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Sample records for 2450-mhz cw microwave

  1. OBSERVATIONS OF SYRIAN HAMSTER FETUSES AFTER EXPOSURE TO 2450-MHZ MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The teratogenic potential of microwaves was examined in a rodent species, the Syrian hamster. Exposure of hamsters to 2450-MHz CW microwaves at a power denisty of 20 mW/sq. cm. for 100 minutes daily on days 6-14 of gestation caused no significant change in fetal survival, body we...

  2. CEREBELLAR HISTOGENESIS IN RATS EXPOSED TO 2450 MHZ MICROWAVE RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pregnant rats were either exposed or sham exposed from day 13 of gestation until birth to 2450 MHz linearly polarized microwaves at 10 mW/sq cm. A third matching group served as cage control. After birth, the pups were kept with their mothers for 21 days without any treatment, an...

  3. MEASUREMENT OF BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER PERMEATION IN RATS DURING EXPOSURE TO 2450-MHZ MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult rats anesthesized with pentobarbital and injected intravenously with a mixture of (C) sucrose and (H) inulin were exposed for 30 min. to an environment at an ambient temperature of 22, 30, or 40 C, or were exposed at 22 C to 2450-MHz CW microwave radiation at power densitie...

  4. EFFECT OF 2450 MHZ MICROWAVE EXPOSURE ON BEHAVIOURAL THERMOREGULATION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to determine the threshold specific absorption rate (SAR) during exposure to 2450 MHz continuous wave (CW) microwaves that affected thermoregulatory behavior in mice. A plexiglas shuttle box was placed inside a waveguide imposed with a temperature gr...

  5. TEMPERATURE-SPECIFIC INHIBITION OF HUMAN RED CELL NA(1+)/K(1+) ATPASE BY 2450-MHZ MICROWAVE RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ATPase activity in human red blood cell membranes was investigated in vitro as a function of temperature and exposure to 2450 MHz (CW) microwave radiation. Assays were conducted spectrophotometrically during microwave exposure with a custom-made spectrophotometer-waveguide ap...

  6. Studies on acute in vivo exposure of rats to 2450-MHz microwave radiation. III. Biochemical and hematologic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, M.J.; Ortner, M.J.; McRee, P.I.

    1982-06-01

    Male rats were exposed to 2450-MHz cw microwave radiation for 8 hr at incident power densities of 0 (sham), 2, or 10 mW/cm/sup 2/. Following exposure, rats were killed by decapitation, and blood samples were collected for determination of hematocrit, hemoglobin, red and white cell count, and differential white cell percentages. The total red and white cell counts were not affected by either exposure level. The blood hemoglobin level was also unaffected by the 8-hr microwave exposure, having a value of approximately 15.5 g% for all three groups. The percentages of lymphocytes and neutrophils for both exposed groups was similar to those of the sham group. The other cell types were also unchanged by the microwave exposure. None of the serum biochemistries examined were affected by either microwave exposure level. These data therefore demonstrate that acute (8 hr) exposure to 2450-MHz cw microwave radiation has no effect on the hematologic and biochemical parameters examined.

  7. INTERMITTENT EXPOSURE OF RATS TO 2450 MHZ MICROWAVES AT 2.5 MW CM SQ: BEHAVIORAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-Evans male adult rats were intermittently exposed for 14 weeks to continuous wave (CW) 2450-MHz microwaves at an average power density of 2.5 mW/sq. cm. The mean specific absorption rate was 0.70 W/kg (plus or minus 0.02 SEM). The rats were exposed 7 h/day, 7 days/week in a ...

  8. Developmental and teratogenic effects of 2450-MHz microwaves in mice. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Szmigielski, S.; Chazan, B.

    1986-01-01

    The report describes results of experimental investigations performed during 1982-1985 which indicate that exposure of pregnant mice to nonthermal 2450-MHz microwave fields during the whole period of gestation did not influence the course and outcome of pregnancy. However, both loss of early pregnancy and development of malformations are possible after exposure to thermal fields. An original finding from the investigations is enhancement of teratogenic potency of cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) in pregnant mice exposed to non-thermal 2450-MHz microwave fields. In another investigation, female and male mice (parents) were exposed to non-thermal 2450-MHz microwave fields for 3-5 months (2 hr daily) prior to fertilization. It was found that exposure of parents to microwaves may influence both the course and outcome of pregnancy.

  9. Microwave radiation (2450 MHz) alters the endotoxin-induced hypothermic response of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowicz, R.J.; Compton, K.L.; Riddle, M.M.; Rogers, R.R.; Brugnolotti, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The parenteral administration of bacterial endotoxin to rats causes a hypothermia that is maximal after approximately 90 minutes. When endotoxin-injected rats were held in a controlled environment at 22 degree C and 50% relative humidity and exposed for 90 minutes to microwaves (2450 MHz, CW) at 1 mW/cm2, significant increases were observed in body temperature compared with endotoxin-treated, sham-irradiated rats. The magnitude of the response was related to power density (10 mW/cm2 greater than 5 mW/cm2 greater than 1 mW/cm2). Saline-injected rats exposed for 90 minutes at 5 mW/cm2 (specific absorption rate approximately 1.0 mW/g) showed no significant increase in body temperature compared with saline-injected, sham-irradiated rats. The hypothermia induced by endotoxin in rats was also found to be affected by ambient temperature alone. Increases in ambient temperature above 22 degree C in the absence of microwaves caused a concomitant increase in body temperature. This study reveals that subtle microwave heating is detectable in endotoxin-treated rats that have impaired thermoregulatory capability. These results indicate that the interpretation of microwave-induced biological effects observed in animals at comparable rates and levels of energy absorption should include a consideration of the thermogenic potential of microwave.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF IMMUNE FUNCTION DEVELOPMENT IN MICE IRRADIATED IN UTERO WITH 2450-MHZ MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groups of time-bred pregnant mice were irradiated with 2450-MHz microwaves at an incident power density of 28 mW/sq. cm. for 100 min daily from day 6 to day 18 of pregnancy. The average specific absorption rate (SAR) was 16.5 W/kg. Two experiments were performed under these condi...

  11. BEHAVIORAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC 2,450-MHZ MICROWAVE IRRADIATION OF THE RAT AT 0.5 MW/CM SQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult male Long-Evans rats were intermittently exposed to 2450 MHz CW microwaves at an average power density of 0.5 mW/sq. cm. for 90 days. The resulting SAR was 0.14 W/kg (range 0.11 to 0.18 W/kg). The animals were exposed 7 h/day, 7 days/wk, for a total of 630 h in a monopole-a...

  12. EFFECTS OF AMBIENT TEMPERATURE AND EXPOSURE TO 2450-MHZ MICROWAVE RADIATION ON EVAPORATIVE HEAT LOSS IN THE MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Whole-body evaporative heat loss was measured as whole-body evaporative water loss in mice during a 90 min exposure to 2450-MHz microwave radiation at an ambient temperature of 20 C and in non-exposed mice maintained at ambient temperature of 0, 25, 30, 33, and 35 C. The ambient-...

  13. Effect of 2,450 MHz microwave radiation on the development of the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Inouye, M.; Galvin, M.J.; McRee, D.I.

    1983-12-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2,450 MHz microwave radiation at an incident power density of 10 mW/cm2 daily for 3 hours from day 4 of pregnancy (in utero exposure) through day 40 postpartum, except for 2 days at the perinatal period. The animals were killed, and the brains removed, weighed, measured, and histologically examined at 15, 20, 30, and 40 days of age. The histologic parameters examined included the cortical architecture of the cerebral cortex, the decline of the germinal layer along the lateral ventricles, the myelination of the corpus callosum, and the decline of the external germinal layer of the cerebellar cortex. In 40-day-old rats, quantitative measurements of neurons were also made. The spine density of the pyramidal cells in layer III of the somatosensory cortex, and the density of basal dendritic trees of the pyramidal cells in layer V were measured in Golgi-Cox impregnated specimens. In addition, the density of Purkinje cells and the extent of the Purkinje cell layer in each lobule were measured in midsagittal sections of the cerebellum stained with thionin. There were no remarkable differences between microwave-exposed and control (sham-irradiated) groups for any of the histologic or quantitative parameters examined; however, the findings provide important information on quantitative measurements of the brain. The data from this study failed to demonstrate that there is a significant effect on rat brain development due to microwave exposure (10 mW/cm2) during the embryonic, fetal, and postnatal periods.

  14. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF MICE OFFSPRING AFTER IRRADIATION IN UTERO WITH 2,450-MHZ MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mice offspring irradiated in utero with 2,450-MHz radio-frequency (RF) radiation at 0 or 28 mW/cm. sq. (whole-body averaged specific absorption rate = 0 or 16.5 W/kg) for 100 minutes daily on days 6 through 17 of gestation were evaluated for maturation and development on days 1, ...

  15. LETHALITY IN MICE AND RATS EXPOSED TO 2450 MHZ CIRCULARLY POLARIZED MICROWAVES AS A FUNCTION OF EXPOSURE DURATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult male CD-1 mice and CD rats were used to determine LD50/24 hr of lethality from exposure to 2450-MHz circularly-polarized microwaves. Groups of sixteen mice or six rats were exposed in each of 32 combinations of nominal power density (10, 25, 50 or 75 mW/sq. cm.), exposure d...

  16. An Enhancing Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on the Lethal Action of 2450 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation in Microwave Oven

    PubMed Central

    Mollazadeh-Moghaddam, Kamyar; Moradi, Bardia Varasteh; Dolatabadi-Bazaz, Reza; Shakibae, Mojtaba; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2011-01-01

    Today, there is an increasing interest in the use of metal nanoparticles in health sciences. Amongst all nanoparticles, the gold nanoparticles have been known to kill the cancer cells under hyperthermic condition by near-infrared frequency electromagnetic waves. On the other hand, although there are different physiochemical methods for disinfection of microbial pollution, however applications of irradiated gold nanoparticles against microorganisms have not yet been investigated. In this study, gold nanoparticles were prepared using D-glucose and characterized (particle size <26 nm). In the next step, the enhancing effect of the non toxic level of gold nanoparticles (50 µg/mL) on the antimicrobial activity of 2450 MHz electromagnetic radiation generated at a microwave oven operated at low power (100 W), was investigated by time-kill course assay against Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) ATCC 29737. The results showed that application of gold nanoparticles can enhance the lethal effect of low power microwave in a very short exposure time (5 s). PMID:23407707

  17. EFFECTS OF 200, 591 AND 2450 MHZ MICROWAVES ON CEREBRAL ENERGY METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Earlier work has shown that levels of key biochemicals in the energy production system of rat brain are affected by exposure to 591 MHz microwave radiation at 13.8 mW/sq cm. The objectives of this study were to determine whether there are direct microwave effects on the biologica...

  18. REWARMING MICE FROM HYPOTHERMIA BY EXPOSURE TO 2450-MHZ MICROWAVE RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiofrequency (RF) radiation between frequencies of 1 MHz and 100 GHz is, to varying degrees, readily transmitted and absorbed in biological tissues. Because of its internal absorption characteristics, RF radiation in the microwave spectrum (300-10,000 MHz) has been used in case...

  19. BEHAVIOR, PHYSIOLOGY, AND ENERGY DEPOSITION IN RATS CHRONICALLY EXPOSED TO 2450 MHZ RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research program was initiated to determine both the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the behavioral and physiological consequences of chronic CW microwave radiation exposure at 2450 MHz in the laboratory rat. Whole-body average and local SARs at discrete sites within the b...

  20. Measurement of DNA damage after exposure to 2450 MHz electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Malyapa, R S; Ahern, E W; Straube, W L; Moros, E G; Pickard, W F; Roti Roti, J L

    1997-12-01

    Recent reports suggest that exposure to 2450 MHz electromagnetic radiation causes DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cells of rat brain irradiated in vivo (Lai and Singh, Bioelectromagnetics 16, 207-210, 1995; Int. J. Radiat. Biol. 69, 513-521, 1996). Therefore, we endeavored to determine if exposure of cultured mammalian cells in vitro to 2450 MHz radiation causes DNA damage. The alkaline comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis), which is reportedly the most sensitive method to assay DNA damage in individual cells, was used to measure DNA damage after in vitro 2450 MHz irradiation. Exponentially growing U87MG and C3H 10T1/2 cells were exposed to 2450 MHz continuous-wave (CW) radiation in specially designed radial transmission lines (RTLs) that provided relatively uniform microwave exposure. Specific absorption rates (SARs) were calculated to be 0.7 and 1.9 W/kg. Temperatures in the RTLs were measured in real time and were maintained at 37 +/- 0.3 degrees C. Every experiment included sham exposure(s) in an RTL. Cells were irradiated for 2 h, 2 h followed by a 4-h incubation at 37 degrees C in an incubator, 4 h and 24 h. After these treatments samples were subjected to the alkaline comet assay as described by Olive et al. (Exp. Cell Res. 198, 259-267, 1992). Images of comets were digitized and analyzed using a PC-based image analysis system, and the "normalized comet moment" and "comet length" were determined. No significant differences were observed between the test group and the controls after exposure to 2450 MHz CW irradiation. Thus 2450 MHz irradiation does not appear to cause DNA damage in cultured mammalian cells under these exposure conditions as measured by this assay. PMID:9399707

  1. An evaluation of the teratogenic potential of protracted exposure of pregnant rats to 2450-MHz microwave radiation. II. Postnatal psychophysiologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jensh, R P; Vogel, W H; Brent, R L

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether protracted prenatal exposure of rats to 2450-MHz microwave radiation at a power density level of 20 mW/cm2 would significantly alter postnatal growth and psychophysiologic development. Of 75 pregnant rats, 12 were exposed to microwave radiation, 4 sham-irradiated, and 59 served as environmental control animals. Forty-five females were allowed to deliver their offspring. The neonates were examined and weighed on d 3 and weekly thereafter until 87 d of age. Neonatal reflex tests were initiated as early as d 3 (surface righting, air righting, auditory startle, visual placing). One physiologic parameter, eye opening, was also observed. Mothers were rebred 10 d after weaning and a morphologic evaluation was completed on the second litter. Behavioral tests were begun at 60 d of age and included water T-maze, conditioned avoidance response, open field, activity wheel, forelimb hanging, and swimming. At 90 d of age offspring were bred within and across groups, and a morphologic teratologic analyses was completed on the offspring. Representative tissue samples were collected and organ weights recorded for the brain, liver, kidneys, and gonads of all animals. Analyses of the data indicated that there were no significant malformations or significant alterations in the neonatal physiologic or reflex test results, body/organ weight ratios, or breeding results in the adult offspring. There were no significant alterations in five of the six adult behavioral tests. There were significant differences in activity among the irradiated and control offspring between the sexes, the irradiated offspring being more active. These results are indicative of possible radiation-induced behavioral alterations. Further studies are needed to explore the possibility of microwave radiation-related alterations in animal behavior. PMID:6827624

  2. TERATOGENIC EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pregnant CF-1 mice was exposed to 2450-MHz CW microwave irradiation at power densities of 0, 10, or 30 mW/sq. cm for 6 hours daily from gestational day 1 through day 18. All exposures occurred in an anechoic chamber maintained at 50% relative humidity with air temperature of 22C....

  3. THERMOREGULATORY CONSEQUENCES OF LONG-TERM MICROWAVE EXPOSURE AT CONTROLLED AMBIENT TEMPERATURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was designed to identify and measure changes in thermoregulatory response systems, both behavioral and physiological, that may occur when squirrel monkeys are exposed to 2450-MHz CW microwaves 40 hours/week for 15 weeks. Microwave power densities explored were 1 and 5 m...

  4. MEASUREMENT OF VENTILATORY FREQUENCY IN UNRESTRAINED RODENTS USING MICROWAVE RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel technique for remote determination of breathing frequency in unrestrained rodents using microwave radiation is described. Single mice were placed inside a rectangular waveguide operating at 2450 MHz. Because mice efficiently absorb radio frequency energy at 2450 MHz, any ...

  5. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF 200, 591, AND 2,450 MHZ RADIATION ON RAT BRAIN ENERGY METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three key compounds in brain metabolism have been measured during and after exposure to continuous wave radiofrequency radiation at 200, 591, and 2,450 MHz. Frequency-dependent changes have been found for all three compounds. Changes in NADH fluorescence have been measured on the...

  6. SYSTEMS FOR EXPOSING MICE TO 2,450-MHZ ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two systems for exposing mice to 2,450-MHz electromagnetic fields are described. In a waveguide system, four mice were placed in a Styrofoam cage and exposed dorsally to circularly polarized electromagnetic fields. The temperature and humidity in the mouse holder were kept consta...

  7. Thermoregulation: long-term microwave effects. Final report 1 Feb 83-31 Jan 84

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.

    1984-04-17

    A pilot study investigated the consequences of chronic exposure to 2450-MHz CW microwaves, or sham exposure, in a cold (18 degC) environment on the thermoregulatory responses, both behavioral and physiological, of squirrel monkeys. Two animals exposed to microwaves exhibited responses that were little different from those measured in animals residing in thermoneutral environments while two sham-exposed animals sustained thermoregulatory deficits. These tentative findings require replication.

  8. Biological and behavioral effects of prenatal and postnatal exposure to 2450-MHz electromagnetic radiation in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, J.; Polson, P.; Rebert, C.; Lunan, K.; Gage, M.

    1982-01-01

    Near the beginning of the second trimester of pregnancy, 33 squirrel monkeys were exposed to 2450-MHz irradiation in a multimode cavity at whole-body average specific absorption rates equivalent to those resulting from exposure to plane wave irradiation at 0.034, 0.34, and 3.4 W/kg; exposed monkeys were compared with eight pregnant sham-exposed monkeys. Eighteen of the irradiated mothers and their offspring were exposed for an additional 6 months after parturition, and then their offspring were exposed for another 6 months. No differences were found between irradiated and control adults with respect to the number of live births produced or to measures of locomotor activity, maternal care, urinary catecholamines, plasma cortisol, 3H-thymidine and 14C-uridine uptake by phytohemagglutininstimulated blood lymphocytes, or electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. Similarly, no differences were found between exposed and nonexposed offspring on the same blood, urine, and EEG parameters. Growth rate and most aspects of behavioral development were not altered by exposure. The major difference between irradiated and control offspring was the high mortality rate (4/5) before 6 months of age in those exposed at 3.4 W/kg both before and after birth. These results indicate that microwaves at power densities to 3.4 W/kg might have little direct effect on the monkey fetus when exposures occur in utero during the latter half to two-thirds of pregnancy, but that continued exposure after birth might be harmful.

  9. Performance evaluation of wearable wireless body area networks during walking motions in 444.5 MHz and 2450 MHz.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Kenichi; Watanabe, Katsuhiro; Kumazawa, Masaki; Hamada, Yusuke; Ikegami, Tetsushi; Hamaguchi, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives performance evaluation of wearable wireless body area networks (WBANs) during walking motion. In order to evaluate the performance, received signal strength (RSS), packet error rate (PER), and bit error rate (BER) are measured in an anechoic chamber and an office room. This measurement is conducted in the frequency band of 444.5 and 2450 MHz by using GFSK signal with symbol rate of 1 MHz. The results show that in the anechoic chamber the WBAN using the 444.5 MHz enables to provide error-free communication, on the other hand, the WBAN operated in the 2450 MHz faces packet errors. Measurement results in the office room give comparable performance between these frequencies. From these observations, the use of 2450 MHz for wearable WBANs needs reflection waves in order to compensate a shadowing effect caused by the human body using the WBAN. PMID:21097187

  10. Chronic exposure of cancer-prone mice to low-level 2450 MHz radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Frei, M R; Berger, R E; Dusch, S J; Guel, V; Jauchem, J R; Merritt, J H; Stedham, M A

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether chronic, low-level exposure of mammary-tumor-prone mice to 2450 MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) promotes an earlier onset (decreased latency), a greater total incidence, or a faster growth rate of mammary tumors. One hundred C3H/ HeJ mice were exposed in circularly polarized waveguides (CWG) for 18 months (20 h/day, 7 days/wk) to continuous-wave, 2450 MHz RFR at a whole body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.3 W/kg; 100 mice were sham exposed. Before exposure, SARs were determined calorimetrically; during experimentation, SARs were monitored by differential power measurement. All animals were visually inspected twice daily and were removed from the CWG cages for a weekly inspection, palpation, and weighing. From the time of detection, tumor size was measured weekly. Animals that died spontaneously, became moribund, or were killed after 18 months of exposure were completely necropsied; tissues were fixed and subjected to histopathological evaluations. Results showed no significant difference in weight profiles between sham-irradiated and irradiated mice. Concerning mammary carcinomas, there was no significant difference between groups with respect to palpated tumor incidence (sham = 52%; irradiated = 44%), latency to tumor onset (sham = 62.3 +/- 1.2 wk; irradiated = 64.0 +/- 1.6 wk), and rate of tumor growth. In general, histopathological examination revealed no significant differences in numbers of malignant, metastatic, or benign neoplasms between the two groups; a significantly greater incidence of alveolar-bronchiolar adenoma in the sham-irradiated mice was the only exception. In addition, survival analysis showed no significant difference in cumulative percent survival between sham and irradiated animals. Thus, results indicate that under the conditions of this study, long-term, low-level exposure of mammary-tumor-prone mice to 2450 MHz RFR did not affect mammary tumor incidence, latency to tumor

  11. Naltrexone-sensitive analgesia following exposure of mice to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Maillefer, R.H.; Quock, R.M. )

    1991-03-11

    This study was conducted to determine whether exposure to RFR might induce sufficient thermal stress to activate endogenous opioid mechanisms and induce analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 10, 15 or 20 mV/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested in the abdominal constriction paradigm. Specific absorption rates (SAR) were 23.7 W/kg at 10 mW/cm{sup 2}, 34.6 W/kg at 15 mW/cm{sup 2} and 45.5 W/kg at 20 mW/cm{sup 2}. Confinement in the exposure chamber alone did not appreciably alter body temperature but did appear to induce a stress-associated analgesia that was insensitive to the opioid receptor blocker naltrexone. Exposure of confined mice to RFR elevated body temperature and further increased analgesia in SAR-dependent manner. The high-SAR RFR-induced analgesia, but not the hyperthermia, was reduced by naltrexone. These findings suggest that (1) RFR produces SAR-dependent hyperthermia and analgesia and (2) RFR-induced analgesia is mediated by opioid mechanisms while confinement-induced analgesia involves non-opioid mechanisms.

  12. Naltrexone-sensitive analgesia following exposure of mice to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Maillefer, R H; Quock, R M

    1992-09-01

    To determine whether exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) would induce sufficient thermal stress to activate endogenous opioid mechanisms, male Swiss Webster mice were exposed to 10, 15, and 20 mW/cm2 RFR in a 2450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min at specific absorption rates (SARs) of 23.7, 34.6, and 45.5 W/kg, respectively, then tested in the abdominal constriction paradigm. Confinement in the RFR exposure chamber alone did not appreciably alter body temperature but did appear to induce a stress-associated analgesia that was not blocked by naltrexone. Exposure of confined mice to RFR raised body temperature and further increased analgesia in an SAR-dependent manner. The high SAR-induced analgesia, but not the hyperthermia, was blocked by naltrexone. These findings suggest that 1) RFR produces SAR-dependent hyperthermia and analgesia, and 2) RFR-induced analgesia is mediated by opioid mechanisms while confinement-induced analgesia involves nonopioid mechanisms. PMID:1409913

  13. Microwaves modify thermoregulatory behavior in squirrel monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.; Adams, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) trained to regulate environmental temperature (Ta) behaviorally were exposed in the far field of a horn antenna to ten-minute periods of 2,450 MHz CW microwaves. Incident power density ranged from 1 to 22 mW/cm2. The corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR), derived from temperature increments in saline-filled styrofoam models, ranged from 0.15 to 3.25 W/kg. Controls included exposure to infrared radiation equivalent incident energy and no radiation exposure. Normal thermo-regulatory behavior produces tight control over environmental and body temperatures; most monkeys select a Ta of 34-36 degrees C. Ten-minute exposures to 2,450 MHz CW microwaves at an incident power density of 6-8 mW/cm2 stimulated all animals to select a lower Ta. This threshold energy represents a whole-body SAR of 1.1 W/kg, about 20% of the resting metabolic rate of the monkey. Thermoregulatory behavior was highly efficient, and skin and rectal temperatures remained stable, even at 22 mW/cm2 where the preferred Ta was lowered by as much as 4 degrees C. No comparable reduction in selected Ta below control levels occurred during exposure to infrared radiation of equal incident power density.

  14. Mechanism of lethal action of 2,450-MHz radiation on microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Vela, G R; Wu, J F

    1979-01-01

    Various bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi, and bacteriophages were exposed to microwaves of 2,450 +/- 20 MHz in the presence and in the absence of water. It was found that microorganisms were inactivated only when in the presence of water and that dry or lyophilized organisms were not affected even by extended exposures. The data presented here prove that microorganisms are killed by "thermal effect" only and that, most likely, there is no "nonthermal effect"; cell constituents other than water do not absorb sufficient energy to kill microbial cells. PMID:453828

  15. Analgesia produced by exposure to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) is mediated by brain mu- and kappa-opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, G.; Park, E.J.; Quock, R.M. )

    1992-02-26

    This study was conducted to identify the opioid receptor subtype(s) responsible for RFR-induced analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 20 mW/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested 15 min later in the abdominal constriction paradigm which detects {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid activity. Immediately following RFR exposure, different groups of mice were pretreated intracerebroventricularly with different opioid receptor blockers with selectivity for {mu}- or {kappa}-opioid receptors. Results show that RFR-induced analgesia was attenuated by higher but not lower doses of the non-selective antagonist naloxone, but the selective {mu}-opioid antagonist {beta}-funaltrexamine and by the selective {kappa}-opioid antagonist norbinaltorphimine. RFR-induced analgesia was also reduced by subcutaneous pretreatment with 5.0 mg/kg of the {mu}-/{kappa}-opioid antagonist({minus})-5,9-diethyl-{alpha}-5,9-dialkyl-2{prime}-hydroxy-6,7-benzomorphan(MR-2266). These findings suggest that RFR-induced analgesia may be mediated by both {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid mechanisms.

  16. Switch mode power supply for microwave heating based on the Boucherot effect.

    PubMed

    Georghiou, G E; Meredith, R; Metaxas, A C; Gurwicz, D

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a new self-resonating switch-mode power-supply for driving CW magnetrons, based on the Boucherot effect. A detailed circuit analysis is given and its performance is evaluated for an 800 W/2450 MHz magnetron, whilst work at high power driving a magnetron up to 40 kW is reported. A comparison of the supply with the conventional power-supply used in microwave ovens is made and the principal features of the new design are found to be: low energy dissipation under short-circuit conditions, low ripple current and voltage waveforms that result in more precise control in the range 20-100% of rated power, high efficiencies and small size and weight. PMID:10687152

  17. Definition of procedures for chronic exposure of cancer-prone mice to low-level 2,450-MHz radiofrequency radiation. Final report, Jan-Apr 91

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, M.R.; Merritt, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Several published reports have implied that long-term, low-level exposure to radio-frequency radiation (RFR) may influence the growth and/or differentiation of mammalian cells in vivo. Specifically, the issue involves whether or not such RFR exposure can cause cells to differentiate into an invasive form (tumor induction) or can act as a promoter of tumor expression. To address this issue, the United States Air Force sponsors a project involving long-term exposure of tumor-prone mice to low-level 435-MHz RFR. An earlier onset, greater incidence, or faster growth rate of tumors in the irradiated group, as compared to sham irradiated controls, would suggest an enhanced tumor promotion potential. This investigation is essentially a parallel study to that being conducted at 435 MHz. The critical difference is the exposure frequency; this study will be conducted at 2,450 MHz, which is near the resonant frequency for mice. Knowledge gained from this study will contribute to the ongoing evaluation of safety standards for human exposure to RFR which is essential to the protection of military operational personnel and the general public.

  18. MICROWAVES, HYPERTHERMIA, AND HUMAN LEUKOCYTE FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study is to determine whether exposure to microwaves (2450 MHz) affects the function of human leukocytes in the resting state and during antigenic or mitogenic challenge. This publication is a summary report of the construction and calibration of a waveguide...

  19. BEHAVIOURAL AND AUTONOMIC THERMOREGULATION IN HAMSTERS DURING MICROWAVE-INDUCED HEAT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preferred ambient temperature (Ta) and ventilatory frequency were measured in free-moving hamsters exposed to 2450 MHz microwaves. A waveguide exposure system which permits continuous monitoring of the absorbed heat load accrued from microwave exposure was imposed with a longitud...

  20. BEHAVIORAL AND AUTONOMIC THERMOREGULATION IN MICE EXPOSED TO MICROWAVE RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preferred ambient temperature (T) and breathing rate were measured in free-moving mice exposed to 2,450-MHz microwaves. A waveguide-exposure system was imposed with a longitudinal temperature gradient that permitted mice to select their preferred T. Breathing rate was determined ...

  1. Flight, orientation, and homing abilities of honeybees following exposure to 2. 45-GHz CW microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, N.E.; Westerdahl, B.B.

    1981-01-01

    Foraging-experienced honeybees retained normal flight, orientation, and memory functions after 30 minutes' exposure to 2.45-GHz CW microwaves at power densities from 3 to 50 mW/cm2. These experiments were conducted at power densities approximating and exceeding those that would be present above receiving antennas of the proposed solar power satellite (SPS) energy transmission system and for a duration exceeding that which honeybees living outside a rectenna might be expected to spend within the rectenna on individual foraging trips. There was no evidence that airborne invertebrates would be significantly affected during transient passage through microwaves associated with SPS ground-based microwave receiving stations.

  2. EFFECT OF HEATING RATE ON EVAPORATIVE HEAT LOSS IN THE MICROWAVE-EXPOSED MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male CBA/J mice were administered heat loads of 0-28 J. per g at specific absorption rates (SARs) of either 47 or 93 W. per kg by exposure to 2,450-MHz microwave radiation at an ambient temperature of 30 C while evaporative heat loss (EHL) was continuously monitored with dew-poin...

  3. BRAIN TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT IN RATS: A COMPARISON OF MICROWAVE AND AMBIENT TEMPERATURE EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The brain and core temperatures of rats and rat carcasses exposed to microwave radiation (2450 MHz) or elevated air temperatures were measured in two studies. In general, no substantial evidence for temperature differentials, or hot spots, in the brain of these animals was found....

  4. Microwave enhanced pyrochemical reactions of PuO2-UO2 and U3O8

    SciTech Connect

    Strucken, E.F.; McCurry, L.E.

    1992-04-27

    Experiments in the high level cells at WSRC have established that Plutonium Oxide has an extremely high absorption factor for microwaves: temperatures in excess of 1000 deg C were reached in less than 5 minutes with a multi mode, 2450 MHz, 600 watt, microwave oven. In other microwave heating experiments, stoichiometric compositions of PuO2-UO2 were prepared and U3O8 was reduced to U4O9.

  5. Reduced exposure to microwave radiation by rats: frequency specific effects

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, J.A.; DeWitt, J.R.; Portuguez, L.M.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1988-01-01

    Previous research has shown that SAR hotspots are induced within the laboratory rat and that the resulting thermal hotspots are not entirely dissipated by bloodflow. Two experiments were conducted to determine if hotspot formation in the body and tail of the rat, which is radiation frequency specific, would have behavioral consequences. In the first experiment rats were placed in a plexiglas cage one side of which, when occupied by the rat, commenced microwave radiation exposure; occupancy of the other side terminated exposure. Groups of rats were tested during a baseline period to determine the naturally preferred side of the cage. Subsequent exposure to 360-MHz, 700-MHz or 2450-MHz microwave radiation was made contingent on preferred-side occupancy. A significant reduction in occupancy of the preferred side of the cage, and hence, microwaves subsequently occurred. Reduced exposure to 360-MHz and 2450-MHz microwaves at 1, 2, 6 and 10 W/kg were significantly different from 700-MHz microwaves. In the second experiment semichronic exposures revealed the threshold for reduced exposure of 2450-MHz microwaves to be located between whole-body SAR's of 2.1 and 2.8 W/kg.

  6. Microwave processing of radioactive materials-I

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.; Berry, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is the first of two papers that reviews the major past and present applications of microwave energy for processing radioactive materials, with particular emphasis on processing radioactive wastes. Microwave heating occurs through the internal friction produced inside a dielectric material when its molecules vibrate in response to an oscillating microwave field. For this presentation, we shall focus on the two FCC-approved microwave frequencies for industrial, scientific, and medical use, 915 and 2450 MHz. Also, because of space limitations, we shall postpone addressing plasma processing of hazardous wastes using microwave energy until a later date. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Effects of 2. 45 GHz CW microwave radiation on embryofetal development in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrot, P.S.; McRee, D.I.; Staples, R.E.

    1981-12-01

    The embryofetal toxicity and teratogenicity of plane-wave 2.45 GHz continuous wave (CW) microwave radiation at different intensities were investigated in the CD-1 mouse. Mice were exposed on days 1-15 of gestation to an incident power density of 5 mW/cm2 (specific absorption rate of 6.7 mW/gm) and either on days 1-6 or 6-15 of gestation to 21 mW/cm2 (specific absorption rate of 28.14 mW/gm) or to 30 mW/cm2 (specific absorption rate of 40.2 mW/gm) for 8 hours daily. Exposure either on days 1-6 or 6-15 of gestation to a power density of 21 or 30 mW/cm2 caused an increase in colonic temperature of exposed dams of 1 degree C and 2.3 degrees C, respectively. To distinguish between ''thermal'' and ''nonthermal'' effects of 21 or 30 mW/cm2, groups of mice were also exposed to elevated ambient temperature to raise their body temperature to the level of those animals exposed to microwave. Ambient temperatures of 30 degrees C and 31 degrees C increased the deep colonic temperature to that obtained with the 21 and 30 mW/cm2 microwave exposure, respectively. The temperature-exposed mice were handled in exactly the same manner as the microwave-exposed mice. A significant reduction in maternal weight gain, either during treatment on days 1-6 or 6-15 of gestation was observed in females of all handled groups. Handling plus exposure to elevated ambient temperature (30 degrees C or 31 degrees C) during days 6-15 of gestation increased this reduction in maternal weight gain. A significant decrease in implantation sites per litter and reduction in fetal weight was noted in the group exposed to 30 mW/cm2 during days 1-6 of gestation. Exposure of mice to a power density of 30 mW/cm2 (days 6-15 of gestation) resulted in a slight, but significant increase in the percentage of malformed fetuses, predominantly with cleft palate, when compared to all other groups.

  8. Effect of Dielectric Properties of a Solvent-Water Mixture Used in Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Antioxidants from Potato Peels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashutosh; Nair, Gopu Raveendran; Liplap, Pansa; Gariepy, Yvan; Orsat, Valerie; Raghavan, Vijaya

    2014-01-01

    The dielectric properties of a methanol-water mixture were measured at different temperatures from 20 to 80 °C at two frequencies 915 MHz and 2450 MHz. These frequencies are most commonly used on industrial and domestic scales respectively. In this study, the dielectric properties of a methanol-water mixture were found to be dependent on temperature, solvent concentration, and presence of plant matrix. Linear and quadratic equations were developed to establish the dependency between factors. At 2450 MHz, the dielectric constant of methanol-water mixtures was significantly affected by concentration of methanol rather than by temperature, whereas the dielectric loss factor was significantly affected by temperature rather than by methanol concentration. Introduction of potato peel led to an increase in the effect of temperature on the dielectric properties of the methanol fractions. At 915 MHz, both the dielectric properties were significantly affected by the increase in temperature and solvent concentration, while the presence of potato peel had no significant effect on the dielectric properties. Statistical analysis of the dissipation factor at 915 and 2450 MHz revealed that both temperature and solvent concentration had a significant effect on it, whereas introduction of potato peels at 915 MHz reduced the effect of temperature as compared to 2450 MHz. The total phenolic yield of the microwave-assisted extraction process was significantly affected by the solvent concentration, the dissipation factor of the methanol-water mixture and the extraction time. PMID:26784666

  9. Cognitive impairment and neurogenotoxic effects in rats exposed to low-intensity microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Nasare, Namita; Megha, Kanu; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Ahmed, Rafat Sultana; Singh, Digvijay; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Mediratta, Pramod Kumari

    2015-01-01

    The health hazard of microwave radiation (MWR) has become a recent subject of interest as a result of the enormous increase in mobile phone usage. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chronic low-intensity microwave exposure on cognitive function, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and DNA damage in rat brain. Experiments were performed on male Fischer rats exposed to MWR for 180 days at 3 different frequencies, namely, 900, 1800 MHz, and 2450 MHz. Animals were divided into 4 groups: group I: sham exposed; group II: exposed to MWR at 900 MHz, specific absorption rate (SAR) 5.953 × 10(-4) W/kg; group III: exposed to 1800 MHz, SAR 5.835 × 10(-4) W/kg; and group IV: exposed to 2450 MHz, SAR 6.672 × 10(-4) W/kg. All the rats were tested for cognitive function at the end of the exposure period and were subsequently sacrificed to collect brain. Level of HSP70 was estimated by enzyme-linked immunotarget assay and DNA damage was assessed using alkaline comet assay in all the groups. The results showed declined cognitive function, elevated HSP70 level, and DNA damage in the brain of microwave-exposed animals. The results indicated that, chronic low-intensity microwave exposure in the frequency range of 900 to 2450 MHz may cause hazardous effects on the brain. PMID:25749756

  10. Absorption of microwave radiation by the anesthetized rat: electromagnetic and thermal hotspots in body and tail

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, J.A.; Emmerson, R.Y.; DeWitt, J.R.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1987-01-01

    Anatomic variability in the deposition of radiofrequency electromagnetic energy in mammals has been well documented. A recent study reported specific absorption rate (SAR) hotspots in the brain, rectum and tail of rat carcasses exposed to 360- and to 2450-MHz microwave radiation. Regions of intense energy absorption are generally thought to be of little consequence when predicting thermal effects of microwave irradiation because it is presumed that heat transfer via the circulatory system promptly redistributes localized heat to equilibrate tissue temperature within the body. Experiments on anesthetized, male Long-Evans rats (200-260 g) irradiated for 10 or 16 min with 2450, 700, or 360 MHz radiation at SARs of 2 W/kg, 6 W/kg, or 10 W/kg indicated that postirradiation localized temperatures in regions previously shown to exhibit high SARs were appreciably above temperatures at body sites with lower SARs. The postirradiation temperatures in the rectum and tail were significantly higher in rats irradiated at 360 MHz and higher in the tail at 2450 MHz than temperatures resulting from exposure to 700 MHz. This effect was found for whole-body-averaged SARs as low as 6 W/kg at 360 MHz and 10 W/kg at 2450 MHz. In contrast, brain temperatures in the anesthetized rats were not different from those measured in the rest of the body following microwave exposure.

  11. Absorption of microwave radiation by the anesthetized rat: Electromagnetic and thermal hotspots in body and tail

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, J.A.; Emmerson, R.Y.; DeWitt, J.R.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1987-01-01

    Anatomic variability in the deposition of radiofrequency electromagnetic energy in mammals has been well documented. A recent study reported specific absorption rat (SAR) hotspots in the brain, rectum and tail of rat carcasses exposed to 360- and to 2,450-MHz microwave radiation. Regions of intense energy absorption are generally thought to be of little consequence when predicting thermal effects of microwave irradiation because it is presumed that heat transfer via the circulatory system promptly redistributes localized heat to equilibrate tissue temperature within the body. Experiments on anesthetized, male Long-Evans rats (200-260 g) irradiated for 10 or 16 min with 2,450, 700, or 360 MHz radiation at SARs of 2 W/kg, 6 W/kg, or 10 W/kg indicated that postirradiation localized temperatures in regions previously shown to exhibit high SARs were appreciably above temperatures at body sites with lower SARs. The postirradiation temperatures in the rectum and tail were significantly higher in rats irradiated at 360 MHz and higher in the tail at 2,450 MHz than temperatures resulting from exposure to 700 MHz. The effect was found for whole-body-averages SARs as low as 6 W/kg at 360 MHz and 10 W/g at 2,450 MHz.

  12. Minimal changes in hypothalamic temperature accompany microwave-induced alteration of thermoregulatory behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.; Adams, B.W.; Akel, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    This study probed the mechanisms underlying microwave-induced alterations of thermoregulatory behavior. Adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus), trained to regulate the temperature of their immediate environment (Ta) behaviorally, were chronically implanted with Teflon reentrant tubes in the medical preoptic/anterior hypothalamic area (PO/AH), the brainstem region considered to control normal thermoregulatory processes. A Vitek temperature probe inserted into the tube measured PO/AH temperature continuously while changes in thermoregulatory behavior were induced by either brief (10-min) or prolonged (2.5-h) unilateral exposures to planewave 2,450-MHz continuous wave (CW) microwaves (E polarization). Power densities explored ranged from 4 to 20 mW/cm2 (rate of energy absorption (SAR) . 0.05 (W/kg)/cm2)). Rectal temperature and four representative skin temperatures were also monitored, as was the Ta selected by the animal. When the power density was high enough to induce a monkey to select a cooler Ta (8 mW/cm2 and above), PO/AH temperature rose approximately 0.3 degrees C but seldom more. Lower power densities usually produced smaller increases in PO/AH temperature and no reliable change in thermoregulatory behavior. Rectal temperature remained constant while PO/AH temperature rose only 0.2-0.3 degrees C during 2.5-h exposures at 20 mW/cm2 because the Ta selected was 2-3 degrees C cooler than normally preferred. Sometimes PO/AH temperature increments greater than 0.3 degrees C were recorded, but they always accompanied inadequate thermoregulatory behavior. Thus, a PO/AH temperature rise of 0.2-0.3 degrees C, accompanying microwave exposure, appears to be necessary and sufficient to alter thermoregulatory behavior, which ensures in turn that no greater temperature excursions occur in this hypothalamic thermoregulatory center.

  13. Longevity and food consumption of microwave-treated (2. 45 GHz CW) honeybees in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Westerdahl, B.B.; Gary, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    Adult honeybees, confined singly or in small clusters, were exposed for 0.5, 6, and 24 hours to 2.45-GHz continuous wave microwave radiation at power densities of 3, 6, 12, 25, and 50 mW/cm2. Following exposure, bees were held in the incubator for 21 days to determine the consumption of sucrose syrup and to observe mortality. No significant differences were found between microwave-treated and sham-treated or control bees.

  14. Psychoactive-drug response is affected by acute low-level microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of various psychoactive drugs were studied in rats exposed for 45 min in a circularly polarized, pulsed microwave field (2450 MHz; SAR 0.6 W/kg; 2-microseconds pulses, 500 pps). Apomorphine-induced hypothermia and stereotypy were enhanced by irradiation. Amphetamine-induced hyperthermia was attenuated while stereotypy was unaffected. Morphine-induced catalepsy and lethality were enhanced by irradiation at certain dosages of the drug. Since these drugs have different modes of action on central neural mechanisms and the effects of microwaves depend on the particular drug studied, these results show the complex nature of the effect of microwave irradiation on brain functions.

  15. Food foraging of honey bees in a microwave field (2. 45 GHz CW)

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, N.E.; Westerdahl, B.B.

    1982-02-15

    Honey bees were trained to fly 400 m from their colony to an indoor laboratory foraging arena exposed to 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwaves at 5 power densities (0, 5, 10, 20, and 40 mW/cm/sup 2/). Foraging behavior did not differ from controls foraging within an unexposed sham arena in (1) number of round trips completed during a 3-h exposure session, (2) round trip time between the colony and the foraging arena, and (3) the length of time required to navigate the illuminated foraging arena. This study indicates that honey bees would not be adversely affected by foraging within a similar microwave field that would exist in future receiving antennae for the proposed solar power satellite energy transmission system in which power levels are expected to range from 23 mW/cm/sup 2/ at the antenna center to 1 mW/cm/sup 2/ at the edge.

  16. CW/Pulsed H- ion beam generation with PKU Cs-free 2.45 GHz microwave driven ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, A. L.; Zhang, J. F.; Zhao, J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2015-04-01

    Circular accelerators used for positron emission tomography (PET, i.e. accelerator used for make radio isotopes) need several mA of CW H- ion beam for their routine operation. Other facilities, like Space Radio-Environment Simulate Assembly (SPRESA), require less than 10 mA pulsed mode H- beam. Caesium free negative hydrogen ion source is a good choice for those facilities because of its compact structure, easy operation and low cost. Up to now, there is no H- source able to produce very intense H- beams with important variation of the duty factor[1]. Recently, a new version of 2.45 GHz microwave H- ion source was designed at PKU, based on lessons learnt from the previous one. This non cesiated source is very compact thanks to its permanent magnet configuration. Special attention was paid on the design of the discharge chamber structure, electron dumping and extraction system. Source test to produce H- ion beams in pulsed and CW mode was carried out on PKU ion source test bench. In CW mode, a 10.8 mA/30keV H- beam with rms emittance about 0.16 π.mm.mrad has been obtained with only 500 W rf power. The power efficiency reaches 21 mA/kW. In pulsed mode with duty factor of 10% (100Hz/1ms), this compact source can easily deliver 20 mA H- ion beam at 35 keV with rms emittance about 0.2 π.mm.mrad when RF power is set at 2.2 kW (peak power). Several hour successive running operation in both modes and totaling more than 200 hours proves its high quality. The outside dimension of this new H- source body is ϕ116 mm × 124 mm, and the entire H- source infrastructure, including rf matching section, plasma chamber and extraction system, is ϕ310 × 180 mm. The high voltage region is limited with in a ϕ310 mm × 230 mm diagram. Details are given in this paper.

  17. Microwave enhanced pyrochemical reactions of PuO sub 2 , UO sub 2 , and U sub 3 O sub 8

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.; McCurry, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments in the high level cells at WSRC have established that PuO{sub 2} has an extremely high absorption factor the microwaves: temperatures in excess of 1000{degrees}C were reached in less than 5 minutes with a multi mode, 2450 MHz, 600 watt, microwave oven. In other microwave heating experiments: stoichiometric compositions of PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} were prepared and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} was reduced to U{sub 4}O{sub g}.

  18. [Increase in the immunogenicity of cancer cells exposed to microwaves].

    PubMed

    Douss, T; Santini, R; Deschaux, P; Pacheco, H

    1985-01-01

    A suspension of 10(7) melanoma cells, submitted to microwave hyperthermia (2,450 MHz, 20 minutes, 44 degrees C) leads to a partial protection in mice inoculated 26 days afterwards with a suspension of 10(7) active cells of B16 melanoma (95% vitality). The period of 26 days between the two injections corresponds to the moment where the sera antibodies have an highest level. The kinetics of the primary response of the humoral immunity shows that B16 melanoma proliferation and number of deads can be related to an hypogammaglobulinemia. PMID:2935224

  19. Microwave enhanced pyrochemical reactions of PuO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.; McCurry, L.E.

    1990-12-31

    Experiments in the high level cells at WSRC have established that PuO{sub 2} has an extremely high absorption factor the microwaves: temperatures in excess of 1000{degrees}C were reached in less than 5 minutes with a multi mode, 2450 MHz, 600 watt, microwave oven. In other microwave heating experiments: stoichiometric compositions of PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} were prepared and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} was reduced to U{sub 4}O{sub g}.

  20. Microwave assisted pultrusion of an epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Methven, J.M.; Abidin, A.Z.

    1995-12-01

    A 6mm diameter cylindrical profile based on E-glass fibers and a BF{sub 3}-triamine-epoxy resin system has been manufactured by Microwave Assisted Pultrusion (MAP) using a single mode resonant microwave cavity operating in a TM{sub 010} mode at 2450 MHz. Power transfer is at least 70% and pulling speeds of more than 2m/minute have been achieved for a power input of about 800W. The results are consistent with earlier MAP studies using unsaturated polyesters, epoxies urethane acrylates and vinyl esters. The results provide a sound basis for proposing the use of this type of epoxy system as a material that is suitable for a high speed gel-cure pultrusion process that uses both a microwave heating cavity and a conventional pultrusion die.

  1. In-office microwave disinfection of soft contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.G.; Rechberger, J.; Grant, T.; Holden, B.A. )

    1990-02-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an in-office microwave disinfection procedure which allowed for the disinfection of up to 40 soft contact lenses at one time. Ciba AOSept cases filled with sterile unpreserved saline were contaminated with one of six FDA test challenge microorganisms at a concentration of approximately 10(3) colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml). Twenty cases were placed on the rotating plate of a standard 2450 MHz 650 W microwave oven in a 10-cm diameter circle. The cases were exposed to high intensity microwave irradiation for periods of 0 to 15 min. None of the 6 microorganisms evaluated survived 2 min or longer of microwave exposure. Our findings indicated that microwave irradiation can be a convenient, rapid, and effective method of disinfecting a number of soft contact lenses at one time and thus adaptable as an in-office soft contact lens disinfection procedure.

  2. Development of a microwave clothes dryer: Interim report III

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Gerling, J.E.

    1995-03-01

    Drying clothes with microwave energy combined with conventional hot air can potentially speed the drying process, improve fabric care, and increase dryer efficiency. This report describes important steps taken toward commercialization, particularly conceptualization of a highly sensitive safety sensor system. Such a system would help surmount problems arising from the heating of tramp materials, including metal items and pocket butane lighters. Hazards testing of a laboratory prototype dryer with a 915-MHz power supply initially showed that plastic butane lighters and common small metal objects such as bobby pins, nails, and bread wrapper ties do not heat sufficiently to cause an ignition hazard. However, more in-depth testing of plastic lighters in the 3-kW, 915-MHz fields showed that, just as in 2450-MHz fields, the lighter posed significant hazards because it could release pressurized, combustible gas when the plastic was softened by heating. Wooden-sheathed graphite pencils could also heat to ignition in either 2450-MHz or 915-MHz fields. A detection and control system was then designed to circumvent this hazard by accurately detecting trace amounts of combustion products in the dryer exhaust. Tests in a laboratory apparatus showed that termination of microwave power was possible well before any ignition occurred.

