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Sample records for 2450-mhz microwave radiation

  1. Effect of 2450 MHz microwave radiation on hematopoiesis of preganant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, M.J.; MacNichols, G.L.; McRee, D.I.

    1984-11-01

    In this study, the influence of 2450 MHz CW microwave radiation on hematopoiesis in pregnant mice was examined. Dams (mice CD-1 strain) were irradiated during Days 1-6 or 6-15 of pregnancy. The animals were irradiated for a total of 8 hr per day at an average power density of 30 mW/cm/sup 2/. Peripheral blood and bone marrow samples were obtained on Day 18 of pregnancy. The total leukocyte and differential leukocyte counts of peripheral blood samples were not affected by either exposure regimen. In addition, no effects were noted in either the erythroid or myeloid mitotic indices of bone marrow samples. Exposure of pregnant mice to microwave radiation under the conditions of these experiments had no effects on the investigated aspects of hematopoiesis.

  2. Effect of 2,450 MHz microwave radiation on the development of the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Inouye, M.; Galvin, M.J.; McRee, D.I.

    1983-12-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2,450 MHz microwave radiation at an incident power density of 10 mW/cm2 daily for 3 hours from day 4 of pregnancy (in utero exposure) through day 40 postpartum, except for 2 days at the perinatal period. The animals were killed, and the brains removed, weighed, measured, and histologically examined at 15, 20, 30, and 40 days of age. The histologic parameters examined included the cortical architecture of the cerebral cortex, the decline of the germinal layer along the lateral ventricles, the myelination of the corpus callosum, and the decline of the external germinal layer of the cerebellar cortex. In 40-day-old rats, quantitative measurements of neurons were also made. The spine density of the pyramidal cells in layer III of the somatosensory cortex, and the density of basal dendritic trees of the pyramidal cells in layer V were measured in Golgi-Cox impregnated specimens. In addition, the density of Purkinje cells and the extent of the Purkinje cell layer in each lobule were measured in midsagittal sections of the cerebellum stained with thionin. There were no remarkable differences between microwave-exposed and control (sham-irradiated) groups for any of the histologic or quantitative parameters examined; however, the findings provide important information on quantitative measurements of the brain. The data from this study failed to demonstrate that there is a significant effect on rat brain development due to microwave exposure (10 mW/cm2) during the embryonic, fetal, and postnatal periods.

  3. Microwave radiation (2450 MHz) alters the endotoxin-induced hypothermic response of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowicz, R.J.; Compton, K.L.; Riddle, M.M.; Rogers, R.R.; Brugnolotti, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The parenteral administration of bacterial endotoxin to rats causes a hypothermia that is maximal after approximately 90 minutes. When endotoxin-injected rats were held in a controlled environment at 22 degree C and 50% relative humidity and exposed for 90 minutes to microwaves (2450 MHz, CW) at 1 mW/cm2, significant increases were observed in body temperature compared with endotoxin-treated, sham-irradiated rats. The magnitude of the response was related to power density (10 mW/cm2 greater than 5 mW/cm2 greater than 1 mW/cm2). Saline-injected rats exposed for 90 minutes at 5 mW/cm2 (specific absorption rate approximately 1.0 mW/g) showed no significant increase in body temperature compared with saline-injected, sham-irradiated rats. The hypothermia induced by endotoxin in rats was also found to be affected by ambient temperature alone. Increases in ambient temperature above 22 degree C in the absence of microwaves caused a concomitant increase in body temperature. This study reveals that subtle microwave heating is detectable in endotoxin-treated rats that have impaired thermoregulatory capability. These results indicate that the interpretation of microwave-induced biological effects observed in animals at comparable rates and levels of energy absorption should include a consideration of the thermogenic potential of microwave.

  4. An Enhancing Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on the Lethal Action of 2450 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation in Microwave Oven.

    PubMed

    Mollazadeh-Moghaddam, Kamyar; Moradi, Bardia Varasteh; Dolatabadi-Bazaz, Reza; Shakibae, Mojtaba; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2011-10-01

    Today, there is an increasing interest in the use of metal nanoparticles in health sciences. Amongst all nanoparticles, the gold nanoparticles have been known to kill the cancer cells under hyperthermic condition by near-infrared frequency electromagnetic waves. On the other hand, although there are different physiochemical methods for disinfection of microbial pollution, however applications of irradiated gold nanoparticles against microorganisms have not yet been investigated. In this study, gold nanoparticles were prepared using D-glucose and characterized (particle size <26 nm). In the next step, the enhancing effect of the non toxic level of gold nanoparticles (50 µg/mL) on the antimicrobial activity of 2450 MHz electromagnetic radiation generated at a microwave oven operated at low power (100 W), was investigated by time-kill course assay against Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) ATCC 29737. The results showed that application of gold nanoparticles can enhance the lethal effect of low power microwave in a very short exposure time (5 s).

  5. Effects of 2450 MHz continuous wave microwave radiation and isothermal conduction on canine platelet aggregometry, survival and margination

    SciTech Connect

    Bushberg, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of 2450 MHz microwave radiation and isothermal conduction ex vivo exposures on canine platelets was analyzed in vitro by studying adenosine-5'-diphosphate activated aggregation and in vivo by studying the survival, distribution and physiological integrity of reinfused autologous Indium-111 labeled platelets. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) from eight healthy dogs was subjected to microwave irradiation at 10 MW/cm/sup 2/ and at 50 MW/cm/sup 2/ for 10, 100, 600, 900, 1800 seconds and at 100 MW/cm/sup 2/ for 10, 100, and 600 seconds. Aggregometry analysis was performed immediately after exposure and 10 minutes post-exposure. No significant perturbations were observed following microwave exposure of 10 MW/cm/sup 2/. At higher power densities six specific types of aggregation phenomena were demonstrated: (1) Hyperaggregation, (2) Decreased Velocity Reduced Hyperaggregation, (3) Recovery, (4) Decreased Velocity Delayed Hyperaggregation, (5) Reversible Afunctionality, and (6) Irreversible Afunctionality. The absence of equivalent aggregation responses with isothermal conduction heating (extraisothermal effects) was attributed to differences in heating rate and not to nonthermal microwave-specific effects. Scintigraphic and survival kinetic studies were performed following power density/exposure time combinations. PRP samples I and IV displayed normal survival half-times; however, exposure I resulted in a depressed 15-minute post-reinfusion circulating percentage (CP/sub 15/) of 29% compared to 61% for the control sample. Exposure of groups II and III resulted in a dramatic reduction in the CP/sub 15/ (i.e., 18% and 1.3% respectively) and survival half-times. Margination of the labeled platelets was divided between the spleen, liver and blood pool.

  6. Behavior, physiology, and energy deposition in rats chronically exposed to 2450-MHz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, J.A.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1987-11-01

    The research program was initiated to determine both the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the behavioral and physiological consequences of chronic c-w microwave radiation exposure at 2450 MHz in the laboratory rat. Whole-body average and local SARs at discrete sites within the body of rats and mice were determined experimentally using different exposure systems and analytical techniques. The whole-body average SAR and the distribution of SAR within the body depends on a variety of factors: type of exposure system, polarization of the field, size of the animal, and angle of radiation incident on the body. Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of chronic exposure to 2450-MHz microwave radiation on several measures of rat behavior and physiology. Groups of rats were exposed intermittently to 2450-MHz radiation at power densities of 0.5 mW/sq. cm. or 2.5 mW/sq. cm. for 90 days.

  7. Measurement of DNA damage after exposure to 2450 MHz electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Malyapa, R S; Ahern, E W; Straube, W L; Moros, E G; Pickard, W F; Roti Roti, J L

    1997-12-01

    Recent reports suggest that exposure to 2450 MHz electromagnetic radiation causes DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cells of rat brain irradiated in vivo (Lai and Singh, Bioelectromagnetics 16, 207-210, 1995; Int. J. Radiat. Biol. 69, 513-521, 1996). Therefore, we endeavored to determine if exposure of cultured mammalian cells in vitro to 2450 MHz radiation causes DNA damage. The alkaline comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis), which is reportedly the most sensitive method to assay DNA damage in individual cells, was used to measure DNA damage after in vitro 2450 MHz irradiation. Exponentially growing U87MG and C3H 10T1/2 cells were exposed to 2450 MHz continuous-wave (CW) radiation in specially designed radial transmission lines (RTLs) that provided relatively uniform microwave exposure. Specific absorption rates (SARs) were calculated to be 0.7 and 1.9 W/kg. Temperatures in the RTLs were measured in real time and were maintained at 37 +/- 0.3 degrees C. Every experiment included sham exposure(s) in an RTL. Cells were irradiated for 2 h, 2 h followed by a 4-h incubation at 37 degrees C in an incubator, 4 h and 24 h. After these treatments samples were subjected to the alkaline comet assay as described by Olive et al. (Exp. Cell Res. 198, 259-267, 1992). Images of comets were digitized and analyzed using a PC-based image analysis system, and the "normalized comet moment" and "comet length" were determined. No significant differences were observed between the test group and the controls after exposure to 2450 MHz CW irradiation. Thus 2450 MHz irradiation does not appear to cause DNA damage in cultured mammalian cells under these exposure conditions as measured by this assay.

  8. An evaluation of the teratogenic potential of protracted exposure of pregnant rats to 2450-MHz microwave radiation. II. Postnatal psychophysiologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jensh, R P; Vogel, W H; Brent, R L

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether protracted prenatal exposure of rats to 2450-MHz microwave radiation at a power density level of 20 mW/cm2 would significantly alter postnatal growth and psychophysiologic development. Of 75 pregnant rats, 12 were exposed to microwave radiation, 4 sham-irradiated, and 59 served as environmental control animals. Forty-five females were allowed to deliver their offspring. The neonates were examined and weighed on d 3 and weekly thereafter until 87 d of age. Neonatal reflex tests were initiated as early as d 3 (surface righting, air righting, auditory startle, visual placing). One physiologic parameter, eye opening, was also observed. Mothers were rebred 10 d after weaning and a morphologic evaluation was completed on the second litter. Behavioral tests were begun at 60 d of age and included water T-maze, conditioned avoidance response, open field, activity wheel, forelimb hanging, and swimming. At 90 d of age offspring were bred within and across groups, and a morphologic teratologic analyses was completed on the offspring. Representative tissue samples were collected and organ weights recorded for the brain, liver, kidneys, and gonads of all animals. Analyses of the data indicated that there were no significant malformations or significant alterations in the neonatal physiologic or reflex test results, body/organ weight ratios, or breeding results in the adult offspring. There were no significant alterations in five of the six adult behavioral tests. There were significant differences in activity among the irradiated and control offspring between the sexes, the irradiated offspring being more active. These results are indicative of possible radiation-induced behavioral alterations. Further studies are needed to explore the possibility of microwave radiation-related alterations in animal behavior.

  9. Immunologic and hematopoietic alterations by 2,450-MHz electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, A T; Mold, N G

    1980-01-01

    A biphasic modulation of responsiveness of spleen lymphocytes to mitogens was observed in mice exposed to 2,450-MHz radiation at power densities of 5-15 mW/cm2 over various periods ranging between one and 17 days. This modulated phenomenon may be explained on the basis of 1) suppression of lymphocyte response to microwave-activated macrophages which persists throughout the entire course of radiation, and 2) concurrent progressive direct stimulation of lymphocytes which culminates around day 9 of exposure. Tumor cytotoxicity of killer lymphocytes from mice exposed to five or nine days of radiation did not appear different from sham controls. The highly proliferative hematopoietic marrow cells were sensitive to microwave radiation. Nine days of exposure to radiation (15 mW/cm2) reduced the colony-forming units of myeloid and erythroid series by 50%. This observation may offer a new and more sensitive assay for studying biological effects of electromagnetic radiation.

  10. Growth and development of mice offspring after irradiation in utero with 2,450-MHz microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, E.; Carter, H.B.; House, D.

    1984-12-01

    Mice offspring irradiated in utero with 2,450-MHz radio-frequency (RF) radiation at 0 or 28 mW/cm2 (whole-body averaged specific absorption rate . 0 or 16.5 W/kg) for 100 minutes daily on days 6 through 17 of gestation were evaluated for maturation and development on days 1, 5, 10, 12, 15, and 17 of age. The tests used to determine differences in developmental age in the two treatment groups were body weight, urine concentrating ability, brain weight, tolerance to ouabain, and bone lengths. Fifteen sham-irradiated and 26 RF-irradiated litters, normalized to eight pups/litter, were used in this study. Mean body weight of the microwave-irradiated offspring were significantly (p . .0003) decreased only on day 1 of age. Brain weight on days 10, 12, and 17 were significantly lower in microwave-irradiated pups (p . .01). There were no significant differences in the two groups in urine concentrating ability on day 5, ouabain tolerance on day 15, or bone length on days 5, 10, 12, and 17. It is concluded that there is a persistent delay in postnatal development of the brain after RF irradiation with 16.5 W/kg during gestation.

  11. DNA damage in rat brain cells after in vivo exposure to 2450 MHz electromagnetic radiation and various methods of euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Malyapa, R S; Ahern, E W; Bi, C; Straube, W L; LaRegina, M; Pickard, W F; Roti Roti, J L

    1998-06-01

    The present study was done to confirm the reported observation that low-intensity acute exposure to 2450 MHz radiation causes DNA single-strand breaks (Lai and Singh, Bioelectromagnetics 16, 207-210, 1995). Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing approximately 250 g were irradiated with 2450 MHz continuous-wave (CW) microwaves for 2 h at a specific absorption rate of 1.2 W/kg in a cylindrical waveguide system (Guy et al., Radio Sci. 14, 63-74, 1979). There was no associated rise in the core body temperature of the rats. After the irradiation or sham treatments, rats were euthanized by either CO2 asphyxia or decapitation by guillotine (eight pairs of animals per euthanasia group). After euthanasia the brains were removed and immediately immersed in cold Ames medium and the cells of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus were dissociated separately and subjected to the alkaline comet assay. Irrespective of whether the rats were euthanized by CO2 asphyxia or decapitated by guillotine, no significant differences were observed between either the comet length or the normalized comet moment of cells from either the cerebral cortex or the hippocampus of sham-treated rats and those from the irradiated rats. However, the data for the rats asphyxiated with CO2 showed more intrinsic DNA damage and more experiment-to-experiment variation than did the data for rats euthanized by guillotine. Therefore, the guillotine method of euthanasia is the most appropriate in studies relating to DNA damage. Furthermore, we did not confirm the observation that DNA damage is produced in cells of the rat cerebral cortex or the hippocampus after a 2-h exposure to 2450 MHz CW microwaves or at 4 h after the exposure.

  12. Proliferation and cytogenetic studies in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 2450 MHz radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Mohan, N; Meltz, M L; Wittler, M A

    1997-12-01

    Aliquots of human peripheral blood collected from two healthy human volunteers were exposed in vitro to continuous wave 2450 MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR), either continuously for a period of 90 min or intermittently for a total exposure period of 90 min (30 min on and 30 min off, repeated three times). Blood aliquots which were sham-exposed or exposed in vitro to 150 cGy gamma radiation served as controls. The continuous wave 2450 MHz RFR was generated with a net forward power of 34.5 W and transmitted from a standard gain rectangular antenna horn in a vertically downward direction. The mean power density at the position of the cells was 5.0 mW/cm2. The mean specific absorption rate calculated by Finite Difference Time Domain analysis was 12.46 W/kg. Immediately after exposure, lymphocytes were cultured for 48 and 72 h to determine the incidence of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei, respectively. Proliferation indices were also recorded. There were no significant differences between RFR-exposed and sham-exposed lymphocytes with respect to; (a) mitotic indices; (b) incidence of cells showing chromosome damage; (c) exchange aberrations; (d) acentric fragments; (e) binucleate lymphocytes, and (f) micronuclei, for either the continuous or intermittent RFR exposures. In contrast, the response of positive control cells exposed to 150 cGy gamma radiation was significantly different from RFR-exposed and sham-exposed lymphocytes. Thus, there is no evidence for an effect on mitogen-stimulated proliferation kinetics or for excess genotoxicity within 72 h in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 2450 MHz RFR.

  13. Effect of 2450-MHz microwave energy on the blood-brain barrier to hydrophilic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Microwave energy at 2450 MHz 120 Hz AM was found ineffective in increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier to the hydrophilic tracers HRP and (/sup 14/C) sucrose. Furthermore, a diminished permeability to HRP and sodium fluorescein was apparent after 180 minutes of exposure to microwaves at an incident power density of 20 mW/cm/sup 2/. Colonic temperature, as well as temperature within the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, cerebellum and medulla, were elevated by less than 1/sup 0/C over those of sham-exposed rats. A significant decrease in the permeability to HRP and (/sup 14/C) sucrose occurred after exposure to an incident power density of 65 mW/cm/sup 2/ for 30 minutes. The reduction in permeability to HRP correlated with a suppressed incorporation of the tracer by pinocytosis in cerebral microvessels. Suppression of blood-brain barrier permeability to hydrophilic tracers was most pronounced at brain temperatures exceeding approx. 40/sup 0/C and is demonstrated to be temperature dependent.

  14. Germination response of MR 219 rice variety to different exposure times and periods of 2450 MHz microwave frequency.

    PubMed

    Talei, Daryush; Valdiani, Alireza; Maziah, Mahmood; Mohsenkhah, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Germination is a key process in plants' phenological cycles. Accelerating this process could lead to improvment of the seedling growth as well as the cultivation efficiency. To achieve this, the effect of microwave frequency on the germination of rice seeds was examined. The physiological feedbacks of the MR 219 rice variety in terms of seed germination rate (GR), germination percentage (GP), and mean germination time (MGT) were analyzed by exposing its seeds to 2450 MHz of microwave frequency for one, four, seven, and ten hours. It was revealed that exposing the seeds to the microwave frequency for 10 hours resulted in the highest GP. This treatment led to 100% of germination after three days with a mean germination time of 2.1 days. Although the other exposure times of microwave frequency caused the moderate effects on germination with a GP(a3) ranged from 93% to 98%, they failed to reduce the MGT(a3). The results showed that ten-hour exposure times of microwave frequency for six days significantly facilitated and improved the germination indices (primary shoot and root length). Therefore, the technique is expected to benefit the improvement of rice seed germination considering its simplicity and efficacy in increasing the germination percentage and rate as well as the primary shoot and root length without causing any environmental toxicity.

  15. Naltrexone-sensitive analgesia following exposure of mice to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Maillefer, R.H.; Quock, R.M. )

    1991-03-11

    This study was conducted to determine whether exposure to RFR might induce sufficient thermal stress to activate endogenous opioid mechanisms and induce analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 10, 15 or 20 mV/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested in the abdominal constriction paradigm. Specific absorption rates (SAR) were 23.7 W/kg at 10 mW/cm{sup 2}, 34.6 W/kg at 15 mW/cm{sup 2} and 45.5 W/kg at 20 mW/cm{sup 2}. Confinement in the exposure chamber alone did not appreciably alter body temperature but did appear to induce a stress-associated analgesia that was insensitive to the opioid receptor blocker naltrexone. Exposure of confined mice to RFR elevated body temperature and further increased analgesia in SAR-dependent manner. The high-SAR RFR-induced analgesia, but not the hyperthermia, was reduced by naltrexone. These findings suggest that (1) RFR produces SAR-dependent hyperthermia and analgesia and (2) RFR-induced analgesia is mediated by opioid mechanisms while confinement-induced analgesia involves non-opioid mechanisms.

  16. Biological and behavioral effects of prenatal and postnatal exposure to 2450-MHz electromagnetic radiation in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, J.; Polson, P.; Rebert, C.; Lunan, K.; Gage, M.

    1982-01-01

    Near the beginning of the second trimester of pregnancy, 33 squirrel monkeys were exposed to 2450-MHz irradiation in a multimode cavity at whole-body average specific absorption rates equivalent to those resulting from exposure to plane wave irradiation at 0.034, 0.34, and 3.4 W/kg; exposed monkeys were compared with eight pregnant sham-exposed monkeys. Eighteen of the irradiated mothers and their offspring were exposed for an additional 6 months after parturition, and then their offspring were exposed for another 6 months. No differences were found between irradiated and control adults with respect to the number of live births produced or to measures of locomotor activity, maternal care, urinary catecholamines, plasma cortisol, 3H-thymidine and 14C-uridine uptake by phytohemagglutininstimulated blood lymphocytes, or electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. Similarly, no differences were found between exposed and nonexposed offspring on the same blood, urine, and EEG parameters. Growth rate and most aspects of behavioral development were not altered by exposure. The major difference between irradiated and control offspring was the high mortality rate (4/5) before 6 months of age in those exposed at 3.4 W/kg both before and after birth. These results indicate that microwaves at power densities to 3.4 W/kg might have little direct effect on the monkey fetus when exposures occur in utero during the latter half to two-thirds of pregnancy, but that continued exposure after birth might be harmful.

  17. Analgesia produced by exposure to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) is mediated by brain mu- and kappa-opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, G.; Park, E.J.; Quock, R.M. )

    1992-02-26

    This study was conducted to identify the opioid receptor subtype(s) responsible for RFR-induced analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 20 mW/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested 15 min later in the abdominal constriction paradigm which detects {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid activity. Immediately following RFR exposure, different groups of mice were pretreated intracerebroventricularly with different opioid receptor blockers with selectivity for {mu}- or {kappa}-opioid receptors. Results show that RFR-induced analgesia was attenuated by higher but not lower doses of the non-selective antagonist naloxone, but the selective {mu}-opioid antagonist {beta}-funaltrexamine and by the selective {kappa}-opioid antagonist norbinaltorphimine. RFR-induced analgesia was also reduced by subcutaneous pretreatment with 5.0 mg/kg of the {mu}-/{kappa}-opioid antagonist({minus})-5,9-diethyl-{alpha}-5,9-dialkyl-2{prime}-hydroxy-6,7-benzomorphan(MR-2266). These findings suggest that RFR-induced analgesia may be mediated by both {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid mechanisms.

  18. A confirmation study of Russian and Ukrainian data on effects of 2450 MHz microwave exposure on immunological processes and teratology in rats.

    PubMed

    de Gannes, F Poulletier; Taxile, M; Duleu, S; Hurtier, A; Haro, E; Geffard, M; Ruffié, G; Billaudel, B; Lévêque, P; Dufour, P; Lagroye, I; Veyret, B

    2009-11-01

    In a series of Russian and Ukrainian papers published from 1974-1986, it was reported that 30-day whole-body exposures to continuous-wave (CW) radiofrequency (RF) radiation at 2375 MHz and 5 W/m(2) disrupted the antigenic structure of rat brain tissue. The authors suggested that this action caused an autoimmune response in exposed animals. Moreover, these studies reported that blood serum from exposed rats injected into intact nonexposed female rats on the 10th day of pregnancy led to increased postimplantation embryo mortality and decreased fetus size and body weight. Because the results of these studies served in part as the basis for setting exposure limits in the former USSR, it was deemed necessary to perform confirmation studies, using modern dosimetric and biological methods. In our study, a new system was constructed to expose free-moving rats under far-field conditions. Whole-body and brain-averaged specific absorption rates (SARs) were calculated. All results, using ELISA and classic teratology end points, were negative in our laboratory. On the basis of this investigation, we conclude that, under these exposure conditions (2450 MHz, CW, 7 h/day, 30 days, 0.16 W/kg whole-body SAR), RF-radiation exposure had no influence on several immune and degenerative parameters or on prenatal development.

  19. Effect of microwaves (2450-MHz) on the immune system in mice: studies of nucleic acid and protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W.; Ahmed, A.; Czerski, P.; Leach, W.M.; Sell, K.W.

    1980-01-01

    CBA/J adult male mice were given single or triple exposures to 2450-mHz microwaves in an environmentally controlled wave guide facility. The average absorbed dose rate for a single exposure varied from 12 to 15 mW/g. Sham-exposed mice served as controls. Lymphoid cells were collected and tested for metabolic activity on days 3, 6, and 9 following a single exposure, and on days 9, 12, and 16 following triple exposures on days 0, 3, and 6. Cells were cultured in vitro for four hours to seven days before their metabolic rates were assayed. Under these conditions, microwaves failed to produce any detectable change in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), and protein synthesis, as measured by the incorporation of methyl(3H)-thymidine (3H-TDR) (DNA substrate), 3H-uridine (3H-UR) (RNA substrate), and 3H-leucine (protein substrate) by spleen, bone marrow, and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) in vitro. These data suggest that microwave-induced increases in the frequency of complement-receptor (CR)- or surface-immunoglobulin (sIg)-bearing cells were not associated with a concomitant increase in cell proliferation and/or protein synthesis, and favor the concept that microwaves under these conditions stimulate already existing B-cell precursors for maturation.

  20. Frequency of micronuclei in the peripheral blood and bone marrow of cancer-prone mice chronically exposed to 2450 MHz radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Frei, M R; Dusch, S J; Guel, V; Meltz, M L; Jauchem, J R

    1997-04-01

    C3H/HeJ mice, which are prone to mammary tumors, were exposed for 20 h/day, 7 days/week, over 18 months to continuous-wave 2450 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation in circularly polarized wave guides at a whole-body average specific absorption rate of 1.0 W/kg. Sham-exposed mice were used as controls. The positive controls were the sentinel mice treated with mitomycin C during the last 24 h before necropsy. At the end of the 18 months, all mice were necropsied. Peripheral blood and bone marrow smears were examined for the extent of genotoxicity as indicated by the presence of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs). The results indicate that the incidence of micronuclei/1,000 PCEs was not significantly different between groups exposed to RF radiation (62 mice) and sham-exposed groups (58 mice), and the mean frequencies were 4.5 +/- 1.23 and 4.0 +/- 1.12 in peripheral blood and 6.1 +/- 1.78 and 5.7 +/- 1.60 in bone marrow, respectively. In contrast, the positive controls (7 mice) showed a significantly elevated incidence of micronuclei/1,000 PCEs in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and the mean frequencies were 50.9 +/- 6.18 and 55.2 +/- 4.65, respectively. When the animals with mammary tumors were considered separately, there were no significant differences in the incidence of micronuclei/1,000 PCEs between the group exposed to RF radiation (12 mice) and the sham-exposed group (8 mice), and the mean frequencies were 4.6 +/- 1.03 and 4.1 +/- 0.89 in peripheral blood and 6.1 +/- 1.76 and 5.5 +/- 1.51 in bone marrow, respectively. Thus there was no evidence for genotoxicity in mice prone to mammary tumors that were exposed chronically to 2450 MHz RF radiation compared with sham-exposed controls.

  1. Effects of Pulsed and CW (Continuous Wave) 2450 MHz Radiation on Transformation and Chromosomes of Human Lymphocytes in vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-15

    the subject of two brief communi- cations: one at the IRPA -7 Congress in April, 1988 in Sydney Australia (attachment 2), and a second one at the 10th...Society (2 presentations) in Stamford, Connecticut in 1988 and at the 7th International Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association ( IRPA ...Electromagnetic Fields. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Fl.; 1986; pp 229-272. IRPA 7 Seventh Intemational Congress of the International Radiation Protection

  2. Cognitive impairment and neurogenotoxic effects in rats exposed to low-intensity microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Nasare, Namita; Megha, Kanu; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Ahmed, Rafat Sultana; Singh, Digvijay; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Mediratta, Pramod Kumari

    2015-01-01

    The health hazard of microwave radiation (MWR) has become a recent subject of interest as a result of the enormous increase in mobile phone usage. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chronic low-intensity microwave exposure on cognitive function, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and DNA damage in rat brain. Experiments were performed on male Fischer rats exposed to MWR for 180 days at 3 different frequencies, namely, 900, 1800 MHz, and 2450 MHz. Animals were divided into 4 groups: group I: sham exposed; group II: exposed to MWR at 900 MHz, specific absorption rate (SAR) 5.953 × 10(-4) W/kg; group III: exposed to 1800 MHz, SAR 5.835 × 10(-4) W/kg; and group IV: exposed to 2450 MHz, SAR 6.672 × 10(-4) W/kg. All the rats were tested for cognitive function at the end of the exposure period and were subsequently sacrificed to collect brain. Level of HSP70 was estimated by enzyme-linked immunotarget assay and DNA damage was assessed using alkaline comet assay in all the groups. The results showed declined cognitive function, elevated HSP70 level, and DNA damage in the brain of microwave-exposed animals. The results indicated that, chronic low-intensity microwave exposure in the frequency range of 900 to 2450 MHz may cause hazardous effects on the brain.

  3. Detection of Low Level Microwave Radiation Induced Deoxyribonucleic Acid Damage Vis-à-vis Genotoxicity in Brain of Fischer Rats

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Megha, Kanu; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Ahmed, Rafat Sultana; Chandna, Sudhir; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Non-ionizing radiofrequency radiation has been increasingly used in industry, commerce, medicine and especially in mobile phone technology and has become a matter of serious concern in present time. Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the possible deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damaging effects of low-level microwave radiation in brain of Fischer rats. Materials and Methods: Experiments were performed on male Fischer rats exposed to microwave radiation for 30 days at three different frequencies: 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz. Animals were divided into 4 groups: Group I (Sham exposed): Animals not exposed to microwave radiation but kept under same conditions as that of other groups, Group II: Animals exposed to microwave radiation at frequency 900 MHz at specific absorption rate (SAR) 5.953 × 10−4 W/kg, Group III: Animals exposed to 1800 MHz at SAR 5.835 × 10−4 W/kg and Group IV: Animals exposed to 2450 MHz at SAR 6.672 × 10−4 W/kg. At the end of the exposure period animals were sacrificed immediately and DNA damage in brain tissue was assessed using alkaline comet assay. Results: In the present study, we demonstrated DNA damaging effects of low level microwave radiation in brain. Conclusion: We concluded that low SAR microwave radiation exposure at these frequencies may induce DNA strand breaks in brain tissue. PMID:23833433

  4. Effects of 42- and 2450-MHz dielectric heating on nutrition-related properties of soybeans.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S O; Pour-El, A; Stetson, L E; Peck, E E

    1981-12-01

    Dielectric heating at frequencies of 42 and 2450 MHz was applied to whole soybeans of natural moisture content for varies exposure times. The minimum energy absorbed (MEA) was calculated from moisture-loss and temperature-elevation data. Biochemical analyses were performed to determine protein dispersibility index (PDI), nitrogen solubility index (NSI), and trypsin-inhibitor, urease, lipoxygenase, and peroxidase activities. Because the heating rates were different at the two frequencies for the power levels used, plots of the biochemical properties against temperature of exposure time showed an apparent frequency dependence. This dependence on frequency disappeared, however, when MEA was substituted as the independent variable. Chemical analyses revealed that dielectric heating of soybeans at natural moisture levels should be as effective as conventional steam toasting in reducing trypsin-inhibitor activity. PDI and NSI, but not urease, were suitable indicators of trypsin-inhibitor inactivation by dielectric heating. Lipoxygenase was completely inactivated by the dielectric-heating treatments that gave suitable trypsin-inhibitor inactivation, but peroxidase activity remained relatively high, offering possible advantages for bleaching and improved soy product color.

