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Sample records for 2450-mhz cw microwave

  1. Effect of 2450 MHz microwave radiation on hematopoiesis of preganant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, M.J.; MacNichols, G.L.; McRee, D.I.

    1984-11-01

    In this study, the influence of 2450 MHz CW microwave radiation on hematopoiesis in pregnant mice was examined. Dams (mice CD-1 strain) were irradiated during Days 1-6 or 6-15 of pregnancy. The animals were irradiated for a total of 8 hr per day at an average power density of 30 mW/cm/sup 2/. Peripheral blood and bone marrow samples were obtained on Day 18 of pregnancy. The total leukocyte and differential leukocyte counts of peripheral blood samples were not affected by either exposure regimen. In addition, no effects were noted in either the erythroid or myeloid mitotic indices of bone marrow samples. Exposure of pregnant mice to microwave radiation under the conditions of these experiments had no effects on the investigated aspects of hematopoiesis.

  2. Microwave radiation (2450 MHz) alters the endotoxin-induced hypothermic response of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowicz, R.J.; Compton, K.L.; Riddle, M.M.; Rogers, R.R.; Brugnolotti, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The parenteral administration of bacterial endotoxin to rats causes a hypothermia that is maximal after approximately 90 minutes. When endotoxin-injected rats were held in a controlled environment at 22 degree C and 50% relative humidity and exposed for 90 minutes to microwaves (2450 MHz, CW) at 1 mW/cm2, significant increases were observed in body temperature compared with endotoxin-treated, sham-irradiated rats. The magnitude of the response was related to power density (10 mW/cm2 greater than 5 mW/cm2 greater than 1 mW/cm2). Saline-injected rats exposed for 90 minutes at 5 mW/cm2 (specific absorption rate approximately 1.0 mW/g) showed no significant increase in body temperature compared with saline-injected, sham-irradiated rats. The hypothermia induced by endotoxin in rats was also found to be affected by ambient temperature alone. Increases in ambient temperature above 22 degree C in the absence of microwaves caused a concomitant increase in body temperature. This study reveals that subtle microwave heating is detectable in endotoxin-treated rats that have impaired thermoregulatory capability. These results indicate that the interpretation of microwave-induced biological effects observed in animals at comparable rates and levels of energy absorption should include a consideration of the thermogenic potential of microwave.

  3. Effect of 2450-MHz microwave energy on the blood-brain barrier to hydrophilic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Microwave energy at 2450 MHz 120 Hz AM was found ineffective in increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier to the hydrophilic tracers HRP and (/sup 14/C) sucrose. Furthermore, a diminished permeability to HRP and sodium fluorescein was apparent after 180 minutes of exposure to microwaves at an incident power density of 20 mW/cm/sup 2/. Colonic temperature, as well as temperature within the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, cerebellum and medulla, were elevated by less than 1/sup 0/C over those of sham-exposed rats. A significant decrease in the permeability to HRP and (/sup 14/C) sucrose occurred after exposure to an incident power density of 65 mW/cm/sup 2/ for 30 minutes. The reduction in permeability to HRP correlated with a suppressed incorporation of the tracer by pinocytosis in cerebral microvessels. Suppression of blood-brain barrier permeability to hydrophilic tracers was most pronounced at brain temperatures exceeding approx. 40/sup 0/C and is demonstrated to be temperature dependent.

  4. Growth and development of mice offspring after irradiation in utero with 2,450-MHz microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, E.; Carter, H.B.; House, D.

    1984-12-01

    Mice offspring irradiated in utero with 2,450-MHz radio-frequency (RF) radiation at 0 or 28 mW/cm2 (whole-body averaged specific absorption rate . 0 or 16.5 W/kg) for 100 minutes daily on days 6 through 17 of gestation were evaluated for maturation and development on days 1, 5, 10, 12, 15, and 17 of age. The tests used to determine differences in developmental age in the two treatment groups were body weight, urine concentrating ability, brain weight, tolerance to ouabain, and bone lengths. Fifteen sham-irradiated and 26 RF-irradiated litters, normalized to eight pups/litter, were used in this study. Mean body weight of the microwave-irradiated offspring were significantly (p . .0003) decreased only on day 1 of age. Brain weight on days 10, 12, and 17 were significantly lower in microwave-irradiated pups (p . .01). There were no significant differences in the two groups in urine concentrating ability on day 5, ouabain tolerance on day 15, or bone length on days 5, 10, 12, and 17. It is concluded that there is a persistent delay in postnatal development of the brain after RF irradiation with 16.5 W/kg during gestation.

  5. Effect of 2,450 MHz microwave radiation on the development of the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Inouye, M.; Galvin, M.J.; McRee, D.I.

    1983-12-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2,450 MHz microwave radiation at an incident power density of 10 mW/cm2 daily for 3 hours from day 4 of pregnancy (in utero exposure) through day 40 postpartum, except for 2 days at the perinatal period. The animals were killed, and the brains removed, weighed, measured, and histologically examined at 15, 20, 30, and 40 days of age. The histologic parameters examined included the cortical architecture of the cerebral cortex, the decline of the germinal layer along the lateral ventricles, the myelination of the corpus callosum, and the decline of the external germinal layer of the cerebellar cortex. In 40-day-old rats, quantitative measurements of neurons were also made. The spine density of the pyramidal cells in layer III of the somatosensory cortex, and the density of basal dendritic trees of the pyramidal cells in layer V were measured in Golgi-Cox impregnated specimens. In addition, the density of Purkinje cells and the extent of the Purkinje cell layer in each lobule were measured in midsagittal sections of the cerebellum stained with thionin. There were no remarkable differences between microwave-exposed and control (sham-irradiated) groups for any of the histologic or quantitative parameters examined; however, the findings provide important information on quantitative measurements of the brain. The data from this study failed to demonstrate that there is a significant effect on rat brain development due to microwave exposure (10 mW/cm2) during the embryonic, fetal, and postnatal periods.

  6. Germination response of MR 219 rice variety to different exposure times and periods of 2450 MHz microwave frequency.

    PubMed

    Talei, Daryush; Valdiani, Alireza; Maziah, Mahmood; Mohsenkhah, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Germination is a key process in plants' phenological cycles. Accelerating this process could lead to improvment of the seedling growth as well as the cultivation efficiency. To achieve this, the effect of microwave frequency on the germination of rice seeds was examined. The physiological feedbacks of the MR 219 rice variety in terms of seed germination rate (GR), germination percentage (GP), and mean germination time (MGT) were analyzed by exposing its seeds to 2450 MHz of microwave frequency for one, four, seven, and ten hours. It was revealed that exposing the seeds to the microwave frequency for 10 hours resulted in the highest GP. This treatment led to 100% of germination after three days with a mean germination time of 2.1 days. Although the other exposure times of microwave frequency caused the moderate effects on germination with a GP(a3) ranged from 93% to 98%, they failed to reduce the MGT(a3). The results showed that ten-hour exposure times of microwave frequency for six days significantly facilitated and improved the germination indices (primary shoot and root length). Therefore, the technique is expected to benefit the improvement of rice seed germination considering its simplicity and efficacy in increasing the germination percentage and rate as well as the primary shoot and root length without causing any environmental toxicity.

  7. An Enhancing Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on the Lethal Action of 2450 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation in Microwave Oven.

    PubMed

    Mollazadeh-Moghaddam, Kamyar; Moradi, Bardia Varasteh; Dolatabadi-Bazaz, Reza; Shakibae, Mojtaba; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2011-10-01

    Today, there is an increasing interest in the use of metal nanoparticles in health sciences. Amongst all nanoparticles, the gold nanoparticles have been known to kill the cancer cells under hyperthermic condition by near-infrared frequency electromagnetic waves. On the other hand, although there are different physiochemical methods for disinfection of microbial pollution, however applications of irradiated gold nanoparticles against microorganisms have not yet been investigated. In this study, gold nanoparticles were prepared using D-glucose and characterized (particle size <26 nm). In the next step, the enhancing effect of the non toxic level of gold nanoparticles (50 µg/mL) on the antimicrobial activity of 2450 MHz electromagnetic radiation generated at a microwave oven operated at low power (100 W), was investigated by time-kill course assay against Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) ATCC 29737. The results showed that application of gold nanoparticles can enhance the lethal effect of low power microwave in a very short exposure time (5 s).

  8. Effects of 2450 MHz continuous wave microwave radiation and isothermal conduction on canine platelet aggregometry, survival and margination

    SciTech Connect

    Bushberg, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of 2450 MHz microwave radiation and isothermal conduction ex vivo exposures on canine platelets was analyzed in vitro by studying adenosine-5'-diphosphate activated aggregation and in vivo by studying the survival, distribution and physiological integrity of reinfused autologous Indium-111 labeled platelets. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) from eight healthy dogs was subjected to microwave irradiation at 10 MW/cm/sup 2/ and at 50 MW/cm/sup 2/ for 10, 100, 600, 900, 1800 seconds and at 100 MW/cm/sup 2/ for 10, 100, and 600 seconds. Aggregometry analysis was performed immediately after exposure and 10 minutes post-exposure. No significant perturbations were observed following microwave exposure of 10 MW/cm/sup 2/. At higher power densities six specific types of aggregation phenomena were demonstrated: (1) Hyperaggregation, (2) Decreased Velocity Reduced Hyperaggregation, (3) Recovery, (4) Decreased Velocity Delayed Hyperaggregation, (5) Reversible Afunctionality, and (6) Irreversible Afunctionality. The absence of equivalent aggregation responses with isothermal conduction heating (extraisothermal effects) was attributed to differences in heating rate and not to nonthermal microwave-specific effects. Scintigraphic and survival kinetic studies were performed following power density/exposure time combinations. PRP samples I and IV displayed normal survival half-times; however, exposure I resulted in a depressed 15-minute post-reinfusion circulating percentage (CP/sub 15/) of 29% compared to 61% for the control sample. Exposure of groups II and III resulted in a dramatic reduction in the CP/sub 15/ (i.e., 18% and 1.3% respectively) and survival half-times. Margination of the labeled platelets was divided between the spleen, liver and blood pool.

  9. Behavior, physiology, and energy deposition in rats chronically exposed to 2450-MHz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, J.A.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1987-11-01

    The research program was initiated to determine both the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the behavioral and physiological consequences of chronic c-w microwave radiation exposure at 2450 MHz in the laboratory rat. Whole-body average and local SARs at discrete sites within the body of rats and mice were determined experimentally using different exposure systems and analytical techniques. The whole-body average SAR and the distribution of SAR within the body depends on a variety of factors: type of exposure system, polarization of the field, size of the animal, and angle of radiation incident on the body. Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of chronic exposure to 2450-MHz microwave radiation on several measures of rat behavior and physiology. Groups of rats were exposed intermittently to 2450-MHz radiation at power densities of 0.5 mW/sq. cm. or 2.5 mW/sq. cm. for 90 days.

  10. Measurement of DNA damage after exposure to 2450 MHz electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Malyapa, R S; Ahern, E W; Straube, W L; Moros, E G; Pickard, W F; Roti Roti, J L

    1997-12-01

    Recent reports suggest that exposure to 2450 MHz electromagnetic radiation causes DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cells of rat brain irradiated in vivo (Lai and Singh, Bioelectromagnetics 16, 207-210, 1995; Int. J. Radiat. Biol. 69, 513-521, 1996). Therefore, we endeavored to determine if exposure of cultured mammalian cells in vitro to 2450 MHz radiation causes DNA damage. The alkaline comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis), which is reportedly the most sensitive method to assay DNA damage in individual cells, was used to measure DNA damage after in vitro 2450 MHz irradiation. Exponentially growing U87MG and C3H 10T1/2 cells were exposed to 2450 MHz continuous-wave (CW) radiation in specially designed radial transmission lines (RTLs) that provided relatively uniform microwave exposure. Specific absorption rates (SARs) were calculated to be 0.7 and 1.9 W/kg. Temperatures in the RTLs were measured in real time and were maintained at 37 +/- 0.3 degrees C. Every experiment included sham exposure(s) in an RTL. Cells were irradiated for 2 h, 2 h followed by a 4-h incubation at 37 degrees C in an incubator, 4 h and 24 h. After these treatments samples were subjected to the alkaline comet assay as described by Olive et al. (Exp. Cell Res. 198, 259-267, 1992). Images of comets were digitized and analyzed using a PC-based image analysis system, and the "normalized comet moment" and "comet length" were determined. No significant differences were observed between the test group and the controls after exposure to 2450 MHz CW irradiation. Thus 2450 MHz irradiation does not appear to cause DNA damage in cultured mammalian cells under these exposure conditions as measured by this assay.

  11. A confirmation study of Russian and Ukrainian data on effects of 2450 MHz microwave exposure on immunological processes and teratology in rats.

    PubMed

    de Gannes, F Poulletier; Taxile, M; Duleu, S; Hurtier, A; Haro, E; Geffard, M; Ruffié, G; Billaudel, B; Lévêque, P; Dufour, P; Lagroye, I; Veyret, B

    2009-11-01

    In a series of Russian and Ukrainian papers published from 1974-1986, it was reported that 30-day whole-body exposures to continuous-wave (CW) radiofrequency (RF) radiation at 2375 MHz and 5 W/m(2) disrupted the antigenic structure of rat brain tissue. The authors suggested that this action caused an autoimmune response in exposed animals. Moreover, these studies reported that blood serum from exposed rats injected into intact nonexposed female rats on the 10th day of pregnancy led to increased postimplantation embryo mortality and decreased fetus size and body weight. Because the results of these studies served in part as the basis for setting exposure limits in the former USSR, it was deemed necessary to perform confirmation studies, using modern dosimetric and biological methods. In our study, a new system was constructed to expose free-moving rats under far-field conditions. Whole-body and brain-averaged specific absorption rates (SARs) were calculated. All results, using ELISA and classic teratology end points, were negative in our laboratory. On the basis of this investigation, we conclude that, under these exposure conditions (2450 MHz, CW, 7 h/day, 30 days, 0.16 W/kg whole-body SAR), RF-radiation exposure had no influence on several immune and degenerative parameters or on prenatal development.

  12. An evaluation of the teratogenic potential of protracted exposure of pregnant rats to 2450-MHz microwave radiation. II. Postnatal psychophysiologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jensh, R P; Vogel, W H; Brent, R L

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether protracted prenatal exposure of rats to 2450-MHz microwave radiation at a power density level of 20 mW/cm2 would significantly alter postnatal growth and psychophysiologic development. Of 75 pregnant rats, 12 were exposed to microwave radiation, 4 sham-irradiated, and 59 served as environmental control animals. Forty-five females were allowed to deliver their offspring. The neonates were examined and weighed on d 3 and weekly thereafter until 87 d of age. Neonatal reflex tests were initiated as early as d 3 (surface righting, air righting, auditory startle, visual placing). One physiologic parameter, eye opening, was also observed. Mothers were rebred 10 d after weaning and a morphologic evaluation was completed on the second litter. Behavioral tests were begun at 60 d of age and included water T-maze, conditioned avoidance response, open field, activity wheel, forelimb hanging, and swimming. At 90 d of age offspring were bred within and across groups, and a morphologic teratologic analyses was completed on the offspring. Representative tissue samples were collected and organ weights recorded for the brain, liver, kidneys, and gonads of all animals. Analyses of the data indicated that there were no significant malformations or significant alterations in the neonatal physiologic or reflex test results, body/organ weight ratios, or breeding results in the adult offspring. There were no significant alterations in five of the six adult behavioral tests. There were significant differences in activity among the irradiated and control offspring between the sexes, the irradiated offspring being more active. These results are indicative of possible radiation-induced behavioral alterations. Further studies are needed to explore the possibility of microwave radiation-related alterations in animal behavior.

  13. Effect of microwaves (2450-MHz) on the immune system in mice: studies of nucleic acid and protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W.; Ahmed, A.; Czerski, P.; Leach, W.M.; Sell, K.W.

    1980-01-01

    CBA/J adult male mice were given single or triple exposures to 2450-mHz microwaves in an environmentally controlled wave guide facility. The average absorbed dose rate for a single exposure varied from 12 to 15 mW/g. Sham-exposed mice served as controls. Lymphoid cells were collected and tested for metabolic activity on days 3, 6, and 9 following a single exposure, and on days 9, 12, and 16 following triple exposures on days 0, 3, and 6. Cells were cultured in vitro for four hours to seven days before their metabolic rates were assayed. Under these conditions, microwaves failed to produce any detectable change in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), and protein synthesis, as measured by the incorporation of methyl(3H)-thymidine (3H-TDR) (DNA substrate), 3H-uridine (3H-UR) (RNA substrate), and 3H-leucine (protein substrate) by spleen, bone marrow, and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) in vitro. These data suggest that microwave-induced increases in the frequency of complement-receptor (CR)- or surface-immunoglobulin (sIg)-bearing cells were not associated with a concomitant increase in cell proliferation and/or protein synthesis, and favor the concept that microwaves under these conditions stimulate already existing B-cell precursors for maturation.

  14. DNA damage in rat brain cells after in vivo exposure to 2450 MHz electromagnetic radiation and various methods of euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Malyapa, R S; Ahern, E W; Bi, C; Straube, W L; LaRegina, M; Pickard, W F; Roti Roti, J L

    1998-06-01

    The present study was done to confirm the reported observation that low-intensity acute exposure to 2450 MHz radiation causes DNA single-strand breaks (Lai and Singh, Bioelectromagnetics 16, 207-210, 1995). Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing approximately 250 g were irradiated with 2450 MHz continuous-wave (CW) microwaves for 2 h at a specific absorption rate of 1.2 W/kg in a cylindrical waveguide system (Guy et al., Radio Sci. 14, 63-74, 1979). There was no associated rise in the core body temperature of the rats. After the irradiation or sham treatments, rats were euthanized by either CO2 asphyxia or decapitation by guillotine (eight pairs of animals per euthanasia group). After euthanasia the brains were removed and immediately immersed in cold Ames medium and the cells of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus were dissociated separately and subjected to the alkaline comet assay. Irrespective of whether the rats were euthanized by CO2 asphyxia or decapitated by guillotine, no significant differences were observed between either the comet length or the normalized comet moment of cells from either the cerebral cortex or the hippocampus of sham-treated rats and those from the irradiated rats. However, the data for the rats asphyxiated with CO2 showed more intrinsic DNA damage and more experiment-to-experiment variation than did the data for rats euthanized by guillotine. Therefore, the guillotine method of euthanasia is the most appropriate in studies relating to DNA damage. Furthermore, we did not confirm the observation that DNA damage is produced in cells of the rat cerebral cortex or the hippocampus after a 2-h exposure to 2450 MHz CW microwaves or at 4 h after the exposure.

  15. Immunologic and hematopoietic alterations by 2,450-MHz electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, A T; Mold, N G

    1980-01-01

    A biphasic modulation of responsiveness of spleen lymphocytes to mitogens was observed in mice exposed to 2,450-MHz radiation at power densities of 5-15 mW/cm2 over various periods ranging between one and 17 days. This modulated phenomenon may be explained on the basis of 1) suppression of lymphocyte response to microwave-activated macrophages which persists throughout the entire course of radiation, and 2) concurrent progressive direct stimulation of lymphocytes which culminates around day 9 of exposure. Tumor cytotoxicity of killer lymphocytes from mice exposed to five or nine days of radiation did not appear different from sham controls. The highly proliferative hematopoietic marrow cells were sensitive to microwave radiation. Nine days of exposure to radiation (15 mW/cm2) reduced the colony-forming units of myeloid and erythroid series by 50%. This observation may offer a new and more sensitive assay for studying biological effects of electromagnetic radiation.

  16. Proliferation and cytogenetic studies in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 2450 MHz radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Mohan, N; Meltz, M L; Wittler, M A

    1997-12-01

    Aliquots of human peripheral blood collected from two healthy human volunteers were exposed in vitro to continuous wave 2450 MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR), either continuously for a period of 90 min or intermittently for a total exposure period of 90 min (30 min on and 30 min off, repeated three times). Blood aliquots which were sham-exposed or exposed in vitro to 150 cGy gamma radiation served as controls. The continuous wave 2450 MHz RFR was generated with a net forward power of 34.5 W and transmitted from a standard gain rectangular antenna horn in a vertically downward direction. The mean power density at the position of the cells was 5.0 mW/cm2. The mean specific absorption rate calculated by Finite Difference Time Domain analysis was 12.46 W/kg. Immediately after exposure, lymphocytes were cultured for 48 and 72 h to determine the incidence of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei, respectively. Proliferation indices were also recorded. There were no significant differences between RFR-exposed and sham-exposed lymphocytes with respect to; (a) mitotic indices; (b) incidence of cells showing chromosome damage; (c) exchange aberrations; (d) acentric fragments; (e) binucleate lymphocytes, and (f) micronuclei, for either the continuous or intermittent RFR exposures. In contrast, the response of positive control cells exposed to 150 cGy gamma radiation was significantly different from RFR-exposed and sham-exposed lymphocytes. Thus, there is no evidence for an effect on mitogen-stimulated proliferation kinetics or for excess genotoxicity within 72 h in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 2450 MHz RFR.

  17. Biological and behavioral effects of prenatal and postnatal exposure to 2450-MHz electromagnetic radiation in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, J.; Polson, P.; Rebert, C.; Lunan, K.; Gage, M.

    1982-01-01

    Near the beginning of the second trimester of pregnancy, 33 squirrel monkeys were exposed to 2450-MHz irradiation in a multimode cavity at whole-body average specific absorption rates equivalent to those resulting from exposure to plane wave irradiation at 0.034, 0.34, and 3.4 W/kg; exposed monkeys were compared with eight pregnant sham-exposed monkeys. Eighteen of the irradiated mothers and their offspring were exposed for an additional 6 months after parturition, and then their offspring were exposed for another 6 months. No differences were found between irradiated and control adults with respect to the number of live births produced or to measures of locomotor activity, maternal care, urinary catecholamines, plasma cortisol, 3H-thymidine and 14C-uridine uptake by phytohemagglutininstimulated blood lymphocytes, or electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. Similarly, no differences were found between exposed and nonexposed offspring on the same blood, urine, and EEG parameters. Growth rate and most aspects of behavioral development were not altered by exposure. The major difference between irradiated and control offspring was the high mortality rate (4/5) before 6 months of age in those exposed at 3.4 W/kg both before and after birth. These results indicate that microwaves at power densities to 3.4 W/kg might have little direct effect on the monkey fetus when exposures occur in utero during the latter half to two-thirds of pregnancy, but that continued exposure after birth might be harmful.

  18. Naltrexone-sensitive analgesia following exposure of mice to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Maillefer, R.H.; Quock, R.M. )

    1991-03-11

    This study was conducted to determine whether exposure to RFR might induce sufficient thermal stress to activate endogenous opioid mechanisms and induce analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 10, 15 or 20 mV/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested in the abdominal constriction paradigm. Specific absorption rates (SAR) were 23.7 W/kg at 10 mW/cm{sup 2}, 34.6 W/kg at 15 mW/cm{sup 2} and 45.5 W/kg at 20 mW/cm{sup 2}. Confinement in the exposure chamber alone did not appreciably alter body temperature but did appear to induce a stress-associated analgesia that was insensitive to the opioid receptor blocker naltrexone. Exposure of confined mice to RFR elevated body temperature and further increased analgesia in SAR-dependent manner. The high-SAR RFR-induced analgesia, but not the hyperthermia, was reduced by naltrexone. These findings suggest that (1) RFR produces SAR-dependent hyperthermia and analgesia and (2) RFR-induced analgesia is mediated by opioid mechanisms while confinement-induced analgesia involves non-opioid mechanisms.

  19. Effects of 42- and 2450-MHz dielectric heating on nutrition-related properties of soybeans.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S O; Pour-El, A; Stetson, L E; Peck, E E

    1981-12-01

    Dielectric heating at frequencies of 42 and 2450 MHz was applied to whole soybeans of natural moisture content for varies exposure times. The minimum energy absorbed (MEA) was calculated from moisture-loss and temperature-elevation data. Biochemical analyses were performed to determine protein dispersibility index (PDI), nitrogen solubility index (NSI), and trypsin-inhibitor, urease, lipoxygenase, and peroxidase activities. Because the heating rates were different at the two frequencies for the power levels used, plots of the biochemical properties against temperature of exposure time showed an apparent frequency dependence. This dependence on frequency disappeared, however, when MEA was substituted as the independent variable. Chemical analyses revealed that dielectric heating of soybeans at natural moisture levels should be as effective as conventional steam toasting in reducing trypsin-inhibitor activity. PDI and NSI, but not urease, were suitable indicators of trypsin-inhibitor inactivation by dielectric heating. Lipoxygenase was completely inactivated by the dielectric-heating treatments that gave suitable trypsin-inhibitor inactivation, but peroxidase activity remained relatively high, offering possible advantages for bleaching and improved soy product color.

  20. Effects of Pulsed and CW 2450 MHz Radiation on Transformation and Chromosomes of Human Lymphocytes In Vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-15

    NOTATION Prepared in"collaboration with Dr. P . Czerski, FDA Center for Devices and Rad. Health 17 COSATI CODES 18-SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverie If...Pulsed or amplitude modulated waveforms can be obtained through the use of a Hewlett-Packard Model 8403A p -i-n modulator, for high peak power pulsed...methods. Resralts were considered significant at the p < 0.05 level. 11 __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Effects Of Exposure On Spontaneous Transformation

  1. Effects of Pulsed and CW (Continuous Wave) 2450 MHz Radiation on Transformation and Chromosomes of Human Lymphocytes in Vitro.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-16

    subject of two brief communications: one at the IRPA -7 Congress in April, 1988 in Sydney Australia (Appendix 2), and a second one at the 10𔃾 Annual...AGAIN" 3,0 IF ERRN =12r THEN GOTO 340 320 IF ERRN =63 THEN GOTO 350 330 DISP "AN ERROR HAS OCCURRED - PRESS CONTINUE TO START AGAINŗLi PAUSE GOTO 15 ...dosimetric conditions. This system was also only suitable for short-term exposures. Allis et al. (1975) installed a waveguide exposure system in a Cary 15

  2. Effects of Pulsed and CW (Continuous Wave) 2450 MHz Radiation on Transformation and Chromosomes of Human Lymphocytes in vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-15

    the subject of two brief communi- cations: one at the IRPA -7 Congress in April, 1988 in Sydney Australia (attachment 2), and a second one at the 10th...Society (2 presentations) in Stamford, Connecticut in 1988 and at the 7th International Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association ( IRPA ...Electromagnetic Fields. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Fl.; 1986; pp 229-272. IRPA 7 Seventh Intemational Congress of the International Radiation Protection

  3. Response of Aspergillus nidulans and Physarum polycephalum to microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mezykowski, T; Bal, J; Debiec, H; Kwarecki, K

    1980-06-01

    The influence of microwaves on genetic processes in Aspergillus nidulans and Physarum polycephalum was investigated. Suspensions of organisms were exposed in the far zone to 2450-MHz waves at 10 mW/cm2 for one hour in both CW and pulsed (1 microsecond, 600 pps) fields. Spores of A. nidulans were irradiated before and during germination. No changes in survival rate or in frequency of morphological mutation were found. Polycephalum under the influence of CW microwaves incorporated 3H-Thymine into DNA at a rate five times that of controls and twice that of thermal controls. The accelerated synthesis may reflect more efficient volume heating by microwaves, or in the presence of microthermal gradients in suspensions, or field-specific influences in concern with focal or volume heating.

  4. Analgesia produced by exposure to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) is mediated by brain mu- and kappa-opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, G.; Park, E.J.; Quock, R.M. )

    1992-02-26

    This study was conducted to identify the opioid receptor subtype(s) responsible for RFR-induced analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 20 mW/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested 15 min later in the abdominal constriction paradigm which detects {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid activity. Immediately following RFR exposure, different groups of mice were pretreated intracerebroventricularly with different opioid receptor blockers with selectivity for {mu}- or {kappa}-opioid receptors. Results show that RFR-induced analgesia was attenuated by higher but not lower doses of the non-selective antagonist naloxone, but the selective {mu}-opioid antagonist {beta}-funaltrexamine and by the selective {kappa}-opioid antagonist norbinaltorphimine. RFR-induced analgesia was also reduced by subcutaneous pretreatment with 5.0 mg/kg of the {mu}-/{kappa}-opioid antagonist({minus})-5,9-diethyl-{alpha}-5,9-dialkyl-2{prime}-hydroxy-6,7-benzomorphan(MR-2266). These findings suggest that RFR-induced analgesia may be mediated by both {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid mechanisms.

  5. Frequency of micronuclei in the peripheral blood and bone marrow of cancer-prone mice chronically exposed to 2450 MHz radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Frei, M R; Dusch, S J; Guel, V; Meltz, M L; Jauchem, J R

    1997-04-01

    C3H/HeJ mice, which are prone to mammary tumors, were exposed for 20 h/day, 7 days/week, over 18 months to continuous-wave 2450 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation in circularly polarized wave guides at a whole-body average specific absorption rate of 1.0 W/kg. Sham-exposed mice were used as controls. The positive controls were the sentinel mice treated with mitomycin C during the last 24 h before necropsy. At the end of the 18 months, all mice were necropsied. Peripheral blood and bone marrow smears were examined for the extent of genotoxicity as indicated by the presence of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs). The results indicate that the incidence of micronuclei/1,000 PCEs was not significantly different between groups exposed to RF radiation (62 mice) and sham-exposed groups (58 mice), and the mean frequencies were 4.5 +/- 1.23 and 4.0 +/- 1.12 in peripheral blood and 6.1 +/- 1.78 and 5.7 +/- 1.60 in bone marrow, respectively. In contrast, the positive controls (7 mice) showed a significantly elevated incidence of micronuclei/1,000 PCEs in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and the mean frequencies were 50.9 +/- 6.18 and 55.2 +/- 4.65, respectively. When the animals with mammary tumors were considered separately, there were no significant differences in the incidence of micronuclei/1,000 PCEs between the group exposed to RF radiation (12 mice) and the sham-exposed group (8 mice), and the mean frequencies were 4.6 +/- 1.03 and 4.1 +/- 0.89 in peripheral blood and 6.1 +/- 1.76 and 5.5 +/- 1.51 in bone marrow, respectively. Thus there was no evidence for genotoxicity in mice prone to mammary tumors that were exposed chronically to 2450 MHz RF radiation compared with sham-exposed controls.

  6. The effect of authentic metallic implants on the SAR distribution of the head exposed to 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz dipole near field.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, H; Keshvari, J; Lappalainen, R

    2007-03-07

    As the use of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) fields has increased along with increased use of wireless communication, the possible related health risks have also been widely discussed. One safety aspect is the interaction of medical implants and RF devices like mobile phones. In the literature, effects on active implants like pacemakers have been discussed but the studies of passive metallic (i.e. conductive) implants are rare. However, some studies have shown that the EM power absorption in tissues may be enhanced due to metallic implants. In this study, the effect of authentic passive metallic implants in the head region was examined. A half-wave dipole antenna was used as an exposure source and the specific absorption rate (SAR, W kg(-1)) in the near field was studied numerically. The idea was to model the presumably worst cases of most common implants in an accurate MRI-based phantom. As exposure frequencies GSM (900 and 1800 MHz) and UMTS (2450 MHz) regions were considered. The implants studied were skull plates, fixtures, bone plates and ear rings. The results indicate that some of the implants, under very rare exposure conditions, may cause a notable enhancement in peak mass averaged SAR.

  7. The effect of authentic metallic implants on the SAR distribution of the head exposed to 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz dipole near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, H.; Keshvari, J.; Lappalainen, R.

    2007-03-01

    As the use of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) fields has increased along with increased use of wireless communication, the possible related health risks have also been widely discussed. One safety aspect is the interaction of medical implants and RF devices like mobile phones. In the literature, effects on active implants like pacemakers have been discussed but the studies of passive metallic (i.e. conductive) implants are rare. However, some studies have shown that the EM power absorption in tissues may be enhanced due to metallic implants. In this study, the effect of authentic passive metallic implants in the head region was examined. A half-wave dipole antenna was used as an exposure source and the specific absorption rate (SAR, W kg-1) in the near field was studied numerically. The idea was to model the presumably worst cases of most common implants in an accurate MRI-based phantom. As exposure frequencies GSM (900 and 1800 MHz) and UMTS (2450 MHz) regions were considered. The implants studied were skull plates, fixtures, bone plates and ear rings. The results indicate that some of the implants, under very rare exposure conditions, may cause a notable enhancement in peak mass averaged SAR.

  8. A Study of the Effects of High Power Pulsed 2450 MHz Microwaves, ELF modulated Microwaves, and ELF Fields on Human Lymphocytes and Selected Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-27

    examinations revealed no major changes in morphology except prominent lipofuscin deposition in the liver and urinary tract infection in the exposed...explanations for protein alteration would be immunosuppression since all the exposed animals showed chronic urinary tract infection . This idea may explain serum...albumin decrease, urinary protein increase and high frequency of urinary tract infection . Further investigation is necessary for the evaluation of

  9. Ex situ themo-catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapors using a traveling wave microwave reactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microwave heating offers a number of advantages over conventional heating methods, such as, rapid and volumetric heating, precise temperature control, energy efficiency and lower temperature gradient. In this article we demonstrate the use of 2450 MHz microwave traveling wave reactor to heat the cat...

  10. The use of self heating'' ceramics as crucibles for microwave melting metals and nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crucibles were used to melt aluminum and copper in conventional and tuned microwave cavities at a microwave frequency of 2450 MHz. SiC crucibles were also used to vitrify and homogenize mixtures of nuclear waste and glass frit.

  11. The use of ``self heating`` ceramics as crucibles for microwave melting metals and nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1990-12-31

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crucibles were used to melt aluminum and copper in conventional and tuned microwave cavities at a microwave frequency of 2450 MHz. SiC crucibles were also used to vitrify and homogenize mixtures of nuclear waste and glass frit.

  12. Thermoregulatory consequences of long-term microwave exposure at controlled ambient temperatures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.; Spiers, D.E.; Rawson, R.O.; Adams, B.W.; Sheldon, D.K.

    1984-08-01

    The study was designed to identify and measure changes in thermoregulatory response systems, both behavioral and physiological, that may occur when squirrel monkeys are exposed to 2450-MHz CW microwaves 40 hours/week for 15 weeks. Microwave power densities explored were 1 and 5 mW/sq. cm. (SAR = 0.16 W/kg per mW/sq. cm.) and were presented at controlled environmental temperatures of 25, 30, and 35 C. Standardized tests, conducted periodically, assessed changes in thermoregulatory responses. Dependent variables measured included body mass, certain blood properties, metabolic heat production, sweating, skin temperatures, deep body temperature, and behavioral responses by which the monkeys selected a preferred environmental temperature. Results showed no alteration of metabolic rate, internal body temperature, or thermoregulatory behavior by microwave exposure although the ambient temperature prevailing during chronic exposure could exert an effect. An increase in sweating rate occurred in the 35 C environment, not enhanced significantly by microwave exposure. Skin temperature, reflecting vasomotor state, was reliably influenced by both ambient temperature and microwaves. The most robust consequence of microwave exposure was a reduction in body mass which appeared to be a function of microwave power density.

  13. Freeze-Dehydration by Microwave Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    MATHEMATICAL MODEL DEHYDRATED FOODS ENERGY BEEF EQUATIONS FREEZE DRIED FOODS BEATING ANALYSIS MELTING FREEZE DRYING MICROWAVES MICROWAVE DIELECTRIC ...d) 20. Abstract (continued) The model is applied to simulate the freeze-dehydration of beef meat by microwave dielectric heating at 2450 MHz . The...8 3.3 Dielectric Properties •••.•. .••••....• 8 3.4 Specific Heat of Frozen and Dried Beef

  14. Comparison between the conventional method of extraction of essential oil of Laurus nobilis L. and a novel method which uses microwaves applied in situ, without resorting to an oven.

    PubMed

    Flamini, Guido; Tebano, Marianna; Cioni, Pier Luigi; Ceccarini, Lucia; Ricci, Andrea Simone; Longo, Iginio

    2007-03-02

    A novel microwave method has been applied to the hydrothermal extraction of essential oil from plants. An insulated microwave coaxial antenna was introduced inside a 1000 ml glass flask containing dry Laurus nobilis L. leaves and tap water. Microwave power up to 800 W at 2450 MHz was emitted in continuous wave regime (CW) or in pulsed regime (PR) at 8 kW peak power. Stirring with a magnetic bar and a Clevenger refrigerator connected to the flask enabled to complete the extraction in 1 h. The results of the in situ microwave extraction were compared with those obtained by heating the same reactor with a conventional electric mantle by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Differences were observed both in the composition of the essential oil and from the energetic point of view. The essential oil obtained with microwave (MW) methods contained substantially higher amounts of oxygenated compounds and lower amounts of monoterpenes than conventional method. The in situ microwave heating is safe and versatile; it presents time and energy saving advantages, and therefore it can be considered useful also for industrial applications.

  15. Microwave enhanced pyrochemical reactions of PuO2-UO2 and U3O8

    SciTech Connect

    Strucken, E.F.; McCurry, L.E.

    1992-04-27

    Experiments in the high level cells at WSRC have established that Plutonium Oxide has an extremely high absorption factor for microwaves: temperatures in excess of 1000 deg C were reached in less than 5 minutes with a multi mode, 2450 MHz, 600 watt, microwave oven. In other microwave heating experiments, stoichiometric compositions of PuO2-UO2 were prepared and U3O8 was reduced to U4O9.

  16. Effect of Dielectric Properties of a Solvent-Water Mixture Used in Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Antioxidants from Potato Peels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashutosh; Nair, Gopu Raveendran; Liplap, Pansa; Gariepy, Yvan; Orsat, Valerie; Raghavan, Vijaya

    2014-02-24

    The dielectric properties of a methanol-water mixture were measured at different temperatures from 20 to 80 °C at two frequencies 915 MHz and 2450 MHz. These frequencies are most commonly used on industrial and domestic scales respectively. In this study, the dielectric properties of a methanol-water mixture were found to be dependent on temperature, solvent concentration, and presence of plant matrix. Linear and quadratic equations were developed to establish the dependency between factors. At 2450 MHz, the dielectric constant of methanol-water mixtures was significantly affected by concentration of methanol rather than by temperature, whereas the dielectric loss factor was significantly affected by temperature rather than by methanol concentration. Introduction of potato peel led to an increase in the effect of temperature on the dielectric properties of the methanol fractions. At 915 MHz, both the dielectric properties were significantly affected by the increase in temperature and solvent concentration, while the presence of potato peel had no significant effect on the dielectric properties. Statistical analysis of the dissipation factor at 915 and 2450 MHz revealed that both temperature and solvent concentration had a significant effect on it, whereas introduction of potato peels at 915 MHz reduced the effect of temperature as compared to 2450 MHz. The total phenolic yield of the microwave-assisted extraction process was significantly affected by the solvent concentration, the dissipation factor of the methanol-water mixture and the extraction time.

  17. Effect of Dielectric Properties of a Solvent-Water Mixture Used in Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Antioxidants from Potato Peels

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashutosh; Nair, Gopu Raveendran; Liplap, Pansa; Gariepy, Yvan; Orsat, Valerie; Raghavan, Vijaya

    2014-01-01

    The dielectric properties of a methanol-water mixture were measured at different temperatures from 20 to 80 °C at two frequencies 915 MHz and 2450 MHz. These frequencies are most commonly used on industrial and domestic scales respectively. In this study, the dielectric properties of a methanol-water mixture were found to be dependent on temperature, solvent concentration, and presence of plant matrix. Linear and quadratic equations were developed to establish the dependency between factors. At 2450 MHz, the dielectric constant of methanol-water mixtures was significantly affected by concentration of methanol rather than by temperature, whereas the dielectric loss factor was significantly affected by temperature rather than by methanol concentration. Introduction of potato peel led to an increase in the effect of temperature on the dielectric properties of the methanol fractions. At 915 MHz, both the dielectric properties were significantly affected by the increase in temperature and solvent concentration, while the presence of potato peel had no significant effect on the dielectric properties. Statistical analysis of the dissipation factor at 915 and 2450 MHz revealed that both temperature and solvent concentration had a significant effect on it, whereas introduction of potato peels at 915 MHz reduced the effect of temperature as compared to 2450 MHz. The total phenolic yield of the microwave-assisted extraction process was significantly affected by the solvent concentration, the dissipation factor of the methanol-water mixture and the extraction time. PMID:26784666

  18. Cognitive impairment and neurogenotoxic effects in rats exposed to low-intensity microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Nasare, Namita; Megha, Kanu; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Ahmed, Rafat Sultana; Singh, Digvijay; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Mediratta, Pramod Kumari

    2015-01-01

    The health hazard of microwave radiation (MWR) has become a recent subject of interest as a result of the enormous increase in mobile phone usage. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chronic low-intensity microwave exposure on cognitive function, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and DNA damage in rat brain. Experiments were performed on male Fischer rats exposed to MWR for 180 days at 3 different frequencies, namely, 900, 1800 MHz, and 2450 MHz. Animals were divided into 4 groups: group I: sham exposed; group II: exposed to MWR at 900 MHz, specific absorption rate (SAR) 5.953 × 10(-4) W/kg; group III: exposed to 1800 MHz, SAR 5.835 × 10(-4) W/kg; and group IV: exposed to 2450 MHz, SAR 6.672 × 10(-4) W/kg. All the rats were tested for cognitive function at the end of the exposure period and were subsequently sacrificed to collect brain. Level of HSP70 was estimated by enzyme-linked immunotarget assay and DNA damage was assessed using alkaline comet assay in all the groups. The results showed declined cognitive function, elevated HSP70 level, and DNA damage in the brain of microwave-exposed animals. The results indicated that, chronic low-intensity microwave exposure in the frequency range of 900 to 2450 MHz may cause hazardous effects on the brain.

  19. [Research on the hyperthermia-therapy performances of invasive microwave antennas].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guo-sheng; Liu, Yu-hui; Wang, Jian-qi

    2002-03-01

    The paper introduces four kinds of 2450 MHz antennas including noninsulted (bare), insulated-open-tip (I.O.T.), dipole-type and sleeve invasive microwave ones. The comparison between the antennas' hyperthermia performances in the muscle tissue phantom made by specific absorption rate (SAR) shows that the sleeve antenna is the best. It has a bigger heating range and a changeless shape and is independent of the inserting depth.

  20. Longevity and food consumption of microwave-treated (2. 45 GHz CW) honeybees in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Westerdahl, B.B.; Gary, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    Adult honeybees, confined singly or in small clusters, were exposed for 0.5, 6, and 24 hours to 2.45-GHz continuous wave microwave radiation at power densities of 3, 6, 12, 25, and 50 mW/cm2. Following exposure, bees were held in the incubator for 21 days to determine the consumption of sucrose syrup and to observe mortality. No significant differences were found between microwave-treated and sham-treated or control bees.

  1. Psychoactive-drug response is affected by acute low-level microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of various psychoactive drugs were studied in rats exposed for 45 min in a circularly polarized, pulsed microwave field (2450 MHz; SAR 0.6 W/kg; 2-microseconds pulses, 500 pps). Apomorphine-induced hypothermia and stereotypy were enhanced by irradiation. Amphetamine-induced hyperthermia was attenuated while stereotypy was unaffected. Morphine-induced catalepsy and lethality were enhanced by irradiation at certain dosages of the drug. Since these drugs have different modes of action on central neural mechanisms and the effects of microwaves depend on the particular drug studied, these results show the complex nature of the effect of microwave irradiation on brain functions.

  2. CW/Pulsed H- ion beam generation with PKU Cs-free 2.45 GHz microwave driven ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, A. L.; Zhang, J. F.; Zhao, J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2015-04-01

    Circular accelerators used for positron emission tomography (PET, i.e. accelerator used for make radio isotopes) need several mA of CW H- ion beam for their routine operation. Other facilities, like Space Radio-Environment Simulate Assembly (SPRESA), require less than 10 mA pulsed mode H- beam. Caesium free negative hydrogen ion source is a good choice for those facilities because of its compact structure, easy operation and low cost. Up to now, there is no H- source able to produce very intense H- beams with important variation of the duty factor[1]. Recently, a new version of 2.45 GHz microwave H- ion source was designed at PKU, based on lessons learnt from the previous one. This non cesiated source is very compact thanks to its permanent magnet configuration. Special attention was paid on the design of the discharge chamber structure, electron dumping and extraction system. Source test to produce H- ion beams in pulsed and CW mode was carried out on PKU ion source test bench. In CW mode, a 10.8 mA/30keV H- beam with rms emittance about 0.16 π.mm.mrad has been obtained with only 500 W rf power. The power efficiency reaches 21 mA/kW. In pulsed mode with duty factor of 10% (100Hz/1ms), this compact source can easily deliver 20 mA H- ion beam at 35 keV with rms emittance about 0.2 π.mm.mrad when RF power is set at 2.2 kW (peak power). Several hour successive running operation in both modes and totaling more than 200 hours proves its high quality. The outside dimension of this new H- source body is ϕ116 mm × 124 mm, and the entire H- source infrastructure, including rf matching section, plasma chamber and extraction system, is ϕ310 × 180 mm. The high voltage region is limited with in a ϕ310 mm × 230 mm diagram. Details are given in this paper.

  3. Food foraging of honey bees in a microwave field (2. 45 GHz CW)

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, N.E.; Westerdahl, B.B.

    1982-02-15

    Honey bees were trained to fly 400 m from their colony to an indoor laboratory foraging arena exposed to 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwaves at 5 power densities (0, 5, 10, 20, and 40 mW/cm/sup 2/). Foraging behavior did not differ from controls foraging within an unexposed sham arena in (1) number of round trips completed during a 3-h exposure session, (2) round trip time between the colony and the foraging arena, and (3) the length of time required to navigate the illuminated foraging arena. This study indicates that honey bees would not be adversely affected by foraging within a similar microwave field that would exist in future receiving antennae for the proposed solar power satellite energy transmission system in which power levels are expected to range from 23 mW/cm/sup 2/ at the antenna center to 1 mW/cm/sup 2/ at the edge.

  4. Pretreatment of sludge with microwaves for pathogen destruction and improved anaerobic digestion performance.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung M; Park, Jae K; Teeradej, N; Lee, Y O; Cho, Y K; Park, C H

    2006-01-01

    A new way of generating Class A sludge using microwaves was evaluated through a series of laboratory-scale experiments. Microwaves provide rapid and uniform heating throughout the material. Other benefits of microwave treatment include instant and accurate control and selective and concentrated heating on materials, such as sludge, that have a high dielectric loss factor. Sludge was irradiated with 2450-MHz microwaves, and fecal coliforms were counted. Fecal coliforms were not detected at 65 degrees C for primary sludge and anaerobic digester sludge and at 85 degrees C for waste activated sludge when sludge was irradiated with 2450-MHz microwaves. During the bench-scale anaerobic digester operation, the highest average log reduction of fecal coliforms was achieved by the anaerobic digester fed with microwave-pretreated sludge (> or = 2.66 log removal). The anaerobic digester fed with microwave-irradiated sludge was more efficient in inactivation of fecal coliforms than the other two digesters fed with raw sludge and externally heated sludge, respectively. It took more than three hydraulic retention times for a bench-scale mesophilic anaerobic digester to meet Class A sludge requirements after feeding microwave-irradiated sludge. Class A sludge can be produced consistently with a continuously fed mesophilic anaerobic digester if sludge is pretreated with microwaves to reach 65 degrees C.

  5. Microwave enhanced pyrochemical reactions of PuO sub 2 , UO sub 2 , and U sub 3 O sub 8

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.; McCurry, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments in the high level cells at WSRC have established that PuO{sub 2} has an extremely high absorption factor the microwaves: temperatures in excess of 1000{degrees}C were reached in less than 5 minutes with a multi mode, 2450 MHz, 600 watt, microwave oven. In other microwave heating experiments: stoichiometric compositions of PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} were prepared and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} was reduced to U{sub 4}O{sub g}.

  6. Plasma modified production of high-current, high-purity cw H{sup +}, D{sup +}, and H{sup -} beams from microwave-driven sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, D.; Lykke, K.R.; McMichael, G.E.

    1996-10-01

    We have recently reported production of cw proton beams from magnetically confined microwave-driven sources, operating under nonresonant (non-ECR) conditions, with proton fractions > 0.95, the remaining fraction consisting of H{sub 2}{sup +} (0.05) with no H{sub 3}{sup +}. We achieve this by adding H{sub 2}O to the plasma at molecular concentrations of 1% and about 700 W 2.45 GHz RF power to the source. High-current (45 mA) high-power (45 kV) beams of >92% proton purity have been produced using this technique. Additional impurity ions O{sup +} at 4ppt and OH{sup +} and H{sub 2}O{sup +} at << 1ppt are produced. We report further progress using this technique and similar results achieved for cw D{sup +} beams with D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O additives. Finally, we report progress made in the direct extraction of cw H{sup -} beams from microwave-driven sources in terms of ion source surface material and confining magnetic field configurations. Mechanisms are discussed.

  7. Microwave enhanced pyrochemical reactions of PuO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.; McCurry, L.E.

    1990-12-31

    Experiments in the high level cells at WSRC have established that PuO{sub 2} has an extremely high absorption factor the microwaves: temperatures in excess of 1000{degrees}C were reached in less than 5 minutes with a multi mode, 2450 MHz, 600 watt, microwave oven. In other microwave heating experiments: stoichiometric compositions of PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} were prepared and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} was reduced to U{sub 4}O{sub g}.

  8. In-office microwave disinfection of soft contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.G.; Rechberger, J.; Grant, T.; Holden, B.A. )

    1990-02-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an in-office microwave disinfection procedure which allowed for the disinfection of up to 40 soft contact lenses at one time. Ciba AOSept cases filled with sterile unpreserved saline were contaminated with one of six FDA test challenge microorganisms at a concentration of approximately 10(3) colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml). Twenty cases were placed on the rotating plate of a standard 2450 MHz 650 W microwave oven in a 10-cm diameter circle. The cases were exposed to high intensity microwave irradiation for periods of 0 to 15 min. None of the 6 microorganisms evaluated survived 2 min or longer of microwave exposure. Our findings indicated that microwave irradiation can be a convenient, rapid, and effective method of disinfecting a number of soft contact lenses at one time and thus adaptable as an in-office soft contact lens disinfection procedure.

  9. Detection of Low Level Microwave Radiation Induced Deoxyribonucleic Acid Damage Vis-à-vis Genotoxicity in Brain of Fischer Rats

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Megha, Kanu; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Ahmed, Rafat Sultana; Chandna, Sudhir; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Non-ionizing radiofrequency radiation has been increasingly used in industry, commerce, medicine and especially in mobile phone technology and has become a matter of serious concern in present time. Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the possible deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damaging effects of low-level microwave radiation in brain of Fischer rats. Materials and Methods: Experiments were performed on male Fischer rats exposed to microwave radiation for 30 days at three different frequencies: 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz. Animals were divided into 4 groups: Group I (Sham exposed): Animals not exposed to microwave radiation but kept under same conditions as that of other groups, Group II: Animals exposed to microwave radiation at frequency 900 MHz at specific absorption rate (SAR) 5.953 × 10−4 W/kg, Group III: Animals exposed to 1800 MHz at SAR 5.835 × 10−4 W/kg and Group IV: Animals exposed to 2450 MHz at SAR 6.672 × 10−4 W/kg. At the end of the exposure period animals were sacrificed immediately and DNA damage in brain tissue was assessed using alkaline comet assay. Results: In the present study, we demonstrated DNA damaging effects of low level microwave radiation in brain. Conclusion: We concluded that low SAR microwave radiation exposure at these frequencies may induce DNA strand breaks in brain tissue. PMID:23833433

  10. Use of microwaves to improve nutritional value of soybeans for future space inhabitants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, G.