  3. Use of microwaves to improve nutritional value of soybeans for future space inhabitants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, G.

    1983-01-01

    Whole soybeans from four different varieties at different moisture contents were microwaved for varying times to determine the conditions for maximum destruction of trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase activities, and optimal growth of chicks. Microwaving 150 gm samples of soybeans (at 14 to 28% moisture) for 1.5 min was found optimal for reduction of trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase activities. Microwaving 1 kgm samples of soybeans for 9 minutes destroyed 82% of the trypsin inhibitor activity and gave optimal chick growth. It should be pointed out that the microwaving time would vary according to the weight of the sample and the power of the microwave oven. The microwave oven used in the above experiments was rated at 650 watts 2450 MHz.

  4. EFFECT OF NONIONIZING RADIATION ON THE PURKINJE CELLS OF THE UVULA IN SQUIRREL MONKEY CEREBELLUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pregnant squirrel monkeys were exposed to 2450-MHz (CW) microwaves at an equivalent power density of 10 mW/sq. cm. for three hours daily in a cavity-cage module. The exposure began when pregnancy was determined by a hormonal method, and continued through the offspring's first 9.5...

  5. Acute low-level microwave exposure and central cholinergic activity: studies on irradiation parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    Sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake was measured in the striatum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus of rats after acute exposure (45 min) to pulsed (2 microseconds, 500 pps) or continuous-wave 2,450-MHz microwaves in cylindrical waveguides or miniature anechoic chambers. In all exposure conditions, the average whole-body specific absorption rate was at 0.6 W/kg. Decrease in choline uptake was observed in the frontal cortex after microwave exposure in all of the above irradiation conditions. Regardless of the exposure system used, hippocampal choline uptake was decreased after exposure to pulsed but not continuous-wave microwaves. Striatal choline uptake was decreased after exposure to either pulsed or continuous-wave microwaves in the miniature anechoic chamber. No significant change in hypothalamic choline uptake was observed under any of the exposure conditions studied. We conclude that depending on the parameters of the radiation, microwaves can elicit specific and generalized biological effects.

  6. Afferent mechanisms of microwave-induced biological effects. Annual report, 1 June 1985-31 May 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Lai

    1986-07-01

    Effects of 2450-MHz circularly polarized microwave irradiation on central nervous system functions were studied. Pulsed (microsecond, 500 pps) microwaves decreased high-affinity sodium-dependent choline uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the rat. The effect on hippocampal choline uptake was blocked by pretreatment with narcotic antagonists. Continuous-wave microwaves of the same power density decreased choline uptake in the frontal cortex only. Furthermore, it was found that the effects of pulsed microwaves on central cholinergic activity are classically conditionable to cues in the exposure environment. The hypothesis that some of the neurological effects of pulsed microwave irradiation are caused by its effect on the auditory system was investigated. Effects of pink noise and pulsed microwaves were compared.

  7. CW/Pulsed H{sup −} ion beam generation with PKU Cs-free 2.45 GHz microwave driven ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S. X. Ren, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Zhao, J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E.

    2015-04-08

    Circular accelerators used for positron emission tomography (PET, i.e. accelerator used for make radio isotopes) need several mA of CW H- ion beam for their routine operation. Other facilities, like Space Radio-Environment Simulate Assembly (SPRESA), require less than 10 mA pulsed mode H{sup −} beam. Caesium free negative hydrogen ion source is a good choice for those facilities because of its compact structure, easy operation and low cost. Up to now, there is no H{sup −} source able to produce very intense H{sup −} beams with important variation of the duty factor{sup [1]}. Recently, a new version of 2.45 GHz microwave H{sup −} ion source was designed at PKU, based on lessons learnt from the previous one. This non cesiated source is very compact thanks to its permanent magnet configuration. Special attention was paid on the design of the discharge chamber structure, electron dumping and extraction system. Source test to produce H{sup −} ion beams in pulsed and CW mode was carried out on PKU ion source test bench. In CW mode, a 10.8 mA/30keV H{sup −} beam with rms emittance about 0.16 π·mm·mrad has been obtained with only 500 W rf power. The power efficiency reaches 21 mA/kW. In pulsed mode with duty factor of 10% (100Hz/1ms), this compact source can easily deliver 20 mA H{sup −} ion beam at 35 keV with rms emittance about 0.2 π·mm·mrad when RF power is set at 2.2 kW (peak power). Several hour successive running operation in both modes and totaling more than 200 hours proves its high quality. The outside dimension of this new H{sup −} source body is ϕ116 mm × 124 mm, and the entire H{sup −} source infrastructure, including rf matching section, plasma chamber and extraction system, is ϕ310 × 180 mm. The high voltage region is limited with in a ϕ310 mm × 230 mm diagram. Details are given in this paper.

  8. Effect of heating rate on evaporative heat loss in the microwave-exposed mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, C.J.

    1982-08-01

    Mice were exposed to microwave radiation at 2.450 MHz at varying intensities and heat loads to determine if the animals thermoregulate or temperature regulate in conditions of varying heat load. The mice were exposed to whole-body doses of microwave radiation and power not reflected back was regarded as absorbed by the mouse. Incident powers of three to six watts were used, resulting in specific absorption rates of 47.4-93.4 W/kg. Deep body temperatures and the evaporated heat loss were monitored, and results demonstrated that mice thermoregulate, i.e., dissipate heat loads through evaporative heat loss at a rate which is modeled numerically. It is concluded that a significant portion of the microwave energy is deposited internally.

  9. Spin-Label CW Microwave Power Saturation and Rapid Passage with Triangular Non-Adiabatic Rapid Sweep (NARS) and Adiabatic Rapid Passage (ARP) EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Hyde, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell, A.W., Camenisch, T.G., Ratke, J.J. Sidabras, J.W., Hyde, J.S., 2011 as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions, and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra. In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10−3 to 10−7 s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy. PMID:25917132

  10. Spin-label CW microwave power saturation and rapid passage with triangular non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) and adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Hyde, James S.

    2015-06-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell et al. (2011) as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions (Kittell et al., 2012), and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra (Hyde et al., 2013). In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10-3 to 10-7 s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy.

  11. Spin-label CW microwave power saturation and rapid passage with triangular non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) and adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kittell, Aaron W; Hyde, James S

    2015-06-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell et al. (2011) as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions (Kittell et al., 2012), and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra (Hyde et al., 2013). In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10(-3) to 10(-7) s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy. PMID:25917132

  12. Enhancement of Apoptosis by Titanium Alloy Internal Fixations during Microwave Treatments for Fractures: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lina; Ye, Dongmei; Feng, Xianxuan; Fu, Tengfei; Bai, Yuehong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Microwaves are used in one method of physical therapy and can increase muscle tissue temperature which is useful for improving muscle, tendon and bone injuries. In the study, we sought to determine whether titanium alloy internal fixations influence apoptosis in tissues subjected to microwave treatments at 2,450 MHz and 40 W during the healing of fractures because this issue is not yet fully understood. Methods In this study, titanium alloy internal fixations were used to treat 3.0-mm transverse osteotomies in the middle of New Zealand rabbits’ femurs. After the operation, 30-day microwave treatments were applied to the 3.0 mm transverse osteotomies 3 days after the operation. The changes in the temperatures of the muscle tissues in front of the implants or the 3.0 mm transverse osteotomies were measured during the microwave treatments. To characterize the effects of titanium alloy internal fixations on apoptosis in the muscles after microwave treatment, we performed TUNEL assays, fluorescent real-time (quantitative) PCR, western blotting analyses, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection and transmission electron microscopy examinations. Results The temperatures were markedly increased in the animals with the titanium alloy implants. Apoptosis in the muscle cells of the implanted group was significantly more extensive than that in the non-implanted control group at different time points. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of the skeletal muscles of the implanted groups revealed muscular mitochondrial swelling, vacuolization. ROS, Bax and Hsp70 were up-regulated, and Bcl-2 was down-regulated in the implanted group. Conclusion Our results suggest that titanium alloy internal fixations caused greater muscular tissue cell apoptosis following 2,450 MHz, 40 W microwave treatments in this rabbit femur fracture models. PMID:26132082

  13. Low-level microwave irradiation and central cholinergic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1989-05-01

    Our previous research showed that 45 min of exposure to low-level, pulsed microwaves (2450-MHz, 2-microseconds pulses, 500 pps, whole-body average specific absorption rate 0.6 W/kg) decreased sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. The effects of microwaves on central cholinergic systems were further investigated in this study. Increases in choline uptake activity in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus were observed after 20 min of acute microwave exposure, and tolerance to the effect of microwaves developed in the hypothalamus, but not in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, of rats subjected to ten daily 20-min exposure sessions. Furthermore, the effects of acute microwave irradiation on central choline uptake could be blocked by pretreating the animals before exposure with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone. In another series of experiments, rats were exposed to microwaves in ten daily sessions of either 20 or 45 min, and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in different regions of the brain were studied by 3H-QNB binding assay. Decreases in concentration of receptors occurred in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to ten 20-min microwave exposure sessions, whereas increase in receptor concentration occurred in the hippocampus of animals exposed to ten 45-min sessions. This study also investigated the effects of microwave exposure on learning in the radial-arm maze. Rats were trained in the maze to obtain food reinforcements immediately after 20 or 45 min of microwave exposure.

  14. Microwave-induced post-exposure hyperthermia: Involvement of endogenous opioids and serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.; Horita, A.

    1984-08-01

    Acute exposure to pulsed microwaves (2450 MHz, 1 mW/ cm/sup 2/, SAR 0.6 W/kg, 2-..mu..s pulses, 500 pulses/s) induces a transient post-exposure hyperthermia in the rat. The hyperthermia was attenuated by treatment with either the narcotic antagonist naltrexone or one of the serotonin antagonists cinanserin, cyproheptadine, or metergoline. It was not affected, however, by treatment with the peripheral serotonin antagonist xylamidine nor the dopamine antagonist haloperidol. It thus appears that both endogenous opioids and central serotonin are involved. It is proposed that pulsed microwaves activate endogenous opioid systems, and that they in turn activate a serotonergic mechanism that induces the rise in body temperature.

  15. Microwave-assisted regeneration of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-09-01

    Microwave heating was used in the regeneration of methylene blue-loaded activated carbons produced from fibers (PFAC), empty fruit bunches (EFBAC) and shell (PSAC) of oil palm. The dye-loaded carbons were treated in a modified conventional microwave oven operated at 2450 MHz and irradiation time of 2, 3 and 5 min. The virgin properties of the origin and regenerated activated carbons were characterized by pore structural analysis and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The surface chemistry was examined by zeta potential measurement and determination of surface acidity/basicity, while the adsorptive property was quantified using methylene blue (MB). Microwave irradiation preserved the pore structure, original active sites and adsorption capacity of the regenerated activated carbons. The carbon yield and the monolayer adsorption capacities for MB were maintained at 68.35-82.84% and 154.65-195.22 mg/g, even after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. The findings revealed the potential of microwave heating for regeneration of spent activated carbons. PMID:22728787

  16. Development of a microwave clothes dryer. Interim report II

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Gerling, J.E.

    1994-07-01

    The objective of the project is to investigate the microwave drying of clothes and to produce a database for use by interested parties, including appliance manufacturers, in designing and developing microwave clothes dryers. This is an interim report covering 1992 activities. Performance of a research model of a microwave dryer was compared to that of a conventional (top-of-the-line) electric dryer. Drying time was reduced by 58%; superior fabric care was demonstrated on fine fabrics because of the low drying temperatures; and efficiency was increased 18%. Microwaves penetrate the clothes and heat the water molecules directly while conventional heat energy must be conducted through the clothes to heat the water. A flow of heated air conducts the water vapor away from the clothes. Conventional metal buttons and zippers do not heat greatly in the 2,450 MHz microwave field but bobby pins, bread ties and nails heat enough to damage clothes. That heating has been eliminated by switching to the 915-MHz microwave frequency. Metallized threads may still constitute a heating problem. Based upon results from tests of the research model, a prototype has been designed and three units have been constructed. One unit is retained for laboratory testing while the other two will be shipped to two major appliance manufacturers for evaluations in their laboratories. Consumer panels generally liked the high speed, fabric care and improved efficiency of the microwave dryer but were concerned about the higher first cost.

  17. Corticotropin-releasing factor antagonist blocks microwave-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1990-10-01

    Acute (45-min) irradiation with pulsed low-level microwaves (2450-MHz, 2 microseconds pulses at 500 pps, average power density of 1 mW/cm2, whole-body average specific absorption rate of 0.6 W/kg) decreased sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. These effects were blocked by pretreating the animals before exposure with intracerebroventricular injection of the specific corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonist, alpha-helical-CRF9-41 (25 micrograms). Similar injection of the antagonist had no significant effect on HACU in the brain of the sham-exposed rats. These data suggest that low-level microwave irradiation activates CRF in the brain, which in turn causes the changes in central HACU.

  18. Microwave-assisted synthesis of sensitive silver substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lixin; Wang, Haibo; Wang, Jian; Gong, Ke; Jia, Yi; Zhang, Huili; Sun, Mengtao

    2008-10-01

    A sensitive silver substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy is synthesized under multimode microwave irradiation. The microwave-assisted synthesis of the SERS-active substrate was carried out in a modified domestic microwave oven of 2450 MHz, and the reductive reaction was conducted in a polypropylene container under microwave irradiation with a power of 100 W for 5 min. Formaldehyde was employed as both the reductant and microwave absorber in the reductive process. The effects of different heating methods (microwave dielectric and conventional) on the properties of the SERS-active substrates were investigated. Samples obtained with 5 min of microwave irradiation at a power of 100 W have more well-defined edges, corners, and sharper surface features, while the samples synthesized with 1 h of conventional heating at 40 degrees C consist primarily of spheroidal nanoparticles. The SERS peak intensity of the approximately 1593 cm(-1) band of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid adsorbed on silver nanoparticles synthesized with 5 min of microwave irradiation at a power of 100 W is about 30 times greater than when it is adsorbed on samples synthesized with 1 h of conventional heating at 40 degrees C. The results of quantum chemical calculations are in good agreement with our experimental data. This method is expected to be utilized for the synthesis of other metal nanostructural materials. PMID:19045112

  19. Microwave-assisted synthesis of sensitive silver substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lixin; Wang, Haibo; Wang, Jian; Gong, Ke; Jia, Yi; Zhang, Huili; Sun, Mengtao

    2008-10-01

    A sensitive silver substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy is synthesized under multimode microwave irradiation. The microwave-assisted synthesis of the SERS-active substrate was carried out in a modified domestic microwave oven of 2450MHz, and the reductive reaction was conducted in a polypropylene container under microwave irradiation with a power of 100W for 5min. Formaldehyde was employed as both the reductant and microwave absorber in the reductive process. The effects of different heating methods (microwave dielectric and conventional) on the properties of the SERS-active substrates were investigated. Samples obtained with 5min of microwave irradiation at a power of 100W have more well-defined edges, corners, and sharper surface features, while the samples synthesized with 1h of conventional heating at 40°C consist primarily of spheroidal nanoparticles. The SERS peak intensity of the ˜1593cm-1 band of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid adsorbed on silver nanoparticles synthesized with 5min of microwave irradiation at a power of 100W is about 30 times greater than when it is adsorbed on samples synthesized with 1h of conventional heating at 40°C. The results of quantum chemical calculations are in good agreement with our experimental data. This method is expected to be utilized for the synthesis of other metal nanostructural materials.

  20. Microwave-assisted synthesis of sensitive silver substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Lixin; Wang Haibo; Wang Jian; Gong Ke; Jia Yi; Zhang Huili; Sun Mengtao

    2008-10-07

    A sensitive silver substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy is synthesized under multimode microwave irradiation. The microwave-assisted synthesis of the SERS-active substrate was carried out in a modified domestic microwave oven of 2450 MHz, and the reductive reaction was conducted in a polypropylene container under microwave irradiation with a power of 100 W for 5 min. Formaldehyde was employed as both the reductant and microwave absorber in the reductive process. The effects of different heating methods (microwave dielectric and conventional) on the properties of the SERS-active substrates were investigated. Samples obtained with 5 min of microwave irradiation at a power of 100 W have more well-defined edges, corners, and sharper surface features, while the samples synthesized with 1 h of conventional heating at 40 deg. C consist primarily of spheroidal nanoparticles. The SERS peak intensity of the {approx}1593 cm{sup -1} band of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid adsorbed on silver nanoparticles synthesized with 5 min of microwave irradiation at a power of 100 W is about 30 times greater than when it is adsorbed on samples synthesized with 1 h of conventional heating at 40 deg. C. The results of quantum chemical calculations are in good agreement with our experimental data. This method is expected to be utilized for the synthesis of other metal nanostructural materials.

  1. Comparative effect of microwaves and boiling on the denaturation of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Stroop, W.G.; Schaefer, D.C. )

    1989-11-01

    The effect of heat and microwave denaturation of small volumes of double-stranded plasmid DNA has been compared. Samples of intact plasmid DNA had plasmid DNA linearized by digestion with EcoRI were conventionally denatured in a boiling water bath or denatured by 2450 MHz of microwave energy for 0-300 s. Heat denaturation for periods longer than 120 s caused breakdown of linearized plasmid DNA; however, microwave denaturation for 10-300 s caused no apparent degradation of linearized DNA. Breakdown of DNA forms II and III was noted in plasmid DNA subjected to 300 s of either heat or microwave denaturation but breakdown of forms II and III occurred more quickly with heat than with microwave treatment. Microwave treatment was also found to be better than heat to denature 32P-labeled DNA probes subsequently used to detect homologous DNA samples immobilized on nitrocellulose filters. A microwave-treated 32P-labeled DNA probe was able to hybridize to DNA samples 20 times more dilute than a heat-treated 32P-labeled DNA probe. Depending on the form of DNA to be analyzed, these results indicate that small volumes of DNA solutions and radiolabeled DNA probes can be effectively denatured in a conventional microwave oven.

  2. Orthodontic instrument sterilization with microwave irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yezdani, Arif; Mahalakshmi, Krishnan; Padmavathy, Kesavaram

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of microwave sterilization of orthodontic instruments and molar bands immersed in plain distilled water with and without oral rinse, and to ascertain the minimum time of exposure required to sterilize. Materials and Methods: The orthodontic instruments (hinged and nonhinged), molar bands and mouth mirrorsused in the patient 's mouth were selected for the study. The instruments were divided into two groups – Group I with oral rinse-set A (0.01% chlorhexidine gluconate) and set B (0.025% betadine) and Group II (included sets C and D without oral rinse). The instruments of set A, B and C were microwaved at 2,450 MHz, 800 W for 5 min, whereas, set D was microwaved for 10 min at the same above mentioned specifications. The efficacy of sterilization was assessed by stab inoculation of the instruments onto trypticase soya agar plates. The plates were checked for bacterial growth following incubation at 37 °C for 24 h. For sterility control,Geobacillus stearothermophilus (MTCC 1518) was included. Results: No growth was observed in the plates that were inoculated with the microwaved orthodontic instruments of sets A, B and D, whereas scanty bacterial growth was observed in the plates inoculatedwith the microwaved set C instruments. Conclusion: Effective sterilization was achieved when the orthodontic instruments and molar bands were immersed in distilled water without oral rinse and microwaved for 10 min as also for those that were immersed in distilled water with oral rinse and microwaved for 5 min. PMID:26015686

  3. Behavioral and autonomic thermoregulation in hamsters during microwave-induced heat exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, C.J.; Long, M.D.; Fehlner, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    Preferred ambient temperature (Ta) and ventilatory frequency were measured in free-moving hamsters exposed to 2450-MHz microwaves. A waveguide exposure system that permits continuous monitoring of the absorbed heat load accrued from microwave exposure was imposed with a longitudinal temperature gradient which allowed hamsters to select their preferred Ta. Ventilatory frequency was monitored remotely by analysing the rhythmic shifts in unabsorbed microwave energy passing down the waveguide. Without microwave exposure hamsters selected an average T2 of 30.2 C. This preferred Ta did not change until the rate of heat absorption (SAR) from microwave exposure exceeded approx. 2 W kg-1. In a separate experiment, a SAR of 2.0 W kg-1 at a Ta of 30C was shown to promote an average 0.5 C increase in colonic temperature. Hamsters maintained their ventilatory frequency at baseline levels by selecting a cooler Ta during microwave exposure. These data support previous studies suggesting that during thermal stress behavioral thermo-regulation (i.e. preferred Ta) takes prescedence over autonomic thermoregulation (i.e. ventilatory frequency). It is apparent that selecting a cooler Ta is a more efficient and/or effective than autonomic thermoregulation for dissipating a heat load accrued from microwave exposure.

  4. Development of a microwave clothes dryer: Interim report 4. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Lenz, R.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of the project is to investigate the microwave drying of clothes and to produce data that potential manufacturers can use in developing marketable microwave dryers. This is an interim report covering activities in 1994, the fifth year of the project. During 1994, three field test dryers were completed, two residential models and one commercial subscale model. All of these dryers operated at a microwave frequency of 2,450 MHz, which is the frequency of home microwave ovens and ovens used in fastfood outlets. Consequently, magnetron tubes for these high-production items are inexpensive. The residential dryers were tested according to the Department of Energy protocols and were 15% more efficient than a top-of-the-line conventional electric dryer. They were also 14% faster. Extensive testing was done to assure that the hazard-detection (sniffer) system would sense degradation of the lighter and shut down the dryer before a fire could occur. Numerous butane lighters were heated to destruction in a microwave oven to examine their failure modes. Lighters were placed in microwave dryers equipped with hazard-detection systems; these systems always detected incipient problems before any fire hazard could occur.

  5. Numerical Analysis of Heat Transfer Characteristics in Microwave Heating of Magnetic Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Park, Chong-Lyuck; Kim, Byoung-Gon; Onyedika, Gerald

    2012-03-01

    A numerical simulation of heat transfer during the microwave heating process of magnetite, which is a two-dimensional (2-D) magnetic dielectric, subjected to heat conduction, convection, and radiation was performed. The heat transfer process was modeled using an explicit finite-difference approach, and the temperature profiles for different heating parameters were generated through developing a code in Mathematica 7.0 (Wolfram Research, Inc., Champaign, IL). The temperature in the sample increases rapidly in 1 minute and nonuniform temperature distribution inside the object is observed. An obvious temperature hot spot is formed in the corner of the predicted temperature profile initially, which shifts to the center of the object as heating power increases. Microwave heating at 915 MHz exhibits better heating uniformity than 2450 MHz mainly because of the larger microwave penetration depth. It is also observed that the heating homogeneity in the object can be improved by reducing the dimension of object. The effects of heating time, microwave power, microwave frequency, and object dimension need to be considered to obtain high heating performance and avoid/minimize thermal runaway resulting from temperature nonuniformity in large-scale microwave heating.

  6. Effects of low-level microwave irradiation on hippocampal and frontal cortical choline uptake are classically conditionable

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1987-08-01

    In previous research, we found that sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the rat was lowered after acute (45 min) exposure to low-level 2450-MHz pulsed microwaves (power density 1 mW/cm2; average whole body specific absorption rate, 0.6 W/kg; 2 mu sec pulses, 500 pps). In the present experiment, we investigated developments of tolerance and classical conditioning to these effects of microwaves. Rats were exposed to microwaves in cylindrical waveguides in 10 daily sessions (45 min per session). In an 11th session, we subjected the rats to either microwave (study of tolerance) or sham exposure (study of conditioned effect) for 45 min, and immediately measured choline uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. We found that tolerance, a decrease in response to microwaves, developed to the effect of microwaves on choline uptake in the hippocampus, but not in the frontal cortex. Conditioned effects were also observed: an increase in choline uptake in the hippocampus and a decrease in uptake in the frontal cortex. These data suggest that the effects of microwaves on choline uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex are classically conditionable, probably to cues in the exposure environment.

  7. Combined effect of microwave and activated carbon on the remediation of polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xitao; Yu, Gang

    2006-04-01

    The application of microwave and activated carbon for the treatment of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contaminated soil was explored in this study with a model compound of 2,4,5-trichlorobiphenyl (PCB29). PCB-contaminated soil was treated in a quartz reactor by microwave irradiation at 2450MHz with the addition of granular activated carbon (GAC). In this procedure, GAC acted as microwave absorbent for reaching high temperature and reductant for dechlorination. A sheltered type-K thermocouple was applied to record the temperature rising courses. It was shown that the addition of GAC could effectively promote the temperature rising courses. The determination of PCB residues in soil by gas chromatography (GC) revealed that rates of PCB removal were highly dependent on microwave power, soil moisture content, and the amount of GAC added. GC with mass spectrum (MS) detector and ion chromatography were employed for the analysis of degradation intermediates and chlorine ions, respectively. It was suggested that microwave irradiation with the assistance of activated carbon might be a potential technology for the remediation of PCB-contaminated soil. PMID:16213557

  8. Effects of continuous and pulsed chronic microwave exposure on rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chung-Kwang; Guy, Arthur W.; McDougall, John A.; Han, Lock-Fong

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen young adult New Zealand rabbits (nine males, nine females) were equally divided into three groups. One group was exposed to CW 2450-MHz fields at an incident power density of 1.5 mW/cm2 for 2 hours daily for 3 months. Another group was exposed to pulsed fields with pulses of 10 μ s duration occurring 100 times per second. The third group was sham exposed. Each rabbit was placed in a Plexiglas cage and exposed in a miniature plane wave exposure chamber. An S band horn was mounted 1 m above the animal. Thermographic data showed a peak specific absorption rate of 1.64 W/kg in the head and 2.1 W/kg in the back. Body weights were measured every other day. Electroencephalogram and evoked potentials were recorded weekly via implanted carbon-loaded Teflon electrodes. Blood samples were taken monthly for hematological, chemical, and morphological studies. Eyes were examined for cataract formation. Before the animals were sacrificed, apomorphine-induced behavioral excitation and hyperthermia were studied. Finally, pathological examinations on many tissues and organs were performed. Statistically, there were no significant differences in measured parameters observed between the exposed and sham animals.

  9. Blood-brain barrier alteration after microwave-induced hyperthermia is purely a thermal effect: I. Temperature and power measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, E.; Salcman, M.; Broadwell, R.D. )

    1991-03-01

    The effect of microwave-induced hyperthermia on the blood-brain barrier was studied in 21 Sprague-Dawley rats. Under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia, animals were place in a stereotactic frame, and an interstitial microwave antenna operating at 2450 MHz was inserted in a bony groove drilled parallel to the sagittal suture. Some antennae were equipped with an external cooling jacket. Temperature measurements were made lateral to the antenna by fluoroptical thermometry, and power was calculated from the time-temperature profile. Five minutes prior to termination of microwave irradiation, horseradish peroxidase (1 mg/20 g body weight) was injected intravenously. Extravasation of horseradish peroxidase was observed in brain tissue heated above 44.3 degrees C for 30 minutes and at 42.5 degrees C for 60 minutes. Microwave irradiation failed to open the blood-brain barrier when brain temperatures were sustained below 40.3 degrees C by the cooling system. Extravasation of blood-borne peroxidase occurred at sites of maximal temperature elevation, even when these did not coincide with the site of maximum power density. The data suggest that microwave-induced hyperthermia is an effective means for opening the blood-brain barrier and that the mechanism is not related to the nonthermal effect of microwaves.

  10. Novel microwave applicators for thermal therapy, ablation, and hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Clegg, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Microwave applicators are becoming more prevalent in cancer ablation therapy due to factors of penetration, high power, and shortened treatment time. These applicators create the largest zones of necrosis of available energy sources. Progress has been made both with interstitial applicators for surgical, laparoscopic, or radiological approaches, as well as surface applicators that provide hemostasis or precoagulation prior to resection. Most commonly, the applicators operate at 915 MHz or 2450 MHz, and are well matched to tissue. Surgical applicators are as large as 5.6 mm and have the capability to operate at 100-200 W. With smaller applicators, internal cooling may be required to avoid heating sensitive skin surfaces if used percutaneously or laparoscopically. With the interstitial applicators, animal studies have shown a strong relationship between power and ablation volume, including reaching a steady-state plateau in performance based more on power level and less on time. As shown in-vivo, MW surface applicators are very efficient in surface coagulation for hemostasis or precoagulation and in the treatment of surface breaking lesions. These applicators are also capable of deep penetration as applied from the surface. Characteristic treatment times for interstitial applicators are four minutes and for surface applicators, one minute or less is sufficient. Examples will be shown of multi-organ results with surface coagulation using high-power microwaves. Finally, future trends will be discussed that include treatment planning, multiple applicators, and navigation.

  11. Studies on microwave and blood-brain barrier interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.C.; Lin, M.F.

    1980-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at correlating changes of blood-brain-barrier permeability with the quantity and distribution of absorbed microwave energy inside the brain of adult Wistar rats anesthetized by sodium pentobarbital. Through use of thermographic methods and a direct-contact applicator at the animal's head, the pattern of absorbed microwave energy was determined. Indwelling catheters were placed in the femoral vein and in the left external carotid artery. Evans blue and sodium fluorescein in isotonic saline were used as visual indicators of barrier permeation. Exposure to pulsed 2,450-MHz radiation for 20 min at average power densities of 0.5, 1, 5, 20, 145 or 1,000 mW/cm2, which resulted in average specific absorption rates (SARs) of 0.04, 0.08, 0.4, 1.6, 11.5 or 80.0 mW/g in the brain, did not produce staining, except in the pineal body, the pituitary gland, and the choroid plexus - regions that normally are highly permeable. Except for these regions, staining was also absent in the brains of sham-exposed animals. The rectal temperature, as monitored by a copper-constantan thermocouple, showed a maximum increase of less than 0.75 degrees C from a mean pre-exposure temperature of 36.6 degrees C. The highest brain temperature recorded in a similar group of animals using a thickfilm carbon thermistor was less than 41.0 degrees C.

  12. Tolazoline decreases survival time during microwave-induced lethal heat stress in anesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jauchem, J.R.; Chang, K.S.; Frei, M.R.

    1996-03-01

    Effects of {alpha}-adrenergic antagonists have been studied during environmental heating but not during microwave-induced heating. Tolazoline may exert some of its effects via {alpha}-adrenergic blockade. In the present study, ketamine-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2450-MHz microwaves at an average power density of 60 mW/cm{sup 2} (whole-body specific absorption rate of approximately 14 W/kg) until lethal temperatures were attained. The effects of tolazoline (10 mg/kg body weight) on physiological responses (including changes in body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate) were examined. Survival time was significantly shorter in the tolazoline group than in saline-treated animals. In general, heart rate and blood pressure responses were similar to those that occur during environmental heat stress. Heart rate, however, was significantly elevated in animals that received tolazoline, both before and during terminal microwave exposure. It is possible that changes associated with the elevated heart rate (e.g., less cardiac filling) in tolazoline-treated animals resulted in greater susceptibility to microwave-induced heating and the lower survival time. 47 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Naltrexone pretreatment blocks microwave-induced changes in central cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Wen, Y.F.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Repeated exposure of rats to pulsed, circularly polarized microwaves (2,450-MHz, 2-microseconds pulses at 500 pps, power density 1 mW/cm2, at an averaged, whole-body SAR of 0.6 W/kg) induced biphasic changes in the concentration of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the central nervous system. An increase in receptor concentration occurred in the hippocampus of rats subjected to ten 45-min sessions of microwave exposure, whereas a decrease in concentration was observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats exposed to ten 20-min sessions. These findings, which confirm earlier work in the authors' laboratory, were extended to include pretreatment of rats with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone (1 mg/kg, IP) before each session of exposure. The drug treatment blocked the microwave-induced changes in cholinergic receptors in the brain. These data further support the authors' hypothesis that endogenous opioids play a role in the effects of microwaves on central cholinergic systems.

  14. Effects of exposure to microwaves on cellular immunity and placental steroids in pregnant rats.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, H; Seto, T; Nagase, H; Yoshida, M; Dan, S; Ogino, K

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Microwaves produce various detrimental changes based on actions of heat or non-specific stress, although the effects of microwaves on pregnant organisms has not been uniform. This study was designed to clarify the effect of exposure to microwaves during pregnancy on endocrine and immune functions. METHODS: Natural killer cell activity and natural killer cell subsets in the spleen were measured, as well as some endocrine indicators in blood--corticosterone and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) as indices of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis--beta-endorphin, oestradiol, and progesterone in six female virgin rats and six pregnant rats (nine to 11 days gestation) exposed to microwaves at 10 mW/cm2 incident power density at 2450 MHz for 90 minutes. The same measurements were performed in control rats (six virgin and six pregnant rats). RESULTS: Skin temperature in virgin and pregnant rats increased immediately after exposure to microwaves. Although splenic activity of natural killer cells and any of the subset populations identified by the monoclonal antibodies CD16 and CD57 did not differ in virgin rats with or without exposure to microwaves, pregnant rats exposed to microwaves showed a significant reduction of splenic activity of natural killer cells and CD16+CD57-. Although corticosterone and ACTH increased, and oestradiol decreased in exposed virgin and pregnant rats, microwaves produced significant increases in beta-endorphin and progesterone only in pregnant rats. CONCLUSIONS: Microwaves at the power of 10 mW/cm2 produced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and increased oestradiol in both virgin and pregnant rats, suggesting that microwaves greatly stress pregnant organisms. These findings in pregnant rats suggest that--with exposure to microwaves--pregnancy induces immunosuppression, which could result in successful maintainance of pregnancy. This enhancement of adaptability to heat stress with pregnancy may be mediated by

  15. Mechanisms of microwave-induced blood-brain barrier alterations. Final report 1 Apr 1978-31 Aug 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.C.

    1980-09-01

    This investigation was designed to study the mechanisms of interaction between microwaves and the blood-brain barrier and was aimed at correlating changes of blood-brain barrier permeability with the quantity and distribution of absorbed microwave energy inside the brain of adult Wistar rats under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia. Through use of thermographic methods and a direct-contact applicator at the animal's head, the pattern of absorbed microwave energy was determined. Indwelling catheters were placed in the femoral vein. Evans blue in isotonic saline were used as a visual indicator of barrier permeation. Irradiation with pulsed 2450-MHz microwaves for 20 min at average power densities of 0.5 to 2600 mW/squared, which resulted in average specific absorption rates (SARs) of 0.04 to 200 mW/g in the brain, did not produce staining, except in regions that normally are highly permeable. When the incident power density was increased to 3000 mW/squared (SAR of 240 mW/g), extravasation of Evans blue could be seen in the cortex, hippocampus and midbrain.

  16. Influence of microwaves on the beating rate of isolated rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, K.C.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that microwave exposure can decrease the beating rate of isolated rat hearts. These experiments were conducted at room temperature and with the hearts exposed to air. We observed arrhythmia frequently at room temperature, and the variation of heart beat was so large that it makes the results difficult to reproduce. Therefore, we employed a double-circulating system to provide perfusion through the coronary artery and around the outside of the heart to maintain the rat hearts at 37.7 degrees C. No arrhythmias were observed in our experiments, and the hearts were beating for at least 1 h. The effects of 16-Hz modulated 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (10 microseconds, 100 pps) on the beating rate of 50 isolated rat hearts were studied. Results showed no statistically significant changes of heart rate in exposed groups at SARs of 2 and 10 W/kg compared with the control group. The effect seen at 200 W/kg was shown to be similar to that resulting from heating the heart.

  17. Low-level microwave irradiation and central cholinergic activity: a dose-response study

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    Rats were irradiated with circularly polarized, 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (2-microseconds pulses, 500 pulses per second (pps)) for 45 min in the cylindrical waveguide system of Guy et al. Immediately after exposure, sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake, an indicator of cholinergic activity in neural tissue, was measured in the striatum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. The power density was set to give average whole-body specific absorption rates (SAR) of 0.3, 0.45, 0.6, 0.75, 0.9, or 1.2 W/kg to study the dose-response relationship between the rate of microwave energy absorption and cholinergic activity in the different areas of the brain. Decrease in choline uptake was observed in the striatum at a SAR of 0.75 W/kg and above, whereas for the frontal cortex and hippocampus, decreases in choline uptake were observed at a SAR of 0.45 W/kg and above. No significant effect was observed in the hypothalamus at the irradiation power densities studied. The probit analysis was used to determine the SAR50 in each brain area, i.e., the SAR at which 50% of maximum response was elicited. SAR50 values for the striatum, frontal cortex, and hippocampus were 0.65, 0.38, and 0.44 W/kg, respectively.

  18. The killing activity of microwaves on some non-sporogenic and sporogenic medically important bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Najdovski, L; Dragas, A Z; Kotnik, V

    1991-12-01

    The killing activity of microwaves of 2450 MHz frequency and 325 W, 650 W and 1400 W power on some bacterial strains was investigated. Vegetative strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes Group A, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis and spores of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillis stearothermophilus in aqueous suspensions were exposed to 325 W and 650 W waves for different lengths of time. Enterococcus faecalis and spores of B. subtilis and B. stearothermophilus were exposed additionally to 1400 W waves in aqueous and 'dried' suspensions. Vegetative bacteria were promptly killed in 5 min or less, E. faecalis being slightly more resistant. Bacterial spores were only killed in aqueous suspension when a 1400 W setting was used for 10 to 20 min. Bacterial spores adhering to the tube walls after the aqueous suspension was poured out were reduced in number. We assume that the conventional microwave ovens available on the market may be used for a high level of disinfection but not for sterilization, and only then if sufficient water is present. PMID:1686036

  19. A new system of microwave ablation at 2450 MHz: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mangano, Alberto; Floridi, Chiara; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Biondi, Antonio; Duka, Ejona; Lucchina, Natalie; Lianos, Georgios D; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of the application of the new system (Emprint Microwave Ablation System, Covidien Boulder, CO, USA) and to identify its advantages. In particular the attention was focused to the spherical ablation zone obtained and its usefulness in terms of effectiveness. The new system is composed of: a 2450 MHz generator that delivers a maximum power of 100 W, a fiberglass antenna and a pump for internally cooled antenna. Ten liver nodules (8 hepatocellular carcinomas and 2 metastasis) were percutaneously treated (mean diameter 24.9 mm, range 16-35 mm). Technical success, ablation duration time, overall procedure time and safety were registered. To define the shape of the ablation zone, multiplanar reformatting (MPR) was performed. Roundness index transverse was calculated: a value near 1 represents a more spherical ablation zone shape, and a value distant from 1 implies an oval configuration. Technical success was 100%. Mean ablation time was of 3.85 min (range 3-5 min), mean overall procedure time was 30.5 min (range 25-40 min). No major complications were recorded. Roundness index transverse presented a mean value of 0.94, meaning that a spherical shape of ablation zone was achieved. One of the most promising innovations of the new microwave technology is the spherical shape of the ablation volume that could be related with an improving of the effectiveness and safety. PMID:25776064

  20. The As removal from arsenopyrite-bearing mine waste by microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Myung, Eun Ji; Hack Lim, Dae; Kim, Bong Ju; Park, Cheon Young

    2016-04-01

    Penalties incurred by miners for arsenic in concentrates have increased significantly because the removal and disposal of arsenic is difficult and costly for smelters and because the environmental challenges are increasing worldwide. Typically miners incur penalties on arsenic in concentrates above 0.2% As with smelter rejection limits of 0.5%. Therefore, finding an effective solution for removing As during primary mining activities is necessary to avoid penalty. The aim of this study was to investigate the As removal from mine waste using microwave process. The mine waste samples were characterized by chemical and XRD analysis. To determine of As removal from the microwave experiments, aqua regia digestion was performed according to Korean environmental standard method(KESM) and the As removal effect were evaluated using the standard EPA toxicity characteristic leaching procedure(TCLP, EPA 1311 method). The result of mineralogical character for mine waste using XRD was detected arsenopyrite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite and quartz. The chemical analysis of As, Pb, Zn contents in the mine waste measured 13,896.0, 896.1 and 1,054.6 mg/kg, respectively. The As removal of experiments was conducted to examine the effects of microwave exposure time(1~15min). The results showed that the As removal in mine waste (exposure time = 10min) was 92.90%, and the temperature of mine waste by microwave heating was 886℃. The TCLP leaching of treated mine waste by microwave measured values were below the EPA's current regulatory threshold(As, Pb, Zn : 5 mg/L). The optimum condition of microwave exposure for As removal from arsenopyrite-bearing mine waste was obtained at 800W, 2450MHz, 10min. Acknowledgment : This work was supported by the Energy and Resources Engineering Program Grant funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy, Korea

  1. Influence of microwaves treatment of rapeseed on phenolic compounds and canolol content.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Zheng, Chang; Zhou, Qi; Liu, Changsheng; Li, Wenlin; Huang, Fenghong

    2014-02-26

    Rapeseeds were treated with microwaves under 800 W for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 min at a frequency of 2450 MHz, and oil was extracted with a press to investigate the influence on phenolic compounds, including sinapine, the main free phenolic acids, and canolol content in the rapeseeds and oil from them. The results indicated that sinapine and sinapic acid was the main phenolic compound and free phenolic acid in the rapeseed, respectively, and canolol was the main phenolic compound in the oil from rapeseed by cold press. Microwave treatment significantly influenced phenolic compounds content in the rapeseeds and oil from them. The sinapine, sinapic acid, and canolol content in rapeseed first increased and then decreased depending on the period of microwave radiation (p < 0.05). The canolol content of 7 min microwave pretreatment rapeseed increased to the maximum and was approximately six times greater than that of the unroasted rapeseed. The amount of canolol formed was significantly correlated with the content of sinapic acid and sinapine (for sinapic acid, r = -0.950, p < 0.001, for sinapine, r = -0.828, p < 0.05) and also the loss of sinapic acid and sinapine (for sinapic acid, r = 0.997, p < 0.001, for sinapine, r = 0.952, p < 0.05) during roasting. There were differences in the transfer rate of difference phenolic compounds to the oil extracted by press. Almost all of the sinapine remained in the cold-pressed cake and only 1.4-2.7% of the sinapic acid, whereas approximately 56-83% of the canolol was transferred to the oil. The transfer ratio of canolol significantly increased with microwave radiation time (p < 0.001). Microwave pretreatment of rapeseed benefited improving the oxidative stability of oil. PMID:24476101

  2. Effects of Low-Dose Microwave on Healing of Fractures with Titanium Alloy Internal Fixation: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Fu, Tengfei; Jiang, Lan; Bai, Yuehong

    2013-01-01

    Background Microwave is a method for improving fracture repair. However, one of the contraindications for microwave treatment listed in the literature is surgically implanted metal plates in the treatment field. The reason is that the reflection of electromagnetic waves and the eddy current stimulated by microwave would increase the temperature of magnetic implants and cause heat damage in tissues. Comparing with traditional medical stainless steel, titanium alloy is a kind of medical implants with low magnetic permeability and electric conductivity. But the effects of microwave treatment on fracture with titanium alloy internal fixation in vivo were not reported. The aim of this article was to evaluate the security and effects of microwave on healing of a fracture with titanium alloy internal fixation. Methods Titanium alloy internal fixation systems were implanted in New Zealand rabbits with a 3.0 mm bone defect in the middle of femur. We applied a 30-day microwave treatment (2,450MHz, 25W, 10 min per day) to the fracture 3 days after operation. Temperature changes of muscle tissues around implants were measured during the irradiation. Normalized radiographic density of the fracture gap was measured on the 10th day and 30th day of the microwave treatment. All of the animals were killed after 10 and 30 days microwave treatment with histologic and histomorphometric examinations performed on the harvested tissues. Findings The temperatures did not increase significantly in animals with titanium alloy implants. The security of microwave treatment was also supported by histology of muscles, nerve and bone around the implants. Radiographic assessment, histologic and histomorphometric examinations revealed significant improvement in the healing bone. Conclusion Our results suggest that, in the healing of fracture with titanium alloy internal fixation, a low dose of microwave treatment may be a promising method. PMID:24086626

  3. CW-pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J. C.

    1981-09-01

    An apparatus for generating a spatially coherent laser beam having both CW and pulsed modes is disclosed. The modes are generated in differing volumetric regions of a single gain medium excited by a continuous energy pump. The CW portion of the output beam passes from the gain medium through a partially transmissive output coupling. The pulsed modes in the output beam are created in the respective region of the gain medium when transition materials from a selected group are stimulated to undergo an abrupt change between their reflective and transmissive states. Either cavity dumped or Q-switched configurations can be created by selective and patterned location of the transition materials at the ends of the gain medium. Symmetric organization of the volumetric regions within the gain medium allows temporal superposition of the two modes while maintaining spatial distinctiveness within the laser beam generated.

  4. Colletotrichum gloeosporioides growth-no-growth interface after selected microwave treatments.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Morales, M E; Garcia, H S; López-Malo, A

    2009-07-01

    To study microwave heating for potential postharvest treatments against anthracnose disease, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides growth-no-growth response after selected microwave treatments (2,450 MHz) was fitted by using a logistic regression model. Evaluated variables were power level, exposure time, presence or absence of water in the medium during treatment, and incubation-observation time. Depending on the setting, the applied power ranged from 77.2 to 435.6 W. For the experiments on dry medium (mold spores over filter paper), exposure times were 1, 2, 3, or 4 min, whereas spores dispersed in potato dextrose agar, a wet medium, had exposure times of 3, 6, or 9 s. Growth (response = 1) or no growth (response = 0) was observed after two different incubation-observation times (4 or 10 days). As expected, high power levels and long exposure times resulted in complete inhibition of C. gloeosporioides spore germination. In a number of cases (such as low power levels and short treatment times), only a delay in mold growth was observed. Scanning electron micrographs showed signs of mycelia dehydration and structural collapse in the spores of the studied mold. Cell damage was attributed to heating during microwave exposure. Reduced logistic models included variables and interactions that significantly (P < 0.05) affected mold growth, and were able to predict the growth-no-growth response in at least 83% of the experimental conditions. Microwave treatments (4 min at any of the studied power levels in dry medium, and 9 s at power levels of 30% or more for wet medium) proved effective in the inhibition of C. gloeosporioides in model systems. These no-growth conditions will be tested further on fresh fruits in order to develop feasible postharvest microwave treatments. PMID:19681265

  5. Thermal effect of microwave antenna radiation on a generic model of thyroid gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavriloaia, Gheorghe; Gavriloaia, Mariuca-Roxana; Ghemigean, Adina-Mariana

    2010-11-01

    The rapid diffusion of wireless communication systems has caused an increased concern for the potential detrimental effects on human health deriving from exposure to electromagnetic field. It penetrates the body and acts on all the organs, altering the cell membrane potential and the distribution of ions and dipoles. The thyroid gland is one of the most exposed vital organs and may be a target for electromagnetic radiation. This paper presents the computed temperature and specific absorption rate inside to a generic model of a human thyroid using signals radiated by an antenna operating in the 2450 MHz band and the power density levels up to 100 W/cm2. Calculations were carried out using the Finite Difference Time Domain method for the solving of two coupled differential equations, Maxwell and Pennes. The results show that the temperature can rise up to very dangerous levels, i.e., 46 °C, in a very short time. The estimated temperature distribution in the human thyroid due to exposure from microwave signals can be used to design the dangerous aria for personal working around high power emitted antenna and for medical applications.