  5. Microwave radiation effects on the thermally driven oxidase of erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, J.L.; Erwin, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Sheep red blood cells (SRBCs) were labelled with a concanavalin A-luminol-bovine serum albumin conjugate specific for the transmembrane anion transport protein (Band 3) and exposed to 2450-MHz continuous-wave microwave radiation at an average specific absorption rate of 91W/kg for 10 min. The temperature was held constant at 25, 37, 40, 42, or 45C with an airflow heat-exchange system. Following exposure to microwave or air heating, the decrease in residual base-activated chemiluminescence (CL) of the SRBCs was measured as an indication of infield oxidase activity. Air heating resulted in a significant decrease in residual CL at temperatures above 37C (74% decrease at 45C). Microwave radiation inhibited the decline in residual CL above 37C. At 45C the inhibition was 40%. The results suggest microwave radiation either reversibly altered the thermodynamics of oxygen binding to haemoglobin or failed to energize a significant portion of the haemoglobin molecules in each sample to the thermal threshold of haemoglobin autoxidation.

  6. Metabolic effects of microwave radiation and convection heating on human mononuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kiel, J.L.; Wong, L.S.; Erwin, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of microwave radiation (2450 MHz, continuous wave, mean specific absorption rate of 103.5 +/- 4.2 W/kg) and convection heating on the nonphosphorylating oxidative metabolism of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes (96% lymphocytes, 4% monocytes) at 37 degrees C were investigated. Metabolic activity, determined by chemiluminescence (CL) of cells challenged with luminol (5-amino-2,3-dihydro-1,4-phthalazinedione) linked to bovine serum albumin, was detected with a brightness photometer. A significant stimulation after microwave exposure (p less than 0.005) over total CL of matched 37 degrees C incubator controls was observed. A similar degree of stimulation compared to incubator controls was also detected after sham treatment. There was no significant difference between changes in total CL or stimulation indices of the microwave and sham exposed groups. It appears that exposure to microwave radiation, under normothermic (37 +/- 0.03 degrees C) conditions, has no effect on the oxidative metabolic activity of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. However, the significant differences between microwave or sham exposed cells and their respective incubator controls occurred because the temperature of the incubator controls did not exceed 35.9 degrees C and this temperature required 39 minutes to reach from 22 degrees C. Slow heating of incubator controls must be accounted for in thermal and radiofrequency radiation studies in vitro.

  7. The apoptotic effect and the plausible mechanism of microwave radiation on rat myocardial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhe; Cui, Yan; Feng, Xianmin; Li, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Junjie; Wang, Huiyan; Lv, Shijie

    2016-08-01

    Microwaves may exert adverse biological effects on the cardiovascular system at the integrated system and cellular levels. However, the mechanism underlying such effects remains poorly understood. Here, we report a previously uncharacterized mechanism through which microwaves damage myocardial cells. Rats were treated with 2450 MHz microwave radiation at 50, 100, 150, or 200 mW/cm(2) for 6 min. Microwave treatment significantly enhanced the levels of various enzymes in serum. In addition, it increased the malondialdehyde content while decreasing the levels of antioxidative stress enzymes, activities of enzyme complexes I-IV, and ATP in myocardial tissues. Notably, irradiated myocardial cells exhibited structural damage and underwent apoptosis. Furthermore, Western blot analysis revealed significant changes in expression levels of proteins involved in oxidative stress regulation and apoptotic signaling pathways, indicating that microwave irradiation could induce myocardial cell apoptosis by interfering with oxidative stress and cardiac energy metabolism. Our findings provide useful insights into the mechanism of microwave-induced damage to the cardiovascular system.

  8. Thermal effect of microwave antenna radiation on a generic model of thyroid gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavriloaia, Gheorghe; Gavriloaia, Mariuca-Roxana; Ghemigean, Adina-Mariana

    2010-11-01

    The rapid diffusion of wireless communication systems has caused an increased concern for the potential detrimental effects on human health deriving from exposure to electromagnetic field. It penetrates the body and acts on all the organs, altering the cell membrane potential and the distribution of ions and dipoles. The thyroid gland is one of the most exposed vital organs and may be a target for electromagnetic radiation. This paper presents the computed temperature and specific absorption rate inside to a generic model of a human thyroid using signals radiated by an antenna operating in the 2450 MHz band and the power density levels up to 100 W/cm2. Calculations were carried out using the Finite Difference Time Domain method for the solving of two coupled differential equations, Maxwell and Pennes. The results show that the temperature can rise up to very dangerous levels, i.e., 46 °C, in a very short time. The estimated temperature distribution in the human thyroid due to exposure from microwave signals can be used to design the dangerous aria for personal working around high power emitted antenna and for medical applications.

  9. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (p<0.05). Whereas, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were found significantly decreased in microwave exposed groups (p<0.05). A significant increase in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) was observed in microwave exposed animal (p<0.05). Furthermore, significant DNA damage was also observed in microwave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (p<0.05). In conclusion, the present study suggests that low intensity microwave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect

  10. Microwave treatment of eight seconds protects cells of Isatis indigotica from enhanced UV-B radiation lesions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ping

    2006-01-01

    To determine the role of microwaves in the stress resistance of plants to enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation, Isatis indigotica Fort. seeds were subjected to microwave radiation for 8 s (wavelength 125 mm, power density 1.26 mW mm(-2), 2450 MHz). Afterwards they were cultivated in plastic pots in an artificial-glass greenhouse maintained at 25 degrees C, 70% relative humidity, and 400 micromol mol(-1) CO2, under visible-light conditions of 1500 micromol m(-2) s(-1) for 8 h day(-1). When the seedlings were 10 days old, they were subjected to 10.08 kJ m(-2) UV-B (PAR: 220 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) radiation for 8 days. Changes in a number of physiological and biochemical characteristics and in the thermal decomposition enthalpy of biomass were measured and used as indicators of the protective capacity of microwave radiation in this experiment. Our results revealed that microwave pretreatment of seeds enhanced UV-B stress resistance in the seedlings by decreasing the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) and increasing the concentration of ascorbic acid (AsA) and UV-B-absorbing compounds, increasing the activities of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and increasing the energy accumulation of photosynthesis. All these results suggest that microwave radiation enhances plant metabolism and results in increased UV-B stress resistance. This is the first investigation reporting the use of microwave pretreatment to protect the cells of Isatis indigotica from UV-B-induced lesions.

  11. Effects of Pulsed and CW 2450 MHz Radiation on Transformation and Chromosomes of Human Lymphocytes In Vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-15

    NOTATION Prepared in"collaboration with Dr. P . Czerski, FDA Center for Devices and Rad. Health 17 COSATI CODES 18-SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverie If...Pulsed or amplitude modulated waveforms can be obtained through the use of a Hewlett-Packard Model 8403A p -i-n modulator, for high peak power pulsed...methods. Resralts were considered significant at the p < 0.05 level. 11 __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Effects Of Exposure On Spontaneous Transformation

  12. Effects of Pulsed and CW (Continuous Wave) 2450 MHz Radiation on Transformation and Chromosomes of Human Lymphocytes in Vitro.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-16

    subject of two brief communications: one at the IRPA -7 Congress in April, 1988 in Sydney Australia (Appendix 2), and a second one at the 10𔃾 Annual...AGAIN" 3,0 IF ERRN =12r THEN GOTO 340 320 IF ERRN =63 THEN GOTO 350 330 DISP "AN ERROR HAS OCCURRED - PRESS CONTINUE TO START AGAINŗLi PAUSE GOTO 15 ...dosimetric conditions. This system was also only suitable for short-term exposures. Allis et al. (1975) installed a waveguide exposure system in a Cary 15

  13. Metabolic effects of microwave radiation and convection heating on human mononuclear leukocytes. Final report, January 1985-May 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kiel, J.L.; Wong, L.S.; Erwin, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated here were the effects of microwave (MW) radiation (2450-MHz, continuous-wave, mean specific absorption rate of 103.5 + or - 4.2 W/kg) and convention heating on the nonphosphorylating oxidative metabolism of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes (96% lymphocytes, 4% monocytes) at 37 C. Metabolic activity, determined by chemiluminescence (CL) of cells challenged with luminol (5-aminO-2, 3-dihydro-1, 4-phthalazinedione) linked to bovine serum albumin, was detected with a brightness photomer. A significant stimulation after after MW exposure (p < 0.005) over total CL of matched 37 C-incubator controls was observed. A similar degree of stimulation, compared to incubator controls, was also detected after sham treatment. No significant difference existed between changes in total CL or stimulation indices of the MW and sham-exposed groups. Exposure to MW radiation, under normothermic (37 + or - 0.03 C) conditions, appears to have no effect on the oxidative metabolic activity of human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. However, the significant differences between MW or sham-exposed cells and their respective incubator controls occurred because the temperature of the incubator did not exceed 35.9 C, and 39 minutes were required for the temperature to rise from 22 to 35.9 C. Slow heating of incubator controls must be accounted for in thermal and redio-frequency radiation studies in vitro.

  14. The effect of authentic metallic implants on the SAR distribution of the head exposed to 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz dipole near field.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, H; Keshvari, J; Lappalainen, R

    2007-03-07

    As the use of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) fields has increased along with increased use of wireless communication, the possible related health risks have also been widely discussed. One safety aspect is the interaction of medical implants and RF devices like mobile phones. In the literature, effects on active implants like pacemakers have been discussed but the studies of passive metallic (i.e. conductive) implants are rare. However, some studies have shown that the EM power absorption in tissues may be enhanced due to metallic implants. In this study, the effect of authentic passive metallic implants in the head region was examined. A half-wave dipole antenna was used as an exposure source and the specific absorption rate (SAR, W kg(-1)) in the near field was studied numerically. The idea was to model the presumably worst cases of most common implants in an accurate MRI-based phantom. As exposure frequencies GSM (900 and 1800 MHz) and UMTS (2450 MHz) regions were considered. The implants studied were skull plates, fixtures, bone plates and ear rings. The results indicate that some of the implants, under very rare exposure conditions, may cause a notable enhancement in peak mass averaged SAR.

  15. The effect of authentic metallic implants on the SAR distribution of the head exposed to 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz dipole near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, H.; Keshvari, J.; Lappalainen, R.

    2007-03-01

    As the use of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) fields has increased along with increased use of wireless communication, the possible related health risks have also been widely discussed. One safety aspect is the interaction of medical implants and RF devices like mobile phones. In the literature, effects on active implants like pacemakers have been discussed but the studies of passive metallic (i.e. conductive) implants are rare. However, some studies have shown that the EM power absorption in tissues may be enhanced due to metallic implants. In this study, the effect of authentic passive metallic implants in the head region was examined. A half-wave dipole antenna was used as an exposure source and the specific absorption rate (SAR, W kg-1) in the near field was studied numerically. The idea was to model the presumably worst cases of most common implants in an accurate MRI-based phantom. As exposure frequencies GSM (900 and 1800 MHz) and UMTS (2450 MHz) regions were considered. The implants studied were skull plates, fixtures, bone plates and ear rings. The results indicate that some of the implants, under very rare exposure conditions, may cause a notable enhancement in peak mass averaged SAR.

  16. Microwave Radiation and Thermoregulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    environment ................................................ 33 19. A plot of dry heat losses as a function of the skin-to- ambient temperature gradient...avapora- - on of water to be 0.72 W-h/g. Dry heat exchanged with the environment ’hrough convection C and radiation R must be expressed in terms of...microwave field was present, the animals were observed to sit much more quietly than during the equilibration period, often with eyes closed as though

  17. Microwave and thermal interactions with oxidative hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiel, J.L.; Erwin, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of microwave radiation (2450 MHz, 3,333 pulses per second, duty factor of 0.02, and average specific absorption rate of 0.4 W/kg) on spontaneous hemolysis of human erythrocytes was examined. Cells were exposed to microwave radiation for 20 minutes at 37 degrees, 42 degrees, or 48 degrees C. Some of these cells were sensitized to oxidative damage by treatment with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and/or by coating with wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) conjugate. Microwave radiation significantly decreased spontaneous hemolysis of untreated cells at 42 degrees C but had no effect at 37 degrees or 48 degrees C. Microwave exposure significantly enhanced a CDNB membrane stabilizing effect at 42 degrees C but had no effect at 37 or 48 degrees C. At 42 degrees C, microwave exposure increased hemolysis of WGA-HRP coated cells. Cells treated with both WGA-HRP and CDNB showed no change in fragility at 42 degrees C and increased fragility at 48 degrees C without a microwave effect. The microwave effects observed appear to involve perturbation of the thermal threshold for oxidative hyperthermic hemolysis.

  18. A Study of the Effects of High Power Pulsed 2450 MHz Microwaves, ELF modulated Microwaves, and ELF Fields on Human Lymphocytes and Selected Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-27

    examinations revealed no major changes in morphology except prominent lipofuscin deposition in the liver and urinary tract infection in the exposed...explanations for protein alteration would be immunosuppression since all the exposed animals showed chronic urinary tract infection . This idea may explain serum...albumin decrease, urinary protein increase and high frequency of urinary tract infection . Further investigation is necessary for the evaluation of

  19. Ex situ themo-catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapors using a traveling wave microwave reactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microwave heating offers a number of advantages over conventional heating methods, such as, rapid and volumetric heating, precise temperature control, energy efficiency and lower temperature gradient. In this article we demonstrate the use of 2450 MHz microwave traveling wave reactor to heat the cat...

  20. The use of self heating'' ceramics as crucibles for microwave melting metals and nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crucibles were used to melt aluminum and copper in conventional and tuned microwave cavities at a microwave frequency of 2450 MHz. SiC crucibles were also used to vitrify and homogenize mixtures of nuclear waste and glass frit.

  1. The use of ``self heating`` ceramics as crucibles for microwave melting metals and nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1990-12-31

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crucibles were used to melt aluminum and copper in conventional and tuned microwave cavities at a microwave frequency of 2450 MHz. SiC crucibles were also used to vitrify and homogenize mixtures of nuclear waste and glass frit.

  2. Freeze-Dehydration by Microwave Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    MATHEMATICAL MODEL DEHYDRATED FOODS ENERGY BEEF EQUATIONS FREEZE DRIED FOODS BEATING ANALYSIS MELTING FREEZE DRYING MICROWAVES MICROWAVE DIELECTRIC ...d) 20. Abstract (continued) The model is applied to simulate the freeze-dehydration of beef meat by microwave dielectric heating at 2450 MHz . The...8 3.3 Dielectric Properties •••.•. .••••....• 8 3.4 Specific Heat of Frozen and Dried Beef

  3. Effect of microwave radiation on the beating rate of isolated frog hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, K.C.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    One hundred and two isolated frog hearts were divided into ten groups and placed individually in a waveguide filled with Ringer's solution and exposed to 2,450-MHz CW radiation at 2 and 8.55 W/kg. Heart rate was recorded using one of the following methods: 3-M KCl glass electrode, ultrasound probe, tension transducer, Ringer's solution glass electrode, and a metal wire inserted in the Ringer's solution electrode. An accelerated decrease of heart rate was observed only in those groups recorded using the 3-M KCl electrode and the metal wire Ringer's solution electrode. No effect was found in the other groups. These results indicate that bradycardia in isolated hearts could be caused by electrode artifacts resulting from the intensification of electromagnetic fields.

  4. Microwave enhanced pyrochemical reactions of PuO2-UO2 and U3O8

    SciTech Connect

    Strucken, E.F.; McCurry, L.E.

    1992-04-27

    Experiments in the high level cells at WSRC have established that Plutonium Oxide has an extremely high absorption factor for microwaves: temperatures in excess of 1000 deg C were reached in less than 5 minutes with a multi mode, 2450 MHz, 600 watt, microwave oven. In other microwave heating experiments, stoichiometric compositions of PuO2-UO2 were prepared and U3O8 was reduced to U4O9.

  5. Effects of acute low-level microwaves on pentobarbital-induced hypothermia depend on exposure orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    Two series of experiments were performed to study the effects of acute exposure (45 min) to 2,450-MHz circularly polarized, pulsed microwaves (1 mW/cm2, 2-mus pulses, 500 pps, specific absorption rate (SAR) 0.6 W/kg) on the actions of pentobarbital in the rat. In the first experiment, rats were irradiated with microwaves and then immediately injected with pentobarbital. Microwave exposure did not significantly affect the extent of the pentobarbital-induced fall in colonic temperature. However, the rate of recovery from the hypothermia was significantly slower in the microwave-irradiated rats and they also took a significantly longer time to regain their righting reflex. In a second experiment, rats were first anesthetized with pentobarbital and then exposed to microwaves with their heads either pointing toward the source of microwaves (anterior exposure) or pointing away (posterior exposure). Microwave radiation significantly retarded the pentobarbital-induced fall in colonic temperature regardless of the orientation of exposure. However, the recovery from hypothermia was significantly faster in posterior-exposed animals compared to those of the anterior-exposed and sham-irradiated animals. Furthermore, the posterior-exposed rats took a significantly shorter time to regain their righting reflex than both the anterior-exposed and sham-irradiated animals.

  6. Microwaves (including radar) and protection against radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossel, F.

    1982-08-01

    A directive by the Commission of the European Communities for protection against microwaves is outlined, and the nature of microwaves, and possible protection methods are discussed. Devices which utilize microwaves are reviewed. The health risks from these forms of radiation are discussed, and safety limits are considered. A limit value of 10 mw/sqcm is specified.

  7. Electrodeless microwave source of UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhudarov, E. M.; Kozlov, Yu. N.; Kossyi, I. A.; Malykh, N. I.; Misakyan, M. A.; Taktakishvili, I. M.; Khomichenko, A. A.

    2012-06-01

    The parameters of an electrodeless microwave low-pressure discharge in an Ar + Hg vapor mixture are studied, the design of a UV radiation source for water disinfection is suggested, and its main characteristics are presented. The domestic microwave oven ( f = 2.45 GHz; N = kW) is used as a microwave radiation source. The maximal UV power at wavelength λ = 254 nm amounts to 120-130 W.

  8. Microwave radiation absorption: behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, J A

    1991-07-01

    The literature contains much evidence that absorption of microwave energy will lead to behavioral changes in man and laboratory animals. The changes include simple perturbations or outright stoppage of ongoing behavior. On one extreme, intense microwave absorption can result in seizures followed by death. On the other extreme, man and animals can hear microwave pulses at very low rates of absorption. Under certain conditions of exposure, animals will avoid microwaves, while under other conditions, they will actively work to obtain warmth produced by microwaves. Some research has shown behavioral effects during chronic exposure to low-level microwaves. The specific absorption rates that produce behavioral effects seem to depend on microwave frequency, but controversy exists over thresholds and mechanism of action. In all cases, however, the behavioral disruptions cease when chronic microwave exposure is terminated. Thermal changes in man and animals during microwave exposure appear to account for all reported behavioral effects.

  9. Effect of Dielectric Properties of a Solvent-Water Mixture Used in Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Antioxidants from Potato Peels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashutosh; Nair, Gopu Raveendran; Liplap, Pansa; Gariepy, Yvan; Orsat, Valerie; Raghavan, Vijaya

    2014-02-24

    The dielectric properties of a methanol-water mixture were measured at different temperatures from 20 to 80 °C at two frequencies 915 MHz and 2450 MHz. These frequencies are most commonly used on industrial and domestic scales respectively. In this study, the dielectric properties of a methanol-water mixture were found to be dependent on temperature, solvent concentration, and presence of plant matrix. Linear and quadratic equations were developed to establish the dependency between factors. At 2450 MHz, the dielectric constant of methanol-water mixtures was significantly affected by concentration of methanol rather than by temperature, whereas the dielectric loss factor was significantly affected by temperature rather than by methanol concentration. Introduction of potato peel led to an increase in the effect of temperature on the dielectric properties of the methanol fractions. At 915 MHz, both the dielectric properties were significantly affected by the increase in temperature and solvent concentration, while the presence of potato peel had no significant effect on the dielectric properties. Statistical analysis of the dissipation factor at 915 and 2450 MHz revealed that both temperature and solvent concentration had a significant effect on it, whereas introduction of potato peels at 915 MHz reduced the effect of temperature as compared to 2450 MHz. The total phenolic yield of the microwave-assisted extraction process was significantly affected by the solvent concentration, the dissipation factor of the methanol-water mixture and the extraction time.

  10. Effect of Dielectric Properties of a Solvent-Water Mixture Used in Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Antioxidants from Potato Peels

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashutosh; Nair, Gopu Raveendran; Liplap, Pansa; Gariepy, Yvan; Orsat, Valerie; Raghavan, Vijaya

    2014-01-01

    The dielectric properties of a methanol-water mixture were measured at different temperatures from 20 to 80 °C at two frequencies 915 MHz and 2450 MHz. These frequencies are most commonly used on industrial and domestic scales respectively. In this study, the dielectric properties of a methanol-water mixture were found to be dependent on temperature, solvent concentration, and presence of plant matrix. Linear and quadratic equations were developed to establish the dependency between factors. At 2450 MHz, the dielectric constant of methanol-water mixtures was significantly affected by concentration of methanol rather than by temperature, whereas the dielectric loss factor was significantly affected by temperature rather than by methanol concentration. Introduction of potato peel led to an increase in the effect of temperature on the dielectric properties of the methanol fractions. At 915 MHz, both the dielectric properties were significantly affected by the increase in temperature and solvent concentration, while the presence of potato peel had no significant effect on the dielectric properties. Statistical analysis of the dissipation factor at 915 and 2450 MHz revealed that both temperature and solvent concentration had a significant effect on it, whereas introduction of potato peels at 915 MHz reduced the effect of temperature as compared to 2450 MHz. The total phenolic yield of the microwave-assisted extraction process was significantly affected by the solvent concentration, the dissipation factor of the methanol-water mixture and the extraction time. PMID:26784666

  11. Method of sintering materials with microwave radiation

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, Jr., Harold D.; Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1994-01-01

    A method of sintering ceramic materials following: A compacted article comprising inorganic particles coated with carbon is provided, the carbon providing improved microwave coupling. The compacted article is then heated by microwave radiation to a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to sinter the compacted article.

  12. Physics of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wands, David; Piattella, Oliver F.; Casarini, Luciano

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation provides a remarkable window onto the early universe, revealing its composition and structure. In these lectures we review and discuss the physics underlying the main features of the CMB.

  13. Detection of contraband using microwave radiation

    DOEpatents

    Toth, Richard P.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Bacon, Larry D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and system for using microwave radiation to detect contraband hidden inside of a non-metallic container, such as a pneumatic vehicle tire. The method relies on the attenuation, retardation, time delay, or phase shift of microwave radiation as it passes through the container plus the contraband. The method is non-invasive, non-destructive, low power, and does not require physical contact with the container.

  14. Studies on microwave and blood-brain barrier interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.C.; Lin, M.F.

    1980-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at correlating changes of blood-brain-barrier permeability with the quantity and distribution of absorbed microwave energy inside the brain of adult Wistar rats anesthetized by sodium pentobarbital. Through use of thermographic methods and a direct-contact applicator at the animal's head, the pattern of absorbed microwave energy was determined. Indwelling catheters were placed in the femoral vein and in the left external carotid artery. Evans blue and sodium fluorescein in isotonic saline were used as visual indicators of barrier permeation. Exposure to pulsed 2,450-MHz radiation for 20 min at average power densities of 0.5, 1, 5, 20, 145 or 1,000 mW/cm2, which resulted in average specific absorption rates (SARs) of 0.04, 0.08, 0.4, 1.6, 11.5 or 80.0 mW/g in the brain, did not produce staining, except in the pineal body, the pituitary gland, and the choroid plexus - regions that normally are highly permeable. Except for these regions, staining was also absent in the brains of sham-exposed animals. The rectal temperature, as monitored by a copper-constantan thermocouple, showed a maximum increase of less than 0.75 degrees C from a mean pre-exposure temperature of 36.6 degrees C. The highest brain temperature recorded in a similar group of animals using a thickfilm carbon thermistor was less than 41.0 degrees C.

  15. [Research on the hyperthermia-therapy performances of invasive microwave antennas].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guo-sheng; Liu, Yu-hui; Wang, Jian-qi

    2002-03-01

    The paper introduces four kinds of 2450 MHz antennas including noninsulted (bare), insulated-open-tip (I.O.T.), dipole-type and sleeve invasive microwave ones. The comparison between the antennas' hyperthermia performances in the muscle tissue phantom made by specific absorption rate (SAR) shows that the sleeve antenna is the best. It has a bigger heating range and a changeless shape and is independent of the inserting depth.

  16. Effects of microwave radiation on living tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Surrell, J.A.; Alexander, R.C.; Cohle, S.D.; Lovell, F.R. Jr.; Wehrenberg, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    Prompted by an alleged case of child abuse resulting from microwave oven burns and the discovery of one other case, an animal model was chosen to explore microwave burn characteristics upon living, perfusing tissue. Anesthetized piglets were exposed to radiation from a standard household microwave oven for varying lengths of time, sufficient to result in full-thickness skin and visceral burns. Characteristic burn patterns were grossly identified. Biopsies studied with both light and electron microscopy demonstrated a pattern of relative layered tissue sparing. Layered tissue sparing is characterized by burned skin and muscle, with relatively unburned subcutaneous fat between these two layers. These findings have important forensic and patient care implications.

  17. Microwave pretreatment can enhance tolerance of wheat seedlings to CdCl2 stress.

    PubMed

    Qiu, ZongBo; Li, JinTing; Zhang, YaJie; Bi, ZhenZhen; Wei, HuiFang

    2011-05-01

    In order to determine the role of microwave in cadmium stress tolerance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), seeds were exposed to microwave radiation for 0, 5, 10 and 15 s (wavelength 125 mm, power density 126 mW cm(-2), 2450 MHz), and when the seedlings were 7 d old (with one fully expanded leaves), they were treated with 150 μM CdCl(2) solution for 10 d. Changes in a number of physiological and biochemical characteristics were measured and used as indicators of the protective capacity of microwave radiation in this experiment. Our results showed that 150 μM CdCl(2) treatment reduced plant height, root length, dry weight, AsA and GSH concentration and the activities of SOD, POD, CAT and APX, enhanced the concentration of MDA, H(2)O(2) and the production rate of O(2)- when compared with the control. However, seeds with microwave pretreatment 5 or 10 s conferred tolerance to cadmium stress in wheat seedlings by decreasing the concentration of MDA and H(2)O(2), the production rate of O(2)- and increasing the activities of SOD, POD, CAT, APX and AsA and GSH concentration. Therefore, antioxidative enzymes and antioxidative compounds may participate in tolerance of wheat seedlings to cadmium stress. The results also showed that the microwave radiation had a positive physiological effect on the growth and development of cadmium stressed seedlings. This is the first investigation reporting the use of microwave pretreatment to enhance cadmium stress tolerance of wheat.

  18. Effects of Microwave Radiation on Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Abdollah

    2011-12-01

    A variety of oil recovery methods have been developed and applied to mature and depleted reservoirs in order to improve the efficiency. Microwave radiation oil recovery method is a relatively new method and has been of great interest in the recent years. Crude oil is typically co-mingled with suspended solids and water. To increase oil recovery, it is necessary to remove these components. The separation of oil from water and solids using gravitational settling methods is typically incomplete. Oil-in-water and oil-water-solid emulsions can be demulsified and separated into their individual layers by microwave radiation. The data also show that microwave separation is faster than gravity separation and can be faster than conventional heating at many conditions. After separation of emulsion into water and oil layers, water can be discharged and oil is collected. High-frequency microwave recycling process can recover oil and gases from oil shale, residual oil, drill cuttings, tar sands oil, contaminated dredge/sediments, tires and plastics with significantly greater yields and lower costs than are available utilizing existing known technologies. This process is environmentally friendly, fuel-generating recycler to reduce waste, cut emissions, and save energy. This paper presents a critical review of Microwave radiation method for oil recovery.

  19. Radiation hazard assessment of pulsed microwave radars.

    PubMed

    Puranen, L; Jokela, K

    1996-01-01

    Observed biological effects of pulsed microwave radiation are reviewed and the exposure standards for microwave radiation are summarized. The review indicates that the microwave auditory effect is the only well-established specific effect in realistic exposure situations. The threshold for the effect depends on the energy density per pulse and may be as low as 20 mJ/m2 for people with low hearing threshold. Energy density limits have been included in the most recent exposure standards. A new battery-operated, hand-held meter developed for measurements of pulse power densities around scanning radar antennas is described, and a simple new model for the calculation of power density in the main beam of radar antennas is presented. In the near field measured values differed from the calculated values by 2-3 dB.

  20. Influence of microwaves treatment of rapeseed on phenolic compounds and canolol content.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Zheng, Chang; Zhou, Qi; Liu, Changsheng; Li, Wenlin; Huang, Fenghong

    2014-02-26

    Rapeseeds were treated with microwaves under 800 W for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 min at a frequency of 2450 MHz, and oil was extracted with a press to investigate the influence on phenolic compounds, including sinapine, the main free phenolic acids, and canolol content in the rapeseeds and oil from them. The results indicated that sinapine and sinapic acid was the main phenolic compound and free phenolic acid in the rapeseed, respectively, and canolol was the main phenolic compound in the oil from rapeseed by cold press. Microwave treatment significantly influenced phenolic compounds content in the rapeseeds and oil from them. The sinapine, sinapic acid, and canolol content in rapeseed first increased and then decreased depending on the period of microwave radiation (p < 0.05). The canolol content of 7 min microwave pretreatment rapeseed increased to the maximum and was approximately six times greater than that of the unroasted rapeseed. The amount of canolol formed was significantly correlated with the content of sinapic acid and sinapine (for sinapic acid, r = -0.950, p < 0.001, for sinapine, r = -0.828, p < 0.05) and also the loss of sinapic acid and sinapine (for sinapic acid, r = 0.997, p < 0.001, for sinapine, r = 0.952, p < 0.05) during roasting. There were differences in the transfer rate of difference phenolic compounds to the oil extracted by press. Almost all of the sinapine remained in the cold-pressed cake and only 1.4-2.7% of the sinapic acid, whereas approximately 56-83% of the canolol was transferred to the oil. The transfer ratio of canolol significantly increased with microwave radiation time (p < 0.001). Microwave pretreatment of rapeseed benefited improving the oxidative stability of oil.

  1. Cataracts induced by microwave and ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, R.M.; Tripathi, B.J.; Tripathi, R.C.

