analysis of other gas generation ratios, however, suggests that H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O are evolved together, whereas N{sub 2} is from the air. If similar ratios are observed in planned radiolysis experiments are Argonne National Laboratory, radiolysis would appear to be generating most of the gases in Tank 101-SY. Data from analysis of synthetic waste crust using a dynamic x-ray diffractometer suggest that, in air, organics are being oxidized and liberating CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Experiments at Savannah River Laboratory indicate that irradiation of solutions containing NO{sub 3} and organics can produce N{sub 2}O.

  10. Hanford Tank Safety Project: Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting, February 7--8, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1991-06-01

    The Tank Waste Science Panel met February 7--8, 1991, to review the latest data from the analyses of the October 24, 1990, gas release from Tank 241-SY-101 (101-SY) at Hanford; discuss the results of work being performed in support of the Hanford Tank Safety Project; and be briefed on the ferrocyanide issues included in the expanded scope of the Science Panel. The shapes of the gas release curves from the past three events are similar and correlate well with changes in waste level, but the correlation between the released volume of gas and the waste height is not as good. An analysis of the kinetics of gas generation from waste height measurements in Tank 101-SY suggests that the reaction giving rise to the gases in the tank is independent of the gas pressure and independent of the physical processes that give rise to the episodic release of the gases. Tank waste height data were also used to suggest that a floating crust formed early in the history of the tank and that the current crust is being made thicker in the eastern sector of the tank by repeated upheaval of waste slurry onto the surface. The correlation between the N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} generated in the October release appears to be 1:1, suggesting a single mechanistic pathway. Analysis of other gas generation ratios, however, suggests that H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O are evolved together, whereas N{sub 2} is from the air. If similar ratios are observed in planned radiolysis experiments are Argonne National Laboratory, radiolysis would appear to be generating most of the gases in Tank 101-SY. Data from analysis of synthetic waste crust using a dynamic x-ray diffractometer suggest that, in air, organics are being oxidized and liberating CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Experiments at Savannah River Laboratory indicate that irradiation of solutions containing NO{sub 3} and organics can produce N{sub 2}O.

  11. Manufacturing microsystems-on-a-chip with 5-level surface micromachining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.; Rodgers, M.S.

    1998-05-01

    An agile microsystem manufacturing technology has been developed that provides unprecedented 5 levels of independent polysilicon surface-micromachine films for the designer. Typical surface-micromachining processes offer a maximum of 3 levels, making this the most complex surface-micromachining process technology developed to date. Leveraged from the extensive infrastructure present in the microelectronics industry, the manufacturing method of polysilicon surface-micromachining offers similar advantages of high-volume, high-reliability, and batch-fabrication to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) as has been accomplished with integrated circuits (ICs). These systems, comprised of microscopic-sized mechanical elements, are laying the foundation for a rapidly expanding, multi-billion dollar industry 2 which impacts the automotive, consumer product, and medical industries to name only a few.

  12. The molecular potential energy surface and vibrational energy levels of methyl fluoride. Part II.

    PubMed

    Manson, Steven A; Law, Mark M; Atkinson, Ian A; Thomson, Grant A

    2006-06-28

    New analytical bending and stretching, ground electronic state, potential energy surfaces for CH(3)F are reported. The surfaces are expressed in bond-length, bond-angle internal coordinates. The four-dimensional stretching surface is an accurate, least squares fit to over 2000 symmetrically unique ab initio points calculated at the CCSD(T) level. Similarly, the five-dimensional bending surface is a fit to over 1200 symmetrically unique ab initio points. This is an important first stage towards a full nine-dimensional potential energy surface for the prototype CH(3)F molecule. Using these surfaces, highly excited stretching and (separately) bending vibrational energy levels of CH(3)F are calculated variationally using a finite basis representation method. The method uses the exact vibrational kinetic energy operator derived for XY(3)Z systems by Manson and Law (preceding paper, Part I, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2006, 8, DOI: 10.1039/b603106d). We use the full C(3v) symmetry and the computer codes are designed to use an arbitrary potential energy function. Ultimately, these results will be used to design a compact basis for fully coupled stretch-bend calculations of the vibrational energy levels of the CH(3)F system.

  13. Identification of underlayer components in the surface core-level spectra of W(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Kevin G.; Jupille, Jacques; Derby, Glyn P.; King, David A.

    1987-07-01

    Core-level photoemission spectra from a W(111) surface using synchrotron radiation are presented. These core-level spectra are shown to be composed of four components with the same peak shape: one from bulk atoms and three from different crystallographic sites in the selvedge. The selvedge peaks comprise a peak from the topmost surface atoms (shifted by -0.45+/-0.01 eV) and two different underlayer sites (shifted by -0.30+/-0.02 eV and -0.11+/-0.02 eV from the bulk peak). This contrasts with a previous model, proposed by Wertheim, Citrin and Van der Veen, which used only two surface components: a broadened surface atom peak and one underlayer peak. The data presented can be fitted with three peaks, yielding good agreement with the peak energies obtained by these authors; however, we show that the four-peak model gives a better fit to the experimental spectra. The use of two underlayer peaks is in good agreement both with intuitive arguments based on the coordination number of atoms in the selvedge and with two previous theoretical calculations of the surface core-level shift. The values determined from the fitting parameters for the core-level line shape are also in good agreement with values calculated by other workers.

  14. Identification of underlayer components in the surface core-level spectra of W(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, K.G.; Jupille, J.; Derby, G.P.; King, D.A.

    1987-07-15

    Core-level photoemission spectra from a W(111) surface using synchrotron radiation are presented. These core-level spectra are shown to be composed of four components with the same peak shape: one from bulk atoms and three from different crystallographic sites in the selvedge. The selvedge peaks comprise a peak from the topmost surface atoms (shifted by -0.45 +- 0.01 eV) and two different underlayer sites (shifted by -0.30 +- 0.02 eV and -0.11 +- 0.02 eV from the bulk peak). This contrasts with a previous model, proposed by Wertheim, Citrin and Van der Veen, which used only two surface components: a broadened surface atom peak and one underlayer peak. The data presented can be fitted with three peaks, yielding good agreement with the peak energies obtained by these authors; however, we show that the four-peak model gives a better fit to the experimental spectra. The use of two underlayer peaks is in good agreement both with intuitive arguments based on the coordination number of atoms in the selvedge and with two previous theoretical calculations of the surface core-level shift. The values determined from the fitting parameters for the core-level line shape are also in good agreement with values calculated by other workers.

  15. Microelectro-optical devices in a 5-level polysilicon surface micromachining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Rodgers, M.S.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Miller, S.L.; Hetherington, D.; McWhorter, P.J.; Warren, M.E.

    1998-08-01

    The authors recently reported on the development of a 5-level polysilicon surface micromachine fabrication process consisting of four levels of mechanical poly plus an electrical interconnect layer and its application to complex mechanical systems. This paper describes the application of this technology to create micro-optical systems-on-a-chip. These are demonstration systems, which show that five levels of polysilicon provide greater performance, reliability, and significantly increased functionality. This new technology makes it possible to realize levels of system complexity that have so far only existed on paper, while simultaneously adding to the robustness of many of the individual subassemblies.

  16. 5-level polysilicon surface micromachine technology: Application to complex mechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, M.S.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1998-06-01

    The authors recently reported on the development of a 5-level poly-ilicon surface micromachine fabrication process consisting of four levels of mechanical poly plus an electrical interconnect layer. They are now reporting on the first components designed for and fabricated in this process. These are demonstration systems, which definitively show that five levels of polysilicon provide greater performance, reliability, and significantly increased functionality. This new technology makes it possible to realize levels of system complexity that have so far only existed on paper, while simultaneously adding to the robustness of many of the individual subassemblies.

  17. Development, Characterization, and Optimization of Protein Level in Date Bars Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Salim-ur-Rehman; Muhammad Anjum, Faqir; Murtaza, Mian Anjum; Mueen-ud-Din, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    This project was designed to produce a nourishing date bar with commercial value especially for school going children to meet their body development requirements. Protein level of date bars was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Economical and underutilized sources, that is, whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates, were explored for protein supplementation. Fourteen date bar treatments were produced using a central composite design (CCD) with 2 variables and 3 levels for each variable. Date bars were then analyzed for nutritional profile. Proximate composition revealed that addition of whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates improved the nutritional profile of date bars. Protein level, texture, and taste were considerably improved by incorporating 6.05% whey protein concentrate and 4.35% vetch protein isolates in date bar without affecting any sensory characteristics during storage. Response surface methodology was observed as an economical and effective tool to optimize the ingredient level and to discriminate the interactive effects of independent variables. PMID:22792044

  18. Development, characterization, and optimization of protein level in date bars using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Salim-ur-Rehman; Muhammad Anjum, Faqir; Murtaza, Mian Anjum; Mueen-ud-Din, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    This project was designed to produce a nourishing date bar with commercial value especially for school going children to meet their body development requirements. Protein level of date bars was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Economical and underutilized sources, that is, whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates, were explored for protein supplementation. Fourteen date bar treatments were produced using a central composite design (CCD) with 2 variables and 3 levels for each variable. Date bars were then analyzed for nutritional profile. Proximate composition revealed that addition of whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates improved the nutritional profile of date bars. Protein level, texture, and taste were considerably improved by incorporating 6.05% whey protein concentrate and 4.35% vetch protein isolates in date bar without affecting any sensory characteristics during storage. Response surface methodology was observed as an economical and effective tool to optimize the ingredient level and to discriminate the interactive effects of independent variables.

  19. Dust emissions created by low-level rotary-winged aircraft flight over desert surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, J. A.; Etyemezian, V.; Kuhns, H.; McAlpine, J. D.; King, J.; Uppapalli, S.; Nikolich, G.; Engelbrecht, J.

    2010-03-01

    There is a dearth of information on dust emissions from sources that are unique to U.S. Department of Defense testing and training activities. Dust emissions of PM 10 and PM 2.5 from low-level rotary-winged aircraft travelling (rotor-blade ≈7 m above ground level) over two types of desert surfaces (i.e., relatively undisturbed desert pavement and disturbed desert soil surface) were characterized at the Yuma Proving Ground (Yuma, AZ) in May 2007. Fugitive emissions are created by the shear stress of the outflow of high speed air created by the rotor-blade. The strength of the emissions was observed to scale primarily as a function of forward travel speed of the aircraft. Speed affects dust emissions in two ways: 1) as speed increases, peak shear stress at the soil surface was observed to decline proportionally, and 2) as the helicopter's forward speed increases its residence time over any location on the surface diminishes, so the time the downward rotor-generated flow is acting upon that surface must also decrease. The state of the surface over which the travel occurs also affects the scale of the emissions. The disturbed desert test surface produced approximately an order of magnitude greater emission than the undisturbed surface. Based on the measured emission rates for the test aircraft and the established scaling relationships, a rotary-winged aircraft similar to the test aircraft traveling 30 km h -1 over the disturbed surface would need to travel 4 km to produce emissions equivalent to one kilometer of travel by a light wheeled military vehicle also traveling at 30 km h -1 on an unpaved road. As rotary-winged aircraft activity is substantially less than that of off-road vehicle military testing and training activities it is likely that this source is small compared to emissions created by ground-based vehicle movements.

  20. Low-Cost Dielectric Reflective Surface for Low-Level Backscattered Diffuse Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Nuaimi, Mustafa K. Taher; Hong, Wei; Gao, Xiqi

    2017-02-01

    This article presents the design of non-subwavelength, non-resonant, and non-absorptive dielectric surface that creates a low-level backward diffuse reflections under illumination of a far-field plane wave at millimeter wave regime. Thus, radar cross section reduction of a solid metallic object can be achieved. The dielectric surface is consist of unit cells of only two different electric permittivity ( ɛ r1 = 6.14 and ɛ r2 = 3.49) distributed across the surface aperture to achieve low-level backscattered diffuse reflections. The unit cells used are having non-subwavelength size (0.53λ80GHz) which ensures an easier fabrication of the presented surface using low cost simple PCB technology, in particular at high frequencies. RCS reduction of more than 10 dBsm is achieved from 70 to 87 GHz (BW ≈ 21.65 %) using the presented dielectric surface of optimized permittivity distribution. The RCS reduction capabilities of the presented surface are studied theoretically under both normal and oblique incidences and then fabricated and verified experimentally by reflectivity measurements.

  1. Visually assessing the level of development and soil surface stability of cyanobacterially dominated biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Witwicki, D.L.; Miller, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are an integral part of dryland ecosystems and often included in long-term ecological monitoring programs. Estimating moss and lichen cover is fairly easy and non-destructive, but documenting cyanobacterial level of development (LOD) is more difficult. It requires sample collection for laboratory analysis, which causes soil surface disturbance. Assessing soil surface stability also requires surface disturbance. Here we present a visual technique to assess cyanobacterial LOD and soil surface stability. We define six development levels of cyanobacterially dominated soils based on soil surface darkness. We sampled chlorophyll a concentrations (the most common way of assessing cyanobacterial biomass), exopolysaccharide concentrations, and soil surface aggregate stability from representative areas of each LOD class. We found that, in the laboratory and field, LOD classes were effective at predicting chlorophyll a soil concentrations (R2=68-81%), exopolysaccharide concentrations (R2=71%), and soil aggregate stability (R2=77%). We took representative photos of these classes to construct a field guide. We then tested the ability of field crews to distinguish these classes and found this technique was highly repeatable among observers. We also discuss how to adjust this index for the different types of BSCs found in various dryland regions.

  2. Assessment of heavy metal levels in surface sediments of estuaries and adjacent coastal areas in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianbin; Li, Deliang; Song, Guisheng

    2016-05-01

    This article investigates the variations of contamination levels of heavy metals such as copper, lead, chromium, cadmium, zinc, arsenic, and mercury over time in surface sediments of the Changjiang River Estuary (CRE), Yellow River Estuary (YRE), Pearl River Estuary (PRE), and their adjacent coastal areas in China. The contamination factor (CF), pollution load index (PLI), and geoaccumulation index (I geo) are used to evaluate the quality of the surface sediments in the study areas. The results showed that the CRE, YRE, and their adjacent coastal areas were at a low risk of contamination in terms of heavy metals, while the PRE and its adjacent coastal area were at a moderate level. By comparison, the concentrations of heavy metals in the surface sediments of the YRE and its adjacent coastal area were relatively lower than those in the CRE, PRE, and their adjacent coastal areas.

  3. Assessment of heavy metal levels in surface sediments of estuaries and adjacent coastal areas in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianbin; Li, Deliang; Song, Guisheng

    2017-03-01

    This article investigates the variations of contamination levels of heavy metals such as copper, lead, chromium, cadmium, zinc, arsenic, and mercury over time in surface sediments of the Changjiang River Estuary (CRE), Yellow River Estuary (YRE), Pearl River Estuary (PRE), and their adjacent coastal areas in China. The contamination factor (CF), pollution load index (PLI), and geoaccumulation index ( I geo) are used to evaluate the quality of the surface sediments in the study areas. The results showed that the CRE, YRE, and their adjacent coastal areas were at a low risk of contamination in terms of heavy metals, while the PRE and its adjacent coastal area were at a moderate level. By comparison, the concentrations of heavy metals in the surface sediments of the YRE and its adjacent coastal area were relatively lower than those in the CRE, PRE, and their adjacent coastal areas.

  4. Spatially-varying surface roughness and ground-level air quality in an operational dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Barnes, M J; Brade, T K; MacKenzie, A R; Whyatt, J D; Carruthers, D J; Stocker, J; Cai, X; Hewitt, C N

    2014-02-01

    Urban form controls the overall aerodynamic roughness of a city, and hence plays a significant role in how air flow interacts with the urban landscape. This paper reports improved model performance resulting from the introduction of variable surface roughness in the operational air-quality model ADMS-Urban (v3.1). We then assess to what extent pollutant concentrations can be reduced solely through local reductions in roughness. The model results suggest that reducing surface roughness in a city centre can increase ground-level pollutant concentrations, both locally in the area of reduced roughness and downwind of that area. The unexpected simulation of increased ground-level pollutant concentrations implies that this type of modelling should be used with caution for urban planning and design studies looking at ventilation of pollution. We expect the results from this study to be relevant for all atmospheric dispersion models with urban-surface parameterisations based on roughness.

  5. A new method for the determination of particulate contamination levels for surface cleanliness of fluid systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Levels of contamination in fluid systems can be determined by a definition of a particle by a mathematical model, a method for calculating the tolerance limits of contamination, and an estimation of the probability that the contamination on the surface will migrate with the fluid in the system.

  6. A new method for the determination of particulate contamination levels for surface cleanliness of fluid systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Levels of contamination in fluid systems can be determined by a definition of a particle by a mathematical model, a method for calculating the tolerance limits of contamination, and an estimation of the probability that the contamination on the surface will migrate with the fluid in the system.

  7. Direct measurement of core-level relaxation dynamics on a surface- adsorbate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jing; Miaja-Avila, Luis; Saathoff, Guido; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Mathias, Stefan; Aeschlimann, Martin; Bauer, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Electronic coupling between an adsorbate and the surface on which it resides is fundamental to the understanding of many surface interactions. However, the interaction of highly-excited adsorbate states is an area that has been explored only indirectly to-date. In this work, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the lifetime of core-excited states of an atom adsorbed onto a surface. By implementing laser-assisted Auger decay on an adsorbate/surface system, we directly measure the lifetime of the 4d-1 core level of Xenon on Pt(111) to be 7.1 ± 1.1 fs. This result opens up time domain measurements of highly-excited state dynamics in materials systems where, because of complex interactions, energy-resolved measurements provide incomplete information.

  8. Direct measurement of core-level relaxation dynamics on a surface- adsorbate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jing; Miaja-Avila, Luis; Saathoff, Guido; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Mathias, Stefan; Aeschlimann, Martin; Bauer, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Electronic coupling between an adsorbate and the surface on which it resides is fundamental to the understanding of many surface interactions. However, the interaction of highly-excited adsorbate states is an area that has been explored only indirectly to-date. In this work, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the lifetime of core-excited states of an atom adsorbed onto a surface. By implementing laser-assisted Auger decay on an adsorbate/surface system, we directly measure the lifetime of the 4d-1 core level of Xenon on Pt(111) to be 7.1 ± 1.1 fs. This result opens up time domain measurements of highly-excited state dynamics in materials systems where, because of complex interactions, energy-resolved measurements provide incomplete information.

  9. Relationships between Atomic Level Surface Structure and Stability/Activity of Platinum Surface Atoms in Aqueous Environments

    DOE PAGES

    Lopes, Pietro P.; Strmcnik, Dusan; Tripkovic, Dusan; ...

    2016-03-07

    The development of alternative energy systems for clean production, storage and conversion of energy is strongly dependent on our ability to understand, at atomic-molecular-levels, functional links between activity and stability of electrochemical interfaces. Whereas structure-activity relationships are rapidly evolving, the corresponding structure-stability relationships are still missing. Primarily, this is because there is no adequate experimental approach capable of monitoring in situ stability of well-defined single crystals. Here, by blending the power of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) connected to a stationary probe to measure in situ and real time dissolution rates of surface atoms (at above 0.4 pg cm-2s-1 levels)more » and a rotating disk electrode method for monitoring simultaneously the kinetic rates of electrochemical reactions in a single unite, it was possible to establish almost “atom-by-atom” the structure-stability-activity relationships for platinum single crystals in both acidic and alkaline environments. Furthermore, we found that the degree of stability is strongly dependent on the coordination of surface atoms (less coordinated yields less stable), the nature of covalent (adsorption of hydroxyl, oxygen atoms and halides species), and non-covalent interactions (interactions between hydrated Li cations and surface oxide), the thermodynamic driving force for Pt complexation (Pt ion speciation in solution) and the nature of the electrochemical reaction (the oxygen reduction/evolution and CO oxidation reactions). Consequently, these findings are opening new opportunities for elucidating key fundamental descriptors that govern both activity and stability trends, that ultimately, will assist to develop real energy conversion and storage systems.« less

  10. Relationships between Atomic Level Surface Structure and Stability/Activity of Platinum Surface Atoms in Aqueous Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Pietro P.; Strmcnik, Dusan; Tripkovic, Dusan; Connell, Justin G.; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2016-03-07

    The development of alternative energy systems for clean production, storage and conversion of energy is strongly dependent on our ability to understand, at atomic-molecular-levels, functional links between activity and stability of electrochemical interfaces. Whereas structure-activity relationships are rapidly evolving, the corresponding structure-stability relationships are still missing. Primarily, this is because there is no adequate experimental approach capable of monitoring in situ stability of well-defined single crystals. Here, by blending the power of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) connected to a stationary probe to measure in situ and real time dissolution rates of surface atoms (at above 0.4 pg cm-2s-1 levels) and a rotating disk electrode method for monitoring simultaneously the kinetic rates of electrochemical reactions in a single unite, it was possible to establish almost “atom-by-atom” the structure-stability-activity relationships for platinum single crystals in both acidic and alkaline environments. Furthermore, we found that the degree of stability is strongly dependent on the coordination of surface atoms (less coordinated yields less stable), the nature of covalent (adsorption of hydroxyl, oxygen atoms and halides species), and non-covalent interactions (interactions between hydrated Li cations and surface oxide), the thermodynamic driving force for Pt complexation (Pt ion speciation in solution) and the nature of the electrochemical reaction (the oxygen reduction/evolution and CO oxidation reactions). Consequently, these findings are opening new opportunities for elucidating key fundamental descriptors that govern both activity and stability trends, that ultimately, will assist to develop real energy conversion and storage systems.

  11. Severity of MIH findings at tooth surface level among German school children.

    PubMed

    Petrou, M A; Giraki, M; Bissar, A-R; Wempe, C; Schäfer, M; Schiffner, U; Beikler, T; Schulte, A G; Splieth, C H

    2015-06-01

    This study was to investigate the distribution and clinical characteristics of teeth diagnosed with MIH at surface and defect type level in a cohort of German children. The study cohort included 242 children diagnosed with MIH which had been recorded during the compulsory dental school examinations of 20 German primary schools. The subjects had been enrolled by cluster sampling. All children attended the second to fourth grade (age 7-10 years, mean 8.1 ± 0.8). The children were examined by five calibrated examiners (kappa = 0.9) after tooth brushing. The recording comprised teeth, surfaces, type and severity of MIH defects and was conducted using a portable light, mirrors and cotton rolls. MIH was registered according to the EAPD criteria. Defects <1 mm were not recorded. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and Spearman's correlation. Most affected teeth were first permanent molars (71.4 %) followed by the maxillary central incisors (15.6 %). The most common defects were demarcated opacities (82.2 %), while the remaining 17.8 % of the affected teeth exhibited severe enamel defects. The most frequently affected surface in molars was the occlusal surface (72.4 %); in incisors, it was the buccal surface (73.5 %). There were no atypical restorations in the affected incisors. Different types of MIH defects at various surfaces of the same tooth were common. The number of affected tooth surfaces was positively correlated with the severity of MIH at child (p < 0.001). The study demonstrates severe enamel defects involving in almost one-fifth of all MIH teeth. The knowledge of the intra-oral distribution and severity of MIH findings at the enamel surface level is important for assessing the treatment needs.

  12. Impact of Low Level Clouds on radiative and turbulent surface flux in southern West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohou, Fabienne; Kalthoff, Norbert; Dione, Cheikh; Lothon, Marie; Adler, Bianca; Babic, Karmen; Pedruzo-Bagazgoitia, Xabier; Vila-Guerau De Arellano, Jordi

    2017-04-01

    During the monsoon season in West Africa, low-level clouds form almost every night and break up between 0900 and the middle of the afternoon depending on the day. The break-up of these clouds leads to the formation of boundary-layer cumuli clouds, which can sometimes evolve into deep convection. The low-level clouds have a strong impact on the radiation and energy budget at the surface and consequently on the humidity in the boundary layer and the afternoon convection. During the DACCIWA ground campaign, which took place in June and July 2016, three supersites in Benin, Ghana, and Nigeria were instrumented to document the conditions within the lower troposphere including the cloud layers. Radiative and turbulent fluxes were measured at different places by several surface stations jointly with low-level cloud occurrence during 50 days. These datasets enable the analysis of modifications in the diurnal cycle of the radiative and turbulent surface flux induced by the formation and presence of the low-level clouds. The final objective of this study is to estimate the error made in some NWP simulations when the diurnal cycle of low-level clouds is poorly represented or not represented at all.

  13. Regional Long-Term Sea Level and Sea Surface Temperature Characteristics from Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, O. B.; Knudsen, P.; Beckley, B.

    2006-07-01

    For a the large portion of the world's population liv ing in coastal zones forecasts of long- term sea lev el change is importan t for a var iety of environmen tal and socio- economic r easons. Satellite altimetry offers a unique opportunity for improving our knowledge about glob al and r egional sea level change on bo th global and reg ional scale. Joint TOPEX/PO SEIDON(T/P) +JASON-1 sea level observations and Reyno lds AVH RR sea surface temperature observ ations over th e most recen t 12 years hav e qualitativ ely been used to study regional correlations between long-term changes in sea level and sea surface temper ature. Long-term is here tak en to be lin ear signals in the 12-year time per iod Consistent in creases in both sea level and sea surface temp eratures ar e found in large parts of the world's oceans over this per iod. In the Indian Ocean and particularly th e Pacif ic Ocean , the trends in both sea level and temper ature are domin ated by the larg e changes associated w ith th e El N iño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) . Co mparison with similar trend estimates u sing only 8 years of satellite data shows the incr eased decoupling with ENSO and th e imp act of inter-annual variability on sea lev el tr end estimates.

  14. Geoid Profiles in the Baltic Sea Determined Using GPS and Sea Level Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgenson, Harli; Liibusk, Aive; Ellmann, Artu

    2008-12-01

    The idea was to compare the geoid of sea areas by an independent method, like GPS levelling, on the mainland. On the earth surface we can compare the gravimetric geoid with GPS levelling to get an accuracy estimation and tilt information. On the sea we can do it by the GPS methodology and eliminating the current water tilt corrections and the sea surface topography effect. A modern GPS device on board a ferry can store data every second and determine heights with an accuracy of a few centimetres (using the kinematic method with the postprocessing of data obtained from several base stations close to the ferry line). As a result, it is possible to observe the current water level's relative profile in reference to the ellipsoid. Some areas close to Estonia, such as the eastern part of the Gulf of Finland, are not completely covered by gravity measurements. The Baltic Sea has been measured using airborne gravimetry with the accuracy of about 2 mGal. Therefore, the gravimetric geoid is not fully reliable for the region either. If we take into account the tilt of the water level at the moment of measurement, we can observe the relative change of the geoid using an independent methodology, which serves as a comparison to the gravimetric geoid solution. The main problem during the measurement campaign, of course, was how to eliminate a water tilt. Water placement in relation to level surface is a very complex issue; special studies of that were conducted as well.

  15. The effect of the sea breeze circulation on surface ozone levels at Wallops Island, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.; Williams, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Surface measurements of windspeed, direction, and ozone concentration collected at Wallops Island, Virginia, during the summers of 1977 and 1978 are analyzed to study the effects of the dominant mesoscale sea breeze circulation on the local photochemical oxidant levels. A bimodality in the atmospheric dynamics is linked to systematic variations in ozone concentration. It is concluded that during certain phases of the two circulation modes, increased wind speed reduces the resistance of the earth's surface to the deposition of ozone, and decreased ozone concentration levels result. For other phases, light winds occur, signifying high resistance to deposition and high ozone levels. This modulation by the local dynamics is a major impediment for pollutant studies in coastal environments, especially those centering on transport, because it tends to mask other processes that may be occurring.

  16. Magnetic breakdown and Landau level spectra of a tunable double-quantum-well Fermi surface

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Harff, N.E.; Lyo, S.K.; Klem, J.F.; Boebinger, G.S.; Pfeiffer, L.N.; West, K.W.

    1997-12-31

    By measuring longitudinal resistance, the authors map the Landau level spectra of double quantum wells as a function of both parallel (B{sub {parallel}}) and perpendicular (B{sub {perpendicular}}) magnetic fields. In this continuously tunable highly non-parabolic system, the cyclotron masses of the two Fermi surface orbits change in opposite directions with B{sub {parallel}}. This causes the two corresponding ladders of Landau levels formed at finite B{sub {perpendicular}} to exhibit multiple crossings. They also observe a third set of landau levels, independent of B{sub {parallel}}, which arise from magnetic breakdown of the Fermi surface. Both semiclassical and full quantum mechanical calculations show good agreement with the data.

  17. Evaluation of methods to measure surface level in waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.J.; Park, W.R.; Cuta, F.M.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes the results of a program conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to identify alternative methods to measure the surface level in the waste tanks. This program examined commercially available devices for measuring the distance to a target. Test were performed with five devices to determine their applicability to measure the surface level in the waste tanks. The devices were the Enraf-Nonius{sup {trademark}} 872 Radar Gauge, the Enraf-Nonius{sup {trademark}} 854 Advanced Technology Gauge, the Stanley Tool Laser Measuring Device, the Robertshaw Inven-Tel{sup {reg_sign}} Precision Level Gauge, and the Micro Switch 942 Acoustic Sensor. In addition, discussions were held with several manufacturer representatives regarding other potential devices.

  18. Level-set surface segmentation and registration for computing intrasurgical deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audette, Michel A.; Peters, Terence M.

    1999-05-01

    We propose a method for estimating intrasurgical brain shift for image-guided surgery. This method consists of five stages: the identification of relevant anatomical surfaces within the MRI/CT volume, range-sensing of the skin and cortex in the OR, rigid registration of the skin range image with its MRI/CT homologue, non-rigid motion tracking over time of cortical range images, and lastly, interpolation of this surface displacement information over the whole brain volume via a realistically valued finite element model of the head. This paper focuses on the anatomical surface identification and cortical range surface tracking problems. The surface identification scheme implements a recent algorithm which imbeds 3D surface segmentation as the level- set of a 4D moving front. A by-product of this stage is a Euclidean distance and closest point map which is later exploited to speed up the rigid and non-rigid surface registration. The range-sensor uses both laser-based triangulation and defocusing techniques to produce a 2D range profile, and is linearly swept across the skin or cortical surface to produce a 3D range image. The surface registration technique is of the iterative closest point type, where each iteration benefits from looking up, rather than searching for, explicit closest point pairs. These explicit point pairs in turn are used in conjunction with a closed-form SVD-based rigid transformation computation and with fast recursive splines to make each rigid and non-rigid registration iteration essentially instantaneous. Our method is validated with a novel deformable brain-shaped phantom, made of Polyvinyl Alcohol Cryogel.

  19. Processing of Surface-NMR Data From Sites With High Noise Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozmand, A. A.; Larsen, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    The applicability of surface NMR in investigations of groundwater is often limited by high noise levels in many areas of interest. In this paper we present measurements from a high noise level area in Ristrup, Denmark. Standard multichannel filtering techniques for noise reduction are inadequate for several data sets acquired in this area and surface-NMR signals cannot be resolved from the acquired data. With a careful assessment of the frequency content of the data, we show how a model-based approach can be used to subtract two harmonic noise components from the data and reliable surface-NMR data can be extracted from the noise-reduced data. Moreover, we show the impact of the proposed processing approaches on the inversion results and also present an example where the proposed methodology allows us to reveal and avoid an otherwise overlooked contamination of the reference coil signals with surface-NMR signal. The results of this study show that a careful processing of the data makes it possible to extract surface-NMR data in more places of interest.

  20. The effect of leveling coatings on the atomic oxygen durability of solar concentrator surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Kim K.; Dever, Therese M.; Quinn, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Space power systems for Space Station Freedom will be exposed to the harsh environment of low earth orbit (LEO). Neutral atomic oxygen is the major constituent in LEO and has the potential of severely reducing the efficiency of solar dynamic power systems through degradation of the concentrator surfaces. Several transparent dielectric thin films have been found to provide atomic oxygen protection, but atomic oxygen undercutting at inherent defect sites is still a threat to solar dynamic power system survivability. Leveling coatings smooth microscopically rough surfaces, thus eliminating potential defect sites prone to oxidation attack on concentrator surfaces. The ability of leveling coatings to improve the atomic oxygen durability of concentrator surfaces was investigated. The application of a EPO-TEK 377 epoxy leveling coating on a graphite epoxy substrate resulted in an increase in solar specular reflectance, a decrease in the atomic oxygen defect density by an order of magnitude and a corresponding order of magnitude decrease in the percent loss of specular reflectance during atomic oxygen plasma ashing.

  1. Aerosols attenuating the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants: The horizontal pathway at surface level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Thierry; Ramon, Didier; Dubus, Laurent; Bourdil, Charles; Cuevas-Agulló, Emilio; Zaidouni, Taoufik; Formenti, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols attenuate the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants (STP), along two pathways: 1) the atmospheric column pathway, between the top of the atmosphere and the heliostats, resulting in Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) changes; 2) the grazing pathway close to surface level, between the heliostats and the optical receiver. The attenuation along the surface-level grazing pathway has been less studied than the aerosol impact on changes of DNI, while it becomes significant in STP of 100 MW or more. Indeed aerosols mostly lay within the surface atmospheric layer, called the boundary layer, and the attenuation increases with the distance covered by the solar radiation in the boundary layer. In STP of 100 MW or more, the distance between the heliostats and the optical receiver becomes large enough to produce a significant attenuation by aerosols. We used measured aerosol optical thickness and computed boundary layer height to estimate the attenuation of the solar radiation at surface level at Ouarzazate (Morocco). High variabilities in aerosol amount and in vertical layering generated a significant magnitude in the annual cycle and significant inter-annual changes. Indeed the annual mean of the attenuation caused by aerosols over a 1-km heliostat-receiver distance was 3.7% in 2013, and 5.4% in 2014 because of a longest desert dust season. The monthly minimum attenuation of less than 3% was observed in winter and the maximum of more than 7% was observed in summer.

  2. The effect of leveling coatings on the atomic oxygen durability of solar concentrator surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Degroh, K.K.; Dever, T.M.; Quinn, W.F.

    1990-04-01

    Space power systems for Space Station Freedom will be exposed to the harsh environment of low earth orbit (LEO). Neutral atomic oxygen is the major constituent in LEO and has the potential of severely reducing the efficiency of solar dynamic power systems through degradation of the concentrator surfaces. Several transparent dielectric thin films have been found to provide atomic oxygen protection, but atomic oxygen undercutting at inherent defect sites is still a threat to solar dynamic power system survivability. Leveling coatings smooth microscopically rough surfaces, thus eliminating potential defect sites prone to oxidation attack on concentrator surfaces. The ability of leveling coatings to improve the atomic oxygen durability of concentrator surfaces was investigated. The application of a EPO-TEK 377 epoxy leveling coating on a graphite epoxy substrate resulted in an increase in solar specular reflectance, a decrease in the atomic oxygen defect density by an order of magnitude and a corresponding order of magnitude decrease in the percent loss of specular reflectance during atomic oxygen plasma ashing.

  3. High-level correlated approach to the jellium surface energy, without uniform-gas input.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Lucian A; Pitarke, J M; Dobson, J F; Garcia-Lekue, A; Perdew, John P

    2008-01-25

    We resolve the long-standing controversy over the metal surface energy: Density-functional methods that require uniform-electron-gas input agree with each other, but not with high-level correlated calculations such as Fermi hypernetted chain and diffusion Monte Carlo calculations that predict the uniform-gas correlation energy. Here we apply the inhomogeneous Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjölander method, and find that the density functionals are indeed reliable (because the surface energy is bulklike). Our work also vindicates the use of uniform-gas-based nonlocal kernels in time-dependent density-functional theory.

  4. Surface two-level state dissipation in single-crystalline gold nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minjin; Kim, Jihwan; Kim, Jinhee; Shim, Seung-Bo; Kim, Bongsoo; Suh, Junho

    2017-02-01

    We study the intrinsic dissipation in nanomechanical resonators fabricated with synthetic singlecrystalline gold nanowires. Contrary to the etched nanostructures, the measured resonance frequencies and damping rates unambiguously demonstrate temperature dependence, as predicted by the standard two-level tunneling-state (TLS) theory. We compare the data to a model assuming a thin amorphous layer on the nanowire surface. The deduced TLS parameters are consistent with bulk poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) data, confirming the presence of residual PMMA on the surface as the TLS host.

  5. Synergistic prevention of biofouling in seawater desalination by zwitterionic surfaces and low-level chlorination.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong; Jang, Hongchul; Stocker, Roman; Gleason, Karen K

    2014-03-19

    Smooth, durable, ultrathin antifouling layers are deposited onto commercial reverse osmosis membranes without damaging them and they exhibit a fouling reduction. A new synergistic approach to antifouling, by coupling surface modification and drinking-water-level chlorination is enabled by the films' unique resistance against chlorine degradation. This approach substantially enhances longer-term fouling resistance compared with surface modification or chlorination alone, and can reduce freshwater production cost and its collateral toxicity to marine biota. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Generation of topographic terrain models utilizing synthetic aperture radar and surface level data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Topographical terrain models are generated by digitally delineating the boundary of the region under investigation from the data obtained from an airborne synthetic aperture radar image and surface elevation data concurrently acquired either from an airborne instrument or at ground level. A set of coregistered boundary maps thus generated are then digitally combined in three dimensional space with the acquired surface elevation data by means of image processing software stored in a digital computer. The method is particularly applicable for generating terrain models of flooded regions covered entirely or in part by foliage.

  7. Four-level polarization discriminator based on a surface plasmon polaritonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetou, M. I.; Thomsen, B. C.; Bayvel, P.; Dickson, W.; Zayats, A. V.

    2011-03-01

    A compact, four-level polarization discriminator based on a surface plasmon polaritonic crystal (SPPC) has been experimentally demonstrated. It is able to uniquely resolve and spatially separate four signals that have been linearly polarized at azimuth angles 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°. It exploits the excitation of multiple surface plasmon polariton eigenmodes in nondegenerate directions when the SPPC is illuminated with monochromatic light. The device is planar and of micrometer scale, which makes it suitable for on-chip integration and miniaturization of photonic circuits.

  8. Mapping Hydrophobicity on the Protein Molecular Surface at Atom-Level Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau Jr., Dan V.; Paszek, Ewa; Fulga, Florin; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2014-01-01

    A precise representation of the spatial distribution of hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity and charges on the molecular surface of proteins is critical for the understanding of the interaction with small molecules and larger systems. The representation of hydrophobicity is rarely done at atom-level, as this property is generally assigned to residues. A new methodology for the derivation of atomic hydrophobicity from any amino acid-based hydrophobicity scale was used to derive 8 sets of atomic hydrophobicities, one of which was used to generate the molecular surfaces for 35 proteins with convex structures, 5 of which, i.e., lysozyme, ribonuclease, hemoglobin, albumin and IgG, have been analyzed in more detail. Sets of the molecular surfaces of the model proteins have been constructed using spherical probes with increasingly large radii, from 1.4 to 20 Å, followed by the quantification of (i) the surface hydrophobicity; (ii) their respective molecular surface areas, i.e., total, hydrophilic and hydrophobic area; and (iii) their relative densities, i.e., divided by the total molecular area; or specific densities, i.e., divided by property-specific area. Compared with the amino acid-based formalism, the atom-level description reveals molecular surfaces which (i) present an approximately two times more hydrophilic areas; with (ii) less extended, but between 2 to 5 times more intense hydrophilic patches; and (iii) 3 to 20 times more extended hydrophobic areas. The hydrophobic areas are also approximately 2 times more hydrophobicity-intense. This, more pronounced “leopard skin”-like, design of the protein molecular surface has been confirmed by comparing the results for a restricted set of homologous proteins, i.e., hemoglobins diverging by only one residue (Trp37). These results suggest that the representation of hydrophobicity on the protein molecular surfaces at atom-level resolution, coupled with the probing of the molecular surface at different geometric resolutions

  9. Differential internalin A levels in biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes grown on different surfaces and nutrient conditions.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Niamh; Gião, Maria S; Keevil, Charles W; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2016-02-16

    Listeria monoctyogenes is a foodborne pathogen containing the surface protein, internalin A (InlA). The expression of this protein permits the invasion of L. monocytogenes into intestinal epithelial cells expressing the receptor E-cadherin, thus crossing the intestinal barrier and resulting in listerosis. The main aim of this work was to investigate InlA levels in different L. monocytogenes strains in both planktonic and sessile states using an anti-InlA antibody. Biofilms were grown in high and low nutrient environments on glass, stainless steel and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). This study demonstrated that InlA levels varied greatly between strains and serotypes of L. monocytogenes. However, the serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b and 4b, associated with the largest number of outbreaks of listerosis consistently showed the highest InlA levels, regardless of nutrient content or planktonic or sessile state. Differences in InlA levels were also observed in biofilms grown on different surfaces such as glass, stainless steel and PTFE, with a significant reduction in InlA levels observed in biofilms on PTFE. Interestingly, although a large number of the total cells observed in biofilms formed in tap-water were non-cultivable, the virulence factor, InlA, was expressed at levels between 78 and 85%, thus indicating that these cells may still be virulent. A greater understanding of the factors that affect the levels of InlA on the surface of L. monocytogenes, is essential in the appreciation of the role of InlA in the persistence of biofilms containing L. monocytogenes and their potential to cause food borne disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A kinematic and dynamic comparison of surface and underwater displacement in high level monofin swimming.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Guillaume; Bideau, Benoit

    2009-08-01

    Fin swimming performance can be divided into underwater and surface water races. World records are about 10% faster for underwater swimming vs. surface swimming, but little is known about the advantage of underwater swimming for monofin swimming. Some authors reported that the air-water interface influences the kinematics and leads to a narrow vertical amplitude of the fin. On the one hand, surface swimming is expected to affect drag parameters (cross-sectional area (S) and active drag (AD)) when compared to underwater swimming. On the other hand, the surface swimming technique may also affect efficiency (eta(F)). The aim of this study is therefore to evaluate and compare drag parameters and efficiency during underwater and surface swimming. To this end, 12 international level monofin swimmers were measured during both underwater and surface swimming. Kinematic parameters (both dimensional and non-dimensional), eta(F) (calculated according to the Elongated-Body Theory), and AD (computed with Velocity Perturbation Method) were calculated for an underwater and a surface fin swimming trial, performed at maximal speed. As expected, results showed significantly lower velocities during surface swimming vs. underwater V(1,under) =2.5ms(-1) vs. V(1,surf) =2.36ms(-1), p<.01). Velocities during underwater and surface swimming were strongly correlated (r=.97, p<.01). Underwater swimming was also associated with higher vertical amplitudes of the fin compared to surface swimming (V(under) =0.55mvs. V(surf) )=0.46m, p<.01). Length-specific amplitudes (A(under)/L(b)) were in the order of 20% during underwater swimming as for undulating fish, and significantly higher than during surface swimming (A(surf)/L(b)=17%, p<.01). Efficiency for surface swimming was about 6% lower than for underwater swimming (eta(F,under) =0.79 vs. eta(F,surf) =0.74, p<.01). This decrease could be associated with an increase in swimming frequency for surface swimming (f (surf)=2.15Hz vs. f (under)=2.08Hz

  11. Quantification of epidermal growth factor receptor expression level and binding kinetics on cell surfaces by surface plasmon resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Shaopeng; Yin, Linliang; Yang, Yunze; Guan, Yan; Wang, Wei; Xu, Han; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-10-06

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, also known as ErbB-1 or HER-1) is a membrane bound protein that has been associated with a variety of solid tumors and the control of cell survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Quantification of the EGFR expression level in cell membranes and the interaction kinetics with drugs are thus important for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Here we report mapping of the distribution and interaction kinetics of EGFR in their native environment with the surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) technique. The monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody was used as a model drug in this study. The binding of the antibody to EGFR overexpressed A431 cells was monitored in real time, which was found to follow the first-order kinetics with an association rate constant (ka) and dissociation rate constant (kd) of (2.7 ± 0.6) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and (1.4 ± 0.5) × 10(-4) s(-1), respectively. The dissociation constant (KD) was determined to be 0.53 ± 0.26 nM with up to seven-fold variation among different individual A431 cells. In addition, the averaged A431 cell surface EGFR density was found to be 636/μm(2) with an estimation of 5 × 10(5) EGFR per cell. Additional measurement also revealed that different EGFR positive cell lines (A431, HeLa, and A549) show receptor density dependent anti-EGFR binding kinetics. The results demonstrate that SPRi is a valuable tool for direct quantification of membrane protein expression level and ligand binding kinetics at single cell resolution. Our findings show that the local environment affects the drug-receptor interactions, and in situ measurement of membrane protein binding kinetics is important.

  12. Comparison of TOPEX sea surface heights and tide gauge sea levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchum, Gary T.

    1994-01-01

    TOPEX sea surface height data from the first 300 days of the mission are compared to sea level data from 71 tide gauges. The initial comparison uses sea surface height data processed according to standard procedures as defined in the users handbook. It is found that the median correlations for island and for coastal tide gauges are 0.53 and 0.42, respectively. The analogous root mean square (RMS) differences between the two data sets are 7.9 and 10.4 cm. The comparisons improve significantly when a 60-day harmonic is fit to the differences and removed. This period captures aliased M(sub 2) and S(sub 2) tidal energy that is not removed by the tide model. Making this correction and smoothing the sea surface height data over 25-km along-track segments results in median correlations of 0.58 and 0.46 for the islands and coastal stations, and median RMS differences of 5.8 and 7.7 cm, respectively. Removing once per revolution signals from the sea surface heights results in degraded comparisons with the sea levels. It is also found that a number of stations have poor comparisons due to propagating signals that introduce temporal lags between the altimeter and tide gauge time series. A final comparison is made by eliminating stations where this propagation effect is large, discarding two stations that are suspected to have problems with the sea level data, smoothing over 10-day intervals, and restricting attention to islands gauges. This results in a set of 552 data pairs that have a correlation of 0.66 and a RMS difference of 4.3 cm. The conclusion is that on timescales longer than about 10 days the RMS sea surface height errors are less than or of the order of several centimeters.

  13. Definition and Development of Habitation Readiness Levels (HRLs) for Planetary Surface Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Janis H.; Toups, Larry

    2007-01-01

    One could argue that NASA has never developed a true habitat for a planetary surface, with only the Lunar Module from the 1960's-era Apollo Program providing for a sparse 2 person, 3 day capability. An integral part of NASA's current National Vision for Space Exploration is missions back to the moon and eventually to Mars. One of the largest leaps i11 lunar surface exploration beyond the Apollo lunar missions will be the conduct of these extended duration human missions. These missions could range from 30 to 90 days in length initially and may eventually range up to 500 days in length. To enable these extended duration human missions, probably the single-most important lunar surface element is the Surface Habitat. The requirements that must be met by the Surface Habitat will go far beyond the safety, performance and operational requirements of the Lunar Module, and NASA needs to develop a basis for making intelligent, technically correct habitat design decisions. This paper will discuss the possibilities of the definition and development of a Habitation Readiness Level (HRL) scale that might be mapped to current Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) for technology development. HRLs could help measure how well a particular technology thrust is advanced by a proposed planetary habitat concept. The readiness level would have to be measured differently than TRLs, and may include such milestones as habitat design performance under simulated mission operations and constraints (including relevant field testing), functional allocation demonstrations, crew interface evaluation and post-occupancy evaluation. With many concepts for planetary habitats proposed over the past 20 years, there are many strategic technical challenges facing designers of planetary habitats that will support NASA's exploration of the moon and Mars. The systematic assessment of a variety of planetary habitat options will be an important approach and will influence the associated requirements for human

  14. Definition and Development of Habitation Readiness Levels (HRLs) for Planetary Surface Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Janis H.; Toups, Larry

    2007-01-01

    One could argue that NASA has never developed a true habitat for a planetary surface, with only the Lunar Module from the 1960's-era Apollo Program providing for a sparse 2 person, 3 day capability. An integral part of NASA's current National Vision for Space Exploration is missions back to the moon and eventually to Mars. One of the largest leaps i11 lunar surface exploration beyond the Apollo lunar missions will be the conduct of these extended duration human missions. These missions could range from 30 to 90 days in length initially and may eventually range up to 500 days in length. To enable these extended duration human missions, probably the single-most important lunar surface element is the Surface Habitat. The requirements that must be met by the Surface Habitat will go far beyond the safety, performance and operational requirements of the Lunar Module, and NASA needs to develop a basis for making intelligent, technically correct habitat design decisions. This paper will discuss the possibilities of the definition and development of a Habitation Readiness Level (HRL) scale that might be mapped to current Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) for technology development. HRLs could help measure how well a particular technology thrust is advanced by a proposed planetary habitat concept. The readiness level would have to be measured differently than TRLs, and may include such milestones as habitat design performance under simulated mission operations and constraints (including relevant field testing), functional allocation demonstrations, crew interface evaluation and post-occupancy evaluation. With many concepts for planetary habitats proposed over the past 20 years, there are many strategic technical challenges facing designers of planetary habitats that will support NASA's exploration of the moon and Mars. The systematic assessment of a variety of planetary habitat options will be an important approach and will influence the associated requirements for human

  15. An ab initio potential energy surface and vibrational energy levels of ZnH2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zheng Guo; Yu, Lei; Dai, Yu Mei

    2010-04-15

    A three-dimensional potential energy surface of the electronic ground state of ZnH(2) (X1 Sigma(g)+) molecule is constructed from more than 7500 ab initio points calculated at the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction with the Davidson correction (icMRCI+Q) level employing large basis sets. The calculated relative energies of various dissociation reactions are in good agreement with the previous theoretical/experimental values. Low-lying vibrational energy levels of ZnH(2), ZnD(2), and HZnD are calculated on the three-dimensional potential energy surface using the Lanczos algorithm, and found to be in good agreement with the available experimental band origins and the previous theoretical values. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Surface ozone levels at the end of the nineteenth century in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandroni, S.; Anfossi, D.; Viarengo, S.