  6. Microwave-induced carbon nanotubes catalytic degradation of organic pollutants in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Xue, Shuang; Song, Youtao; Shen, Manli; Zhang, Zhaohong; Yuan, Tianxin; Tian, Fangyuan; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a new catalytic degradation technology using microwave induced carbon nanotubes (MW/CNTs) was proposed and applied in the treatment of organic pollutants in aqueous solution. The catalytic activity of three CNTs of 10-20nm, 20-40nm, and 40-60nm diameters were compared. The results showed that organic pollutants such as methyl orange (MO), methyl parathion (MP), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), bisphenol A (BPA), and methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution could be degraded effectively and rapidly in MW/CNTs system. CNTs with diameter of 10-20nm exhibited the highest catalytic activity of the three CNTs under MW irradiation. Further, complete degradation was obtained using 10-20nm CNTs within 7.0min irradiation when 25mL MO solution (25mg/L), 1.2g/L catalyst dose, 450W, 2450MHz, and pH=6.0 were applied. The rate constants (k) for the degradation of SDBS, MB, MP, MO and BPA using 10-20nm CNTs/MW system were 0.726, 0.679, 0.463, 0.334 and 0.168min(-1), respectively. Therefore, this technology may have potential application for the treatment of targeted organic pollutants in wastewaters. PMID:26937869

  7. CW laser light condensation.

    PubMed

    Zhurahov, Michael; Bekker, Alexander; Levit, Boris; Weill, Rafi; Fischer, Baruch

    2016-03-21

    We present a first experimental demonstration of classical CW laser light condensation (LC) in the frequency (mode) domain that verifies its prediction (Fischer and Weill, Opt. Express20, 26704 (2012)). LC is based on weighting the modes in a noisy environment in a loss-gain measure compared to an energy (frequency) scale in Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). It is characterized by a sharp transition from multi- to single-mode oscillation, occurring when the spectral-filtering (loss-trap) has near the lowest-loss mode ("ground-state") a power-law dependence with an exponent smaller than 1. An important meaning of the many-mode LC system stems from its relation to lasing and photon-BEC. PMID:27136845

  8. Microwave Sterilization in School Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynn, Brian; Dixon, Angela

    1988-01-01

    Described are two investigations carried out in a high school biology department using a domestic microwave oven to compare the relative attributes of the autoclave and microwave oven in school use. Discussed are equipment, methods, and results of each investigation. (Author/CW)

  9. Phonological and Phonetic Asymmetries of Cw Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Yunju

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates the relationship between the phonological distribution of Cw combinations, and the acoustic/perceptual distinctiveness between syllables with plain C onsets and with Cw combination onsets. Distributional asymmetries of Cw combinations discussed in this thesis include the avoidance of Cw combinations in the labial consonant…

  10. Granular activated carbon adsorption and microwave regeneration for the treatment of 2,4,5-trichlorobiphenyl in simulated soil-washing solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xitao; Yu, Gang; Han, Wenya

    2007-08-25

    The treatment of 2,4,5-trichlorobiphenyl (PCB29) in simulated soil-washing solution by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and microwave (MW) regeneration was investigated in this study. The PCB29 adsorption process was carried out in a continuous flow adsorption column. After adsorption, the PCB29-loaded GAC was dried at 103 degrees C, and regenerated in a quartz reactor by 2450MHz MW irradiation at 700W for 5min. The efficacy of this procedure was analyzed by determining the rates and amounts of PCB29 adsorbed in successive adsorption/MW regeneration cycles. Effects of the regeneration on the textural properties and the PCB29 adsorption capacity of GAC were examined. It was found that after several adsorption/MW regeneration cycles, the adsorption rate of GAC increased, whereas, the adsorption capacity decreased, which could be explained according to the change of textural properties. Most of the PCB29 adsorbed on GAC was degraded within 3min under MW irradiation, and the analysis of degradation products by GC-MS demonstrated that PCB29 experienced dechlorination during this treatment. PMID:17368933

  11. Absorption line CW EPR using an amplitude modulated longitudinal field.

    PubMed

    Fedin, Matvey; Gromov, Igor; Schweiger, Arthur

    2004-11-01

    In standard continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) experiments, the first derivative of absorption lines is detected. This type of a line shape is caused by the magnetic field modulation and is usually an undesired feature, since the sensitivity of CW-EPR drastically decreases with increasing linewidth. A new approach is introduced, which allows for the measurement of absorption line EPR spectra in systems with broad inhomogeneous lines. The method makes use of multiple-photon transitions that are induced in spin systems when a transverse microwave and a longitudinal radio frequency field are simultaneously applied. The absorption lines are obtained by using amplitude modulation of the radio frequency field and slight saturation of the spectral lines. The basics of the new approach are discussed and experimental examples are given. PMID:15504685

  12. ABSORPTION OF MICROWAVE RADIATION BY THE ANESTHETIZED RAT: ELECTROMAGNETIC AND THERMAL HOTSPOTS IN BODY AND TAIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anatomic variability in the deposition of radio frequency electromagnetic energy in mammals as been well documented. ecent study [D'Andrea et al. 1985] reported specific absorption rat (SAR) hotspots in the brain, rectum, and tail of rat carcasses exposed to 360- and to 2,450-MHz...

  13. TEMPERATURE REGULATION IN THE MOUSE AND HAMSTER EXPOSED TO MICROWAVES IN HOT ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colonic temperature was measured in naive BALB/c mice and golden hamsters immediately following 90 min exposures to 2450 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 32.2 or 35 C (dry air). Exposures were performed in a temperature-controlled waveguide whic...

  14. Resonant and Ground Experimental Study on the Microwave Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; He, Hongqing; Mao, Genwang; Qu, Kun; Tang, Jinlan; Han, Xianwei

    2002-01-01

    chemistry. Therefore, the application of EP for the attitude control and station keeping of satellite, the propulsion of deep space exploration craft allows to reduce substantially the mass of on-board propellant and the launching cost. The EP research is now receiving high interest everywhere. microwave generating subsystem, the propellant supplying subsystem and the resonator (the thruster). Its principle is that the magnetron of the microwave generating subsystem transfers electric energy into microwave energy at given frequency which is introduced into a resonant cavity. Microwave will resonate within the cavity when it is adjusted. When the propellant gas (N2, Ar, He, NH3 or H2) is put into the cavity and coupled with microwave energy at the maximal electric intensity place, it will be broken down to form free-floating plasma, which flows from nozzle with high speed to produce thrust. Its characteristic is high efficiency, simple power supply and without electrode ablation, its specific impulse is greater than arcjet. 2450MHz, have been developed. The microwave generating subsystem and resonator of lower power MPT, 70-200W, are coaxial. The resonator with TEM resonating mode is section of coaxial wave-guide, of which one end is shorted, another is semi-opened. The maximal electric intensity field is in the lumped capacity formed between the end surface of inner conductor, retracting in the cavity, and the semi-opened surface of outer conductor. It provides favorable condition for gas breakdown. The microwave generating system and resonator of middle power MPT, 500-1,000W, are wave-guide cavity. The resonator with TM011 resonating mode is cylinder wave-guide cavity, of which two end surface are shorted. The distribution of electromagnetic field is axial symmetry, its maximal electric intensity field locates on the axis and closes to the exit of nozzle, where the propellant gas is breakdown to form free floating plasma. The plasma is free from the wall of

  15. Kinetics and scaling of gain and lasing in a 1-5 kW microwave discharge oxygen iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, Wilson T.; Lee, Seonkyung; Hicks, Adam J.; Konen, Ian M.; Plumb, Emily P.; Oakes, David B.; Davis, Steven J.

    2010-02-01

    Scaling of Electric Oxygen-Iodine Laser (EOIL) systems to higher powers requires extension of electric discharge powers into the kW range and beyond, with high efficiency and singlet oxygen yield. This paper describes the implementation of a moderate-power (1 to 5 kW) microwave discharge at 30 to 70 Torr pressure in a supersonic flow reactor designed for systematic investigations of the scaling of gain and lasing with power and flow conditions. The 2450 MHz microwave discharge is confined near the flow axis by a swirl flow. The discharge effluent, containing active species including O2(a1▵), O(3P), and O3, passes through a 2-D flow duct equipped with a supersonic nozzle and cavity. I2 is injected upstream of the supersonic nozzle. The apparatus is water-cooled, and is modular to permit a variety of inlet, nozzle, and optical configurations. A comprehensive suite of optical emission and absorption diagnostics monitors the absolute concentrations of O2(a), O(3P), O3, I2, I(2P3/2), I(2P1/2), small-signal gain, and temperature in both the subsonic and supersonic flow streams. The experimental results include numerous observations of positive gain and lasing in supersonic flow, and the scaling of gain with a variety of flow and reaction rate conditions. The results are compared with kinetics modeling predictions to highlight key discrepancies as well as areas of agreement. The observed gains are generally lower than the predicted values, due in part to chemical kinetics effects and also due to mixing limitations specific to the reagent injection design. We discuss in detail the observed effects related to O-atom chemistry, and their import for scaling the gain to higher levels. We also will present initial beam quality measurements.

  16. Interstitial microwave transition from hyperthermia to ablation: historical perspectives and current trends in thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Thomas P; Turner, Paul F; Hamilton, Brianne

    2010-01-01

    This work reviews the transition from hyperthermia to ablation for cancer treatment with interstitial microwave (MW) antennas. Early work utilising MW energy for thermal treatment of cancer tissue began in the late 1970s using single antennas applied interstitially or the use of multiple interstitial antennas driven with the same phase and equal power at 915 or 2450 MHz. The original antenna designs utilised monopole or dipole configurations. Early work in thermal therapy in the hyperthermia field eventually led to utilisation of these antennas and methods for MW ablation of tumours. Efforts to boost the radiated MW power levels while decreasing antenna shaft temperatures led to incorporation of internally cooled antennas for ablation. To address larger tumours, MW treatment utilised arrays that were simultaneously activated by either non-synchronous or synchronous phase operation, benefiting both hyperthermia and ablation strategies. Numerical modelling was used to provide treatment planning guidance for hyperthermia treatments and is expected to provide a similar benefit for ablation therapy. Although this is primarily a review paper, some new data are included. These new data show that three antennas with 2.5 cm spacing at 45 W/channel and 10 min resulted in a volume of 89.8 cm(3) when operated synchronously, but only 53.4 cm(3) non-synchronously. Efficiency was 1.1 (synchronous) versus 0.7 (non-synchronous). MW systems, treatment planning, and image guidance continue to evolve to provide better tools and options for clinicians and patients in order to provide better approach and targeting optimisation with the goal of improved treatment for the patient. PMID:20597625

  17. CW laser pumped emerald laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Lai, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    A CW laser-pumped emerald laser is reported. A 34 percent output power slope efficiency is observed with longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity. The laser has been tuned from 728.8 to 809.0 nm. Losses in emerald are larger than those of alexandrite determined in a similar cavity. The present data also indicate that the excited state absorption minimum is shifted from that of alexandrite. 13 references.

  18. First 200 kW CW operation of a 60 GHz gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jory, H.; Bier, R.; Evans, S.; Felch, K.; Fox, L.; Huey, H.; Shively, J.; Spang, S.

    1983-01-01

    The gyrotron is a microwave tube which employs the electron cyclotron maser interaction to produce high power output at millimeter wavelengths. It has important and growing applications for heating of plasmas in controlled thermonuclear fusion experiments. The Varian 60 GHz gyrotron has recently generated microwave power in excess of 200 kW during CW operation, wth excellent dynamic range and operating stability. This is the highest average power ever produced by a microwave tube in the millimeter wave region. A description of the gyrotron design and test results are presented.

  19. Discharge conditions for CW and pulse-modulated surface-wave plasmas in low-temperature sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Terashita, F.; Nonaka, H.; Ogino, A.; Nagata, T.; Koide, Y.; Nanko, S.; Kurawaki, I.; Nagatsu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The discharge conditions required for low-temperature plasma sterilization were investigated using low-pressure surface-wave plasma (SWP). The discharge conditions for both continuous wave (CW) and pulse-modulated SWPs in low-temperature sterilization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus with a population of 1.5 × 106 and 3.0 × 106 were studied by varying the microwave input power from 500 W to 3 kW, and the effective plasma treatment time from 40 to 300 s. Results showed that sterilization was possible in a shorter treatment time using a higher microwave power for both CW and pulse-modulated SWPs. Pulse-modulated SWPs gave effective sterilization at a temperature roughly 10 to 20 °C below that of CW SWPs under the same average microwave power.

  20. Acute microwave irradiation and cataract formation in rabbits and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kramar, P; Harris, C; Emery, A F; Guy, A W

    1978-09-01

    Rabbits and monkeys were irradiated in the near field of a cavity-backed 2450 MHz resonant slot radiator, to determine the cataractogenic threshold. Rabbits developed cataracts at incident "apparent" power densities of 180 mW/cm2 (E2/120 pi, where E=rms/electric field strength). Monkeys sustained facial burns, but no lens damage, even at incident "apparent" power densities of 500 mW/cm2. These results were substantiated by computer thermal models. PMID:108401

  1. IMMUNOLOGICAL AND HEMATOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE POWER TRANSMISSION FROM A SATELLITE POWER SYSTEM (PART 1 AND PART 2)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two systems for exposing mice to 2450 MHz electromagnetic fields are described. The first system was used to expose mice dorsally to circularly polarized electromagnetic fields. The second system was a minature anechoic chamber modified from the original design. Mice were exposed...

  2. WHOLE-BODY DOSIMETRY OF MICROWAVE RADIATION IN SMALL ANIMALS: THE EFFECT OF BODY MASS AND EXPOSURE GEOMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Whole-body absorption of 2450-MHz radiation was measured in rats that ranged from 6 to 440 grams and mice that ranged from 30 to 50 grams. Simultaneous exposure of groups of animals in varying numbers and various configurations were made under free-field conditions in an electric...

  3. Rainfall and River Currents Retrieved from Microwave Backscatter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, W.J.; Keller, W.C.; Hayes, K.; Nystuen, J.; Spicer, K.

    2003-01-01

    The use of CW microwave sensors in yielding information on both river surface velocities and rain rates was discussed. Eight CW microwave sensors were installed at Cowlitz river in Western Washington State in the US. The sensors measured the river surface velocity via Doppler shifts at eight locations across the river. Comparison of the surface velocities derived from the sensors mounted on the bridge with those measured by current meters and acoustic sensors demonstrated good agreement.

  4. CW ultrasonic bolt tensioning monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A CW ultrasonic device is described for measuring frequency shifts of the peak of a mechanical resonance in a body. One application of the device is measuring the strain in a bolt, and other applications such as measuring the thickness of a body, measuring the depth of a flaw in a body, measuring the elongation of a body, and measuring changes in velocity of sound in a body. The body is connected, by means of a CW transducer, to electrical circuit means including a narrow band RF amplifier to form a closed loop feedback marginal oscillator that frequency locks the device to the peak of a mechanical resonance in the body. When the frequency of this peak changes, because of a physical change in the body, the frequency of the oscillator changes. The device includes an automatic frequency resonant peak tracker that produces a voltage that is related to a change in frequency of the oscillator. This voltage is applied to the RF amplifier to change the center of its frequency band to include the frequency of the peak and is a measure of the frequency shift.

  5. NBS-LASL cw microtron

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, S.; Cutler, R.I.; Debenham, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    The NBS-LASL racetrack microtron (RIM) is a joint research project of the National Bureau of Standards and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The project goals are to determine the feasibility of, and develop the necessary technology for building high-energy, high-current, continuous-beam (cw) electron accelerators using beam recirculation and room-temperature rf accelerating structures. To achieve these goals, a demonstration accelerator will be designed, constructed, and tested. Parameters of the demonstration RIM are: injection energy - 5 MEV; energy gain per pass -12 MeV; number of passes - 15; final beam energy - 185 MeV; maximum current 550 ..mu..A. One 450 kW cw klystron operating at 2380 MHz will supply rf power to both the injector linac and the main accelerating section of the RTM. The disk and washer standing wave rf structure being developed at LASL will be used. SUPERFISH calculations indicate that an effective shunt impedance (ZT) of about 100 M..cap omega../m can be obtained. Thus, rf power dissipation of 25 kW/m results in an energy gain of more than 1.5 MeV/m. Accelerators of this type should be attractive for many applications. At beam energies above about 50 MeV, an RTM should be considerably cheaper to build and operate than a conventional pulsed rf linac of the same maximum energy and time-average beam power. In addition, the RTM provides superior beam quality and a continuous beam which is essential for nuclear physics experiments requiring time-coincidence measurements between emitted particles.

  6. Design, fabrication and testing of a CFA for use in the solar power satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    A crossed field amplifier was designed to meet the performance objectives of high signal to noise ratio, an efficiency of 85%, a CW microwave power output of 5-8 kW, and a frequency of 2450 MHz. The signal to noise ratio achieved was better than 69 db/MHz in a 2000 MHz band centered on the carrier. High circuit efficiency of 97% and a sharp knee on voltage current characteristic were achieved. The basic problem of maintaining good transfer of heat to the external radiator while providing for adequate connections to input and output was solved. Maximum efficiency achieved was 70.5% and gain and power level were below objectives. An investigation of causes of reduced performance indicated the poor field pattern in the cathode anode interaction area of the tube was a major cause.

  7. GENETIC AND CELLULAR EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE RADIATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research program was initiated with the overall objective of determining genetic and cellular effects from exposure of unicellular organisms to selected frequencies of CW and pulsed microwave radiation which is prevalent in the biosphere. Several tester strains of the bacter...

  8. Installation of a cw radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.D.; Bolme, J.; Brown, V.

    1994-09-01

    Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) has had a long history of cw proton beam development for production of intense neutron sources and fissile fuel breeders. In 1986 CRL and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) entered into a collaborative effort to establish a base technologies program for the development of a cw radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ). The initial cw RFQ design had 50-keV proton injection energy with 600-keV output energy. The 75-mA design current at 600-keV beam energy was obtained in 1990. Subsequently, the RFQ output energy was increased to 1250 keV by replacing the RFQ vanes, still maintaining the 75-m A design current. A new 250-kW cw klystrode rf power source at 267-MHz was installed at CRL. By April of 1993, 55-mA proton beams had been accelerated to 1250 keV. Concurrent developments were taking place on proton source development and on 50-keV low-energy beam transport (LEBT) systems. Development of a dc, high-proton fraction ({ge} 70%) microwave ion source led to utilization of a single-solenoid RFQ direct injection scheme. It was decided to continue this cw RFQ demonstration project at Los Alamos when the CRL project was terminated in April 1993. The LANL goals are to find the current limit of the 1250-keV RFQ, better understand the beam transport properties through the single-solenoid focusing LEBT, continue the application of the cw klystrode tube technology to accelerators, and develop a two-solenoid LEBT which could be the front end of an Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT) linear accelerator.

  9. CW CO2 Laser Induced Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pola, Joseph

    1989-05-01

    CW CO2 laser driven reactions between sulfur hexafluoride and carbon oxide, carbon suboxide, carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide proceed at subatmospheric pressures and yield fluorinated carbon compounds and sulfur tetrafluoride. CW CO2 laser driven reactions of organic compounds in the presence of energy-conveying sulfur hexafluoride show reaction course different from that normally observed due to elimination of reactor hot surface effects. The examples concern the decomposition of polychlorohydrocarbons, 2-nitropropane, tert.-butylamine, allyl chloride, spirohexane, isobornyl acetate and the oxidation of haloolefins. CW CO2 laser induced fragmentation of 1-methyl-l-silacyclobutanes and 4-silaspiro(3.4)octane in the presence of sulfur hexafluoride is an effective way for preparation and deposition of stable organosilicon polymers.

  10. Cw operation of the FMIT RFQ accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Recently, we have achieved reliable cw operation of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. In addition to the operational experiences in achieving this status, some of the modifications of the vacuum system, cooling system, and rf structure are discussed. Preliminary beam-characterization results are presented. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  11. CW arc-lamp-pumped alexandrite lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, H.; Walling, J.C.; Wernikowski, T.; Harter, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    The performance characteristics of arc-lamp- (Xe and Hg) pumped, CW alexandrite lasers are described in detail. The modes of operation considered are free running, tuned, and repetitively Q-switched. The experimental arrangement and apparatus are also outlined. The experimental results are discussed in terms of a steady-state model, and the areas of agreement and difficulty are pointed out.

  12. A CW Gunn Diode Switching Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, Marco; Rosenbaum, Fred J.

    As part of a study of the application of communication satellites to educational development, certain technical aspects of such a system were examined. A current controlled bistable switching element using a CW Gunn diode is reported on here. With modest circuits switching rates of the order of 10 MHz have been obtained. Switching is initiated by…

  13. 2 MW CW RF load for gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Ives, R.; Marsden, David; Mizuhara, Max; Collins, George; Neilson, Jeff; Borchard, Philipp

    2011-07-01

    Final design and assembly are in progress for a 2MW CW RF load for gyrotrons. Such loads are required for testing high power gyrotrons for electron cyclotron heating of fusion plasmas. The research is building on experience with a 1 MW load to increase the power capability, reduce backscattered RF power, and improve the mechanical design. (author)

  14. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9–4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  15. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9-4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  16. Solar power satellite 50 kW VKS-7773 cw klystron evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larue, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    A test program for evaluating the electrical characteristics of a cw, 50 kW power output klystron at 2.45 GHz is described. The tube tested was an 8-cavity klystron, the VKS-7773 which had been in storage for seven years. Tests included preliminary testing of the tube, cold tests of microwave components, tests of the electromagnet, and first and second hot tests of the tube. During the second hot test, the tuner in the fifth cavity went down to air, preventing any further testing. Cause of failure is not known, and recommendations are to repair and modify the tube, then proceed with testing as before to meet program objectives.

  17. A 100 MV cryomodule for CW operation

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece

    2005-07-10

    A cryomodule designed for high-gradient CW operation has been built at Jefferson Lab. The Renascence cryomodule is the final prototype of a design for use in the 12 GeV CEBAF upgrade. The module uses eight 7-cell 1497 MHz cavities to be individually powered by 13 kW klystrons. Specifications call for providing >109 MV CW with < 250 W of dynamic heat at 2.07 K. The module incorporates a new generation of tuners and higher power input waveguides. A mixture of the new HG and LL cavity shapes are used. A new high thermal conductivity RF feedthrough has been developed and used on the 32 HOM coupler probes of Renascence. The cryomodule assembly is complete. Testing is to begin late June. Design features and initial test data will be presented.

  18. Proton Injector for CW-Mode Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Joseph D.; Swenson, Donald; Guy, Frank; Love, Cody; Starling, Joel; Willis, Carl

    2009-03-01

    Numerous applications exist for CW linear accelerators with final energies in the 0.5 to 4.0 MeV proton energy range. Typical proton current at the linac output energy is 20 mA. An important subsystem for the accelerator facility is a reliable dc mode proton injector. We present here design and laboratory results for a dc, 25-keV, 30-mA proton injector. The proton source is a 2.45-GHz microwave hydrogen ion source which operates with an 875-G axial magnetic field. Low emittance, high proton fraction (>85%), beams have been demonstrated from this source. The injector uses a novel dual-solenoid magnet for matching the injector beam into a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator. Recently, a dc ion-source development program has given up to 30 mA beam current. The dual solenoid is a compact and simple design utilizing tape-wound, edge-cooled coils. The low-energy beam transport design as well as 25-keV beam matching calculations to an RFQ will also be presented.

  19. Microwave Transmitter With Multimode Output Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Bhanji, Alaudin M.; Cormier, Reginald A.

    1988-01-01

    Output-waveguide structure transports 400 kW of continuous-wave signal power at 34.5 GHz. Transmitter generates 400 kW of continuous-wave (CW) signal power. Main feature of conceptual design of this microwave transmitter is output section. Output waveguide structure includes mode converter, directional coupler, polarization monitor, and corrugated overmoded output section. Output directional pattern suitable for antenna illumination without flared feedhorn.

  20. Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation of CW industrial heating magnetron.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Andrey D; Hendricks, Kyle J

    2010-01-01

    Modern CW industrial heating magnetrons are capable for producing as high as 300 kW of continuous-wave microwave power at frequencies around 900 MHz and are sold commercially [Wynn et al., 2004]. However, to utilize these magnetrons in some specific research and scientific applications being of interest for the Air Force, the necessary adaptation and redesign are required. It means that the detailed knowledge of principles of their operation and full understanding of how the changes of the design parameters affect their operational characteristics are necessary. We have developed and tested computer model of a 10-vane high-power strapped magnetron, which geometrical dimensions and design parameters are close to those of the California Tube Laboratory's commercially produced CWM-75/100L tube. The computer model is built by using the 3-D Improved Concurrent Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell (ICEPIC) code. Simulations of the strapped magnetron operation are performed and the following operational characteristics are obtained during the simulation: frequency and mode of magnetron oscillations, output microwave power and efficiency of magnetron operation, anode current and anode-cathode voltage dynamics. The developed computer model of a non-relativistic high-power strapped magnetron may be used by the industrial magnetron community for designing following generations of the CW industrial heating high-power magnetrons. PMID:21721323

  1. Diode-pumped CW molecular lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellegehausen, B.; Luhs, W.

    2016-05-01

    First continuous laser oscillation on many lines in the range of 533-635 nm on different transitions of Na2 and Te2 molecules has been obtained, optically pumped with common cw blue emitting InGaN diode lasers operating around 445 and 460 nm. Spectral narrowing of the diode laser is achieved with a beamsplitter and grating setup, allowing use of more than 50 % of the diode power. Operation conditions and properties of the laser systems are presented, and perspectives for the realization of compact low cost molecular lasers are discussed.

  2. Microwave Ovens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Required Reports for the Microwave Oven Manufacturers or Industry Exemption from Certain Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements for ... Microwave Ovens (PDF) (PDF - 2.5MB) FDA eSubmitter Industry Guidance - Documents of Interest Notifications to Industry (PDF ...

  3. CW silver ion laser with electron beam excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsman, B.; Prabhuram, T.; Lewis, K.; Gonzalez, F.; Villagran, M.

    1988-08-01

    A CW laser power of 140 mW was obtained in the 840.39-nm transition of Ag II by electron-beam excitation. The electron-beam excited metal-vapor ion laser is capable of operating using metals with high vaporization temperatures, and is of interest for generation of CW coherent radiation in the 220-260-nm spectral region.

  4. Moderate-power cw fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2004-10-31

    A review of the development and investigation of moderate-power (10{sup -1}-10{sup 2} W) cw fibre lasers is presented. The properties of optical fibres doped with rare-earth ions and methods for fabricating double-clad fibres are considered. The methods for fabrication of fibre Bragg gratings used as selective reflectors are discussed and the grating properties are analysed. The main pump schemes for double-clad fibre lasers are described. The properties of fibre lasers doped with neodymium, ytterbium, erbium, thulium, and holmium ions are also considered. The principles of fabrication of Raman converters of laser radiation based on optical fibres of different compositions are discussed and the main results of their studies are presented. It is concluded that fibre lasers described in the review can produce moderate-power radiation at any wavelength in the spectral range from 0.9 to 2 {mu}m. (review)

  5. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  6. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  7. Conceptual design of a 1-MW CW X-band transmitter for planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhanji, A. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Conroy, B. L.; Freiley, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design to increase the output power of an existing X-band planetary radar transmitter used for planetary radar exploration from 365 kW to 1 MW CW is presented. The basic transmitter system requirements as dictated by the specifications for the radar are covered. The characteristics and expected performance of the high-power klystrons are considered, and the transmitter power amplifier system is discussed. Also included is the design of all of the associated high-power microwave components, the feed system, and the phase-stable exciter. The expected performance of the beam supply, heat exchanger, and monitor and control devices is also presented. Finally, an assessment of the state-of-the-art technology needed to meet system requirements is given and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  8. Conceptual design of a 1-MW CW X-band transmitter for planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhanji, A. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Conroy, B. L.; Freiley, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design to increase the output power of an existing X-band radar transmitter used for planetary radar exploration from 365 kW to 1 MW CW is presented. The basic transmitter system requirements as dictated by the specifications for the radar are covered. The characteristics and expected performance of the high-power klystrons are considered, and the transmitter power amplifier system is described. Also included is the design of all of the associated high-power microwave components, the feed system, and the phase-stable exciter. The expected performance of the beam supply, heat exchanger, and monitor and control devices is also presented. Finally, an assessment of the state-of-the-art technology needed to meet system requirements is given and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  9. High efficiency cw laser-pumped tunable alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, S.T.; Shand, M.L.

    1983-10-01

    High efficiency cw alexandrite laser operation has been achieved. With longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity, a 51% output power slope efficiency has been measured. Including the transmission at the input coupler mirror, a quantum yield of 85% has been attained above threshold. Tunability from 726 to 802 nm has also been demonstrated. The low loss and good thermal properties make alexandrite ideal for cw laser operation.

  10. Abnormal cardiovascular responses induced by localized high power microwave exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.-T; Brown, D.O.; Johnson, C.E.; Mathur, S.P. ); Elson, E.C. )

    1992-05-01

    A hypothesis of microwave-induced circulatory under perfusion was tested in ketamine anesthetized rats whose heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure, respiration rate, and body temperatures were monitored continuously. Fifty-eight ventral head and neck exposures in a waveguide consisted of sham-exposure and exposure to continuous wave (CW) and pulsed 1.25 GHz microwaves for 5 min. The 0.5 Hz and 16 Hz pulsemodulated microwaves were delivered at 400 kW peak power. The CW microwaves were 2 and 6.4 W. The average specific absorption rate was 4.75 W/kg per watt transmitted in the brain and 17.15 W/kg per watt transmitted in the neck. Respiration rate and mean arterial pressure were not altered. Changes in heart rate and pulse pressure were observed in rats exposed to higher power but not to the lower average power microwaves. Depression of pulse pressure, an indication of a decrease in stroke volume, and increased or decreased heart rate were noted in presence of whole-body hyperthermia. The cardiac output of those animals exposed to higher average power microwaves was considered to be below normal as hypothesized. Decreased cardiac output and normal mean arterial pressure resulted in an increase in the total peripheral resistance which was contrary to the anticipated thermal response of animals.

  11. 3 μm CW lasers for myringotomy and microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Linden, Kurt J; Pfeffer, Christian P; Sousa, John Gary; D'Alleva, Nicholas; Aslani, Arash; Gorski, Grzegorz; Kenna, Margaret; Poe, Dennis S

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of 3 μm lasers for myringotomy and microsurgery. Two different lasers were investigated. The first, an Er-doped, CW zirconate glass fiber laser optically pumped by a 970 nm diode laser, emitted > 1 W of CW power at 2.76 μm with concomitant green incoherent emission that served as a convenient visible illumination beam. The second, a 1 W CW Er:YAG solid-state laser also optically pumped by a 970 nm diode laser, emitted > 1 W of CW power at 2.94 μm, coincident with the strongest infrared water absorption peak. Running CW, both lasers are expected to avoid the loud acoustical shocks associated with pulsed lasers. Myringotomies were carried out with the Er:YAG laser on anaesthetized guinea pigs and the effects of the laser were documented. Laser ablated samples of tympanic membrane, soft tissue and bone were histologically examined. Histology results indicated that the CW Er:YAG laser is a potential candidate for a new myringotomy tool and possibly for otologic microsurgery, but deliverable power levels need to be increased to the 2 W (or higher) level. This work was funded under NIH SBIR Grant No. 5R44DC004899. PMID:24382990

  12. Design for a compact CW atom laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Erik; Raithel, Georg

    2011-05-01

    We present a design for a compact continuous-wave atom laser on a chip. A 2D spiral-shaped quadrupole guide is formed by two 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm wires carrying 5 A each embedded in a Si wafer; a 1.5 mm × 0.5 mm wire on the bottom layer carries -10 A, producing a horizontal B-field that pushes the guiding channel center above the chip surface. The center-to-center separation between the top wires is varied from 1.6 mm at the start of the guide to 1 mm at the end, decreasing the guide height from ~ 500 μm to ~ 25 μm above the surface as the atoms travel the 70 cm-long guide. The magnetic gradient of the guiding channel gradually increases from ~ 100 G /cm to ~ 930 G /cm . These features result in continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling and progressive magnetic compression. Spin flip losses are mitigated by a solenoid sewn around the guide to produce a longitudinal B-field. 87Rb atoms are gravitationally loaded into the guide. A far off-resonant light shift barrier at the end of the guide traps the atoms and allows formation of a BEC. Tuning the barrier height to create a non-zero tunneling rate equal to the loading rate completes the implementation of a CW atom laser. Two options for atom interferometry are implemented on the first-generation chip (matter-wave Fabry-Perot interferometer and guide-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer). Current construction status and challenges will be discussed, along with preliminary results.

  13. Microwave generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  14. Microwave reflectometer ionization sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seals, Joseph; Fordham, Jeffrey A.; Pauley, Robert G.; Simonutti, Mario D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of the Microwave Reflectometer Ionization Sensor (MRIS) Instrument for use on the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) spacecraft is described. The instrument contract was terminated, due to cancellation of the AFE program, subsequent to testing of an engineering development model. The MRIS, a four-frequency reflectometer, was designed for the detection and location of critical electron density levels in spacecraft reentry plasmas. The instrument would sample the relative magnitude and phase of reflected signals at discrete frequency steps across 4 GHz bandwidths centered at four frequencies: 20, 44, 95, and 140 GHz. The sampled data would be stored for later processing to calculate the distance from the spacecraft surface to the critical electron densities versus time. Four stepped PM CW transmitter receivers were located behind the thermal protection system of the spacecraft with horn antennas radiating and receiving through an insulating tile. Techniques were developed to deal with interference, including multiple reflections and resonance effects, resulting from the antenna configuration and operating environment.

  15. A portable CW/FM-CW Doppler radar for local investigation of severe storms

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, W.P.; Wolf, M.A.; Bluestein, H.B.

    1988-01-01

    During the 1987 spring storm season we used a portable 1-W X-band CW Doppler radar to probe a tornado, a funnel cloud, and a wall cloud in Oklahoma and Texas. This same device was used during the spring storm season in 1988 to probe a wall cloud in Texas. The radar was battery powered and highly portable, and thus convenient to deploy from our chase vehicle. The device separated the receding and approaching Doppler velocities in real time and, while the radar was being used, it allowed convenient stereo data recording for later spectral analysis and operator monitoring of the Doppler signals in stereo headphones. This aural monitoring, coupled with the ease with which an operator can be trained to recognize the nature of the signals heard, made the radar very easy to operate reliably and significantly enhanced the quality of the data being recorded. At the end of the 1988 spring season, the radar was modified to include FM-CW ranging and processing. These modifications were based on a unique combination of video recording and FM chirp generation, which incorporated a video camera and recorder as an integral part of the radar. After modification, the radar retains its convenient portability and the operational advantage of being able to listen to the Doppler signals directly. The original mechanical design was unaffected by these additions. During the summer of 1988, this modified device was used at the Langmuir Laboratory at Socorro, New Mexico in an attempt to measure vertical convective flow in a thunderstorm. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  16. A portable CW/FM-CW Doppler radar for local investigation of severe storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Wesley P.; Wolf, Michael A.; Bluestein, Howard B.

    During the 1987 spring storm season we used a portable 1-W X-band CW Doppler radar to probe a tornado, a funnel cloud, and a wall cloud in Oklahoma and Texas. This same device was used during the spring storm season in 1988 to probe a wall cloud in Texas. The radar was battery powered and highly portable, and thus convenient to deploy from our chase vehicle. The device separated the receding and approaching Doppler velocities in real time and, while the radar was being used, it allowed convenient stereo data recording for later spectral analysis and operator monitoring of the Doppler signals in stereo headphones. This aural monitoring, coupled with the ease with which an operator can be trained to recognize the nature of the signals heard, made the radar very easy to operate reliably and significantly enhanced the quality of the data being recorded. At the end of the 1988 spring season, the radar was modified to include FM-CW ranging and processing. These modifications were based on a unique combination of video recording and FM chirp generation, which incorporated a video camera and recorder as an integral part of the radar. After modification, the radar retains its convenient portability and the operational advantage of being able to listen to the Doppler signals directly. The original mechanical design was unaffected by these additions. During the summer of 1988, this modified device was used at the Langmuir Laboratory at Socorro, New Mexico in an attempt to measure vertical convective flow in a thunderstorm.

  17. On the measurement of wind speeds in tornadoes with a portable CW/FM-CW Doppler radar

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, H.B. . School of Meteorology); Unruh, W.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Both the formation mechanism and structure of tornadoes are not yet well understood. The Doppler radar is probably the best remote-sensing instrument at present for determining the wind field in tornadoes. Although much has been learned about the non-supercell tornado from relatively close range using Doppler radars at fixed sites, close-range measurements in supercell tornadoes are relatively few. Doppler radar can increase significantly the number of high-resolution, sub-cloud base measurements of both the tornado vortex and its parent vortex in supercells, with simultaneous visual documentation. The design details and operation of the CW/FM-CW Doppler radar developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and used by storm-intercept teams at the Univ. of Oklahoma are described elsewhere. The radar transmits 1 W at 3 cm, and can be switched back and forth between CW and FM-CW modes. In the FM-CW mode the sweep repetition frequency is 15.575 kHz and the sweep width 1.9 MHz; the corresponding maximum unambiguous range and velocity, and range resolution are 5 km, {plus minus} 115 m s{sup {minus}1}, and 78 m respectively. The bistatic antennas, which have half-power beamwidths of 5{degree}, are easily pointed wit the aid of a boresighted VCR. FM-CW Data are recorded on the VCR, while voice documentation is recorded on the audio tape; video is recorded on another VCR. The radar and antennas are easily mounted on a tripod, and can be set up by three people in a minute or two. The purpose of this paper is to describe the signal processing techniques used to determine the Doppler spectrum in the FM-CW mode and a method of its interpretation in real time, and to present data gathered in a tornadic storm in 1990. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Simple laboratory methods for quantitative IR measurements of CW agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckrin, Eldon; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Lavoie, Hugo; Dubé, Denis; Lepage, Carmela J.; Petryk, Michael

    2005-11-01

    A simple method is presented for quantitatively measuring the absorbance of chemical warfare (CW) agents and their simulants in the vapour phase. The technique is based on a standard lab-bench FTIR spectrometer, 10-cm gas cell, a high accuracy Baratron pressure manometer, vacuum pump and simple stainless-steel hardware components. The results of this measurement technique are demonstrated for sarin (GB) and soman (GD). A second technique is also introduced for the passive IR detection of CW agents in an open- air path located in a fumehood. Using a modified open-cell with a pathlength of 45 cm, open-air passive infrared measurements have been obtained for simulants and several classical CW agents. Detection, identification and quantification results based on passive infrared measurements are presented for GB and the CW agent simulant, DMMP, using the CATSI sensor which has been developed by DRDC Valcartier. The open-cell technique represents a relatively simple and feasible method for examining the detection capability of passive sensors, such as CATSI, for CW agents.

  19. First experiments with gasdynamic ion source in CW mode.

    PubMed

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Vodopyanov, A; Tarvainen, O

    2016-02-01

    A new type of ECR ion source-a gasdynamic ECR ion source-has been recently developed at the Institute of Applied Physics. The main advantages of such device are extremely high ion beam current with a current density up to 600-700 emA/cm(2) in combination with low emittance, i.e., normalized RMS emittance below 0.1 π mm mrad. Previous investigations were carried out in pulsed operation with 37.5 or 75 GHz gyrotron radiation with power up to 100 kW at SMIS 37 experimental facility. The present work demonstrates the first experience of operating the gasdynamic ECR ion source in CW mode. A test bench of SMIS 24 facility has been developed at IAP RAS. 24 GHz radiation of CW gyrotron was used for plasma heating in a magnetic trap with simple mirror configuration. Initial studies of plasma parameters were performed. Ion beams with pulsed and CW high voltage were successfully extracted from the CW discharge. Obtained experimental results demonstrate that all advantages of the gasdynamic source can be realized also in CW operation. PMID:26931933

  20. First experiments with gasdynamic ion source in CW mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Vodopyanov, A.; Tarvainen, O.

    2016-02-01

    A new type of ECR ion source—a gasdynamic ECR ion source—has been recently developed at the Institute of Applied Physics. The main advantages of such device are extremely high ion beam current with a current density up to 600-700 emA/cm2 in combination with low emittance, i.e., normalized RMS emittance below 0.1 π mm mrad. Previous investigations were carried out in pulsed operation with 37.5 or 75 GHz gyrotron radiation with power up to 100 kW at SMIS 37 experimental facility. The present work demonstrates the first experience of operating the gasdynamic ECR ion source in CW mode. A test bench of SMIS 24 facility has been developed at IAP RAS. 24 GHz radiation of CW gyrotron was used for plasma heating in a magnetic trap with simple mirror configuration. Initial studies of plasma parameters were performed. Ion beams with pulsed and CW high voltage were successfully extracted from the CW discharge. Obtained experimental results demonstrate that all advantages of the gasdynamic source can be realized also in CW operation.

  1. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, Jr., Harold D.; Janney, Mark A.; Ferber, Mattison K.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy.

  2. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Janney, M.A.; Ferber, M.K.

    1992-03-24

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy. 2 figs.

  3. Quantum efficiency of a double quantum dot microwave photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Clement; Vavilov, Maxim

    Motivated by recent interest in implementing circuit quantum electrodynamics with semiconducting quantum dots, we study charge transfer through a double quantum dot (DQD) capacitively coupled to a superconducting cavity subject to a microwave field. We analyze the DQD current response using input-output theory and determine the optimal parameter regime for complete absorption of radiation and efficient conversion of microwave photons to electric current. For experimentally available DQD systems, we show that the cavity-coupled DQD operates as a photon-to-charge converter with quantum efficiencies up to 80% C.W. acknowledges support by the Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program.

  4. Saturation by Noise and CW Signals in SIS Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, A. R.

    2002-03-01

    In ALMA Memo 321, Plambeck points out that saturation (gain compression) is likely to be a significant factor limiting the calibration accuracy of ALMA observations. In this paper, saturation by broadband noise and CW signals is analyzed for representative SIS receivers operating at different frequencies. Many SIS mixers in current use are expected to exhibit a significant degree of gain compression when connected to a room-temperature source. Previous analyses of saturation in SIS mixers have applied only to CW signals. To analyze saturation by noise, the statistics of the output voltage are derived from those of the input signal. A single constant, applicable to all SIS mixers, is determined experimentally by fitting the predicted CW gain compression curve to measured data.

  5. Time Shifted PN Codes for CW Lidar, Radar, and Sonar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor); Prasad, Narasimha S. (Inventor); Harrison, Fenton W. (Inventor); Flood, Michael A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A continuous wave Light Detection and Ranging (CW LiDAR) system utilizes two or more laser frequencies and time or range shifted pseudorandom noise (PN) codes to discriminate between the laser frequencies. The performance of these codes can be improved by subtracting out the bias before processing. The CW LiDAR system may be mounted to an artificial satellite orbiting the earth, and the relative strength of the return signal for each frequency can be utilized to determine the concentration of selected gases or other substances in the atmosphere.

  6. SRF cavities for CW option of Project X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lunin, A.; Perunov, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Alternative option of Project X is based on the CW SC 2GeV Linac with the average current 1mA. Possible option of the CW Linac considered in the paper includes low energy part consisted of a few families SC Spoke cavities (from 2.5 MeV to 466 MeV) and high energy part consisted of 2 types of elliptical cavities (v/c=0.81 and v/c=1). Requirements and designed parameters of cavities are considered.

  7. cw passive mode locking of a Ti:sapphire laser

    SciTech Connect

    Sarukura, N.; Ishida, Y.; Nakano, H.; Yamamoto, Y. )

    1990-02-26

    cw passive mode locking of a Ti:sapphire laser is achieved with 1,1{prime}-dietyl-2,2{prime}-dicarbocyanine iodide as the saturable absorber dye, using a 5 {mu}m thin dye jet flow. The pulse width is 4.0 ps, which is almost the transform-limited pulse for the observed spectrum width. The output power is {similar to}50 mW, when it is pumped by a 5 W cw Ar laser, while the tuning range is 745--755 nm.

  8. Nonlinear optical properties of methyl red under CW irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yu; Ye, Qing; Wang, Chen; Wang, Jin; Deng, Zhichao; Mei, Jianchun; Zhou, Wenyuan; Zhang, Chunping; Tian, Jianguo

    2015-12-01

    Organic materials have wide potential application in nonlinear optical devices. The nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of methyl red (MR) doped polymethyl methacrylate (MR-PMMA) are investigated under CW laser irradiation at 473 nm, 532 nm and 632.8 nm, respectively. By combining Kramers-Kronig (K-K) relation and CW Z-scan technique, the effective refractive index n2 and the change of refractive index Δn are obtained under different scanning speed at 473 nm and 532 nm. Δn is positive at 473 nm, while Δn is negative at 532 nm. The experimental result is consistent with that of K-K relation. With the scanning speed decreasing, the NLO properties of MR-PMMA are enhanced. With different laser powers at 632.8 nm, MR-PMMA has only nonlinear absorption rather than nonlinear refraction. Meanwhile, the sample is investigated under pulse laser irradiation at 532 nm. Through the comparison of results of CW Z-scan and pulse Z-scan, the influence of the cumulative thermal effect on NLO properties of material is investigated. The results indicate that, under CW irradiation near the absorption peak wavelength, the cumulative thermal effect has great influence to the NLO properties of MR-PMMA.

  9. Investigations of atmospheric dynamics using a CW Doppler sounder array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional CW Doppler sounding system currently under operation at the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama is described. The properties of the neutral atmosphere are discussed along with the theory of Doppler sounding technique. Methods of data analyses used to investigate the dynamical phenomena at the ionospheric heights are presented and suggestions for future investigations provided.

  10. Applications of KHZ-CW Lidar in Ecological Entomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmqvist, Elin; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2016-06-01

    The benefits of kHz lidar in ecological entomology are explained. Results from kHz-measurements on insects, carried out with a CW-lidar system, employing the Scheimpflug principle to obtain range resolution, are presented. A method to extract insect events and analyze the large amount of lidar data is also described.

  11. CW-FIT: Group Contingency Effects across the Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, Howard P.; Iwaszuk, Wendy M.; Kamps, Debra; Shumate, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the effects of a group-contingency intervention on student behavior across academic instructional periods. Research suggests group contingencies are evidence-based practices, yet calls for investigation to determine the best conditions and groups suited for this type of intervention. CW-FIT (Class-Wide Function-related…

  12. Cascaded combiners for a high power CW fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qirui; Ge, Tingwu; Zhang, Xuexia; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    We report cascaded combiners for a high power continuous wave (CW) fiber laser in this paper. The cascaded combiners are fabricated with an improved lateral splicing process. During the fusing process, there is no stress or tension between the pump fiber and the double-cladding fiber. Thus, the parameters of the combiner are better than those that have been reported. The coupling efficiency is 98.5%, and the signal insertion loss is 1%. The coupling efficiency of the cascaded combiners is 97.5%. The pump lights are individually coupled into the double-cladding fiber via five combiners. The thermal effects cannot cause damage to the combiners and the cascaded combiners can operate stably in high power CW fiber lasers. We also develop a high power CW fiber laser that generates a maximum 780 W of CW signal power at 1080 nm with 71% optical-to-optical conversion efficiency. The fiber laser is pumped via five intra-cavity cascaded combiners and five extra-cavity cascaded combiners with a maximum pump power of 1096 W and a pump wavelength of 975 nm.

  13. Status and Evaluation of Microwave Furnace Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizcano, Maricela; Mackey, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    The microwave (MW) furnace is a HY-Tech Microwave Systems, 2 kW 2.45 GHz Single Mode Microwave Applicator operating in continuous wave (CW) with variable power. It is located in Cleveland, Ohio at NASA Glenn Research Center. Until recently, the furnace capabilities had not been fully realized due to unknown failure that subsequently damaged critical furnace components. Although the causes of the problems were unknown, an assessment of the furnace itself indicated operational failure may have been partially caused by power quality. This report summarizes the status of the MW furnace and evaluates its capabilities in materials processing.

  14. Experimental atomic scale investigation of irradiation effects in CW 316SS and UFG-CW 316SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareige, P.; Etienne, A.; Radiguet, B.

    2009-06-01

    Materials of the core internals of pressurized water reactor (austenitic stainless steels) are subject to neutron irradiation. To understand the ageing mechanisms associated with irradiation and propose life predictions of components or develop new materials, irradiation damage needs to be experimentally investigated. Atomic scale investigation of a neutron-irradiated CW316 SS with the laser pulsed atom probe gives a detailed description of the solute segregation in the austenitic grains. In order to understand the mechanism of solute segregation detected in the neutron-irradiated materials, ion irradiations were performed. These latest irradiations were realized on a CW 316SS as well as on a nanostructured CW 316SS. The study of irradiation effects in a nanograin material allows first, to easily analyse grain boundary segregation and second, to test the behaviour under irradiation of a new nanostructured material. The three aspects of this atomic scale investigation (neutron irradiation effect, model ion irradiation, new nanostructured CW 316 SS) are tackled in this paper.

  15. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on microwave processing of ceramics: Microwave-material interactions; anticipated advantage of microwave sintering; ceramic sintering; and ceramic joining. 24 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  16. Design, construction and evaluation of a 12.2 GHz, 4.0 kW-CW coupled-cavity traveling wave tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, W. R.; Harman, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program to study design techniques and to utilize these techniques to optimize the performance of an X-band 4 kW, CW traveling wave tube ultimately intended for satellite-borne television broadcast transmitters is described. The design is based on the coupled-cavity slow-wave circuit with velocity resynchronization to maximize the conversion efficiency. The design incorporates a collector which is demountable from the tube. This was done to facilitate multistage depressed collector experiments employing a NASA designed axisymmetric, electrostatic collector for linear beam microwave tubes after shipment of the tubes to NASA.

  17. Modeling of cw OIL energy performance based on similarity criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhenin, Andrey V.; Pichugin, Sergey Y.; Azyazov, Valeriy N.

    2012-01-01

    A simplified two-level generation model predicts that power extraction from an cw oxygen-iodine laser (OIL) with stable resonator depends on three similarity criteria. Criterion τd is the ratio of the residence time of active medium in the resonator to the O2(1Δ) reduction time at the infinitely large intraresonator intensity. Criterion Π is small-signal gain to the threshold ratio. Criterion Λ is the relaxation to excitation rate ratio for the electronically excited iodine atoms I(2P1/2). Effective power extraction from a cw OIL is achieved when the values of the similarity criteria are located in the intervals: τd=5-8, Π=3-8 and Λ<=0.01.

  18. PROSPECTS FOR A VERY HIGH POWER CW SRF LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer

    2010-06-01

    Steady development in SRF accelerator technology combined with the success of large scale installations such as CEBAF at Jefferson Laboratory and the SNS Linac at ORNL gives credibility to the concept of very high average power CW machines for light sources or Proton drivers. Such machines would be powerful tools for discovery science in themselves but could also pave the way to reliable cost effective drivers for such applications as neutrino factories, an energy-frontier muon collider, nuclear waste transmutation or accelerator driven subcritical reactors for energy production. In contrast to machines such as ILC that need maximum accelerating gradient, the challenges in these machines are mainly in efficiency, reliability, beam stability, beam loss and of course cost. In this paper the present state of the art is briefly reviewed and options for a multi-GeV, multi-MW CW linac are discussed.