    1988-11-01

    Microwaves most commonly cause anterior and/or posterior subcapsular lenticular opacities in experimental animals and, as shown in epidemiologic studies and case reports, in human subjects. The formation of cataracts seems to be related directly to the power of the microwave and the duration of exposure. The mechanism of cataractogenesis includes deformation of heat-labile enzymes, such as glutathione peroxide, that ordinarily protect lens cell proteins and membrane lipids from oxidative damage. Oxidation of protein sulfhydryl groups and the formation of high-molecular-weight aggregates cause local variations in the orderly structure of the lens cells. An alternative mechanism is thermoelastic expansion through which pressure waves in the aqueous humor cause direct physical damage to the lens cells. Cataracts induced by ionizing radiation (e.g., X-rays and gamma rays) usually are observed in the posterior region of the lens, often in the form of a posterior subcapsular cataract. Increasing the dose of ionizing radiation causes increasing opacification of the lens, which appears after a decreasing latency period. Like cataract formation by microwaves, cataractogenesis induced by ionizing radiation is associated with damage to the lens cell membrane. Another possible mechanism is damage to lens cell DNA, with decreases in the production of protective enzymes and in sulfur-sulfur bond formation, and with altered protein concentrations. Until further definitive conclusions about the mechanisms of microwaves and ionizing radiation induced cataracts are reached, and alternative protective measures are found, one can only recommend mechanical shielding from these radiations to minimize the possibility of development of radiation-induced cataracts. 74 references.

  2. Radiation-hardened microwave system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.F.; Bible, D.W.; Crutcher, R.I.; Moore, J.A.; Nowlin, C.H.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1990-01-01

    In order to develop a wireless communication system to meet the stringent requirements for a nuclear hot cell and similar environments, including control of advanced servomanipulators, a microwave signal transmission system development program was established to produce a demonstration prototype for the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Proof-of-principle tests in a partially metal lined enclosure at ORNL successfully demonstrated the feasibility of directed microwave signal transmission techniques for remote systems applications. The potential for much more severe RF multipath propagation conditions in fully metal lined cells led to a programmatic decision to conduct additional testing in more typical hot-cell environments at other sites. Again, the test results were excellent. Based on the designs of the earlier systems, an advanced MSTS configuration was subsequently developed that, in highly reflective environments, will support both high-performance video channels and high band-rate digital data links at total gamma dose tolerance levels exceeding 10{sup 7} rads and at elevated ambient temperatures. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Psychoactive-drug response is affected by acute low-level microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of various psychoactive drugs were studied in rats exposed for 45 min in a circularly polarized, pulsed microwave field (2450 MHz; SAR 0.6 W/kg; 2-microseconds pulses, 500 pps). Apomorphine-induced hypothermia and stereotypy were enhanced by irradiation. Amphetamine-induced hyperthermia was attenuated while stereotypy was unaffected. Morphine-induced catalepsy and lethality were enhanced by irradiation at certain dosages of the drug. Since these drugs have different modes of action on central neural mechanisms and the effects of microwaves depend on the particular drug studied, these results show the complex nature of the effect of microwave irradiation on brain functions.

  4. In vitro fertilization of mouse ova by spermatozoa exposed isothermally to radio-frequency radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Liu, L.M.; Graham, R.; East, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Mouse spermatozoa were exposed in vitro for 1 h to 27- or 2,450-MHz CW RF radiation at SARs of 0 to 90 W/kg under isothermal (37 +/- 0.2 degrees C) conditions. Exposure at either frequency to RF radiation at SARs of 50 W/kg or greater resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the ability of irradiated sperm to fertilize mouse ova in vitro (P less than .05). Over the range of SARs there was no apparent difference in the effects of 27- vs. 2,450-MHz RF radiation. There were no readily detectable exposure effects on spermatozoan morphology, ultrastructure, or capacitation. The reduction of in vitro fertilization is attributed to a direct effect of RF radiation on spermatozoa rather than to heating.

  5. Radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Adnan; Sharabati, Afifeh

    2013-12-01

    This work presents data on the amount of radiation leakage from 117 microwave ovens in domestic and restaurant use in the West Bank, Palestine. The study of leakage is based on the measurements of radiation emissions from the oven in real-life conditions by using a frequency selective field strength measuring system. The power density from individual ovens was measured at a distance of 1 m and at the height of centre of door screen. The tested ovens were of different types, models with operating powers between 1000 and 1600 W and ages ranging from 1 month to >20 y, including 16 ovens with unknown ages. The amount of radiation leakage at a distance of 1 m was found to vary from 0.43 to 16.4 μW cm(-2) with an average value equalling 3.64 μW cm(-2). Leakages from all tested microwave ovens except for seven ovens (∼6 % of the total) were below 10 μW cm(-2). The highest radiation leakage from any tested oven was ∼16.4 μW cm(-2), and found in two cases only. In no case did the leakage exceed the limit of 1 mW cm(-2) recommended by the ICNIRP for 2.45-GHz radiofrequency. This study confirms a linear correlation between the amount of leakage and both oven age and operating power, with a stronger dependence of leakage on age.

  6. Pretreatment of sludge with microwaves for pathogen destruction and improved anaerobic digestion performance.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung M; Park, Jae K; Teeradej, N; Lee, Y O; Cho, Y K; Park, C H

    2006-01-01

    A new way of generating Class A sludge using microwaves was evaluated through a series of laboratory-scale experiments. Microwaves provide rapid and uniform heating throughout the material. Other benefits of microwave treatment include instant and accurate control and selective and concentrated heating on materials, such as sludge, that have a high dielectric loss factor. Sludge was irradiated with 2450-MHz microwaves, and fecal coliforms were counted. Fecal coliforms were not detected at 65 degrees C for primary sludge and anaerobic digester sludge and at 85 degrees C for waste activated sludge when sludge was irradiated with 2450-MHz microwaves. During the bench-scale anaerobic digester operation, the highest average log reduction of fecal coliforms was achieved by the anaerobic digester fed with microwave-pretreated sludge (> or = 2.66 log removal). The anaerobic digester fed with microwave-irradiated sludge was more efficient in inactivation of fecal coliforms than the other two digesters fed with raw sludge and externally heated sludge, respectively. It took more than three hydraulic retention times for a bench-scale mesophilic anaerobic digester to meet Class A sludge requirements after feeding microwave-irradiated sludge. Class A sludge can be produced consistently with a continuously fed mesophilic anaerobic digester if sludge is pretreated with microwaves to reach 65 degrees C.

  7. Radiofrequency and microwave radiation in the microelectronics industry.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R

    1986-01-01

    The microscopic precision required to produce minute integrated circuits is dependent on several processes utilizing radiofrequency and microwave radiation. This article provides a review of radiofrequency and microwave exposures in microelectronics and of the physical and biologic properties of these types of radiation; summarizes the existing, relevant medical literature; and provides the clinician with guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of excessive exposures to microwave and radiofrequency radiation.

  8. Microwave enhanced pyrochemical reactions of PuO sub 2 , UO sub 2 , and U sub 3 O sub 8

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.; McCurry, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments in the high level cells at WSRC have established that PuO{sub 2} has an extremely high absorption factor the microwaves: temperatures in excess of 1000{degrees}C were reached in less than 5 minutes with a multi mode, 2450 MHz, 600 watt, microwave oven. In other microwave heating experiments: stoichiometric compositions of PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} were prepared and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} was reduced to U{sub 4}O{sub g}.

  9. Effects of microwave radiation on the lens of the eye

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The effects of microwave radiation on the lens of the eye, particularly in regard to potential for cataractogenesis at low exposure levels are examined. The partially understood biophysical mechanism of microwave cataractogenesis is discussed. No evidence was found for cataract induction by microwave fields of less than 10 per sq cm.

  10. Radiation-hardened microwave communications system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.F.; Crutcher, R.I.; Vandermolen, R.I. )

    1990-01-01

    The consolidated fuel reprocessing program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing signal transmission techniques and equipment to improve the efficiency of remote handling operations for nuclear applications. These efforts have been largely directed toward the goals of (a) remotely controlling bilateral force-reflecting servomanipulators for dexterous manipulation-based operations in remote maintenance tasks and (b) providing television viewing of the work site. In September 1987, developmental microwave transceiving hardware operating with dish antennas was demonstrated in the advanced integrated maintenance system (AIMS) facility at ORNL, successfully implementing both high-quality one-way television transmissions and simultaneous bidirectional digital control data transmissions with very low error rates. Initial test results based on digital transmission at a 1.0-Mbaud data rate indicated that the error rates of the microwave system were comparable to those of a hardwired system. During these test intervals, complex manipulator operations were performed, and the AIMS transporter was moved repeatedly without adverse effects on data integrity. Results of these tests have been factored into subsequent phases of the development program, with an ultimate goal of designing a fully radiation-hardened microwave signal transmission system for use in nuclear facilities.

  11. Non-Ionizing Radiation Used in Microwave Ovens

    MedlinePlus

    ... that emit radiation. The standards ensure that radiation emissions do not pose a hazard to public health. These standards can be viewed on FDA's Code of Federal Regulations on Microwave Ovens . FDA establishes performance standards for ...

  12. Rapid and Decentralized Human Waste Treatment by Microwave Radiation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tu Anh; Babel, Sandhya; Boonyarattanakalin, Siwarutt; Koottatep, Thammarat

    2016-09-07

    This study evaluates the technical feasibility of using microwave radiation for the rapid treatment of human feces. Human feces of 1000 g were radiated with a commercially available household microwave oven (with rotation) at different exposure time lengths (30, 50, 60, 70, and 75 minutes) and powers (600, 800, and 1000 W). Volume reduction over 90% occurred after 1000 W microwave radiation for 75 minutes. Pathogen eradiation performances of six log units or more at a high range of microwave powers were achieved. Treatments with the same energy input of 1000 Wh, but at lower powers with prolonged exposure times, significantly enhanced moisture removal and volume reduction. Microwave radiation caused carbonization and resulted in a more stable end product. The energy content of the samples after microwave treatment at 1000 W and 75 minutes is 3517 ± 8.85 calories/g of dried sample, and the product can also be used as compost.

  13. Strong enhancement of dispersion forces from microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sernelius, B. E.

    2002-11-01

    We have studied non-thermal effects of microwave radiation on the forces between objects. This is the first step in a study of possible effects of microwave radiation from cellular phones on biological tissue. We have used a simplified model for human blood cells in blood. We find for the normal radiation level of cellular phones an enhancement of the attractive force with ten orders of magnitude as compared to the corresponding effect at thermal radiation.

  14. Microwave enhanced pyrochemical reactions of PuO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect

    Sturcken, E.F.; McCurry, L.E.

    1990-12-31

    Experiments in the high level cells at WSRC have established that PuO{sub 2} has an extremely high absorption factor the microwaves: temperatures in excess of 1000{degrees}C were reached in less than 5 minutes with a multi mode, 2450 MHz, 600 watt, microwave oven. In other microwave heating experiments: stoichiometric compositions of PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} were prepared and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} was reduced to U{sub 4}O{sub g}.

  15. The influence of microwave radiation on transdermal delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Moseley, H; Johnston, S; Allen, A

    1990-03-01

    It has been alleged that the exposure of a transdermal delivery system to leakage of microwave radiation from a domestic microwave oven can result in the user receiving a second-degree burn in the area of the patch. Several transdermal delivery systems were exposed to microwave radiation from an Electro Medical Supplies Microtron 200 microwave diathermy unit. Temperature rises of up to 2.2 degrees C were recorded at a maximum power density of 800 W/m2. These temperature rises were considered insignificant compared to that required to produce a burn. The exposure of transdermal delivery systems to a microwave diathermy field or lower level leakage radiation from a microwave oven is unlikely to cause direct thermal injury to the wearer.

  16. Microwave radiation effects on cardiac muscle cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, M.J.; Hall, C.A.; McRee, D.I.

    1981-05-01

    Isolated cardiac muscle cells were exposed to microwave radiation in a temperature-controlled waveguide apparatus. Microwave radiation for 90 min at specific absorption rates (SAR) as low as 10 mW/g increases the permeability of cardiac cells to trypan blue. At 100 mW/g the inability of the cells to exclude trypan blue is concurrent with the release of lactic dehydrogenase into the suspending medium. However, when the SAR is decreased to 50 mW/g, trypan blue uptake is still elevated without the concomitant release of lactic dehydrogenase. Transmission electron micrographs of the exposed cells showed cellular damage only at the 100 mW/g exposure level. The microwave-reduced change in membrane permeability was unrelated to a macroscopic heating effect of microwave radiation on the cells, but appeared to be due to some other specific action of microwave radiation on isolated cardiac cells.

  17. Radiated microwave power transmission system efficiency measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.; Brown, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    The measured and calculated results from determining the operating efficiencies of a laboratory version of a system for transporting electric power from one point to another via a wireless free space radiated microwave beam are reported. The system's overall end-to-end efficiency as well as intermediated conversion efficiencies were measured. The maximum achieved end-to-end dc-to-ac system efficiency was 54.18% with a probable error of + or - 0.94%. The dc-to-RF conversion efficiency was measured to be 68.87% + or - 1.0% and the RF-to-dc conversion efficiency was 78.67 + or - 1.1%. Under these conditions a dc power of 495.62 + or - 3.57 W was received with a free space transmitter antenna receiver antenna separation of 170.2 cm (67 in).

  18. In-office microwave disinfection of soft contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.G.; Rechberger, J.; Grant, T.; Holden, B.A. )

    1990-02-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an in-office microwave disinfection procedure which allowed for the disinfection of up to 40 soft contact lenses at one time. Ciba AOSept cases filled with sterile unpreserved saline were contaminated with one of six FDA test challenge microorganisms at a concentration of approximately 10(3) colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml). Twenty cases were placed on the rotating plate of a standard 2450 MHz 650 W microwave oven in a 10-cm diameter circle. The cases were exposed to high intensity microwave irradiation for periods of 0 to 15 min. None of the 6 microorganisms evaluated survived 2 min or longer of microwave exposure. Our findings indicated that microwave irradiation can be a convenient, rapid, and effective method of disinfecting a number of soft contact lenses at one time and thus adaptable as an in-office soft contact lens disinfection procedure.

  19. Cosmic Needles versus Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aigen

    2003-02-01

    It has been suggested by a number of authors that the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation might have arisen from the radiation of ``Population III'' objects thermalized by conducting cosmic graphite/iron needle-shaped dust. Due to a lack of an accurate solution to the absorption properties of exceedingly elongated grains, in existing literature which studies the CMB thermalizing process they are generally modeled as (1) needle-like spheroids in terms of the Rayleigh approximation, (2) infinite cylinders, and (3) antennae. We show here that the Rayleigh approximation is not valid since the Rayleigh criterion is not satisfied for highly conducting needles. We also show that the available intergalactic iron dust, if modeled as infinite cylinders, is not sufficient to supply the required opacity at long wavelengths to obtain the observed isotropy and Planckian nature of the CMB. If appealing to the antenna theory, conducting iron needles with exceedingly large elongations ( >104) appear able to provide sufficient opacity to thermalize the CMB within the iron density limit. But the applicability of the antenna theory to exceedingly thin needles of nanometer/micrometer thickness has not yet been verified.

  20. Adhesive bonding via exposure to variable frequency microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulauskas, F.L.; McMillan, A.D.; Warren, C.D.

    1996-05-01

    Adhesive bonding through the application of variable frequency microwave (VFM) radiation has been evaluated as an alternative curing method for joining composite materials. The studies showed that the required cure time of a thermosetting epoxy adhesive is substantially reduced by the use of VFM when compared to conventional (thermal) curing methods. Variable frequency microwave processing appeared to yield a slight reduction in the required adhesive cure time when compared to processing by the application of single frequency microwave radiation. In contrast to the single frequency processing, the variable frequency methodology does not readily produce localized overheating (burnt or brown spots) in the adhesive or the composite. This makes handling and location of the sample in the microwave oven less critical for producing high quality bonds and allows for a more homogeneous distribution of the cure energy. Variable frequency microwave processing is a valuable alternative method for rapidly curing thermoset adhesives at low input power levels.

  1. Interaction of microwave radiation with an erosion plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkin, V. G.; Pashchina, A. S.; Ryazanskiy, N. M.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of high-power pulsed microwave radiation with a plasma jet formed by a discharge in an ablative capillary is studied. A significant influence of microwave radiation on the plasma jet flow is found. Depending on the intensity of the initial perturbation of the jet, different scenarios of its evolution downstream are possible: attenuation or amplification accompanied with the development of turbulence up to the disruption of the flow if a certain threshold of the energy action is exceeded. A significant influence of the plasma jet and its state on the spatial position of the microwave energy release zone is found.

  2. Melatonin and a spin-trap compound block radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in rat brain cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, H; Singh, N P

    1997-01-01

    Effects of in vivo microwave exposure on DNA strand breaks, a form of DNA damage, were investigated in rat brain cells. In previous research, we have found that acute (2 hours) exposure to pulsed (2 microseconds pulses, 500 pps) 2450-MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RFR) (power density 2 mW/cm2, average whole body specific absorption rate 1.2 W/kg) caused an increase in DNA single- and double-strand breaks in brain cells of the rat when assayed 4 hours post exposure using a microgel electrophoresis assay. In the present study, we found that treatment of rats immediately before and after RFR exposure with either melatonin (1 mg/kg/injection, SC) or the spin-trap compound N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) (100 mg/kg/injection, i.p.) blocks this effects of RFR. Since both melatonin and PBN are efficient free radical scavengers it is hypothesized that free radicals are involved in RFR-induced DNA damage in the brain cells of rats. Since cumulated DNA strand breaks in brain cells can lead to neurodegenerative diseases and cancer and an excess of free radicals in cells has been suggested to be the cause of various human diseases, data from this study could have important implications for the health effects of RFR exposure.

  3. Use of microwaves to improve nutritional value of soybeans for future space inhabitants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, G.

    1983-01-01

    Whole soybeans from four different varieties at different moisture contents were microwaved for varying times to determine the conditions for maximum destruction of trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase activities, and optimal growth of chicks. Microwaving 150 gm samples of soybeans (at 14 to 28% moisture) for 1.5 min was found optimal for reduction of trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase activities. Microwaving 1 kgm samples of soybeans for 9 minutes destroyed 82% of the trypsin inhibitor activity and gave optimal chick growth. It should be pointed out that the microwaving time would vary according to the weight of the sample and the power of the microwave oven. The microwave oven used in the above experiments was rated at 650 watts 2450 MHz.

  4. Response of Aspergillus nidulans and Physarum polycephalum to microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mezykowski, T; Bal, J; Debiec, H; Kwarecki, K

    1980-06-01

    The influence of microwaves on genetic processes in Aspergillus nidulans and Physarum polycephalum was investigated. Suspensions of organisms were exposed in the far zone to 2450-MHz waves at 10 mW/cm2 for one hour in both CW and pulsed (1 microsecond, 600 pps) fields. Spores of A. nidulans were irradiated before and during germination. No changes in survival rate or in frequency of morphological mutation were found. Polycephalum under the influence of CW microwaves incorporated 3H-Thymine into DNA at a rate five times that of controls and twice that of thermal controls. The accelerated synthesis may reflect more efficient volume heating by microwaves, or in the presence of microthermal gradients in suspensions, or field-specific influences in concern with focal or volume heating.

  5. Afferent mechanisms of microwave-induced biological effects. Annual report, 1 June 1985-31 May 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Lai

    1986-07-01

    Effects of 2450-MHz circularly polarized microwave irradiation on central nervous system functions were studied. Pulsed (microsecond, 500 pps) microwaves decreased high-affinity sodium-dependent choline uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of the rat. The effect on hippocampal choline uptake was blocked by pretreatment with narcotic antagonists. Continuous-wave microwaves of the same power density decreased choline uptake in the frontal cortex only. Furthermore, it was found that the effects of pulsed microwaves on central cholinergic activity are classically conditionable to cues in the exposure environment. The hypothesis that some of the neurological effects of pulsed microwave irradiation are caused by its effect on the auditory system was investigated. Effects of pink noise and pulsed microwaves were compared.

  6. Effect of microwave radiation on coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbayoglu, G.; Depci, T.; Ataman, N.

    2009-07-01

    Most low-rank coals are high in moisture and acid functional groups, therefore showing poor floatability. Drying, which removes the water molecules trapped in the pores and adsorbed at the surface of coal, decreases the hydrophilic character and improves the floatability. Microwave heating, whose simplest application is drying, was applied at 0.9 kW power level for 60 sec exposure time in the experiments to decrease the moisture content of coal in order to enhance the hydrophobicity. The flotation tests of microwave-treated coal by using heptanol and octanol lead to a higher flotation yield and ash removal than original coal.

  7. Uniform bulk Material Processing using Multimode Microwave Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, Ravi; Vaughan, Worth E.

    1999-06-18

    An apparatus for generating uniform heating in material contained in a cylindrical vessel is described. TE{sub 10}-mode microwave radiation is coupled into a cylindrical microwave transition such that microwave radiation having TE{sub 11}-, TE{sub 01}- and TM{sub 01}-cylindrical modes is excited therein. By adjusting the intensities of these modes, substantially uniform heating of materials contained in a cylindrical drum which is coupled to the microwave transition through a rotatable choke can be achieved. The use of a poor microwave absorbing insulating cylindrical insert, such as aluminum oxide, for separating the material in the container from the container walls and for providing a volume through which air is circulated is expected to maintain the container walls at room temperature. The use of layer of highly microwave absorbing material, such as SiC, inside of the insulating insert and facing the material to be heated is calculated to improve the heating pattern of the present apparatus.

  8. Uniform bulk material processing using multimode microwave radiation

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Ravi; Vaughn, Worth E.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for generating uniform heating in material contained in a cylindrical vessel is described. TE.sub.10 -mode microwave radiation is coupled into a cylindrical microwave transition such that microwave radiation having TE.sub.11 -, TE.sub.01 - and TM.sub.01 -cylindrical modes is excited therein. By adjusting the intensities of these modes, substantially uniform heating of materials contained in a cylindrical drum which is coupled to the microwave transition through a rotatable choke can be achieved. The use of a poor microwave absorbing insulating cylindrical insert, such as aluminum oxide, for separating the material in the container from the container walls and for providing a volume through which air is circulated is expected to maintain the container walls at room temperature. The use of layer of highly microwave absorbing material, such as SiC, inside of the insulating insert and facing the material to be heated is calculated to improve the heating pattern of the present apparatus.

  9. Spin-Crossover Materials towards Microwave Radiation Switches

    PubMed Central

    Kucheriv, Olesia I.; Oliynyk, Viktor V.; Zagorodnii, Volodymyr V.; Launets, Vilen L.; Gural’skiy, Il’ya A.

    2016-01-01

    Microwave electromagnetic radiation that ranges from one meter to one millimetre wavelengths is finding numerous applications for wireless communication, navigation and detection, which makes materials able to tune microwave radiation getting widespread interest. Here we offer a new way to tune GHz frequency radiation by using spin-crossover complexes that are known to change their various physical properties under the influence of diverse external stimuli. As a result of electronic re-configuration process, microwave absorption properties differ for high spin and low spin forms of the complex. The evolution of a microwave absorption spectrum for the switchable compound within the region of thermal transition indicates that the high-spin and the low-spin forms are characterized by a different attenuation of electromagnetic waves. Absorption and reflection coefficients were found to be higher in the high-spin state comparing to the low-spin state. These results reveal a considerable potential for the implementation of spin-crossover materials into different elements of microwave signal switching and wireless communication. PMID:27910956

  10. Spin-Crossover Materials towards Microwave Radiation Switches.

    PubMed

    Kucheriv, Olesia I; Oliynyk, Viktor V; Zagorodnii, Volodymyr V; Launets, Vilen L; Gural'skiy, Il'ya A

    2016-12-02

    Microwave electromagnetic radiation that ranges from one meter to one millimetre wavelengths is finding numerous applications for wireless communication, navigation and detection, which makes materials able to tune microwave radiation getting widespread interest. Here we offer a new way to tune GHz frequency radiation by using spin-crossover complexes that are known to change their various physical properties under the influence of diverse external stimuli. As a result of electronic re-configuration process, microwave absorption properties differ for high spin and low spin forms of the complex. The evolution of a microwave absorption spectrum for the switchable compound within the region of thermal transition indicates that the high-spin and the low-spin forms are characterized by a different attenuation of electromagnetic waves. Absorption and reflection coefficients were found to be higher in the high-spin state comparing to the low-spin state. These results reveal a considerable potential for the implementation of spin-crossover materials into different elements of microwave signal switching and wireless communication.

  11. Biologic effects of microwave exposure. II. Studies on the mechanisms controlling susceptibility to microwave-induced increases in complement receptor-positive spleen cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schlagel, C.J.; Sulek, K.; Ho, H.S.; Leach, W.M.; Ahmed, A.; Woody, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    In attempting to evaluate the mechanisms responsible for susceptibility to the inductive increase in splenic complement receptor-positive (CR+) cells following exposure to 2450-MHz microwaves, it was found that sensitivity to microwave-induced CR+ cell increases was under genetic control. In particular, evidence was accumulated suggesting that regulation was under the control of a gene or genes closely associated with but outside of the mouse major histocompatibility complex (H-2). All responsive strains of mice tested were of the H-2k haplotype, while mice of the H-2a, H-2b, H-2d and H-1i5 haplotypes were refractory to the microwave-induced increases in CR+ cells. By utilizing certain H-2k strains of mice that were genetically unable to respond to endotoxin, we were able to show that these strains of mice responded to microwaves, but not to endotoxin, by increasing CR+ cells. Microwave-induced increases in CR+ cells were not mimicked by the intraperitoneal injection of hydrocortisone. Athymic mice responded to microwave exposure, indicating that this event was not regulated by the T-cell population. Mice less than eight weeks old were found not to be susceptible to exposure to 2450-MHz microwaves. These studies indicate that microwaves do induce changes in the population of cells with specific cell-surface receptors, that susceptibility to these changes is under genetic control, and that it is unlikely that endotoxin, corticosteroids, or regulatory T cells play a significant role in the mechanisms regulating these increases.

  12. Radiation-hardened microwave communications system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.F.; Bible, D.W.; Crutcher, R.I.; Hannah, J.H.; Moore, J.A.; Nowlin, C.H.; Vandermolen, R.I. ); Chagnot, D.; LeRoy, A. )

    1993-01-01

    To develop a wireless communication system to meet the stringent requirements for a nuclear hot cell and similar environments, including control of advanced servomanipulators, a microwave signal transmission system development program was established to produce a demonstration prototype for the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Proof-of-principle tests in a partially metal lined enclosure at ORNL successfully demonstrated the feasibility of directed microwave signal transmission techniques for remote systems applications. The potential for much more severe radio-frequency (RF) multipath propagation conditions in fully metal lined cells led to a programmatic decision to conduct additional testing in more typical hot-cell environments at other sites. Again, the test results were excellent. Based on the designs of the earlier systems, an advanced microwave signal transmission system configuration was subsequently developed that, in highly reflective environments, will support both high-performance video channels and high baud-rate digital data links at total gamma dose tolerance levels exceeding 10[sup 7] rads and at elevated ambient temperatures.

  13. Radiation-hardened microwave communications system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.F.; Bible, D.W.; Crutcher, R.I.; Hannah, J.H.; Moore, J.A.; Nowlin, C.H.; Vandermolen, R.I.; Chagnot, D.; LeRoy, A.

    1993-03-01

    To develop a wireless communication system to meet the stringent requirements for a nuclear hot cell and similar environments, including control of advanced servomanipulators, a microwave signal transmission system development program was established to produce a demonstration prototype for the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Proof-of-principle tests in a partially metal lined enclosure at ORNL successfully demonstrated the feasibility of directed microwave signal transmission techniques for remote systems applications. The potential for much more severe radio-frequency (RF) multipath propagation conditions in fully metal lined cells led to a programmatic decision to conduct additional testing in more typical hot-cell environments at other sites. Again, the test results were excellent. Based on the designs of the earlier systems, an advanced microwave signal transmission system configuration was subsequently developed that, in highly reflective environments, will support both high-performance video channels and high baud-rate digital data links at total gamma dose tolerance levels exceeding 10{sup 7} rads and at elevated ambient temperatures.

  14. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food... FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.30 Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation, including microwave frequencies, may be...

  15. Processing of thermoset prepreg laminate via exposure to microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulauskas, F.L.; Meek, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    Studies of microwave-assisted curing of neat resins (epoxy) and unidirectional glass and carbon fiber laminates have shown that a substantial reduction in the curing time was obtained. This may be explained by the penetration of microwave energy directly and throughout the laminate with enhancement of the kinetics of the chemical reaction. Results of this work indicate that the microwave assisted curing of glass fiber laminates also shows a substantial reduction of the required curing time. Microwave radiation of 2.45 GHz has been demonstrated to be an acceptable method to cure unidirectional carbon fiber laminates. Also, effective curing of crossply (0/90) laminates through this method was observed when proper rotation of the parts accompanied the curing process. This is in accordance with previous work. Multidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy laminates demonstrate a lack of coupling during the curing process. A direct curing of these laminates was not possible by microwave radiation with the experimental approach used, in agreement with previous work. Nevertheless, a moderate reduction in the curing time of these thin laminates was observed due to hybrid curing.

  16. [Two-step exposure of biological objects to infrared laser and microwave radiation].

    PubMed

    Kol'tsov, Iu V; Korolev, V N; Kusakin, S A

    1999-01-01

    The effect of two-step exposure of bacterial objects to infrared laser and microwave pulse radiations was studied. The effect is determined by the time interval between two excitation steps and pulse duration. It was shown that the biologically active dose of microwave radiation is much lower than that of infrared laser radiation; however, laser radiation induces a stronger cellular response. It was found that microwaves enhance the efficiency of infrared laser radiation.

  17. Interpreting snowpack radiometry using currently existing microwave radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Do-Hyuk; Tang, Shurun; Kim, Edward J.

    2015-10-01

    A radiative transfer model (RTM) to calculate the snow brightness temperatures (Tb) is a critical element in terrestrial snow parameter retrieval from microwave remote sensing observations. The RTM simulates the Tb based on a layered snow by solving a set of microwave radiative transfer equations. Even with the same snow physical inputs to drive the RTM, currently existing models such as Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS), Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT-QMS), and Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) models produce different Tb responses. To backwardly invert snow physical properties from the Tb, differences from RTMs are first to be quantitatively explained. To this end, this initial investigation evaluates the sources of perturbations in these RTMs, and reveals the equations where the variations are made among the three models. Modelling experiments are conducted by providing the same but gradual changes in snow physical inputs such as snow grain size, and snow density to the 3 RTMs. Simulations are conducted with the frequencies consistent with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer- E (AMSR-E) at 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz. For realistic simulations, the 3 RTMs are simultaneously driven by the same snow physics model with the meteorological forcing datasets and are validated against the snow insitu samplings from the CLPX (Cold Land Processes Field Experiment) 2002-2003, and NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) 2009-2010.

  18. Interpreting snowpack radiometry using currently existing microwave radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D. H.; Tan, S.; Kim, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    A radiative transfer model (RTM) to calculate a snow brightness temperature (Tb) is a critical element to retrieve terrestrial snow from microwave remote sensing observations. The RTM simulates the Tb based on a layered snow by solving a set of microwave radiative transfer formulas. Even with the same snow physical inputs used for the RTM, currently existing models such as Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS), Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT-Tsang), and Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) models produce different Tb responses. To backwardly invert snow physical properties from the Tb, the differences from the RTMs are to be quantitatively explained. To this end, the paper evaluates the sources of perturbations in the RTMs, and reveals the equations where the variations are made among three models. Investigations are conducted by providing the same but gradual changes in snow physical inputs such as snow grain size, and snow density to the 3 RTMs. Simulations are done with the frequencies consistent with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-E (AMSR-E) at 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz. For realistic simulations, the 3 RTMs are simultaneously driven by the same snow physics model with the meteorological forcing datasets and are validated from the snow core samplings from the CLPX (Cold Land Processes Field Experiment) 2002-2003, and NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) 2009-2010.