    1992-02-01

    Records of surface ozone data collected twice a day by means of the Schönbein method at Villa Colon, Montevideo, Uruguay, during the years 1883-1885 and at Cordoba, Argentina, during the years 1886-1892 have been converted to present-day concentrations. Most of the uncertainties suffered from the original technique are removed by a two-step procedure, in particular a conversion algorithm for humidity and a linear regression constructed by simultaneous readings of Schönbein and a quantitative method. The relative error of this procedure, previously applied to the Moncalieri data series, is 33%. Within these limitations we can state that one century ago the surface ozone levels at that latitude of the southern hemisphere were comparable to those of Moncalieri and Montsouris. Furthermore, the recent levels observed in remote areas at that latitude are approximately twice as large as a century ago.

  17. Bio-molecule Surfaces Construction via a Higher-Order Level-Set Method.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L; Xu, Guo-Liang; Zhang, Qin

    2008-11-01

    We present a general framework for a higher-order spline level-set (HLS) method and apply this to bio-molecule surfaces construction. Starting from a first order energy functional, we obtain a general level set formulation of geometric partial differential equation, and provide an efficient approach to solve this partial differential equation using a C(2) spline basis. We also present a fast cubic spline interpolation algorithm based on convolution and the Z-transform, which exploits the local relationship of interpolatory cubic spline coefficients with respect to given function data values. One example of our HLS method is demonstrated, which is the construction of bio-molecule surfaces (an implicit solvation interface) with their individual atomic coordinates and solvated radii as prerequisite.

  18. Atmospheric iodine levels influenced by sea surface emissions of inorganic iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Lucy J.; MacDonald, Samantha M.; Shaw, Marvin D.; Kumar, Ravi; Saunders, Russell W.; Parthipan, Rajendran; Wilson, Julie; Plane, John M. C.

    2013-02-01

    Naturally occurring bromine- and iodine-containing compounds substantially reduce regional, and possibly even global, tropospheric ozone levels. As such, these halogen gases reduce the global warming effects of ozone in the troposphere, and its capacity to initiate the chemical removal of hydrocarbons such as methane. The majority of halogen-related surface ozone destruction is attributable to iodine chemistry. So far, organic iodine compounds have been assumed to serve as the main source of oceanic iodine emissions. However, known organic sources of atmospheric iodine cannot account for gas-phase iodine oxide concentrations in the lower troposphere over the tropical oceans. Here, we quantify gaseous emissions of inorganic iodine following the reaction of iodide with ozone in a series of laboratory experiments. We show that the reaction of iodide with ozone leads to the formation of both molecular iodine and hypoiodous acid. Using a kinetic box model of the sea surface layer and a one-dimensional model of the marine boundary layer, we show that the reaction of ozone with iodide on the sea surface could account for around 75% of observed iodine oxide levels over the tropical Atlantic Ocean. According to the sea surface model, hypoiodous acid--not previously considered as an oceanic source of iodine--is emitted at a rate ten-fold higher than that of molecular iodine under ambient conditions.

  19. The assessment of ultrasonic root surface debridement by determination of residual endotoxin levels.

    PubMed

    Smart, G J; Wilson, M; Davies, E H; Kieser, J B

    1990-03-01

    Recent demonstrations of the superficial nature and ease of removal of root-surface-associated cytotoxic materials suggest that extensive root-surface instrumentation is not warranted clinically. This in vitro investigation determined the detoxifying effects of a conservative regime of ultrasonic root debridement, using the Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an indication of the presence or absence of cytotoxic materials. 20 extracted periodontally-involved single-rooted teeth, with no clinically detectable calculus deposits, were debrided with a Cavitron TF-10 tip. Light pressure, resulting from a force application of approximately 50 g, lasting for 0.8 s/mm2 of root surface was used and complete overlapping instrumentation ensured. The finding of LPS levels of less than 2.5 ng per root in 19 out of 20 teeth after such debridement was comparable to LPS levels found on healthy, uninvolved control teeth, and thus endorses the growing belief that root surface cleanliness can be readily achieved.

  20. Iterative algorithm for reconstructing rotationally asymmetric surface deviation with pixel-level spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Haiyang; Wu, Fan; Hou, Xi

    2015-10-01

    New method for reconstructing rotationally asymmetric surface deviation with pixel-level spatial resolution is proposed. It is based on basic iterative scheme and accelerates the Gauss-Seidel method by introducing an acceleration parameter. This modified Successive Over-relaxation (SOR) is effective for solving the rotationally asymmetric components with pixel-level spatial resolution, without the usage of a fitting procedure. Compared to the Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel method, the modified SOR method with an optimal relaxation factor converges much faster and saves more computational costs and memory space without reducing accuracy. It has been proved by real experimental results.

  1. BN, AlN, GaN, InN: Charge Neutrality Level, Surface, Interfaces, Doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudnyi, V. N.

    2017-04-01

    On the basis of the charge neutrality concept, the analysis is fulfilled of the experimental data on the electron properties of the defective semiconductors after the radiation exposure, the electronic parameters of interfaces, surface work function and efficiency of doping with the impurities of high solubility in the nitrides of the group wz-III-N (BN, AlN, GaN, InN). The numerical evaluations of the charge neutrality levels in these compounds are presented.

  2. Soft and rigid two-level microfluidic networks for patterning surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juncker, David; Schmid, Heinz; Bernard, André; Caelen, Isabelle; Michel, Bruno; de Rooij, Nico; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2001-09-01

    We describe the microfabrication and use of elastomeric and rigid two-level microfluidic networks (µFNs), made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) or Si, for patterning surfaces. The first level corresponds to microchannels and the second to via holes through the µFNs serving as filling and venting ports. µFNs in PDMS are manufactured using a `sandwich' replication from a microfabricated four inch mold structured with SU-8 photoresist, which is planarized by mechanical polishing. µFNs in Si are microfabricated using deep reactive ion etching. Both types of µFNs can be positioned onto a substrate, creating sealed microchannels, filled with different liquids, flushed, removed and reused. These two-level µFNs allow us to access the ports from the rear, minimize interchannel crosstalk, and are economic of solutions. The channels are made wettable so that the liquids can flow spontaneously into the conduits, but stop at the venting ports. The sealing of the conduits usually requires that either the µFN or the substrate be soft. A strategy for using hard two-level µFNs, in Si, for patterning hard substrates is presented: despite voids in-between the µFN and the substrate, a water-based solution can be guided by hydrophilic microchannels over a hydrophobic surface. Adjusting the wetting properties of the various surfaces is key to preventing undesired spreading of solutions. We illustrate our concepts by micromolding colored photocurable polymers on glass and patterning proteins as lines on a polystyrene surface.}

  3. Magnetic cooling at a single molecule level: a spectroscopic investigation of isolated molecules on a surface.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Valdis; Ghirri, Alberto; Candini, Andrea; Biagi, Roberto; del Pennino, Umberto; Dotti, Gianluca; Otero, Edwige; Choueikani, Fadi; Blagg, Robin J; McInnes, Eric J L; Affronte, Marco

    2013-05-28

    A sub-monolayer distribution of isolated molecular Fe14 (bta)6 nanomagnets is deposited intact on a Au(111) surface and investigated by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy. The entropy variation with respect to the applied magnetic field is extracted from the magnetization curves and evidences high magnetocaloric values at the single molecule level. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Determination of Vertical Surface Deformation From Repeated Historical Leveling in Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdonck, D.

    2004-05-01

    Over the last decade, surface deformation studies at subduction zones have focused primarily on GPS determined horizontal deformation. The emphasis on horizontal deformation is because GPS determined vertical deformation rates do not have sufficient precision to constrain subduction models. In order to include active vertical deformation data as constraints on subduction models, we need to utilize uplift rates determined from sources other than GPS. In this study, I estimate vertical deformation rates for Washington, Oregon, and northern California from historical repeated differential leveling and tide gauge data. The data distribution is more than adequate to constrain first order subduction models. Since 1904, more than 5500 benchmarks have been leveled to more than once yielding nearly 200 independent uplift rate profiles. The leveling data are corrected for systematic errors and reviewed for suitability. Uplift rate profiles are calculated by differencing elevations from repeated leveling lines. The uplift rate profiles are locally smoothed using a robust, locally weighted, technique. The smoothing is used to remove short wavelength features and reduce the effects of local benchmark instabilities and leveling blunders. The smoothed rates are adjusted and are tied to tide gauge data using a least square technique. A regional pattern of interseismic uplift is then determined by fitting a surface to the adjusted uplift profiles. Tests with synthetic data show the method provides adequate resolution and precision.

  5. Water-level surface in the Chicot equivalent aquifer system in southeastern Louisiana, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomaszewski, Dan J.

    2011-01-01

    The Chicot equivalent aquifer system is an important source of freshwater in southeastern Louisiana. In 2005, about 47 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from the Chicot equivalent aquifer system in East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, Livingston, Tangipahoa, St. Helena, St. Tammany, Washington, and West Feliciana Parishes. Concentrated withdrawals exceeded 5 Mgal/d in Bogalusa, the city of Baton Rouge, and in northwestern East Baton Rouge Parish. In the study area, about 30,000 wells screened in the Chicot equivalent aquifer system were registered with the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (LaDOTD). These wells were constructed for public-supply, industry, irrigation, and domestic uses. Most of the wells were registered as domestic-use wells and are small-diameter, low-yielding wells. Total withdrawal from the Chicot equivalent aquifer system for domestic use was estimated to be 12 Mgal/d in 2005. This report documents the 2009 water-level surface of the Chicot equivalent aquifer system in southeastern Louisiana. The report also shows differences in water-level measurements for the years 1991 and 2009 at selected sites. Understanding changes and trends in water levels is important for continued use, planning, and management of groundwater resources. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, conducted this study of the water-level surface of the Chicot equivalent aquifer system as part of an ongoing effort to monitor groundwater levels in aquifers in Louisiana.

  6. Surface Elevation, Carbon Sequestration Potential and Rising sea Levels in Estuarine Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, J. F.; Howe, A.; Saco, P. M.

    2007-12-01

    Estuarine wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth, providing habitat for commercially important fish species and migratory shorebirds, serving as nurseries for many other marine organisms and supporting the productivity of adjacent coastal waters. Typically, these wetlands are driven by tidal hydrodynamics and are net sinks for sediment and soil carbon. Their distribution in the tidal frame depends on a delicate balance between topographic gradient, the rate of vertical soil development, and the rate of sea level change. The complex interactions between hydrodynamics, ecology and soil processes that govern this balance produce positive feedbacks and system self-organization. As complex systems, these wetlands demonstrate resilience under a wide range of conditions but they have been observed to collapse or move to another equilibrium state above certain thresholds. Research at a wetland in the Hunter estuary, southeast Australia has tracked changes in relative sea level and surface elevation in mangrove and saltmarsh wetlands over a five year period (2002- 2006) and soil carbon over a two year period (2005-2006). Mangrove surface elevation was strongly correlated with relative sea level (R2=0.715, p=0.004) but there was no correlation between relative sea level and saltmarsh surface elevation (R2=0.093, p=0.424). Soil carbon levels were high in both vegetation types (% loss on ignition of 16.2% and 18.8% for mangrove and saltmarsh soils, respectively) and not significantly different (ANOVA F=1.36, p=0.270). A 16% increase in soil carbon was recorded in each vegetation type over the period 2005-2006. Mean annual sea level rose by 55 mm and net annual precipitation (rainfall minus evaporation) fell by 189 mm over the same period. The ability of mangrove to respond rapidly to changes in relative sea level and the indicative positive trend between soil carbon and relative sea level suggest that this wetland type is both resilient to future sea level

  7. Statistical relation between monthly mean precipitable water and surface-level humidity over global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    Monthly summaries of atmospheric soundings taken over 17 years from 49 midocean stations at small islands and weather ships distributed over major oceans are examined. Over tropical oceans, precipitable water is found to be a better predictor of surface-level humidity than surface-level air temperature. A statistical relation in the form of a polynomial is derived; from this relation, the monthly-mean, surface-level mixing ratio can be computed from monthly-mean precipitable water. The root-mean-square differences between the measured and derived values were found to be less than 8 x 10 to the -4th over most ocean areas. Such a relation is useful in deriving large-scale evaporation and latent heat flux data from the ocean, using spaceborne observations. The temporal and spatial variabilities of data deviations from this relation are examined. This relation is found to be applicable to all major ocean basins and can be used to monitor interannual variability. Boundary-layer thermodynamics of different air masses are suggested as an explanation of some characteristics of this relation.

  8. Microchemical and surface evaluation of canine tibial plateau leveling osteotomy plates.

    PubMed

    Lackowski, William M; Vasilyeva, Yulia B; Crooks, Richard M; Kerwin, Sharon C; Hulse, Donald A

    2007-08-01

    To determine the microchemical and surface composition of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) plates before and after explantation. 7 TPLO plates surgically removed from host dogs 6 to 54 months after implantation; 2 raw unpolished-and-unpassivated 316L TPLO plates; and 2 heat-treated, polished-and-passivated, and cleaned 316L TPLO plates. Samples were removed by use of standard techniques to ensure the plate surface was not damaged. Sample pieces were dissolved and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to determine bulk elemental composition. Other sample pieces were investigated by use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for determination of sample morphology, near-surface elemental composition, and surface elemental composition, respectively. To investigate the possibility of corrosion in situ, some samples were chemically corroded and analyzed. ICP-MS confirmed that elemental composition of samples was consistent with 316L stainless steel. The SEM and EDS analyses revealed trace amounts of polishing materials and a nonuniform carbonaceous biofilm on < 1% of the surface area of samples removed from the host dogs. The XPS analysis indicated an increase in the chromium-to-iron ratio on passivated surfaces, with no difference between passivated samples before implantation and after explantation. Composition of the TPLO plates was consistent with 316L stainless steel. No chemical or topographic changes were detected in TPLO plates that had been implanted in dogs for up to 54 months. A small amount of biofilm was evident on the surface of 2 plates.

  9. Potential energy surface and rovibrational energy levels of the H2-CS van der Waals complex.

    PubMed

    Denis-Alpizar, Otoniel; Stoecklin, Thierry; Halvick, Philippe; Dubernet, Marie-Lise; Marinakis, Sarantos

    2012-12-21

    Owing to its large dipole, astrophysicists use carbon monosulfide (CS) as a tracer of molecular gas in the interstellar medium, often in regions where H(2) is the most abundant collider. Predictions of the rovibrational energy levels of the weakly bound complex CS-H(2) (not yet observed) and also of rate coefficients for rotational transitions of CS in collision with H(2) should help to interpret the observed spectra. This paper deals with the first goal, i.e., the calculation of the rovibrational energy levels. A new four-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface for the H(2)-CS complex is presented. Ab initio potential energy calculations were carried out at the coupled-cluster level with single and double excitations and a perturbative treatment of triple excitations, using a quadruple-zeta basis set and midbond functions. The potential energy surface was obtained by an analytic fit of the ab initio data. The equilibrium structure of the H(2)-CS complex is found to be linear with the carbon pointing toward H(2) at the intermolecular separation of 8.6 a(o). The corresponding well depth is -173 cm(-1). The potential was used to calculate the rovibrational energy levels of the para-H(2)-CS and ortho-H(2)-CS complexes. The present work provides the first theoretical predictions of these levels. The calculated dissociation energies are found to be 35.9 cm(-1) and 49.9 cm(-1), respectively, for the para and ortho complexes. The second virial coefficient for the H(2)-CS pair has also been calculated for a large range of temperature. These results could be used to assign future experimental spectra and to check the accuracy of the potential energy surface.

  10. Wetland Ecohydrology: stochastic description of water level fluctuations across the soil surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamea, S.; Muneepeerakul, R.; Laio, F.; Ridolfi, L.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2009-12-01

    Wetlands provide a suite of social and ecological critical functions such as being habitats of disease-carrying vectors, providing buffer zones against hurricanes, controlling sediment transport, filtering nutrients and contaminants, and a repository of great biological diversity. More recently, wetlands have also been recognized as crucial for carbon storage in the context of global climate change. Despite such importance, quantitative approaches to many aspects of wetlands are far from adequate. Therefore, improving our quantitative understanding of wetlands is necessary to our ability to maintain, manage, and restore these invaluable environments. In wetlands, hydrologic factors and ecosystem processes interplay and generate unique characteristics and a delicate balance between biotic and abiotic elements. The main hydrologic driver of wetland ecosystems is the position of the water level that, being above or below ground, determines the submergence or exposure of soil. When the water level is above the soil surface, soil saturation and lack of oxygen causes hypoxia, anaerobic functioning of microorganisms and anoxic stress in plants, that might lead to the death of non-adapted organisms. When the water level lies below the soil surface, the ecosystem becomes groundwater-dependent, and pedological and physiological aspects play their role in the soil water balance. We propose here a quantitative description of wetland ecohydrology, through a stochastic process-based water balance, driven by a marked compound Poisson noise representing rainfall events. The model includes processes such as rainfall infiltration, evapotranspiration, capillary rise, and the contribution of external water bodies, which are quantified in a simple yet realistic way. The semi-analytical steady-state probability distributions of water level spanning across the soil surface are validated with data from the Everglades (Florida, USA). The model and its results allow for a quantitative

  11. C sub 60 bonding and energy-level alignment on metal and semiconductor surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, T.R.; Chen, Y.; Harvey, S.E.; Kroll, G.H.; Weaver, J.H. ); Haufler, R.E.; Smalley, R.E. )

    1991-12-15

    Electronic-structure studies of C{sub 60} condensed on metal surfaces show that the energy levels derived from the fullerene align with the substrate Fermi level, not the vacuum level. For thick layers grown on metals at 300 K, the binding energy of the C 1{ital s} main line was 284.7 eV and the center of the band derived from the highest occupied molecular orbital was 2.25 eV below the Fermi level. For monolayer amounts of C{sub 60} adsorbed on Au and Cr, however, the C 1{ital s} line was broadened asymmetrically and shifted to lower binding energy, the shakeup features were less distinct, and a band derived from the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) was shifted toward the Fermi level. These monolayer effects demonstrate partial occupancy of a LUMO-derived state, dipole formation, and changes in screening that are associated with LUMO occupancy. Results for C{sub 60} monolayers on {ital n}-type GaAs(110) show transfer of {le}0.02 electron per fullerene, as gauged by substrate band bending. For C{sub 60} on {ital p}-type GaAs, however, the bands remained flat because electron redistribution was not possible, and the C{sub 60}-derived energy levels were aligned to the substrate vacuum level.

  12. Monitoring the variability of sea level and surface circulation with satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Denis L. "Jr"

    2004-10-01

    Variability in the ocean plays an important role in determining global weather and climate conditions. The advent of satellite altimetry has significantly facilitated the study of the variability of sea level and surface circulation. Satellites provide high-quality regular and nearly global measurements enabling us to study the oceanic variability on the spatial scales from the size of an eddy to global, and on the temporal scales from weeks to interannual and longer. This thesis demonstrates how satellite altimetry measurements can be used to study the mesoscale, seasonal and interannual variability of sea level and surface circulation. Oceanic variability at these time scales is mainly induced by the variations of heat and fresh water fluxes (buoyancy fluxes) at air-sea interface, the variations of heat and salt budget due to the advection of water masses with different properties, eddy generation mechanisms due to the instability of oceanic currents, Rossby waves, etc. It is shown how the sea level in the extratropical North Atlantic Ocean was changing during the investigated time interval from 1993 to 2003. The mesoscale, seasonal and inter-annual modes of the variability are revealed, and the magnitude and relative contribution of each mode to the total variance is assessed. The inter-annual change of the sea surface height in the northern North Atlantic, measured with altimetry, is coupled with in situ observations along the transatlantic section AR7E, repeated almost every year from 1990 to 2003 in the framework of the WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) and CLIVAR (CLImate VARiability) hydrographic programs. This allowed interpreting the observed inter-annual change of sea level in terms of changes in the sea water properties and the distribution of water masses. A comparative analysis of changes observed in the extratropical North Atlantic and in the extratropical North Pacific is performed. The magnitudes, spatial patterns, and also trends of the

  13. The SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture data assimilation product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichle, R. H.; De Lannoy, G. J. M.; Crow, W. T.; Kimball, J. S.; Koster, R. D.; Liu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch in January 2015 and will provide L-band radar and radiometer observations that are sensitive to surface soil moisture (in the top few centimeters of the soil column). For several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, knowledge of root zone soil moisture (defined here nominally as soil moisture in the top 1 m of the soil column) is needed. The SMAP mission will therefore provide a value-added Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product with the two key objectives: (i) to provide estimates of root zone soil moisture based on SMAP observations, and (ii) to provide a global surface and root zone soil moisture product that is spatially and temporally complete. The L4_SM algorithm uses an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to merge SMAP observations with soil moisture estimates from the NASA GEOS-5 Catchment land surface model. The model describes the vertical transfer of soil moisture between the surface and root zone reservoirs and will be driven with observation-based surface meteorological forcing data, including precipitation, on a global 9 km Earth-fixed grid. The presentation provides an overview of the SMAP L4_SM algorithm and pre-launch validation. Specifically, an L4_SM prototype product based on the assimilation of observations from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission was validated using in situ measurements from SMAP core validation sites (densely instrumented watersheds) and from more than 100 single-profile sensors scattered across the United States. The validation results indicate that the prototype soil moisture product satisfies the formal RMSE requirement for the L4_SM product of 0.04 m3/m3 (after removal of the long-term mean bias). An examination of the observation-minus-forecast residuals from the L4_SM system suggests where the system could be improved further.

  14. Exceptionally crystalline and conducting acid doped polyaniline films by level surface assisted solution casting approach

    SciTech Connect

    Puthirath, Anand B.; Varma, Sreekanth J.; Jayalekshmi, S.; Methattel Raman, Shijeesh

    2016-04-18

    Emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI) was synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerisation method using ammonium persulfate as oxidant. Resultant emeraldine salt form of PANI was dedoped using ammonia solution and then re-doped with camphor sulphonic acid (CSA), naphthaline sulphonic acid (NSA), hydrochloric acid (HCl), and m-cresol. Thin films of these doped PANI samples were deposited on glass substrates using solution casting method with m-cresol as solvent. A level surface was employed to get homogeneous thin films of uniform thickness. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the films are exceptionally crystalline. The crystalline peaks observed in the XRD spectra can be indexed to simple monoclinic structure. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy studies provide convincing explanation for the exceptional crystallinity observed in these polymer films. FESEM and AFM images give better details of surface morphology of doped PANI films. The DC electrical conductivity of the samples was measured using four point probe technique. It is seen that the samples also exhibit quite high DC electrical conductivity, about 287 S/cm for CSA doped PANI, 67 S/cm for NSA doped PANI 65 S/cm for HCl doped PANI, and just below 1 S/cm for m-cresol doped PANI. Effect of using the level surface for solution casting is studied and correlated with the observed crystallinity.

  15. Exceptionally crystalline and conducting acid doped polyaniline films by level surface assisted solution casting approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthirath, Anand B.; Methattel Raman, Shijeesh; Varma, Sreekanth J.; Jayalekshmi, S.

    2016-04-01

    Emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI) was synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerisation method using ammonium persulfate as oxidant. Resultant emeraldine salt form of PANI was dedoped using ammonia solution and then re-doped with camphor sulphonic acid (CSA), naphthaline sulphonic acid (NSA), hydrochloric acid (HCl), and m-cresol. Thin films of these doped PANI samples were deposited on glass substrates using solution casting method with m-cresol as solvent. A level surface was employed to get homogeneous thin films of uniform thickness. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the films are exceptionally crystalline. The crystalline peaks observed in the XRD spectra can be indexed to simple monoclinic structure. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy studies provide convincing explanation for the exceptional crystallinity observed in these polymer films. FESEM and AFM images give better details of surface morphology of doped PANI films. The DC electrical conductivity of the samples was measured using four point probe technique. It is seen that the samples also exhibit quite high DC electrical conductivity, about 287 S/cm for CSA doped PANI, 67 S/cm for NSA doped PANI 65 S/cm for HCl doped PANI, and just below 1 S/cm for m-cresol doped PANI. Effect of using the level surface for solution casting is studied and correlated with the observed crystallinity.

  16. Reduction of Fermi level pinning and recombination at polycrystalline CdTe surfaces by laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, Brian J.; Kheraj, Vipul; Palekis, Vasilios; Ferekides, Christos; Scarpulla, Michael A.

    2015-06-14

    Laser processing of polycrystalline CdTe is a promising approach that could potentially increase module manufacturing throughput while reducing capital expenditure costs. For these benefits to be realized, the basic effects of laser irradiation on CdTe must be ascertained. In this study, we utilize surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) to investigate the changes to the electronic properties of the surface of polycrystalline CdTe solar cell stacks induced by continuous-wave laser annealing. The experimental data explained within a model consisting of two space charge regions, one at the CdTe/air interface and one at the CdTe/CdS junction, are used to interpret our SPS results. The frequency dependence and phase spectra of the SPS signal are also discussed. To support the SPS findings, low-temperature spectrally-resolved photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence were also measured. The data show that a modest laser treatment of 250 W/cm{sup 2} with a dwell time of 20 s is sufficient to reduce the effects of Fermi level pinning at the surface due to surface defects.

  17. Surface elevation change and susceptibility of coastal wetlands to sea level rise in Liaohe Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guo-dong; Wang, Ming; Lu, Xian-guo; Jiang, Ming

    2016-10-01

    The Liaohe Delta in China is an ecologically and commercially important wetland system under threat from sea level rise and marsh subsidence. Sediments deposited in coastal marshes could offer wetlands a potentially important means for adjusting surface elevation with rising sea level, yet coastal wetland stability in Liaohe Delta is not well understood due to limited data from long-term experiments. In this study, wetland surface elevation and vertical accretion were measured from 2011 to 2015 using a surface elevation table (SET) and feldspar marker horizons in two Phragmites and two Suaeda marshes receiving Liaohe River water. The analysis shows that the Phragmites marshes exhibited higher rates of marsh accretion and elevation change than the Suaeda marshes. The two Phragmites marsh sites had average surface elevation change rates at 8.8 and 9.3 mm yr-1, vertical accretion at 17.4 and 17.6 mm yr-1, and shallow subsidence at 8.6 and 8.3 mm yr-1. The average rates of elevation change, vertical accretion, and shallow subsidence at two Suaeda marsh sites were 5.8 and 6.3 mm yr-1, 13.6 and 14.8 mm yr-1, and 7.8 and 8.5 mm yr-1, respectively. The trends suggest that coastal marshes in Liaohe Delta are experiencing changes in average soil elevation that range from a net increase of 0.3 mm y-1 to 6.9 mm y-1 relative to averaged sea level rise in Bohai Sea reported by the 2016 State Oceanic Administration People's Republic of China projection (2.4-5.5 mm y-1), which indicated that the four wetland sites would adjust to the sea level rise and even continue to gain elevation, especially for the Phragmites sites. Nevertheless, the vulnerability of coastal wetlands in Liaohe Delta need further assessment considering the accelerated sea level rise, the high rate of subsidence, and the declining sediment delivery owing to anthropogenic activities such as dam constructions in the river basin.

  18. Fermi level pinning and the charge transfer contribution to the energy of adsorption at semiconducting surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krukowski, Stanisław; Kempisty, Paweł; Strak, Paweł; Sakowski, Konrad

    2014-01-28

    It is shown that charge transfer, the process analogous to formation of semiconductor p-n junction, contributes significantly to adsorption energy at semiconductor surfaces. For the processes without the charge transfer, such as molecular adsorption of closed shell systems, the adsorption energy is determined by the bonding only. In the case involving charge transfer, such as open shell systems like metal atoms or the dissociating molecules, the energy attains different value for the Fermi level differently pinned. The Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulation of species adsorption at different surfaces, such as SiC(0001) or GaN(0001) confirms these predictions: the molecular adsorption is independent on the coverage, while the dissociative process adsorption energy varies by several electronvolts.

  19. Physics of the Be(10{bar 1} 0) Surface Core Level Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lizzit, S.; Pohl, K. |; Baraldi, A.; Comelli, G.; Fritzsche, V.; Plummer, E.W. |; Stumpf, R.; Hofmann, P. ||

    1998-10-01

    Photoelectron diffraction has been utilized to confirm the theoretical prediction that the surface core level shifts observed for Be(10{bar 1}0) have been improperly assigned. The original assignment based upon the relative intensity of the shifted components was intuitively obvious: the peak with the largest shift of {minus}0.7 eV with respect to the bulk was associated with the surface plane, the next peak shifted by {minus}0.5 eV stems from the second layer, and the third peak at {minus}0.22 eV from the third and fourth layers. First-principles theory and our experimental data show that the largest shift is associated with the second plane, not the first plane. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  20. Two-Level Micro-to-Nanoscale Hierarchical TiO₂ Nanolayers on Titanium Surface.

    PubMed

    Zemtsova, Elena G; Arbenin, Andrei Yu; Valiev, Ruslan Z; Orekhov, Evgeny V; Semenov, Valentin G; Smirnov, Vladimir M

    2016-12-13

    Joint replacement is being actively developed within modern orthopedics. One novel material providing fast implantation is bioactive coatings. The synthesis of targeted nanocoatings on metallic nanotitanium surface is reported in this paper. TiO₂-based micro- and nanocoatings were produced by sol-gel synthesis using dip-coating technology with subsequent fast (shock) drying in hot plate mode at 400 °C. As a result of shock drying, the two-level hierarchical TiO₂ nanolayer on the nanotitanium was obtained. This two-level hierarchy includes nanorelief of porous xerogel and microrelief of the micron-sized "defect" network (a crack network). The thickness of TiO₂ nanolayers was controlled by repeating dip-coating process the necessary number of times after the first layer deposition. The state of the MS3T3-E1 osteoblast cell line (young cells that form bone tissue) on the two-level hierarchical surface has been studied. Particularly, adhesion character, adhesion time and morphology have been studied. The reported results may serve the starting point for the development of novel bioactive coatings for bone and teeth implants.

  1. Modelling the impact of global changes on European summer surface ozone levels at the 2050 horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clain, Gaelle; Szopa, Sophie; Vautard, Robert; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Colette, Augustin

    2013-04-01

    As pointed by the IPCC, climate change and evolution of green house gases emissions in the coming decades are likely to affect regional pollution levels as well as the background ozone levels (Jacob et al., 1999): first, the evolution of climate due to the increase of green house gas emissions is liable to induce modifications of the meteorological parameters of crucial interest for air quality. Secondly, the emissions of air pollutants will be affected by changes in population and energy demands as well as policy aiming to reduce global warming or pollution impacts. In order to assess the relative impact of climate change and change in green house gas emissions, a set of regional simulations is conducted using CHIMERE model (Bessagnet et al., 2009). These simulations account for change in anthropogenic emissions of precursors from future scenarii, global background pollutant levels through appropriate boundary conditions from LMDz-INCA model, and future meteorological conditions reflecting AR5 scenario. For consistency, all these forcings are built on the same scenario: the RCP 8.5 (Representative Concentration Pathways, Riahi et al., 2007) developed in IPCC-AR5 framework for climate projections. The RCP8.5 scenario used in this study is defined by a rising radiative forcing pathway leading to 8.5 W.m-2 in 2100. Long term simulations of summer periods (July 1st to August 31st ) with CHIMERE model are conducted, reproducing present (1995-2005), future (2045-2055) conditions in emissions, climate, and boundary conditions. Mean summer surface ozone levels from each simulated case are compared in order to discriminate the impact of climate and the impact of RCP8.5 scenario emission progression alone on surface ozone levels.

  2. Serum hepatitis B surface antigen levels in the natural history of chronic hepatitis B infection.

    PubMed

    Jang, J W; Yoo, S H; Kwon, J H; You, C R; Lee, S; Lee, J H; Chung, K W

    2011-12-01

    BACKGROUND  The production of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) may evolve during long-lasting virus-host interactions in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). The impact of age on HBsAg production remains unclear. AIM  To determine the age-specific distribution patterns of HBsAg and related factors during the natural course of CHB infection. METHODS  Seven hundred and sixty-eight untreated HBsAg carriers were enrolled in the study. The parameters and distribution patterns of HBsAg were evaluated in relation to age and immune phases. RESULTS  The HBsAg levels were significantly lower in the HBeAg-negative stage, with the lowest levels in inactive carriers. The HBsAg tended to decrease from hepatitis to cirrhosis and to hepatocellular carcinoma, and from Child-Pugh class A to B and to C. Age and HBV DNA were independently associated with HBsAg levels. In HBeAg-positive patients, the HBsAg levels were distributed in a triphasic-like decline pattern by 2 logs across age strata. For HBeAg-negative patients, the titres in inactive carriers exhibited a 2-log reduction, but remained unchanged over age strata in patients with HBeAg-negative hepatitis. The ratios of HBsAg/HBV-DNA were highest, but steadily decreased with age in inactive carriers, whereas the levels remained largely unchanged over the entire age strata in patients with HBeAg-negative hepatitis. CONCLUSIONS  Age and HBV DNA levels are independent parameters of HBsAg levels. During the natural course of CHB infection, HBsAg levels decrease with age and disease progression, but the patterns are significantly different between the immune phases of CHB. This information may contribute to our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of chronic hepatitis B and management involving HBsAg quantification. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Levels of hydrocarbons in mussels, Mytilus edulis, and surface sediments from Danish coastal areas

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, K.

    1981-02-01

    Until recently, most effort in oil pollution research has been spent on investigating the effects of oil spills and use of detergents. The effects of long-term low level input to the marine environment are much less elucidated. This study represents the first step in a project concerning chronic oil pollution undertaken by the Marine Pollution Laboratory, Denmark. Results from previous studies on this subject in the area concerned, which have not been internationally published, are also included. In a series of Danish coastal localities, samples of surface sediments (top cm) were taken and samples of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, were collected by SCUBA diving.

  4. Microfluidic continuum sorting of sub-populations of tumor cells via surface antibody expression levels.

    PubMed

    Jack, Rhonda; Hussain, Khadijah; Rodrigues, Danika; Zeinali, Mina; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max; Simeone, Diane M; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2017-03-29

    The extent of inter- and intra-tumor cell heterogeneity observed in patient tumors appears to be directly associated with patient prognosis. Moreover, studies indicate that targeting distinct subpopulations of tumor cells may be more relevant to successfully managing cancer metastasis. The ability to distinguish and characterize unique tumor cell subpopulations within a given sample is thus exigent. Existing platforms separate cells binarily, based on some threshold level of phenotypic characteristics without consideration of the continuum levels of biomarker expression and the associated implications. Herein we describe how specific tumor cell groups have been immunomagnetically enriched according to a continuum of EpCAM surface marker expression levels. Even among a relatively homogenous group of cells such as the PANC-1 cell line, cells could be separated according to their EpCAM levels into low, moderate and high expression. To physiologically assess each subpopulation, a wound healing assay was performed which revealed distinct invasive potentials among each subset. Furthermore, the clinical relevance of the approach was demonstrated by isolating pancreatic cancer CTCs from the same patient sample based on their EpCAM levels. We demonstrate a robust method of isolating CTCs according to their varying protein levels, which enables extensive studies on tumor cell heterogeneity. Interestingly, 5 of 6 samples had CTCs that could be recovered at all three levels of EpCAM expression though the majority of CTCs were recovered as low expression events. Preliminary studies that compare tumor cell subpopulations in this continuum manner can potentially increase our understanding of the dynamic nature of cell heterogeneity and how it relates to patient outcomes. Ultimately further investigation may yield therapeutic targets against virulent cell subpopulations.

  5. Paper-based surfaced enhanced Raman spectroscopy for drug level testing with tear fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kenji; Yokoyama, Moe; Jeong, Hieyong; Kido, Michiko; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to show the effectiveness of therapeutic drug level testing by Paper-based Surfaced Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (PSERS) for artificial lacrimal fluid. We have been used substrates which consist of a common filter paper and gold nano-rods. The targets were Phenobarbital (PB) which dissolved in artificial lacrimal fluid. We measured them using PSERS which the wavelength was 785nm, the power was 30mW. It was found that there were the strong peaks of PB at 997cm-1 and 1026cm-1 which corresponded with solid PB spectral peak for 1mM artificial lacrimal fluid. The results demonstrated the usefulness of this method. It is concluded that our method for therapeutic drug level testing is very efficient.

  6. Experimental observation of surface states and Landau levels bending in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Long-Jing; Zhang, Yu; Qiao, Jia-Bin; Li, Si-Yu; He, Lin

    2016-03-01

    We report on microscopic measurements of the low-energy electronic structures both at the zigzag and armchair edges of bilayer graphene using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS). We have found that, both in the absence and in the presence of a magnetic field, an almost zero-energy peak in the density of states was localized at the zigzag edges, as expected for the surface states at the zigzag edges of bilayer graphene. In the quantum Hall regime, we have clearly observed Landau levels bending away from the charge neutrality point near both the zigzag and armchair edges. Such a result is direct evidence for the evolution of Landau levels into quantum Hall edge states in graphene bilayers. Our experiment indicates that it is possible to explore rich quantum Hall physics in graphene systems using STM and STS.

  7. Revisiting thoracic surface anatomy in an adult population: A computed tomography evaluation of vertebral level.

    PubMed

    Badshah, Masroor; Soames, Roger; Khan, Muhammad Jaffar; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Khan, Adnan

    2017-03-01

    To compare key thoracic anatomical surface landmarks between healthy and patient adult populations using Computed Tomography (CT). Sixteen slice CT images of 250 age and gender matched healthy individuals and 99 patients with lung parenchymal disease were analyzed to determine the relationship of 17 thoracic structures and their vertebral levels using a 32-bit Radiant DICOM viewer. The structures studied were: aortic hiatus, azygos vein, brachiocephalic artery, gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), left and right common carotid arteries, left and right subclavian arteries, pulmonary trunk bifurcation, superior vena cava junction with the right atrium, carina, cardiac apex, manubriosternal junction, xiphisternal joint, inferior vena cava (IVC) crossing the diaphragm, aortic arch and junction of brachiocephalic veins. The surface anatomy of all structures varied among individuals with no significant effect of age. Binary logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between individual health status and vertebral level for brachiocephalic artery (P = 0.049), GEJ (P = 0.020), right common carotid (P = 0.009) and subclavian arteries (P = 0.009), pulmonary trunk bifurcation (P = 0.049), carina (P = 0.004), and IVC crossing the diaphragm (P = 0.025). These observations differ from those reported in a healthy white Caucasian population and from the vertebral levels of the IVC, esophagus, and aorta crossing the diaphragm in an Iranian population. The differences observed in this study provide insight into the effect of lung pathology on specific thoracic structures and their vertebral levels. Further studies are needed to determine whether these are general changes or pathology-specific. Clin. Anat. 30:227-236, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Surface L-type Ca2+ channel expression levels are increased in aged hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Santana, Félix Luis; Oh, Myongsoo Matthew; Antion, Marcia Diana; Lee, Amy; Hell, Johannes Wilhelm; Disterhoft, John Francis

    2014-01-01

    Age-related increase in L-type Ca2+ channel (LTCC) expression in hippocampal pyramidal neurons has been hypothesized to underlie the increased Ca2+ influx and subsequent reduced intrinsic neuronal excitability of these neurons that lead to age-related cognitive deficits. Here, using specific antibodies against Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 subunits of LTCCs, we systematically re-examined the expression of these proteins in the hippocampus from young (3 to 4 month old) and aged (30 to 32 month old) F344xBN rats. Western blot analysis of the total expression levels revealed significant reductions in both Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 subunits from all three major hippocampal regions of aged rats. Despite the decreases in total expression levels, surface biotinylation experiments revealed significantly higher proportion of expression on the plasma membrane of Cav1.2 in the CA1 and CA3 regions and of Cav1.3 in the CA3 region from aged rats. Furthermore, the surface biotinylation results were supported by immunohistochemical analysis that revealed significant increases in Cav1.2 immunoreactivity in the CA1 and CA3 regions of aged hippocampal pyramidal neurons. In addition, we found a significant increase in the level of phosphorylated Cav1.2 on the plasma membrane in the dentate gyrus of aged rats. Taken together, our present findings strongly suggest that age-related cognitive deficits cannot be attributed to a global change in L-type channel expression nor to the level of phosphorylation of Cav1.2 on the plasma membrane of hippocampal neurons. Rather, increased expression and density of LTCCs on the plasma membrane may underlie the age-related increase in L-type Ca2+ channel activity in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:24033980

  9. On-line measurements of ozone surface fluxes: Part II. Surface-level ozone fluxes onto the Sahara desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güsten, Hans; Heinrich, Günther; Mönnich, Erbo; Sprung, Detlev; Weppner, Joseph; Ramadan, Abou Bakr; Ezz El-Din, Mohammed R. M.; Ahmed, Darwish M.; Hassan, Galal K. Y.

    Surface-level ozone concentrations, the vertical turbulent ozone flux as well as the fluxes of sensible and latent heat were continuously monitored by the eddy covariance method in the Lybian desert, 30 km south of the Dakhla Oasis in Egypt, from 23 March until 9 April 1993. An automatic station powered by a photovoltaics generator system was used to measure the vertical turbulent ozone flux to the desert ecosystem. Fairly high ozone volume fractions up to 60 ppb were recorded when northerly winds prevailed. When southerly winds were blowing, the ozone volume fractions were lower and reached maximum values slightly above 40 ppb. On-line eddy correlation measurements of the vertical turbulent ozone flux to the desert were performed with a novel fast-response ozone sensor. The fairly small ozone fluxes were corrected for effects of micro-turbulent density fluctuations caused by the concomitant fluxes of heat and water vapour in the air volume (Webb correction). While ozone fluxes to the desert ecosystem are below 2 ppb cm s - in the night, maximum daytime ozone fluxes of 20 ppb cm s -1 were measured which yielded a maximum daily dry deposition velocity of 0.15 cm s -1. During the whole measurement campaign of 16 d a mean deposition velocity of Vd = 0.065 cm s -1 for ozone is calculated. For global numerical models in which the sources and sinks of ozone in the troposphere are taken into account, a daytime Vdof 0.1 cm s -1 and a nighttime value of 0.04 cm s -1 are recommended for the desert ecosystem.

  10. MARCH1 regulates insulin sensitivity by controlling cell surface insulin receptor levels

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Petersen, Max C.; Nasiri, Ali R.; Butrico, Gina; Fung, Annie; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Kursawe, Romy; Caprio, Sonia; Thibodeau, Jacques; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Sun, Lisha; Gao, Guangping; Bhanot, Sanjay; Jurczak, Michael J.; Green, Michael R.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key driver of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and is characterized by defective insulin receptor (INSR) signalling. Although surface INSR downregulation is a well-established contributor to insulin resistance, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH1 impairs cellular insulin action by degrading cell surface INSR. Using a large-scale RNA interference screen, we identify MARCH1 as a negative regulator of INSR signalling. March1 loss-of-function enhances, and March1 overexpression impairs, hepatic insulin sensitivity in mice. MARCH1 ubiquitinates INSR to decrease cell surface INSR levels, but unlike other INSR ubiquitin ligases, MARCH1 acts in the basal state rather than after insulin stimulation. Thus, MARCH1 may help set the basal gain of insulin signalling. MARCH1 expression is increased in white adipose tissue of obese humans, suggesting that MARCH1 contributes to the pathophysiology of T2D and could be a new therapeutic target. PMID:27577745

  11. Comparison pesticide residue levels in the surface of Bertam River in Cameron Highlands, Pahang

    SciTech Connect

    Haron, S. H. Ismail, B. S.

    2015-09-25

    The presence of pesticide residues in the surface water of Bertam River in the agricultural areas of Cameron Highlands in Pahang, Malaysia was monitored from May to October 2014. The sampling sites were located at 10 sampling points along the Bertam River in the vegetable planting areas. The extraction method of the pesticide (organophosphate/pyrethroid) from the river samples used solid phase extraction followed by gas chromatography (with electron capture detector, ECD). Insecticides, cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos were found in the surface water of Bertam River. High level concentrations of those insecticides in the river were observed during the period from May to October 2014, a period which included both seasons (wet and dry seasons). The highest concentration of 2.66 µg/mL and 1.23 µg/mL of cypermethrin was observed during the wet and dry seasons respectively. This could be due to the frequent usage of the above-mentioned insecticides coupled with contamination that could have originated from the application sites. Meanwhile, the lowest concentration detected in the surface water was chlorpyrifos (0.11 µg/mL and 0.17 µg/mL) during the dry and wet seasons, respectively.

  12. Energy level shifts at the silica/Ru(0001) heterojunction driven by surface and interface dipoles

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Mengen; Zhong, Jian -Qiang; Kestell, John; ...

    2016-09-12

    Charge redistribution at heterogeneous interfaces is a fundamental aspect of surface chemistry. Manipulating the amount of charges and the magnitude of dipole moments at the interface in a controlled way has attracted tremendous attention for its potential to modify the activity of heterogeneous catalysts in catalyst design. Two-dimensional ultrathin silica films with well-defined atomic structures have been recently synthesized and proposed as model systems for heterogeneous catalysts studies. R. Wlodarczyk et al. (Phys. Rev. B, 85, 085403 (2012)) have demonstrated that the electronic structure of silica/Ru(0001) can be reversibly tuned by changing the amount of interfacial chemisorbed oxygen. Here wemore » carried out systematic investigations to understand the underlying mechanism through which the electronic structure at the silica/Ru(0001) interface can be tuned. As corroborated by both in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, the observed interface energy level alignments strongly depend on the surface and interfacial charge transfer induced dipoles at the silica/Ru(0001) heterojunction. These observations may help to understand variations in catalytic performance of the model system from the viewpoint of the electronic properties at the confined space between the silica bilayer and the Ru(0001) surface. As a result, the same behavior is observed for the aluminosilicate bilayer, which has been previously proposed as a model system for zeolites.« less

  13. Energy level shifts at the silica/Ru(0001) heterojunction driven by surface and interface dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Mengen; Zhong, Jian -Qiang; Kestell, John; Waluyo, Iradwikanari; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Boscoboinik, J. Anibal; Lu, Deyu

    2016-09-12

    Charge redistribution at heterogeneous interfaces is a fundamental aspect of surface chemistry. Manipulating the amount of charges and the magnitude of dipole moments at the interface in a controlled way has attracted tremendous attention for its potential to modify the activity of heterogeneous catalysts in catalyst design. Two-dimensional ultrathin silica films with well-defined atomic structures have been recently synthesized and proposed as model systems for heterogeneous catalysts studies. R. Wlodarczyk et al. (Phys. Rev. B, 85, 085403 (2012)) have demonstrated that the electronic structure of silica/Ru(0001) can be reversibly tuned by changing the amount of interfacial chemisorbed oxygen. Here we carried out systematic investigations to understand the underlying mechanism through which the electronic structure at the silica/Ru(0001) interface can be tuned. As corroborated by both in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, the observed interface energy level alignments strongly depend on the surface and interfacial charge transfer induced dipoles at the silica/Ru(0001) heterojunction. These observations may help to understand variations in catalytic performance of the model system from the viewpoint of the electronic properties at the confined space between the silica bilayer and the Ru(0001) surface. As a result, the same behavior is observed for the aluminosilicate bilayer, which has been previously proposed as a model system for zeolites.

  14. Formation of Triboelectric Series via Atomic-Level Surface Functionalization for Triboelectric Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung-Ho; Bae, Young Eun; Moon, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Jungkil; Choi, Suk-Ho; Kim, Yongho; Yoon, Hyo Jae; Lee, Min Hyung; Nah, Junghyo

    2017-06-27

    Triboelectric charging involves frictional contact of two different materials, and their contact electrification usually relies on polarity difference in the triboelectric series. This limits the choices of materials for triboelectric contact pairs, hindering research and development of energy harvest devices utilizing triboelectric effect. A progressive approach to resolve this issue involves modification of chemical structures of materials for effectively engineering their triboelectric properties. Here, we describe a facile method to change triboelectric property of a polymeric surface via atomic-level chemical functionalizations using a series of halogens and amines, which allows a wide spectrum of triboelectric series over single material. Using this method, tunable triboelectric output power density is demonstrated in triboelectric generators. Furthermore, molecular-scale calculation using density functional theory unveils that electrons transferred through electrification are occupying the PET group rather than the surface functional group. The work introduced here would open the ability to tune triboelectric property of materials by chemical modification of surface and facilitate the development of energy harvesting devices and sensors exploiting triboelectric effect.