  19. BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER PERMEATION IN THE RAT DURING EXPOSURE TO LOW-POWER 1.7-GHZ MICROWAVE RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeability of the blood-brain barrier to high-and low-molecular-weight compounds has been measured as a function of continuous wave (CW) and pulsed microwave radiation. Adult rats, anesthetized with pentobarbital and injected intravenously with a mixture of (14C) sucrose an...

  20. In vitro fertilization of mouse ova by spermatozoa exposed isothermally to radio-frequency radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Liu, L.M.; Graham, R.; East, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Mouse spermatozoa were exposed in vitro for 1 h to 27- or 2,450-MHz CW RF radiation at SARs of 0 to 90 W/kg under isothermal (37 +/- 0.2 degrees C) conditions. Exposure at either frequency to RF radiation at SARs of 50 W/kg or greater resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the ability of irradiated sperm to fertilize mouse ova in vitro (P less than .05). Over the range of SARs there was no apparent difference in the effects of 27- vs. 2,450-MHz RF radiation. There were no readily detectable exposure effects on spermatozoan morphology, ultrastructure, or capacitation. The reduction of in vitro fertilization is attributed to a direct effect of RF radiation on spermatozoa rather than to heating.

  1. Computationally efficient, rotational nonequilibrium CW chemical laser model

    SciTech Connect

    Sentman, L.H.; Rushmore, W.

    1981-10-01

    The essential fluid dynamic and kinetic phenomena required for a quantitative, computationally efficient, rotational nonequilibrium model of a CW HF chemical laser are identified. It is shown that, in addition to the pumping, collisional deactivation, and rotational relaxation reactions, F-atom wall recombination, the hot pumping reaction, and multiquantum deactivation reactions play a significant role in determining laser performance. Several problems with the HF kinetics package are identified. The effect of various parameters on run time is discussed.

  2. The eclipsing binary CW Eridani. [three-color photoelectric observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.-Y.

    1975-01-01

    Results of three-color photoelectric observations of CW Eridani are presented which were made with a 30-inch telescope over the three-year period from 1970 to 1973. The times of minima are computed, solutions of the light curves are obtained, and theoretical light curves are computed from the solutions. The period is determined to be 2.72837 days, and the orbital and photoelectric elements are derived from solutions based on the idealized Russell model.

  3. Low threshold CW Nc laser oscillator at 1060 nm study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, M.; Deshazer, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    A broad range of characteristics of neodymium/yag lasers were investigated. With Nd:YVO4 crystals, CW 1.06 mu lasers were operated with thresholds a factor of 2 lower than Nd:YAG and with greater slope efficiencies. Thus, the first step in the development of new oscillators suitable for application in high data rate laser communication systems which surpass the present performance of the Nd:YAG laser has been successfully demonstrated.

  4. Laser Photon Force Measurements using a CW Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Perry; Edwards, David L.; Carruth, M. Ralph, Jr.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The photon force resulting from the non-damaging impact of laser derived photons on a metallic target was measured using a vacuum compatible microbalance. This experiment quantitatively verified that the force resulting from laser photons impacting a reflective surface is measurable and predictable. The photon wavelength is 1064 mn and the laser is a multi-mode 30OW Nd YAG continuous wave (CW) laser.

  5. Status of the Project-X CW Linac Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, J-F.; Solyak, N.; Berrutti, P.; Carneiro, J.P.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Saini, A.; Stheynas, B.; Yakovlev, V.P.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Project-X is a proposed proton accelerator complex at Fermilab that would provide particle beams to support a diversified experimental program at the intensity frontier. As currently envisioned, the complex would employ a CW superconducting linac to accelerate a 1 mA average, 5 mA peak H{sup -} beam from 2.1 MeV to 3 GeV. A second superconducting linac, operating in pulsed mode would ultimately accelerate a small fraction of this beam up to 8 GeV. The CW linac is based on five families of resonators operating at three frequencies: half-wave (1 family at 162.5 MHz), spoke (2 families at 325 MHz) and elliptical (2 families at 650 MHz). Accelerating and focusing elements are assembled in cryomodules separated by short warm sections. A long open region ({approx} 15 m) allows beam extraction at 1 GeV in support of a nuclear experimental program. In this paper, we present the latest iteration of the CW linac baseline lattice. We also briefly compare it to an alternative where the 162.5 half-wave resonators are replaced with 325 MHz spoke resonators.

  6. Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Perez, Raul M.; Glazer, Stuart D.

    1990-06-01

    Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window, obtained using an imaging IR radiometer during transmitter operation at 365 kW CW and 8.5 GHz, are discussed. The window under investigation was constructed of HTP-6, a high-thermal-performance material developed to shield the Space Shuttle Orbiter from the heat of reentry. The measurement technique is described, and experimental results are presented. The window performed adequately at 365 kW CW with a center temperature of 475 C. The tests verify that HTP-6 can be used as a window material or a support structure in high-power waveguides at power densities of 1.47 kW/sq cm for extended periods of time, with no change in its mechanical characteristics.

  7. JLab CW Cryomodules for 4th Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert; Bundy, Richard; Cheng, Guangfeng; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clemens, William; Daly, Edward; Henry, James; Hicks, William; Kneisel, Peter; Manning, Stephen; Manus, Robert; Marhauser, Frank; Preble, Joseph; Reece, Charles; Smith, Karl; Stirbet, Mircea; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Wilson, Katherine

    2008-01-23

    Fourth generation light sources hold the prospect of unprecedented brightness and optical beam quality for a wide range of scientific applications. Many of the proposed new facilities will rely on large superconducting radio frequency (SRF) based linacs to provide high energy, low emittance CW electron beams. For high average power applications there is a growing acceptance of energy recovery linac (ERL) technology as the way to support large recirculating currents with modest RF power requirements. CW SRF and high current ERLs are two core competencies at Jefferson Lab. JLab has designed and built a number of CW cryomodules of several different types starting with the original CEBAF design, with variations for higher current in the two generations of JLab’s free-electron laser (FEL), through two intermediate prototypes to the final high-performance module for the 12 GeV upgrade. Each of these represent fully engineered and tested configurations with a variety of specifications that could be considered for possible use in fourth generation light sources. Furthermore JLab has been actively pursuing advanced concepts for highcurrent high-efficiency cryomodules for next generation ERL based FEL’s. These existing and proposed designs span the range from about 1mA single-pass to over 100 mA energy recovered current capability. Specialized configurations also exist for high-current non-energy recovered sections such as the injector region where very high RF power is required. We discuss the performance parameters of these existing and proposed designs and their suitability to different classes of fourth generation light sources.

  8. Quasi-CW Laser Diode Bar Life Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Krainak, Michael A.; Dallas, Joseph L.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is developing technology for satellite-based, high peak power, LIDAR transmitters requiring 3-5 years of reliable operation. Semi-conductor laser diodes provide high efficiency pumping of solid state lasers with the promise of long-lived, reliable operation. 100-watt quasi- CW laser diode bars have been baselined for the next generation laser altimeters. Multi-billion shot lifetimes are required. The authors have monitored the performance of several diodes for billions of shots and investigated operational modes for improving diode lifetime.

  9. Design of 250-MW CW RF system for APT

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.

    1997-09-01

    The design for the RF systems for the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) proton linac will be presented. The linac produces a continuous beam power of 130 MW at 1300 MeV with the installed capability to produce up to a 170 MW beam at 1700 MeV. The linac is comprised of a 350 MHz RFQ to 7 MeV followed in sequence by a 700 MHz coupled-cavity drift tube linac, coupled-cavity linac, and superconducting (SC) linac to 1700 MeV. At the 1700 MeV, 100 mA level the linac requires 213 MW of continuous-wave (CW) RF power. This power will be supplied by klystrons with a nominal output power of 1.0 MW. 237 kystrons are required with all but three of these klystrons operating at 700 MHz. The klystron count includes redundancy provisions that will be described which allow the RF systems to meet an operational availability in excess of 95 percent. The approach to achieve this redundancy will be presented for both the normal conducting (NC) and SC accelerators. Because of the large amount of CW RF power required for the APT linac, efficiency is very important to minimize operating cost. Operation and the RF system design, including in-progress advanced technology developments which improve efficiency, will be discussed. RF system performance will also be predicted. Because of the simultaneous pressures to increase RF system reliability, reduce tunnel envelope, and minimize RF system cost, the design of the RF vacuum windows has become an important issue. The power from a klystron will be divided into four equal parts to minimize the stress on the RF vacuum windows. Even with this reduction, the RF power level at the window is at the upper boundary of the power levels employed at other CW accelerator facilities. The design of a 350 MHz, coaxial vacuum window will be presented as well as test results and high power conditioning profiles. The transmission of 950 kW, CW, power through this window has been demonstrated with only minimal high power conditioning.

  10. High efficiency CW green-pumped alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, J. W.; Brown, D. C.

    2006-02-01

    High power, CW and pulsed alexandrite lasers were produced by pumping the laser rod with a high quality diode pumped 532 nm laser sources. This pumping architecture provides stable performance with output power > 1.4 W at 767nm in the free running mode and 0.78W at 1000 Hz. An output of 80 mW at 375.5 nm was achieved at 500 Hz. This approach holds promise for the production of a scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  11. Cavitation induced by CW lasers in absorbing liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.; Rodriguez-Aboytes, E.; Martínez-Canton, A. E.; Baldovino-Pantaleon, O.; Torres-Hurtado, S.; Robledo-Martinez, A.; Korneev, N.; Ramos-Garcia, R.

    2010-02-01

    Novel results are presented on thermocavitation in highly absorbing solutions using CW low power laser (λ=975 nm). Due to the large absorption coefficient (135 cm-1) at the laser wavelength, penetration length is only ~74μm inside the liquid and asymmetric bubbles are generated near the beam's entrance wall. We report the temporal dynamic of the cavitation bubble, which is much shorter than previously reported. We found that the amplitude of the shock wave decreases exponentially with the beam power. As shown in this work, thermocavitation is a phenomenon that has a great application potential in areas such as ultrasonic waves generation and controlled tissue ablation for use in lithotripsy.

  12. Ultraviolet photometry of the eclipsing variable CW Cephei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieski, S.

    1972-01-01

    An extended series of photometric observations were made of the eclipsing variable CW Cephei using the Wisconsin instrument on OAO-2. Approximate elements which were derived based solely on the eclipse depths and shape of the secondary are in satisfactory agreement with those found using ground based observations. However, persistent asymmetries and anomalous light variations, all larger than the expected experimental error, were also found; subsequent ground-based observations show H sub alpha entirely in emission indicating the presence of an extended gaseous system surrounding one or both of the components. Consistent solutions utilizing all data at all wavelengths were not found.

  13. GEM: ANL 4-GeV CW electron microtron design

    SciTech Connect

    Kustom, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    A six-sided hexagonal microtron has been chosen as the accelerator to generate the beams required to pursue a national research program at a CW 4 GeV electron laboratory. This option has the advantage of superior beam quality, low capital and operating cost, and promise of furnishing beams of several electron energies simultaneously. Only moderate rf power is required because of the basic feature of all microtron designs, recirculation of the electron beam through the same rf accelerating section many times. The hexatron design has the additional feature of compatibility with an existing accelerator complex at Argonne which is currently unoccupied and available.

  14. Photometric analysis of the overcontact binary CW Cas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. J.; Qian, S. B.; He, J. J.; Li, L. J.; Zhao, E. G.

    2014-11-01

    New CCD photometric observations of overcontact binary CW Cas were carried out in 2004 and 2011. In particular, the light curve obtained in 2004 shows a remarkable O'Connell effect. Compared with light curves in different observing seasons, variations were found. These variations can be explained by dark spot activities on the surface of at least one component. Using the Wilson-Devinney code with a spot model, we find that the photometric solutions confirm CW Cas is a shallow W-subtype overcontact binary with a spotted massive component. Our new determined times of minimum light together with the others published in the literature were analyzed to find a change of orbital period. From the O – C curves, the period of the system shows a cyclic period change (P {sub 3} = 69.9 yr, A {sub 3} = 0.03196 days) superposed on the linear increase. The cyclic variation, if explained as the light-travel time effect, reveals the presence of a tertiary companion.

  15. An Acoustic Demonstration Model for CW and Pulsed Spectrosocopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starck, Torben; Mäder, Heinrich; Trueman, Trevor; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    High school and undergraduate students have often difficulties if new concepts are introduced in their physics or chemistry lectures. Lecture demonstrations and references to more familiar analogues can be of great help to the students in such situations. We have developed an experimental setup to demonstrate the principles of cw absorption and pulsed excitation - emission spectroscopies, using acoustical analogues. Our radiation source is a speaker and the detector is a microphone, both controlled by a computer sound card. The acoustical setup is housed in a plexiglas box, which serves as a resonator. It turns out that beer glasses are suitable samples; this also helps to keep the students interested! The instrument is controlled by a LabView program. In a cw experiment, the sound frequency is swept through a certain frequency range and the microphone response is recorded simultaneously as function of frequency. A background signal without sample is recorded, and background subtraction yields the beer glass spectrum. In a pulsed experiment, a short sound pulse is generated and the microphone is used to record the resulting emission signal of the beer glass. A Fourier transformation of the time domain signal gives then the spectrum. We will discuss the experimental setup and show videos of the experiments.

  16. Photometric Analysis of the Overcontact Binary CW Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.; Qian, S. B.; He, J. J.; Li, L. J.; Zhao, E. G.

    2014-11-01

    New CCD photometric observations of overcontact binary CW Cas were carried out in 2004 and 2011. In particular, the light curve obtained in 2004 shows a remarkable O'Connell effect. Compared with light curves in different observing seasons, variations were found. These variations can be explained by dark spot activities on the surface of at least one component. Using the Wilson-Devinney code with a spot model, we find that the photometric solutions confirm CW Cas is a shallow W-subtype overcontact binary with a spotted massive component. Our new determined times of minimum light together with the others published in the literature were analyzed to find a change of orbital period. From the O - C curves, the period of the system shows a cyclic period change (P 3 = 69.9 yr, A 3 = 0.03196 days) superposed on the linear increase. The cyclic variation, if explained as the light-travel time effect, reveals the presence of a tertiary companion.

  17. Optimal Signal Processing of Frequency-Stepped CW Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ybarra, Gary A.; Wu, Shawkang M.; Bilbro, Griff L.; Ardalan, Sasan H.; Hearn, Chase P.; Neece, Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    An optimal signal processing algorithm is derived for estimating the time delay and amplitude of each scatterer reflection using a frequency-stepped CW system. The channel is assumed to be composed of abrupt changes in the reflection coefficient profile. The optimization technique is intended to maximize the target range resolution achievable from any set of frequency-stepped CW radar measurements made in such an environment. The algorithm is composed of an iterative two-step procedure. First, the amplitudes of the echoes are optimized by solving an overdetermined least squares set of equations. Then, a nonlinear objective function is scanned in an organized fashion to find its global minimum. The result is a set of echo strengths and time delay estimates. Although this paper addresses the specific problem of resolving the time delay between the two echoes, the derivation is general in the number of echoes. Performance of the optimization approach is illustrated using measured data obtained from an HP-851O network analyzer. It is demonstrated that the optimization approach offers a significant resolution enhancement over the standard processing approach that employs an IFFT. Degradation in the performance of the algorithm due to suboptimal model order selection and the effects of additive white Gaussion noise are addressed.

  18. Optimal Signal Processing of Frequency-Stepped CW Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ybarra, Gary A.; Wu, Shawkang M.; Bilbro, Griff L.; Ardalan, Sasan H.; Hearn, Chase P.; Neece, Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    An optimal signal processing algorithm is derived for estimating the time delay and amplitude of each scatterer reflection using a frequency-stepped CW system. The channel is assumed to be composed of abrupt changes in the reflection coefficient profile. The optimization technique is intended to maximize the target range resolution achievable from any set of frequency-stepped CW radar measurements made in such an environment. The algorithm is composed of an iterative two-step procedure. First, the amplitudes of the echoes are optimized by solving an overdetermined least squares set of equations. Then, a nonlinear objective function is scanned in an organized fashion to find its global minimum. The result is a set of echo strengths and time delay estimates. Although this paper addresses the specific problem of resolving the time delay between the first two echoes, the derivation is general in the number of echoes. Performance of the optimization approach is illustrated using measured data obtained from an HP-X510 network analyzer. It is demonstrated that the optimization approach offers a significant resolution enhancement over the standard processing approach that employs an IFFT. Degradation in the performance of the algorithm due to suboptimal model order selection and the effects of additive white Gaussion noise are addressed.

  19. Optimizing Frequency-Modulated CW EDMR in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lihuang; van Schooten, Kipp; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a powerful method of probing dopant and defect spin states in semiconductor devices. Moreover, at the single dopant level, these spin states are heavily investigated as potential qubit systems, though facile electronic access to single dopants is exceedingly difficult. We therefore characterize detection sensitivities of frequency-modulated CW-EDMR of phosphorus donors in silicon Si:P using a home-built 2.5 GHz system (~80 mT) at 5 K. An arbitrary waveform generator controls the frequency modulation, allowing us to optimize the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of both the dangling bond and phosphorus donor signals against multiple experimental parameters, such as modulation amplitude and modulation frequency. The optimal range of frequency modulation parameters is constrained by the relaxation time of the phosphorous electron at 5 K, resulting in the same sensitivity limit as field modulated CW-EDMR, but offers some technical advantages; e.g. reducing the relative contribution of magnetic field induced currents and eliminating the need for field modulation coils. We further characterize the EDMR SNR in Si:P as a function of optical excitation energy by using a narrow line laser, tunable across donor exciton and band gap states.

  20. Stationary Inverted Balmer and Lyman populations for a CW HI water-plasma laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Randell L.

    2002-10-01

    Stationary inverted H Balmer and Lyman populations were observed from a low pressure water-vapor microwave discharge plasma. The ionization and population of excited atomic hydrogen levels was attributed to energy provided by a catalytic resonance energy transfer between hydrogen atoms and molecular oxygen formed in the water plasma. The catalysis mechanism was supported by the observation of O^2+ and H Balmer line broadening of 55 eV compared to 1 eV for hydrogen alone. The high hydrogen atom temperature with a relatively low electron temperature, Te = 2 eV, exhibited characteristics of cold recombining plasmas. These conditions of a water plasma favored an inverted population in the lower levels. Thus, the catalysis of atomic hydrogen may pump a cw HI laser. From our results, laser oscillations are may be possible from (i) n = 3, n = 4, n = 5, n = 6, n = 7, and n = 8 to n = 2, (ii) n = 4, n = 5, n = 6, and n = 7 to n = 3 and (iii) n = 5 and n = 6 to n = 4. Lines of the Balmer series of n = 5, and n = 6 to n = 2 and the Paschen series of n = 5 to n = 3 were of particular importance because of the potential to design blue and 1.3 micron infrared lasers, respectively, which are ideal for many communications and microelectronics applications. At a microwave input power of 9W/cm^3, a collisional radiative model showed that the hydrogen excited state population distribution was consistent with an n = 1arrow5,6 pumping power of an unprecedented 200W/cm^3. High power hydrogen gas lasers are anticipated at wavelengths, over a broad spectral range from far infrared to violet which may be miniaturized to micron dimensions. Such a hydrogen laser represents the first new atomic gas laser in over a decade, and it may prove to be the most efficient, versatile, and useful of all. A further application is the direct generation of electrical power using photovoltaic conversion of the spontaneous or stimulated water vapor plasma emission.

  1. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, VR

    2006-08-01

    The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

  2. Microwave Workshop for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin

    1998-01-01

    "Microwave Workshop for Windows" consists of three programs that act as teaching aid and provide a circuit design utility within the field of microwave engineering. The first program is a computer representation of a graphical design tool; the second is an accurate visual and analytical representation of a microwave test bench; the third is a more…

  3. Control of soliton train transmission, storage, and clock recovery by cw light injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wabnitz, S.

    1996-12-01

    The Gordon-Haus time jitter and the soliton-soliton interactions in a soliton fiber loop memory or in a transmission link may be suppressed by the periodic injection of a weak cw control beam. In the case of a fiber ring cavity cw injection may also permit clock regeneration from a randomly modulated soliton train. .

  4. The 1.083 micron tunable CW semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. S.; Chen, Jan-Shin; Lu, Ken-Gen; Ouyang, Keng

    1991-01-01

    A tunable CW laser is desired to produce light equivalent to the helium spectral line at 1.08 microns. This laser will serve as an optical pumping source for He-3 and He-4 atoms used in space magnetometers. This light source can be fabricated either as a semiconductor laser diode or a pumped solid state laser. Continuous output power of greater than 10 mW is desired. Semiconductor lasers can be thermally tuned, but must be capable of locking onto the helium resonance lines. Solid state lasers must have efficient pumping sources suitable for space configuration. Additional requirements are as follows: space magnetometer applications will include low mass (less than 0.5 kg), low power consumption (less than 0.75 W), and high stability/reliability for long missions (5-10 years).

  5. Concepts for the JLab Ampere-Class CW Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    R. Rimmer; E.F. Daly; W.R. Hicks; J. Henry; J. Preble; M. Stirbet; H. Wang; K.M. Wilson; G. Wu

    2005-05-01

    We describe the concepts and developments underway at JLab as part of the program to develop a new CW cryomodule capable of transporting ampere-level beam currents in a compact FEL. Requirements include real-estate gradient of at least 10 MV/m and very strong HOM damping to push BBU thresholds up by two or more orders of magnitude compared to existing designs. Cavity shape, HOM damping, power couplers, tuners etc. are being designed and optimized for this application. Cavity considerations include a large iris for beam halo, low-RF losses, HOM frequencies and Q's, low peak surface fields, field flatness and microphonics. Module considerations include high packing factor, low static heat leak, image current heating of beam-line components, cost and maintainability. This module is being developed for the next generation ERL based high power FELs but may be useful for other applications such as electron cooling, electron-ion colliders, industrial processing etc.

  6. CW laser generated ultrasound techniques for microstructure material properties evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thursby, Graham; Culshaw, Brian; Pierce, Gareth; Cleary, Alison; McKee, Campbell; Veres, Istvan

    2009-03-01

    Mechanical properties of materials may be obtained from the inversion of ultrasonic Lamb wave dispersion curves. In order to do this broadband excitation and detection of ultrasound is required. As sample size and, in particular, thickness, are reduced to those of microstructures, ultrasound frequencies in the range of the gigahertz region will be required. We look at two possible cw laser excitation techniques which, having far lower peak powers than the more frequently used Q-switched lasers, therefore give a negligible risk of damaging the sample through ablation. In the first method the modulation frequency of a sinusoidally modulated laser is swept over the required range. In the second, the laser is modulated with a series of square pulses whose timing is given by a PRBS (pseudo random binary sequence) in the form of a modified m-sequence.

  7. Low power cw-laser signatures on human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Lihachev, A; Lesinsh, J; Jakovels, D; Spigulis, J

    2011-01-24

    Impact of cw laser radiation on autofluorescence features of human skin is studied. Two methods of autofluorescence detection are applied: the spectral method with the use of a fibreoptic probe and spectrometer for determining the autofluorescence recovery kinetics at a fixed skin area of {approx}12 mm{sup 2}, and the multispectral visualisation method with the use of a multispectral imaging camera for visualising long-term autofluorescence changes in a skin area of {approx}4 cm{sup 2}. The autofluorescence recovery kinetics after preliminary laser irradiation is determined. Skin autofluorescence images with visible long-term changes - 'signatures' of low power laser treatment are acquired. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  8. Operational experience with CW high gradient and high QL cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Hovater, J. Curt; Allison, Trent L.; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Daly, Edward F.; Drury, Michael A.; Lahti, George E.; Mounts, Clyde I.; Nelson, Richard M.; Plawski, Tomasz E.

    2014-12-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of ten new 100 MV cryomodules (80 cavities). The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at an accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m with a QL of 3×107. The RF system employs single cavity control using new digital LLRF controls and 13 kW klystrons. Recently, all of the new cryomodules and associated RF hardware and software have been commissioned and operated in the CEBAF accelerator. Electrons at linac currents up to 10 ?A have been successfully accelerated and used for nuclear physics experiments. This paper reports on the commissioning and operation of the cryomodules and RF system.

  9. The reliability of /AlGa/As CW laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettenberg, M.; Kressel, H.

    1980-02-01

    Major factors bearing on the reliability of (AlGa)As CW laser diodes are reviewed with attention given to the degradation modes of facet mirror damage, contact degradation, and internal damage. Detailed results are provided for the oxide-defined stripe-contact double-heterojunction lasers operated for more than 40,000 h with extrapolations indicating a median time to failure between 100,000 and 1,000,000. Facet damage and contact degradation appear to be under control, and internal damage remains the dominant failure mechanism. Most of the data deals with threshold current increase; however, shifts in far-field pattern and changes in laser modulation characteristics, including self-sustained oscillations, may affect laser performance in real systems.

  10. Parametric four-wave mixing using a single cw laser.

    PubMed

    Brekke, E; Alderson, L

    2013-06-15

    Four-wave mixing can be used to generate coherent output beams, with frequencies difficult to acquire in commercial lasers. Here, a single narrow external cavity diode laser locked to the two photon 5s-5d transition in rubidium is combined with a tapered amplifier system to produce a high power cw beam at 778 nm and used to generate coherent light at 420 nm through parametric four-wave mixing. This process is analyzed in terms of the intensity and frequency of the incoming beam as well as the atomic density of the sample. The efficiency of the process is currently limited when on resonance due to the absorption of the 420 nm beam, and modifications should allow a significant increase in output power. PMID:23939005

  11. Characterization of a THz CW spectrometer pumped at 1550 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Woon-Gi; Nahar, Niru K.

    2015-07-01

    We present an evaluation of a cost-effective THz CW spectrometer pumped at 1550 nm wavelengths with a fixed delay line. To study the spectral competence of the spectrometer, transmission data is obtained for various organic and inorganic samples. Spectral comparisons of the samples are presented by using THz time domain spectroscopy and vector network analyzer (VNA). Despite the capability of highly resolved transmission spectroscopy, our current system reveals the uncertainty in interferometric output data for phase analysis. Here, we identify the effect of fringing space of raw output data toward frequency resolution, phase analysis, and data acquisition time. We also propose the proper delay line setup for phase analysis for this type of spectrometers.

  12. Quasi-cw tissue transillumination at 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernini, Umberto; Ramaglia, Antonio; Russo, Paolo

    1997-08-01

    An extended series of transillumination experiments has been performed in vitro on animal samples (bovine muscle, up to 30- mm-thick; chicken wing and quail femur, 12-mm-thick) and in vivo on the human hand (thickness, about 20 mm), using a pulsed light source (7 ns, about 10-4 J/pulse, 10 Hz rep rate) from a collimated (1.2 m) Nd:YAG laser beam (1064 nm). A PIN photodiode connected to a digital oscilloscope was used to measure the maximum intensity of the beam pulse transmitted through the sample (i.e., no temporal discrimination of the output signal was attempted) while it was scanned across the source/detector assembly. One dimensional scans were performed on bovine muscle samples in which thin metallic test objects were embedded, in order to study the spatial resolution of the technique (for bovine muscle at 1064 nm, absorption and reduced scattering coefficients are reported to be about 1 cm-1 and 3 cm-1, respectively). The measured spatial resolution was as good as 3.6 mm in 30 mm of tissue thickness. In the two-dimensional scans of the chicken and quail sample, fat and bone tissues can be easily seen with good resolution, whereas imaging of the middle finger of a human hand shows cartilaginoid and bone tissue with 1 - 2 mm resolution. Hence, this simple collimated quasi-cw technique gives significantly better results for tissue imaging than pure cw transillumination. Use of (pulsed) light above 1000 nm and a high energy content per pulse are supposed to explain the positive experimental findings.

  13. Microwave spectroscopy of chemical warfare agents: prospects for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Alan C.; Jensen, James O.; Suenram, Richard D.; Hight Walker, Angela R.; Woolard, Dwight L.

    1999-07-01

    The high level of interest in the sensor development community in millimeter wave technology development demonstrates the potential for several multipurpose applications of millimeter wave sensors. The potential for remote sensing of hazardous chemical materials based on their millimeter wave rotational signatures is yet another possible applications, offering certain distinct advantages over FTIR remote sensing. The high specificity of the rotational spectra to the molecular structures affords the capability of detecting chemical warfare (CW) agents and degradation products in complex mixtures including water vapor and smoke, an important consideration in military applications. Furthermore, the rotational modes are not complicated by electronic or vibrational transitions, reducing the potential for false alarms. We have conducted microwave spectroscopic measurements on two CW nerve agents (sarin and soman) and one blister agent (H-mustard). The assignment of the observed band furnishes us with an extremely accurate tool for predicting the rotational spectrum of these agents at any arbitrary frequency. By factoring in the effects of pressure (Lorentzian broadening and intensity reduction), we present the predicted spectral signatures of the CW agents in the 80 - 300 GHz region. This frequency regime is important for atmospheric monitoring as it exploits the wide bandwidth capability of millimeter wave sensors as well as the atmospheric windows that occur in this region.

  14. Medical applications of microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, Jan; Lapes, M.

    2004-04-01

    Medical applications of microwaves (i.e. a possibility to use microwave energy and/or microwave technique and technology for therapeutical purposes) are a quite new and a very rapidly developing field. Microwave thermotherapy is being used in medicine for the cancer treatment and treatment of some other diseases since early eighties. In this contribution we would like to offer general overview of present activities in the Czech Republic, i.e. clinical applications and results, technical aspects of thermo therapeutic equipment and last but not least, prospective diagnostics based on microwave principals ant technology and instrumentation.

  15. Microwave sintering of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    Successful adaptation of microwave heating to the densification of ceramic materials require a marriage of microwave and materials technologies. Using an interdisciplinary team of microwave and materials engineers, we have successfully demonstrated the ability to density ceramic materials over a wide range of temperatures. Microstructural evolution during microwave sintering has been found to be significantly different from that observed in conventional sintering. Our results and those of others indicate that microwave sintering has the potential to fabricate components to near net shape with mechanical properties equivalent to hot pressed or hot isostatically pressed material. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  16. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  17. Dosimetry considerations in far field microwave exposure of mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meltz, M.L.; Eagan, P.; Harris, C.R.; Erwin, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    A circulating water bath exposure system has been designed for in vitro radiofrequency radiation (RFR) exposure studies in the 915 to 2450 MHz range. A Styrofoam float, in which 10 T-25 plastic tissue culture flasks are embedded, is rotated at approximately 20 rpm in a Plexiglas water bath at a distance beneath a rectangular horn. The continuous circular rotation of the flasks is designed to average out the heterogeneity present in stationary flask exposures. The rotation also serves to prevent the establishment of chemical gradients in the medium within the flasks. Several factors have been demonstrated to affect the specific absorption rate (SAR) measured in the medium in the exposed flasks. These factors include: 1) the position of the exposure flasks relative to the long axis of the antenna horn; 2) whether the flasks are exposed while stationary or in rotation; 3) the volume of the medium contained in the flask; and 4) the depth in the medium in the flask at which temperatures for SAR calculation are measured. The presence of cells in the exposure flask (as attached monolayer or cell suspension) did not result in an SAR different from that measured in the same volume of medium without cells present.

  18. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  19. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  20. Microwave Plasma Window Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, Andrew; Zheng, Peng; Franzi, Matthew; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Plasma, Pulsed Power,; Microwave Laboratory Team

    2011-10-01

    The microwave plasma window is an experiment designed to promote RF breakdown in a controlled vacuum-gas environment using a DC bias. Experimental data has shown that this DC bias will significantly reduce the RF power required to yield breakdown, a feature also shown in recent simulation. The cross-polarized conducting array is biased at (100's V) DC on the surface of a Lucite vacuum window. Microwave power is supplied to the window's surface by a single 1-kW magnetron operating at 2.45 GHz CW. The goal of this project is to establish controllable characteristics relating vacuum pressure, DC bias, RF power required for surface breakdown, as well as RF transmission after the formation of plasma. Experimental data will be compared with multipactor susceptibility curves generated using a Monte Carlo simulation which incorporates an applied DC bias and finite pressures of air and argon. Research supported by an AFOSR grant on the Basic Physics of Distributed Plasma Discharge, AFRL, L-3 Communications, and Northrop Grumman.

  1. Picosecond Measurements with Mode-Locked CW Lasers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosaad, Neamat Roushdy M.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The characteristics of output pulses from a synchronously and hybridly mode-locked CW Rhodamine 6G dye laser were studied in detail by both spectral and temporal measurements. In a synchronous system, the observed spectrum was found to change from deeply channelled to nearly smooth according to the position of the birefringent filter. The output pulses were nearly transform-limited and believed to have a single-sided exponential shape. Hybridly CW mode-locked dye laser was a more reliable source for generating broadly tunable subpicosecond pulses, compared to a synchronously mode-locked laser. With carefull adjustment of the dye laser and the saturable absorber concentration (DQOCI) mixed with R6G in a single dye jet stream, pulses as short as 0.21 ps have been obtained with a compression factor of 5. The observed spectrum showed asymmetric broadening at the long-wavelength side alone. The SHG autocorrelation traces showed broad wings with exponential-like shape. The time-bandwidth product for these pulses were about three to seven times larger than that for the transform-limited pulse with single-sided exponential shape. This suggest that the pulse is largely frequency-chirped which can consistently be explained by taking into account the nonlinear process of self-phase modulation due to optical Kerr effect in a mixed dye jet stream. The timing pulse jitter was reduced by a factor of 2.4 due to mode-locking stabilization. Optical pulse compression utilizing nonlinear propagation in single-mode fibres was studied. The propagation in the fibre broadens and chirps the pulse due to the combined action of group velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. The channelled spectrum disappeared completely and a smooth Gaussian shape was observed with the same overall width. The pulse can then be compressed by passage through a suitable dispersive delay line. Short pulses were obtained with a

  2. Effect of a weak CW trigger on optical rogue waves in the femtosecond supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Duan, Xiaoqi

    2015-06-15

    We numerically study the characteristics of optical rogue waves in the femtosecond supercontinuum (SC) generation and use the CW triggering mechanism to control the SC generation. Detailed simulation results show for the first time that a weak CW trigger can manipulate the behaviors of optical rogue waves in the femtosecond SC regime. For the proposed CW triggering technique which requires only wavelength tuning and is a handy approach for the active control of SC, the resultant spectrum can be greatly broadened, and the noise properties of the SC can be significantly improved in terms of both of the coherence and intensity stability. PMID:26193609

  3. Adapting TESLA technology for future cw light sources using HoBiCaT.

    PubMed

    Kugeler, O; Neumann, A; Anders, W; Knobloch, J

    2010-07-01

    The HoBiCaT facility has been set up and operated at the Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin and BESSY since 2005. Its purpose is testing superconducting cavities in cw mode of operation and it was successfully demonstrated that TESLA pulsed technology can be used for cw mode of operation with only minor changes. Issues that were addressed comprise of elevated dynamic thermal losses in the cavity walls, necessary modifications in the cryogenics and the cavity processing, the optimum choice of operational parameters such as cavity temperature or bandwidth, the characterization of higher order modes in the cavity, and the usability of existing tuners and couplers for cw. PMID:20687747

  4. Adapting TESLA technology for future cw light sources using HoBiCaT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugeler, O.; Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-07-01

    The HoBiCaT facility has been set up and operated at the Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin and BESSY since 2005. Its purpose is testing superconducting cavities in cw mode of operation and it was successfully demonstrated that TESLA pulsed technology can be used for cw mode of operation with only minor changes. Issues that were addressed comprise of elevated dynamic thermal losses in the cavity walls, necessary modifications in the cryogenics and the cavity processing, the optimum choice of operational parameters such as cavity temperature or bandwidth, the characterization of higher order modes in the cavity, and the usability of existing tuners and couplers for cw.

  5. Development of a high power microwave thruster, with a magnetic nozzle, for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, John L.; Chapman, Randall A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the current development of a high-power microwave electrothermal thruster (MET) concept at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Such a thruster would be employed in space for applications such as orbit raining, orbit maneuvering, station change, and possibly trans-lunar or trans-planetary propulsion of spacecraft. The MET concept employs low frequency continuous wave (CW) microwave power to create and continuously pump energy into a flowing propellant gas at relative high pressure via a plasma discharge. The propellant is heated to very high bulk temperatures while passing through the plasma discharge region and then is expanded through a throat-nozzle assembly to produce thrust, as in a conventional rocket engine. Apparatus, which is described, is being assembled at NASA Lewis to test the MET concept to CW power levels of 30 kW at a frequency of 915 MHz. The microwave energy is applied in a resonant cavity applicator and is absorbed by a plasma discharge in the flowing propellant. The ignited plasma acts as a lossy load, and with optimal tuning, energy absorption efficiencies over 95 percent (based on the applied microwave power) are expected. Nitrogen, helium, and hydrogen will be tested as propellants in the MET, at discharge chamber pressures to 10 atm.

  6. Microwave Lightcraft concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Looking like an alien space ship or a flying saucer the Microwave Lightcraft is an unconventional launch vehicle approach for delivering payload to orbit using power transmitted via microwaves. Microwaves re beamed from either a ground station or an orbiting solar power satellite to the lightcraft. The energy received breaks air molecules into a plasma and a magnetohydrodynamic fanjet provides the lifting force. Only a small amount of propellant is required for circulation, attitude control and deorbit.

  7. Enhanced production of ECR plasma by using pulse mode microwaves on a large bore ECRIS with permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-11-06

    In order to enhance the efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for a broad and dense ion beam source at low pressure, the magnetic field configuration is constructed by all permanent magnets. By using the pulse mode, we aim at the generation of plasma with parameters that cannot be achieved in the CW mode at microwave frequencies of 11-13GHz, under the constraint of the same average incident microwave powers. It is found that the total beam currents are increased by the pulse mode operation compared with the case of the CW mode. According to probe measurements of the ECR plasma, it is found that the electron density in the pulse mode is larger than that in the CW mode, while the electron temperatures in the pulse mode are lower than that in the CW mode. These results are discussed from the viewpoint of relaxation times obtained on plasma parameters and ECR efficiency. The cause of the beam current increment and operational windows spread due to the pulse mode are also discussed on these parameters suitable to production of molecular/cluster ions.

  8. Investigation of RF excited CW CO2 waveguide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1984-01-01

    The RF excited 2 to 3W CW CO2 waveguide lasers with lifetimes of the order of 10(4) to 2.10(4) hours were produced. This was achieved with CO and N2 bearing gas mixtures and with internal as well as external discharge electrodes. It is noted that these tests were conducted with unstabilized lasers which drift around in their signatures. The average power output was reduced to about one half of the highest peak power output in the signature. One of the lasers, no. 1.1, still shows 60% of its original output power after it was cycled on and off every 10 minutes for more than 50,000 times. The starting voltage and driving point impedance of the RF excited gas discharge structure for different gas pressures and mixtures were measured. These data will serve as a basis for the matching and starting network optimization. The second laser body was frit and indium sealed. To our a vacuum leak between the bore and electrode holes was noted. The leak seems to be due to a defect or crack in the BeO body.

  9. CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago

    2011-04-01

    Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong focusing optics are expected to mitigate space charge effects, and a recent innovation in design has coupled stable tunes with isochronous orbits, making the FFAG capable of fixed-frequency, CW acceleration, as in the classical cyclotron. This paper reports on these new advances in FFAG accelerator technology and references advanced modeling tools for fixed-field accelerators developed for and unique to the code COSY INFINITY.

  10. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymeric materials. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIM Materials Program, allows the authors, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of various thermoset resins will be studied because it holds the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components or in-situ curing of adhesives, including metal-to-metal. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  11. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymer composites. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIC Materials Program, will allow us, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of thermoset resins will be studied because it hold the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  12. Detection of undistorted continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra with non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) of the magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Camenisch, Theodore G.; Ratke, Joseph J.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Hyde, James S.

    2011-01-01

    A continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum is typically displayed as the first harmonic response to the application of 100 kHz magnetic field modulation, which is used to enhance sensitivity by reducing the level of 1/f noise. However, magnetic field modulation of any amplitude causes spectral broadening and sacrifices EPR spectral intensity by at least a factor of two. In the work presented here, a CW rapid-scan spectroscopic technique that avoids these compromises and also provides a means of avoiding 1/f noise is developed. This technique, termed non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) EPR, consists of repetitively sweeping the polarizing magnetic field in a linear manner over a spectral fragment with a small coil at a repetition rate that is sufficiently high that receiver noise, microwave phase noise, and environmental microphonics, each of which has 1/f characteristics, are overcome. Nevertheless, the rate of sweep is sufficiently slow that adiabatic responses are avoided and the spin system is always close to thermal equilibrium. The repetitively acquired spectra from the spectral fragment are averaged. Under these conditions, undistorted pure absorption spectra are obtained without broadening or loss of signal intensity. A digital filter such as a moving average is applied to remove high frequency noise, which is approximately equivalent in bandwidth to use of an integrating time constant in conventional field modulation with lock-in detection. Nitroxide spectra at L- and X-band are presented. PMID:21741868

  13. Design, construction and evaluation of a 12.045 GHz, 2.0 kW-cw permanent-magnet focused klystron amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishida, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a lightweight, high-efficiency, 1-2 kW cw, permanent magnet focused klystron operating at 12.0 GHz was described. The design is based on use of a samarium-cobalt permanent magnet for focusing of the electron beam and choice of the most optimum parameters for maximum efficiency. A filter-loaded output circuit is used for the required bandwidth. The design incorporates a collector which is demountable from the tube to facilitate multistage depressed collector experiments, permitting replacement with a NASA-designed axisymmetric, electrostatic collector for linear beam microwave tubes. A further requirement is that the focusing field between the last interaction gap and the collector decay in a prescribed manner referred to as adiabatic expansion.

  14. Design, construction and evaluation of a 12.2 GHz, 4.0 kW-CW high efficiency klystron amplifier. [for satellite-borne TV broadcast transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishida, J. M.; Brodersen, L. K.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program is described, for studying design techniques for optimizing the conversion efficiency of klystron amplifiers, and to utilize these techniques in the development and fabrication of an X-band 4 kW cw klystron, for use in satellite-borne television broadcast transmitters. The design is based on a technique for increasing the RF beam current by using the second harmonic space charge forces in the bunched beam. Experimental analysis was also made of a method to enhance circuit efficiency in the klystron cavities. The design incorporates a collector which is demountable from the tube to facilitate multistage depressed collector experiments employing an axisymmetric, electrostatic collector for linear beam microwave tubes.

  15. EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE-EXPOSURE AND TEMPERATURE ON SURVIVAL OF MICE INFECTED WITH 'STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE' (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Female CD-1 mice were injected with an LD50 dose of Streptococcus pneumoniae and then exposed to 2.45 GHz (CW) microwave radiation at an incident power density of 10 mW/cm2 (SAR approximately equals 6.8 W/kg), 4 h/d for 5 d at ambient temperatures of 19, 22, 25, 28, 31, 34, 37 an...

  16. Transpupillary CW YAG laser coagulation. A comparison with argon green and krypton red lasers.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Conway, M D; House, B

    1983-08-01

    The authors have developed a CW YAG laser for transpupillary coagulation. The effects of CW YAG coagulation on the retina, retinal vessels, and fovea were compared with those produced by the krypton red and argon green lasers. To produce threshold coagulative lesions in monkeys and rabbits, we needed five to ten times more energy with the CW YAG than with the krypton red or argon green lasers. Nerve fiber damage was observed only when coagulating retinal vessels with the argon green laser. At the parameters used, none of the lasers damaged the sensory retina of the fovea. The CW YAG may be used as a new mode of laser coagulation in the treatment of retinal diseases. PMID:6688868

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Ralstonia pickettii Strains SSH4 and CW2, Isolated from Space Equipment.

    PubMed

    Monsieurs, Pieter; Mijnendonckx, Kristel; Provoost, Ann; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Ott, C Mark; Leys, Natalie; Van Houdt, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii SSH4 and CW2 were isolated from space equipment. Here, we report their draft genome sequences with the aim of gaining insight into their potential to adapt to these environments. PMID:25189592

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Ralstonia pickettii Strains SSH4 and CW2, Isolated from Space Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Monsieurs, Pieter; Mijnendonckx, Kristel; Provoost, Ann; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Ott, C. Mark; Leys, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii SSH4 and CW2 were isolated from space equipment. Here, we report their draft genome sequences with the aim of gaining insight into their potential to adapt to these environments. PMID:25189592

  19. Attogram measurement of rare isotopes by CW resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, B.A.

    1992-05-01

    Three-color double-resonance ionization mass spectrometry, using two single-frequency cw dye lasers and a cw carbon dioxide laser, has been applied to the detection of attogram quantities of rare radionuclides. {sup 210}Pb has been measured in human hair and brain tissue samples to assess indoor radon exposure. Measurements on {sup 90}Sr have shown overall isotopic selectivity of greater than 10{sup 9} despite unfavorable isotope shifts relative to the major stable isotope, {sup 88}Sr.

  20. Natural gas leaks detection by spatial-resolvable-CW-laser-based remote monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Agishev, R.R.; Bajazitov, R.A.; Galeyev, M.M.; Ismagilow, Z.B.

    1996-12-31

    The opportunities of spatial-resolvable atmosphere monitoring and atmospheric pollutions remote chemical analysis based on the CW-laser radiants are investigated. A frequency-responsive processing peculiarities of atmosphere remote sensing signals are described. Application of the mentioned approach for the limited hydrocarbons remote detection and sensing is discussed. The requirements to the CW-LIDAR receiving and radiating systems parameters are formulated. The evaluations of the system sensitivity limit, measurement accuracy and accuracy increase ways are presented.

  1. CW operation of an intracavity pumped molecular submillimeter-wave laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    The 373-micron line of CH3CN was operated in a CW mode in an arrangement where the submillimeter (SMM)-wave laser is placed inside the resonator of the CO2 pump laser. 1 mW of CW output power was obtained; this is five times the power of a comparable SMM-wave laser in the common extracavity arrangement. In a pulsed mode, a peak power of 46 mW was measured.

  2. Gyrotron FU CW VII for 300 MHz and 600 MHz DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, Toshitaka; Kosuga, Kosuke; Agusu, La; Ogawa, Isamu; Takahashi, Hiroki; Smith, Mark E.; Dupree, Ray

    2010-07-01

    Gyrotron FU CW VII, one of the FU CW Series Gyrotrons, has been designed, constructed and completed operational tests successfully in the Research Center for Development of Far Infrared Region, University of Fukui (FIR FU). The gyrotron operates at around 200 GHz for the fundamental cyclotron resonances and at around 400 GHz for the second harmonics. These radiation frequencies will be applied to 300 MHz and 600 MHz DNP enhanced NMR spectroscopy.

  3. Quantitative cw Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for the Analysis of Local Water Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Franck, John M.; Pavlova, Anna; Scott, John A.; Han, Songi

    2013-01-01

    Liquid state Overhauser Effect Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) has experienced a recent resurgence of interest. The ODNP technique described here relies on the double resonance of electron spin resonance (ESR) at the most common, i.e. X-band (~ 10 GHz), frequency and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at ~ 15 MHz. It requires only a standard continuous wave (cw) ESR spectrometer with an NMR probe inserted or built into an X-band cavity. Our focus lies on reviewing a new and powerful manifestation of ODNP as a high frequency NMR relaxometry tool that probes dipolar cross relaxation between the electron spins and the 1H nuclear spins at X-band frequencies. This technique selectively measures the translational mobility of water within a volume extending 0.5–1.5 nm outward from a nitroxide radical spin probe that is attached to a targeted site of a macromolecule. This method has been applied to study the dynamics of water that hydrates or permeates the surface or interior of proteins, polymers, and lipid membrane vesicles. We begin by reviewing the recent advances that have helped develop ODNP into a tool for mapping the dynamic landscape of hydration water with sub-nanometer locality. In order to bind this work coherently together, and to place it in the context of the extensive body of research in the field of NMR relaxometry, we then rephrase the analytical model and extend the description of the ODNP-derived NMR signal enhancements. This extended model highlights several aspects of ODNP data analysis, including the importance of considering all possible effects of microwave sample heating, the need to consider the error associated with various relaxation rates, and the unique ability of ODNP to probe the electron–1H cross-relaxation process, which is uniquely sensitive to fast (tens of ps) dynamical processes. By implementing the relevant corrections in a stepwise fashion, this paper draws a consensus result from previous ODNP procedures, and then shows

  4. MICROWAVES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of microwaves, a non-ionizing radiation, on organic reactions is described both in polar solvents and under solvent-free conditions. The special applications are highlighted in the context of solventless organic synthesis which involve microwave (MW) exposure of neat r...

  5. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  6. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-04-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  7. Television Microwave--1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Roger E.

    Since it became a reality just before World War II, terrestrial microwave has improved in systems and equipments, but with the improvements have come higher costs. Television microwave costs are so high because users are demanding more capability, land prices have increased, operating costs are higher, and there is frequency congestion along many…

  8. Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W.; Lauf, Robert J.; Johnson, Arvid C.; Thigpen, Larry T.