    1983-01-01

    Whole soybeans from four different varieties at different moisture contents were microwaved for varying times to determine the conditions for maximum destruction of trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase activities, and optimal growth of chicks. Microwaving 150 gm samples of soybeans (at 14 to 28% moisture) for 1.5 min was found optimal for reduction of trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase activities. Microwaving 1 kgm samples of soybeans for 9 minutes destroyed 82% of the trypsin inhibitor activity and gave optimal chick growth. It should be pointed out that the microwaving time would vary according to the weight of the sample and the power of the microwave oven. The microwave oven used in the above experiments was rated at 650 watts 2450 MHz.

  11. Afferent mechanisms of microwave-induced biological effects. Annual report, 1 June 1985-31 May 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Lai

    1986-07-01

    Effects of 2450-MHz circularly polarized microwave irradiation on central nervous system functions were studied. Pulsed (microsecond, 500 pps) microwaves decreased high-affinity sodium-dependent choline uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the rat. The effect on hippocampal choline uptake was blocked by pretreatment with narcotic antagonists. Continuous-wave microwaves of the same power density decreased choline uptake in the frontal cortex only. Furthermore, it was found that the effects of pulsed microwaves on central cholinergic activity are classically conditionable to cues in the exposure environment. The hypothesis that some of the neurological effects of pulsed microwave irradiation are caused by its effect on the auditory system was investigated. Effects of pink noise and pulsed microwaves were compared.

  12. Biologic effects of microwave exposure. II. Studies on the mechanisms controlling susceptibility to microwave-induced increases in complement receptor-positive spleen cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schlagel, C.J.; Sulek, K.; Ho, H.S.; Leach, W.M.; Ahmed, A.; Woody, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    In attempting to evaluate the mechanisms responsible for susceptibility to the inductive increase in splenic complement receptor-positive (CR+) cells following exposure to 2450-MHz microwaves, it was found that sensitivity to microwave-induced CR+ cell increases was under genetic control. In particular, evidence was accumulated suggesting that regulation was under the control of a gene or genes closely associated with but outside of the mouse major histocompatibility complex (H-2). All responsive strains of mice tested were of the H-2k haplotype, while mice of the H-2a, H-2b, H-2d and H-1i5 haplotypes were refractory to the microwave-induced increases in CR+ cells. By utilizing certain H-2k strains of mice that were genetically unable to respond to endotoxin, we were able to show that these strains of mice responded to microwaves, but not to endotoxin, by increasing CR+ cells. Microwave-induced increases in CR+ cells were not mimicked by the intraperitoneal injection of hydrocortisone. Athymic mice responded to microwave exposure, indicating that this event was not regulated by the T-cell population. Mice less than eight weeks old were found not to be susceptible to exposure to 2450-MHz microwaves. These studies indicate that microwaves do induce changes in the population of cells with specific cell-surface receptors, that susceptibility to these changes is under genetic control, and that it is unlikely that endotoxin, corticosteroids, or regulatory T cells play a significant role in the mechanisms regulating these increases.

  13. CW/Pulsed H{sup −} ion beam generation with PKU Cs-free 2.45 GHz microwave driven ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S. X. Ren, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Zhao, J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E.

    2015-04-08

    Circular accelerators used for positron emission tomography (PET, i.e. accelerator used for make radio isotopes) need several mA of CW H- ion beam for their routine operation. Other facilities, like Space Radio-Environment Simulate Assembly (SPRESA), require less than 10 mA pulsed mode H{sup −} beam. Caesium free negative hydrogen ion source is a good choice for those facilities because of its compact structure, easy operation and low cost. Up to now, there is no H{sup −} source able to produce very intense H{sup −} beams with important variation of the duty factor{sup [1]}. Recently, a new version of 2.45 GHz microwave H{sup −} ion source was designed at PKU, based on lessons learnt from the previous one. This non cesiated source is very compact thanks to its permanent magnet configuration. Special attention was paid on the design of the discharge chamber structure, electron dumping and extraction system. Source test to produce H{sup −} ion beams in pulsed and CW mode was carried out on PKU ion source test bench. In CW mode, a 10.8 mA/30keV H{sup −} beam with rms emittance about 0.16 π·mm·mrad has been obtained with only 500 W rf power. The power efficiency reaches 21 mA/kW. In pulsed mode with duty factor of 10% (100Hz/1ms), this compact source can easily deliver 20 mA H{sup −} ion beam at 35 keV with rms emittance about 0.2 π·mm·mrad when RF power is set at 2.2 kW (peak power). Several hour successive running operation in both modes and totaling more than 200 hours proves its high quality. The outside dimension of this new H{sup −} source body is ϕ116 mm × 124 mm, and the entire H{sup −} source infrastructure, including rf matching section, plasma chamber and extraction system, is ϕ310 × 180 mm. The high voltage region is limited with in a ϕ310 mm × 230 mm diagram. Details are given in this paper.

  14. Spin-Label CW Microwave Power Saturation and Rapid Passage with Triangular Non-Adiabatic Rapid Sweep (NARS) and Adiabatic Rapid Passage (ARP) EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Hyde, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell, A.W., Camenisch, T.G., Ratke, J.J. Sidabras, J.W., Hyde, J.S., 2011 as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions, and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra. In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10−3 to 10−7 s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy. PMID:25917132

  15. Spin-label CW microwave power saturation and rapid passage with triangular non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) and adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kittell, Aaron W; Hyde, James S

    2015-06-01

    Non-adiabatic rapid passage (NARS) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was introduced by Kittell et al. (2011) as a general purpose technique to collect the pure absorption response. The technique has been used to improve sensitivity relative to sinusoidal magnetic field modulation, increase the range of inter-spin distances that can be measured under near physiological conditions (Kittell et al., 2012), and enhance spectral resolution in copper (II) spectra (Hyde et al., 2013). In the present work, the method is extended to CW microwave power saturation of spin-labeled T4 Lysozyme (T4L). As in the cited papers, rapid triangular sweep of the polarizing magnetic field was superimposed on slow sweep across the spectrum. Adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) effects were encountered in samples undergoing very slow rotational diffusion as the triangular magnetic field sweep rate was increased. The paper reports results of variation of experimental parameters at the interface of adiabatic and non-adiabatic rapid sweep conditions. Comparison of the forward (up) and reverse (down) triangular sweeps is shown to be a good indicator of the presence of rapid passage effects. Spectral turning points can be distinguished from spectral regions between turning points in two ways: differential microwave power saturation and differential passage effects. Oxygen accessibility data are shown under NARS conditions that appear similar to conventional field modulation data. However, the sensitivity is much higher, permitting, in principle, experiments at substantially lower protein concentrations. Spectral displays were obtained that appear sensitive to rotational diffusion in the range of rotational correlation times of 10(-3) to 10(-7) s in a manner that is analogous to saturation transfer spectroscopy.

  16. Microwave and thermal interactions with oxidative hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiel, J.L.; Erwin, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of microwave radiation (2450 MHz, 3,333 pulses per second, duty factor of 0.02, and average specific absorption rate of 0.4 W/kg) on spontaneous hemolysis of human erythrocytes was examined. Cells were exposed to microwave radiation for 20 minutes at 37 degrees, 42 degrees, or 48 degrees C. Some of these cells were sensitized to oxidative damage by treatment with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and/or by coating with wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) conjugate. Microwave radiation significantly decreased spontaneous hemolysis of untreated cells at 42 degrees C but had no effect at 37 degrees or 48 degrees C. Microwave exposure significantly enhanced a CDNB membrane stabilizing effect at 42 degrees C but had no effect at 37 or 48 degrees C. At 42 degrees C, microwave exposure increased hemolysis of WGA-HRP coated cells. Cells treated with both WGA-HRP and CDNB showed no change in fragility at 42 degrees C and increased fragility at 48 degrees C without a microwave effect. The microwave effects observed appear to involve perturbation of the thermal threshold for oxidative hyperthermic hemolysis.

  17. Enhancement of Apoptosis by Titanium Alloy Internal Fixations during Microwave Treatments for Fractures: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lina; Ye, Dongmei; Feng, Xianxuan; Fu, Tengfei; Bai, Yuehong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Microwaves are used in one method of physical therapy and can increase muscle tissue temperature which is useful for improving muscle, tendon and bone injuries. In the study, we sought to determine whether titanium alloy internal fixations influence apoptosis in tissues subjected to microwave treatments at 2,450 MHz and 40 W during the healing of fractures because this issue is not yet fully understood. Methods In this study, titanium alloy internal fixations were used to treat 3.0-mm transverse osteotomies in the middle of New Zealand rabbits’ femurs. After the operation, 30-day microwave treatments were applied to the 3.0 mm transverse osteotomies 3 days after the operation. The changes in the temperatures of the muscle tissues in front of the implants or the 3.0 mm transverse osteotomies were measured during the microwave treatments. To characterize the effects of titanium alloy internal fixations on apoptosis in the muscles after microwave treatment, we performed TUNEL assays, fluorescent real-time (quantitative) PCR, western blotting analyses, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection and transmission electron microscopy examinations. Results The temperatures were markedly increased in the animals with the titanium alloy implants. Apoptosis in the muscle cells of the implanted group was significantly more extensive than that in the non-implanted control group at different time points. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of the skeletal muscles of the implanted groups revealed muscular mitochondrial swelling, vacuolization. ROS, Bax and Hsp70 were up-regulated, and Bcl-2 was down-regulated in the implanted group. Conclusion Our results suggest that titanium alloy internal fixations caused greater muscular tissue cell apoptosis following 2,450 MHz, 40 W microwave treatments in this rabbit femur fracture models. PMID:26132082

  18. Effect of microwave radiation on the beating rate of isolated frog hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, K.C.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    One hundred and two isolated frog hearts were divided into ten groups and placed individually in a waveguide filled with Ringer's solution and exposed to 2,450-MHz CW radiation at 2 and 8.55 W/kg. Heart rate was recorded using one of the following methods: 3-M KCl glass electrode, ultrasound probe, tension transducer, Ringer's solution glass electrode, and a metal wire inserted in the Ringer's solution electrode. An accelerated decrease of heart rate was observed only in those groups recorded using the 3-M KCl electrode and the metal wire Ringer's solution electrode. No effect was found in the other groups. These results indicate that bradycardia in isolated hearts could be caused by electrode artifacts resulting from the intensification of electromagnetic fields.

  19. Low-level microwave irradiation and central cholinergic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1989-05-01

    Our previous research showed that 45 min of exposure to low-level, pulsed microwaves (2450-MHz, 2-microseconds pulses, 500 pps, whole-body average specific absorption rate 0.6 W/kg) decreased sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. The effects of microwaves on central cholinergic systems were further investigated in this study. Increases in choline uptake activity in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus were observed after 20 min of acute microwave exposure, and tolerance to the effect of microwaves developed in the hypothalamus, but not in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, of rats subjected to ten daily 20-min exposure sessions. Furthermore, the effects of acute microwave irradiation on central choline uptake could be blocked by pretreating the animals before exposure with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone. In another series of experiments, rats were exposed to microwaves in ten daily sessions of either 20 or 45 min, and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in different regions of the brain were studied by 3H-QNB binding assay. Decreases in concentration of receptors occurred in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to ten 20-min microwave exposure sessions, whereas increase in receptor concentration occurred in the hippocampus of animals exposed to ten 45-min sessions. This study also investigated the effects of microwave exposure on learning in the radial-arm maze. Rats were trained in the maze to obtain food reinforcements immediately after 20 or 45 min of microwave exposure.

  20. Increasing of the endurance of polymeric construction materials with the multilevel hierarchical structure in the microwave electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlobina, I. V.; Muldasheva, G. K.; Bekrenev, N. V.

    2016-11-01

    Here are shown the results of the effect of the microwave electromagnetic field frequency 2450 MHz and the power density 4-5, 17-18, and 30-32 W/cm3 on properties of composite materials, reinforced plastics, and additive rubber. It is found that the microwave processing with the specific power 17-18 W/cm3 increases the duration of the operation of a rod carbon construction under a load by 1.5-4.5 times. The endurance of rods made of MBS plastics increases by 2-3 times under load. The yielding of sealing rubber after the treatment in the microwave electromagnetic field increases from 18 to 70% with the applied load. This increases the stability of the specimen characteristics after putting them at temperatures from -25 to +40°C.

  1. Optimization of microwave pretreatment conditions to maximize methane production and methane yield in mesophilic anaerobic sludge digestion.

    PubMed

    Park, W J; Ahn, J H

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to find optimum microwave pretreatment conditions for methane production and methane yield in anaerobic sludge digestion. The sludge was pretreated using a laboratory-scale industrial microwave unit (2450 MHz frequency). Microwave temperature increase rate (TIR) (2.9-17.1 degrees C/min) and final temperature (FT) (52-108 degrees C) significantly affected solubilization, methane production, and methane yield. Solubilization degree (soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD)/total COD) in the pretreated sludge (3.3-14.7%) was clearly higher than that in the raw sludge (2.6%). Within the design boundaries, the optimum conditions for maximum methane production (2.02 L/L) were TIR = 9.1 degrees C/min and FT = 90 degrees C, and the optimum conditions for maximum methane yield (809 mL/g VS(removed)) were TIR 7.1 degrees C/min and FT = 92 degrees C.

  2. Microwave-induced post-exposure hyperthermia: Involvement of endogenous opioids and serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.; Horita, A.

    1984-08-01

    Acute exposure to pulsed microwaves (2450 MHz, 1 mW/ cm/sup 2/, SAR 0.6 W/kg, 2-..mu..s pulses, 500 pulses/s) induces a transient post-exposure hyperthermia in the rat. The hyperthermia was attenuated by treatment with either the narcotic antagonist naltrexone or one of the serotonin antagonists cinanserin, cyproheptadine, or metergoline. It was not affected, however, by treatment with the peripheral serotonin antagonist xylamidine nor the dopamine antagonist haloperidol. It thus appears that both endogenous opioids and central serotonin are involved. It is proposed that pulsed microwaves activate endogenous opioid systems, and that they in turn activate a serotonergic mechanism that induces the rise in body temperature.

  3. Comparative effect of microwaves and boiling on the denaturation of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Stroop, W.G.; Schaefer, D.C. )

    1989-11-01

    The effect of heat and microwave denaturation of small volumes of double-stranded plasmid DNA has been compared. Samples of intact plasmid DNA had plasmid DNA linearized by digestion with EcoRI were conventionally denatured in a boiling water bath or denatured by 2450 MHz of microwave energy for 0-300 s. Heat denaturation for periods longer than 120 s caused breakdown of linearized plasmid DNA; however, microwave denaturation for 10-300 s caused no apparent degradation of linearized DNA. Breakdown of DNA forms II and III was noted in plasmid DNA subjected to 300 s of either heat or microwave denaturation but breakdown of forms II and III occurred more quickly with heat than with microwave treatment. Microwave treatment was also found to be better than heat to denature 32P-labeled DNA probes subsequently used to detect homologous DNA samples immobilized on nitrocellulose filters. A microwave-treated 32P-labeled DNA probe was able to hybridize to DNA samples 20 times more dilute than a heat-treated 32P-labeled DNA probe. Depending on the form of DNA to be analyzed, these results indicate that small volumes of DNA solutions and radiolabeled DNA probes can be effectively denatured in a conventional microwave oven.

  4. Microwave-assisted synthesis of sensitive silver substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Lixin; Wang Haibo; Wang Jian; Gong Ke; Jia Yi; Zhang Huili; Sun Mengtao

    2008-10-07

    A sensitive silver substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy is synthesized under multimode microwave irradiation. The microwave-assisted synthesis of the SERS-active substrate was carried out in a modified domestic microwave oven of 2450 MHz, and the reductive reaction was conducted in a polypropylene container under microwave irradiation with a power of 100 W for 5 min. Formaldehyde was employed as both the reductant and microwave absorber in the reductive process. The effects of different heating methods (microwave dielectric and conventional) on the properties of the SERS-active substrates were investigated. Samples obtained with 5 min of microwave irradiation at a power of 100 W have more well-defined edges, corners, and sharper surface features, while the samples synthesized with 1 h of conventional heating at 40 deg. C consist primarily of spheroidal nanoparticles. The SERS peak intensity of the {approx}1593 cm{sup -1} band of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid adsorbed on silver nanoparticles synthesized with 5 min of microwave irradiation at a power of 100 W is about 30 times greater than when it is adsorbed on samples synthesized with 1 h of conventional heating at 40 deg. C. The results of quantum chemical calculations are in good agreement with our experimental data. This method is expected to be utilized for the synthesis of other metal nanostructural materials.

  5. Orthodontic instrument sterilization with microwave irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yezdani, Arif; Mahalakshmi, Krishnan; Padmavathy, Kesavaram

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of microwave sterilization of orthodontic instruments and molar bands immersed in plain distilled water with and without oral rinse, and to ascertain the minimum time of exposure required to sterilize. Materials and Methods: The orthodontic instruments (hinged and nonhinged), molar bands and mouth mirrorsused in the patient 's mouth were selected for the study. The instruments were divided into two groups – Group I with oral rinse-set A (0.01% chlorhexidine gluconate) and set B (0.025% betadine) and Group II (included sets C and D without oral rinse). The instruments of set A, B and C were microwaved at 2,450 MHz, 800 W for 5 min, whereas, set D was microwaved for 10 min at the same above mentioned specifications. The efficacy of sterilization was assessed by stab inoculation of the instruments onto trypticase soya agar plates. The plates were checked for bacterial growth following incubation at 37 °C for 24 h. For sterility control,Geobacillus stearothermophilus (MTCC 1518) was included. Results: No growth was observed in the plates that were inoculated with the microwaved orthodontic instruments of sets A, B and D, whereas scanty bacterial growth was observed in the plates inoculatedwith the microwaved set C instruments. Conclusion: Effective sterilization was achieved when the orthodontic instruments and molar bands were immersed in distilled water without oral rinse and microwaved for 10 min as also for those that were immersed in distilled water with oral rinse and microwaved for 5 min. PMID:26015686

  6. Microwave Absorption Characteristics of Conventionally Heated Nonstoichiometric Ferrous Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Mouris, Joe; Hutcheon, Ron; Sun, Xiang

    2011-08-01

    The temperature dependence of the microwave absorption of conventionally heated nonstoichiometric ferrous oxide (Fe0.925O) was characterized via the cavity perturbation technique between 294 K and 1373 K (21 °C and 1100 °C). The complex relative permittivity and permeability of the heated Fe0.925O sample slightly change with temperature from 294 K to 473 K (21 °C to 200 °C). The dramatic variations of permittivity and permeability of the sample from 473 K to 823 K (200 °C to 550 °C) are partially attributed to the formation of magnetite (Fe3O4) and metal iron (Fe) from the thermal decomposition of Fe0.925O, as confirmed by the high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD). At higher temperatures up to 1373 K (1100 °C), it is found that Fe0.925O regenerates and remains as a stable phase with high permittivity. Since the permittivity dominates the microwave absorption of Fe0.925O above 823 K (550 °C), resulting in shallow microwave penetration depth (~0.11 and ~0.015 m at 915 and 2450 MHz, respectively), the regenerated nonstoichiometric ferrous oxide exhibits useful microwave absorption capability in the temperature range of 823 K to1373 K (550 °C to 1100 °C).

  7. Microwave radiation effects on the thermally driven oxidase of erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, J.L.; Erwin, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Sheep red blood cells (SRBCs) were labelled with a concanavalin A-luminol-bovine serum albumin conjugate specific for the transmembrane anion transport protein (Band 3) and exposed to 2450-MHz continuous-wave microwave radiation at an average specific absorption rate of 91W/kg for 10 min. The temperature was held constant at 25, 37, 40, 42, or 45C with an airflow heat-exchange system. Following exposure to microwave or air heating, the decrease in residual base-activated chemiluminescence (CL) of the SRBCs was measured as an indication of infield oxidase activity. Air heating resulted in a significant decrease in residual CL at temperatures above 37C (74% decrease at 45C). Microwave radiation inhibited the decline in residual CL above 37C. At 45C the inhibition was 40%. The results suggest microwave radiation either reversibly altered the thermodynamics of oxygen binding to haemoglobin or failed to energize a significant portion of the haemoglobin molecules in each sample to the thermal threshold of haemoglobin autoxidation.

  8. Effects of acute low-level microwaves on pentobarbital-induced hypothermia depend on exposure orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    Two series of experiments were performed to study the effects of acute exposure (45 min) to 2,450-MHz circularly polarized, pulsed microwaves (1 mW/cm2, 2-mus pulses, 500 pps, specific absorption rate (SAR) 0.6 W/kg) on the actions of pentobarbital in the rat. In the first experiment, rats were irradiated with microwaves and then immediately injected with pentobarbital. Microwave exposure did not significantly affect the extent of the pentobarbital-induced fall in colonic temperature. However, the rate of recovery from the hypothermia was significantly slower in the microwave-irradiated rats and they also took a significantly longer time to regain their righting reflex. In a second experiment, rats were first anesthetized with pentobarbital and then exposed to microwaves with their heads either pointing toward the source of microwaves (anterior exposure) or pointing away (posterior exposure). Microwave radiation significantly retarded the pentobarbital-induced fall in colonic temperature regardless of the orientation of exposure. However, the recovery from hypothermia was significantly faster in posterior-exposed animals compared to those of the anterior-exposed and sham-irradiated animals. Furthermore, the posterior-exposed rats took a significantly shorter time to regain their righting reflex than both the anterior-exposed and sham-irradiated animals.

  9. Behavioral and autonomic thermoregulation in hamsters during microwave-induced heat exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, C.J.; Long, M.D.; Fehlner, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    Preferred ambient temperature (Ta) and ventilatory frequency were measured in free-moving hamsters exposed to 2450-MHz microwaves. A waveguide exposure system that permits continuous monitoring of the absorbed heat load accrued from microwave exposure was imposed with a longitudinal temperature gradient which allowed hamsters to select their preferred Ta. Ventilatory frequency was monitored remotely by analysing the rhythmic shifts in unabsorbed microwave energy passing down the waveguide. Without microwave exposure hamsters selected an average T2 of 30.2 C. This preferred Ta did not change until the rate of heat absorption (SAR) from microwave exposure exceeded approx. 2 W kg-1. In a separate experiment, a SAR of 2.0 W kg-1 at a Ta of 30C was shown to promote an average 0.5 C increase in colonic temperature. Hamsters maintained their ventilatory frequency at baseline levels by selecting a cooler Ta during microwave exposure. These data support previous studies suggesting that during thermal stress behavioral thermo-regulation (i.e. preferred Ta) takes prescedence over autonomic thermoregulation (i.e. ventilatory frequency). It is apparent that selecting a cooler Ta is a more efficient and/or effective than autonomic thermoregulation for dissipating a heat load accrued from microwave exposure.

  10. Comparative effects of extremely high power microwave pulses and a brief CW irradiation on pacemaker function in isolated frog heart slices.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, A G; Mathur, S P; Doyle, J; Stuck, B E; Kiel, J L; Murphy, M R

    2000-05-01

    The existence of specific bioeffects due to high peak power microwaves and their potential health hazards are among the most debated but least explored problems in microwave biology. The present study attempted to reveal such effects by comparing the bioeffects of short trains of extremely high power microwave pulses (EHPP, 1 micros width, 250-350 kW/g, 9.2 GHz) with those of relatively low power pulses (LPP, 0.5-10 s width, 3-30 W/g, 9.2 GHz). EHPP train duration and average power were made equal to those of an LPP; therefore both exposure modalities produced the same temperature rise. Bioeffects were studied in isolated, spontaneously beating slices of the frog heart. In most cases, a single EHPP train or LPP immediately decreased the inter-beat interval (IBI). The effect was proportional to microwave heating, fully reversible, and easily reproducible. The magnitude and time course of EHPP- and LPP-induced changes always were the same. No delayed or irreversible effects of irradiation were observed. The same effect could be repeated in a single preparation numerous times with no signs of adaptation, sensitization, lasting functional alteration, or damage. A qualitatively different effect, namely, a temporary arrest of preparation beats, could be observed when microwave heating exceeded physiologically tolerable limits. This effect also did not depend on whether the critical temperature rise was produced by LPP or EHPP exposure. Within the studied limits, we found no indications of EHPP-specific bioeffects. EHPP- and LPP-induced changes in the pacemaker rhythm of isolated frog heart preparation were identical and could be entirely attributed to microwave heating.

  11. Development of a microwave clothes dryer: Interim report 4. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Lenz, R.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of the project is to investigate the microwave drying of clothes and to produce data that potential manufacturers can use in developing marketable microwave dryers. This is an interim report covering activities in 1994, the fifth year of the project. During 1994, three field test dryers were completed, two residential models and one commercial subscale model. All of these dryers operated at a microwave frequency of 2,450 MHz, which is the frequency of home microwave ovens and ovens used in fastfood outlets. Consequently, magnetron tubes for these high-production items are inexpensive. The residential dryers were tested according to the Department of Energy protocols and were 15% more efficient than a top-of-the-line conventional electric dryer. They were also 14% faster. Extensive testing was done to assure that the hazard-detection (sniffer) system would sense degradation of the lighter and shut down the dryer before a fire could occur. Numerous butane lighters were heated to destruction in a microwave oven to examine their failure modes. Lighters were placed in microwave dryers equipped with hazard-detection systems; these systems always detected incipient problems before any fire hazard could occur.

  12. The apoptotic effect and the plausible mechanism of microwave radiation on rat myocardial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhe; Cui, Yan; Feng, Xianmin; Li, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Junjie; Wang, Huiyan; Lv, Shijie

    2016-08-01

    Microwaves may exert adverse biological effects on the cardiovascular system at the integrated system and cellular levels. However, the mechanism underlying such effects remains poorly understood. Here, we report a previously uncharacterized mechanism through which microwaves damage myocardial cells. Rats were treated with 2450 MHz microwave radiation at 50, 100, 150, or 200 mW/cm(2) for 6 min. Microwave treatment significantly enhanced the levels of various enzymes in serum. In addition, it increased the malondialdehyde content while decreasing the levels of antioxidative stress enzymes, activities of enzyme complexes I-IV, and ATP in myocardial tissues. Notably, irradiated myocardial cells exhibited structural damage and underwent apoptosis. Furthermore, Western blot analysis revealed significant changes in expression levels of proteins involved in oxidative stress regulation and apoptotic signaling pathways, indicating that microwave irradiation could induce myocardial cell apoptosis by interfering with oxidative stress and cardiac energy metabolism. Our findings provide useful insights into the mechanism of microwave-induced damage to the cardiovascular system.

  13. Thin-layer liquid crystal thermometry of cells in vitro during hyperthermal microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J E; McCulloch, D; Harrison, G H; Cheung, A Y

    1982-01-01

    A nonperturbing technique of thin-layer liquid crystal thermometry was developed to quantitate heating of Chinese hamster ovary cells and the bacterium Serratia marcescens when exposed to 2450-MHz microwave fields at 0.2-0.5 W/cm2. Cells suspended in culture medium were injected into 5-cm glass microcapillary tubes coated on the inside with a thin layer of liquid crystal. The tubes were sealed and placed parallel to the electric field in a watertight waveguide exposure chamber where they were heated by circulating temperature-controlled water. Even at high circulation rates, liquid crystal color changes indicated local microwave capillary tube heating of 0.1-0.25 degrees C. Precision of measurement was 0.02 degrees C. Observations during microwave heating were significantly different from observations without microwaves at the 1% level, and heating increased as circulating water flow was reduced from 300 ml/s to 100 ml/s. The results of a cell survival assay following hyperthermal treatment were in good agreement with expectations based on the observations of microwave heating using liquid crystals.

  14. Metabolic effects of microwave radiation and convection heating on human mononuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kiel, J.L.; Wong, L.S.; Erwin, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of microwave radiation (2450 MHz, continuous wave, mean specific absorption rate of 103.5 +/- 4.2 W/kg) and convection heating on the nonphosphorylating oxidative metabolism of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes (96% lymphocytes, 4% monocytes) at 37 degrees C were investigated. Metabolic activity, determined by chemiluminescence (CL) of cells challenged with luminol (5-amino-2,3-dihydro-1,4-phthalazinedione) linked to bovine serum albumin, was detected with a brightness photometer. A significant stimulation after microwave exposure (p less than 0.005) over total CL of matched 37 degrees C incubator controls was observed. A similar degree of stimulation compared to incubator controls was also detected after sham treatment. There was no significant difference between changes in total CL or stimulation indices of the microwave and sham exposed groups. It appears that exposure to microwave radiation, under normothermic (37 +/- 0.03 degrees C) conditions, has no effect on the oxidative metabolic activity of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. However, the significant differences between microwave or sham exposed cells and their respective incubator controls occurred because the temperature of the incubator controls did not exceed 35.9 degrees C and this temperature required 39 minutes to reach from 22 degrees C. Slow heating of incubator controls must be accounted for in thermal and radiofrequency radiation studies in vitro.

  15. Effects of continuous and pulsed chronic microwave exposure on rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chung-Kwang; Guy, Arthur W.; McDougall, John A.; Han, Lock-Fong

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen young adult New Zealand rabbits (nine males, nine females) were equally divided into three groups. One group was exposed to CW 2450-MHz fields at an incident power density of 1.5 mW/cm2 for 2 hours daily for 3 months. Another group was exposed to pulsed fields with pulses of 10 μ s duration occurring 100 times per second. The third group was sham exposed. Each rabbit was placed in a Plexiglas cage and exposed in a miniature plane wave exposure chamber. An S band horn was mounted 1 m above the animal. Thermographic data showed a peak specific absorption rate of 1.64 W/kg in the head and 2.1 W/kg in the back. Body weights were measured every other day. Electroencephalogram and evoked potentials were recorded weekly via implanted carbon-loaded Teflon electrodes. Blood samples were taken monthly for hematological, chemical, and morphological studies. Eyes were examined for cataract formation. Before the animals were sacrificed, apomorphine-induced behavioral excitation and hyperthermia were studied. Finally, pathological examinations on many tissues and organs were performed. Statistically, there were no significant differences in measured parameters observed between the exposed and sham animals.

  16. Studies on microwave and blood-brain barrier interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.C.; Lin, M.F.

    1980-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at correlating changes of blood-brain-barrier permeability with the quantity and distribution of absorbed microwave energy inside the brain of adult Wistar rats anesthetized by sodium pentobarbital. Through use of thermographic methods and a direct-contact applicator at the animal's head, the pattern of absorbed microwave energy was determined. Indwelling catheters were placed in the femoral vein and in the left external carotid artery. Evans blue and sodium fluorescein in isotonic saline were used as visual indicators of barrier permeation. Exposure to pulsed 2,450-MHz radiation for 20 min at average power densities of 0.5, 1, 5, 20, 145 or 1,000 mW/cm2, which resulted in average specific absorption rates (SARs) of 0.04, 0.08, 0.4, 1.6, 11.5 or 80.0 mW/g in the brain, did not produce staining, except in the pineal body, the pituitary gland, and the choroid plexus - regions that normally are highly permeable. Except for these regions, staining was also absent in the brains of sham-exposed animals. The rectal temperature, as monitored by a copper-constantan thermocouple, showed a maximum increase of less than 0.75 degrees C from a mean pre-exposure temperature of 36.6 degrees C. The highest brain temperature recorded in a similar group of animals using a thickfilm carbon thermistor was less than 41.0 degrees C.

  17. Effects of exposure to microwaves on cellular immunity and placental steroids in pregnant rats.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, H; Seto, T; Nagase, H; Yoshida, M; Dan, S; Ogino, K

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Microwaves produce various detrimental changes based on actions of heat or non-specific stress, although the effects of microwaves on pregnant organisms has not been uniform. This study was designed to clarify the effect of exposure to microwaves during pregnancy on endocrine and immune functions. METHODS: Natural killer cell activity and natural killer cell subsets in the spleen were measured, as well as some endocrine indicators in blood--corticosterone and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) as indices of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis--beta-endorphin, oestradiol, and progesterone in six female virgin rats and six pregnant rats (nine to 11 days gestation) exposed to microwaves at 10 mW/cm2 incident power density at 2450 MHz for 90 minutes. The same measurements were performed in control rats (six virgin and six pregnant rats). RESULTS: Skin temperature in virgin and pregnant rats increased immediately after exposure to microwaves. Although splenic activity of natural killer cells and any of the subset populations identified by the monoclonal antibodies CD16 and CD57 did not differ in virgin rats with or without exposure to microwaves, pregnant rats exposed to microwaves showed a significant reduction of splenic activity of natural killer cells and CD16+CD57-. Although corticosterone and ACTH increased, and oestradiol decreased in exposed virgin and pregnant rats, microwaves produced significant increases in beta-endorphin and progesterone only in pregnant rats. CONCLUSIONS: Microwaves at the power of 10 mW/cm2 produced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and increased oestradiol in both virgin and pregnant rats, suggesting that microwaves greatly stress pregnant organisms. These findings in pregnant rats suggest that--with exposure to microwaves--pregnancy induces immunosuppression, which could result in successful maintainance of pregnancy. This enhancement of adaptability to heat stress with pregnancy may be mediated by

  18. Naltrexone pretreatment blocks microwave-induced changes in central cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Wen, Y.F.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Repeated exposure of rats to pulsed, circularly polarized microwaves (2,450-MHz, 2-microseconds pulses at 500 pps, power density 1 mW/cm2, at an averaged, whole-body SAR of 0.6 W/kg) induced biphasic changes in the concentration of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the central nervous system. An increase in receptor concentration occurred in the hippocampus of rats subjected to ten 45-min sessions of microwave exposure, whereas a decrease in concentration was observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats exposed to ten 20-min sessions. These findings, which confirm earlier work in the authors' laboratory, were extended to include pretreatment of rats with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone (1 mg/kg, IP) before each session of exposure. The drug treatment blocked the microwave-induced changes in cholinergic receptors in the brain. These data further support the authors' hypothesis that endogenous opioids play a role in the effects of microwaves on central cholinergic systems.

  19. Oil extraction from Scenedesmus obliquus using a continuous microwave system--design, optimization, and quality characterization.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sundar; Allen, James D; Kanitkar, Akanksha; Boldor, Dorin

    2011-02-01

    A 1.2 kW, 2450 MHz resonant continuous microwave processing system was designed and optimized for oil extraction from green algae (Scenedesmus obliquus). Algae-water suspension (1:1 w/w) was heated to 80 and 95°C, and subjected to extraction for up to 30 min. Maximum oil yield was achieved at 95°C and 30 min. The microwave system extracted 76-77% of total recoverable oil at 20-30 min and 95°C, compared to only 43-47% for water bath control. Extraction time and temperature had significant influence (p<0.0001) on extraction yield. Oil analysis indicated that microwaves extracted oil containing higher percentages of unsaturated and essential fatty acids (indicating higher quality). This study validates for the first time the efficiency of a continuous microwave system for extraction of lipids from algae. Higher oil yields, faster extraction rates and superior oil quality demonstrate this system's feasibility for oil extraction from a variety of feedstock.

  20. Tolazoline decreases survival time during microwave-induced lethal heat stress in anesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jauchem, J.R.; Chang, K.S.; Frei, M.R.

    1996-03-01

    Effects of {alpha}-adrenergic antagonists have been studied during environmental heating but not during microwave-induced heating. Tolazoline may exert some of its effects via {alpha}-adrenergic blockade. In the present study, ketamine-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2450-MHz microwaves at an average power density of 60 mW/cm{sup 2} (whole-body specific absorption rate of approximately 14 W/kg) until lethal temperatures were attained. The effects of tolazoline (10 mg/kg body weight) on physiological responses (including changes in body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate) were examined. Survival time was significantly shorter in the tolazoline group than in saline-treated animals. In general, heart rate and blood pressure responses were similar to those that occur during environmental heat stress. Heart rate, however, was significantly elevated in animals that received tolazoline, both before and during terminal microwave exposure. It is possible that changes associated with the elevated heart rate (e.g., less cardiac filling) in tolazoline-treated animals resulted in greater susceptibility to microwave-induced heating and the lower survival time. 47 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Effect of pretreatment with dehulling and microwaving on the flavor characteristics of cold-pressed rapeseed oil by GC-MS-PCA and electronic nose discrimination.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Yang, Mei; Huang, Fenghong; Zheng, Chang; Deng, Qianchun

    2013-07-01

    Raw and dehulled rapeseeds were treated with microwave energy (800 W) from 1 to 8 min with 1-min intervals at a frequency of 2450 MHz to investigate the influence of microwaving and dehulling pretreatment on the flavor characteristics of rapeseed oil extracted by pressing. Headspace solid phase microextraction was used to isolate the volatile compounds of rapeseed oil, which were then identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The results indicated that microwave and dehulling pretreatment of rapeseed can significantly influence the kinds and content of volatile compounds. The key flavor compounds in rapeseed oil were oxidized volatiles, heterocyclic compounds, and degradation products of glucosinolates. A pungent compound, 4-isothiocyanato-1-butene, was reduced by 97% in rapeseed treated for 3 min with microwaves energy when compared to the rapeseed oil without any treatment. The pyrazine compounds in the oil appeared after 6 min of microwave pretreatment and give a pleasant roasting flavor when compared to crude oils. Principal component analysis was able to differentiate between oils obtained using 4 pretreatment processes based on volatile compounds and electronic nose. The results showed that dehulling pretreatment could improve the flavor, yet microwaving had a greater effect on the flavor of rapeseed oils.

  2. A new method for the precise multiband microwave dielectric measurement using stepped impedance stub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, M. Y.; Ali, A.; Hunter, I. C.; Roberts, N. S.

    2016-11-01

    This article presents a new method of wideband dielectric measurement at microwave frequencies. This method can be used to determine the complex dielectric properties of solid and semisolid materials from 0.9 GHz to 4.5 GHz, including the ISM bands of 915 MHz and 2450 MHz. The new method is based on the scattering parameter measurement of a stepped impedance open circuited micro-strip stub, partly loaded with dielectric test material. Current microwave wideband spectroscopy techniques generally measure dielectric materials over a wide range of frequencies but their accuracy is limited. In contrast, narrowband techniques generally measure dielectric properties to a high accuracy but only at a single frequency. This new technique is capable of measuring dielectric properties over a wide range of frequencies to a high accuracy. The technique has been verified by the empirical characterisation of the dielectric properties of Teflon and Duroid 5880 materials. Empirical results were in good agreement with values in the manufacturer’s Data Sheets. The complex permittivity data will be useful for further microwave processing of the materials.

  3. Microwave ablation of the atrioventricular junction in open-chest dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.C.; Wang, Y.J.; Beckman, K.J.; Hariman, R.J.; Bharati, S.; Lev, M.

    1995-06-01

    The use of microwave energy for ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) junction was examined in open-chest dogs. Usually a specially designed microwave catheter and a 2,450 MHz generator, microwave energy was delivered to the AV junction according to one of two protocols. In protocol 1, increasing amounts of energy were delivered until irreversible AV block occurred. In protocol 2, only two applications of energy were used, one at low energy and the other at an energy found to be high enough to cause irreversible AV block. Each dog received between one and six applications of microwave energy. The amount of energy delivered per application ranged from 25.6 to 311.4 J. No AV block was seen at 59.4 {+-} 28.3 J. Reversible AV block was seen with an energy of 120.6 {+-} 58 J. Irreversible AV block was seen at 188.1 {+-} 75.9 J. Irreversible AV block could be achieved in each animal. There was no difference in the energy required to cause irreversible AV block between the two protocols. The tissue temperature measured near the tip of the microwave catheter was correlated with both the amount of energy delivered and the extent of AV block caused. Histologic examination demonstrated coagulation necrosis of the conduction system. Microwave energy is a feasible alternative energy source for myocardial ablation. Since tissue damage is due exclusively to heating and the resulting rise in temperature can be measured, microwave energy may have advantages over currently existing energy sources in terms of both titrating delivered energy and monitoring the extent of tissue destruction.

  4. Influence of microwaves on the beating rate of isolated rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, K.C.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that microwave exposure can decrease the beating rate of isolated rat hearts. These experiments were conducted at room temperature and with the hearts exposed to air. We observed arrhythmia frequently at room temperature, and the variation of heart beat was so large that it makes the results difficult to reproduce. Therefore, we employed a double-circulating system to provide perfusion through the coronary artery and around the outside of the heart to maintain the rat hearts at 37.7 degrees C. No arrhythmias were observed in our experiments, and the hearts were beating for at least 1 h. The effects of 16-Hz modulated 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (10 microseconds, 100 pps) on the beating rate of 50 isolated rat hearts were studied. Results showed no statistically significant changes of heart rate in exposed groups at SARs of 2 and 10 W/kg compared with the control group. The effect seen at 200 W/kg was shown to be similar to that resulting from heating the heart.

  5. A new system of microwave ablation at 2450 MHz: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mangano, Alberto; Floridi, Chiara; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Biondi, Antonio; Duka, Ejona; Lucchina, Natalie; Lianos, Georgios D; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of the application of the new system (Emprint Microwave Ablation System, Covidien Boulder, CO, USA) and to identify its advantages. In particular the attention was focused to the spherical ablation zone obtained and its usefulness in terms of effectiveness. The new system is composed of: a 2450 MHz generator that delivers a maximum power of 100 W, a fiberglass antenna and a pump for internally cooled antenna. Ten liver nodules (8 hepatocellular carcinomas and 2 metastasis) were percutaneously treated (mean diameter 24.9 mm, range 16-35 mm). Technical success, ablation duration time, overall procedure time and safety were registered. To define the shape of the ablation zone, multiplanar reformatting (MPR) was performed. Roundness index transverse was calculated: a value near 1 represents a more spherical ablation zone shape, and a value distant from 1 implies an oval configuration. Technical success was 100%. Mean ablation time was of 3.85 min (range 3-5 min), mean overall procedure time was 30.5 min (range 25-40 min). No major complications were recorded. Roundness index transverse presented a mean value of 0.94, meaning that a spherical shape of ablation zone was achieved. One of the most promising innovations of the new microwave technology is the spherical shape of the ablation volume that could be related with an improving of the effectiveness and safety.

  6. Active microwave water equivalence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyne, H. S.; Ellerbruch, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of water equivalence using an active FM-CW microwave system were conducted over the past three years at various sites in Colorado, Wyoming, and California. The measurement method is described. Measurements of water equivalence and stratigraphy are compared with ground truth. A comparison of microwave, federal sampler, and snow pillow measurements at three sites in Colorado is described.

  7. Influence of microwaves treatment of rapeseed on phenolic compounds and canolol content.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Zheng, Chang; Zhou, Qi; Liu, Changsheng; Li, Wenlin; Huang, Fenghong

    2014-02-26

    Rapeseeds were treated with microwaves under 800 W for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 min at a frequency of 2450 MHz, and oil was extracted with a press to investigate the influence on phenolic compounds, including sinapine, the main free phenolic acids, and canolol content in the rapeseeds and oil from them. The results indicated that sinapine and sinapic acid was the main phenolic compound and free phenolic acid in the rapeseed, respectively, and canolol was the main phenolic compound in the oil from rapeseed by cold press. Microwave treatment significantly influenced phenolic compounds content in the rapeseeds and oil from them. The sinapine, sinapic acid, and canolol content in rapeseed first increased and then decreased depending on the period of microwave radiation (p < 0.05). The canolol content of 7 min microwave pretreatment rapeseed increased to the maximum and was approximately six times greater than that of the unroasted rapeseed. The amount of canolol formed was significantly correlated with the content of sinapic acid and sinapine (for sinapic acid, r = -0.950, p < 0.001, for sinapine, r = -0.828, p < 0.05) and also the loss of sinapic acid and sinapine (for sinapic acid, r = 0.997, p < 0.001, for sinapine, r = 0.952, p < 0.05) during roasting. There were differences in the transfer rate of difference phenolic compounds to the oil extracted by press. Almost all of the sinapine remained in the cold-pressed cake and only 1.4-2.7% of the sinapic acid, whereas approximately 56-83% of the canolol was transferred to the oil. The transfer ratio of canolol significantly increased with microwave radiation time (p < 0.001). Microwave pretreatment of rapeseed benefited improving the oxidative stability of oil.

  8. Microwave pretreatment can enhance tolerance of wheat seedlings to CdCl2 stress.

    PubMed

    Qiu, ZongBo; Li, JinTing; Zhang, YaJie; Bi, ZhenZhen; Wei, HuiFang

    2011-05-01

    In order to determine the role of microwave in cadmium stress tolerance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), seeds were exposed to microwave radiation for 0, 5, 10 and 15 s (wavelength 125 mm, power density 126 mW cm(-2), 2450 MHz), and when the seedlings were 7 d old (with one fully expanded leaves), they were treated with 150 μM CdCl(2) solution for 10 d. Changes in a number of physiological and biochemical characteristics were measured and used as indicators of the protective capacity of microwave radiation in this experiment. Our results showed that 150 μM CdCl(2) treatment reduced plant height, root length, dry weight, AsA and GSH concentration and the activities of SOD, POD, CAT and APX, enhanced the concentration of MDA, H(2)O(2) and the production rate of O(2)- when compared with the control. However, seeds with microwave pretreatment 5 or 10 s conferred tolerance to cadmium stress in wheat seedlings by decreasing the concentration of MDA and H(2)O(2), the production rate of O(2)- and increasing the activities of SOD, POD, CAT, APX and AsA and GSH concentration. Therefore, antioxidative enzymes and antioxidative compounds may participate in tolerance of wheat seedlings to cadmium stress. The results also showed that the microwave radiation had a positive physiological effect on the growth and development of cadmium stressed seedlings. This is the first investigation reporting the use of microwave pretreatment to enhance cadmium stress tolerance of wheat.

  9. The As removal from arsenopyrite-bearing mine waste by microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Myung, Eun Ji; Hack Lim, Dae; Kim, Bong Ju; Park, Cheon Young

    2016-04-01

    Penalties incurred by miners for arsenic in concentrates have increased significantly because the removal and disposal of arsenic is difficult and costly for smelters and because the environmental challenges are increasing worldwide. Typically miners incur penalties on arsenic in concentrates above 0.2% As with smelter rejection limits of 0.5%. Therefore, finding an effective solution for removing As during primary mining activities is necessary to avoid penalty. The aim of this study was to investigate the As removal from mine waste using microwave process. The mine waste samples were characterized by chemical and XRD analysis. To determine of As removal from the microwave experiments, aqua regia digestion was performed according to Korean environmental standard method(KESM) and the As removal effect were evaluated using the standard EPA toxicity characteristic leaching procedure(TCLP, EPA 1311 method). The result of mineralogical character for mine waste using XRD was detected arsenopyrite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite and quartz. The chemical analysis of As, Pb, Zn contents in the mine waste measured 13,896.0, 896.1 and 1,054.6 mg/kg, respectively. The As removal of experiments was conducted to examine the effects of microwave exposure time(1~15min). The results showed that the As removal in mine waste (exposure time = 10min) was 92.90%, and the temperature of mine waste by microwave heating was 886℃. The TCLP leaching of treated mine waste by microwave measured values were below the EPA's current regulatory threshold(As, Pb, Zn : 5 mg/L). The optimum condition of microwave exposure for As removal from arsenopyrite-bearing mine waste was obtained at 800W, 2450MHz, 10min. Acknowledgment : This work was supported by the Energy and Resources Engineering Program Grant funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy, Korea

  10. Microwave based oxidation process for recycling the off-specification (U,Pu)O2 fuel pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.; Khot, P. M.; Kumar, Pradeep; Bhatt, R. B.; Behere, P. G.; Afzal, Mohd

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports development of a process named MicroWave Direct Oxidation (MWDO) for recycling the off-specification (U,Pu)O2 mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pellets generated during fabrication of typical fast reactor fuels. MWDO is a two-stage, single-cycle process based on oxidative pulverisation of pellets using 2450 MHz microwave. The powder sinterability was evaluated by bulk density and BET specific surface area. The oxidised powders were analyzed for phases using XRD and stoichiometry by thermogravimetry. The sinterability was significantly enhanced by carrying out oxidation in higher oxygen partial pressure and by subjecting MOX to multiple micronisation-oxidation cycles. After three cycles, the recycled powder from (U,28%Pu)O2 resulted surface area >3 m2/g and 100% re-used for MOX fabrication. The flow sheet was developed for maximum utilization of recycled powder describable by a parameter called Scrap Recycling Ratio (SRR). The process demonstrates smaller processing cycle, better powder properties and higher oxidative pulverisation over conventional method.

  11. Colletotrichum gloeosporioides growth-no-growth interface after selected microwave treatments.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Morales, M E; Garcia, H S; López-Malo, A

    2009-07-01

    To study microwave heating for potential postharvest treatments against anthracnose disease, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides growth-no-growth response after selected microwave treatments (2,450 MHz) was fitted by using a logistic regression model. Evaluated variables were power level, exposure time, presence or absence of water in the medium during treatment, and incubation-observation time. Depending on the setting, the applied power ranged from 77.2 to 435.6 W. For the experiments on dry medium (mold spores over filter paper), exposure times were 1, 2, 3, or 4 min, whereas spores dispersed in potato dextrose agar, a wet medium, had exposure times of 3, 6, or 9 s. Growth (response = 1) or no growth (response = 0) was observed after two different incubation-observation times (4 or 10 days). As expected, high power levels and long exposure times resulted in complete inhibition of C. gloeosporioides spore germination. In a number of cases (such as low power levels and short treatment times), only a delay in mold growth was observed. Scanning electron micrographs showed signs of mycelia dehydration and structural collapse in the spores of the studied mold. Cell damage was attributed to heating during microwave exposure. Reduced logistic models included variables and interactions that significantly (P < 0.05) affected mold growth, and were able to predict the growth-no-growth response in at least 83% of the experimental conditions. Microwave treatments (4 min at any of the studied power levels in dry medium, and 9 s at power levels of 30% or more for wet medium) proved effective in the inhibition of C. gloeosporioides in model systems. These no-growth conditions will be tested further on fresh fruits in order to develop feasible postharvest microwave treatments.