  15. Half-filled Landau level, topological insulator surfaces, and three-dimensional quantum spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Senthil, T.

    2016-02-01

    We synthesize and partly review recent developments relating the physics of the half-filled Landau level in two dimensions to correlated surface states of topological insulators in three dimensions. The latter are in turn related to the physics of certain three-dimensional quantum spin liquid states. The resulting insights provide an interesting answer to the old question of how particle-hole symmetry is realized in composite fermion liquids. Specifically the metallic state at filling ν =1/2 —described originally in pioneering work by Halperin, Lee, and Read as a liquid of composite fermions—was proposed recently by Son to be described by a particle-hole symmetric effective field theory distinct from that in the prior literature. We show how the relation to topological insulator surface states leads to a physical understanding of the correctness of this proposal. We develop a simple picture of the particle-hole symmetric composite fermion through a modification of older pictures as electrically neutral "dipolar" particles. We revisit the phenomenology of composite fermi liquids (with or without particle-hole symmetry), and show that their heat/electrical transport dramatically violates the conventional Wiedemann-Franz law but satisfies a modified one. We also discuss the implications of these insights for finding physical realizations of correlated topological insulator surfaces.

  16. Energy level shifts at the silica/Ru(0001) heterojunction driven by surface and interface dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Mengen; Zhong, Jian -Qiang; Kestell, John; Waluyo, Iradwikanari; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Boscoboinik, J. Anibal; Lu, Deyu

    2016-09-12

    Charge redistribution at heterogeneous interfaces is a fundamental aspect of surface chemistry. Manipulating the amount of charges and the magnitude of dipole moments at the interface in a controlled way has attracted tremendous attention for its potential to modify the activity of heterogeneous catalysts in catalyst design. Two-dimensional ultrathin silica films with well-defined atomic structures have been recently synthesized and proposed as model systems for heterogeneous catalysts studies. R. Wlodarczyk et al. (Phys. Rev. B, 85, 085403 (2012)) have demonstrated that the electronic structure of silica/Ru(0001) can be reversibly tuned by changing the amount of interfacial chemisorbed oxygen. Here we carried out systematic investigations to understand the underlying mechanism through which the electronic structure at the silica/Ru(0001) interface can be tuned. As corroborated by both in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, the observed interface energy level alignments strongly depend on the surface and interfacial charge transfer induced dipoles at the silica/Ru(0001) heterojunction. These observations may help to understand variations in catalytic performance of the model system from the viewpoint of the electronic properties at the confined space between the silica bilayer and the Ru(0001) surface. As a result, the same behavior is observed for the aluminosilicate bilayer, which has been previously proposed as a model system for zeolites.

  17. Atomic-level simulation of gas-surface interactions and hypersonic flow features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Paolo

    First-principles based atomic-level simulations can be used to develop realistic models of gas-surface chemistry and gas-phase chemistry, or to inform or validate the existing ones. A mechanism-based finite rate catalytic wall boundary condition for use in reacting flow simulation is presented. The input parameters of this model are the reaction rates kr of each elementary one-step process, including molecular and atomic adsorption. Therefore, ReaxFF Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of O2 adsorption on a platinum (111) surface are presented and compared to the existing experimental and computational results in the literature. Furthermore, the surface state of a catalyst strongly affects its performance. Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to study oxygen coverage on Pt(111) exposed to molecular oxygen at certain pressure and temperature conditions. The results compare well with the available experimental and first-principles data. Finally, full-scale MD simulations of normal shock waves in dilute and rarefied argon are presented, and are critically compared to similar Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) calculations as well as experiments. For very dilute gases, a novel Event-Driven/Time-Driven algorithm is developed to speed up the MD simulation of rarefied gases using realistic spherically symmetric soft potentials. This technique could pave the way for the application of much more refined and expensive interatomic potentials (potentially ab initio) to MD simulations of nonequilibrium flow features in rarefied gases, involving vibrational excitation and chemical reactivity.

  18. Comparison pesticide residue levels in the surface of Bertam River in Cameron Highlands, Pahang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, S. H.; Ismail B., S.

    2015-09-01

    The presence of pesticide residues in the surface water of Bertam River in the agricultural areas of Cameron Highlands in Pahang, Malaysia was monitored from May to October 2014. The sampling sites were located at 10 sampling points along the Bertam River in the vegetable planting areas. The extraction method of the pesticide (organophosphate/pyrethroid) from the river samples used solid phase extraction followed by gas chromatography (with electron capture detector, ECD). Insecticides, cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos were found in the surface water of Bertam River. High level concentrations of those insecticides in the river were observed during the period from May to October 2014, a period which included both seasons (wet and dry seasons). The highest concentration of 2.66 µg/mL and 1.23 µg/mL of cypermethrin was observed during the wet and dry seasons respectively. This could be due to the frequent usage of the above-mentioned insecticides coupled with contamination that could have originated from the application sites. Meanwhile, the lowest concentration detected in the surface water was chlorpyrifos (0.11 µg/mL and 0.17 µg/mL) during the dry and wet seasons, respectively.

  19. The SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf; Crow, Wade; Koster, Randal; Kimball, John

    2010-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission is being developed by NASA for launch in 2013 as one of four first-tier missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space in 2007. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, the high resolution soil moisture mapping provided by SMAP has practical applications in weather and seasonal climate prediction, agriculture, human health, drought and flood decision support. In this paper we describe the assimilation of SMAP observations for the generation of the planned SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product. The SMAP mission makes simultaneous active (radar) and passive (radiometer) measurements in the 1.26-1.43 GHz range (L-band) from a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit. Measurements will be obtained across a 1000 km wide swath using conical scanning at a constant incidence angle (40 deg). The radar resolution varies from 1-3 km over the outer 70% of the swath to about 30 km near the center of the swath. The radiometer resolution is 40 km across the entire swath. The radiometer measurements will allow high-accuracy but coarse resolution (40 km) measurements. The radar measurements will add significantly higher resolution information. The radar is however very sensitive to surface roughness and vegetation structure. The combination of the two measurements allows optimal blending of the advantages of each instrument. SMAP directly observes only surface soil moisture (in the top 5 cm of the soil column). Several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, require knowledge of root zone soil moisture (approximately top 1 m of the soil column), which is not directly measured by SMAP. The foremost objective of the SMAP L4_SM product is to fill this gap and provide estimates of root zone soil moisture

  20. The SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf; Crow, Wade; Koster, Randal; Kimball, John

    2010-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission is being developed by NASA for launch in 2013 as one of four first-tier missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space in 2007. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, the high resolution soil moisture mapping provided by SMAP has practical applications in weather and seasonal climate prediction, agriculture, human health, drought and flood decision support. In this paper we describe the assimilation of SMAP observations for the generation of the planned SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product. The SMAP mission makes simultaneous active (radar) and passive (radiometer) measurements in the 1.26-1.43 GHz range (L-band) from a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit. Measurements will be obtained across a 1000 km wide swath using conical scanning at a constant incidence angle (40 deg). The radar resolution varies from 1-3 km over the outer 70% of the swath to about 30 km near the center of the swath. The radiometer resolution is 40 km across the entire swath. The radiometer measurements will allow high-accuracy but coarse resolution (40 km) measurements. The radar measurements will add significantly higher resolution information. The radar is however very sensitive to surface roughness and vegetation structure. The combination of the two measurements allows optimal blending of the advantages of each instrument. SMAP directly observes only surface soil moisture (in the top 5 cm of the soil column). Several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, however, require knowledge of root zone soil moisture (approximately top 1 m of the soil column), which is not directly measured by SMAP. The foremost objective of the SMAP L4_SM product is to fill this gap and provide estimates of root zone soil moisture

  1. Alteration of Surface EMG amplitude levels of five major trunk muscles by defined electrode location displacement.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Agnes; Faenger, Bernd; Schenk, Philipp; Scholle, Hans-Christoph; Anders, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Exact electrode positioning is vital for obtaining reliable results in Surface EMG. This study aimed at systematically assessing the influence of defined electrode shifts on measured Surface EMG amplitudes of trunk muscles in a group of 15 middle aged healthy male subjects. The following leftsided muscles were investigated: rectus abdominis muscle, internal and external oblique abdominal muscles, lumbar multifidus muscle, and longissimus muscle. In addition to the recommended electrode positions, extra electrodes were placed parallel to these and along muscle fiber direction. Measurements were performed under isometric conditions in upright body position. Gradually changing, but defined loads were applied considering subject's upper body weight. For the abdominal muscles amplitude differences varied considerably depending on load level, magnitude, and direction. For both back muscles amplitudes dropped consistently but rather little for parallel electrode displacements. However, for the longissimus muscle a caudal electrode shift resulted in an amplitude increase of similar extent and independent from load level. Influence of electrode position variations can be proven for all trunk muscles but are more evident in abdominal than back muscles. Those muscle-specific effects confirm the necessity for an exact definition of electrode positioning to allow comparisons between individual subjects, groups of subjects, and studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Screening level ecological risk assessment for phenols in surface water of the Taihu Lake.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wenjue; Wang, Donghong; Xu, Xiaowei; Luo, Qian; Wang, Bingyi; Shan, Xiaoquan; Wang, Zijian

    2010-08-01

    A number of approaches have been proposed for screening level ecological risk assessment. In this paper, we first established a mass spectrum library including 50 phenols using retention time locking (RTL) technology and deconvolution reporting software (DRS). Distribution of phenols in surface water of the Taihu Lake was screened. Among the 22 identified phenols, 14 phenols were quantified. The concentrations of total phenols ranged 675.2-3346.1 ng L(-1). The distributions of ecological effect quotients (EEQs) of 14 phenols were characterized in terms of the exposure concentration distributions (ECDs) and species sensitivity distributions (SSDs). Those phenols with EEQs exceeding the threshold proposed by Water Environment Research Foundation of Alexandria were selected as priorities. As a result, 2-nitrophenol (2-NP), p-chloro-m-xylenol (PCMX) and pyrocatechol were determined as potential ecological risk stressors in surface water of the Taihu Lake. Results of the present study suggested that the proposed approach is feasible for the screening level ecological risk assessment.

  3. Robust space-time extraction of ventricular surface evolution using multiphase level sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drapaca, Corina S.; Cardenas, Valerie; Studholme, Colin

    2004-05-01

    This paper focuses on the problem of accurately extracting the CSF-tissue boundary, particularly around the ventricular surface, from serial structural MRI of the brain acquired in imaging studies of aging and dementia. This is a challenging problem because of the common occurrence of peri-ventricular lesions which locally alter the appearance of white matter. We examine a level set approach which evolves a four dimensional description of the ventricular surface over time. This has the advantage of allowing constraints on the contour in the temporal dimension, improving the consistency of the extracted object over time. We follow the approach proposed by Chan and Vese which is based on the Mumford and Shah model and implemented using the Osher and Sethian level set method. We have extended this to the 4 dimensional case to propagate a 4D contour toward the tissue boundaries through the evolution of a 5D implicit function. For convergence we use region-based information provided by the image rather than the gradient of the image. This is adapted to allow intensity contrast changes between time frames in the MRI sequence. Results on time sequences of 3D brain MR images are presented and discussed.

  4. Reduction Expansion Synthesis as Strategy to Control Nitrogen Doping Level and Surface Area in Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Canty, Russell; Gonzalez, Edwin; MacDonald, Caleb; Osswald, Sebastian; Zea, Hugo; Luhrs, Claudia C.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene sheets doped with nitrogen were produced by the reduction-expansion (RES) method utilizing graphite oxide (GO) and urea as precursor materials. The simultaneous graphene generation and nitrogen insertion reactions are based on the fact that urea decomposes upon heating to release reducing gases. The volatile byproducts perform two primary functions: (i) promoting the reduction of the GO and (ii) providing the nitrogen to be inserted in situ as the graphene structure is created. Samples with diverse urea/GO mass ratios were treated at 800 °C in inert atmosphere to generate graphene with diverse microstructural characteristics and levels of nitrogen doping. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to study the microstructural features of the products. The effects of doping on the samples structure and surface area were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, and Brunauer Emmet Teller (BET). The GO and urea decomposition-reduction process as well as nitrogen-doped graphene stability were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with mass spectroscopy (MS) analysis of the evolved gases. Results show that the proposed method offers a high level of control over the amount of nitrogen inserted in the graphene and may be used alternatively to control its surface area. To demonstrate the practical relevance of these findings, as-produced samples were used as electrodes in supercapacitor and battery devices and compared with conventional, thermally exfoliated graphene. PMID:28793618

  5. Measurements of Location-Dependent Nitric Oxide Levels on Skin Surface in relation to Acupuncture Point.

    PubMed

    Ha, Yejin; Kim, Misun; Nah, Jiseon; Suh, Minah; Lee, Youngmi

    2012-01-01

    Location-dependent skin surface's partial nitric oxide pressure (pNO) is studied using highly sensitive amperometric NO microsensor with a small sensing area (diameter  = 76 μm). The pNO level of LI4 (Hegu) acupuncture point is measured and compared with the pNO level of nonacupuncture point. In addition, the mapping of pNO is carried out over the left wrist skin area one- as well as two-dimensionally. Statistically higher pNO levels near the position of acupuncture points than non-acupuncture points are observed consistently, implying tight relationship between the level of NO release of skin and acupuncture points. The amperometric planar NO microsensor successfully monitors the heterogeneity of skin pNO distribution in high spatial resolution due to its advantageous features such as high sensitivity and small sensing dimension. The current study suggests the direct connection between NO and acupuncture points and possibly provides beneficial information to understand physiological roles and basis of the acupuncture points.

  6. Surface ozone levels in the forest and vegetation areas of the Biga Peninsula, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sari, Deniz; İncecik, Selahattin; Ozkurt, Nesimi

    2016-11-15

    Spatial and temporal variability of surface ozone in the rural, mountainous and suburban sites of Biga Peninsula, at the northwest of Turkey which is about 300km southwest of Istanbul was investigated using passive samplers and continuous analyzers. A total 10 passive samplers and two continuous analyzers were used between 1.1.2013 and 31.12.2014. OX levels in the study region were examined to understand NOx dependent or independent contribution to ozone. The influences of the meteorological parameters on ozone levels were also examined by wind speed and ambient temperature. The results clearly show that mountainous areas have higher cumulative exposure to ozone than suburban locations. In order to understand the long range transport sources contributing to the high ozone levels in the region backward trajectories were computed using HYSPLIT model and then clustering of trajectories are performed. The results clearly show the characteristics of pollutant transport from north to Biga Peninsula. Additionally, AOT40 (Accumulated hourly O3 concentrations Over a Threshold of 40ppb) cumulative index was calculated using daytime hourly measurements. The results indicate that the ozone values in the study area are much higher than the critical levels for forest and vegetation based on EU Directive 2008/50/EC.

  7. Measurements of Location-Dependent Nitric Oxide Levels on Skin Surface in relation to Acupuncture Point

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Yejin; Kim, Misun; Nah, Jiseon; Suh, Minah; Lee, Youngmi

    2012-01-01

    Location-dependent skin surface's partial nitric oxide pressure (pNO) is studied using highly sensitive amperometric NO microsensor with a small sensing area (diameter  = 76 μm). The pNO level of LI4 (Hegu) acupuncture point is measured and compared with the pNO level of nonacupuncture point. In addition, the mapping of pNO is carried out over the left wrist skin area one- as well as two-dimensionally. Statistically higher pNO levels near the position of acupuncture points than non-acupuncture points are observed consistently, implying tight relationship between the level of NO release of skin and acupuncture points. The amperometric planar NO microsensor successfully monitors the heterogeneity of skin pNO distribution in high spatial resolution due to its advantageous features such as high sensitivity and small sensing dimension. The current study suggests the direct connection between NO and acupuncture points and possibly provides beneficial information to understand physiological roles and basis of the acupuncture points. PMID:23049611

  8. Tear MMP-9 levels as a marker of ocular surface inflammation in conjunctivochalasis.

    PubMed

    Acera, Arantxa; Vecino, Elena; Duran, Juan A

    2013-12-23

    To evaluate the efficacy of surgical treatment for conjunctivochalasis by monitoring matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 levels in the tears of patients with conjunctivochalasis before and after surgery and their correlation with clinical signs and symptoms. Twelve eyes of patients with symptomatic conjunctivochalasis were included in this study as well as five eyes of healthy volunteers. Ocular surface inflammation was measured in terms of the concentration of pro-MMP-9 in tears, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and zymography. Tear analysis was performed before and 1 month after surgery. The surgical technique consisted of the excision of redundant tissue and the use of organic glue for wound closure. The concentration of pro-MMP-9 was significantly higher in the conjunctivochalasis eyes than in the healthy controls (223.4 ± 74.53 ng/mL vs. 20.32 ± 5.21 ng/mL; P < 0.001). Tear pro-MMP-9 levels decreased significantly after conjunctival resection in patients with conjunctivochalasis without dry eye compared with patients with conjunctivochalasis and dry eye associated. Zymographic analysis indicated that MMP-9 is present in its active form only in conjunctivochalasis tears. After a follow-up of 4.9 ± 1.3 weeks, all operated eyes were found to have recovered a smooth and stable conjunctival surface, epithelial defects had improved, and epiphora had been resolved in 89% of cases. Our results indicate that inflammation is likely to play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of conjunctivochalasis. Appropriate surgery decreases inflammatory activity, leading to symptom improvement, and tear analysis may facilitate the treatment of the ocular surface.

  9. Photometric Stereo Shape-And for Pixel-Level Resolution Lunar Surface Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. C.; Wu, B.

    2017-07-01

    Shape and Albedo from Shading (SAfS) techniques recover pixel-wise surface details based on the relationship between terrain slopes, illumination and imaging geometry, and the energy response (i.e., image intensity) captured by the sensing system. Multiple images with different illumination geometries (i.e., photometric stereo) can provide better SAfS surface reconstruction due to the increase in observations. Photometric stereo SAfS is suitable for detailed surface reconstruction of the Moon and other extra-terrestrial bodies due to the availability of photometric stereo and the less complex surface reflecting properties (i.e., albedo) of the target bodies as compared to the Earth. Considering only one photometric stereo pair (i.e., two images), pixel-variant albedo is still a major obstacle to satisfactory reconstruction and it needs to be regulated by the SAfS algorithm. The illumination directional difference between the two images also becomes an important factor affecting the reconstruction quality. This paper presents a photometric stereo SAfS algorithm for pixel-level resolution lunar surface reconstruction. The algorithm includes a hierarchical optimization architecture for handling pixel-variant albedo and improving performance. With the use of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera - Narrow Angle Camera (LROC NAC) photometric stereo images, the reconstructed topography (i.e., the DEM) is compared with the DEM produced independently by photogrammetric methods. This paper also addresses the effect of illumination directional difference in between one photometric stereo pair on the reconstruction quality of the proposed algorithm by both mathematical and experimental analysis. In this case, LROC NAC images under multiple illumination directions are utilized by the proposed algorithm for experimental comparison. The mathematical derivation suggests an illumination azimuthal difference of 90 degrees between two images is recommended to achieve minimal error in

  10. High-Level Clouds and Relation to Sea Surface Temperature as Inferred from Japan's GMS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Lindzen, Richard S.; Lee, Kyu-Tae; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-level clouds have a significant impact on the radiation energy budgets and, hence, the climate of the Earth. Convective cloud systems, which are controlled by large-scale thermal and dynamical conditions, propagate rapidly within days. At this time scale, changes of sea surface temperature (SST) are small. Radiances measured by Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS) are used to study the relation between high-level clouds and SST in the tropical western and central Pacific (30 S-30 N; 130 E-170 W), where the ocean is warm and deep convection is intensive. Twenty months (January 1998 - August, 1999) of GMS data are used, which cover the second half of the strong 1997-1998 El Nino. Brightness temperature at the 11-micron channel is used to identify high-level clouds. The core of convection is identified based on the difference in the brightness temperatures of the 11- and 12-micron channels. Because of the rapid movement of clouds, there is little correlation between clouds six hours apart. When most of deep convection moves to regions of high SST, the domain averaged high-level cloud amount decreases. A +2C change of SST in cloudy regions results in a relative change of -30% in high-level cloud amount. This large change in cloud amount is due to clouds moving from cool regions to warm regions but not the change in SST itself. A reduction in high-level cloud amount in the equatorial region implies an expanded dry upper troposphere in the off-equatorial region, and the greenhouse warming of high clouds and water vapor is reduced through enhanced longwave cooling to space. The results are important for understanding the physical processes relating SST, convection, and water vapor in the tropics. They are also important for validating climate simulations using global general circulation models.

  11. Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.-W.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.H.; Miralles-Wilhelm, F.; Sonenshein, R.

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric processing of JERS-1 L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired over south Florida during 1993-1996 reveals detectable surface changes in the Everglades wetlands. Although our study is limited to south Florida it has implication for other large-scale wetlands, because south Florida wetlands have diverse vegetation types and both managed and natural flow environments. Our analysis reveals that interferometric coherence level is sensitive to wetland vegetation type and to the interferogram time span. Interferograms with time spans less than six months maintain phase observations for all wetland types, allowing characterization of water level changes in different wetland environments. The most noticeable changes occur between the managed and the natural flow wetlands. In the managed wetlands, fringes are organized, follow patterns related to some of the managed water control structures and have high fringe-rate. In the natural flow areas, fringes are irregular and have a low fringe-rate. The high fringe rate in managed areas reflects dynamic water topography caused by high flow rate due to gate operation. Although this organized fringe pattern is not characteristic of most large-scale wetlands, the high level of water level change enables accurate estimation of the wetland InSAR technique, which lies in the range of 5-10??cm. The irregular and low rate fringe pattern in the natural flow area reflects uninterrupted flow that diffuses water efficiently and evenly. Most of the interferograms in the natural flow area show an elongated fringe located along the transitional zone between salt- and fresh-water wetlands, reflecting water level changes due to ocean tides. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Holocene depositional environments and surface-level changes at Lake Fryxell, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whittaker, T.E.; Hall, B.L.; Hendy, C.H.; Spaulding, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    We report on Holocene surface-level variations of Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, as determined from multi-proxy analyses of 18 sediment cores. During this time accumulating sediments were predominantly aeolian sand with algal and carbonate laminae. Based on stratigraphy, mineralogy and diatom assemblages we suggest some carbonate laminae were deposited when lake level dropped, leading to concentration and subsequent precipitation of salts. Although lake level appears to have remained relatively stable throughout the Holocene, minor (<4.5 m below present) lowstands occurred at approximately 6400, 4700, 3800 and ??? 1600 cal. yr BP. The stability of Lake Fryxell during the Holocene contrasts with large-scale variability at other Dry Valleys lakes (eg, Lake Vanda) and with suggestions from chemical diffusion models of a near-desiccation at ???1200 cal. yr BP. The reason for the comparative stability of Lake Fryxell is uncertain, but may be the result of basin morphology and the number, aspect and proximity of meltwater sources. ?? 2008 SAGE Publications.

  13. Using continuous surface water level and temperature data to characterize hydrological connectivity in riparian wetlands.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Alvaro; Gonzalez-Sanchís, Maria; Gallardo, Belinda; Comín, Francisco A

    2011-12-01

    Methods to characterize hydrological connectivity at riparian wetlands are necessary for ecosystem management given its importance over ecosystem structure and functioning. In this paper, we aimed to describe hydrological connectivity at one Ebro River reach (NE Spain) and test a method to perform such characterization. Continuous surface water level and temperature data were recorded at five riparian wetlands during the period October 2006-June 2007. Combining water level and temperature, we classified the examined wetlands in three groups, which mainly differed in the dominant water source during different flood stages. Firstly, a comparison of water level fluctuations in riparian wetlands with those in the river channel during events with different characteristics was used to describe hydrological connectivity. Such comparison was also used to extract quantitative hydrological connectivity descriptors as the wetland response initiation time. Secondly, water temperature series were divided in phases with different average, range and daily oscillation, and these parameters were interpreted for each phase to identify dominant flowpaths. By doing so, a more complete description of hydrological connectivity was achieved. Our method provided useful insights to describe hydrological connectivity using a qualitative approach that can be expanded if required to include quantitative parameters for studies of biotic assemblages or ecosystem processes.

  14. A Response Surface Methodology for Bi-Level Integrated System Synthesis (BLISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altus, Troy David; Sobieski, Jaroslaw (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The report describes a new method for optimization of engineering systems such as aerospace vehicles whose design must harmonize a number of subsystems and various physical phenomena, each represented by a separate computer code, e.g., aerodynamics, structures, propulsion, performance, etc. To represent the system internal couplings, the codes receive output from other codes as part of their inputs. The system analysis and optimization task is decomposed into subtasks that can be executed concurrently, each subtask conducted using local state and design variables and holding constant a set of the system-level design variables. The subtasks results are stored in form of the Response Surfaces (RS) fitted in the space of the system-level variables to be used as the subtask surrogates in a system-level optimization whose purpose is to optimize the system objective(s) and to reconcile the system internal couplings. By virtue of decomposition and execution concurrency, the method enables a broad workfront in organization of an engineering project involving a number of specialty groups that might be geographically dispersed, and it exploits the contemporary computing technology of massively concurrent and distributed processing. The report includes a demonstration test case of supersonic business jet design.

  15. Multi-level, multi-scale resource selection functions and resistance surfaces for conservation planning: Pumas as a case study.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Katherine A; Vickers, T Winston; Ernest, Holly B; Boyce, Walter M

    2017-01-01

    The importance of examining multiple hierarchical levels when modeling resource use for wildlife has been acknowledged for decades. Multi-level resource selection functions have recently been promoted as a method to synthesize resource use across nested organizational levels into a single predictive surface. Analyzing multiple scales of selection within each hierarchical level further strengthens multi-level resource selection functions. We extend this multi-level, multi-scale framework to modeling resistance for wildlife by combining multi-scale resistance surfaces from two data types, genetic and movement. Resistance estimation has typically been conducted with one of these data types, or compared between the two. However, we contend it is not an either/or issue and that resistance may be better-modeled using a combination of resistance surfaces that represent processes at different hierarchical levels. Resistance surfaces estimated from genetic data characterize temporally broad-scale dispersal and successful breeding over generations, whereas resistance surfaces estimated from movement data represent fine-scale travel and contextualized movement decisions. We used telemetry and genetic data from a long-term study on pumas (Puma concolor) in a highly developed landscape in southern California to develop a multi-level, multi-scale resource selection function and a multi-level, multi-scale resistance surface. We used these multi-level, multi-scale surfaces to identify resource use patches and resistant kernel corridors. Across levels, we found puma avoided urban, agricultural areas, and roads and preferred riparian areas and more rugged terrain. For other landscape features, selection differed among levels, as did the scales of selection for each feature. With these results, we developed a conservation plan for one of the most isolated puma populations in the U.S. Our approach captured a wide spectrum of ecological relationships for a population, resulted in

  16. Multi-level, multi-scale resource selection functions and resistance surfaces for conservation planning: Pumas as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, T. Winston; Ernest, Holly B.; Boyce, Walter M.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of examining multiple hierarchical levels when modeling resource use for wildlife has been acknowledged for decades. Multi-level resource selection functions have recently been promoted as a method to synthesize resource use across nested organizational levels into a single predictive surface. Analyzing multiple scales of selection within each hierarchical level further strengthens multi-level resource selection functions. We extend this multi-level, multi-scale framework to modeling resistance for wildlife by combining multi-scale resistance surfaces from two data types, genetic and movement. Resistance estimation has typically been conducted with one of these data types, or compared between the two. However, we contend it is not an either/or issue and that resistance may be better-modeled using a combination of resistance surfaces that represent processes at different hierarchical levels. Resistance surfaces estimated from genetic data characterize temporally broad-scale dispersal and successful breeding over generations, whereas resistance surfaces estimated from movement data represent fine-scale travel and contextualized movement decisions. We used telemetry and genetic data from a long-term study on pumas (Puma concolor) in a highly developed landscape in southern California to develop a multi-level, multi-scale resource selection function and a multi-level, multi-scale resistance surface. We used these multi-level, multi-scale surfaces to identify resource use patches and resistant kernel corridors. Across levels, we found puma avoided urban, agricultural areas, and roads and preferred riparian areas and more rugged terrain. For other landscape features, selection differed among levels, as did the scales of selection for each feature. With these results, we developed a conservation plan for one of the most isolated puma populations in the U.S. Our approach captured a wide spectrum of ecological relationships for a population, resulted in

  17. Improving Limit Surface Search Algorithms in RAVEN Using Acceleration Schemes: Level II Milestone

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Sen, Ramazan Sonat; Smith, Curtis Lee

    2015-07-01

    , subject of the analysis. These methodologies are named, in the RAVEN environment, adaptive sampling strategies. These methodologies infer system responses from surrogate models constructed from already existing samples (produced using high fidelity simulations) and suggest the most relevant location (coordinate in the input space) of the next sampling point to be explored in the uncertain/parametric domain. When using those methodologies, it is possible to understand features of the system response with a small number of carefully selected samples. This report focuses on the development and improvement of the limit surface search. The limit surface is an important concept in system reliability analysis. Without going into the details, which will be covered later in the report, the limit surface could be briefly described as an hyper-surface in the system uncertainty/parametric space separating the regions leading to a prescribed system outcome. For example, if the uncertainty/parametric space is the one generated by the reactor power level and the duration of the batteries, the system is a nuclear power plant and the system outcome discriminating variable is the clad failure in a station blackout scenario, then the limit surface separates the combinations of reactor power level and battery duration that lead to clad failure from the ones that do not.

  18. Resonances and thresholds in the Rydberg-level population of multiply charged ions at solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedeljković, Lj. D.; Nedeljković, N. N.

    1998-12-01

    We present a theoretical study of resonances and thresholds, two specific features of Rydberg-state formation of multiply charged ions (Z=6, 7, and 8) escaping a solid surface at intermediate velocities (v~1 a.u.) in the normal emergence geometry. The resonances are recognized in pronounced maxima of the experimentally observed population curves of Ar VIII ions for resonant values of the principal quantum number n=nres=11 and for the angular momentum quantum numbers l=1 and 2. Absence of optical signals in detectors of beam-foil experiments for n>nthr of S VI and Cl VII ions (with l=0, 1, and 2) and Ar VIII for l=0 is interpreted as a threshold phenomenon. An interplay between resonance and threshold effects is established within the framework of quantum dynamics of the low angular momentum Rydberg-state formation, based on a generalization of Demkov-Ostrovskii's charge-exchange model. In the model proposed, the Ar VIII resonances appear as a consequence of electron tunneling in the very vicinity of the ion-surface potential barrier top and at some critical ion-surface distances Rc. The observed thresholds are explained by means of a decay mechanism of ionic Rydberg states formed dominantly above the Fermi level EF of a solid conduction band. The theoretically predicted resonant and threshold values, nres and nthr of the principal quantum number n, as well as the obtained population probabilities Pnl=Pnl(v,Z), are in sufficiently good agreement with all available experimental findings.

  19. Interannual Trends in Southern Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures and Sea Level from Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. A.

    As is shown in last years researches climate changes in Antarctic result in interannual increase trend of surface air temperature and decrease of ice thickness These tendencies are must try in the Southern Ocean hydrological regime For that next remote sensing data AVHRR MCSST data and satellite altimetry data merged data of mission ERS TOPEX Poseidon Jason-1 ENVISAT GFO-1 are used to this task which give information about sea surface temperature SST and sea level anomaly SLA correspondingly According to obtained results SST has positive trend more 0 01 oC yr for 23-yr record 1982-2005 within 300-1000 km northward Antarctic coast However on average for the Southern Ocean SST have negative trend about -0 018 -0 035 oC yr In area of Pacific-Antarctic Ridge and of southern part of Mid Atlantic Ridge decrease rate is more than -0 075 oC yr SLA increases in all area of the Southern Ocean and has average rate about 0 024 -0 026 cm yr for 12-yr record 1993-2005 Around Antarctic SST rate good correspond with the trend analysis of surface air temperature of 8722 0 042 - 0 067oC yr inferred from the satellite 20-yr record Comiso 2000 Nevertheless the observed cooling is intriguing especially since it is compatible with the observed trend in the sea ice cover In the sea ice regions the northernmost positions of the ice edge are shown to be influenced by alternating warm and cold anomalies around the continent This work was partly supported by the Russian Fund of Basic Research Grant 06-05-65061

  20. Energy pumping analysis of skating motion in a half pipe and on a level surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z. C.; Xin, Ming

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an energy pumping mechanism for locomotion is analysed. The pumping is accomplished by exerting forces perpendicular to the direction of motion. The paper attempts to demonstrate an interesting application of the classical mechanics to two sporting events: a person skating in a half pipe and a person travelling on a level surface on a skateboard. The equations of motion based on simplified mechanical models are derived using the Lagrange mechanics. The energy-pumping phenomenon is revealed through numerical simulations with simple pumping actions. The result presented in this paper can be used as an interesting class project in undergraduate mechanics or physics courses. It also motivates potential new applications of energy pumping in many engineering fields.

  1. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of beryllium monohydroxide.

    PubMed

    Koput, Jacek

    2017-01-05

    The accurate potential energy surface of beryllium monohydroxide, BeOH, in its ground electronic state X 2A' has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach in conjunction with the correlation-consistent core-valence basis sets up to septuple-zeta quality. The higher-order electron correlation, scalar relativistic, and adiabatic effects were taken into account. The BeOH molecule was confirmed to be bent at equilibrium, with the BeOH angle of 141.2° and the barrier to linearity of 129 cm(-1) . The vibration-rotation energy levels of the BeOH and BeOD isotopologues were predicted using a variational approach and compared with recent experimental data. The results can be useful in a further analysis of high-resolution vibration-rotation spectra of these interesting species. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of sulfur dioxide.

    PubMed

    Koput, Jacek

    2017-05-05

    An accurate potential energy surface of sulfur dioxide, SO2 , in its ground electronic state X∼ 1A1 has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach in conjunction with the correlation-consistent basis sets up to septuple-zeta quality. The results obtained with the conventional and explicitly correlated coupled-cluster methods are compared. The role of the core-electron correlation, higher-order valence-electron correlation, scalar relativistic, and adiabatic effects in determining the structure and dynamics of the SO2 molecule is discussed. The vibration-rotation energy levels of the (32) SO2 and (34) SO2 isotopologues were predicted using a variational approach. It was shown that the inclusion of the aforementioned effects was mandatory to attain the "spectroscopic" accuracy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Selection of replacement material for the failed surface level gauge wire in Hanford waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Anantatmula, R.P.; Pitman, S.G.; Lund, A.L.

    1995-10-01

    Surface level gauges fabricated from AISI Type 316 stainless steel (316) wire failed after only a few weeks of operation in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The wire failure was determined to be due to chloride ion assisted corrosion of the 316 wire. Radiation-induced breakdown of the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) riser liners is suspected to be the primary source of the chloride ions. An extensive literature search followed by expert concurrence was undertaken to select a replacement material for the wire. Platinum (Pt){minus}20 % Iridium (Ir) alloy was selected as the replacement material from tile candidate materials, P-20% Ir, Pt-1O% Rhodium (Rh), Pt-20%Rh and Hastelloy C-22. The selection was made on the basis of the alloy`s immunity towards acidic and basic environments as well as its adequate tensile properties in the fully annealed state.

  4. Reactive ion etching-assisted surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements on the single nanoparticle level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Si-Yi; Jiang, Xiang-Xu; Wei, Xin-Pan; Lee, Shuit-Tong E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; He, Yao E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; Xu, Ting-Ting

    2014-06-16

    Single-nanoparticle surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurement is of essential importance for both fundamental research and practical applications. In this work, we develop a class of single-particle SERS approaches, i.e., reactive ion etching (RIE)-assisted SERS measurements correlated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) strategy (RIE/SERS/SEM), enabling precise and high-resolution identification of single gold nanoparticle (AuNP) in facile and reliable manners. By using AuNP-coated silicon wafer and quartz glass slide as models, we further employ the developed RIE/SERS/SEM method for interrogating the relationship between SERS substrates and enhancement factor (EF) on the single particle level. Together with theoretical calculation using an established finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method, we demonstrate silicon wafer as superior SERS substrates, facilitating improvement of EF values.

  5. Level of agreement between coding sources of percentage total body surface area burnt (%TBSA).

    PubMed

    Watterson, Dina; Cleland, Heather; Picton, Natalie; Simpson, Pam M; Gabbe, Belinda J

    2011-01-01

    The percentage of total body surface area burnt (%TBSA) is a critical measure of burn injury severity and a key predictor of burn injury outcome. This study evaluated the level of agreement between four sources of %TBSA using 120 cases identified through the Victorian State Trauma Registry. Expert clinician, ICD-10-AM, Abbreviated Injury Scale, and burns registry coding were compared using measures of agreement. There was near-perfect agreement (weighted Kappa statistic 0.81-1) between all sources of data, suggesting that ICD-10-AM is a valid source of %TBSA and use of ICD-10-AM codes could reduce the resource used by trauma and burns registries capturing this information.

  6. BOREAS Level-2 MAS Surface Reflectance and Temperature Images in BSQ Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey (Editor); Lobitz, Brad; Spanner, Michael; Strub, Richard; Lobitz, Brad

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Staff Science Aircraft Data Acquisition Program focused on providing the research teams with the remotely sensed aircraft data products they needed to compare and spatially extend point results. The MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) images, along with other remotely sensed data, were collected to provide spatially extensive information over the primary study areas. This information includes biophysical parameter maps such as surface reflectance and temperature. Collection of the MAS images occurred over the study areas during the 1994 field campaigns. The level-2 MAS data cover the dates of 21-Jul-1994, 24-Jul-1994, 04-Aug-1994, and 08-Aug-1994. The data are not geographically/geometrically corrected; however, files of relative X and Y coordinates for each image pixel were derived by using the C130 navigation data in a MAS scan model. The data are provided in binary image format files.

  7. BOREAS Level-4c AVHRR-LAC Ten-Day Composite Images: Surface Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, Josef; Chen, Jing; Huang, Fengting; Nickeson, Jaime; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Staff Science Satellite Data Acquisition Program focused on providing the research teams with the remotely sensed satellite data products they needed to compare and spatially extend point results. Manitoba Remote Sensing Center (MRSC) and BOREAS Information System (BORIS) personnel acquired, processed, and archived data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments on the NOAA-11 and -14 satellites. The AVHRR data were acquired by CCRS and were provided to BORIS for use by BOREAS researchers. These AVHRR level-4c data are gridded, 10-day composites of surface parameters produced from sets of single-day images. Temporally, the 10-day compositing periods begin 11-Apr-1994 and end 10-Sep-1994. Spatially, the data cover the entire BOREAS region. The data are stored in binary image format files. Note: Some of the data files on the BOREAS CD-ROMs have been compressed using the Gzip program.

  8. Facet personality and surface-level diversity as team mental model antecedents: implications for implicit coordination.

    PubMed

    Fisher, David M; Bell, Suzanne T; Dierdorff, Erich C; Belohlav, James A

    2012-07-01

    Team mental models (TMMs) have received much attention as important drivers of effective team processes and performance. Less is known about the factors that give rise to these shared cognitive structures. We examined potential antecedents of TMMs, with a specific focus on team composition variables, including various facets of personality and surface-level diversity. Further, we examined implicit coordination as an important outcome of TMMs. Results suggest that team composition in terms of the cooperation facet of agreeableness and racial diversity were significantly related to team-focused TMM similarity. TMM similarity was also positively predictive of implicit coordination, which mediated the relationship between TMM similarity and team performance. Post hoc analyses revealed a significant interaction between the trust facet of agreeableness and racial diversity in predicting TMM similarity. Results are discussed in terms of facilitating the emergence of TMMs and corresponding implications for team-related human resource practices. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. A Low-Voltage Rotary Actuator Fabricated Using a Five-Level Polysilicon Surface Micromachining Technology

    SciTech Connect

    JAKUBCZAK II,JEROME F.; KRYGOWSKI,THOMAS W.; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; RODGERS,M. STEVEN; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.

    1999-09-22

    The design, fabrication and characterization of a low-voltage rotary stepper motor are presented in this work. Using a five-level polysilicon MEMS technology, steps were taken to increase the capacitance over previous stepper motor designs to generate high torque at low voltages. A low-friction hub was developed to minimize frictional loads due to rubbing surfaces, producing an estimated resistive torque of about 6 pN-m. This design also allowed investigations into the potential benefit of using hard materials such as silicon nitride for lining of both the stationary and rotating hub components. The result is an electrostatic stepper motor capable of operation at less than six volts.

  10. Estimation of biologically damaging UV levels in marine surface waters with DNA and viral dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Steven W; Jeffrey, Wade H; Suttle, Curtis A; Mitchell, David L

    2002-09-01

    We have surveyed the biologically harmful radiation penetrating the water column along a transect in the western Gulf of Mexico using dosimeters consisting of intact viruses or naked calf-thymus DNA (ctDNA). The indigenous marine bacteriophage PWH3a-P1, which lytically infects the heterotrophic bacterium Vibrio natriegens (strain PWH3a), displayed decay rates for infectivity approaching 1.0 h(-1) in surface waters when deployed in a seawater-based dosimeter. The accumulation of pyrimidine dimers in ctDNA dosimeters provided a strong correlation to these results, with pyrimidine dimers representing more than 0.3% (up to ca 3800 dimers Mb(-1) DNA) of the total DNA in dosimeters exposed to sea surface levels of solar radiation. The results demonstrate a strong correlation between the dimer formation in the DNA dosimeters, the decay rates of viral infectivity and the penetration of UVB radiation into the water column. The decay of viral infectivity attenuated with depth in a manner similar to the decay of solar radiation and was still significant at 10 m in offshore oligotrophic water and at dimer frequencies less than 0.1% (ca 200-300 dimers Mb(-1) DNA).

  11. Reduction of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ levels favors plasma membrane surface exposure of calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Tufi, R; Panaretakis, T; Bianchi, K; Criollo, A; Fazi, B; Di Sano, F; Tesniere, A; Kepp, O; Paterlini-Brechot, P; Zitvogel, L; Piacentini, M; Szabadkai, G; Kroemer, G

    2008-02-01

    Some chemotherapeutic agents can elicit apoptotic cancer cell death, thereby activating an anticancer immune response that influences therapeutic outcome. We previously reported that anthracyclins are particularly efficient in inducing immunogenic cell death, correlating with the pre-apoptotic exposure of calreticulin (CRT) on the plasma membrane surface of anthracyclin-treated tumor cells. Here, we investigated the role of cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis on CRT exposure. A neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) failed to expose CRT in response to anthracyclin treatment. This defect in CRT exposure could be overcome by the overexpression of Reticulon-1C, a manipulation that led to a decrease in the Ca(2+) concentration within the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. The combination of Reticulon-1C expression and anthracyclin treatment yielded more pronounced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) depletion than either of the two manipulations alone. Chelation of intracellular (and endoplasmic reticulum) Ca(2+), targeted expression of the ligand-binding domain of the IP(3) receptor and inhibition of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pump reduced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) load and promoted pre-apoptotic CRT exposure on the cell surface, in SH-SY5Y and HeLa cells. These results provide evidence that endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) levels control the exposure of CRT.

  12. Fabrication and surface enhanced Raman scattering effect of centimeter level AgCuAu composite nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dapeng; Zhang, Song; Yang, Wei; Chen, Jian

    2017-10-01

    Centimeter level AgCuAu composite nanowires were prepared by a solid-state ionics method under a direct current electric field (DCEF) using fast ionic conductor RbAg4I5 films and vacuum thermal evaporation method. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the AuAgCu composite nanowires were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), respectively. Raman enhancement performance of the AgCuAu composite nanowires substrates was detected by Rhodamine 6G (R6G) aqueous solutions as probe molecules. Long-range order and short-range order AgCuAu composite nanowires with the length of 1 cm were prepared. The nanowires were bamboo-shaped with high surface roughness and the diameters of nanowires ranged from 60 to 100 nm. The molar ratio of Ag:Cu:Au in composite nanowires is 15:2:1. The intrinsic Raman peaks of 10-16 mol/L R6G at 612, 773, 1125, 1182, 1307, 1361, 1418, 1506, 1545, 1575, 1597, 1650 cm-1 are all present when AgCuAu composite nanowires were used as the SERS substrates.

  13. Evaluation of pressure transducers to measure surface level in the waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.J.; Colson, J.B.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the results of tests conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine if pressure transducers can be used to measure the surface level in the waste tanks. A survey was first conducted to evaluate which, if any, commercially available pressure transducers were available that could meet the requirements for use in the waste tanks. More than 35 companies were contacted to determine if they manufactured a pressure transducer that could be used in the 101-SY waste tank. The three basic requirements for a pressure transducer for this application were that they were radiation-hardened, could withstand a caustic environment, and were certified to be intrinsically safe. No manufacturer was able to meet all three of these requirements with a commercially available product. Seven companies were able to meet the requirements for being radiation-hardened and being able to withstand the caustic environment. However, only two of the nine companies were willing to supply a pressure transducer for laboratory testing. The two pressure transducers that were tested in this program were the VEGA D36-38 from HiTech Technologies, Inc., and the KP-1911-A from Kaman Instrumentation Corporation. Pressure transducers operate on the principle that the pressure at the location of a sensor increases directly with the depth of the liquid above it. A liquid is required in order for these devices to operate. For these tests, water was first used to determine the ideal operation of the devices, then the devices were placed in a 101-SY waste tank simulant. The simulant had a specific gravity of 1.96 and had the consistency similar to the convective layer in the 101-SY waste tank. In order to determine the surface level with pressure transducers, the density of the material needs to be known.

  14. Work plan for transition of SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect

    McClees, J.; Truitt, R.W.

    1994-10-12

    The purpose of this effort is to transfer operating and maintenance responsibility for the 241-SY-101 data acquisition and control system (DACS-1) from Los Alamos National Laboratory to Westinghouse Hanford Company. This work plan defines the tasks required for a successful turnover. It identifies DACS-1 transition, deliverables, responsible organizations and individuals, interfaces, cost, and schedule. The transition plan will discuss all required hardware, software, documentation, maintenance, operations, and training for use at Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101. The transfer of responsibilities for DACS-1 to WHC is contingent on final approval of applicable Acceptance for Beneficial Use documentation by Waste Tank Operations. The DACS-1 was designed to provide data monitoring, display, and storage for Tank 241-SY-101. The DACS-1 also provides alarm and control of all the hydrogen mitigation testing systems, as well as ancillary systems and equipment (HVAC, UPS, etc.) required to achieve safe and reliable operation of the testing systems in the tank.

  15. The contribution of neighbouring countries to pesticide levels in Dutch surface waters.

    PubMed

    Van 'T Zelfde, M; Tamis, W L M; Vijver, M G; De Snoo, G R

    2011-01-01

    Compared with other European countries, Dutch consumption of pesticides is high, particularly in agriculture, with many of the compounds found in surface waters in high concentrations and various standards being exceeded. Surface water quality is routinely monitored and the data obtained are published in the Dutch Pesticides Atlas. One important mechanism for reducing pesticide levels in surface waters is authorisation policy, which proceeds on the assumption that the pollution concerned has taken place in the Netherlands. The country straddles the delta of several major European rivers, however, and as river basins do not respect national borders some of the water quality problems will derive from neighbouring countries. Against this background the general question addressed in this article is the following: To what extent do countries neighbouring on the Netherlands contribute to pesticide pollution of Dutch surface waters? To answer this question, data from the Pesticides Atlas for the period 2005-2009 were used. Border zones with Belgium and Germany were defined and the data for these zones compared with Dutch data. In the analyses, due allowance was also made for authorised and non-authorised compounds and for differences between flowing and stagnant waters. Monitoring efforts in the border zones and in the Netherlands were also characterised, showing that efforts in the former are similar to those in the rest of the country. In the border zone with Belgium the relative number of non-authorised pesticides exceeding the standards is clearly higher than in the rest of the Netherlands. These exceedances are observed mainly in flowing waters. In contrast, there is no difference in the relative number of standard-exceeding measurements between the border zones and the rest of the Netherlands. In the boundary zones the array of standard-exceeding compounds clearly deviates from that in the rest of the Netherlands, with compounds authorised in the neighbouring

  16. Levels of Organochlorine Pesticides and Heavy Metals in Surface Waters of Konya Closed Basin, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Mehmet Emin; Ozcan, Senar; Beduk, Fatma; Tor, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), including α-, β-, γ-, and δ-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, dieldrin, aldrin, endrin, endrin aldehyde, endrin ketone, endosulfan I, endosulfan II, endosulfan sulfate, p,p′-DDE, p,p′-DDD, p,p′-DDT, methoxychlor, chlordane I, chlordane II, and heavy metals, such as As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ni in surface water samples from the Konya closed basin were determined to evaluate the level of contamination. Among all HCH isomers, β-HCH is the main isomer with a concentration range of 0.015–0.065 μg/L. DDE, DDD, and DDT were almost determined in all samples, in which DDE isomer had the highest concentration ranged from not detected to 0.037 μg/L. In all studied OCPs, aldrin showed the highest concentration at 0.220 μg/L. The concentrations of heavy metals in water samples were observed with order: Mn < Cu < Ni < As < Cr < Fe. In some samples, As, Fe, and Cr concentrations exceeded the drinking water quality recommended by EU, US EPA, WHO, and Turkish Regulation, while Cu, Ni, and Mn concentrations are below the guideline values. The levels of both OCPs and heavy metals were also compared with other previously published data. PMID:23533363

  17. Characterization of the relationship of mixing height development and collapse to surface-level ozone concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotter, Steven Mack

    The eastern Tennessee ridge-and-valley region has recently experienced tropospheric ozone levels that approach the national ambient air quality standards. The objective of this research was to characterize the atmospheric mixing height and vertical structure of ozone during morning and evening at a site within the ridge- and-valley. Historically, high ozone concentrations in eastern Tennessee occurred in summer months during hot, stagnant days. Thus, this study focused on periods when the region was under the influence of high pressure systems and elevated temperatures during July and August, 1995. Meteorological and ozone measurements were made during daytime and nighttime to provide information on the development and subsequent collapse of the mixing height during morning and evening, respectively; measurements were obtained using a tethered balloon sounding system. Morning profiles were characterized by growth of the mixing height and entrainment of upper ozone reservoirs. Evening profiles depicted reduction of the mixing height and growth of the nocturnal, stable boundary layer. Ground-level ozone concentrations decreased whereas ozone concentrations at greater heights (100-300 m) remained comparatively high. This study demonstrated that the entrainment of ozone reservoirs aloft played a significant, if not dominant, role in increased ozone concentrations at the surface. Experimental data were used to construct an alternative model for mixing heights in regions under meteorological conditions of elevated temperatures and high pressure systems.