    1999-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  9. Forensic Application of FM-CW and Pulse Radar

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Koppenjan; R. S. Freeland; M. L. Miller; R. E. Yoder

    2003-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technology has supplied vital assistance in criminal investigations. However, law enforcement personnel desire further developments such that the technology is rapidly deployable, and that it provides both a simple user interface and sophisticated target identification. To assist in the development of target identification algorithms, our efforts involve gathering background GPR data for the various site conditions and circumstances that often typify clandestine burials. For this study, forensic anthropologists established shallow-grave plots at The University of Tennessee Anthropological Research Facility (ARF) that are specific to GPR research. These plots contain donated human cadavers lying in various configurations and depths, surrounded by assorted construction material and backfill debris. We scanned the plots using two GPR technologies: (1) a multi-frequency synthetic-aperture FM-CW radar (200-700 MHz) (GPR-X) developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Special Technologies Laboratory (STL), Bechtel Nevada (Koppenjan et al., 2000), and (2) a commercial pulse radar (SIR-20) manufactured by Geophysical Survey Systems, Inc. (400 and 900 MHz)(GSSI). The sweep-frequency data show the large biological mass decomposing within the torso as encircled ''hot spots.'' The 400-MHz pulse radar exhibit major horizontal reflectors above the body, with shadow reflectors (horizontal multiples) occurring beneath the body at 60 cm depth. The 400-MHz antenna was able to discern the grave walls and folded tarp covering the lower body. Under these moist, clay-rich conditions, the 900-MHz antenna was able to penetrate slightly beyond 30 cm beneath the concrete layer. However, neither system was able to penetrate beyond a one meter depth in the moist, clay-rich soil (fine, mixed, thermic Typic Paleudalf). Example scans from each system are provided, along with a discussion of the survey protocol and general performance.

  10. Microwave hydrology: A trilogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.; Johnston, E. J.; Girard, M. A.; Regusters, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Microwave hydrology, as the term in construed in this trilogy, deals with the investigation of important hydrological features on the Earth's surface as they are remotely, and passively, sensed by orbiting microwave receivers. Microwave wavelengths penetrate clouds, foliage, ground cover, and soil, in varying degrees, and reveal the occurrence of standing liquid water on and beneath the surface. The manifestation of liquid water appearing on or near the surface is reported by a microwave receiver as a signal with a low flux level, or, equivalently, a cold temperature. Actually, the surface of the liquid water reflects the low flux level from the cosmic background into the input terminals of the receiver. This trilogy describes and shows by microwave flux images: the hydrological features that sustain Lake Baykal as an extraordinary freshwater resource; manifestations of subsurface water in Iran; and the major water features of the Congo Basin, a rain forest.

  11. Microwave ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Thomae, Rainer W.

    2005-07-26

    A compact microwave ion source has a permanent magnet dipole field, a microwave launcher, and an extractor parallel to the source axis. The dipole field is in the form of a ring. The microwaves are launched from the middle of the dipole ring using a coaxial waveguide. Electrons are heated using ECR in the magnetic field. The ions are extracted from the side of the source from the middle of the dipole perpendicular to the source axis. The plasma density can be increased by boosting the microwave ion source by the addition of an RF antenna. Higher charge states can be achieved by increasing the microwave frequency. A xenon source with a magnetic pinch can be used to produce intense EUV radiation.

  12. Microwave radiation hazards around large microwave antenna.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klascius, A.

    1973-01-01

    The microwave radiation hazards associated with the use of large antennas become increasingly more dangerous to personnel as the transmitters go to ever higher powers. The near-field area is of the greatest concern. It has spill over from subreflector and reflections from nearby objects. Centimeter waves meeting in phase will reinforce each other and create hot spots of microwave energy. This has been measured in front of and around several 26-meter antennas. Hot spots have been found and are going to be the determining factor in delineating safe areas for personnel to work. Better techniques and instruments to measure these fields are needed for the evaluation of hazard areas.

  13. Microwave bonding of MEMS component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Mai, John D. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor); Budraa, Nasser K. (Inventor); Pike, William T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Bonding of MEMs materials is carried out using microwave. High microwave absorbing films are placed within a microwave cavity, and excited to cause selective heating in the skin of the material. This causes heating in one place more than another. Thereby minimizing the effects of the bonding microwave energy.

  14. Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Characterizing a CW Raman Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    .A relatively simple technique for characterizing an all-resonant intracavity continuous-wave (CW) solid-state Raman laser involves the use of ring-down spectroscopy. As used here, characterizing signifies determining such parameters as threshold pump power, Raman gain, conversion efficiency, and quality factors (Q values) of the pump and Stokes cavity modes. Heretofore, in order to characterize resonant-cavity-based Raman lasers, it has usually been necessary to manipulate the frequencies and power levels of pump lasers and, in each case, to take several sets of measurements. In cases involving ultra-high-Q resonators, it also has been desirable to lock pump lasers to resonator modes to ensure the quality of measurement data. Simpler techniques could be useful. In the present ring-down spectroscopic technique, one infers the parameters of interest from the decay of the laser out of its steady state. This technique does not require changing the power or frequency of the pump laser or locking the pump laser to the resonator mode. The technique is based on a theoretical analysis of what happens when the pump laser is abruptly switched off after the Raman generation reaches the steady state. The analysis starts with differential equations for the evolution of the amplitudes of the pump and Stokes electric fields, leading to solutions for the power levels of the pump and Stokes fields as functions of time and of the aforementioned parameters. Among other things, these solutions show how the ring-down time depends, to some extent, on the electromagnetic energy accumulated in the cavity. The solutions are readily converted to relatively simple equations for the parameters as functions of quantities that can be determined from measurements of the time-dependent power levels. For example, the steady-state intracavity conversion efficiency is given by G1/G2 1 and the threshold power is given by Pin(G2/G1)2, where Pin is the steady-state input pump power immediately prior to

  15. Argonne CW Linac (ACWL) -- Legacy from SDI and opportunities for the future

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, G.E.; Yule, T.J.

    1994-08-01

    The former Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) invested significant resources over a 6-year period to develop and build an accelerator to demonstrate the launching of a cw beam with characteristics suitable for a space-based Neutral Particle Beam (NPD) system. This accelerator, the CWDD (Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator) accelerator, was designed to accelerate 80 mA cw of D{sup {minus}} to 7.5 MeV. A considerable amount of hardware was constructed and installed in the Argonne-based facility, and major performance milestones were achieved before program funding from the Department of Defense ended in October 1993. Existing assets have been turned over to Argonne. Assets include a fully functional 200 kV cw D{sup {minus}} injector, a cw RFQ that has been tuned, leak checked and aligned, beam lines and a high-power beam stop, all installed in a shielded vault with appropriate safety and interlock systems. In addition, there are two high power (1 MW) cw rf amplifiers and all the ancillary power, cooling and control systems required for a high-power accelerator system. The SDI mission required that the CWDD accelerator structures operate at cryogenic temperatures (26 K), a requirement that placed severe limitations on operating period (CWDD would have provided 20 seconds of cw beam every 90 minutes). However, the accelerator structures were designed for full-power rf operation with water cooling and ACWL (Argonne Continuous Wave Linac), the new name for CWDD in its water-cooled, positive-ion configuration, will be able to operate continuously. Project status and achievements will be reviewed. Preliminary design of a proton conversion for the RFQ, and other proposals for turning ACWL into a testbed for cw-linac engineering, will be discussed.

  16. Argonne CW Linac (ACWL)—legacy from SDI and opportunities for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, G. E.; Yule, T. J.

    1995-09-01

    The former Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) invested significant resources over a 6-year period to develop and build an accelerator to demonstrate the launching of a cw beam with characteristics suitable for a space-based Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) system. This accelerator, the CWDD (Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator) accelerator, was designed to accelerate 80 mA cw of D- to 7.5 MeV. A considerable amount of hardware was constructed and installed in the Argonne-based facility, and major performance milestones were achieved before program funding from the Department of Defense ended in October 1993. Existing assets have been turned over to Argonne. Assets include a fully functional 200 kV cw D- injector, a cw RFQ that has been tuned, leak checked and aligned, beam lines and a high-power beam stop, all installed in a shielded vault with appropriate safety and interlock systems. In addition, there are two high power (1 MW) cw rf amplifiers and all the ancillary power, cooling and control systems required for a high-power accelerator system. The SDI mission required that the CWDD accelerator structures operate at cryogenic temperatures (26K), a requirement that placed severe limitations on operating period (CWDD would have provided 20 seconds of cw beam every 90 minutes). However, the accelerator structures were designed for full-power rf operation with water cooling and ACWL (Argonne Continuous Wave Linac), the new name for CWDD in its water-cooled, positive-ion configuration, will be able to operate continuously. Project status and achievements will be reviewed. Preliminary design of a proton conversion for the RFQ, and other proposals for turning ACWL into a testbed for cw-linac engineering, will be discussed.

  17. Microwave vision for robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Leon; Struckman, Keith

    1994-01-01

    Microwave Vision (MV), a concept originally developed in 1985, could play a significant role in the solution to robotic vision problems. Originally our Microwave Vision concept was based on a pattern matching approach employing computer based stored replica correlation processing. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) processor technology offers an attractive alternative to the correlation processing approach, namely the ability to learn and to adapt to changing environments. This paper describes the Microwave Vision concept, some initial ANN-MV experiments, and the design of an ANN-MV system that has led to a second patent disclosure in the robotic vision field.

  18. Microwave Comb Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    Stable reference tones aid testing and calibration of microwave receivers. Signal generator puts out stable tones in frequency range of 2 to 10 GHz at all multiples of reference input frequency, at any frequency up to 1 MHz. Called "comb generator" because spectral plot resembles comb. DC reverse-bias current switched on and off at 1 MHz to generate sharp pulses in step-recovery diode. Microwave components mounted on back of special connector containing built-in attenuator. Used in testing microwave and spread-spectrum wide-band receivers.

  19. Microwave coupler and method

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a microwave coupler for enhancing the heating or metallurgical treatment of materials within a cold-wall, rapidly heated cavity as provided by a microwave furnace. The coupling material of the present invention is an alpha-rhombohedral-boron-derivative-structure material such as boron carbide or boron silicide which can be appropriately positioned as a susceptor within the furnace to heat other material or be in powder particulate form so that composites and structures of boron carbide such as cutting tools, grinding wheels and the like can be rapidly and efficiently formed within microwave furnaces.

  20. Microwave coupler and method

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention is directed to a microwave coupler for enhancing the heating or metallurgical treatment of materials within a cold-wall, rapidly heated cavity as provided by a microwave furnace. The coupling material of the present invention is an alpha-rhombohedral-boron-derivative-structure material such as boron carbide or boron silicide which can be appropriately positioned as a susceptor within the furnace to heat other material or be in powder particulate form so that composites and structures of boron carbide such as cutting tools, grinding wheels and the like can be rapidly and efficiently formed within microwave furnaces.

  1. Microwave thawing apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Fathi, Zakaryae; Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.

    2004-06-01

    An apparatus for thawing a frozen material includes: a microwave energy source; a microwave applicator which defines a cavity for applying microwave energy from the microwave source to a material to be thawed; and a shielded region which is shielded from the microwave source, the shielded region in fluid communication with the cavity so that thawed material may flow from the cavity into the shielded region.

  2. DNA strand breaks are not induced in human cells exposed to 2.1425 GHz band CW and W-CDMA modulated radiofrequency fields allocated to mobile radio base stations.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, N; Komatsubara, Y; Takeda, H; Hirose, H; Sekijima, M; Nojima, T; Miyakoshi, J

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale in vitro study focused on the effects of low level radiofrequency (RF) fields from mobile radio base stations employing the International Mobile Telecommunication 2000 (IMT-2000) cellular system in order to test the hypothesis that modulated RF fields may act as a DNA damaging agent. First, we evaluated the responses of human cells to microwave exposure at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 80 mW/kg, which corresponds to the limit of the average whole body SAR for general public exposure defined as a basic restriction in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. Second, we investigated whether continuous wave (CW) and Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA) modulated signal RF fields at 2.1425 GHz induced different levels of DNA damage. Human glioblastoma A172 cells and normal human IMR-90 fibroblasts from fetal lungs were exposed to mobile communication frequency radiation to investigate whether such exposure produced DNA strand breaks in cell culture. A172 cells were exposed to W-CDMA radiation at SARs of 80, 250, and 800 mW/kg and CW radiation at 80 mW/kg for 2 and 24 h, while IMR-90 cells were exposed to both W-CDMA and CW radiations at a SAR of 80 mW/kg for the same time periods. Under the same RF field exposure conditions, no significant differences in the DNA strand breaks were observed between the test groups exposed to W-CDMA or CW radiation and the sham exposed negative controls, as evaluated immediately after the exposure periods by alkaline comet assays. Our results confirm that low level exposures do not act as a genotoxicant up to a SAR of 800 mW/kg. PMID:16283663

  3. Progress in CPI Microwave Tube Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Edward L.; Bohlen, Heinz

    2006-01-01

    CPI continues its role as a leading supplier of state-of-the-art, high-power microwave tubes; from linear beam, velocity- and density-modulated devices, to high frequency gyro-devices. Klystrons are the device-of-choice for many high-power microwave applications, and can provide multi-megawatts to multi-kilowatts of power from UHF to W-band, respectively. A number of recent and on-going developments will be described. At UHF frequencies, the inductive output tube (IOT) has replaced the klystron for terrestrial NTSC and HDTV broadcast, due to its high efficiency and linearity, and is beginning to see use in scientific applications requiring 300 kW or less. Recent advances have enabled use well into L-band. CPI has developed a number of multiple-beam amplifiers. The VKL-8301 multiple-beam klystron (MBK) was built for the TESLA V/UV and x-ray FEL projects, and is a candidate RF source for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We have also contributed to the development of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) high-power fundamental-mode S-band MBK. The VHP-8330B multiple-beam, high-order mode (HOM) IOT shows great promise as a compact, CW UHF source for high power applications. These topics will be discussed, along with CPI's development capabilities for new and novel applications. Most important is our availability to provide design and fabrication services to organizations requiring CPI's manufacturing and process control infrastructure to build and test state-of-the-art devices.

  4. Microwave sensing from orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritikos, H. N.; Shiue, J.

    1979-01-01

    Microwave sensors, used in conjunction with the traditional sensors of visible and infrared light to extend present capabilities of global weather forecasts and local storm watches, are discussed. The great advantage of these sensors is that they can penetrate or 'see' through cloud formations to monitor temperature, humidity and wind fields below the clouds. Other uses are that they can penetrate the earth deeper than optical and IR systems; they can control their own angle of incidence; they can detect oil spills; and they can enhance the studies of the upper atmosphere through measurement of temperature, water vapor and other gaseous species. Two types of microwave sensors, active and passive, are examined. Special attention is given to the study of the microwave radiometer and the corresponding temperature resolution as detected by the antenna. It is determined that not only will the microwave remote sensors save lives by allowing close monitoring of developing storms, but also save approximately $172 million/year.

  5. Microwave Radiation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Direct photon detector responds to microwave frequencies. Method based on trapped-ion frequency-generation standards proposed to detect radio-frequency (RF) radiation at 40.5 GHz. Technique used for directdetection (RF) communication, radar, and radio astronomy.

  6. Emitron: microwave diode

    DOEpatents

    Craig, G.D.; Pettibone, J.S.; Drobot, A.T.

    1982-05-06

    The invention comprises a new class of device, driven by electron or other charged particle flow, for producing coherent microwaves by utilizing the interaction of electromagnetic waves with electron flow in diodes not requiring an external magnetic field. Anode and cathode surfaces are electrically charged with respect to one another by electron flow, for example caused by a Marx bank voltage source or by other charged particle flow, for example by a high energy charged particle beam. This produces an electric field which stimulates an emitted electron beam to flow in the anode-cathode region. The emitted electrons are accelerated by the electric field and coherent microwaves are produced by the three dimensional spatial and temporal interaction of the accelerated electrons with geometrically allowed microwave modes which results in the bunching of the electrons and the pumping of at least one dominant microwave mode.

  7. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  8. Microwave Oven Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.; Richardson, Denise; Yan, Yuan

    1998-01-01

    Explains a series of laboratory activities which employ a microwave oven to help students understand word problems that relate to states of matter, collect data, and calculate and compare electrical costs to heat energy costs. (DDR)

  9. Single dose toxicity study of IRDye 800CW in Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Milton V.; Draney, Daniel; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Olive, D. Michael

    2010-02-01

    Fluorophore-labeled contrast imaging agents are moving toward clinical use as aids in nodal staging and intraoperative resection of tumors. Near-infrared fluorophores with defined toxicity properties will be needed before these agents can be translated to the clinic. The near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW is frequently used in its N-hydroxysuccinamide (NHS) ester form for labeling these agents. Following conjugation or breakdown of a labeled ligand, excess NHS ester is converted to the carboxylate form. We report here the results of a preliminary toxicity study on IRDye 800CW carboxylate in preparation for its use as a labeling moiety for targeted contrast agents. Male and female Sprague Dawley rats were given a single intravenous or intradermal administration of IRDye 800CW carboxylate; indocyanine green was used as a comparative control. Following administration of varying doses of either the dyes or saline, animals were observed for up to fourteen days during which time, hematological, clinical chemistry, enzymological, and histological testing was performed on animal subgroups. Under the conditions tested, a single administration of IRDye 800CW carboxylate intravenously at dose levels of 1, 5 and 20 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg intradermally produced no pathological evidence of toxicity. A dose of 20 mg/kg was identified as the NOAEL (no observed adverse effect level) following IV or ID routes of administration of IRDye 800CW.

  10. Calorimetric output power measurements on a CW 20 kW 7.16 GHz microwave transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Raul M.; Conroy, Bruce L.

    1991-01-01

    A calorimetric measurement technique developed for NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) transmitters that does not require data on the coolant's thermal parameters is described. Calibration of the measurement system is achieved by measuring the DC input power to the klystron and relating coolant temperature increases to this known power dissipation. Agreement between calorimetric and electrical measurements of total system power was good, the difference being less than 2 percent. The operation of the system was not greatly affected by the composition of the coolant, which was varied from pure water to 40 percent ethylene glycol by mass. Good accuracy was also shown at output power levels, which varied over a 3.6:1 range.

  11. Microwave emissions from snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation emitted from dry and wet snowpack in the microwave region (1 to 100 GHz) is discussed and related to ground observations. Results from theoretical model calculations match the brightness temperatures obtained by truck mounted, airborne and spaceborne microwave sensor systems. Snow wetness and internal layer structure complicate the snow parameter retrieval algorithm. Further understanding of electromagnetic interaction with snowpack may eventually provide a technique to probe the internal snow properties

  12. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  13. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  14. Microwave sintering process model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hu; Tinga, W R; Sundararaj, U; Eadie, R L

    2003-01-01

    In order to simulate and optimize the microwave sintering of a silicon nitride and tungsten carbide/cobalt toolbits process, a microwave sintering process model has been built. A cylindrical sintering furnace was used containing a heat insulating layer, a susceptor layer, and an alumina tube containing the green toolbit parts between parallel, electrically conductive, graphite plates. Dielectric and absorption properties of the silicon nitride green parts, the tungsten carbide/cobalt green parts, and an oxidizable susceptor material were measured using perturbation and waveguide transmission methods. Microwave absorption data were measured over a temperature range from 20 degrees C to 800 degrees C. These data were then used in the microwave process model which assumed plane wave propagation along the radial direction and included the microwave reflection at each interface between the materials and the microwave absorption in the bulk materials. Heat transfer between the components inside the cylindrical sintering furnace was also included in the model. The simulated heating process data for both silicon nitride and tungsten carbide/cobalt samples closely follow the experimental data. By varying the physical parameters of the sintering furnace model, such as the thickness of the susceptor layer, the thickness of the allumina tube wall, the sample load volume and the graphite plate mass, the model data predicts their effects which are helpful in optimizing those parameters in the industrial sintering process. PMID:15323110

  15. Microwave quantum illumination.

    PubMed

    Barzanjeh, Shabir; Guha, Saikat; Weedbrook, Christian; Vitali, David; Shapiro, Jeffrey H; Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-02-27

    Quantum illumination is a quantum-optical sensing technique in which an entangled source is exploited to improve the detection of a low-reflectivity object that is immersed in a bright thermal background. Here, we describe and analyze a system for applying this technique at microwave frequencies, a more appropriate spectral region for target detection than the optical, due to the naturally occurring bright thermal background in the microwave regime. We use an electro-optomechanical converter to entangle microwave signal and optical idler fields, with the former being sent to probe the target region and the latter being retained at the source. The microwave radiation collected from the target region is then phase conjugated and upconverted into an optical field that is combined with the retained idler in a joint-detection quantum measurement. The error probability of this microwave quantum-illumination system, or quantum radar, is shown to be superior to that of any classical microwave radar of equal transmitted energy. PMID:25768743

  16. Behavioral effects of microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S.

    1980-01-01

    Microwaves can produce sensations of warmth and sound in humans. In other species, they also can serve as cues, they may be avoided, and they can disrupt ongoing behavior. These actions appear to be due to heat produced by energy absorption. The rate of absorption depends on the microwave parameters and the electrical and geometric properties of the subject. We therefore, cannot predict the human response to microwaves based on data from other animals without appropriate scaling considerations. At low levels of exposure, microwaves can produce changes in behavior without large, or even measureable, changes in body temperature. Thermoregulatory behavior may respond to those low levels of heat, and thereby affect other behavior occurring concurrently. There are no data that demonstrate that behavioral effects of microwaves depend on any mechanism other than reactions to heat. Our interpretation of whether a reported behavioral effect indicates that microwaves may be hazardous depends on our having a complete description of the experiment and on our criteria of behavioral toxicity.

  17. Design considerations in achieving 1 MW CW operation with a whispering-gallery-mode gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Feinstein, J.; Hess, C.; Huey, H.; Jongewaard, E.; Jory, H.; Neilson, J.; Pendleton, R.; Pirkle, D.; Zitelli, L. )

    1989-09-01

    Varian is developing high-power, CW gyrotrons at frequencies in the range 100 GHz to 150 GHz, for use in electron cyclotron heating applications. Early test vehicles have utilized a TE{sub 15,2,1} interaction cavity, have achieved short-pulse power levels of 820 kW and average power levels of 80 kW at 140 GHz. Present tests are aimed at reaching 400 kW under CW operating conditions and up to 1 MW for short pulse durations. Work is also underway on modifications to the present design that will enable power levels of up to 1 MW CW to be achieved. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  18. CW-THz image contrast enhancement using wavelet transform and Retinex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Min; Hu, Qi-fan; Huang, Ying-Xue; Liang, Hua-Wei

    2015-10-01

    To enhance continuous wave terahertz (CW-THz) scanning images contrast and denoising, a method based on wavelet transform and Retinex theory was proposed. In this paper, the factors affecting the quality of CW-THz images were analysed. Second, an approach of combination of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and a designed nonlinear function in wavelet domain for the purpose of contrast enhancing was applied. Then, we combine the Retinex algorithm for further contrast enhancement. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method in qualitative and quantitative, it was compared with the adaptive histogram equalization method, the homomorphic filtering method and the SSR(Single-Scale-Retinex) method. Experimental results demonstrated that the presented algorithm can effectively enhance the contrast of CW-THZ image and obtain better visual effect.

  19. The experimental study of a CW 1080 nm multi-point pump fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuexia; Ge, Tingwu; Ding, Xing; Tan, Qirui; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report on a CW 1080 nm fiber laser cascaded-pumped by a CW 975 nm diode laser. The fiber used in the experiment has a core diameter of 20 μm (NA  =  0.06), inner clad of 400 μm (NA  =  0.46), and an absorption coefficient of about 1.26 dB m‑1 at 975 nm. An output power of 780 W with an optical conversion efficiency of 71% has been achieved at a pump light of 1.1 kW. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a 1080 nm CW fiber laser has used a cascaded-pump coupler.

  20. Development of voids in pulsed and CW- driven reactive plasmas with large nanoparticle density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanović, I.; Sikimić, B.; Aschinger, A.; Berndt, J.; Kovačević, E.; Winter, J.

    2015-09-01

    This contribution deals with the nanoparticle distribution inside of plasma with large nanoparticle density. In particular, the formation of voids i.e. dust-free regions in pulsed and CW discharge regime is analyzed. The discharge was ignited in a mixture of argon and acetylene in the conditions favorable for nanoparticles’ formation and growth. The temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of nanoparticles during their growth is studied experimentally by means of a laser light scattering technique. The experimental results show that the void expands much faster in the case of pulsed plasma than in the CW plasma operated for the same gas mixture and at the same (average) input power. In the CW plasma, we observed a rapid expansion of the void after some tens of minutes, whereas the corresponding process in the pulsed plasma occurred after some tens of seconds.

  1. VUV Photon Fluxes from Microwave Excited Microplasmas at Low Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Peng; Denning, Mark; Urdhal, Randall; Kushner, Mark J.

    2013-09-01

    Microplasmas in rare gases and rare gases mixtures can provide efficient and discretely tunable sources of VUV light. Microwave excited microplasma sources excited by a split-ring resonator antenna in rare gas mixtures operated in ceramic cavities with sub-mm dimensions have been developed as discretely tunable VUV sources for chemical analysis. Controlling wavelengths and the ratio of ion to VUV fluxes are important to achieving chemical selectivity. In this paper, we will discuss results from an investigation of scaling laws for the efficiency of VUV photon production in rare gas mixtures. The investigation was performed using a hydrodynamics model where the electron energy distribution and radiation transport are addressed by Monte Carlo simulations. Plasma density, VUV photon production and fluxes from the cavities will be discussed for mixtures of Ar, He, Xe, Kr, and as a function of power format (pulsing, cw), pressure and cavity sizes.

  2. High power microwave components for space communications satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankowski, H.; Geia, A.

    1972-01-01

    Analyzed, developed, and tested were high power microwave components for communications satellites systems. Included were waveguide and flange configurations with venting, a harmonic filter, forward and reverse power monitors, electrical fault sensors, and a diplexer for two channel simultaneous transmission. The assembly of 8.36 GHz components was bench tested, and then operated for 60 hours at 3.5 kW CW in a high vacuum. The diplexer was omitted from this test pending a modification of its end irises. An RF leakage test showed only that care is required at flange junctions; all other components were RF tight. Designs were extrapolated for 12 GHz and 2.64 GHz high power satellite systems.

  3. Dual diode detector for homodyne EPR microwave bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koscielniak, Janusz; Berliner, Lawrence J.

    1994-07-01

    After low noise FET amplifiers found widespread use in both X-band and low-frequency systems, it became possible to use multidiode mixers for signal detection. Here, a novel dual diode mixer is described for use in homodyne microwave bridges for both cw and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometers. The structure is composed of a 90° hybrid coupler and separate detectors in two arms. The device provides common mode rejection of noise-like regular balanced mixers but, by making diode dc currents accessible, offers big advantages for tuning of the bridge when low Q sample probes are used. Although the use of this detector does not affect sensitivity directly, tuning precision and increased long-term stability leads to unexpected improvements.

  4. Theoretical study of cw to short pulse conversion in an active cw-injected ring cavity with a Yb3+:YAG amplifier.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiyun; Bourdet, Gilbert L

    2007-05-10

    The short laser pulse generated from an active cw-injected ring cavity with Yb3+:YAG crystal, which is treated as the homogeneously broadened amplifier, is studied theoretically. Based on the derived results, the impacts of the amplifier length, the seeding laser intensity and frequency, the pump intensity, the efficiency of the acousto-optic modulator (AOM), and the frequency shift generated by the AOM on the performance of the laser pulse are analyzed. PMID:17446920

  5. Admittance Test and Conceptual Study of a CW Positron Source for CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Golge, Serkan; Hyde, Charles E.; Freyberger, Arne

    2009-09-02

    A conceptual study of a Continuous Wave (CW) positron production is presented in this paper. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) operates with a CW electron beam with a well-defined emittance, time structure and energy spread. Positrons created via bremsstrahlung photons in a high-Z target emerge with a large emittance compared to incoming electron beam. An admittance study has been performed at CEBAF to estimate the maximum beam phase space area that can be transported in the LINAC and in the Arcs. A positron source is described utilizing the CEBAF injector electron beam, and directly injecting the positrons into the CEBAF LINAC.

  6. Design of a Ka Band 35 kW CW Low-Voltage Harmonic Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Pu-Kun; Su, Yi Nong; Xu, Shou Xi; Xue, Qian Zhong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a continuous wave (CW) low-voltage second harmonic gyrotron with the conventional cavity has been preliminarily designed and evaluated with self-consistent nonlinear simulation code and the particle-in-cell code CHIPIC. The simulation results of the two codes are shown to be in agreement basically. The 35 kW CW output power of the designed harmonic gyrotron driven by a 25 kV 5.0A electron beam from a magnetron injection gun (MIG) is obtained. The maximum output power and the electronic efficiency of the gyrotron is about 35 kW and 30% respectively.

  7. Passively cooled diode lasers in the cw power range of 120 to 200W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzen, Dirk; Meusel, Jens; Schröder, Dominic; Hennig, Petra

    2008-02-01

    Improvements of laser diode bar efficiency and mounting technology have boosted output powers of passively cooled diode lasers beyond the 100W cw limit. After an introduction about reliablity statements and reliability assessment, the performance increase by technology improvements is documented in current-step failure discrimination tests. Electro-optical parameters of improved diode lasers are subsequently presented in detail as well as the results of lifetime tests at different powers and in different operation modes - steady-state and repetitive/intermittent ("hard pulse") cw operation.

  8. Effect of CW YAG and argon green lasers on experimentally detached retinas.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Conway, M D; House, B J

    1984-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of argon-green (514.5 nm) and CW neodymium YAG (1060 nm) wavelengths on experimentally detached retinas of primates. Neither laser produced damage to the sensory retina of the fovea. The argon green wavelength, which was absorbed by haemoglobin in the vessel or by extravasated red blood cells, created vasospasm and nerve fiber layer damage. The beam of the CW YAG was not absorbed by haemoglobin; therefore, no vasospasm could be produced on experimentally detached retinas. PMID:6547800

  9. Modulated Sine Waves for Differential Absorption Measurements Using a CW Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor); Lin, Bing (Inventor); Nehrir, Amin R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A continuous wave Light Detection and Ranging (CW LiDAR) system utilizes two or more laser frequencies and time or range shifted pseudorandom noise (PN) codes to discriminate between the laser frequencies. The performance of these codes can be improved by subtracting out the bias before processing. The CW LiDAR system may be mounted to an artificial satellite orbiting the earth, and the relative strength of the return signal for each frequency can be utilized to determine the concentration of selected gases or other substances in the atmosphere.

  10. Effect of scanned quasi-cw CO2 laser irradiation on tissue thermal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domankevitz, Yacov; Bua, Dominic; Chung, Jina; Hanel, Edward; Silver, Geoffrey; Nishioka, Norman S.

    1994-08-01

    Residual thermal damage produced by a scanned quasi cw CO2 laser was measured in pig skin. The effects of scan speed on thermal damage distribution for laser dwell times ranging between 1 and 150 msec were examined. Significantly larger thermal damage zones were produced along the crater wall for laser dwell times longer than 50 msec. Thermal damage along the crater base was constant independent of dwell time. The preliminary experimental results suggest that quasi cw CO2 can consistently produce less than 200 micrometers zones of thermal damage if laser parameters are carefully chosen.

  11. Diode pumped CW and passively Q-switched Nd:LGGG laser at 1062 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Jia, Z. T.; Zhang, B. T.; He, J. L.; Liu, S. D.; Yang, Y.; Tao, X. T.

    2012-05-01

    We report a Nd:LGGG laser at 1062 nm in the operations of the continuous-wave (CW) and passively Q-switching. The maximum CW output power of 5.62 W was obtained, corresponding to an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 49.0% and slope efficiency of 55.9%. By using Cr4+:YAG with initial transmission of 94% as the saturable absorber, for the first time, we got the maximum passively Q-switched output power of 1.21 W, accompanied with a highest pulse repetition rate of 27.1 kHz and a shortest pulse width of 9.1 ns.

  12. 219.3 W CW diode-side-pumped 1123 nm Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Y.; Bo, Y.; Xu, Y. T.; Yang, F.; Wang, Z. C.; Wang, B. S.; Xu, J. L.; Gao, H. W.; Peng, Q. J.; Cui, D. F.; Xu, Z. Y.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a high power continuous wave (CW) diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG laser operating at 1123 nm with a plano-plano configuration. By means of precise coating, a single 1123 nm wavelength is achieved. Under the pump power of 1080 W, an output power of 219.3 W is obtained, which corresponds to an optical-optical conversion efficiency of 20.3%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power for CW 1123 nm laser based on Nd:YAG crystal.

  13. 93.7 W 1112 nm diode-side-pumped CW Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Y.; Wang, Z. C.; Xu, Y. T.; Yang, F.; Wang, B. S.; Gao, H. W.; Bo, Y.; Peng, Q. J.; Cui, D. F.; Xu, Z. Y.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a high power continuous wave (CW) infrared laser operated at 1112 nm from a diode side-pumped Nd:YAG crystal with a plano-plano symmetrical resonator. By inserting an etalon, an output power of as high as 93.7 W at 1112 nm was obtained at the pump power of 570 W with conversion efficiency of 16.4%. The beam quality factor of M2 was measured to be about 17. The wavelength tunable performance of the etalon was also analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the highest output power at 1112 nm CW laser based on Nd:YAG crystal.

  14. Design of a microwave calorimeter for the microwave tokamak experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Marinak, M. )

    1988-10-07

    The initial design of a microwave calorimeter for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment is presented. The design is optimized to measure the refraction and absorption of millimeter rf microwaves as they traverse the toroidal plasma of the Alcator C tokamak. Techniques utilized can be adapted for use in measuring high intensity pulsed output from a microwave device in an environment of ultra high vacuum, intense fields of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and intense magnetic fields. 16 refs.

  15. MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave-accelerated chemical syntheses in various solvents as well as under solvent-free conditions have witnessed an explosive growth. The technique has found widespread application predominantly exploiting the inexpensive unmodified household microwave (MW) ovens although th...

  16. Refinement of microwave vegetation indices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous investigations have established the basis for a new type of vegetation index based on passive microwave satellite observations. These microwave vegetation indices (MVIs) have been qualitatively evaluated by examining global spatial and seasonal temporal features. Limited quantitative studie...

  17. Microwave Ablation of Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Tim J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an extremely promising heat-based thermal ablation modality that has particular applicability in treating hepatic malignancies. Microwaves can generate very high temperatures in very short time periods, potentially leading to improved treatment efficiency and larger ablation zones. As the available technology continues to improve, microwave ablation is emerging as a valuable alternative to radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. This article reviews the current state of microwave ablation including technical and clinical considerations. PMID:24436518

  18. Uniform batch processing using microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A microwave oven and microwave heating method generates microwaves within a cavity in a predetermined mode such that there is a known region of uniform microwave field. Samples placed in the region will then be heated in a relatively identical manner. Where perturbations induced by the samples are significant, samples are arranged in a symmetrical distribution so that the cumulative perturbation at each sample location is the same.

  19. Optomechanics with microwave light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Konrad

    2009-03-01

    Recently, superconducting circuits resonant at microwave frequencies have revolutionized the measurement of astrophysical detectors [1] and superconducting qubits [2]. In this talk, I will describe how we extend this technique to measuring and manipulating nanomechanical oscillators. By strongly coupling the motion of a nanomechanical oscillator to the resonance of the microwave circuit we create structures where the dominant dissipative force acting on the oscillator is the radiation pressure of microwave ``light'' [3]. These devices are ultrasensitive force detectors and they allow us to cool the oscillator towards its motional ground state. [4pt] [1] P. K. Day et al., Nature 425, 817 (2003).[0pt] [2] A. Wallraff et al., Nature 431, 162 (2004).[0pt] [3] J. D. Teufel, J. W. Harlow, C. A. Regal and K. W. Lehnert, Phys. Rev. Lett., 101, 197203 (2008).

  20. RFTF ECH microwave system

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; White, T.L.; Kimrey, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    A Radio-Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) has recently been constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for development and testing of Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) antennas under realistic fusion reactor plasma edge conditions. High-power ICH antennas must be immersed in the plasma for proper coupling of rf power and therefore are subject to particle bombardment and heat flux. In RFTF, plasma is generated and heated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with 28-GHz microwave power from a gyrotron tube. The plasma is confined in a simple magnetic mirror formed by two superconducting coils surrounding a box-shaped vacuum vessel. Using 50 kW of microwave power, a plasma with density of 5 x 10/sup 11/ cm/sup 3/ and temperature of 8 eV is obtained, a fairly good fusion research edge plasma. This presentation covers the microwave generation and transmission system plus some of the electron cyclotron heated (ECH) results on RFTF.

  1. Microwave-assisted Chemical Transformations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, there has been a considerable interest in developing sustainable chemistries utilizing green chemistry principles. Since the first published report in 1986 by Gedye and Giguere on microwave assisted synthesis in household microwave ovens, the use of microwaves as...

  2. Physics of the Microwave Oven

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This is the first of two articles about the physics of microwave ovens. This article deals with the generation of microwaves in the oven and includes the operation of the magnetrons, waveguides and standing waves in resonant cavities. It then considers the absorption of microwaves by foods, discussing the dielectric relaxation of water,…

  3. EXPOSURE OF RATS TO 425-MHZ (CW) RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION: EFFECTS ON LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four experiments were performed in which six pregnant rats were exposed from day 12 of pregnancy to parturition, for 4 hours a day in a temperature-controlled environment, to 425-MHz (CW) radiation, using a multimode rectangular strip transmission line. Four male pups born to eac...

  4. Proton beam studies with a 1.25 MeV, cw radio frequency quadrupole linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, G.O.; Hardek, T.W.; Hansborough, L.D.

    1998-12-31

    A high-current, cw linear accelerator has been proposed as a spallation neutron source driver for tritium production. Key features of this accelerator are high current (100 mA), low emittance-growth beam propagation, cw operation, high efficiency, and minimal maintenance downtime. A 268 MHz, cw radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) LINAC section and klystrode based rf system were obtained from the Chalk River Laboratories and were previously installed at LANL to support systems development and advanced studies in support of cw, proton accelerators. A variation of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) proton injector, modified to operate at 50 keV, was mated to the RFQ and was operated to support advance developments for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program. High current, proton beam studies were completed which focused on the details of injector-RFQ integration, development of beam diagnostics, development of operations procedures, and personnel and equipment safety systems integration. This development led to acceleration of up to 100 mA proton beam.

  5. CHRONIC EXPOSURE OF RATS TO 100-MHZ (CW) RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION: ASSESSMENT OF BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multidisciplinary approach was employed to assess the possible biological effects of chronic exposure of rats to 100-MHz continuous wave (CW) radiofrequency (RF) radiation. A group of 20 time-bred rats were exposed in a transverse electronmagnetic mode (TEM) transmission line t...

  6. The CW domain, a new histone recognition module in chromatin proteins.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Verena; Thorstensen, Tage; Kristiansen, Per Eugen; Veiseth, Silje Veie; Rahman, Mohummad Aminur; Finne, Kenneth; Aalen, Reidunn B; Aasland, Rein

    2011-05-18

    Post-translational modifications of the N-terminal histone tails, including lysine methylation, have key roles in regulation of chromatin and gene expression. A number of protein modules have been identified that recognize differentially modified histone tails and provide their proteins with the capacity to sense such modifications. Here, we identify the CW domain of plant and animal chromatin-related proteins as a novel module that recognizes different methylated states of lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4me). The solution structure of the CW domain of the Arabidopsis ASH1 HOMOLOG2 (ASHH2) histone methyltransferase provides insight into how different CW domains can distinguish different methylated histone tails. We provide evidence that ASHH2 is acting on H3K4me-marked genes, allowing for ASHH2-dependent H3K36 tri-methylation, which contributes to sustained expression of tissue-specific and developmentally regulated genes. This suggests that ASHH2 is a combined 'reader' and 'writer' of the histone code. We propose that different CW domains, dependent on their specificity for different H3K4 methylations, are important for epigenetic memory or participate in switching between permissive and repressive chromatin states. PMID:21522130

  7. Development of a high average power, CW, MM-wave FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ramian, G.

    1995-12-31

    Important operational attributes of FELs remain to be demonstrated including high average power and single-frequency, extremely narrow-linewidth lasing. An FEL specifically designed to achieve these goals for scientific research applications is currently under construction. Its most salient feature is operation in a continuous-wave (CW) mode with an electrostatically generated, high-current, recirculating, DC electron beam.

  8. Red-light-emitting laser diodes operating CW at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kressel, H.; Hawrylo, F. Z.

    1976-01-01

    Heterojunction laser diodes of AlGaAs have been prepared with threshold current densities substantially below those previously achieved at room temperature in the 7200-8000-A spectral range. These devices operate continuously with simple oxide-isolated stripe contacts to 7400 A, which extends CW operation into the visible (red) portion of the spectrum.

  9. Topological Invariants and CW Complexes of Cartesian Product and Hexagonal Tiling Paces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Juan García

    2011-09-01

    The cohomology of a class of cartesian product tiling spaces in N dimensions when the inflation factor is a Pisot-Vijayaraghavan unit is analyzed. A CW complex for an hexagonal tiling space is defined in terms of collared tiles for the study of its topological invariants.

  10. Characterization of High-power Quasi-cw Laser Diode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Troupaki, Elisavet; Allan, Graham R.; Kashem, Nasir B.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s requirements for high reliability, high performance satellite laser instruments have driven the investigation of many critical components; specifically, 808 nm laser diode array (LDA) pump devices. Performance and comprehensive characterization data of Quasi-CW, High-power, laser diode arrays is presented.

  11. Method for generating high-energy and high repetition rate laser pulses from CW amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-18

    A method for obtaining high-energy, high repetition rate laser pulses simultaneously using continuous wave (CW) amplifiers is described. The method provides for generating micro-joule level energy in pico-second laser pulses at Mega-hertz repetition rates.

  12. Use of Self-Management with the CW-FIT Group Contingency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamps, Debra; Conklin, Carl; Wills, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of self-management as a tier two enhancement to the group contingency intervention, Class-Wide Function-related Intervention Teams Program (CW-FIT). Two classrooms, first and fourth grade, and two students in each of the classrooms participated in the intervention. The group contingency…

  13. Characterization of IRDye 800CW chlorotoxin as a targeting agent for brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kovar, Joy L; Curtis, Evan; Othman, Shadi F; Simpson, Melanie A; Olive, D Michael

    2013-09-15

    Primary brain tumors present significant challenges for surgical resection because of their location and the frequent occurrence of malignant projections extending beyond the primary tumor. Visualization of the tumor margins during surgery is critical for a favorable outcome. We report the use of IRDye 800CW chlorotoxin (CLTX) as a targeted imaging agent for brain tumors in a spontaneous mouse model of medulloblastoma, ND2:SmoA1. Specificity and functionality of the targeted agent were confirmed in cell-based assays. Tumors were detected by magnetic resonance imaging and IRDye 800CW CLTX administered to individual animals for optical imaging at 1-month increments. The integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was measured by Evan's Blue perfusion prior to sacrifice. Results show that IRDye 800CW CLTX specifically targeted tumor tissue. The extravasation of Evan's Blue was observed in all tumors, suggesting that the presence of the tumors can introduce alterations in the permeability of the BBB. Because increased vascular permeability was observed early in the disease model, larger dye-labeled imaging agents that exceed current BBB size restrictions may warrant renewed consideration as candidates for tumor detection and surgical resection. Our study provides data characterizing in vitro and in vivo use of IRDye 800CW CLTX as a broadly applicable tumor imaging agent. PMID:23711726

  14. Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams "CW-FIT" Efficacy Trial Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard; Dawson-Bannister, Harriett; Heitzman-Powell, Linda; Kottwitz, Esther; Hansen, Blake; Fleming, Kandace

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of the Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) program for improving students' on-task behavior, and increasing teacher recognition of appropriate behavior. The intervention is a group contingency classroom management program consisting of teaching and reinforcing appropriate…

  15. New High Power CW Test Facilities For ITER ICRH Components Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, J. M.; Lombard, G.; Argouarch, A.; Chaix, J. P.; Fejoz, P.; Garibaldi, P.; Hatchressian, J. C.; Lebourg, P.; Martinez, A.; Mollard, P.; Mouyon, D.; Mougeolle, G.; Pagano, M.; Thouvenin, D.; Volpe, D.; Volpe, R.; Vulliez, K.

    2011-12-01

    First CW test bed, devoted for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH), has been built at CEA Cadarache. It has been designed for testing the ICRH antenna sub assemblies under ITER relevant conditions (vacuum, cooling and RF). This paper presents a technical overview of these facilities and discusses their future operations in the framework of the ITER ICRH European R&D program.

  16. Harmonic generation in the free-electron laser. II. cw calculation for the linearly polarized wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Abawi, H.; Moore, G.T.; Scully, M.O.

    1982-01-01

    Harmonic generation in the free-electron laser offers a possible means to extend the wavelength range of the device towards high frequency. Numerical solutions to the basic equations describing this process are shown for cw operation using a linearly polarized wiggler. Higher harmonic emission becomes enhanced as the magnetic field is increased and as the energy spread in the electron beam is reduced.

  17. Study of plasma formation in CW CO2 laser beam-metal surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Vasilchenko, Zh V.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Gresev, A. N.; Zabelin, Alexandre M.; Chubrik, N. I.; Shimanovich, V. D.

    1994-04-01

    An interaction of the cw CO2 laser beam and a moving metal surface has been studied. The pulsed and thermodynamical parameters of the surface plasma were investigated by optical and spectroscopical methods. The subsonic radiation wave propagation in the erosion plasma torch has been studied.

  18. Noise amplitude measurements of single-mode CW lasers at radio frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, G. C.; Hillard, M. E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This letter presents the results of noise measurements for a variety of single-longitudinal-mode CW lasers (Ar/+/, standing-wave-dye, and ring-dye) that are commercially available. A quantitative comparison of the total output power fluctuations detected over the 7-300 MHz region (3 dB points) is presented.

  19. Applications of FM-CW laser radar to antenna contour mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slotwinski, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The FM-CW coherent laser radar concept, based on the FM radar principle which makes use of the coherence and lunability of injection laser diodes, is discussed. Laser radar precision/time tradeoffs, block diagrams, system performance, fiber optic system implantation, and receiver improvements are briefly described.

  20. Design studies of the output system of a 95 GHz, 100 kW, CW gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Vamshi Krishna, P.; Kartikeyan, M.V. E-mail: kartik@iitr.ernet.in; Thumm, M.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the design studies of the output system of a 95 GHz, 100 kW, CW gyrotron for ECRH7ECRIS applications. During this course, the design studies of an advanced dimpled-wall quasi optical launcher, non-linear taper and RF window will be carried out. (author)

  1. 25. C.W. Todd and E.A. Rand, May 1902 'OUTLINE,' SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. C.W. Todd and E.A. Rand, May 1902 'OUTLINE,' SHOWING END AND SIDE ELEVATIONS OF THE 4,000-VOLT, ATB-TYPE GENERATORS (4 AND 5) - Washington Water Power Company Monroe Street Plant, Units 4 & 5, South Bank Spokane River, below Monroe Street Bridge, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  2. Handbook of microwave testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverghetta, T. S.

    A description of microwave test equipment is presented, taking into account signal generators, signal detection/indicating devices, auxiliary testing devices, and microwave systems. Low power, medium power, high power, and peak power measurements are considered along with noise measurements, spectrum analyzer measurements, active testing, antenna measurements, and automatic testing. Attention is given to phase noise, Q measurements, the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurement, swept impedance, noise sources, noise meters, manual noise measurements, automatic noise figure measurements, gain, gain compression, intermodulation, the third order intercept, and questions of spectral purity.

  3. Microwave Frequency Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Vien The; Mirel, Paul; Kogut, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and analysis of microwave frequency polarizing grids. The grids are designed to measure polarization from the cosmic microwave background. It is effective in the range of 500 to 1500 micron wavelength. It is cryogenic compatible and highly robust to high load impacts. Each grid is fabricated using an array of different assembly processes which vary in the types of tension mechanisms to the shape and size of the grids. We provide a comprehensive study on the analysis of the grids' wire heights, diameters, and spacing.

  4. High power microwave generator

    SciTech Connect

    Minich, Roger W.

    1988-01-01

    A device (10) for producing high-powered and coherent microwaves is described. The device comprises an evacuated, cylindrical, and hollow real cathode (20) that is driven to inwardly field emit relativistic electrons. The electrons pass through an internally disposed cylindrical and substantially electron-transparent cylindrical anode (24), proceed toward a cylindrical electron collector electrode (26), and form a cylindrical virtual cathode (32). Microwaves are produced by spatial and temporal oscillations of the cylindrical virtual cathode (32), and by electrons that reflex back and forth between the cylindrical virtual cathode (32) and the cylindrical real cathode (20).