  12. Microwave-induced carbon nanotubes catalytic degradation of organic pollutants in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Xue, Shuang; Song, Youtao; Shen, Manli; Zhang, Zhaohong; Yuan, Tianxin; Tian, Fangyuan; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-06-05

    In this study, a new catalytic degradation technology using microwave induced carbon nanotubes (MW/CNTs) was proposed and applied in the treatment of organic pollutants in aqueous solution. The catalytic activity of three CNTs of 10-20nm, 20-40nm, and 40-60nm diameters were compared. The results showed that organic pollutants such as methyl orange (MO), methyl parathion (MP), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), bisphenol A (BPA), and methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution could be degraded effectively and rapidly in MW/CNTs system. CNTs with diameter of 10-20nm exhibited the highest catalytic activity of the three CNTs under MW irradiation. Further, complete degradation was obtained using 10-20nm CNTs within 7.0min irradiation when 25mL MO solution (25mg/L), 1.2g/L catalyst dose, 450W, 2450MHz, and pH=6.0 were applied. The rate constants (k) for the degradation of SDBS, MB, MP, MO and BPA using 10-20nm CNTs/MW system were 0.726, 0.679, 0.463, 0.334 and 0.168min(-1), respectively. Therefore, this technology may have potential application for the treatment of targeted organic pollutants in wastewaters.

  13. Thermal effect of microwave antenna radiation on a generic model of thyroid gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavriloaia, Gheorghe; Gavriloaia, Mariuca-Roxana; Ghemigean, Adina-Mariana

    2010-11-01

    The rapid diffusion of wireless communication systems has caused an increased concern for the potential detrimental effects on human health deriving from exposure to electromagnetic field. It penetrates the body and acts on all the organs, altering the cell membrane potential and the distribution of ions and dipoles. The thyroid gland is one of the most exposed vital organs and may be a target for electromagnetic radiation. This paper presents the computed temperature and specific absorption rate inside to a generic model of a human thyroid using signals radiated by an antenna operating in the 2450 MHz band and the power density levels up to 100 W/cm2. Calculations were carried out using the Finite Difference Time Domain method for the solving of two coupled differential equations, Maxwell and Pennes. The results show that the temperature can rise up to very dangerous levels, i.e., 46 °C, in a very short time. The estimated temperature distribution in the human thyroid due to exposure from microwave signals can be used to design the dangerous aria for personal working around high power emitted antenna and for medical applications.

  14. Study on the effect of chemoembolization combined with microwave ablation for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vogl, Thomas Josef; Qian, Jun; Tran, Andreas; Oppermann, Elsie; Naguib, Nagy N.; Korkusuz, Huedayi; Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A.; Bechstein, Wolf Otto

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the combining effects of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and open local thermal microwave ablation in a hepatocellular carcinoma animal model. METHODS Tumor cubes were implanted into the liver of 30 male inbred ACI rats. Groups of 10 animals were treated at 13 days (TACE or microwave ablation) and 16 days (microwave ablation) postimplantation with combined therapy of TACE (0.1 mg mitomycin C; 0.1 mg iodized oil; 5.0 mg degradable starch microspheres) and microwave ablation (2450 Mhz; 45 s; 35 W) (study group A), TACE alone (control group B), or microwave ablation alone (control group C). At day 12 and day 25 tumor size was measured via magnetic resonance imaging and the relative growth ratio was calculated. Hepatic specimens were immunohistochemically examined for the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). RESULTS Mean growth rates were 1.34±0.19 in group A, 3.19±0.13 in group B, and 4.18±0.19 in group C. Compared with control groups B and C, tumor growth rate in group A was significantly inhibited (P < 0.01). The VEGF-antibody reaction in peritumoral tissue (staining intensity at portal triad, percent antibody reaction and staining intensity at central vein) was significantly lower in group A compared with group B (P < 0.01). No significant difference between group A and group C could be observed. CONCLUSION This investigation shows improved results of TACE followed by microwave ablation as treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in a rat model, compared with single therapy regimen regarding the inhibition of growth rate and reduction of VEGF-level in peritumoral tissue. PMID:28185998

  15. Microwave treatment of eight seconds protects cells of Isatis indigotica from enhanced UV-B radiation lesions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ping

    2006-01-01

    To determine the role of microwaves in the stress resistance of plants to enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation, Isatis indigotica Fort. seeds were subjected to microwave radiation for 8 s (wavelength 125 mm, power density 1.26 mW mm(-2), 2450 MHz). Afterwards they were cultivated in plastic pots in an artificial-glass greenhouse maintained at 25 degrees C, 70% relative humidity, and 400 micromol mol(-1) CO2, under visible-light conditions of 1500 micromol m(-2) s(-1) for 8 h day(-1). When the seedlings were 10 days old, they were subjected to 10.08 kJ m(-2) UV-B (PAR: 220 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) radiation for 8 days. Changes in a number of physiological and biochemical characteristics and in the thermal decomposition enthalpy of biomass were measured and used as indicators of the protective capacity of microwave radiation in this experiment. Our results revealed that microwave pretreatment of seeds enhanced UV-B stress resistance in the seedlings by decreasing the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) and increasing the concentration of ascorbic acid (AsA) and UV-B-absorbing compounds, increasing the activities of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and increasing the energy accumulation of photosynthesis. All these results suggest that microwave radiation enhances plant metabolism and results in increased UV-B stress resistance. This is the first investigation reporting the use of microwave pretreatment to protect the cells of Isatis indigotica from UV-B-induced lesions.

  16. Tissue structure of rat brain after microwave irradiation using maximum magnetic field component.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Y; Okada, M; Maruyama, Y

    1986-05-14

    A novel microwave instrument has recently been designed by New Japan Radio Co. Ltd., to provide more homogeneous distribution of the rapidly deposited heat in the rodent brain. Being the first commercial unit which concentrates the maximum magnetic field component of irradiation, rather than the usual electric field, it provides complete enzymatic inactivation in a typical rat brain when a power of 9 kW (90% of maximum) is applied for 0.80 s at the standard operating frequency of 2450 MHz. Tissue structural integrity was investigated in animals sacrificed by this approach or by the usual decapitation to see if any tissue disruption or pressure-induced spreading, a major problem with other microwave devices, might also be of concern for this new unit. Histological examination of tissue samples employed both light and electron microscopy. Using Luxol Fast Blue in the light microscopy, the microwave irradiated tissues exhibited a decreased affinity for the staining agent, an appearance of slight vacuoles, and the disappearance of fine fibrils in the parenchyma. However, the interfacial areas between distinct brain regions remained well preserved. Electron microscopic observation indicated that microwave irradiated tissue caused protein denaturation accompanied by the aggregation of nuclear chromatin, the disappearance of Nissl bodies, ribosomes and neurofilaments, and noticeably irregular myelin sheaths. However, the essential structure of nerve cell membranes and synaptic membranes were maintained, and synaptic vesicles were clearly defined. These results indicated that the rapid heating of brain tissue with maximal magnetic field concentration of the irradiation does not result in significant tissue disruption, pressure-induced spreading or cell breakdown.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (p<0.05). Whereas, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were found significantly decreased in microwave exposed groups (p<0.05). A significant increase in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) was observed in microwave exposed animal (p<0.05). Furthermore, significant DNA damage was also observed in microwave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (p<0.05). In conclusion, the present study suggests that low intensity microwave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect

  18. Microwaves and the cell membrane. III. Protein shedding is oxygen and temperature dependent: evidence for cation bridge involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Liburdy, R.P.; Vanek, P.F. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    Microwaves (2450 MHz, 60 mW/g) are shown to result in the release or shedding of at least 11 low-molecular-weight proteins (less than or equal to 31,000 Da) from rabbit erythrocytes maintained in physiological buffer. Protein release was detected by gel electrophoresis of cell-free supernatants using sensitive silver staining. This release is oxygen dependent and occurs in 30 min for exposures conducted within the special temperature region of 17-21 degrees C, which is linked to a structural or conformational transition in the cell membrane. Shedding of 26,000 and 24,000 Da proteins is unique to microwave treatment, with enhanced release of 28,000 and less than or equal to 15,000 Da species during microwave compared to sham exposures. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing further reveals that proteins of less than or equal to 14,000 Da shed during microwave treatment exhibit a pI of 6.8-7.3 not seen in sham-treated cells. Treatment of erythrocytes with a serine-directed protease inhibitor does not prevent release of proteins. However, when erythrocytes are maintained at 17-21 degrees C by conventional heating in the absence of divalent cations, release of 28,000-31,000 and less than or equal to 14,000 Da components is detected. This indicates that cation-bridge stability may be important for release of these proteins. The above results provide evidence that microwaves alter erythrocyte protein composition at temperatures linked to a transition in the cell membrane and that destabilization of salt bridges may play a role in an interaction mechanism for protein release.

  19. Microwave Sterilization in School Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynn, Brian; Dixon, Angela

    1988-01-01

    Described are two investigations carried out in a high school biology department using a domestic microwave oven to compare the relative attributes of the autoclave and microwave oven in school use. Discussed are equipment, methods, and results of each investigation. (Author/CW)

  20. Phonological and Phonetic Asymmetries of Cw Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Yunju

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates the relationship between the phonological distribution of Cw combinations, and the acoustic/perceptual distinctiveness between syllables with plain C onsets and with Cw combination onsets. Distributional asymmetries of Cw combinations discussed in this thesis include the avoidance of Cw combinations in the labial consonant…

  1. Metabolic effects of microwave radiation and convection heating on human mononuclear leukocytes. Final report, January 1985-May 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kiel, J.L.; Wong, L.S.; Erwin, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated here were the effects of microwave (MW) radiation (2450-MHz, continuous-wave, mean specific absorption rate of 103.5 + or - 4.2 W/kg) and convention heating on the nonphosphorylating oxidative metabolism of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes (96% lymphocytes, 4% monocytes) at 37 C. Metabolic activity, determined by chemiluminescence (CL) of cells challenged with luminol (5-aminO-2, 3-dihydro-1, 4-phthalazinedione) linked to bovine serum albumin, was detected with a brightness photomer. A significant stimulation after after MW exposure (p < 0.005) over total CL of matched 37 C-incubator controls was observed. A similar degree of stimulation, compared to incubator controls, was also detected after sham treatment. No significant difference existed between changes in total CL or stimulation indices of the MW and sham-exposed groups. Exposure to MW radiation, under normothermic (37 + or - 0.03 C) conditions, appears to have no effect on the oxidative metabolic activity of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. However, the significant differences between MW or sham-exposed cells and their respective incubator controls occurred because the temperature of the incubator did not exceed 35.9 C, and 39 minutes were required for the temperature to rise from 22 to 35.9 C. Slow heating of incubator controls must be accounted for in thermal and redio-frequency radiation studies in vitro.

  2. An analysis of the microwave dielectric properties of solvent-oil feedstock mixtures at 300-3000 MHz.

    PubMed

    Terigar, Beatrice G; Balasubramanian, Sundar; Boldor, Dorin

    2010-08-01

    Microwaves can be a more efficient method than traditional thermal treatment to deliver the energy required for heating in solvent-oil extraction due to its volumetric, direct coupling with the material. An understanding of the behavior of dielectric properties of solvent-feedstock mixtures is important for designing and optimizing any microwave-based extraction process. In this study rice bran and soybean flour were mixed separately with four different solvents (methanol, ethanol, hexane and isopropanol) at different ratios (1:2, 1:1, 2:1 w/w). For the samples mixed with ethanol, the dielectric properties were measured at 23, 30, 40 and 50 degrees C, while for all other sample-solvent mixtures experiments were performed at room temperature. Dielectric properties were determined using a vector network analyzer and dielectric probe kit using the open-ended coaxial probe method in the frequency range of 300 MHz to 3 GHz. Results from the study indicate that dielectric constants were dependent on frequency and were strongly influenced by temperature, mix ratio and solvent type. The dielectric loss of all mixtures except those with hexane (which were virtually zero) varied with frequency and temperature, solvent type, and mix ratio. Most of the results presented are emphasized at 433, 915 and 2450 MHz, frequencies allocated by the Federal Communication Commission (F.C.C.) for microwave applications. The results of the study, presented here for the first time to our knowledge, will help in selection of appropriate solvent, mixing ratio and frequency for designing microwave-assisted oil extraction systems.

  3. CW RFQ fabrication and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Schrage, D.; Young, L.; Roybal, P.

    1998-12-31

    The design and fabrication of a four-vane RFQ to deliver a 100 mA CW proton beam at 6.7 MeV is described. This linac is an Oxygen-Free Electrolytic (OFE) copper structure 8 m in length and was fabricated using hydrogen furnace brazing as the joining technology.

  4. Validity of actinometry to monitor oxygen atom concentration in microwave discharges created by surface wave in O2-N2 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granier, A.; Chéreau, D.; Henda, K.; Safari, R.; Leprince, P.

    1994-01-01

    The validity of actinometry to monitor oxygen atom concentration in O2-N2 microwave discharges created by surface wave is investigated. The plasma is created with a gas flow in a quartz tube of inner diameter 16 mm at pressures in the Torr range. First, it is shown that the reliability of actinometry can be deduced from the longitudinal profile of the actinometry signal. Second, absolute concentrations of oxygen atoms are estimated from the experimental actinometry signal and agree satisfactorily with concentrations simultaneously measured by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) absorption downstream from the plasma. Moreover, upon varying the nitrogen percentage (0%-100%), it is evidenced that the actinometry signal is proportional to the concentration measured by VUV absorption. Furthermore, it is evidenced that the oxygen dissociation rate is only 2% in pure oxygen plasmas, while it reaches 15% (433 MHz) or 30% (2450 MHz) for mixtures containing more than 20% of nitrogen. This drastic increase in [O] upon the addition of N2 is extensively discussed and, finally, attributed to a decrease in the recombination frequency of oxygen atoms on the quartz wall, in the presence of nitrogen.

  5. Treatment of lung tumours with high-energy microwave ablation: a single-centre experience.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Coppola, Andrea; Lucchina, Natalie; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to report safety, technical success, effectiveness, local progression-free survival (LPFS) and overall survival of percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) to treat lung tumours unsuitable for surgery. Nineteen patients with thirty-one tumours (mean diameter 2.4 cm) underwent percutaneous MWA in 28 sessions. Microwave ablation was carried out using a 2450-MHz generator (Emprint/Covidien, Boulder, CO, USA). Procedures were performed under cone-beam CT (CBCT) and under fluoro-CT (one session) guidance. Safety, technical success, effectiveness, LPFS and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Safety was defined as the frequency of major and minor complications. The efficacy was evaluated on the basis of imaging characteristics, using RECIST criteria. CT follow-up was performed at 1, 3 and 6 months and yearly. LPFS was defined as the interval between MWA treatment and evidence of local recurrence, if there was any. OS was defined as the percentage of patients who were still alive. We registered one major complication (purulent hydro-pneumothorax). Minor complications were spontaneously resolved (pneumothorax and perilesional haemorrhagic effusion). Technical success was 100%. Residual disease was registered in two cases, one of whom was retreated. Complete ablation was obtained in the remaining cases (90.3%). During available follow-up (mean 9.6 months), 9/31 tumours demonstrated local recurrence. Five tumours were retreated, and none of them presented residual disease during follow-up (LPFS 22.6%). Overall survival was 93.8%. Percutaneous high-energy MWA is a safe, effective and confident technique to treat lung tumours not suitable for surgery.

  6. New frequency translation technique for FM-CW reflectometrya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses, Luis; Cupido, Luis; Manso, M. E.; Jet-Efda Contributors

    2010-10-01

    In broadband microwave reflectometry, coherent detection is widely used to obtain the phase information and to improve the systems sensitivity, both in diagnostics measuring the electronic density profile and plasma fluctuations. Coherent detection uses a translated version of the probing signal to guarantee a stable intermediate frequency. Here, a novel technique to generate the frequency translation by double frequency conversion is presented and its advantages over the commonly used single frequency conversion techniques employing image rejection mixers are discussed. The results obtained with the new frequency translator modules developed for the three JET FM-CW reflectometers, operating successfully at JET since mid-2009, are presented.

  7. CW laser pumped emerald laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Lai, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    A CW laser-pumped emerald laser is reported. A 34 percent output power slope efficiency is observed with longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity. The laser has been tuned from 728.8 to 809.0 nm. Losses in emerald are larger than those of alexandrite determined in a similar cavity. The present data also indicate that the excited state absorption minimum is shifted from that of alexandrite. 13 references.

  8. Resonant and Ground Experimental Study on the Microwave Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; He, Hongqing; Mao, Genwang; Qu, Kun; Tang, Jinlan; Han, Xianwei

    2002-01-01

    chemistry. Therefore, the application of EP for the attitude control and station keeping of satellite, the propulsion of deep space exploration craft allows to reduce substantially the mass of on-board propellant and the launching cost. The EP research is now receiving high interest everywhere. microwave generating subsystem, the propellant supplying subsystem and the resonator (the thruster). Its principle is that the magnetron of the microwave generating subsystem transfers electric energy into microwave energy at given frequency which is introduced into a resonant cavity. Microwave will resonate within the cavity when it is adjusted. When the propellant gas (N2, Ar, He, NH3 or H2) is put into the cavity and coupled with microwave energy at the maximal electric intensity place, it will be broken down to form free-floating plasma, which flows from nozzle with high speed to produce thrust. Its characteristic is high efficiency, simple power supply and without electrode ablation, its specific impulse is greater than arcjet. 2450MHz, have been developed. The microwave generating subsystem and resonator of lower power MPT, 70-200W, are coaxial. The resonator with TEM resonating mode is section of coaxial wave-guide, of which one end is shorted, another is semi-opened. The maximal electric intensity field is in the lumped capacity formed between the end surface of inner conductor, retracting in the cavity, and the semi-opened surface of outer conductor. It provides favorable condition for gas breakdown. The microwave generating system and resonator of middle power MPT, 500-1,000W, are wave-guide cavity. The resonator with TM011 resonating mode is cylinder wave-guide cavity, of which two end surface are shorted. The distribution of electromagnetic field is axial symmetry, its maximal electric intensity field locates on the axis and closes to the exit of nozzle, where the propellant gas is breakdown to form free floating plasma. The plasma is free from the wall of

  9. CW simulant detection by NDIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Jim; McNeal, Mark; Gully, Bill; Swanson, Frank

    2005-11-01

    A compact, low-cost, multi-wavelength NDIR sensor was designed to measure G-type CW agents at ppm-levels. This 4-color sensor can distinguish between the different agents (sarin, soman, tabun) and is more sensitive than a single wavelength sensor. The design of the sensor and test results with simulants R-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane) and sulfur hexafluoride is presented. These test results support a lower detection limit of 3 ppmv for a 1 sec integration time. Modifications of the sensor design which will enable us to achieve <1 ppmv sensitivity are discussed.

  10. CW ultrasonic bolt tensioning monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A CW ultrasonic device is described for measuring frequency shifts of the peak of a mechanical resonance in a body. One application of the device is measuring the strain in a bolt, and other applications such as measuring the thickness of a body, measuring the depth of a flaw in a body, measuring the elongation of a body, and measuring changes in velocity of sound in a body. The body is connected, by means of a CW transducer, to electrical circuit means including a narrow band RF amplifier to form a closed loop feedback marginal oscillator that frequency locks the device to the peak of a mechanical resonance in the body. When the frequency of this peak changes, because of a physical change in the body, the frequency of the oscillator changes. The device includes an automatic frequency resonant peak tracker that produces a voltage that is related to a change in frequency of the oscillator. This voltage is applied to the RF amplifier to change the center of its frequency band to include the frequency of the peak and is a measure of the frequency shift.

  11. Rainfall and River Currents Retrieved from Microwave Backscatter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, W.J.; Keller, W.C.; Hayes, K.; Nystuen, J.; Spicer, K.

    2003-01-01

    The use of CW microwave sensors in yielding information on both river surface velocities and rain rates was discussed. Eight CW microwave sensors were installed at Cowlitz river in Western Washington State in the US. The sensors measured the river surface velocity via Doppler shifts at eight locations across the river. Comparison of the surface velocities derived from the sensors mounted on the bridge with those measured by current meters and acoustic sensors demonstrated good agreement.

  12. HLA-Cw*1214 allele arisen via recombination between HLA-Cw*070201 and HLA-Cw*120201.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, T V; Ohashi, M; Huang, A; Vasconcellos, S; Alosco, S M; Kempenich, J; Yu, N

    2004-12-01

    Allelic polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex arises mostly from gene conversion. Intralocus gene conversion usually involves limited fragments of DNA, whereas recombination involving large fragments of DNA is considered to be a rare event. During routine sequencing-based typing of donors for the National Marrow Donor Program, a new HLA-C allele was identified in a Caucasian donor. The allele, HLA-Cw*1214, proved to be the product of recombination between HLA-Cw*070201 and HLA-Cw*120201. Exons 1, 2, the 3' end of exon 3 and exon 4 (with one mismatch) belong to HLA-Cw*120201, whereas part of exon 3 belongs to HLA-Cw*070201. Sequencing with primers based in exon 2 and exon 3 showed that intron 2 of the new allele also belonged completely to HLA-Cw*1202. The recombination event apparently occurred within exon 3 with the first point of recombination somewhere between codons 92 and 134 and the second one between codons 157 and 181.

  13. RF coupler for high-power CW FEL photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.; Young, L. M.

    2003-01-01

    A high-current emittance-compensated RF photoinjector is a key enabling technology for a high-power CW FEL. The design presently under way is a 100-mA 2.5-cell {pi}-mode, 700-MHz, normal conducting demonstration CW RF photoinjector. This photoinjector will be capable of accelerating 3 nC per bunch with an emittance at the wiggler less than 10 mm-mrad. The paper presents results for the RF coupling from ridged wave guides to hte photoinjector RF cavity. The LEDA and SNS couplers inspired this 'dog-bone' design. Electromagnetic modeling of the coupler-cavity system has been performed using both 2-D and 3-D frequency-domain calculations, and a novel time-domain approach with MicroWave Studio. These simulations were used to adjust the coupling coefficient and calculate the power-loss distribution on the coupling slot. The cooling of this slot is a rather challenging thermal management project.

  14. Design, fabrication and testing of a CFA for use in the solar power satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    A crossed field amplifier was designed to meet the performance objectives of high signal to noise ratio, an efficiency of 85%, a CW microwave power output of 5-8 kW, and a frequency of 2450 MHz. The signal to noise ratio achieved was better than 69 db/MHz in a 2000 MHz band centered on the carrier. High circuit efficiency of 97% and a sharp knee on voltage current characteristic were achieved. The basic problem of maintaining good transfer of heat to the external radiator while providing for adequate connections to input and output was solved. Maximum efficiency achieved was 70.5% and gain and power level were below objectives. An investigation of causes of reduced performance indicated the poor field pattern in the cathode anode interaction area of the tube was a major cause.

  15. A CW Gunn diode bistable switching element.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurtado, M.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments with a current-controlled bistable switching element using a CW Gunn diode are reported. Switching rates of the order of 10 MHz have been obtained. Switching is initiated by current pulses of short duration (5-10 ns). Rise times of the order of several nanoseconds could be obtained.

  16. A CW Gunn Diode Switching Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, Marco; Rosenbaum, Fred J.

    As part of a study of the application of communication satellites to educational development, certain technical aspects of such a system were examined. A current controlled bistable switching element using a CW Gunn diode is reported on here. With modest circuits switching rates of the order of 10 MHz have been obtained. Switching is initiated by…

  17. Cw operation of the FMIT RFQ accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Recently, we have achieved reliable cw operation of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. In addition to the operational experiences in achieving this status, some of the modifications of the vacuum system, cooling system, and rf structure are discussed. Preliminary beam-characterization results are presented. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  18. CW arc-lamp-pumped alexandrite lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, H.; Walling, J.C.; Wernikowski, T.; Harter, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    The performance characteristics of arc-lamp- (Xe and Hg) pumped, CW alexandrite lasers are described in detail. The modes of operation considered are free running, tuned, and repetitively Q-switched. The experimental arrangement and apparatus are also outlined. The experimental results are discussed in terms of a steady-state model, and the areas of agreement and difficulty are pointed out.

  19. Large Scale CW ECRH Systems: Some considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erckmann, V.; Kasparek, W.; Plaum, B.; Lechte, C.; Petelin, M. I.; Braune, H.; Gantenbein, G.; Laqua, H. P.; Lubiako, L.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Michel, G.; Turkin, Y.; Weissgerber, M.

    2012-09-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) is a key component in the heating arsenal for the next step fusion devices like W7-X and ITER. These devices are equipped with superconducting coils and are designed to operate steady state. ECRH must thus operate in CW-mode with a large flexibility to comply with various physics demands such as plasma start-up, heating and current drive, as well as configurationand MHD - control. The request for many different sophisticated applications results in a growing complexity, which is in conflict with the request for high availability, reliability, and maintainability. `Advanced' ECRH-systems must, therefore, comply with both the complex physics demands and operational robustness and reliability. The W7-X ECRH system is the first CW- facility of an ITER relevant size and is used as a test bed for advanced components. Proposals for future developments are presented together with improvements of gyrotrons, transmission components and launchers.

  20. A 100 MV cryomodule for CW operation

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece

    2005-07-10

    A cryomodule designed for high-gradient CW operation has been built at Jefferson Lab. The Renascence cryomodule is the final prototype of a design for use in the 12 GeV CEBAF upgrade. The module uses eight 7-cell 1497 MHz cavities to be individually powered by 13 kW klystrons. Specifications call for providing >109 MV CW with < 250 W of dynamic heat at 2.07 K. The module incorporates a new generation of tuners and higher power input waveguides. A mixture of the new HG and LL cavity shapes are used. A new high thermal conductivity RF feedthrough has been developed and used on the 32 HOM coupler probes of Renascence. The cryomodule assembly is complete. Testing is to begin late June. Design features and initial test data will be presented.

  1. Optimising a High-Stability CW Laser-Pumped Rubidium Gas-Cell Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Miletic, D.; Mileti, G.

    2009-04-01

    We report on our development of a compact and high-performance laser-pumped Rubidium atomic frequency standard. The clock design is based on optical-microwave double-resonance using cw optical pumping, and a physical realization as simple as possible. Main development goals are a short-term instability of ≤ 6 × 10-13 τ-1/2 and a flicker floor of ≤ 1 × 10-14 up to one day. Here we discuss our approaches for controlling the clock's main physical parameters in view of optimized frequency stability.

  2. Solar power satellite 50 kW VKS-7773 cw klystron evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larue, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    A test program for evaluating the electrical characteristics of a cw, 50 kW power output klystron at 2.45 GHz is described. The tube tested was an 8-cavity klystron, the VKS-7773 which had been in storage for seven years. Tests included preliminary testing of the tube, cold tests of microwave components, tests of the electromagnet, and first and second hot tests of the tube. During the second hot test, the tuner in the fifth cavity went down to air, preventing any further testing. Cause of failure is not known, and recommendations are to repair and modify the tube, then proceed with testing as before to meet program objectives.

  3. Microwave Ovens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emitting Products Radiation-Emitting Products and Procedures Home, Business, and Entertainment Products Microwave ... for Consumers Laws, Regulations & Standards Industry Guidance Other Resources Description Microwave ...

  4. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9–4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  5. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9-4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  6. Temperature changes associated with radiofrequency exposure near authentic metallic implants in the head phantom--a near field simulation study with 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz dipole.

    PubMed

    Matikka Virtanen, H; Keshvari, J; Lappalainen, R

    2010-10-07

    Along with increased use of wireless communication devices operating in the radiofrequency (RF) range, concern has been raised about the related possible health risks. Among other concerns, the interaction of medical implants and RF devices has been studied in order to assure the safety of implant carriers under various exposure conditions. In the RF range, the main established quantitative effect of electromagnetic (EM) fields on biological tissues is heating due to vibrational movements of water molecules. The temperature changes induced in tissues also constitute the basis for the setting of RF exposure limits and recommendations. In this study, temperature changes induced by electromagnetic field enhancements near passive metallic implants have been simulated in the head region. Furthermore, the effect of the implant material on the induced temperature change was evaluated using clinically used metals with the highest and the lowest thermal conductivities. In some cases, remarkable increases in maximum temperatures of tissues (as much as 8 °C) were seen in the near field with 1 W power level whereas at lower power levels significant temperature increases were not observed.

  7. Very high speed cw digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-López, Carlos; de La Torre-Ibarra, Manuel H.; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando

    2006-10-01

    It is reported for the first time the use of a very high speed camera in digital holographic interferometry with an out of plane sensitivity setup. The image plane holograms of a spherical latex balloon illuminated by a cw laser were acquired at a rate of 4000 frames per second, representing a time spacing between holograms of 250 microseconds, for 512 × 512 pixels at 8 bits resolution. Two types of tests were accomplished for a proof of principle of the technique, one with no constrains on the object which meant random movements due to non controlled environmental air currents, and the other with specific controlled conditions on the object. Results presented correspond to a random sample of sequential digital holograms, chosen from a 1 second exposure, individually Fourier processed in order to perform the usual comparison by subtraction between consecutive pairs thus obtaining the phase map of the object out of plane displacement, shown as a movie.

  8. Moderate-power cw fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2004-10-31

    A review of the development and investigation of moderate-power (10{sup -1}-10{sup 2} W) cw fibre lasers is presented. The properties of optical fibres doped with rare-earth ions and methods for fabricating double-clad fibres are considered. The methods for fabrication of fibre Bragg gratings used as selective reflectors are discussed and the grating properties are analysed. The main pump schemes for double-clad fibre lasers are described. The properties of fibre lasers doped with neodymium, ytterbium, erbium, thulium, and holmium ions are also considered. The principles of fabrication of Raman converters of laser radiation based on optical fibres of different compositions are discussed and the main results of their studies are presented. It is concluded that fibre lasers described in the review can produce moderate-power radiation at any wavelength in the spectral range from 0.9 to 2 {mu}m. (review)

  9. Development of second harmonic gyrotrons, Gyrotron FU CW GII and Gyrotron FU CW GIII, equipped with internal mode converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatematsu, Yoshinori; Yamaguchi, Yuusuke; Idehara, Toshitaka; Kawase, Tatsuru; Ichioka, Ryoichi; Ogawa, Isamu; Saito, Teruo; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2014-01-01

    Second harmonic gyrotrons, Gyrotron FU CW GII and Gyrotron FU CW GIII, were developed at the Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Japan to achieve two goals. Each gyrotron was equipped with an internal quasi-optical mode converter. Using Gyrotron FU CW GII allowed the design of the cavity and mode converter to be validated, which was the first goal. After that, Gyrotron FU CW GIII, which is an improved version of Gyrotron FU CW GII, allowed us to achieve a high power output of up to 420 W, which was the second goal, with a cathode voltage setting of -21 kV and a beam current of 0.57 A. This was achieved using a newly developed electron gun and with the careful sitting of the gyrotron on the magnet.

  10. Optic cavitation with CW lasers: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Martinez, J. P.; Berrospe-Rodriguez, C.; Aguilar, G.; Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.; Ramos-Garcia, R.

    2014-12-01

    The most common method to generate optic cavitation involves the focusing of short-pulsed lasers in a transparent liquid media. In this work, we review a novel method of optic cavitation that uses low power CW lasers incident in highly absorbing liquids. This novel method of cavitation is called thermocavitation. Light absorbed heats up the liquid beyond its boiling temperature (spinodal limit) in a time span of microseconds to milliseconds (depending on the optical intensity). Once the liquid is heated up to its spinodal limit (˜300 °C for pure water), the superheated water becomes unstable to random density fluctuations and an explosive phase transition to vapor takes place producing a fast-expanding vapor bubble. Eventually, the bubble collapses emitting a strong shock-wave. The bubble is always attached to the surface taking a semi-spherical shape, in contrast to that produced by pulsed lasers in transparent liquids, where the bubble is produced at the focal point. Using high speed video (105 frames/s), we study the bubble's dynamic behavior. Finally, we show that heat diffusion determines the water superheated volume and, therefore, the amplitude of the shock wave. A full experimental characterization of thermocavitation is described.

  11. Conceptual design of a 1-MW CW X-band transmitter for planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhanji, A. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Conroy, B. L.; Freiley, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design to increase the output power of an existing X-band radar transmitter used for planetary radar exploration from 365 kW to 1 MW CW is presented. The basic transmitter system requirements as dictated by the specifications for the radar are covered. The characteristics and expected performance of the high-power klystrons are considered, and the transmitter power amplifier system is described. Also included is the design of all of the associated high-power microwave components, the feed system, and the phase-stable exciter. The expected performance of the beam supply, heat exchanger, and monitor and control devices is also presented. Finally, an assessment of the state-of-the-art technology needed to meet system requirements is given and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  12. Conceptual design of a 1-MW CW X-band transmitter for planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhanji, A. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Conroy, B. L.; Freiley, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design to increase the output power of an existing X-band planetary radar transmitter used for planetary radar exploration from 365 kW to 1 MW CW is presented. The basic transmitter system requirements as dictated by the specifications for the radar are covered. The characteristics and expected performance of the high-power klystrons are considered, and the transmitter power amplifier system is discussed. Also included is the design of all of the associated high-power microwave components, the feed system, and the phase-stable exciter. The expected performance of the beam supply, heat exchanger, and monitor and control devices is also presented. Finally, an assessment of the state-of-the-art technology needed to meet system requirements is given and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  13. Microwave generator for scientific and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, V.; Surducan, E.; Ciupa, R.; Neamtu, C.

    2012-02-01

    Nowadays power microwave radiation is widely used in medical applications as hyperthermia, diathermy or ablation and for scientific applications such as plasma generation, digestion, or as a catalyst in green chemistry. Nevertheless, designing a suitably adapted microwave generator that meets both the scientific and the more restrictive medical criteria remains a difficult task. We present here a simplified approach in designing such a microwave generator, according to the IEC60601 medical standard. The generator, based on a continuous wave (CW) magnetron, is coupled via a TE10 waveguide to feed either a hyperthermia applicator or a reactor chamber. Microwave interactions with the probe (or the tissue) depend strongly on the magnetron's power supply parameters and the impedance match of the entire microwave circuit. Any unmatched elements (magnetron to waveguide, waveguide to applicator, applicator to patient) give rise to a large voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) which loads the generator with a surplus energy, converted to heat. Extra heating of the magnetron will deteriorate the amplitude of the generated microwave power field. We show here that, by using a proprietary patented temperature sensor sheet, we were able to detect and improve the impedance matching of the microwave circuit.

  14. High power CW iodine laser pumped by solar simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Lee, Min H.; Weaver, Willard R.

    1987-01-01

    An iodine photodissociation laser was pumped by a long Ar arc as the solar simulator to produce a 10-W CW output. Continuous lasing for 1 h was achieved with a flow of the laser material n-C3F7I. The 10-W CW output is the highest produced to date and establishes the feasibility of developing a solar-pumped laser for space power transmission.

  15. High efficiency cw laser-pumped tunable alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, S.T.; Shand, M.L.

    1983-10-01

    High efficiency cw alexandrite laser operation has been achieved. With longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity, a 51% output power slope efficiency has been measured. Including the transmission at the input coupler mirror, a quantum yield of 85% has been attained above threshold. Tunability from 726 to 802 nm has also been demonstrated. The low loss and good thermal properties make alexandrite ideal for cw laser operation.

  16. Design for a compact CW atom laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Erik; Raithel, Georg

    2011-05-01

    We present a design for a compact continuous-wave atom laser on a chip. A 2D spiral-shaped quadrupole guide is formed by two 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm wires carrying 5 A each embedded in a Si wafer; a 1.5 mm × 0.5 mm wire on the bottom layer carries -10 A, producing a horizontal B-field that pushes the guiding channel center above the chip surface. The center-to-center separation between the top wires is varied from 1.6 mm at the start of the guide to 1 mm at the end, decreasing the guide height from ~ 500 μm to ~ 25 μm above the surface as the atoms travel the 70 cm-long guide. The magnetic gradient of the guiding channel gradually increases from ~ 100 G /cm to ~ 930 G /cm . These features result in continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling and progressive magnetic compression. Spin flip losses are mitigated by a solenoid sewn around the guide to produce a longitudinal B-field. 87Rb atoms are gravitationally loaded into the guide. A far off-resonant light shift barrier at the end of the guide traps the atoms and allows formation of a BEC. Tuning the barrier height to create a non-zero tunneling rate equal to the loading rate completes the implementation of a CW atom laser. Two options for atom interferometry are implemented on the first-generation chip (matter-wave Fabry-Perot interferometer and guide-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer). Current construction status and challenges will be discussed, along with preliminary results.

  17. 3 μm CW lasers for myringotomy and microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Linden, Kurt J; Pfeffer, Christian P; Sousa, John Gary; D'Alleva, Nicholas; Aslani, Arash; Gorski, Grzegorz; Kenna, Margaret; Poe, Dennis S

    2013-03-08

    This paper describes the development and implementation of 3 μm lasers for myringotomy and microsurgery. Two different lasers were investigated. The first, an Er-doped, CW zirconate glass fiber laser optically pumped by a 970 nm diode laser, emitted > 1 W of CW power at 2.76 μm with concomitant green incoherent emission that served as a convenient visible illumination beam. The second, a 1 W CW Er:YAG solid-state laser also optically pumped by a 970 nm diode laser, emitted > 1 W of CW power at 2.94 μm, coincident with the strongest infrared water absorption peak. Running CW, both lasers are expected to avoid the loud acoustical shocks associated with pulsed lasers. Myringotomies were carried out with the Er:YAG laser on anaesthetized guinea pigs and the effects of the laser were documented. Laser ablated samples of tympanic membrane, soft tissue and bone were histologically examined. Histology results indicated that the CW Er:YAG laser is a potential candidate for a new myringotomy tool and possibly for otologic microsurgery, but deliverable power levels need to be increased to the 2 W (or higher) level. This work was funded under NIH SBIR Grant No. 5R44DC004899.

  18. 3 μm CW lasers for myringotomy and microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Kurt J.; Pfeffer, Christian P.; Sousa, John Gary; D’Alleva, Nicholas; Aslani, Arash; Gorski, Grzegorz; Kenna, Margaret; Poe, Dennis S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of 3 μm lasers for myringotomy and microsurgery. Two different lasers were investigated. The first, an Er-doped, CW zirconate glass fiber laser optically pumped by a 970 nm diode laser, emitted > 1 W of CW power at 2.76 μm with concomitant green incoherent emission that served as a convenient visible illumination beam. The second, a 1 W CW Er:YAG solid-state laser also optically pumped by a 970 nm diode laser, emitted > 1 W of CW power at 2.94 μm, coincident with the strongest infrared water absorption peak. Running CW, both lasers are expected to avoid the loud acoustical shocks associated with pulsed lasers. Myringotomies were carried out with the Er:YAG laser on anaesthetized guinea pigs and the effects of the laser were documented. Laser ablated samples of tympanic membrane, soft tissue and bone were histologically examined. Histology results indicated that the CW Er:YAG laser is a potential candidate for a new myringotomy tool and possibly for otologic microsurgery, but deliverable power levels need to be increased to the 2 W (or higher) level. This work was funded under NIH SBIR Grant No. 5R44DC004899. PMID:24382990

  19. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  20. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  1. Comparative Pharmacodynamics of Pancuronium, Cisatracurium, and CW002 in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Leslie L; Zhang, Jingwei; Heerdt, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Pancuronium is a long-duration neuromuscular blocking drug (NMBD) that has been used in anesthetized rabbits at 0.1 mg/kg. However, there are limited data regarding the time course for recovery from this dose either spontaneously or with pharmacologic reversal. Here we defined the potency, onset, and recovery characteristics for the intermediate-duration NMBD cisatracurium and CW002 (a novel cysteine-inactivated molecule) in the rabbit, and test the hypothesis that these drugs may be alternatives to 0.1 mg/kg pancuronium for survival procedures. New Zealand white rabbits anesthetized with isoflurane were studied in a cross-over design. Potencies of cisatracurium and CW002 were defined as the effective dose for 95% depression of evoked muscle twitch (ED95). Responses to 3×ED95 were used to define onset (time to maximal effect), recovery index (RI; time from 25% to 75% recovery of twitch), and duration (time to complete recovery). Responses to all drugs were determined with and without reversal by neostigmine–glycopyrrolate or l-cysteine. CW002 was 4-fold more potent than was cisatracurium, but their onset, RI, and duration were similar. Pancuronium had similar onset and RI but longer duration, compared with cisatracurium and CW002. Reversal shortened the recovery index and duration for all 3 drugs. At 3×ED95, cisatracurium and CW002 had the same onset as did standard-dose pancuronium, but durations were shorter and more predictable. In addition, CW002 can be reversed without the potential side effects of cholinergic manipulation. We conclude that cisatracurium and CW002 are viable alternatives to pancuronium for survival studies in rabbits. PMID:24827571

  2. Microwaves and nanoparticles: from synthesis to imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Kenith E.; Majithiaa, Ravish; Brown, R. A.; Wang, Lihong V.; Maffeis, T. G. G.

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the use of energy delivery using microwave radiation for both synthesis of nanoparticles as well as a hybrid imaging technique known as thermoacoustic tomography (TAT). In each instance, the absorption of microwave radiation is converted into heat. In the case of nanoparticle synthesis, water is used as the solvent and heated to induce synthesis of the nanostructures. For this aqueous synthesis technique, we demonstrate the use of both pulsed and continuous wave (CW) microwave systems operating at 2.45 GHz. In this report, we concentrate on ZnO nanostructures including nanorods, nanowire arrays and nanobelts. These are compared with nanowire arrays and nanobelts grown by vapor transport through both electron microscopy and photo-excited luminescence. We also review the use of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as contrast agents in TAT as previously reported. Here, we measured the properties of the colloidal nanoparticles in the microwave regime and compared the absorption with the TAT signal produced by our thermoacoustic imaging system at 3 GHz. The nanoparticles directly absorb the microwave radiation and produce a thermo-acoustic signal. The results from nanoparticles are compared to the signal produced by deionized water. The results demonstrate that microwaves represent an efficient method for the delivery of energy for both synthesis and biomedical imaging.

  3. Abnormal cardiovascular responses induced by localized high power microwave exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.-T; Brown, D.O.; Johnson, C.E.; Mathur, S.P. ); Elson, E.C. )

    1992-05-01

    A hypothesis of microwave-induced circulatory under perfusion was tested in ketamine anesthetized rats whose heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure, respiration rate, and body temperatures were monitored continuously. Fifty-eight ventral head and neck exposures in a waveguide consisted of sham-exposure and exposure to continuous wave (CW) and pulsed 1.25 GHz microwaves for 5 min. The 0.5 Hz and 16 Hz pulsemodulated microwaves were delivered at 400 kW peak power. The CW microwaves were 2 and 6.4 W. The average specific absorption rate was 4.75 W/kg per watt transmitted in the brain and 17.15 W/kg per watt transmitted in the neck. Respiration rate and mean arterial pressure were not altered. Changes in heart rate and pulse pressure were observed in rats exposed to higher power but not to the lower average power microwaves. Depression of pulse pressure, an indication of a decrease in stroke volume, and increased or decreased heart rate were noted in presence of whole-body hyperthermia. The cardiac output of those animals exposed to higher average power microwaves was considered to be below normal as hypothesized. Decreased cardiac output and normal mean arterial pressure resulted in an increase in the total peripheral resistance which was contrary to the anticipated thermal response of animals.

  4. First experiments with gasdynamic ion source in CW mode

    SciTech Connect

    Skalyga, V. Vodopyanov, A.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Tarvainen, O.

    2016-02-15

    A new type of ECR ion source—a gasdynamic ECR ion source—has been recently developed at the Institute of Applied Physics. The main advantages of such device are extremely high ion beam current with a current density up to 600–700 emA/cm{sup 2} in combination with low emittance, i.e., normalized RMS emittance below 0.1 π mm mrad. Previous investigations were carried out in pulsed operation with 37.5 or 75 GHz gyrotron radiation with power up to 100 kW at SMIS 37 experimental facility. The present work demonstrates the first experience of operating the gasdynamic ECR ion source in CW mode. A test bench of SMIS 24 facility has been developed at IAP RAS. 24 GHz radiation of CW gyrotron was used for plasma heating in a magnetic trap with simple mirror configuration. Initial studies of plasma parameters were performed. Ion beams with pulsed and CW high voltage were successfully extracted from the CW discharge. Obtained experimental results demonstrate that all advantages of the gasdynamic source can be realized also in CW operation.

  5. Microwave detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1986-12-02

    A detector is described for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations, the detector comprising: a B-dot loop linking the magnetic field of the microwave pulse; a biased ferrite, that produces a magnetization field flux that links the B-dot loop. The ferrite is positioned within the B-dot loop so that the magnetic field of the microwave pulse interacts with the ferrite and thereby participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux; and high-frequency insensitive means for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop.

  6. Time Shifted PN Codes for CW Lidar, Radar, and Sonar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor); Prasad, Narasimha S. (Inventor); Harrison, Fenton W. (Inventor); Flood, Michael A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A continuous wave Light Detection and Ranging (CW LiDAR) system utilizes two or more laser frequencies and time or range shifted pseudorandom noise (PN) codes to discriminate between the laser frequencies. The performance of these codes can be improved by subtracting out the bias before processing. The CW LiDAR system may be mounted to an artificial satellite orbiting the earth, and the relative strength of the return signal for each frequency can be utilized to determine the concentration of selected gases or other substances in the atmosphere.

  7. SRF cavities for CW option of Project X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lunin, A.; Perunov, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Alternative option of Project X is based on the CW SC 2GeV Linac with the average current 1mA. Possible option of the CW Linac considered in the paper includes low energy part consisted of a few families SC Spoke cavities (from 2.5 MeV to 466 MeV) and high energy part consisted of 2 types of elliptical cavities (v/c=0.81 and v/c=1). Requirements and designed parameters of cavities are considered.

  8. Random FM-CW radar and its ECCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guosui; Shi, Xiangquan; Lu, Jinhui

    The principle of a random FM-CW radar system is introduced, and the range cutoff charactertistic (RCC) for the system is derived. In a fuze radar system, this radar can be used against passive jamming away from the point of range cutoff as well as against active jamming. Experimental results are presented which show that the random FM-CW radar system has RCC and ECCM properties. The system can be used as a short-range detection system, a low-altitude altimeter, and a blind landing device.

  9. Development of a microwave probe for the optical study of microwave-excited spin physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Yu-Sheng; Chiu, Yi-Hsin; Adur, Rohan; Odenthal, Patrick; Kawakami, Roland; Hammel, P. Chris; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel

    2014-03-01

    We have developed an experimental probe that allows simultaneous broadband microwave excitation and optical excitation/detection at variable temperature and magnetic field. Specifically, we have designed a unique sample probe with a microwave stripline based sample mount that allows for direct optical access to the sample under study within a magneto- optical cryostat. This powerful combination enables optical studies of spintronic systems under microwave excitation using both CW (e.g. photo- and electro-luminescence) and time resolved (e.g. time resolved absorption/transmission and time resolved Kerr rotation, TRKR) techniques. To benchmark the capabilities of this probe we present data demonstrating simultaneous ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and TRKR in a Fe/MgO/GaAs heterostructure. Such studies have potential applications in the study of FMR driven spin pumping and interaction of free carrier spins with native and engineered defects. MRSEC (DMR-0820414).

  10. Microwave reflectometer ionization sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seals, Joseph; Fordham, Jeffrey A.; Pauley, Robert G.; Simonutti, Mario D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of the Microwave Reflectometer Ionization Sensor (MRIS) Instrument for use on the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) spacecraft is described. The instrument contract was terminated, due to cancellation of the AFE program, subsequent to testing of an engineering development model. The MRIS, a four-frequency reflectometer, was designed for the detection and location of critical electron density levels in spacecraft reentry plasmas. The instrument would sample the relative magnitude and phase of reflected signals at discrete frequency steps across 4 GHz bandwidths centered at four frequencies: 20, 44, 95, and 140 GHz. The sampled data would be stored for later processing to calculate the distance from the spacecraft surface to the critical electron densities versus time. Four stepped PM CW transmitter receivers were located behind the thermal protection system of the spacecraft with horn antennas radiating and receiving through an insulating tile. Techniques were developed to deal with interference, including multiple reflections and resonance effects, resulting from the antenna configuration and operating environment.

  11. Microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  12. Combined microwave heating and surface cooling of the cornea.

    PubMed

    Trembly, B S; Keates, R H

    1991-01-01

    We investigated a nonsurgical means of reshaping the cornea to correct hyperopia, keratoconus, or myopia. The object was to heat the central stroma of the cornea to the shrinkage temperature of collagen, 55-58 degrees C. The heating device was an open-ended, coaxial, near-field applicator driven at 2450 MHz; it incorporates cooling of the cornea surface by flow of saline. We investigated the system theoretically by computing the 2-D, axisymmetric temperature distribution with the finite element method. We investigated the system experimentally by heating excised steer corneas. Histology showed the system could shrink the stroma to a depth of 0.6 mm while sparing the epithelium in 75% of cases; the diameter of shrinkage was 1.3 mm. Theory predicted a significantly deeper and narrower region of shrinkage than was observed.

  13. HV-system for CW-gyrotrons at W7-X and the relevance for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braune, H.; Brand, P.; Krampitz, R.; Leonhardt, W.; Mellein, D.; Michel, G.; Mueller, G.; Sachtleben, J.; Winkler, M.; W7-X ECRH Teams at IPP IPF; FZK

    2005-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) is the main heating method for the Wendelstein 7-X Stellarator (W7-X), which is under construction at IPP-Greifswald. A 10 MW ECRH plant with CW-capability at 140 GHz is under construction to meet the scientific objectives. The microwave power is generated by 10 gyrotrons with 1 MW each two gyrotrons are operational at IPP in Greifswald. The tubes are equipped with a single-stage depressed collector for energy recovery and operate with an output power modulation between 0.3 and 1 MW with a sinusoidal frequency of up to 10 kHz which is achieved by modulating the depression voltage and is an interesting feature for NTM control at ITER. The general features of the ECRH-plant such as frequency power, cw-capability, flexibility and the experimental experience are of high relevance for the ITER system. Each gyrotron is fed by two high-voltage sources. A high-power supply for driving the electron beam and a precision low-power supply for beam acceleration. The high-power facility consists of modular solid state HV-supplies (-65 kV 50/100 A) providing fast power control and high flexibility. The low-power high-voltage source for beam acceleration is realized by a feed back controlled high-voltage servo-amplifier driving the depression voltage. A protection system with a thyratron crowbar for fast power removal in case of gyrotron failure by arcing is installed. Both the high power and low-power high-voltage sources have the capability to supply a 2 MW ITER gyrotron without any modification. Analogue electronic devices control the fast functions of the high-voltage system for each gyrotron and a hierarchy of industrial standard PLCs and computers supervise the whole ECRH-plant.

  14. Quantum efficiency of a double quantum dot microwave photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Clement; Vavilov, Maxim

    Motivated by recent interest in implementing circuit quantum electrodynamics with semiconducting quantum dots, we study charge transfer through a double quantum dot (DQD) capacitively coupled to a superconducting cavity subject to a microwave field. We analyze the DQD current response using input-output theory and determine the optimal parameter regime for complete absorption of radiation and efficient conversion of microwave photons to electric current. For experimentally available DQD systems, we show that the cavity-coupled DQD operates as a photon-to-charge converter with quantum efficiencies up to 80% C.W. acknowledges support by the Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program.