  19. Topological magnetoelectric effects in microwave far-field radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, M.; Kamenetskii, E. O.; Shavit, R.

    2016-07-01

    Similar to electromagnetism, described by the Maxwell equations, the physics of magnetoelectric (ME) phenomena deals with the fundamental problem of the relationship between electric and magnetic fields. Despite a formal resemblance between the two notions, they concern effects of different natures. In general, ME-coupling effects manifest in numerous macroscopic phenomena in solids with space and time symmetry breakings. Recently, it was shown that the near fields in the proximity of a small ferrite particle with magnetic-dipolar-mode (MDM) oscillations have the space and time symmetry breakings and the topological properties of these fields are different from the topological properties of the free-space electromagnetic fields. Such MDM-originated fields—called magnetoelectric (ME) fields—carry both spin and orbital angular momenta. They are characterized by power-flow vortices and non-zero helicity. In this paper, we report on observation of the topological ME effects in far-field microwave radiation based on a small microwave antenna with a MDM ferrite resonator. We show that the microwave far-field radiation can be manifested with a torsion structure where an angle between the electric and magnetic field vectors varies. We discuss the question on observation of the regions of localized ME energy in far-field microwave radiation.

  20. Harmonic millimeter radiation from a microwave FEL amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.-H.; Marshall, T. C.

    1997-02-01

    In this project, an electron beam is bunched at a microwave frequency and the harmonics of this bunching drive radiation at millimeter wavelengths, using a FEL, configured as a single-pass travelling wave amplifier. A 10 kW 24 GHz microwave input signal grows to ˜200 kW level using the lower-frequency unstable root of the waveguide FEL dispersion relation. The Columbia FEL facility operates at this frequency in the TE11 mode, using a helical undulator (1.85 cm period) and a 3 mm diameter 600 kV electron beam contained in a 8.7 mm ID cylindrical waveguide. The harmonic currents set up by the microwave are found to cause growth of harmonic power under two conditions. First, we choose the parameters of the device so that the upper frequency root corresponds to the third harmonic, in which case we observe a small amount of third-harmonic emission in the TE11 mode, accompanied by comparable second harmonic. The millimeter harmonic radiation produced is coherent and phase-related to the microwave source. Second, we have found substantial emission at the seventh harmonic, most likely from the TE72 mode — which, in cylindrical waveguide geometry, travels at very nearly the same wave speed as the 24 GHz TE11 power. In order to excite the seventh-harmonic radiation, the electron beam must be displaced from the system axis — ˜2 mm in this device. The seventh-harmonic output is potentially an attractive choice for a CW FEL which must generate appreciable power at ˜2 mm wavelength for plasma electron cyclotron heating since we can produce this radiation for electron beam energy as low as 400 kV. We present a theoretical model of the experiment which predicts that if the microwave signal is strong enough to drive the FEL into saturation, the harmonic emission becomes powerful.

  1. Cosmic microwave background radiation of black hole universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. X.

    2010-11-01

    Modifying slightly the big bang theory, the author has recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe. This new cosmological model is consistent with the Mach principle, Einsteinian general theory of relativity, and observations of the universe. The origin, structure, evolution, and expansion of the black hole universe have been presented in the recent sequence of American Astronomical Society (AAS) meetings and published recently in a scientific journal: Progress in Physics. This paper explains the observed 2.725 K cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present universe with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses. According to the black hole universe model, the observed cosmic microwave background radiation can be explained as the black body radiation of the black hole universe, which can be considered as an ideal black body. When a hot and dense star-like black hole accretes its ambient materials and merges with other black holes, it expands and cools down. A governing equation that expresses the possible thermal history of the black hole universe is derived from the Planck law of black body radiation and radiation energy conservation. The result obtained by solving the governing equation indicates that the radiation temperature of the present universe can be ˜2.725 K if the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole, and is therefore consistent with the observation of the cosmic microwave background radiation. A smaller or younger black hole universe usually cools down faster. The characteristics of the original star-like or supermassive black hole are not critical to the physical properties of the black hole universe at present, because matter and radiation are mainly from the outside space, i.e., the mother universe.

  2. The design of a monopole radiator to investigate the effect of microwave radiation in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Bigu-del-Blanco, J; Romero-Sierra, C

    1977-08-01

    The design of a microwave monopole radiator, using a hollow hypodermic needle, is described. This radiator has two unique features. It allows both i) irradiation of deep biological structures by simple needle injection and ii) simultaneous chemotherapic treatment of tissue. The matching characteristics of the monopole in saline solutions are given.

  3. Applicaton of radiative transfer theory to microwave transmission medium calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelzried, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    Precise determinations of the transmission medium loss and noise temperature contribution which are important to the performance characterization of low noise microwave receiving systems and thermal noise standards are discussed. Tropospheric loss is frequently inferred from microwave radiometer noise temperature measurements. Interpretation of these measurements requires an inversion of the radiative transfer integral equation. This is inconvenient even with computer techniques. Solutions of a rapidly convergent power series of the radiative transfer equations are presented. This solution is applicable to a low loss medium with either uniform or nonuniform loss distributions. A four layer atmosphere model is investigated to demonstrate the accuracy of the solution relative to the model. Applications include thermal noise standards and single- and dual-frequency water radiometers.

  4. Effect of microwave radiation on Jayadhar cotton fibers: WAXS studies

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjana, A. R. Mahesh, S. S. Divakara, S. Somashekar, R.

    2014-04-24

    Thermal effect in the form of micro wave energy on Jayadhar cotton fiber has been investigated. Microstructural parameters have been estimated using wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) data and line profile analysis program developed by us. Physical properties like tensile strength are correlated with X-ray results. We observe that the microwave radiation do affect significantly many parameters and we have suggested a multivariate analysis of these parameters to arrive at a significant result.

  5. Measuring plasma turbulence using low coherence microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.

    2012-02-20

    Low coherence backscattering (LCBS) is a proposed diagnostic technique for measuring plasma turbulence and fluctuations. LCBS is an adaptation of optical coherence tomography, a biomedical imaging technique. Calculations and simulations show LCBS measurements can achieve centimeter-scale spatial resolution using low coherence microwave radiation. LCBS measurements exhibit several advantages over standard plasma turbulence measurement techniques including immunity to spurious reflections and measurement access in hollow density profiles. Also, LCBS is scalable for 1-D profile measurements and 2-D turbulence imaging.

  6. Effects of Microwave Radiation on Neuronal Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells , microglia) do not survive under our culture conditions. The pyramidal cells are positively stained with antibody to...at 16 Hz. Continuous exposure to radio- frequency radiation for 4 consecutive days led to the development of a cell number density gradient. The...greater number of cells occurred in the center of the culture plate which was directly in the field as opposed to the more peripheral areas of the plate

  7. Measuring Radiofrequency and Microwave Radiation from Varying Signal Strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bette; Gaul, W. C.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the process of measuring radiofrequency and microwave radiation from various signal strengths. The topics include: 1) Limits and Guidelines; 2) Typical Variable Standard (IEEE) Frequency Dependent; 3) FCC Standard 47 CFR 1.1310; 4) Compliance Follows Unity Rule; 5) Multiple Sources Contribute; 6) Types of RF Signals; 7) Interfering Radiations; 8) Different Frequencies Different Powers; 9) Power Summing - Peak Power; 10) Contribution from Various Single Sources; 11) Total Power from Multiple Sources; 12) Are You Out of Compliance?; and 13) In Compliance.

  8. Forward Monte Carlo Computations of Polarized Microwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battaglia, A.; Kummerow, C.

    2000-01-01

    Microwave radiative transfer computations continue to acquire greater importance as the emphasis in remote sensing shifts towards the understanding of microphysical properties of clouds and with these to better understand the non linear relation between rainfall rates and satellite-observed radiance. A first step toward realistic radiative simulations has been the introduction of techniques capable of treating 3-dimensional geometry being generated by ever more sophisticated cloud resolving models. To date, a series of numerical codes have been developed to treat spherical and randomly oriented axisymmetric particles. Backward and backward-forward Monte Carlo methods are, indeed, efficient in this field. These methods, however, cannot deal properly with oriented particles, which seem to play an important role in polarization signatures over stratiform precipitation. Moreover, beyond the polarization channel, the next generation of fully polarimetric radiometers challenges us to better understand the behavior of the last two Stokes parameters as well. In order to solve the vector radiative transfer equation, one-dimensional numerical models have been developed, These codes, unfortunately, consider the atmosphere as horizontally homogeneous with horizontally infinite plane parallel layers. The next development step for microwave radiative transfer codes must be fully polarized 3-D methods. Recently a 3-D polarized radiative transfer model based on the discrete ordinate method was presented. A forward MC code was developed that treats oriented nonspherical hydrometeors, but only for plane-parallel situations.

  9. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation and its Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollack, Edward

    2016-03-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation and its faint polarization have provided a unique means to constrain the physical state of the early Universe. Continued advances in instrumentation, observation, and analysis have revealed polarized radiation signatures associated with gravitational lensing and have heightened the prospects for using precision polarimetry to experimentally confront the inflationary paradigm. Characterization of this relic radiation field has the power to constrain or reveal the detailed properties of astroparticle species and long wave gravitational radiation. On going and planned CMB polarization efforts from the ground, balloon, and space borne platforms will be briefly surveyed. Recent community activities by the Inflation Probe Science Interest Group (IPSIG) will also be summarized. NASA PCOS mini-symposium (invited IPSIG talk).

  10. Enhancement of Apoptosis by Titanium Alloy Internal Fixations during Microwave Treatments for Fractures: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lina; Ye, Dongmei; Feng, Xianxuan; Fu, Tengfei; Bai, Yuehong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Microwaves are used in one method of physical therapy and can increase muscle tissue temperature which is useful for improving muscle, tendon and bone injuries. In the study, we sought to determine whether titanium alloy internal fixations influence apoptosis in tissues subjected to microwave treatments at 2,450 MHz and 40 W during the healing of fractures because this issue is not yet fully understood. Methods In this study, titanium alloy internal fixations were used to treat 3.0-mm transverse osteotomies in the middle of New Zealand rabbits’ femurs. After the operation, 30-day microwave treatments were applied to the 3.0 mm transverse osteotomies 3 days after the operation. The changes in the temperatures of the muscle tissues in front of the implants or the 3.0 mm transverse osteotomies were measured during the microwave treatments. To characterize the effects of titanium alloy internal fixations on apoptosis in the muscles after microwave treatment, we performed TUNEL assays, fluorescent real-time (quantitative) PCR, western blotting analyses, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection and transmission electron microscopy examinations. Results The temperatures were markedly increased in the animals with the titanium alloy implants. Apoptosis in the muscle cells of the implanted group was significantly more extensive than that in the non-implanted control group at different time points. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of the skeletal muscles of the implanted groups revealed muscular mitochondrial swelling, vacuolization. ROS, Bax and Hsp70 were up-regulated, and Bcl-2 was down-regulated in the implanted group. Conclusion Our results suggest that titanium alloy internal fixations caused greater muscular tissue cell apoptosis following 2,450 MHz, 40 W microwave treatments in this rabbit femur fracture models. PMID:26132082

  11. Carbothermal Reductive Upgrading of a Bauxite Ore Using Microwave Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Pickles, C. A.; Kelebek, S.

    2012-04-01

    The utilization of microwave radiation as the energy source for the carbothermal reductive upgrading of a bauxite ore was investigated. The bauxite ore was mechanically mixed with carbon and reacted in a quartz crucible in a multimode cavity. The iron oxide in the bauxite ore was reduced to magnetite and/or iron and the magnetic fraction was separated using a Davis Tube Tester. Three experimental arrangements were utilized: (i) microwaving of the mixture, (ii) microwaving of the mixture plus charcoal layers under ambient conditions and (iii) microwaving of the mixture plus charcoal layers in argon. The utilization of the charcoal layers resulted in more uniform heating of the sample. The effects of irradiation time, sample mass and incident power on the mass of the magnetic fraction were determined. Both the iron and the aluminum contents of the magnetic fraction were measured and using these values, the iron removal from the bauxite ore and the alumina recovery in the non-magnetic fraction were calculated. It was shown that under mildly reducing conditions, almost half of the iron could be removed as magnetite. However, the formation of hercynite limited the iron separation as magnetite and higher iron removals could only be achieved through the formation of metallic iron under more highly reducing conditions.

  12. Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation of Black Hole Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2009-05-01

    Recently, the author has proposed an alternative cosmological model called black hole universe. According to this model, the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole with several solar masses, and gradually grew up through a supermassive black hole with billion solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillion solar masses by accreting ambient materials and merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with infinite layers hierarchically. The innermost three layers are the universe that we are living, the outside called mother universe, and the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes. The outermost layer is infinite in radius and limits to zero for both the mass density and absolute temperature. The observed cosmic microwave background radiation can be explained as the black body radiation of the black hole universe. When a hot and dense star-like black hole accretes its ambient matter and radiation or merges with other black holes, it expands and cools down. In terms of the Planck law of the black body radiation, a possible thermal history of the black hole universe is obtained. The result shows that the temperature of the present universe can be 3 K as observed if the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole. The initial properties (e.g., temperature, angular momentum, etc.) of the star-like black hole are not critical to the present universe, because most matter and radiation are from the mother universe. Therefore, the black hole universe model is also consistent with the observation of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  13. Low-level microwave irradiation and central cholinergic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1989-05-01

    Our previous research showed that 45 min of exposure to low-level, pulsed microwaves (2450-MHz, 2-microseconds pulses, 500 pps, whole-body average specific absorption rate 0.6 W/kg) decreased sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. The effects of microwaves on central cholinergic systems were further investigated in this study. Increases in choline uptake activity in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus were observed after 20 min of acute microwave exposure, and tolerance to the effect of microwaves developed in the hypothalamus, but not in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, of rats subjected to ten daily 20-min exposure sessions. Furthermore, the effects of acute microwave irradiation on central choline uptake could be blocked by pretreating the animals before exposure with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone. In another series of experiments, rats were exposed to microwaves in ten daily sessions of either 20 or 45 min, and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in different regions of the brain were studied by 3H-QNB binding assay. Decreases in concentration of receptors occurred in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to ten 20-min microwave exposure sessions, whereas increase in receptor concentration occurred in the hippocampus of animals exposed to ten 45-min sessions. This study also investigated the effects of microwave exposure on learning in the radial-arm maze. Rats were trained in the maze to obtain food reinforcements immediately after 20 or 45 min of microwave exposure.

  14. Increasing of the endurance of polymeric construction materials with the multilevel hierarchical structure in the microwave electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlobina, I. V.; Muldasheva, G. K.; Bekrenev, N. V.

    2016-11-01

    Here are shown the results of the effect of the microwave electromagnetic field frequency 2450 MHz and the power density 4-5, 17-18, and 30-32 W/cm3 on properties of composite materials, reinforced plastics, and additive rubber. It is found that the microwave processing with the specific power 17-18 W/cm3 increases the duration of the operation of a rod carbon construction under a load by 1.5-4.5 times. The endurance of rods made of MBS plastics increases by 2-3 times under load. The yielding of sealing rubber after the treatment in the microwave electromagnetic field increases from 18 to 70% with the applied load. This increases the stability of the specimen characteristics after putting them at temperatures from -25 to +40°C.

  15. Optimization of microwave pretreatment conditions to maximize methane production and methane yield in mesophilic anaerobic sludge digestion.

    PubMed

    Park, W J; Ahn, J H

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to find optimum microwave pretreatment conditions for methane production and methane yield in anaerobic sludge digestion. The sludge was pretreated using a laboratory-scale industrial microwave unit (2450 MHz frequency). Microwave temperature increase rate (TIR) (2.9-17.1 degrees C/min) and final temperature (FT) (52-108 degrees C) significantly affected solubilization, methane production, and methane yield. Solubilization degree (soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD)/total COD) in the pretreated sludge (3.3-14.7%) was clearly higher than that in the raw sludge (2.6%). Within the design boundaries, the optimum conditions for maximum methane production (2.02 L/L) were TIR = 9.1 degrees C/min and FT = 90 degrees C, and the optimum conditions for maximum methane yield (809 mL/g VS(removed)) were TIR 7.1 degrees C/min and FT = 92 degrees C.

  16. Sintering of Titanium in Vacuum by Microwave Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, S. D.; Yan, M.; Schaffer, G. B.; Qian, M.

    2011-08-01

    The effectiveness of microwave (MW) sintering has been demonstrated on many ceramic systems, a number of metallic systems, and metal-ceramic composites, but remains ambiguous for Ti powder materials. This work presents a detailed comparative study of MW and conventional sintering of Ti powder compacts in vacuum. It is shown that MW radiation is effective in heating Ti powder compacts with the assistance of MW susceptors; it delivered an average heating rate of 34 K/min (34 °C/min), compared to 4 K/min (4 °C/min) by conventional vacuum heating in an alumina-tube furnace. Microwave radiation resulted in similar densification with well-developed sinter bonds. However, MW-sintered samples showed higher bulk hardness, a harder surface shell, and coarser grains. The difference in hardness is attributed to the difference in the oxygen content, supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. The mechanisms of MW heating for metal powder compacts are discussed in the context of the sintering of Ti powder materials and attributed to three combined effects. These include heat radiation from the MW susceptors at low temperatures, enhanced MW absorption due to the transformation of the TiO2 film on each Ti powder particle to oxygen-deficient Ti oxides, which are MW absorbers; and the volumetric heating of Ti powder particles by eddy currents.

  17. Effects of Microwave Radiation on Selected Mechanical Properties of Silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Emily Jane

    Impressive mechanical properties have served to peak interest in silk as an engineering material. In addition, the ease with which silk can be altered through processing has led to its use in various biomaterial applications. As the uses of silk branch into new territory, it is imperative (and inevitable) to discover the boundary conditions beyond which silk no longer performs as expected. These boundary conditions include factors as familiar as temperature and humidity, but may also include other less familiar contributions, such as exposure to different types of radiation. The inherent variations in mechanical properties of silk, as well as its sensitivity to moisture, suggest that in an engineering context silk is best suited for use in composite materials; that way, silk can be shielded from ambient moisture fluctuations, and the surrounding matrix allows efficient load transfer from weaker fibers to stronger ones. One such application is to use silk as a reinforcing fiber in epoxy composites. When used in this way, there are several instances in which exposure to microwave radiation is likely (for example, as a means of speeding epoxy cure rates), the effects of which remain mostly unstudied. It will be the purpose of this dissertation to determine whether selected mechanical properties of B. mori cocoon silk are affected by exposure to microwave radiation, under specified temperature and humidity conditions. Results of our analyses are directly applicable wherever exposure of silk to microwave radiation is possible, including in fiber reinforced epoxy composites (the entire composite may be microwaved to speed epoxy cure time), or when silk is used as a component in the material used to construct the radome of an aircraft (RADAR units use frequencies in the microwave range of the electromagnetic spectrum), or when microwave energy is used to sterilize biomaterials (such as cell scaffolds) made of silk. In general, we find that microwave exposure does not

  18. Engineering squeezed states of microwave radiation with circuit quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li Pengbo; Li Fuli

    2011-03-15

    We introduce a squeezed state source for microwave radiation with tunable parameters in circuit quantum electrodynamics. We show that when a superconducting artificial multilevel atom interacting with a transmission line resonator is suitably driven by external classical fields, two-mode squeezed states of the cavity modes can be engineered in a controllable fashion from the vacuum state via adiabatic following of the ground state of the system. This scheme appears to be robust against decoherence and is realizable with present techniques in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  19. Alcohol effects on behavioral thermoregulation with microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Vitulli, W F; Rust, M L; Mortellaro, P M; Quinn, J M; Barbin, J M; DePace, A N

    1992-06-01

    Ethanol may play an active role in modifying "set point" levels in conjunction with behavioral thermoregulation. A geometric series of doses of ethanol solutions was administered (ip) prior to fixed-interval 2-min. schedules of microwave reinforcement in rats tested in a cold environment. Four Sprague-Dawley rats were conditioned to regulate their thermal environment with 5-sec. exposures of MW reinforcement. Friedman's nonparametric test showed significant differences between ethanol doses, and Sign tests showed that moderate and high doses of ethanol suppressed operant behavior reinforced by MW radiation. Interactions between changes in "set-point" and discriminative properties of ethanol are discussed.

  20. Microwave-induced post-exposure hyperthermia: Involvement of endogenous opioids and serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.; Horita, A.

    1984-08-01

    Acute exposure to pulsed microwaves (2450 MHz, 1 mW/ cm/sup 2/, SAR 0.6 W/kg, 2-..mu..s pulses, 500 pulses/s) induces a transient post-exposure hyperthermia in the rat. The hyperthermia was attenuated by treatment with either the narcotic antagonist naltrexone or one of the serotonin antagonists cinanserin, cyproheptadine, or metergoline. It was not affected, however, by treatment with the peripheral serotonin antagonist xylamidine nor the dopamine antagonist haloperidol. It thus appears that both endogenous opioids and central serotonin are involved. It is proposed that pulsed microwaves activate endogenous opioid systems, and that they in turn activate a serotonergic mechanism that induces the rise in body temperature.

  1. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food... PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.30 Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation,...

  2. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food... PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.30 Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation,...

  3. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food... PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.30 Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation,...

  4. 21 CFR 179.30 - Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food... PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND HANDLING OF FOOD Radiation and Radiation Sources § 179.30 Radiofrequency radiation for the heating of food, including microwave frequencies. Radiofrequency radiation,...

  5. The local contribution to the microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecker, Jean-Claude; Narlikar, Jayant V.; Ochsenbein, Francois; Wickramasinghe, Chandra

    2015-04-01

    The observed microwave background radiation (MBR) is commonly interpreted as the relic of an early hot universe, and its observed features (spectrum and anisotropy) are explained in terms of properties of the early universe. Here we describe a complementary, even possibly alternative, interpretation of MBR, first proposed in the early 20th century, and adapt it to modern observations. For example, the stellar Hipparcos data show that the energy density of starlight from the Milky Way, if suitably thermalized, yields a temperature of ∼2.81 K. This and other arguments given here strongly suggest that the origin of MBR may lie, at least in a very large part, in re-radiation of thermalized galactic starlight. The strengths and weaknesses of this alternative radical explanation are discussed.

  6. Radiation Tolerance of Aluminum Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatsu, K.; Dominjon, A.; Fujino, T.; Funaki, T.; Hazumi, M.; Irie, F.; Ishino, H.; Kida, Y.; Matsumura, T.; Mizukami, K.; Naruse, M.; Nitta, T.; Noguchi, T.; Oka, N.; Sekiguchi, S.; Sekimoto, Y.; Sekine, M.; Shu, S.; Yamada, Y.; Yamashita, T.

    2016-08-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) is one of the candidates of focal plane detector for future satellite missions such as LiteBIRD. For the space use of MKIDs, the radiation tolerance is one of the challenges to be characterized prior to the launch. Aluminum (Al) MKIDs with 50 nm thickness on silicon substrate and on sapphire substrate were irradiated with a proton beam of 160 MeV at the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba. The total water-equivalent absorbed dose was ˜ 10 krad which should simulate the worst radiation absorption of 5 years observation at the Lagrange point L2. We measured characteristics of these MKIDs before and after the irradiation. We found no significant changes on resonator quality factor, responsivity, and recombination time of quasi-particles. The change on electrical noise equivalent power was also evaluated, and no significant increase was found at the noise level of O(10^{-18}) W/√{ Hz }.

  7. Thermoacoustic Emission Induced by Deeply-Penetrating Radiation and its Application to Biomedical Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Soo Chin

    Thermoacoustic emissions induced by 2450 MHz microwave pulses in water, tissue-simulating phantoms and dog kidneys have been detected. The analytic signal magnitude has been employed in generating 'A-mode' images with excellent depth resolution. Thermoacoustic emissions have also been detected from the dose-gradient at the beam edges of a 4 MeV x-ray beam in water. These results establish the feasibility of employing thermoacoustic signals in generating diagnostic images, and in locating x-ray beam edges during radiation therapy. A theoretical model for thermoacoustic imaging using a directional transducer has been developed, which may be used in the design of future thermoacoustic imaging system, and in facilitating comparisons with other types of imaging systems. A method of characterizing biological tissues has been proposed, which relates the power spectrum of the detected thermoacoustic signals to the autocorrelation function of the thermoacoustic source distribution in the tissues. The temperature dependence of acoustic signals induced by microwave pulses in water has been investigated. The signal amplitudes vary with temperature as the thermal expansion of water, except near 4^circ C. The signal waveforms show a gradual phase change as the temperature changes from below 4^ circ to above 4^circ C. This anomaly is due to the presence of a nonthermal component detected near 4^circC, whose waveform is similar to the derivative of the room temperature signal. The results are compared to a model based on a nonequilibrium relaxation mechanism proposed by Pierce and Hsieh. The relaxation time was found to be (0.20 +/- 0.02) ns and (0.13 +/- 0.02) ns for 200 ns and 400 ns microwave pulse widths, respectively. A microwave-induced thermoacoustic source capable of launching large aperture, unipolar ultrasonic plane wave pulses in water has been constructed. This source consists of a thin water layer trapped between two dielectric media. Due to the large mismatch in the

  8. Method for heat treating and sintering metal oxides with microwave radiation

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Meek, Thomas T.

    1989-01-01

    A method for microwave sintering materials, primarily metal oxides, is described. Metal oxides do not normally absorb microwave radiation at temperatures ranging from about room temperature to several hundred degrees centrigrade are sintered with microwave radiation without the use of the heretofore required sintering aids. This sintering is achieved by enclosing a compact of the oxide material in a housing or capsule formed of a oxide which has microwave coupling properties at room temprature up to at least the microwave coupling temperature of the oxide material forming the compact. The heating of the housing effects the initial heating of the oxide material forming the compact by heat transference and then functions as a thermal insulator for the encased oxide material after the oxide material reaches a sufficient temperature to adequately absorb or couple with microwave radiation for heating thereof to sintering temperature.

  9. The impact of microwave stray radiation to in-vessel diagnostic components

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, M.; Laqua, H. P.; Hathiramani, D.; Baldzuhn, J.; Biedermann, C.; Cardella, A.; Erckmann, V.; König, R.; Köppen, M.; Zhang, D.; Oosterbeek, J.; Brand, H. von der; Parquay, S.; Jimenez, R. [Centro de Investigationes Energeticas, Medioambientales y Technológicas, Association EURATOM Collaboration: W7-X Teasm

    2014-08-21

    Microwave stray radiation resulting from unabsorbed multiple reflected ECRH / ECCD beams may cause severe heating of microwave absorbing in-vessel components such as gaskets, bellows, windows, ceramics and cable insulations. In view of long-pulse operation of WENDELSTEIN-7X the MIcrowave STray RAdiation Launch facility, MISTRAL, allows to test in-vessel components in the environment of isotropic 140 GHz microwave radiation at power load of up to 50 kW/m{sup 2} over 30 min. The results show that both, sufficient microwave shielding measures and cooling of all components are mandatory. If shielding/cooling measures of in-vessel diagnostic components are not efficient enough, the level of stray radiation may be (locally) reduced by dedicated absorbing ceramic coatings on cooled structures.

  10. The Local Contribution to the Microwave Background Radiation(MBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narlikar, Jayant V.; Pecker, Jean-Claude; Wickramasinghe, N. Ch.

    2010-11-01

    In the early fifties, from the early theories of the big bang universe, Gamow, Alpher & Herman have predicted the existence of a "cosmological" microwave background radiation, corresponding to a black body of a few Kelvins. When, in 1964, Penzias & Wilson, observed a radiation at 2.7K, the scientific world concluded quickly it was a proof, a final proof, of the big bang type cosmologies. But it should be realized that, in the beginning of the XX-th century, several authors, from Guillaume to Eddington, have predicted the same thing in a static Universe. We have redone the calculations of Eddington, and based them on the recent and very accurate photometric results from the satellite Hipparcos. In the absence of any expansion, of any big bang type behaviour, we compute the local temperature induced by the reradiation by local matter of stellar radiation, and we found it to be in excellent agreement with the observations. This result, completed by a careful discussion, could lead to a dramatic revision of the classical cosmological concepts.

  11. Effects of microwave radiation on the eye: The occupational health perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Cutz, A. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this overview is to promote an interest in understanding and reducing the possible occupational health risks of microwave radiation on the eye. Microwaves act on living tissue through two types of mechanisms, thermal and nonthermal. Lens opacities can be induced in experimental animals at relatively high intensities (power densities greater than 100 mW/cm2). For lower intensities, lens changes may depend on the cumulative dose. At nonthermal intensities, microwaves can act as a trigger and set off changes in the living tissues (e.g. Ca++ efflux). Some cataract-causing agents (alloxan and galactose) act synergistically with microwaves. Microwaves also accelerate formation of cataracts due to diabetes. The corneal endothelium can be damaged by microwaves alone or in combination with some drugs. Microwave degeneration of retinal nerve endings and a small increase in retinal permeability were also found in animals. The effect of long-term low-intensity microwave exposure on the human lens remains poorly understood. Several reports have implicated occupational microwave exposure as a factor in increasing the rate of lens aging and retinal injury in microwave workers. In Canada, recommended microwave exposure limits are set at 25 mW/cm2 for microwave workers and at 1 mW/cm2 for the general public (both averaged over 1 minute). The Australian microwave exposure safety standard (1985) recommends pre- and post-employment eye examinations for workers.

  12. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) effects on behavioral thermoregulation with microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Vitulli, W F; Laconsay, K L; Agnew, A C; Henderson, M E; Quinn, J M; Holland, B E; DePace, A N

    1993-08-01

    Aspirin is a widely used over-the-counter drug in our society which has wide therapeutic value, yet not all of the behavioral side effects have been studied. Different doses of aspirin solutions were administered (ip) prior to fixed-interval 2-min. schedules of microwave reinforcement in rats tested in a cold environment. Four Sprague-Dawley rats were conditioned to regulate their thermal environment with 5-sec. exposures of MW reinforcement. Friedman's nonparametric test showed significant differences among aspirin and saline-control doses. Post hoc sign tests showed that a moderate dose of aspirin increased operant behavior reinforced by MW radiation, yet lower and higher doses decreased and then increased the rate of responding which resulted in an inverted U-shaped trend. Possible multiple effects of aspirin in terms of its thermoregulatory as well as its pain-tolerance properties, and implications for hypothalamic "set point" are discussed.