  5. EDITORIAL: Microwave Moisture Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatze, Udo; Kupfer, Klaus; Hübner, Christof

    2007-04-01

    Microwave moisture measurements refer to a methodology by which the water content of materials is non-invasively determined using electromagnetic fields of radio and microwave frequencies. Being the omnipresent liquid on our planet, water occurs as a component in most materials and often exercises a significant influence on their properties. Precise measurements of the water content are thus extremely useful in pure sciences, particularly in biochemistry and biophysics. They are likewise important in many agricultural, technical and industrial fields. Applications are broad and diverse, and include the quality assessment of foodstuffs, the determination of water content in paper, cardboard and textile production, the monitoring of moisture in sands, gravels, soils and constructions, as well as the measurement of water admixtures to coal and crude oil in reservoirs and in pipelines. Microwave moisture measurements and evaluations require insights in various disciplines, such as materials science, dielectrics, the physical chemistry of water, electrodynamics and microwave techniques. The cooperation of experts from the different fields of science is thus necessary for the efficient development of this complex discipline. In order to advance cooperation the Workshop on Electromagnetic Wave Interaction with Water and Moist Substances was held in 1993 in Atlanta. It initiated a series of international conferences, of which the last one was held in 2005 in Weimar. The meeting brought together 130 scientists and engineers from all over the world. This special issue presents a collection of some selected papers that were given at the event. The papers cover most topics of the conference, featuring dielectric properties of aqueous materials, electromagnetic wave interactions, measurement methods and sensors, and various applications. The special issue is dedicated to Dr Andrzej W Kraszewski, who died in July 2006 after a distinguished career of 48 years in the research of

  6. Antiviral Potential of a Novel Compound CW-33 against Enterovirus A71 via Inhibition of Viral 2A Protease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Ying; Huang, An-Cheng; Hour, Mann-Jen; Huang, Su-Hua; Kung, Szu-Hao; Chen, Chao-Hsien; Chen, I-Chieh; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2015-06-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) in the Picornaviridae family causes hand-foot-and-mouth disease, aseptic meningitis, severe central nervous system disease, even death. EV-A71 2A protease cleaves Type I interferon (IFN)-α/β receptor 1 (IFNAR1) to block IFN-induced Jak/STAT signaling. This study investigated anti-EV-A7l activity and synergistic mechanism(s) of a novel furoquinoline alkaloid compound CW-33 alone and in combination with IFN-β Anti-EV-A71 activities of CW-33 alone and in combination with IFN-β were evaluated by inhibitory assays of virus-induced apoptosis, plaque formation, and virus yield. CW-33 showed antiviral activities with an IC50 of near 200 µM in EV-A71 plaque reduction and virus yield inhibition assays. While, anti-EV-A71 activities of CW-33 combined with 100 U/mL IFN-β exhibited a synergistic potency with an IC50 of approximate 1 µM in plaque reduction and virus yield inhibition assays. Molecular docking revealed CW-33 binding to EV-A71 2A protease active sites, correlating with an inhibitory effect of CW33 on in vitro enzymatic activity of recombinant 2A protease IC50 = 53.1 µM). Western blotting demonstrated CW-33 specifically inhibiting 2A protease-mediated cleavage of IFNAR1. CW-33 also recovered Type I IFN-induced Tyk2 and STAT1 phosphorylation as well as 2\\',5\\'-OAS upregulation in EV-A71 infected cells. The results demonstrated CW-33 inhibiting viral 2A protease activity to reduce Type I IFN antagonism of EV-A71. Therefore, CW-33 combined with a low-dose of Type I IFN could be applied in developing alternative approaches to treat EV-A71 infection. PMID:26090728

  7. Microwave Treatment as a Pesticide Alternative for Stored-Products

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; Forrester, S.C.; Halverson, S.; Halverson, B.; Phillips, T.

    2003-05-21

    This CRADA was a continuation of earlier work with Micro-Grain, Inc. to develop power, high frequency microwave treatment process to treat insect infested grain. ORNLs role was as a subcontractor to Micro-Grain's Phase II SBIR project funded by the US Department of Agriculture. The primary objective was to develop a commercial scale prototype unit capable of treating infested grain at flow rates approaching 1 kg/sec, which is required to be viable in the grain handling industry. A flow rate of {approx} 0.12 Kg/second was demonstrated at 20 kW microwave power level with 100% kill rate. The system is capable of 200 kW however waveguide arcing due to grain dust in the waveguide limited the power to 20 kW during the tests. Development tasks performed during the project included modification of an existing high-power microwave exposure facility to uniformly process large grain samples at high flow rates and improved instrumentation to detect grain flow and uniformity. Microwave processing tasks include a series of controlled exposure tests using infested grain samples provided and analyzed by the University of Oklahoma. Grain samples were infested with red flour beetles which proved the most difficult to kill in earlier tests. Most of the samples processed resulted in quite successful kill rates and a maximum grain temperature of 46 C. The facilities utilized at ORNL are located in the Fusion Energy building (9201-2 at Y-12) and include the 28 GHz 200 kW CW high power microwave facility and microwave test equipment associated with the FED Microwave Development Laboratory in 9201-2. An improved microwave exposure chamber and grain flow control and handling equipment were designed and build as a joint effort between Micro-Grain and ORNL. A number of insect infested grain tests were successfully performed although the higher power, higher flow rates were limited by arcing in the microwave waveguide and damage to the gyrotron output window. Test results and the overall

  8. Testicular function and the effects of microwave radiation. Final report, April 1983-August 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Lebovitz, R.M.; Johnson; Orr

    1986-04-01

    The effects of pulse-modulated (PM) and continuous-wave (CW) microwave radiation (MWR) at 1.3 GHZ on spermatogenesis in the rat were studied. Undrugged freely mobile or anesthetized adult male rats were treated, then sacrificed at discrete latencies in relationship to the 13-day cycle time of the seminiferous epithelium. Changes in rectal and testicular temperatures were measured during warm-water immersion of the testicles. Exposure of the freely mobile rat for 8 h to CW MWR at 9 mW/g was ineffective. Acute (90-min) exposure of the anesthetized rat, PM MWR at 7.7 mW/g yielded sharp reductions in daily sperm production (DSP) at 13 and 26 days with only partial recovery at 52 days. There were no detectable changes at 6.5 days, thus suggesting the absence of an effect on mature spermatids. Immersion heating of the testis to 39 C yielded an initial decline in DSP at 6.5 days, followed by recovery to control levels. With respect to changes in DSP and/or sperm morphology, the elevation of testicular temperature was a common underlying variable; a rise to at least 39 C through either MWR or conventionally induced heating was required to produce evident decrement. Thus, MWR had the most-pronounced impact on early spermatids and/or primary spermatocytes. CW MWR yielded essentially the same results as did PM MWR. The major factor impacting sperm production is the adult rat temperature rise in the testis.

  9. Non-military microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierman, Howard

    1990-04-01

    The nonmilitary applications of microwave technology in medicine, communications, and agriculture are discussed. Particular attention is given to a microwave multichannel multipoint video distribution system (a broadcasting system with up to 20 programs drawn from satellites, video tape libraries, and locally generated material); microwaves used in DBS distribution; satellite receivers for data communications; microwave thermography used for early cancer detection, brain temperature measurements, and appendicitis diagnosis; an experimental Doppler radar assembly for guiding robots walking on a factory floor; and an agricultural application where microwaves are used to break down slugs in soil and thus improve potato and grain crops. Schematic diagrams are included.

  10. A tunable general purpose Q-band resonator for CW and pulse EPR/ENDOR experiments with large sample access and optical excitation.

    PubMed

    Reijerse, Edward; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Isaacson, Roger; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We describe a frequency tunable Q-band cavity (34 GHz) designed for CW and pulse Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) as well as Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Electron Double Resonance (ELDOR) experiments. The TE(011) cylindrical resonator is machined either from brass or from graphite (which is subsequently gold plated), to improve the penetration of the 100 kHz field modulation signal. The (self-supporting) ENDOR coil consists of four 0.8mm silver posts at 2.67 mm distance from the cavity center axis, penetrating through the plunger heads. It is very robust and immune to mechanical vibrations. The coil is electrically shielded to enable CW ENDOR experiments with high RF power (500 W). The top plunger of the cavity is movable and allows a frequency tuning of ±2 GHz. In our setup the standard operation frequency is 34.0 GHz. The microwaves are coupled into the resonator through an iris in the cylinder wall and matching is accomplished by a sliding short in the coupling waveguide. Optical excitation of the sample is enabled through slits in the cavity wall (transmission ∼60%). The resonator accepts 3mm o.d. sample tubes. This leads to a favorable sensitivity especially for pulse EPR experiments of low concentration biological samples. The probehead dimensions are compatible with that of Bruker flexline Q-band resonators and it fits perfectly into an Oxford CF935 Helium flow cryostat (4-300 K). It is demonstrated that, due to the relatively large active sample volume (20-30 μl), the described resonator has superior concentration sensitivity as compared to commercial pulse Q-band resonators. The quality factor (Q(L)) of the resonator can be varied between 2600 (critical coupling) and 1300 (over-coupling). The shortest achieved π/2-pulse durations are 20 ns using a 3 W microwave amplifier. ENDOR (RF) π-pulses of 20 μs ((1)H @ 51 MHz) were obtained for a 300 W amplifier and 7 μs using a 2500 W amplifier. Selected applications of the

  11. A tunable general purpose Q-band resonator for CW and pulse EPR/ENDOR experiments with large sample access and optical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijerse, Edward; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Isaacson, Roger; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We describe a frequency tunable Q-band cavity (34 GHz) designed for CW and pulse Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) as well as Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Electron Double Resonance (ELDOR) experiments. The TE 011 cylindrical resonator is machined either from brass or from graphite (which is subsequently gold plated), to improve the penetration of the 100 kHz field modulation signal. The (self-supporting) ENDOR coil consists of four 0.8 mm silver posts at 2.67 mm distance from the cavity center axis, penetrating through the plunger heads. It is very robust and immune to mechanical vibrations. The coil is electrically shielded to enable CW ENDOR experiments with high RF power (500 W). The top plunger of the cavity is movable and allows a frequency tuning of ±2 GHz. In our setup the standard operation frequency is 34.0 GHz. The microwaves are coupled into the resonator through an iris in the cylinder wall and matching is accomplished by a sliding short in the coupling waveguide. Optical excitation of the sample is enabled through slits in the cavity wall (transmission ˜60%). The resonator accepts 3 mm o.d. sample tubes. This leads to a favorable sensitivity especially for pulse EPR experiments of low concentration biological samples. The probehead dimensions are compatible with that of Bruker flexline Q-band resonators and it fits perfectly into an Oxford CF935 Helium flow cryostat (4-300 K). It is demonstrated that, due to the relatively large active sample volume (20-30 μl), the described resonator has superior concentration sensitivity as compared to commercial pulse Q-band resonators. The quality factor ( Q L) of the resonator can be varied between 2600 (critical coupling) and 1300 (over-coupling). The shortest achieved π/2-pulse durations are 20 ns using a 3 W microwave amplifier. ENDOR (RF) π-pulses of 20 μs ( 1H @ 51 MHz) were obtained for a 300 W amplifier and 7 μs using a 2500 W amplifier. Selected applications of the

  12. Microwave system performance summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Nalos, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The design of the microwave system for the solar power satellite is described. Design modifications recommended include changes in phase control to the power module level, a reduction in allowable amplitude jitter, the use of metal matrix waveguides, and sequences for startup/shutdown procedures. Investigations into reshaping the beam pattern to improve overall rectenna collection efficiency and improve sidelobe control are surveyed.

  13. Microwave and quantum magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, F. R.; Kyhl, R. L.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Zeskind, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The objective is to develop an understanding of electromagnetic, magnetostatic, and magnetoelastic wave phenomena and to employ them to create novel device concepts useful for microwave signal-processing applications. The development of novel device concepts for the millimeter wavelength portion of the electromagnetic spectrum is also under investigation. Experimental results are indicated.

  14. MICROWAVE RESONANCES IN DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes spectroscopic studies of DNA which were undertaken to better understand a physical basis for microwave absorption by this molecule. hree types of studies are described. ) The low frequency scattered light spectrum of DNA was studied by two methods. irst, Ram...

  15. Hybrid Microwave Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G.G.

    2001-03-07

    A team associated with a Federal Laboratory, academia, and industry has been actively developing new microwave technology for treatment and remediation of a variety of potentially hazardous materials for almost a decade. This collaboration has resulted in unique equipment and processes with potential applicability to many fields, including disposition of electronic circuitry and components, medical wastes, radioactive materials and recycling of used tires.

  16. Leakage of Microwave Ovens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Bushey, R.; Winn, G.

    2011-01-01

    Physics is essential for students who want to succeed in science and engineering. Excitement and interest in the content matter contribute to enhancing this success. We have developed a laboratory experiment that takes advantage of microwave ovens to demonstrate important physical concepts and increase interest in physics. This experiment…

  17. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.

    1994-06-14

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system includes a microwave signal generator or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator. A second amplifier is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier. The second amplifier outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity. In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply is provided for operation of the second amplifier. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load. 5 figs.

  18. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14) for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier (18) may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator (12) or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14). A second amplifier (20) is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier (18). The second amplifier (20) outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity (34). In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier (20) is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the second amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  19. Temperature regulation in the mouse and hamster exposed to microwaves in hot environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, C.J.; Long, M.D.; Fehlner, K.S.; Stead, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    Colonic temperature was measured in naive BALB/c mice and golden hamsters immediately following 90-min exposures to 2450-MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 32.2 or 35 C (dry air). Exposures were performed in a temperature-controlled waveguide that permitted continuous monitoring of the specific absorption rate (SAR) of RF energy. At a Ta of 32.2 C, the threshold SAR for elevating colonic temperature and the SAR resulting in a 1.0 C elevation in colonic temperature were, respectively, 4.3 and 10.0 W/kg for the mouse and 0.69 and 1.9 W/kg for the hamster. At a Ta of 35 C, these values were 0.12 and 5.3 W/kg for the mouse and 0.46 and 1.4 W/kg for the hamster. The SARs required to induce hyperthermia in the mouse and hamster at these relatively warm Ta's are considerably lower than those required at cooler Ta's of 20 to 3 C. Overall, the hamster became hyperthermic at lower SARs than in the mouse. Ta's of 35 C and greater are frequently encountered during heat waves in the summer months.

  20. Noise Analysis of EPR Spectrometers with Cryogenic Microwave Preamplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenninger, S.; Froncisz, W.; Hyde, J. S.

    Studies are reported on the sensitivity of an EPR spectrometer utilizing a cryogenic preamplifier (0.5 dB noise figure, 35 K equivalent noise temperature). Three cases are considered: (a) resonator matched in a CW experiment, (b) resonator Q spoiled by overcoupling, and (c) resonator matched in pulse experiments. Contributions to the system noise because of losses in the microwave bridge have been determined quantitatively: the equivalent noise temperature of the receiver chain rises from 35 to 100 K. It is suggested that improved system performance can be achieved by cooling major components of the microwave bridge. It is particularly advantageous to cool the load resistor at port 1 of the circulator. Measurements of source noise are reported. This noise contribution becomes increasingly apparent as the system noise is decreased, but can be suppressed by use of loop-gap resonators. Analysis is carried out in a mixed engineering vocabulary of output noise temperature and equivalent noise temperature, which are temperatures referred to the output and input of the circuit, respectively. It is suggested that this is an appropriate analytical approach when there are multiple paths that feed noise to the output of the circuit with different physical temperatures of the input load resistor for each path.

  1. Comparison of clinical features of HLA-Cw*0602-positive and -negative psoriasis patients in a Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing; Yang, Sen; Sun, Liang Dan; Liang, Yan Hua; Gao, Min; Zhang, Kai Yue; Huang, Wei; Zhang, XueJun

    2007-01-01

    HLA-Cw6 is strongly associated with psoriasis and has been suggested to be the PSORS1 gene that confers susceptibility to early-onset psoriasis. In this study of the clinical features of HLA-Cw*0602-positive and -negative psoriasis patients in a Han Chinese population, we typed HLA-C in a cohort of 679 patients and compared the two groups. Cw*0602-positive patients (n=345) had an earlier disease onset (p < 1 x 10(-5)), more severe disease (p < 1 x 10(-3)), higher frequency of guttate psoriasis (p < 1 x 10(-9)), more affected legs and trunk (p < 1 x 10(-5)), higher incidence of Köbner's phenomenon (p=0.005) and of trauma history (p=0.009). Cw*0602-negative patients (n= 334) had more palmoplantar pustulosis (p=0.004), nail changes (p=0.001) and scalp involvement (p=0.007). However, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding age, gender, incidence of plaque psoriasis, erythrodermic, inverse, psoriatic arthritis, and the precipitation factors stress and infection. The study showed that Cw*0602-positive patients had some obvious clinical differences from Cw*0602-negative patients in a Han Chinese population, which provides evidence for an HLA-Cw*0602-associated phenotype in psoriasis. PMID:17598037

  2. Reproduction in male Japanese quail exposed to microwave radiation during embryogeny

    SciTech Connect

    McRee, D.I.; Thaxton, J.P.; Parkhurst, C.R.

    1983-10-01

    Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) embryos were exposed continuously to 2.45 GHz CW microwave radiation during the first 12 days of embryogenesis. The incident power density was 5 mW/cm/sup 2/, and the specific absorption rate (SAR) was 4.03 mW/g. At 23 weeks of age an assessment of the reproductive capacity of the males was performed. Spermatozoal numbers and motility in semen samples which were collected manually were reduced significantly (P less than or equal to 0.01). However, spermatozoal viability and gross morphological characteristics in the exposed birds were not consistently different from the controls. Relative testicular weights were not altered significantly in the exposed males. Percentage of fertile eggs was significantly reduced when exposed males were mated to sham control females. The percentage of fertile eggs obtained from mating exposed males with sham control females was 72.5%, while the percentage of fertile eggs from mating of sham control males with sham control females was 80.4%. These data indicate that reproductive capacity in male Japanese quail is reduced when the birds are exposed to 2.45 GHz CW microwave radiation during embryogenesis.

  3. Effects of long-term low-level radiofrequency radiation exposure on rats. Volume 9. Summary. Final report, June 1980-July 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, A.W.; Chou, C.K.; Kunz, L.L.; Crowley, J.; Krupp, J.

    1985-08-01

    For 25 months, 100 male SPF rats were exposed to pulsed 2450-MHz circularly polarized microwaves at an average power density of 0.48 mW/cmS. Another 100 rats served as sham-exposed controls. This report summarizes the results of the eight previous volumes, which reported on measurements of 155 parameters. For most of the parameters no statistical difference was found between the exposed and sham-exposed groups. This report discusses a few end points that were statistically different.

  4. Volumetric and selective heating in agriculture and chemistry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Vijaya G.; Dai, Jianming; Sunjka, Predrag S.

    2004-04-01

    Microwaves of 2450 MHz have been attracting attention from researchers of various fields. The most distinguished characteristics of microwave from conventional heating are volumetric and selectivity. Due to these characteristics, when combined with convective air, microwave-assisted drying can greatly reduce drying time and energy usage to achieve certain moisture content. These characteristics also make it possible to combine this highly efficient heating method with vacuum drying by passing the energy through a microwave-transparent vacuum chamber. Microwaves also have various applications in chemistry such as extraction of natural products from plant materials and microwave-assisted synthesis. In this paper, the work conducted in our lab on the applications of microwave energy in agriculture and chemistry is briefly reviewed.

  5. HIGH AVERAGE CURRENT LOW EMITTANCE BEAM EMPLOYING CW NORMAL CONDUCTING GUN.

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG,X.; BEN-ZVI, I.; KEWISCH, J.; PAI, C.

    2007-06-25

    CW normal conducting guns usually do not achieve very high field gradient and waste much RF power at high field gradient compared to superconducting cavities. But they have less trapped modes and wakefields compared to the superconducting cavities due to their low Q. The external bucking coil can also be applied very close to the cathode to improve the beam quality. By using a low frequency gun with a recessed cathode and a carefully designed beam line we can get a high average current and a high quality beam with acceptable RF power loss on the cavity wall. This paper shows that the CW normal conducting gun can be a backup solution for those projects which need high peak and average current, low emittance electron beams such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) e-cooling project and Energy Recovery Linac (Em) project.

  6. Noise analysis for near field 3-D FM-CW radar imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.

    2015-06-19

    Near field radar imaging systems are used for several applications including concealed weapon detection in airports and other high-security venues. Despite the near-field operation, phase noise and thermal noise can limit the performance in several ways including reduction in system sensitivity and reduction of image dynamic range. In this paper, the effects of thermal noise, phase noise, and processing gain are analyzed in the context of a near field 3-D FM-CW imaging radar as might be used for concealed weapon detection. In addition to traditional frequency domain analysis, a time-domain simulation is employed to graphically demonstrate the effect of these noise sources on a fast-chirping FM-CW system.

  7. Design of a 1-MW CW 8.5 GHz transmitter for planetary RADAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Bhanji, Alaudin M.

    1990-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design for increasing the output power of an existing X-band planetary radar transmitter from 365 kW to 1 MW CW is discussed. The paper covers the basic transmitter system requirements as dictated by the specifications for the radar. The characteristics and expected performance of the high-power klystrons are considered and the transmitter power amplifier system is discussed. Also included in the discussion is the design of the exiter system. Two alternative feed systems for delivering the 1-MW CW signal to the antenna system are described. The expected performance of the beam supply, heat exchanger, and monitor and control devices is also presented. Finally, an assessment of the state-of-the-art technology to meet system requirements is given and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  8. Choosing dyes for cw-STED nanoscopy using self-assembled nanorulers.

    PubMed

    Beater, Susanne; Holzmeister, Phil; Pibiri, Enrico; Lalkens, Birka; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-04-21

    Superresolution microscopy is currently revolutionizing optical imaging. A key factor for getting images of highest quality is - besides a well-performing imaging system - the labeling of the sample. We compared the fluorescent dyes Abberior Star 488, Alexa 488, Chromeo 488 and Oregon Green 488 for use in continuous wave (cw-)STED microscopy in aqueous buffer and in a durable polymer matrix. To optimize comparability, we designed DNA origami standards labeled with the fluorescent dyes including a bead-like DNA origami with dyes focused on one spot and a DNA origami with two marks at a designed distance of ∼100 nm. Our data show that all dyes are well suited for cw-STED microscopy but that the optimal dye depends on the embedding medium. The precise comparison enabled by DNA origami nanorulers indicates that these structures have matured from the proof-of-concept to easily applicable tools in fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24599511

  9. Two-photon excitation in living cells induced by low-power cw laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Liu, Yagang; Berns, Michael W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1996-05-01

    We demonstrate multi-photon excitation in optically-trapped living cells. Intracellular non- resonant two-photon excitation of endogenous and exogenous chromophores was induced by CW near infrared (NIR) trapping beams of 105 mW power. In the case of fluorescent chromophores, detection of NIR-excited visible fluorescence was achieved by imaging and spectroscopy methods. Trap-induced, two-photon excited fluorescence was employed as a novel diagnostic method to monitor intracellular redox state and cell vitality of single motile spermatozoa and Chinese hamster ovary cells. We found, that nonlinear absorption of NIR photons < 800 nm may lead to oxidative stress and severe cell damage. Biological response was amplified in multimode CW lasers due to longitudinal mode-beating and partial mode- locking. As a result, we recommend the use of longwavelength-NIR, single-frequency traps (`optical tweezers') for micromanipulation of vital cells.

  10. 20 °C, 9 GHz CW-EPR saturation measurements of five selected Alberta coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudynska, J.; Buckmaster, H. A.; Duczmal, T.

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports the first determination of the spin-lattice (T_1) and spin-spin (T_2) relaxation times at 20 °C for two subbituminous and three hv bituminous selected Alberta coals using 9 GHz CW-EPR saturation measurements. Argand diagrammatic techniques were used to verify that the lineshapes were Lorentzian since the deviation was less than 4%. Consequently, it was assumed that the CW-EPR spectral resonances could be approximated to homogeneously broadened lineshapes and saturation techniques could be used to determine these relaxation times. The T_1 and T_2 relaxation times are in good agreement with values reported in the literature using saturation measurements, but two orders of magnitude shorter than those obtained using ESE because coal EPR spectral resonances are the unresolved superposition of comparatively narrow homogeneous resonances.

  11. Upgrade and validation on plasma of the Tore Supra CW LHCD generator

    SciTech Connect

    Delpech, L.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Berger-By, G.; Bertrand, E.; Bouquey, F.; Chaix, J. P.; Corbel, E.; Crest, I.; Ekedahl, A.; Faisse, F.; Fejoz, P.; Garibaldi, P.; Goletto, C.; Lebourg, P.; Leroux, F.; Lombard, G.; Magne, R.; Martinez, A.; Moreau, M.

    2011-12-23

    A one year-long major upgrade of the 3.7 GHz Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) generator for the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak has been performed. It consisted in installing a first series of eight Thales Electron Devices (TED) 700 kW CW klystrons, new CW components and auxiliaries, and in modifying the transmitter control and protection software. Modifications and calibration of the sensors and the RF subsystems were completed as well. Finally, the RF power available in the generator has been increased by 35% and the pulse duration could reach 1000 s. A complete validation and optimization of the klystrons have been performed in 2010 on matched load before the generator could enter into operation. The eight klystrons connected with the Full Active Multijunction (FAM) antenna delivered 3.5 MW/50s in December 2010. The upgrade of the generator and the steps to validate the modifications are described.

  12. 11-GHz waveguide Nd:YAG laser CW mode-locked with single-layer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Okhrimchuk, Andrey G.; Obraztsov, Petr A.

    2015-01-01

    We report stable, passive, continuous-wave (CW) mode-locking of a compact diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser with a single-layer graphene saturable absorber. The depressed cladding waveguide in the Nd:YAG crystal is fabricated with an ultrafast laser inscription method. The saturable absorber is formed by direct deposition of CVD single-layer graphene on the output coupler. The few millimeter-long cavity provides generation of 16-ps pulses with repetition rates in the GHz range (up to 11.3 GHz) and 12 mW average power. Stable CW mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with a Gires–Tournois interferometer. PMID:26052678

  13. 11-GHz waveguide Nd:YAG laser CW mode-locked with single-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Okhrimchuk, Andrey G; Obraztsov, Petr A

    2015-01-01

    We report stable, passive, continuous-wave (CW) mode-locking of a compact diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser with a single-layer graphene saturable absorber. The depressed cladding waveguide in the Nd:YAG crystal is fabricated with an ultrafast laser inscription method. The saturable absorber is formed by direct deposition of CVD single-layer graphene on the output coupler. The few millimeter-long cavity provides generation of 16-ps pulses with repetition rates in the GHz range (up to 11.3 GHz) and 12 mW average power. Stable CW mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with a Gires-Tournois interferometer. PMID:26052678

  14. CW Interference Effects on High Data Rate Transmission Through the ACTS Wideband Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Ngo, Duc H.; Tran, Quang K.; Tran, Diepchi T.; Yu, John; Kachmar, Brian A.; Svoboda, James S.

    1996-01-01

    Satellite communications channels are susceptible to various sources of interference. Wideband channels have a proportionally greater probability of receiving interference than narrowband channels. NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) includes a 900 MHz bandwidth hardlimiting transponder which has provided an opportunity for the study of interference effects of wideband channels. A series of interference tests using two independent ACTS ground terminals measured the effects of continuous-wave (CW) uplink interference on the bit-error rate of a 220 Mbps digitally modulated carrier. These results indicate the susceptibility of high data rate transmissions to CW interference and are compared to results obtained with a laboratory hardware-based system simulation and a computer simulation.

  15. Multilayer optical data storage by fluorescence modulation using a CW laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Kenneth D.; Christenson, Cory W.; Saini, Anuj; Ryan, Christopher J.; Mirletz, Heather; Shiyanovskaya, Irina; Yin, Kezhen; Baer, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Optical data storage has been widely used in certain consumer applications owing to its passive and robust nature, but has failed to keep with larger industry data storage needs due to the lack of capacity. Many alternatives have been proposed and developed, such as 3D data storage using two-photon absorption that require complex and dangerous laser systems to localize the bits. In this paper, we present a method for localizing bits using a CW 405nm laser diode, in a multilayered polymer film. Data is stored by photobleaching a fluorescent dye, and the response of the material is nonlinear, despite the CW laser and absorption in the visible region. This is achieved using sub-μs pulses from the laser initiating a photothermal effect. This writing method, along with the inexpensive roll-to-roll method for making the disc, will allow for terabyte-scale optical discs using conventional commercial optics and lasers.

  16. Development of a 9.3 micrometer CW LIDAR for the study of atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteside, B. N.; Schotland, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides a brief summary of the basic requirements to obtain coherent or heterodyne mixing of the optical radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosols with that from a fixed frequency source. The continuous wave (CW) mode of operation for a coherent lidar is reviewed along with the associated lidar transfer equation. A complete optical design of the three major subsystems of a CW, coherent lidar is given. Lens design software is implemented to model and optimize receiver performance. Techniques for the opto-mechanical assembly and some of the critical tolerances of the coherent lidar are provided along with preliminary tests of the subsystems. Included in these tests is a comparison of the experimental and the theoretical average power signal-to-noise ratio. The analog to digital software used to evaluate the power spectrum of the backscattered signal is presented in the Appendix of this report.

  17. A High-Gradient CW R Photo-Cathode Electron Gun for High Current Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer

    2005-05-01

    The paper describes the analysis and preliminary design of a high-gradient photo-cathode RF gun optimized for high current CW operation. The gun cell shape is optimized to provide maximum acceleration for the newly emitted beam while minimizing wall losses in the structure. The design is intended for use in future high-current high-power CW FELs but the shape optimization for low wall losses may be advantageous for other applications such as XFELs or Linear Colliders using high peak power low duty factor guns where pulse heating is a limitation. The concept allows for DC bias on the photocathode in order to repel ions and improve cathode lifetime.

  18. Differential high-resolution stimulated CW Raman spectroscopy of hydrogen in a hollow-core fiber.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Philip G; Lassen, Mikael; Petersen, Jan C

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrate sensitive high-resolution stimulated Raman measurements of hydrogen using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). The Raman transition is pumped by a narrow linewidth (< 50 kHz) 1064 nm continuous-wave (CW) fiber laser. The probe light is produced by a homebuilt CW optical parametric oscillator (OPO), tunable from around 800 nm to 1300 nm (linewidth ∼ 5 MHz). These narrow linewidth lasers allow for an excellent spectral resolution of approximately 10(-4) cm(-1). The setup employs a differential measurement technique for noise rejection in the probe beam, which also eliminates background signals from the fiber. With the high sensitivity obtained, Raman signals were observed with only a few mW of optical power in both the pump and probe beams. This demonstration allows for high resolution Raman identification of molecules and quantification of Raman signal strengths. PMID:26193604

  19. CW single transverse mode all-fiber Tm3+-doped silica fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, E. Z.; Li, W. H.; You, L.

    2012-04-01

    The CW 25.6 W output power with a slope efficiency of 30.6% respected to the pump power from a CW single transverse mode all-fiber Tm3+-doped Silica Fiber Laser is reported. The all-fiber laser is made up by progressively splicing the pigtail fiber, matched FBG fiber and Tm fiber. The reflective FBG and Tm3+-doped fiber end Fresnel reflection build up the laser resonance cavity. Due to the multi-mode FBG as the reflective mirror, the output laser spectrum is multi-peaks at high output power, but the spectrum width is less than 2 nm at 1.94 μm. We estimate the beam quality to be M 2 = 2.39, clearly indicating nearly diffraction-limited beam propagation.

  20. Microwave superheaters for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.B.; Hoffman, M.A.; Logan, B.G.

    1987-10-16

    The microwave superheater uses the synchrotron radiation from a thermonuclear plasma to heat gas seeded with an alkali metal to temperatures far above the temperature of material walls. It can improve the efficiency of the Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine (CFAR) cycle described elsewhere in these proceedings. For a proof-of-principle experiment using helium, calculations show that a gas superheat ..delta..T of 2000/sup 0/K is possible when the wall temperature is maintained at 1000/sup 0/K. The concept can be scaled to reactor grade systems. Because of the need for synchrotron radiation, the microwave superheater is best suited for use with plasmas burning an advanced fuel such as D-/sup 3/He. 5 refs.

  1. Effects of microwave exposure and temperature on survival of mice infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, C.G.; Putnam, J.P.; Lewter, O.H.

    1987-01-01

    Female CD-1 mice were injected with an LD50 dose of Streptococcus pneumoniae and then exposed to 2.45 GHz (CW) microwave radiation at an incident power density of 10 mW/cm2 (SAR approximately equals 6.8 W/kg), 4 h/d for 5 d at ambient temperatures of 19, 22, 25, 28, 31, 34, 37 and 40/sup 0/C. The results showed that survival of sham exposed animals increased as ambient temperature increased until 37/sup 0/C when the thermoregulatory capacity of the animals was exceeded and deaths due to hyperthermia occurred. Survival of microwave exposed animals was significantly greater than the shams (approximately 20%) at each ambient temperature below 34/sup 0/C. An analysis of the data suggests that the hyperthermia from microwaves may be more effective in increasing survival than conventional hyperthermia. The results indicate that microwave radiation may be beneficial to infected animals at low and moderate ambient temperatures, but detrimental when combined with high ambient temperatures.

  2. An experimental study of waveguide coupled microwave heating with conventional multicusp negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Komppula, J.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Laulainen, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-04-08

    Negative ion production with conventional multicusp plasma chambers utilizing 2.45 GHz microwave heating is demonstrated. The experimental results were obtained with the multicusp plasma chambers and extraction systems of the RF-driven RADIS ion source and the filament driven arc discharge ion source LIISA. A waveguide microwave coupling system, which is almost similar to the one used with the SILHI ion source, was used. The results demonstrate that at least one third of negative ion beam obtained with inductive RF-coupling (RADIS) or arc discharge (LIISA) can be achieved with 1 kW of 2.45 GHz microwave power in CW mode without any modification of the plasma chamber. The co-extracted electron to H{sup −} ratio and the optimum pressure range were observed to be similar for both heating methods. The behaviour of the plasma implies that the energy transfer from the microwaves to the plasma electrons is mainly an off-resonance process.

  3. Microwave solidification project overview

    SciTech Connect

    Sprenger, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant Microwave Solidification Project has application potential to the Mixed Waste Treatment Project and the The Mixed Waste Integrated Program. The technical areas being addressed include (1) waste destruction and stabilization; (2) final waste form; and (3) front-end waste handling and feed preparation. This document covers need for such a program; technology description; significance; regulatory requirements; and accomplishments to date. A list of significant reports published under this project is included.

  4. Enhanced Type-I Polarization-Entangled Photons Using CW-Diode Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazi, Salem; Mansour, Mohy S.; El Nadi, Lotfia

    2013-03-01

    We used two type-I BBO crystals pumped by violet cw-diode laser of relatively wide bandwidth to produce entangled photons of considerable degree of purity. While diode laser serves the mobility and the low-cost of the entangled photons source, suitable temporal compensation is required in this case to recover the purity of the state. We studied also effect of tilting the two-crystal set on overlapping of the SPDC cones.

  5. CW, single-frequency 229nm laser source for Cd-cooling by harmonic conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Yushi; Yarborough, J. M.; Merzlyak, Yevgeny

    2015-02-01

    More than 200mW of CW 229nm for Cd atom cooling application was generated by the 4th harmonic of a single frequency optically pumped semiconductor laser using a 10-mm long, Brewster-cut BBO crystal in an external cavity. With 650mW of 458nm input, 216mW of 229nm power was observed. Conversion efficiency from 458nm to 229nm was more than 33%.

  6. Coherent quasi-CW 153-nm light source at high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yutaka; Ito, Yoshiaki; Ozawa, Akira; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chuangtian; Shin, Shik; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2012-02-01

    We present a quasi-cw laser in vacuum ultraviolet region at megahertz repetition rate. The narrowband pulses generated from an ytterbium-fiber laser system at 33 MHz repetition rate at the central wavelength of 1074 nm is frequency-converted by successive stages of LBO crystals and KBBF crystals. The generated radiation at 153 nm has the shortest wavelength achieved through phase-matched frequency conversion processes in nonlinear optical crystals to our knowledge.

  7. Investigation of in-vivo skin autofluorescence lifetimes under long-term cw optical excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lihachev, A; Ferulova, I; Vasiljeva, K; Spigulis, J

    2014-08-31

    The main results obtained during the last five years in the field of laser-excited in-vivo human skin photobleaching effects are presented. The main achievements and results obtained, as well as methods and experimental devices are briefly described. In addition, the impact of long-term 405-nm cw low-power laser excitation on the skin autofluorescence lifetime is experimentally investigated. (laser biophotonics)

  8. Simple analytical derivations of thermal lensing in longitudinally Q-CW pumped Yb:YAG.

    PubMed

    Bourdet, Gilbert L; Gouédard, Claude

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce analytical derivations for the thermal lensing of an end-pumped laser disk. These derivations are done for pump beam shapes from Gaussian to top hat, assuming that the thermal conductivity is either constant with the temperature or not. We give examples in two temperature regions, where the thermal conductivity exhibits T(-1) or T(-2) dependence. Numerical applications are given for a Q-CW pumped Yb:YAG disk laser. PMID:20676168

  9. Non-invasive optoacoustic temperature determination during retinal cw-laser treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandulla, Jochen; Elsner, Hanno; Sandeau, Julien; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2006-02-01

    In almost all retinal laser treatments the therapeutic effect is initiated by a transient temperature increase. Due to differences in tissue properties and physiology like pigmentation and vascular blood flow an individually different temperature increase might occur with crucial effects on the therapeutic benefit of the treatment. In order to determine the individual retinal temperature increase during cw-laser irradiation in real-time we developed a non-invasive method based on optoacoustics. Simultaneously to the cw-laser irradiation (λ = 810 nm, P < 3 W, t = 60 s) pulses from a dye laser (λ = 500 nm, τ = 3.5 ns, Ε ~ 5 μJ) are applied concentrically to the cw-laser spot on the eyeground. The absorption of the pulses lead to a consequent heating and thermoelastic expansion of the tissue. This causes the emission of an ultrasonic pressure wave, which amplitude was found to be temperature dependent following in good approximation a 2 nd order polynomial. The pressure wave was measured by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a contact lens placed on the cornea. The experiments were performed in-vivo on rabbits. Simultaneous measurements with a miniaturized thermocouple showed a similar slope with a maximum local deviation of 0.4 °C for a temperature increase of 5.5 °C. On two rabbits measurements pre and post mortem at the same location were performed. The temperature increase after 60 s was found to raise by 12.0 % and 66.7 % post mortem, respectively. These data were used to calculate the influence of heat convection by blood circulation using a numerical model based on two absorbing layers and assuming a constant perfusion rate for the choriocapillaris and the choroid. Overall the presented optoacoustic method seems feasible for a non-invasive real-time determination of cw-laser induced retinal temperature increases and might serve as a temperature based dosimetry control during retinal laser treatments.

  10. High Energy Density Microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.M.

    1999-04-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the RF98 Workshop entitled `High Energy Density Microwaves` held in California in October, 1998. The topics discussed were predominantly accelerator{minus}related. The Workshop dealt, for the most part, with the generation and control of electron beams, the amplification of RF signals, the design of mode converters, and the effect of very high RF field gradients. This Workshop was designed to address the concerns of the microwave tube industry worldwide, the plasma physicists who deal with very high beam currents and gigawatts of RF power, and researchers in accelerator centers around the world. Papers were presented on multibeam klystrons, gyrotron development, plasmas in microwave tubes, RF breakdown, and alternatives to conventional linear coliders at 1 TeV and above. The Workshop was partially sponsored by the US Department of Energy. There were 46 papers presented at the conference,out of which 19 have been abstracted for the Energy,Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  11. A low-power CMOS trans-impedance amplifier for FM/cw ladar imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kai; Zhao, Yi-qiang; Sheng, Yun; Zhao, Hong-liang; Yu, Hai-xia

    2013-09-01

    A scannerless ladar imaging system based on a unique frequency modulation/continuous wave (FM/cw) technique is able to entirely capture the target environment, using a focal plane array to construct a 3D picture of the target. This paper presents a low power trans-impedance amplifier (TIA) designed and implemented by 0.18 μm CMOS technology, which is used in the FM/cw imaging ladar with a 64×64 metal-semiconductor-metal(MSM) self-mixing detector array. The input stage of the operational amplifier (op amp) in TIA is realized with folded cascade structure to achieve large open loop gain and low offset. The simulation and test results of TIA with MSM detectors indicate that the single-end trans-impedance gain is beyond 100 kΩ, and the -3 dB bandwidth of Op Amp is beyond 60 MHz. The input common mode voltage ranges from 0.2 V to 1.5 V, and the power dissipation is reduced to 1.8 mW with a supply voltage of 3.3 V. The performance test results show that the TIA is a candidate for preamplifier of the read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) in the FM/cw scannerless ladar imaging system.

  12. Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) with Pulsed and CW-Lasers on Plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, P.; Huber, G.; Passler, G.; Trautmann, N.; Wendt, K.

    2005-04-01

    The detection of long-lived plutonium isotopes in ultra-trace amounts by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a well-established routine method. Detection limits of 106 to 107 atoms and precise measurements of the isotopic composition have been achieved. In this work multi-step resonance ionization of plutonium atoms has been performed with tunable lasers having very different output intensities and spectral properties. In order to compare different ways for the resonance ionization of plutonium broadband pulsed dye and titanium:sapphire lasers as well as narrow-band cw-diode and titanium:sapphire lasers have been applied for a number of efficient excitation schemes. It has been shown, that for identical excitation schemes the optical isotope selectivity can be improved by using cw-lasers (bandwidths < 10 MHz) instead of pulsed lasers (bandwidths > 2 GHz). Pulsed and cw-laser systems have been used simultaneously for resonance ionization enabling direct comparisons of pulsed and continuous ionization processes. So far, a three-step, three-color laser excitation scheme has been proven to be most practical in terms of efficiency, selectivity and laser wavelengths. Alternatively a newly discovered three-step, two-color excitation scheme which includes a strong two-photon transition from an excited state into a high-lying autoionizing state yields similar ionization efficiencies. This two-photon transition was characterized with respect to saturation behavior and line width.

  13. Material characterization with top-hat cw laser induced photothermal techniques: A short review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrath, N. G. C.; Shen, J.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Malacarne, L. C.; Pedreira, P. R. B.; Bento, A. C.; Zhou, J.

    2010-03-01

    In this work, we present a short review of the recent development of the theoretical models for top-hat cw laser induced spectroscopies of thermal lens and thermal mirror. With the same probe and top-hat excitation lasers, an apparatus is set up to concurrently measure both thermal lens and thermal mirror effects of transparent samples. With the theoretical models and the experimental apparatus, not only optical and thermal properties are measured, but also the fluorescence quantum coefficient and the temperature coefficient of the optical path length of a fluorescent sample are simultaneously determined with no need of any reference sample. Mechanical properties also could be measured. Opaque samples are also studied using top-hat cw laser thermal mirror and top-hat photothermal deflection techniques to determine thermal properties (e.g., thermal conductivity and unit volume specific heat). This work shows that the combined top-hat cw laser photothermal techniques are useful for nondestructive evaluation of both transparent and opaque samples with a less expensive non-TEM00 Gaussian laser.

  14. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2003-05-06

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. A low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively.

  15. Design of 57.5 MHz CW RFQ for medium energy heavy ion superconducting linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kashinsky, D. A.; Minaev, S. A.; Pershin, V. I.; Tretyakova, T. E.; Yaramishev, S. G.; Physics; Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics

    2002-06-01

    The nuclear science community considers the construction of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility as a top priority. The RIA includes a 1.4 GV superconducting linac for production of 400 kW cw heavy ion beams. The initial acceleration of heavy ions delivered from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source can be effectively performed by a 57.5 MHz 4-m long room temperature RFQ. The principal specifications of the RFQ are (i) formation of extremely low longitudinal emittance, (ii) stable operation over a wide range of voltage for acceleration of various ion species needed for RIA operation, and (iii) simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states of uranium ions. cw operation of an accelerating structure leads to a number of requirements for the resonators such as high shunt impedance, efficient water cooling of all parts of the resonant cavity, mechanical stability together with precise alignment, reliable rf contacts, a stable operating mode, and fine tuning of the resonant frequency during operation. To satisfy these requirements a new resonant structure has been developed. This paper discusses the beam dynamics and electrodynamics design of the RFQ cavity, as well as some aspects of the mechanical design of the low-frequency cw RFQ.

  16. Design of 57.5 MHz cw RFQ structure for the rare isotope accelerator facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kashinsky, D. A.; Minaev, S. A.; Pershin, V. I.; Yaramishev, S. G.; Tretyakova, T. E.

    2002-01-29

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility includes a driver linac for production of 400 kW CW heavy-ion beams. The initial acceleration of heavy-ions delivered from an ECR ion source can be effectively performed by a 57.5 MHz four-meter long RFQ. The principal specifications of the RFQ are: (1) formation of extremely low longitudinal emittance; (2) stable operation over a wide range of voltage for acceleration of various ion species needed for RIA operation; (3) simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states of uranium ions. CW operation of an accelerating structure leads to a number of requirements for the resonators such as high shunt impedance, efficient water cooling of all parts of the resonant cavity, mechanical stability together with precise alignment, reliable rf contacts, a stable operating mode and fine tuning of the resonant frequency during operation. To satisfy these requirements a new resonant structure has been developed. This paper discusses beam dynamics and electrodynamics design of the RFQ cavity, as well as, some aspects of the mechanical design of this low-frequency CW RFQ.

  17. Self-mixing detector candidates for an FM/cw ladar architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, William C.; Bruno, John D.; Kennerly, Stephen W.; Ritter, Ken; Shen, Paul H.; Stann, Barry L.; Stead, Michael R.; Sztankay, Zoltan G.; Tobin, Mary S.

    2000-09-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is currently investigating unique self-mixing detectors for ladar systems. These detectors have the ability to internally detect and down-convert light signals that are amplitude modulated at ultra-high frequencies (UHF). ARL is also investigating a ladar architecture based on FM/cw radar principles, whereby the range information is contained in the low-frequency mixing product derived by mixing a reference UHF chirp with a detected, time-delayed UHF chirp. When inserted into the ARL FM/cw ladar architecture, the self-mixing detector eliminates the need for wide band transimpedance amplifiers in the ladar receiver because the UHF mixing is done internal to the detector, thereby reducing both the cost and complexity of the system and enhancing its range capability. This fits well with ARL's goal of developing low-cost, high-speed line array ladars for submunition applications and extremely low-cost, single pixel ladars for ranging applications. Several candidate detectors have been investigated for this application, with metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) detectors showing the most promise. This paper discusses the requirements for a self-mixing detector, characterization measurements from several candidate detectors and experimental results from their insertion in a laboratory FM/cw ladar.

  18. Frequency comb generation by CW laser injection into a quantum-dot mode-locked laser.

    PubMed

    Pinkert, T J; Salumbides, E J; Tahvili, M S; Ubachs, W; Bente, E A J M; Eikema, K S E

    2012-09-10

    We report on frequency comb generation at 1.5 μm by injection of a CW laser in a hybridly mode-locked InAs/InP two-section quantum-dot laser (HMLQDL). The generated comb has > 60 modes spaced by ∼ 4.5 GHz and a -20 dBc width of > 100 GHz (23 modes) at > 30 dB signal to background ratio. Comb generation was observed with the CW laser (red) detuned more than 20 nm outside the HMLQDL spectrum, spanning a large part of the gain spectrum of the quantum dot material. It is shown that the generated comb is fully coherent with the injected CW laser and RF frequency used to drive the hybrid mode-locking. This method of comb generation is of interest for the creation of small and robust frequency combs for use in optical frequency metrology, high-frequency (> 100 GHz) RF generation and telecommunication applications. PMID:23037259

  19. Free electron laser with small period wiggler and sheet electron beam: A study of the feasibility of operation at 300 GHz with 1 MW CW output power

    SciTech Connect

    Booske, J.H.; Granatstein, V.L.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Destler, W.W.; Finn, J.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Radack, D.; Rodgers, J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of a small period wiggler (/ell//sub ..omega../ < 1 cm) together with a sheet electron beam has been proposed as a low cost source of power for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in magnetic fusion plasmas. Other potential applications include space-based radar systems. We have experimentally demonstrated stable propagation of a sheet beam (18 A. 1 mm /times/ 20 mm) through a ten-period wiggler electromagnet with peak field of 1.2 kG. Calculation of microwave wall heating and pressurized water cooling have also been carried out, and indicate the feasibility of operating a near-millimeter, sheet beam FEL with an output power of 1 MW CW (corresponding to power density into the walls of 2 kW/cm/sup 2/). Based on these encouraging results, a proof-of-principle experiment is being assembled, and is aimed at demonstrating FEL operating at 120 GHz with 300 kW output power in 1 ..mu..s pulses: electron energy would be 410 keV. Preliminary design of a 300 GHz 1 MW FEL with an untapered wiggler is also presented. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. The Microwave SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mates, John Arthur Benson

    2011-12-01

    This thesis describes a multiplexer of Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) with low-noise, ultra-low power dissipation, and great scalability. The multiplexer circuit measures the magnetic flux in a large number of unshunted rf SQUIDs by coupling each SQUID to a superconducting microwave resonator tuned to a unique resonance frequency and driving the resonators from a common feedline. A superposition of microwave tones measures each SQUID simultaneously using only two coaxial cables between the cryogenic device and room temperature. This multiplexer will enable the instrumentation of arrays with hundreds of thousands of low-temperature detectors for new applications in cosmology, materials analysis, and nuclear non-proliferation. The driving application of the Microwave SQUID Multiplexer is the readout of large arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors, by some figures of merit the most sensitive detectors of electromagnetic signals over a span of more than nine orders of magnitude in energy, from 40 GHz microwaves to 200 keV gamma rays. Modern transition-edge sensors have noise-equivalent power as low as 10-20 W / Hz1/2 and energy resolution as good as 2 eV at 6 keV. These per-pixel sensitivities approach theoretical limits set by the underlying signals, motivating a rapid increase in pixel count to access new science. Compelling applications, like the non-destructive assay of nuclear material for treaty verification or the search for primordial gravity waves from inflation use arrays of these detectors to increase collection area or tile a focal plane. We developed three generations of SQUID multiplexers, optimizing the first for flux noise 0.17 muPhi0 / Hz1/2, the second for input current noise 19 pA / Hz1/2, and the last for practical multiplexing of large arrays of cosmic microwave background polarimeters based on transition-edge sensors. Using the last design we demonstrated multiplexed readout of prototype polarimeters with the

  1. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sagripanti, J.L.; Swicord, M.L.; Davis, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  2. Microwave generators simplify swept tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, C. E.; Hagins, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    The utilization of the swept-frequency capability makes it possible to conduct any number of microwave tests. It is pointed out that today's microwave sweepers make such tests simple and straightforward. A filter test involving a high-pass filter with a cutoff frequency of 14.0 GHz is discussed, taking into account the use of a microwave sweeper operating in the range from 12 to 18 GHz. Attention is also given to swept-frequency amplifier testing, antenna swept-gain testing, and microwave antenna testing. With a sweep generator, it is simple to assemble a setup for testing amplifier small-signal gain, flatness, and rolloff.