  15. Passively mode-locked cw Coumarin 6 ring dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    French, P.M.W.; Opalinska, M.M.; Taylor, J.

    1989-02-15

    The passive mode locking of a cw Coumarin 6 dye laser in a colliding-pulse ring configuration is reported. Pulses of less than 500-fsec duration have been obtained from 518 to 554 nm, with the shortest pulses obtained being of 96-fsec duration.

  16. A wide-band Gunn-effect CW waveguide amplifier.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sene, A.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Broad-band CW amplification with Gunn diodes in waveguide circuits has been obtained, with power gains typically between 10 and 15 dB and half-power bandwidths of more than 1 GHz. It is found that amplifier performance can be modeled with fair accuracy using a rough characterization for the diode parameters.

  17. CW-FIT: Group Contingency Effects across the Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, Howard P.; Iwaszuk, Wendy M.; Kamps, Debra; Shumate, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the effects of a group-contingency intervention on student behavior across academic instructional periods. Research suggests group contingencies are evidence-based practices, yet calls for investigation to determine the best conditions and groups suited for this type of intervention. CW-FIT (Class-Wide Function-related…

  18. Investigations of atmospheric dynamics using a CW Doppler sounder array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional CW Doppler sounding system currently under operation at the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama is described. The properties of the neutral atmosphere are discussed along with the theory of Doppler sounding technique. Methods of data analyses used to investigate the dynamical phenomena at the ionospheric heights are presented and suggestions for future investigations provided.

  19. Applications of KHZ-CW Lidar in Ecological Entomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmqvist, Elin; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2016-06-01

    The benefits of kHz lidar in ecological entomology are explained. Results from kHz-measurements on insects, carried out with a CW-lidar system, employing the Scheimpflug principle to obtain range resolution, are presented. A method to extract insect events and analyze the large amount of lidar data is also described.

  20. Cascaded combiners for a high power CW fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qirui; Ge, Tingwu; Zhang, Xuexia; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    We report cascaded combiners for a high power continuous wave (CW) fiber laser in this paper. The cascaded combiners are fabricated with an improved lateral splicing process. During the fusing process, there is no stress or tension between the pump fiber and the double-cladding fiber. Thus, the parameters of the combiner are better than those that have been reported. The coupling efficiency is 98.5%, and the signal insertion loss is 1%. The coupling efficiency of the cascaded combiners is 97.5%. The pump lights are individually coupled into the double-cladding fiber via five combiners. The thermal effects cannot cause damage to the combiners and the cascaded combiners can operate stably in high power CW fiber lasers. We also develop a high power CW fiber laser that generates a maximum 780 W of CW signal power at 1080 nm with 71% optical-to-optical conversion efficiency. The fiber laser is pumped via five intra-cavity cascaded combiners and five extra-cavity cascaded combiners with a maximum pump power of 1096 W and a pump wavelength of 975 nm.

  1. Extrapolation of the FOM 1MW free electron maser to a multi-megawatt millimeter microwave source

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Valentini, M.; Verhoeven, A.; Urbanus, W.; Tulupov, A.

    1996-12-01

    A Free Electron Maser is now under test at the FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen) Netherlands with the goal of producing 1 MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz to 250 GHz with wall plug efficiencies of 60%. An extrapolated version of this device is proposed, which would produce microwave power levels of up to 5 MW CW. This would allow for practical applications in such diverse areas as space power beaming, heating of fusion plasmas and hearing of high Mach number wind tunnels.

  2. Effect on the immune system of mice exposed chronically to 50 Hz amplitude-modulated 2.45 GHz microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Elekes, E.; Thuroczy, G.; Szabo, L.D.

    1996-12-01

    The effect of continuous (CW; 2.45 GHz carrier frequency) or amplitude-modulated (AM; 50 Hz square wave) microwave radiation on the immune response was tested. CW exposures (6 days, 3 h/day) induced elevations of the number of antibody-producing cells in the spleen of male Balb/c mice (+37%). AM microwave exposure induced elevation of the spleen index (+15%) and antibody-producing cell number (+55%) in the spleen of male mice. No changes were observed in female mice. It is concluded that both types of exposure conditions induced moderate elevation of antibody production only in male mice.

  3. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Janney, M.A.; Ferber, M.K.

    1992-03-24

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy. 2 figs.

  4. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, Jr., Harold D.; Janney, Mark A.; Ferber, Mattison K.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy.

  5. Report of the IEEE ICES/COST 281 Thermal Physiology Workshop Held in Paris, France on September 22-24, 2004

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-27

    MHz) in human volunteers. Bioelectromagnetics . 2003 Oct;24(7):502-9 Adair ER, Mylacraine KS, Allen SJ.Thermophysiological consequences of whole body...resonant RF exposure (100 MHz) in human volunteers. Bioelectromagnetics . 2003 Oct;24(7):489-501 Adair ER, Mylacraine KS, Cobb BL. Human exposure to...2450 MHz CW energy at levels outside the IEEE C95.1 standard does not increase core temperature. Bioelectromagnetics . 2001 Sep;22(6):429-39 Adair

  6. Active microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D.; Vidal-Madjar, D.

    1994-01-01

    Research on the use of active microwaves in remote sensing, presented during plenary and poster sessions, is summarized. The main highlights are: calibration techniques are well understood; innovative modeling approaches have been developed which increase active microwave applications (segmentation prior to model inversion, use of ERS-1 scatterometer, simulations); polarization angle and frequency diversity improves characterization of ice sheets, vegetation, and determination of soil moisture (X band sensor study); SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry potential is emerging; use of multiple sensors/extended spectral signatures is important (increase emphasis).

  7. Effect of pulse-modulated microwaves on fullerene ion production with electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Asaji, T; Uchida, T; Minezaki, H; Oshima, K; Racz, R; Muramatsu, M; Biri, S; Kitagawa, A; Kato, Y; Yoshida, Y

    2012-02-01

    Fullerene plasmas generated by pulse-modulated microwaves have been investigated under typical conditions at the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source. The effect of the pulse modulation is distinct from that of simply structured gases, and then the density of the fullerene plasmas increased as decreasing the duty ratio. The density for a pulse width of 10 μs at the period of 100 μs is 1.34 times higher than that for CW mode. We have studied the responses of fullerene and argon plasmas to pulsed microwaves. After the turnoff of microwave power, fullerene plasmas lasted ∼30 times longer than argon plasmas.

  8. Status and Evaluation of Microwave Furnace Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizcano, Maricela; Mackey, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    The microwave (MW) furnace is a HY-Tech Microwave Systems, 2 kW 2.45 GHz Single Mode Microwave Applicator operating in continuous wave (CW) with variable power. It is located in Cleveland, Ohio at NASA Glenn Research Center. Until recently, the furnace capabilities had not been fully realized due to unknown failure that subsequently damaged critical furnace components. Although the causes of the problems were unknown, an assessment of the furnace itself indicated operational failure may have been partially caused by power quality. This report summarizes the status of the MW furnace and evaluates its capabilities in materials processing.

  9. Generation of high purity cw proton beams from microwave driven sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, D.; Lykke, K.R.

    1995-07-01

    We describe a technique we have developed to significantly increase the proton fraction extracted from high pressure (mTorr) electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) sources of the type developed by Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). Specifically, this proton enhancement is achieved by the addition of environmentally benign additives (H{sub 2}O being the most effective) to the plasma, in molecular concentrations of the order of 1%. Typically, operating under non- resonant source conditions, this technique will enhance the proton fraction from about 75% to greater than 95% for a power input of 700W at 2.45 GHz. Similar results are achieved for deuteron beams. We believe this technique is capable of similar results in arc-discharge (bucket) sources, Penning sources and any other gas discharge sources, under suitable conditions.

  10. Large Scale CW ECRH Systems: Meeting a Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Erckmann, V.; Braune, H.; Laqua, H. P.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Michel, G.; Kasparek, W.; Plaum, B.; Lechte, C.; Stuttgart, IPF; Petelin, M. I.; Lubiako, L.; Bruschi, A.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Bin, W.; Van Den Braber, R.; Doelman, N.; Gantenbein, G.; Thumm, M.

    2011-12-23

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) systems for next step-fusion devices like W7-X and ITER operate in CW-mode and provide a large flexibility to comply with various physics demands such as plasma start-up, heating and current drive, as well as configuration and MHD control. The request for many different sophisticated applications results in a growing complexity of the systems. This is in conflict with the request for high availability, reliability, and maintainability, which arises from DEMO demands. 'Advanced' ECRH-components must, therefore, comply with both the complex physics demands and operational robustness and reliability. The W7-X ECRH system is the first CW facility of an ITER relevant size and is used as a test bed for such components. Results on improvements of gyrotrons, transmission components and launchers are presented together with proposals for future developments.

  11. PROSPECTS FOR A VERY HIGH POWER CW SRF LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer

    2010-06-01

    Steady development in SRF accelerator technology combined with the success of large scale installations such as CEBAF at Jefferson Laboratory and the SNS Linac at ORNL gives credibility to the concept of very high average power CW machines for light sources or Proton drivers. Such machines would be powerful tools for discovery science in themselves but could also pave the way to reliable cost effective drivers for such applications as neutrino factories, an energy-frontier muon collider, nuclear waste transmutation or accelerator driven subcritical reactors for energy production. In contrast to machines such as ILC that need maximum accelerating gradient, the challenges in these machines are mainly in efficiency, reliability, beam stability, beam loss and of course cost. In this paper the present state of the art is briefly reviewed and options for a multi-GeV, multi-MW CW linac are discussed.

  12. Design, construction and evaluation of a 12.2 GHz, 4.0 kW-CW coupled-cavity traveling wave tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, W. R.; Harman, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program to study design techniques and to utilize these techniques to optimize the performance of an X-band 4 kW, CW traveling wave tube ultimately intended for satellite-borne television broadcast transmitters is described. The design is based on the coupled-cavity slow-wave circuit with velocity resynchronization to maximize the conversion efficiency. The design incorporates a collector which is demountable from the tube. This was done to facilitate multistage depressed collector experiments employing a NASA designed axisymmetric, electrostatic collector for linear beam microwave tubes after shipment of the tubes to NASA.

  13. Compatibility of CW Agent Degrading Enzymes with Disinfectants and Foams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-19

    can be produced in large quantity with over-expression clones. Similar to commercial laundry detergents containing different enzymes , the...shown to retain high level of activity in ColdFire® and a variety of fire- fighting foams, degreasers, laundry detergent , skin lotion, or other...1 COMPATIBILITY OF CW AGENT DEGRADING ENZYMES WITH DISINFECTANTS AND FOAMS Tu-chen Cheng1, Vipin K. Rastogi1, Joseph J. DeFrank1 and Ilona

  14. Translation of Toxicity Data into CW Agent Toxicity Estimates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    dosage defined by vapor concentration (C) multiplied by exposure time (T) CTXX -- Lethal or Effective Concentration-Time to XX% exposed Dependence of...kg, young healthy adult males Agents addressed: GA (tabun), GB (sarin), GD (soman), GF (cyclosarin), VX and HD (mustard) Routes of exposure ...use with CW agent exposure scenarios involving healthy adult males Evidence exists that in some mammalian species (ex. rodents) that a significant

  15. All-PM CW fiber optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Zlobina, Ekaterina A; Kablukov, Sergey I; Babin, Sergey A

    2016-10-31

    We demonstrate for the first time a CW all-polarization maintaining (PM) all-fiber optical parametric oscillator (FOPO) based on a birefringent photonic crystal fiber pumped by a tunable linearly polarized ytterbium-doped fiber laser. The all-PM FOPO features polarization-adjustment-free tunable operation in wavelength range from 920 to 1000 nm for both the slow and the fast fiber axes with output power reaching 1.3 W.

  16. Laser Photon Force Measurements using a CW Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Perry; Edwards, David L.; Carruth, M. Ralph, Jr.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The photon force resulting from the non-damaging impact of laser derived photons on a metallic target was measured using a vacuum compatible microbalance. This experiment quantitatively verified that the force resulting from laser photons impacting a reflective surface is measurable and predictable. The photon wavelength is 1064 mn and the laser is a multi-mode 30OW Nd YAG continuous wave (CW) laser.

  17. Quasi-cw 808-nm 300-W laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezotosnyi, V. V.; Kozyrev, A. A.; Kondakova, N. S.; Kondakov, S. A.; Krokhin, O. N.; Mikaelyan, G. T.; Oleshchenko, V. A.; Popov, Yu. M.; Cheshev, E. A.

    2017-02-01

    Samples of 808-nm quasi-cw laser diode arrays (LDAs) with an output power exceeding 300 W, a pulse duration of 200 μs, and a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz are developed and fabricated. The main output parameters of a set of five LDAs, including light – current characteristics, current – voltage characteristics, and emission spectra are measured. Preliminary life tests show that the LDA power remains stable for 108 pulses.

  18. Scattering of a CW plane wave by a pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivett, D. H.; Rogers, P. H.

    1982-05-01

    A procedure similar to the CW crossed-beam calculation of Ingard and Pridmore-Brown (1956) is used to calculate the far field scattered sound pressure of a pulse interacting with a plane wave. The scattered sound is found to be at neither the sum nor the difference frequency. It is suggested that this type of interaction is ideal for investigating the scattering of sound by sound, and a numerical solution is used to discuss the general features of the nearfield waveform.

  19. Development of a cw Co : MgF 2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lieto, A.

    2003-03-01

    The results obtained in the development of a cryogenic cw Co : MgF 2 laser, realized at the Dipartimento di Fisica of the Università di Pisa are presented. The laser can be tuned continuously in the range between 1.6 and 2.1 μm, with a typical output power of 1-2 W. A preliminary application to the spectroscopy of a Tm : YLF doped crystal is reported by using a photoacoustic apparatus.

  20. The eclipsing binary CW Eridani. [three-color photoelectric observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.-Y.

    1975-01-01

    Results of three-color photoelectric observations of CW Eridani are presented which were made with a 30-inch telescope over the three-year period from 1970 to 1973. The times of minima are computed, solutions of the light curves are obtained, and theoretical light curves are computed from the solutions. The period is determined to be 2.72837 days, and the orbital and photoelectric elements are derived from solutions based on the idealized Russell model.

  1. Inhomogeneous broadening effects in multimode CW chemical lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirels, H.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of a multiple longitudinal mode CW chemical laser is investigated with reference to the effects of inhomogeneous broadening for the case where the longitudinal mode spacing is small compared with the characteristic Doppler and homogeneous widths of the lasing medium. Both a Fabry-Perot resonator and a saturated amplifier are considered, using a two-vibrational-level model. Closed form solutions are obtained which are shown to be in good agreement with the numerical results of Bullock and Lipkis (1979).

  2. Low threshold CW Nc laser oscillator at 1060 nm study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, M.; Deshazer, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    A broad range of characteristics of neodymium/yag lasers were investigated. With Nd:YVO4 crystals, CW 1.06 mu lasers were operated with thresholds a factor of 2 lower than Nd:YAG and with greater slope efficiencies. Thus, the first step in the development of new oscillators suitable for application in high data rate laser communication systems which surpass the present performance of the Nd:YAG laser has been successfully demonstrated.

  3. Design of a 10 MeV normal conducting CW proton linac based on equidistant multi-gap CH cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Continuous wave (CW) high current proton linacs have wide applications as the front end of high power proton machines. The low energy part of such a linac is the most difficult and there is currently no widely accepted solution. Based on the analysis of the focusing properties of the CW low energy proton linac, a 10 MeV low energy normal conducting proton linac based on equidistant seven-gap Cross-bar H-type (CH) cavities is proposed. The linac is composed of ten 7-gap CH cavities and the transverse focusing is maintained by quadrupole doublets located between the cavities. The total length of the linac is less than 6 meters and the average acceleration gradient is about 1.2 MeV/m. The electromagnetic properties of the cavities are investigated by Microwave Studio. At the nominal acceleration gradient the maximum surface electric field in the cavities is less than 1.3 times the Kilpatrick limit, and the Ohmic loss of each cavity is less than 35 kW. Multi-particle beam dynamics simulations are performed with Tracewin code, and the results show that the beam dynamics of the linac are quite stable, the linac has the capability to accelerate up to 30 mA beam with acceptable dynamics behavior. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375122, 91126003)

  4. Synergistic effect of Fe-doping and stacking faults on the dielectric permittivity and microwave absorption properties of SiC whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Jianlei; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Wenxiu; Cao, Wenbin

    2015-05-01

    Previously, we have found that the stacking faults density in SiC whisker (SiCw) significantly affects its dielectric permittivity mainly through the enhanced dipolar loss mechanism. Doping has been considered as another effective way to increase the dielectric permittivity of granular SiC. In order to further investigate the possible synergistic effect of Fe-doping and stacking faults on permittivity, permeability, and microwave absorption properties, Fe-doped SiCw with various stacking faults densities were prepared. Experimental results indicate that the Fe-doped SiCw with internal stacking faults shows a higher dielectric permittivity than that of undoped SiCw with only stacking faults. Both dielectric permittivity and microwave absorption properties of Fe-doped SiCw increased significantly with the increase in dopant concentration. First-principle calculation reveals that Fe-doping tunes SiC to be half-metallic, and thus, its electric conductivity as well as conduction loss is enhanced. So, both the dielectric permittivity and microwave absorption properties of Fe-doped SiCw were significantly improved due to the synergistic effect of the enhanced conduction loss caused by Fe-doping and the dipolar loss induced by stacking faults. And, the measured weak magnetic loss contributes to that as well.

  5. Status of the Project-X CW Linac Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, J-F.; Solyak, N.; Berrutti, P.; Carneiro, J.P.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Saini, A.; Stheynas, B.; Yakovlev, V.P.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Project-X is a proposed proton accelerator complex at Fermilab that would provide particle beams to support a diversified experimental program at the intensity frontier. As currently envisioned, the complex would employ a CW superconducting linac to accelerate a 1 mA average, 5 mA peak H{sup -} beam from 2.1 MeV to 3 GeV. A second superconducting linac, operating in pulsed mode would ultimately accelerate a small fraction of this beam up to 8 GeV. The CW linac is based on five families of resonators operating at three frequencies: half-wave (1 family at 162.5 MHz), spoke (2 families at 325 MHz) and elliptical (2 families at 650 MHz). Accelerating and focusing elements are assembled in cryomodules separated by short warm sections. A long open region ({approx} 15 m) allows beam extraction at 1 GeV in support of a nuclear experimental program. In this paper, we present the latest iteration of the CW linac baseline lattice. We also briefly compare it to an alternative where the 162.5 half-wave resonators are replaced with 325 MHz spoke resonators.

  6. A Variable Energy CW Compact Accelerator for Ion Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, Carol J.; Taylor, J.; Edgecock, R.; Schulte, R.

    2016-03-10

    Cancer is the second-largest cause of death in the U.S. and approximately two-thirds of all cancer patients will receive radiation therapy with the majority of the radiation treatments performed using x-rays produced by electron linacs. Charged particle beam radiation therapy, both protons and light ions, however, offers advantageous physical-dose distributions over conventional photon radiotherapy, and, for particles heavier than protons, a significant biological advantage. Despite recognition of potential advantages, there is almost no research activity in this field in the U.S. due to the lack of clinical accelerator facilities offering light ion therapy in the States. In January, 2013, a joint DOE/NCI workshop was convened to address the challenges of light ion therapy [1], inviting more than 60 experts from diverse fields related to radiation therapy. This paper reports on the conclusions of the workshop, then translates the clinical requirements into accelerat or and beam-delivery technical specifications. A comparison of available or feasible accelerator technologies is compared, including a new concept for a compact, CW, and variable energy light ion accelerator currently under development. This new light ion accelerator is based on advances in nonscaling Fixed-Field Alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator design. The new design concepts combine isochronous orbits with long (up to 4m) straight sections in a compact racetrack format allowing inner circulating orbits to be energy selected for low-loss, CW extraction, effectively eliminating the high-loss energy degrader in conventional CW cyclotron designs.

  7. 9 GHz CW-EPR molecular dynamics study of polycrystalline 1-benzyl 4-hydroxy piperidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzyminiewski, R.; Pawlicka, M.; Kruczynski, Z.; Kudynska, J.; Buckmaster, H. A.

    1998-07-01

    This paper reports the results of a 9.4 GHz CW-EPR study of the molecular dynamics in a polycrystalline sample of 1-benzyl 4-hydroxy piperidine which was γ-irradiated with a 150 kGy dose at 293 K. The temperature dependence of the hyperfine splitting (HFS) and spectral line width was measured in this acceptor-bridge-donor molecular structure from 123-273 K. A model evaluation procedure was used to determine the best-fit simulation of the observed spectrum. It was concluded that the ionizing radiation generates a free radical (I) by removal of one hydrogen from the CH 2 group in the bridge connecting the benzene and piperidine rings and another free radical (II) by breaking the bond between the carbon and hydrogen atoms in the piperidine ring. The HFS parameters and the unpaired electron densities were determined. The line width for radical (I) was found to be temperature dependent with an anomaly near 190 K indicative of either a solid-solid structural phase transition or conformational changes and did not saturate at microwave cavity input power levels up to 7 mW. The HFS parameter for radical (I) was also found to be temperature dependent between 123 and 273 K with an anomalous peak near 190 K in agreement with that observed for the line width.

  8. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on microwave processing of ceramics: Microwave-material interactions; anticipated advantage of microwave sintering; ceramic sintering; and ceramic joining. 24 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  9. The novel HLA-Cw*1802 allele is associated with B*5703 in the Bubi population from Equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    Vilches, C; Bunce, M; de Pablo, R; Moreno, M E; Puente, S; Sanz, L; Kreisler, M

    1997-06-01

    The HLA-Cw*1801 specificity, a Cw7/Cw4 hybrid allele, has recently been described in association with B*8101 (formerly B"DT"). In this study, the new Cw*1802 variant, differing from Cw*1801 at exon 5, is found associated with B*5703 in Bubi individuals from Equatorial Guinea. Confirmatory complete coding regions of B*5703 and B*3910 are also reported.

  10. Stable 1.25-W CW Methanol Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Pickett, Herbert M.

    1989-01-01

    Far-infrared (FIR) laser operating at 119-micrometer-wavelength transition of methanol achieves very low drift in frequency. Continuous-wave (CW) FIR output is 1.25 W when laser pumped by 125-W commercial CO2 laser. Rate of drift of output frequency less than plus or minus 100 kHz per hour because laser designed to have low thermal-expansion coefficients and because temperatures of input and output couplers held within 0.1 degree C of fixed values.

  11. DC information preservation for cardiopulmonary monitor utilizing CW Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Alexander M; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lubecke, Victor M

    2008-01-01

    Direct conversion RF receivers introduce large DC offsets, reducing the dynamic range of the baseband signal. Coupled with the relatively small time varying signals in human vital sign monitoring using CW Doppler radar, extraction of cardio-pulmonary information becomes difficult. Previous DC offset compensation techniques utilizing AC coupling have proven detrimental to the performance of the system and the integrity of the low-frequency cardiopulmonary signals. A proposed system utilizing digitally controlled voltage feedback and center finding preserves the important DC information for optimal extraction of phase information in the quadrature system.

  12. A CW radar for ranging with PN/PSK modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, W.; Waesserling, H. G.; Wigger, B.

    The design and performance of a compact CW spread-spectrum ranging radar with pseudonoise phase-shift-keying (PN/PSK) modulation are discussed. The operating principles of the SAW convolver employed for matched filtering (Grossl, 1985) are explained; the system configuration is illustrated with a block diagram; and performance data are summarized in a table. The radar provides range resolution 2 m out to a maximum range of 2.4 km. Operating parameters include code length 511 chirps, dynamic range 50 dB, pseudorandom-function repetition rate 31.9 MHz, processing time 16 microsec, and target recognition level above noise 38 dB.

  13. Quasi-CW Laser Diode Bar Life Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Krainak, Michael A.; Dallas, Joseph L.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is developing technology for satellite-based, high peak power, LIDAR transmitters requiring 3-5 years of reliable operation. Semi-conductor laser diodes provide high efficiency pumping of solid state lasers with the promise of long-lived, reliable operation. 100-watt quasi- CW laser diode bars have been baselined for the next generation laser altimeters. Multi-billion shot lifetimes are required. The authors have monitored the performance of several diodes for billions of shots and investigated operational modes for improving diode lifetime.

  14. Design of 250-MW CW RF system for APT

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.

    1997-09-01

    The design for the RF systems for the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) proton linac will be presented. The linac produces a continuous beam power of 130 MW at 1300 MeV with the installed capability to produce up to a 170 MW beam at 1700 MeV. The linac is comprised of a 350 MHz RFQ to 7 MeV followed in sequence by a 700 MHz coupled-cavity drift tube linac, coupled-cavity linac, and superconducting (SC) linac to 1700 MeV. At the 1700 MeV, 100 mA level the linac requires 213 MW of continuous-wave (CW) RF power. This power will be supplied by klystrons with a nominal output power of 1.0 MW. 237 kystrons are required with all but three of these klystrons operating at 700 MHz. The klystron count includes redundancy provisions that will be described which allow the RF systems to meet an operational availability in excess of 95 percent. The approach to achieve this redundancy will be presented for both the normal conducting (NC) and SC accelerators. Because of the large amount of CW RF power required for the APT linac, efficiency is very important to minimize operating cost. Operation and the RF system design, including in-progress advanced technology developments which improve efficiency, will be discussed. RF system performance will also be predicted. Because of the simultaneous pressures to increase RF system reliability, reduce tunnel envelope, and minimize RF system cost, the design of the RF vacuum windows has become an important issue. The power from a klystron will be divided into four equal parts to minimize the stress on the RF vacuum windows. Even with this reduction, the RF power level at the window is at the upper boundary of the power levels employed at other CW accelerator facilities. The design of a 350 MHz, coaxial vacuum window will be presented as well as test results and high power conditioning profiles. The transmission of 950 kW, CW, power through this window has been demonstrated with only minimal high power conditioning.

  15. Statistical properties of partially coherent cw fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Churkin, Dmitriy V; Smirnov, Sergey V; Podivilov, Evgenii V

    2010-10-01

    We perform a detailed quantitative numerical analysis of a partially coherent quasi-cw fiber laser on the example of a high-Q normal dispersion cavity Raman fiber laser. The key role of precise spectral performances of fiber Bragg gratings forming the laser cavity is clarified. It is shown that cross-phase modulation between the pump and Stokes waves does not affect the generation. Amplitudes of different longitudinal modes strongly fluctuate, obeying the Gaussian distribution. As the intensity statistics is noticeably nonexponential, longitudinal modes should be correlated.

  16. High efficiency CW green-pumped alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, J. W.; Brown, D. C.

    2006-02-01

    High power, CW and pulsed alexandrite lasers were produced by pumping the laser rod with a high quality diode pumped 532 nm laser sources. This pumping architecture provides stable performance with output power > 1.4 W at 767nm in the free running mode and 0.78W at 1000 Hz. An output of 80 mW at 375.5 nm was achieved at 500 Hz. This approach holds promise for the production of a scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  17. MMIC-calibrated probing by CW electrooptic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Quang, D.; Erasme, Didier; Huyart, Bernard

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes an electrooptic probing technique using a cw semiconductor-laser beam associated with a fast photodetector. Besides its simplicity, this technique presents some advantages over the sampling one thanks to the presence of a Fabry-Perot effect, namely an enhancement of the electrooptic interaction and a simple solution to the calibration problem. The good validity of the calibration method allows the application of this technique to S-parameter measurements. The S-parameter determination, in modulus and in phase, of an industrial MMIC by the electrooptic method is reported and compared with direct network analyzer measurements.

  18. In vitro fertilization of mouse ova by spermatozoa exposed isothermally to radio-frequency radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Liu, L.M.; Graham, R.; East, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Mouse spermatozoa were exposed in vitro for 1 h to 27- or 2,450-MHz CW RF radiation at SARs of 0 to 90 W/kg under isothermal (37 +/- 0.2 degrees C) conditions. Exposure at either frequency to RF radiation at SARs of 50 W/kg or greater resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the ability of irradiated sperm to fertilize mouse ova in vitro (P less than .05). Over the range of SARs there was no apparent difference in the effects of 27- vs. 2,450-MHz RF radiation. There were no readily detectable exposure effects on spermatozoan morphology, ultrastructure, or capacitation. The reduction of in vitro fertilization is attributed to a direct effect of RF radiation on spermatozoa rather than to heating.

  19. Analysis of Free Electron Laser Performance Utilizing the National Bureau of Standards’ CW Microtron,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    as well as for basic physics and chemistry, is to be situated at the National Bureau of Standards’. A CW 185 MeV racetrack microtron (RTM)3 is under...LASER PERFORMANCE UTILIZING THE NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS* CW MICROTRON Cha-Mei Tang and Phillip Sprangle Plasma Physics Division. Naval Research...K. Maruyama Department of Physics, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943 Abstract The National Bureau of Standards’ (NBS) CW racetrack

  20. Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Perez, Raul M.; Glazer, Stuart D.

    1990-01-01

    Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window, obtained using an imaging IR radiometer during transmitter operation at 365 kW CW and 8.5 GHz, are discussed. The window under investigation was constructed of HTP-6, a high-thermal-performance material developed to shield the Space Shuttle Orbiter from the heat of reentry. The measurement technique is described, and experimental results are presented. The window performed adequately at 365 kW CW with a center temperature of 475 C. The tests verify that HTP-6 can be used as a window material or a support structure in high-power waveguides at power densities of 1.47 kW/sq cm for extended periods of time, with no change in its mechanical characteristics.

  1. Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Perez, Raul M.; Glazer, Stuart D.

    1990-06-01

    Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window, obtained using an imaging IR radiometer during transmitter operation at 365 kW CW and 8.5 GHz, are discussed. The window under investigation was constructed of HTP-6, a high-thermal-performance material developed to shield the Space Shuttle Orbiter from the heat of reentry. The measurement technique is described, and experimental results are presented. The window performed adequately at 365 kW CW with a center temperature of 475 C. The tests verify that HTP-6 can be used as a window material or a support structure in high-power waveguides at power densities of 1.47 kW/sq cm for extended periods of time, with no change in its mechanical characteristics.

  2. Optimal Signal Processing of Frequency-Stepped CW Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ybarra, Gary A.; Wu, Shawkang M.; Bilbro, Griff L.; Ardalan, Sasan H.; Hearn, Chase P.; Neece, Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    An optimal signal processing algorithm is derived for estimating the time delay and amplitude of each scatterer reflection using a frequency-stepped CW system. The channel is assumed to be composed of abrupt changes in the reflection coefficient profile. The optimization technique is intended to maximize the target range resolution achievable from any set of frequency-stepped CW radar measurements made in such an environment. The algorithm is composed of an iterative two-step procedure. First, the amplitudes of the echoes are optimized by solving an overdetermined least squares set of equations. Then, a nonlinear objective function is scanned in an organized fashion to find its global minimum. The result is a set of echo strengths and time delay estimates. Although this paper addresses the specific problem of resolving the time delay between the first two echoes, the derivation is general in the number of echoes. Performance of the optimization approach is illustrated using measured data obtained from an HP-X510 network analyzer. It is demonstrated that the optimization approach offers a significant resolution enhancement over the standard processing approach that employs an IFFT. Degradation in the performance of the algorithm due to suboptimal model order selection and the effects of additive white Gaussion noise are addressed.

  3. Optimal Signal Processing of Frequency-Stepped CW Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ybarra, Gary A.; Wu, Shawkang M.; Bilbro, Griff L.; Ardalan, Sasan H.; Hearn, Chase P.; Neece, Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    An optimal signal processing algorithm is derived for estimating the time delay and amplitude of each scatterer reflection using a frequency-stepped CW system. The channel is assumed to be composed of abrupt changes in the reflection coefficient profile. The optimization technique is intended to maximize the target range resolution achievable from any set of frequency-stepped CW radar measurements made in such an environment. The algorithm is composed of an iterative two-step procedure. First, the amplitudes of the echoes are optimized by solving an overdetermined least squares set of equations. Then, a nonlinear objective function is scanned in an organized fashion to find its global minimum. The result is a set of echo strengths and time delay estimates. Although this paper addresses the specific problem of resolving the time delay between the two echoes, the derivation is general in the number of echoes. Performance of the optimization approach is illustrated using measured data obtained from an HP-851O network analyzer. It is demonstrated that the optimization approach offers a significant resolution enhancement over the standard processing approach that employs an IFFT. Degradation in the performance of the algorithm due to suboptimal model order selection and the effects of additive white Gaussion noise are addressed.

  4. Photometric analysis of the overcontact binary CW Cas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. J.; Qian, S. B.; He, J. J.; Li, L. J.; Zhao, E. G.

    2014-11-01

    New CCD photometric observations of overcontact binary CW Cas were carried out in 2004 and 2011. In particular, the light curve obtained in 2004 shows a remarkable O'Connell effect. Compared with light curves in different observing seasons, variations were found. These variations can be explained by dark spot activities on the surface of at least one component. Using the Wilson-Devinney code with a spot model, we find that the photometric solutions confirm CW Cas is a shallow W-subtype overcontact binary with a spotted massive component. Our new determined times of minimum light together with the others published in the literature were analyzed to find a change of orbital period. From the O – C curves, the period of the system shows a cyclic period change (P {sub 3} = 69.9 yr, A {sub 3} = 0.03196 days) superposed on the linear increase. The cyclic variation, if explained as the light-travel time effect, reveals the presence of a tertiary companion.

  5. Optimizing Frequency-Modulated CW EDMR in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lihuang; van Schooten, Kipp; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a powerful method of probing dopant and defect spin states in semiconductor devices. Moreover, at the single dopant level, these spin states are heavily investigated as potential qubit systems, though facile electronic access to single dopants is exceedingly difficult. We therefore characterize detection sensitivities of frequency-modulated CW-EDMR of phosphorus donors in silicon Si:P using a home-built 2.5 GHz system (~80 mT) at 5 K. An arbitrary waveform generator controls the frequency modulation, allowing us to optimize the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of both the dangling bond and phosphorus donor signals against multiple experimental parameters, such as modulation amplitude and modulation frequency. The optimal range of frequency modulation parameters is constrained by the relaxation time of the phosphorous electron at 5 K, resulting in the same sensitivity limit as field modulated CW-EDMR, but offers some technical advantages; e.g. reducing the relative contribution of magnetic field induced currents and eliminating the need for field modulation coils. We further characterize the EDMR SNR in Si:P as a function of optical excitation energy by using a narrow line laser, tunable across donor exciton and band gap states.

  6. Innovative high-power CW Yb:YAG cryogenic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. C.; Singley, J. M.; Yager, E.; Kuper, J. W.; Lotito, B. J.; Bennett, L. L.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we discuss a CW Yb:YAG cryogenic laser program that has resulted in the design and demonstration of a novel high power laser. Cryogenically-cooled crystalline solid-state lasers, and Yb:YAG lasers in particular, are attractive sources of scalable CW output power with very high wallplug efficiency and excellent beam-quality that is independent of the output power. This laser consists of a distributed array of seven highly-doped thin Yb:YAG-sapphire disks in a folded multiple-Z resonator. Individual disks are pumped from opposite sides using fiber-coupled ~ 30W 940nm pump diodes. The laser system we have constructed produces a near-diffraction-limited TEM 00 output beam with the aid of an active conduction-cooling design. In addition, the device can be scaled to very high average power in a MOPA configuration, by increasing the number and diameter of the thin disks, and by increasing the power of the pump diodes with only minor modifications to the current design. The thermal and optical benefits of cryogenically-cooled solid-state lasers will be reviewed, scalability of our Yb:YAG cryogenic laser design will be discussed, and we will present experimental results including output power, slope and optical-optical efficiencies, and beam-quality.

  7. Innovative high-power CW Yb:YAG cryogenic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. C.; Singley, J. M.; Yager, E.; Kuper, J. W.; Lotito, B. J.; Bennett, L. L.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we discuss a CW Yb:YAG cryogenic laser program that has resulted in the design and demonstration of a novel high power laser. Cryogenically-cooled crystalline solid-state lasers, and Yb:YAG lasers in particular, are attractive sources of scalable CW output power with very high wallplug efficiency and excellent beam-quality that is independent of the output power. This laser consists of a distributed array of seven highly-doped thin Yb:YAG-sapphire disks in a folded multiple-Z resonator. Individual disks are pumped from opposite sides using fiber-coupled ~ 30W 940nm pump diodes. The laser system we have constructed produces a near-diffraction-limited TEM 00 output beam with the aid of an active conduction-cooling design. In addition, the device can be scaled to very high average power in a MOPA configuration, by increasing the number and diameter of the thin disks, and by increasing the power of the pump diodes with only minor modifications to the current design. The thermal and optical benefits of cryogenically-cooled solid-state lasers will be reviewed, scalability of our Yb:YAG cryogenic laser design will be discussed, and we will present experimental results including output power, slope and optical-optical efficiencies, and beam-quality.

  8. Non-destructive sub-THz CW imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpowicz, Nicholas; Zhong, Hua; Xu, Jingzhou; Lin, Kuang-I.; Hwang, Jenn-Shyong; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2005-03-01

    A simple, compact CW sub-THz imaging system, utilizing a 0.2 and 0.6 THz Gunn diode source is presented. A silicon beam lead diode detector and a Golay cell are used for the detection. Various results are presented, which show that the CW THz imaging modality is suitable for diverse applications, such as non-destructive testing and security. The key components of the system include the Gunn diode assembly, an optical chopper, a polyethylene lens, a detector, a lock-in amplifier, and two translation stages. The beam from the Gunn diode is focused on the sample being imaged by the polyethylene lens, the transmitted or reflected beam is measured by the detector. The energy transmitted through the sample at each point in the plane of the sample is detected. Since the system has relatively few components compared to pulsed THz imaging systems, it is less expensive and easier to design and operate, although it does not provide depth or spectral information about the sample. Since no time-delay scans take place, scanning can be done quickly compared to a time-domain system, limited by the maximum velocity of the translation stages and response of the detectors. It provides information about the macroscopic features of hidden structures within materials that are transparent to sub THz radiation, such as space shuttle insulating foam, articles of clothing, and luggage.

  9. An Acoustic Demonstration Model for CW and Pulsed Spectrosocopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starck, Torben; Mäder, Heinrich; Trueman, Trevor; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    High school and undergraduate students have often difficulties if new concepts are introduced in their physics or chemistry lectures. Lecture demonstrations and references to more familiar analogues can be of great help to the students in such situations. We have developed an experimental setup to demonstrate the principles of cw absorption and pulsed excitation - emission spectroscopies, using acoustical analogues. Our radiation source is a speaker and the detector is a microphone, both controlled by a computer sound card. The acoustical setup is housed in a plexiglas box, which serves as a resonator. It turns out that beer glasses are suitable samples; this also helps to keep the students interested! The instrument is controlled by a LabView program. In a cw experiment, the sound frequency is swept through a certain frequency range and the microphone response is recorded simultaneously as function of frequency. A background signal without sample is recorded, and background subtraction yields the beer glass spectrum. In a pulsed experiment, a short sound pulse is generated and the microphone is used to record the resulting emission signal of the beer glass. A Fourier transformation of the time domain signal gives then the spectrum. We will discuss the experimental setup and show videos of the experiments.

  10. High-power pulsed and CW diode-pumped mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Larry R.; Hays, A. D.; Kaz, Alex; Kasinski, Jeff; Burnham, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The operation of both pulsed and CW diode-pumped mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers are presented. The pulsed laser produced 1.0 mJ with pulsewidths of 90 psec at 20 Hz. The CW pumped laser produced 6 W output at 1.064 microns and 3 W output at 532 nm.

  11. Research on Doppler frequency in incoherent FM/CW laser detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Cui, Zhanzhong

    2010-10-01

    The principle of transmitted and received laser in incoherent FM/CW laser detection is different from the one in coherent FM/CW laser detection. The methods for distance solution in both detections are similar. Incoherent FM/CW laser detection uses subcarrier to modulate the intensity of laser, and the photodetector detects the intensity of received signal. The amplified photocurrent is mixed with local oscillator signal, and the intermediate frequency (IF) signal contains the information of distance from sensor to target. The Doppler frequency for this detection is related with the relative radial velocity between sensor and target. The optical frequency is directly modulated with electro-optic device in coherent FM/CW laser detection and the received laser signal is photomixed with transmitted laser signal. The Doppler frequency in the detection relates to the optical frequency. In distance-measuring lidar, the Doppler frequency affects the solution. The Doppler frequency in incoherent FM/CW laser detection is unrelated with optical frequency, and it is much less than the one in coherent FM/CW laser detection, correspondingly. The error in incoherent FM/CW laser detection is smaller. As a result, the incoherent FM/CW laser detection is more suitable for the use of distance-measuring lidar.

  12. High-power cw visible lasers pumped by Raman fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surin, A. A.; Larin, S. V.; Borisenko, T. E.; Prusakov, K. Yu.; Stirmanov, Yu. S.

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes cw visible lasers having an output power above 10 {\\text{W}} and emitting at wavelengths of 561, 589 and 623 {\\text{nm}}. An approach is proposed for obtaining single-mode cw visible laser light with a power above 10 {\\text{W}} at any wavelength in the range 560 - 660 {\\text{nm}}.

  13. The 1.083 micron tunable CW semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. S.; Chen, Jan-Shin; Lu, Ken-Gen; Ouyang, Keng

    1991-01-01

    A tunable CW laser is desired to produce light equivalent to the helium spectral line at 1.08 microns. This laser will serve as an optical pumping source for He-3 and He-4 atoms used in space magnetometers. This light source can be fabricated either as a semiconductor laser diode or a pumped solid state laser. Continuous output power of greater than 10 mW is desired. Semiconductor lasers can be thermally tuned, but must be capable of locking onto the helium resonance lines. Solid state lasers must have efficient pumping sources suitable for space configuration. Additional requirements are as follows: space magnetometer applications will include low mass (less than 0.5 kg), low power consumption (less than 0.75 W), and high stability/reliability for long missions (5-10 years).

  14. Low power cw-laser signatures on human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Lihachev, A; Lesinsh, J; Jakovels, D; Spigulis, J

    2011-01-24

    Impact of cw laser radiation on autofluorescence features of human skin is studied. Two methods of autofluorescence detection are applied: the spectral method with the use of a fibreoptic probe and spectrometer for determining the autofluorescence recovery kinetics at a fixed skin area of {approx}12 mm{sup 2}, and the multispectral visualisation method with the use of a multispectral imaging camera for visualising long-term autofluorescence changes in a skin area of {approx}4 cm{sup 2}. The autofluorescence recovery kinetics after preliminary laser irradiation is determined. Skin autofluorescence images with visible long-term changes - 'signatures' of low power laser treatment are acquired. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  15. Concepts for the JLab Ampere-Class CW Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    R. Rimmer; E.F. Daly; W.R. Hicks; J. Henry; J. Preble; M. Stirbet; H. Wang; K.M. Wilson; G. Wu

    2005-05-01

    We describe the concepts and developments underway at JLab as part of the program to develop a new CW cryomodule capable of transporting ampere-level beam currents in a compact FEL. Requirements include real-estate gradient of at least 10 MV/m and very strong HOM damping to push BBU thresholds up by two or more orders of magnitude compared to existing designs. Cavity shape, HOM damping, power couplers, tuners etc. are being designed and optimized for this application. Cavity considerations include a large iris for beam halo, low-RF losses, HOM frequencies and Q's, low peak surface fields, field flatness and microphonics. Module considerations include high packing factor, low static heat leak, image current heating of beam-line components, cost and maintainability. This module is being developed for the next generation ERL based high power FELs but may be useful for other applications such as electron cooling, electron-ion colliders, industrial processing etc.

  16. Apsidal Motion Study of Close Binary System CW Cephei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wonyong; Jeong, Min-Ji; Yoon, Joh-Na; Kim, Hyoun-Woo; Kim, Yonggii; Kim, Chun-Hwey

    2015-12-01

    New observations for the times of minimum lights of a well-known apsidal motion star CW Cephei were made using a 0.6 m wide field telescope at Jincheon station of Chungbuk National University Observatory, Korea during the 2015 observational season. We determined new times of minimum lights from these observations and analyzed O-C diagrams together with collected times of minima to study both the apsidal motion and the Light Time Effect (LTE) suggested in the system. The new periods of the apsidal motion and the LTE were calculated as 46.6 and 39.3 years, respectively, which were similar but improved accuracy than earlier ones investigated by Han et al. (2002), Erdem et al. (2004) and Wolf et al. (2006).

  17. Autoconfocal microscopy with a cw laser and thermionic detection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Daryl; Chu, Kengyeh K; Mertz, Jerome

    2008-06-15

    We introduce an application of thermionic emission in a PMT photocathode. Because of the nonlinear dependence of thermionic emission on absorbed laser power, a conventional PMT is found to produce a virtual pinhole effect that rejects unfocused light at least as strongly as a physical pinhole. This virtual pinhole effect is exploited in a scanning transmission confocal microscope equipped with a cw laser source. Because the area of the PMT photocathode is large, signal descanning is not required and thermionic detection acts as a self-aligned pinhole. Our technique of thermionic-detection autoconfocal microscopy is further implemented with graded-field contrast to obtain enhanced phase-gradient sensitivity in unlabeled samples, such as rat hippocampal brain slices.

  18. Pulsed and CW performance of 7-stage interband cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Canedy, Chadwick L; Abell, Joshua; Merritt, Charles D; Bewley, William W; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Mijin; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R

    2014-04-07

    We report a narrow-ridge interband cascade laser emitting at λ ≈3.5 μm that produces up to 592 mW of cw power with a wallplug efficiency of 10.1% and beam quality factor of M(2) = 3.7 at T = 25 °C. A pulsed cavity length study of broad-area lasers from the same wafer confirms that the 7-stage structure with thicker separate confinement layers has a reduced internal loss of ≈3 cm(-1). More generally, devices from a large number of wafers with similar 7-stage designs and wavelengths spanning 2.95-4.7 μm exhibit consistently higher pulsed external differential quantum efficiencies than earlier state-of-the-art ICLs.

  19. Parametric four-wave mixing using a single cw laser.

    PubMed

    Brekke, E; Alderson, L

    2013-06-15

    Four-wave mixing can be used to generate coherent output beams, with frequencies difficult to acquire in commercial lasers. Here, a single narrow external cavity diode laser locked to the two photon 5s-5d transition in rubidium is combined with a tapered amplifier system to produce a high power cw beam at 778 nm and used to generate coherent light at 420 nm through parametric four-wave mixing. This process is analyzed in terms of the intensity and frequency of the incoming beam as well as the atomic density of the sample. The efficiency of the process is currently limited when on resonance due to the absorption of the 420 nm beam, and modifications should allow a significant increase in output power.

  20. Operational experience with CW high gradient and high QL cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Hovater, J. Curt; Allison, Trent L.; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Daly, Edward F.; Drury, Michael A.; Lahti, George E.; Mounts, Clyde I.; Nelson, Richard M.; Plawski, Tomasz E.

    2014-12-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of ten new 100 MV cryomodules (80 cavities). The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at an accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m with a QL of 3×107. The RF system employs single cavity control using new digital LLRF controls and 13 kW klystrons. Recently, all of the new cryomodules and associated RF hardware and software have been commissioned and operated in the CEBAF accelerator. Electrons at linac currents up to 10 ?A have been successfully accelerated and used for nuclear physics experiments. This paper reports on the commissioning and operation of the cryomodules and RF system.

  1. Superheating water by CW excitation of gold nanodots.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Michael T; Green, Andrew J; Richardson, Hugh H

    2012-03-14

    A temperature-dependent photoluminescent thin film of Al(0.94)Ga(0.06)N doped with Er(3+) is used to measure the temperature of lithographically prepared gold nanodots. The gold nanodots and thin film are excited simultaneously with a continuous wave (CW) Nd:YAG 532 nm laser. The gold nanodot is submersed under water, and the dot is subsequently heated. The water immediately surrounding the nanodot is superheated beyond the boiling point up to the spinodal decomposition temperature at 594 ± 17 K. The spinodal decomposition has been confirmed with the observation of critical opalescence. We characterize the laser scattering that occurs in unison with spinodal decomposition due to an increased coherence length associated with the liquid-liquid transition.

  2. Characterization of a THz CW spectrometer pumped at 1550 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Woon-Gi; Nahar, Niru K.

    2015-07-01

    We present an evaluation of a cost-effective THz CW spectrometer pumped at 1550 nm wavelengths with a fixed delay line. To study the spectral competence of the spectrometer, transmission data is obtained for various organic and inorganic samples. Spectral comparisons of the samples are presented by using THz time domain spectroscopy and vector network analyzer (VNA). Despite the capability of highly resolved transmission spectroscopy, our current system reveals the uncertainty in interferometric output data for phase analysis. Here, we identify the effect of fringing space of raw output data toward frequency resolution, phase analysis, and data acquisition time. We also propose the proper delay line setup for phase analysis for this type of spectrometers.

  3. Microwave imaging of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabot, Roland; Elbèze, Didier; Lee, Woochang; Nam, Yoonbum; Park, Hyeon; Shen, Junsong; Yun, Gunsu; Choi, Minjun; Giacalone, Jean-Claude; Nicolas, Timothée; Bottereau, Christine; Clairet, Frédéric; Lotte, Philippe; Molina, Diego

    2016-11-01

    Microwave imaging diagnostics are extremely useful for observing magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in magnetic fusion plasmas. Two imaging diagnostics will be available on the WEST tokamak. A method was developed to reconstruct electron density maps from electron density profiles measured by ultrafast reflectometry, a technique based on FM-CW radar principle. It relies on plasma rotation to perform 2D reconstruction. An Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic will image directly the temperature fluctuations. It will be equivalent to 24 stacked vertically radiometers, each probing a spot of few centimetres. These two complementary techniques will contribute to the validation of MHD models.

  4. Microwave holographic imaging of aircraft with spaceborne illuminating source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, R. S.; Dzekov, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    The conceptual development of a method for the high angular resolution and accurate angular position estimates for the surveillance and traffic control of aircraft is considered. A target volume several hundred kilometers in diameter is illuminated by a CW microwave source located on a satellite in geosynchronous orbit. Signals are received by a large array of random, conformally located receiving elements. Each element receives the direct signal from the satellite plus signals reflected from aircraft in the illuminated volume. Coherent combination of the signals received from the individual elements permits the equivalent of holographic imaging or multiple beam formation from which the useful target data can be obtained.