  18. A Continuous Liquid-Level Sensor for Fuel Tanks Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Pozo, Antonio M.; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco; Rabaza, Ovidio

    2016-01-01

    A standard problem in large tanks at oil refineries and petrol stations is that water and fuel usually occupy the same tank. This is undesirable and causes problems such as corrosion in the tanks. Normally, the water level in tanks is unknown, with the problems that this entails. We propose herein a method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to detect in real time the interfaces in a tank which can simultaneously contain water, gasoline (or diesel) and air. The plasmonic sensor is composed of a hemispherical glass prism, a magnesium fluoride layer, and a gold layer. We have optimized the structural parameters of the sensor from the theoretical modeling of the reflectance curve. The sensor detects water-fuel and fuel-air interfaces and measures the level of each liquid in real time. This sensor is recommended for inflammable liquids because inside the tank there are no electrical or electronic signals which could cause explosions. The sensor proposed has a sensitivity of between 1.2 and 3.5 RIU−1 and a resolution of between 5.7 × 10−4 and 16.5 × 10−4 RIU. PMID:27213388

  19. Correlation and coherence analysis between sea surface temperature and altimetric sea level anomaly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbylut-Górska, Maria; Kosek, Wiesław; Wnęk, Agnieszka; Młocek, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Agnieszka; Popiński, Waldemar; Niedzielski, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    One of the main causes of the sea level variations is the steric effect caused by changes of local sea surface temperature (SST). To show how the altimetric Sea Level Anomaly (SLA) data are related to the SST data, correlation coefficients between them as a function of geographic location were computed. The analysis showed a high positive correlation (about 0.7), especially in the Northern and South-Eastern parts of the Pacific Ocean and a large part of the Atlantic Ocean. There is a negative correlation of about 0.5 in the South-East part of Indian Ocean, on the Arafura Sea and the Red Sea. In addition the time-frequency coherence and semblance functions between the SLA and SST data were calculated using Fourier transform band pass filter. The maps of such coherence and semblance functions in frequency bands corresponding to the annual oscillation and its integer multiplicities were computed. The most imporntat contribution to the correlation coefficient values has the annual oscillation in the SST and SLA data.

  20. A Continuous Liquid-Level Sensor for Fuel Tanks Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Antonio M; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco; Rabaza, Ovidio

    2016-05-19

    A standard problem in large tanks at oil refineries and petrol stations is that water and fuel usually occupy the same tank. This is undesirable and causes problems such as corrosion in the tanks. Normally, the water level in tanks is unknown, with the problems that this entails. We propose herein a method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to detect in real time the interfaces in a tank which can simultaneously contain water, gasoline (or diesel) and air. The plasmonic sensor is composed of a hemispherical glass prism, a magnesium fluoride layer, and a gold layer. We have optimized the structural parameters of the sensor from the theoretical modeling of the reflectance curve. The sensor detects water-fuel and fuel-air interfaces and measures the level of each liquid in real time. This sensor is recommended for inflammable liquids because inside the tank there are no electrical or electronic signals which could cause explosions. The sensor proposed has a sensitivity of between 1.2 and 3.5 RIU(-1) and a resolution of between 5.7 × 10(-4) and 16.5 × 10(-4) RIU.

  1. Levels of organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals in surface waters of Konya closed basin, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet Emin; Ozcan, Senar; Beduk, Fatma; Tor, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), including α -, β -, γ -, and δ -hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, dieldrin, aldrin, endrin, endrin aldehyde, endrin ketone, endosulfan I, endosulfan II, endosulfan sulfate, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDT, methoxychlor, chlordane I, chlordane II, and heavy metals, such as As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ni in surface water samples from the Konya closed basin were determined to evaluate the level of contamination. Among all HCH isomers, β -HCH is the main isomer with a concentration range of 0.015-0.065 μ g/L. DDE, DDD, and DDT were almost determined in all samples, in which DDE isomer had the highest concentration ranged from not detected to 0.037 μ g/L. In all studied OCPs, aldrin showed the highest concentration at 0.220 μ g/L. The concentrations of heavy metals in water samples were observed with order: Mnlevels of both OCPs and heavy metals were also compared with other previously published data.

  2. Fabrication of piezoelectric P(VDF-TrFE) microcantilevers by wafer-level surface micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sharon Roslyn; Yao, Kui; Eng Hock Tay, Francis

    2013-09-01

    A wafer-level microfabrication process using standard cleanroom facilities was established and implemented to batch produce free-standing poly(vinylidine fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems cantilevers via surface micromachining. Furthermore, the fabrication of a prototype of double-level cantilevers was demonstrated. The fabrication of working piezoelectric polymer cantilever structures required the deposition and patterning of multiple polymer and metal layers including the pattering and removal of the sacrificial layer, which posed many challenging limitations on the chemicals and processing conditions. Dedicatedly selected chemicals and materials were used in our fabrication, including water soluble PVA with an appropriate molecular weight and degree of hydrolysis as the sacrificial layer for releasing the cantilever structure. The temperature in the whole process was kept low with controlled durations, due to the sensitivity of the polymers to thermal impacts. The P(VDF-TrFE) active layers, after going through the fabrication, exhibited ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties comparable to the intact films. Furthermore, the free-standing P(VDF-TrFE) cantilevers exhibited piezoelectric vibrations under electrical excitation. This low temperature fabrication method, which only involves mild chemicals, also has the potential to be integrated with CMOS processes.

  3. [Serum hormonal levels in diamond-extracting industry workers of Yakutia, with surface and underground type of work].

    PubMed

    Seliatitskaia, V G; Kuz'minova, O I; Nikolaev, Iu A; Galanova, Zh M

    2011-01-01

    The authors studied influence of work type (surface or underground) on serum hormonal levels in male workers of "International" mine within diamond-extracting complex of Yakutia-Sakha Republic. The results obtained show compensation and adaptation changes of endocrine system in males engaged into underground work vs. those of surface work.

  4. Intricate Mechanisms-on-a Chip Enabled by 5-Level Surface Micromachining

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; McWhorter, P.J.; Miller, S.L.; Rodgers, M.S.; Smith, J.H.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1999-03-30

    Surface micromachining generally offers more design freedom than related technologies, and it is the technology of choice for most microelectromechanical applications that require multi-level structures. However, the design flexibility that surface micromachining offers is not without limitations. In addition to determining how to fabricate devices in a planar world, the designer also needs to consider issues such as film quality, thickness, residual stress, topography propagation, stringers, processing limitations, and concerns about surface adhesion [1]. Only a few years ago, these were the types of issues that limited design complexity. As the technology improved, the number of mechanical layers available to the designer became the dominant constraint on system functionality. In response, we developed a 5-level polysilicon fabrication technology [2] that offers an unprecedented level of microelectromechanical complexity with simultaneous increases in system yield and robustness. This paper outlines the application that was the driving force behind this work and describes the first devices specifically designed for and fabricated in this technology. The 5-level fabrication technology developed to support this program is known as SUMMiT-V. Four mechanical layers of polysilicon referred to as polyl, poly2, poly3, and poly4 are fabricated above a polyO electrical interconnect and ground plane layer [2,4]. PolyO is 0.3 pm thick, polyl is 1.0 pm, poly 2 is 1.5 pm, and both poly3 and poly4 are 2.25 pm. All films except polyl and poly2 are separated by 2-pm thick depositions of sacrificial oxide. A 0.5-m sacrificial oxide between polyl and poly2 typically defines the clearance between close mating parts such as hubs and hinges. This entire stack is built on a single crystal substrate with a dielectric foundation of 0.8 pm of nitride over 0.63 m of oxide. Seventeen drawing layer are combined to generate the 14 photolithographic masks used to pattern these films during a

  5. Hepatitis B surface antigen levels during natural history of chronic hepatitis B: a Chinese perspective study.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin-Yan; Lian, Jiang-Shan; Chen, Jian-Yang; Jia, Hong-Yu; Zhang, Yi-Min; Xiang, Dai-Rong; Yu, Liang; Hu, Jian-Hua; Lu, Ying-Feng; Zheng, Lin; Li, Lan-Juan; Yang, Yi-Da

    2014-07-21

    To determine the baseline hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels during the different phases of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients in China. Six hundred and twenty-three hepatitis B virus or un-infected patients not receiving antiviral therapy were analyzed in a cross-sectional study. The CHB patients were classified into five phases: immune-tolerant (IT, n = 108), immune-clearance (IC, n = 161), hepatitis B e antigen negative hepatitis (ENH, n = 149), low-replicative (LR, n = 135), and liver cirrhosis (LC, n = 70). HBsAg was quantified (Abbott ARCHITECT assay) and correlated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA, and serum alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST) in each phase of CHB was also determined. Median HBsAg titers were different in each phase of CHB (P < 0.001): IT (4.85 log10 IU/mL), IC (4.36 log10 IU/mL), ENH (2.95 log10 IU/mL), LR (3.18 log10 IU/mL) and LC (2.69 log10 IU/mL). HBsAg titers were highest in the IT phase and lowest in the LC phase. Serum HBsAg titers showed a strong correlation with HBV viral load in the IC phase (r = 0.683, P < 0.001). No correlation between serum HBsAg level and ALT/AST was observed. The mean baseline HBsAg levels differ significantly during the five phases of CHB, providing evidence on the natural history of HBV infection. HBsAg quantification may predict the effects of immune-modulator or oral nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy.

  6. Comparisons of predicted steady-state levels in rooms with extended- and local-reaction bounding surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Murray; Wareing, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    A combined beam-tracing and transfer-matrix model for predicting steady-state sound-pressure levels in rooms with multilayer bounding surfaces was used to compare the effect of extended- and local-reaction surfaces, and the accuracy of the local-reaction approximation. Three rooms—an office, a corridor and a workshop—with one or more multilayer test surfaces were considered. The test surfaces were a single-glass panel, a double-drywall panel, a carpeted floor, a suspended-acoustical ceiling, a double-steel panel, and glass fibre on a hard backing. Each test surface was modeled as of extended or of local reaction. Sound-pressure levels were predicted and compared to determine the significance of the surface-reaction assumption. The main conclusions were that the difference between modeling a room surface as of extended or of local reaction is not significant when the surface is a single plate or a single layer of material (solid or porous) with a hard backing. The difference is significant when the surface consists of multilayers of solid or porous material and includes a layer of fluid with a large thickness relative to the other layers. The results are partially explained by considering the surface-reflection coefficients at the first-reflection angles.

  7. The association between amalgam dental surfaces and urinary mercury levels in a sample of Albertans, a prevalence study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between number of dental amalgam surfaces and urinary mercury levels. Methods This study uses participant data from a large philanthropic chronic disease prevention program in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Urine samples were analysed for mercury levels (measured in μg/g-creatinine). T-tests were used to determine if differences in urine mercury were statistically significant between persons with no dental amalgam surfaces and one or more dental amalgam surfaces. Linear regression was used to estimate the change in urinary mercury per amalgam surface. Results Urinary mercury levels were statistically significantly higher in participants with amalgam surfaces, with an average difference of 0.55 μg/g-creatinine. Per amalgam surface, we estimated an expected increase of 0.04 μg/g-creatinine. Measured urinary mercury levels were also statistically significantly higher in participants with dental amalgam surfaces following the oral administration of 2,3-dimercaptopropane-l-sulfonate (DMPS) and meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) which are used to mobilize mercury from the blood and tissues. Discussion Our estimates indicate that an individual with seven or more dental amalgam surfaces has 30% to 50% higher urinary mercury levels than an individual without amalgams. This is consistent with past literature that has identified seven amalgam surfaces as an unsafe level of exposure to mercury vapor. Our analysis suggests that continued use of silver amalgam dental fillings for restorative dentistry is a non-negligible, unnecessary source of mercury exposure considering the availability of composite resin alternatives. PMID:23984857

  8. Surface display vectors for selective detection and isolation of high level antibody producing cells.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sabine; Drewello, Delia; Wichter, Johannes; Nommay, Audrey; Wilms, Burkhard; Knopf, Hans-Peter; Jostock, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Cell line generation for production of biopharmaceuticals in mammalian cells usually involves intensive screening of clones to identify the rare high producers. In order to facilitate efficient and selective fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) based enrichment and cloning of antibody producing CHO cells, we developed a special vector setup by inserting a leaky translation termination signal between the heavy chain of an IgG antibody and an IgG transmembrane domain. Partial read-through during translation of the antibody heavy chain leads to display of a subset of the produced antibody on the surface of the expressing cell. We could show that the level of surface expression correlates well with the productivity. By applying FACS, high producing cells can be selectively enriched and cloned. Two sequential FACS enrichment cycles were performed which led to more than eightfold increased productivities of transfected and selected cell populations without cloning. The combination of selective FACS enrichment and FACS cloning with the new vector setup led to a sevenfold higher average productivity of the resulting clones as compared to a reference vector. Productivity and production stability assessment of clones generated with the new vector showed no negative impact of the co-expression of transmembrane antibody. Clone productivities of 4 g/L in a generic shake flask fed-batch model were achieved. Thus, this new vector setup facilitates fast and selective isolation of high producing production cell lines and allows significant reduction of clone screening efforts during cell line development for production cell lines. Additionally, the high productivity of FACS-enriched but non-clonal cell populations supports rapid, high yield, and cost efficient material production in early project phases. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2386-2393. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Analysis of Ultra High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Level 4 Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) studies are often focused on improving accuracy, or understanding and quantifying uncertainties in the measurement, as SST is a leading indicator of climate change and represents the longest time series of any ocean variable observed from space. Over the past several decades SST has been studied with the use of satellite data. This allows a larger area to be studied with much more frequent measurements being taken than direct measurements collected aboard ship or buoys. The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) is an international project that distributes satellite derived sea surface temperatures (SST) data from multiple platforms and sensors. The goal of the project is to distribute these SSTs for operational uses such as ocean model assimilation and decision support applications, as well as support fundamental SST research and climate studies. Examples of near real time applications include hurricane and fisheries studies and numerical weather forecasting. The JPL group has produced a new 1 km daily global Level 4 SST product, the Multiscale Ultrahigh Resolution (MUR), that blends SST data from 3 distinct NASA radiometers: the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer ? Earth Observing System(AMSRE). This new product requires further validation and accuracy assessment, especially in coastal regions.We examined the accuracy of the new MUR SST product by comparing the high resolution version and a lower resolution version that has been smoothed to 19 km (but still gridded to 1 km). Both versions were compared to the same data set of in situ buoy temperature measurements with a focus on study regions of the oceans surrounding North and Central America as well as two smaller regions around the Gulf Stream and California coast. Ocean fronts exhibit high temperature gradients (Roden, 1976), and thus

  10. Adsorption of lithium on the Si(111)7 × 7 surface studied with high resolution core-level spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grehk, T. M.; Larsson, C. U. S.; Prince, N. P.; Flodström, S. A.

    1993-03-01

    Li-adsorption on the Si(111)7 × 7 surface at room temperature has been studied for different metal coverages with core-level spectroscopy. Four Li-induced components are observed in the Si 2p level at high Li-coverages indicating the formation of four thermodynamically stable phases. It is shown that the reaction between the Li atoms and the Si(111)7 × 7 surface takes place in two steps. In the first the surface reconstructs towards a "7 × 1" reconstruction and in the second Li react with the Si-substrate, forming Li suicides, with the Si atom coordinating up to four Li neighbors.

  11. Use of Conformal Mapping to Calculate the Mean Level of the Electromagnetic Field Above the Sea Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, F. N.; Akulinichev, Yu. P.; Anikin, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    A new method is proposed to calculate the mean level of an electromagnetic field propagating along sea paths, based on a numerical solution of the parabolic equation. A way of taking the influence of waviness of the sea surface on the mean level of the field strength of the radio field is proposed. This method is based on the method of conformal mapping of a curvilinear coordinate system above the uneven sea surface onto a Cartesian coordinate system above the sea surface. A comparison with computer simulations obtained using the Monte Carlo method is carried out.

  12. Study to investigate the trace levels of contamination on surfaces when narcotic contraband is concealed in a vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rod; Brittain, Alan H.

    1997-01-01

    When a vehicle is used to transport narcotic contraband material trace levels of that material can be found on surfaces of the vehicle, people associated with the vehicle and surface they contact. The detection of these trace levels can help to target vehicles associated with the smuggling of the contraband. A study to determine the typical levels of narcotic material that can be detected from these surfaces has been performed by personnel from Graseby, using a variety of drug materials. The size and packaging of the drug materials has been prepared to try to reflect that typically found in smuggling operations. These tests show that for all hard drugs easily detectable traces of drug material can be found on the vehicle, the proxy and secondary surfaces handled by the proxy. For detection of cannabis, the condition of the original material had a great bearing ont he reliability of detection.

  13. An efficient and simple method to increase the level of displayed protein on the yeast cell surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Zhuang; Xu, Li-Ming; Liu, Miao; Cao, Yong-Sheng; LaPatra, Scott E; Yin, Jia-Sheng; Liu, Hong-Bai; Lu, Tong-Yan

    2017-04-01

    The development of oral vaccines using yeast surface display technology is an area of intensive study in vaccine development, but the protein level displayed on yeast surfaces is not currently high enough to obtain a robust immune response. To address this issue, we established an efficient and simple method of increasing the level of displayed protein on the yeast cell surface. We used the single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody against the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus isolate Sn1203 as a target display protein. The yeast-derived scFv was first displayed on the yeast surface by galactose induction, and then Escherichia coli-derived scFv was also displayed on the same yeast via an artificial anchoring condition to increase the total scFv level on the yeast surface. The levels of yeast- and E. coli-derived scFv displayed on the yeast cell surface were analyzed by flow cytometry, western blotting, and fluorescent microscopy. The flow cytometry results indicated that when the cells were suspended in phosphate-buffered saline with 1mmol/L glutathione, 0.2mmol/L oxidized glutathione, and 5% dimethyl sulfoxide at 4°C for 6h, the E. coli-derived scFv protein was stably anchored to the yeast cell surface. The mean fluorescence intensity in these experiments, which is an indirect quantitative representation of the surface scFv expression, was three times higher in the treated cells than that in control cells. The western blotting results show two specific protein bands, the smaller of which was identified as the E. coli-derived scFv that was displayed on the yeast cell surface. Cell immunofluorescence is a more direct way to detect differentially produced proteins that are displayed on the yeast cell surface. The fluorescence microscopy results show that both fluorescence corresponding to the yeast-derived scFv and fluorescence corresponding to the E. coli-derived scFv can exist on the cell surface of same yeast cell. This confirms that the E. coli

  14. Semi-Automated Detection of Surface Degradation on Bridges Based on a Level Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiero, A.; Guarnieri, A.; Pirotti, F.; Vettore, A.

    2015-08-01

    Due to the effect of climate factors, natural phenomena and human usage, buildings and infrastructures are subject of progressive degradation. The deterioration of these structures has to be monitored in order to avoid hazards for human beings and for the natural environment in their neighborhood. Hence, on the one hand, monitoring such infrastructures is of primarily importance. On the other hand, unfortunately, nowadays this monitoring effort is mostly done by expert and skilled personnel, which follow the overall data acquisition, analysis and result reporting process, making the whole monitoring procedure quite expensive for the public (and private, as well) agencies. This paper proposes the use of a partially user-assisted procedure in order to reduce the monitoring cost and to make the obtained result less subjective as well. The developed method relies on the use of images acquired with standard cameras by even inexperienced personnel. The deterioration on the infrastructure surface is detected by image segmentation based on a level sets method. The results of the semi-automated analysis procedure are remapped on a 3D model of the infrastructure obtained by means of a terrestrial laser scanning acquisition. The proposed method has been successfully tested on a portion of a road bridge in Perarolo di Cadore (BL), Italy.

  15. Identification of a Key Motif That Determines the Differential Surface Levels of RET and TrkB Tyrosine Kinase Receptors and Controls Depolarization Enhanced RET Surface Insertion*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Zhi; Yan, Jing; Huang, Shu-Hong; Zhao, Ling; Wang, Jue; Chen, Zhe-Yu

    2012-01-01

    The RET tyrosine kinase receptor plays an important role in the development and maintenance of the nervous system. Although the ligand-induced RET signaling pathway has been well described, little is known about the regulation of RET surface expression, which is integral to the cell ability to control the response to ligand stimuli. We found that in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which co-express RET and TrkB, the receptor surface levels of RET are significantly higher than that of TrkB. Using a sequence substitution strategy, we identified a key motif (Box1), which is necessary and sufficient for the differential RET and TrkB surface levels. Furthermore, pharmacological and mutagenesis assays revealed that protein kinase C (PKC) and high K+ depolarization increase RET surface levels through phosphorylation of the Thr675 residue in the Box1 motif. Finally, we found that the phosphorylation status of the Thr675 residue influences RET mediated response to GDNF stimulation. In all, these findings provide a novel mechanism for the modulation of RET surface expression. PMID:22128160

  16. Core-Level Photoemission Investigations of the CADMIUM-TELLURIDE(100) and INDIUM-ANTIMONY(100) Surface and Interfacial Structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Peter James

    1988-12-01

    Photoemission techniques, utilizing a synchrotron light source, were used to analyze the clean (100) surfaces of the zinc-blende semiconductor materials CdTe and InSb. Several interfacial systems involving the surfaces of these materials were also studied, including the CdTe(100)-Ag interface, the CdTe(100)-Sb system, and the InSb(100)-Sn interface. High -energy electron diffraction was also employed to acquire information about of surface structure. A one-domain (2x1) structure was observed for the CdTe(100) surface. Analysis of photoemission spectra of the Cd 4d core level for this surface structure revealed two components resulting from Cd surface atoms. The total intensity of these components accounts for a full monolayer of Cd atoms on the surface. A structural model is discussed commensurate with these results. Photoemission spectra of the Cd and Te 4d core levels indicate that Ag or Sb deposited on the CdTe(100)-(2x1) surface at room temperature do not bound strongly to the surface Cd atoms. The room temperature growth characteristics for these two elements on the CdTe(100)-(2x1) are discussed. The growth at elevated substrate temperatures was also studied for Sb deposition. The InSb(100) surface differed from the CdTe(100) surface. Using molecular beam epitaxy, several structures could be generated for the InSb(100) surface, including a c(8x2), a c(4x4), an asymmetric (1x3), a symmetric (1x3), and a (1x1). Analysis of photoemission intensities and line shapes indicates that the c(4x4) surface is terminated with 1{3 over 4} monolayers of Sb atoms. The c(8x2) surface is found to be terminated with {3over 4} monolayer of In atoms. Structural models for both of these surfaces are proposed based upon the photoemission results and upon models of the similar GaAs(100) structures. The room temperature growth characteristics of grey Sn on the InSb(100)-c(4x4) and InSb(100)-c(8x2) surfaces were studied with photoemission. The discontinuity in the valence band maximum

  17. Lake Storage Measurements For Water Resources Management: Combining Remotely Sensed Water Levels and Surface Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakenridge, G. R.; Birkett, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Presently operating satellite-based radar altimeters have the ability to monitor variations in surface water height for large lakes and reservoirs, and future sensors will expand observational capabilities to many smaller water bodies. Such remote sensing provides objective, independent information where in situ data are lacking or access is restricted. A USDA/NASA (http://www.pecad.fas.usda.gov/cropexplorer/global_reservoir/) program is performing operational altimetric monitoring of the largest lakes and reservoirs around the world using data from the NASA/CNES, NRL, and ESA missions. Public lake-level products from the Global Reservoir and Lake Monitor (GRLM) are a combination of archived and near real time information. The USDA/FAS utilizes the products for assessing international irrigation potential and for crop production estimates; other end-users study climate trends, observe anthropogenic effects, and/or are are involved in other water resources management and regional water security issues. At the same time, the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (http://floodobservatory.colorado.edu/), its NASA GSFC partners (http://oas.gsfc.nasa.gov/floodmap/home.html), and associated MODIS data and automated processing algorithms are providing public access to a growing GIS record of the Earth's changing surface water extent, including changes related to floods and droughts. The Observatory's web site also provide both archival and near real time information, and is based mainly on the highest spatial resolution (250 m) MODIS bands. Therefore, it is now possible to provide on an international basis reservoir and lake storage change measurements entirely from remote sensing, on a frequently updating basis. The volume change values are based on standard numerical procedures used for many decades for analysis of coeval lake area and height data. We provide first results of this combination, including prototype displays for public access and data retrieval of water storage

  18. Tectonic and climatic significance of a late Eocene low-relief, high-level geomorphic surface, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kathryn M.; Chase, Clement G

    1994-01-01

    New paleobotanical data suggest that in the late Eocene the erosion surface which capped the Front Range, Colorado was 2.2-2.3 km in elevation, which is similar to the 2.5-km present elevation of surface remnants. This estimated elevation casts doubt on the conventional belief that the low-relief geomorphic surface was formed by lateral planation of streams to a base level not much higher than sea level and that the present deeply incised canyons must represent Neogene uplift of Colorado. Description of the surface, calculations of sediment volume, and isostatic balance and fluvial landsculpting models demonstrate that while the high elevation of the erosion surface was due to tectonic forces, its smoothness was mostly a result of climatic factors. A sediment balance calculated for the Front Range suggests that from 2 to 4 km of material were eroded by the late Eocene, consistent with fission track ages. This amount of erosion would remove a significant portionof the 7 km of Laramide upper crustal thickening. Isostatic modeling implies that the 2.2-3.3 km elevation was most likely created by lower crustal thickening during the Laramide. A numerical model of fluvial erosion and deposition suggests a way that a late Eocene surface could have formed at this high elevation without incision. A humid climate with a preponderance of small storm events will diffusively smooth topography and is a possible mechanism for formation oflow-relief, high-level surfaces. Paleoclimate models suggest a lack of large strom events in the late Eocene because of cool sea surface temperatures in the equatorial region. Return to a drier but stormier climate post-Eocene could have caused the incision of the surface by young canyons. By this interpretation, regional erosion surfaces may represent regional climatic rather than tectonic conditions.

  19. Tectonic and climatic significance of a late Eocene low-relief, high-level geomorphic surface, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kathryn M.; Chase, Clement G

    1994-01-01

    New paleobotanical data suggest that in the late Eocene the erosion surface which capped the Front Range, Colorado was 2.2-2.3 km in elevation, which is similar to the 2.5-km present elevation of surface remnants. This estimated elevation casts doubt on the conventional belief that the low-relief geomorphic surface was formed by lateral planation of streams to a base level not much higher than sea level and that the present deeply incised canyons must represent Neogene uplift of Colorado. Description of the surface, calculations of sediment volume, and isostatic balance and fluvial landsculpting models demonstrate that while the high elevation of the erosion surface was due to tectonic forces, its smoothness was mostly a result of climatic factors. A sediment balance calculated for the Front Range suggests that from 2 to 4 km of material were eroded by the late Eocene, consistent with fission track ages. This amount of erosion would remove a significant portionof the 7 km of Laramide upper crustal thickening. Isostatic modeling implies that the 2.2-3.3 km elevation was most likely created by lower crustal thickening during the Laramide. A numerical model of fluvial erosion and deposition suggests a way that a late Eocene surface could have formed at this high elevation without incision. A humid climate with a preponderance of small storm events will diffusively smooth topography and is a possible mechanism for formation oflow-relief, high-level surfaces. Paleoclimate models suggest a lack of large strom events in the late Eocene because of cool sea surface temperatures in the equatorial region. Return to a drier but stormier climate post-Eocene could have caused the incision of the surface by young canyons. By this interpretation, regional erosion surfaces may represent regional climatic rather than tectonic conditions.

  20. Level-set immersed boundary method for simulating 3D turbulent free surface flows in arbitrarily complex open channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seokkoo; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-11-01

    A numerical method is developed for simulating three-dimensional free surface flows in open channels of arbitrarily complex bathymetry. The complex geometry is handled using the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method of Ge and Sotiropoulos (J. of Computational Physics, 2007) and free surface deformation is modeled by employing a two-phase flow level-set approach. A new method is developed for solving the level-set equations and the reinitialization equation in the context of the CURVIB framework. The method is validated for various free-surface model problems and its capabilities are demonstrated by applying to simulate turbulent free-surface flow in an open channel with embedded complex hydraulic structures.

  1. One-level modeling for diagnosing surface winds over complex terrain. II - Applicability to short-range forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, P.; Getenio, B.; Zak-Rosenthal, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Alpert and Getenio (1988) modification of the Mass and Dempsey (1985) one-level sigma-surface model was used to study four synoptic events that included two winter cases (a Cyprus low and a Siberian high) and two summer cases. Results of statistical verification showed that the model is not only capable of diagnosing many details of surface mesoscale flow, but might also be useful for various applications which require operative short-range prediction of the diurnal changes of high-resolution surface flow over complex terrain, for example, in locating wildland fires, determining the dispersion of air pollutants, and predicting changes in wind energy or of surface wind for low-level air flights.

  2. Urbanization increased metal levels in lake surface sediment and catchment topsoil of waterscape parks.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Bo; Yu, Shen; Li, Gui-Lin; Liu, Yi; Yu, Guang-Bin; Deng, Hong; Wu, Sheng-Chun; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2012-08-15

    Lake surface sediment is mainly derived from topsoil in its catchment. We hypothesized that distribution of anthropogenic metals would be homogenous in lake surface sediment and the lake's catchment topsoil. Anthropogenic metal distributions (cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn)) in fourteen waterscape parks were investigated in surface sediments and catchment topsoils and possible source homogeneity was tested using stable Pb isotopic ratio analysis. The parks were located along an urbanization gradient consisting of suburban (SU), developing urban (DIU), developed urban (DDU), and central urban core (CUC) areas in Shanghai, China. Results indicated that surface lake sediments and catchment topsoils in the CUC parks were highly contaminated by the investigated anthropogenic metals. Total metal contents in surface sediment and topsoil gradually increased along the urbanization gradient from the SU to CUC areas. Generally, the surface sediments had greater total metal contents than their catchment topsoils. These results suggest that urbanization drives the anthropogenic metal enrichment in both surface sediment and its catchment topsoil in the waterscape parks. Soil fine particles (<63 μm) and surface sediments had similar enrichment ratios of metals, suggesting that surface runoff might act as a carrier for metals transporting from catchment to lake. Stable Pb isotope ratio analysis revealed that the major anthropogenic Pb source in surface sediment was coal combustion as in the catchment topsoil. Urbanization also correlated with chemical fractionation of metals in both surface sediment and catchment topsoil. From the SU to the CUC parks, amounts of labile metal fractions increased while the residual fraction of those metals remained rather constant. In short, urbanization in Shanghai drives anthropogenic metal distribution in environmental matrices and the sources were homogenous. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide on the surface morphology and zinc oxide levels of IRM fillings.

    PubMed

    Rostein, I; Cohenca, N; Mor, C; Moshonov, J; Stabholz, A

    1995-12-01

    The effect of 10% carbamide peroxide or 10% hydrogen peroxide on the surface morphology and zinc oxide levels of IRM fillings was tested. Ninety IRM samples were treated with either 10% carbamide peroxide, 10% hydrogen peroxide or phosphate buffer which served as control. Treatment consisted of placing the samples in a dry incubator at 37 degrees C for 1, 3 or 7 days. At each time point, the samples were removed from the test solutions, dried and prepared for surface scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometric analysis. After 3 days, 10% carbamide peroxide significantly reduced the zinc oxide levels as compared to the 10% hydrogen peroxide group (<0.01) and the controls (p<0.01). 10% hydrogen peroxide reduced the zinc oxide levels similarly to the control. No significant changes in the zinc oxide levels were found between 3 and 7 days in any of the groups tested. Microscopy examination of the carbamide peroxide group revealed granular surface with well defined crystalline areas. In the hydrogen peroxide group, numerous cracks with multiple sun burst-like areas were found. At the macroscopic level, the samples of this group appeared cracked and more swollen, as compared to controls and samples treated with carbamide peroxide. In conclusion, both 10% carbamide peroxide and 10% hydrogen peroxide altered the surface morphology and the zinc oxide levels of IRM fillings, but their modes of action differed.

  4. Adhesion of biofilms to inert surfaces: A molecular level approach directed at the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Baty, A M; Frølund, B; Geesey, G G; Langille, S; Quintero, E J; Suci, P A; Weiner, R M

    1996-01-01

    Protein/ligand interactions involved in mediating adhesion between microorganisms and biological surfaces have been well-characterized in some cases (e.g. pathogen/host interactions). The strategies microorganisms employ for attachment to inert surfaces have not been so clearly elucidated. An experimental approach is presented which addresses the issues from the point of view of molecular interactions occurring at the interface.

  5. Mathematical Estimation of the Level of Microbial Contamination on Spacecraft Surfaces by Volumetric Air Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Oxborrow, G. S.; Roark, A. L.; Fields, N. D.; Puleo, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Microbiological sampling methods presently used for enumeration of microorganisms on spacecraft surfaces require contact with easily damaged components. Estimation of viable particles on surfaces using air sampling methods in conjunction with a mathematical model would be desirable. Parameters necessary for the mathematical model are the effect of angled surfaces on viable particle collection and the number of viable cells per viable particle. Deposition of viable particles on angled surfaces closely followed a cosine function, and the number of viable cells per viable particle was consistent with a Poisson distribution. Other parameters considered by the mathematical model included deposition rate and fractional removal per unit time. A close nonlinear correlation between volumetric air sampling and airborne fallout on surfaces was established with all fallout data points falling within the 95% confidence limits as determined by the mathematical model. PMID:4151118

  6. Mathematical estimation of the level of microbial contamination on spacecraft surfaces by volumetric air sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oxborrow, G. S.; Roark, A. L.; Fields, N. D.; Puleo, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Microbiological sampling methods presently used for enumeration of microorganisms on spacecraft surfaces require contact with easily damaged components. Estimation of viable particles on surfaces using air sampling methods in conjunction with a mathematical model would be desirable. Parameters necessary for the mathematical model are the effect of angled surfaces on viable particle collection and the number of viable cells per viable particle. Deposition of viable particles on angled surfaces closely followed a cosine function, and the number of viable cells per viable particle was consistent with a Poisson distribution. Other parameters considered by the mathematical model included deposition rate and fractional removal per unit time. A close nonlinear correlation between volumetric air sampling and airborne fallout on surfaces was established with all fallout data points falling within the 95% confidence limits as determined by the mathematical model.

  7. Mathematical estimation of the level of microbial contamination on spacecraft surfaces by volumetric air sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oxborrow, G. S.; Roark, A. L.; Fields, N. D.; Puleo, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Microbiological sampling methods presently used for enumeration of microorganisms on spacecraft surfaces require contact with easily damaged components. Estimation of viable particles on surfaces using air sampling methods in conjunction with a mathematical model would be desirable. Parameters necessary for the mathematical model are the effect of angled surfaces on viable particle collection and the number of viable cells per viable particle. Deposition of viable particles on angled surfaces closely followed a cosine function, and the number of viable cells per viable particle was consistent with a Poisson distribution. Other parameters considered by the mathematical model included deposition rate and fractional removal per unit time. A close nonlinear correlation between volumetric air sampling and airborne fallout on surfaces was established with all fallout data points falling within the 95% confidence limits as determined by the mathematical model.

  8. A free energy-based surface tension force model for simulation of multiphase flows by level-set method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H. Z.; Chen, Z.; Shu, C.; Wang, Y.; Niu, X. D.; Shu, S.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a free energy-based surface tension force (FESF) model is presented for accurately resolving the surface tension force in numerical simulation of multiphase flows by the level set method. By using the analytical form of order parameter along the normal direction to the interface in the phase-field method and the free energy principle, FESF model offers an explicit and analytical formulation for the surface tension force. The only variable in this formulation is the normal distance to the interface, which can be substituted by the distance function solved by the level set method. On one hand, as compared to conventional continuum surface force (CSF) model in the level set method, FESF model introduces no regularized delta function, due to which it suffers less from numerical diffusions and performs better in mass conservation. On the other hand, as compared to the phase field surface tension force (PFSF) model, the evaluation of surface tension force in FESF model is based on an analytical approach rather than numerical approximations of spatial derivatives. Therefore, better numerical stability and higher accuracy can be expected. Various numerical examples are tested to validate the robustness of the proposed FESF model. It turns out that FESF model performs better than CSF model and PFSF model in terms of accuracy, stability, convergence speed and mass conservation. It is also shown in numerical tests that FESF model can effectively simulate problems with high density/viscosity ratio, high Reynolds number and severe topological interfacial changes.

  9. cGMP decreases surface NKCC2 levels in the thick ascending limb: role of phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2)

    PubMed Central

    Ares, Gustavo R.; Caceres, Paulo; Alvarez-Leefmans, Francisco J.; Ortiz, Pablo A.

    2008-01-01

    NaCl absorption in the medullary thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (THAL) is mediated by the apical Na/K/2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2). Hormones that increase cGMP, such as nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptides, decrease NaCl absorption by the THAL. However, the mechanism by which cGMP decreases NaCl absorption in THALs is not known. We hypothesized that cGMP decreases surface NKCC2 levels in the THAL. We used surface biotinylation to measure surface NKCC2 levels in rat THAL suspensions. We tested the effect of the membrane-permeant cGMP analog dibutyryl-cGMP (db-cGMP) on surface NKCC2 levels. Incubating THALs with db-cGMP for 20 min decreased surface NKCC2 levels in a concentration-dependent manner (basal = 100%; db-cGMP 100 μM = 77 ± 7%; 500 μM = 54 ± 10% and 1,000 μM = 61 ± 8%). A different cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP) also decreased surface NKCC2 levels by 25%, (basal = 100%; 8-Br-cGMP = 75 ± 5%). Incubation of isolated, perfused THALs with db-cGMP decreased apical surface NKCC2 labeling levels as measured by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. cGMP-stimulated phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) mediates the inhibitory effect of NO on NaCl absorption by THALs. Thus we examined the role of PDE2 and found that PDE2 inhibitors blocked the effect of db-cGMP on surface NKCC2. Also, a nonstimulatory concentration of db-cAMP blocked the cGMP-induced decrease in surface NKCC2. Finally, db-cGMP inhibited THAL net Cl absorption by 48 ± 4%, and this effect was completely blocked by PDE2 inhibition. We conclude that cGMP decreases NKCC2 levels in the apical membrane of THALs and that this effect is mediated by PDE2. This is an important mechanism by which cGMP inhibits NaCl absorption by the THAL. PMID:18684888

  10. Abdominal strengthening using the AbVice machine as measured by surface electromyographic activation levels.

    PubMed

    Avedisian, Lori; Kowalsky, Don S; Albro, Richard C; Goldner, Daniel; Gill, Robert C

    2005-08-01

    Twenty-four college students served as subjects in a study that examined the effect of a prototypical abdominal muscle strengthening device (AbVice) compared with other devices currently on the market. The purpose of the present study was to investigate a prototypical device (AbVice) that incorporates contraction of the hamstring and gluteal musculature in conjunction with the abdominals, which may assist in decreasing activation of the hip flexors by allowing greater activity levels of the abdominal musculature via the theory of reflex inhibition, compared with other devices currently available on the market (AbRoller and AbRocker). The repeated-measures study included 17 women and 7 men who ranged in age from 20-23 years (mean +/- SD age, 21.3 +/- 1.5 years). Each subject underwent a single session of data collection during which they completed 10 repetitions of abdominal crunches per device. Subjects completed 4 different crunch sets (AbRocker, AbRoller, standard crunch, AbVice). Counterbalancing of the device was used to negate the effect of fatigue. Speed of repetitions was ensured via use of a metronome set at 40 b.min(-1) to permit similar contraction times and rest periods between repetitions. Rest between conditions was 3 minutes. Mean activation levels of surface electromyography (EMG) were recorded for each condition at the following locations on the right side of the body: rectus abdominis 2.5 cm superior to the umbilicus, rectus abdominis 2.5 cm inferior to the umbilicus, external oblique abdominis 1.0 cm medial to the anterior superior iliac spine, and external oblique abdominis less than 1.0 cm superior to the inguinal ligament. Mean (SD) activation was 1,165.21 mV (634.60 mV) with the AbVice, 242.92 mV (263.03 mV) with the AbRocker, 753.29 mV (514.80 mV) with the standard crunch, and 757.67 mV (542.85 mV) with the AbRoller. Broken down by sex, women had the following mean (SD) EMG values: 1,079.76 mV (705.02 mV) with the AbVice, 680.35 mV (535.35 m

  11. Pronounced Surface Band Bending of Thin-Film Silicon Revealed by Modeling Core Levels Probed with Hard X-rays.

    PubMed

    Wippler, David; Wilks, Regan G; Pieters, Bart E; van Albada, Sacha J; Gerlach, Dominic; Hüpkes, Jürgen; Bär, Marcus; Rau, Uwe

    2016-07-13

    Enhancing the probing depth of photoemission studies by using hard X-rays allows the investigation of buried interfaces of real-world device structures. However, it also requires the consideration of photoelectron-signal attenuation when evaluating surface effects. Here, we employ a computational model incorporating surface band bending and exponential photoelectron-signal attenuation to model depth-dependent spectral changes of Si 1s and Si 2s core level lines. The data were acquired from hydrogenated boron-doped microcrystalline thin-film silicon, which is applied in silicon-based solar cells. The core level spectra, measured by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using different excitation energies, reveal the presence of a 0.29 nm thick surface oxide layer. In the silicon film a downward surface band bending of eVbb = -0.65 eV over ∼6 nm obtained via inverse modeling explains the observed core level shifts and line broadening. Moreover, the computational model allows the extraction of the "real" Si 1s and Si 2s bulk core level binding energies as 1839.13 and 150.39 eV, and their natural Lorentzian line widths as 496 and 859 meV, respectively. These values significantly differ from those directly extracted from the measured spectra. Because band bending usually occurs at material surfaces we highly recommend the detailed consideration of signal integration over depth for quantitative statements from depth-dependent measurements.

  12. Potentiometric surface, 2013, and water-level differences, 1991-2013, of the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer in northwest Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fendick, Robert B.; Carter, Kayla

    2015-01-01

    This report presents data and maps that illustrate the potentiometric surface of the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer during March–May 2013 and water-level differences from 1991 to 2013. The potentiometric surface map can be used for determining the direction of groundwater flow, hydraulic gradients, and effects of withdrawals on the groundwater resource. The rate of groundwater movement also can be estimated from the gradient when the hydraulic conductivity is applied. Water-level data collected for this study are stored in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) and are on file at the USGS office in Baton Rouge, La.

  13. Chemical Environment at Waste Package Surfaces in a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S; Alai, M; Craig, L; Gdowski, G; Hailey, P; Nguyen, Q A; Rard, J; Staggs, K; Sutton, M; Wolery, T

    2005-05-26

    We have conducted a series of deliquescence, boiling point, chemical transformation, and evaporation experiments to determine the composition of waters likely to contact waste package surfaces over the thermal history of the repository as it heats up and cools back down to ambient conditions. In the above-boiling period, brines will be characterized by high nitrate to chloride ratios that are stable to higher temperatures than previously predicted. This is clearly shown for the NaCl-KNO{sub 3} salt system in the deliquescence and boiling point experiments in this report. Our results show that additional thermodynamic data are needed in nitrate systems to accurately predict brine stability and composition due to salt deliquescence in dust deposited on waste package surfaces. Current YMP models capture dry-out conditions but not composition for NaCl-KNO{sub 3} brines, and they fail to predict dry-out conditions for NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} brines. Boiling point and deliquescence experiments are needed in NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} systems to directly determine dry-out conditions and composition, because these salt mixtures are also predicted to control brine composition in the above-boiling period. Corrosion experiments are needed in high temperature and high NO{sub 3}:Cl brines to determine if nitrate inhibits corrosion in these concentrated brines at temperatures above 160 C. Chemical transformations appear to be important for pure calcium- and magnesium-chloride brines at temperatures greater than 120 C. This stems from a lack of acid gas volatility in NaCl/KNO{sub 3} based brines and by slow CO{sub 2}(g) diffusion in alkaline brines. This suggests that YMP corrosion models based on bulk solution experiments over the appropriate composition, temperature, and relative humidity range can be used to predict corrosion in thin brine films formed by salt deliquescence. In contrast to the above-boiling period, the

  14. Leveling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1966-01-01

    Geodetic leveling by the U.S. Geological Survey provides a framework of accurate elevations for topographic mapping. Elevations are referred to the Sea Level Datum of 1929. Lines of leveling may be run either with automatic or with precise spirit levels, by either the center-wire or the three-wire method. For future use, the surveys are monumented with bench marks, using standard metal tablets or other marking devices. The elevations are adjusted by least squares or other suitable method and are published in lists of control.

  15. Surface tension, viscosity, and rheology of water-based nanofluids: a microscopic interpretation on the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gui; Duan, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Dong

    2014-09-01

    Nanofluids are suspensions of nanometer-sized particles which significantly modify the properties of the base fluids. Nanofluids exhibit attractive properties, such as high thermal conductivity, tunable surface tension, viscosity, and rheology. Various attempts have been made to understand the mechanisms for these property modifications caused by adding nanoparticles; however, due to the lack of direct nanoscale evidence, these explanations are still controversial. This work calculated the surface tension, viscosity, and rheology of gold-water nanofluids using molecular dynamics simulations which provide a microscopic interpretation for the modified properties on the molecular level. The gold-water interaction potential parameters were changed to mimic various nanoparticle types. The results show that the nanoparticle wettability is responsible for the modified surface tension. Hydrophobic nanoparticles always tend to stay on the free surface so they behave like a surfactant to reduce the surface tension. Hydrophilic nanoparticles immersed into the bulk fluid impose strong attractive forces on the water molecules at the free surface which reduces the free surface thickness and increases the surface tension of the nanofluid. Solid-like absorbed water layers were observed around the nanoparticles which increase the equivalent nanoparticle radius and reduce the mobility of the nanoparticles within the base fluid which increases the nanofluid viscosity. The results show the water molecule solidification between two or many nanoparticles at high nanoparticle loadings, but the solidification effect is suppressed for shear rates greater than a critical shear rate; thus Newtonian nanofluids can present shear-thinning non-Newtonian behavior.

  16. Potential dose distributions at proposed surface radioactvity clearance levels resulting from occupational scenarios.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.; Rabovsky, J.

    2011-08-02

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the potential dose distribution resulting from surface radioactivity, using occupational radiation exposure scenarios. The surface radioactivity clearance values considered in this analysis may ultimately replace those currently specified in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and guidance for radiological protection of workers, the public and the environment. The surface contamination values apply to radioactive contamination deposited on a surface (i.e., not incorporated into the interior of the material). For these calculations, the dose coefficients for intake of radionuclides were taken from ICRP Publication 68 (ICRP 1994), and external exposure dose coefficients were taken from the compact disc (CD) that accompanied Federal Guidance Report (FGR) 13 (Eckerman et al. 1999). The ICRP Publication 68 dose coefficients were based on ICRP Publication 60 (ICRP 1990) and were used specifically for worker dose calculations. The calculated dose in this analysis is the 'effective dose' (ED), rather than the 'effective dose equivalent' (EDE).

  17. Monitoring of ppm level humic acid in surface water using ZnO-chitosan nano-composite as fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basumallick, Srijita; Santra, Swadeshmukul

    2017-05-01

    Surface water contains natural pollutants humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid at ppm level which form carcinogenic chloro-compounds during chlorination in water treatment plants. We report here synthesis of ZnO-chitosan (CS) nano-composites by simple hydrothermal technique and examined their application potential as fluorescent probe for monitoring ppm level HA. These ZnO-CS composites have been characterized by HRTEM, EDX, FTIR, AFM and Fluorescence Spectra. HRTEM images show the formation of ZnO-CS nano-composites of average diameter of 50-250 nm. Aqueous dispersions of these nano-composites show fluorescence emission at 395 nm when excited at 300 nm which is strongly quenched by ppm level HA indicating their possible use in monitoring ppm level HA present in surface water.