  3. Microwave NDE for Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Melapudi, Vikram R.; Rothwell, Edward J.; Udpa, Lalita; Udpa, Satish S.

    2006-03-01

    Nondestructive assessment of the integrity of civil structures is of paramount importance for ensuring safety. In concrete imaging, radiography, ground penetrating radar and infrared thermography are some of the widely used techniques for health monitoring. Other emerging technologies that are gaining impetus for detecting and locating flaws in steel reinforcement bar include radioactive computed tomography, microwave holography, microwave and acoustic tomography. Of all the emerging techniques, microwave NDT is a promising imaging modality largely due to their ability to penetrate thick concrete structures, contrast between steel rebar and concrete and their non-radioactive nature. This paper investigates the feasibility of a far field microwave NDE technique for reinforced concrete structures.

  4. Antiviral Activity of a Novel Compound CW-33 against Japanese Encephalitis Virus through Inhibiting Intracellular Calcium Overload.

    PubMed

    Huang, Su-Hua; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Chen, Chao-Jung; Liu, Yu-Ching; Wang, Ching-Ying; Ping, Chia-Fong; Lin, Yu-Fong; Huang, An-Cheng; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, has five genotypes (I, II, III, IV, and V). JEV genotype I circulates widely in some Asian countries. However, current JEV vaccines based on genotype III strains show low neutralizing capacities against genotype I variants. In addition, JE has no specific treatment, except a few supportive treatments. Compound CW-33, an intermediate synthesized derivative of furoquinolines, was investigated for its antiviral activities against JEV in this study. CW-33 exhibited the less cytotoxicity to Syrian baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) and human medulloblastoma (TE761) cells. CW-33 dose-dependently reduced the cytopathic effect and apoptosis of JEV-infected cells. Supernatant virus yield assay pinpointed CW-33 as having potential anti-JEV activity with IC50 values ranging from 12.7 to 38.5 μM. Time-of-addition assay with CW-33 indicated that simultaneous and post-treatment had no plaque reduction activity, but continuous and simultaneous treatments proved to have highly effective antiviral activity, with IC50 values of 32.7 and 48.5 μM, respectively. CW-33 significantly moderated JEV-triggered Ca(2+) overload, which correlated with the recovery of mitochondria membrane potential as well as the activation of Akt/mTOR and Jak/STAT1 signals in treated infected cells. Phosphopeptide profiling by LC-MS/MS revealed that CW-33 upregulated proteins from the enzyme modulator category, such as protein phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2), Rho GTPase-activating protein 35, ARF GTPase-activating protein GIT2, and putative 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 2. These enzyme modulators identified were associated with the activation of Akt/mTOR and Jak/STAT1 signals. Meanwhile, I-2 treatment substantially inhibited the apoptosis of JEV-infected cells. The results demonstrated that CW-33 exhibited a significant potential in the development of anti-JEV agents. PMID:27563890

  5. More than 100 channel supercontinuum CW optical source with precise 25GHz spacing for 10Gbit/s DWDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianping; Nan, Yinbo; Zhou, Xianwei

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the generation of supercontinuum (SC) with a 12.5GHz DFB/EAM ultrashort optical pulse broadened in the high nonlinear fiber (HNLF). Through longitudinal mode-carving of the SC spectrum, a novel multiwavelength continuous wave (CW) optical source with precise 25GHz channel spacing is realized. The bit error rate (BER) curve and eye diagram show that the multiwavelength CW optical source is promising for dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) systems.

  6. Observations of tornadoes and wall clouds with a portable FM-CW Doppler radar: 1989--1990 results

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, H.B. . School of Meteorology); Unruh, W.P. )

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on our progress using a portable, 1 W,FM (frequency modulated)-CW (continuous wave) Doppler radar developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to make measurements of the wind field in tornadoes and wall clouds along with simultaneous visual documentation. Results using a CW version of the radar in 1987--1988 are given in Bluestein and Unruh (1989). 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Dielectric characterization of the seeds of invasive Chinese tallow tree.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Laura Picou; Boldor, Dorin

    2013-01-01

    Biofuels have the potential to replace a significant portion of the transportation needs of the USA and the world. Low-cost lipid feedstock (i.e. tallow tree seeds) can be used for production of biodiesel, but these seeds need to be dried. Microwave drying is utilized to dry various seeds and grain, but for this process to be most efficient the dielectric properties of the materials need to be known. This study presents, for the first time, the dielectric properties of the seeds of the Chinese tallow tree. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss factor were determined using a modified free-space method for different moisture contents at frequency ranges centered around 915 and 2450 MHz respectively. The dielectric constant decreased with frequency in those respective ranges, and increased linearly with increasing moisture content, from 1.96 at 0% m.c. to 2.3 at 7% m.c. at 915 MHz, and from 2.08 at 0% m.c. to 2.42 at 7.6% m.c. at 2450 MHz. The dielectric loss factor generally decreased with frequency in both frequency ranges, and increased linearly with moisture content from a low of 0.16 at 0% m.c. to 0.21 at 7.56% at 915 MHz, respectively from a low of 0.13 at 0% m.c. to 0.2 at 7.6% m.c. at 2450 MHz. These results can be used to design microwave processing operations and systems for drying of tallow tree seeds, as well as for non-destructive determination of theses seeds' moisture content. PMID:24779226

  8. Microwave and Pulsed Power

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, E.K.

    1993-03-01

    The goals of the Microwave and Pulsed Power thrust area are to identify realizable research and development efforts and to conduct high-quality research in those pulse power and microwave technologies that support existing and emerging programmatic requirements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Our main objective is to work on nationally important problems while enhancing our basic understanding of enabling technologies such as component design and testing, compact systems packaging, exploratory physics experiments, and advanced systems integration and performance. During FY-92, we concentrated our research efforts on the six project areas described in this report. (1) We are investigating the superior electronic and thermal properties of diamond that may make it an ideal material for a high-power, solid-state switch. (2) We are studying the feasibility of using advanced Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar technology for reliable non-destructive evaluation of bridges and other high-value concrete structures. These studies include conceptual designs, modeling, experimental verifications, and image reconstruction of simulated radar data. (3) We are exploring the efficiency of pulsed plasma processing techniques used for the removal of NO{sub x} from various effluent sources. (4) We have finished the investigation of the properties of a magnetically delayed low-pressure gas switch, which was designed here at LLNL. (5) We are applying statistical electromagnetic theory techniques to help assess microwave effects on electronic subsystems, by using a mode stirred chamber as our measurement tool. (6) We are investigating the generation of perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in proposed CFC replacement fluids when they are subjected to high electrical stresses and breakdown environments.

  9. Microwave radiometric systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.

    1972-01-01

    Microwave radiometers measure thermal electromagnetic radiation at frequencies ranging over the entire radio spectrum, from audio to infrared. The temperatures of black-body radiators can be measured with sensitivities better than 0.01 K, and with absolute accuracies better than 0.5 K. Radiometric systems have been built with as many as 400 independent spectral channels. Frequency resolutions range from hertz to gigahertz; and integration times range from microseconds to hours. Radiometric systems have operated reliably on the ground, and in balloons, aircraft, and spacecraft, including the 1962 Mariner 2 planetary probe to Venus.

  10. Microwave imaging of aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Bernard D.

    1988-12-01

    Three methods of imaging aircraft from the ground with microwave radar with quality suitable for aircraft target recognition are described. The imaging methods are based on a self-calibration procedure called adaptive beamforming that compensates for the severe geometric distortion inherent in any imaging system that is large enough to achieve the high angular resolution necessary for two-dimensional target imaging. The signal processing algorithm is described and X-band (3-cm)-wavelength experiments demonstrate its success on commercial aircraft flying into Philadelphia International Airport.

  11. Microwave PASER Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Antipov, S.; Poluektov, O.; Jing, C.

    2009-01-22

    The PASER (Particle Acceleration by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) concept for particle acceleration entails the direct transfer of energy from an active medium to a charged particle beam. The PASER was originally formulated for optical (laser) media; we are planning a PASER demonstration experiment based on an optically pumped X-band paramagnetic medium consisting of porphyrin or fullerene (C{sub 60}) derivatives in a toluene solution or polystyrene matrix. We discuss the background of this project and report on the status of the experiment to measure the acceleration of electrons using the microwave PASER.

  12. DSN Microwave Antenna Holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, D. J.; Seidel, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    The DSN microwave antenna holography project will obtain three-dimensional pictures of the large DSN antenna surfaces. These pictures must be of suffi icient resolution to allow adjustment of the reflector panels to an rms surface of 0.5 mm (0.25 mm, goal). The major parameters and equations needed to define a holographic measurement system are outlined and then the proof of concept demonstration measurement that was made at DSS-43 (Australia) that resulted in contour maps with spatial resolution of 7 m in the aperture plane and resolution orthogonal to the aperture plane of 0.7 mm was discussed.

  13. CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS & TRANSFORMATIONS USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A historical account of the utility of microwaves in a variety of chemical synthesis applications will be presented, including a solvent-free strategy that involves microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants (undiluted) catalyzed by the surfaces of recyclable mineral supports such...

  14. High-Sensitivity Microwave Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, W. M., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a 3.33-cm wavelength (9 GHz) microwave system that achieves a high overall signal sensitivity and a well-collimated beam with moderate-size equipment. The system has been used to develop microwave versions of the Michelson interferometer, Bragg reflector, Brewster's law and total internal reflection, and Young's interference experiment.…

  15. More Experiments with Microwave Ovens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter; Karstadt, Detlef

    2004-01-01

    Microwave ovens can be used to perform exciting demonstrations that illustrate a variety of physics topics. Experiments discussed here show superheating, visualize the inhomogeneous heating that takes place in a microwave and also show how to use a mobile phone to detect radiation leaking from the oven. Finally eggs can give some spectacular…

  16. GREENER SYNTHETIC TRANSFORMATIONS USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave irradiation has been used for a variety of organic transformations wherein chemical reactions are expedited because of selective adsorption of microwave (MW) energy by polar molecules, non-polar molecules being inert to the MW dielectric loss. The MW application under s...

  17. Microwave sintering of multiple aritcles

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R.D.; Katz, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    Disclosed are apparatus and method for producing articles of alumina and of alumina and silicon carbide in which the articles are sintered at high temperatures using microwave radiation. The articles are placed in a sintering container which is placed in a microwave cavity for heating. The rates at which heating and cooling take place is controlled.

  18. Microwave sintering of multiple articles

    DOEpatents

    Blake, Rodger D.; Katz, Joel D.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing articles of alumina and of alumina and silicon carbide in which the articles are sintered at high temperatures using microwave radiation. The articles are placed in a sintering container which is placed in a microwave cavity for heating. The rates at which heating and cooling take place is controlled.

  19. Computer-Generated Microwave Holograms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leming, Charles W.; Hastings, Orestes Patterson, III

    1980-01-01

    Described is the phasor method of superposition of waves. The intensity pattern from a system of microwave sources is calculated point by point on a plane corresponding to a film emulsion, and then printed and directly converted to a hologram for 3-cm microwaves. Calculations, construction, and viewing of holograms are included. (Author/DS)

  20. Microwave drying of seed cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A small lab dryer was designed for use in drying seed cotton with components of a microwave generator mounted thereon. The magnetron emitted radiation directly into the seed cotton and a fan directed air cross-flow to the radiation direction. The microwave components were a 1.1 kW magnetron, trans...

  1. Transcatheter Microwave Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, Dickey G. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method, simulation, and apparatus are provided that are highly suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A catheter is disclosed that includes a small diameter disk loaded monopole antenna surrounded by fusion material having a high heat of fusion and a melting point preferably at or near body temperature. Microwaves from the antenna heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. The fusion material keeps the urethra cool by means of the heat of fusion of the fusion material. This prevents damage to the urethra while the prostatic tissue is necrosed. A computer simulation is provided that can be used to predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of the catheter and method of applying microwave energy a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  2. Microwave hematoma detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Hematoma Detector is a non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots near the outer surface of the body. While being geared towards finding sub-dural and epi-dural hematomas, the device can be used to detect blood pooling anywhere near the surface of the body. Modified versions of the device can also detect pneumothorax, organ hemorrhage, atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries, evaluate perfusion (blood flow) at or near the body surface, body tissue damage at or near the surface (especially for burn assessment) and be used in a number of NDE applications. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with a specialized antenna, signal processing/recognition algorithms and a disposable cap worn by the patient which will facilitate accurate mapping of the brain and proper function of the instrument. The invention may be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of sub-dural or epi-dural hematoma in human or animal patients, detection of hemorrhage within approximately 5 cm of the outer surface anywhere on a patient's body.

  3. Diffuse Microwave Emission Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, R. A.; Mather, J.; Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Seiffert, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Levin, S. M.

    1996-12-01

    The Diffuse Microwave Emission Survey (DIMES) is a mission concept selected by NASA in 1995 to answer fundamental questions about the content and history of the universe. DIMES will use a set of absolutely calibrated cryogenic radiometers from a space platform to measure the frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at wavelengths 15--0.3 cm (frequency 2--100 GHz) to precision 0.1 mK or better. Measurements at centimeter wavelengths probe different physical processes than the COBE-FIRAS spectra at shorter wavelengths, and complement the anisotropy measurements from DMR, balloon and ground-based instruments, and the planned MAP and COBRAS/SAMBA satellites. DIMES will observe the free-free signal from early photoionization to establish the precise epoch of structure formation, and will measure or limit energy release at redshift 10(4) < z < 10(7) by measuring the chemical potential distortion of the CMB spectrum. Both are likely under current cosmological theory and allowed by current measurement limits; even an upper limit at the expected sensitivity 10(-5) MJy/sr will place important constraints on the matter content, structure, and evolution of the universe. Detecting these distortions or showing that they do not exist constitutes the last frontier of CMB observations.

  4. Tuning Broadband Microwave Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Alaniz, Gabriel

    2003-09-05

    The PEP-II/DA {Phi} NE/ALS longitudinal feedback systems are complex wide bandwidth systems requiring analog, digital and microwave circuits. The solid-state amplifier is one of the components in the microwave circuit that is required to suppress the coupled bunch instabilities that exist in the PEP-II accelerator. The suppression is achieved by using an antenna as a kicker structure that provides an electric field in order to increase or decrease the energy of particles passing through the structure. The amplifier is made up of sixteen 30 to 35W microstrip GaAs FET modules that are combined to obtain 500W over a bandwidth of 850MHz to 1850MHz. The amplifier malfunctioned causing a reduction in the functionality and power output of the individual GaAs FET modules. The amplifier must be repaired. After repair, the amplifier must be tuned to optimize the gain while maintaining proper power output. The amplifier is tuned using microstrip circuit techniques. A variety of microstrip methods are used to obtain the proper line impedance. The result is a working amplifier that operates efficiently.

  5. Microwave generation with low residual phase noise from a femtosecond fiber laser with an intracavity electro-optic modulator.

    PubMed

    Swann, William C; Baumann, Esther; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R; Newbury, Nathan R

    2011-11-21

    Low phase-noise microwave generation has previously been demonstrated using self-referenced frequency combs to divide down a low noise optical reference. We demonstrate an approach based on a fs Er-fiber laser that avoids the complexity of self-referenced stabilization of the offset frequency. Instead, the repetition rate of the femtosecond Er-fiber laser is phase locked to two cavity-stabilized cw fiber lasers that span 3.74 THz by use of an intracavity electro-optic modulator with over 2 MHz feedback bandwidth. The fs fiber laser effectively divides the 3.74 THz difference signal to produce microwave signals at harmonics of the repetition rate. Through comparison of two identical dividers, we measure a residual phase noise on a 1.5 GHz carrier of -120 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz offset. PMID:22109466

  6. Direct Detection of C_2H_2 in Air and Human Breath by Cw-Crds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Florian M.; Vaittinen, Olavi; Metsälä, Markus; Halonen, Lauri

    2010-06-01

    Continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) is an established cavity-enhanced absorption technique that can provide the necessary sensitivity, selectivity and fast acquisition time for many applications involving the detection of trace species. We present a simple but highly sensitive cw-CRDS spectrometer based on an external cavity diode laser operating in the near-infrared region. This instrument allows us to directly detect acetylene (C_2H_2) mixing ratios in air with a detection limit of 120 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) measuring on a C_2H_2 absorption line at 6565.620 cm-1. Acetylene is a combustion product that is routinely used in environmental monitoring as a marker for anthropogenic emissions. In a recent work, the spectrometer was employed to measure the level of acetylene in indoor and outdoor air in Helsinki. Continuous flow measurements with high time resolution (one minute) revealed strong fluctuations in the acetylene mixing ratio in outdoor air during daytime. Due to its non-invasive nature and fast response time, the analysis of exhaled breath for medical diagnostics is an excellent and straightforward alternative to methods using urine or blood samples. In an ongoing study, the cw-CRDS instrument is used to establish the baseline level of acetylene in the breath of the healthy population. An elevated amount of acetylene in breath could indicate exposure to combustion exhausts or other volatile organic compound (VOC) rich sources. The latest results of this investigation will be presented. F. M. Schmidt, O. Vaittinen, M. Metsälä, P. Kraus and L. Halonen, submitted for publication in Appl. Phys. B.

  7. Noise analysis for near-field 3D FM-CW radar imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.

    2015-05-01

    Near field radar imaging systems are used for demanding security applications including concealed weapon detection in airports and other high-security venues. Despite the near-field operation, phase noise and thermal noise can limit performance in several ways. Practical imaging systems can employ arrays with low gain antennas and relatively large signal distribution networks that have substantial losses which limit transmit power and increase the effective noise figure of the receiver chain, resulting in substantial thermal noise. Phase noise can also limit system performance. The signal coupled from transmitter to receiver is much larger than expected target signals. Phase noise from this coupled signal can set the system noise floor if the oscillator is too noisy. Frequency modulated continuous wave (FM-CW) radar transceivers used in short range systems are relatively immune to the effects of the coupled phase noise due to range correlation effects. This effect can reduce the phase-noise floor such that it is below the thermal noise floor for moderate performance oscillators. Phase noise is also manifested in the range response around bright targets, and can cause smaller targets to be obscured. Noise in synthetic aperture imaging systems is mitigated by the processing gain of the system. In this paper, the effects of thermal noise, phase noise, and processing gain are analyzed in the context of a near field 3-D FM-CW imaging radar as might be used for concealed weapon detection. In addition to traditional frequency domain analysis, a time-domain simulation is employed to graphically demonstrate the effect of these noise sources on a fast-chirping FM-CW system.

  8. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2000-11-21

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. In accordance with the teachings of the invention, a low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic tansaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively. For example, it may also be used to diagnose diseases associated with the concentration of Raman-active constituents in urine, lymph and saliva It may be used to identify cancer in the breast, cervix, uterus, ovaries and the like by measuring the fingerprint excitation Raman spectra of these tissues. It may also be used to reveal the growing of tumors or cancers by measuring the levels of nitric oxide in tissue.

  9. CW- and pulsed-EPR of carbonaceous matter in primitive meteorites: solving a lineshape paradox.

    PubMed

    Delpoux, Olivier; Gourier, Didier; Binet, Laurent; Vezin, Hervé; Derenne, Sylvie; Robert, François

    2008-05-01

    Insoluble organic matter (IOM) of Orgueil and Tagish Lake meteorites are studied by CW-EPR and pulsed-EPR spectroscopies. The EPR line is due to polycyclic paramagnetic moieties concentrated in defect-rich regions of the IOM, with concentrations of the order of 4x10(19) spin/g. CW-EPR reveals two types of paramagnetic defects: centres with S=1/2, and centres with S=0 ground state and thermally accessible triple state S=1. In spite of the Lorentzian shape of the EPR and its narrowing upon increasing the spin concentration, the EPR line is not in the exchange narrowing regime as previously deduced from multi-frequency CW-EPR [L. Binet, D. Gourier, Appl. Magn. Reson. 30 (2006) 207-231]. It is inhomogeneously broadened as demonstrated by the presence of nuclear modulations in the spin-echo decay. The line narrowing, similar to an exchange narrowing effect, is the result of an increasing contribution of the narrow line of the triplet state centres in addition to the broader line of doublet states. Hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy (HYSCORE) of hydrogen and (13)C nuclei indicates that IOM* centres are small polycyclic moieties that are moderately branched with aliphatic chains, as shown by the presence of aromatic hydrogen atoms. On the contrary the lack of such aromatic hydrogen in triplet states suggests that these radicals are most probably highly branched. Paramagnetic centres are considerably enriched in deuterium, with D/H approximately 1.5+/-0.5x10(-2) of the order of values existing in interstellar medium. PMID:18024197

  10. Duty factor variation possibility from 1% to 100% with PKU microwave driven Cs-free volume H- sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. X.; Zhang, T.; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, A. L.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, J. F.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    Microwave driven cesium-free volume H- sources, that have the ability to deliver tens of mA H- at 35 keV both in CW and 10% duty factor (100 Hz/1 ms), were developed at Peking University (PKU) [S. X. Peng et al., in Proceeding of IPAC 2015, WEPWA027, Richmond, Virginia, USA, 3-8 May 2015]. Recently, special efforts were paid on the investigation of duty factor variation possibility from 1% to 100% with them. Most of the experiments were carried out with a pulsed length (τ) of 1 ms and different intervals of 99 ms, 49 ms, 39 ms, 29 ms, 19 ms, 9 ms, 4 ms, 2 ms, 1 ms, 0.5 ms, and 0 ms, respectively. Other experiments were focused on CW operation and fixed duty factor of 1%. Experimental results prove that PKU H- sources can deliver tens of mA H- at duty factor from 1% to 100%. The RF power efficiency increases steadily with the increasing of duty factor from 1% to CW at a fixed pulsed length. Under a given duty factor and pulsed length, RF power efficiency keeps constant and the H- current increases with RF power linearly. Details will be presented in the paper.

  11. Duty factor variation possibility from 1% to 100% with PKU microwave driven Cs-free volume H⁻ sources.

    PubMed

    Peng, S X; Zhang, T; Ren, H T; Zhang, A L; Xu, Y; Zhang, J F; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Microwave driven cesium-free volume H(-) sources, that have the ability to deliver tens of mA H(-) at 35 keV both in CW and 10% duty factor (100 Hz/1 ms), were developed at Peking University (PKU) [S. X. Peng et al., in Proceeding of IPAC 2015, WEPWA027, Richmond, Virginia, USA, 3-8 May 2015]. Recently, special efforts were paid on the investigation of duty factor variation possibility from 1% to 100% with them. Most of the experiments were carried out with a pulsed length (τ) of 1 ms and different intervals of 99 ms, 49 ms, 39 ms, 29 ms, 19 ms, 9 ms, 4 ms, 2 ms, 1 ms, 0.5 ms, and 0 ms, respectively. Other experiments were focused on CW operation and fixed duty factor of 1%. Experimental results prove that PKU H(-) sources can deliver tens of mA H(-) at duty factor from 1% to 100%. The RF power efficiency increases steadily with the increasing of duty factor from 1% to CW at a fixed pulsed length. Under a given duty factor and pulsed length, RF power efficiency keeps constant and the H(-) current increases with RF power linearly. Details will be presented in the paper. PMID:26932007

  12. Performance of three-crystal 1800 watt CW Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, J.L.; Keicher, D.M.; Fuerschbach, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a laser system that would combine some of the favorable characteristics of the two most commonly used lasers for seam welding of heat sensitive assemblies. A multirod (3) symmetrical resonator CW Nd:YAG laser has been developed that is rated at 1800 watts output power. By utilizing the symmetrical resonator design, beam characteristics are not significantly compromised compared to that of single rod systems. The laser is capable of producing acceptable welds in aluminum and copper alloys and also has sufficient power to produce welds in steels and nickel base alloys at high welding speeds. 4 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  13. Design considerations for a 100 kW c-w, 140 GHz gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Bier, R.; Fox, L.; Huey, H.; Ives, L.; Jory, H.; Spang, S.

    1984-01-01

    A gyrotron oscillator capable of generating 100 kW of c-w power is currently under development at Varian. The tube is being designed for operation in the TE/sup 0//sub 031/ cavity mode with the electron beam located at the second radial electric field maximum in the cavity. The electron beam will be produced by a magnetron injection gun and the 56 kG magnetic field required for 140 GHz operation will be provided by a superconducting magnet. Initial design calculations for the important elements of the tube are reported and the various technology issues of the tube design are discussed.

  14. Optimum search strategy for randomly distributed CW transmitters. [for project SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.

    1985-01-01

    The relative probability of detecting randomly distributed CW transmitters as a function of the fraction of the sky which is searched (in a fixed time interval) is given. It is shown that the probability of detecting such a class of transmitters with a given receiving system is a maximum if the entire sky is searched, provided that the receiving system is sufficiently sensitive to detect the nearest transmitter in the allocated time and that the integration time - bandwidth product in a specified direction is greater than 8.

  15. Note on the Optimum Search Strategy for Uniformly Distributed CW Transmitters. [implications for Project Seti

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.

    1984-01-01

    The relative probability of detecting randomly distributed CW transmitters as a function of the fraction of the sky which is searched (in a fixed time) is given. It is shown that the probability of detecting such a class of transmitters with a given receiving system is a maximum if the entire sky is searched. The particular case of a search in which the number of directions searched is equal to the telescope gain and the integration time per beam element is equal to the reciprocal of the channel bandwidth is discussed.

  16. Problems in the development of autonomous mobile laser systems based on a cw chemical DF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, B P; Bashkin, A S; Beznozdrev, V N; Parfen'ev, M V; Pirogov, N A; Semenov, S N

    2003-01-31

    The problems involved in designing autonomous mobile laser systems based on high-power cw chemical DF lasers, whose mass and size parameters would make it possible to install them on various vehicles, are discussed. The need for mobility of such lasers necessitates special attention to be paid to the quest for ways and means of reducing the mass and size of the main laser systems. The optimisation of the parameters of such lasers is studied for various methods of scaling their systems. A complex approach to analysis of the optical scheme of the laser system is developed. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  17. Strategies for minimizing emittance growth in high charge CW FEL injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the best strategies for designing low emittance, high charge CW FEL injectors. This issue has become more and more critical as today`s interest in FELs is toward UV wavelength high average power operation. The challenge of obtaining the smallest possible emittance is discussed from both the practical point of view and the beam physics point of view. Various mechanisms responsible for beam emittance growth are addressed in detail. Finally, the design of a high charge injector test stand at CEBAF is chosen to help illustrate the design strategies and emittance growth mechanisms discussed in this paper.

  18. Broad-band chopper for a CW proton linac at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Lebedev, V.A.; Solyak, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Sun, D.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The future Fermilab program in the high energy physics is based on a new facility called the Project X [1] to be built in the following decade. It is based on a 3 MW CW linear accelerator delivering the 3 GeV 1 mA H{sup -} beam to a few experiments simultaneously. Small fraction of this beam will be redirected for further acceleration to 8 GeV to be injected to the Recycler/Main Injector for a usage in a neutrino program and other synchrotron based high energy experiments. Requirements and technical limitations to the bunch-by-bunch chopper for the Fermilab Project X are discussed.

  19. CW 100 kW radio frequency-free-electron laser design at 10 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazzoli, Claudio G.; Rodenburg, Robert E.; Romero, Jacob B.; Adamski, John L.; Pistoresi, Denis J.; Shoffstall, Donald R.; Quimby, David C.

    1991-12-01

    The authors describe the 100 kW continuous-wave (CW) radio frequency free-electron laser at 10 microns to be built at Boeing Defense and Space Group in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory. The authors discuss the criteria which led to the selection of the operating point. The authors outline the single-accelerator master-oscillator power-amplifier concept. This approach and the wavelength were chosen on the basis of maximum cost-effectiveness, including utilization of existing hardware, reasonable technical risk, and potential for future applications. The major experimental goals for the average power laser experiment (APLE) program are discussed, and the expected performance is considered.

  20. Similarity criteria in calculations of the energy characteristics of a cw oxygen - iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhenin, A. V.; Azyazov, V. N.

    2012-12-01

    The calculated and experimental data on the energy efficiency of a cw oxygen - iodine laser (OIL) are analysed based on two similarity criteria, namely, on the ratio of the residence time of the gas mixture in the resonator to the characteristic time of extraction of the energy stored in singlet oxygen td and on the gain-to-loss ratio Π. It is shown that the simplified two-level laser model satisfactorily predicts the output characteristics of OILs with a stable resonator at τd <= 7. Efficient energy extraction from the OIL active medium is achieved in the case of τd = 5 - 7, Π = 4 - 8.

  1. Similarity criteria in calculations of the energy characteristics of a cw oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mezhenin, A V; Azyazov, V N

    2012-12-31

    The calculated and experimental data on the energy efficiency of a cw oxygen - iodine laser (OIL) are analysed based on two similarity criteria, namely, on the ratio of the residence time of the gas mixture in the resonator to the characteristic time of extraction of the energy stored in singlet oxygen td and on the gain-to-loss ratio {Pi}. It is shown that the simplified two-level laser model satisfactorily predicts the output characteristics of OILs with a stable resonator at {tau}{sub d} {<=} 7. Efficient energy extraction from the OIL active medium is achieved in the case of {tau}{sub d} = 5 - 7, {Pi} = 4 - 8. (lasers)

  2. Explosive vaporization of metallic sodium microparticles by CW resonant laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Atutov, S N; Baldini, W; Biancalana, V; Calabrese, R; Guidi, V; Mai, B; Mariotti, E; Mazzocca, G; Moi, L; Pod'yachev, S P; Tomassetti, L

    2001-11-19

    Explosive vaporization of metallic Na microparticles stimulated by resonant cw laser radiation has been observed in a glass cell. Vaporization occurs at low laser-power density. The effect consists in the generation of optically thick and sharply localized Na vapor clouds propagating in the cell against the laser beam. The effect is explained by laser excitation of Na atoms, which collide onto the surface of the microparticles and transfer their internal energy. This causes other atoms to be vaporized and to continue the avalanche process. PMID:11736344

  3. Simulation of a two-frequency cw chemical HF-HBr laser

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, B P; Katorgin, B I; Stepanov, A A

    2008-10-31

    An autonomous cw chemical HF-HBr laser emitting simultaneously at {approx}2.7 {mu}m (HF molecules) and {approx}4.2 {mu}m (HBr molecules) is studied numerically by using complete Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that the output power of the HBr laser per unit area of the nozzle array can achieve {approx}20 W cm{sup -2} for the laser region length {approx}20 cm. The relation between the radiation intensities emitted by HF and HBr molecules is controlled by diluting the secondary fuel by bromine. (lasers)

  4. Clinical trials in near infrared fluorescence imaging with IRDye 800CW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draney, Daniel R.

    2015-03-01

    A monofunctional, heptamethine dye, IRDye® 800CW, is being manufactured under GMP conditions for use in human clinical trials. When attached to a suitable targeting agent and paired with an appropriate camera system, the dye allows Near Infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging of tumor tissue during surgery. The talk will describe the properties of the dye and give an overview of current and planned clinical trials in Europe and the USA. The dye is available in both the NHS ester and carboxylate forms for conjugation to targeting molecules. A GMP toxicology study of the dye was described in a previous publication.

  5. Spectroscopic binary orbits from ultraviolet radial velocities. X - CW Cephei (HD 218066)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickland, D. J.; Koch, R. H.; Pfeiffer, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of CW Cephei were carried out repeatedly in the course of three days in December 1991, using the high-resolution, short-wavelength spectrograph of IUE, with an additional spectrum taken on February 6, 1992. The paper presents a log of these observations, which represent the only high-resolution observations of this star in the archive. The observations have an advantage of Popper's (1974) optical observations that they do not stretch out over a significant part of the apsidal cycle and can thus be treated with the value of omega taken as fixed.

  6. RF status of superconducting module development suitable for CW operation: ELBE cryostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichert, J.; Büchner, A.; Büttig, H.; Gabriel, F.; Michel, P.; Möller, K.; Lehnert, U.; Schneider, Ch.; Stephan, J.; Winter, A.

    2006-02-01

    For the ELBE electron linear accelerator a superconducting accelerating module was developed and is now in routine operation. The cryostat contains two TESLA cavities (1.3 GHz) and is designed for continuous-wave (CW) operation with an accelerating gradient of 10 MV/m and a maximum average beam current of 1 mA. For the RF power two 10 kW klystrons are used. Special tuners, power couplers, low-level RF control, cryogenic control systems and safety systems were developed. Engineering design, operation parameters and experience with the module are discussed.

  7. Spatio-temporal generation regimes in quasi-CW Raman fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Nikita; Sugavanam, Srikanth; Churkin, Dmitry

    2015-09-21

    We present experimental measurements of intensity spatio-temporal dynamics in quasi-CW Raman fiber laser. Depending on the power, the laser operates in different spatio-temporal regimes varying from partial mode-locking near the generation threshold to almost stochastic radiation and a generation of short-lived pulses at high power. The transitions between the generation regimes are evident in intensity spatio-temporal dynamics. Two-dimensional auto-correlation functions provide an additional insight into temporal and spatial properties of the observed regimes. PMID:26406625

  8. Feasibility and conceptual design of a C.W. positron source at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Golge, Serkan

    2010-08-01

    A feasibility study of a CW positron source for the 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) is provided. The proposed ≥ 100 nA Continuous Wave (CW) positron source at JLAB has several unique and challenging characteristics: high current incident electron beam at 126 MeV with a high beam power (up to a MW); CW e- beam and CW e+ production. The multiple scattering is a dominant process when creating e+ in a target, which results a large phase space area of the emitted positrons. An admittance study was done at CEBAF to find the maximum phase space area, which is tolerated in the machine. The measured geometrical transverse admittance (A) were Ax =10 and Ay = 5 mm∙mrad at the injector. Energy spread measurement was also done at the ARC1. The fractional spread limit in the ARC1 was measured as δ = 3×10-3 at 653 MeV. By using the optimized results and the CEBAF parameters, three positron injector configurations are proposed; Combined Function Magnet, Two-Dipole and Microtron Dipole configurations. With the assumptions made, by using 126 MeV Ⓧ10 mA e- beam impinging on a 2 mm W target with a 100 μm spot size, we can get up to 3 μA useful e+ current at the North Linac connection. One of the biggest challenges is the target design, which the deposited power is about 60 kW. ILC designs project power deposition up to 13 kW, which would allow the creation of a e+ beam of up to 650 nA otherwise. The results of analytic and monte carlo simulations of the positron production, capture and acceleration are presented. For the target design, a review is presented of solutions for the high power production target. Portions of this dissertation work have been published in two conference proceedings.

  9. First results from the Cornell high Q cw full linac cryo- module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, R.; Furuta, F.; He, Y.; Ge, M.; Hoffstaetter, G.; O'Connell, T.; Quigley, P.; Sabol, D.; Sears, J.; Smith, E.; Liepe, M.; Markham, S.; Bullock, B.; Elmore, B.; Kaufman, J.; Conway, J.; Veshcherevich, V.

    2015-12-01

    Cornell University has finished building a 10 m long superconducting accelerator module as a prototype of the main linac of a proposed ERL facility. This module houses 6 superconducting cavities- operated at 1.8 K in continuous wave (CW) mode - with individual HOM absorbers and one magnet/ BPM section. In pushing the limits, a high quality factor of the cavities (2•1010) and high beam currents (100 mA accelerated plus 100 mA decelerated) were targeted. The design of the cryomodule and the results of components tested before assembly will be presented in this paper.

  10. High-power cw laser bars of the 750 - 790-nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Degtyareva, N S; Kondakov, S A; Mikayelyan, G T; Gorlachuk, P V; Ladugin, M A; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Ryaboshtan, Yu L; Yarotskaya, I V

    2013-06-30

    We have developed the effective design of semiconductor heterostructures, which allow one to fabricate cw laser diodes emitting in the 750 - 790-nm spectral range. The optimal conditions for fabrication of GaAsP/AlGaInP/GaAs heterostructures by MOCVD have been determined. It is shown that the use of quantum wells with a precisely defined quantity mismatch reduces the threshold current density and increases the external differential efficiency. The results of studies of characteristics of diode laser bars fabricated from these heterostructures are presented. (lasers)

  11. Mode selection and resonator design studies of a 95 GHz, 100 kW, CW gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Vamshi Krishna, P.; Kartikeyan, M.V. E-mail: kartik@iitr.ernet.in; Thumm, M.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the mode selection procedure leading to the design and the cavity resonator design studies of a 95 GHz, 100 kW, CW Gyrotron will be presented, such a gyrotron will be used for specific ECRH/ECRIS applications. In this course all the suitable modes with design constraints within the limits of design goals are considered and finally the TE{sub 10.4} mode is chosen as the operating mode which is suitable for the design. Design constraints are carefully investigated, and starting currents are computed. (author)

  12. Visibility and aerosol measurement by diode-laser random-modulation CW lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, N.; Baba, H.; Sakurai, K.; Ueno, T.; Ishikawa, N.

    1986-01-01

    Examples of diode laser (DL) random-modulation continuous wave (RM-CW) lidar measurements are reported. The ability of the measurement of the visibility, vertical aerosol profile, and the cloud ceiling height is demonstrated. Although the data shown here were all measured at night time, the daytime measurement is, of course, possible. For that purpose, accurate control of the laser frequency to the center frequency of a narrow band filter is required. Now a new system with a frequency control is under construction.

  13. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, I.H. . Dept. of Physics); Lee, J.H. . Langley Research Center)

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on the efficiencies and threshold pump intensities of various solid-state laser materials that have been estimated to compare their performance characteristics as direct solar-pumped CW lasers. Among the laser materials evaluated in this research, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6%; however, it does not seem to be practical for solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AMO) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12% when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  14. Design of a multistage depressed collector system for 1 MW CW gyrotrons. Part 2: System consideration

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R.L.; Mizuhara, M.; Schumacher, R.; Neilson, J. ); Singh, A.; Granatstein, V.L. . Inst. for Plasma Research); Gaudreau, M.; Casey, J.A. )

    1999-04-01

    Part 2 describes the basic mechanical design of the two-stage collector, including the thermal performance. The design should be applicable to Gaussian mode gyrotrons over a very broad frequency range at power levels up to one megawatt CW. Part 2 also describes an innovative regenerative power supply system that utilizes highly efficient, solid state, switching technology that provides high reliability and significantly reduced cost over conventional technology. An advanced computer control system that will provide user-friendly gyrotron operation and allow modes of operation not possible with manual operation is also being developed.

  15. Microwave-driven ultraviolet light sources

    DOEpatents

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.

    2002-01-29

    A microwave-driven ultraviolet (UV) light source is provided. The light source comprises an over-moded microwave cavity having at least one discharge bulb disposed within the microwave cavity. At least one magnetron probe is coupled directly to the microwave cavity.

  16. The Liverpool Microwave Palaeointensity System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Mimi; Biggin, Andrew; Hawkins, Louise; Hodgson, Emma; Hurst, Elliot

    2016-04-01

    The motivation for the group at Liverpool in the 1990s (led by John Shaw and Derek Walton) to start experimenting with using microwaves to demagnetise and remagnetise palaeomagnetic samples, rather than heating using conventional ovens, was to reduce laboratory induced alteration in absolute palaeointensity experiments. As with other methods, the non-ideal effects of grain size and naturally altered remanence must still be addressed. From humble beginnings using a domestic microwave oven the current 4th generation microwave system (MWS) has developed in to an integrated combined 14 GHz microwave resonant cavity and SQUID magnetometer system. The MWS is designed to investigate one 5 mm diameter sample at a time with microwave exposure (the equivalent of a heating step in conventional experiments) ranging from a few seconds up to around a minute. Each experiment (protocol, checks, direction and strength of applied field, number of steps etc) can be tailored to the behaviour of each individual sample. There have been many published studies demonstrating the equivalence of conventional thermal (Thellier) and microwave techniques using both artificial and natural remanence and also that the microwave method can indeed reduce laboratory induced alteration. Here an overview of the present MWS including a discussion of the physical processes occurring will be given. Examples of current projects (both archaeological and geological) utilising the method will also be described. Finally, future developments and applications of the method will be discussed.

  17. Microwave radiometry and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polívka, Jiří

    1995-09-01

    The radiometry in general is a method of detecting the radiation of matter. All material bodies and substances radiate energy in the form of electromagnetic waves according to Planck s Law. The frequency spectrum of such thermal radiation is determined, beyond the properties of a blackbody, by the emissivity of surfaces and by the temperature of a particular body. Also, its reflectivity and dispersion take part. Investigating the intensity of radiation and its spectral distribution, one may determine the temperature and characterize the radiating body as well as the ambient medium, all independently of distance. With the above possibilities, the radiometry represents a base of scientific method called remote sensing. Utilizing various models, temperature of distant bodies and images of observed scenes can be determined from the spatial distribution of radiation. In this method, two parameters are of paramount importance: the temperature resolution, which flows out from the detected energy, and the spatial resolution (or, angular resolution), which depends upon antenna size with respect to wavelength. An instrument usable to conduct radiometric observations thus consists of two basic elements: a detector or radiometer, which determines the temperature resolution, and an antenna which determines the angular or spatial resolution. For example, a photographic camera consists of an objective lens (antenna) and of a sensitive element (a film or a CCD). In remote sensing, different lenses and reflectors and different sensors are employed, both adjusted to a particular spectrum region in which certain important features of observed bodies and scenes are present: frequently, UV and IR bands are used. The microwave radiometry utilizes various types of antennas and detectors and provides some advantages in observing various scenes: the temperature resolution is recently being given in milikelvins, while the range extends from zero to millions of Kelvins. Microwaves also offer

  18. Ultrastable Cryogenic Microwave Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Anthony G.

    Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are secondary frequency standards in the microwave domain. The best of these oscillators have demonstrated a short term frequency stability in the range 10-14 to a few times 10-16. The main application for these oscillators is as flywheel oscillators for the next generation of passive atomic frequency standards, and as local oscillators in space telemetry ground stations to clean up the transmitter close in phase noise. Fractional frequency stabilities of passive atomic frequency standards are now approaching 3 x10^-14 /τ where τ is the measurement time, limited only by the number of atoms that are being interrogated. This requires an interrogation oscillator whose short-term stability is of the order of 10-14 or better, which cannot be provided by present-day quartz technology. Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are based on resonators which have very high electrical Q-factors. The resolution of the resonator's linewidth is typically limited by electronics noise to about 1ppm and hence Q-factors in excess of 108 are required. As these are only attained in superconducting cavities or sapphire resonators at low temperatures, use of liquid helium cooling is mandatory, which has so far restricted these oscillators to the research or metrology laboratory. Recently, there has been an effort to dispense with the need for liquid helium and make compact flywheel oscillators for the new generation of primary frequency standards. Work is under way to achieve this goal in space-borne and mobile liquid-nitrogen-cooled systems. The best cryogenic oscillators developed to date are the ``whispering gallery'' (WG) mode sapphire resonator-oscillators of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of Western Australia (UWA), as well as Stanford University's superconducting cavity stabilized oscillator (SCSO). All of these oscillators have demonstrated frequency

  19. The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.; Cohen, B.I.; Hooper, E.B.; Lang, D.D.; Nevins, W.M.

    1987-10-02

    A new experimental facility is being assembled at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for studying microwave propagation and absorption in high density plasmas. A unique feature of the facility is the free electron laser (FEL) used to generate high peak power microwaves at 250 GHz, at a repetition rate so as to produce up to 2 MW of average power for up to 30 s. Called the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX), the facility will be used for studies of plasma heating, current drive, and confinement.

  20. Microwave Tomography Using Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Udpa, Lalita; Udpa, Satish S.

    2008-09-01

    Microwave tomography aims to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the electrical property of penetrable objects using field measurements acquired from multiple views at single or multiple frequencies. This paper presents a novel microwave tomography technique to image penetrable scatterers using deformable mirrors. The deformable mirror consists of a continuum of radiating elements that yields multi-view field measurements for noninvasive characterization of the spatial dielectric property of the scatterer in the microwave regime. Computational feasibility of the proposed technique is presented for heterogeneous two dimensional dielectric scatterers.

  1. Image recorder with microwave fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, N.; Isaka, K.

    1984-11-13

    The present invention is directed to improvement in an image recorder for recording developed images or toner images by microwave fixation. According to the invention there is used a novel thermoplastic developer comprising of two components. The first component contains a dielectric material which is able to absorb microwave and generate heat by dielectric loss. The second component contains magnetic loss exothermic material. The microwave absorbing power of the first component is improved by heating the first component with heat generated from the second component.

  2. Method and apparatus for selectively annealing heterostructures using microwave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, Harry A. (Inventor); Brain, Ruth A. (Inventor); Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for selectively annealing heterostructures using microwaves. A heterostructure, comprised of a material having higher microwave absorption and a material having lower microwave absorption, is exposed to microwaves in the cavity. The higher microwave absorbing material absorbs the microwaves and selectively heats while the lower microwave absorbing material absorbs small amounts of microwaves and minimally heats. The higher microwave absorbing material is thereby annealed onto the less absorbing material which is thermally isolated.

  3. Method and apparatus for selectively annealing heterostructures using microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, Harry A. (Inventor); Brain, Ruth A. (Inventor); Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for selectively annealing heterostructures using microwaves. A heterostructure, comprised of a material having higher microwave absorption and a material having lower microwave absorption, is exposed to microwaves in the cavity. The higher microwave absorbing material absorbs the microwaves and selectively heats while the lower microwave absorbing material absorbs small amounts of microwaves and minimally heats. The higher microwave absorbing material is thereby annealed onto the less absorbing material which is thermally isolated.

  4. A Microwave Pressure Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    An instrument to measure atmospheric pressure at the earth's surface from an orbiting satellite would be a valuable addition to the expanding inventory of remote sensors. The subject of this report is such an instrument - the Microwave Pressure Sounder (MPS). It is shown that global-ocean coverage is attainable with sufficient accuracy, resolution and observational frequency for meteorological, oceanographic and climate research applications. Surface pressure can be deduced from a measurement of the absorption by an atmospheric column at a frequency in the wing of the oxygen band centered on 60 GHz. An active multifrequency instrument is needed to make this measurement with sufficient accuracy. The selection of optimum operating frequencies is based upon accepted models of surface reflection, oxygen, water vapor and cloud absorption. Numerical simulation using a range of real atmospheres defined by radiosonde observations were used to validate the frequency selection procedure. Analyses are presented of alternative system configurations that define the balance between accuracy and achievable resolution.

  5. Microwave ice accretion meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magenheim, Bertram (Inventor); Rocks, James K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system for indicating ice thickness and rate of ice thickness growth on surfaces is disclosed. The region to be monitored for ice accretion is provided with a resonant surface waveguide which is mounted flush, below the surface being monitored. A controlled oscillator provides microwave energy via a feed point at a controllable frequency. A detector is coupled to the surface waveguide and is responsive to electrical energy. A measuring device indicates the frequency deviation of the controlled oscillator from a quiescent frequency. A control means is provided to control the frequency of oscillation of the controlled oscillator. In a first, open-loop embodiment, the control means is a shaft operated by an operator. In a second, closed-loop embodiment, the control means is a processor which effects automatic control.

  6. Multilayered Graphene in Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzhir, P.; Volynets, N.; Maksimenko, S.; Kaplas, T.; Svirko, Yu.

    2013-05-01

    We report on the experimental study of electromagnetic (EM) properties of multilayered graphene in Ka-band synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process in between nanometrically thin Cu catalyst film and dielectric (SiO2) substrate. The quality of the produced multilayered graphene samples were monitored by Raman spectroscopy. The thickness of graphene films was controlled by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and was found to be a few nanometers (up to 5 nm). We discovered, that the fabricated graphene provided remarkably high EM shielding efficiency caused by absorption losses at the level of 35-43% of incident power. Being highly conductive at room temperature, multi-layer graphene emerges as a promising material for manufacturing ultrathin microwave coatings to be used in aerospace applications.

  7. Gigatron microwave amplifier

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    An electron tube for achieving high power at high frequency with high efficiency, including an input coupler, a ribbon-shaped electron beam and a traveling wave output coupler. The input coupler is a lumped constant resonant circuit that modulates a field emitter array cathode at microwave frequency. A bunched ribbon electron beam is emitted from the cathode in periodic bursts at the desired frequency. The beam has a ribbon configuration to eliminate limitations inherent in round beam devices. The traveling wave coupler efficiently extracts energy from the electron beam, and includes a waveguide with a slot therethrough for receiving the electron beam. The ribbon beam is tilted at an angle with respect to the traveling wave coupler so that the electron beam couples in-phase with the traveling wave in the waveguide. The traveling wave coupler thus extracts energy from the electron beam over the entire width of the beam.

  8. Gigatron microwave amplifier

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, P.M.

    1993-07-13

    An electron tube for achieving high power at high frequency with high efficiency is described, including an input coupler, a ribbon-shaped electron beam and a traveling wave output coupler. The input coupler is a lumped constant resonant circuit that modulates a field emitter array cathode at microwave frequency. A bunched ribbon electron beam is emitted from the cathode in periodic bursts at the desired frequency. The beam has a ribbon configuration to eliminate limitations inherent in round beam devices. The traveling wave coupler efficiently extracts energy from the electron beam, and includes a waveguide with a slot there through for receiving the electron beam. The ribbon beam is tilted at an angle with respect to the traveling wave coupler so that the electron beam couples in-phase with the traveling wave in the waveguide. The traveling wave coupler thus extracts energy from the electron beam over the entire width of the beam.