  13. Responsive behavior of regenerated cellulose in hydrolysis under microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jinping; Na, Haining; She, Zhen; Wang, Jinggang; Xue, Wenwen; Zhu, Jin

    2014-09-01

    This work studied the responsive behavior of regenerated cellulose (RC) in hydrolysis under microwave radiation. Four types of RC with different crystallinity (Cr) and degree of polymerization (DP) are produced to evaluate the reactivity of RC by step-by-step hydrolysis. Results show Cr is the key factor to affect the reactivity of RCs. With hydrolysis of amorphous region and the formation of recrystallization, the Cr of RC reaches a high value and thus weakens the reactivity. As a result, the increment of cellulose conversion and sugar yield gradually reduces. Decrease of the DP of RC is helpful to increase the speed at the onset of hydrolysis and produce high sugar yield. But, there is no direct influence with the reactivity of RC to prolong the time of pretreatment. This research provides an accurate understanding to guide the RC preparation for sugar formation with relative high efficiency under mild reaction conditions.

  14. Beamed microwave power transmitting and receiving subsystems radiation characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Measured characteristics of the spectrum of typical converters and the distribution of radiated Radio Frequency (RF) energy from the terminals (transmitting antenna and rectenna) of a beamed microwave power subsystem are presented for small transmitting and receiving S-band (2.45 GHz) subarrays. Noise and harmonic levels of tube and solid-state RF power amplifiers are shown. The RF patterns and envelope of a 64 element slotted waveguide antenna are given for the fundamental frequency and harmonics through the fifth. Reflected fundamental and harmonic patterns through the fourth for a 42 element rectenna subarray are presented for various dc load and illumination conditions. Bandwidth measurements for the waveguide antenna and rectenna are shown.

  15. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: I. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using the explicit form of the functions to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure in the finite range of frequencies v 1≤ v≤ v 2 are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60-600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T=2.72548 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and σ, and the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the CMB radiation are obtained using the mean amplitude T amp=3.358 mK. It is shown that the Doppler shift leads to a renormalization of the radiation density constant a, the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ, and the corresponding constants for the thermodynamic functions. The expressions for new astrophysical parameters, such as the entropy density/Boltzmann constant, and number density of CMB photons are obtained. The radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation for the monopole and dipole spectra at redshift z≈1089 are calculated.

  16. Mechanism of low-level microwave radiation effect on nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hinrikus, Hiie; Bachmann, Maie; Karai, Denis; Lass, Jaanus

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explain the mechanism of the effect of low-level modulated microwave radiation on brain bioelectrical oscillations. The proposed model of excitation by low-level microwave radiation bases on the influence of water polarization on hydrogen bonding forces between water molecules, caused by this the enhancement of diffusion and consequences on neurotransmitters transit time and neuron resting potential. Modulated microwave radiation causes periodic alteration of the neurophysiologic parameters and parametric excitation of brain bioelectric oscillations. The experiments to detect logical outcome of the mechanism on physiological level were carried out on 15 human volunteers. The 450-MHz microwave radiation modulated at 7, 40 and 1000 Hz frequencies was applied at the field power density of 0.16 mW/cm(2). A relative change in the EEG power with and without radiation during 10 cycles was used as a quantitative measure. Experimental data demonstrated that modulated at 40 Hz microwave radiation enhanced EEG power in EEG alpha and beta frequency bands. No significant alterations were detected at 7 and 1000 Hz modulation frequencies. These results are in good agreement with the theory of parametric excitation of the brain bioelectric oscillations caused by the periodic alteration of neurophysiologic parameters and support the proposed mechanism. The proposed theoretical framework has been shown to predict the results of experimental study. The suggested mechanism, free of the restrictions related to field strength or time constant, is the first one providing explanation of low-level microwave radiation effects.

  17. Inference of the microwave absorption coefficient from stray radiation measurements in Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseev, D.; Laqua, H. P.; Marsen, S.; Marushchenko, N.; Stange, T.; Braune, H.; Gellert, F.; Hirsch, M.; Hoefel, U.; Knauer, J.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Turkin, Y.; The Wendelstein 7-X Team

    2017-03-01

    The efficiency of electron cyclotron heating is determined by the microwave absorption of the plasma. Good microwave absorption is also crucial for the machine safety. In this paper we present a method of evaluating the microwave absorption coefficient from stray radiation measurements. The discussed method is computationally simple and can be applied potentially in real time. Evolution of the second harmonic extraordinary mode (X2) microwave absorption coefficient in Wendelstein 7-X during the start-up phase is presented, as well as an estimate of the absorption coefficient for the second harmonic ordinary mode (O2) wave.

  18. Comparative effect of microwaves and boiling on the denaturation of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Stroop, W.G.; Schaefer, D.C. )

    1989-11-01

    The effect of heat and microwave denaturation of small volumes of double-stranded plasmid DNA has been compared. Samples of intact plasmid DNA had plasmid DNA linearized by digestion with EcoRI were conventionally denatured in a boiling water bath or denatured by 2450 MHz of microwave energy for 0-300 s. Heat denaturation for periods longer than 120 s caused breakdown of linearized plasmid DNA; however, microwave denaturation for 10-300 s caused no apparent degradation of linearized DNA. Breakdown of DNA forms II and III was noted in plasmid DNA subjected to 300 s of either heat or microwave denaturation but breakdown of forms II and III occurred more quickly with heat than with microwave treatment. Microwave treatment was also found to be better than heat to denature 32P-labeled DNA probes subsequently used to detect homologous DNA samples immobilized on nitrocellulose filters. A microwave-treated 32P-labeled DNA probe was able to hybridize to DNA samples 20 times more dilute than a heat-treated 32P-labeled DNA probe. Depending on the form of DNA to be analyzed, these results indicate that small volumes of DNA solutions and radiolabeled DNA probes can be effectively denatured in a conventional microwave oven.

  19. Microwave-assisted synthesis of sensitive silver substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Lixin; Wang Haibo; Wang Jian; Gong Ke; Jia Yi; Zhang Huili; Sun Mengtao

    2008-10-07

    A sensitive silver substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy is synthesized under multimode microwave irradiation. The microwave-assisted synthesis of the SERS-active substrate was carried out in a modified domestic microwave oven of 2450 MHz, and the reductive reaction was conducted in a polypropylene container under microwave irradiation with a power of 100 W for 5 min. Formaldehyde was employed as both the reductant and microwave absorber in the reductive process. The effects of different heating methods (microwave dielectric and conventional) on the properties of the SERS-active substrates were investigated. Samples obtained with 5 min of microwave irradiation at a power of 100 W have more well-defined edges, corners, and sharper surface features, while the samples synthesized with 1 h of conventional heating at 40 deg. C consist primarily of spheroidal nanoparticles. The SERS peak intensity of the {approx}1593 cm{sup -1} band of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid adsorbed on silver nanoparticles synthesized with 5 min of microwave irradiation at a power of 100 W is about 30 times greater than when it is adsorbed on samples synthesized with 1 h of conventional heating at 40 deg. C. The results of quantum chemical calculations are in good agreement with our experimental data. This method is expected to be utilized for the synthesis of other metal nanostructural materials.

  20. Pathophysiology of microwave radiation: effect on rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Behari, Jitendra

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the effect of 2.45 GHz microwave radiation on Wistar rats. Rats of 35 days old with 130 ± 10 g body weight were selected for this study. Animals were divided into two groups: sham exposed and experimental (six animals each). Animals were exposed for 2 h a day for 45 days at 2.45 GHz frequency (power density, 0.21 mW/cm(2)). The whole body specific absorption rate was estimated to be 0.14 W/kg. Exposure took place in a ventilated plexiglas cage and kept in an anechoic chamber under a horn antenna. After completion of the exposure period, rats were killed, and pineal gland and whole brain tissues were isolated for the estimation of melatonin, creatine kinase, caspase 3, and calcium ion concentration. Experiments were performed in a blind manner and repeated. A significant decrease (P < 0.05) was recorded in the level of pineal melatonin of exposed group as compared with sham exposed. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in creatine kinase, caspase 3, and calcium ion concentration was observed in whole brain of exposed group of animals as compared to sham exposed. One-way analysis of variance method was adopted for statistical analysis. The study concludes that a reduction in melatonin or an increase in caspase-3, creatine kinase, and calcium ion may cause significant damage in brain due to chronic exposure of these radiations. These biomarkers clearly indicate possible health implications of such exposures.

  1. Proflavin and microwave radiation: Absence of a mutagenic interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Meltz, M.L.; Eagan, P.; Erwin, D.N. )

    1990-01-01

    The potential ability of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RFR) in the microwave range to induce mutagenesis, chromosomal aberrations, and sister chromatid exchanges in mammalian cells is being explored in our laboratories. In addition, we have also been examining the ability of simultaneous exposure to RFR and chemical mutagens to alter the genotoxic damage induced by chemical mutagens acting alone. We have performed experiments to determine whether there is an interaction between 2.45-GHz, pulsed-wave, RFR and proflavin, a DNA-intercalating drug. The endpoint studied was forward mutation at the thymidine kinase locus in L5178Y mouse leukemic cells. Any effect on the size distribution of the resulting colonies of mutated cells was also examined. The exposures were performed at net forward powers of 500 or 600 W, resulting in a specific absorption rate (SAR) of approximately 40 W/kg. The culture-medium temperature reached a 3 degrees C maximal increase during the 4-h exposure; appropriate 37 degrees C and convection-heating temperature controls (TC) were performed. In no case was there any indication of a statistically significant increase in the induced mutant frequency due to the simultaneous exposure to RFR and proflavin, as compared with the proflavin exposures alone. There was also no indication of any change in the colony-size distribution of the resulting mutant colonies, neither, and there was no evidence in these experiments of any mutagenic action by the RFR exposure alone.

  2. Plasma formation on a metal surface under combined action of laser and microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilyuk, A P; Shaparev, N Ya

    2013-10-31

    By means of numerical modelling of the combined effect of laser (1.06 mm) and microwave (10{sup 10} – 10{sup 13} s{sup -1}) radiation on the aluminium surface in vacuum it is shown that the additional action of microwave radiation with the frequency 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} provides complete ionisation of the metal vapour (for the values of laser radiation duration and intensity used in the calculations), while in the absence of microwave radiation the vapour remains weakly ionised. The mathematical model used accounts for the processes, occurring in the condensed phase (heat conduction, melting), the evaporation and the kinetic processes in the resulting vapour. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  3. Snow Crystal Orientation Effects on the Scattering of Passive Microwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. L.; Barton, J. S.; Chang, A. T. C.; Hall, D. K.

    1999-01-01

    For this study, consideration is given to the role crystal orientation plays in scattering and absorbing microwave radiation. A discrete dipole scattering model is used to measure the passive microwave radiation, at two polarizations (horizontal and vertical), scattered by snow crystals oriented in random and non random positions, having various sizes (ranging between 1 micrometers to 10,000 micrometers in radius), and shapes (including spheroids, cylinders, hexagons). The model results demonstrate that for the crystal sizes typically found in a snowpack, crystal orientation is insignificant compared to crystal size in terms of scattering microwave energy in the 8,100 gm (37 GHz) region of the spectrum. Therefore, the assumption used in radiative transfer approaches, where snow crystals are modeled as randomly oriented spheres, is adequate to account for the transfer of microwave energy emanating from the ground and passing through a snowpack.

  4. Orthodontic instrument sterilization with microwave irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yezdani, Arif; Mahalakshmi, Krishnan; Padmavathy, Kesavaram

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of microwave sterilization of orthodontic instruments and molar bands immersed in plain distilled water with and without oral rinse, and to ascertain the minimum time of exposure required to sterilize. Materials and Methods: The orthodontic instruments (hinged and nonhinged), molar bands and mouth mirrorsused in the patient 's mouth were selected for the study. The instruments were divided into two groups – Group I with oral rinse-set A (0.01% chlorhexidine gluconate) and set B (0.025% betadine) and Group II (included sets C and D without oral rinse). The instruments of set A, B and C were microwaved at 2,450 MHz, 800 W for 5 min, whereas, set D was microwaved for 10 min at the same above mentioned specifications. The efficacy of sterilization was assessed by stab inoculation of the instruments onto trypticase soya agar plates. The plates were checked for bacterial growth following incubation at 37 °C for 24 h. For sterility control,Geobacillus stearothermophilus (MTCC 1518) was included. Results: No growth was observed in the plates that were inoculated with the microwaved orthodontic instruments of sets A, B and D, whereas scanty bacterial growth was observed in the plates inoculatedwith the microwaved set C instruments. Conclusion: Effective sterilization was achieved when the orthodontic instruments and molar bands were immersed in distilled water without oral rinse and microwaved for 10 min as also for those that were immersed in distilled water with oral rinse and microwaved for 5 min. PMID:26015686

  5. Analog of microwave-induced resistance oscillations induced in GaAs heterostructures by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, T.; Dmitriev, I. A.; Kozlov, D. A.; Schneider, M.; Jentzsch, B.; Kvon, Z. D.; Olbrich, P.; Bel'kov, V. V.; Bayer, A.; Schuh, D.; Bougeard, D.; Kuczmik, T.; Oltscher, M.; Weiss, D.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the study of terahertz radiation-induced MIRO-like oscillations of magnetoresistivity in GaAs heterostructures. Our experiments provide an answer on two most intriguing questions—effect of radiation helicity and the role of the edges—yielding crucial information for an understanding of the MIRO (microwave-induced resistance oscillations) origin. Moreover, we demonstrate that the range of materials exhibiting radiation-induced magneto-oscillations can be largely extended by using high-frequency radiation.

  6. Microwave Absorption Characteristics of Conventionally Heated Nonstoichiometric Ferrous Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Mouris, Joe; Hutcheon, Ron; Sun, Xiang

    2011-08-01

    The temperature dependence of the microwave absorption of conventionally heated nonstoichiometric ferrous oxide (Fe0.925O) was characterized via the cavity perturbation technique between 294 K and 1373 K (21 °C and 1100 °C). The complex relative permittivity and permeability of the heated Fe0.925O sample slightly change with temperature from 294 K to 473 K (21 °C to 200 °C). The dramatic variations of permittivity and permeability of the sample from 473 K to 823 K (200 °C to 550 °C) are partially attributed to the formation of magnetite (Fe3O4) and metal iron (Fe) from the thermal decomposition of Fe0.925O, as confirmed by the high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD). At higher temperatures up to 1373 K (1100 °C), it is found that Fe0.925O regenerates and remains as a stable phase with high permittivity. Since the permittivity dominates the microwave absorption of Fe0.925O above 823 K (550 °C), resulting in shallow microwave penetration depth (~0.11 and ~0.015 m at 915 and 2450 MHz, respectively), the regenerated nonstoichiometric ferrous oxide exhibits useful microwave absorption capability in the temperature range of 823 K to1373 K (550 °C to 1100 °C).

  7. Thermoregulatory consequences of long-term microwave exposure at controlled ambient temperatures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.; Spiers, D.E.; Rawson, R.O.; Adams, B.W.; Sheldon, D.K.

    1984-08-01

    The study was designed to identify and measure changes in thermoregulatory response systems, both behavioral and physiological, that may occur when squirrel monkeys are exposed to 2450-MHz CW microwaves 40 hours/week for 15 weeks. Microwave power densities explored were 1 and 5 mW/sq. cm. (SAR = 0.16 W/kg per mW/sq. cm.) and were presented at controlled environmental temperatures of 25, 30, and 35 C. Standardized tests, conducted periodically, assessed changes in thermoregulatory responses. Dependent variables measured included body mass, certain blood properties, metabolic heat production, sweating, skin temperatures, deep body temperature, and behavioral responses by which the monkeys selected a preferred environmental temperature. Results showed no alteration of metabolic rate, internal body temperature, or thermoregulatory behavior by microwave exposure although the ambient temperature prevailing during chronic exposure could exert an effect. An increase in sweating rate occurred in the 35 C environment, not enhanced significantly by microwave exposure. Skin temperature, reflecting vasomotor state, was reliably influenced by both ambient temperature and microwaves. The most robust consequence of microwave exposure was a reduction in body mass which appeared to be a function of microwave power density.

  8. Behavioral and autonomic thermoregulation in hamsters during microwave-induced heat exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, C.J.; Long, M.D.; Fehlner, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    Preferred ambient temperature (Ta) and ventilatory frequency were measured in free-moving hamsters exposed to 2450-MHz microwaves. A waveguide exposure system that permits continuous monitoring of the absorbed heat load accrued from microwave exposure was imposed with a longitudinal temperature gradient which allowed hamsters to select their preferred Ta. Ventilatory frequency was monitored remotely by analysing the rhythmic shifts in unabsorbed microwave energy passing down the waveguide. Without microwave exposure hamsters selected an average T2 of 30.2 C. This preferred Ta did not change until the rate of heat absorption (SAR) from microwave exposure exceeded approx. 2 W kg-1. In a separate experiment, a SAR of 2.0 W kg-1 at a Ta of 30C was shown to promote an average 0.5 C increase in colonic temperature. Hamsters maintained their ventilatory frequency at baseline levels by selecting a cooler Ta during microwave exposure. These data support previous studies suggesting that during thermal stress behavioral thermo-regulation (i.e. preferred Ta) takes prescedence over autonomic thermoregulation (i.e. ventilatory frequency). It is apparent that selecting a cooler Ta is a more efficient and/or effective than autonomic thermoregulation for dissipating a heat load accrued from microwave exposure.

  9. Microwave Ovens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emitting Products Radiation-Emitting Products and Procedures Home, Business, and Entertainment Products Microwave ... for Consumers Laws, Regulations & Standards Industry Guidance Other Resources Description Microwave ...

  10. A Flat Universe from High-Resolution Maps of the Cosmic MicrowaveBackground Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    de Bernardis, P.; Ade, P.A.R.; Bock, J.J.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill,J.; Boscaleri, A.; Coble, K.; Crill, B.P.; De Gasperis, G.; Farese, P.C.; Ferreira, P.G.; Ganga, K.; Giacometti, M.; Hivon, E.; Hristov, V.V.; Iacoangeli, A.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lange, A.E.; Martinis, L.; Masi, S.; Mason,P.; Mauskopf, P.D.; Melchiorri, A.; Miglio, L.; Montroy, T.; Netterfield,C.B.; Pascale, E.; Piacentini, F.; Pogosyan, D.; Prunet, S.; Rao, S.; Romeo, G.; Ruhl, J.E.; Scaramuzzi, F.; Sforna, D.; Vittorio, N.

    2000-04-28

    The blackbody radiation left over from the Big Bang has been transformed by the expansion of the Universe into the nearly isotropic 2.73 K Cosmic Microwave Background. Tiny inhomogeneities in the early Universe left their imprint on the microwave background in the form of small anisotropies in its temperature. These anisotropies contain information about basic cosmological parameters, particularly the total energy density and curvature of the universe. Here we report the first images of resolved structure in the microwave background anisotropies over a significant part of the sky. Maps at four frequencies clearly distinguish the microwave background from foreground emission. We compute the angular power spectrum of the microwave background, and find a peak at Legendre multipole {ell}{sub peak} = (197 {+-} 6), with an amplitude DT{sub 200} = (69 {+-} 8){mu}K. This is consistent with that expected for cold dark matter models in a flat (euclidean) Universe, as favored by standard inflationary scenarios.

  11. Enhanced extraction of patchouli alcohol from Pogostemon cablin by microwave radiation-accelerated ionic liquid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ling; Jin, Ronghua; Liu, Yinghu; An, Min; Chen, Shi

    2011-11-15

    A microwave radiation-accelerated ionic liquid pretreatment (MRAILP) was developed to enhance extraction of patchouli alcohol from Pogostemon cablin. 1-N-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C(4)mim]Cl) was selected as microwave absorbing and cellulose dissolution medium and microwave was applied to accelerate sample dissolution. The conditions of MRAILP including particle size, solvent, microwave pretreatment time and power and the ratio of ionic liquid (IL) to sample were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction yield of patchouli alcohol by the MRAILP was 1.94%, which has increased by 166% compared with microwave-assisted extraction. The recovery was in the range of 95.71-103.7% with relative standard deviation lower than 3.0%. It was a novel alternative extraction method for the fast extraction and determination of patchouli alcohol from Pogostemon cablin.

  12. A flat Universe from high-resolution maps of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    PubMed

    de Bernardis P; Ade; Bock; Bond; Borrill; Boscaleri; Coble; Crill; De Gasperis G; Farese; Ferreira; Ganga; Giacometti; Hivon; Hristov; Iacoangeli; Jaffe; Lange; Martinis; Masi; Mason; Mauskopf; Melchiorri; Miglio; Montroy; Netterfield

    2000-04-27

    The blackbody radiation left over from the Big Bang has been transformed by the expansion of the Universe into the nearly isotropic 2.73 K cosmic microwave background. Tiny inhomogeneities in the early Universe left their imprint on the microwave background in the form of small anisotropies in its temperature. These anisotropies contain information about basic cosmological parameters, particularly the total energy density and curvature of the Universe. Here we report the first images of resolved structure in the microwave background anisotropies over a significant part of the sky. Maps at four frequencies clearly distinguish the microwave background from foreground emission. We compute the angular power spectrum of the microwave background, and find a peak at Legendre multipole Ipeak = (197 +/- 6), with an amplitude delta T200 = (69 +/- 8) microK. This is consistent with that expected for cold dark matter models in a flat (euclidean) Universe, as favoured by standard inflationary models.

  13. Microwave absorption by magnetite: a possible mechanism for coupling nonthermal levels of radiation to biological systems.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, J L

    1996-01-01

    The presence of trace amounts of biogenic magnetite (Fe3O4) in animal and human tissues and the observation that ferromagnetic particles are ubiquitous in laboratory materials (including tissue culture media) provide a physical mechanism through which microwave radiation might produce or appear to produce biological effects. Magnetite is an excellent absorber of microwave radiation at frequencies between 0.5 and 10.0 GHz through the process of ferromagnetic resonance, where the magnetic vector of the incident field causes precession of Bohr magnetons around the internal demagnetizing field of the crystal. Energy absorbed by this process is first transduced into acoustic vibrations at the microwave carrier frequency within the crystal lattice via the magnetoacoustic effect; then, the energy should be dissipated in cellular structures in close proximity to the magnetite crystals. Several possible methods for testing this hypothesis experimentally are discussed. Studies of microwave dosimetry at the cellular level should consider effects of biogenic magnetite.

  14. Differential Damage in Bacterial Cells by Microwave Radiation on the Basis of Cell Wall Structure

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Im-Sun; Rhee, In-Koo; Park, Heui-Dong

    2000-01-01

    Microwave radiation in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis cell suspensions resulted in a dramatic reduction of the viable counts as well as increases in the amounts of DNA and protein released from the cells according to the increase of the final temperature of the cell suspensions. However, no significant reduction of cell density was observed in either cell suspension. It is believed that this is due to the fact that most of the bacterial cells inactivated by microwave radiation remained unlysed. Scanning electron microscopy of the microwave-heated cells revealed severe damage on the surface of most E. coli cells, yet there was no significant change observed in the B. subtilis cells. Microwave-injured E. coli cells were easily lysed in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), yet B. subtilis cells were resistant to SDS. PMID:10788410

  15. Artifacts caused by microwave radiation in cardiac radio telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, A. B.; Gurkovskiy, B. V.; Onishchenko, E. M.; Trifonova, N. Y.; Veselov, D. S.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of the cardiac radio biotelemetry on human heart rate variability has been investigated. The burst transmission mode with a high duty cycle minimizes the influence of microwave artifacts on the reliability of transmitted data.

  16. Effects of Low Intensity Microwave Radiation on Mammalian Serum Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    such response variables, they will busdto investigate the basic mechanisms of interaction of microwave fields wihbiological systems. The identification...this frequency the rabbits were placed in a styrofoam box consisting of a base 24" by 18" with four 2" square 12" vertical sytrofoam posts at each...increased BUN, thus the mechanism (s) responsible for microwave-induced increases in BUN are uncertain at this time. The explanation of the significant

  17. Use of microwave radiation in separating emulsions and dispersions of hydrocarbons and water

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, N.O.

    1986-04-15

    A method is described for enhancing the separation of hydrocarbon and water from an emulsion or dispersion thereof comprising the steps of subjecting the emulsion or dispersion to microwave radiation in the range of one millimeter to 30 centimeters and heating the microwave irradiated emulsion or dispersion to a separating temperature using conventional heating means. A method is also described for enhancing the separation of hydrocarbon and water from from dispersion or emulsion thereof in the presence of chemical deemulsifiers comprising the steps of contacting the dispersion or emulsion and chemical deemulsifiers with microwave energy before heating the emulsion or dispersion to a separating temperature using conventional heating means.

  18. Non-thermal effects of 500MHz - 900MHz microwave radiation on enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Pirogova, E; Vojisavljevic, V; Cosic, I

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes are essential for the catalysis of biochemical reactions and in the regulation of metabolic pathways. They function by greatly accelerating the rate of specific chemical reactions that would otherwise be slow. It has been shown that extremely low-power microwaves can influence enzyme activity [1-5]. This study is focused at investigating the effects of low level microwave exposures ranging from 500MHz to 900MHz on L-Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme activity. The results obtained revealed the increased bioactivity of the LDH upon microwave radiation at two particular frequencies 500MHz and 900MHz.

  19. Development of a microwave clothes dryer: Interim report 4. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Lenz, R.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of the project is to investigate the microwave drying of clothes and to produce data that potential manufacturers can use in developing marketable microwave dryers. This is an interim report covering activities in 1994, the fifth year of the project. During 1994, three field test dryers were completed, two residential models and one commercial subscale model. All of these dryers operated at a microwave frequency of 2,450 MHz, which is the frequency of home microwave ovens and ovens used in fastfood outlets. Consequently, magnetron tubes for these high-production items are inexpensive. The residential dryers were tested according to the Department of Energy protocols and were 15% more efficient than a top-of-the-line conventional electric dryer. They were also 14% faster. Extensive testing was done to assure that the hazard-detection (sniffer) system would sense degradation of the lighter and shut down the dryer before a fire could occur. Numerous butane lighters were heated to destruction in a microwave oven to examine their failure modes. Lighters were placed in microwave dryers equipped with hazard-detection systems; these systems always detected incipient problems before any fire hazard could occur.

  20. Multifrequency analysis of cosmic microwave background radiation and radiation transport in simulations of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, Kevin Michael

    2006-06-01

    We explore two means for probing cosmology, through multifrequency microwave background measurements and through future observations of the epoch of reionization. We use multi-frequency information in first year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data to search for the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We derive an optimal combination of WMAP cross-spectra to extract SZ, limiting the SZ contribution to less than 2% (95% c.l.) at the first acoustic peak in W band. Under the assumption that the removed radio point sources are not correlated with SZ, this limit implies s 8 < 1.07 at 95% c.l. The next generation of microwave telescopes will study the sky at high resolution, scales where both primary and secondary anisotropies are important. We focus on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), simulating observations in three channels, and extracting power spectra in a multifrequency analysis. We find that both radio and infrared extragalactic point sources are important contaminants, but can be effectively removed given three (or more) channels and a good understanding of their frequency dependence. However, improper treatment of the scatter in the point source frequency dependence introduces a large systematic bias. The kinetic SZ effect corrupts measurements of the primordial slope and amplitude on small scales. We discuss the non-Gaussianity of the one- point probability distribution function as a way to constrain the kinetic SZ effect, developing a method for distinguishing this effect. We explore the simulation of maps for ACT, their application to the ACT survey geometry, and filtering techniques to recover signals. Recent work suggests that cosmological fluctuations in reionization developon scales of tens or hundreds of comoving megaparsecs.We build models of ionizing sources from simulations, concluding that a large-scale simulation will require radiation transport from a large fraction of the grid cells. Simulations at a reasonable resolution will have

  1. Viability of fungal and actinomycetal spores after microwave radiation of building materials.

    PubMed

    Górny, Rafał L; Mainelis, Gediminas; Wlazło, Agnieszka; Niesler, Anna; Lis, Danuta O; Marzec, Stanisław; Siwińska, Ewa; Łudzeń-Izbińska, Beata; Harkawy, Aleksander; Kasznia-Kocot, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    The effects of microwave radiation on viability of fungal and actinomycetal spores growing on agar (medium optimal for growth) as well as on wooden panel and drywall (common building construction/finishing materials) were studied. All materials were incubated at high (97-99%) and low (32-33%) relative humidity to mimic "wet" and "dry" environmental conditions. Two microwave power densities (10 and 60 mW/cm2) and three times of exposure (5, 30, and 60 min) were tested to find the most effective parameters of radiation which could be applied to non-invasive reduction or cleaning of building materials from microbial contaminants. Additionally, a control of the surface temperature during the experiments allowed differentiation between thermal and microwave effect of such radiation. The results showed that the viability of studied microorganisms differed depending on their strains, growth conditions, power density of microwave radiation, time of exposure, and varied according to the applied combination of the two latter elements. The effect of radiation resulting in a decrease of spore viability on "wet" wooden panel and drywall was generally observed at 60 min exposure. Shorter exposure times decreased the viability of fungal spores only, while in actinomycetes colonizing the studied building materials, such radiation caused an opposite (supporting growth) effect.

  2. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han-Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. For circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ. PMID:26450679

  3. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han -Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-10-09

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. As a result, for circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ.

  4. Effect of chronic microwave radiation on T cell-mediated immunity in the rabbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nageswari, K. Sri; Sarma, K. R.; Rajvanshi, V. S.; Sharan, R.; Sharma, Manju; Barathwal, Vinita; Singh, Vinod

    1991-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to elucidate the effects of chronic low power-level microwave radiation on the immunological systems of rabbits. Fourteen male Belgian white rabbits were exposed to microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2, 2.1 GHz, 3 h daily, 6 days/week for 3 months in two batches of 7 each in specially designed miniature anechoicchambers. Seven rabbits were subjected to sham exposure for identical duration. The microwave energy was provided through S band standard gain horns connected to a 4K3SJ2 Klystron power amplifier. The first batch of animals were assessed for T lymphocyte-mediated cellular immune response mechanisms and the second batch of animals for B lymphocyte-mediated humoral immune response mechanisms. The peripheral blood samples collected monthly during microwave/sham exposure and during follow-up (5/14 days after termination of exposures, in the second batch animals only) were analysed for T lymphocyte numbers and their mitogen responsiveness to ConA and PHA. Significant suppression of T lymphocyte numbers was noted in the microwave group at 2 months ( P<0.01, Δ% 21.5%) and during follow-up ( P<0.01, Δ% 30.2%). The first batch animals were initially sensitised with BCG and challenged with tuberculin (0.03 ml) at the termination of microwave irradiation/sham exposure and the increase in foot pad thickness (Δ mm), which is a measure of T cell-mediated immunity (delayed type hypersensitivity response, DTH) was noted in both the groups. The microwave group revealed a better response than the control group (Δ%+12.4 vs.+7.54). The animals were sacrified and the tissue T lymphocyte counts (spleen and lymph node) were analysed. No significant variation was observed in the tissue T lymphocyte counts of microwave-irradiated rabbits. From these results it is speculated that the T lymphocytes are sequestered to various lymphoid organs under the influence of microwaves. A sub-population of T cells known as T helper cells (mediating DTH response) are

  5. Long-Wavelength Measurements of the Cosmic Microwave BackgroundRadiation Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, G.F.; Bensadoun, M.; Bersanelli, M.; pDe Amici, G.; Kogut,A.; Levine, S.; Witebsky, C.