  5. Millimeter Wave Generation by Relativistic Electron Beams and Microwave- Plasma Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-04

    there has been considerable effort in generating powerful microwave radiations by relativistic electron beams. Various devices including gyrotrons ... power high-frequency sources motivates the search for many other novel ways of improving the operation of high harmonic gyrotrons . Further, it is also...either in the CW range or the step range. Destler et al. (1981) showed that the efficiency of a gyrotron operating at higher harmonics can be

  6. Analysis of the expression of KIR and HLA-Cw in a Northeast Han population.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu; Zhao, Ling; Jiang, Zhenyu; Ma, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-Cw and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes in a Jilin Han population and to provide a theoretical basis for further studies of their roles in disease. A total of 154 unpaid Jilin Han blood donors were selected and KIR and HLA-Cw genotyping was performed using PCR-SSP. Recognition of HLA-Cw and the corresponding activatory or inhibitory KIR receptor was distinguished according to the identification of HLA-Cw and KIR. In the present study, the expression frequency of HLA-C2(Lys80)+2DL1 was 27.27%, HLA-C1(Asn80)+2DL2/2DL3 was 68.83%, 2DS2+HLA-C1(Asn80) was 9.74% and 2DS1+HLA-C2(Lys80) was 9.74%. Of the individuals in the study, 72.08% expressed only KIR2DL1 without HLA-Cw, 21.43% expressed only KIR2DS1 without HLA-Cw(Lys)-KIR2DL1 and 2.60% expressed only KIR2DS2 without HLA-Cw(Asn)-KIR2DL2/L3. In conclusion, the expression of inhibitory HLA-Cw-KIR is higher than the expression of activating HLA-Cw-KIR and approximately 20% of the individuals separately expressed the activated HLA-Cw-KIR in the Jilin Han population in the present study.

  7. Total microwave processing using microwave technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, P.J.; Kingston, H.M.

    1995-12-31

    The implementation of total microwave processing of samples involves all processes after the collection of a sample up to but not including the analysis. These processes are often time consuming and a primary source of critical analytical errors. The use of microwave technology has been shown to improve sample digestion while also reducing contamination. However, microwave technology can also be used in the preparation of representative samples and matrix modifications; essentially total sample preparation. The concept of total microwave processing will be discussed as applied to the routine analysis of samples according to proposed Environmental Protection Agency Method 3052. This method requires microwave digestion and provides for several methods of post-digestion removal of hydrofluoric acid. Microwave technologies will be shown to efficiently dry, digest, and perform matrix modifications.

  8. An experimental study of waveguide coupled microwave heating with conventional multicusp negative ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komppula, J.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Laulainen, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-04-01

    Negative ion production with conventional multicusp plasma chambers utilizing 2.45 GHz microwave heating is demonstrated. The experimental results were obtained with the multicusp plasma chambers and extraction systems of the RF-driven RADIS ion source and the filament driven arc discharge ion source LIISA. A waveguide microwave coupling system, which is almost similar to the one used with the SILHI ion source, was used. The results demonstrate that at least one third of negative ion beam obtained with inductive RF-coupling (RADIS) or arc discharge (LIISA) can be achieved with 1 kW of 2.45 GHz microwave power in CW mode without any modification of the plasma chamber. The co-extracted electron to H- ratio and the optimum pressure range were observed to be similar for both heating methods. The behaviour of the plasma implies that the energy transfer from the microwaves to the plasma electrons is mainly an off-resonance process.

  9. MICROWAVE SOLID-STATE GENERATORS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    RADIOFREQUENCY GENERATORS , *SEMICONDUCTOR DIODES, *TRANSISTORS, MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, X BAND, FREQUENCY MULTIPLIERS, MICROWAVE OSCILLATORS, CIRCUITS, BROADBAND, NARROWBAND, RADIOFREQUENCY POWER, TRANSISTOR AMPLIFIERS.

  10. Retrograde regulation of nuclear gene expression in CW-CMS of rice.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Sota; Komatsu, Setsuko; Toriyama, Kinya

    2007-02-01

    The CW-cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) line has the cytoplasm of Oryza rufipogon Griff, and mature pollen is morphologically normal under an optical microscope but lacks the ability to germinate; restorer gene Rf17 has been identified as restoring this ability. The difference between nuclear gene expression in mature anthers was compared for the CW-CMS line, [cms-CW] rf17rf17, and a maintainer line with normal cytoplasm of Oryza sativa L., [normal] rf17rf17. Using a 22-k rice oligoarray we detected 58 genes that were up-regulated more than threefold in the CW-CMS line. Expression in other organs was further investigated for 20 genes using RT-PCR. Five genes, including genes for alternative oxidase, were found to be preferentially expressed in [cms-CW] rf17rf17 but not in [normal] rf17rf17 or [cms-CW] Rf17Rf17. Such [cms-CW] rf17rf17-specific gene expression was only observed in mature anthers but not in leaves, stems, or roots, indicating the presence of anther-specific mitochondrial retrograde regulation of nuclear gene expression, and that Rf17 has a role in restoring the ectopic gene expression. We also used a proteomic approach to discover the retrograde regulated proteins and identified six proteins that were accumulated differently. These results reveal organ-specific induced mitochondrial retrograde pathways affecting nuclear gene expression possibly related to CMS.

  11. Microwave spectroscopy of chemical warfare agents: prospects for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Alan C.; Jensen, James O.; Suenram, Richard D.; Hight Walker, Angela R.; Woolard, Dwight L.

    1999-07-01

    The high level of interest in the sensor development community in millimeter wave technology development demonstrates the potential for several multipurpose applications of millimeter wave sensors. The potential for remote sensing of hazardous chemical materials based on their millimeter wave rotational signatures is yet another possible applications, offering certain distinct advantages over FTIR remote sensing. The high specificity of the rotational spectra to the molecular structures affords the capability of detecting chemical warfare (CW) agents and degradation products in complex mixtures including water vapor and smoke, an important consideration in military applications. Furthermore, the rotational modes are not complicated by electronic or vibrational transitions, reducing the potential for false alarms. We have conducted microwave spectroscopic measurements on two CW nerve agents (sarin and soman) and one blister agent (H-mustard). The assignment of the observed band furnishes us with an extremely accurate tool for predicting the rotational spectrum of these agents at any arbitrary frequency. By factoring in the effects of pressure (Lorentzian broadening and intensity reduction), we present the predicted spectral signatures of the CW agents in the 80 - 300 GHz region. This frequency regime is important for atmospheric monitoring as it exploits the wide bandwidth capability of millimeter wave sensors as well as the atmospheric windows that occur in this region.

  12. Analysis of Free Electron Laser Performance Utilizing the National Bureau of Standards’ CW Microtron,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Based on recent measure- Standards" . A CW 185 MeV racetrack microtron (RTM)’ ments of the performance of the 5 MeV injector linac, the ac...NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS’ CW MICROTRON ’ Cha-kMei Tang and Phillip Sprangle Uai Plasma Ph Isics Division. .Vatdi Research Laboratory, Washington. D.C...1 IE C 7 The National Bureau of Standards’ (NBS) CW racetrack nicrotron (RTNI) will be utilized as a driver for a free elec- O tron laser (FEL

  13. Adapting TESLA technology for future cw light sources using HoBiCaT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugeler, O.; Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-07-01

    The HoBiCaT facility has been set up and operated at the Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin and BESSY since 2005. Its purpose is testing superconducting cavities in cw mode of operation and it was successfully demonstrated that TESLA pulsed technology can be used for cw mode of operation with only minor changes. Issues that were addressed comprise of elevated dynamic thermal losses in the cavity walls, necessary modifications in the cryogenics and the cavity processing, the optimum choice of operational parameters such as cavity temperature or bandwidth, the characterization of higher order modes in the cavity, and the usability of existing tuners and couplers for cw.

  14. Heterogeneously integrated 2.0 μm CW hybrid silicon lasers at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Spott, Alexander; Davenport, Michael; Peters, Jon; Bovington, Jock; Heck, Martijn J R; Stanton, Eric J; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry; Bowers, John

    2015-04-01

    Here we experimentally demonstrate room temperature, continuous-wave (CW), 2.0 μm wavelength lasers heterogeneously integrated on silicon. Molecular wafer bonding of InP to Si is employed. These hybrid silicon lasers operate CW up to 35°C and emit up to 4.2 mW of single-facet CW power at room temperature. III-V tapers transfer light from a hybrid III-V/silicon optical mode into a Si waveguide mode. These lasers enable the realization of a number of sensing and detection applications in compact silicon photonic systems.

  15. Design and operation of 140 GHz gyrotron oscillators for power levels up to 1 MW CW

    SciTech Connect

    Jory, H.; Bier, R.; Craig, L.J.; Felch, K.; Ives, L.; Lopez, N.; Spang, S.

    1986-12-01

    Varian has designed and tested 140 GHz gyrotron oscillators that have generated output powers of 100 kW CW and 200 kW for 1 ms pulses. Upcoming tubes will be designed to operate at power levels of 200 kW CW and ultimately up to 1 MW CW. The important design considerations which are addressed in the higher power tubes include the design of the electron gun, interaction circuit, and output window. These issues will be discussed and the results of the earlier 140 GHz gyrotron work at Varian will be summarized.

  16. Microwave Workshop for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin

    1998-01-01

    "Microwave Workshop for Windows" consists of three programs that act as teaching aid and provide a circuit design utility within the field of microwave engineering. The first program is a computer representation of a graphical design tool; the second is an accurate visual and analytical representation of a microwave test bench; the third…

  17. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, VR

    2006-08-01

    The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

  18. Development of 1 to 1.5 MW CW Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felch, K.; Blank, M.; Borchard, P.; Cahalan, P.; Cauffman, S.; Chu, S.; Jory, H.

    2003-10-01

    High power mm-wave sources provide electron cyclotron heating, current drive, and instability suppression in fusion plasmas. CPI has delivered three 110 GHz, 1 MW gyrotrons for ECH and ECCD experiments on DIII-D, each of which has demonstrated reliable operation at 1 MW for pulse lengths up to 5 seconds. CPI has also delivered a 140 GHz, 1 MW gyrotron to IPP for use on W-7X. This gyrotron has produced a peak output power of 900 kW, and pulse lengths up to 700 seconds at 500 kW. Ten consecutive 500 kW 600 second pulses were demonstrated without fault at 25CPI's test facilities could not support long pulse operation at full power, such operation is planned at IPP. The 140 GHz system employs a diode magnetron injection gun, a TE_28,7 cavity interaction mode, an internal mode converter to produce a Gaussian output beam, a low-loss CVD diamond output window, and a single-stage depressed-voltage beam collector to enhance the overall electrical efficiency of the device. Currently, under a DOE development program, CPI is fabricating a 110 GHz, 1.3-1.5 MW CW depressed-collector gyrotron to deliver improved reliability at power levels above 1 MW.

  19. Spectral output from a premixed chain reaction cw HF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, A.C.; Bien, F.

    1980-07-01

    Spectral measurements of the output from a purely chemical chain reaction cw HF laser are reported. The laser is a subsonic H/sub 2/-F/sub 2/ flame, with supersonic premixing and spatially uniform initiation by a stationary normal shock. Initial chemical production of fluorine atoms is by the bimolecular reaction of F/sub 2/ with NO. Spectral measurements of the laser output near the initiating shock indicate lasing transitions in the P branches of the v=3 ..-->.. v=2, v=2 ..-->.. v=1, and v=1 ..-->.. v=0 HF bands. Further downstream, the upper vibrational levels are strongly deactivated, and lasing occurs only in the v=1 ..-->.. v=0 band. Laser emission in the v=2 ..-->.. v=1 band reappears at reduced NO flow rates, suggesting efficient deactivation of HF (v) by NO, possibly through multiquantum V-V exchange. An approximate rate of 5 x 10/sup -13plus-or-minus0.5/ cm/sup 3//sec for deactivation of HF (v=2) by NO is inferred.

  20. Microwave sintering of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    Successful adaptation of microwave heating to the densification of ceramic materials require a marriage of microwave and materials technologies. Using an interdisciplinary team of microwave and materials engineers, we have successfully demonstrated the ability to density ceramic materials over a wide range of temperatures. Microstructural evolution during microwave sintering has been found to be significantly different from that observed in conventional sintering. Our results and those of others indicate that microwave sintering has the potential to fabricate components to near net shape with mechanical properties equivalent to hot pressed or hot isostatically pressed material. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  1. Design, construction and evaluation of a 12.2 GHz, 4.0 kW-CW high efficiency klystron amplifier. [for satellite-borne TV broadcast transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishida, J. M.; Brodersen, L. K.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program is described, for studying design techniques for optimizing the conversion efficiency of klystron amplifiers, and to utilize these techniques in the development and fabrication of an X-band 4 kW cw klystron, for use in satellite-borne television broadcast transmitters. The design is based on a technique for increasing the RF beam current by using the second harmonic space charge forces in the bunched beam. Experimental analysis was also made of a method to enhance circuit efficiency in the klystron cavities. The design incorporates a collector which is demountable from the tube to facilitate multistage depressed collector experiments employing an axisymmetric, electrostatic collector for linear beam microwave tubes.

  2. Design, construction and evaluation of a 12.045 GHz, 2.0 kW-cw permanent-magnet focused klystron amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishida, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a lightweight, high-efficiency, 1-2 kW cw, permanent magnet focused klystron operating at 12.0 GHz was described. The design is based on use of a samarium-cobalt permanent magnet for focusing of the electron beam and choice of the most optimum parameters for maximum efficiency. A filter-loaded output circuit is used for the required bandwidth. The design incorporates a collector which is demountable from the tube to facilitate multistage depressed collector experiments, permitting replacement with a NASA-designed axisymmetric, electrostatic collector for linear beam microwave tubes. A further requirement is that the focusing field between the last interaction gap and the collector decay in a prescribed manner referred to as adiabatic expansion.

  3. Millimeter microwave effect on ion transport across lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Ziskin, M C

    1995-01-01

    The effects of millimeter microwaves in the frequency range of 54-76 GHz on capacitance and conductance of lipid bilayer membranes (BLM) were studied. Some of the membranes were modified by gramicidin A and amphotericin B or by tetraphenylboron anions (TPhB-). The millimeter microwaves were pulse-modulated (PW) at repetition rates ranging from 1 to 100 pps, PW at 1000 pps, or unmodulated continuous waves (CW). The maximum output power at the waveguide outlet was 20 mW. It was found that CW irradiation decreased the unmodified BLM capacitance by 1.2% +/- 0.5%. At the same time, membrane current induced by TPhB- transport increased by 5% +/- 1%. The changes in conductance of ionic channels formed by gramicidin A and amphotericin B were small (0.6% +/- 0.4%). No "resonance-like" effects of mm-wave irradiation on membrane capacitance, ionic channel currents, or TPhB- transport were detected. All changes in membrane capacitance and currents were independent of the modulation employed and were equivalent to heating by approximately 1.1 degrees C.

  4. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  5. Transpupillary CW YAG laser coagulation. A comparison with argon green and krypton red lasers.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Conway, M D; House, B

    1983-08-01

    The authors have developed a CW YAG laser for transpupillary coagulation. The effects of CW YAG coagulation on the retina, retinal vessels, and fovea were compared with those produced by the krypton red and argon green lasers. To produce threshold coagulative lesions in monkeys and rabbits, we needed five to ten times more energy with the CW YAG than with the krypton red or argon green lasers. Nerve fiber damage was observed only when coagulating retinal vessels with the argon green laser. At the parameters used, none of the lasers damaged the sensory retina of the fovea. The CW YAG may be used as a new mode of laser coagulation in the treatment of retinal diseases.

  6. The complete primary structure of Cw*1701 reveals a highly divergent HLA class I molecule.

    PubMed

    Herrero, M J; Vilches, C; de Pablo, R; Puente, S; Kreisler, M

    1997-03-01

    Genotyping of the HLA-C locus by PCR-SSP has previously shown 100% association of B41 and B42 with a new allelic variant. Partial sequencing studies (exons 2-4) demonstrated that this PCR-SSP variant corresponded to the new allele Cw*1701. In this study we have characterized the whole coding region of Cw*1701 from a Bubi individual of Equatorial Guinea. Our results partially confirm the previously reported sequence and reveal that Cw*1701 has many new polymorphisms at several exons, including a 18-bp insertion in exon 5. Cw*1701 is thus a most unusual HLA-C molecule defining a third allelic lineage of this locus.

  7. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  8. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  9. Natural gas leaks detection by spatial-resolvable cw-laser-based remote monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agishev, Ravil R.; Bajazitov, Ravil A.; Galeyev, Marat M.; Ismagilov, Zufar B.

    1996-11-01

    The opportunities of spatial-resolvable atmosphere monitoring and atmospheric pollutions' remote chemical analysis based on the CW-laser radiants are investigated. A frequency-responsive processing peculiarities of atmosphere remote sensing signals are described. Application of the mentioned approach for the limited hydrocarbons remote detection and sensing is discussed. The requirements to the CW-LIDAR' receiving and radiating systems parameters are formulated. The evaluations of the system sensitivity limit, measurement accuracy and accuracy increase ways are presented.

  10. Spatial-resolvable remote sensing and detection of hydrocarbons based on cw low-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agishev, Ravil R.; Bajazitov, Ravil A.; Galeyev, Marat M.

    1996-09-01

    The opportunities of spatial-resolvable atmosphere monitoring and atmospheric pollutions' remote chemical analysis based on the CW-laser radiants are investigated. A frequency-responsive processing peculiarities of atmosphere remote sensing signals are described. Application of the mentioned approach for the limited hydrocarbons remote detection and sensing is discussed. The requirements to the CW-LIDAR receiving and radiating systems parameters are formulated. The evaluations of the system sensitivity limit, measurement accuracy and accuracy increase ways are presented.

  11. Effect of CW YAG and argon green lasers on experimentally detached retinas.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Conway, M D; House, B J

    1984-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of argon-green (514.5 nm) and CW neodymium YAG (1060 nm) wavelengths on experimentally detached retinas of primates. Neither laser produced damage to the sensory retina of the fovea. The argon green wavelength, which was absorbed by haemoglobin in the vessel or by extravasated red blood cells, created vasospasm and nerve fiber layer damage. The beam of the CW YAG was not absorbed by haemoglobin; therefore, no vasospasm could be produced on experimentally detached retinas.

  12. Proposal for FEL Experiments Driven by the National Bureau of Standards’ CW Microtron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-31

    CONTENTS 1. THE NES RACETRACK MICROTRON .......................... 1 II. FEL EXPERIMENTS....................................... 3 *III. SUMMARY...FOR FEL EXPERIMENTS DRIVEN BY THE NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS’ CW MICROTRON I. The NBS Racetrack Microtron The RTM has not previously received...Proposal for FEL Experiments Driven by the National Bureau of Standards’ CW Microtron CHA-MEI TANG AND P. SPRANGLE Plasma Theory Branch N Plasma Physics

  13. Attogram measurement of rare isotopes by CW resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, B.A.

    1992-05-01

    Three-color double-resonance ionization mass spectrometry, using two single-frequency cw dye lasers and a cw carbon dioxide laser, has been applied to the detection of attogram quantities of rare radionuclides. {sup 210}Pb has been measured in human hair and brain tissue samples to assess indoor radon exposure. Measurements on {sup 90}Sr have shown overall isotopic selectivity of greater than 10{sup 9} despite unfavorable isotope shifts relative to the major stable isotope, {sup 88}Sr.

  14. Forensic Application of FM-CW and Pulse Radar

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Koppenjan; R. S. Freeland; M. L. Miller; R. E. Yoder

    2003-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technology has supplied vital assistance in criminal investigations. However, law enforcement personnel desire further developments such that the technology is rapidly deployable, and that it provides both a simple user interface and sophisticated target identification. To assist in the development of target identification algorithms, our efforts involve gathering background GPR data for the various site conditions and circumstances that often typify clandestine burials. For this study, forensic anthropologists established shallow-grave plots at The University of Tennessee Anthropological Research Facility (ARF) that are specific to GPR research. These plots contain donated human cadavers lying in various configurations and depths, surrounded by assorted construction material and backfill debris. We scanned the plots using two GPR technologies: (1) a multi-frequency synthetic-aperture FM-CW radar (200-700 MHz) (GPR-X) developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Special Technologies Laboratory (STL), Bechtel Nevada (Koppenjan et al., 2000), and (2) a commercial pulse radar (SIR-20) manufactured by Geophysical Survey Systems, Inc. (400 and 900 MHz)(GSSI). The sweep-frequency data show the large biological mass decomposing within the torso as encircled ''hot spots.'' The 400-MHz pulse radar exhibit major horizontal reflectors above the body, with shadow reflectors (horizontal multiples) occurring beneath the body at 60 cm depth. The 400-MHz antenna was able to discern the grave walls and folded tarp covering the lower body. Under these moist, clay-rich conditions, the 900-MHz antenna was able to penetrate slightly beyond 30 cm beneath the concrete layer. However, neither system was able to penetrate beyond a one meter depth in the moist, clay-rich soil (fine, mixed, thermic Typic Paleudalf). Example scans from each system are provided, along with a discussion of the survey protocol and general performance.

  15. Pulsed Orotron - A new microwave source for submillimeter pulse high-field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grishin, Yu.A.; Fuchs, M.R.; Schnegg, A.; Dubinskii, A.A.; Dumesh, B.S.; Rusin, F.S.; Bratman, V.L.; Moebius, K.

    2004-09-01

    A vacuum-tube device for the generation of pulsed microwave radiation in the submillimeter range (up to 380 GHz) is presented, designed for use as a source in a 360 GHz high-field/high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer - the pulsed Orotron. Analogous to the known continuous wave (cw) version, in the pulsed Orotron microwave radiation is generated by the interaction of a nonrelativistic electron beam with a diffraction grating (stimulated Smith-Purcell radiation) in feedback with an open Fabry-Perot resonator construction. The presented design extends the cw Orotron by a gate electrode and a high-voltage pulsing unit to control the electron beam current. The generated pulses at 360 GHz have pulse lengths from 100 ns-10 {mu}s and a pulse power of (22{+-}5) mW. The output in a broader frequency band between 320 and 380 GHz ranges from 20 up to 60 mW. Within a 10 {mu}s time slot, incoherent pulse trains of arbitrary duration can be generated. The pulsed Orotron has been incorporated in the quasioptical microwave bridge of a heterodyne induction mode EPR spectrometer. The first free induction decay measurements at a microwave frequency of 360 GHz and a magnetic field of 12.8 T on a polycrystalline perylenyl-ion sample are presented and future applications and extensions of Orotron-EPR spectroscopy are discussed.

  16. Development of a high power microwave thruster, with a magnetic nozzle, for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, John L.; Chapman, Randall A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the current development of a high-power microwave electrothermal thruster (MET) concept at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Such a thruster would be employed in space for applications such as orbit raining, orbit maneuvering, station change, and possibly trans-lunar or trans-planetary propulsion of spacecraft. The MET concept employs low frequency continuous wave (CW) microwave power to create and continuously pump energy into a flowing propellant gas at relative high pressure via a plasma discharge. The propellant is heated to very high bulk temperatures while passing through the plasma discharge region and then is expanded through a throat-nozzle assembly to produce thrust, as in a conventional rocket engine. Apparatus, which is described, is being assembled at NASA Lewis to test the MET concept to CW power levels of 30 kW at a frequency of 915 MHz. The microwave energy is applied in a resonant cavity applicator and is absorbed by a plasma discharge in the flowing propellant. The ignited plasma acts as a lossy load, and with optimal tuning, energy absorption efficiencies over 95 percent (based on the applied microwave power) are expected. Nitrogen, helium, and hydrogen will be tested as propellants in the MET, at discharge chamber pressures to 10 atm.

  17. [CW bio-radar vital sign detector and experiment study].

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Wang, Yunfeng; Zhao, Zhangyan; Zhang, Haiying

    2014-03-01

    Non-contact vital sign detection technique provides an effective usage in health monitoring applications. A vital sign detector was designed based on microwave bio-radar technique. Using Doppler principle, continuous wave bioradar was designed for tiny body movement detection, short-time Fourier transform and interpolation algorithm were adopted for heart and respiration rate extraction, embedded system was used for system integration, real-time signal processing software was designed on it. Experiments were done by using simulation device and human body for research and performance evaluation. The result shows that the proposed prototype can be used for single target vital signs detection at the distance of 90 cm, and the heart rate result shows a 96% recognition rate.

  18. RT-CW: widely tunable semiconductor THz QCL sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razeghi, M.; Lu, Q. Y.

    2016-09-01

    Distinctive position of Terahertz (THz) frequencies (ν 0.3 -10 THz) in the electromagnetic spectrum with their lower quantum energy compared to IR and higher frequency compared to microwave range allows for many potential applications unique to them. Especially in the security side of the THz sensing applications, the distinct absorption spectra of explosives and related compounds in the range of 0.1-5 THz makes THz technology a competitive technique for detecting hidden explosives. A compact, high power, room temperature continuous wave terahertz source emitting in a wide frequency range will greatly boost the THz applications for the diagnosis and detection of explosives. Here we present a new strong-coupled strain-balanced quantum cascade laser design for efficient THz generation based intracavity DFG. Room temperature continuous wave operation with electrical frequency tuning range of 2.06-4.35 THz is demonstrated.

  19. LD dual-end-pumped CW Tm:YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin-yu; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Yong-ji; Wang, Chao; Jin, Guang-yong

    2013-09-01

    We report on a LD dual-end-pumped 792nm continuous wave operation Tm:YLF laser. Firstly, the rate equation of LD end-pumped CW operation Tm:YLF laser were established, in which the energy transfer upconversion and without energy transfer upconversion under continuous-wave considerate were considered, as well the pump threshold and the slope efficiency of the laser system were analyzed. Simultaneously, the cavity stability condition and the pattern matching of the plano- concave resonator were analyzed according to ABCD Matrix theory. Comparing respectively the laser threshold and the slope efficiency and optical-optical conversion efficiency under circumstances which the output mirror transmittance of 15% and 23%. In addition, the M2 of the output laser were contrasted and analyzed in adjusting the resonator cavity length by using different radius of curvature of the output mirror in 150mm, 200mm and 300mm all in the above case. As the process of thermal lens focal length changing greater than 90mm, it exhibited that the two fundamental modes in the cavity resonator matched well in numerical simulation when the radius of curvature of the output mirror was 300mm, as well the two fundamental modes matched well when it more than 100mm in a certain pump power. We designed a single LD dual-end-pumped continuous wave operation Tm:YLF laser. Using Tm:YLF (3 at.%) crystal for gain medium, which the size was 3×3×14mm3. In experiments, the Tm:YLF laser crystal keeps 291K and the temperature control method is water cooling. The length of the resonator was 135mm when L shape plano-concave resonator was applied, and the radius of curvature output mirror was 300mm, as well as the temperature of the Tm:YLF laser crystal was 291K. The output laser we observed by this system and the central laser wavelength was 1944nm. The threshold power was 8.11W and the highest output power reaches to 4.01W when the totally input pump power was 17W, and the optical conversion efficiency was 23

  20. Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Characterizing a CW Raman Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    .A relatively simple technique for characterizing an all-resonant intracavity continuous-wave (CW) solid-state Raman laser involves the use of ring-down spectroscopy. As used here, characterizing signifies determining such parameters as threshold pump power, Raman gain, conversion efficiency, and quality factors (Q values) of the pump and Stokes cavity modes. Heretofore, in order to characterize resonant-cavity-based Raman lasers, it has usually been necessary to manipulate the frequencies and power levels of pump lasers and, in each case, to take several sets of measurements. In cases involving ultra-high-Q resonators, it also has been desirable to lock pump lasers to resonator modes to ensure the quality of measurement data. Simpler techniques could be useful. In the present ring-down spectroscopic technique, one infers the parameters of interest from the decay of the laser out of its steady state. This technique does not require changing the power or frequency of the pump laser or locking the pump laser to the resonator mode. The technique is based on a theoretical analysis of what happens when the pump laser is abruptly switched off after the Raman generation reaches the steady state. The analysis starts with differential equations for the evolution of the amplitudes of the pump and Stokes electric fields, leading to solutions for the power levels of the pump and Stokes fields as functions of time and of the aforementioned parameters. Among other things, these solutions show how the ring-down time depends, to some extent, on the electromagnetic energy accumulated in the cavity. The solutions are readily converted to relatively simple equations for the parameters as functions of quantities that can be determined from measurements of the time-dependent power levels. For example, the steady-state intracavity conversion efficiency is given by G1/G2 1 and the threshold power is given by Pin(G2/G1)2, where Pin is the steady-state input pump power immediately prior to

  1. Developments in LFM-CW SAR for UAV Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringham, Craig

    Opportunities to use synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in scientific studies and military operations are expanding with the development of small SAR systems that can be operated on small unmanned air vehicles (UAV)s. While the nimble nature of small UAVs make them an attractive platform for many reasons, small UAVs are also more prone to deviate from a linear course due autopilot errors and external forces such as turbulence and wind. Thus, motion compensation and improved processing algorithms are required to properly focus the SAR images. The work of this dissertation overcomes some of the challenges and addresses some of the opportunities of operating SAR on small UAVs. Several contributions to SAR backprojection processing for UAV SARs are developed including: 1. The derivation of a novel SAR backprojection algorithm that accounts for motion during the pulse that is appropriate for narrow or ultra-wide-band SAR. 2. A compensation method for SAR backprojection to enable radiometrically accurate image processing. 3. The design and implementation of a real-time backprojection processor on a commercially available GPU that takes advantage of the GPU texture cache. 4. A new autofocus method that improves the image focus by estimating motion measurement errors in three dimensions, correcting for both amplitude and phase errors caused by inaccurate motion parameters. 5. A generalization of factorized backprojection, which we call the Dually Factorized Backprojection method, that factorizes the correlation integral in both slow-time and fast-time in order to efficiently account for general motion during the transmit of an LFM-CW pulse. Much of this work was conducted in support of the Characterization of Arctic Sea Ice Experiment (CASIE), and the appendices provide substantial contributions for this project as well, including: 1. My work in designing and implementing the digital receiver and controller board for the microASAR which was used for CASIE. 2. A description of

  2. Microwave Processing of Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    of peak output power of 100 megawatts at 10 GHz. Microwave Fundamentals 11 RESONANT HELIX TWT STO KLYSTRON CTf C 0 Grid oShadow Grid PPM FOCUS SPACE C...Rather, broadband and high-temperature measurement techniques that have been used in conjunction with microwave processing of materials-specifically... Broadband Dielectric Properties Measurement Techniques. Pp. 527-539 in Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, Vol. 269, Microwave Processing

  3. Microwave Lightcraft concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Looking like an alien space ship or a flying saucer the Microwave Lightcraft is an unconventional launch vehicle approach for delivering payload to orbit using power transmitted via microwaves. Microwaves re beamed from either a ground station or an orbiting solar power satellite to the lightcraft. The energy received breaks air molecules into a plasma and a magnetohydrodynamic fanjet provides the lifting force. Only a small amount of propellant is required for circulation, attitude control and deorbit.

  4. Argonne CW Linac (ACWL) -- Legacy from SDI and opportunities for the future

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, G.E.; Yule, T.J.

    1994-08-01

    The former Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) invested significant resources over a 6-year period to develop and build an accelerator to demonstrate the launching of a cw beam with characteristics suitable for a space-based Neutral Particle Beam (NPD) system. This accelerator, the CWDD (Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator) accelerator, was designed to accelerate 80 mA cw of D{sup {minus}} to 7.5 MeV. A considerable amount of hardware was constructed and installed in the Argonne-based facility, and major performance milestones were achieved before program funding from the Department of Defense ended in October 1993. Existing assets have been turned over to Argonne. Assets include a fully functional 200 kV cw D{sup {minus}} injector, a cw RFQ that has been tuned, leak checked and aligned, beam lines and a high-power beam stop, all installed in a shielded vault with appropriate safety and interlock systems. In addition, there are two high power (1 MW) cw rf amplifiers and all the ancillary power, cooling and control systems required for a high-power accelerator system. The SDI mission required that the CWDD accelerator structures operate at cryogenic temperatures (26 K), a requirement that placed severe limitations on operating period (CWDD would have provided 20 seconds of cw beam every 90 minutes). However, the accelerator structures were designed for full-power rf operation with water cooling and ACWL (Argonne Continuous Wave Linac), the new name for CWDD in its water-cooled, positive-ion configuration, will be able to operate continuously. Project status and achievements will be reviewed. Preliminary design of a proton conversion for the RFQ, and other proposals for turning ACWL into a testbed for cw-linac engineering, will be discussed.

  5. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymer composites. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIC Materials Program, will allow us, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of thermoset resins will be studied because it hold the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  6. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymeric materials. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIM Materials Program, allows the authors, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of various thermoset resins will be studied because it holds the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components or in-situ curing of adhesives, including metal-to-metal. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  7. Digital communications: Microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feher, K.

    Transmission concepts and techniques of digital systems are presented; and practical state-of-the-art implementation of digital communications systems by line-of-sight microwaves is described. Particular consideration is given to statistical methods in digital transmission systems analysis, digital modulation methods, microwave amplifiers, system gain, m-ary and QAM microwave systems, correlative techniques and applications to digital radio systems, hybrid systems, digital microwave systems design, diversity and protection switching techniques, measurement techniques, and research and development trends and unsolved problems.

  8. NOVEL MICROWAVE FILTER DESIGN TECHNIQUES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE FILTERS, MICROWAVE FREQUENCY, PHASE SHIFT CIRCUITS, BANDPASS FILTERS, TUNED CIRCUITS, NETWORKS, IMPEDANCE MATCHING , LOW PASS FILTERS, MULTIPLEXING, MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, WAVEGUIDE FILTERS, WAVEGUIDE COUPLERS.

  9. NOVEL MICROWAVE FILTER DESIGN TECHNIQUES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTRIC FILTERS, MICROWAVE FREQUENCY), (*MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, ELECTRIC FILTERS), CIRCUITS, CAPACITORS, COILS, RESONATORS, STRIP TRANSMISSION LINES, WAVEGUIDES, TUNING DEVICES, PARAMETRIC AMPLIFIERS, FREQUENCY CONVERTERS .

  10. DNA strand breaks are not induced in human cells exposed to 2.1425 GHz band CW and W-CDMA modulated radiofrequency fields allocated to mobile radio base stations.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, N; Komatsubara, Y; Takeda, H; Hirose, H; Sekijima, M; Nojima, T; Miyakoshi, J

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale in vitro study focused on the effects of low level radiofrequency (RF) fields from mobile radio base stations employing the International Mobile Telecommunication 2000 (IMT-2000) cellular system in order to test the hypothesis that modulated RF fields may act as a DNA damaging agent. First, we evaluated the responses of human cells to microwave exposure at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 80 mW/kg, which corresponds to the limit of the average whole body SAR for general public exposure defined as a basic restriction in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. Second, we investigated whether continuous wave (CW) and Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA) modulated signal RF fields at 2.1425 GHz induced different levels of DNA damage. Human glioblastoma A172 cells and normal human IMR-90 fibroblasts from fetal lungs were exposed to mobile communication frequency radiation to investigate whether such exposure produced DNA strand breaks in cell culture. A172 cells were exposed to W-CDMA radiation at SARs of 80, 250, and 800 mW/kg and CW radiation at 80 mW/kg for 2 and 24 h, while IMR-90 cells were exposed to both W-CDMA and CW radiations at a SAR of 80 mW/kg for the same time periods. Under the same RF field exposure conditions, no significant differences in the DNA strand breaks were observed between the test groups exposed to W-CDMA or CW radiation and the sham exposed negative controls, as evaluated immediately after the exposure periods by alkaline comet assays. Our results confirm that low level exposures do not act as a genotoxicant up to a SAR of 800 mW/kg.

  11. CW, high power, gyrotron development at 110 GHz for ECH applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.S.; Borchard, P.; Felch, K.; Jory, H.; Loring, C.M.

    1996-12-31

    Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is the most promising plasma heating method to achieve fusion. High-power, long-pulse or CW gyrotrons are required in many present and future ECH experiments. For example, the planned experiment at DIII-D, the experimental tokamak at General Atomics, will require 4 MW of RF power at 110 GHz for a pulse duration of 10 seconds. The RF requirement for the planned International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is 50 MW at 170 GHz and CW operation. CPI is developing high-power, CW gyrotrons at frequencies ranging from 84--170 GHz for various ECH experiments. In particular, the authors are developing a 1 MW, CW gyrotron with an internal converter at 110 GHz. To achieve the goal of 1 MW, CW operation, the authors have designed and begun fabrication of a new tube that has improved cooling to all tube parts which showed signs of overheating during the last experiment. In addition, they are looking at the possibility of using alternate output window designs to increase power handling capability. They summarize the design of the new tube and present initial test data.

  12. CW, high power, gyrotron development at 110 GHz for ECH applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.S.; Borchard, P.; Felch, K.; Jory, H.; Loring, C.M.

    1996-12-31

    Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is the most promising plasma heating method to achieve fusion. High-power, long-pulse or CW gyrotrons are required in many present and future ECH experiments. For example, the planned experiment at DIII-D, the experimental tokamak at General Atomics, will require 4 MW of RF power at 110 GHz for a pulse duration of 10 seconds. The RF requirement for the planned International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is 50 MW at 170 GHz and CW operation. CPI is developing high-power, CW gyrotrons at frequencies ranging from 84--170 GHz for various ECH experiments. In particular, the authors are developing a 1 MW, CW gyrotron with an internal converter at 110 GHz. To achieve the goal of 1 MW, CW operation, they have designed and begun fabrication of a new tube that has improved cooling to all tube parts which showed signs of overheating during the last experiment. In addition, they are looking at the possibility of using alternate output window designs to increase power handling capability. They will summarize the design of the new tube and present initial test data.

  13. Model for cw laser collisionally induced fluorescence in low-temperature discharges

    PubMed

    Stewart; Smith; Borthwick; Paterson

    2000-08-01

    A perturbed steady-state rate-equation model has been developed for the cw laser collisionally induced fluorescence (LCIF) produced by excitation on one of the 1s-2p noble gas transitions. This work is one part of a wider complementary modeling program which includes cw optogalvanic spectroscopy, optical emission spectroscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy, with the overall aim of testing all of these models with the same stringently assembled atomic and discharge data set. Our aim here is to demonstrate the principal features of our cw LCIF model by using it to describe our experimental observations produced by pumping transitions originating on the 1s(5) metastable and 1s(4) resonance states of neon atoms in the positive column of a normal glow discharge at 2.0 Torr and a discharge current of 5 mA. The model shows that these cw LCIF spectra are dominated by 1s-2p excitation and electron collisional coupling among the 2p states. We show that the model allows us to quantify explicitly the various individual contributions to each line in the cw LCIF spectra. The theory and analyses presented here apply equally well to other noble gases and we believe can be modified appropriately for trace noble gases in atomic-molecular mixtures.

  14. Single dose toxicity study of IRDye 800CW in Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Milton V.; Draney, Daniel; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Olive, D. Michael

    2010-02-01

    Fluorophore-labeled contrast imaging agents are moving toward clinical use as aids in nodal staging and intraoperative resection of tumors. Near-infrared fluorophores with defined toxicity properties will be needed before these agents can be translated to the clinic. The near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW is frequently used in its N-hydroxysuccinamide (NHS) ester form for labeling these agents. Following conjugation or breakdown of a labeled ligand, excess NHS ester is converted to the carboxylate form. We report here the results of a preliminary toxicity study on IRDye 800CW carboxylate in preparation for its use as a labeling moiety for targeted contrast agents. Male and female Sprague Dawley rats were given a single intravenous or intradermal administration of IRDye 800CW carboxylate; indocyanine green was used as a comparative control. Following administration of varying doses of either the dyes or saline, animals were observed for up to fourteen days during which time, hematological, clinical chemistry, enzymological, and histological testing was performed on animal subgroups. Under the conditions tested, a single administration of IRDye 800CW carboxylate intravenously at dose levels of 1, 5 and 20 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg intradermally produced no pathological evidence of toxicity. A dose of 20 mg/kg was identified as the NOAEL (no observed adverse effect level) following IV or ID routes of administration of IRDye 800CW.

  15. Severe neonatal hemolysis due to a maternal antibody to the low-frequency Rh antigen C(w).

    PubMed

    May-Wewers, Julie; Kaiser, Jeffrey R; Moore, Ellen Kay; Blackall, Douglas P

    2006-05-01

    C(w) is a low-frequency antigen in the Rh blood group system with a prevalence of approximately 2% in whites. Although anti-C(w) is not an uncommon antibody in pregnancy (0.1% incidence), clinically significant hemolytic disease of the newborn is highly unusual. We report the case of an infant with severe hyperbilirubinemia and persistent anemia due to a high-titer maternal C(w) antibody. The medical literature relating to maternal C(w) alloimmunization and neonatal outcome is also reviewed. In addition, recommendations are made regarding the management of pregnancies and newborns complicated by antibodies to C(w).

  16. Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W.; Lauf, Robert J.; Johnson, Arvid C.; Thigpen, Larry T.

    1999-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  17. Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.; Johnson, A.C.; Thigpen, L.T.

    1999-10-05

    A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  18. Coaxial microwave plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Gushchin, P. A.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kotelev, M. S.

    2011-11-15

    Physical principles underlying the operation of a pulsed coaxial microwave plasma source (micro-wave plasmatron) are considered. The design and parameters of the device are described, and results of experimental studies of the characteristics of the generated plasma are presented. The possibility of application of this type of plasmatron in gas-discharge physics is discussed.

  19. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  20. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-04-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  1. Television Microwave--1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Roger E.

    Since it became a reality just before World War II, terrestrial microwave has improved in systems and equipments, but with the improvements have come higher costs. Television microwave costs are so high because users are demanding more capability, land prices have increased, operating costs are higher, and there is frequency congestion along many…

  2. Microwave device investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, K. K. D.; Haddad, G. I.; Kwok, S. P.; Masnari, N. A.; Trew, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Materials, devices and novel schemes for generation, amplification and detection of microwave and millimeter wave energy are studied. Considered are: (1) Schottky-barrier microwave devices; (2) intermodulation products in IMPATT diode amplifiers; and (3) harmonic generation using Read diode varactors.

  3. MICROWAVES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of microwaves, a non-ionizing radiation, on organic reactions is described both in polar solvents and under solvent-free conditions. The special applications are highlighted in the context of solventless organic synthesis which involve microwave (MW) exposure of neat r...

  4. Microwave hydrology: A trilogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.; Johnston, E. J.; Girard, M. A.; Regusters, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Microwave hydrology, as the term in construed in this trilogy, deals with the investigation of important hydrological features on the Earth's surface as they are remotely, and passively, sensed by orbiting microwave receivers. Microwave wavelengths penetrate clouds, foliage, ground cover, and soil, in varying degrees, and reveal the occurrence of standing liquid water on and beneath the surface. The manifestation of liquid water appearing on or near the surface is reported by a microwave receiver as a signal with a low flux level, or, equivalently, a cold temperature. Actually, the surface of the liquid water reflects the low flux level from the cosmic background into the input terminals of the receiver. This trilogy describes and shows by microwave flux images: the hydrological features that sustain Lake Baykal as an extraordinary freshwater resource; manifestations of subsurface water in Iran; and the major water features of the Congo Basin, a rain forest.

  5. Microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Thomae, Rainer W.

    2005-07-26

    A compact microwave ion source has a permanent magnet dipole field, a microwave launcher, and an extractor parallel to the source axis. The dipole field is in the form of a ring. The microwaves are launched from the middle of the dipole ring using a coaxial waveguide. Electrons are heated using ECR in the magnetic field. The ions are extracted from the side of the source from the middle of the dipole perpendicular to the source axis. The plasma density can be increased by boosting the microwave ion source by the addition of an RF antenna. Higher charge states can be achieved by increasing the microwave frequency. A xenon source with a magnetic pinch can be used to produce intense EUV radiation.

  6. Design considerations in achieving 1 MW CW operation with a whispering-gallery-mode gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Feinstein, J.; Hess, C.; Huey, H.; Jongewaard, E.; Jory, H.; Neilson, J.; Pendleton, R.; Pirkle, D.; Zitelli, L. )

    1989-09-01

    Varian is developing high-power, CW gyrotrons at frequencies in the range 100 GHz to 150 GHz, for use in electron cyclotron heating applications. Early test vehicles have utilized a TE{sub 15,2,1} interaction cavity, have achieved short-pulse power levels of 820 kW and average power levels of 80 kW at 140 GHz. Present tests are aimed at reaching 400 kW under CW operating conditions and up to 1 MW for short pulse durations. Work is also underway on modifications to the present design that will enable power levels of up to 1 MW CW to be achieved. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  7. CW-THz image contrast enhancement using wavelet transform and Retinex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Min; Hu, Qi-fan; Huang, Ying-Xue; Liang, Hua-Wei

    2015-10-01

    To enhance continuous wave terahertz (CW-THz) scanning images contrast and denoising, a method based on wavelet transform and Retinex theory was proposed. In this paper, the factors affecting the quality of CW-THz images were analysed. Second, an approach of combination of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and a designed nonlinear function in wavelet domain for the purpose of contrast enhancing was applied. Then, we combine the Retinex algorithm for further contrast enhancement. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method in qualitative and quantitative, it was compared with the adaptive histogram equalization method, the homomorphic filtering method and the SSR(Single-Scale-Retinex) method. Experimental results demonstrated that the presented algorithm can effectively enhance the contrast of CW-THZ image and obtain better visual effect.

  8. Effects of CW interference on the carrier tracking loop of the deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sue, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    A radio-frequency interference (RFI) environment can cause serious problems for communications systems, such as the Deep Space Network (DSN). For this reason, it is necessary to determine first the RFI susceptibility characteristics for DSN receiving systgms. The present investigation is concerned with CW RFI's which are close in frequency to the carrier frequency. The carrier tracking loop is highly sensitive, and this type of RFI will degrade the carrier loop performance before saturation effects become noticeable. The investigation has the objective to develop an analytical model which will make it possible to predict the tracking performance of the Block IV receiver when operated in the presence of a CW RFI in the receiver passband. The Block IV receiver represents one of the DSN receivers. Attention is given to the effects of a CW RFI on a phase-locked loop, the effects of a bandpass limiter, numerical results, experimental verification, and aspects of computer simulation.

  9. Frequency comb generation by CW laser injection into a quantum-dot mode-locked laser.

    PubMed

    Pinkert, T J; Salumbides, E J; Tahvili, M S; Ubachs, W; Bente, E A J M; Eikema, K S E

    2012-09-10

    We report on frequency comb generation at 1.5 μm by injection of a CW laser in a hybridly mode-locked InAs/InP two-section quantum-dot laser (HMLQDL). The generated comb has > 60 modes spaced by ∼ 4.5 GHz and a -20 dBc width of > 100 GHz (23 modes) at > 30 dB signal to background ratio. Comb generation was observed with the CW laser (red) detuned more than 20 nm outside the HMLQDL spectrum, spanning a large part of the gain spectrum of the quantum dot material. It is shown that the generated comb is fully coherent with the injected CW laser and RF frequency used to drive the hybrid mode-locking. This method of comb generation is of interest for the creation of small and robust frequency combs for use in optical frequency metrology, high-frequency (> 100 GHz) RF generation and telecommunication applications.

  10. The experimental study of a CW 1080 nm multi-point pump fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuexia; Ge, Tingwu; Ding, Xing; Tan, Qirui; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report on a CW 1080 nm fiber laser cascaded-pumped by a CW 975 nm diode laser. The fiber used in the experiment has a core diameter of 20 μm (NA  =  0.06), inner clad of 400 μm (NA  =  0.46), and an absorption coefficient of about 1.26 dB m-1 at 975 nm. An output power of 780 W with an optical conversion efficiency of 71% has been achieved at a pump light of 1.1 kW. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a 1080 nm CW fiber laser has used a cascaded-pump coupler.

  11. Harmonic millimeter radiation from a microwave FEL amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.-H.; Marshall, T. C.

    1997-02-01

    In this project, an electron beam is bunched at a microwave frequency and the harmonics of this bunching drive radiation at millimeter wavelengths, using a FEL, configured as a single-pass travelling wave amplifier. A 10 kW 24 GHz microwave input signal grows to ˜200 kW level using the lower-frequency unstable root of the waveguide FEL dispersion relation. The Columbia FEL facility operates at this frequency in the TE11 mode, using a helical undulator (1.85 cm period) and a 3 mm diameter 600 kV electron beam contained in a 8.7 mm ID cylindrical waveguide. The harmonic currents set up by the microwave are found to cause growth of harmonic power under two conditions. First, we choose the parameters of the device so that the upper frequency root corresponds to the third harmonic, in which case we observe a small amount of third-harmonic emission in the TE11 mode, accompanied by comparable second harmonic. The millimeter harmonic radiation produced is coherent and phase-related to the microwave source. Second, we have found substantial emission at the seventh harmonic, most likely from the TE72 mode — which, in cylindrical waveguide geometry, travels at very nearly the same wave speed as the 24 GHz TE11 power. In order to excite the seventh-harmonic radiation, the electron beam must be displaced from the system axis — ˜2 mm in this device. The seventh-harmonic output is potentially an attractive choice for a CW FEL which must generate appreciable power at ˜2 mm wavelength for plasma electron cyclotron heating since we can produce this radiation for electron beam energy as low as 400 kV. We present a theoretical model of the experiment which predicts that if the microwave signal is strong enough to drive the FEL into saturation, the harmonic emission becomes powerful.

  12. Modulated Sine Waves for Differential Absorption Measurements Using a CW Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor); Lin, Bing (Inventor); Nehrir, Amin R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A continuous wave Light Detection and Ranging (CW LiDAR) system utilizes two or more laser frequencies and time or range shifted pseudorandom noise (PN) codes to discriminate between the laser frequencies. The performance of these codes can be improved by subtracting out the bias before processing. The CW LiDAR system may be mounted to an artificial satellite orbiting the earth, and the relative strength of the return signal for each frequency can be utilized to determine the concentration of selected gases or other substances in the atmosphere.

  13. Reactions of CW Agents HD And GD with the Polymer Fabrics PVAM and CHEMCAT 41

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    REACTIONS OF CW AGENTS HD AND GD WITH THE POLYMER FABRICS PVAM AND CHEMCAT 41   ECBC-TR-1311 David J. McGarvey RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY...2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Aug 2011 - Nov 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Reactions of CW Agents HD and GD with the Polymer ... ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Director, ECBC, ATTN: RDCB-DRC-M, APG, MD 21010-5424   Leidos, Inc., P.O. Box 68, Gunpowder, MD 21010-0068     8

  14. Diode pumped CW and passively Q-switched Nd:LGGG laser at 1062 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Jia, Z. T.; Zhang, B. T.; He, J. L.; Liu, S. D.; Yang, Y.; Tao, X. T.

    2012-05-01

    We report a Nd:LGGG laser at 1062 nm in the operations of the continuous-wave (CW) and passively Q-switching. The maximum CW output power of 5.62 W was obtained, corresponding to an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 49.0% and slope efficiency of 55.9%. By using Cr4+:YAG with initial transmission of 94% as the saturable absorber, for the first time, we got the maximum passively Q-switched output power of 1.21 W, accompanied with a highest pulse repetition rate of 27.1 kHz and a shortest pulse width of 9.1 ns.