  18. Limiting Factors for Satellite-Based Retrievals of Surface-Level Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Alonso, S.; Deeter, M. N.; Worden, H. M.; Barré, J.

    2015-12-01

    CO is mostly produced in the lower troposphere by incomplete combustion of biomass and fuels. CO oxidation consumes ~75% of the tropospheric OH, which then is not available to remove CH4 and other greenhouse gases. CO oxidation also leads to the production of tropospheric O3. These critical impacts of CO on air quality and climate require accurate determination of the abundance and evolution of CO near the surface.Satellite retrievals would be well-suited to monitor surface CO globally. However, how do they compare to actual surface abundances? Some aspects to be considered include: the vertical sensitivity of retrievals (given by the averaging kernels), or how thick are the atmospheric layers that can be resolved; the vertical correlation length of CO with respect to the thickness of those layers; and the horizontal variability of CO with respect to the instrument's footprint.To investigate these questions we analyze MOPITT retrievals, DISCOVER-AQ and NOAA profiles, as well as WDCGG surface measurements. MOPITT, on board NASA's Terra satellite, has been measuring tropospheric CO since 2000, providing the longest global CO record to date. Its unique multispectral CO product offers enhanced sensitivity to CO near the surface. Vertical profiles of the lower troposphere were acquired during the DISCOVER-AQ airborne campaigns over selected regions of the USA. NOAA's airborne flask sampling program results in a multi-year, multi-seasonal record of vertical profiles from near the surface up to the mid troposphere, acquired over a number of stations, mostly in North America. Long-term, cross-calibrated surface CO data from ground stations worldwide are available through the WDCGG.Statistical analyses of the DISCOVER-AQ and NOAA profiles indicate that surface vertical correlation length varies greatly depending on geographic location. This may explain contrasting results obtained for different ground stations when comparing MOPITT and WDCGG co-located data and timeseries.

  19. Contamination levels of human pharmaceutical compounds in French surface and drinking water.

    PubMed

    Mompelat, S; Thomas, O; Le Bot, B

    2011-10-01

    The occurrence of 20 human pharmaceutical compounds and metabolites from 10 representative therapeutic classes was analysed from resource and drinking water in two catchment basins located in north-west France. 98 samples were analysed from 63 stations (surface water and drinking water produced from surface water). Of the 20 human pharmaceutical compounds selected, 16 were quantified in both the surface water and drinking water, with 22% of the values above the limit of quantification for surface water and 14% for drinking water). Psychostimulants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, iodinated contrast media and anxiolytic drugs were the main therapeutic classes of human pharmaceutical compounds detected in the surface water and drinking water. The results for surface water were close to results from previous studies in spite of differences in prescription rates of human pharmaceutical compounds in different countries. The removal rate of human pharmaceutical compounds at 11 water treatment units was also determined. Only caffeine proved to be resistant to drinking water treatment processes (with a minimum rate of 5%). Other human pharmaceutical compounds seemed to be removed more efficiently (average elimination rate of over 50%) by adsorption onto activated carbon and oxidation/disinfection with ozone or chlorine (not taking account of the disinfection by-products). These results add to the increasing evidence of the occurrence of human pharmaceutical compounds in drinking water that may represent a threat to human beings exposed to a cocktail of human pharmaceutical compounds and related metabolites and by-products in drinking water.

  20. Role of deep level trapping on surface photovoltage of semi-insulating GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q.; Ruda, H.E.; Koutzarov, I.P.; Jedral, L.; Chen, G.; Prasad, M.

    1996-12-31

    Dual beam (bias and probe) transient Surface Photovoltage (SPV) measurements were made on undoped Semi-Insulating (SI) GaAs over an extended temperature range. Above 270 K, SPV recovery transients following a bias pulse were shown to reflect near surface conductivity changes; these are in turn controlled by surface/interface state thermal emission. Owing to the absence of a strong surface electric field in this material, the emitted carriers are not immediately removed from the near surface region. The recapturing of the emitted carriers is shown to be responsible for non-exponential conductivity and reciprocal-SPV transients. This behavior is considered to be characteristic of relaxation-type semiconductors with near-surface ungated structures. Below 150 K, the photoinduced transition of EL2 from its ground to metastable state El2* was shown to change the effective electron and hole mobilities and augment the SPV signals immediately following the bias pulse. Thermally induced EL2* recovery above 120 K decreases the SPV signal from its maximum. This decay transient was analyzed and the decay rate fitted to a single exponential. An activation energy of 0.32 eV and a pre-exponential constant of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 12} s{sup {minus}1} were obtained, and attributed to the thermal recovery rate for EL2*.

  1. Accurate high level ab initio-based global potential energy surface and dynamics calculations for ground state of CH2(+).

    PubMed

    Li, Y Q; Zhang, P Y; Han, K L

    2015-03-28

    A global many-body expansion potential energy surface is reported for the electronic ground state of CH2 (+) by fitting high level ab initio energies calculated at the multireference configuration interaction level with the aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. The topographical features of the new global potential energy surface are examined in detail and found to be in good agreement with those calculated directly from the raw ab initio energies, as well as previous calculations available in the literature. In turn, in order to validate the potential energy surface, a test theoretical study of the reaction CH(+)(X(1)Σ(+))+H((2)S)→C(+)((2)P)+H2(X(1)Σg (+)) has been carried out with the method of time dependent wavepacket on the title potential energy surface. The total integral cross sections and the rate coefficients have been calculated; the results determined that the new potential energy surface can both be recommended for dynamics studies of any type and as building blocks for constructing the potential energy surfaces of larger C(+)/H containing systems.

  2. Program plan for evaluation and remediation of the generation and release of flammable gases in Hanford Site waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.D.

    1991-08-01

    This program plan describes the activities being conducted for the resolution of the flammable gas problem that is associated with 23 high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The classification of the wastes in all of these tanks is not final and some wastes may not be high-level wastes. However, until the characterization and classification is complete, all the tanks are treated as if they contain high-level waste. Of the 23 tanks, Tank 241-SY-101 (referred to as Tank 101-SY) has exhibited significant episodic releases of flammable gases (hydrogen and nitrous oxide) for the past 10 years. The major near-term focus of this program is for the understanding and stabilization of this tank. An understanding of the mechanism for gas generation and the processes for the episodic release will be obtained through sampling of the tank contents, laboratory studies, and modeling of the tank behavior. Additional information will be obtained through new and upgraded instrumentation for the tank. A number of remediation, or stabilization, concepts will be evaluated for near-term (2 to 3 years) applications to Tank 101-SY. Detailed safety assessments are required for all activities that will occur in the tank (sampling, removal of equipment, and addition of new instruments). This program plan presents a discussion of each task, provides schedules for near-term activities, and gives a summary of the expected work for fiscal years 1991, 1992, and 1993. 16 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Water levels in the Calumet aquifer and their relation to surface-water levels in northern Lake County, Indiana, 1985-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeman, Theodore K.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of water-level data from the data-collection network indicates that the water table normally slopes toward streams, ditches, sewers, the Indiana Harbor Canal, and Lake Michigan. The slope of the water table toward the Grand Calumet River is greatest in the winter and can decrease to being almost horizontal in the summer. Wells near streams respond quickly to nearby surface-water-level changes. Water-table maps indicate that sewers and dewatering systems are lowering ground-water levels in large areas. Ditches, the Grand Calumet River, and the Indiana Harbor Canal connect the Lake Michigan water level to large parts of the study area. The surface-water stage in the Indiana Harbor Canal, which functions as a ditch, can equal Lake Michigan's stage up to 3.75 miles inland from the lakeshore. Human activity, the stage of Lake Michigan, and the storage capacity of the Calumet aquifer combine to reduce vertical changes in the water table in the study area.

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Biosafety Level 2 Opportunistic Pathogens Isolated from the Environmental Surfaces of the International Space Station

    PubMed Central

    Checinska Sielaff, Aleksandra; Singh, Nitin K.; Allen, Jonathan E.; Thissen, James; Jaing, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of 20 biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) opportunistic pathogens isolated from the environmental surfaces of the International Space Station (ISS) were presented. These genomic sequences will help in understanding the influence of microgravity on the pathogenicity and virulence of these strains when compared with Earth strains. PMID:28034853

  5. Draft Genome Sequences of Biosafety Level 2 Opportunistic Pathogens Isolated from the Environmental Surfaces of the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Checinska Sielaff, Aleksandra; Singh, Nitin K; Allen, Jonathan E; Thissen, James; Jaing, Crystal; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2016-12-29

    The draft genome sequences of 20 biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) opportunistic pathogens isolated from the environmental surfaces of the International Space Station (ISS) were presented. These genomic sequences will help in understanding the influence of microgravity on the pathogenicity and virulence of these strains when compared with Earth strains. Copyright © 2016 Checinska Sielaff et al.

  6. Effects of rice harvest moisture on kernel damage and milled rice surface free fatty acid levels.

    PubMed

    Parker, Amanda M; Proctor, Andrew; Eason, Robert L; Jain, Vishal

    2007-01-01

    Surface free fatty acid (FFA) on milled rice is a key factor in determining rice quality and acceptability to the brewing industry. Rice FFA oxidizes, causing off-flavors and odors to develop, compromising the brewing quality of milled rice. The effect of harvest moisture (13%, 16%, and 20%), harvester type (1688 Case and 9500 John Deere), and rice variety (Cocodrie and Bengal) on harvest damaged rough rice and milled rice surface FFA after drying to 12% moisture and 6 mo rough rice storage was examined. The Case harvester produced more damaged kernels than the John Deere harvester, but this was not reflected in surface FFA development. There were no significant FFA differences in variety or harvester type. Rice harvested at a higher moisture content (20%) produced significantly greater FFA values, with a peak near 0.1%, than rice harvested at lower moisture contents (13% and 16%), which had FFA values near 0.08%. Retention of bran by damaged kernels at high harvest moisture probably was responsible for promoting surface FFA development, but if bran was lost at lower harvest moistures, surface FFA, development was limited. Harvest moisture affected milled rice FFA, although rough rice was dried to 12% immediately after harvesting.

  7. Atomic-Level Simulation Study of n-Hexane Pyrolysis on Silicon Carbide Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sajib, Md Symon Jahan; Samieegohar, Mohammadreza; Wei, Tao; Shing, Katherine

    2017-10-03

    Ethylene production plays a key role in the petrochemical industry. The severe operation conditions of ethylene thermal cracking, such as high-temperature and coke-formation, pose challenges for the development of new corrosion-resistant and coking-resistant materials for ethylene reactor radiant coils tubes (RCTs). We investigated the performance of ceramic materials such as silicon carbide (SiC) in severe pyrolysis conditions by using reactive force field molecular dynamics (ReaxFF MD) simulation method. Our results indicate that β-SiC surface remains fully stable at 1500 K, whereas increased temperature results in melted interface. At 2500 K, fully grown cross-linked-graphene-like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon coking structure on SiC surfaces was observed. Such coking was particularly severe in the carbon-side of the surface slab. The coking structures were mainly derived from surface atoms at the initial 3.0 ns, as a result of the loss of interfacial hydroxyl layer and further hydrothermal corrosion. The SiC substrate surface enhances the ethylene cracking rate and also leads to different intermediate-state compounds. Our fundamental research will have significant and broad impact on both petrochemical industry and academic research in materials science, petrochemistry, and combustion chemistry.

  8. Correlating the Local Defect-Level Density with the Macroscopic Composition and Energetics of Chalcopyrite Thin-Film Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bröker, Sebastian; Kück, Dennis; Timmer, Alexander; Lauermann, Iver; Ümsür, Bünyamin; Greiner, Dieter; Kaufmann, Christian A; Mönig, Harry

    2015-06-17

    The unusual defect chemistry of polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin films is a main issue for a profound understanding of recombination losses in chalcopyrite thin-film solar cells. Especially, impurity-driven passivation of electronic levels due to point defects segregating at the surface and at grain boundaries is extensively debated. By combining current imaging tunneling spectroscopy with photoelectron spectroscopy, the local defect-level density and unusual optoelectronic grain-boundary properties of this material are correlated with the macroscopic energy levels and surface composition. Vacuum annealing of different CIGSe materials provides evidence that Na diffusion from the glass substrate does not affect the surface defect passivation or grain-boundary properties of standard Cu-poor materials. Furthermore, we find no major impact on the observed thermally activated dipole compensation or the accompanying change in surface band bending (up to 0.6 eV) due to Na. In contrast, Cu-rich CIGSe shows an opposing surface defect chemistry with only minor heat-induced band bending. Our results lead to a comprehensive picture, where the highly desirable type inversion at the p/n interface in standard chalcopyrite thin-film solar cells is dominated by band bending within the CIGSe absorber rather than the result of Na impurities or an n-type defect phase segregating at the interface. This is in accordance with recent studies suggesting a surface reconstruction as the origin for Cu depletion and band-gap widening at the surface of chalcopyrite thin films.

  9. Estimation of Articular Cartilage Surface Roughness Using Gray-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix of Laser Speckle Image

    PubMed Central

    El-Ghandoor, Hatem; Kandel, Hamed; El-Azab, Jala; Hassab-Elnaby, Salah

    2017-01-01

    The application of He-Ne laser technologies for description of articular cartilage degeneration, one of the most common diseases worldwide, is an innovative usage of these technologies used primarily in material engineering. Plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging are insufficient to allow the early assessment of the disease. As surface roughness of articular cartilage is an important indicator of articular cartilage degeneration progress, a safe and noncontact technique based on laser speckle image to estimate the surface roughness is provided. This speckle image from the articular cartilage surface, when illuminated by laser beam, gives very important information about the physical properties of the surface. An experimental setup using a low power He-Ne laser and a high-resolution digital camera was implemented to obtain speckle images of ten bovine articular cartilage specimens prepared for different average roughness values. Texture analysis method based on gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) analyzed on the captured speckle images is used to characterize the surface roughness of the specimens depending on the computation of Haralick’s texture features. In conclusion, this promising method can accurately estimate the surface roughness of articular cartilage even for early signs of degeneration. The method is effective for estimation of average surface roughness values ranging from 0.09 µm to 2.51 µm with an accuracy of 0.03 µm. PMID:28773080

  10. Estimation of Articular Cartilage Surface Roughness Using Gray-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix of Laser Speckle Image.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Doaa; El-Ghandoor, Hatem; Kandel, Hamed; El-Azab, Jala; Hassab-Elnaby, Salah

    2017-06-28

    The application of He-Ne laser technologies for description of articular cartilage degeneration, one of the most common diseases worldwide, is an innovative usage of these technologies used primarily in material engineering. Plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging are insufficient to allow the early assessment of the disease. As surface roughness of articular cartilage is an important indicator of articular cartilage degeneration progress, a safe and noncontact technique based on laser speckle image to estimate the surface roughness is provided. This speckle image from the articular cartilage surface, when illuminated by laser beam, gives very important information about the physical properties of the surface. An experimental setup using a low power He-Ne laser and a high-resolution digital camera was implemented to obtain speckle images of ten bovine articular cartilage specimens prepared for different average roughness values. Texture analysis method based on gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) analyzed on the captured speckle images is used to characterize the surface roughness of the specimens depending on the computation of Haralick's texture features. In conclusion, this promising method can accurately estimate the surface roughness of articular cartilage even for early signs of degeneration. The method is effective for estimation of average surface roughness values ranging from 0.09 µm to 2.51 µm with an accuracy of 0.03 µm.

  11. GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

    2014-05-05

    This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

  12. The SMAP level 4 surface and root zone soil moisture data assimilation product

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch in January 2015 and will provide L-band radar and radiometer observations that are sensitive to surface soil moisture (in the top few centimeters of the soil column). For several of the key applications targeted by SMAP, ho...

  13. TEMPORAL VARIATION IN PESTICIDE LEVELS IN SURFACE WATERS OF THE SOUTHERN NEVADA, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We sampled surface waters in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks in the Sierra Nevada of California from mid June to mid October 2003. Two pesticides found commonly in previous studies of pesticides in Sierra Nevada waters, chlorpyrifos and diazinon, were found only rarely.

  14. Observed instantaneous cirrus radiative effect on surface-level shortwave and longwave irradiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, Martial

    2008-11-01

    Data collected at the SIRTA Observatory, 20 km south of Paris, are analyzed to determine the instantaneous surface cloud radiative effect (CRE) induced by cirrus clouds. CRE is here defined as the difference between overcast-sky and clear-sky surface radiative fluxes obtained by ground-based measurement of broadband fluxes and clear-sky parametric models, respectively. Clear-sky periods detected by a double threshold based on lidar and radiative fluxes analysis show a root mean square error for clear-sky models smaller than 6.5 W m-2 for shortwave flux and 4 W m-2 for longwave flux. Over 100 h in 2003-2006 characterized by homogeneous overcast cirrus clouds are analyzed. Fifty percent of this cirrus population is subvisible and semitransparent, that is, with optical thickness less than 0.3. The mean surface shortwave cirrus cloud radiative effect (CRESW) is found near -50 W m-2. We establish the relationship between CRESW and cirrus optical thickness (COT) to be about -90 W m-2 per unit of COT. This SW sensitivity ranges from -80 W m-2 COT-1 to -100 W m-2 COT-1 for turbid to pristine atmospheres, respectively. We also establish the relationship between surface longwave cloud radiative effect (CRELW) and the irradiance emitted by the cirrus cloud derived from cloud infrared emissivity and cloud temperature. The average surface CRELW is about +5 W m-2. CRELW is found to be about 10% of the cloud irradiance. This LW effect ranges from 5 to 15% of the cirrus irradiance depending on atmospheric humidity for the wet and dry atmosphere, respectively.

  15. What Are Normal Metal Ion Levels After Total Hip Arthroplasty? A Serologic Analysis of Four Bearing Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Brian T; Ortiz, Philippe A; Boles, John W; Lee, Yuo-Yu; Padgett, Douglas E; Westrich, Geoffrey H

    2017-05-01

    The recent experiences with adverse local tissue reactions have highlighted the need to establish what are normal serum levels of cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), and titanium (Ti) after hip arthroplasty. Serum Co, Cr, and Ti levels were measured in 80 nonconsecutive patients with well-functioning unilateral total hip arthroplasty and compared among 4 bearing surfaces: ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC); ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP); metal-on-polyethylene (MoP), and dual mobility (DM). The preoperative and most recent University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were compared among the different bearing surfaces. No significant difference was found among serum Co and Cr levels between the 4 bearing surface groups (P = .0609 and P = .1577). Secondary analysis comparing metal and ceramic femoral heads demonstrated that the metal group (MoP, modular dual mobility (Stryker Orthopedics, Mahwah, NJ) [metal]) had significant higher serum Co levels compared with the ceramic group (CoC, CoP, MDM [ceramic]) (1.05 mg/L ± 1.25 vs 0.59 mg/L ± 0.24; P = .0411). Spearman coefficient identified no correlation between metal ion levels and patient-reported outcome scores. No serum metal ion level differences were found among well-functioning total hip arthroplasty with modern bearing couples. Significantly higher serum Co levels were seen when comparing metal vs ceramic femoral heads in this study and warrants further investigation. Metal ion levels did not correlate with patient-reported outcome measures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Low level ozone exposure induces airways inflammation and modifies cell surface phenotypes in healthy humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The effects of low level ozone exposure (0.08 ppm) on pulmonary function in healthy young adults are well known, however much less is known about the inflammatory and immuno-modulatory effects oflow level ozone in the airways. Techniques such as induced sputum and flo...

  17. Low level ozone exposure induces airways inflammation and modifies cell surface phenotypes in healthy humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The effects of low level ozone exposure (0.08 ppm) on pulmonary function in healthy young adults are well known, however much less is known about the inflammatory and immuno-modulatory effects oflow level ozone in the airways. Techniques such as induced sputum and flo...

  18. Microbiological levels of randomly selected food contact surfaces in hotels located in Spain during 2007-2009.

    PubMed

    Doménech-Sánchez, Antonio; Laso, Elena; Pérez, María José; Berrocal, Clara Isabel

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the microbial levels of food contact surfaces in hotels. Microbiological levels of 4611 surfaces (chopping machines, kitchenware, knives, worktops, and cutting boards) from 280 different facilities in Spain were determined in a 3-year period. The contact-plate technique was used throughout the survey. Overall, the mean of the log of total aerobic count cm(-2) was 0.62, better than those reported for child-care and assisted living facilities. Significant differences were detected among different types of surfaces, time of sampling, season, and year. The majority (74%) of food contact surfaces sampled in Spanish hotels was within the recommended standard of <1.3 log CFU cm(-2), and differences depend on several factors. Our results set a representative picture of the actual situation in our resorts and establish the basis for the development of educational programs to improve food handlers' knowledge of foodborne diseases and their transmission via food contact surfaces.

  19. Molecular-level understanding of protein adsorption at the interface between water and a strongly interacting uncharged solid surface.

    PubMed

    Penna, Matthew J; Mijajlovic, Milan; Biggs, Mark J

    2014-04-09

    Although protein adsorption on solids is of immense relevance, experimental limitations mean there is still a remarkable lack of understanding of the adsorption mechanism, particularly at a molecular level. By subjecting 240+ molecular dynamics simulations of two peptide/water/solid surface systems to statistical analysis, a generalized molecular level mechanism for peptide adsorption has been identified for uncharged surfaces that interact strongly with the solution phase. This mechanism is composed of three phases: (1) biased diffusion of the peptide from the bulk phase toward the surface; (2) anchoring of the peptide to the water/solid interface via interaction of a hydrophilic group with the water adjacent to the surface or a strongly interacting hydrophobic group with the surface; and (3) lockdown of the peptide on the surface via a slow, stepwise and largely sequential adsorption of its residues, which we term 'statistical zippering'. The adsorption mechanism is dictated by the existence of water layers adjacent to the solid and orientational ordering therein. By extending the solid into the solution by ~8 Å and endowing it with a charged character, the water layers ensure the peptide feels the effect of the solid at a range well beyond the dispersion force that arises from it, thus inducing biased diffusion from afar. The charging of the interface also facilitates anchoring of the peptide near the surface via one of its hydrophilic groups, allowing it time it would otherwise not have to rearrange and lockdown. Finally, the slowness of the lockdown process is dictated by the need for the peptide groups to replace adjacent tightly bound interfacial water.

  20. Relationship between lead levels on painted surfaces and percent lead in the particles aerosolized during lead abatement.

    PubMed

    Choe, Kyoo T; Trunov, Mikhaylo; Menrath, William; Succop, Paul; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2002-08-01

    Quantifying airborne lead on lead abatement work sites is critical in assessing worker lead exposures. Airborne lead levels depend on both the concentration of aerosolized particles and the percent lead in those particles. The lead level on the painted surface being abated may affect the percent lead in aerosolized particles. Experiments were performed in the University of Cincinnati Environmental Test Chamber (volume approximately 24.3 m3) using wood doors painted with lead-based paint. Three methods were used for paint removal: dry scraping, wet scraping, and dry machine sanding. Particles aerosolized during lead abatement activities were collected on filters using the Button Personal Inhalable Aerosol Samplers (SKC Inc., Eighty Four, PA) mounted in the workers' breathing zone. The filters were subsequently analyzed for percent lead in the particles. A portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument (NITON-700, NITON Inc., Bedford, MA) was used to measure surface lead levels of the doors. The accuracy of the XRF instrument was verified by testing standard reference materials prepared by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and by Princeton Gamma Tech Inc. It was also verified by relating XRF results from painted door surfaces to laboratory lead analysis data obtained from paint chip samples taken from the same painted surfaces (r2 = 0.81, p < 0.001). A highly significant relationship (r2 = 0.83, p < 0.001) was found between the XRF readings and the percent lead in the particles aerosolized during dry scraping. No significant relationship was found for wet scraping (r2 = 0.09, p = 0.56) or dry machine sanding (r2 = 0.002, p = 0.92). The relationship between surface lead levels and percent lead in particles was found to be dependent on the paint removal method. This variation was attributed to the difference in water absorption property of the paint layers and the different particle aerosolization mechanisms inherent in each paint removal method.

  1. Video requirements plan for the HMT equipment removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, G.F. Jr.

    1995-02-01

    This document is the plan defining the video coverage requirements for the equipment removal event of the Hydrogen Mitigation Test (HMT) mixer pump currently installed in high level nuclear waste storage Tank 241-SY-101. When the mixer pump fails the removal and installation of a spare pump will be a time critical event. Since the success of the HMT mixer pump has resolved the DOE safety issue it is absolutely essential that mixing be restored to the tank in a short as time possible. Therefore, the removal of the failed pump and the installation of the spare pump must be anticipated and planned well in advance. The removal, containment, transporting, and storage of the failed pump is a very complex and hazardous task. The successful completion of this task will require careful planning and monitoring. Certain events, during the removal and subsequent installation of the new pump, will require video observation and storage for safety, documenting, training, and promotional use. Furthermore, certain events will require close monitoring and observation by the event directors and key supervisory personnel for the execution of specific tasks during the equipment removal event.

  2. Flammable gas project topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.D.

    1997-01-29

    The flammable gas safety issue was recognized in 1990 with the declaration of an unreviewed safety question (USQ) by the U. S. Department of Energy as a result of the behavior of the Hanford Site high-level waste tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gas that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years there has been a considerable amount of knowledge gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-1 01 and other tanks associated with the flammable gas safety issue. This report was prepared to provide an overview of that knowledge and to provide a description of the key information still needed to resolve the issue. Items covered by this report include summaries of the understanding of gas generation, retention and release mechanisms, the composition and flammability behavior of the gas mixture, the amounts of stored gas, and estimated gas release fractions for spontaneous releases. `Me report also discusses methods being developed for evaluating the 177 tanks at the Hanford Site and the problems associated with these methods. Means for measuring the gases emitted from the waste are described along with laboratory experiments designed to gain more information regarding rates of generation, species of gases emitted and modes of gas storage and release. Finally, the process for closing the USQ is outlined as are the information requirements to understand and resolve the flammable gas issue.

  3. Levels of dissolved zinc and cadmium in some surface waters of western Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Fatoki, O.S.

    1993-12-31

    Dissolved zinc and cadmium in some surface waters of Western Nigeria were separated and quantified using anion exchange of their chloro-complexes and detected by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Concentrations of zinc and cadmium found in tested water samples ranged from 0.99 to 2.97 mg L{sup {minus}1} and 0.13 to 0.17 mg L{sup {minus}1}, respectively. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Pore-level numerical analysis of the infrared surface temperature of metallic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Xia, Xin-Lin; Sun, Chuang; Tan, He-Ping; Wang, Jing

    2017-10-01

    Open-cell metallic foams are increasingly used in various thermal systems. The temperature distributions are significant for the comprehensive understanding of these foam-based engineering applications. This study aims to numerically investigate the modeling of the infrared surface temperature (IRST) of open-cell metallic foam measured by an infrared camera placed above the sample. Two typical approaches based on Backward Monte Carlo simulation are developed to estimate the IRSTs: the first one, discrete-scale approach (DSA), uses a realistic discrete representation of the foam structure obtained from a computed tomography reconstruction while the second one, continuous-scale approach (CSA), assumes that the foam sample behaves like a continuous homogeneous semi-transparent medium. The radiative properties employed in CSA are directly determined by a ray-tracing process inside the discrete foam representation. The IRSTs for different material properties (material emissivity, specularity parameter) are computed by the two approaches. The results show that local IRSTs can vary according to the local compositions of the foam surface (void and solid). The temperature difference between void and solid areas is gradually attenuated with increasing material emissivity. In addition, the annular void space near to the foam surface behaves like a black cavity for thermal radiation, which is ensued by copious neighboring skeletons. For most of the cases studied, the mean IRSTs computed by the DSA and CSA are close to each other, except when the material emissivity is highly weakened and the sample temperature is extremely high.

  5. Water surface level profile estimation by image analysis with varying overhead camera posture angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwung, H. H.; Kuo, C. A.; Chien, C. H.

    2009-07-01

    A digital CCD camera was used to capture and record the positions of the water surface at the sidewall of a wave flume by various angles of overhead posture. The wave image data were obtained using spatial transformation, image reconstruction and image detection processes. Two wave detection algorithms, which were the threshold method (TM) and the hyperbolic tangent function (HTF), were used to detect the water surface, and the detected results of the wave were compared with the measurement by a wave gauge. The results show that the wave surface detected by the HTF algorithm is better than that detected by the TM algorithm. The wave periods analyzed by the image data agreed very well with those of the wave gauges and the effect of variation of the overhead posture angle (θ) on wave period measurement was small. Since the pixel resolution increases with the overhead posture angle, however, the mean error of wave height measurement, which was analyzed by the TM algorithm, increased from 1.5% to 2.7% as θ changed from 15° to 45°. When θ was increased to 60°, the mean error of wave height rose to 4.7%. The mean error of wave height measurement, which was analyzed by the HTF algorithm, increased as the overhead posture angle increased, but the deviation was lower than that of the TM algorithm.

  6. Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities.

    PubMed

    Drollette, Brian D; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Warner, Nathaniel R; Darrah, Thomas H; Karatum, Osman; O'Connor, Megan P; Nelson, Robert K; Fernandez, Loretta A; Reddy, Christopher M; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L

    2015-10-27

    Hundreds of organic chemicals are used during natural gas extraction via high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF). However, it is unclear whether these chemicals, injected into deep shale horizons, reach shallow groundwater aquifers and affect local water quality, either from those deep HVHF injection sites or from the surface or shallow subsurface. Here, we report detectable levels of organic compounds in shallow groundwater samples from private residential wells overlying the Marcellus Shale in northeastern Pennsylvania. Analyses of purgeable and extractable organic compounds from 64 groundwater samples revealed trace levels of volatile organic compounds, well below the Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant levels, and low levels of both gasoline range (0-8 ppb) and diesel range organic compounds (DRO; 0-157 ppb). A compound-specific analysis revealed the presence of bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, which is a disclosed HVHF additive, that was notably absent in a representative geogenic water sample and field blanks. Pairing these analyses with (i) inorganic chemical fingerprinting of deep saline groundwater, (ii) characteristic noble gas isotopes, and (iii) spatial relationships between active shale gas extraction wells and wells with disclosed environmental health and safety violations, we differentiate between a chemical signature associated with naturally occurring saline groundwater and one associated with alternative anthropogenic routes from the surface (e.g., accidental spills or leaks). The data support a transport mechanism of DRO to groundwater via accidental release of fracturing fluid chemicals derived from the surface rather than subsurface flow of these fluids from the underlying shale formation.

  7. A new accurate ground-state potential energy surface of ethylene and predictions for rotational and vibrational energy levels.

    PubMed

    Delahaye, Thibault; Nikitin, Andrei; Rey, Michaël; Szalay, Péter G; Tyuterev, Vladimir G

    2014-09-14

    In this paper we report a new ground state potential energy surface for ethylene (ethene) C2H4 obtained from extended ab initio calculations. The coupled-cluster approach with the perturbative inclusion of the connected triple excitations CCSD(T) and correlation consistent polarized valence basis set cc-pVQZ was employed for computations of electronic ground state energies. The fit of the surface included 82,542 nuclear configurations using sixth order expansion in curvilinear symmetry-adapted coordinates involving 2236 parameters. A good convergence for variationally computed vibrational levels of the C2H4 molecule was obtained with a RMS(Obs.-Calc.) deviation of 2.7 cm(-1) for fundamental bands centers and 5.9 cm(-1) for vibrational bands up to 7800 cm(-1). Large scale vibrational and rotational calculations for (12)C2H4, (13)C2H4, and (12)C2D4 isotopologues were performed using this new surface. Energy levels for J = 20 up to 6000 cm(-1) are in a good agreement with observations. This represents a considerable improvement with respect to available global predictions of vibrational levels of (13)C2H4 and (12)C2D4 and rovibrational levels of (12)C2H4.

  8. Importance of High-Resolution LiDAR Data in Modeling Runoff Levels Over Impervious Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, C.; Rao, M.

    2013-12-01

    Directly connected impervious areas collect and deliver unfiltered runoff to modified and impacted waterways. Modeling water flow over the landscape is an effective method of observing drainage patterns and predicting pollutant and sediment loadings. Improved models applying high-resolution elevation data can identify key areas with high pollutant output. This is a crucial issue in the Lake Tahoe Basin where lakeshore urban development has increased and lake clarity has been declining for years. This study aims to evaluate an integrated LiDAR and GIS-based modeling approach that uses a fine-scaled ground surface and impervious surface connectivity to predict the pollutant load in the Lake Tahoe Basin This study produced a fine-scaled surface model of nine subset catchments in the South Tahoe basin, including areas of low (below 20%), medium (30% to 50%) and high (above 50%) impervious surface cover. Our method integrated LiDAR, multispectral imagery, and GIS data to develop accurate terrain models, hydrologic routing, and directly connected impervious area layers for the Lake Tahoe basin. The high-density ground and object elevation data collected using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) creates an accurate picture of water flow over the land, and obstacles to the flow such as buildings. High-resolution LiDAR data was obtained from the Round 10 Lake Tahoe Southern Nevada Public Land Management capital program from the year 2010. This data was processed to create a digital elevation model of the ground surface. Land use classification used object height information from the LiDAR cloud, NAIP 4-band images with 1-meter resolution and a normalized difference vegetation index image derived from the NAIP imagery. The US Army Core of Engineers hydrologic modeling system (HEC-HMS) will be used to model runoff. Based on long-term simulations the effect of directly connected impervious area on rainfall-runoff characteristics for the South Lake Tahoe catchments will be

  9. Fungal microcolonies on indoor surfaces — an explanation for the base-level fungal spore counts in indoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasanen, A.-L.; Heinonen-Tanski, H.; Kalliokoski, P.; Jantunen, M. J.

    In the subarctic winter, fungal spores are found in indoor air even when outdoor spore levels are very low. The results of this study support an explanation that some indoor airborne fungal spores are derived from unnoticeable fungal microcolonies, which may develop on temporarily wet surfaces. Laboratory experiments on Penicillium verrucosum indicated that the fungus germinated on new wallpaper very quickly (about half an hour) under moist conditions. Hyphal growth and sporulation of the fungus on moist wallpaper occured within one day of incubation. In gravity-settling tape samples from occasionally wet surfaces in a suburban home, large spore aggregates, hyphal fragments with some spores and spores in the germination stage were found, indicating fungal growth. These experiments showed that fungal microcolonies can develop within a week on occasionally wet indoor surfaces.

  10. Pharmaceutical residues in tidal surface sediments of three rivers in southeastern China at detectable and measurable levels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongshan S; Yu, Shen; Hong, Youwei W; Lin, Qiaoying Y; Li, Hongbo B

    2013-12-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds were increasingly detected in environmental matrices but little is known whether these compounds would transport to coastal zones via watersheds. Three typical tidal rivers in southeastern China were selected and 15 surface sediment samples (0-10 cm) were collected along a 50-km tidal section of each river. Surface sediment samples were frozen-drying and then extracted for pharmaceutical compounds by an accelerated solvent extraction system. The pharmaceutical compounds in extracts were scanned using a high-performance liquid chromatography/tandern mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Three hundred and thirty compounds from nine pharmaceutical groups were detected with signal-to-noise above three (detectable level) in the surface sediments, of which 186 compounds were with a signal-to-noise above ten (measurable level). Of all, 291 and 80 compounds were detectable and measurable in all the three rivers, respectively. The Jiulong River showed a high load of pharmaceutical compounds in surface sediment than other two rivers. Of the nine pharmaceutical groups, the antihistamines and detoxification group and anti-infective drug group contributed five dominant compounds in the surface sediments in all the three rivers. Natures of pharmaceutical compounds rather than the sediment properties (pH, EC, and total carbon content) might influence their residues. The incredible number and intensity of pharmaceutical residues were detected in tidal surface sediments of the three rivers indicating that the pharmaceutical contamination should be strongly considered in China. Source identification and eco-toxicity assessment should be taken into account in the future study. Therapeutic medicine managements need to be strictly improved at a watershed scale to reduce loads of pharmaceuticals into aquatic ecosystems.

  11. Formation of polar InN with surface Fermi level near the valence band maximum by means of ammonia nitridation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, J.; Kuzmin, M.; Adell, J.; Balasubramanian, T.; Laukkanen, P.

    2012-12-01

    Development of InN films for devices is hindered due to metallic In clusters, formed readily during growth, and unintentional n-type conductivity of the nominally undoped films, including surface electron-accumulation layers via the Fermi level pinning into the conduction band. Plasma nitridation eliminates even large In clusters from the surface by changing them to two-dimensional InN [Yamaguchi and Nanishi, Appl. Phys. Expr.10.1143/APEX.2.051001 2, 051001 (2009)]. Here we utilized a similar approach, that is, nitridation of In-covered surfaces with ammonia (NH3) to grow thin, up to 25 nm thick polar InN films on Si(111) and GaN(0001) substrates. By means of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, as well as photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that this simple NH3 nitridation provides the hitherto not reported formation of polar InN(000-1) films with the surface Fermi level close to the valence band maximum, as recent calculations [Belabbes , Phys. Rev. B10.1103/PhysRevB.84.205304 84, 205304 (2011)] predict.

  12. Cytoplasmic calcium levels and membrane fluidity of platelets in contact with polyether-polyamide multiblock-copolymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yui, N; Okano, T; Sakurai, Y; Kora, S; Ishikawa, K; Hiranuma, T; Yamashita, S

    1996-02-01

    Cytoplasmic calcium levels and the membrane fluidity of rabbit platelets stored in mini blood bags of crystalline-amorphous microstructured polymers (polyether-polyamide multiblock-copolymers) were studied. Fluorescent dye (Fura 2 or 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene)-loaded platelet suspensions were stored at 37 degrees C for 1 h in the blood bags, and metabolic changes in the platelets during storage were evaluated by the fluorescent spectroscopic technique. The surfaces of poly(vinyl chloride) and polyolefin elastomers, which are used for commercially available blood bags, enhanced the progress of platelet metabolism; i.e., there was a dramatic decrease in membrane fluidity and an increase in [Ca2+]i. Furthermore, the decrease in membrane fluidity was observed prior to the increase in [Ca2+]i. These results suggest that the decrease in membrane fluidity of platelets in contact with polymer surfaces can be the dominant stage in the activation of these platelets. In contrast, the surfaces of polyether-polyamide multiblock-copolymers exhibited few changes in either membrane fluidity or [Ca2+]i levels. These results suggest that the platelets in contact with the crystalline-amorphous microstructured copolymer surfaces can be inert and inactivated in terms of the prevention of a decrease in membrane fluidity.

  13. Mean sea level and sea surface variability of northwest pacific ocean and eastern China seas from Geosat altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ge; He, Ming-Xia; Masatoshi, Akiyama; Yasuhiro, Sugimori; Jun, Suwa

    1994-06-01

    Collinear analysis technique is widely used for determining sea surface variability with Geosat altimeter data from its Exact Repeat Mission (ERM). But most of the researches have been only on global scale or in oceans deeper than 2000 m. In shallow shelf waters this method is hampered by the inaccuracy of ocean tide data supplied with Geosat Geophysical Data Records (GDRs). This work uses a modified collinear analysis technique characterized by simultaneous separation of mean sea level and ocean tide with the least squares method, to compute sea surface variability in the Northwest Pacific Ocean and eastern China Seas. The mean sea level map obtained contains not only bathymetric but also dynamic features such as amphidromes, indicating considerable improvement over previous works. Our sea surface variability maps show clearly the main current system, the well-known Zhejiang coastal upwelling, and a northern East China Sea meso-scale eddy in good agreement with satellite sea surface temperature (SST) observation and historical in situ measurement. These all suggest that meaningful and reliable oceanographic results can still be achieved in shallow shelf waters from Geosat altimetry as long as proper data processing techniques are applied.

  14. DNA vaccines expressing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) elicit protection levels comparable to recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniela M; Miyaji, Eliane N; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Darrieux, Michelle; Arêas, Ana Paula M; Ho, Paulo L; Leite, Luciana C C

    2006-04-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) is a promising candidate for the development of cost-effective vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the present study, BALB/c mice were immunized with DNA vaccine vectors expressing the N-terminal region of PspA. Animals immunized with a vector expressing secreted PspA developed higher levels of antibody than mice immunized with the vector expressing the antigen in the cytosol. However, both immunogens elicited similar levels of protection against intraperitoneal challenge. Furthermore, immunization with exactly the same fragment in the form of a recombinant protein, with aluminium hydroxide as an adjuvant, elicited even higher antibody levels, but this increased humoral response did not correlate with enhanced protection. These results show that DNA vaccines expressing PspA are able to elicit protection levels comparable to recombinant protein, even though total anti-PspA IgG response is considerably lower.

  15. An acceleration of the characteristics by a space-angle two-level method using surface discontinuity factors

    SciTech Connect

    Grassi, G.

    2006-07-01

    We present a non-linear space-angle two-level acceleration scheme for the method of the characteristics (MOC). To the fine level on which the MOC transport calculation is performed, we associate a more coarsely discretized phase space in which a low-order problem is solved as an acceleration step. Cross sections on the coarse level are obtained by a flux-volume homogenisation technique, which entails the non-linearity of the acceleration. Discontinuity factors per surface are introduced as additional degrees of freedom on the coarse level in order to ensure the equivalence of the heterogeneous and the homogenised problem. After each fine transport iteration, a low-order transport problem is iteratively solved on the homogenised grid. The solution of this problem is then used to correct the angular moments of the flux resulting from the previous free transport sweep. Numerical tests for a given benchmark have been performed. Results are discussed. (authors)

  16. Decoherence of three-level systems: Application to nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond near a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajisaka, Shigeru; Band, Y. B.

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamics of quantum three-level systems due to fast fluctuations of their environment (white noise). As an example, we model the decoherence and dephasing of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond that are positioned near a surface that gives rise to quickly fluctuating magnetic field noise, with and without the presence of a rf field that couples levels of the ground electronic state manifold. We use a simple quantum mechanical model that allows for analytical solutions. The model treats the NV three-level ground state in the presence of rapidly fluctuating magnetic fields that arise from the environment and result in decoherence, dephasing, and dissipation. We show that the magnetic field fluctuations can couple all the elements of the density matrix of the three-level system. Hence, all 9 eigenmodes may contribute to both population and coherence dynamics. We also discuss consequences for fitting experiments in which decoherence plays a role.

  17. On the role of sea surface temperature gradients in forcing low-level winds and convergence in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, Richard S.; Nigam, Sumant

    1987-01-01

    The potential contribution of the SST gradient-driven flow to the low-level (p not less than 700 mb) convergence over tropical oceans is determined using a simple one-layer model of the trade cumulus boundary layer wherein surface temperature gradients are mixed vertically (consistent with the ECMWF analyzed data). The influence of the layers above 700 mb is intentionally suppressed. The results of the study demonstrate the importance of taking account of the fact that cumulonimbus convection takes a small but finite time to adjust to low-level convergence. Failure to consider this effect leads to unreasonably large equatorial convergence.

  18. Estimating seepage flux from ephemeral stream channels using surface water and groundwater level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorduijn, Saskia L.; Shanafield, Margaret; Trigg, Mark A.; Harrington, Glenn A.; Cook, Peter G.; Peeters, L.

    2014-02-01

    Seepage flux from ephemeral streams can be an important component of the water balance in arid and semiarid regions. An emerging technique for quantifying this flux involves the measurement and simulation of a flood wave as it moves along an initially dry channel. This study investigates the usefulness of including surface water and groundwater data to improve model calibration when using this technique. We trialed this approach using a controlled flow event along a 1387 m reach of artificial stream channel. Observations were then simulated using a numerical model that combines the diffusion-wave approximation of the Saint-Vénant equations for streamflow routing, with Philip's infiltration equation and the groundwater flow equation. Model estimates of seepage flux for the upstream segments of the study reach, where streambed hydraulic conductivities were approximately 101 m d-1, were on the order of 10-4 m3 d-1 m-2. In the downstream segments, streambed hydraulic conductivities were generally much lower but highly variable (˜10-3 to 10-7 m d-1). A Latin Hypercube Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis showed that the flood front timing, surface water stage, groundwater heads, and the predicted streamflow seepage were most influenced by specific yield. Furthermore, inclusion of groundwater data resulted in a higher estimate of total seepage estimates than if the flood front timing were used alone.

  19. Nondestructive characterization and enzyme cleaning of painted surfaces: assessment from the macro to nano level.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Catarina; Busani, Tito; Branco, Luis C; Joosten, Ineke; Sandu, Irina Crina Anca

    2013-12-01

    This work establishes a multiscale and multitechnique nondestructive approach as valid methodology for monitoring surface properties and evaluating the effectiveness of enzymatic removal of varnishes from paintings/polychrome artefacts. Mock-up samples (documented reconstructions of oil, tempera, and gilded layers on canvas and wooden supports) were covered with different proteinaceous varnishes (egg white, animal and fish glue, casein) and then characterized before and after the removal of these coatings with enzyme-based solutions. The varnish was cleaned in several steps (two dry swabs and two wet swabs) with a clearance step for removing the residues from proteinaceous varnish or from enzyme solution. Microscopy [stereomicroscopy (SM), optical microscopy (OM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)] and colorimetric (CIE L*a*b* system) techniques were used for characterization of the reconstruction surfaces at different scales (macro-scale by SM and OM; micro-scale by SEM and nano-scale by AFM). These techniques were also used to monitor the cleaning treatment. Although results presented in this work were obtained for the specific treatment of enzyme removal, the methodology could be extended to other types of materials and cleaning. Further experiments on real works of art are needed for a complete validation of the methodology.

  20. Pesticide levels in ground and surface waters of Primavera do Leste Region, Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dores, Eliana F G C; Carbo, Leandro; Ribeiro, Maria L; De-Lamonica-Freire, Ermelinda M

    2008-08-01

    Residues of the herbicides simazine, metribuzin, metolachlor, trifluralin, atrazine, and two metabolites of atrazine, deisopropylatrazine (DIA) and deethylatrazine (DEA), are surveyed in the surface and groundwater of the Primavera do Leste region, Mato Grosso, Brazil during September and December 1998 and April 1999. Different water source sampling stations of groundwater (irrigation water well, drinking water well, and water hole) and surface water (dam and river) are set up based on agricultural land use. A solid-phase extraction procedure followed by gas chromatography-nitrogen-phosphorus detection is used for the determination of these compounds. All compounds are detected at least once in water samples. A temporal trend of pesticide contamination is observed, with the highest contamination frequency occurring in December during the main application season. Metribuzin shows the highest individual detection frequencies throughout the monitoring period, followed by metolachlor, simazine, and DEA. The maximum mean concentrations of pesticides in this study are in the range from 0.14 to 1.7 microg/L. We deduct that the contamination of water resources is predominantly caused by non-point pollution of pesticides used in intensive cash-crop cultures of the Cerrado area. Therefore, a continuous monitoring of pesticide concentrations in water resources of this tropical region is necessary to detect the longer term contamination trends and developing health risks.

  1. Effects of DO levels on surface force, cell membrane properties and microbial community dynamics of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ma, Si-Jia; Ding, Li-Li; Huang, Hui; Geng, Jin-Ju; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Hong-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we employ atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and MiSeq analysis to study the effects of traditional dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.71-1.32mg/L, 2.13-3.02mg/L and 4.31-5.16mg/L) on surface force, cell membrane properties and microbial community dynamics of activated sludge. Results showed that low DO level enhanced the surface force and roughness of activated sludge; the medium DO level decreased cell membrane fluidity by reducing the synthesis of branched fatty acids in the cell membrane; high DO level resulted in the highest protein content in the effluent by EEM scanning. Abundance of Micropruina, Zoogloea and Nakamurella increased and Paracoccus and Rudaea decreased with the increase of DO levels. RDA analysis suggested that saturated fatty acids (SFA), anteiso-fatty acids (AFA) and iso-fatty acids (IFA) were closely related to effluent quality as well as some genera. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Created mangrove wetlands store belowground carbon and surface elevation change enables them to adjust to sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, Ken W.; Cormier, Nicole; Osland, Michael J.; Kirwan, Matthew L.; Stagg, Camille L.; Nestlerode, Janet A.; Russell, Marc J.; From, Andrew; Spivak, Amanda C.; Dantin, Darrin D.; Harvey, James E.; Almario, Alejandro E.

    2017-01-01

    Mangrove wetlands provide ecosystem services for millions of people, most prominently by providing storm protection, food and fodder. Mangrove wetlands are also valuable ecosystems for promoting carbon (C) sequestration and storage. However, loss of mangrove wetlands and these ecosystem services are a global concern, prompting the restoration and creation of mangrove wetlands as a potential solution. Here, we investigate soil surface elevation change, and its components, in created mangrove wetlands over a 25 year developmental gradient. All created mangrove wetlands were exceeding current relative sea-level rise rates (2.6 mm yr−1), with surface elevation change of 4.2–11.0 mm yr−1 compared with 1.5–7.2 mm yr−1 for nearby reference mangroves. While mangrove wetlands store C persistently in roots/soils, storage capacity is most valuable if maintained with future sea-level rise. Through empirical modeling, we discovered that properly designed creation projects may not only yield enhanced C storage, but also can facilitate wetland persistence perennially under current rates of sea-level rise and, for most sites, for over a century with projected medium accelerations in sea-level rise (IPCC RCP 6.0). Only the fastest projected accelerations in sea-level rise (IPCC RCP 8.5) led to widespread submergence and potential loss of stored C for created mangrove wetlands before 2100.