    1987-02-01

    We have measured the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation at wavelengths of 0.33, 3.0, 8.2 and 21.3 cm. These measurements represent a continuation of the work reported by Smoot et al. (1985). The new results have a weighted average of 2.70 {+-} 0.05 K and are consistent with past measurements. They limit the possible distortion of the cosmic microwave background radiation spectrum to less than 6%. The results of all measurements to date are consistent with a Planckian spectrum with temperature 2.74 {+-} 0.02 K spanning a wavelength range of 0.1 to 21 cm.

  6. [Effects of microwave radiation on conditioned behavior of rats].

    PubMed

    Zhavoronkov, L P; Kolganova, O I; Dubovik, B V; Matrënina, V L; Posadskaia, V M

    2003-01-01

    Research has been carried out to investigate the effects of microwave exposure (7 GHz, surface energy density 10-50 mW/cm2, SAR 2.1-10.5 W/kg) on learned behaviors of rats in the paradigm of conditioned avoidance reflex. It was shown that transitory reductions in conditioned behavior after acute microwave exposure occurred at an SAR equal to the intensity of rat basal metabolism. It was found cumulative effects for intermittent exposures of rats at a power density of 10 mW/cm2.

  7. Imaging spectroscopy of solar microwave radiation. 1: Flaring emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Jeremy; Gary, Dale E.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Lemen, James R.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of an impulsive microwave burst on the Sun with both high spatial and spectral resolution, made with the Solar Array at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). We used the measured brightness temperature spectrum to infer the emission process responsible for each microwave source, and to derive physical conditions in the source region. We confimed our predictions using soft X-ray measurements from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), soft X-ray images from Yohkoh, and H-alpha flare images together with sunspots and magnetogram images from the Big Bear Solar Observatory.

  8. Experimental study of the plasma effect on the generation of microwave radiation in systems with a virtual cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Zherlitsyn, A. G.; Isakov, P. Ya.; Mel'nikov, G. V.; Slinko, V. N.

    2010-02-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the plasma effect on the generation of microwave radiation in systems with a virtual cathode. Using a triode with a virtual cathode as an example, it is shown that the cathode and anode plasmas reduce the generation efficiency; in particular, the power of the generated microwave radiation decreases and the radiation frequency and the microwave pulse duration change appreciably. It is demonstrated that, at high microwave powers, the power radiated into free space can be reduced by the plasma generated at the surface of the output window. This plasma appears due to discharges developing on the window surface under the combined action of bremsstrahlung, UV radiation, electrons and ions arriving from the beam formation zone, and the microwave electric field.

  9. Thin-layer liquid crystal thermometry of cells in vitro during hyperthermal microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J E; McCulloch, D; Harrison, G H; Cheung, A Y

    1982-01-01

    A nonperturbing technique of thin-layer liquid crystal thermometry was developed to quantitate heating of Chinese hamster ovary cells and the bacterium Serratia marcescens when exposed to 2450-MHz microwave fields at 0.2-0.5 W/cm2. Cells suspended in culture medium were injected into 5-cm glass microcapillary tubes coated on the inside with a thin layer of liquid crystal. The tubes were sealed and placed parallel to the electric field in a watertight waveguide exposure chamber where they were heated by circulating temperature-controlled water. Even at high circulation rates, liquid crystal color changes indicated local microwave capillary tube heating of 0.1-0.25 degrees C. Precision of measurement was 0.02 degrees C. Observations during microwave heating were significantly different from observations without microwaves at the 1% level, and heating increased as circulating water flow was reduced from 300 ml/s to 100 ml/s. The results of a cell survival assay following hyperthermal treatment were in good agreement with expectations based on the observations of microwave heating using liquid crystals.

  10. Influence of microwave frequency electromagnetic radiation on terpene emission and content in aromatic plants.

    PubMed

    Soran, Maria-Loredana; Stan, Manuela; Niinemets, Ülo; Copolovici, Lucian

    2014-09-15

    Influence of environmental stress factors on both crop and wild plants of nutritional value is an important research topic. The past research has focused on rising temperatures, drought, soil salinity and toxicity, but the potential effects of increased environmental contamination by human-generated electromagnetic radiation on plants have little been studied. Here we studied the influence of microwave irradiation at bands corresponding to wireless router (WLAN) and mobile devices (GSM) on leaf anatomy, essential oil content and volatile emissions in Petroselinum crispum, Apium graveolens and Anethum graveolens. Microwave irradiation resulted in thinner cell walls, smaller chloroplasts and mitochondria, and enhanced emissions of volatile compounds, in particular, monoterpenes and green leaf volatiles (GLV). These effects were stronger for WLAN-frequency microwaves. Essential oil content was enhanced by GSM-frequency microwaves, but the effect of WLAN-frequency microwaves was inhibitory. There was a direct relationship between microwave-induced structural and chemical modifications of the three plant species studied. These data collectively demonstrate that human-generated microwave pollution can potentially constitute a stress to the plants.

  11. Influence of microwave frequency electromagnetic radiation on terpene emission and content in aromatic plants

    PubMed Central

    Soran, Maria-Loredana; Stan, Manuela; Niinemets, Ülo; Copolovici, Lucian

    2015-01-01

    Influence of environmental stress factors on both crop and wild plants of nutritional value is an important research topic. The past research has focused on rising temperatures, drought, soil salinity and toxicity, but the potential effects of increased environmental contamination by human-generated electromagnetic radiation on plants have little been studied. Here we studied the influence of microwave irradiation at bands corresponding to wireless router (WLAN) and mobile devices (GSM) on leaf anatomy, essential oil content and volatile emissions in Petroselinum crispum, Apium graveolens and Anethum graveolens. Microwave irradiation resulted in thinner cell walls, smaller chloroplasts and mitochondria, and enhanced emissions of volatile compounds, in particular, monoterpenes and green leaf volatiles. These effects were stronger for WLAN-frequency microwaves. Essential oil content was enhanced by GSM-frequency microwaves, but the effect of WLAN-frequency microwaves was inhibitory. There was a direct relationship between microwave-induced structural and chemical modifications of the three plant species studied. These data collectively demonstrate that human-generated microwave pollution can potentially constitute a stress to the plants. PMID:25050479

  12. Estimation of radiofrequency power leakage from microwave ovens for dosimetric assessment at nonionizing radiation exposure levels.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Iturri, Peio; de Miguel-Bilbao, Silvia; Aguirre, Erik; Azpilicueta, Leire; Falcone, Francisco; Ramos, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic field leakage levels of nonionizing radiation from a microwave oven have been estimated within a complex indoor scenario. By employing a hybrid simulation technique, based on coupling full wave simulation with an in-house developed deterministic 3D ray launching code, estimations of the observed electric field values can be obtained for the complete indoor scenario. The microwave oven can be modeled as a time- and frequency-dependent radiating source, in which leakage, basically from the microwave oven door, is propagated along the complete indoor scenario interacting with all of the elements present in it. This method can be of aid in order to assess the impact of such devices on expected exposure levels, allowing adequate minimization strategies such as optimal location to be applied.

  13. Estimation of Radiofrequency Power Leakage from Microwave Ovens for Dosimetric Assessment at Nonionizing Radiation Exposure Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Iturri, Peio; de Miguel-Bilbao, Silvia; Aguirre, Erik; Azpilicueta, Leire; Falcone, Francisco; Ramos, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic field leakage levels of nonionizing radiation from a microwave oven have been estimated within a complex indoor scenario. By employing a hybrid simulation technique, based on coupling full wave simulation with an in-house developed deterministic 3D ray launching code, estimations of the observed electric field values can be obtained for the complete indoor scenario. The microwave oven can be modeled as a time- and frequency-dependent radiating source, in which leakage, basically from the microwave oven door, is propagated along the complete indoor scenario interacting with all of the elements present in it. This method can be of aid in order to assess the impact of such devices on expected exposure levels, allowing adequate minimization strategies such as optimal location to be applied. PMID:25705676

  14. The Microwave Applications Theory Program at NRL and Some Chemistry Code Applications to Ionospheric Heating by Microwave Radiation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-26

    RADIATION 1. INTRODUCTION The advent of high power pulsed microwave devices, the magnetrons, at NRL,I which currently generate ’U 1 G Watt at X 1 0 cm and a...separation needed to sustain such a plasma. ( g ) relaxation of the disturbed air and the impact of the late time air chemistry on multi pulse breakdown...and the first negative bands of N 2+ . These two band systems correspond2 7 to N2 +(B2E - X2 E) and N2 (C 3Tu - B 3 g ) transitions, respectively. The

  15. The influence of microwave radiation from cellular phone on fetal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ji; Yuhua, Zhang; Xiao-qian, Yang; Rongping, Jiang; Dong-mei, Guo; Xi, Cui

    2012-03-01

    The increasing use of cellular phones in our society has brought focus on the potential detrimental effects to human health by microwave radiation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the intensity of oxidative stress and the level of neurotransmitters in the brains of fetal rats chronically exposed to cellular phones. The experiment was performed on pregnant rats exposed to different intensities of microwave radiation from cellular phones. Thirty-two pregnant rats were randomly divided into four groups: CG, GL, GM, and GH. CG accepted no microwave radiation, GL group radiated 10 min each time, GM group radiated 30 min, and GH group radiated 60 min. The 3 experimental groups were radiated 3 times a day from the first pregnant day for consecutively 20 days, and on the 21st day, the fetal rats were taken and then the contents of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), malondialdehyde (MDA), noradrenaline (NE), dopamine (DA), and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HT) in the brain were assayed. Compared with CG, there were significant differences (P<0.05) found in the contents of SOD, GSH-Px, and MDA in GM and GH; the contents of SOD and GSH-Px decreased and the content of MDA increased. The significant content differences of NE and DA were found in fetal rat brains in GL and GH groups, with the GL group increased and the GH group decreased. Through this study, we concluded that receiving a certain period of microwave radiation from cellular phones during pregnancy has certain harm on fetal rat brains.

  16. Effect of microwave radiation on inactivation of Clostridium sporogenes (PA 3679) spores

    SciTech Connect

    Welt, B.A.; Lund, D.B.; Rossen, J.L. ); Tong, C.H. Rutgers Univ., Cook College, New Brunswick, NJ )

    1994-02-01

    Three techniques for studying effects of microwave radiation on microorganisms were introduced. Spores of Clostridium sporogenes (PA 3679) were chosen as a test organism because the kinetic parameters for thermal inactivation are well known and because of the importance of the genus Clostridium to the food industry. For the first technique, a specially designed kinetics vessel was used to compare inactivation rates of microwave-heated and conventionally heated spores at steady-state temperatures of 90, 100, and 110[degrees]C. Rats were found to be similar at the 95% confidence level. The second and third techniques were designed to study the effect of relatively high power microwave exposure at sublethal temperatures. In the second approach, the suspension was continuously cooled via direct contact with a copper cooling coil in a well-mixed vessel, outside the microwave oven. The suspension was pumped through a Teflon loop in the oven, where it continuously absorbed approximately 400 W of microwave power. Inactivation occurred in both irradiated and unirradiated samples. It was suspected that copper ions entered the suspension form the copper coil and were toxic to the spores. The fact that the results were similar, however, implied the absence of nonthermal microwave effects. In the third approach, the copper coil was replaced with a silicone tubing loop in a microwave transparent vessel. The suspension was continuously irradiated at 150 W of microwave power. No detectable inactivation occurred. Results indicated that the effect of microwave energy on viability of spores was indistinguishable from the effect of conventional heating.

  17. Effect of microwave radiation on inactivation of Clostridium sporogenes (PA 3679) spores.

    PubMed Central

    Welt, B A; Tong, C H; Rossen, J L; Lund, D B

    1994-01-01

    Three techniques for studying effects of microwave radiation on microorganisms were introduced. Spores of Clostridium sporogenes (PA 3679) were chosen as a test organism because the kinetic parameters for thermal inactivation are well known and because of the importance of the genus Clostridium to the food industry. For the first technique, a specially designed kinetics vessel was used to compare inactivation rates of microwave-heated and conventionally heated spores at steady-state temperatures of 90, 100, and 110 degrees C. Rates were found to be similar at the 95% confidence level. The second and third techniques were designed to study the effect of relatively high power microwave exposure at sublethal temperatures. In the second approach, the suspension was continuously cooled via direct contact with a copper cooling coil in a well-mixed vessel, outside the microwave oven. The suspension was pumped through a Teflon loop in the oven, where it continuously absorbed approximately 400 W of microwave power. Inactivation occurred in both irradiated and unirradiated samples. It was suspected that copper ions entered the suspension from the copper coil and were toxic to the spores. The fact that the results were similar, however, implied the absence of nonthermal microwave effects. In the third approach, the copper coil was replaced with a silicone tubing loop in a microwave transparent vessel. The suspension was continuously irradiated at 150 W of microwave power. No detectable inactivation occurred. Results indicated that the effect of microwave energy on viability of spores was indistinguishable from the effect of conventional heating. PMID:8135512

  18. Operating a Microwave Radiation Detection Monitor. Module 10. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on operating a microwave radiation detection monitor. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) testing the…

  19. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function: II. Combined effect of radiation and some drugs.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, A G; Dubovick, B V; Degtyariov, I G; Pronkevich, A N

    1995-01-01

    The combined effects of microwave radiation and some drugs were studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The experiments established that exposure to pulse-modulated 915 MHz microwaves for up to 40 min had no effect on either the rate or the amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches, unless the average absorbed power was high enough to produce preparation heating. Treatment of the preparation with saline containing (0.6-3.0) 10(-5) M of propranolol or (0.5-1.5) 10(-7) M of atropine altered neither its pacemaker nor its contractile functions; these drugs also had no effect when they were combined with nonthermal microwave irradiation. Caffeine (1 mM) strongly increased the average heart power, which was calculated as the product of twitch rate and amplitude. The caffeine effect appeared to be significantly augmented (by about 15%, P < 0.02) under exposure to burst-type pulsed microwaves (pulse width, 1.5 msec; pause, 2.5 msec; 8 pulses/burst, 16 bursts/s; average SAR, 8-10 W/kg). By itself, this modulation was not effective; the heating of the preparation and saline during exposure was approximately 0.1 degrees C, which could not account for the detected changes. The experimental results demonstrate that caffeine treatment increases the microwave sensitivity of the frog auricle preparation and reveals primarily subthreshold, nonthermal microwave effect.

  20. Effects of 900-MHz microwave radiation on gamma-ray-induced damage to mouse hematopoietic system.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Xu, Qian; Jin, Zong-Da; Zhang, Jun; Lu, Min-Xia; Nie, Ji-Hua; Tong, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of humans simultaneously to microwave and gamma-ray irradiation may be a commonly encountered phenomenon. In a previous study data showed that low-dose microwave radiation increased the survival rate of mice irradiated with 8Gy gamma-ray; however, the mechanisms underlying these findings remain unclear. Consequently, studies were undertaken to examine the effects of microwave exposure on hematopoietic system adversely altered by gamma-ray irradiation in mice. Preexposure to low-dose microwaves attenuated the damage produced by gamma-ray irradiation as evidenced by less severe pathological alterations in bone marrow and spleen. The protective effects of microwaves were postulated to be due to up-expression of some hematopoietic growth factors, stimulation of proliferation of the granulocyte-macrophages in bone marrow, and inhibition of the gamma-ray induced suppression of hematopoietic stem cells/hematopoietic progenitor cells. Data thus indicate that prior exposure to microwaves may be beneficial in providing protection against injuries produced by gamma-ray on the hematopoietic system in mice.

  1. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function. 2: Combined effect of radiation and some drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, A.G.; Dubovick, B.V.; Degtyariov, I.G.; Pronkevich, A.N.

    1995-09-01

    The combined effects of microwave radiation and some drugs were studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The experiments established that exposure to pulse-modulated 915 Mhz microwaves for up to 40 min had no effect on either the rate or the amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches, unless the average absorbed power was high enough to produce preparation heating. Treatment of the preparation with saline containing (0.6--3.0) 10{sup {minus}5} M of propranolol or (0.5--1.5) 10{sup {minus}7} M of atropine altered neither its pacemaker nor its contractile functions; these drugs also had no effect when they were combined with nonthermal microwave irradiation. Caffeine (1 mM) strongly increased the average heart power, which was calculated as the product of twitch rate ad amplitude. The caffeine effect appeared to be significantly augmented (by about 15%, P<0.02) under exposure to burst-type pulsed microwaves (pulse width, 1.5 msec; pause, 2.5 msec; 8 pulses/burst, 16 bursts/s; average SAR, 8--10 W/kg). By itself, this modulation was not effective; the heating of the preparation and saline during exposure was approximately 0.1 C, which could not account for the detected changes. The experimental results demonstrate that caffeine treatment increases the microwave sensitivity of the frog auricle preparation and reveals primarily subthreshold, nonthermal microwave effect.

  2. Dark energy and the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, S.; Knox, L.

    2000-01-01

    We find that current cosmic microwave background anisotropy data strongly constrain the mean spatial curvature of the Universe to be near zero, or, equivalently, the total energy density to be near critical-as predicted by inflation. This result is robust to editing of data sets, and variation of other cosmological parameters (totaling seven, including a cosmological constant). Other lines of argument indicate that the energy density of nonrelativistic matter is much less than critical. Together, these results are evidence, independent of supernovae data, for dark energy in the Universe.

  3. Effects of exposure to microwaves on cellular immunity and placental steroids in pregnant rats.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, H; Seto, T; Nagase, H; Yoshida, M; Dan, S; Ogino, K

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Microwaves produce various detrimental changes based on actions of heat or non-specific stress, although the effects of microwaves on pregnant organisms has not been uniform. This study was designed to clarify the effect of exposure to microwaves during pregnancy on endocrine and immune functions. METHODS: Natural killer cell activity and natural killer cell subsets in the spleen were measured, as well as some endocrine indicators in blood--corticosterone and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) as indices of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis--beta-endorphin, oestradiol, and progesterone in six female virgin rats and six pregnant rats (nine to 11 days gestation) exposed to microwaves at 10 mW/cm2 incident power density at 2450 MHz for 90 minutes. The same measurements were performed in control rats (six virgin and six pregnant rats). RESULTS: Skin temperature in virgin and pregnant rats increased immediately after exposure to microwaves. Although splenic activity of natural killer cells and any of the subset populations identified by the monoclonal antibodies CD16 and CD57 did not differ in virgin rats with or without exposure to microwaves, pregnant rats exposed to microwaves showed a significant reduction of splenic activity of natural killer cells and CD16+CD57-. Although corticosterone and ACTH increased, and oestradiol decreased in exposed virgin and pregnant rats, microwaves produced significant increases in beta-endorphin and progesterone only in pregnant rats. CONCLUSIONS: Microwaves at the power of 10 mW/cm2 produced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and increased oestradiol in both virgin and pregnant rats, suggesting that microwaves greatly stress pregnant organisms. These findings in pregnant rats suggest that--with exposure to microwaves--pregnancy induces immunosuppression, which could result in successful maintainance of pregnancy. This enhancement of adaptability to heat stress with pregnancy may be mediated by

  4. Naltrexone pretreatment blocks microwave-induced changes in central cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Wen, Y.F.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Repeated exposure of rats to pulsed, circularly polarized microwaves (2,450-MHz, 2-microseconds pulses at 500 pps, power density 1 mW/cm2, at an averaged, whole-body SAR of 0.6 W/kg) induced biphasic changes in the concentration of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the central nervous system. An increase in receptor concentration occurred in the hippocampus of rats subjected to ten 45-min sessions of microwave exposure, whereas a decrease in concentration was observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats exposed to ten 20-min sessions. These findings, which confirm earlier work in the authors' laboratory, were extended to include pretreatment of rats with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone (1 mg/kg, IP) before each session of exposure. The drug treatment blocked the microwave-induced changes in cholinergic receptors in the brain. These data further support the authors' hypothesis that endogenous opioids play a role in the effects of microwaves on central cholinergic systems.

  5. Oil extraction from Scenedesmus obliquus using a continuous microwave system--design, optimization, and quality characterization.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sundar; Allen, James D; Kanitkar, Akanksha; Boldor, Dorin

    2011-02-01

    A 1.2 kW, 2450 MHz resonant continuous microwave processing system was designed and optimized for oil extraction from green algae (Scenedesmus obliquus). Algae-water suspension (1:1 w/w) was heated to 80 and 95°C, and subjected to extraction for up to 30 min. Maximum oil yield was achieved at 95°C and 30 min. The microwave system extracted 76-77% of total recoverable oil at 20-30 min and 95°C, compared to only 43-47% for water bath control. Extraction time and temperature had significant influence (p<0.0001) on extraction yield. Oil analysis indicated that microwaves extracted oil containing higher percentages of unsaturated and essential fatty acids (indicating higher quality). This study validates for the first time the efficiency of a continuous microwave system for extraction of lipids from algae. Higher oil yields, faster extraction rates and superior oil quality demonstrate this system's feasibility for oil extraction from a variety of feedstock.

  6. Tolazoline decreases survival time during microwave-induced lethal heat stress in anesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jauchem, J.R.; Chang, K.S.; Frei, M.R.

    1996-03-01

    Effects of {alpha}-adrenergic antagonists have been studied during environmental heating but not during microwave-induced heating. Tolazoline may exert some of its effects via {alpha}-adrenergic blockade. In the present study, ketamine-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2450-MHz microwaves at an average power density of 60 mW/cm{sup 2} (whole-body specific absorption rate of approximately 14 W/kg) until lethal temperatures were attained. The effects of tolazoline (10 mg/kg body weight) on physiological responses (including changes in body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate) were examined. Survival time was significantly shorter in the tolazoline group than in saline-treated animals. In general, heart rate and blood pressure responses were similar to those that occur during environmental heat stress. Heart rate, however, was significantly elevated in animals that received tolazoline, both before and during terminal microwave exposure. It is possible that changes associated with the elevated heart rate (e.g., less cardiac filling) in tolazoline-treated animals resulted in greater susceptibility to microwave-induced heating and the lower survival time. 47 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Effects of fetal microwave radiation exposure on offspring behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanchun; Li, Zhihui; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Chenggang

    2015-03-01

    The recent rapid development of electronic communication techniques is resulting in a marked increase in exposure of humans to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This has raised public concerns about the health hazards of long-term environmental EMF exposure for fetuses and children. Some studies have suggested EMF exposure in children could induce nervous system disorders. However, gender-dependent effects of microwave radiation exposure on cognitive dysfunction have not previously been reported. Here we investigated whether in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz microwave throughout gestation (Days 3.5-18) affected behavior, using the open field test (OFT), elevated-plus maze (EPM), tail suspension test (TST), forced swimming test (FST) and Morris water maze (MWM). We found that mice showed less movement in the center of an open field (using the OFT) and in an open arm (using the EPM) after in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz radiation, which suggested that the mice had increased anxiety-related behavior. Mice demonstrated reduced immobility in TST and FST after in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz radiation, which suggested that the mice had decreased depression-related behavior. From the MWM test, we observed that male offspring demonstrated decreased learning and memory, while females were not affected in learning and memory, which suggested that microwaves had gender-dependent effects. In summary, we have provided the first experimental evidence of microwaves inducing gender-dependent effects.

  8. Application of the thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensor in a power radiation monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Gao; Jing, Yang; Si, Jiang; Debo, Wang

    2016-08-01

    A power radiation monitoring system based on thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensors is studied. This monitoring system consists of three modules: a data acquisition module, a data processing and display module, and a data sharing module. It can detect the power radiation in the environment and the date information can be processed and shared. The measured results show that the thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensor and the power radiation monitoring system both have a relatively good linearity. The sensitivity of the thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensor is about 0.101 mV/mW, and the sensitivity of the monitoring system is about 0.038 V/mW. The voltage gain of the monitoring system is about 380 times, which is relatively consistent with the theoretical value. In addition, the low-frequency and low-power module in the monitoring system is adopted in order to reduce the electromagnetic pollution and the power consumption, and this work will extend the application of the thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensor in more areas. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11304158), the Province Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu (No. BK20140890), the Open Research Fund of the Key Laboratory of MEMS of Ministry of Education, Southeast University (No. 3206005302), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications (Nos. NY213024, NY215139).

  9. Effects of fetal microwave radiation exposure on offspring behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanchun; Li, Zhihui; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Chenggang

    2015-01-01

    The recent rapid development of electronic communication techniques is resulting in a marked increase in exposure of humans to electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This has raised public concerns about the health hazards of long-term environmental EMF exposure for fetuses and children. Some studies have suggested EMF exposure in children could induce nervous system disorders. However, gender-dependent effects of microwave radiation exposure on cognitive dysfunction have not previously been reported. Here we investigated whether in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz microwave throughout gestation (Days 3.5–18) affected behavior, using the open field test (OFT), elevated-plus maze (EPM), tail suspension test (TST), forced swimming test (FST) and Morris water maze (MWM). We found that mice showed less movement in the center of an open field (using the OFT) and in an open arm (using the EPM) after in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz radiation, which suggested that the mice had increased anxiety-related behavior. Mice demonstrated reduced immobility in TST and FST after in utero exposure to 9.417-GHz radiation, which suggested that the mice had decreased depression-related behavior. From the MWM test, we observed that male offspring demonstrated decreased learning and memory, while females were not affected in learning and memory, which suggested that microwaves had gender-dependent effects. In summary, we have provided the first experimental evidence of microwaves inducing gender-dependent effects. PMID:25359903

  10. Propagation of Polarized Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation in an Anisotropic Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moskaliuk, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    The polarization plane of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) can be rotated either in a space-time with metric of anisotropic type and in a magnetized plasma or in the presence of a quintessential background with pseudoscalar coupling to electromagnetism. A unified treatment of these three phenomena is presented for cold anisotropic plasma at the pre-recombination epoch. It is argued that the generalized expressions derived in the present study may be relevant for direct searches of a possible rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization.

  11. Observation of linear-polarization-sensitivity in the microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, R. G.; Ramanayaka, A. N.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    We examine the linear polarization sensitivity of the radiation- induced magneto-resistance oscillations by investigating the effect of rotating in-situ the electric field of linearly polarized microwaves relative to the current, in the GaAs/AlGaAs system. We find that the frequency and the phase of the photo-excited magneto-resistance oscillations are insensitive to the polarization. On the other hand, the amplitude of the resistance oscillations are strongly sensitive to the relative orientation between the microwave antenna and the current-axis in the specimen.

  12. A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare agricultural soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, W. J.; Paris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare, stratified agricultural soils was developed to assist in the analysis of data gathered in the joint soil moisture experiment. The predictions of the model were compared with preliminary X band (2.8 cm) microwave and ground based observations. Measured brightness temperatures at vertical and horizontal polarizations can be used to estimate the moisture content of the top centimeter of soil with + or - 1 percent accuracy. It is also shown that the Stokes parameters can be used to distinguish between moisture and surface roughness effects.

  13. Designing of conducting polymer composites for shielding of microwave radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Parveen; Barala, Sunil Kumar; Arora, Manju; Kotnala, R. K.

    2013-06-01

    Nanocomposites (NCs) possessing moderate conductivity and dielectric/magnetic properties were prepared by in-situ incorporation of different fillers [BaTiO3 (BT) and γ-Fe2O3 (FO) nanoparticles (NPs)] within polyaniline (PANI) matrix. Several compositions were prepared by keeping PANI:filler ratio as 2:1 and varying the FO:BT ratio of the NCs. The X-Ray diffraction patterns confirmed the formation of electrically conducting PANI and proper incorporation of BT or FO NPs. Similarly, HRTEM images and EDX elemental analysis confirm the formation of NCs and phase preservation of incorporated FO or BT NPS. The magnetization measurements revealed that incorporation of γ-Fe2O3 resulted in improvement in magnetic properties with saturation magnetization value of 12.8 emu/g. The microwave shielding studies in the 12.4-18.0 GHz frequency range (P-band) revealed that the among various NCs, refelction loss was minimum (-4.6 dB) for composition having BT:FO ratio of 1:1 (i.e. PBF3) probably due to better matching of input impedance. Further, the incorporation of BT and FO NPs leads to reduction of skin depth and additional dielectric/magnetic losses resulting in absorption loss of -20.2 dB. The total attenuation (T) of -24.8 dB (i.e. >99 % attenuation) demonstrate the potential of these NCs for making futuristic microwave shields.

  14. Results of microwave oven radiation leakage surveys at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the results of routine microwave oven leakage surveys which were conducted at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) between 1974 and 1985. A total of 80 ovens representing 250 oven-years of operation were examined. The mean maximum leakage at any point 5 cm from the surface was 0.20 x/ 3.1 mW/cm/sup 2/. Although there was a great deal of scatter in sequential measurements for individual ovens, it appears that leakage tends to increase with oven age. The mean logarithmic rate of increase for the 55 ovens with usable data was 0.21 per year. Case histories of ovens leaking in excess of the standard were examined, and improvements in leakage monitoring programs are suggested.

  15. Microwave radiation absorbers based on corrugated composites with carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D. S.; Plyushch, A. O.; Gorokhov, G. V.; Bychanok, U. S.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Maksimenko, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    A complex analysis of the dependence of the absorption coefficient of polymer composites with nonmagnetic carbon inclusions on the real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity, as well as on the material thickness is performed in frequency range 26-37 GHz. The composites containing 0.2 wt % of carbon fibers have been obtained. It has been experimentally found that the corrugation of the composite surface substantially increases the absorbability (from 63 to 92% at a frequency of 30 GHz and a thickness of 4.50 mm) upon a decrease in the sample mass (by 28%). A method has been proposed for calculating the absorptance of corrugated composites in the microwave range.

  16. Interpretation of the cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, E. L.; Meyer, S. S.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Hauser, M. G.; Kogut, A.; Lineweaver, C.; Mather, J. C.; Smoot, G. F.

    1992-01-01

    The large-scale cosmic background anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument is compared to the sensitive previous measurements on various angular scales, and to the predictions of a wide variety of models of structure formation driven by gravitational instability. The observed anisotropy is consistent with all previously measured upper limits and with a number of dynamical models of structure formation. For example, the data agree with an unbiased cold dark matter (CDM) model with H0 = 50 km/s Mpc and Delta-M/M = 1 in a 16 Mpc radius sphere. Other models, such as CDM plus massive neutrinos (hot dark matter (HDM)), or CDM with a nonzero cosmological constant are also consistent with the COBE detection and can provide the extra power seen on 5-10,000 km/s scales.