  15. The Effects of CW (Chemical Warfare)-Related Chemicals on Social Behavior and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    g-o3oi 9\\a AD- The Effects of CW-Related Che~icala onne k So1ial Behavior and Performancec 0) 0o Annual Report Bradford N. Punnell W. Ben Iturrian...11. TITLE (include Security Classification) The Effects of CW-Related Chemicals on Social Behavior and Performance 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Bradford N...performance that will be sensitive to the effects Ofb/C•4 -related chemicals considered Tor use as l antidotes or prophyractics against-a agents

  16. Admittance Test and Conceptual Study of a CW Positron Source for CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Golge, Serkan; Hyde, Charles E.; Freyberger, Arne

    2009-09-02

    A conceptual study of a Continuous Wave (CW) positron production is presented in this paper. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) operates with a CW electron beam with a well-defined emittance, time structure and energy spread. Positrons created via bremsstrahlung photons in a high-Z target emerge with a large emittance compared to incoming electron beam. An admittance study has been performed at CEBAF to estimate the maximum beam phase space area that can be transported in the LINAC and in the Arcs. A positron source is described utilizing the CEBAF injector electron beam, and directly injecting the positrons into the CEBAF LINAC.

  17. Microwave bonding of MEMS component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Mai, John D. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor); Budraa, Nasser K. (Inventor); Pike, William T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Bonding of MEMs materials is carried out using microwave. High microwave absorbing films are placed within a microwave cavity, and excited to cause selective heating in the skin of the material. This causes heating in one place more than another. Thereby minimizing the effects of the bonding microwave energy.

  18. Intense high-frequency gyrotron-based microwave beams for material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hardek, T.W.; Cooke, W.D.; Katz, J.D.; Perry, W.L.; Rees, D.E.

    1997-03-01

    Microwave processing of materials has traditionally utilized frequencies in the 0.915 and 2.45 GHz regions. Microwave power sources are readily available at these frequencies but the relatively long wavelengths can present challenges in uniformly heating materials. An additional difficulty is the poor coupling of ceramic based materials to the microwave energy. Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists, working in conjunction with the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), have assembled a high-frequency demonstration processing facility utilizing gyrotron based RF sources. The facility is primarily intended to demonstrate the unique features available at frequencies as high as 84 GHz. The authors can readily provide quasi-optical, 37 GHz beams at continuous wave (CW) power levels in the 10 kW range. They have also provided beams at 84 GHz at 10 kW CW power levels. They are presently preparing a facility to demonstrate the sintering of ceramics at 30 GHz. This paper presents an overview of the present demonstration processing facility and describes some of the features they have available now and will have available in the near future.

  19. Gold Nanoparticle Microwave Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Krantz, Kelsie E.; Christian, Jonathan H.; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Washington, II, Aaron L.; Murph, Simona H.

    2016-07-27

    At the nanometer scale, numerous compounds display different properties than those found in bulk material that can prove useful in areas such as medicinal chemistry. Gold nanoparticles, for example, display promise in newly developed hyperthermia therapies for cancer treatment. Currently, gold nanoparticle synthesis is performed via the hot injection technique which has large variability in final particle size and a longer reaction time. One underdeveloped area by which these particles could be produced is through microwave synthesis. To initiate heating, microwaves agitate polar molecules creating a vibration that gives off the heat energy needed. Previous studies have used microwaves for gold nanoparticle synthesis; however, polar solvents were used that partially absorbed incident microwaves, leading to partial thermal heating of the sample rather than taking full advantage of the microwave to solely heat the gold nanoparticle precursors in a non-polar solution. Through this project, microwaves were utilized as the sole heat source, and non-polar solvents were used to explore the effects of microwave heating only as pertains to the precursor material. Our findings show that the use of non-polar solvents allows for more rapid heating as compared to polar solvents, and a reduction in reaction time from 10 minutes to 1 minute; this maximizes the efficiency of the reaction, and allows for reproducibility in the size/shape of the fabricated nanoparticles.

  20. Microwave thawing apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Fathi, Zakaryae; Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.

    2004-06-01

    An apparatus for thawing a frozen material includes: a microwave energy source; a microwave applicator which defines a cavity for applying microwave energy from the microwave source to a material to be thawed; and a shielded region which is shielded from the microwave source, the shielded region in fluid communication with the cavity so that thawed material may flow from the cavity into the shielded region.

  1. Microwave coupler and method

    SciTech Connect

    Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a microwave coupler for enhancing the heating or metallurgical treatment of materials within a cold-wall, rapidly heated cavity as provided by a microwave furnace. The coupling material of the present invention is an alpha-rhombohedral-boron-derivative-structure material such as boron carbide or boron silicide which can be appropriately positioned as a susceptor within the furnace to heat other material or be in powder particulate form so that composites and structures of boron carbide such as cutting tools, grinding wheels and the like can be rapidly and efficiently formed within microwave furnaces.

  2. Monolithic microwave integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucel, R. A.

    Monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs), a new microwave technology which is expected to exert a profound influence on microwave circuit designs for future military systems as well as for the commercial and consumer markets, is discussed. The book contains an historical discussion followed by a comprehensive review presenting the current status in the field. The general topics of the volume are: design considerations, materials and processing considerations, monolithic circuit applications, and CAD, measurement, and packaging techniques. All phases of MMIC technology are covered, from design to testing.

  3. Microwave coupler and method

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention is directed to a microwave coupler for enhancing the heating or metallurgical treatment of materials within a cold-wall, rapidly heated cavity as provided by a microwave furnace. The coupling material of the present invention is an alpha-rhombohedral-boron-derivative-structure material such as boron carbide or boron silicide which can be appropriately positioned as a susceptor within the furnace to heat other material or be in powder particulate form so that composites and structures of boron carbide such as cutting tools, grinding wheels and the like can be rapidly and efficiently formed within microwave furnaces.

  4. Microwave vision for robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Leon; Struckman, Keith

    1994-01-01

    Microwave Vision (MV), a concept originally developed in 1985, could play a significant role in the solution to robotic vision problems. Originally our Microwave Vision concept was based on a pattern matching approach employing computer based stored replica correlation processing. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) processor technology offers an attractive alternative to the correlation processing approach, namely the ability to learn and to adapt to changing environments. This paper describes the Microwave Vision concept, some initial ANN-MV experiments, and the design of an ANN-MV system that has led to a second patent disclosure in the robotic vision field.

  5. Progress in CPI Microwave Tube Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Edward L.; Bohlen, Heinz

    2006-01-01

    CPI continues its role as a leading supplier of state-of-the-art, high-power microwave tubes; from linear beam, velocity- and density-modulated devices, to high frequency gyro-devices. Klystrons are the device-of-choice for many high-power microwave applications, and can provide multi-megawatts to multi-kilowatts of power from UHF to W-band, respectively. A number of recent and on-going developments will be described. At UHF frequencies, the inductive output tube (IOT) has replaced the klystron for terrestrial NTSC and HDTV broadcast, due to its high efficiency and linearity, and is beginning to see use in scientific applications requiring 300 kW or less. Recent advances have enabled use well into L-band. CPI has developed a number of multiple-beam amplifiers. The VKL-8301 multiple-beam klystron (MBK) was built for the TESLA V/UV and x-ray FEL projects, and is a candidate RF source for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We have also contributed to the development of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) high-power fundamental-mode S-band MBK. The VHP-8330B multiple-beam, high-order mode (HOM) IOT shows great promise as a compact, CW UHF source for high power applications. These topics will be discussed, along with CPI's development capabilities for new and novel applications. Most important is our availability to provide design and fabrication services to organizations requiring CPI's manufacturing and process control infrastructure to build and test state-of-the-art devices.

  6. CW and mode-locked operation of Yb(3+)-doped Lu3Al5O12 ceramic laser.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Hiroaki; Shirakawa, Akira; Ueda, Ken-ichi; Yagi, Hideki; Yanagitani, Takagimi

    2012-07-02

    CW laser operation and first mode-locked laser operation of Yb:LuAG ceramic are reported. Efficient CW laser operation was obtained with maximum output power of 2.14 W and a 72% slope efficiency. Femtosecond mode-locked laser operation was achieved with pulse duration of 699 fs and a 200 mW average output power.

  7. Fully reconfigurable photonic microwave transversal filter based on digital micromirror device and continuous-wave, incoherent supercontinuum source.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Han; Chang, You Min; Han, Young-Geun; Lee, Sang Bae; Chung, Hae Yang

    2007-08-01

    The combined use of a programmable, digital micromirror device (DMD) and an ultrabroadband, cw, incoherent supercontinuum (SC) source is experimentally demonstrated to fully explore various aspects on the reconfiguration of a microwave filter transfer function by creating a range of multiwavelength optical filter shapes. Owing to both the unique characteristic of the DMD that an arbitrary optical filter shape can be readily produced and the ultrabroad bandwidth of the cw SC source that is 3 times larger than that of Er-amplified spontaneous emission, a multiwavelength optical beam pattern can be generated with a large number of wavelength filter taps apodized by an arbitrary amplitude window. Therefore various types of high-quality microwave filter can be readily achieved through the spectrum slicing-based photonic microwave transversal filter scheme. The experimental demonstration is performed in three aspects: the tuning of a filter resonance bandwidth at a fixed resonance frequency, filter resonance frequency tuning at a fixed resonance frequency, and flexible microwave filter shape reconstruction.

  8. 25. C.W. Todd and E.A. Rand, May 1902 'OUTLINE,' SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. C.W. Todd and E.A. Rand, May 1902 'OUTLINE,' SHOWING END AND SIDE ELEVATIONS OF THE 4,000-VOLT, ATB-TYPE GENERATORS (4 AND 5) - Washington Water Power Company Monroe Street Plant, Units 4 & 5, South Bank Spokane River, below Monroe Street Bridge, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  9. Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams "CW-FIT" Efficacy Trial Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard; Dawson-Bannister, Harriett; Heitzman-Powell, Linda; Kottwitz, Esther; Hansen, Blake; Fleming, Kandace

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of the Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) program for improving students' on-task behavior, and increasing teacher recognition of appropriate behavior. The intervention is a group contingency classroom management program consisting of teaching and reinforcing appropriate…

  10. Implementing Positive Behavior Support in Preschools: An Exploratory Study of CW-FIT Tier 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolstead, Krystine A.; Caldarella, Paul; Hansen, Blake; Korth, Byran B.; Williams, Leslie; Kamps, Debra

    2017-01-01

    Challenging behavior in preschool is a serious concern for teachers. Positive behavior interventions and supports (PBIS) have been shown to be effective in reducing such behaviors. Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) is a specific multi-tiered intervention for implementing effective classroom management strategies using PBIS…

  11. Proton beam studies with a 1.25 MeV, cw radio frequency quadrupole linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, G.O.; Hardek, T.W.; Hansborough, L.D.

    1998-12-31

    A high-current, cw linear accelerator has been proposed as a spallation neutron source driver for tritium production. Key features of this accelerator are high current (100 mA), low emittance-growth beam propagation, cw operation, high efficiency, and minimal maintenance downtime. A 268 MHz, cw radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) LINAC section and klystrode based rf system were obtained from the Chalk River Laboratories and were previously installed at LANL to support systems development and advanced studies in support of cw, proton accelerators. A variation of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) proton injector, modified to operate at 50 keV, was mated to the RFQ and was operated to support advance developments for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program. High current, proton beam studies were completed which focused on the details of injector-RFQ integration, development of beam diagnostics, development of operations procedures, and personnel and equipment safety systems integration. This development led to acceleration of up to 100 mA proton beam.

  12. Method for generating high-energy and high repetition rate laser pulses from CW amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-18

    A method for obtaining high-energy, high repetition rate laser pulses simultaneously using continuous wave (CW) amplifiers is described. The method provides for generating micro-joule level energy in pico-second laser pulses at Mega-hertz repetition rates.

  13. Development of a high average power, CW, MM-wave FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ramian, G.

    1995-12-31

    Important operational attributes of FELs remain to be demonstrated including high average power and single-frequency, extremely narrow-linewidth lasing. An FEL specifically designed to achieve these goals for scientific research applications is currently under construction. Its most salient feature is operation in a continuous-wave (CW) mode with an electrostatically generated, high-current, recirculating, DC electron beam.

  14. Design studies of the output system of a 95 GHz, 100 kW, CW gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Vamshi Krishna, P.; Kartikeyan, M.V. E-mail: kartik@iitr.ernet.in; Thumm, M.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the design studies of the output system of a 95 GHz, 100 kW, CW gyrotron for ECRH7ECRIS applications. During this course, the design studies of an advanced dimpled-wall quasi optical launcher, non-linear taper and RF window will be carried out. (author)

  15. Use of Self-Management with the CW-FIT Group Contingency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamps, Debra; Conklin, Carl; Wills, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of self-management as a tier two enhancement to the group contingency intervention, Class-Wide Function-related Intervention Teams Program (CW-FIT). Two classrooms, first and fourth grade, and two students in each of the classrooms participated in the intervention. The group contingency…

  16. Characterization of High-power Quasi-cw Laser Diode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Troupaki, Elisavet; Allan, Graham R.; Kashem, Nasir B.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s requirements for high reliability, high performance satellite laser instruments have driven the investigation of many critical components; specifically, 808 nm laser diode array (LDA) pump devices. Performance and comprehensive characterization data of Quasi-CW, High-power, laser diode arrays is presented.

  17. A comparison between pulsed and CW laser annealing for solar cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jellison, G. E., Jr.; Young, R. T.; Wood, R. F.; Gat, A.

    1980-01-01

    The application of laser processing in solar cell fabrication is considered. Specific emphasis is placed on a process developed for the fabrication of a 16.6% silicon solar cell using pulsed laser processing. Results are presented which compare pulsed laser annealing with CW laser annealing in solar cell fabrication.

  18. Al2O3 half-wave films for long-life CW lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.; Ettenberg, M.; Lockwood, H. F.; Kressel, H.

    1977-01-01

    Long-term operating-life data are reported for (AlGa)As CW laser diodes. The use of half-wave Al2O3 facet coatings is shown to eliminate facet erosion, allowing stable diode operation at constant current for periods in excess of 10,000 h.

  19. InGaAsP CW Lasers on (110) InP Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawrylo, F. Z.

    1983-01-01

    Quality InGaAsP/InP CW laser structures grown by conventional liquidphase epitaxy on (110) InP substrates without using special growth procedures. Improved surface quality and grown-layer morphology are attributable to nearlyperfect surface stoichiometry of (110) surface which makes available equal numbers of In and P deposition sites.

  20. Applications of FM-CW laser radar to antenna contour mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slotwinski, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The FM-CW coherent laser radar concept, based on the FM radar principle which makes use of the coherence and lunability of injection laser diodes, is discussed. Laser radar precision/time tradeoffs, block diagrams, system performance, fiber optic system implantation, and receiver improvements are briefly described.

  1. Multiphoton upconversion process in Tm 3+ doped ZBLAN glass by CW laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianfu; Wang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Zhankui

    2009-11-01

    Blue, even ultraviolet emissions and very strong red emissions have been observed in ZBLAN glass doped with Tm 3+ under 800 nm CW laser excitation. The red emissions were demonstrated to be of sequential two-photon process, while the ultraviolet emissions be of three-photon process, according to the intensity dependence.

  2. Study of plasma formation in CW CO2 laser beam-metal surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Vasilchenko, Zh V.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Gresev, A. N.; Zabelin, Alexandre M.; Chubrik, N. I.; Shimanovich, V. D.

    1994-04-01

    An interaction of the cw CO2 laser beam and a moving metal surface has been studied. The pulsed and thermodynamical parameters of the surface plasma were investigated by optical and spectroscopical methods. The subsonic radiation wave propagation in the erosion plasma torch has been studied.

  3. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  4. Emitron: microwave diode

    DOEpatents

    Craig, G.D.; Pettibone, J.S.; Drobot, A.T.

    1982-05-06

    The invention comprises a new class of device, driven by electron or other charged particle flow, for producing coherent microwaves by utilizing the interaction of electromagnetic waves with electron flow in diodes not requiring an external magnetic field. Anode and cathode surfaces are electrically charged with respect to one another by electron flow, for example caused by a Marx bank voltage source or by other charged particle flow, for example by a high energy charged particle beam. This produces an electric field which stimulates an emitted electron beam to flow in the anode-cathode region. The emitted electrons are accelerated by the electric field and coherent microwaves are produced by the three dimensional spatial and temporal interaction of the accelerated electrons with geometrically allowed microwave modes which results in the bunching of the electrons and the pumping of at least one dominant microwave mode.

  5. Microwave Oven Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.; Richardson, Denise; Yan, Yuan

    1998-01-01

    Explains a series of laboratory activities which employ a microwave oven to help students understand word problems that relate to states of matter, collect data, and calculate and compare electrical costs to heat energy costs. (DDR)

  6. Anti-fibrotic effects of a methylenedioxybenzene compound, CW209292 on dimethylnitrosamine-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Woong; Kim, Dae-Hoon; Ha, Jong-Ryul; Kim, Dae-Yong

    2009-08-01

    A series of methylenedioxybenzene compounds were synthesized and found to have hepatoprotective effects in chemical-induced hepatotoxicity models. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the anti-fibrotic effects of a synthetic methylenedioxybenzene compound, CW209292, using the dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced chronic liver injury model in rats. Liver injuries were induced in Sprague Dawley rats by injection of DMN (intraperitoneally, 10 microl/kg) 3 times per week for 4 weeks. The rats were treated with CW209292 (per os, 25 or 75 mg/kg/d) for 4 weeks. Treatment of rats with DMN for 4 weeks resulted in significant decreases in serum albumin levels, whereas concomitant treatment with CW209292 prevented these decreases. CW209292 treatment also shortened prothrombin time prolonged by DMN, providing evidence that the agent was active in preserving liver function against DMN insult. DMN treatment caused marked increases in plasma bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), and hyaluronic acid levels; CW209292 treatment reversed these increases. CW209292 also significantly reduced hepatic hydroxyproline content as well as hepatic fibrosis and inflammation in histological examination. Additionally, immunochemically detectable hepatic collagen type IV and alpha-smooth muscle actin levels were decreased by CW209292 treatment. Proliferation of hepatic stellate cells isolated from DMN-treated rats was inhibited by CW209292. Furthermore, tumor growth factor (TGF)-beta1 mRNA expression was increased in DMN-treated rats, whereas CW209292 treatment prevented these increases. These results suggest that CW209292 exhibits anti-fibrotic effects in Sprague Dawley rats with DMN-induced hepatic fibrosis by blocking the mRNA expression of TGF-beta1 and subsequent inhibition of the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells.

  7. Antiviral Potential of a Novel Compound CW-33 against Enterovirus A71 via Inhibition of Viral 2A Protease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-Ying; Huang, An-Cheng; Hour, Mann-Jen; Huang, Su-Hua; Kung, Szu-Hao; Chen, Chao-Hsien; Chen, I-Chieh; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) in the Picornaviridae family causes hand-foot-and-mouth disease, aseptic meningitis, severe central nervous system disease, even death. EV-A71 2A protease cleaves Type I interferon (IFN)-α/β receptor 1 (IFNAR1) to block IFN-induced Jak/STAT signaling. This study investigated anti-EV-A7l activity and synergistic mechanism(s) of a novel furoquinoline alkaloid compound CW-33 alone and in combination with IFN-β. Anti-EV-A71 activities of CW-33 alone and in combination with IFN-β were evaluated by inhibitory assays of virus-induced apoptosis, plaque formation, and virus yield. CW-33 showed antiviral activities with an IC50 of near 200 μM in EV-A71 plaque reduction and virus yield inhibition assays. While, anti-EV-A71 activities of CW-33 combined with 100 U/mL IFN-β exhibited a synergistic potency with an IC50 of approximate 1 μM in plaque reduction and virus yield inhibition assays. Molecular docking revealed CW-33 binding to EV-A71 2A protease active sites, correlating with an inhibitory effect of CW33 on in vitro enzymatic activity of recombinant 2A protease (IC50 = 53.1 μM). Western blotting demonstrated CW-33 specifically inhibiting 2A protease-mediated cleavage of IFNAR1. CW-33 also recovered Type I IFN-induced Tyk2 and STAT1 phosphorylation as well as 2′,5′-OAS upregulation in EV-A71 infected cells. The results demonstrated CW-33 inhibiting viral 2A protease activity to reduce Type I IFN antagonism of EV-A71. Therefore, CW-33 combined with a low-dose of Type I IFN could be applied in developing alternative approaches to treat EV-A71 infection. PMID:26090728

  8. High power microwave components for space communications satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankowski, H.; Geia, A.

    1972-01-01

    Analyzed, developed, and tested were high power microwave components for communications satellites systems. Included were waveguide and flange configurations with venting, a harmonic filter, forward and reverse power monitors, electrical fault sensors, and a diplexer for two channel simultaneous transmission. The assembly of 8.36 GHz components was bench tested, and then operated for 60 hours at 3.5 kW CW in a high vacuum. The diplexer was omitted from this test pending a modification of its end irises. An RF leakage test showed only that care is required at flange junctions; all other components were RF tight. Designs were extrapolated for 12 GHz and 2.64 GHz high power satellite systems.

  9. VUV Photon Fluxes from Microwave Excited Microplasmas at Low Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Peng; Denning, Mark; Urdhal, Randall; Kushner, Mark J.

    2013-09-01

    Microplasmas in rare gases and rare gases mixtures can provide efficient and discretely tunable sources of VUV light. Microwave excited microplasma sources excited by a split-ring resonator antenna in rare gas mixtures operated in ceramic cavities with sub-mm dimensions have been developed as discretely tunable VUV sources for chemical analysis. Controlling wavelengths and the ratio of ion to VUV fluxes are important to achieving chemical selectivity. In this paper, we will discuss results from an investigation of scaling laws for the efficiency of VUV photon production in rare gas mixtures. The investigation was performed using a hydrodynamics model where the electron energy distribution and radiation transport are addressed by Monte Carlo simulations. Plasma density, VUV photon production and fluxes from the cavities will be discussed for mixtures of Ar, He, Xe, Kr, and as a function of power format (pulsing, cw), pressure and cavity sizes.

  10. Tunable Microwave Transversal Filters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER AFOSR-TR. 84-0977 S4. TI TLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYP ?FE&T&PEO OEE U!NABLE MICROWAVE TRANSVERSAL FILTERS...this goal through magnetostatic waves MSW propagating at microwave frequency in magnetically biased, liquid phase epitaxial films of yttrium iron...garnet (YIG) grown on gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG). This technology has a number of advantages; low loss (greater than 30db/usec at xband), tunable by

  11. Microwave emissions from snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation emitted from dry and wet snowpack in the microwave region (1 to 100 GHz) is discussed and related to ground observations. Results from theoretical model calculations match the brightness temperatures obtained by truck mounted, airborne and spaceborne microwave sensor systems. Snow wetness and internal layer structure complicate the snow parameter retrieval algorithm. Further understanding of electromagnetic interaction with snowpack may eventually provide a technique to probe the internal snow properties

  12. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  13. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  14. Automatic Microwave Network Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A program and procedure are developed for the automatic measurement of microwave networks using a Hewlett-Packard network analyzer and programmable calculator . The program and procedure are used in the measurement of a simple microwave two port network. These measurements are evaluated by comparing with measurements on the same network using other techniques. The programs...in the programmable calculator are listed in Appendix 1. The step by step procedure used is listed in Appendix 2. (Author)

  15. CW mode locked Nd:YVO4 laser pumped by 20-W laser diode bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabczyński, J. K.; Żendzian, W.; Kwiatkowski, J.

    2006-06-01

    The efficient cw mode locking (cw-ML) regime was demonstrated in Nd:YVO4 laser by means of saturable absorber mirror (SAM). The 0.3-at.% Nd3+ doped 10-mm-long YVO4 crystal end pumped by 20-W diode module with a beam shaper was applied as a gain medium located in the close vicinity to the rear flat mirror of the first arm of Z-type resonator of 316 cm total length with two curved mirrors of 100-cm curvature radii. The SAM of 2%-saturable absorptance and saturation fluence of 50 μJ/cm2 was mounted at the opposite end of a resonator. The developed "dynamically stable" cavity design mitigates detrimental role of thermal aberration in gain medium, enforcing clean perfect mode locking even for the highest pump densities. The cw-ML pulses with 47.5 MHz repetition rate and pulse durations in the range of 15-20 ps were observed for a wide range of pump powers and output coupler losses. In the best case, for 32% of output coupler transmission, up to 6.2 W of average power with near 35% slope efficiency was achieved. The thresholds for Q-switched ML, cw-ML regimes were 2.67 W and 6.13 W of pump power, respectively. For the maximum pump power of 20 W we obtained 133 nJ of pulse energy with 16-ps pulse duration, resulting in a peak power higher than 8 kW. The threshold energy density at SAM giving the QML regime was estimated to be about 30 μJ/cm2, threshold of cw-ML regime was 220 μJ/cm2.

  16. Nonthermal effects of mobile-phone frequency microwaves on uteroplacental functions in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Matsuzaki, Ichiyo; Hatta, Kotaro; Nobukuni, Yoshitaka; Kambayashi, Yasuhiro; Ogino, Keiki

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to high-density microwaves can cause detrimental effects on the testis, eye, and other tissues, and induce significant biologic changes through thermal actions. To examine nonthermal effect of continuous wave (CW) 915MHz microwaves used in cellular phones, we compared the effects of microwaves with those of heat. Thirty-six pregnant rats were assigned to six groups: rats exposed to microwaves at 0.6 or 3mW/cm(2) incident power density at 915MHz for 90min, rats immersed in water at 38 or 40 degrees C, which induces about the same increase in colonic temperature of 1.0 or 3.5 degrees C as 0.6 or 3mW/cm(2) microwaves, respectively; rats immersed in water at 34 degrees C, which is considered to be thermoneutral; and control rats. We identified significant differences in the uteroplacental circulation, and in placental endocrine and immune functions between pregnant rats immersed in water at 34 and 38 degrees C, but not between rats immersed at 38 degrees C and those exposed to microwaves at 0.6mW/cm(2). By contrast, we observed significant decreases in uteroplacental blood flow and estradiol in rats exposed to microwaves at 3mW/cm(2) as compared with those immersed in water at 40 degrees C. These results suggest microwaves at 0.6mW/cm(2) at 915MHz, equal to a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.4W/kg, which is the maximum permissible exposure level recommended by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), do not exert nonthermal effects on blood estradiol and progesterone, on splenic natural killer cell activity, on the uteroplacental circulation.

  17. Microwaves and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's diseases (AD) is the most common type of dementia and a neurodegenerative disease that occurs when the nerve cells in the brain die. The cause and treatment of AD remain unknown. However, AD is a disease that affects the brain, an organ that controls behavior. Accordingly, anything that can interact with the brain may affect this organ positively or negatively, thereby protecting or encouraging AD. In this regard, modern life encompasses microwaves for all issues including industrial, communications, medical and domestic tenders, and among all applications, the cell phone wave, which directly exposes the brain, continues to be the most used. Evidence suggests that microwaves may produce various biological effects on the central nervous system (CNS) and many arguments relay the possibility that microwaves may be involved in the pathophysiology of CNS disease, including AD. By contrast, previous studies have reported some beneficial cognitive effects and that microwaves may protect against cognitive impairment in AD. However, although many of the beneficial effects of microwaves are derived from animal models, but can easily be extrapolated to humans, whether microwaves cause AD is an important issue that is to be addressed in the current review. PMID:27698682

  18. Microwaves and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's diseases (AD) is the most common type of dementia and a neurodegenerative disease that occurs when the nerve cells in the brain die. The cause and treatment of AD remain unknown. However, AD is a disease that affects the brain, an organ that controls behavior. Accordingly, anything that can interact with the brain may affect this organ positively or negatively, thereby protecting or encouraging AD. In this regard, modern life encompasses microwaves for all issues including industrial, communications, medical and domestic tenders, and among all applications, the cell phone wave, which directly exposes the brain, continues to be the most used. Evidence suggests that microwaves may produce various biological effects on the central nervous system (CNS) and many arguments relay the possibility that microwaves may be involved in the pathophysiology of CNS disease, including AD. By contrast, previous studies have reported some beneficial cognitive effects and that microwaves may protect against cognitive impairment in AD. However, although many of the beneficial effects of microwaves are derived from animal models, but can easily be extrapolated to humans, whether microwaves cause AD is an important issue that is to be addressed in the current review.

  19. Microwave sintering process model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hu; Tinga, W R; Sundararaj, U; Eadie, R L

    2003-01-01

    In order to simulate and optimize the microwave sintering of a silicon nitride and tungsten carbide/cobalt toolbits process, a microwave sintering process model has been built. A cylindrical sintering furnace was used containing a heat insulating layer, a susceptor layer, and an alumina tube containing the green toolbit parts between parallel, electrically conductive, graphite plates. Dielectric and absorption properties of the silicon nitride green parts, the tungsten carbide/cobalt green parts, and an oxidizable susceptor material were measured using perturbation and waveguide transmission methods. Microwave absorption data were measured over a temperature range from 20 degrees C to 800 degrees C. These data were then used in the microwave process model which assumed plane wave propagation along the radial direction and included the microwave reflection at each interface between the materials and the microwave absorption in the bulk materials. Heat transfer between the components inside the cylindrical sintering furnace was also included in the model. The simulated heating process data for both silicon nitride and tungsten carbide/cobalt samples closely follow the experimental data. By varying the physical parameters of the sintering furnace model, such as the thickness of the susceptor layer, the thickness of the allumina tube wall, the sample load volume and the graphite plate mass, the model data predicts their effects which are helpful in optimizing those parameters in the industrial sintering process.

  20. Microwave radiation absorption: behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, J A

    1991-07-01

    The literature contains much evidence that absorption of microwave energy will lead to behavioral changes in man and laboratory animals. The changes include simple perturbations or outright stoppage of ongoing behavior. On one extreme, intense microwave absorption can result in seizures followed by death. On the other extreme, man and animals can hear microwave pulses at very low rates of absorption. Under certain conditions of exposure, animals will avoid microwaves, while under other conditions, they will actively work to obtain warmth produced by microwaves. Some research has shown behavioral effects during chronic exposure to low-level microwaves. The specific absorption rates that produce behavioral effects seem to depend on microwave frequency, but controversy exists over thresholds and mechanism of action. In all cases, however, the behavioral disruptions cease when chronic microwave exposure is terminated. Thermal changes in man and animals during microwave exposure appear to account for all reported behavioral effects.

  1. A tunable general purpose Q-band resonator for CW and pulse EPR/ENDOR experiments with large sample access and optical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijerse, Edward; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Isaacson, Roger; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We describe a frequency tunable Q-band cavity (34 GHz) designed for CW and pulse Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) as well as Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Electron Double Resonance (ELDOR) experiments. The TE 011 cylindrical resonator is machined either from brass or from graphite (which is subsequently gold plated), to improve the penetration of the 100 kHz field modulation signal. The (self-supporting) ENDOR coil consists of four 0.8 mm silver posts at 2.67 mm distance from the cavity center axis, penetrating through the plunger heads. It is very robust and immune to mechanical vibrations. The coil is electrically shielded to enable CW ENDOR experiments with high RF power (500 W). The top plunger of the cavity is movable and allows a frequency tuning of ±2 GHz. In our setup the standard operation frequency is 34.0 GHz. The microwaves are coupled into the resonator through an iris in the cylinder wall and matching is accomplished by a sliding short in the coupling waveguide. Optical excitation of the sample is enabled through slits in the cavity wall (transmission ˜60%). The resonator accepts 3 mm o.d. sample tubes. This leads to a favorable sensitivity especially for pulse EPR experiments of low concentration biological samples. The probehead dimensions are compatible with that of Bruker flexline Q-band resonators and it fits perfectly into an Oxford CF935 Helium flow cryostat (4-300 K). It is demonstrated that, due to the relatively large active sample volume (20-30 μl), the described resonator has superior concentration sensitivity as compared to commercial pulse Q-band resonators. The quality factor ( Q L) of the resonator can be varied between 2600 (critical coupling) and 1300 (over-coupling). The shortest achieved π/2-pulse durations are 20 ns using a 3 W microwave amplifier. ENDOR (RF) π-pulses of 20 μs ( 1H @ 51 MHz) were obtained for a 300 W amplifier and 7 μs using a 2500 W amplifier. Selected applications of the

  2. 100% N2 atmospheric-pressure microwave-line-plasma production with a modified waveguide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Haruka; Tamura, Yuto; Itoh, Hitoshi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2016-09-01

    Large-scale atmospheric pressure (AP) plasmas have been given much attention because of its high cost benefit and a variety of possibilities for industrial applications. Microwave discharge plasma using slot antenna is attractive due to its ability of high-density and stable plasma production, and we have developed a long-scale AP microwave plasma (AP microwave line plasma: AP-MLP) source using loop-structured waveguide and travelling wave and have reported spatially-uniform AP-MLP of 40 cm in length using Ar or He gas discharge. However, rare gas discharge is not always suitable for industrial applications because usage of large volume rare gas degrades the AP cost benefit. Furthermore, many industrial applications require chemically-reactive species and the AP-MLP using molecular gas will drastically increase the applications of the AP-MLP. In this study, we demonstrate 100% N2 discharge of the AP-MLP with a modified waveguide structure. Cross-sectional structure of the waveguide is improved to enhance the microwave electric field in the slot. 100% N2 plasma of 15 cm-long is successfully produced using CW microwave power of 2 kW. Low gas temperature of 1000 K is confirmed by optical emission spectroscopy, suggesting applications of the AP-MLP to low temperature processes. Part of this work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25286079.

  3. Sequence and Structural Characterization of Great Salt Lake Bacteriophage CW02, a Member of the T7-Like Supergroup

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Peter S.; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Makaju, Aman; Taylor, Ryan M.; Hoggan, Ryan; Culumber, Michele D.; Oberg, Craig J.; Breakwell, Donald P.; Prince, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Halophage CW02 infects a Salinivibrio costicola-like bacterium, SA50, isolated from the Great Salt Lake. Following isolation, cultivation, and purification, CW02 was characterized by DNA sequencing, mass spectrometry, and electron microscopy. A conserved module of structural genes places CW02 in the T7 supergroup, members of which are found in diverse aquatic environments, including marine and freshwater ecosystems. CW02 has morphological similarities to viruses of the Podoviridae family. The structure of CW02, solved by cryogenic electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction, enabled the fitting of a portion of the bacteriophage HK97 capsid protein into CW02 capsid density, thereby providing additional evidence that capsid proteins of tailed double-stranded DNA phages have a conserved fold. The CW02 capsid consists of bacteriophage lambda gpD-like densities that likely contribute to particle stability. Turret-like densities were found on icosahedral vertices and may represent a unique adaptation similar to what has been seen in other extremophilic viruses that infect archaea, such as Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus and halophage SH1. PMID:22593163

  4. Design of a microwave calorimeter for the microwave tokamak experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Marinak, M. )

    1988-10-07

    The initial design of a microwave calorimeter for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment is presented. The design is optimized to measure the refraction and absorption of millimeter rf microwaves as they traverse the toroidal plasma of the Alcator C tokamak. Techniques utilized can be adapted for use in measuring high intensity pulsed output from a microwave device in an environment of ultra high vacuum, intense fields of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and intense magnetic fields. 16 refs.

  5. MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave-accelerated chemical syntheses in various solvents as well as under solvent-free conditions have witnessed an explosive growth. The technique has found widespread application predominantly exploiting the inexpensive unmodified household microwave (MW) ovens although th...

  6. [Experimental estimation of thermogenic levels of acute microwave exposure for different animal species].

    PubMed

    Kolganova, O I; Drozd, A I; Zhavoronkov, L P; Baranov, V D; Glushakova, V S; Panferova, T A

    2000-01-01

    In experiments on laboratory animals it was found the different patterns of reactions in response to acute thermogenic 7 GHz CW microwave exposures. The effects were related specifically to the intensity of the field. SAR equal 0.5-0.7 power of basal metabolism of different species did not result in increase of body temperature. At SARs over intensity of basal metabolism (up to 1.5-2.0 basal metabolism for the mice and for the rats and up to 1.5 for the rabbits) the "stepped" pattern of body heating with periods of rectal temperature stabilization was observed. This results may have implications for prognostic estimation of dose-temporal limits of endurable intensities of microwaves.

  7. Uniform batch processing using microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A microwave oven and microwave heating method generates microwaves within a cavity in a predetermined mode such that there is a known region of uniform microwave field. Samples placed in the region will then be heated in a relatively identical manner. Where perturbations induced by the samples are significant, samples are arranged in a symmetrical distribution so that the cumulative perturbation at each sample location is the same.

  8. Disinfection of Wastewater by Microwaves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    temperature of the cells before treatment with microwaves nor the temperature of the diluent buffer showed any effect on the rate and extent of...suspension on the sur- vival of E. coli B cells subjected to microwave treatment. 11 2. Effect of the temperature of diluent upon the survival of microwave...the surface of the material to be heated by conduction, convection, and/or radiation. While microwave energy is recognized to have bactericidal ability

  9. 11-GHz waveguide Nd:YAG laser CW mode-locked with single-layer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Okhrimchuk, Andrey G.; Obraztsov, Petr A.

    2015-01-01

    We report stable, passive, continuous-wave (CW) mode-locking of a compact diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser with a single-layer graphene saturable absorber. The depressed cladding waveguide in the Nd:YAG crystal is fabricated with an ultrafast laser inscription method. The saturable absorber is formed by direct deposition of CVD single-layer graphene on the output coupler. The few millimeter-long cavity provides generation of 16-ps pulses with repetition rates in the GHz range (up to 11.3 GHz) and 12 mW average power. Stable CW mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with a Gires–Tournois interferometer. PMID:26052678

  10. A High-Gradient CW R Photo-Cathode Electron Gun for High Current Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer

    2005-05-01

    The paper describes the analysis and preliminary design of a high-gradient photo-cathode RF gun optimized for high current CW operation. The gun cell shape is optimized to provide maximum acceleration for the newly emitted beam while minimizing wall losses in the structure. The design is intended for use in future high-current high-power CW FELs but the shape optimization for low wall losses may be advantageous for other applications such as XFELs or Linear Colliders using high peak power low duty factor guns where pulse heating is a limitation. The concept allows for DC bias on the photocathode in order to repel ions and improve cathode lifetime.

  11. Tunable CW all-fiber optical parametric oscillator operating below 1 μm.

    PubMed

    Zlobina, Ekaterina A; Kablukov, Sergey I; Babin, Sergey A

    2013-03-25

    CW all-fiber optical parametric oscillator (FOPO) with tuning range from 950 to 1010 nm is demonstrated using birefringent photonic crystal fiber pumped by an Ytterbium-doped fiber laser (YDFL) near 1 μm. CW parametric generation with spectral linewidth of 3.7 nm at 972 nm has been obtained with slope efficiency as high as 9.4% and output power of up to 460 mW. It is also shown that the FOPO slope efficiency reaches 25% after narrowing of the pump spectrum down to 40 pm. At that the generated power exceeds 1 W, but in this case the generated radiation is modulated with 48 ns period and 50% duty factor due to pump laser power modulation which is probably caused by stimulated Brillouin back scattering.

  12. Generation of ROS in cells on exposure to CW and pulsed near-infrared laser tweezers.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Samarendra Kumar; Sharma, Mrinalini; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of a study on generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and changes in the membrane potential of mitochondria of carcinoma of cervix (HeLa) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells following exposure to continuous wave (cw) or pulsed Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm). For a given laser irradiation, the generation of ROS and induced changes in the membrane potential of mitochondria were more pronounced for HeLa cells as compared to CHO cells. However, in both the cells the laser dose required to elicit a given change was much lower with pulsed laser exposure compared to that required with a cw laser exposure. This suggests involvement of photothermal effects in the laser irradiation induced changes. Mechanistic studies using quenchers for ROS suggest that laser irradiation leads to generation of hydroxyl radicals.

  13. CW laser strategies for simultaneous, multi-parameter measurements in high-speed gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Rosa, M. D.; Philippe, L. C.; Arroyo, M. P.; Hanson, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    Strategies utilizing continuous wave (CW) lasers are considered which are capable of simultaneously measuring the flow parameters of velocity, temperature, and pressure at sampling rates exceeding 3 kHz. Velocity is determined from the Doppler shift of the spectral profile, temperature is extracted from intensity ratios of multiple lines, and pressure is measured from either the collision of broadening or the magnitude of absorption. Distinctions between strategies concern the specifics of probe spacies (NO, OH, O2, and H2O) in terms of nominal probe wavelength, equipment, and detection scheme. CW lasers were applied to path-integrated absorption measurements of transient shock-tube flows and spatially resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurements of underexpanded jets.

  14. 11-GHz waveguide Nd:YAG laser CW mode-locked with single-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Okhrimchuk, Andrey G; Obraztsov, Petr A

    2015-06-08

    We report stable, passive, continuous-wave (CW) mode-locking of a compact diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser with a single-layer graphene saturable absorber. The depressed cladding waveguide in the Nd:YAG crystal is fabricated with an ultrafast laser inscription method. The saturable absorber is formed by direct deposition of CVD single-layer graphene on the output coupler. The few millimeter-long cavity provides generation of 16-ps pulses with repetition rates in the GHz range (up to 11.3 GHz) and 12 mW average power. Stable CW mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with a Gires-Tournois interferometer.

  15. HF omnidirectional spectral CW auroral radar (HF-OSCAR) at very high latitude. Part 1: Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, J. K.; Jacobsen, K. E.; Stauning, P.; Henriksen, S.

    1983-12-01

    An HF system for studies of very high latitude ionospheric irregularities was described. Radio aurora from field-aligned E-region irregularities of the Slant E Condition type were discussed. The complete system combines an ionosonde, a 12 MHz pulse radar and a 12 MHz bistatic CW Doppler-range set-up. The two latter units use alternately a 360 deg rotating Yagi antenna. High precision oscillators secure the frequency stability of the Doppler system in which the received signal is mixed down to a center frequency of 500 Hz. The Doppler shift range is max + or - 500 Hz. The received signal is recorded in analog form on magnetic tape and may be monitored visually and audibly. Echo range of the CW Doppler signal is obtained by a 150 Hz amplitude modulation of the transmitted signal and phase comparison with the backscattered signal.

  16. Noise analysis for near field 3-D FM-CW radar imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.

    2015-06-19

    Near field radar imaging systems are used for several applications including concealed weapon detection in airports and other high-security venues. Despite the near-field operation, phase noise and thermal noise can limit the performance in several ways including reduction in system sensitivity and reduction of image dynamic range. In this paper, the effects of thermal noise, phase noise, and processing gain are analyzed in the context of a near field 3-D FM-CW imaging radar as might be used for concealed weapon detection. In addition to traditional frequency domain analysis, a time-domain simulation is employed to graphically demonstrate the effect of these noise sources on a fast-chirping FM-CW system.

  17. Limitation of the output power of cw electric-discharge CO{sub 2} lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Nevdakh, Vladimir V

    1999-04-30

    The output power of a sealed-off tunable cw CO{sub 2} laser was optimised. The dependences of the small-signal gain for the 10P(20) line and of the output powers for different transmittances of the cavity on the discharge current were determined. The distributed loss coefficient and the saturation parameter were measured. The saturation parameter increased continuously with increase in the discharge current, leading to a mismatch between the output power and gain maxima. It was established that the principal factor limiting the output power of cw electric-discharge CO{sub 2} lasers is not an increase in the temperature of the active medium but the dissociation of CO{sub 2} molecules. When the latter is minimised in order to achieve the maximum laser power, low gas temperatures are not required. (lasers)

  18. Development of a 9.3 micrometer CW LIDAR for the study of atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteside, B. N.; Schotland, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides a brief summary of the basic requirements to obtain coherent or heterodyne mixing of the optical radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosols with that from a fixed frequency source. The continuous wave (CW) mode of operation for a coherent lidar is reviewed along with the associated lidar transfer equation. A complete optical design of the three major subsystems of a CW, coherent lidar is given. Lens design software is implemented to model and optimize receiver performance. Techniques for the opto-mechanical assembly and some of the critical tolerances of the coherent lidar are provided along with preliminary tests of the subsystems. Included in these tests is a comparison of the experimental and the theoretical average power signal-to-noise ratio. The analog to digital software used to evaluate the power spectrum of the backscattered signal is presented in the Appendix of this report.

  19. Upgrade and validation on plasma of the Tore Supra CW LHCD generator

    SciTech Connect

    Delpech, L.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Berger-By, G.; Bertrand, E.; Bouquey, F.; Chaix, J. P.; Corbel, E.; Crest, I.; Ekedahl, A.; Faisse, F.; Fejoz, P.; Garibaldi, P.; Goletto, C.; Lebourg, P.; Leroux, F.; Lombard, G.; Magne, R.; Martinez, A.; Moreau, M.

    2011-12-23

    A one year-long major upgrade of the 3.7 GHz Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) generator for the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak has been performed. It consisted in installing a first series of eight Thales Electron Devices (TED) 700 kW CW klystrons, new CW components and auxiliaries, and in modifying the transmitter control and protection software. Modifications and calibration of the sensors and the RF subsystems were completed as well. Finally, the RF power available in the generator has been increased by 35% and the pulse duration could reach 1000 s. A complete validation and optimization of the klystrons have been performed in 2010 on matched load before the generator could enter into operation. The eight klystrons connected with the Full Active Multijunction (FAM) antenna delivered 3.5 MW/50s in December 2010. The upgrade of the generator and the steps to validate the modifications are described.

  20. CW Interference Effects on High Data Rate Transmission Through the ACTS Wideband Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Ngo, Duc H.; Tran, Quang K.; Tran, Diepchi T.; Yu, John; Kachmar, Brian A.; Svoboda, James S.

    1996-01-01

    Satellite communications channels are susceptible to various sources of interference. Wideband channels have a proportionally greater probability of receiving interference than narrowband channels. NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) includes a 900 MHz bandwidth hardlimiting transponder which has provided an opportunity for the study of interference effects of wideband channels. A series of interference tests using two independent ACTS ground terminals measured the effects of continuous-wave (CW) uplink interference on the bit-error rate of a 220 Mbps digitally modulated carrier. These results indicate the susceptibility of high data rate transmissions to CW interference and are compared to results obtained with a laboratory hardware-based system simulation and a computer simulation.

  1. Physics of the Microwave Oven

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This is the first of two articles about the physics of microwave ovens. This article deals with the generation of microwaves in the oven and includes the operation of the magnetrons, waveguides and standing waves in resonant cavities. It then considers the absorption of microwaves by foods, discussing the dielectric relaxation of water,…

  2. Microwave-assisted Chemical Transformations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, there has been a considerable interest in developing sustainable chemistries utilizing green chemistry principles. Since the first published report in 1986 by Gedye and Giguere on microwave assisted synthesis in household microwave ovens, the use of microwaves as...

  3. Range sidelobe elimination in maximal sequence phase coded C.W. radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, D. G.; Aitchison, C. S.

    Elimination of the range sidelobe of the autocorrelation of the periodic binary maximal sequence has been achieved. A new property of the m-sequence is defined. As a result the ambiguity function of an m-sequence PSK CW radar coincides with the ambiguity function of the equivalent pulse radar as far as the range and velocity resolution are concerned. The signal to noise deterioration due to the post-correlation implementation of the new property is insignificant.

  4. Non-invasive optoacoustic temperature determination during retinal cw-laser treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandulla, Jochen; Elsner, Hanno; Sandeau, Julien; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2006-02-01

    In almost all retinal laser treatments the therapeutic effect is initiated by a transient temperature increase. Due to differences in tissue properties and physiology like pigmentation and vascular blood flow an individually different temperature increase might occur with crucial effects on the therapeutic benefit of the treatment. In order to determine the individual retinal temperature increase during cw-laser irradiation in real-time we developed a non-invasive method based on optoacoustics. Simultaneously to the cw-laser irradiation (λ = 810 nm, P < 3 W, t = 60 s) pulses from a dye laser (λ = 500 nm, τ = 3.5 ns, Ε ~ 5 μJ) are applied concentrically to the cw-laser spot on the eyeground. The absorption of the pulses lead to a consequent heating and thermoelastic expansion of the tissue. This causes the emission of an ultrasonic pressure wave, which amplitude was found to be temperature dependent following in good approximation a 2 nd order polynomial. The pressure wave was measured by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a contact lens placed on the cornea. The experiments were performed in-vivo on rabbits. Simultaneous measurements with a miniaturized thermocouple showed a similar slope with a maximum local deviation of 0.4 °C for a temperature increase of 5.5 °C. On two rabbits measurements pre and post mortem at the same location were performed. The temperature increase after 60 s was found to raise by 12.0 % and 66.7 % post mortem, respectively. These data were used to calculate the influence of heat convection by blood circulation using a numerical model based on two absorbing layers and assuming a constant perfusion rate for the choriocapillaris and the choroid. Overall the presented optoacoustic method seems feasible for a non-invasive real-time determination of cw-laser induced retinal temperature increases and might serve as a temperature based dosimetry control during retinal laser treatments.

  5. Integration of CW / Radionucleotide Detection Systems to the Fido XT Explosives Detector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-31

    and advancement of the Fido XT. Testing of the phenyl quinoline (PQ) based CW reporter, which was funded under the original parent Phase II SBIR...not change from 6.52. The observed change in pH was slow, however, the bulk solution environment likely resulted in diffusion limitation into the...detector with supporting NRE was processed. The Interceptor components were configured to operate under a Windows CE processor environment , and to

  6. Tunable cw Single-Frequency Source for Injection Seeding 2-micrometer Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    CW DROs. Output frequency distributions -5- were measured with a 300-MHz-free- spectral -range scanning interferometer and a one- meter grating...monochromator. The pulsed DRO was remarkable constant both temporally and spectrally from shot to shot at 320 kHz repetition rate, but did have a tendency to...Earlier analyses 15.1 are extended to provide a quantitative description of spectral hops between adjacent axial modes and the larger discontinuous

  7. Method for characterizing single photon detectors in saturation regime by cw laser.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jungmi; Antonelli, Cristian; Tur, Moshe; Brodsky, Misha

    2010-03-15

    We derive an analytical expression for the count probability of a single photon detector for a wide range of input optical power that includes afterpulsing effects. We confirm the validity of the expression by fitting it to the data obtained from a saturated commercial Single Photon Detector by illuminating it with a cw laser. Detector efficiency and afterpulsing probability extracted from the fits agree with the manufacture specs for low repetition frequencies.

  8. Coherent quasi-CW 153-nm light source at high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yutaka; Ito, Yoshiaki; Ozawa, Akira; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chuangtian; Shin, Shik; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2012-02-01

    We present a quasi-cw laser in vacuum ultraviolet region at megahertz repetition rate. The narrowband pulses generated from an ytterbium-fiber laser system at 33 MHz repetition rate at the central wavelength of 1074 nm is frequency-converted by successive stages of LBO crystals and KBBF crystals. The generated radiation at 153 nm has the shortest wavelength achieved through phase-matched frequency conversion processes in nonlinear optical crystals to our knowledge.