  3. Created mangrove wetlands store belowground carbon and surface elevation change enables them to adjust to sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Ken W; Cormier, Nicole; Osland, Michael J; Kirwan, Matthew L; Stagg, Camille L; Nestlerode, Janet A; Russell, Marc J; From, Andrew S; Spivak, Amanda C; Dantin, Darrin D; Harvey, James E; Almario, Alejandro E

    2017-04-21

    Mangrove wetlands provide ecosystem services for millions of people, most prominently by providing storm protection, food and fodder. Mangrove wetlands are also valuable ecosystems for promoting carbon (C) sequestration and storage. However, loss of mangrove wetlands and these ecosystem services are a global concern, prompting the restoration and creation of mangrove wetlands as a potential solution. Here, we investigate soil surface elevation change, and its components, in created mangrove wetlands over a 25 year developmental gradient. All created mangrove wetlands were exceeding current relative sea-level rise rates (2.6 mm yr(-1)), with surface elevation change of 4.2-11.0 mm yr(-1) compared with 1.5-7.2 mm yr(-1) for nearby reference mangroves. While mangrove wetlands store C persistently in roots/soils, storage capacity is most valuable if maintained with future sea-level rise. Through empirical modeling, we discovered that properly designed creation projects may not only yield enhanced C storage, but also can facilitate wetland persistence perennially under current rates of sea-level rise and, for most sites, for over a century with projected medium accelerations in sea-level rise (IPCC RCP 6.0). Only the fastest projected accelerations in sea-level rise (IPCC RCP 8.5) led to widespread submergence and potential loss of stored C for created mangrove wetlands before 2100.

  4. Strain level differences in E. coli transport, cell surface and adhesion characteristics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Given the importance of E. coli as an indicator of fecal contamination, it is imperative that genotypic and phenotypic variability among strains of E. coli from the same host and/or environmental niche are understood. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of strain level differences on t...

  5. Optical properties and defect levels in a surface layer found on CuInSe{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Abulfotuh, F.; Wangensteen, T.; Ahrenkiel, R.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1996-05-01

    In this paper the authors have used photoluminescence (PL) and wavelength scanning ellipsometry (WSE) to clarify the relationship among the electro-optical properties of copper indium diselenide (CIS) thin films, the type and origin of dominant defect states, and device performance. The PL study has revealed several shallow acceptor and donor levels dominating the semiconductor. PL emission from points at different depths from the surface of the CIS sample has been obtained by changing the angle of incidence of the excitation laser beam. The resulting data were used to determine the dominant defect states as a function of composition gradient at the surface of the chalcopyrite compound. The significance of this type of measurement is that it allowed the detection of a very thin layer with a larger bandgap (1.15-1.26 eV) than the CIS present on the surface of the CIS thin films. The presence of this layer has been correlated by several groups to improvement of the CIS cell performance. An important need that results from detecting this layer on the surface of the CIS semiconductor is the determination of its thickness and optical constants (n, k) as a function of wavelength. The thickness of this surface layer is about 500 {Angstrom}.

  6. Global and local aspects of the surface potential landscape for energy level alignment at organic-ZnO interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stähler, Julia; Rinke, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    Hybrid systems of organic and inorganic semiconductors are a promising route for the development of novel opto-electronic and light-harvesting devices. A key ingredient for achieving a superior functionality by means of a hybrid system is the right relative position of energy levels at the interfaces of the two material classes. In this Perspective, we address the sensitivity of the potential energy landscape at various ZnO surfaces, a key ingredient for interfacial energy level alignment, by combining one- and two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy with density-functional theory calculations (DFT). We show that even very large work function changes (>2.5 eV) do not necessarily have to be accompanied by surface band bending in ZnO. Band bending - if it does occur - may be localized to few Å or extend over hundreds of nanometers with very different results for the surface work function and energy level alignment. Managing the delicate balance of different interface manipulation mechanisms in organic-inorganic hybrid systems will be a major challenge towards future applications.

  7. Adsorption and dissociation of acidic trace gases on ice surfaces - caught in the act with core level spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldner, Astrid; Orlando, Fabrizio; Ammann, Markus; Kleibert, Armin; Huthwelker, Thomas; Peter, Thomas; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Chemistry and physical processes in Earth's ice and snow cover can change the composition of the atmosphere and the contaminant content of the cryosphere. They have thus direct impacts on geochemical cycles and the climate system. Our ability to predict the fate of chemicals in snow or air masses in exchange with the cryosphere on a regional scale or to model those in snow chemistry models is currently hampered by our limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms on a molecular level. So far, direct experimental observations under environmentally relevant conditions of the ice surface and of the adsorption of trace gases to it are very limited. The unique approach of this study is to combine two surface sensitive spectroscopic methods to directly probe the hydrogen-bonding network at the ice surface ( ~1 nm depth) and the concentration, depth profile (~1 to 10 nm), and dissociation degree of the dopant. We present first core-electron photoemission (XPS) and partial electron yield X-ray absorption (NEXAFS) measurements of formic acid adsorbed to ice at 240 K. The analysis of oxygen NEXAFS spectra reveals information on changes in the hydrogen-bonding network of the ice surface upon adsorption of formic acid. Depth profiles based on XPS measurements indicate that the adsorbed acid stays at the ice surface. Furthermore we obtained a preliminary estimation of the degree of formic acid dissociation at the ice surface. Results are compared to earlier core-electron studies of several trace gases adsorbed to ice at 240 K and compared to results from more traditional method to and snow to reveal fundamental aspects of the ice surface and how it interacts with dopants. Even with the focus on adsorption of acidic trace gases to ice, results of this study will thus be of high relevance also for other chemical processes in ice and snow. This is of interest not only in environmental science but also in material science, cryobiology, and astrophysics.

  8. Termination-specific study of oxygen vacancy transition levels on SrTiO3(001) surfaces by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaputra, Wattaka; Sivadas, Nikhil; Skowronski, Marek; Xiao, Di; Feenstra, Randall

    2015-03-01

    We have studied the surface electronic structure of oxygen vacancies on SrTiO3(001) surfaces using scanning tunneling spectroscopy and DFT calculations with local spin density approximation (LSDA +U). With high dynamic range measurements, a mid-gap level associated with the surface oxygen vacancies was observed for SrO-terminated surfaces. TiO2-terminated surfaces, on the other hand, did not exhibit observable mid-gap states (this lack of signal is believed to be due to the nature of defect wavefunction involved, as well as possibly involving transport limitations in the STS measurements). Both vacuum-cleaved and MBE-grown surface have been studied. For the former, the Fermi level is pinned near mid-gap owing to disorder-induced surface states. The amount of surface disorder can be controlled in the case of epitaxially grown surfaces. Rougher MBE-grown surfaces were found to exhibit similar spectral characteristics to the cleaved surfaces, while a shift of the Fermi level toward the conduction band was observed for flatter grown surfaces. Notably, with a decreasing number of disorder-induced surface states, the Fermi level is found to be pinned within the observed band of oxygen vacancy levels. This research was supported by AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-12-1-0479, and it used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, supported by the Office of Science, US Department of Energy under Contract No. DEAC02-05CH11231.

  9. Hepatitis B surface antigen levels of cessation of nucleos(t)ide analogs associated with virological relapse in hepatitis B surface antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Ge, Guo-Hong; Ye, Yun; Zhou, Xin-Bei; Chen, Li; He, Cong; Wen, Dan-Feng; Tan, You-Wen

    2015-07-28

    To investigate the virological relapse rate in hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative patients after antiviral therapy discontinuation and analyze the factors associated with virological relapse. Among patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B infection between May 2005 and July 2010, 204 were eligible for analysis. The Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to calculate the cumulative rate of relapse and compare cumulative relapse rates between groups. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to evaluate the predictive factor of virological relapse. The 2 and 1 year cumulative risks of virological relapse after antiviral therapy discontinuation were 79.41% (162/204) and 43.82% (71/162), respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that only post treatment hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) level was associated with virological relapse (P = 0.011). The cumulative risk of virological relapse was higher in the patients with HBsAg levels ≥ 1500 IU/L than in those with HBsAg levels < 1500 IU/L (P = 0.0013). The area under the curve was 0.603 (P = 0.033). The cutoff HBsAg value for predicting virological relapse was 1443 IU/L. We found that the virological relapse rate remained high after antiviral therapy discontinuation in the HBeAg-negative patients and that the post treatment HBsAg levels predicted virological relapse.

  10. Optimized background reduction in low-level gamma-ray spectrometry at a surface laboratory.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, S; García-León, M; García-Tenorio, R

    2006-09-01

    The background of a coaxial Ge detector placed at a surface laboratory has been reduced by means of a background reduction setup consisting of a passive shield of low-activity lead, a simple radon suppression system and an active shield with a plastic scintillation plate. In particular, we have devoted our efforts to in-depth optimization of each parameter associated with different anticoincidence setups and to their subsequent intercomparison. The overall performance of the active shield was improved by using the optimum time parameters for each setup. The final objective is to decrease the cosmic-ray background and, by this way, to reduce the detection limits of gamma-ray spectrometers at conventional laboratories, and consequently make them competitive for different measurements like (210)Pb dating.

  11. The fate of metals in Arctic surface waters. Method for defining critical levels.

    PubMed

    Moiseenko, T I

    1999-09-15

    Based upon studies in the industrially developed Arctic region, Russian Kola, here we discuss the fate of metals in high latitude surface water. Mainly, attention is paid to the priority pollutants from copper-nickel smelters. The influence of accompanying processes, such as acidification and eutrophication, on metal behavior is considered. The dramatic situation for fauna of Arctic latitudes is illustrated: (i) during the snow-melt, due to the pulse of ionic metal forms; and (ii) during the long polar winter in lower water layers, due to the involvement of a wide spectrum of metals in the redox-cycle under eutrophication and oxygen deficiency. Here we identify fish pathologies, which are related to the influence of metals. Generalizing the data on metal behavior, an original approach to define the integrated impact dose of metals--a toxicity index--has been developed. It presents a visualization of the integrated toxicity index for surface waters of the Russian Kola (based on the data for a 460-lake survey). As shown, there is a risk of fish diseases, due to both airborne contamination by metals and an indirect leaching by acid runoff over almost 30% of the area of the Russian Kola. For the Arctic region, polar winter stress syndrome will be repeatedly significant. During the polar night, as well as the spring, the vulnerability of the Arctic biota to toxic impact is higher. The accompaniment of water metal-pollution by two or more stressors would occur simultaneously, thereby multiplying the risk that it could develop.

  12. Imaging and Tuning Molecular Levels at the Surface of a Gated Graphene Device

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gate-controlled tuning of the charge carrier density in graphene devices provides new opportunities to control the behavior of molecular adsorbates. We have used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) to show how the vibronic electronic levels of 1,3,5-tris(2,2-dicyanovinyl)benzene molecules adsorbed onto a graphene/BN/SiO2 device can be tuned via application of a backgate voltage. The molecules are observed to electronically decouple from the graphene layer, giving rise to well-resolved vibronic states in dI/dV spectroscopy at the single-molecule level. Density functional theory (DFT) and many-body spectral function calculations show that these states arise from molecular orbitals coupled strongly to carbon–hydrogen rocking modes. Application of a back-gate voltage allows switching between different electronic states of the molecules for fixed sample bias. PMID:24746016

  13. Effect of Rate and Level of Lowered Finger Surface Temperature on Manual Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-12-05

    United greater knot-tying decrements than did fast States Army Natick Laboratories , Natick, Masse- cooling to the same temperature. The differ- chusetts...peratures, but did not persist when an electric box in order to supply varying levels of wind move. muff was used to rewarm the hands. Clark ment. Two mock...The subjects were 32 enlisted men who volunteered the thermocouple output was not recorded. The sub- for assignment to the Climatic Research Laboratory

  14. FY2003 Visual examination of In Tank and Tank annuli at 241-SY tank farm

    SciTech Connect

    AFTANAS, B.L.

    2003-07-08

    This report documents the completion of the FY 2003 in-tank and annulus video inspections for the 241-SY tank farms. Representative photos of observed anomalies, water-streaks, corrosion deposits, pitting, and in-tank strains on the 241-SY-101, 102 & 103

  15. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation test pump-2

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, A.K.; Kolowith, R.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the results of the run-in test of the replacement mixer pump for the Tank 241-SY-101. The test was conducted at the 400 Area MASF facility between August 12 and September 29, 1994. The report includes findings, analysis, recommendations, and corrective actions taken.

  16. System design description for ``Mini-DACS`` data acquisition and control system

    SciTech Connect

    Ermi, A.M.

    1996-10-01

    This document describes the computer software design and associated hardware for the Mini-DACS (Data Acquisition and Control System) in support of testing the second spare pump (HMR-3) for tank 241SY101. The testing of HMR-3 was conducted at the Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF).

  17. Design layout for gas monitoring system II (GMS-2) computer system

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, V.; Philipp, B.L.; Manke, M.P.

    1995-08-02

    This document provides a general overview of the computer systems software that perform the data acquisition and control for the 241-SY-101 Gas Monitoring System II (GMS-2). It outlines the system layout, and contains descriptions of components and the functions they perform. The GMS-2 system was designed and implemented by Los Alamos National Laboratory and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company

  18. Cradle/pump heating system operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-01

    This is the operation and maintenance manual for the 241-SY-101 Cradle/Pump Heating System. The Heating System provides the means to heat the pump (HMT {number_sign}2) during cold weather to assure safe and smooth pump installation.

  19. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting, November 11--13, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    The sixth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held November 11--13, 1991, in Pasco and Richland, Washington. Participating scientists presented the results of recent work on various aspects of issues relating to the generation and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the presence of ferrocyanide in other tanks at Hanford. Results are discussed.

  20. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting, November 11--13, 1991. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    The sixth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held November 11--13, 1991, in Pasco and Richland, Washington. Participating scientists presented the results of recent work on various aspects of issues relating to the generation and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the presence of ferrocyanide in other tanks at Hanford. Results are discussed.

  1. Set point calculations for RAPID project

    SciTech Connect

    HICKMAN, G.L.

    1999-10-18

    The Respond and Pump in Days (RAPID) project was initiated to pump part of the contents of tank 241-SY-101 into tank 241-SY-102. This document establishes the basis for all set points and ranges used in the RAPID project.

  2. Set Point Calculations for RAPID Project [Removal of Hold for HNF-5087 and HNF-5088 and HNF-5089

    SciTech Connect

    HICKMAN, G.L.

    1999-09-02

    The Respond and Pump in Days (RAPID) project was initiated to pump part of the contents of tank 241-SY-101 into tanks 241-SY-102. This document establishes the basis for all set points and ranges used in the RAPID project.

  3. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting July 9--1, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    The fifth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held July 9--11, 1991, in Atlanta, Georgia. The subject areas included the generation, retention, and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the chemistry of ferrocyanide wastes.

  4. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting July 9--1, 1991. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    The fifth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held July 9--11, 1991, in Atlanta, Georgia. The subject areas included the generation, retention, and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the chemistry of ferrocyanide wastes.

  5. Flammable gas safety program. Analytical methods development: FY 1994 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.; Grant, K.; Hoopes, V.; Lerner, B.; Lucke, R.; Mong, G.; Rau, J.; Wahl, K.; Steele, R.

    1994-09-01

    This report describes the status of developing analytical methods to account for the organic components in Hanford waste tanks, with particular focus on tanks assigned to the Flammable Gas Watch List. The methods that have been developed are illustrated by their application to samples obtained from Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY).

  6. An improved empirical dynamic control system model of global mean sea level rise and surface temperature change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Luu, Quang-Hung; Tkalich, Pavel; Chen, Ge

    2017-03-01

    Having great impacts on human lives, global warming and associated sea level rise are believed to be strongly linked to anthropogenic causes. Statistical approach offers a simple and yet conceptually verifiable combination of remotely connected climate variables and indices, including sea level and surface temperature. We propose an improved statistical reconstruction model based on the empirical dynamic control system by taking into account the climate variability and deriving parameters from Monte Carlo cross-validation random experiments. For the historic data from 1880 to 2001, we yielded higher correlation results compared to those from other dynamic empirical models. The averaged root mean square errors are reduced in both reconstructed fields, namely, the global mean surface temperature (by 24-37%) and the global mean sea level (by 5-25%). Our model is also more robust as it notably diminished the unstable problem associated with varying initial values. Such results suggest that the model not only enhances significantly the global mean reconstructions of temperature and sea level but also may have a potential to improve future projections.

  7. The Sentinel-3 Surface Topography Mission (S-3 STM): Level 2 SAR Ocean Retracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinardo, S.; Lucas, B.; Benveniste, J.

    2015-12-01

    The SRAL Radar Altimeter, on board of the ESA Mission Sentinel-3 (S-3), has the capacity to operate either in the Pulse-Limited Mode (also known as LRM) or in the novel Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode. Thanks to the initial results from SAR Altimetry obtained exploiting CryoSat-2 data, lately the interest by the scientific community in this new technology has significantly increased and consequently the definition of accurate processing methodologies (along with validation strategies) has now assumed a capital importance. In this paper, we present the algorithm proposed to retrieve from S-3 STM SAR return waveforms the standard ocean geophysical parameters (ocean topography, wave height and sigma nought) and the validation results that have been so far achieved exploiting the CryoSat-2 data as well as the simulated data. The inversion method (retracking) to extract from the return waveform the geophysical information is a curve best-fitting scheme based on the bounded Levenberg-Marquardt Least-Squares Estimation Method (LEVMAR-LSE). The S-3 STM SAR Ocean retracking algorithm adopts, as return waveform’s model, the “SAMOSA” model [Ray et al, 2014], named after the R&D project SAMOSA (led by Satoc and funded by ESA), in which it has been initially developed. The SAMOSA model is a physically-based model that offers a complete description of a SAR Altimeter return waveform from ocean surface, expressed in the form of maps of reflected power in Delay-Doppler space (also known as stack) or expressed as multilooked echoes. SAMOSA is able to account for an elliptical antenna pattern, mispointing errors in roll and yaw, surface scattering pattern, non-linear ocean wave statistics and spherical Earth surface effects. In spite of its truly comprehensive character, the SAMOSA model comes with a compact analytical formulation expressed in term of Modified Bessel functions. The specifications of the retracking algorithm have been gathered in a technical document (DPM

  8. BOREAS RSS-14 Level -3 Gridded Radiometer and Satellite Surface Radiation Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Hodges, Gary; Smith, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-14 team collected and processed GOES-7 and -8 images of the BOREAS region as part of its effort to characterize the incoming, reflected, and emitted radiation at regional scales. This data set contains surface radiation parameters, such as net radiation and net solar radiation, that have been interpolated from GOES-7 images and AMS data onto the standard BOREAS mapping grid at a resolution of 5 km N-S and E-W. While some parameters are taken directly from the AMS data set, others have been corrected according to calibrations carried out during IFC-2 in 1994. The corrected values as well as the uncorrected values are included. For example, two values of net radiation are provided: an uncorrected value (Rn), and a value that has been corrected according to the calibrations (Rn-COR). The data are provided in binary image format data files. Some of the data files on the BOREAS CD-ROMs have been compressed using the Gzip program. See section 8.2 for details. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  9. Thermal advection and stratification effects on surface winds and the low level meridional mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Gad; Tiu, Felice S.

    1990-01-01

    Statistical tests are performed on the Seasat scatterometer observations to examine if and to what degree thermal advection and stratification effects manifest themselves in these remotely sensed measurements of mean wind and wind stress over the ocean. On the basis of a two layer baroclinic boundary layer model which is presented, it is shown that the thermal advection and stratification of the entire boundary layer as well as the geostrophic forcing influence the modeled near surface wind and wind stress profiles. Evidence of diurnal variation in the stratification under barotropic conditions is found in the data, with the daytime marine boundary layer being more convective than its nighttime counterpart. The temporal and spacial sampling pattern of the satellite makes it impossible to recover the full diurnal cycle, however. The observed effects of the thermal advection are shown to be statistically significant during the day (and presumed more convective) hours, causing a systematic increase in the poleward transport of mass and heat. The statistical results are in a qualitative agreement with the model simulations and cannot be reproduced in randomized control tests.

  10. Surface plasmon resonance sensor for phosmet of agricultural products at the ppt detection level.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Liu, Ming; Wang, Shuo

    2013-03-20

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunoassay using a PH-BSA immobilized sensor chip was developed to measure phosmet in food samples. The in-competitive inhibition assay showed highly sensitive and good specificity of the cross-reactivity with analogue structure pesticides. The biosensor exhibited a linear detection range from 8.0 to 60.0 ng/L of phosmet with a lower detection limit of 1.6 ng/L (S/N = 3). The sensitivity obtained with the present SPR affinity biosensor was significantly higher than most of the sensors reported with different measurement methodologies for phosmet. A recovery test of pesticide quantification in peaches, apples, cabbages, and rapes was also studied. Good recoveries (86.4-102.8%) and coefficients of variation (CVs) (5.1-12.6%) were obtained in all cases. The SPR biosensor assay method was compared with cd-ELISA in terms of analysis time, antibody dosage, recoveries, precision, detection limit, pretreatment, and testing costs, and clear advantages could be seen over the traditional ELISA-based detection systems. The developed SPR method was suitable for the rapid quantitative or qualitative determination of phosmet in agricultural products.

  11. Experiences with Opto-Mechanical Systems that Affect Optical Surfaces at the Sub-Nanometer Level

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L C; Taylor, J S

    2008-04-03

    Projection optical systems built for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) demonstrated the ability to produce, support and position reflective optical surfaces for achieving transmitted wavefront errors of 1 nm or less. Principal challenges included optical interferometry, optical manufacturing processes, multi-layer coating technology and opto mechanics. Our group was responsible for designing, building and aligning two different projection optical systems: a full-field, 0.1 NA, four-mirror system for 70 nm features and a small-field, 0.3 NA, two-mirror system for 30 nm features. Other than physical size and configuration, the two systems were very similar in the way they were designed, built and aligned. A key difference exists in the optic mounts, driven primarily by constraints from the metrology equipment used by different optics manufacturers. As mechanical stability and deterministic position control of optics will continue to play an essential role in future systems, we focus our discussion on opto-mechanics and primarily the optic mounts.

  12. Effects of two tasks and two levels of difficulty upon surface electrogastrograms.

    PubMed

    Ercolani, M; Baldaro, B; Trombini, G

    1989-08-01

    The effects of differentiation, novelty, and difficulty of ability tasks upon electrogastrographic activity of healthy subjects during digestion were investigated. Electrical recording of activity of the stomach by means of surface electrodes was performed in 40 healthy volunteers before and after easy or hard tasks. 20 subjects had to complete puzzles; the others had mental arithmetic. Both groups were matched in terms of scores on easy and difficult tasks. Baseline recordings were performed before each trial. The number of waves with peak amplitude greater than 100 mu v on electrogastrographic recording during each time span was measured, using a visual analysis. There was a significant decrease in number of waves/min, during task performance. A more pronounced decrease was produced by subjects working on puzzles than those working on mental calculation and by subjects working on easy tasks than those working on difficult tasks when the easy preceded the difficult ones. A larger decrease was obtained when the tasks of comparable difficulty were performed first. Emotional correlates such as anger and irritability were suggested to play a role in the interpretation of results.

  13. Technical Methods of Evaluation of Near-surface Disposal of Very Low Level Radioactive Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, R.; Teng, Y.; Wang, J.

    2010-12-01

    Radioactive waste disposal is one of the most difficult world's environmental problems for control and solving, it is as a hotspot in the field of pollution control and remediation. For the economical and efficient disposal, very low level radioactive waste (VLLW) is separated from low and intermediate level waste, and bulky VLLW could be disposed in the disposal site without the special engineering barrier. The approach is not only significant savings in disposal costs, but meeting the public on the environment. Therefore, it is very important for disposal and management of radioactive waste. In this paper, as the studied object of the VLLW disposal site in the southwestern China, a systemic analysis in the relational technology was developed, and as the key technology, the barrier and technical methods of evaluation was researched with emphasis. The disposal site was on a hilltop of debris flow, and the repository with barrier was selected, 90Sr were selected as the typical nuclides, and the releasing concentration was calculated by the given model. The fine particle (d<1mm) was used as barrier material of the repository with the thickness of 0.5m. The sorption and migration characteristics were measured by batch and column tests, and the results reflected the material has a good sorption capacity on 90Sr. From the results of simulation, the nuclide of 90Sr was almost basically retarded in the unsaturated zone.

  14. Diatom Abundance in Surface Sediments: A Quantitative Proxy for Primary Productivity at the Global Level?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrantes, F. F. G.; Lopes, C.; Romero, O. E.; Matos, L.; Rufino, M. M.; Magalhaes, V. H.; Cermeno, P.

    2014-12-01

    Diatom abundance and assemblage composition has for long been considered one of the best proxies for primary production, in particular for low latitude coastal upwelling areas, where they constitute the dominant phytoplankton. To investigate productivity conditions at those upwelling systems at any time and at the global level would be of great use for C export estimations and climate modeling, since primary production and C export in those systems is of major importance in controlling Earth's climate. To assess the value of the diatom sediment record at the global level, total abundance of marine diatoms was determined for 730 sites distributed by the five most important coastal upwelling systems of the modern ocean, and compared to several meaningful ecological parameters. Investigations of the satellite estimated primary productivity; upwelling index; water column physical properties and nutrient content, reveal a clear relation between sediment diatom abundance and primary production - although different between areas. Furthermore, upwelled waters [Si] appear as a determinant factor of the observed global diatom distribution.

  15. Level-crossing statistics of the horizontal wind speed in the planetary surface boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Paul J.; Hurst, Robert B.

    2001-09-01

    The probability density of the times for which the horizontal wind remains above or below a given threshold speed is of some interest in the fields of renewable energy generation and pollutant dispersal. However there appear to be no analytic or conceptual models which account for the observed power law form of the distribution of these episode lengths over a range of over three decades, from a few tens of seconds to a day or more. We reanalyze high resolution wind data and demonstrate the fractal character of the point process generated by the wind speed level crossings. We simulate the fluctuating wind speed by a Markov process which approximates the characteristics of the real (non-Markovian) wind and successfully generates a power law distribution of episode lengths. However, fundamental questions concerning the physical basis for this behavior and the connection between the properties of a continuous-time stochastic process and the fractal statistics of the point process generated by its level crossings remain unanswered. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Dynamics and kinematics of ant locomotion: do wood ants climb on level surfaces?

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Lars; Weihmann, Tom; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2009-08-01

    The biomechanics of running in small animals have remained poorly characterized because of the difficulty of recording three-dimensional ground reaction forces. Available techniques limit investigations to animals with a body mass above 1 g. Here we present, for the first time, single-leg ground reaction forces of ants (body mass 10 mg), measured with a custom-built miniature force plate. We investigated forces and high-speed kinematics for straight level runs (average speed: 8.4 cm s(-1)) of Formica polyctena workers. The major finding was that the time course of ground reaction forces strongly differed from previous observations of larger insects. Maximum vertical force was reached during the first third of the tripod contact phase. During this period the body was decelerated predominantly by the front legs. Subsequently, the front legs pulled and accelerated the body. This 'climbing' type of stride may be useful on the bumpy and unstable substrates that the animals face in their natural habitats, and may therefore also occur on level ground. Propulsive forces were generated predominantly by the front and hind legs. Dragging of the gaster on the substrate resulted in a breaking momentum, which was compensated by the legs. Future investigations will reveal, whether the identified pattern is due to specialization.

  17. Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities

    PubMed Central

    Drollette, Brian D.; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Karatum, Osman; O’Connor, Megan P.; Nelson, Robert K.; Fernandez, Loretta A.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L.

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of organic chemicals are used during natural gas extraction via high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF). However, it is unclear whether these chemicals, injected into deep shale horizons, reach shallow groundwater aquifers and affect local water quality, either from those deep HVHF injection sites or from the surface or shallow subsurface. Here, we report detectable levels of organic compounds in shallow groundwater samples from private residential wells overlying the Marcellus Shale in northeastern Pennsylvania. Analyses of purgeable and extractable organic compounds from 64 groundwater samples revealed trace levels of volatile organic compounds, well below the Environmental Protection Agency’s maximum contaminant levels, and low levels of both gasoline range (0–8 ppb) and diesel range organic compounds (DRO; 0–157 ppb). A compound-specific analysis revealed the presence of bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, which is a disclosed HVHF additive, that was notably absent in a representative geogenic water sample and field blanks. Pairing these analyses with (i) inorganic chemical fingerprinting of deep saline groundwater, (ii) characteristic noble gas isotopes, and (iii) spatial relationships between active shale gas extraction wells and wells with disclosed environmental health and safety violations, we differentiate between a chemical signature associated with naturally occurring saline groundwater and one associated with alternative anthropogenic routes from the surface (e.g., accidental spills or leaks). The data support a transport mechanism of DRO to groundwater via accidental release of fracturing fluid chemicals derived from the surface rather than subsurface flow of these fluids from the underlying shale formation. PMID:26460018

  18. A new accurate ground-state potential energy surface of ethylene and predictions for rotational and vibrational energy levels

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, Thibault Rey, Michaël Tyuterev, Vladimir G.; Nikitin, Andrei; Szalay, Péter G.

    2014-09-14

    In this paper we report a new ground state potential energy surface for ethylene (ethene) C{sub 2}H{sub 4} obtained from extended ab initio calculations. The coupled-cluster approach with the perturbative inclusion of the connected triple excitations CCSD(T) and correlation consistent polarized valence basis set cc-pVQZ was employed for computations of electronic ground state energies. The fit of the surface included 82 542 nuclear configurations using sixth order expansion in curvilinear symmetry-adapted coordinates involving 2236 parameters. A good convergence for variationally computed vibrational levels of the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} molecule was obtained with a RMS(Obs.–Calc.) deviation of 2.7 cm{sup −1} for fundamental bands centers and 5.9 cm{sup −1} for vibrational bands up to 7800 cm{sup −1}. Large scale vibrational and rotational calculations for {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and {sup 12}C{sub 2}D{sub 4} isotopologues were performed using this new surface. Energy levels for J = 20 up to 6000 cm{sup −1} are in a good agreement with observations. This represents a considerable improvement with respect to available global predictions of vibrational levels of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and {sup 12}C{sub 2}D{sub 4} and rovibrational levels of {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}.

  19. Body Surface Contamination Levels of Residents under Different Evacuation Scenarios after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Takashi; Hasegawa, Arifumi; Kohayagawa, Yoshitaka; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Suzuki, Gen

    2017-09-01

    Body surface contamination levels should be correlated with inhaled actual thyroid doses during evacuation following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. Evacuees and residents were screened for body surface contamination using a Geiger-Mueller survey meter. The authors obtained 7,539 individual screening data sheets as well as gamma-spectrometry data from measurements made on clothing of two subjects by using a germanium spectrometer. Body surface contamination levels were analyzed in four residential groups during two different periods: 12-14 and 15-17 March 2011. Contamination levels during 12-14 March in the Tomioka/Okuma/Futaba/Naraha group were very low, indicating that residents evacuated before the radioactive plume reached their towns on 12 March. In contrast, levels in the Namie and Minamisoma groups were higher than those in the other groups in both periods, indicating that these residents were exposed to plumes twice on 12 and 15-16 March. The plume on 12 March was enriched with short-lived radionuclides: averaged proportions of radioactivity (relative to I) from Te, I, and Cs measured in clothing from two subjects were 2.3, 1.1, and 0.1, respectively, after correction for physical decay by 12:00 on 12 March. These proportions are similar to those (relative to I) from Te and Cs in dust sampled by a high-volume air sampler in the zone 20 km from the FDNPP on 12 March: 1.9 and 0.1, respectively. These data indicate that the relative contribution to inhaled thyroid dose of short-lived radionuclides in radioactive plumes released on 12 March could be as much as 37.5% in 1-y-old children.

  20. Total metal levels in crayfish Astacus leptodactylus (Eschscholtz, 1823), and surface sediments in Lake Terkos, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kurun, Aysegül; Balkis, Nuray; Erkan, Melike; Balkis, Hüsamettin; Aksu, Abdullah; Erşan, Mahmut Selim

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the total metal accumulation (aluminium, copper, manganese, lead, cadmium and iron) in different organs and eggs of Astacus leptodactylus (Eschscholtz, 1823) and sediments total metal contents (aluminium, copper, manganese, lead, cadmium, iron, zinc, chromium, nickel) in Lake Terkos. Water and sediment samples were collected from two stations at two different depths (1 and 2 m) of Lake Terkos in May 2008. Crayfish samples were collected by trammel net at the same region. Primary hydrographic conditions, such as temperature (13.6-19.4 degrees C), salinity (0.27-0.34 per thousand), dissolved oxygen (7.04-12.30 mg l(-1)) and pH (7.42-8.51), were recorded for each sampling point. Moreover, the total organic carbon (1.65-5.44%) and the total calcium carbonate contents (19.44-41.16%) of sediment samples were determined. According to the Turkish Food Codex (J Zool 26:283-288, 2002), the maximum allowable Pb and Cd levels in crayfish are 0.5 mg/kg wet weight. Accordingly, the Pb and Cd levels determined in A. leptodactylus samples are below this limit. However, when compared with the acceptable metal limits defined by WHO, Australian National Health and Medical Research Council and Ministry of Agriculture in United Kingdom (UK), it is clear that the Cu level is at the limit and the Cd results exceed the limit. When the metal contents in sediment samples from Lake Terkos are examined, it is seen that the Al, Fe, Mn, Ni and Cu contents are lower while Zn, Cr, Cd and Pb contents are higher than the crustal average values. The high values draw attention to the land-based domestic and industrial inputs. Lake Terkos sediments have high enrichment factors (EF) of Zn, Cr, Cd and Pb metals which corroborate this result. The low EFs of Fe, Ni and Cu are due to the natural (terrigeneous) inputs. Additionally, there is no Al, Fe, Ni and Cu metal enrichment in these lake sediments because of the low contamination factor (CF) values. However, it is

  1. Observation of core-level binding energy shifts between (100) surface and bulk atoms of epitaxial CuInSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.J.; Berry, G.; Rockett, A.

    1997-04-01

    Core-level and valence band photoemission from semiconductors has been shown to exhibit binding energy differences between surface atoms and bulk atoms, thus allowing one to unambiguously distinguish between the two atomic positions. Quite clearly, surface atoms experience a potential different from the bulk due to the lower coordination number - a characteristic feature of any surface is the incomplete atomic coordination. Theoretical accounts of this phenomena are well documented in the literature for III-V and II-VI semiconductors. However, surface state energies corresponding to the equilibrium geometry of (100) and (111) surfaces of Cu-based ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors have not been calculated or experimental determined. These compounds are generating great interest for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications, and are an isoelectronic analog of the II-VI binary compound semiconductors. Surface core-level binding energy shifts depend on the surface cohesive energies, and surface cohesive energies are related to surface structure. For ternary compound semiconductor surfaces, such as CuInSe{sub 2}, one has the possibility of variations in surface stoichiometry. Applying standard thermodynamical calculations which consider the number of individual surface atoms and their respective chemical potentials should allow one to qualitatively determine the magnitude of surface core-level shifts and, consequently, surface state energies.

  2. Heterogeneity of Skin Surface Oxygen Level of Wrist in Relation to Acupuncture Point

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Minyoung; Park, Sarah S.; Ha, Yejin; Lee, Jaegeun; Yoo, Kwangsik; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Suh, Minah; Lee, Youngmi

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of partial oxygen pressure (pO2) is analyzed for the anterior aspect of the left wrist with an amperometric oxygen microsensor composed of a small planar Pt disk-sensing area (diameter = 25 μm). The pO2 levels vary depending on the measurement location over the wrist skin, and they are systematically monitored in the analysis for both one-dimensional single line (along the wrist transverse crease) and two-dimensional square area of the wrist region. Relatively higher pO2 values are observed at certain area in close proximity to the position of acupuncture points with statistical significance, indicating strong relationship between oxygen and acupuncture point. The used oxygen microsensor is sensitive enough to detect the pO2 variation depending on the location. This study may provide information helpful to understand possible physiological roles of the acupuncture points. PMID:22666285

  3. 4th generation of the 1st level surface detector trigger in the Pierre Auger Observator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szadkowski, Z.

    The proposal of a new 4th generation of the Front-End with the advanced 1st level triggers for the Infill Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory and for the Auger North is described. Newest FPGA chips offer much higher capacity of logic registers and memories, as well as DSP blocks. The calibration channel, previously supported by an external dual-port RAM, has been fully implemented into FPGA chip, through a large internal memory. In turn DSP blocks allowed on implementation of much more sophisticated spectral trigger algorithms. A single chip simplified board design, newer architecture of FPGA reduced resouces utilization and power consumption. Higher sampling in the new Front- End in comparison with previous 40 MHz designs as well as free resources for new detection algotithms can be a good platform for CR radio detection technique at Auger enhancing a duty cycle for the detection of UHECR’s.

  4. Impurity activation and surface γ-dose levels in first wall structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancarli, Luciano

    1986-05-01

    Research in the field of low-activity structural materials for the first wall and blanket of nuclear fusion reactors has assumed much importance in the last few years. In this study the effects of the presence of low concentrations of unintended impurities among the basic components of low-activation materials on their long term activation and dose rate levels have been investigated. A new library of neutron cross-sections has been generated with the THRES-F code for all those elements that are not traditional components of structural materials. The contribution of 1 ppm of each possible impurity element to the long term activity and γ-dose rate of a structural material has subsequently been determined with the aid of a modified version of the ORIGEN code.

  5. Assimilation of Smos Observations to Generate a Prototype SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-Zone Soil Moisture Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Crow, Wade T.; Koster, Randal D.; Kimball, John

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP; [1]) mission is being implemented by NASA for launch in October 2014. The primary science objectives of SMAP are to enhance understanding of land surface controls on the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to determine their linkages. Moreover, the high-resolution soil moisture mapping provided by SMAP has practical applications in weather and seasonal climate prediction, agriculture, human health, drought and flood decision support. The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS; [2]) mission was launched by ESA in November 2009 and has since been observing L-band (1.4 GHz) upwelling passive microwaves. In this paper we describe our use of SMOS brightness temperature observations to generate a prototype of the planned SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) product [5].

  6. Rapid colorimetric field test to determine levels of deltamethrin on PermaNet surfaces: association with mosquito bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael D; Atieli, Frances; Akogbeto, Martin

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate a simple and inexpensive colorimetric test to measure the amount of cyanopyrethroid insecticide residue from filter paper exposed to mosquito net surfaces. The net sampling protocol and colorimetric test (NetTest) were evaluated for deltamethrin-impregnated PermaNet 2.0 by comparison with high-performance liquid chromatographic assays and mosquito mortality (WHO Cone Test). The observed correlation between the amount of deltamethrin adsorbed onto the filter paper and the entire amount of deltamethrin per unit area of net material was good: 0.967, five assays. The relationship between the surface levels of deltamethrin determined by the colorimetric test and the 'gold standard' mosquito bioassay reveals a relatively accurate field test with a sensitivity of 91.4% and specificity if 85.4% (76 samplings from 19 nets).

  7. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration from satellite observation taking into account the aerosol vertical profiles and hygroscopicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanchul; Lee, Kwon H; Kim, Ji I; Noh, Youngmin; Shin, Dong H; Shin, Sung K; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young J; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Surface-level PM10 distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of vertical profiles and hygroscopicity of aerosols over Jeju, Korea during March 2008 and October 2009. In this study, MODIS AOD data from the Terra and Aqua satellites were corrected with aerosol extinction profiles and relative humidity data. PBLH (Planetary Boundary Layer Height) was determined from MPLNET lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficient profiles. Through statistical analysis, better agreement in correlation (R = 0.82) between the hourly PM10 concentration and hourly average Sunphotometer AOD was the obtained when vertical fraction method (VFM) considering Haze Layer Height (HLH) and hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) was used. The validity of the derived relationship between satellite AOD and surface PM10 concentration clearly demonstrates that satellite AOD data can be utilized for remote sensing of spatial distribution of regional PM10 concentration.

  8. On the choice of the ab initio level of theory for potential energy surface developments.

    PubMed

    Czakó, Gábor; Szabó, István; Telekes, Hajnalka

    2014-01-23

    We test the accuracy of various standard, explicitly correlated F12, and composite ab initio methods with different correlation consistent basis sets for high-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) developments, thereby providing a practical guidance for reaction dynamics studies. Relative potential energies are computed at 15 geometries covering the energy range and configuration space of chemical importance for each of the six prototypical polyatomic reactions, X + CH4 → HX + CH3 [X = F, O, Cl] and X(-) + CH3Y → Y(-) + CH3X [X/Y = F/F, OH/F, F/Cl]. The average accuracies of the Hartree-Fock and MP2 methods are 1500-8000 and 400-1000 cm(-1), respectively. The standard CCSD(T) method provides errors of 900-1400 and 250-450 cm(-1) with aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets, respectively. The explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12 method reduces the corresponding errors to about 200 and 100 cm(-1); thus, we recommend using the F12 methods for PES developments. For F12 computations, the cc-pVnZ-F12 [n = D and T] basis sets usually, but not always, perform better than the corresponding aug-cc-pVnZ bases. We do not find clear preference between the F12a and F12b methods for PES developments. Composite methods are advocated instead of standard CCSD(T) because for example, one can obtain CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVnZ quality results on the expense of MP2/aug-cc-pVnZ [n = T and Q] computations. The post-CCSD(T), the core correlation, and the scalar relativistic effects are found to be ∼100, 80-130, and 10-50 cm(-1), respectively. The all-electron CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pCVnZ relative energies differ from the complete-basis-set limit by about 1000, 300, 100, and 50 cm(-1) for n = D, T, Q, and 5, respectively.

  9. Variability of Surface pollutants and aerosol concentration over Abu Dhabi, UAE - sources, transport and current levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanikumar, Devulapalli V.; Basha, Ghouse; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2015-04-01

    In the view of recent economic, industrial, and rapid development, Abu Dhabi (24.4oN; 54.4oE; 27m msl) has become one of the most populated regions in the world despite of extreme heat, frequent dust storms, and with distinctive topography. The major sources of air pollution are from the dust and sand storms, greenhouse gas emissions, and to some extent from industrial pollution. In order to realize the accurate and comprehensive understanding of air quality and plausible sources over this region, we have made a detailed analysis of three years simultaneous measurements during 2011-13 of pollutants such as O3, SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 concentrations. Diurnal variation of meteorological parameters such as temperature and wind speed/relative humidity clearly shows daytime maximum/minimum in summer followed by pre-monsoon, post-monsoon and winter. The prevailing winds over this region are mostly from northwesterly direction (Shamal wind). Diurnal wind pattern showed a clear contrast with the majority of the wind pattern during nighttime and early morning is from the westerly/northwesterly and daytime is from southwesterly/southeasterly directions. The diurnal pattern of O3 shows minimum during 08 LT and increases thereafter reaching maximum at 17 LT and decreases during nighttime. However, the diurnal pattern of SO2 and NO2 show a peak at ~ 08 LT and dip at ~ 14 LT during all the seasons with some variability in each season. On the other hand, the diurnal pattern of CO shows a peculiar picture of elevated levels during daytime peaking at ~ 10 LT (prominent in summer and post-monsoon) followed by a sharp decrease and minimum is ~14 LT. PM10 concentration has an early morning peak at ~ 02 LT and then decreases to a minimum value at ~11 LT and again increases in the afternoon hours (maximum at ~17 LT) depicting a forenoon-afternoon asymmetry. Monthly variation of PM10 shows maximum in pre-monsoon season and minimum in winter. Our observations show the diurnal pattern of

  10. Highly Accurate Potential Energy Surface, Dipole Moment Surface, Rovibrational Energy Levels, and Infrared Line List for (32)S(16)O2 up to 8000 cm(exp -1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    A purely ab initio potential energy surface (PES) was refined with selected (32)S(16)O2 HITRAN data. Compared to HITRAN, the root-mean-squares error (RMS) error for all J=0-80 rovibrational energy levels computed on the refined PES (denoted Ames-1) is 0.013 cm(exp -1). Combined with a CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV(Q+d)Z dipole moment surface (DMS), an infrared (IR) line list (denoted Ames-296K) has been computed at 296K and covers up to 8,000 cm(exp -1). Compared to the HITRAN and CDMS databases, the intensity agreement for most vibrational bands is better than 85-90%. Our predictions for (34)S(16)O2 band origins, higher energy (32)S(16)O2 band origins and missing (32)S(16)O2 IR bands have been verified by most recent experiments and available HITRAN data. We conclude that the Ames-1 PES is able to predict (32/34)S(16)O2 band origins below 5500 cm(exp -1) with 0.01-0.03 cm(exp -1) uncertainties, and the Ames-296K line list provides continuous, reliable and accurate IR simulations. The Ka-dependence of both line position and line intensity errors is discussed. The line list will greatly facilitate SO2 IR spectral experimental analysis, as well as elimination of SO2 lines in high-resolution astronomical observations.

  11. Highly accurate potential energy surface, dipole moment surface, rovibrational energy levels, and infrared line list for 32S16O2 up to 8000 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2014-03-01

    A purely ab initio potential energy surface (PES) was refined with selected 32S16O2 HITRAN data. Compared to HITRAN, the root-mean-squares error (σRMS) for all J = 0-80 rovibrational energy levels computed on the refined PES (denoted Ames-1) is 0.013 cm-1. Combined with a CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV(Q+d)Z dipole moment surface (DMS), an infrared (IR) line list (denoted Ames-296K) has been computed at 296 K and covers up to 8000 cm-1. Compared to the HITRAN and CDMS databases, the intensity agreement for most vibrational bands is better than 85%-90%. Our predictions for 34S16O2 band origins, higher energy 32S16O2 band origins and missing 32S16O2 IR bands have been verified by most recent experiments and available HITRAN data. We conclude that the Ames-1 PES is able to predict 32/34S16O2 band origins below 5500 cm-1 with 0.01-0.03 cm-1 uncertainties, and the Ames-296K line list provides continuous, reliable and accurate IR simulations. The Ka-dependence of both line position and line intensity errors is discussed. The line list will greatly facilitate SO2 IR spectral experimental analysis, as well as elimination of SO2 lines in high-resolution astronomical observations.

  12. Response of groundwater level and surface-water/groundwater interaction to climate variability: Clarence-Moreton Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Tao; Raiber, Matthias; Pagendam, Dan; Gilfedder, Mat; Rassam, David

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the response of groundwater levels in alluvial and sedimentary basin aquifers to climatic variability and human water-resource developments is a key step in many hydrogeological investigations. This study presents an analysis of groundwater response to climate variability from 2000 to 2012 in the Queensland part of the sedimentary Clarence-Moreton Basin, Australia. It contributes to the baseline hydrogeological understanding by identifying the primary groundwater flow pattern, water-level response to climate extremes, and the resulting dynamics of surface-water/groundwater interaction. Groundwater-level measurements from thousands of bores over several decades were analysed using Kriging and nonparametric trend analysis, together with a newly developed three-dimensional geological model. Groundwater-level contours suggest that groundwater flow in the shallow aquifers shows local variations in the close vicinity of streams, notwithstanding general conformance with topographic relief. The trend analysis reveals that climate variability can be quickly reflected in the shallow aquifers of the Clarence-Moreton Basin although the alluvial aquifers have a quicker rainfall response than the sedimentary bedrock formations. The Lockyer Valley alluvium represents the most sensitively responding alluvium in the area, with the highest declining (-0.7 m/year) and ascending (2.1 m/year) Sen's slope rates during and after the drought period, respectively. Different surface-water/groundwater interaction characteristics were observed in different catchments by studying groundwater-level fluctuations along hydrogeologic cross-sections. The findings of this study lay a foundation for future water-resource management in the study area.

  13. Trace-level perchlorate analysis of impacted groundwater by elevated gold ellipse dimer nanoantenna surface-enhanced Raman scattering: Trace-level perchlorate analysis of impacted groundwater

    DOE PAGES

    Jubb, Aaron M.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Gu, Baohua

    2016-12-16

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) contamination has received increased attention the past two decades because of health concerns from its impact on thyroid function coupled with its environmental ubiquity and persistence. We demonstrate the detection of ClO4- below micromolar (<1 × 10-6 moles l-1) levels using a portable Raman instrument integrated with novel elevated gold (Au) ellipse dimer nanoantenna surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) architectures. Furthermore, the ellipse dimer nanoantenna architectures demonstrate improved ClO4- detection limits over previously reported SERS substrates while maintaining good reproducibility. The impact of chloride (Cl-), nitrate (NO3-), and sulfate (SO42-) interferences on the detection efficiency is systematically evaluated;more » SO42- is found to exhibit the largest interference effect at low concentrations while at higher ion concentrations the interference effects among ions are similar. In addition, ClO4- concentrations on the order of 1 mg l-1 are determined in groundwaters collected from an US Department of Defense Navy site demonstrating the applicability of these SERS architectures for the rapid, field detection of trace-level ClO4- contamination within complex environmental samples.« less

  14. An analysis of the vertical structure of the atmosphere and the upper-level meteorology and their impact on surface ozone levels in Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglück, Bernhard; Perna, Ryan; Zhong, Shiyuan; Morris, Gary A.