  17. Microwave radiation and reactor design influence microbial communities during methane fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Zieliński, Marcin; Jaranowska, Paulina

    2012-09-01

    The effect of reactor design and method of heating on the efficiency of methane fermentation and composition of microbial communities, especially methanogenic Archaea, were determined. The research was carried out using submerge- and trickling-bed reactors fed with wastewater and the heat supply into the reactors included a convection heating method and microwave radiation. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and relative real-time PCR were used in order to assess the biofilm communities. The best fermentation results and the highest abundance of methanogenic Archaea in biomass were observed in microwave heated trickling-bed reactors. The research proved that in reactors of identical design, the application of microwaves enabled a higher fermentation efficiency to be obtained and simultaneously increased the diversity of methanogenic Archaea communities that favors process stability. All the identified sequences of Archaea belonged to Methanosarcina sp., suggesting that species from this genera are susceptible to non-thermal effects of microwaves. There were no effects from microwaves on the bacterial communities in both types of reactors, however, the bacterial species composition varied in the reactors of different design.

  18. Effect of pretreatment with dehulling and microwaving on the flavor characteristics of cold-pressed rapeseed oil by GC-MS-PCA and electronic nose discrimination.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Yang, Mei; Huang, Fenghong; Zheng, Chang; Deng, Qianchun

    2013-07-01

    Raw and dehulled rapeseeds were treated with microwave energy (800 W) from 1 to 8 min with 1-min intervals at a frequency of 2450 MHz to investigate the influence of microwaving and dehulling pretreatment on the flavor characteristics of rapeseed oil extracted by pressing. Headspace solid phase microextraction was used to isolate the volatile compounds of rapeseed oil, which were then identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The results indicated that microwave and dehulling pretreatment of rapeseed can significantly influence the kinds and content of volatile compounds. The key flavor compounds in rapeseed oil were oxidized volatiles, heterocyclic compounds, and degradation products of glucosinolates. A pungent compound, 4-isothiocyanato-1-butene, was reduced by 97% in rapeseed treated for 3 min with microwaves energy when compared to the rapeseed oil without any treatment. The pyrazine compounds in the oil appeared after 6 min of microwave pretreatment and give a pleasant roasting flavor when compared to crude oils. Principal component analysis was able to differentiate between oils obtained using 4 pretreatment processes based on volatile compounds and electronic nose. The results showed that dehulling pretreatment could improve the flavor, yet microwaving had a greater effect on the flavor of rapeseed oils.

  19. Interaction of ionizing radiation, genetically active chemicals, and radiofrequency radiation in human and rodent cells. Final report 1 Oct 87-30 Sep 89

    SciTech Connect

    Meltz, M.L.; Holahan, P.K.; Smith, S.T.; Kerbacher, J.J.; Ciaravino, V.

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the possible interaction between radiofrequency radiation (RFR) and agents which are known to damage DNA. Experiments were performed using exposures of CHO cells to 350, 850, 1200, and 2450 MHz RFR at up to 40 W/kg and temperatures ranging from 37 to 40 C. No genotoxic effect was observed by sister chromotid exchange induction, chromosome aberration induction, or gene mutation (at the thymidine kinase locus). At levels at or below 10 mW/cm2 and specific absorption rates (SARs) at or below 4 W/kg, there was no evidence that DNA repair was induced or repair of preexisting DNA damage was inhibited. Adriamycin but not mitomycin c caused a statistically significant increase in the frequency of aberrant cells at 40 C with or without RFR. These observations support thermal mechanisms of RFR interaction.

  20. Method for digesting spent ion exchange resins and recovering actinides therefrom using microwave radiation

    DOEpatents

    Maxwell, III, Sherrod L.; Nichols, Sheldon T.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for digesting diphosphonic acid substituted cation exchange resins that have become loaded with actinides, rare earth metals, or heavy metals, in a way that allows for downstream chromatographic analysis of the adsorbed species without damage to or inadequate elution from the downstream chromatographic resins. The methods of the present invention involve contacting the loaded diphosphonic acid resin with concentrated oxidizing acid in a closed vessel, and irradiating this mixture with microwave radiation. This efficiently increases the temperature of the mixture to a level suitable for digestion of the resin without the use of dehydrating acids that can damage downstream analytical resins. In order to ensure more complete digestion, the irradiated mixture can be mixed with hydrogen peroxide or other oxidant, and reirradiated with microwave radiation.

  1. Investigation of the Surface Filamentary Discharge in Focus of Microwave Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    undisturbed gas 0 sE qL (10.28) - full energy of the explosion. Inserting measured value of the angle α in (10.12), we get the measured value of the...microwave (MW) wavelength range showed that they are being realized in a streamer form at some definite range of gas parameters and radiation. Such...structure formation velocity, maximum gas temperature T of discharge plasma in streamer channels, absorbing ability etc. In frames of the Project

  2. A new method for the precise multiband microwave dielectric measurement using stepped impedance stub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, M. Y.; Ali, A.; Hunter, I. C.; Roberts, N. S.

    2016-11-01

    This article presents a new method of wideband dielectric measurement at microwave frequencies. This method can be used to determine the complex dielectric properties of solid and semisolid materials from 0.9 GHz to 4.5 GHz, including the ISM bands of 915 MHz and 2450 MHz. The new method is based on the scattering parameter measurement of a stepped impedance open circuited micro-strip stub, partly loaded with dielectric test material. Current microwave wideband spectroscopy techniques generally measure dielectric materials over a wide range of frequencies but their accuracy is limited. In contrast, narrowband techniques generally measure dielectric properties to a high accuracy but only at a single frequency. This new technique is capable of measuring dielectric properties over a wide range of frequencies to a high accuracy. The technique has been verified by the empirical characterisation of the dielectric properties of Teflon and Duroid 5880 materials. Empirical results were in good agreement with values in the manufacturer’s Data Sheets. The complex permittivity data will be useful for further microwave processing of the materials.

  3. Exposure of cultured astroglial and microglial brain cells to 900 MHz microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Thorlin, Thorleif; Rouquette, Jean-Michel; Hamnerius, Yngve; Hansson, Elisabeth; Persson, Mikael; Björklund, Ulrika; Rosengren, Lars; Rönnbäck, Lars; Persson, Mikael

    2006-08-01

    The rapid rise in the use of mobile communications has raised concerns about health issues related to low-level microwave radiation. The head and brain are usually the most exposed targets in mobile phone users. In the brain, two types of glial cells, the astroglial and the microglial cells, are interesting in the context of biological effects from microwave exposure. These cells are widely distributed in the brain and are directly involved in the response to brain damage as well as in the development of brain cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether 900 MHz radiation could affect these two different glial cell types in culture by studying markers for damage-related processes in the cells. Primary cultures enriched in astroglial cells were exposed to 900 MHz microwave radiation in a temperature-controlled exposure system at specific absorption rates (SARs) of 3 W/kg GSM modulated wave (mw) for 4, 8 and 24 h or 27 W/kg continuous wave (cw) for 24 h, and the release into the extracellular medium of the two pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (Il6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (Tnfa) was analyzed. In addition, levels of the astroglial cell-specific reactive marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap), whose expression dynamics is different from that of cytokines, were measured in astroglial cultures and in astroglial cell-conditioned cell culture medium at SARs of 27 and 54 W/kg (cw) for 4 or 24 h. No significant differences could be detected for any of the parameters studied at any time and for any of the radiation characteristics. Total protein levels remained constant during the experiments. Microglial cell cultures were exposed to 900 MHz radiation at an SAR of 3 W/kg (mw) for 8 h, and I16, Tnfa, total protein and the microglial reactivity marker ED-1 (a macrophage activation antigen) were measured. No significant differences were found. The morphology of the cultured astroglial cells and microglia was studied and appeared to be

  4. A unique combination of infrared and microwave radiation accelerates wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schramm, J Mark; Warner, Dave; Hardesty, Robert A; Oberg, Kerby C

    2003-01-01

    Light or electromagnetic radiation has been reported to enhance wound healing. The use of selected spectra, including infrared and microwave, has been described; however, no studies to date have examined the potential benefit of combining these spectra. In this study, a device that emits electromagnetic radiation across both the infrared and microwave ranges was used. To test the effects of this unique electromagnetic radiation spectrum on wound healing, two clinically relevant wound-healing models (i.e., tensile strength of simple incisions and survival of McFarlane flaps) were selected. After the creation of a simple full-thickness incision (n = 35 rats) or a caudally based McFarlane flap (n = 33 rats), animals were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: untreated control, infrared, or combined electromagnetic radiation. Treatment was administered for 30 minutes, twice daily for 18 days in animals with simple incisions, and 15 days in animals with McFarlane flaps. The wound area or flap was harvested and analyzed, blinded to the treatment regimens. A p value of less than 0.05 obtained by analysis of variance was considered to be statistically significant. Animals receiving combined electromagnetic radiation demonstrated increased tensile strength (2.62 N/mm2) compared with animals receiving infrared radiation (2.36 N/mm2) or untreated controls (1.73 N/mm2, p < 0.001). Animals with McFarlane flaps receiving combined electromagnetic radiation had increased flap survival (78.0 percent) compared with animals receiving infrared radiation (69.7 percent) and untreated controls (63.1 percent, p < 0.01). Thus, combined electromagnetic radiation provided a distinct advantage in wound healing that might augment current treatment regimens.

  5. The effect of microwave electromagnetic radiation on organic compounds removal efficiency in a reactor with a biofilm.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, M; Krzemieniewski, M

    2007-01-01

    This article shows the results of research on microwave radiation as a factor affecting organic compounds removal in a reactor with a biofilm. In the experiment a bioreactor was situated inside a microwave tube and there exposed to radiation. Municipal wastes were supplied to the bioreactor from a retention tank, to which they returned having passed through the reactor's packing. The whole system operated in a time cycle comprising a 24-hour detention of the wastewaters supply. The research was based on the specific properties of microwave heating, i.e. their ability to heat only the substances of appropriate dielectric properties. As the reactor was properly constructed and the microwave generator work was synchronised with that of the volumetric pump, microwave energy was directed mostly to the biofilm. It was observed that as a result of microwave radiation the process of organic compounds removal, defined as Chemical Oxygen Demand COD, increased its rate nearly by half. Simultaneously the process efficiency increased by 7.7% at the maximum. While analysing the changes the organic compounds underwent it was revealed that the load in-built in the biomass decreased by over half as a result of microwave radiation input at 2.5 W s(-1), which was optimal under the experimental conditions. Similarly the amount of pollutant remaining in the treated effluent decreased nearly by half, whereas the role of oxidation in removing organic pollutant increased in excess of 25% when compared to the control system.

  6. Teratogenic, biochemical, and histological studies with mice prenatally exposed to 2. 45-GHz microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrot, P.S.; McRee, D.I.; Galvin, M.J.

    1985-04-01

    Pregnant CD-1 mice were exposed to 2.45-GHz continuous wave microwave radiation at an incident power density of 30 mW/Cm/sup 2/. The local specific absorption rate near the uterine area (deep colonic location), as determined from time-temperature profiles measured with a Vitek thermistor probe, was 40.2 mW/G. Groups of mice were exposed 8 hr per day through Days 1-6 or 6-15 of pregnancy. Other groups of animals were exposed to an elevated ambient temperature of 31/sup 0/C which increased the colonic temperature 2.3/sup 0/C, the same as that produced by the microwaves. For the two conditions, temperature exposed and sham exposed, two groups of animals were used. One group was handled in the same manner as the microwave-irradiated group and the other group was not handled so as to evaluate the effects of stressing the animals by handling. On Day 18 of gestation the dams of all experimental groups were sacrificed and their reproductive status was determined. The fetuses were examined for visceral and skeletal alterations. Brain cholinesterase activity and histology were evaluated in the groups exposed on Days 6-15. The results show that microwave radiation increases embryo lethality at the early stages of gestation. Fetal toxicity and teratogenicity were not significantly increased by exposure to microwaves on either Days 1-6 or 6-15 of gestation. Cholinesterase activity and histology of the brain of 18-day-old fetuses were not adversely affected.

  7. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han -Chun; Wang, Zhuo; ...

    2015-10-09

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. As a result, for circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response ismore » hardly sensitive to θ.« less

  8. Monte Carlo Calculations of Polarized Microwave Radiation Emerging from Cloud Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Roberti, Laura

    1998-01-01

    The last decade has seen tremendous growth in cloud dynamical and microphysical models that are able to simulate storms and storm systems with very high spatial resolution, typically of the order of a few kilometers. The fairly realistic distributions of cloud and hydrometeor properties that these models generate has in turn led to a renewed interest in the three-dimensional microwave radiative transfer modeling needed to understand the effect of cloud and rainfall inhomogeneities upon microwave observations. Monte Carlo methods, and particularly backwards Monte Carlo methods have shown themselves to be very desirable due to the quick convergence of the solutions. Unfortunately, backwards Monte Carlo methods are not well suited to treat polarized radiation. This study reviews the existing Monte Carlo methods and presents a new polarized Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The code is based on a forward scheme but uses aliasing techniques to keep the computational requirements equivalent to the backwards solution. Radiative transfer computations have been performed using a microphysical-dynamical cloud model and the results are presented together with the algorithm description.

  9. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation - A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary F.

    2009-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approximately 1100. Data from the first five years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  10. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation - A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary F.

    2009-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approx. 1100. Data from the first five years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time.

  11. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation-A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of 11 00. Data from the first seven years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  12. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation - A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary F.

    2008-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approximately 1100. Data from the first five years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown university; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  13. Fast Disinfection of Escherichia coli Bacteria Using Carbon Nanotubes Interaction with Microwave Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakami, Samer M.; Khalil, Amjad B.; Laoui, Tahar; Atieh, Muataz Ali

    2013-01-01

    Water disinfection has attracted the attention of scientists worldwide due to water scarcity. The most significant challenges are determining how to achieve proper disinfection without producing harmful byproducts obtained usually using conventional chemical disinfectants and developing new point-of-use methods for the removal and inactivation of waterborne pathogens. The removal of contaminants and reuse of the treated water would provide significant reductions in cost, time, liabilities, and labour to the industry and result in improved environmental stewardship. The present study demonstrates a new approach for the removal of Escherichia coli (E. coli) from water using as-produced and modified/functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with 1-octadecanol groups (C18) under the effect of microwave irradiation. Scanning/transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and FTIR spectroscopy were used to characterise the morphological/structural and thermal properties of CNTs. The 1-octadecanol (C18) functional group was attached to the surface of CNTs via Fischer esterification. The produced CNTs were tested for their efficiency in destroying the pathogenic bacteria (E. coli) in water with and without the effect of microwave radiation. A low removal rate (3–5%) of (E. coli) bacteria was obtained when CNTs alone were used, indicating that CNTs did not cause bacterial cellular death. When combined with microwave radiation, the unmodified CNTs were able to remove up to 98% of bacteria from water, while a higher removal of bacteria (up to 100%) was achieved when CNTs-C18 was used under the same conditions. PMID:23606820

  14. Fast Disinfection of Escherichia coli Bacteria Using Carbon Nanotubes Interaction with Microwave Radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hakami, Samer M; Khalil, Amjad B; Laoui, Tahar; Atieh, Muataz Ali

    2013-01-01

    Water disinfection has attracted the attention of scientists worldwide due to water scarcity. The most significant challenges are determining how to achieve proper disinfection without producing harmful byproducts obtained usually using conventional chemical disinfectants and developing new point-of-use methods for the removal and inactivation of waterborne pathogens. The removal of contaminants and reuse of the treated water would provide significant reductions in cost, time, liabilities, and labour to the industry and result in improved environmental stewardship. The present study demonstrates a new approach for the removal of Escherichia coli (E. coli) from water using as-produced and modified/functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with 1-octadecanol groups (C18) under the effect of microwave irradiation. Scanning/transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and FTIR spectroscopy were used to characterise the morphological/structural and thermal properties of CNTs. The 1-octadecanol (C18) functional group was attached to the surface of CNTs via Fischer esterification. The produced CNTs were tested for their efficiency in destroying the pathogenic bacteria (E. coli) in water with and without the effect of microwave radiation. A low removal rate (3-5%) of (E. coli) bacteria was obtained when CNTs alone were used, indicating that CNTs did not cause bacterial cellular death. When combined with microwave radiation, the unmodified CNTs were able to remove up to 98% of bacteria from water, while a higher removal of bacteria (up to 100%) was achieved when CNTs-C18 was used under the same conditions.

  15. Aircraft observations of the vertical structure of stratiform precipitation relevant to microwave radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A.T.C. ); Barnes, A.; Glass, M. ); Kakar, R. ); Wilheit, T.T. )

    1993-06-01

    The retrieval of rainfall intensity over the oceans from passive microwave observations is based on a radiative transfer model. direct rainfall observations of oceanic rainfall are virtually nonexistent making validation of the retrievals extremely difficult. Observations of the model assumptions provide an alternative approach for improving and developing confidence in the rainfall retrievals. In the winter of 1983, the NASA CV-990 aircraft was equipped with a payload suitable for examining several of the model assumptions. The payload included microwave and infrared radiometers, mirror hygrometers, temperature probes, and PMS probes. On two occasions the aircraft ascended on a spiral track through stratiform precipitation providing an opportunity to study the atmospheric parameters. The assumptions concerning liquid hydrometeors, water vapor, lapse rate, and nonprecipitating clouds were studied. Model assumptions seem to be supported by these observations. 23 refs., 7 figs.

  16. On the accuracy of the Eddington approximation for radiative transfer in the microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian

    1993-01-01

    The paper examines how well an Eddington approximation can reproduce brightness temperatures obtained from a more complete, N-stream discrete ordinate solution in the microwave regime. Radiation propagation through a plane parallel medium is considered. Although model discrepancies are complicated functions of the cloud constituents, the differences between an eight-stream discrete ordinate solution and an analytical Eddington solution were found to be generally small, ranging from 0 to 6 K when only one uniform layer of hydrometeors was considered. When realistic multilayered cloud hydrometeor profiles were used, the differences between these two models never exceeded 3 K over the entire range of microwave frequencies considered (6.6-183 GHz). The models agreed to within 0.2 K in the absence of scattering constituents.

  17. Aircraft observations of the vertical structure of stratiform precipitation relevant to microwave radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Barnes, A.; Glass, M.; Kakar, R.; Wilheit, T. T.

    1993-01-01

    The retrieval of rainfall intensity over the oceans from passive microwave observations is based on a radiative transfer model. Direct rainfall observations of oceanic rainfall are virtually nonexistent making validation of the retrievals extremely difficult. Observations of the model assumptions provide an alternative approach for improving and developing confidence in the rainfall retrievals. In the winter of 1983, the NASA CV-990 aircraft was equipped with a payload suitable for examining several of the model assumptions. The payload included microwave and infrared radiometers, mirror hygrometers, temperature probes, and PMS probes. On two occasions the aircraft ascended on a spiral track through stratiform precipitation providing an opportunity to study the atmospheric parameters. The assumptions concerning liquid hydrometeors, water vapor, lapse rate, and nonprecipitating clouds were studied. Model assumptions seem to be supported by these observations.

  18. NMR analysis of diacyl peroxide decomposition in methanol in response to temperature and microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidukevich, O. A.; Skakovskii, E. D.; Tychinskaya, L. Yu.; Zvereva, T. D.; Dikusar, E. A.; Lamotkin, S. A.; Rykov, S. V.

    2012-05-01

    We have studied the decomposition of benzoyl and acetyl benzoyl peroxides in methanol-d4 in response to temperature and microwave radiation. We have shown that chemically-induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) can be observed even when the reactions are carried out in spectrometers with high magnetic fields. In this case, spin correlation persists in geminal radical pairs involving labile acyloxyl radicals. Regardless of the method used to initiate peroxide decomposition, the same amount of products are formed. Homolysis occurs according to a chain mechanism. The contribution of induced decomposition decreases over the course of the reaction. Dissolved oxygen molecules efficiently terminate the chain, decreasing the rate of peroxide decomposition. In the case of acetyl benzoyl peroxide, the product yield depends on the initiation mechanism: for microwave irradiation, the solvent molecules are more active while dissolved oxygen is less active than in thermolysis.

  19. Microwave radiation (2.45 GHz)-induced oxidative stress: Whole-body exposure effect on histopathology of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Parul; Verma, H N; Sisodia, Rashmi; Kesari, Kavindra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Man-made microwave and radiofrequency (RF) radiation technologies have been steadily increasing with the growing demand of electronic appliances such as microwave oven and cell phones. These appliances affect biological systems by increasing free radicals, thus leading to oxidative damage. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of 2.45 GHz microwave radiation on histology and the level of lipid peroxide (LPO) in Wistar rats. Sixty-day-old male Wistar rats with 180 ± 10 g body weight were used for this study. Animals were divided into two groups: sham exposed (control) and microwave exposed. These animals were exposed for 2 h a day for 35 d to 2.45 GHz microwave radiation (power density, 0.2 mW/cm(2)). The whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) was estimated to be 0.14 W/kg. After completion of the exposure period, rats were sacrificed, and brain, liver, kidney, testis and spleen were stored/preserved for determination of LPO and histological parameters. Significantly high level of LPO was observed in the liver (p < 0.001), brain (p < 0.004) and spleen (p < 0.006) in samples from rats exposed to microwave radiation. Also histological changes were observed in the brain, liver, testis, kidney and spleen after whole-body microwave exposure, compared to the control group. Based on the results obtained in this study, we conclude that exposure to microwave radiation 2 h a day for 35 d can potentially cause histopathology and oxidative changes in Wistar rats. These results indicate possible implications of such exposure on human health.

  20. Searching for O-X-B mode-conversion window with monitoring of stray microwave radiation in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Igami, H.; Kubo, S.; Laqua, H. P.; Nagasaki, K.; Inagaki, S.; Notake, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Mutoh, T.; LHD Experimental Group

    2006-10-15

    In the Large Helical Device, the stray microwave radiation is monitored by using so-called sniffer probes during electron cyclotron heating. In monitoring the stray radiation, we changed the microwave beam injection angle and search the O-X-B mode-conversion window to excite electron Bernstein waves (EBWs). When the microwave beam is injected toward the vicinity of the predicted O-X-B mode-conversion window, the electron temperature rises in the central part of overdense plasmas. In that case, the stray radiation level near the injection antenna becomes low. These results indicate that monitoring the stray radiation near the injection antenna is helpful in confirming the effectiveness of excitation of EBWs simply without precise analysis.

  1. Comparison between the conventional method of extraction of essential oil of Laurus nobilis L. and a novel method which uses microwaves applied in situ, without resorting to an oven.

    PubMed

    Flamini, Guido; Tebano, Marianna; Cioni, Pier Luigi; Ceccarini, Lucia; Ricci, Andrea Simone; Longo, Iginio

    2007-03-02

    A novel microwave method has been applied to the hydrothermal extraction of essential oil from plants. An insulated microwave coaxial antenna was introduced inside a 1000 ml glass flask containing dry Laurus nobilis L. leaves and tap water. Microwave power up to 800 W at 2450 MHz was emitted in continuous wave regime (CW) or in pulsed regime (PR) at 8 kW peak power. Stirring with a magnetic bar and a Clevenger refrigerator connected to the flask enabled to complete the extraction in 1 h. The results of the in situ microwave extraction were compared with those obtained by heating the same reactor with a conventional electric mantle by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Differences were observed both in the composition of the essential oil and from the energetic point of view. The essential oil obtained with microwave (MW) methods contained substantially higher amounts of oxygenated compounds and lower amounts of monoterpenes than conventional method. The in situ microwave heating is safe and versatile; it presents time and energy saving advantages, and therefore it can be considered useful also for industrial applications.

  2. Effects of low power microwave radiation on biological activity of Collagenase enzyme and growth rate of S. Cerevisiae yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsuhaim, Hamad S.; Vojisavljevic, Vuk; Pirogova, E.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, microwave radiation, a type/subset of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (EMR) has been widely used in industry, medicine, as well as food technology and mobile communication. Use of mobile phones is rapidly growing. Four years from now, 5.1 billion people will be mobile phone users around the globe - almost 1 billion more mobile users than the 4.3 billion people worldwide using them now. Consequently, exposure to weak radiofrequency/microwave radiation generated by these devices is markedly increasing. Accordingly, public concern about potential hazards on human health is mounting [1]. Thermal effects of radiofrequency/microwave radiation are very well-known and extensively studied. Of particular interest are non-thermal effects of microwave exposures on biological systems. Nonthermal effects are described as changes in cellular metabolism caused by both resonance absorption and induced EMR and are often accompanied by a specific biological response. Non-thermal biological effects are measurable changes in biological systems that may or may not be associated with adverse health effects. In this study we studied non-thermal effects of low power microwave exposures on kinetics of L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme and growth rate of yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae strains type II. The selected model systems were continuously exposed to microwave radiation at the frequency of 968MHz and power of 10dBm using the designed and constructed (custom made) Transverse Electro-Magnetic (TEM) cell [2]. The findings reveal that microwave radiation at 968MHz and power of 10dBm inhibits L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity by 26% and increases significantly (15%) the proliferation rate of yeast cells.

  3. Microwave ablation of the atrioventricular junction in open-chest dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.C.; Wang, Y.J.; Beckman, K.J.; Hariman, R.J.; Bharati, S.; Lev, M.

    1995-06-01

    The use of microwave energy for ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) junction was examined in open-chest dogs. Usually a specially designed microwave catheter and a 2,450 MHz generator, microwave energy was delivered to the AV junction according to one of two protocols. In protocol 1, increasing amounts of energy were delivered until irreversible AV block occurred. In protocol 2, only two applications of energy were used, one at low energy and the other at an energy found to be high enough to cause irreversible AV block. Each dog received between one and six applications of microwave energy. The amount of energy delivered per application ranged from 25.6 to 311.4 J. No AV block was seen at 59.4 {+-} 28.3 J. Reversible AV block was seen with an energy of 120.6 {+-} 58 J. Irreversible AV block was seen at 188.1 {+-} 75.9 J. Irreversible AV block could be achieved in each animal. There was no difference in the energy required to cause irreversible AV block between the two protocols. The tissue temperature measured near the tip of the microwave catheter was correlated with both the amount of energy delivered and the extent of AV block caused. Histologic examination demonstrated coagulation necrosis of the conduction system. Microwave energy is a feasible alternative energy source for myocardial ablation. Since tissue damage is due exclusively to heating and the resulting rise in temperature can be measured, microwave energy may have advantages over currently existing energy sources in terms of both titrating delivered energy and monitoring the extent of tissue destruction.

  4. Influence of microwaves on the beating rate of isolated rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, K.C.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that microwave exposure can decrease the beating rate of isolated rat hearts. These experiments were conducted at room temperature and with the hearts exposed to air. We observed arrhythmia frequently at room temperature, and the variation of heart beat was so large that it makes the results difficult to reproduce. Therefore, we employed a double-circulating system to provide perfusion through the coronary artery and around the outside of the heart to maintain the rat hearts at 37.7 degrees C. No arrhythmias were observed in our experiments, and the hearts were beating for at least 1 h. The effects of 16-Hz modulated 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (10 microseconds, 100 pps) on the beating rate of 50 isolated rat hearts were studied. Results showed no statistically significant changes of heart rate in exposed groups at SARs of 2 and 10 W/kg compared with the control group. The effect seen at 200 W/kg was shown to be similar to that resulting from heating the heart.

  5. A new system of microwave ablation at 2450 MHz: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mangano, Alberto; Floridi, Chiara; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Biondi, Antonio; Duka, Ejona; Lucchina, Natalie; Lianos, Georgios D; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of the application of the new system (Emprint Microwave Ablation System, Covidien Boulder, CO, USA) and to identify its advantages. In particular the attention was focused to the spherical ablation zone obtained and its usefulness in terms of effectiveness. The new system is composed of: a 2450 MHz generator that delivers a maximum power of 100 W, a fiberglass antenna and a pump for internally cooled antenna. Ten liver nodules (8 hepatocellular carcinomas and 2 metastasis) were percutaneously treated (mean diameter 24.9 mm, range 16-35 mm). Technical success, ablation duration time, overall procedure time and safety were registered. To define the shape of the ablation zone, multiplanar reformatting (MPR) was performed. Roundness index transverse was calculated: a value near 1 represents a more spherical ablation zone shape, and a value distant from 1 implies an oval configuration. Technical success was 100%. Mean ablation time was of 3.85 min (range 3-5 min), mean overall procedure time was 30.5 min (range 25-40 min). No major complications were recorded. Roundness index transverse presented a mean value of 0.94, meaning that a spherical shape of ablation zone was achieved. One of the most promising innovations of the new microwave technology is the spherical shape of the ablation volume that could be related with an improving of the effectiveness and safety.

  6. Evolution of the linear-polarization-angle-dependence of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance-oscillations with microwave power

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2014-11-10

    We examine the role of the microwave power in the linear polarization angle dependence of the microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system. The diagonal resistance R{sub xx} was measured at the fixed magnetic fields of the photo-excited oscillatory extrema of R{sub xx} as a function of both the microwave power, P, and the linear polarization angle, θ. Color contour plots of such measurements demonstrate the evolution of the lineshape of R{sub xx} versus θ with increasing microwave power. We report that the non-linear power dependence of the amplitude of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations distorts the cosine-square relation between R{sub xx} and θ at high power.

  7. Effect of infrared and microwave radiations on properties of Indian Horse Chestnut starch.

    PubMed

    Shah, Umar; Gani, Adil; Ashwar, Bilal Ahmad; Shah, Asima; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Masoodi, Farooq Ahmad

    2016-03-01

    Starch extracted from Indian Horse Chestnut (IHCN) was subjected to infrared and microwave radiations for different time intervals (15 s, 30 s, & 45 s) at constant dose. The structural change of MW and IR radiated IHCN starches were determined by Fourier transform-infra red spectroscopy. The increased peak intensity at 3240 cm(-1) of treated starch represents more exposure of hydroxyl groups due to radiation. Granule morphology of native starch showed round and elliptical granules with smooth surfaces. However radiation treatment resulted in the development of surface cracks. Effect of radiation on physicochemical properties of starch revealed increase in water absorption capacity and light transmittance and decrease in apparent amylose content, pH, and syneresis. The peak, trough, final, and setback viscosities were significantly reduced with increase in treatment time. Radiated starches displayed significantly lower values of To,Tp, and ΔHgel than native starch. Further antioxidant activities were evaluated by DPPH and FRAP assays. Results showed significant improvement in antioxidant activity of starch by both MW and IR treatments.

  8. Ralph A. Alpher, Robert C. Herman, and the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpher, Victor S.

    2012-09-01

    Much of the literature on the history of the prediction and discovery of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) is incorrect in some respects. I focus on the early history of the CMBR, from its prediction in 1948 to its measurement in 1964, basing my discussion on the published literature, the private papers of Ralph A. Alpher, and interviews with several of the major figures involved in the prediction and measurement of the CMBR. I show that the early prediction of the CMBR continues to be widely misunderstood.

  9. Worldwide Asian longhorned beetle eradication: An example of biological applications of noncontact microwave and ultrasound radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Mary R.