  9. Integrin αvβ3-Targeted IRDye 800CW Near-Infrared Imaging of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruimin; Vider, Jelena; Kovar, Joy L.; Olive, D. Michael; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; Kircher, Moritz F.; Blasberg, Ronald G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Integrin αvβ3 plays an important role in tumor angiogenesis, growth and metastasis. We have tested a targeted probe to visualize integrin receptor expression in glioblastomas using near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging. Experimental design A transgenic glioblastoma mouse model (RCAS-PDGF-driven/tv-a glioblastoma, which mimics the infiltrative growth pattern of human glioblastomas), and two human orthotopic glioblastoma models, (U-87 MG with high integrin β3 expression and TS543 with low integrin β3 expression), were studied. An integrin-targeting NIRF probe, IRDye 800CW-cyclic-RGD peptide (IRDye 800CW-RGD), was tested by in vivo and ex vivo NIRF imaging. Results We demonstrate that the IRDye 800CW-RGD peptide: 1) specifically binds to integrin receptors, 2) is selectively localized to glioblastoma tissue with overexpressed integrin receptors and is retained over prolonged periods of time, 3) is associated with minimal autofluorescence and photobleaching due to imaging at 800 nm, 4) provides delineation of tumor tissue with high precision due to a high tumor-to-normal brain fluorescence ratio (79.7±6.9, 31.2±2.8, and 16.3±1.3) in the U-87 MG, RCAS-PDGF, and TS543 models, respectively; p<0.01) and 5) enables fluorescence-guided glioblastoma resection. Importantly, small foci of residual fluorescence were observed after resection was completed using white light imaging alone, and these fluorescent foci were shown to represent residual tumor tissue by histology. Conclusions NIRF imaging with the IRDye 800CW-RGD probe provides a simple, rapid, low-cost, non-radioactive and highly translatable approach for improved intraoperative glioblastoma visualization and resection. It also has the potential to serve as an imaging platform for noninvasive cancer detection and drug efficacy evaluation studies. PMID:22914772

  10. Initial High-Power-CW-Laser Testing of Liquid-Crystal Optical Phased Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2010-1043 INITIAL HIGH-POWER-CW-LASER TESTING OF LIQUID-CRYSTAL OPTICAL PHASED ARRAYS Bert Whitaker OptiMetrics, Inc...Bert Whitaker (OptiMetrics, Inc.) Scott Harris (Flatiron Research, LLC) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 2003 5e. TASK NUMBER 11 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER...to a Carl Zeiss petrographic microscope. The crossed polarizers in this microscope highlighted the presence of LC material due to its birefringence

  11. Watt-level CW output from ceramic Cr 2+:ZnSe laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu; Hang, Yin

    2008-03-01

    Demonstrations of CW lasing in ceramic Cr 2+:ZnSe are reported. The laser consists of a 1.7-mm thick ceramic Cr 2+:ZnSe disk pumped by a double-clad Tm-silica fiber laser at 2050 nm. Using a concave HR mirror with a radius of curvature of 500 mm as the rear mirror, the laser delivers up to 1030mW of radiation around 2.367 μm.

  12. Plasma density measurements using FM-CW millimeter wave radar techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Doane, J.L.; Mazzucato, E.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1980-09-01

    Modified FM-CW radar techniques using swept millimeter-wave oscillators are useful for determining when a particular density has been reached in a plasma. Narrowband measurements on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) demonstrate the suitability of these techniques for controlling high-power auxiliary plasma heating systems. Broadband measurements using these same techniques are proposed, by which the density profile could be determined.

  13. Simple analytical derivations of thermal lensing in longitudinally Q-CW pumped Yb:YAG.

    PubMed

    Bourdet, Gilbert L; Gouédard, Claude

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce analytical derivations for the thermal lensing of an end-pumped laser disk. These derivations are done for pump beam shapes from Gaussian to top hat, assuming that the thermal conductivity is either constant with the temperature or not. We give examples in two temperature regions, where the thermal conductivity exhibits T(-1) or T(-2) dependence. Numerical applications are given for a Q-CW pumped Yb:YAG disk laser.

  14. Investigation of in-vivo skin autofluorescence lifetimes under long-term cw optical excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lihachev, A; Ferulova, I; Vasiljeva, K; Spigulis, J

    2014-08-31

    The main results obtained during the last five years in the field of laser-excited in-vivo human skin photobleaching effects are presented. The main achievements and results obtained, as well as methods and experimental devices are briefly described. In addition, the impact of long-term 405-nm cw low-power laser excitation on the skin autofluorescence lifetime is experimentally investigated. (laser biophotonics)

  15. Handbook of microwave testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverghetta, T. S.

    A description of microwave test equipment is presented, taking into account signal generators, signal detection/indicating devices, auxiliary testing devices, and microwave systems. Low power, medium power, high power, and peak power measurements are considered along with noise measurements, spectrum analyzer measurements, active testing, antenna measurements, and automatic testing. Attention is given to phase noise, Q measurements, the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurement, swept impedance, noise sources, noise meters, manual noise measurements, automatic noise figure measurements, gain, gain compression, intermodulation, the third order intercept, and questions of spectral purity.

  16. Microwave Frequency Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Vien The; Mirel, Paul; Kogut, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and analysis of microwave frequency polarizing grids. The grids are designed to measure polarization from the cosmic microwave background. It is effective in the range of 500 to 1500 micron wavelength. It is cryogenic compatible and highly robust to high load impacts. Each grid is fabricated using an array of different assembly processes which vary in the types of tension mechanisms to the shape and size of the grids. We provide a comprehensive study on the analysis of the grids' wire heights, diameters, and spacing.

  17. EDITORIAL: Microwave Moisture Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatze, Udo; Kupfer, Klaus; Hübner, Christof

    2007-04-01

    Microwave moisture measurements refer to a methodology by which the water content of materials is non-invasively determined using electromagnetic fields of radio and microwave frequencies. Being the omnipresent liquid on our planet, water occurs as a component in most materials and often exercises a significant influence on their properties. Precise measurements of the water content are thus extremely useful in pure sciences, particularly in biochemistry and biophysics. They are likewise important in many agricultural, technical and industrial fields. Applications are broad and diverse, and include the quality assessment of foodstuffs, the determination of water content in paper, cardboard and textile production, the monitoring of moisture in sands, gravels, soils and constructions, as well as the measurement of water admixtures to coal and crude oil in reservoirs and in pipelines. Microwave moisture measurements and evaluations require insights in various disciplines, such as materials science, dielectrics, the physical chemistry of water, electrodynamics and microwave techniques. The cooperation of experts from the different fields of science is thus necessary for the efficient development of this complex discipline. In order to advance cooperation the Workshop on Electromagnetic Wave Interaction with Water and Moist Substances was held in 1993 in Atlanta. It initiated a series of international conferences, of which the last one was held in 2005 in Weimar. The meeting brought together 130 scientists and engineers from all over the world. This special issue presents a collection of some selected papers that were given at the event. The papers cover most topics of the conference, featuring dielectric properties of aqueous materials, electromagnetic wave interactions, measurement methods and sensors, and various applications. The special issue is dedicated to Dr Andrzej W Kraszewski, who died in July 2006 after a distinguished career of 48 years in the research of

  18. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Minich, Roger W.

    1988-01-01

    A device (10) for producing high-powered and coherent microwaves is described. The device comprises an evacuated, cylindrical, and hollow real cathode (20) that is driven to inwardly field emit relativistic electrons. The electrons pass through an internally disposed cylindrical and substantially electron-transparent cylindrical anode (24), proceed toward a cylindrical electron collector electrode (26), and form a cylindrical virtual cathode (32). Microwaves are produced by spatial and temporal oscillations of the cylindrical virtual cathode (32), and by electrons that reflex back and forth between the cylindrical virtual cathode (32) and the cylindrical real cathode (20).

  19. Prospects for CW and LP operation of the European XFEL in hard X-ray regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, R.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Sekutowicz, J.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2014-12-01

    The European XFEL will operate nominally at 17.5 GeV in SP (short pulse) mode with 0.65 ms long bunch train and 10 Hz repetition rate. A possible upgrade of the linac to CW (continuous wave) or LP (long pulse) modes with a corresponding reduction of electron beam energy is under discussion for many years. Recent successes in the dedicated R&D program allow to forecast a technical feasibility of such an upgrade in the foreseeable future. One of the challenges is to provide sub-Ångström FEL operation in CW and LP modes. In this paper we perform a preliminary analysis of a possible operation of the European XFEL in the hard X-ray regime in CW and LP modes with electron energies of 7 GeV and 10 GeV, respectively. We consider lasing in the baseline XFEL undulator as well as in a new undulator with a reduced period. We show that, with reasonable requirements on electron beam quality, lasing on the fundamental will be possible in the sub-Ångström regime. As an option for generating brilliant photon beams at short wavelengths we also consider harmonic lasing that has recently attracted a significant attention.

  20. Wavelength tunable CW red laser generated based on an intracavity-SFG composite cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. N.; Bai, Y.; Lei, G. Z.; Bai, B.; Sun, Y. X.; Hu, M. X.; Wang, C.; Bai, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    We report a wavelength-tunable watt-level continuous wave (CW) red laser that uses a composite cavity based on an intracavity sum-frequency generation (SFG). The composite cavity is composed of a LD side-pumped Nd: GdVO4 p-polarized 1062.9 nm resonant cavity and a resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO) of s-polarized signal light using a periodically poled crystal MgO: PPLN. Based on the temperature tuning from 30 °C to 200 °C, the CW red laser beams are obtained in a tunable waveband from 634.4 nm to 649.1 nm, corresponding to a tunable output waveband from 3278.0 nm to 2940.2 nm of the mid-infrared idler lights. The maximum CW output power of the red laser at 634.4 nm and the idler light at 3278.0 nm reach 3.03 W and 4.13 W under 30 °C, respectively.

  1. Investigation of radical locations in various sesame seeds by CW EPR and 9-GHz EPR imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, K; Hara, H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the location of radical in various sesame seeds using continuous-wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and 9-GHz EPR imaging. CW EPR detected persistent radicals (single line) for various sesame seeds. The EPR linewidth of black sesame seeds was narrower than that of the irradiated white sesame seeds. A very small signal was detected for the white sesame seeds. Two-dimensional (2D) imaging using a 9-GHz EPR imager showed that radical locations vary for various sesame seeds. The paramagnetic species in black sesame seeds were located on the seed coat (skin) and in the hilum region. The signal with the highest intensity was obtained from the hilum part. A very low-intensity image was observed for the white sesame seeds. In addition, the 2D imaging of the irradiated white sesame seeds showed that free radicals were located throughout the entire seed. For the first time, CW EPR and 9-GHz EPR imaging showed the exact location of radical species in various sesame seeds.

  2. RF couplers for normal-conducting photoinjector of high-power CW FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.

    2004-01-01

    A high-current emittance-compensated RF photoinjector is a key enabling technology for a high-power CW FEL. A preliminary design of a normal-conducting, 2.5-cell pi-mode, 700-MHz CW RF photoinjector that will be built for demonstration purposes, is completed. This photoinjector will be capable of accelerating a 100-mA electron beam (3 nC per bunch at 35 MHz bunch repetition rate) to 2.7 MeV while providing an emittance below 7 mm-mrad at the wiggler. More than 1 MW of RF power will be fed into the photoinjector cavity through two ridge-loaded tapered waveguides. The waveguides are coupled to the cavity by 'dog-bone' irises cut in a thick wall. Due to CW operation of the photoinjector, the cooling of the coupler irises is a rather challenging thermal management project. This paper presents results of a detailed electromagnetic modeling of the coupler-cavity system, which has been performed to select the coupler design that minimizes the iris heating due to RF power loss in its walls.

  3. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2003-05-06

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. A low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively.

  4. Design of 57.5 MHz CW RFQ for medium energy heavy ion superconducting linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kashinsky, D. A.; Minaev, S. A.; Pershin, V. I.; Tretyakova, T. E.; Yaramishev, S. G.; Physics; Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics

    2002-06-01

    The nuclear science community considers the construction of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility as a top priority. The RIA includes a 1.4 GV superconducting linac for production of 400 kW cw heavy ion beams. The initial acceleration of heavy ions delivered from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source can be effectively performed by a 57.5 MHz 4-m long room temperature RFQ. The principal specifications of the RFQ are (i) formation of extremely low longitudinal emittance, (ii) stable operation over a wide range of voltage for acceleration of various ion species needed for RIA operation, and (iii) simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states of uranium ions. cw operation of an accelerating structure leads to a number of requirements for the resonators such as high shunt impedance, efficient water cooling of all parts of the resonant cavity, mechanical stability together with precise alignment, reliable rf contacts, a stable operating mode, and fine tuning of the resonant frequency during operation. To satisfy these requirements a new resonant structure has been developed. This paper discusses the beam dynamics and electrodynamics design of the RFQ cavity, as well as some aspects of the mechanical design of the low-frequency cw RFQ.

  5. Antiviral Activity of a Novel Compound CW-33 against Japanese Encephalitis Virus through Inhibiting Intracellular Calcium Overload

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Su-Hua; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Chen, Chao-Jung; Liu, Yu-Ching; Wang, Ching-Ying; Ping, Chia-Fong; Lin, Yu-Fong; Huang, An-Cheng; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, has five genotypes (I, II, III, IV, and V). JEV genotype I circulates widely in some Asian countries. However, current JEV vaccines based on genotype III strains show low neutralizing capacities against genotype I variants. In addition, JE has no specific treatment, except a few supportive treatments. Compound CW-33, an intermediate synthesized derivative of furoquinolines, was investigated for its antiviral activities against JEV in this study. CW-33 exhibited the less cytotoxicity to Syrian baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) and human medulloblastoma (TE761) cells. CW-33 dose-dependently reduced the cytopathic effect and apoptosis of JEV-infected cells. Supernatant virus yield assay pinpointed CW-33 as having potential anti-JEV activity with IC50 values ranging from 12.7 to 38.5 μM. Time-of-addition assay with CW-33 indicated that simultaneous and post-treatment had no plaque reduction activity, but continuous and simultaneous treatments proved to have highly effective antiviral activity, with IC50 values of 32.7 and 48.5 μM, respectively. CW-33 significantly moderated JEV-triggered Ca2+ overload, which correlated with the recovery of mitochondria membrane potential as well as the activation of Akt/mTOR and Jak/STAT1 signals in treated infected cells. Phosphopeptide profiling by LC-MS/MS revealed that CW-33 upregulated proteins from the enzyme modulator category, such as protein phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2), Rho GTPase-activating protein 35, ARF GTPase-activating protein GIT2, and putative 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 2. These enzyme modulators identified were associated with the activation of Akt/mTOR and Jak/STAT1 signals. Meanwhile, I-2 treatment substantially inhibited the apoptosis of JEV-infected cells. The results demonstrated that CW-33 exhibited a significant potential in the development of anti-JEV agents. PMID:27563890

  6. Observations of tornadoes and wall clouds with a portable FM-CW Doppler radar: 1989--1990 results

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, H.B. . School of Meteorology); Unruh, W.P. )

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on our progress using a portable, 1 W,FM (frequency modulated)-CW (continuous wave) Doppler radar developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to make measurements of the wind field in tornadoes and wall clouds along with simultaneous visual documentation. Results using a CW version of the radar in 1987--1988 are given in Bluestein and Unruh (1989). 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14) for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier (18) may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator (12) or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14). A second amplifier (20) is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier (18). The second amplifier (20) outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity (34). In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier (20) is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the second amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  8. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.

    1994-06-14

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system includes a microwave signal generator or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator. A second amplifier is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier. The second amplifier outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity. In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply is provided for operation of the second amplifier. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load. 5 figs.

  9. Leakage of Microwave Ovens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Bushey, R.; Winn, G.

    2011-01-01

    Physics is essential for students who want to succeed in science and engineering. Excitement and interest in the content matter contribute to enhancing this success. We have developed a laboratory experiment that takes advantage of microwave ovens to demonstrate important physical concepts and increase interest in physics. This experiment…

  10. Electronically Tuned Microwave Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, Mysore

    1987-01-01

    Features include low phase noise and frequency stability. Bias-tuned, low-phase-noise microwave oscillator circuit based on npn bipolar transistor and dielectric resonator. Operating at frequency of about 8.4 GHz, oscillator adjusted to give low phase noise, relatively flat power output versus frequency, and nearly linear frequency versus bias voltage.

  11. An experimental study of waveguide coupled microwave heating with conventional multicusp negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Komppula, J.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Laulainen, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-04-08

    Negative ion production with conventional multicusp plasma chambers utilizing 2.45 GHz microwave heating is demonstrated. The experimental results were obtained with the multicusp plasma chambers and extraction systems of the RF-driven RADIS ion source and the filament driven arc discharge ion source LIISA. A waveguide microwave coupling system, which is almost similar to the one used with the SILHI ion source, was used. The results demonstrate that at least one third of negative ion beam obtained with inductive RF-coupling (RADIS) or arc discharge (LIISA) can be achieved with 1 kW of 2.45 GHz microwave power in CW mode without any modification of the plasma chamber. The co-extracted electron to H{sup −} ratio and the optimum pressure range were observed to be similar for both heating methods. The behaviour of the plasma implies that the energy transfer from the microwaves to the plasma electrons is mainly an off-resonance process.

  12. ELF/VLF wave generation using simultaneous CW and modulated HF heating of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. C.; Agrawal, D.

    2011-04-01

    Experimental observations of ELF/VLF waves generated using the dual-beam heating capability of the High frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) HF transmitter in Gakona, Alaska, are compared with the predictions of an ionospheric HF heating model that accounts for the simultaneous propagation and absorption of multiple HF beams. The model output is used to assess three properties of the ELF/VLF waves observed on the ground: the ELF/VLF signal magnitude, the ELF/VLF harmonic ratio, and the ELF/VLF power law exponent. Ground-based experimental observations indicate that simultaneous heating of the ionosphere by a CW HF wave and a modulated HF wave generates significantly lower ELF/VLF magnitudes than during periods without CW heating, consistent with model predictions. Further modeling predictions demonstrate the sensitive dependence of ELF/VLF magnitude on the frequency and power of the CW signal. The ratio of ELF/VLF harmonic magnitudes is also shown to be a sensitive indicator of ionospheric modification, although it is somewhat less sensitive than the ELF/VLF magnitude. Last, the peak power level of the modulated HF beam was varied in order to assess the power dependence of ELF/VLF wave generation under both single- and dual-beam heating conditions. Experimental and theoretical results indicate that accurate evaluation of the ELF/VLF power law index requires high signal-to-noise ratio; it is thus a less sensitive indicator of ionospheric modification than either ELF/VLF magnitude or the ELF/VLF harmonic ratio.

  13. Kilowatt class high-power CW Yb:YAG cryogenic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. C.; Singley, J. M.; Yager, E.; Kowalewski, K.; Guelzow, J.; Kuper, J. W.

    2008-04-01

    We discuss progress towards a kilowatt class CW Yb:YAG cryogenic laser. Cryogenically-cooled crystalline solid-state lasers, and Yb:YAG lasers in particular, are attractive sources of scalable CW output power with very high wallplug efficiency and excellent beam-quality that is independent of the output power. Results are presented for a high power Yb:YAG oscillator that has produced over 550 W of output power with good slope and optical-optical efficiencies while maintaining single transverse mode output. We also describe a new oscillator-amplifier cryogenic Yb:YAG system nearing completion, that will build on the work presented here and result in CW power output of > 1 kW while maintaining near-diffraction-limited beam quality. The oscillator described here consists of a distributed array of seven highly-doped thin Yb:YAG-sapphire disks in a folded multiple-Z resonator. Individual disks are pumped from opposite sides using 100 W fiber-coupled 940 nm pump diodes. The laser system produces a near-diffraction-limited TEM 00 output beam with the aid of an active conduction-cooling design. In addition, the device can be scaled to very high average power in an oscillator-amplifier configuration, by increasing the number and diameter of the thin disks, and by increasing the power of the pump diodes with only minor modifications to the current design. We will present experimental results including output power, threshold power, and slope and optical-optical efficiencies.

  14. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2000-11-21

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. In accordance with the teachings of the invention, a low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic tansaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively. For example, it may also be used to diagnose diseases associated with the concentration of Raman-active constituents in urine, lymph and saliva It may be used to identify cancer in the breast, cervix, uterus, ovaries and the like by measuring the fingerprint excitation Raman spectra of these tissues. It may also be used to reveal the growing of tumors or cancers by measuring the levels of nitric oxide in tissue.

  15. CW- and pulsed-EPR of carbonaceous matter in primitive meteorites: solving a lineshape paradox.

    PubMed

    Delpoux, Olivier; Gourier, Didier; Binet, Laurent; Vezin, Hervé; Derenne, Sylvie; Robert, François

    2008-05-01

    Insoluble organic matter (IOM) of Orgueil and Tagish Lake meteorites are studied by CW-EPR and pulsed-EPR spectroscopies. The EPR line is due to polycyclic paramagnetic moieties concentrated in defect-rich regions of the IOM, with concentrations of the order of 4x10(19) spin/g. CW-EPR reveals two types of paramagnetic defects: centres with S=1/2, and centres with S=0 ground state and thermally accessible triple state S=1. In spite of the Lorentzian shape of the EPR and its narrowing upon increasing the spin concentration, the EPR line is not in the exchange narrowing regime as previously deduced from multi-frequency CW-EPR [L. Binet, D. Gourier, Appl. Magn. Reson. 30 (2006) 207-231]. It is inhomogeneously broadened as demonstrated by the presence of nuclear modulations in the spin-echo decay. The line narrowing, similar to an exchange narrowing effect, is the result of an increasing contribution of the narrow line of the triplet state centres in addition to the broader line of doublet states. Hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy (HYSCORE) of hydrogen and (13)C nuclei indicates that IOM* centres are small polycyclic moieties that are moderately branched with aliphatic chains, as shown by the presence of aromatic hydrogen atoms. On the contrary the lack of such aromatic hydrogen in triplet states suggests that these radicals are most probably highly branched. Paramagnetic centres are considerably enriched in deuterium, with D/H approximately 1.5+/-0.5x10(-2) of the order of values existing in interstellar medium.

  16. CW- and pulsed-EPR of carbonaceous matter in primitive meteorites: Solving a lineshape paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpoux, Olivier; Gourier, Didier; Binet, Laurent; Vezin, Hervé; Derenne, Sylvie; Robert, François

    2008-05-01

    Insoluble organic matter (IOM) of Orgueil and Tagish Lake meteorites are studied by CW-EPR and pulsed-EPR spectroscopies. The EPR line is due to polycyclic paramagnetic moieties concentrated in defect-rich regions of the IOM, with concentrations of the order of 4 × 10 19 spin/g. CW-EPR reveals two types of paramagnetic defects: centres with S = 1/2, and centres with S = 0 ground state and thermally accessible triple state S = 1. In spite of the Lorentzian shape of the EPR and its narrowing upon increasing the spin concentration, the EPR line is not in the exchange narrowing regime as previously deduced from multi-frequency CW-EPR [L. Binet, D. Gourier, Appl. Magn. Reson. 30 (2006) 207-231]. It is inhomogeneously broadened as demonstrated by the presence of nuclear modulations in the spin-echo decay. The line narrowing, similar to an exchange narrowing effect, is the result of an increasing contribution of the narrow line of the triplet state centres in addition to the broader line of doublet states. Hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy (HYSCORE) of hydrogen and 13C nuclei indicates that IOM rad centres are small polycyclic moieties that are moderately branched with aliphatic chains, as shown by the presence of aromatic hydrogen atoms. On the contrary the lack of such aromatic hydrogen in triplet states suggests that these radicals are most probably highly branched. Paramagnetic centres are considerably enriched in deuterium, with D/H ≈ 1.5 ± 0.5 × 10 -2 of the order of values existing in interstellar medium.

  17. Microwave superheaters for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.B.; Hoffman, M.A.; Logan, B.G.

    1987-10-16

    The microwave superheater uses the synchrotron radiation from a thermonuclear plasma to heat gas seeded with an alkali metal to temperatures far above the temperature of material walls. It can improve the efficiency of the Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine (CFAR) cycle described elsewhere in these proceedings. For a proof-of-principle experiment using helium, calculations show that a gas superheat ..delta..T of 2000/sup 0/K is possible when the wall temperature is maintained at 1000/sup 0/K. The concept can be scaled to reactor grade systems. Because of the need for synchrotron radiation, the microwave superheater is best suited for use with plasmas burning an advanced fuel such as D-/sup 3/He. 5 refs.

  18. First results from the Cornell high Q cw full linac cryo- module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, R.; Furuta, F.; He, Y.; Ge, M.; Hoffstaetter, G.; O'Connell, T.; Quigley, P.; Sabol, D.; Sears, J.; Smith, E.; Liepe, M.; Markham, S.; Bullock, B.; Elmore, B.; Kaufman, J.; Conway, J.; Veshcherevich, V.

    2015-12-01

    Cornell University has finished building a 10 m long superconducting accelerator module as a prototype of the main linac of a proposed ERL facility. This module houses 6 superconducting cavities- operated at 1.8 K in continuous wave (CW) mode - with individual HOM absorbers and one magnet/ BPM section. In pushing the limits, a high quality factor of the cavities (2•1010) and high beam currents (100 mA accelerated plus 100 mA decelerated) were targeted. The design of the cryomodule and the results of components tested before assembly will be presented in this paper.

  19. Design considerations for a 100 kW c-w, 140 GHz gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Bier, R.; Fox, L.; Huey, H.; Ives, L.; Jory, H.; Spang, S.

    1984-01-01

    A gyrotron oscillator capable of generating 100 kW of c-w power is currently under development at Varian. The tube is being designed for operation in the TE/sup 0//sub 031/ cavity mode with the electron beam located at the second radial electric field maximum in the cavity. The electron beam will be produced by a magnetron injection gun and the 56 kG magnetic field required for 140 GHz operation will be provided by a superconducting magnet. Initial design calculations for the important elements of the tube are reported and the various technology issues of the tube design are discussed.

  20. Transient fracture of the aluminium plate in tension and irradiated by CW CO2 laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuze; Li, Sizhong

    1993-07-01

    The experimental results of the transient fracture effect of aluminum plate in tension and irradiated by 8kW CW CO2 laser beam are presented in this paper. The study has shown that the macro physical fracture or micro damage of the plate caused by transient temperature elevation may evolve into the macro crack source of structure fracture. The large deformation and structure failure are mainly attributed to the transient thermal softening of material, the corresponding redistribution of macro loading, and deformation in the structure. The larger pretension the aluminum plate bears, the less the incident laser energy for fracture of the structure will be.

  1. Design of a high charge CW photocathode injector test stand at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Lliu, H.; Kehne, D.; Benson, S.

    1996-08-01

    A 10 MeV high-charge CW electron injector test stand has been designed for the CEBAF UV FEL driver accelerator. It consists of a 500 kV DC photocathode gun, a 1500 MHz room-temperature buncher, a modified CEBAF cryounit (quarter cryomodule) with an SRF accelerating gradient of {approximately}10 MV/m, two solenoids in the 500 kV region and an achromatic, non-isochronous injection transport line delivering 10 MeV beam to the driver accelerator. Experimental work is in progress toward establishing design system performance. 21 refs. , 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. DPAL: A New Class of Lasers for CW Power Beaming at Ideal Photovoltaic Cell Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Krupke, W F; Beach, R J; Payne, S A; Kanz, V K; Early, J T

    2003-09-15

    The new class of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers (DPALs) offers high efficiency cw laser beams at wavelengths which efficiently couple to photovoltaic (PV) cells: silicon cells at 895 nm (cesium), and GaAs cells at 795 nm (rubidium) and at 770 nm (potassium). DPAL electrical efficiencies of 25-30% are projected, enabling PV cell efficiencies {approx}40% (Si) and {approx}60% (GaAs). Near-diffraction-limited DPAL device power scaling into the multi-kilowatt regime from a single aperture is projected.

  3. High-power cw laser bars of the 750 - 790-nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Degtyareva, N S; Kondakov, S A; Mikayelyan, G T; Gorlachuk, P V; Ladugin, M A; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Ryaboshtan, Yu L; Yarotskaya, I V

    2013-06-30

    We have developed the effective design of semiconductor heterostructures, which allow one to fabricate cw laser diodes emitting in the 750 - 790-nm spectral range. The optimal conditions for fabrication of GaAsP/AlGaInP/GaAs heterostructures by MOCVD have been determined. It is shown that the use of quantum wells with a precisely defined quantity mismatch reduces the threshold current density and increases the external differential efficiency. The results of studies of characteristics of diode laser bars fabricated from these heterostructures are presented. (lasers)

  4. Performance of three-crystal 1800 watt CW Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, J.L.; Keicher, D.M.; Fuerschbach, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a laser system that would combine some of the favorable characteristics of the two most commonly used lasers for seam welding of heat sensitive assemblies. A multirod (3) symmetrical resonator CW Nd:YAG laser has been developed that is rated at 1800 watts output power. By utilizing the symmetrical resonator design, beam characteristics are not significantly compromised compared to that of single rod systems. The laser is capable of producing acceptable welds in aluminum and copper alloys and also has sufficient power to produce welds in steels and nickel base alloys at high welding speeds. 4 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  5. A boron nitride CW Carbon dioxide waveguide laser for optically pumping heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, D. E.; Prunty, S. L.; Sexton, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    Boron nitride has been used to fabricate a 1 cm 3 CW CO 2 capillary waveguide laser which operates at 130 torr gas pressure, and generates 7 W of 10 μm radiation untuned and up to 3 W on individual grating-selected emission lines. Pressure broadened gain profiles are limited to ±200 MHz from line centre by longitudinal cavity mode spacing. Increased absorption of the 9μm band R(22) line by D 2O vapour is observed as this line is tuned across the broadened gain profile towards its D 2O absorption.

  6. Design of a 1-MW, CW coaxial gyrotron with two gaussian beam outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Y.; Hayashi, K.; Mitsunaka, Y.; Itoh, Y.; Sugawara, T.

    1995-04-01

    The design of a 170 GHz, 1 MW-CW gyrotron for electron cyclotron heating of nuclear fusion plasmas is presented. The designed gyrotron incorporates a coaxial cavity to reduce mode competition, and a coaxial electron gun to support the cavity inner conductor. A new mode converter splits the generated wave into two beams and radiates them in different directions. The radiated beams are transmitted to two output windows through two mirror systems, being transformed into Gaussian-like beams. A single-stage depressed collector improves the overall efficiency of the gyrotron and reduces the heat flux to the collector surface.

  7. Feasibility and conceptual design of a C.W. positron source at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Golge, Serkan

    2010-08-01

    A feasibility study of a CW positron source for the 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) is provided. The proposed ≥ 100 nA Continuous Wave (CW) positron source at JLAB has several unique and challenging characteristics: high current incident electron beam at 126 MeV with a high beam power (up to a MW); CW e- beam and CW e+ production. The multiple scattering is a dominant process when creating e+ in a target, which results a large phase space area of the emitted positrons. An admittance study was done at CEBAF to find the maximum phase space area, which is tolerated in the machine. The measured geometrical transverse admittance (A) were Ax =10 and Ay = 5 mm∙mrad at the injector. Energy spread measurement was also done at the ARC1. The fractional spread limit in the ARC1 was measured as δ = 3×10-3 at 653 MeV. By using the optimized results and the CEBAF parameters, three positron injector configurations are proposed; Combined Function Magnet, Two-Dipole and Microtron Dipole configurations. With the assumptions made, by using 126 MeV Ⓧ10 mA e- beam impinging on a 2 mm W target with a 100 μm spot size, we can get up to 3 μA useful e+ current at the North Linac connection. One of the biggest challenges is the target design, which the deposited power is about 60 kW. ILC designs project power deposition up to 13 kW, which would allow the creation of a e+ beam of up to 650 nA otherwise. The results of analytic and monte carlo simulations of the positron production, capture and acceleration are presented. For the target design, a review is presented of solutions for the high power production target. Portions of this dissertation work have been published in two conference proceedings.

  8. SSPARAMA: A Nonlinear, Wave Optics Multipulse (and CW) Steady-State Propagation Code with Adaptive Coordinates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-10

    MADEIR, AND U[IItC1I1 aperture as the pulse under study begins to propagate. The solution to Eq. (8) il ob- tained subject to the energy...Herrmann of Lincoln Laboratory, who studied the propagation of a CW infinite Gauuian with a C-2 diameter of 70 cm. The absorption coefficient was 0.07 km -1...mnitiazatin rure coline with a call to UTUT tsore vio alerue untity calcult aeamed. int * The call to DNC aomppes the urie trno ofi Eq. (6) and then he

  9. Synthesis of silicon carbide powders by a CW CO 2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, F.; Ghiglione, G.; Musci, M.; Nannetti, C.

    Ultrafine SiC ceramic powders have been produced by irradiating silane and acetylene mixtures with a CW CO 2 laser. The work is mainly concerned with the evaluation of the parameters affecting the material production efficiency: laser power and laser intensity, pressure in the reaction chamber, reactant and carrier gas flow rates. The characterization of the produced material refers to particle composition, size and shape and crystalline structure. Sintering tests have been made in order to evaluate the performances of laser-produced ceramic powders. Preliminary measurements aimed at the evaluation of the feasibility of process scaling-up have been also carried out.

  10. Spatio-temporal generation regimes in quasi-CW Raman fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Nikita; Sugavanam, Srikanth; Churkin, Dmitry

    2015-09-21

    We present experimental measurements of intensity spatio-temporal dynamics in quasi-CW Raman fiber laser. Depending on the power, the laser operates in different spatio-temporal regimes varying from partial mode-locking near the generation threshold to almost stochastic radiation and a generation of short-lived pulses at high power. The transitions between the generation regimes are evident in intensity spatio-temporal dynamics. Two-dimensional auto-correlation functions provide an additional insight into temporal and spatial properties of the observed regimes.

  11. Radiation build-up in laminar and turbulent regimes in quasi-CW Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Sergey V; Tarasov, Nikita; Churkin, Dmitry V

    2015-10-19

    We study the radiation build-up in laminar and turbulent generation regimes in quasi-CW Raman fiber laser. We found the resulted spectral shape and generation type is defined by the total spectral broadening/narrowing balance over laser cavity round-trip, which is substantially different in different regimes starting from first round-trips of the radiation build-up. In turbulent regime, the steady-state is reached only after a few round-trips, while in the laminar regime the laser approaches the equilibrium spectrum shape asymptotically.

  12. CW seeded optical parametric amplifier providing wavelength and pulse duration tunable nearly transform limited pulses.

    PubMed

    Hädrich, S; Gottschall, T; Rothhardt, J; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2010-02-01

    An optical parametric amplifier that delivers nearly transform limited pulses is presented. The center wavelength of these pulses can be tuned between 993 nm and 1070 nm and, at the same time, the pulse duration is varied between 206 fs and 650 fs. At the shortest pulse duration the pulse energy was increased up to 7.2 microJ at 50 kHz repetition rate. Variation of the wavelength is achieved by applying a tunable cw seed while the pulse duration can be varied via altering the pump pulse duration. This scheme offers superior flexibility and scaling possibilities.

  13. On the Use of X-Band CW Nanosecond Airborne Radar for Terrain Profiling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    Report 5599 On the Use of X-Band CW Nanosecond Airborne Radar for Terrain Profiling (D. T. CHEN AND E. A. ULIANA00 00 Space Sensing Branch Space...Radar for Terrain Profiling 2 ERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Chen, D.T. and Uliana, E.A. - 𔄀 SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION Radar return waveform analysis Hfigh pass...filter. 79 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse of necessary and identify by block number) - ’ Terrain profile sensed by a 10 GHz X-band airborne nanosecond radar

  14. Measurement of Wideband FM-CW-Radar Characteristics During Approach of Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küllmer, A.; Spieker, H.; Schüür, J.; Ender, A.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper a method to measure and characterize wideband fm-cw-radars like the radio altimeter of aircraft is presented. The limitations of frequency domain measuring systems will be shown by comparing the results from frequency and time domain based measurements. The need of additional measuring equipment like a down converter and amplifier to improve the signal quality in time domain is described as well as the used software tools to calculate the spectrum. Finally it is described how the frequency ramp speed and shape of the frequency modulated signal can be determined in addition to the already calculated occupied bandwidth and spectral power density.

  15. Strategies for minimizing emittance growth in high charge CW FEL injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the best strategies for designing low emittance, high charge CW FEL injectors. This issue has become more and more critical as today`s interest in FELs is toward UV wavelength high average power operation. The challenge of obtaining the smallest possible emittance is discussed from both the practical point of view and the beam physics point of view. Various mechanisms responsible for beam emittance growth are addressed in detail. Finally, the design of a high charge injector test stand at CEBAF is chosen to help illustrate the design strategies and emittance growth mechanisms discussed in this paper.

  16. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, I.H. . Dept. of Physics); Lee, J.H. . Langley Research Center)

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on the efficiencies and threshold pump intensities of various solid-state laser materials that have been estimated to compare their performance characteristics as direct solar-pumped CW lasers. Among the laser materials evaluated in this research, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6%; however, it does not seem to be practical for solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AMO) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12% when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  17. Simulation of a two-frequency cw chemical HF-HBr laser

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, B P; Katorgin, B I; Stepanov, A A

    2008-10-31

    An autonomous cw chemical HF-HBr laser emitting simultaneously at {approx}2.7 {mu}m (HF molecules) and {approx}4.2 {mu}m (HBr molecules) is studied numerically by using complete Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that the output power of the HBr laser per unit area of the nozzle array can achieve {approx}20 W cm{sup -2} for the laser region length {approx}20 cm. The relation between the radiation intensities emitted by HF and HBr molecules is controlled by diluting the secondary fuel by bromine. (lasers)

  18. Visibility and aerosol measurement by diode-laser random-modulation CW lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, N.; Baba, H.; Sakurai, K.; Ueno, T.; Ishikawa, N.

    1986-01-01

    Examples of diode laser (DL) random-modulation continuous wave (RM-CW) lidar measurements are reported. The ability of the measurement of the visibility, vertical aerosol profile, and the cloud ceiling height is demonstrated. Although the data shown here were all measured at night time, the daytime measurement is, of course, possible. For that purpose, accurate control of the laser frequency to the center frequency of a narrow band filter is required. Now a new system with a frequency control is under construction.

  19. Broad-band chopper for a CW proton linac at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Lebedev, V.A.; Solyak, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Sun, D.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The future Fermilab program in the high energy physics is based on a new facility called the Project X [1] to be built in the following decade. It is based on a 3 MW CW linear accelerator delivering the 3 GeV 1 mA H{sup -} beam to a few experiments simultaneously. Small fraction of this beam will be redirected for further acceleration to 8 GeV to be injected to the Recycler/Main Injector for a usage in a neutrino program and other synchrotron based high energy experiments. Requirements and technical limitations to the bunch-by-bunch chopper for the Fermilab Project X are discussed.

  20. Development of high power CW 3.7 GHz klystrons for fusion experiments on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Magne, R.; Armitano, A.; Berger-By, G.; Bouquey, F.; Corbel, E.; Delpech, L.; Mollard, P.; Prou, M.; Samaille, F.; Volpe, D.; Beunas, A.; Kazarian, F.

    2011-07-01

    In the frame of the CIMES project, a collaborative effort between Association Euratom-CEA and Thales Electron Devices (TED) has led to the development of a high power CW klystron TH 2103 C, working at 3.7 GHz, for plasma heating and current drive for the Tokamak Tore Supra. A prototype has been manufactured and thoroughly tested on water load in December 2007 to verify that all the parameters met the specifications. The paper will present in detail the process and results of the test of the klystrons.

  1. Clinical trials in near infrared fluorescence imaging with IRDye 800CW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draney, Daniel R.

    2015-03-01

    A monofunctional, heptamethine dye, IRDye® 800CW, is being manufactured under GMP conditions for use in human clinical trials. When attached to a suitable targeting agent and paired with an appropriate camera system, the dye allows Near Infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging of tumor tissue during surgery. The talk will describe the properties of the dye and give an overview of current and planned clinical trials in Europe and the USA. The dye is available in both the NHS ester and carboxylate forms for conjugation to targeting molecules. A GMP toxicology study of the dye was described in a previous publication.

  2. Experimental study of the interaction between DC discharge microplasmas and CW lasers.

    PubMed

    Forati, Ebrahim; Piltan, Shiva; Li, Aobo; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2016-01-25

    A high power (~ 1W) continuous wave (CW) laser was focused on argon microplasma generated in the microgap between two electrodes with submillimeter diameters. Dependence of breakdown (V(BD)) and quench (V(Q)) voltages of microplasma to the laser power, wavelength, and spot location were studied as the gap size and pressure varied. It was observed that the laser-plasma interaction can only occur thermally through the electrodes. Also, the thermal effect of the laser was noticeable at relatively higher pressures (> 10Torr), and in most cases led to a decrease in V(BD), proportional to the pressure.

  3. Changes in IR spectra of polysaccharides induced by CW CO2-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugunovich, Viacheslav A.; Zhbankov, R. G.; Zhdanovskii, Vladimir A.; Nasennik, L. N.; Puhnarevich, S. A.; Firsov, S. P.

    2003-04-01

    By IR spectroscopy methods the structural changes of high molecular polymers irradiated by CW CO2-laser radiation was investigated. Some changes in the structural sensitive regions at 1250 - 950 and 950 - 850 cm-1 of the IR spectra of the investigated polysaccharides [pullulan (molecular mass of 14500) and microcrystalline cellulose (structural modifications I and II)] were exhibit. These changes indicated that the degree of conformational order of polysaccharide molecules increases under the laser irradiation, while its structural order always decreases as a result of heating by traditional thermal sources.

  4. Mode selection and resonator design studies of a 95 GHz, 100 kW, CW gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Vamshi Krishna, P.; Kartikeyan, M.V. E-mail: kartik@iitr.ernet.in; Thumm, M.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the mode selection procedure leading to the design and the cavity resonator design studies of a 95 GHz, 100 kW, CW Gyrotron will be presented, such a gyrotron will be used for specific ECRH/ECRIS applications. In this course all the suitable modes with design constraints within the limits of design goals are considered and finally the TE{sub 10.4} mode is chosen as the operating mode which is suitable for the design. Design constraints are carefully investigated, and starting currents are computed. (author)

  5. The F-type eclipsing binaries ZZ Bootis, CW Eridani, and BK Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popper, D. M.

    1983-08-01

    Spectrographic orbits of these three double-lined binaries are determined from spectrograms obtained at the Lick Observatory. The photometric observations of ZZ Boo by McNamara et al. and of CW Eri by Chen are reanalyzed, and revised properties of the components are derived. The properties of the most definitive F-type stars are shown in the mass-radius, mass-luminosity, and color-magnitude planes, along with zero-age relations. The components of the three systems analyzed here are among the more evolved binaries having both components in the state of core hydrogen burning.

  6. Microwave Quantum Illumination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-29

    target detection than the optical, due to the naturally -occurring bright thermal background in the microwave regime. We use an electro-opto...technologically-driven information task. So far, QI has only been demonstrated at optical wave- lengths [9, 14, 15], for which naturally -occurring back...background. The QI communication protocol from [8, 9] deals with this ∗ stefano.pirandola@york.ac.uk problem in a natural way by purposefully injecting am

  7. Microwave Radiation and Thermoregulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    environment ................................................ 33 19. A plot of dry heat losses as a function of the skin-to- ambient temperature gradient...avapora- - on of water to be 0.72 W-h/g. Dry heat exchanged with the environment ’hrough convection C and radiation R must be expressed in terms of...microwave field was present, the animals were observed to sit much more quietly than during the equilibration period, often with eyes closed as though

  8. Microwave-Assisted Olefin Metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicks, François; Borguet, Yannick; Sauvage, Xavier; Bicchielli, Dario; Delfosse, Sébastien; Delaude, Lionel; Demonceau, Albert

    Since the first reports on the use of microwave irradiation to accelerate organic chemical transformations, a plethora of papers have been published in this field. In most examples, microwave heating has been shown to dramatically reduce reaction times, increase product yields, and enhance product purity by reducing unwanted side reactions compared to conventional heating methods. The present contribution aims at illustrating the advantages of this technology in olefin metathesis and, when data are available, at comparing microwave-heated and conventionally heated experiments

  9. Passive Microwave Power Distribution Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    wavelength by switching a reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifter in the stub, in response to termination of microwave power from one of the feed tubes....A standby microwave transmitter power amplifier tube is switched into a microwave power distribution system for a phased array in microseconds when...after the switching is completed, the switching being accomplished by changing electrical length of a quarter-wavelength waveguide stub to one-half

  10. Passive microwave soil moisture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The AgRISTARS Soil Moisture Project has made significant progress in the quantification of microwave sensor capabilities for soil moisture remote sensing. The 21-cm wavelength has been verified to be the best single channel for radiometric observations of soil moisture. It has also been found that other remote sensing approaches used in conjunction with L-band passive data are more successful than multiple wavelength microwave radiometry in this application. AgRISTARS studies have also improved current understanding of noise factors affecting the interpretability of microwave emission data. The absorption of soil emission by vegetation has been quantified, although this effect is less important than absorption effects for microwave radiometry.

  11. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Sagripanti, J L; Swicord, M L; Davis, C C

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  12. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sagripanti, J.L.; Swicord, M.L.; Davis, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  13. Dielectric characterization of the seeds of invasive Chinese tallow tree.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Laura Picou; Boldor, Dorin

    2013-01-01

    Biofuels have the potential to replace a significant portion of the transportation needs of the USA and the world. Low-cost lipid feedstock (i.e. tallow tree seeds) can be used for production of biodiesel, but these seeds need to be dried. Microwave drying is utilized to dry various seeds and grain, but for this process to be most efficient the dielectric properties of the materials need to be known. This study presents, for the first time, the dielectric properties of the seeds of the Chinese tallow tree. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss factor were determined using a modified free-space method for different moisture contents at frequency ranges centered around 915 and 2450 MHz respectively. The dielectric constant decreased with frequency in those respective ranges, and increased linearly with increasing moisture content, from 1.96 at 0% m.c. to 2.3 at 7% m.c. at 915 MHz, and from 2.08 at 0% m.c. to 2.42 at 7.6% m.c. at 2450 MHz. The dielectric loss factor generally decreased with frequency in both frequency ranges, and increased linearly with moisture content from a low of 0.16 at 0% m.c. to 0.21 at 7.56% at 915 MHz, respectively from a low of 0.13 at 0% m.c. to 0.2 at 7.6% m.c. at 2450 MHz. These results can be used to design microwave processing operations and systems for drying of tallow tree seeds, as well as for non-destructive determination of theses seeds' moisture content.

  14. End-to-end laser radar range code for coherent cw lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, M. John; Seliverstov, Dima

    1996-06-01

    A user friendly modular computer code is described for CW coherent laser radar which includes all relevant physical effects needed to evaluate the probability of detection versus time after launch for ballistic missiles or other targets of interest. The beginning point of the code is the conventional laser radar range equation. Atmospheric attenuation is determined from an integral FASCODE calculation, and the laser radar range equation is solved for a curved-earth geometry including free air turbulence induced beam spreading. Several different atmospheric turbulence models are selectable. Target cross-sections can be input into the code as a function of aspect angle Coherence time and transverse coherence length limits are included in the code. Beam jitter effects are also calculated. The carrier-to-noise ratio is calculated including all of these (complicated) variables and degradations. The code then calculates the probability of detection of the target as a function of time using incoherent integration of coherent sub-pulses. The governing equations and practical results are presented for detection and tracking of long range theater ballistic missiles from airborne surveillance platforms. The use of CW lasers requires increased measurement times compared to pulsed lasers and results in an averaging of the target fading statistics.

  15. Workshops on Science Enabled by a Coherent, CW, Synchrotron X-ray Source, June 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Joel

    2012-01-03

    In June of 2011 we held six two-day workshops called "XDL-2011: Science at the Hard X-ray Diffraction Limit". The six workshops covered (1) Diffraction-based imaging techniques, (2) Biomolecular structure from non-crystalline materials, (3) Ultra-fast science, (4) High-pressure science, (5) Materials research with nano-beams and (6) X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS), In each workshop, invited speaker from around the world presented examples of novel experiments that require a CW, diffraction-limited source. During the workshop, each invited speaker provided a one-page description of the experiment and an illustrative graphic. The experiments identified by the workshops demonstrate the broad and deep scientific case for a CW coherent synchrotron x-ray source. The next step is to perform detailed simulations of the best of these ideas to test them quantitatively and to guide detailed x-ray beam-line designs. These designs are the first step toward developing detailed facility designs and cost estimates.

  16. CW laser induced crystallization of thin amorphous silicon films deposited by EBE and PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said-Bacar, Z.; Prathap, P.; Cayron, C.; Mermet, F.; Leroy, Y.; Antoni, F.; Slaoui, A.; Fogarassy, E.

    2012-09-01

    This work presents the Continuous Wave (CW) laser crystallization of thin amorphous silicon (a-Si) films deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and by Electron Beam Evaporation (EBE) on low cost glass substrate. The films are characterized by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and by Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to evaluate the hydrogen content. Analysis shows that the PECVD films contain a high hydrogen concentration (˜10 at.%) while the EBE films are almost hydrogen-free. It is found that the hydrogen is in a bonding configuration with the a-Si network and in a free form, requiring a long thermal annealing for exodiffusion before the laser treatment to avoid explosive effusion. The CW laser crystallization process of the amorphous silicon films was operated in liquid phase regime. We show by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) that polysilicon films with large grains can be obtained with EBE as well as for the PECVD amorphous silicon provided that for the latest the hydrogen content is lower than 2 at.%.

  17. Design considerations for a 1 MW CW gyrotron with an internal converter

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Chu, T.S.; Huey, H.; Jory, H.; Neilson, J.; Schumacher, R.; Lorbeck, J.A.; Vernon, R.J.

    1993-07-01

    Varian is carrying out the development of high-power, CW gyrotrons at frequencies ranging from 100--140 GHz. Recent experiments, carried out at a frequency of 110 GHz, resulted in the generation of output powers of 500 kW for 2.5-second pulses and 1 MW for 1 ms pulse durations. The output mode of this tube was a whispering-gallery mode, based on the TE{sub 22,2} mode employed in the interaction cavity. Current design activity is aimed at producing a 1 MW CW gryotron at the same frequency, but with a guassian output mode structure. This type of output mode is desirable for low-loss transmission in a corrugated waveguide or mirror transmission line. In addition to the change in output coupling, the cavity mode will be changed to the TE{sub 22,6} mode. The higher order cavity mode is consistent with higher power or higher frequency requirements that will be addressed in subsequent development activities.

  18. Efficient third harmonic generation of a CW-fibered 1.5 µm laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, Charles; Chea, Erick; Nishida, Yoshiki; du Burck, Frédéric; Acef, Ouali

    2016-10-01

    We report on frequency tripling of CW-Telecom laser diode using two cascaded PPLN ridge nonlinear crystals, both used in single-pass configuration. All optical components used for this development are fibered, leading to a very compact and easy to use optical setup. We have generated up to 290 mW optical power in the green range, from 800 mW only of infrared power around 1.54 µm. This result corresponds to an optical conversion efficiency P 3 ω / P ω > 36 %. To our knowledge, this is best value ever demonstrated up today for a CW-third harmonic generation in single-pass configuration. This frequency tripling experimental setup was tested over more than 2 years of continuous operation, without any interruption. The compactness and the reliability of our device make it very suitable as a transportable optical oscillator. In particular, it paves the way for embedded applications thanks to the high level of long-term stability of the optical alignments.