  9. Microwave catheter design.

    PubMed

    Nevels, R D; Arndt, G D; Raffoul, G W; Carl, J R; Pacifico, A

    1998-07-01

    A microwave antenna system for transcatheter ablation of cardiac tissue is investigated. A numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain method incorporating a Gaussian pulse excitation has been constructed and frequency domain electric and magnetic fields are obtained through Fourier transformation. Results are presented for a coaxial line fed monopole catheter which is modified by the successive inclusion of a Teflon sheath outer coating, a terminating disk at the tip of the antenna, a sleeve choke, and a high dielectric constant cylinder surrounding the monopole antenna. The effects of these design features are characterized in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR) and return loss (RL). Numerical calculations are confirmed by comparing with the RL measurement of a Teflon-coated monopole containing a disk and choke. PMID:9644897

  10. Microwave antenna holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Seidel, Boris L.

    1992-01-01

    This microwave holography technique utilizes the Fourier transform relation between the complex far field radiation pattern of an antenna and the complex aperture field distribution. Resulting aperture phase and amplitude distribution data can be used to precisely characterize various crucial performance parameters, including panel alignment, panel shaping, subreflector position, antenna aperture illumination, directivity at various frequencies, and gravity deformation effects. The methodology of data processing presented here was successfully applied to the Deep Space Network (DSN) 34-m beam waveguide antennas. The antenna performance was improved at all operating frequencies by reducing the main reflector mechanical surface rms error to 0.43 mm. At Ka-band (32 GHz), the estimated improvement is 4.1 dB, resulting in an aperture efficiency of 52 percent. The performance improvement was verified by efficiency measurements and additional holographic measurements.

  11. Experimental Demonstration of Microwave Signal/Electric Thruster Plasma Interaction Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz J.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Curran, Frank M.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment was designed and conducted in the Electric Propulsion Laboratory of NASA Lewis Research Center to assess the impact of ion thruster exhaust plasma plume on electromagnetic signal propagation. A microwave transmission experiment was set up inside the propulsion test bed using a pair of broadband horn antennas and a 30 cm 2.3 kW ion thruster. Frequency of signal propagation covered from 6.5 to 18 GHz range. The stainless steel test bed when enclosed can be depressurized to simulate a near vacuum environment. A pulsed CW system with gating hardware was utilized to eliminate multiple chamber reflections from the test signal. Microwave signal was transmitted and received between the two hours when the thruster was operating at a given power level in such a way that the signal propagation path crossed directly through the plume volume. Signal attenuation and phase shift due to the plume was measured for the entire frequency band. Results for this worst case configuration simulation indicate that the effects of the ion thruster plume on microwave signals is a negligible attenuation (within 0.15 dB) and a small phase shift (within 8 deg.). This paper describes the detailed experiment and presents some of the results.

  12. Microwave interferometry of laser induced air plasmas formed by short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jungwirth, P.W.

    1993-08-01

    Applications for the interaction of laser induced plasmas with electromagnetic probes requires time varying complex conductivity data for specific laser/electromagnetic probe geometries. Applications for this data include plasma switching (Q switching) and the study of ionization fronts. The plasmas were created in laboratory air by 100 ps laser pulses at a wavelength of 1 {mu}m. A long focal length lens focused the laser pulse into WR90 (X band) rectangular waveguide. Two different laser beam/electromagnetic probe geometries were investigated. For the longitudinal geometry, the laser pulse and the microwave counterpropagated inside the waveguide. For the transverse geometry, the laser created a plasma ``post`` inside the waveguide. The effects of the laser beam deliberately hitting the waveguide were also investigated. Each geometry exhibits its own characteristics. This research project focused on the longitudinal geometry. Since the laser beam intensity varies inside the waveguide, the charge distribution inside the waveguide also varies. A 10 GHz CW microwave probe traveled through the laser induced plasma. From the magnitude and phase of the microwave probe, a spatially integrated complex conductivity was calculated. No measurements of the temporal or spatial variation of the laser induced plasma were made. For the ``plasma post,`` the electron density is more uniform.

  13. Preliminary investigation of high power microwave plasmas for electrothermal thruster use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, John L.; Sullivan, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Results are reported from preliminary tests to evaluate the high power microwave electrothermal thruster (MET) concept, which employs a free-floating plasma discharge maintained by applied CW microwave power to heat a propellant gas flow. Stable plasmas have been created and maintained in helium (He), nitrogen (N2), and hydrogen (H2) as propellants in both the TM(sub 011) and TM(sub 012) modes at discharge pressures from 10 Pa to 69 kPa. Reproducible starting conditions of pressure and power have been documented for all the plasmas. Vortical inflow of the propellant gas was observed to cause the formation of on-axis 'spike' plasmas. The formation and unformation conditions of these plasmas were studied. Operation in the spike plasma condition enables maximum power absorption with minimum wall heating and offers maximum efficiency in heating the propellant gas. In the spike condition, plasmas of the three propellant gases were investigated in an open channel configuration to a maximum applied power level of 11.2 kW (in N2). Microwave power coupling efficiencies of over 90 percent were routinely obtained at absorbed power levels up to 2 kW. Magnetic nozzle effects were investigated with a superconducting solenoid Al magnet applying a high magnetic field to the plasmas in and exiting from the discharge tube.

  14. Use of Multipass Recirculation and Energy Recovery In CW SRF X-FEL Driver Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David; Akers, Walt; Benson, Stephen V.; Biallas, George; Blackburn, Keith; Boyce, James; Bullard, Donald; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Ellingsworth, Forrest; Evtushenko, Pavel; Fisk, Sally; Gould, Christopher; Gubeli, Joseph; Hannon, Fay; Hardy, David; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Jordan, Kevin; Klopf, John; Kortze, J.; Legg, Robert; Li, Rui; Marchlik, Matthew; Moore, Steven W.; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Sexton, Daniel; Shin, Ilkyoung; Shinn, Michelle D.; Tennant, Christopher; Terzic, Balsa; Walker, Richard; Williams, Gwyn P.; Wilson, G.; Zhang, Shukui

    2010-08-01

    We discuss the use of multipass recirculation and energy recovery in CW SRF drivers for short wavelength FELs. Benefits include cost management (through reduced system footprint, required RF and SRF hardware, and associated infrastructure - including high power beam dumps and cryogenic systems), ease in radiation control (low drive beam exhaust energy), ability to accelerate and deliver multiple beams of differing energy to multiple FELs, and opportunity for seamless integration of multistage bunch length compression into the longitudinal matching scenario. Issues include all those associated with ERLs compounded by the challenge of generating and preserving the CW electron drive beam brightness required by short wavelength FELs. We thus consider the impact of space charge, BBU and other environmental wakes and impedances, ISR and CSR, potential for microbunching, intra-beam and beam-residual gas scattering, ion effects, RF transients, and halo, as well as the effect of traditional design, fabrication, installation and operational errors (lattice aberrations, alignment, powering, field quality). Context for the discussion is provided by JLAMP, the proposed VUV/X-ray upgrade to the existing Jefferson Lab FEL.

  15. ALMA Data Suggest the Presence of Spiral Structure in the Inner Wind of CW Leo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, H.; Leen, D.

    2015-12-01

    Evolved low-mass stars lose a significant fraction of their mass through stellar winds. While the overall morphology of the stellar wind structure during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase is thought to be roughly spherically symmetric, the morphology changes dramatically during the post-AGB and planetary nebula phase, during which bipolar and multi-polar structures are often observed. We have observed the close-by carbon-rich AGB star CW Leo using ALMA (Cycle 0) in band 9 around 650 GHz. The channel maps and position-velocity diagram of the 13CO J=6-5 line show a complex structure. Using detailed 3D radiative transfer models, we show that the curved structure in the position velocity map of the 13CO J=6-5 line can be explained by a spiral structure in the inner wind of CW Leo, probably induced by a binary companion. From modelling the ALMA data, we deduce that the potential orbital axis for the binary system lies at a position angle of 10 to 20 degrees to the north-east and that the spiral structure is seen almost edge-on. We infer an orbital period of 55 yr and a binary separation of 25 au (or 8.2 stellar radii). We tentatively estimate that the companion is an unevolved low-mass main sequence star.

  16. Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams “CW-FIT” Efficacy Trial Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard; Bannister, Harriett Dawson; Heitzman-Powell, Linda; Kottwitz, Esther; Hansen, Blake; Fleming, Kandace

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of the Class-wide Function-related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) program for improving students’ on-task behavior, and increasing teacher recognition of appropriate behavior. The intervention is a group contingency classroom management program consisting of teaching and reinforcing appropriate behaviors (i.e., getting the teacher’s attention, following directions, and ignoring inappropriate behaviors of peers). Seventeen elementary schools, the majority in urban and culturally diverse communities, participated in a randomized trial with 86 teachers (classrooms) assigned to CW-FIT, and 73 teachers (classrooms) assigned to the comparison group. Class-wide student on-task behavior improved over baseline levels in the intervention classes. Teachers were able to implement the intervention with high fidelity overall, as observed in adherence to 96% of the fidelity criteria on average. Teacher praise and attention to appropriate behaviors increased, and reprimands decreased. These effects were replicated in new classrooms each of the 4 years of the study, and for all years combined. PMID:26279616

  17. Homogeneity and EPR metrics for assessment of regular grids used in CW EPR powder simulations.

    PubMed

    Crăciun, Cora

    2014-08-01

    CW EPR powder spectra may be approximated numerically using a spherical grid and a Voronoi tessellation-based cubature. For a given spin system, the quality of simulated EPR spectra depends on the grid type, size, and orientation in the molecular frame. In previous work, the grids used in CW EPR powder simulations have been compared mainly from geometric perspective. However, some grids with similar homogeneity degree generate different quality simulated spectra. This paper evaluates the grids from EPR perspective, by defining two metrics depending on the spin system characteristics and the grid Voronoi tessellation. The first metric determines if the grid points are EPR-centred in their Voronoi cells, based on the resonance magnetic field variations inside these cells. The second metric verifies if the adjacent Voronoi cells of the tessellation are EPR-overlapping, by computing the common range of their resonance magnetic field intervals. Beside a series of well known regular grids, the paper investigates a modified ZCW grid and a Fibonacci spherical code, which are new in the context of EPR simulations. For the investigated grids, the EPR metrics bring more information than the homogeneity quantities and are better related to the grids' EPR behaviour, for different spin system symmetries. The metrics' efficiency and limits are finally verified for grids generated from the initial ones, by using the original or magnetic field-constraint variants of the Spherical Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation method. PMID:24968092

  18. MBE growth of active regions for electrically pumped, cw-operating GaSb-based VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani-Shirazi, K.; Bachmann, A.; Boehm, G.; Ziegler, S.; Amann, M.-C.

    2009-03-01

    Electrically pumped, cw-operating, single-mode GaSb-based VCSELs are attractive light sources for trace-gas sensing systems using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) [A. Vicet, D.A. Yarekha, A. Pérona, Y. Rouillard, S. Gaillard, Spectrochimica Acta Part A 58 (2002) 2405-2412]. Only recently, the first electrically pumped (EP) devices emitting at 2.325 μm in cw-mode at room temperature have been reported [A. Bachmann, T. Lim, K. Kashani-Shirazi, O. Dier, C. Lauer, M.-C. Amann, Electronics Letters 44(3) (2008) 202-203]. The fabrication of these devices employs the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of GaSb/AlAsSb-distributed Bragg mirrors, a multi-quantum-well active region made of AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb and an InAsSb/GaSb-buried-tunnel junction. As VCSELs are usually driven under high injection rates, an optimum electrical design of active regions is essential for high-performance devices. In this paper we present an enhanced simulation of current flow in the active region under operation conditions. The calculation includes carrier transport by drift, diffusion and tunneling. We discuss different design criteria and material compositions for active regions. Active regions with various barrier materials were incorporated into edge emitter samples to evaluate their performance. Aluminum-containing barriers show better internal efficiency compared to active regions with GaSb as the barrier material.

  19. Workshops on Science Enabled by a Coherent, CW, Synchrotron X-ray Source, June 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Joel

    2012-01-03

    In June of 2011 we held six two-day workshops called "XDL-2011: Science at the Hard X-ray Diffraction Limit". The six workshops covered (1) Diffraction-based imaging techniques, (2) Biomolecular structure from non-crystalline materials, (3) Ultra-fast science, (4) High-pressure science, (5) Materials research with nano-beams and (6) X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS), In each workshop, invited speaker from around the world presented examples of novel experiments that require a CW, diffraction-limited source. During the workshop, each invited speaker provided a one-page description of the experiment and an illustrative graphic. The experiments identified by the workshops demonstrate the broad and deep scientific case for a CW coherent synchrotron x-ray source. The next step is to perform detailed simulations of the best of these ideas to test them quantitatively and to guide detailed x-ray beam-line designs. These designs are the first step toward developing detailed facility designs and cost estimates.

  20. Study of effects of failure of beamline elements and their compensation in CW superconducting linac

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, A.; Ranjan, K.; Solyak, N.; Mishra, S.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project-X is the proposed high intensity proton facility to be built at Fermilab, US. First stage of the Project-X consists of superconducting linac which will be operated in continuous wave (CW) mode to accelerate the beam from 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV. The operation at CW mode puts high tolerances on the beam line components, particularly on radiofrequency (RF) cavity. The failure of beam line elements at low energy is very critical as it results in mis-match of the beam with the following sections due to different beam parameters than designed parameter. It makes the beam unstable which causes emittance dilution, and ultimately results in beam losses. In worst case, it could affect the reliability of the machine and may lead to the shutdown of the Linac to replace the failed elements. Thus, it is important to study these effects and their compensation to get smooth beam propagation in linac. This paper describes the results of study performed for the failure of RF cavity & solenoid in SSR0 section.

  1. High Power Laser Cutting of Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Polymers with cw- and Pulsed Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F.; Wolf, N.; Petring, D.

    Glass fiber and carbon fiber reinforced polymers with thermoplastic matrix enable high volume production with short cycle times. Cutting and trimming operations in these production chains require the use of high average laser power for an efficient cutting speed, but employment of high laser power runs the risk to induce a wide heat affected zone (HAZ). This paper deals with investigations with cw and ns-pulsed CO2-laser radiation in the kilowatt range in single-pass and multiple-pass processes. Using multi-pass processing at high processing speeds of 100 m/min and above a reduced heat affected zone in the range of 100 μm to 200 μm could be achieved by the ns-pulsed radiation. With cw radiation at the same average power of 1 kW however, the HAZ was 300-400 μm. Also employing ns-pulses in the kW-range average power leads to heat accumulation in the material. Small HAZ were obtained with sufficient break times between subsequent passes.

  2. Improvements of PKU PMECRIS for continuous hundred hours CW proton beam operation.

    PubMed

    Peng, S X; Zhang, A L; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the source stability, a long term continuous wave (CW) proton beam experiment has been carried out with Peking University compact permanent magnet 2.45 GHz ECR ion source (PKU PMECRIS). Before such an experiment a lot of improvements and modifications were completed on the source body, the Faraday cup and the PKU ion source test bench. At the beginning of 2015, a continuous operation of PKU PMECRIS for 306 h with more than 50 mA CW beam was carried out after success of many short term tests. No plasma generator failure or high voltage breakdown was observed during that running period and the proton source reliability is near 100%. Total beam availability, which is defined as 35-keV beam-on time divided by elapsed time, was higher than 99% [S. X. Peng et al., Chin. Phys. B 24(7), 075203 (2015)]. A re-inspection was performed after another additional 100 h operation (counting time) and no obvious sign of component failure was observed. Counting the previous source testing time together, this PMECRs longevity is now demonstrated to be greater than 460 h. This paper is mainly concentrated on the improvements for this long term experiment. PMID:26931924

  3. Improvements of PKU PMECRIS for continuous hundred hours CW proton beam operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. X.; Zhang, A. L.; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the source stability, a long term continuous wave (CW) proton beam experiment has been carried out with Peking University compact permanent magnet 2.45 GHz ECR ion source (PKU PMECRIS). Before such an experiment a lot of improvements and modifications were completed on the source body, the Faraday cup and the PKU ion source test bench. At the beginning of 2015, a continuous operation of PKU PMECRIS for 306 h with more than 50 mA CW beam was carried out after success of many short term tests. No plasma generator failure or high voltage breakdown was observed during that running period and the proton source reliability is near 100%. Total beam availability, which is defined as 35-keV beam-on time divided by elapsed time, was higher than 99% [S. X. Peng et al., Chin. Phys. B 24(7), 075203 (2015)]. A re-inspection was performed after another additional 100 h operation (counting time) and no obvious sign of component failure was observed. Counting the previous source testing time together, this PMECRs longevity is now demonstrated to be greater than 460 h. This paper is mainly concentrated on the improvements for this long term experiment.

  4. Simple design for singlemode high power CW fiber laser using multimode high NA fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morasse, Bertrand; Chatigny, Stéphane; Desrosiers, Cynthia; Gagnon, Éric; Lapointe, Marc-André; de Sandro, Jean-Philippe

    2009-02-01

    A large number of high power CW fiber lasers described in the literature use large mode area (LMA) double cladding fibers. These fibers have large core and low core numerical aperture (NA) to limit the number of supported modes and are typically operated under coiling to eliminate higher order modes. We describe here multimode (MM) high NA ytterbium doped fibers used in single mode output high power laser/amplifier configuration. Efficient single mode amplification is realized in the multimode doped fiber by matching the fundamental mode of the doped fiber to the LP01 mode of the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and by selecting the upper V-number value that limits the overlap of the LP01 to the higher order modes. We show that negligible mode coupling is realized in the doped fiber, which ensures a stable power output over external perturbation without the use of tapers. Fundamental mode operation is maintained at all time without coiling through the use of FBG written in a single mode fiber. We show that such fiber is inherently more photosensitive and easier to splice than LMA fiber. We demonstrate an efficient 75W singlemode CW fiber laser using this configuration and predict that the power scaling to the kW level can be achieved, the design being more practical and resistant to photodarkening compared to conventional low NA LMA fiber.

  5. CW RF system of the Project-X accelerator front end

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Gonin, I.; Solyak, N.; Terechkine, I.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Front end of a CW linac of the Project X contains an H{sup -} source, an RFQ, a medium energy transport line with the beam chopper, and a SC low-beta linac that accelerates H{sup -} from 2.5 MeV to 160 MeV. SC Single Spoke Resonators (SSR) will be used in the linac, because Fermilab already successfully developed and tested a SSR for beta = 0.21. Two manufactured cavities achieve 2.5 times more than design accelerating gradients. One of these cavities completely dressed, e.g. welded to helium vessel with integrated slow and fast tuners, and tested in CW regime. Successful tests of beta = 0.21 SSR give us a confidence to use this type of cavity for low beta (0.117) and for high-beta (0.4) as well. Both types of these cavities are under development. In present report the basic constrains, parameters, electromagnetic and mechanical design for all the three SSR cavities, and first test results of beta = 0.21 SSR are presented.

  6. Atmospheric turbulence remote sensing by cw and pulsed CO2 Doppler lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurochkin, Nikolay N.; Gordienko, Vyacheslav M.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Poutivski, Iouri Y.

    1994-12-01

    The theoretical basis for wind velocity field parameters' measurements using CW Doppler Lidars (DL) is outlined. The instant power spectrum of photocurrent is shown to be histogram of velocity projection field with a weight depending on Dl's parameters. A non-destructive long-range method is presented for measuring the structure constant of the wind velocity field. The essence of the method is (the constancy of the backscatter coefficient is assumed): the average square width of the DL photocurrent power spectrum is the averaged structure function of the wind velocity weighted with a function depending on the DL parameters, the measurement time and the average wind velocity. Consequently, it is proportional to velocity structure constant with a factor depending on the DL parameters, the measurement time, the average wind velocity, the internal and external scales of turbulence. At certain DL parameters and measurement time the factor is shown to be practically independent from the average wind velocity, the internal and external scales of turbulence, thus a priori estimate can be successfully used instead of their real values. The differences between structures of CW and pulsed DL signal are discussed. The described above method is applied for pulsed DL.

  7. Study of Effects of Failure of Beamline Elements and its Compensation in CW Superconducting Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, J.-F.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Mishra, C.S.; Ranjan, K.; Saini, A.; /Delhi U.

    2012-05-01

    Project-X is a proposed high intensity proton facility to be built at Fermilab in United States. The first stage consists of a superconducting linac (SC) operating in continuous wave (CW) mode to accelerate a H{sup -} beam from 2.1 MeV to 3 GeV. Failure of any beamline element during operations induces a downstream mismatch of the beam which is especially severe when the failure occurs at low energy. A large mismatch causes emittance growth and ultimately results in beam losses. In a worst case scenario, the operability of the machine may be affected and long downtime may be needed to replace the failed element. To minimize possible downtime, the optics can be designed in a way that allows local retuning to make the machine operable. This paper presents studies performed to investigate retuning scenarios after failure of an accelerating cavity or a focusing magnet at critical locations in the Project-X CW superconducting linac.

  8. The halogen atom/metal trimer CW laser-engineering concept overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, G.; Jacobs, T. A.

    1992-07-01

    A halogen atom/metal vapor laser is discussed in terms of CW power and performance. Fluorine and sodium represent surrogates for the halogen and metal species; other combinations are possible. Since lasing may occur from a variety of excited electronic states, operation is expected to be broadly dispersed over the visible and near UV wavelength regions. The device is a low pressure, supersonic mixing laser that resembles the HF/DF CW laser, e.g., separate plenums are utilized for the fluorine and sodium vapors, and each plenum feeds a nozzle array. Sodium trimer formation begins in the nozzle and continues inside the laser cavity. The design of this nozzle is particularly important; the concept of controlled condensation is introduced. Downstream of the nozzle bank, the two vapor streams mix and the F-Na3 reaction pumps several electronically excited states that have gain in the blue-green region. Estimates are given for power per unit mass flow rate and power per unit nozzle bank cross-sectional area.

  9. Development of a cw-laser-based cavity-ringdown sensor aboard a spacecraft for trace air constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Awtry, A. R.; Miller, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    The progress in the development of a sensor for the detection of trace air constituents to monitor spacecraft air quality is reported. A continuous-wave (cw), external-cavity tunable diode laser centered at 1.55 micrometers is used to pump an optical cavity absorption cell in cw-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (cw-CRDS). Preliminary results are presented that demonstrate the sensitivity, selectivity and reproducibility of this method. Detection limits of 2.0 ppm for CO, 2.5 ppm for CO2, 1.8 ppm for H2O, 19.4 ppb for NH3, 7.9 ppb for HCN and 4.0 ppb for C2H2 are calculated.

  10. Microwave Dielectrophoretic Levitation In Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L.; Jackson, Henry W.; Barmatz, Martin B.

    1993-01-01

    Two reports propose use of dielectrophoresis in microwave resonant cavities to levitate samples of materials for containerless processing in microgravity in vacuum or in any suitable atmosphere. Also describe experiments undertaken to verify feasibility of proposal.

  11. EFFICIENT CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synthetic organic transformations performed under non-traditional conditions are becoming popular primarily to circumvent the growing environmental concerns. A solvent-free approach that involves microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants catalyzed by the surfaces of less-expensiv...

  12. Microwave instability near transition energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Lee, S.Y.

    1989-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation for the microwave instability agrees with analytic calculation solving the Vlasov equation, provided that bunch shape distortion due to coupling is taken into account. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Silicon nitride microwave photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Roeloffzen, Chris G H; Zhuang, Leimeng; Taddei, Caterina; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René G; van Dijk, Paulus W L; Oldenbeuving, Ruud M; Marpaung, David A I; Burla, Maurizio; Boller, Klaus-J

    2013-09-23

    We present an overview of several microwave photonic processing functionalities based on combinations of Mach-Zehnder and ring resonator filters using the high index contrast silicon nitride (TriPleX™) waveguide technology. All functionalities are built using the same basic building blocks, namely straight waveguides, phase tuning elements and directional couplers. We recall previously shown measurements on high spurious free dynamic range microwave photonic (MWP) link, ultra-wideband pulse generation, instantaneous frequency measurements, Hilbert transformers, microwave polarization networks and demonstrate new measurements and functionalities on a 16 channel optical beamforming network and modulation format transformer as well as an outlook on future microwave photonic platform integration, which will lead to a significantly reduced footprint and thereby enables the path to commercially viable MWP systems. PMID:24104179

  14. EXPEDITIOUS SYNTHETIC TRANSFORMATIONS USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave-expedited solvent-free synthetic processes will be described for the synthesis of a variety of industrially significant compounds and intermediates namely, enamines, nitroalkenes, enones, oxidized sulfur compounds and ionic liquids. This solvent-free synthetic methodolo...

  15. Tracking Code for Microwave Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.; /SLAC

    2006-09-21

    To study microwave instability the tracking code is developed. For bench marking, results are compared with Oide-Yokoya results [1] for broad-band Q = 1 impedance. Results hint to two possible mechanisms determining the threshold of instability.

  16. GEO Sounding Using Microwave Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, James; Krimchansky, Sergey; Susskind, Joel; Krimchansky, Alexander; Chu, Donald; Davis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    There are several microwave instruments in low Earth orbit (LEO) that are used for atmospheric temperature and humidity sounding in conjunction with companion IR sounders as well as by themselves. These instruments have achieved a certain degree of maturity and undergoing a redesign to minimize their size, mass, and power from the previous generation instruments. An example of these instruments is the AMSU-A series, now flying on POES and AQUA spacecraft with the IR sounders HIRS and AIRS. These older microwave instruments are going to be replaced by the ATMS instruments that will fly on NPP and NPOESS satellites with the CrIS sounder. A number of techniques learned from the ATMS project in instrument hardware design and data processing are directly applicable to a similar microwave sounder on a geosynchronous platform. These techniques can significantly simplify the design of a Geostationary orbit (GEO) microwave instrument, avoiding costly development and minimizing the risk of not being able to meet the scientific requirements. In fact, some of the 'enabling' technology, such as the use of MMIC microwave components (which is the basis for the ATMS' much reduced volume) can be directly applied to a GEO sounder. The benefits of microwave sounders are well known; for example, they penetrate non-precipitating cloud cover and allow for use of colocated IR observations in up to 80% cloud cover. The key advantages of a microwave instrument in GEO will be the ability to provide high temporal resolution as well as uniform spatial resolution and extend the utility of a colocated advanced IR sounder to cases in which partial cloud cover exists. A footprint of the order of 100 km by 100 km resolution with hemispherical coverage within one hour can be easily achieved for sounding channels in the 50 to 59 GHz range. A GEO microwave sounder will also allow mesoscale sampling of select regions.

  17. Student concepts of microwave ovens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassebaum, Thomas; May, David; Aubrecht, Gordon

    2000-05-01

    Previous surveys and student interviews have revealed that students believe microwave ovens can be a source of microwave radiation, x radiation, and gamma radiation. We have probed student ideas in recent detailed interviews and find that students believe that at least some form of what physicists call electromagnetic radiation is emitted and that x and gamma radiation can make a person radioactive. We will discuss details of these interviews, comparing the results to what we learned in previous surveys.

  18. The classical microwave frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busca, Giovanni; Thomann, Pierre; Laurent-Guy, Bernier; Willemin, Philippe; Schweda, Hartmut S.

    1990-01-01

    Some key problems are presented encountered in the classical microwave frequency standards which are still not solved today. The point of view expressed benefits from the experience gained both in the industry and in the research lab, on the following classical microwave frequency standards: active and passive H, conventional and laser pumped Cs beam tube, small conventional and laser pumped Rubidium. The accent is put on the Rubidium standard.

  19. Two Thick Microwave Dichroic Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Larry W.; Chen, Jacqueline C.; Stanton, Philip H.; Jorgenson, Roy E.

    1994-01-01

    Cross-shaped apertures enable relatively tight packing, eliminating some grating lobes. Two panels made of thin, honey-comblike metal walls constitute planar arrays of waveguidelike apertures designed to satisfy special requirements with respect to microwave transmittance and reflectance. Considered for use in multiplexing signals at various frequencies in microwave communication system. Both panels required to exhibit low insertion loss. Angle of incidence 30 degrees.

  20. Study of federal microwave standards

    SciTech Connect

    David, L.

    1980-08-01

    Present and future federal regulatory processes which may impact the permissible levels of microwave radiation emitted by the SPS Microwave Power Transmission (MPTS) were studied. An historical development of US occupational and public microwave standards includes an overview of Western and East European philosophies of environmental protection and neurophysiology which have led to the current widely differing maximum permissible exposure limits to microwaves. The possible convergence of microwave standards is characterized by a lowering of Western exposure levels while Eastern countries consider standard relaxation. A trend toward stricter controls on activities perceived as harmful to public health is under way as is interest in improving the federal regulatory process. Particularly relevant to SPS is the initiation of long-term, low-level microwave exposure programs. Coupled with new developments in instrumentation and dosimetry, the results from chronic exposure program and population exposure studies could be expected within the next five to ten years. Also discussed is the increasing public concern that rf energy is yet another hazardous environmental agent.

  1. A Robust, Microwave Rain Gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansheim, T. J.; Niemeier, J. J.; Kruger, A.

    2008-12-01

    Researchers at The University of Iowa have developed an all-electronic rain gauge that uses microwave sensors operating at either 10 GHz or 23 GHz, and measures the Doppler shift caused by falling raindrops. It is straightforward to interface these sensors with conventional data loggers, or integrate them into a wireless sensor network. A disadvantage of these microwave rain gauges is that they consume significant power when they are operating. However, this may be partially negated by using data loggers' or sensors networks' sleep-wake-sleep mechanism. Advantages of the microwave rain gauges are that one can make them very robust, they cannot clog, they don't have mechanical parts that wear out, and they don't have to be perfectly level. Prototype microwave rain gauges were collocated with tipping-bucket rain gauges, and data were collected for two seasons. At higher rain rates, microwave rain gauge measurements compare well with tipping-bucket measurements. At lower rain rates, the microwave rain gauges provide more detailed information than tipping buckets, which quantize measurement typically in 1 tip per 0.01 inch, or 1 tip per mm of rainfall.

  2. Efficient heteronuclear decoupling in MAS solid-state NMR using non-rotor-synchronized rCW irradiation.

    PubMed

    Equbal, Asif; Paul, Subhradip; Mithu, Venus Singh; Madhu, P K; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2014-09-01

    We present new non-rotor-synchronized variants of the recently introduced refocused continuous wave (rCW) heteronuclear decoupling method significantly improving the performance relative to the original rotor-synchronized variants. Under non-rotor-synchronized conditions the rCW decoupling sequences provide more efficient decoupling, are easier to setup, and prove more robust towards experimental parameters such as radio frequency (rf) field amplitude and spinning frequency. This is demonstrated through numerical simulations substantiated with experimental results under different sample spinning and rf field amplitude conditions for powder samples of U-(13)C-glycine and U-(13)C-L-histidine·HCl·H2O. PMID:25123538

  3. Inefficient assembly limits transport and cell surface expression of HLA-Cw4 molecules in C1R.

    PubMed

    Zemmour, J

    1996-12-01

    HLA-C antigens are expressed to the cell surface at roughly 10% the level of HLA-B or -A, and their serological definition remains persistently difficult. To characterize the factors limiting surface expression, the processes of assembly and intracellular transport of HLA-Cw4 molecules were investigated in the C1R cell line. When appropriate peptides were added to cultured cells or in cell lysates significant amounts of conformed HLA-C molecules that associate with beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2 m) are detected, but are indeed not sufficient to restore expression to the level observed for HLA-A or -B molecules. Furthermore, a precursor/product relationship exists between the free class I heavy chain and the mature conformation of HLA-Cw4 molecules. Thus, HLA-C assembly promotes the conversion of HC-10-reactive molecules (weakly-beta 2m-associated non-ligand associated free HC form) into the beta 2m-associated class I molecules recognized by W6/32. To further investigate the factors that regulate cell surface expression, intracellular transport of HLA-Cw4 was studied in pulse chase analysis. In contrast to some HLA-A and B, maturation of HLA-Cw4 heavy chains and their export to the medial and trans-Golgi compartments are quite inefficient. After 4 h of chase period, roughly half of the pulse-labeled HLA-Cw4 molecules have transited to the medial-Golgi and acquired complex oligosaccharides characteristic of mature form. In addition, treatment with gamma-interferon does not appear to improve maturation of HLA-Cw4 heavy chains, suggesting that increased supply of peptides does not influence intracellular transport. Moreover, only a small fraction in the pool of HLA-Cw4 molecules was subsequently transported through the trans-Golgi network, as indicated by their acquisition of sialic acids. Taken together these studies show that HLA-Cw4 molecules are inefficiently transported through the Golgi apparatus and presumably retained in the endoplasmic reticulum or cis

  4. High-power efficient cw and pulsed lasers based on bulk Yb : KYW crystals with end diode pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G H; Yang, G H; Lee, D S; Kulik, Alexander V; Sall', E G; Chizhov, S A; Yashin, V E; Kang, U

    2012-04-30

    End-diode-pumped lasers based on one and two Yb : KYW crystals operating in cw and Q-switched regimes, as well as in the regime of mode-locking, are studied. The single-crystal laser generated stable ultrashort (shorter than 100 fs) laser pulses at wavelengths of 1035 and 1043 nm with an average power exceeding 1 W. The average output power of the two-crystal laser exceeded 18 W in the cw regime and 16 W in the Q-switched regime with a slope efficiency exceeding 30%.

  5. Wide-bandwidth phase lock between a CW laser and a frequency comb based on a feed-forward configuration.

    PubMed

    Sala, T; Gatti, D; Gambetta, A; Coluccelli, N; Galzerano, G; Laporta, P; Marangoni, M

    2012-07-01

    Wide-bandwidth phase lock between the tooth of a frequency comb and a CW extended-cavity diode laser at 1.55 μm is achieved by the use of an acousto-optical frequency shifter in a feed-forward configuration. The coherence properties of the comb are efficiently transferred to the CW laser, whose linewidth is narrowed down to the ∼10 KHz comb level. A maximum control bandwidth of ∼0.6 MHz has been experimentally achieved, limited by the transit time of the acoustic wave inside the frequency shifter. PMID:22743465

  6. Noise caused by a finite extinction ratio of the light modulator in CW cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Lehmann, K. K.

    2009-02-01

    A model is presented for the effect of a finite extinction ratio of the light modulator used in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW-CRDS) experiments. We present a simple analytical expression for the minimum isolation required to prevent a significant increase in the fluctuations of the cavity decay rate, which determine the sensitivity of the method. We also present systematic measurements of the signal to noise in CW-CRDS as a function of the effective isolation of the light modulator, and excellent agreement with the model is found.

  7. RF power upgrade at the superconducting 1.3 GHz CW LINAC "ELBE" with solid state amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttig, Hartmut; Arnold, A.; Büchner, A.; Justus, M.; Kuntsch, M.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.; Schurig, R.; Staats, G.; Teichert, J.

    2013-03-01

    The RF power for the superconducting 1.3 GHz CW LINAC "ELBE" has been doubled from less than 10 kW to 20 kW per cavity. In January 2012 the four 10 kW klystrons used to drive the four superconducting cavities of the LINAC have been replaced by pairs of 10 kW solid state power amplifiers (SSPA). ELBE is now worldwide the first 1.3 GHz CW LINAC equipped with solid state RF power amplifiers. This technical note details on this project.

  8. A high power microwave triggered RF opening switch.

    PubMed

    Beeson, S; Dickens, J; Neuber, A

    2015-03-01

    A 4-port S-band waveguide structure was designed and fabricated such that a signal of any amplitude (less than 1 MW) can be switched from a normally closed state, <0.5 dB insertion loss (IL), to an open state >30 dB IL by initiating plasma in a gas cell situated at the junction of this waveguide and one propagating a megawatt level magnetron pulse. The 90/10 switching time is as low as 20 ns with a delay of ∼30 ns between the onset of the high power microwave pulse and the initial drop of the signal. Two ports of this device are for the high power triggering pulse while the other two ports are for the triggered signal in a Moreno-like coupler configuration. In order to maintain high isolation, these two sets of waveguides are rotated 90° from each other with a TE111 resonator/plasma cell located at the intersection. This manuscript describes the design and optimization of this structure using COMSOL 4.4 at the design frequency of 2.85 GHz, comparison of simulated scattering parameters with measured "cold tests" (testing without plasma), and finally the temporal waveforms of this device being used to successfully switch a low power CW signal from 2 W to <5 mW on a sub-microsecond timescale. PMID:25832255

  9. Plasma-assisted microwave processing of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin (Inventor); Ylin, Tzu-yuan (Inventor); Jackson, Henry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A microwave plasma assisted method and system for heating and joining materials. The invention uses a microwave induced plasma to controllably preheat workpiece materials that are poorly microwave absorbing. The plasma preheats the workpiece to a temperature that improves the materials' ability to absorb microwave energy. The plasma is extinguished and microwave energy is able to volumetrically heat the workpiece. Localized heating of good microwave absorbing materials is done by shielding certain parts of the workpiece and igniting the plasma in the areas not shielded. Microwave induced plasma is also used to induce self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) process for the joining of materials. Preferably, a microwave induced plasma preheats the material and then microwave energy ignites the center of the material, thereby causing a high temperature spherical wave front from the center outward.

  10. Hydrodynamic and thermal effects of continuous microwave-sustained plasma in capillary tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dap, S.; Leroy, O.; Andrieu, J.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Stancu, G. D.; Minea, T.

    2015-12-01

    Argon micro-plasmas can be generated at low power (10-100 W) in hollow-core capillaries 100-700 μm in diameter and over a few cm in length using continuous wave (CW) microwave surfatron excitation at 2.45 GHz. Electromagnetic simulations have been performed in order to design the surfatron cavity for optimal discharge ignition and stable plasma CW operation. The plasma characterization was carried out by optical emission spectroscopy on excited species present as impurities in argon. The rotational spectra of OH molecules were used to determine the gas temperature, and Stark broadening of the H β line was used to obtain the electron density. The gas temperature turns out to be in the 500-1200 K range along the plasma column, and the maximum electron density (at the surfatron gap) in the 8  ×  1014-5  ×  1015 cm-3 range. The electron density was also obtained by a semi-empirical analysis of the power coupled to the plasma along the axial direction and was found to be in good agreement with the Stark measurements. The hydrodynamic and thermal effects of plasma were investigated by the modelling of neutral gas flow and heat transfer which is of interest for the remote control of gas flow properties along the capillary.

  11. Microwave Sterilization and Depyrogenation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Dahl, Roger W.; Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    A fully functional, microgravity-compatible microwave sterilization and depyrogenation system (MSDS) prototype was developed that is capable of producing medical-grade water (MGW) without expendable supplies, using NASA potable water that currently is available aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be available for Lunar and planetary missions in the future. The microwave- based, continuous MSDS efficiently couples microwaves to a single-phase, pressurized, flowing water stream that is rapidly heated above 150 C. Under these conditions, water is rapidly sterilized. Endotoxins, significant biological toxins that originate from the cell walls of gram-negative bacteria and which represent another defining MGW requirement, are also deactivated (i.e., depyrogenated) albeit more slowly, with such deactivation representing a more difficult challenge than sterilization. Several innovations culminated in the successful MSDS prototype design. The most significant is the antenna-directed microwave heating of a water stream flowing through a microwave sterilization chamber (MSC). Novel antenna designs were developed to increase microwave transmission efficiency. These improvements resulted in greater than 95-percent absorption of incident microwaves. In addition, incorporation of recuperative heat exchangers (RHxs) in the design reduced the microwave power required to heat a water stream flowing at 15 mL/min to 170 C to only 50 W. Further improvements in energy efficiency involved the employment of a second antenna to redirect reflected microwaves back into the MSC, eliminating the need for a water load and simplifying MSDS design. A quick connect (QC) is another innovation that can be sterilized and depyrogenated at temperature, and then cooled using a unique flow design, allowing collection of MGW at atmospheric pressure and 80 C. The final innovation was the use of in-line mixers incorporated in the flow path to disrupt laminar flow and increase contact time

  12. Dual frequency dichroic feed performance. [dual feed system for microwave antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathker, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Net (DSN) in support of the Viking Mars Project in 1976, and for science and technology demonstrations during the Mariner-Venus-Mercury mission in 1974, has developed and implemented a dual (S- and X-band) feed for large ground microwave antennas. This feed provides for a multiplicity of functions; very low listening capability at each downlink (spacecraft-to-earth) band as well as simultaneous diplexed very high cw power uplink (earth-to-spacecraft) at the S-band frequency. Total 64-m antenna system performance, is considered in terms of gain, operating noise temperature and dual beam pointing or boresight coincidence. Because of the unique ability to fold or stow the dual band feed elements for single band operations, the performance definition between single and dual band operations will be reliable and accurate.

  13. Microwave assisted synthesis, spectroscopic studies and non linear optical properties of bis-chromophores.

    PubMed

    Khan, Salman A; Razvi, M A N; Bakry, Ahmed H; Afzal, S M; Asiri, Abdullah M; El-Daly, Samy A

    2015-02-25

    Bis chromophores were synthesized by the terephthalaldehyde with (4-nitrophenyl) acetonitrile/(4-flurophenyl) acetonitrile under microwave irradiation. Bis-chromophores were obtained in good to excellent yields. The structures of bis-chromophores were established by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, EI-MS and elemental analyses. Physical chemical properties such as singlet absorption, extinction coefficient, stokes shift, oscillator strength and dipole moment, were investigated by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. Further we also measured the nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficients of these compounds using the single beam z-scan technique with a cw argon ion laser at 514.5 nm at different concentrations in DMSO solvent. The third order nonlinear susceptibility was estimated from these measurements and it shows high nonlinearity. The high negative refractive index makes these compounds suitable for optical limiting application. PMID:25300042

  14. Toward improved software security training using a cyber warfare opposing force (CW OPFOR): the knowledge base design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.

    2005-03-01

    "Train the way you will fight" has been a guiding principle for military training and has served the warfighter well as evidenced by numerous successful operations over the last decade. This need for realistic training for all combatants has been recognized and proven by the warfighter and continues to guide military training. However, to date, this key training principle has not been applied fully in the arena of cyberwarfare due to the lack of realistic, cost effective, reasonable, and formidable cyberwarfare opponents. Recent technological advances, improvements in the capability of computer-generated forces (CGFs) to emulate human behavior, and current results in research in information assurance and software protection, coupled with increasing dependence upon information superiority, indicate that the cyberbattlespace will be a key aspect of future conflict and that it is time to address the cyberwarfare training shortfall. To address the need for a cyberwarfare training and defensive testing capability, we propose research and development to yield a prototype computerized, semi-autonomous (SAF) red team capability. We term this capability the Cyber Warfare Opposing Force (CW OPFOR). There are several technologies that are now mature enough to enable, for the first time, the development of this powerful, effective, high fidelity CW OPFOR. These include improved knowledge about cyberwarfare attack and defense, improved techniques for assembling CGFs, improved techniques for capturing and expressing knowledge, software technologies that permit effective rapid prototyping to be effectively used on large projects, and the capability for effective hybrid reasoning systems. Our development approach for the CW OPFOR lays out several phases in order to address these requirements in an orderly manner and to enable us to test the capabilities of the CW OPFOR and exploit them as they are developed. We have completed the first phase of the research project, which

  15. 5 Tips for Using Your Microwave Oven Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... a microwave oven, the door should close and seal fully. Unsafe Microwave Oven Use If the fan, ... openings such as gaps in the microwave oven seals. However, FDA regulations require that microwave ovens are ...

  16. Microwave field effect transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Ho-Chung (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Electrodes of a high power, microwave field effect transistor are substantially matched to external input and output networks. The field effect transistor includes a metal ground plane layer, a dielectric layer on the ground plane layer, a gallium arsenide active region on the dielectric layer, and substantially coplanar spaced source, gate, and drain electrodes having active segments covering the active region. The active segment of the gate electrode is located between edges of the active segments of the source and drain electrodes. The gate and drain electrodes include inactive pads remote from the active segments. The pads are connected directly to the input and output networks. The source electrode is connected to the ground plane layer. The space between the electrodes and the geometry of the electrodes extablish parasitic shunt capacitances and series inductances that provide substantial matches between the input network and the gate electrode and between the output network and the drain electrode. Many of the devices are connected in parallel and share a common active region, so that each pair of adjacent devices shares the same source electrodes and each pair of adjacent devices shares the same drain electrodes. The gate electrodes for the parallel devices are formed by a continuous stripe that extends between adjacent devices and is connected at different points to the common gate pad.

  17. Multilayer volume microwave filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdev, V. I.; Smirnov, S. V.; Chernushenko, A. M.

    1985-09-01

    Multilayer volume microwave filters are particularly suitable for miniaturization of radioelectronic devices by way of circuit integration, the principal advantage over planar filters being the much higher Q-factor; Q sub 0 or = 10 to the 3rd power as compared with Q sub 0 or = 10 to the 2nd power. Their metal-dielectric structure forms an array of coupled half-wavelength resonators electrically symmetric with respect to the center layer, coupling being effected by a magnetic field normal to the plane of resonators. The structure consists of an asymmetric strip line with conductor at the input end, followed by a metal layer with cut out symmetric slot line, a dielectric layer, a symmetric strip line with conductor, a metal layer with cut out symmetric slot line, a dielectric layer, and an asymmetric strip line with conductor at the output end. The size of such a filter depends directly on the number of resonator stages and, without the case, is comparable with the size of conventional filters on symmetric strip lines only but is much smaller than that of conventional filters on asymmetric strip lines only.

  18. Microwave Argon Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, Edgar; Pencheva, Mariana; Benova, Evgenia; Dias, Fransisco; Tatarova, Elena

    2009-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of a microwave (2.45 GHz) Argon plasma torch driven by a surface wave is presented. The theoretical model couples in a self-consistent way the wave electrodynamics and the electron and heavy particle kinetics. The set of coupled equations includes: Maxwell's equations, the electron Boltzmann equation, including electron-electron collisions, and the particle balance equations for electrons, excited atoms (4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, 6s), and atomic (Ar^+) and molecular ions (Ar2^+). The input parameters of the model are: gas pressure (760 Torr), plasma radius (R = 0.75 cm), dielectric permittivity (ɛd = 4.0) and tube thickness (d = 0.15 cm) as well as the measured axial profile of the gas temperature (3500 K - 1500 K). The latter was determined from measurements of the rotational temperature of the OH molecular band in the range 306 - 315 nm. Phase and amplitude sensitive recording provides the data for the axial wavenumber and wave attenuation coefficient. The wavenumber decreases along the generated plasma torch. The electron density (Ne) axial profile as determined from measurements of Hβ Stark broadening is in agreement with the theoretical one.

  19. GA microwave window development

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, C.P.; Kasugai, A.; Sakamoto, K.; Takahashi, K.

    1994-10-01

    The GA prototype distributed window was tested in a 32 mm diam. waveguide system at a power density suitable for a MW gyrotron, using the JAERI/Toshiba 110 GHz long pulse internal converter gyrotron in the JAERI test stand. The presence of the untilted distributed window had no adverse effect on the gyrotron operation. A pulse length of 10 times the calculated thermal equilibrium time (1/e time) of 30 msec was reached, and the window passed at least 750 pulses greater than 30 msec and 343 pulses greater than 60 msec. Beyond 100 msec, the window calorimetry reached steady state, allowing the window dissipation to be measured in a single pulse. The measured loss of 4.0% agrees both with the estimated loss, on which the stress calculations are based, and with the attenuation measured at low power in the HE{sub 11} mode. After the end of the tests, the window was examined; no evidence of arcing air coating was found in the part of the window directly illuminated by the microwaves, although there was discoloration in a recess containing an optical diagnostic which outgassed, causing a local discharge to occur in that recess. Finally, there was no failure of the metal-sapphire joints during a total operating time of 50 seconds consisting of pulses longer than 30 msec.

  20. HLA-Cw Allele Frequency in Definite Meniere’s Disease Compared to Probable Meniere’s Disease and Healthy Controls in an Iranian Sample

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Sasan; Ghadimi, Fatemeh; Firouzifar, Mohammadreza; Yazdani, Nasrin; Mohammad-Amoli, Mahsa; Vakili, Varasteh; Mahvi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several lines of evidence support the contribution of autoimmune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of Meniere’s disease. The aim of this study was determining the association between HLA-Cw Alleles in patients with definite Meniere’s disease and patients with probable Meniere’s disease and a control group. Materials and Methods: HLA-Cw genotyping was performed in 23 patients with definite Meniere’s disease, 24 with probable Meniere’s disease, and 91 healthy normal subjects, using sequence specific primers polymerase chain reaction technique. The statistical analysis was performed using stata 8 software. Results: There was a significant association between HLA-Cw*04 and HLA-Cw*16 in both definite and probable Meniere’s disease compared to normal healthy controls. We observed a significant difference in HLA-Cw*12 frequencies between patients with definite Meniere’s disease compared to patients with probable Meniere’s disease (P=0.04). The frequency of HLA-Cw*18 is significantly higher in healthy controls (P=0.002). Conclusion: Our findings support the rule of HLA-Cw Alleles in both definite and probable Meniere’s disease. In addition, differences in HLA-Cw*12 frequency in definite and probable Meniere’s disease in our study’s population might indicate distinct immune and inflammatory mechanisms involved in each condition. PMID:27602337