    2008-09-01

    Despite emission reductions, Houston continues to be designated as a nonattainment area for ozone (O3) by the Environmental Protection Agency. Upper-level synoptic maps and information about the vertical structure of the lower troposphere obtained by in situ measurements were analyzed to characterize ozone exceedances in which peak 8-h average concentration exceeded 85 ppb during the Texas Air Quality Study-II in August-September 2006. Cluster analysis of meteorological conditions showed that the highest background surface O3 concentrations occurred under northerly or easterly flow regimes at 850 hPa, coinciding with the advection of dry continental air. Exceedance days in September 2006 occurred almost exclusively in postfrontal environments. These frontal passages are associated with shifts in wind direction and may lead to increases in background O3 from 30 ppbv (marine) to 60-70 ppbv (continental) throughout the lower troposphere. Several factors are identified to be important for 8-h average ozone peaks in Houston under well-developed land-sea-bay breeze conditions, including (1) the presence of easterly winds advecting industrial emissions from the Ship Channel, and (2) the presence of persistent large-scale northerly flows aloft advecting elevated continental background ozone levels that are eventually entrained into lower layers through the growth of the convective planetary boundary layer.

  15. Trace-level perchlorate analysis of impacted groundwater by elevated gold ellipse dimer nanoantenna surface-enhanced Raman scattering: Trace-level perchlorate analysis of impacted groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Jubb, Aaron M.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Gu, Baohua

    2016-12-16

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) contamination has received increased attention the past two decades because of health concerns from its impact on thyroid function coupled with its environmental ubiquity and persistence. We demonstrate the detection of ClO4- below micromolar (<1 × 10-6 moles l-1) levels using a portable Raman instrument integrated with novel elevated gold (Au) ellipse dimer nanoantenna surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) architectures. Furthermore, the ellipse dimer nanoantenna architectures demonstrate improved ClO4- detection limits over previously reported SERS substrates while maintaining good reproducibility. The impact of chloride (Cl-), nitrate (NO3-), and sulfate (SO42-) interferences on the detection efficiency is systematically evaluated; SO42- is found to exhibit the largest interference effect at low concentrations while at higher ion concentrations the interference effects among ions are similar. In addition, ClO4- concentrations on the order of 1 mg l-1 are determined in groundwaters collected from an US Department of Defense Navy site demonstrating the applicability of these SERS architectures for the rapid, field detection of trace-level ClO4- contamination within complex environmental samples.

  16. Inhomogeneous Weyl and Dirac Semimetals: Transport in Axial Magnetic Fields and Fermi Arc Surface States from Pseudo-Landau Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grushin, Adolfo G.; Venderbos, Jörn W. F.; Vishwanath, Ashvin; Ilan, Roni

    2016-10-01

    Topological Dirac and Weyl semimetals have an energy spectrum that hosts Weyl nodes appearing in pairs of opposite chirality. Topological stability is ensured when the nodes are separated in momentum space and unique spectral and transport properties follow. In this work, we study the effect of a space-dependent Weyl node separation, which we interpret as an emergent background axial-vector potential, on the electromagnetic response and the energy spectrum of Weyl and Dirac semimetals. This situation can arise in the solid state either from inhomogeneous strain or nonuniform magnetization and can also be engineered in cold atomic systems. Using a semiclassical approach, we show that the resulting axial magnetic field B5 is observable through an enhancement of the conductivity as σ ˜B52 due to an underlying chiral pseudomagnetic effect. We then use two lattice models to analyze the effect of B5 on the spectral properties of topological semimetals. We describe the emergent pseudo-Landau-level structure for different spatial profiles of B5, revealing that (i) the celebrated surface states of Weyl semimetals, the Fermi arcs, can be reinterpreted as n =0 pseudo-Landau levels resulting from a B5 confined to the surface, (ii) as a consequence of position-momentum locking, a bulk B5 creates pseudo-Landau levels interpolating in real space between Fermi arcs at opposite surfaces, and (iii) there are equilibrium bound currents proportional to B5 that average to zero over the sample, which are the analogs of bound currents in magnetic materials. We conclude by discussing how our findings can be probed experimentally.

  17. Estimation of surface-level PM2.5 concentration using aerosol optical thickness through aerosol type analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi-Xiang; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Xing; Jiang, Yan-Qiu; Tan, He-Ping

    2017-06-01

    Surface-level particulate matter is closely related to column aerosol optical thickness (AOT). Previous researches have successfully used column AOT and different meteorological parameters to estimate surface-level PM concentration. In this study, the performance of a selected linear model that estimates surface-level PM2.5 concentration was evaluated following the aerosol type analysis method (ATAM) for the first time. We utilized 443 daily average data for Xuzhou, Jiangsu province, collected using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) during the period October 2013 to April 2016. Several parameters including atmospheric boundary layer height (BLH), relative humidity (RH), and effective radius of the aerosol size distribution (Ref) were used to assess the relationship between the column AOT and PM2.5 concentration. By including the BLH, ambient RH, and effective radius, the correlation (R2) increased from 0.084 to 0.250 at Xuzhou, and with the use of ATAM, the correlation increased further to 0.335. To compare the results, 450 daily average data for Beijing, pertaining to the same period, were utilized. The study found that model correlations improved by varying degrees in different seasons and at different sites following ATAM. The average urban industry (UI) aerosol ratios at Xuzhou and Beijing were 0.792 and 0.451, respectively, demonstrating poorer air conditions at Xuzhou. PM2.5 estimation at Xuzhou showed lower correlation (R2 = 0.335) compared to Beijing (R2 = 0.407), and the increase of R2 at Xuzhou and Beijing site following use of ATAM were 33.8% and 12.4%, respectively.

  18. Influence of SHI upon nanohole free volume and micro scale level surface modifications of polyethyleneterephthalate polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Paramjit

    2015-05-01

    Topographic micro scale and in-depth nano scale level modifications of polymeric materials play an important role in engineering their physical and chemical properties. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is an important class of semi-crystalline polymers used for gas separation properties. The gas diffusion and permeability parameters are directly related to the free volume fractions and the hole distributions. The controlled and precise ion beam irradiation can be used to induce surface and in-depth modifications in the properties of the polymers which help in modifying free volume holes and their distributions. In the present study, the investigation of free volume (nano scale level) and surface (micro scale level) properties of PET polymeric thin films after SHI treatment were employed by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The PET thin films were irradiated by 50 MeV lithium ions as a function of ion fluence. The value of hole radius (R) and intensity (I3) of o-Ps were observed to be increased after ion beam treatment. The further analyses were employed to calculate the free volume and fractional free volume of holes from the obtained values of R and I3. The AFM studies reveal the surface modifications of the irradiated polymer films. The structural, optical and chemical properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible (UV-vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometry. Different parameters such as crystallite size and band gap energy were calculated from the obtained data of XRD and UV-vis, respectively.

  19. Surface-Level Ozone Variability in the Gulf of Maine during ICARTT 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, W. T.; Bauer, A. J.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.; Hintsa, E. J.; Twickler, M. S.; Talbot, R. W.

    2005-12-01

    During July and August 2004, the PSI UV Ozone Photometer was deployed on a commercial cruise ferry to measure temporal and spatial variations in ozone off the New Hampshire coast. The MV Thomas Laighton, operated by the Isles of Shoals Steamship Company in Portsmouth, NH, provided a mobile platform from which to conduct twice daily measurement transects between the coastline and the Isles of Shoals area some 8 km offshore. Ozone mixing ratios, ambient air temperature, and GPS latitude and longitude were sampled at a 1 Hz data rate via a mast and forward-facing air sampling inlet extending into the free stream above the wheelhouse of the vessel. The spatial resolution of the 1 Hz measurements was 5 to 10 m. Previous measurements of this type, during NEAQS 2002, showed extensive spatial variability in off-shore ozone mixing ratios during high-ozone events. The 2004 measurements sampled primarily very low ozone levels associated with clean air from the north and east, as well as a limited set of medium-ozone events associated with southwesterly winds from the polluted urban corridor. As in 2002, the data show substantial spatial variability in ozone mixing ratios for a given transect. These include frequent small-scale depletions in ozone on the scale of tens of meters, due to titration of ozone by localized NOx emissions including the ship's own exhaust, and large scale ozone depletions on the scale of km, associated with medium-high-ozone events. The results are compared to calculated air parcel trajectories, and to ozone measurements from fixed-site instruments on Appledore Island and on a buoy stationed 20 km east of Appledore Island. In general, the off-shore ozone concentrations appear to be greatly elevated only during periods of southerly or southwesterly winds, and are modulated by a complex sea breeze/land breeze effect near the coastline.

  20. Wafer-level fabrication of nanocone forests by plasma repolymerization technique for surface-enhanced Raman scattering devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Haiyang; Huang, Chengjun; Wu, Wengang; Xue, Mei; Yang, Yudong; Xiong, Jijun; Ming, Anjie; Wang, Weibing

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a novel type of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) devices based on nanocone forests. The nanocone forests are fabricated by using a plasma repolymerization technique, which is a simple and parallel approach that has high reproducibility in wafer-level fabrication. The nanocone forest-based SERS devices exhibit an averaged enhancement factor at the order of 3 × 106, meanwhile, the relative standard deviation of Raman intensity over large areas is around 7%. These experimental results demonstrate great potential of the nanocone forest-based SERS devices in wide applications.

  1. Potentiometric surface and water-level difference maps of selected confined aquifers in Southern Maryland and Maryland’s Eastern Shore, 1975-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staley, Andrew W.; Andreasen, David C.; Curtin, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    The potentiometric surface maps show water levels ranging from 165 feet above sea level to 199 feet below sea level. Water levels have declined by as much as 113 feet in the Aquia aquifer since 1982, 81 feet in the Magothy aquifer since 1975, and 61 and 95 feet in the Upper Patapsco and Lower Patapsco aquifer systems, respectively, since 1990.

  2. Surface gas pollutants in Lhasa, a highland city of Tibet: current levels and pollution implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, L.; Lin, W. L.; Deji, Y. Z.; La, B.; Tsering, P. M.; Xu, X. B.; Wang, W.

    2014-05-01

    Through several years of development, the city of Lhasa has become one of the most populated and urbanized areas on the highest plateau in the world. In the process of urbanization, current and potential air quality issues have been gradually concerned. To investigate the current status of air pollution in Lhasa, various gas pollutants including NOx, CO, SO2 and O3 were continuously measured from June 2012 to May 2013 at an urban site (29.40° N, 91.08° E, 3650 m a.s.l.). The seasonal variations of primary gas pollutants exhibited a peak from November to January with a large variability. High concentrations of primary trace gases almost exclusively occurred under low wind speed and showed no distinct dependence on wind direction, implying local urban emissions to be predominant. A comparison of NO2, CO and SO2 concentrations in summer between 1998 and 2012 indicated a significant increase in emissions of these gas pollutants and a change in their intercorrelations, as a result of a substantial growth in the demand of energy consumption using fossil fuels instead of previously widely used biofuels. The pronounced diurnal double peaks of primary trace gases in all seasons suggested automobile exhaust to be a major emission source in Lhasa. The secondary gas pollutant O3 displayed an average diurnal cycle of a shallow flat peak for about 4-5 h in the afternoon and a minimum in the early morning. Nighttime O3 was sometimes completely consumed by the high level of NOx. Seasonally, the variations of O3 concentrations displayed a low valley in winter and a peak in spring. In autumn and winter, transport largely contributed to the observed O3 concentrations, given its dependence on wind speed and wind direction, while in spring and summer photochemistry played an important role. A more efficient buildup of O3 concentrations in the morning and a higher peak in the afternoon was found in summer 2012 than in 1998. An enhancement in O3 concentrations would be expected in the

  3. Surface gas pollutants in Lhasa, a highland city of Tibet - current levels and pollution implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, L.; Lin, W. L.; Deji, Y. Z.; La, B.; Tsering, P. M.; Xu, X. B.; Wang, W.

    2014-10-01

    Through several years of development, the city of Lhasa has become one of the most populated and urbanized areas on the highest plateau in the world. In the process of urbanization, current and potential air quality issues have been gradually concerned. To investigate the current status of air pollution in Lhasa, various gas pollutants including NOx, CO, SO2, and O3, were continuously measured from June 2012 to May 2013 at an urban site (29.40° N, 91.08° E, 3650 m a.s.l.). The seasonal variations of primary gas pollutants exhibited a peak from November to January with a large variability. High mixing ratios of primary trace gases almost exclusively occurred under low wind speed and showed no distinct dependence on wind direction, implying local urban emissions to be predominant. A comparison of NO2, CO, and SO2 mixing ratios in summer between 1998 and 2012 indicated a significant increase in emissions of these gas pollutants and a change in their intercorrelations, as a result of a substantial growth in the demand of energy consumption using fossil fuels instead of previously widely used biomass. The pronounced diurnal double peaks of primary trace gases in all seasons suggested automobile exhaust to be a major emission source in Lhasa. The secondary gas pollutant O3 displayed an average diurnal cycle of a shallow flat peak for about 4-5 h in the afternoon and a minimum in the early morning. Nighttime O3 was sometimes completely consumed by the high level of NOx. Seasonally, the variations of O3 mixing ratios displayed a low valley in winter and a peak in spring. In autumn and winter, transport largely contributed to the observed O3 mixing ratios, given its dependence on wind speed and wind direction, while in spring and summer photochemistry played an important role. A more efficient buildup of O3 mixing ratios in the morning and a higher peak in the afternoon was found in summer 2012 than in 1998. An enhancement in O3 mixing ratios would be expected in the

  4. Surface-level fine particle mass concentrations: from hemispheric distributions to megacity sources.

    PubMed

    Hidy, George M

    2009-07-01

    Since 1990, basic knowledge of the "chemical climate" of fine particles, has greatly improved from Junge's compilation from the 1960s. A worldwide baseline distribution of fine particle concentrations on a synoptic scale of approximately 1000 km can be estimated at least qualitatively from measurements. A geographical distribution of fine particle characteristics is deduced from a synthesis of a variety of disparate data collected at ground level on all continents, especially in the northern hemisphere. On the average, the regional mass concentrations range from 1 to 80 microg/m3, with the highest concentrations in regions of high population density and industrialization. Fine particles by mass on a continental and hemispheric spatial scale are generally dominated by non-sea salt sulfate (0.2 to approximately 20 microg/m3, or approximately 25%) and organic carbon (0.2-> 10 microg/m3, or approximately 25%), with lesser contributions of ammonium, nitrate, elemental carbon, and elements found in sea salt or soil dust. The crustal and trace metal elements contribute a varied amount to fine particle mass depending on location, with a larger contribution in marine conditions or during certain events such as dust storms or volcanic disturbances. The average distribution of mass concentration and major components depends on the proximity to areal aggregations of sources, most of which are continental in origin, with contributions from sea salt emissions in the marine environment. The highest concentrations generally are within or near very large population and industrial centers, especially in Asia, including parts of China and India, as well as North America and Europe. Natural sources of blowing dust, sea salt, and wildfires contribute to large, intermittent spatial-scale particle loadings beyond these ranges. A sampling of 10 megacities illustrates a range of characteristic particle composition, dependent on local and regional sources. Long-range transport of pollution

  5. Time prediction of an onset of shallow landslides based on the monitoring of the groundwater level and the surface displacement at different locations on a sandy model slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasahara, Katsuo

    2016-04-01

    Location of monitoring of the deformation and the groundwater level in a slope is important for time-prediction of an onset of shallow landslides based on the monitoring. The analysis of the monitored data of the surface displacement and the groundwater level at different locations in sandy model slope under artificial rainfall was conducted in this study. The monitored data showed that the surface displacement increased with the increase of the groundwater level significantly. Then the analysis of the monitored data revealed that the relation between the surface displacement and the groundwater level can be modified as hyperbolic curve. The surface displacement grew larger and maximum groundwater level was smaller at farther location from the toe of the slope. Time-prediction of an onset of a landslide based on the monitored data at different location on the slope was proposed as following procedures. (1) To make a regression equation for the relation between the surface displacement and the groundwater level based on the monitored data at any time before the failure, (2) To make a regression equation for the relation between the time and the groundwater level based on the same data with (1), and (3) To incorporate the equation for the relation between the time and the groundwater level into that between the surface displacement and the groundwater level to derive the time - the surface displacement relation. (4) To derive the time - the inverse of the surface displacement velocity from the equation for the time - the surface displacement relation. The equation for the time - the surface displacement and the equation for the time - the inverse of the surface displacement velocity could simulate the actual phenomena of the slope well based on the monitored data at any location on the model slope.

  6. Office of River Protection (ORP) Monthly Performance Report for September 2000

    SciTech Connect

    WAGNILD, K.J.

    2000-11-21

    CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) had an outstanding year. The most significant accomplishments that occurred throughout fiscal year (FY) 2000 include the following: On April 24,2000, DOE ORP received BNFL Inc. B-1 deliverables and CHG completed Phase 1 Part B-2 Readiness-to-Proceed (RTP), to demonstrate the ability to provide waste feed to be treated/stored in a long-term disposal facility. The RTP consisted of key enabling assumptions, critical risks, waste handling actions, financial and schedule risk analysis, staffing plans, a project execution plan, and a resource loaded schedule. The Department determined that the BNFL Inc. proposal was unacceptable in many areas and essentially shifted the financial risk from BNFL Inc. back to the Federal government; thus a key benefit of privatization was lost. On May 8,2000, the Secretary announced that the privatization contract be terminated. In the interim, the Department directed the onsite Tank Farm Contractor, CHG, to continue the design work scope for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant until a new waste treatment contract is awarded. DOE ORP released its request for proposals (RFP) for a new Waste Treatment and Immobilization contractor on August 31,2000 and is on schedule to meet award of the contract by January 15,2000. CHG successfully reached 1,000,000 safe work hours without a lost workday injury or illness on Wednesday, September 23,2000. The record was initiated on May 23,2000 and took 114 days to achieve. All Tri-Party Agreement and Consent Decree milestones scheduled for the fiscal year were completed. Along with meeting all enforceable agreement milestones, nineteen out of twenty Performance Incentives (PIS) were successfully completed. The 20 PIS comprised of 114 specific deliverables, of which 107 were met. In addition to the 20 scheduled PIS, six accelerated activities were completed. Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen generation was successfully mitigated this fiscal year, including a series of

  7. Skin-depth lattice strain, core-level trap depression and valence charge polarization of Al surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Bo, Maolin; Liu, Yonghui; Guo, Yongling; Wang, Haibin; Yue, Jian; Huang, Yongli

    2016-01-01

    Clarifying the origin for surface core-level shift (SCLS) and gaining quantitative information regarding the coordination-resolved local strain, binding energy (BE) shift and cohesive energy change have been a challenge. Here, we show that a combination of the bond order-length-strength (BOLS) premise, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations of aluminum (Al) 2p3/2 energy shift of Al surfaces has enabled us to derive such information, namely, (i) the 2p3/2 energy of an isolated Al atom (72.146 ± 0.003eV) and its bulk shift (0.499 eV); (ii) the skin lattice contracts by up to 12.5% and the BE density increases by 70%; and (iii) the cohesive energy drops up to 38%. It is affirmed that the shorter and stronger bonds between under-coordinated atoms provide a perturbation to the Hamiltonian and hence lead to the local strain, quantum entrapment and valence charge polarization. Findings should help in understanding the phenomena of surface pre-melting and skin-high elasticity, in general.

  8. Influence of surface states on deep level transient spectroscopy in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Zhu; Xiao-Hua, Ma; Wei-Wei, Chen; Bin, Hou; Jie-Jie, Zhu; Meng, Zhang; Li-Xiang, Chen; Yan-Rong, Cao; Yue, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) as a method to investigate deep traps in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure or high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) has been widely utilized. The DLTS measurements under different bias conditions are carried out in this paper. Two hole-like traps with active energies of E v + 0.47 eV, and E v + 0.10 eV are observed, which are related to surface states. The electron traps with active energies of E c - 0.56 eV are located in the channel, those with E c - 0.33 eV and E c - 0.88 eV are located in the AlGaN layer. The presence of surface states has a strong influence on the detection of electron traps, especially when the electron traps are low in density. The DLTS signal peak height of the electron trap is reduced and even disappears due to the presence of plentiful surface state. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CBA00606), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, China (Grant No. NCET-12-0915), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61334002 and 61404097).

  9. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel Meeting March 25--27, 1992. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    Schutz, W W; Strachan, D M

    1992-08-01

    Discussions from the seventh meeting of the Tank Waste Science are presented in Colorado. The subject areas included the generation of gases in Tank 241-SY-101, the possible use of sonication as a mitigation method, and analysis for organic constituents in core samples. Results presented and discussed include: Ferrocyanides appear to be rapidly dissolved in 1M NaOH; upon standing in the laboratory at ambient conditions oxalate precipitates from simulated wastes containing HEDTA. This suggests that one of the main components in the solids in Tank 241-SY-101 is oxalate; hydrogen evolved from waste samples from Tank 241-SY-101 is five times that observed in the off gas from the tank; data suggest that mitigation of Tank 241-SY-101 will not cause a high release of dissolved N{sub 2}O; when using a slurry for radiation studies, a portion of the generated gases is very difficult to remove. To totally recover the generated gases, the solids must first be dissolved. This result may have an impact on mitigation by mixing if the gases are not released. Using {sup 13}C-labeled organics in thermal degradation studies has allowed researchers to illucidate much of the kinetic mechanism for the degradation of HEDTA and glycolate. In addition to some of the intermediate, more complex organic species, oxalate, formate, and CO{sub 2} were identified; and analytic methods for organics in radioactive complex solutions such as that found in Tank 241-SY-101 have been developed and others continue to be developed.

  10. On the effect of different aerosol types on surface solar radiation levels over the region of Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandri, Georgia; Georgoulias, Aristeidis K.; Kourtidis, Konstantinos; Meleti, Charikleia; Balis, Dimitris

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we examine the direct effect of different aerosol types on the surface solar radiation (SSR) levels in the region of Eastern Mediterranean. Simulations with the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model were performed using ground and satellite-based data as input. An IDL tool that "feeds" SBDART with the appropriate input data was developed allowing us to simulate SSR with a time step of 1 hour. Level-2 aerosol optical depth, cloud optical depth, cloud fraction, effective droplet radius, cloud top pressure, precipitable water and surface albedo data from MODIS, as well as ozone total column data from Earth Probe TOMS and OMI satellite sensors, coarse resolution cloud data from the ISCCP and single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor and Angström exponent sunphotometric data from the AERONET are used in our radiative transfer simulations. Simulations are performed over selected spots within Eastern Mediterranean for clear, liquid cloud and ice cloud covered skies and for different aerosol types (maritime, dust, anthropogenic, fine-mode natural). The optical properties of aerosols were determined using a combination of satellite, ground-based, model and reanalysis products. The aerosol direct radiative effect is defined as the difference between simulations done with and without the presence of aerosols. This research has been financed by EPAN II and PEP under the national action "Bilateral, multilateral and regional R&T cooperations" (AEROVIS Sino-Greek project).

  11. Cell surface Glut1 levels distinguish human CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte subsets with distinct effector functions

    PubMed Central

    Cretenet, Gaspard; Clerc, Isabelle; Matias, Maria; Loisel, Severine; Craveiro, Marco; Oburoglu, Leal; Kinet, Sandrina; Mongellaz, Cédric; Dardalhon, Valérie; Taylor, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte activation requires the generation of sufficient energy to support new biosynthetic demands. Following T cell receptor (TCR) engagement, these requirements are met by an increased glycolysis, due, at least in part, to induction of the Glut1 glucose transporter. As Glut1 is upregulated on tumor cells in response to hypoxia, we assessed whether surface Glut1 levels regulate the antigen responsiveness of human T lymphocytes in both hypoxic and atmospheric oxygen conditions. Notably, Glut1 upregulation in response to TCR stimulation was significantly higher in T lymphocytes activated under hypoxic as compared to atmospheric oxygen conditions. Furthermore, TCR-stimulated human T lymphocytes sorted on the basis of Glut1-Lo and Glut1-Hi profiles maintained distinct characteristics, irrespective of the oxygen tension. While T cells activated in hypoxia divided less than those activated in atmospheric oxygen, Glut1-Hi lymphocytes exhibited increased effector phenotype acquisition, augmented proliferation, and an inverted CD4/CD8 ratio in both oxygen conditions. Moreover, Glut1-Hi T lymphocytes exhibited a significantly enhanced ability to produce IFN-γ and this secretion potential was completely dependent on continued glycolysis. Thus, Glut1 surface levels identify human T lymphocytes with distinct effector functions in both hypoxic and atmospheric oxygen tensions. PMID:27067254

  12. Tuning the surface Fermi level on p-type gallium nitride nanowires for efficient overall water splitting.

    PubMed

    Kibria, M G; Zhao, S; Chowdhury, F A; Wang, Q; Nguyen, H P T; Trudeau, M L; Guo, H; Mi, Z

    2014-04-30

    Solar water splitting is one of the key steps in artificial photosynthesis for future carbon-neutral, storable and sustainable source of energy. Here we show that one of the major obstacles for achieving efficient and stable overall water splitting over the emerging nanostructured photocatalyst is directly related to the uncontrolled surface charge properties. By tuning the Fermi level on the nonpolar surfaces of gallium nitride nanowire arrays, we demonstrate that the quantum efficiency can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude. The internal quantum efficiency and activity on p-type gallium nitride nanowires can reach ~51% and ~4.0 mol hydrogen h(-1) g(-1), respectively. The nanowires remain virtually unchanged after over 50,000 μmol gas (hydrogen and oxygen) is produced, which is more than 10,000 times the amount of photocatalyst itself (~4.6 μmol). The essential role of Fermi-level tuning in balancing redox reactions and in enhancing the efficiency and stability is also elucidated.

  13. Altitude of potentiometric surface, fall 1985, and historic water-level changes in the Fort Pillow aquifer in western Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parks, W.S.; Carmichael, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    Recharge to the Fort Pillow aquifer of Tertiary age in Tennessee is from precipitation on the outcrop, which forms a narrow belt across western Tennessee, and by downward infiltration of water from the overlying fluvial deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age and alluvium of Quaternary age or, where the upper confining unit is absent, from the overlying Memphis aquifer of Tertiary age. The potentiometric surface in the Fort Pillow aquifer slopes gently westward from the outcrop-recharge area, and the water moves slowly in that direction. A depression in the potentiometric surface in the Memphis area is the result of past pumping at Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division (MLGW) well fields (1924-74), and past and present pumping at an industrial well field at Memphis, and the municipal well field at West Memphis, Ark. Water levels in areas affected by pumping have declined at average rates ranging from 0.4 to 0. 9 ft/year during the period 1945-85. The greatest rate of decline was as much as 4.0 ft/year between 1945 and 1954 in an observation well in a well field of MLGW at Memphis. In 1971, MLGW ceased pumping from the Fort Pillow aquifer at this well field, and between 1972 and 1976, water levels rose about 28 ft in this well. Withdrawals from the Fort Pillow aquifer in western Tennessee in 1985 averaged about 12 million gal/day. (USGS)

  14. Calculation of rotation-vibration energy levels of the ammonia molecule based on an ab initio potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyansky, Oleg L.; Ovsyannikov, Roman I.; Kyuberis, Aleksandra A.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yachmenev, Andrey; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Zobov, Nikolai F.

    2016-09-01

    An ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for gas-phase ammonia NH3 has been computed using the methodology pioneered for water (Polyansky et al., 2013). Multireference configuration interaction calculations are performed at about 50 000 points using the aug-cc-pCVQZ and aug-cc-pCV5Z basis sets and basis set extrapolation. Relativistic and adiabatic surfaces are also computed. The points are fitted to a suitable analytical form, producing the most accurate ab initio PES for this molecule available. The rotation-vibration energy levels are computed using nuclear motion program TROVE in both linearised and curvilinear coordinates. Better convergence is obtained using curvilinear coordinates. Our results are used to assign the visible spectrum of 14NH3 recorded by Coy and Lehmann (1986). Rotation-vibration energy levels for the isotopologues NH2D, NHD2, ND3 and 15NH3 are also given. An ab initio value for the dissociation energy D0 of 14NH3 is also presented.

  15. Coupled Atmosphere-Surface Modeling of Lake Levels of the North American Great Lakes under Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofgren, B. M.; Xiao, C.

    2016-12-01

    The influence of projected climate change on the water levels of the Great Lakes is subject to considerable uncertainty, and methods that have long been used to determine this sensitivity have been discredited. A strong candidate, albeit expensive, to replace problematic methods is to use outputs that result from dynamical downscaling of future climate simulations, focused on the hydroclimate of the Great Lakes basin. We have produced initial estimates of Great Lakes water levels in the mid- and late 21st century using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, including its lake module, driven by lateral boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab Climate Model version 3.0 (GFDL CM3), under RCP4.5 and 8.5 scenarios. Future lake levels are influenced by the balance between projected general increases in precipitation and increases in evapotranspiration from both land and lake in the basin, driven primarily by the surface radiative energy budget and secondarily by air temperature. The net result was drops in lake level of up to 15 cm, in contrast to the results from much-used older methods, which often projected drops exceeding 1 m. Future plans include increased detail in the simulation of water flow overland and in river channels using WRF-Hydro, and full coupling of regional atmospheric systems with 3-dimensional dynamical lake implementation of the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM).

  16. Effect of wind turbine wakes on cropland surface fluxes in the US Great Plains during a Nocturnal Low Level Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, M. E.; Aitken, M.; Lundquist, J. K.; Takle, E. S.; Prueger, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Installation of large scale wind farms is becoming a common operation in the Midwest, and wind farms frequently are situated among fields of agricultural crops. Each wind turbine is known to alter the behavior of the air mass downwind of the rotor; consequently, the rotor wakes alter the local microclimate. Quantification of the effects of wind turbine wakes on local microclimate is required to understand how large-scale wind deployment affects large-scale agriculture. This study examines the potential effect of wind turbine wakes on a corn crop in central Iowa during summer 2010. The field site consisted of one surface flux tower upwind of a row of five modern wind turbine generators, an identical surface flux station downwind of the turbine row, and a ground based LIDAR system downwind of the wind turbines. Each flux tower was instrumented with an array consisting of radiometers, a three-dimensional sonic anemometer, an open cell CO2 analyzer, a cup anemometer and wind vane, temperature and relative humidity sensors, and a tipping bucket. The LIDAR system reliably obtained readings up to 200 m above ground level (AGL), spanning the entire rotor disk (~40 m to 120 m AGL). This presentation examines wake-surface interaction on one particular night, during which the prevailing winds situated the LIDAR directly behind a wind turbine approximately 2 rotor diameters downwind of the turbine tower. As expected preliminary LIDAR results indicate that in the turbine rotor shadow there is a strong deficit of horizontal momentum. Additionally, a strong nocturnal low-level jet occurred above the turbine rotor disk. Wavelet spectral analysis indicates that oscillatory behavior, with frequencies characteristic of wind turbine wakes, is observed in the LIDAR horizontal and vertical winds and in the downwind flux station datastreams. The characterization of wake effects provided by this unique dataset will allow for better parameterization and modeling of wind turbine wake

  17. Power spectral analysis of surface electromyography (EMG) at matched contraction levels of the first dorsal interosseous muscle in stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Shin, Henry; Zhou, Ping; Niu, Xun; Liu, Jie; Rymer, William Zev

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to help assess complex neural and muscular changes induced by stroke using power spectral analysis of surface electromyogram (EMG) signals. Fourteen stroke subjects participated in the study. They were instructed to perform isometric voluntary contractions by abducting the index finger. Surface EMG signals were collected from the paretic and contralateral first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles with forces ranging from 30% to 70% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the paretic muscle. Power spectral analysis was performed to characterize features of the surface EMG in paretic and contralateral muscles at matched forces. A Linear Mixed Model was applied to identify the spectral changes in the hemiparetic muscle and to examine the relation between spectral parameters and contraction levels. Regression analysis was performed to examine the correlations between spectral characteristics and clinical features. Differences in power spectrum distribution patterns were observed in paretic muscles when compared with their contralateral pairs. Nine subjects showed increased mean power frequency (MPF) in the contralateral side (>15 Hz). No evident spectrum difference was observed in 3 subjects. Only 2 subjects had higher MPF in the paretic muscle than the contralateral muscle. Pooling all subjects' data, there was a significant reduction of MPF in the paretic muscle compared with the contralateral muscle (paretic: 168.7 ± 7.6 Hz, contralateral: 186.1 ± 8.7 Hz, mean ± standard error, F=36.56, p<0.001). Examination of force factor on the surface EMG power spectrum did not confirm a significant correlation between the MPF and contraction force in either hand (F=0.7, p>0.5). There was no correlation between spectrum difference and Fugl-Meyer or Chedoke scores, or ratio of paretic and contralateral MVC (p>0.2). There appears to be complex muscular and neural processes at work post stroke that may impact the surface EMG power spectrum. The

  18. Surface elevation change and susceptibility of different mangrove zones to sea-level rise on Pacific high islands of Micronesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, K.W.; Cahoon, D.R.; Allen, J.A.; Ewel, K.C.; Lynch, J.C.; Cormier, N.

    2010-01-01

    Mangroves on Pacific high islands offer a number of important ecosystem services to both natural ecological communities and human societies. High islands are subjected to constant erosion over geologic time, which establishes an important source of terrigeneous sediment for nearby marine communities. Many of these sediments are deposited in mangrove forests and offer mangroves a potentially important means for adjusting surface elevation with rising sea level. In this study, we investigated sedimentation and elevation dynamics of mangrove forests in three hydrogeomorphic settings on the islands of Kosrae and Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia (FSM). Surface accretion rates ranged from 2.9 to 20.8 mm y-1, and are high for naturally occurring mangroves. Although mangrove forests in Micronesian high islands appear to have a strong capacity to offset elevation losses by way of sedimentation, elevation change over 61/2 years ranged from -3.2 to 4.1 mm y-1, depending on the location. Mangrove surface elevation change also varied by hydrogeomorphic setting and river, and suggested differential, and not uniformly bleak, susceptibilities among Pacific high island mangroves to sea-level rise. Fringe, riverine, and interior settings registered elevation changes of -1.30, 0.46, and 1.56 mm y-1, respectively, with the greatest elevation deficit (-3.2 mm y-1) from a fringe zone on Pohnpei and the highest rate of elevation gain (4.1 mm y-1) from an interior zone on Kosrae. Relative to sea-level rise estimates for FSM (0.8-1.8 mm y-1) and assuming a consistent linear trend in these estimates, soil elevations in mangroves on Kosrae and Pohnpei are experiencing between an annual deficit of 4.95 mm and an annual surplus of 3.28 mm. Although natural disturbances are important in mediating elevation gain in some situations, constant allochthonous sediment deposition probably matters most on these Pacific high islands, and is especially helpful in certain hydrogeomorphic zones

  19. Kinetics of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Level in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients who Achieved Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Loss during Pegylated Interferon Alpha-2a Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-Hui; Zhang, Lu; Qu, Xiao-Jing; Lu, Yao; Shen, Ge; Wu, Shu-Ling; Chang, Min; Liu, Ru-Yu; Hu, Lei-Ping; Li, Zhen-Zhen; Hua, Wen-Hao; Song, Shu-Jing; Xie, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) loss/seroconversion is considered to be the ideal endpoint of antiviral therapy and the ultimate treatment goal in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). This study aimed to assess the patterns of HBsAg kinetics in CHB patients who achieved HBsAg loss during the treatment of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) α-2a. Methods: A total of 150 patients were enrolled, composing of 83 hepatitis B envelope antigen (HBeAg)-positive and 67 HBeAg-negative patients. Patients were treated with PEG-IFN α-2a180 μg/week until HBsAg loss/seroconversion was achieved, which occurred within 96 weeks. Serum hepatitis B virus deoxyribonucleic acid and serological indicators (HBsAg, anti-HBs, HBeAg, and anti-HBe) were determined before and every 3 months during PEG-IFN α-2a treatment. Biochemical markers and peripheral blood neutrophil and platelet counts were tested every 1–3 months. Results: Baseline HBsAg levels were 2.5 ± 1.3 log IU/ml, and decreased rapidly at 12 and 24 weeks by 48.3% and 88.3%, respectively. The mean time to HBsAg loss was 54.2 ± 30.4 weeks, though most patients needed extended treatment and 30.0% of HBsAg loss occurred during 72–96 weeks. Baseline HBsAg levels were significantly higher in HBeAg-positive patients (2.9 ± 1.1 log IU/ml) compared with HBeAg-negative patients (2.0 ± 1.3 log IU/ml; t = 4.733, P < 0.001), but the HBsAg kinetics were similar. Patients who achieved HBsAg loss within 48 weeks had significantly lower baseline HBsAg levels and had more rapid decline of HBsAg at 12 weeks compared to patients who needed extended treatment to achieve HBsAg loss. Conclusions: Patients with lower baseline HBsAg levels and more rapid decline during early treatment with PEG-IFN are more likely to achieve HBsAg loss during 96 weeks of treatment, and extended therapy longer than 48 weeks may be required to achieve HBsAg loss. PMID:28229987

  20. The Site Investigation Of Low-Level Radioactive Waste For Sub-Surface Disposal Facility In Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoya, S.; Sasaki, T.

    2006-12-01

    [1.Concept of the sub-surface disposal facility] In Japan, the facilities of Low-Level Radioactive West (LLW) for near-surface disposal have already been in operation. Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) has a plan of a new facility of LLW for sub-surface disposal with engineered barrier, for short "the sub-surface disposal facility".This facility can accept the relatively higher low-level waste from unclear power plant operation and in core materials from the decommissioning, estimated about 20 thousands cubic meter in total.In addition, this will accept transuranim (TRU) slightly contaminated waste from reprocessing plant operation and decommissioning. It shall be located at a sufficient depth enough to avoid normal human activities in future. [2.Site investigation] From 2001 to 2006,the site investigation on geology and hydrogeology has been performed in order to acquire the basic data for the design and the safety assessment for the sub-surface disposal facility.The candidate area is located at the site of JNFL, where Rokkasho-mura, Aomori Prefecture in the northern area of the Mainland of Japan.To confirm geology hydraulic conditions and geo-chemistry, 22 boring survey including 6 holes in swamp and marsh have been performed. The 1km long access tunnel (the entrance level EL 8.0m, incline of 1/10) to the altitude of EL -86m underground, around 100m depth from surface, has excavated. During excavating the tunnel, observation of geology, permeability tests, pore water pressure measurements and so on has been performed in situ.And the large size test cavern of 18m diameters was constructed at the end of the tunnel to demonstrate stability of the tunnel. Prior to the excavation, 3 measuring tunnels were excavated surrounding the test cavern to examine the excavation. [3.Geological features] The sedimentary rock called Takahoko formation at the Neogene period is distributed upper than EL-500m in the candidate area.The quaternary stratum about 10m in thickness is

  1. Core-level spectroscopy investigation of the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, P.F.; Zehner, D.M.

    1993-10-01

    Preferential surface segregation in the Mo{sub 0.75}(100) surface region was investigated using high-resolution core-level spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. The magnitude and direction of the surface core-level shifts observed in this study can be qualitatively understood by comparison to W and Mo core-level shifts. Measured core-level intensities are found to be consistent with the segregation of Mo to the surface of the alloy, with an enrichment of Re in the second layer (as found in previous investigations). It is inferred that both Tc and Os will segregate to the Mo{sub 0.75}Re{sub 0.25}(100) surface.

  2. The role of surface and subsurface processes in keeping pace with sea level rise in intertidal wetlands of Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Bennion, Vicki; Grinham, Alistair; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    Increases in the elevation of the soil surfaces of mangroves and salt marshes are key to the maintenance of these habitats with accelerating sea level rise. Understanding the processes that give rise to increases in soil surface elevation provides science for management of landscapes for sustainable coastal wetlands. Here, we tested whether the soil surface elevation of mangroves and salt marshes in Moreton Bay is keeping up with local rates of sea level rise (2.358 mm y-1) and whether accretion on the soil surface was the most important process for keeping up with sea level rise. We found variability in surface elevation gains, with sandy areas in the eastern bay having the highest surface elevation gains in both mangrove and salt marsh (5.9 and 1.9 mm y-1) whereas in the muddier western bay rates of surface elevation gain were lower (1.4 and -0.3 mm y-1 in mangrove and salt marsh, respectively). Both sides of the bay had similar rates of surface accretion (~7–9 mm y-1 in the mangrove and 1–3 mm y-1 in the salt marsh), but mangrove soils in the western bay were subsiding at a rate of approximately 8 mm y-1, possibly due to compaction of organic sediments. Over the study surface elevation increments were sensitive to position in the intertidal zone (higher when lower in the intertidal) and also to variation in mean sea level (higher at high sea level). Although surface accretion was the most important process for keeping up with sea level rise in the eastern bay, subsidence largely negated gains made through surface accretion in the western bay indicating a high vulnerability to sea level rise in these forests.

  3. Evaluation of pH Levels and Surface Roughness After Bleaching and Abrasion Tests of Eight Commercial Products.

    PubMed

    Trentino, Ana Carolina; Soares, Ana Flavia; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2015-07-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of different bleaching protocols and the variation of pH levels of bleaching gels regarding roughness and wear of bovine enamel, after in-office bleaching protocols and brushing. Ninety fragments were randomly divided into nine groups: C, control; WHP15, 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Whiteness HP, FGM) three gel applications of 15 min each, three sessions with 1 week intervals; WHP45, 35% HP (Whiteness HP) one application/45 min, three sessions with 1 week intervals; LPS, 35% HP (Lase Peroxide, DMC) plus hybrid light (HL) [light-emitting diode (LED)/diode laser], four applications/7 min 30 sec (6 min of HL activation), one session; LPSII, 25% HP (Lase Peroxide II, DMC) plus HL, four applications/7 min 30 sec (6 min of HL activation), one session; LPL, 15% HP (Lase Peroxide Light, DMC) four applications/7 min 30 sec (6 min of HL activation), one session; WO, 35% HP (Whitegold Office, Dentsply) three applications/15 min, three sessions with 1 week intervals; WBC40, 35% HP (Whiteness HP Blue Calcium, FGM) one application/40 min, three sessions with 1 week intervals; and WBC50, 20% HP (Whiteness HP Blue Calcium) one application/50 min, three sessions with 1 week intervals. The median pH values were determined utilizing a pH meter during the initial and final gel applications. A rugosimeter was utilized to evaluate the surface roughness (Ra) before and after bleaching and brushing (100,000 strokes), and the surface wear after brushing. For the results of the pH values, there was a decrease in the pH levels from the initial to the final bleaching time, except for the WBC50. The WO and WBC40 groups exhibited higher pH values. For the results of roughness and wear, there was an increase in surface roughness and wear among the groups. The pH values tended to decrease from the initial to the final bleaching. After tooth brushing, bleaching procedures with lower pH products provided a significant increase in

  4. Levels of flame retardants HBCD, TBBPA and TBC in surface soils from an industrialized region of East China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianfeng; Feng, Jiayong; Li, Xinhu; Li, Gang

    2014-05-01

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) are of increasing concern because of their potential environmental persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity. Tris-(2,3-dibromopropyl)isocyanurate (TBC) is another brominated flame retardant (BFR) which has recently been found in the environment and begun to attract attention. The objective of this study is to determine the concentration of these three BFRs in surface soil samples collected from a heavily industrialized and urbanized region in East China. Levels of ∑HBCDs ranged from below detection limits (0.020 ng g(-1)) to 102.6 ng g(-1) on a dry weight basis (dw) with a median level of 15.8 ng g(-1) dw. For TBBPA, the concentration ranged from below detection limits (0.025 ng g(-1)) to 78.6 ng g(-1) dw with a median level of 9.17 ng g(-1) dw. TBC was found at relatively lower concentrations ranging from below detection limits (0.024 ng g(-1)) to 16.4 ng g(-1) dw with a median level of 0.95 ng g(-1) dw. The concentrations of these three BFRs are significantly positively correlated, indicating a common source. Variable BFRs levels were found in different types of soils, with significantly higher concentrations observed at waste dumping sites and industrial areas. The diastereoisomer profiles of HBCDs in most of the soil samples differed from those of the commercial products. The mass inventories of HBCDs, TBBPA and TBC in this region gave preliminarily estimates of 6.68, 2.67 and 0.85 kg, respectively. Therefore, the ubiquitous contamination of soils by these BFRs may well reflect their widespread usage in the study area.

  5. Surface aerosol and rehabilitation properties of ground-level atmosphere in the mountains of the North Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reps, Valentina; Efimenko, Natalia; Povolotskaya, Nina; Abramtsova, Anna; Ischenko, Dmitriy; Senik, Irina; Slepikh, Victor

    2017-04-01

    The rehabilitative properties (RP) of ground-level atmosphere (GA) of Russian resorts are considered as natural healing resources and received state legal protection [1]. Due to global urbanization the chemical composition and particle size distribution of the surface aerosol are changing rapidly. However, the influence of surface aerosol on the RP of GA has been insufficiently studied. At the resort region of the North Caucasus complex monitoring (aerosol, trace gases NOx, CO, O3, CH4; periodically - heavy metals) is performed at two high levels (860 masl - a park zone of a large mountain resort, 2070 masl - alpine grassland, the net station). The results of the measurements are used in programs of bioclimatic, landscape and medical monitoring to specify the influence of aerosol on rehabilitation properties of the environment and human adaptative reserves. The aerosol particles of size range 500-1000 nm are used as a marker of the pathogenic effect of aerosol [2]. In the conditions of regional urbanization and complicated mountain atmospheric circulation the influence of aerosol on RP of GA and the variability of heart rhythm with the volunteers at different heights were investigated. At the height of 860 masl (urbanized resort) there have been noticed aerosol variations in the range of 0,04-0,35 particles/cm3 (slightly aerosol polluted), in mountain conditions - background pollution aerosol level. The difference of bioclimatic conditions at the specified high-rise levels has been referred to the category of contrasts. The natural aero ionization ∑(N+)+(N-) varied from 960 ion/cm3 to 1460 ion/cm3 in the resort park (860 m); from 1295 ion/cm3 to 4850 ion/cm3 on the Alpine meadow (2070 m); from 1128 ion/cm3 to 3420 ion/cm3 - on the tested site near the edge of the pinewood (1720 m). In the group of volunteers the trip from low-hill terrain zone (860 m) to the lower zone of highlands (2070 m) caused the activation of neuro and humoral regulation, vegetative and

  6. Progress in our understanding of structure bonding and reactivity of metal surfaces and adsorbed monolayers at the molecular level: A 25 year perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somorjai, G. A.

    1995-12-01

    Over fifty techniques have been developed during the past 25 years that permit molecular level investigation of structure and bonding of the surface monolayer. Among them, low-energy electron diffraction surface crystallography and vibrational spectroscopies using photons and electrons have contributed the lion's share of quantitative experimental data. (Most of these investigations have utilized small area (~1 cm 2) external surfaces, although microporous large internal surface area samples were also scrutinized.) From these studies, the physical picture of the surface which emerges is one of a separate phase with distinct structure, composition, and bonding that is distinguishable from the solid bulk. The new surface phenomena which were discovered include clean surface reconstruction, adsorbate-induced restructuring, ordering and reactivity of surface defects (steps and kinks), cluster-like bonding, the large mobility of adsorbates, and the coadsorption bond. Techniques were also developed that permit in situ molecular level study of surfaces during reactions at high pressures and temperatures with good time resolution (10 -12-10 -3 sec). Molecular surface science has had a great impact in major applications involving surface phenomena-selective adsorption, heterogeneous catalysis, coatings, microelectronics, electrochemistry, and tribology-and spawned new surface technologies. The demands of these applications focus attention on the behavior of the buried interface, both solid-liquid and solid-solid.

  7. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of silicon dicarbide, SiC2.

    PubMed

    Koput, Jacek

    2016-10-05

    The accurate ground-state potential energy surface of silicon dicarbide, SiC2 , has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach. Results obtained with the conventional and explicitly correlated coupled-cluster methods were compared. The core-electron correlation, higher-order valence-electron correlation, and scalar relativistic effects were taken into account. The potential energy barrier to the linear SiCC configuration was predicted to be 1782 cm(-1) . The vibration-rotation energy levels of the SiC2 , (29) SiC2 , (30) SiC2 , and SiC(13) C isotopologues were calculated using a variational method. The experimental vibration-rotation energy levels of the main isotopologue were reproduced to high accuracy. In particular, the experimental energy levels of the highly anharmonic vibrational ν3 mode of SiC2 were reproduced to within 6.7 cm(-1) , up to as high as the v3  = 16 state. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Features, events, processes, and safety factor analysis applied to a near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, M.E.; Dolinar, G.M.; Lange, B.A.