  19. Stationary bubble formation and Marangoni convection induced by CW laser heating of a single gold nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Setoura, Kenji; Ito, Syoji; Miyasaka, Hiroshi

    2017-01-05

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) efficiently convert incident light into heat under the resonant conditions of localized surface plasmon. Controlling mass transfer through plasmonic heating of Au NPs has potential applications such as manipulation and fabrication within a small space. Here, we describe the formation of stationary microbubbles and subsequent fluid convection induced by CW laser heating of Au NPs in water. Stationary bubbles of about 1-20 μm in diameter were produced by irradiating individual Au NPs with a CW laser. Spatial profiles and velocity distribution of fluid convection around the microbubbles were visualized by the wide-field fluorescence imaging of tracer nanospheres. To evaluate the bubble-induced convection, numerical simulations were performed on the basis of general heat diffusion and Navier-Stokes equations. A comparison between the experimental and computational results revealed that a temperature derivative of surface tension at the bubble surface is a key factor to control the fluid convection. Temperature differences of a few Kelvin at the bubble surface resulted in convective velocities ranging from 10(2) to 10(3) μm s(-1). The convective velocity gradually increased with increasing bubble diameter. This article covers both natural and Marangoni convection induced by plasmonic heating of Au NPs.

  20. Homogeneity and EPR metrics for assessment of regular grids used in CW EPR powder simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crăciun, Cora

    2014-08-01

    CW EPR powder spectra may be approximated numerically using a spherical grid and a Voronoi tessellation-based cubature. For a given spin system, the quality of simulated EPR spectra depends on the grid type, size, and orientation in the molecular frame. In previous work, the grids used in CW EPR powder simulations have been compared mainly from geometric perspective. However, some grids with similar homogeneity degree generate different quality simulated spectra. This paper evaluates the grids from EPR perspective, by defining two metrics depending on the spin system characteristics and the grid Voronoi tessellation. The first metric determines if the grid points are EPR-centred in their Voronoi cells, based on the resonance magnetic field variations inside these cells. The second metric verifies if the adjacent Voronoi cells of the tessellation are EPR-overlapping, by computing the common range of their resonance magnetic field intervals. Beside a series of well known regular grids, the paper investigates a modified ZCW grid and a Fibonacci spherical code, which are new in the context of EPR simulations. For the investigated grids, the EPR metrics bring more information than the homogeneity quantities and are better related to the grids’ EPR behaviour, for different spin system symmetries. The metrics’ efficiency and limits are finally verified for grids generated from the initial ones, by using the original or magnetic field-constraint variants of the Spherical Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation method.

  1. Improvements of PKU PMECRIS for continuous hundred hours CW proton beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S. X. Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.; Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-02-15

    In order to improve the source stability, a long term continuous wave (CW) proton beam experiment has been carried out with Peking University compact permanent magnet 2.45 GHz ECR ion source (PKU PMECRIS). Before such an experiment a lot of improvements and modifications were completed on the source body, the Faraday cup and the PKU ion source test bench. At the beginning of 2015, a continuous operation of PKU PMECRIS for 306 h with more than 50 mA CW beam was carried out after success of many short term tests. No plasma generator failure or high voltage breakdown was observed during that running period and the proton source reliability is near 100%. Total beam availability, which is defined as 35-keV beam-on time divided by elapsed time, was higher than 99% [S. X. Peng et al., Chin. Phys. B 24(7), 075203 (2015)]. A re-inspection was performed after another additional 100 h operation (counting time) and no obvious sign of component failure was observed. Counting the previous source testing time together, this PMECRs longevity is now demonstrated to be greater than 460 h. This paper is mainly concentrated on the improvements for this long term experiment.

  2. Plasma Radiofrequency Discharges as Cleaning Technique for the Removal of C-W Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremona, A.; Vassallo, E.; Caniello, R.; Ghezzi, F.; Grosso, G.; Laguardia, L.

    2013-06-01

    Erosion of materials by chemical and physical sputtering is one of the most concern of plasma wall interaction in tokamaks. In divertor ITER-like tokamaks, where carbon and tungsten are planned to be used, hydrogenated C-W mixed compounds are expected to form by erosion, transport and re-deposition processes. The selection of these materials as divertor components involves lifetime and safety issues due to tritium retention in carbon co-deposits. In this paper a cleaning technique based on RF (13.56 MHz) capacitively coupled H2/Ar plasmas has been used to remove C-W mixed materials from test specimens. The dependence of the removal rate on the H2/Ar ratio and on the plasma pressure has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, profilometry as regards the solid phase and by Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy as regards the plasma phase. The best result has been obtained with a H2/Ar ratio of 10/90 at a pressure of 1 Pa. An explanation based on a synergistic effect between physical sputtering due to energetic ions and chemical etching due to radicals, together with the pressure dependence of the ion energy distribution function, is given.

  3. 3 Watt CW OPO tunable 604nm to 616nm for quantum optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Angus; Halfmann, Thomas; Mieth, Simon

    2012-06-01

    A continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (CW OPO) pumped by a fiber laser has been developed which emits up to 3 Watts of single longitudinal mode radiation tunable in the wavelength range 604nm to 616nm. The device is a modified version of the ``Argos'' Model 2400 commercial product by Lockheed Martin Aculight. A 15 Watt 1064nm fiber laser pumps a CW OPO based upon periodically-poled Lithium Niobate (PPLN). A short section of the nonlinear crystal is poled to allow efficient intracavity sum frequency generation (SFG) between the OPO pump and signal wavelengths to generate orange radiation. The device can be coarsely tuned by matching the poling periods and temperature within the nonlinear crystal to phase-match both OPO and SFG processes simultaneously. Fine mode-hop-free tuning of the orange wavelength of up to 100GHz range can be achieved by applying a voltage to a PZT which tunes the pump laser. By similar intracavity conversion schemes, the system offers the potential of providing high power at wavelengths from 600nm to 1400nm in addition to the direct signal and idler wavelength ranges from 1400nm to 4630nm. Such capability comes without the complexity and reliability issues which are inherent in dye and Ti:Sapphire systems. Details of the OPO system performance and its use in quantum optics applications will be provided.

  4. Use of Multipass Recirculation and Energy Recovery In CW SRF X-FEL Driver Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David; Akers, Walt; Benson, Stephen V.; Biallas, George; Blackburn, Keith; Boyce, James; Bullard, Donald; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Ellingsworth, Forrest; Evtushenko, Pavel; Fisk, Sally; Gould, Christopher; Gubeli, Joseph; Hannon, Fay; Hardy, David; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Jordan, Kevin; Klopf, John; Kortze, J.; Legg, Robert; Li, Rui; Marchlik, Matthew; Moore, Steven W.; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Sexton, Daniel; Shin, Ilkyoung; Shinn, Michelle D.; Tennant, Christopher; Terzic, Balsa; Walker, Richard; Williams, Gwyn P.; Wilson, G.; Zhang, Shukui

    2010-08-01

    We discuss the use of multipass recirculation and energy recovery in CW SRF drivers for short wavelength FELs. Benefits include cost management (through reduced system footprint, required RF and SRF hardware, and associated infrastructure - including high power beam dumps and cryogenic systems), ease in radiation control (low drive beam exhaust energy), ability to accelerate and deliver multiple beams of differing energy to multiple FELs, and opportunity for seamless integration of multistage bunch length compression into the longitudinal matching scenario. Issues include all those associated with ERLs compounded by the challenge of generating and preserving the CW electron drive beam brightness required by short wavelength FELs. We thus consider the impact of space charge, BBU and other environmental wakes and impedances, ISR and CSR, potential for microbunching, intra-beam and beam-residual gas scattering, ion effects, RF transients, and halo, as well as the effect of traditional design, fabrication, installation and operational errors (lattice aberrations, alignment, powering, field quality). Context for the discussion is provided by JLAMP, the proposed VUV/X-ray upgrade to the existing Jefferson Lab FEL.

  5. Comparison of CW Nd:YAG contact transscleral cyclophotocoagulation with cyclocryopexy

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, H.D.; Federman, J.L.

    1989-03-01

    The cyclodestructive and inflammatory effects of CW Nd:YAG contact laser were compared to those of conventional cryopexy. CW Nd:YAG light transmitted by fiber optic cable and sapphire crystal was applied transsclerally to the ciliary body of pigmented and albino rabbits. Cyclocryopexy was given to a comparable second group. The intraocular pressure (IOP), flare, iritis, cells and conjunctival hyperemia were monitored clinically up to 3 weeks. The breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier and time course of ocular inflammation was similar for both modalities and IOP was -12.2 +/- 4.2 mm Hg for laser cyclopexy and -15.1 +/- 5.4 mm Hg for cyclocryopexy at 3 weeks. Ciliary body lesions were noted in both groups. Overall, albino rabbits showed less histological damage and faster recovery of IOP. Contact cyclophotocoagulation and cyclocryopexy can be considered models of ocular injury. The similarities in ocular irritative response suggest a similar pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the pressure behavior in both thermal mode injuries.

  6. Study of Fluctuations in the CW Penning Surface-Plasma Source of Negative Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belchenko, Yuri; Sanin, Andrey; Savkin, Valery

    2011-09-01

    Study of current fluctuations for cw Penning SPS with hollow cathode drive was done. The noiseproof measurements of negative ion beam current, current in extracted electrode circuit, discharge current and voltage were carried out by the low-inductive probes in wide frequency range. Spectrum and intensity of fluctuations at various operation modes, parameters and electrode geometry were recorded for two versions of cw Penning SPS. H- beam current and the extracted electrode circuit current had the level of ripples higher, than the ripples in discharge current and voltage signals. Frequency spectrum of beam and discharge fluctuations displayed stable peaks. The main peak had location in the range 0.1÷1.5 MHz and FWHM of about 0.1 MHz. For the basic operational mode the main peak in frequency spectrum was in the range 0.3-0.4 MHz. The fluctuations of current in extracted electrode circuit and in accelerated electrode circuit had the similar structure and correlated with beam current fluctuations. The obtained data show that plasma density oscillations are responsible for the beam current fluctuations. The 0.1÷1.5 MHz fluctuations of plasma density could be produced by oscillations of cathode emissivity and of discharge current distribution between the specific cathode regions.

  7. High Power Laser Cutting of Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Polymers with cw- and Pulsed Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F.; Wolf, N.; Petring, D.

    Glass fiber and carbon fiber reinforced polymers with thermoplastic matrix enable high volume production with short cycle times. Cutting and trimming operations in these production chains require the use of high average laser power for an efficient cutting speed, but employment of high laser power runs the risk to induce a wide heat affected zone (HAZ). This paper deals with investigations with cw and ns-pulsed CO2-laser radiation in the kilowatt range in single-pass and multiple-pass processes. Using multi-pass processing at high processing speeds of 100 m/min and above a reduced heat affected zone in the range of 100 μm to 200 μm could be achieved by the ns-pulsed radiation. With cw radiation at the same average power of 1 kW however, the HAZ was 300-400 μm. Also employing ns-pulses in the kW-range average power leads to heat accumulation in the material. Small HAZ were obtained with sufficient break times between subsequent passes.

  8. Installation and test results of a high-power, CW klystrode amplifier at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.; Keffeler, D.; Rees, D.; Roybal, W.; Sheikh, J.

    1994-09-01

    The Chalk River Laboratory (CRL) 1.25 MeV, 267 MHz CW radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) project has been moved to Los Alamos AOT Division as a collaborative effort between Los Alamos and Chalk River Laboratories. The RF part of this project includes two 267 MHz, 0.25 MW, CW klystrode transmitters. The klystrode is a relatively new type of RF source that combines the input structure from a conventional gridded tube and the output structure of a klystron. It is widely used within the UHF television band at reduced power (60 kW at peak of sync). However, this is the first application of a high power klystrode for a particle accelerator. This paper will describe the experimental configuration at Los Alamos, provide block diagrams of the klystrode transmitter, discuss the attributes of the klystrode which make it a desirable candidate for high efficiency CW accelerators, and present relevant test results.

  9. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Computational and experimental study of a Q-switched cw chemical HF/DF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, Boris S.; Kuprenyuk, V. I.; Maksimov, Yurii P.; Mashendzhinov, Viktor I.; Rodionov, A. Yu; Rotinyan, Mikhail A.; Sudarikov, V. V.; Tret'yakov, Nikolai E.; Fedorov, Igor'A.; Etsina, Alla L.

    2007-06-01

    The energy and temporal parameters of radiation from a cw chemical medium-size HF/DF laser mechanically Q-switched by a mirror rotating at a frequency of up to 1 kHz are calculated and studied experimentally. The peak power of laser pulses in the repetitively pulsed regime exceeds the cw output power of the HF laser at least by a factor of four. The average power in the repetitively pulses regime is lower than that in the cw regime, but it increases (approximately doubles) with increasing modulation frequency. The time of the complete recovery of the gain profile in the active medium is measured to be 6-7 μs. Two numerical models are developed which describe the dynamics of Q-switched HF and DF lasers. Some specific features of the operation of these lasers are analysed with the help of these models.

  10. Development of compact CW-IR laser deposition system for high-throughput growth of organic single crystals.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Yoko; Maruyama, Shingo; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2011-10-01

    We developed a compact continuous-wave infrared (CW-IR) laser deposition system for the high-throughput growth of organic single crystals. In this system, two CW-IR lasers are used for the sample heating and thermal evaporation of materials. The CW-IR laser heating is simple and allows good control of the deposition rate and growth temperature, in response to the on/off laser switching. Six samples can be loaded simultaneously in a chamber, which allows one-by-one sequential deposition for high-throughput experiments, without breaking the vacuum. Using this setup, we studied the effect of ionic liquids on the growth of C60 crystals in vacuum.

  11. Development of a cw-laser-based cavity-ringdown sensor aboard a spacecraft for trace air constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Awtry, A. R.; Miller, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    The progress in the development of a sensor for the detection of trace air constituents to monitor spacecraft air quality is reported. A continuous-wave (cw), external-cavity tunable diode laser centered at 1.55 micrometers is used to pump an optical cavity absorption cell in cw-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (cw-CRDS). Preliminary results are presented that demonstrate the sensitivity, selectivity and reproducibility of this method. Detection limits of 2.0 ppm for CO, 2.5 ppm for CO2, 1.8 ppm for H2O, 19.4 ppb for NH3, 7.9 ppb for HCN and 4.0 ppb for C2H2 are calculated.

  12. Duty factor variation possibility from 1% to 100% with PKU microwave driven Cs-free volume H- sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. X.; Zhang, T.; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, A. L.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, J. F.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    Microwave driven cesium-free volume H- sources, that have the ability to deliver tens of mA H- at 35 keV both in CW and 10% duty factor (100 Hz/1 ms), were developed at Peking University (PKU) [S. X. Peng et al., in Proceeding of IPAC 2015, WEPWA027, Richmond, Virginia, USA, 3-8 May 2015]. Recently, special efforts were paid on the investigation of duty factor variation possibility from 1% to 100% with them. Most of the experiments were carried out with a pulsed length (τ) of 1 ms and different intervals of 99 ms, 49 ms, 39 ms, 29 ms, 19 ms, 9 ms, 4 ms, 2 ms, 1 ms, 0.5 ms, and 0 ms, respectively. Other experiments were focused on CW operation and fixed duty factor of 1%. Experimental results prove that PKU H- sources can deliver tens of mA H- at duty factor from 1% to 100%. The RF power efficiency increases steadily with the increasing of duty factor from 1% to CW at a fixed pulsed length. Under a given duty factor and pulsed length, RF power efficiency keeps constant and the H- current increases with RF power linearly. Details will be presented in the paper.

  13. Computer-Generated Microwave Holograms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leming, Charles W.; Hastings, Orestes Patterson, III

    1980-01-01

    Described is the phasor method of superposition of waves. The intensity pattern from a system of microwave sources is calculated point by point on a plane corresponding to a film emulsion, and then printed and directly converted to a hologram for 3-cm microwaves. Calculations, construction, and viewing of holograms are included. (Author/DS)

  14. High-Sensitivity Microwave Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, W. M., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a 3.33-cm wavelength (9 GHz) microwave system that achieves a high overall signal sensitivity and a well-collimated beam with moderate-size equipment. The system has been used to develop microwave versions of the Michelson interferometer, Bragg reflector, Brewster's law and total internal reflection, and Young's interference experiment.…

  15. Advanced components for microwave photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonjallaz, Pierre-Yves; Gunnarsson, Ola; Popov, Mikhail; Margulis, Walter; Petermann, Ingemar; Berlemont, David; Carlsson, Fredrik

    2003-04-01

    This persentation gives an overveiw of the field of microwave photonics with an emphasis on new fiber based devices which we belive have a real practical potential. Microwave photonics can be considered as the fruitful meeting point bewteen optics and microwave engineering, where optoelectronic devices and systems are used both for processing at microwave rates and for signal handling in microwave systems. The use of specialty fibers, glass poling and naturally fiber Bragg gratings opens new perspectives for the realization of low-cost devices with appropriate functionality. The application field for optical microwave transmission and processing spans from radar technology to cable TV and mobile communications systems. Over the last few years very much attention has been directed towards radio-over-fiber systems for the next-generation mobile communications infrastructure as well as hybrid fiber radio for picocell systems at 60 GHz or above. As a matter of fact, the higher the microwave frequencies, the greater are the similarities with the optical carrier and the more there is to be gained by processing the microwave signal in the optical domain. Other important application examples are beamforming networks for phased array antennas and subcarrier processing for routing in optical networks.

  16. GREENER SYNTHETIC TRANSFORMATIONS USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave irradiation has been used for a variety of organic transformations wherein chemical reactions are expedited because of selective adsorption of microwave (MW) energy by polar molecules, non-polar molecules being inert to the MW dielectric loss. The MW application under s...

  17. Microwave sintering of multiple articles

    DOEpatents

    Blake, Rodger D.; Katz, Joel D.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing articles of alumina and of alumina and silicon carbide in which the articles are sintered at high temperatures using microwave radiation. The articles are placed in a sintering container which is placed in a microwave cavity for heating. The rates at which heating and cooling take place is controlled.

  18. CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS & TRANSFORMATIONS USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A historical account of the utility of microwaves in a variety of chemical synthesis applications will be presented, including a solvent-free strategy that involves microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants (undiluted) catalyzed by the surfaces of recyclable mineral supports such...

  19. More Experiments with Microwave Ovens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter; Karstadt, Detlef

    2004-01-01

    Microwave ovens can be used to perform exciting demonstrations that illustrate a variety of physics topics. Experiments discussed here show superheating, visualize the inhomogeneous heating that takes place in a microwave and also show how to use a mobile phone to detect radiation leaking from the oven. Finally eggs can give some spectacular…

  20. Image formation in microwave holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cribbs, R. W.; Lamb, B. L.

    1973-01-01

    Microwave holograms are made without offset reference beam, but it has been found that Van der Lugt filter can be used to produce image offset. Also, filter permits "decoding" of holograms in contrast with usual practice of reconstructing visible-light analogs of original micro-wave wave fronts.

  1. Microwave drying of seed cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A small lab dryer was designed for use in drying seed cotton with components of a microwave generator mounted thereon. The magnetron emitted radiation directly into the seed cotton and a fan directed air cross-flow to the radiation direction. The microwave components were a 1.1 kW magnetron, trans...

  2. Microwave and Pulsed Power

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, E.K.

    1993-03-01

    The goals of the Microwave and Pulsed Power thrust area are to identify realizable research and development efforts and to conduct high-quality research in those pulse power and microwave technologies that support existing and emerging programmatic requirements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Our main objective is to work on nationally important problems while enhancing our basic understanding of enabling technologies such as component design and testing, compact systems packaging, exploratory physics experiments, and advanced systems integration and performance. During FY-92, we concentrated our research efforts on the six project areas described in this report. (1) We are investigating the superior electronic and thermal properties of diamond that may make it an ideal material for a high-power, solid-state switch. (2) We are studying the feasibility of using advanced Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar technology for reliable non-destructive evaluation of bridges and other high-value concrete structures. These studies include conceptual designs, modeling, experimental verifications, and image reconstruction of simulated radar data. (3) We are exploring the efficiency of pulsed plasma processing techniques used for the removal of NO{sub x} from various effluent sources. (4) We have finished the investigation of the properties of a magnetically delayed low-pressure gas switch, which was designed here at LLNL. (5) We are applying statistical electromagnetic theory techniques to help assess microwave effects on electronic subsystems, by using a mode stirred chamber as our measurement tool. (6) We are investigating the generation of perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in proposed CFC replacement fluids when they are subjected to high electrical stresses and breakdown environments.

  3. Microwave and pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freytag, E. K.

    1993-03-01

    The goals of the Microwave and Pulsed Power thrust area are to identify realizable research and development efforts and to conduct high-quality research in those pulse power and microwave technologies that support existing and emerging programmatic requirements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Our main objective is to work on nationally important problems while enhancing our basic understanding of enabling technologies such as component design and testing, compact systems packaging, exploratory physics experiments, and advanced systems integration and performance. During FY-92, we concentrated our research efforts on the six project areas described in this report. We are investigating the superior electronic and thermal properties of diamond that may make it an ideal material for a high-power, solid-state switch. We are studying the feasibility of using advanced Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar technology for reliable non-destructive evaluation of bridges and other high-value concrete structures. These studies include conceptual designs, modeling, experimental verifications, and image reconstruction of simulated radar data. We are exploring the efficiency of pulsed plasma processing techniques used for the removal of NO(x) from various effluent sources. We have finished the investigation of the properties of a magnetically delayed low-pressure gas switch, which was designed here at LLNL. We are applying statistical electromagnetic theory techniques to help assess microwave effects on electronic subsystems, by using a mode stirred chamber as our measurement tool. We are investigating the generation of perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in proposed CFC replacement fluids when they are subjected to high electrical stresses and breakdown environments.

  4. Microwave semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitch, J. E.

    1985-03-01

    The state of the art of microwave semiconductor design is reviewed, with emphasis on developments of the past 10-12 years. Consideration is given to: varistor diodes; varactor diodes; and transit time negative diodes. The design principles of bipolar and unipolar transistors are discussed, with reference to power FETs, traveling-wave FETs, and camel or planar-doped barrier transistors. Recent innovations in the field of fabrication technology are also considered, including: crystal growth; doping; and packaging. Several schematic drawings and photographs of the different devices are provided.

  5. Microwave imaging of aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Bernard D.

    1988-12-01

    Three methods of imaging aircraft from the ground with microwave radar with quality suitable for aircraft target recognition are described. The imaging methods are based on a self-calibration procedure called adaptive beamforming that compensates for the severe geometric distortion inherent in any imaging system that is large enough to achieve the high angular resolution necessary for two-dimensional target imaging. The signal processing algorithm is described and X-band (3-cm)-wavelength experiments demonstrate its success on commercial aircraft flying into Philadelphia International Airport.

  6. Microwave PASER Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Antipov, S.; Poluektov, O.; Jing, C.

    2009-01-22

    The PASER (Particle Acceleration by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) concept for particle acceleration entails the direct transfer of energy from an active medium to a charged particle beam. The PASER was originally formulated for optical (laser) media; we are planning a PASER demonstration experiment based on an optically pumped X-band paramagnetic medium consisting of porphyrin or fullerene (C{sub 60}) derivatives in a toluene solution or polystyrene matrix. We discuss the background of this project and report on the status of the experiment to measure the acceleration of electrons using the microwave PASER.

  7. High-power efficient cw and pulsed lasers based on bulk Yb : KYW crystals with end diode pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G H; Yang, G H; Lee, D S; Kulik, Alexander V; Sall', E G; Chizhov, S A; Yashin, V E; Kang, U

    2012-04-30

    End-diode-pumped lasers based on one and two Yb : KYW crystals operating in cw and Q-switched regimes, as well as in the regime of mode-locking, are studied. The single-crystal laser generated stable ultrashort (shorter than 100 fs) laser pulses at wavelengths of 1035 and 1043 nm with an average power exceeding 1 W. The average output power of the two-crystal laser exceeded 18 W in the cw regime and 16 W in the Q-switched regime with a slope efficiency exceeding 30%.

  8. Variable-wavelength second harmonic generation of CW Yb-fibre laser in partially coupled enhancement cavity.

    PubMed

    Khripunov, Sergey; Radnatarov, Daba; Kobtsev, Sergey; Skorkin, Aleksey

    2014-03-24

    This work for the first time proposes and studies a method of frequency doubling of CW non-single-frequency fibre lasers with a high-Q resonator partially coupled to the fibre laser cavity. The proposed new approach resulted in the following parameters: laser's maximal output power 880 mW at 536 nm when pumped with 6.2 W at 976 nm, wavelength tuneability range 521-545 nm with the output power at the extreme ends of this range 420 and 220 mW correspondingly. The proposed configuration allows efficient non-linear transformation of both CW and pulsed radiation in a partially coupled enhancement cavity.

  9. CW and femtosecond operation of a diode-pumped Yb:BaY(2)F(8) laser.

    PubMed

    Galzerano, G; Coluccelli, N; Gatti, D; Di Lieto, A; Tonelli, M; Laporta, P

    2010-03-15

    We report for the first time on laser action of a diode-pumped Yb:BaY(2)F(8) crystal. Both CW and femtosecond operations have been demonstrated at room-temperature conditions. A maximum output power of 0.56 W, a slope efficiency of 34%, and a tunability range from 1013 to 1067 nm have been obtained in CW regime. Transform-limited pulse trains with a minimum duration of 275 fs, an average power of 40 mW, and a repetition rate of 83 MHz have been achieved in a passive mode-locked regime using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror.

  10. Combination microwave and gas oven

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, N.; Taga, Y.

    1980-07-08

    One selling point of a combined microwave and gas oven is that it can not only defrost and reheat foods quickly but can also brown them to make the food look more appetizing. Although other combined oven designs have been proposed, they have proved to be impractical due to microwave leakage or radiant-heat damage to the microwave energy source. This improved design provides a fan that effectively circulates the heat. The microwave source is protected by a heat-insulating cover with a film that reflects radiant energy. A choking system terminates microwave energy leaks, particularly around the shaft of the circulating fan and its connectors. The oven is relatively simple in construction and can be manufactured at low cost.

  11. Microwave coupling in EBT reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.; Uckan, T.; Dandl, R.A.

    1980-02-01

    For a typical size ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor (approx. 1000 MWe), microwave frequencies required lie in the range of 60 to 110 GHz at power levels of 50 to 75 MW. As the frequency rises, the unloaded cavity (i.e., without plasma) quality factor Q decreases. Because of the short wavelengths of microwave heating power and the large cavity dimensions of a reactor, it is possible to apply quasi-optical principles in the efficient coupling of power to the plasma. The use of a confocal Fabry-Perot resonator with spherical mirrors is discussed; these serve to confine the microwave power to the region occupied by the plasma. The potential advantages of these resonators include high efficiency utilization of microwave power, minimal thermal burden on the cryopumping system, and significant benefit in preventing microwave leakage from the device. An estimation of the unloaded cavity quality factor Q and the design considerations of Fabry-Perot resonator are given.

  12. Exposure of cultured astroglial and microglial brain cells to 900 MHz microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Thorlin, Thorleif; Rouquette, Jean-Michel; Hamnerius, Yngve; Hansson, Elisabeth; Persson, Mikael; Björklund, Ulrika; Rosengren, Lars; Rönnbäck, Lars; Persson, Mikael

    2006-08-01

    The rapid rise in the use of mobile communications has raised concerns about health issues related to low-level microwave radiation. The head and brain are usually the most exposed targets in mobile phone users. In the brain, two types of glial cells, the astroglial and the microglial cells, are interesting in the context of biological effects from microwave exposure. These cells are widely distributed in the brain and are directly involved in the response to brain damage as well as in the development of brain cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether 900 MHz radiation could affect these two different glial cell types in culture by studying markers for damage-related processes in the cells. Primary cultures enriched in astroglial cells were exposed to 900 MHz microwave radiation in a temperature-controlled exposure system at specific absorption rates (SARs) of 3 W/kg GSM modulated wave (mw) for 4, 8 and 24 h or 27 W/kg continuous wave (cw) for 24 h, and the release into the extracellular medium of the two pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (Il6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (Tnfa) was analyzed. In addition, levels of the astroglial cell-specific reactive marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap), whose expression dynamics is different from that of cytokines, were measured in astroglial cultures and in astroglial cell-conditioned cell culture medium at SARs of 27 and 54 W/kg (cw) for 4 or 24 h. No significant differences could be detected for any of the parameters studied at any time and for any of the radiation characteristics. Total protein levels remained constant during the experiments. Microglial cell cultures were exposed to 900 MHz radiation at an SAR of 3 W/kg (mw) for 8 h, and I16, Tnfa, total protein and the microglial reactivity marker ED-1 (a macrophage activation antigen) were measured. No significant differences were found. The morphology of the cultured astroglial cells and microglia was studied and appeared to be

  13. Tuning Broadband Microwave Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Alaniz, Gabriel

    2003-09-05

    The PEP-II/DA {Phi} NE/ALS longitudinal feedback systems are complex wide bandwidth systems requiring analog, digital and microwave circuits. The solid-state amplifier is one of the components in the microwave circuit that is required to suppress the coupled bunch instabilities that exist in the PEP-II accelerator. The suppression is achieved by using an antenna as a kicker structure that provides an electric field in order to increase or decrease the energy of particles passing through the structure. The amplifier is made up of sixteen 30 to 35W microstrip GaAs FET modules that are combined to obtain 500W over a bandwidth of 850MHz to 1850MHz. The amplifier malfunctioned causing a reduction in the functionality and power output of the individual GaAs FET modules. The amplifier must be repaired. After repair, the amplifier must be tuned to optimize the gain while maintaining proper power output. The amplifier is tuned using microstrip circuit techniques. A variety of microstrip methods are used to obtain the proper line impedance. The result is a working amplifier that operates efficiently.

  14. Transcatheter Microwave Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, Dickey G. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method, simulation, and apparatus are provided that are highly suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A catheter is disclosed that includes a small diameter disk loaded monopole antenna surrounded by fusion material having a high heat of fusion and a melting point preferably at or near body temperature. Microwaves from the antenna heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. The fusion material keeps the urethra cool by means of the heat of fusion of the fusion material. This prevents damage to the urethra while the prostatic tissue is necrosed. A computer simulation is provided that can be used to predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of the catheter and method of applying microwave energy a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  15. Microwave hematoma detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Hematoma Detector is a non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots near the outer surface of the body. While being geared towards finding sub-dural and epi-dural hematomas, the device can be used to detect blood pooling anywhere near the surface of the body. Modified versions of the device can also detect pneumothorax, organ hemorrhage, atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries, evaluate perfusion (blood flow) at or near the body surface, body tissue damage at or near the surface (especially for burn assessment) and be used in a number of NDE applications. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with a specialized antenna, signal processing/recognition algorithms and a disposable cap worn by the patient which will facilitate accurate mapping of the brain and proper function of the instrument. The invention may be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of sub-dural or epi-dural hematoma in human or animal patients, detection of hemorrhage within approximately 5 cm of the outer surface anywhere on a patient's body.

  16. Toward improved software security training using a cyber warfare opposing force (CW OPFOR): the knowledge base design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.

    2005-03-01

    "Train the way you will fight" has been a guiding principle for military training and has served the warfighter well as evidenced by numerous successful operations over the last decade. This need for realistic training for all combatants has been recognized and proven by the warfighter and continues to guide military training. However, to date, this key training principle has not been applied fully in the arena of cyberwarfare due to the lack of realistic, cost effective, reasonable, and formidable cyberwarfare opponents. Recent technological advances, improvements in the capability of computer-generated forces (CGFs) to emulate human behavior, and current results in research in information assurance and software protection, coupled with increasing dependence upon information superiority, indicate that the cyberbattlespace will be a key aspect of future conflict and that it is time to address the cyberwarfare training shortfall. To address the need for a cyberwarfare training and defensive testing capability, we propose research and development to yield a prototype computerized, semi-autonomous (SAF) red team capability. We term this capability the Cyber Warfare Opposing Force (CW OPFOR). There are several technologies that are now mature enough to enable, for the first time, the development of this powerful, effective, high fidelity CW OPFOR. These include improved knowledge about cyberwarfare attack and defense, improved techniques for assembling CGFs, improved techniques for capturing and expressing knowledge, software technologies that permit effective rapid prototyping to be effectively used on large projects, and the capability for effective hybrid reasoning systems. Our development approach for the CW OPFOR lays out several phases in order to address these requirements in an orderly manner and to enable us to test the capabilities of the CW OPFOR and exploit them as they are developed. We have completed the first phase of the research project, which

  17. Microwave Frequency Multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazco, J. E.

    2017-02-01

    High-power microwave radiation is used in the Deep Space Network (DSN) and Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) for uplink communications with spacecraft and for monitoring asteroids and space debris, respectively. Intense X-band (7.1 to 8.6 GHz) microwave signals are produced for these applications via klystron and traveling-wave microwave vacuum tubes. In order to achieve higher data rate communications with spacecraft, the DSN is planning to gradually furnish several of its deep space stations with uplink systems that employ Ka-band (34-GHz) radiation. Also, the next generation of planetary radar, such as Ka-Band Objects Observation and Monitoring (KaBOOM), is considering frequencies in the Ka-band range (34 to 36 GHz) in order to achieve higher target resolution. Current commercial Ka-band sources are limited to power levels that range from hundreds of watts up to a kilowatt and, at the high-power end, tend to suffer from poor reliability. In either case, there is a clear need for stable Ka-band sources that can produce kilowatts of power with high reliability. In this article, we present a new concept for high-power, high-frequency generation (including Ka-band) that we refer to as the microwave frequency multiplier (MFM). The MFM is a two-cavity vacuum tube concept where low-frequency (2 to 8 GHz) power is fed into the input cavity to modulate and accelerate an electron beam. In the second cavity, the modulated electron beam excites and amplifies high-power microwaves at a frequency that is a multiple integer of the input cavity's frequency. Frequency multiplication factors in the 4 to 10 range are being considered for the current application, although higher multiplication factors are feasible. This novel beam-wave interaction allows the MFM to produce high-power, high-frequency radiation with high efficiency. A key feature of the MFM is that it uses significantly larger cavities than its klystron counterparts, thus greatly reducing power density and arcing

  18. Microwave-driven ultraviolet light sources

    DOEpatents

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.

    2002-01-29

    A microwave-driven ultraviolet (UV) light source is provided. The light source comprises an over-moded microwave cavity having at least one discharge bulb disposed within the microwave cavity. At least one magnetron probe is coupled directly to the microwave cavity.

  19. 47 CFR 101.141 - Microwave modulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Microwave modulation. 101.141 Section 101.141 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.141 Microwave modulation. (a) Microwave transmitters employing...

  20. 47 CFR 101.141 - Microwave modulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Microwave modulation. 101.141 Section 101.141 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.141 Microwave modulation. (a) Microwave transmitters employing...

  1. 47 CFR 101.141 - Microwave modulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Microwave modulation. 101.141 Section 101.141 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.141 Microwave modulation. (a) Microwave transmitters employing...

  2. HLA-Cw Allele Frequency in Definite Meniere’s Disease Compared to Probable Meniere’s Disease and Healthy Controls in an Iranian Sample

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Sasan; Ghadimi, Fatemeh; Firouzifar, Mohammadreza; Yazdani, Nasrin; Mohammad-Amoli, Mahsa; Vakili, Varasteh; Mahvi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several lines of evidence support the contribution of autoimmune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of Meniere’s disease. The aim of this study was determining the association between HLA-Cw Alleles in patients with definite Meniere’s disease and patients with probable Meniere’s disease and a control group. Materials and Methods: HLA-Cw genotyping was performed in 23 patients with definite Meniere’s disease, 24 with probable Meniere’s disease, and 91 healthy normal subjects, using sequence specific primers polymerase chain reaction technique. The statistical analysis was performed using stata 8 software. Results: There was a significant association between HLA-Cw*04 and HLA-Cw*16 in both definite and probable Meniere’s disease compared to normal healthy controls. We observed a significant difference in HLA-Cw*12 frequencies between patients with definite Meniere’s disease compared to patients with probable Meniere’s disease (P=0.04). The frequency of HLA-Cw*18 is significantly higher in healthy controls (P=0.002). Conclusion: Our findings support the rule of HLA-Cw Alleles in both definite and probable Meniere’s disease. In addition, differences in HLA-Cw*12 frequency in definite and probable Meniere’s disease in our study’s population might indicate distinct immune and inflammatory mechanisms involved in each condition. PMID:27602337

  3. Absolute Current Calibration of 1$\\mu$A CW Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Arne Freyberger; Mike Bevins; Anthony Day; Arunava Saha; Stephanie Slachtouski; Ronald Gilman; Pavel Degtiarenko

    2005-06-01

    The future experimental program at Jefferson Lab requires an absolute current calibration of a 1 {mu}A CW electron beam to better than 1% accuracy. This paper presents the mechanical and electrical design of a Tungsten calorimeter that is being constructed to provide an accurate measurement of the deposited energy. The energy is determined by measuring the change in temperature after beam exposure. Knowledge of the beam energy then yields number of electrons stopped by the calorimeter during the exposure. Simulations show that the energy lost due to electromagnetic and hadronic particle losses are the dominant uncertainty. Details of the precision thermometry and calibration, mechanical design, thermal simulations and simulations will be presented.

  4. Absolute Current Calibrations of 1muA CW Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    A. Freyberger, M.E. Bevins, A.R. Day, P. Degtiarenko, A. Saha, S. Slachtouski, R. Gilman

    2005-06-06

    The future experimental program at Jefferson Lab requires an absolute current calibration of a 1{mu}A CW electron beam to better than 1% accuracy. This paper presents the mechanical and electrical design of a Tungsten calorimeter that is being constructed to provide an accurate measurement of the deposited energy. The energy is determined by measuring the change in temperature after beam exposure. Knowledge of the beam energy then yields number of electrons stopped by the calorimeter during the exposure. Simulations show that the energy losses due to electromagnetic and hadronic losses are the dominant uncertainty. Details of the precision thermometry and calibration, mechanical design, thermal simulations and GEANT simulations will be presented.

  5. The Cornell Main Linac Cryomodule: A Full Scale, High Q Accelerator Module for cw Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, R.; Bullock, B.; Elmore, B.; Clasby, B.; Furuta, F.; He, Y.; Hoffstaetter, G.; Liepe, M.; O'Connell, T.; Conway, J.; Quigley, P.; Sabol, D.; Sears, J.; Smith, E.; Veshcherevich, V.

    Cornell University is in the process of building a 10 m long superconducting accelerator module as a prototype of the main linac of a proposed ERL facility. This module houses 6 superconducting cavities- operated at 1.8 K in continuous wave (CW) mode - with individual HOM absorbers and one magnet/BPM section. In pushing the limits, a high quality factor of the cavities (2•1010) and high beam currents (100 mA accelerated plus 100 mA decelerated) were targeted. We will review the design shortly and present the results of the components tested before the assembly. This includes data of the quality-factors of all 6 cavities that we produced and treated in-house, the HOM absorber performance measured with beam on a test set-up as well as testing of the couplers and the tuners.

  6. Remote wind sensing with a CW diode laser lidar beyond the coherence regime.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi; Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-08-15

    We experimentally demonstrate for the first time (to our knowledge) a coherent CW lidar system capable of wind speed measurement at a probing distance beyond the coherence regime of the light source. A side-by-side wind measurement was conducted on the field using two lidar systems with identical optical designs but different laser linewidths. While one system was operating within the coherence regime, the other was measuring at least 2.4 times the coherence range. The probing distance of both lidars is 85 m and the radial wind speed correlation was measured to be r2=0.965 between the two lidars at a sampling rate of 2 Hz. Based on our experimental results, we describe a practical guideline for designing a wind lidar operating beyond the coherence regime.

  7. He-Ne and CW CO2 laser long-path systems for gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1986-03-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a laboratory prototype dual He-Ne laser system for the detection of methane leaks from underground pipelines and solid-waste landfill sites using differential absorption of radiation backscattered from topographic targets. A laboratory-prototype dual CW carbon dioxide laser system also using topographic backscatter is discussed, and measurement results for methanol are given. With both systems, it was observed that the time-varying differential absorption signal was useful in indicating the presence of a gas coming from a nearby source. Limitations to measurement sensitivity, especially the role of speckle and atmospheric turbulence, are described. The speckle results for hard targets are contrasted with those from atmospheric aerosols. The appendix gives appropriate laser lines and values of absorption coefficients for the hydrazine fuel gases.

  8. Controlling software development of CW terahertz target scattering properties measurements based on LabVIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chang-Kun; Li, Qi; Zhou, Yi; Zhao, Yong-Peng; Chen, De-Ying

    2016-10-01

    With the development of terahertz technology and increasing studies on terahertz target scattering properties, research on terahertz target scattering properties measurements attracts more and more attention. In this paper, to solve problems in the detection process, we design a controlling software for Continuous-Wave (CW) terahertz target scattering properties measurements. The software is designed and programmed based on LabVIEW. The software controls the whole system, involving the switch between the target and the calibration target, the rotation of target, collection, display and storage of the initial data and display, storage of the data after the calibration process. The experimental results show that the software can accomplish the expected requirement, enhance the speed of scattering properties measurements and reduce operation errors.

  9. A 350 MHz, 200 kW CW, Multiple Beam Inductive Output Tube - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R.Lawrece Ives; George Collins; David Marsden Michael Read; Edward Eisen; Takuchi Kamura, Philipp Borchard

    2012-11-28

    This program developed a 200 kW CW, 350 MHz, multiple beam inductive output tube (MBIOT) for driving accelerator cavities. The MBIOT operates at 30 kV with a gain of 23 dB. The estimated efficiency is 70%. The device uses seven electron beams, each transmitting 1.4 A of current. The tube is approximately six feet long and weighs approximately 400 lbs. The prototype device will be evaluated as a potential RF source for the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Because of issues related to delivery of the electron guns, it was not possible to complete assembly and test of the MBIOT during the Phase II program. The device is being completed with support from Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., Communications & Power Industries, LLC. and the Naval Surface Weapons Center (NSWC) in Dahlgren, VA. The MBIOT will be initially tested at NSWC before delivery to ANL. The testing at NSWC is scheduled for February 2013.

  10. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Baggott, Renee S.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Most Lidar applications rely on moderate to high power solid state lasers to generate the required transmitted pulses. However, the reliability of solid state lasers, which can operate autonomously over long periods, is constrained by their laser diode pump arrays. Thermal cycling of the active regions is considered the primary reason for rapid degradation of the quasi-CW high power laser diode arrays, and the excessive temperature rise is the leading suspect in premature failure. The thermal issues of laser diode arrays are even more drastic for 2-micron solid state lasers which require considerably longer pump pulses compared to the more commonly used pump arrays for 1-micron lasers. This paper describes several advanced packaging techniques being employed for more efficient heat removal from the active regions of the laser diode bars. Experimental results for several high power laser diode array devices will be reported and their performance when operated at long pulsewidths of about 1msec will be described.

  11. Large Area Deposition Of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon By CW CO2 Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenchi, R.; Musci, M.; Murri, R.

    1984-06-01

    In order to enhance the deposited area and to improve the uniformity of hydrogenated amor phous silicon (a-Si:H) films, obtained from photodissociation of silane molecules by CO2 laser radiation, two new different experimental approaches are investigated. One of these utilizes a high power (≍ 1 KW) CW CO2 laser with uniform intensity distribution in a rectangular beam cross section; the other consists in a continuous scanning, along a horizontal plane parallel to the substrate, of a low power (≍ 100 W) gaussian laser beam. Preliminary results about p and n doping of the photodeposited material by boron and pho-sphorous ion implantation proved its high doping efficiency and its structural similarity to the chemical vapor deposition produced material.

  12. Spatial intensity distribution of the radiative return from scattering media irradiated by a cw laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurdev, Ljuan L.; Dreischuh, Tanja N.; Vankov, Orlin I.; Toncheva, Eleonora N.; Avramov, Lachezar A.; Stoyanov, Dimitar V.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental measurements and theoretical description have been performed of the spatial intensity distribution of the backward radiative response of tissue-like Intralipid-20% dilutions in distilled water irradiated by a collimated near-infrared cw laser beam. The investigations performed are a first step toward a complete estimation of the feasibility and potentialities of a stationary one-sided linear-strategy biomedical tomography approach to detecting characteristic inclusions (inhomogeneities, say ill places) in homogeneous highly-scattering host media (healthy tissues). The experimental results obtained are in good agreement with the derived theoretical expressions that thus would be of importance for the development and numerical modeling of stationary tomography algorithms ensuring optimally accurate data processing and interpretation.

  13. CW Room Temperature Re-Buncher for the Project X Front End

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Awida, Mohamed H.; Chen, Meiyu; Gonin, Ivan V.; Kazakov, Sergey; Kostin, Roman; Lebedev, Valeri; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-09

    At Fermilab there is a plan to construct the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE) facility - a prototype of the front end of the Project X, a multi-MW proton source based on superconducting linac. The construction and successful operations of this facility will validate the concept for the Project X front end, thereby minimizing the primary technical risk element within the Project. The room temperature front end of the linac contains an ion source, an RFQ accelerator and a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) section comprising a high bandwidth bunch selective chopper. The MEBT length is about 10 m, so three re-bunching CW cavities are used to support the beam longitudinal dynamics. The paper reports a RF design of the re-bunchers along with preliminary beam dynamic and thermal analysis of the cavities.

  14. Rapid detection of CW residues on soil using an ion trap SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Ingram, J.C.; Dahl, D.A.; Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E.

    1997-08-01

    Technology for the rapid detection and identification of chemical warfare (CW) residues on soil samples is being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The development effort is being undertaken because of a need for rapid and specific characterization for possibly contaminated soils samples, preferably in the field. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is being pursued for these applications because SIMS combines rapid, specific and sensitive surface analyses with the potential for small instrument size. This latter attribute suggests that field characterization using SIMS is possible, and this avenue is being supported by the Army at the INEEL. This paper describes ongoing development efforts focused on the development of small-scale, transportable SIMS instrumentation, and on the application of the technology to likely contamination scenarios.

  15. Time-resolved thermal mirror technique with top-hat cw laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Astrath, Francine B; Astrath, Nelson G; Shen, Jun; Zhou, Jianqin; Malacarne, Luis C; Pedreira, P R B; Baesso, Mauro L

    2008-08-04

    A theoretical model was developed for time-resolved thermal mirror spectroscopy under top-hat cw laser excitation that induced a nanoscale surface displacement of a low absorption sample. An additional phase shift to the electrical field of a TEM(00) probe beam reflected from the surface displacement was derived, and Fresnel diffraction theory was used to calculate the propagation of the probe beam. With the theory, optical and thermal properties of three glasses were measured, and found to be consistent with literature values. With a top-hat excitation, an experimental apparatus was developed for either a single thermal mirror or a single thermal lens measurement. Furthermore, the apparatus was used for concurrent measurements of thermal mirror and thermal lens. More physical properties could be measured using the concurrent measurements.

  16. Design of spherical electron gun for ultra high frequency, CW power inductive output tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Meenu; Joshi, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    Inductive Output Tube (IOT) is an amplifier that usually operates in UHF range. It is an electron tube whose basic structure is similar to conventional vacuum devices. This device is widely used in broadcast applications but is now being explored for scientific applications also specifically, particle accelerators and fusion plasma heating purposes. The paper describes the design approach of a spherical gridded electron gun of a 500 MHz, 100 kW CW power IOT. The electron gun structure has been simulated and optimized for operating voltage and current of 40kV and 3.5 A respectively. The electromagnetic analysis of this spherical electron gun has been carried out in CST and TRAK codes.

  17. Operating Experience and Reliability Improvements on the 5 kW CW Klystron at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R.; Holben, S.

    1997-05-01

    With substantial operating hours on the RF system, considerable information on reliability of the 5 kW CW klystrons has been obtained. High early failure rates led to examination of the operating conditions and failure modes. Internal ceramic contamination caused premature failure of gun potting material and ultimate tube demise through arcing or ceramic fracture. A planned course of repotting and reconditioning of approximately 300 klystrons, plus careful attention to operating conditions and periodic analysis of operational data, has substantially reduced the failure rate. It is anticipated that implementation of planned supplemental monitoring systems for the klystrons will allow most catastrophic failures to be avoided. By predicting end of life, tubes can be changed out before they fail, thus minimizing unplanned downtime. Initial tests have also been conducted on this same klystron operated at higher voltages with resultant higher output power. The outcome of these tests will provide information to be considered for future upgrades to the accelerator.

  18. High power CW (16W) and pulse (145W) laser diodes based on quantum well heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Ilya S; Pikhtin, Nikita A; Slipchenko, Sergey O; Sokolova, Zinaida N; Vinokurov, Dmitry A; Borschev, Kirill S; Kapitonov, Vladimir A; Khomylev, Maxim A; Leshko, Andrey Yu; Lyutetskiy, Andrey V; Stankevich, Alexey L

    2007-04-01

    We suggested and experimentally confirmed the effective method of internal optical loss reduction by high order mode suppression in a separate confinement quantum well laser heterostructure with asymmetric ultra thick waveguide. Manufacturing of InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs laser heterostructure with a 1.7 microm-thick asymmetric waveguide allowed attaining super low value of internal optical loss alphai=0.34 cm-1 preserving high efficiency and fundamental transverse mode operation. Record-high 16 W continuous wave (CW) and 145 W pulse room temperature front facet output optical power and 74% wallplug efficiency were attained in 100-microm-aperture 1.06-microm-emitting laser diodes with 3 mm cavity length.

  19. 1-kilowatt CW all-fiber laser oscillator pumped with wavelength-beam-combined diode stacks.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Brunet, F; Kanskar, M; Faucher, M; Wetter, A; Holehouse, N

    2012-01-30

    We have demonstrated a monolithic cladding-pumped ytterbium-doped single all-fiber laser oscillator generating 1 kW of CW signal power at 1080 nm with 71% slope efficiency and near diffraction-limited beam quality. Fiber components were highly integrated on "spliceless" passive fibers to promote laser efficiency and alleviate non-linear effects. The laser was pumped through a 7:1 pump combiner with seven 200-W 91x nm fiber-pigtailed wavelength-beam-combined diode-stack modules. The signal power of such a single all-fiber laser oscillator showed no evidence of roll-over, and the highest output was limited only by available pump power.

  20. Revealing statistical properties of quasi-CW fibre lasers in bandwidth-limited measurements.

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, O A; Sugavanam, S; Churkin, D V

    2014-11-17

    We introduce a general technique how to reveal in experiments of limited electrical bandwidth which is lower than the optical bandwidth of the optical signal under study, whether the statistical properties of the light source obey Gaussian distribution or mode correlations do exist. To do that one needs to perform measurements by decreasing the measurement bandwidth. We develop a simple model of bandwidth-limited measurements and predict universal laws how intensity probability density function and intensity auto-correlation function of ideal completely stochastic source of Gaussian statistics depend on limited measurement bandwidth and measurement noise level. Results of experimental investigation are in good agreement with model predictions. In particular, we reveal partial mode correlations in the radiation of quasi-CW Raman fibre laser.