    1995-12-31

    An analysis of features, events, processes (FEPs) and other safety factors was applied to AECL`s proposed IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure) near-surface LLRW disposal facility. The FEP analysis process which had been developed for and applied to high-level and transuranic disposal concepts was adapted for application to a low-level facility for which significant efforts in developing a safety case had already been made. The starting point for this process was a series of meetings of the project team to identify and briefly describe FEPs or safety factors which they thought should be considered. At this early stage participants were specifically asked not to screen ideas. This initial list was supplemented by selecting FEPs documented in other programs and comments received from an initial regulatory review. The entire list was then sorted by topic and common issues were grouped, and issues were classified in three priority categories and assigned to individuals for resolution. In this paper, the issue identification and resolution process will be described, from the initial description of an issue to its resolution and inclusion in the various levels of the safety case documentation.

  9. Links between type E botulism outbreaks, lake levels, and surface water temperatures in Lake Michigan, 1963-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafrancois, Brenda Moraska; Riley, Stephen C.; Blehert, David S.; Ballmann, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    Relationships between large-scale environmental factors and the incidence of type E avian botulism outbreaks in Lake Michigan were examined from 1963 to 2008. Avian botulism outbreaks most frequently occurred in years with low mean annual water levels, and lake levels were significantly lower in outbreak years than in non-outbreak years. Mean surface water temperatures in northern Lake Michigan during the period when type E outbreaks tend to occur (July through September) were significantly higher in outbreak years than in non-outbreak years. Trends in fish populations did not strongly correlate with botulism outbreaks, although botulism outbreaks in the 1960s coincided with high alewife abundance, and recent botulism outbreaks coincided with rapidly increasing round goby abundance. Botulism outbreaks occurred cyclically, and the frequency of outbreaks did not increase over the period of record. Climate change scenarios for the Great Lakes predict lower water levels and warmer water temperatures. As a consequence, the frequency and magnitude of type E botulism outbreaks in the Great Lakes may increase.

  10. Potentiometric Surfaces and Water-Level Trends in the Cockfield and Wilcox Aquifers of Southern and Northeastern Arkansas, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schrader, T.P.

    2007-01-01

    The Cockfield Formation of Claiborne Group and the Wilcox Group contain aquifers that provide sources of ground water in southern and northeastern Arkansas. In 2000, about 9.9 million gallons per day was withdrawn from the Cockfield Formation of Claiborne Group and about 22.2 million gallons per day was withdrawn from the Wilcox Group. Major withdrawals from the aquifers were for industrial and public water supplies. A study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission and the Arkansas Geological Survey to determine the water level associated with the aquifers in the Cockfield Formation of Claiborne Group and the Wilcox Group in southern and northeastern Arkansas. During February and March 2006, 56 water-level measurements were made in wells completed in the Cockfield aquifer and 59 water-level measurements were made in wells completed in the Wilcox aquifer, 16 in southwestern and 43 in northeastern Arkansas. This report presents the results as potentiometric-surface maps and as long-term water-level hydrographs. The regional direction of ground-water flow in the Cockfield Formation of Claiborne Group generally is towards the east and southeast, away from the outcrop, except in areas of intense ground-water withdrawals, such as western Drew County, southeastern Lincoln County, southwestern Calhoun County, and near Crossett in Ashley County. There are three cones of depression indicated by relatively low water-level altitudes in southeastern Lincoln County, southwestern Calhoun County, and near Crossett in Ashley County. The lowest water-level altitude measured was 44 feet above the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 in Lincoln County; the highest water-level altitude measured was 346 feet above the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 in Columbia County at the outcrop area. Hydrographs from 40 wells with historical water levels from 1986 to 2006 were evaluated using linear regression to

  11. An analysis of the Ross Ice Shelf low-level wind field using surface observations and modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seefeldt, Mark William

    A dominant feature of the Ross Ice Shelf region wind field is the Ross Ice Shelf air stream (RAS). The RAS is a northward moving air stream in the lower atmosphere over the Ross Ice Shelf. The RAS is comprised of katabatic winds, barrier winds, and winds associated with the passage of cyclone and mesocyclones. An analysis of the surface wind field is done using automatic weather station (AWS) observations by dividing the wind field into dominant wind regimes. The dominant wind regimes are classified by identifying patterns in the wind speed and wind direction from AWS across the Ross Ice Shelf region. The results indicate that previous studies on the Ross Ice Shelf surface wind field, focusing on katabatic winds and barrier winds, represent less than half of the observed winds. An analysis of the presence and location of low-level jets (LLJs) across the Ross Ice Shelf region is presented based on the analysis of the archived real-time numerical weather prediction output. The method of self-organizing maps (SOMs) is used to objectively identify different patterns in column-averaged wind speed as an identifier to the location of LLJs. The results indicate three LLJs in the region. The largest and most dominant LLJ is along the Transantarctic Mountains by the Siple Coast and the southern end of the Ross Ice Shelf. The second LLJ extends from the base of Byrd Glacier and curves to the north passing by the eastern extremes of Ross Island. The third LLJ extends from the base of Reeves Glacier and curves to the north across the western Ross Sea. The low-level wind field is investigated to provide more insight into the RAS through the use of SOMs. Four generalized patterns are found in the low-level wind field. The patterns are associated with a weak synoptic environment, a Ross Sea cyclone, a Cape Colbeck cyclone, and an elongated cyclone near Cape Adare. A temporal sequence in the low-level wind field is presented based on an analysis of transitions in the low-level wind

  12. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product Specification Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will enhance the accuracy and the resolution of space-based measurements of terrestrial soil moisture and freeze-thaw state. SMAP data products will have a noteworthy impact on multiple relevant and current Earth Science endeavors. These include: Understanding of the processes that link the terrestrial water, the energy and the carbon cycles, Estimations of global water and energy fluxes over the land surfaces, Quantification of the net carbon flux in boreal landscapes Forecast skill of both weather and climate, Predictions and monitoring of natural disasters including floods, landslides and droughts, and Predictions of agricultural productivity. To provide these data, the SMAP mission will deploy a satellite observatory in a near polar, sun synchronous orbit. The observatory will house an L-band radiometer that operates at 1.40 GHz and an L-band radar that operates at 1.26 GHz. The instruments will share a rotating reflector antenna with a 6 meter aperture that scans over a 1000 km swath.

  13. The concept of an ACEX® cost-effective first level surface detector trigger in the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szadkowski, Z.

    2005-10-01

    The paper describes the new design of the first level trigger for the surface array in the Pierre Auger Observatory. The previous design was tested in a small test segment called Engineering Array (EA). It confirmed full functionality and reliability of the PLD approach. However, because of the high price of the chips available at that time, a new cost-effective design was developed. Altera® offered cost-effective family, which allows reducing the total budget of the electronics without compromise in the functionality. The here described concept of a splitting of data processing into two sub-channels implemented into the parallel working chips, the chips synchronization and the automatization of internal processing management, together with the fully pipelined AHDL code became the framework for the further implementation in the environmental condition of the Argentinian pampa.

  14. Near-field chemical composition of porewaters in a near-surface low-level radioactive waste vault

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, F.; Haas, M.K.; Torok, J.; Manni, G.

    1997-12-31

    A long-term waste degradation experiment has been performed with actual low-level radioactive wastes (LLRW) at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), to support the licensing and modelling efforts for near-surface disposal. The wastes consist of paper, mop heads, paper towels, used clothing, etc. The wastes were compacted into bales and sealed into separate steel containers, which were connected to leachate collection systems for sampling. The leachates collected had a composition typical of landfill leachates. The major inorganic ions were Na, Ca, Cl, and Fe, and the ionic strength was {approximately}0.05 M. The relative distribution of inorganic ions in the leachates was remarkably similar between bales. Volatile fatty acids (VFA) were the major species of dissolved organic carbon (DOC; total DOC up to 7,000 mg/L). A typical composition of leachates is proposed, which can be used in geochemical and source term modelling.

  15. On using the levelling of the free surface of a Newtonian fluid to measure viscosity and Navier slip length

    PubMed Central

    Gilormini, P.; Teyssèdre, H.

    2013-01-01

    Measuring the relaxation time involved in the levelling of a free surface of a Newtonian fluid laid on a substrate can give access to material parameters. It is shown here how most favourable pattern geometries of the free surface and film thicknesses can be defined for the measures of viscosity and Navier slip length at the fluid–solid interface, respectively. Moreover, we put special emphasis on the conditions required to avoid shear thinning by controlling the maximum shear rate. For initially sinusoidal patterns with infinitesimal amplitudes, an analytical solution including slip at the fluid–solid interface is used, and numerical simulations based on the natural element method allow one to discuss the effect of finite amplitudes. This leads to the definition of a relevance domain for the analytical solution that avoids the need for numerical simulations in practical applications. It is also shown how these results can be applied to crenelated profiles, where Fourier series expansion can be used, but with caution. PMID:24353474

  16. Relation between Mesophyll Surface Area, Photosynthetic Rate, and Illumination Level during Development for Leaves of Plectranthus parviflorus Henckel 1

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.; Zaragoza, Lawrence J.; Smith, William K.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of illumination level during leaf development on the mesophyll cell surface area per unit leaf area (Ames/A), CO2 resistances, and the photosynthetic rate was determined for leaves of Plectranthus parviflorus Henckel. The relative importance of Ames/A versus CO2 resistances in accounting for observed changes in photosynthesis was quantitatively evaluated using equations based on analogies to electrical circuits. When the illumination during development was raised from 900 to 42,000 lux, the leaves more than tripled in thickness as the mesophyll cells increased in size and frequency, which caused Ames/A to go from 11 to 50. The net rate of photosynthesis at light saturation concomitantly increased 4-fold, reflecting a corresponding decrease in the total resistance for CO2 movement per unit leaf area. However, the CO2 resistance per unit area of mesophyll cells remained about 580 seconds per centimeter for leaves grown under 900 to 42,000 lux. Thus, for P. parviflorus, the increased photosynthetic rate for leaves developing under higher illuminations resulted from a higher Ames/A, not from changes in the CO2 resistances within individual mesophyll cells, expressed per unit area of cell surface. Results are discussed in terms of previously observed increases in thickness, internal leaf area, and photosynthetic rates for sun versus shade leaves on various plant species. PMID:16659211

  17. On using the levelling of the free surface of a Newtonian fluid to measure viscosity and Navier slip length.

    PubMed

    Gilormini, P; Teyssèdre, H

    2013-12-08

    Measuring the relaxation time involved in the levelling of a free surface of a Newtonian fluid laid on a substrate can give access to material parameters. It is shown here how most favourable pattern geometries of the free surface and film thicknesses can be defined for the measures of viscosity and Navier slip length at the fluid-solid interface, respectively. Moreover, we put special emphasis on the conditions required to avoid shear thinning by controlling the maximum shear rate. For initially sinusoidal patterns with infinitesimal amplitudes, an analytical solution including slip at the fluid-solid interface is used, and numerical simulations based on the natural element method allow one to discuss the effect of finite amplitudes. This leads to the definition of a relevance domain for the analytical solution that avoids the need for numerical simulations in practical applications. It is also shown how these results can be applied to crenelated profiles, where Fourier series expansion can be used, but with caution.

  18. Implications of atomic-level manipulation on the Si(100) surface: From enhanced CMOS reliability to molecular nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersam, M. C.; Lee, J.; Guisinger, N. P.; Lyding, J. W.

    2000-05-01

    The ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (UHVSTM) has been used to induce desorption of H from the Si(100)-2X1:H surface with atomic-level precision. The study of the desorption mechanism led to the discovery of a substantial isotope effect between H and D, which has recently been employed to minimize hot electron degradation at the Si/SiO2 interface in conventional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. This paper will reveal secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) data that show a direct correlation between D incorporation at this interface and transistor lifetime. D incorporation can be enhanced via high-pressure processing, which has led to lifetime improvements in excess of 700 × for Samsung`s latest 0.18 μ m, 1.5 V CMOS technology. In addition to enhancing current integrated circuits, UHVSTM-induced hydrogen desorption has aided the development of nanoelectronics on the molecular-size scale. Feedback-controlled lithography (FCL) has refined the desorption process to the point where templates of individual dangling bonds can be generated in arbitrary geometries. The chemical contrast between dangling bonds and H-passivated Si is then utilized to isolate individual copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and C60molecules on the Si(100) surface. Following isolation, STM spectroscopy has characterized the mechanical and electrical properties of these molecules with intra -molecular precision.

  19. Levels of Serum Immunoglobulin G Specific to Bacterial Surface Protein A of Tannerella forsythia are Related to Periodontal Status

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Lindsay M.; Dunford, Robert G.; Genco, Robert J.; Sharma, Ashu

    2015-01-01

    Background Tannerella forsythia (Tf) is a Gram-negative anaerobe implicated in the development of periodontal disease. Bacterial surface protein A (BspA) is a surface-expressed and -secreted protein that is recognized as an important virulence factor of Tf. This study was undertaken to determine whether Tf BspA induces an antibody response in periodontal disease. We hypothesized that serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels against BspA correlate with the disease of patients. Methods Sera were obtained from 100 patients with cardiac disorders and periodontal disease and 73 patients who experienced myocardial infarction but were periodontally healthy. Sera samples were assayed for anti-BspA antibody (total IgG and IgG subtypes) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antibody levels were measured in ELISA units by using an arbitrary patient as a standard. Results A negative correlation was found with BspA-specific total IgG antibody titers and the severity of disease measured as the clinical attachment level (CAL) when healthy and diseased groups were analyzed separately (healthy group: [−0.23, correlation value] Student’s t value [73 degrees of freedom] = 1.99; P = 0.05; diseased group: [−0.21] t [100 degrees of freedom] = 2.12; P = 0.03]). However, there was a positive correlation ([0.18 correlation value] Student’s t value [173 degrees of freedom] = 2.39; P = 0.017) when healthy and diseased groups were combined. A strong positive correlation ([0.338 correlation value] Student’s t value [173 degrees of freedom] = 4.69; P <0.0001) between the BspA-specific IgG titers and periodontal probing depth was observed when healthy and disease groups were combined. Conclusions Data demonstrated that antibodies to Tf BspA were elicited in patients with periodontal disease, and antibody levels were associated with the disease severity. Furthermore, data suggested that anti-BspA IgG might have a protective function in periodontal disease by minimizing the

  20. Surface anatomy of major anatomical landmarks of the neck in an adult population: A Ct Evaluation of Vertebral Level.

    PubMed

    Badshah, Masroor; Soames, Roger; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Jaffar; Khan, Adnan

    2017-09-01

    To compare the projectional surface anatomy of healthy individuals in an adult population with those with a thyroid mass, using computed tomography (CT). Sixteen slice CT images of 101 individuals were analyzed using a 32-bit Radiant DICOM viewer to establish the relationships among major anatomical landmarks in the neck and their vertebral levels. The structures investigated included: hard palate (HP), hyoid bone (HB) including body and lesser horns, soft palate (SP), thyroid gland (TG) (both superior and inferior poles), thyroid gland anteroposterior (APD) and superoinferior (SID) diameters, thyroid isthmus (TI) superoinferior dimension, epiglottis, vertebral arteries (right and left), and both right and left parotid glands (superior and inferior extents). The vertebral levels noted most frequently were: body of hyoid bone (C4, 42.71%); lesser horns of hyoid bone (C3, 36.46%); thyroid gland superior pole (C6, 31.25%); and thyroid gland inferior pole (T2, 30.2%). TG-ID, TG-APD, and TG-SID were not significantly different between males and females in the healthy group; however, there was a significant gender difference in thyroid gland inferior diameter in the pathology group [males 2.16(±1.16) vs. females 3.37(±1.30), P = 0.01, paired sample t-test]. Further studies are needed to determine whether neck pathology in those with a thyroid mass affects the dimensions of the thyroid gland. Moreover, the surface anatomy of the neck should be revisited using modern imaging techniques to address inconsistencies in anatomy and clinical reference texts. Clin. Anat. 30:781-787, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Design and operational considerations of United States commercial near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Birk, S.M.

    1997-10-01

    In accordance with the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, states are responsible for providing for disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) within their borders. LLW in the US is defined as all radioactive waste that is not classified as spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or by-product material resulting from the extraction of uranium from ore. Commercial waste includes LLW generated by hospitals, universities, industry, pharmaceutical companies, and power utilities. LLW generated by the country`s defense operations is the responsibility of the Federal government and its agency, the Department of Energy. The commercial LLRW disposal sites discussed in this report are located near: Sheffield, Illinois (closed); Maxey Flats, Kentucky (closed); Beatty, Nevada (closed); West Valley, New York (closed); Barnwell, South Carolina (operating); Richland, Washington (operating); Ward Valley, California, (proposed); Sierra Blanca, Texas (proposed); Wake County, North Carolina (proposed); and Boyd County, Nebraska (proposed). While some comparisons between the sites described in this report are appropriate, this must be done with caution. In addition to differences in climate and geology between sites, LLW facilities in the past were not designed and operated to today`s standards. This report summarizes each site`s design and operational considerations for near-surface disposal of low-level radioactive waste. The report includes: a description of waste characteristics; design and operational features; post closure measures and plans; cost and duration of site characterization, construction, and operation; recent related R and D activities for LLW treatment and disposal; and the status of the LLW system in the US.

  2. Vibrational Levels and Resonances on a New Potential Energy Surface for the Ground Electronic State of Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndengue, Steve Alexandre; Dawes, Richard; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2014-06-01

    The isotopic ratios for ozone observed in laboratory and atmospheric measurements, known as the ozone isotopic anomaly,[1,2] have been an open question in physical and atmospheric chemistry for the past 30 years. The biggest limitation in achieving agreement between theory and experiment has been the availability of a satisfactory[3-5] ground state potential energy surface (PES). The presence of a spurious reef feature in the asymptotic region of most PESs has been associated with large discrepancies between calculated and observed rates of formation especially at low temperature. We recently proposed a new global potential energy surface for ozone[6,7] possessing 4 features that make it suitable for kinetics and dynamics studies: excellent equilibrium parameters, good agreement with experimental vibrational levels, accurate dissociation energy and a transition region with accurate topography (without the reef artifact). This PES has been used recently to simulate the temperature dependent exchange reaction (16O+16O2) with a quantum statistical model[6,7], and, for the first time, a negative temperature dependence which agrees with experiments was obtained, indicating the good quality of this global surface. A quantum description of the ozone exchange and recombination reaction requires knowledge of the resonances but also the rovibrational levels just below the dissociation. We present results of global 3-well vibrational-state calculations up to the dissociation threshold and (J = 0) resonances up to 1000 wn beyond. The calculations were done using a large DVR basis ( 24 million functions) with a symmetry-adapted Lanczos algorithm as well as MCTDH. Results indicate the presence of localized bound states at energies close to the dissociation threshold beyond which some long-lived resonances follow, contrasted with a few delocalized bound states with density at large values of the stretching coordinates. References: 1- K. Mauersberger et al., Adv. At. Mol. Opt

  3. Detection of the transitional layer between laminar and turbulent flow areas on a wing surface. [using an accelerometer to measure pressure levels during wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    A system is disclosed for detecting the laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition on a surface while simultaneously taking pressure measurements. The system uses an accelerometer for producing electrical signals proportional to the noise levels along the surface and a transducer for producing electrical signals proportional to pressure along the surface. The signals generated by the accelerometer and transducer are sent to a data reduction system for interpretation and storage.

  4. Quantitative study of stress levels in AT and BT cut quartz crystal microbalances associated with surface laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, L. H.; Bililign, E. S.; McCann, B. J.; Keller, B. W.; Stevens, K.; Kenny, S. G.; Krim, J.

    The frequency response of an AT cut Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) to laser irradiation has been increasingly studied in recent years, as the combination of photons with materials on a QCM's electrodes enables fundamental studies of topics that span biophysics to photovoltaics. In order for such studies to advance, however, the impact of heating effects associated with laser irradiation of the QCM must be accounted for. Prior studies reached qualitative conclusions that laser irradiation induces stress QCM's arising from non-uniform thermal expansion, but did not quantitatively measure the degree of stress. Secondary effects such as surface film desorption and/or changes in temperature were also reported to be present. We report here a study of the frequency response of AT and BT cut QCM's to laser irradiation. AT and BT cut QCM's have similar response to mass adsorption, but opposite frequency response to stress levels, allowing the stress levels induced by the laser light to be quantitatively measured when the results are compared. Studies were performed in both vacuum and air, to control for the presence of adsorbed films. As expected, system designs that minimize temperature gradients result in less of an effect. Work supported by NSF DMR-1310456.

  5. The Impact of the Parcel-Level Land Architecture on Land Surface Temperature in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, X.; Ouyang, Y.; Turner, B. L., II; Harlan, S.; Brazel, A.

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between land surface temperature (LST) and characteristics of the urban land system has received increasing attention in urban heat island research, especially for desert cities. The relationship between the land composition and LST has been widely studied. Such researches generally employ medium or coarser spatial resolution remotely sensed data and primarily focuses on the effects of one land cover type on the LST. In this study, we explore the effects of land system architecture - composition and configuration of different land-cover classes - on LST in the central Arizona-Phoenix metropolitan area at a fine-scale resolution, focused on the composition and configuration of single family residential parcels. A 1 m resolution land-cover map is used to calculate landscape metrics at the parcel level, and 6.8 m resolution data from the MODIS/ASTER are employed to retrieve LST. We introduce the socio-economic factors at neighborhood level as explanatory variables to help control for potential neighborhood effects. Multiple linear regression models examine the effects of landscape configuration on LST at the parcel scale, controlling for the effects of landscape composition and neighborhood characteristics. Results show that the configuration of parcels affects LST, revealing significant variable relationships between that architecture and LST at nighttime and daytime, and the role of the neighborhood effects on the outcomes.

  6. Aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments collected from mangroves with different levels of urbanization in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Maíra Algarve; Frena, Morgana; Santos, Ana Paula Stein; Dos Santos Madureira, Luiz Augusto

    2017-06-15

    Three mangroves located in southern Brazil, Carijós (CA), Rio Tavares (RT) and Itacorubi (ITA), with distinct anthropogenic influences, were assessed with regard to the presence of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In this study, the n-alkane concentrations ranged from 1.9μg g(-1) (CA) to 55.6μg g(-1) (ITA) (dry weight). The carbon preference index (CPI) ranged from 2.1 to 7.9 and values for the terrestrial/aquatic ratio (TAR) were >1. Thus, both indexes indicated the predominance of sediment of terrestrial origin, mainly comprised of higher plants. Concentrations of total PAH ranged from 6.8ng g(-1) (RT) to 437.3ng g(-1) (ITA). The PAH isomeric ratios indicated that these compounds originated mainly from pyrogenic sources. Nevertheless, levels of n-alkanes in the three mangroves were relatively low and they are considered typical of uncontaminated surface sediments, while the level of contamination with PAH was classified as low to moderate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Muscle-tendon units localization and activation level analysis based on high-density surface EMG array and NMF algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengjun; Chen, Xiang; Cao, Shuai; Zhang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Some skeletal muscles can be subdivided into smaller segments called muscle-tendon units (MTUs). The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework to locate the active region of the corresponding MTUs within a single skeletal muscle and to analyze the activation level varieties of different MTUs during a dynamic motion task. Approach. Biceps brachii and gastrocnemius were selected as targeted muscles and three dynamic motion tasks were designed and studied. Eight healthy male subjects participated in the data collection experiments, and 128-channel surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals were collected with a high-density sEMG electrode grid (a grid consists of 8 rows and 16 columns). Then the sEMG envelopes matrix was factorized into a matrix of weighting vectors and a matrix of time-varying coefficients by nonnegative matrix factorization algorithm. Main results. The experimental results demonstrated that the weightings vectors, which represent invariant pattern of muscle activity across all channels, could be used to estimate the location of MTUs and the time-varying coefficients could be used to depict the variation of MTUs activation level during dynamic motion task. Significance. The proposed method provides one way to analyze in-depth the functional state of MTUs during dynamic tasks and thus can be employed on multiple noteworthy sEMG-based applications such as muscle force estimation, muscle fatigue research and the control of myoelectric prostheses. This work was supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China under Grant 61431017 and 61271138.

  8. China's air pollution reduction efforts may result in an increase in surface ozone levels in highly polluted areas.

    PubMed

    Anger, Annela; Dessens, Olivier; Xi, Fengming; Barker, Terry; Wu, Rui

    2016-03-01

    China, as a fast growing fossil-fuel-based economy, experiences increasing levels of air pollution. To tackle air pollution, China has taken the first steps by setting emission-reduction targets for nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) in the 11th and 12th Five Year Plans. This paper uses two models-the Energy-Environment-Economy Model at the Global level (E3MG) and the global Chemistry Transport Model pTOMCAT-to test the effects of these policies. If the policy targets are met, then the maximum values of 32 % and 45 % reductions below 'business as usual' in the monthly mean NO x and SO2 concentrations, respectively, will be achieved in 2015. However, a decrease in NO x concentrations in some highly polluted areas of East, North-East and South-East China can lead to up to a 10% increase in the monthly mean concentrations in surface ozone in 2015. Our study demonstrates an urgent need for the more detailed analysis of the impacts and designs of air pollution reduction guidelines for China.

  9. High level multiple antibiotic resistance among fish surface associated bacterial populations in non-aquaculture freshwater environment.

    PubMed

    Ozaktas, Tugba; Taskin, Bilgin; Gozen, Ayse G

    2012-12-01

    Freshwater fish, Alburnus alburnus (bleak), were captured from Lake Mogan, situated in Ankara, during spring. The surface mucus of the fish was collected and associated bacteria were cultured and isolated. By sequencing PCR-amplified 16S RNA encoding genes, the isolates were identified as members of 12 different genera: Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Bacillus, Brevundimonas, Gordonia, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Mycobacterium, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, and Staphylococcus, in addition to one strain that was unidentified. The mucus-dwelling bacterial isolates were tested for resistance against ampicillin, kanamycin, streptomycin and chloramphenicol. About 95% of the isolates were found to be resistant to ampicillin, 93% to chloramphenicol, and 88% to kanamycin and streptomycin. A Microbacterium oxydans and the unidentified environmental isolate were resistant to all four antibiotics tested at very high levels (>1600 μg/ml ampicillin and streptomycin; >1120 μg/ml kanamycin; >960 μg/ml chloramphenicol). Only a Kocuria sp. was sensitive to all four antibiotics at the lowest concentrations tested (3.10 μg/ml ampicillin and streptomycin; 2.15 μg/ml kanamycin; 1.85 μg/ml chloramphenicol). The rest of the isolates showed different resistance levels. Plasmid isolations were carried out to determine if the multiple antibiotic resistance could be attributed to the presence of plasmids. However, no plasmid was detected in any of the isolates. The resistance appeared to be mediated by chromosome-associated functions. This study indicated that multiple antibiotic resistance at moderate to high levels is common among the current phenotypes of the fish mucus-dwelling bacterial populations in this temperate, shallow lake which has not been subjected to any aquaculturing so far but under anthropogenic effect being in a recreational area.

  10. Structure-based sampling and self-correcting machine learning for accurate calculations of potential energy surfaces and vibrational levels.

    PubMed

    Dral, Pavlo O; Owens, Alec; Yurchenko, Sergei N; Thiel, Walter

    2017-06-28

    We present an efficient approach for generating highly accurate molecular potential energy surfaces (PESs) using self-correcting, kernel ridge regression (KRR) based machine learning (ML). We introduce structure-based sampling to automatically assign nuclear configurations from a pre-defined grid to the training and prediction sets, respectively. Accurate high-level ab initio energies are required only for the points in the training set, while the energies for the remaining points are provided by the ML model with negligible computational cost. The proposed sampling procedure is shown to be superior to random sampling and also eliminates the need for training several ML models. Self-correcting machine learning has been implemented such that each additional layer corrects errors from the previous layer. The performance of our approach is demonstrated in a case study on a published high-level ab initio PES of methyl chloride with 44 819 points. The ML model is trained on sets of different sizes and then used to predict the energies for tens of thousands of nuclear configurations within seconds. The resulting datasets are utilized in variational calculations of the vibrational energy levels of CH3Cl. By using both structure-based sampling and self-correction, the size of the training set can be kept small (e.g., 10% of the points) without any significant loss of accuracy. In ab initio rovibrational spectroscopy, it is thus possible to reduce the number of computationally costly electronic structure calculations through structure-based sampling and self-correcting KRR-based machine learning by up to 90%.

  11. Structure-based sampling and self-correcting machine learning for accurate calculations of potential energy surfaces and vibrational levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dral, Pavlo O.; Owens, Alec; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Thiel, Walter

    2017-06-01

    We present an efficient approach for generating highly accurate molecular potential energy surfaces (PESs) using self-correcting, kernel ridge regression (KRR) based machine learning (ML). We introduce structure-based sampling to automatically assign nuclear configurations from a pre-defined grid to the training and prediction sets, respectively. Accurate high-level ab initio energies are required only for the points in the training set, while the energies for the remaining points are provided by the ML model with negligible computational cost. The proposed sampling procedure is shown to be superior to random sampling and also eliminates the need for training several ML models. Self-correcting machine learning has been implemented such that each additional layer corrects errors from the previous layer. The performance of our approach is demonstrated in a case study on a published high-level ab initio PES of methyl chloride with 44 819 points. The ML model is trained on sets of different sizes and then used to predict the energies for tens of thousands of nuclear configurations within seconds. The resulting datasets are utilized in variational calculations of the vibrational energy levels of CH3Cl. By using both structure-based sampling and self-correction, the size of the training set can be kept small (e.g., 10% of the points) without any significant loss of accuracy. In ab initio rovibrational spectroscopy, it is thus possible to reduce the number of computationally costly electronic structure calculations through structure-based sampling and self-correcting KRR-based machine learning by up to 90%.

  12. Effect of sward surface height and level of herbage depletion on bite features of cattle grazing Sorghum bicolor swards.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, L; Carvalho, P C F; Mezzalira, J C; Bremm, C; Galli, J R; Gregorini, P

    2013-09-01

    To maximize herbage DMI, pregrazing sward surface height (SSH) and level of herbage depletion (HD) must be such that variables determining short-term herbage intake such as bite mass (BM) and bite rate (BR) are optimized. The objective of this study was to determine a SSH target and the level of HD as a proportion of the SSH that optimizes BM and BR of beef heifers grazing Sorghum bicolor swards. Two experiments were conducted using 2 S. bicolor swards and 4 beef heifers (25 mo old; 322 kg BW). Experiment 1 compared the effect of 6 pregrazing SSH, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 cm, on BM, BR, and jaw movements. Experiment 2 assessed the effect of HD level as a proportion of SSH (0.17, 0.34, 0.50, 0.67 and 0.84) on BM, BR, and jaw movements using the optimal pregrazing SSH defined in Exp. 1. Short-term herbage DMI was estimated using a double-weighing technique and corrected for insensible BW loss. Herbage DMI was subsequently used to calculate the BM. Net eating time and jaw movements for apprehension and manipulation + mastication during grazing as well as total jaw movements were determined using the IGER (Institute of Grassland and Environmental Research) behavior recorders. Bite rate and the number of total jaw movements per gram herbage DMI were derived from jaw movement count and measurements of herbage DMI. The results of Exp. 1 showed low and high SSH constraint the ease of herbage harvesting. Greater BM are maintained until a SSH of 50 cm is reached (P < 0.05) and then decline at greater SSH due to herbage dispersion. The nonbiting jaw movement rate increased at greater SSH whereas BR decreased (P < 0.05). For both variables, the turning point was close to a SSH of 50 cm. Experiment 2 showed that such an optimization of BM and BR was maintained until an HD level of 0.34 was reached (P < 0.05). There was a linear increase in both the total jaw movements per unit herbage DMI and the nonbiting jaw movements rate (manipulation + mastication) subsequent to levels

  13. Level and ecological risk of four common metals in surface water along the Qinhuangdao coastal areas, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liping; Lei, Kun; Qiao, Yanzhen; Hao, Chenlin

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metals have been a widespread environmental contamination. Due to their associated ecological risk, the presence in water environment has attracted broad attention to public. Here 4 most common metals including copper (Cu), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) were determined in surface water along the Qinhuangdao coastal areas, China. And their ecological risk was assessed using species sensitivity distribution (SSD) method. Total 12 stations were designed near the main estuary in the study area. The results showed that the concentrations of Cu, Pb, Cd and Zn of surface water were in the range of 847.81-1602.81µg/L, 0.42-1.59µg/L, 1.82-7.99µg/L and 26.9 -59.36µg/L, respectively. According to the National Seawater Quality Standard of China (GB3097-1997), Cu concentration in each station was much higher than the standard value of IV level (50µg/L), thus Cu could not even met the lowest level of water quality. In contrast, Pb met the I or II level of water quality, Cd and Zn met the II or III level. The HC5 (hazardous concentration for 5% of species) of each metal was obtained from their corresponding SSD curve. In case of Cu and Zn, the concentration at all sites exceeded their HC5 values, suggesting both of them had adverse effect on the aquatic organism, especially Cu. While Pb concentration at all sites was much lower than its HC5 value, thus Pb had no negative effect on aquatic life. In case of Cd, the concentration at 5 sites was higher than its HC5 value, and the other 7 sites was lower than its HC5 value, suggesting that adverse effect only occur at partial region in the study area. The RQ (risk quotient) value of Cu varied between 1355.41 and 2621.28, far larger than 1, indicating that 100% of sites had a much higher risk. The RQ of Zn varied between 6.06 and 13.88 (>1) indicating that Zn had a high risk in the study area. In case of Cd, the RQ ranged from 0.94 to 4.41 and about 92% of sites were larger than 1, suggesting that Cd had a high risk

  14. Analysis of different smoke plume products to remove potential bias between satellite AOD and surface level PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazmi, Chowdhury

    Satellite remote sensing has the potential for direct observation of aerosols based on the property of atmospheric reflection of sunlight due to particulate scattering. Since particle mass to some level of approximation is linearly related to the optical scattering coefficient of the particles, this implies that the total column integrated aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements would also be connected to surface PM2.5 through a simple linear model. Unfortunately, a wide range of factors can greatly modify the AOD to PM2.5 relationship including such factors as: 1. Planetary Boundary Layer Height (PBLH) 2. Aerosol type 3. Meteorology such as wind speed, RH, temperature etc. 4. Aloft Plume Contamination which affects the satellite AOD without changing the surface PM2.5. While existing approaches using ancillary meteorology and CTM's have been made in an effort to extract PM2.5, little consideration has been focused on the 4th factor which clearly has the potential to bias the result by overestimating the PBL AOD by adding the Aloft Aerosol contribution. Our results study a number of potential smoke plume indicators. In particular, we show that the multi-year GOES-ASDTA smoke product, the NAAPS aerosol model and to a lesser extent, the OMI Aerosol data products can be used to get a useful smoke indicator (averaged over an extended area) that can significantly eliminate smoke contaminated cases. This is illustrated by improved regression results for conditions when linear behavior is expected to dominate. In motivating this study, it should be pointed out that even though the filtering process can be inexact and result in a large amount of data being removed from the analysis, further improvements in satellite observation technology such as GOES-R (multi-time aggregation) and better methods to perform single pixel type retrievals using better surface modelling will result in a very large gain in satellite AOD retrievals making it less problematic for additional

  15. Surface radiological investigations of Trench 6 and low-level waste Line Leak Site 7. 4b at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Uziel, M.S.; Tiner, P.F.; Williams, J.K.

    1991-08-01

    A surface radiological investigation of Trench 6 and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) Line Leak Site 7.4b was conducted in July and August 1989 and January 1990 by the Measurement Applications and Development Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purposes of this survey were (1) to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination and (2) to recommend interim corrective action to limit human exposures to radioactivity and minimize the potential for contaminant dispersion. Highest surface gamma levels encountered during the survey (39 mR/h) were found just south of the asphalt covering LLW Line Leak Site 7.4b. Elevated surface gamma levels (measuring 28 to 560 {mu}R/h) extended from this area to a width of 100 ft, westward 250 ft, and beyond the survey boundary. Beta-gamma levels up to 17 mrad/h measured on contact with the trunks of trees growing in the area southwest of Trench 6 suggest that three roots are reaching contamination deep within the ground. Since no gamma activity is associated with the trees or their leaves, the elevated beta levels are probably due to the uptake of residual {sup 90}Sr originating from the documented seepage at the Trench 6/Leak Site 7.4b area. Beta activity present in the leaf litter and surface soil indicate that decaying leaves are depositing measurable contaminants on the ground surface. Recommendations for corrective actions are included. 7 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Surface water characteristics and trace metals level of the Bonny/New Calabar River Estuary, Niger Delta, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onojake, M. C.; Sikoki, F. D.; Omokheyeke, O.; Akpiri, R. U.

    2015-07-01

    Surface water samples from three stations in the Bonny/New Calabar River Estuary were analyzed for the physicochemical characteristics and trace metal level in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Results show pH ranged from 7.56 to 7.88 mg/L; conductivity, 33,489.00 to 33,592.00 µScm-1; salinity, 15.33 to 15.50 ‰; turbidity, 4.35 to 6.65 NTU; total dissolved solids, 22111.00 to 23263.00 gm-3; dissolved oxygen, 4.53 to 6.65 mg/L; and biochemical oxygen demand, 1.72 mg/L. The level of some trace metals (Ca, Mg, K, Zn, Pb, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Na) were also analyzed by Atomic absorption spectrometry with K, Zn, and Co being statistically significant (P < 0.05). The results were compared with USEPA and WHO Permissible Limits for water quality standards. It was observed that the water quality parameters in the Bonny Estuary show seasonal variation with higher values for pH, DO, BOD, temperature, and salinity during the dry season than wet season. Concentrations of trace metals such as Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Cr were higher than stipulated limits by WHO (2006). The result of the Metal Pollution Index suggests that the river was slightly affected and therefore continuous monitoring is necessary to avert possible public health implications of these metals on consumers of water and seafood from the study area.

  17. Surface water characteristics and trace metals level of the Bonny/New Calabar River Estuary, Niger Delta, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onojake, M. C.; Sikoki, F. D.; Omokheyeke, O.; Akpiri, R. U.

    2017-05-01

    Surface water samples from three stations in the Bonny/New Calabar River Estuary were analyzed for the physicochemical characteristics and trace metal level in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Results show pH ranged from 7.56 to 7.88 mg/L; conductivity, 33,489.00 to 33,592.00 µScm-1; salinity, 15.33 to 15.50 ‰; turbidity, 4.35 to 6.65 NTU; total dissolved solids, 22111.00 to 23263.00 gm-3; dissolved oxygen, 4.53 to 6.65 mg/L; and biochemical oxygen demand, 1.72 mg/L. The level of some trace metals (Ca, Mg, K, Zn, Pb, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Na) were also analyzed by Atomic absorption spectrometry with K, Zn, and Co being statistically significant ( P < 0.05). The results were compared with USEPA and WHO Permissible Limits for water quality standards. It was observed that the water quality parameters in the Bonny Estuary show seasonal variation with higher values for pH, DO, BOD, temperature, and salinity during the dry season than wet season. Concentrations of trace metals such as Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Cr were higher than stipulated limits by WHO (2006). The result of the Metal Pollution Index suggests that the river was slightly affected and therefore continuous monitoring is necessary to avert possible public health implications of these metals on consumers of water and seafood from the study area.

  18. Impact of Raised Serum Cobalt Levels From Recalled Articular Surface Replacement Hip Prostheses on the Visual Pathway.

    PubMed

    Unsworth-Smith, Timothy; Khan, Jane C; Khan, Riaz J K; Chelva, Enid; Lim, Caroline Ann; Haebich, Samantha; Trevenen, Michelle L

    2017-05-11

    The articular surface replacement (ASR) was recalled in 2010 because of higher than expected revision rates. Patients reported symptoms of neurologic dysfunction including poor vision. This cohort study, using objective measurements, aimed to establish whether a higher incidence of visual function defects exists in ASR patients. Thirty-three ASR patients and 33 non-ASR controls (control 1) were recruited. Data were compared with normative population data from the visual electrophysiology database (control 2). Patients underwent investigations for serum cobalt levels, psychophysical visual tests, and extensive electrophysiological visual testing. After excluding 2 subjects with pre-existing eye disease, data from 33 ASR patients were compared with the 2 control cohorts. The median serum cobalt level in the ASR group (median, 52 nmol/L [interquartile range, 14-151 nmol/L]) was significantly higher than that in the control 1 cohort (median, 7 nmol/L [interquartile range, 5-14 nmol/L]; P < .0001). The photoreceptor function of patients with an ASR of the hip showed significantly larger electroretinography mixed rod-cone b-wave amplitudes than both control 1 and control 2 cohorts (P = .0294 and .0410, respectively). Abnormalities in macular function as reflected by multifocal and scotopic electroretinography were more prevalent in control 1 (P = .0445 and .0275, respectively). Optic nerve pathway measurements using visual-evoked potential latency was significantly longer in the ASR group compared with those in the control 2 cohort (P = .0201). There were no statistical differences in visual acuity. A statistically significant disturbance in visual electrophysiology was found in the ASR group when compared with the control groups. These differences did not translate to identifiable clinical visual deficits. Orthopedic surgeons need to be aware of the possibility of visual dysfunction in patients with ASR and other metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties; however, routine

  19. Allele-specific antibodies to Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1: prevalence and inverse relationship to haemoglobin levels during infection.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Nuno; Morais, Cristiane Guimarães; Mourão, Luiza Carvalho; Freire, Matheus França; Fontes, Cor Jesus F; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius G; Drakeley, Chris J; Braga, Érika Martins

    2016-11-16

    Antigenic polymorphisms are considered as one of the main strategies employed by malaria parasites to escape from the host immune responses after infections. Merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) of Plasmodium vivax, a promising vaccine candidate, is a highly polymorphic protein whose immune recognition is not well understood. The IgG responses to conserved (MSP-119) and polymorphic (block 2 and block 10) epitopes of PvMSP-1 were evaluated in 141 P. vivax infected patients. Ten recombinant proteins corresponding to block 2 (variants BR07, BP29, BP39, BP30, BEL) and block 10 (BR07, BP29, BP39, BP01, BP13) often observed in Brazilian P. vivax isolates were assessed by ELISA in order to determine levels of specific antibodies and their respective seroprevalence. The magnitude and the frequency of variant-specific responses were very low, except for BR07 variant (>40%), which was the predominant haplotype as revealed by block 10 PvMSP-1 gene sequencing. By contrast, 89% of patients had IgG against the C-terminal conserved domain (PvMSP-119), confirming the high antigenicity of this protein. Using multiple linear and logistic regression models, there was evidence for a negative association between levels of haemoglobin and several IgG antibodies against block 2 variant antigens, with the strongest association being observed for BP39 allelic version. This variant was also found to increase the odds of anaemia in these patients. These findings may have implications for vaccine development and represent an important step towards a better understanding of the polymorphic PvMSP-1 domain as potential targets of vaccine development. These data highlight the importance of extending the study of these polymorphic epitopes of PvMSP-1 to different epidemiological settings.

  20. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Engineering-Initial High-Level Safety Risk Assessment and Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT's NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract: "New ATM Requirements--Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development." ITT has completed a safety hazard analysis providing a preliminary safety assessment for the proposed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface communication system. The assessment was performed following the guidelines outlined in the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Risk Management Guidance for System Acquisitions document. The safety analysis did not identify any hazards with an unacceptable risk, though a number of hazards with a medium risk were documented. This effort represents an initial high-level safety hazard analysis and notes the triggers for risk reassessment. A detailed safety hazards analysis is recommended as a follow-on activity to assess particular components of the C-band communication system after the profile is finalized and system rollout timing is determined. A security risk assessment has been performed by NASA as a parallel activity. While safety analysis is concerned with a prevention of accidental errors and failures, the security threat analysis focuses on deliberate attacks. Both processes identify the events that affect operation of the system; and from a safety perspective the security threats may present safety risks.

  1. Effects of vegetation and soil-surface cover treatments on the hydrologic behavior of low-level waste trench caps

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, E.A.; Barnes, F.J.; Antonio, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented on a three-year field study at Los Alamos National Laboratory to evaluate the influence of different low-level radioactive waste trench cap designs on water balance under natural precipitation. Erosion plots having two different vegetative covers (shrubs and grasses) and with either gravel-mulched or unmulched soil surface treatments have been established on three different soil profiles on a decommissioned waste site. Total runoff and soil loss from each plot is measured after each precipitation event. Soil moisture is measured biweekly while plant canopy cover is measured seasonally. Preliminary results from the first year show that the application of a gravel mulch reduced runoff by 73 to 90%. Total soil loss was reduced by 83 to 93% by the mulch treatment. On unmulched plots, grass cover reduced both runoff and soil loss by about 50% compared to the shrub plots. Continued monitoring of the study site will provide data that will be used to analyze complex interactions between independent variables such rainfall amount and intensity, antecedent soil moisture, and soil and vegetation factors, as they influence water balance, and soil erosion. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. The role of the meridional sea surface temperature gradient in controlling the Caribbean low-level jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Tito; Rutgersson, Anna; Caballero, Rodrigo; Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Alfaro, Eric; Amador, Jorge

    2017-06-01

    The Caribbean low-level jet (CLLJ) is an important modulator of regional climate, especially precipitation, in the Caribbean and Central America. Previous work has inferred, due to their semiannual cycle, an association between CLLJ strength and meridional sea surface temperature (SST) gradients in the Caribbean Sea, suggesting that the SST gradients may control the intensity and vertical shear of the CLLJ. In addition, both the horizontal and vertical structure of the jet have been related to topographic effects via interaction with the mountains in Northern South America (NSA), including funneling effects and changes in the meridional geopotential gradient. Here we test these hypotheses, using an atmospheric general circulation model to perform a set of sensitivity experiments to examine the impact of both SST gradients and topography on the CLLJ. In one sensitivity experiment, we remove the meridional SST gradient over the Caribbean Sea and in the other, we flatten the mountains over NSA. Our results show that the SST gradient and topography have little or no impact on the jet intensity, vertical, and horizontal wind shears, contrary to previous works. However, our findings do not discount a possible one-way coupling between the SST and the wind over the Caribbean Sea through friction force. We also examined an alternative approach based on barotropic instability to understand the CLLJ intensity, vertical, and horizontal wind shears. Our results show that the current hypothesis about the CLLJ must be reviewed in order to fully understand the atmospheric dynamics governing the Caribbean region.

  3. Effects of high CO2 levels on surface temperature and atmospheric oxidation state of the early earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.; Pollack, J. B.; Crisp, D.

    1984-01-01

    One-dimensional radiative and photochemical models are used to determine how much CO2 must have been present to maintain a temperate early climate and to examine the consequences that are implied for the controls on atmospheric oxidation state. It is shown that CO2 concentrations of the order of 1000 PAL are required to keep the average surface temperature close to the present value, if albedo changes and heating by reduced greenhouse gases were relatively unimportant. The oxidation state of such a high-CO2, prebiotic atmosphere should have been largely determined by the balance between the H2O2 rainout rate and the rate at which hydrogen escaped to space, with only a weak dependence on the volcanic outgassing rate or on other speculative sources of H2. The implied upper limit on the ground-level O2 mixing ratio is approximately 10 to the -11th and is subject to less uncertainty than the results of previous models.

  4. Concentration Levels and Ecological Risks of Persistent Organic Pollutants in the Surface Sediments of Tianjin Coastal Area, China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Chaoqi; Zhang, Shu; Hou, Zhen; Yang, Junjun

    2013-01-01

    Sediments were sampled from different surface water bodies in Tianjin coastal area, China, and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured using GC/MS or GC/ECD. The purposes were to investigate the concentration levels of the POPs and to assess their ecological risks. The results showed that all the 16 priority PAHs were detected from the 10 sediments sampled with the total concentrations of the 16 PAHs ranging from 274.06 μg/kg to 2656.65 μg/kg, while the concentrations of the halogenated POPs were generally low except in the Dagu waste discharging river where the total concentrations of 24 OCPs, 35 PCBs, and 14 PBDEs were 3103.36 μg/kg, 87.31 μg/kg, and 13.88 μg/kg, respectively. In the studied sediments, PAHs exhibited risks to benthonic organisms; particularly the concentrations of naphthalene and/or acenaphthene exceeded their probable effect concentrations in several locations. In comparison, only in the Dagu waste discharging river, OCPs exhibited risks with the concentrations of heptachlor epoxide and lindane exceeding their probable effect concentrations. PCBs and PBDEs posed rare risks in the studied area. PMID:23401668

  5. Use of the discriminant Fourier-derived cepstrum with feature-level post-processing for surface electromyographic signal classification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinpu; Zhu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Dingguo

    2009-12-01

    Myoelectrical pattern classification is a crucial part in multi-functional prosthesis control. This paper investigates a discriminant Fourier-derived cepstrum (DFC) and feature-level post-processing (FLPP) to discriminate hand and wrist motions using the surface electromyographic signal. The Fourier-derived cepstrum takes advantage of the Fourier magnitude or sub-band power energy of signals directly and provides flexible use of spectral inf