    Destructive pests such as the Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis Motsch.) (ALB) can be transported around the world via wooden packing materials used in pallets and crates, placing urban and forest resources at grave risk. A potential nondestructive technique to detect pest infestations in wooden packing materials is noncontact ultrasound technology. Noncontact ultrasound (100 kHz to 500 kHz) detection of living larvae in wood was found to be unfeasible due to inference of transmission by the tunnel air/wood interfaces in the wood. However, 100 kHz, 200 kHz, and 500 kHz ultrasound transmission through 1-in. thick wood samples of any orientation was possible. C-scan images (200 kHz) showed the location of holes drilled inside the wood and movement of a larva placed on top of the wood. The use of microwave energy to treat these wooden packing materials in the source country before transport to eradicate wood-boring pests infesting these materials was also investigated. Destruction of pests infesting wooden packing materials is required by international guidelines. Eradication of cerambycid larval infestations in laboratory-size pine and poplar lumber less than 6-in. thick (volume of 216 in3) was shown to be feasible using 2.45 GHz microwave energy. Five minutes of 1100 W radiation produced 100% mortality of cottonwood borer and ALB infestations in red pine, eastern white pine, loblolly pine, and aspen samples with moisture contents ranging from 30% to 130% of dry weight. The parameters of importance for scale up to commercial size loads include wood moisture content and energy to wood volume ratios. Lethal doses of 2.45 GHz microwave energy increased as wood moisture content increased. The proposed optimal energy to volume ratio for up to 78% moisture content wood samples is 2,812.5 J/in3. Total insect mortality occurred for all three time/power combinations (1000 W for 3 minutes, 2000 W for 1.5 minutes, or 3000 W for 1 minute) tested. Industry

  10. A comparison of radiative transfer models for predicting the microwave emission from soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    Two general types of numerical models for predicting microwave emission from soils are compared-coherent and noncoherent. In the former, radiation in the soil is treated coherently, and the boundary conditions on the electric fields across the layer boundaries are used to calculate the radiation intensity. In the latter, the radiation is assumed to be noncoherent, and the intensities of the radiation are considered directly. The results of the two approaches may be different because of the effects of interference, which can cause the transmitted intensity at the surface (i.e., emissivity) to be sometimes higher and sometimes lower for the coherent case than for the noncoherent case, depending on the relative phases of reflected fields from the lower layers. This coupling between soil layers in the coherent models leads to greater soil moisture sampling depths observed with this type of model, and is the major difference that is found between the two types of models. In noncoherent models, the emissivity is determined by the dielectric constraint at the air/soil interface. The subsequent differences in the results are functions of both the frequency of the radiation being considered and the steepness of the moisture gradient near the surface. The calculations were performed at frequencies of 1.4 and 19.4 GHz and for two sets of soil profiles. Little difference was observed between the models at 19.4 GHz; and only at the lower frequency were differences apparent because of the greater soil moisture sampling depth at this frequency.

  11. The space microwave interferometer and the search for cosmic background gravitational wave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel

    1989-01-01

    Present and planned investigations which use interplanetary spacecraft for gravitational wave searches are severely limited in their detection capability. This limitation has to do both with the Earth-based tracking procedures used and with the configuration of the experiments themselves. It is suggested that a much improved experiment can now be made using a multiarm interferometer designed with current operating elements. An important source of gravitational wave radiation, the cosmic background, may well be within reach of detection with these procedures. It is proposed to make a number of experimental steps that can now be carried out using TDRSS spacecraft and would conclude in the establishment of an operating multiarm microwave interferometer. This interferometer is projected to have a sensitivity to cosmic background gravitational wave radiation with an energy of less than 10(exp -4) cosmic closure density and to periodic waves generating spatial strain approaching 10(exp -19) in the range 0.1 to 0.001 Hz.

  12. The As removal from arsenopyrite-bearing mine waste by microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Myung, Eun Ji; Hack Lim, Dae; Kim, Bong Ju; Park, Cheon Young

    2016-04-01

    Penalties incurred by miners for arsenic in concentrates have increased significantly because the removal and disposal of arsenic is difficult and costly for smelters and because the environmental challenges are increasing worldwide. Typically miners incur penalties on arsenic in concentrates above 0.2% As with smelter rejection limits of 0.5%. Therefore, finding an effective solution for removing As during primary mining activities is necessary to avoid penalty. The aim of this study was to investigate the As removal from mine waste using microwave process. The mine waste samples were characterized by chemical and XRD analysis. To determine of As removal from the microwave experiments, aqua regia digestion was performed according to Korean environmental standard method(KESM) and the As removal effect were evaluated using the standard EPA toxicity characteristic leaching procedure(TCLP, EPA 1311 method). The result of mineralogical character for mine waste using XRD was detected arsenopyrite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite and quartz. The chemical analysis of As, Pb, Zn contents in the mine waste measured 13,896.0, 896.1 and 1,054.6 mg/kg, respectively. The As removal of experiments was conducted to examine the effects of microwave exposure time(1~15min). The results showed that the As removal in mine waste (exposure time = 10min) was 92.90%, and the temperature of mine waste by microwave heating was 886℃. The TCLP leaching of treated mine waste by microwave measured values were below the EPA's current regulatory threshold(As, Pb, Zn : 5 mg/L). The optimum condition of microwave exposure for As removal from arsenopyrite-bearing mine waste was obtained at 800W, 2450MHz, 10min. Acknowledgment : This work was supported by the Energy and Resources Engineering Program Grant funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy, Korea

  13. Observing the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation: A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics,of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales will reveal the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approx. 1100. The validity of inflationary models will be tested and, if agreement is found, accurate values for most of the key cosmological parameters will result. If disagreement is found, we will need to rethink our basic ideas about the physics of the early universe. I will present an overview of the physical processes at work in forming the anisotropy and discuss what we have already learned from current observations. I will conclude with a brief overview of the recently launched Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission which will observe the anisotropy over the full sky with 0.21 degree angular resolution. At the time of this meeting, MAP will have just arrived at the L2 Lagrange point, marking the start of its observing campaign. The MAP hardware is being produced by Goddard in partnership with Princeton University.

  14. The combination of infrared and microwave radiation to quantify trace elements in organic samples by ICP OES.

    PubMed

    Dantas, A N S; Matos, W O; Gouveia, S T; Lopes, G S

    2013-03-30

    Sample-decomposition methods using microwave radiation in closed systems have been commonly used in the analysis of inorganic constituents; however, these methods are limited to small amounts of organic samples. This work proposes the combined use of infrared radiation and microwave radiation (IR-MW) to increase the amount of organic samples digested. The determination of Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P and Zn in human-feed samples was accomplished by ICP OES. The results were in agreement with those obtained from conventional decomposition by microwave radiation (closed system). The results obtained using the proposed IR-MW system for standard reference material (whole milk powder, NIST 8435) were also compared. Agreements of 85-100% were obtained for Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P and Zn in the standard reference material. The IR-MW system is simple to implement and cheap because it uses commercially available infrared lamps and allows the use of infrared radiation in the microwave-digestion vessel. Additionally, it is possible to reach better precision in the analysis of the human-feed samples using the IR-MW system. The proposed method also allows total digestion of large sample amounts or samples rich in organic compounds can also be performed in the IR-MW system using small volumes of nitric acid.

  15. The cosmic microwave background radiation temperature at a redshift of 2.34.

    PubMed

    Srianand, R; Petitjean, P; Ledoux, C

    The existence of the cosmic microwave background radiation is a fundamental prediction of hot Big Bang cosmology, and its temperature should increase with increasing redshift. At the present time (redshift z = 0), the temperature has been determined with high precision to be T(CMBR)(0) = 2.726 +/- 0.010 K. In principle, the background temperature can be determined using measurements of the relative populations of atomic fine-structure levels, which are excited by the background radiation. But all previous measurements have achieved only upper limits, thus still formally permitting the radiation temperature to be constant with increasing redshift. Here we report the detection of absorption lines from the first and second fine-structure levels of neutral carbon atoms in an isolated cloud of gas at z = 2.3371. We also detected absorption due to several rotational transitions of molecular hydrogen, and fine-structure lines of singly ionized carbon. These constraints enable us to determine that the background radiation was indeed warmer in the past: we find that T(CMBR)(z = 2.3371) is between 6.0 and 14 K. This is in accord with the temperature of 9.1 K predicted by hot Big Bang cosmology.

  16. Microwave based oxidation process for recycling the off-specification (U,Pu)O2 fuel pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.; Khot, P. M.; Kumar, Pradeep; Bhatt, R. B.; Behere, P. G.; Afzal, Mohd

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports development of a process named MicroWave Direct Oxidation (MWDO) for recycling the off-specification (U,Pu)O2 mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pellets generated during fabrication of typical fast reactor fuels. MWDO is a two-stage, single-cycle process based on oxidative pulverisation of pellets using 2450 MHz microwave. The powder sinterability was evaluated by bulk density and BET specific surface area. The oxidised powders were analyzed for phases using XRD and stoichiometry by thermogravimetry. The sinterability was significantly enhanced by carrying out oxidation in higher oxygen partial pressure and by subjecting MOX to multiple micronisation-oxidation cycles. After three cycles, the recycled powder from (U,28%Pu)O2 resulted surface area >3 m2/g and 100% re-used for MOX fabrication. The flow sheet was developed for maximum utilization of recycled powder describable by a parameter called Scrap Recycling Ratio (SRR). The process demonstrates smaller processing cycle, better powder properties and higher oxidative pulverisation over conventional method.

  17. Influence of microwave radiation on the growth of gold nanoparticles and microporous zincophosphates in a reverse micellar system.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, John W; Dutta, Prabir K

    2006-05-09

    The water core of reverse micelles has been extensively used as the site for synthesis of a variety of materials. However, water-in-oil reverse micelles have a limited range of temperatures over which they are stable as a single phase. Directing heat to the water cores, the usual site of synthesis without heating the bulk provides added opportunities for synthesis. Microwave radiation is a method for superheating the water cores. In this study, we use an H2O-sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)-heptane reverse micelle system for the synthesis of Au particles by hydrazine reduction of HAuCl4 in the presence and absence of microwave radiation. The duration of the microwave radiation was limited to a 2-min duration at a power of 300 W, thereby ensuring that the reverse micelle phase is maintained during the synthesis. At all hydrazine concentrations studied (0.5-2 M), the presence of microwave radiation led to an increase in the particle size of Au. The second system examined was the growth of microporous zincophosphate-X (ZnPO-X, an analogue of the faujasite structure) synthesized from H2O-dioctyldimethylammonium chloride (DODMAC)-heptane reverse micelle system. Microwave radiation was applied for 1 min at 150 W at various stages of the nucleation and growth process, and did not disrupt the reverse micelle system. Product analysis after 48 h of reaction showed that the 1-min microwave pulse, if applied during the nucleation stage (the first 4 h), promoted the formation of NaZnPO4.H2O over ZnPO-X. The effect of the microwave pulse at the growth stage was to promote the formation of ZnPO-X. Absorption of the microwave radiation by the water core and surrounding polar surfactant molecules leads to a rapid rise in local temperature (predicted to be approximately 150 degrees C/min for the AOT system), increasing the rates of intramicellar reactions.

  18. Colletotrichum gloeosporioides growth-no-growth interface after selected microwave treatments.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Morales, M E; Garcia, H S; López-Malo, A

    2009-07-01

    To study microwave heating for potential postharvest treatments against anthracnose disease, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides growth-no-growth response after selected microwave treatments (2,450 MHz) was fitted by using a logistic regression model. Evaluated variables were power level, exposure time, presence or absence of water in the medium during treatment, and incubation-observation time. Depending on the setting, the applied power ranged from 77.2 to 435.6 W. For the experiments on dry medium (mold spores over filter paper), exposure times were 1, 2, 3, or 4 min, whereas spores dispersed in potato dextrose agar, a wet medium, had exposure times of 3, 6, or 9 s. Growth (response = 1) or no growth (response = 0) was observed after two different incubation-observation times (4 or 10 days). As expected, high power levels and long exposure times resulted in complete inhibition of C. gloeosporioides spore germination. In a number of cases (such as low power levels and short treatment times), only a delay in mold growth was observed. Scanning electron micrographs showed signs of mycelia dehydration and structural collapse in the spores of the studied mold. Cell damage was attributed to heating during microwave exposure. Reduced logistic models included variables and interactions that significantly (P < 0.05) affected mold growth, and were able to predict the growth-no-growth response in at least 83% of the experimental conditions. Microwave treatments (4 min at any of the studied power levels in dry medium, and 9 s at power levels of 30% or more for wet medium) proved effective in the inhibition of C. gloeosporioides in model systems. These no-growth conditions will be tested further on fresh fruits in order to develop feasible postharvest microwave treatments.

  19. Effect of Low-Intensity Microwave Radiation on Monoamine Neurotransmitters and Their Key Regulating Enzymes in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin S; Ravi, Alok K; Tripathi, Ashok K; Abegaonkar, Mahesh P; Banerjee, Basu D

    2015-09-01

    The increasing use of wireless communication devices has raised major concerns towards deleterious effects of microwave radiation on human health. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the effect of low-intensity microwave radiation on levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and gene expression of their key regulating enzymes in brain of Fischer rats. Animals were exposed to 900 MHz and 1800 MHz microwave radiation for 30 days (2 h/day, 5 days/week) with respective specific absorption rates as 5.953 × 10(-4) and 5.835 × 10(-4) W/kg. The levels of monoamine neurotransmitters viz. dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and serotonin (5-HT) were detected using LC-MS/MS in hippocampus of all experimental animals. In addition, mRNA expression of key regulating enzymes for these neurotransmitters viz. tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) (for DA, NE and E) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH1 and TPH2) (for serotonin) was also estimated. Results showed significant reduction in levels of DA, NE, E and 5-HT in hippocampus of microwave-exposed animals in comparison with sham-exposed (control) animals. In addition, significant downregulation in mRNA expression of TH, TPH1 and TPH2 was also observed in microwave-exposed animals (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the results indicate that low-intensity microwave radiation may cause learning and memory disturbances by altering levels of brain monoamine neurotransmitters at mRNA and protein levels.

  20. Epidemiologic Evidence of Radiofrequency Radiation (Microwave) Effects on Health in Military, Broadcasting, and Occupational Studies.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith

    1995-01-01

    In this opinion piece, the author brings together and discusses the collective relevance of possible health effects of microwave or radar exposure in military, broadcasting, and occupational circumstances, with a view to assuring optimal protective practices. Sources of the information presented include 1) historical data, 2) experiences of Polish soldiers, 3) a study of U.S. naval personnel using radar in the Korean War, 4) preliminary findings of exposures to the Skrunda, Latvia, transmitter, 5) data obtained near Hawaiian broadcasting facilities, 6) occupational studies of electronic and electrical workers, including ham radio operators, 7) reproductive outcomes among physiotherapists using short-wave and microwave diathermy, and 8) U.S. foreign service personnel exposed at Embassies in Eastern Europe. Some of the data are available in the peer-reviewed literature, others in abstracts, reports, or other non-peer-reviewed forms. Some were obtained under Freedom of Information statutes and are incomplete. For some of these, there is reason to believe that further evidence desired by the investigator was not obtained. Some are case-referent studies, but most are not. Some are ecological, and all are retrospective. Few have reliable dose estimations, and none has accurate dosage information on each subject. None includes evidence of tissue heating or any short-term effect. Possible outcomes considered included 1) blood count changes, 2) evidence of somatic mutation, 3) impairment of reproductive outcomes, especially increased spontaneous abortion, and 4) increase in cancer incidence and mortality, especially of the hematopoietic system, brain, and breast. The author presents evidence that sufficient microwave exposures are associated with all four of these outcomes, concluding that the possible effects and their timings with respect to exposure are qualitatively similar to those on ionizing radiation. A prudent course of action would be to provide more protection

  1. Electromagnetic radiation and health risks: Cell phones and microwave radiation in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, I.

    1996-07-01

    Presently the public is concerned over the proliferation of cellphone repeater sites around the cities of New Zealand and whether they pose a risk to health. The debate continued for some weeks over the proposal to erect a cellphone repeater in a school yard. The issues that came out of that debate are profiled in this paper -- environmental health professionals need to be able to communicate well-judged advice to their employers. Cellular phone networks use relatively low-powered transmitters to restrict coverage to a circumscribed locality and thereby enable particular carrier frequencies to be used simultaneously at different cell sites in the same general area. Compared with TV and radio broadcasting, the radiation power levels near cell sites are therefore relatively small. Broadcast transmission antennae are designed to confine the radiation so that it doesn`t go in directions where it is not required or not wanted.

  2. Attenuating microwave radiation by absorption through controlled nanoparticle localization in PC/PVDF blends.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sourav; Kar, Goutam Prasanna; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2015-11-07

    Nanoscale ordering in a polymer blend structure is indispensable to obtain materials with tailored properties. It was established here that controlling the arrangement of nanoparticles, with different characteristics, in co-continuous PC/PVDF (polycarbonate/poly(vinylidene fluoride)) blends can result in outstanding microwave absorption (ca. 90%). An excellent reflection loss (RL) of ca. -71 dB was obtained for a model blend structure wherein the conducting (multiwall carbon nanotubes, MWNTs) and the magnetic inclusions (Fe3O4) are localized in PVDF and the dielectric inclusion (barium titanate, BT) is in PC. The MWNTs were modified using polyaniline, which facilitates better charge transport in the blends. Furthermore, by introducing surface active groups on BT nanoparticles and changing the macroscopic processing conditions, the localization of BT nanoparticles can be tailored, otherwise BT nanoparticles would localize in the preferred phase (PVDF). In this study, we have shown that by ordered arrangement of nanoparticles, the incoming EM radiation can be attenuated. For instance, when PANI-MWNTs were localized in PVDF, the shielding was mainly through reflection. Now by localizing the conducting inclusion and the magnetic lossy materials in PVDF and the dielectric materials in PC, an outstanding shielding effectiveness of ca. -37 dB was achieved where shielding was mainly through absorption (ca. 90%). Thus, this study clearly demonstrates that lightweight microwave absorbers can be designed using polymer blends as a tool.

  3. Microwave-induced carbon nanotubes catalytic degradation of organic pollutants in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Xue, Shuang; Song, Youtao; Shen, Manli; Zhang, Zhaohong; Yuan, Tianxin; Tian, Fangyuan; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-06-05

    In this study, a new catalytic degradation technology using microwave induced carbon nanotubes (MW/CNTs) was proposed and applied in the treatment of organic pollutants in aqueous solution. The catalytic activity of three CNTs of 10-20nm, 20-40nm, and 40-60nm diameters were compared. The results showed that organic pollutants such as methyl orange (MO), methyl parathion (MP), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), bisphenol A (BPA), and methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution could be degraded effectively and rapidly in MW/CNTs system. CNTs with diameter of 10-20nm exhibited the highest catalytic activity of the three CNTs under MW irradiation. Further, complete degradation was obtained using 10-20nm CNTs within 7.0min irradiation when 25mL MO solution (25mg/L), 1.2g/L catalyst dose, 450W, 2450MHz, and pH=6.0 were applied. The rate constants (k) for the degradation of SDBS, MB, MP, MO and BPA using 10-20nm CNTs/MW system were 0.726, 0.679, 0.463, 0.334 and 0.168min(-1), respectively. Therefore, this technology may have potential application for the treatment of targeted organic pollutants in wastewaters.

  4. Primordial Gravitational Waves and Rescattered Electromagnetic Radiation in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Trippe, Sascha

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an apparently as-yet-overlooked effect. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs, and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this polarization effect can be schematically represented out of the Stokes parameters. We work out the representations of gradient modes (E-modes) and curl modes (B-modes) to produce polarization maps. Although the polarization effect results from GWs, we find that its representations, the E- and B-modes, do not practically reflect the GW properties such as strain amplitude, frequency, and polarization states.

  5. [Dynamics of morphological changes in the spinal cord following exposure to non-ionizing microwave radiation].

    PubMed

    Belokrinitskiĭ, V S

    1983-05-01

    The structure of different portions (cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacral and coccygeal) of the spinal cord were studied in the experiments on 50 animals with the use of the Nissl, Zimmermann, Cajal and other methods on days 1, 10, 20 and 30 after exposure to non-ionizing microwave radiation (NMI). Single exposure to NMI (wave length 12.6 cm, intensity 400-500 mW/cm2) for one hour (cats) or four hours (dogs) produces a severe distress of glial neurones and cells, which is marked by the appearance of dystrophic processes along the entire spinal cord. The disease progresses, leading to abnormalities of motor and other physiological functions of the body.

  6. Hydrolysis behavior of regenerated celluloses with different degree of polymerization under microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jinping; Teng, Na; Chen, Haizhen; Wang, Jinggang; Zhu, Jin; Na, Haining

    2015-09-01

    This work studied the hydrolysis behavior of regenerated celluloses (RCs) with different degree of polymerization (DP) by using the catalyst of dilute acid under microwave radiation. Results showed that the DP had a considerable influence on hydrolysis of cellulose. The reactivity of RCs was significantly improved when DP was lower than 51. The highest sugar yield of 59.2% was achieved from RC with lowest DP of 23 at 160 °C for 15 min. But the lowest yield of 32.6% was obtained when RC with highest DP of 132 was used. Recrystallization of cellulose was found to hinder the further hydrolysis particularly with the high DP. The effect of recrystallization can be reduced by the decrease of DP of RCs. This research demonstrates that the DP of RCs plays a crucial role on hydrolysis and it provides a preliminary guide based on DP to find a suitable pretreatment method for cellulose hydrolysis.

  7. Boomerang 2003: Measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisner, Theodore Schuyler

    In early 2003, the Boomerang telescope flew for fifteen days over the Antarctic continent suspended from a balloon at an approximate altitude of 100,000 feet. Using a cryogenically cooled, bolometric receiver, it made measurements of the intensity and polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Radiation in two overlapping sky patches of 100 and 800 square degrees. A spatial analysis of this data provides confirmation of previous measurements of the multipole angular power spectrum of the temperature anisotropies of the CMB. This data also provides power spectra of the polarization and temperature- polarization correlations that are competitive with previous experiments. Cosmological parameters estimated from these angular power spectra are consistent with a "standard" Lambda-CDM universe where inflation was adiabatic.

  8. Estimates of the Tropospheric Vertical Structure of Neptune Based on Microwave Radiative Transfer Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBoer, David R.; Steffes, Paul G.

    1996-01-01

    A radiative transfer model incorporating, among other things, the recently measured centimeter wavelength opacity of H2S, the full line catalog of PH3, and absorption due to CO has been developed to study the tropospheric vertical structure of Neptune. To match radio-telescope observations, subsolar amounts of NH3 and supersolar amounts of H2S are found to be needed, as has been previously noted. To match both the measured microwave emission and the measured opacity at 13 cm and 6.3 bars by Voyager 2, an H2S dominant atmosphere (H2S/NH3 approximately equals 40) with enhanced PH3 (15 x solar) or NH3 supersaturation with respect to the putative NH4SH cloud (400 ppbv) seems to be indicated. Due to the possible importance of PH3 opacity, it is suggested that measurements of its opacity could aid in resolving some of the outstanding ambiguities concerning Neptune's tropospheric structure.

  9. Anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation on Large and Medium Angular Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, Anthony; Timbie, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This grant has supported work at Brown University on measurements of the 2.7 K Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB). The goal has been to characterize the spatial variations in the temperature of the CMB in order to understand the formation of large-scale structure in the universe. We have concurrently pursued two measurements using millimeter-wave telescopes carried aloft by scientific balloons. Both systems operate over a range of wavelengths, chosen to allow spectral removal of foreground sources such as the atmosphere, Galaxy, etc. The angular resolution of approx. 25 arcminutes is near the angular scale at which the most structure is predicted by current models to be visible in the CMB angular power spectrum. The main goal is to determine the angular scale of this structure; in turn we can infer the density parameter, Omega, for the universe as well as other cosmological parameters, such as the Hubble constant.

  10. Interaction of CuCl2 with poly(ethylene glycol) under microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tverjanovich, A.; Grevtsev, A.; Bereznev, S.

    2017-01-01

    CuCl2 solutions various concentration in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) are treated with microwave (MW) radiation. Optical absorption and FT-IR spectra of the solutions before treatment and after treatment are discussed. It is proposed that before treatment Cu2+ ions have rhombic distorted octahedral coordination in solution with four oxygen atoms of PEG and two Cl‑ ions. These oxygen atoms can be from hydroxyl or ether groups of PEG, depending on the relative ration OH‑ groups and Cu2+ ions. MW treatment of the solution results in a two-step reaction divided in time. The first stage of MW treatment leads to the reduction of Cu2+ ions to Cu+ ions. At the second stage Cu+ ions are reduced to Cu0 forming high-purity copper nanoparticles. In the same time PEG transforms with a formation of carbonyl groups. The shape of the obtained nanoparticles depends on the molecular weight of the used PEG.

  11. The implications of the COBE diffuse microwave radiation results for cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, David P.; Stebbins, Albert; Bouchet, Francois R.

    1992-01-01

    We compare the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation measured by the COBE experiment to those predicted by cosmic string theories. We use an analytic model for the Delta T/T power spectrum that is based on our previous numerical simulations of strings, under the assumption that cosmic strings are the sole source of the measured anisotropy. This implies a value for the string mass per unit length of 1.5 +/- 0.5 x 10 exp -6 C-squared/G. This is within the range of values required for cosmic strings to successfully seed the formation of large-scale structures in the universe. These results clearly encourage further studies of Delta T/T and large-scale structure in the cosmic string model.

  12. The Effects of Nearby Clusters of Galaxies on the Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birkinshaw, M.

    1999-01-01

    This project proposed to use the COBE (Cosmic Background Explorer) DMR sky-maps to measure the anisotropies introduced into the microwave background radiation by the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and Rees-Sciama effects of nearby clusters and superclusters of galaxies. We intended to seek these effects by making maps of the best-fit anisotropies on particular angular scales and comparing the apparent anisotropies near target clusters and superclusters with the statistical noise and sky variance. The locations of the clusters and superclusters were to be found using HEAO-1 (High Energy Astronomy Observatory) A2 and Einstein X-ray maps. Checks against biases were to be made using radio and X-ray sky-maps as guides to the properties of the clusters and superclusters. Any signals detected would have implications for the gas properties and baryonic masses of clusters and superclusters. The scientific background, project activities and references to published papers are included.

  13. An investigation of Titan's aerosols using microwave analog measurements and radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Osip, J. E.; Gustafson, B. Å. S.; Kolokolova, L.; Xu, Y.-L.

    2005-12-01

    A combination of laboratory experiments, theoretical modeling, and spacecraft observations is employed to characterize the aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan. The scattering properties of model aerosols were measured using the Microwave Analog Light Scattering Facility at the University of Florida and complemented with theoretical modeling of single scattering characteristics and radiative transfer in Titan's atmosphere. This study compares these modeling results with photopolarimetric observations made over a range of phase angles by the Pioneer 11 and Voyagers 1 and 2 spacecraft. Important results of this work include a survey of the scattering properties of different particle morphologies and compositions necessary to accurately interpret these observations without introducing non-physical assumptions about the particles or requiring additional free parameters to the radiative transfer models. Previous studies use calculation methods which, due to computing memory and processing time requirements, a priori exclude much of the parameter space that the microwave analog laboratory is ideal for exploring. The goal of the present work, to directly constrain aerosol physical characteristics, is addressed by studying in a consistent manner how a variety of particle morphologies and refractive indices affect the polarization and intensity reflected by Titan's atmosphere. Based on comparisons of model results to spacecraft observations, many model morphologies are excluded from further consideration. The most plausible physical particle models suggest that a combination of Rayleigh-like single particles and aggregates that are larger than those previously suggested and investigated [West, R.A., Smith, P.H., 1991. Evidence for aggregate particles in the atmospheres of Titan and Jupiter. Icarus 90, 330-333; Rannou, P., Cabane, M., Botet, R., Chassefière, E., 1997. A new interpretation of scattered light measurements at Titan's limb. J. Geophys. Res. 102, 10997

  14. Clinical system for simultaneous external superficial microwave hyperthermia and cobalt-60 radiation.

    PubMed

    Moros, E G; Straube, W L; Klein, E E; Maurath, J; Myerson, R J

    1995-01-01

    A system for simultaneous thermoradiotherapy was devised to investigate the possible benefits and/or complications of thermal radiosensitization in human superficial tumours. The system combines the well-known treatment modalities of external 915 MHz microwave hyperthermia and cobalt-60 teletherapy. Single waveguide applicators are utilized either attached to blocking trays, so that the gamma beam travels through a waveguide and into the patient (en face setup), or in a conventional way with the microwave propagation vector orthogonal to the gamma beam (orthogonal setup). With these setups a radiation fraction can be delivered in the middle of a 60-min, non-interrupted hyperthermia treatment. Temperatures and power level are remotely monitored and recorded outside the Cobalt room. Extensive measurements and testing showed that the operation of the hyperthermia system (generator, applicators, thermometry unit and temperature sensors) was not disrupted by irradiation and that the microwaves were confined to the treatment room and did not interfere with the operation of the Cobalt unit, of an adjacent linear accelerator or of an adjacent radiotherapy simulator. For the en face setup the dose distributions induced in solid water phantoms were uniform with the exception of a narrow (< 0.5 cm) region under the applicators' internal probes where 10-18% reduction exists. This dose defect is clinically smoothed using feathering techniques. The system has been successfully used without technical problems in 51 treatments in 15 patients (18 lesions) in a phase I/II clinical trial. An analysis of the thermal data showed that the temperature distributions achieved during simultaneous delivery have the same general characteristics of those achieved in conventional sequential hyperthermia with microwaves, and that the steady state distributions are maintained during the time of simultaneous irradiation. The tests performed in addition to the preliminary clinical experience

  15. Efficient degradation of crystal violet in magnetic CuFe2O4 aqueous solution coupled with microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongzhe; Yang, Shaogui; Chang, Jiao; Yu, Kai; Li, Dongfang; Sun, Cheng; Li, Aimin

    2012-09-01

    Nanoscale copper ferrite was prepared by co-precipitation method, while citrate acid assisted method was used as reference. Microwave-induced degradation of crystal violet was performed with synthesized copper ferrite, and the behavior of copper ferrite in this process was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, SEM/EDS and vector network analyzer. Microwave radiation could greatly enhance the activity of copper ferrite in organic oxidation. The variant of copper and iron on the surface and in the inner core of copper ferrite was studied here. Copper ferrite presents relatively low dielectric loss. Meanwhile, microwave radiation makes a faster degradation than conventional heating process, indicating an indispensable non-thermal effect of microwave with copper ferrite in the process. Microwave induced holes could be responsible for the efficient degradation. The effect of annealing on crystallization and degradation process was considered here, and the intermediates and products were studied by GC-MS and LC-MS to provide a comprehensively evaluation of degradation.

  16. Study on the effect of chemoembolization combined with microwave ablation for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vogl, Thomas Josef; Qian, Jun; Tran, Andreas; Oppermann, Elsie; Naguib, Nagy N.; Korkusuz, Huedayi; Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A.; Bechstein, Wolf Otto

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the combining effects of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and open local thermal microwave ablation in a hepatocellular carcinoma animal model. METHODS Tumor cubes were implanted into the liver of 30 male inbred ACI rats. Groups of 10 animals were treated at 13 days (TACE or microwave ablation) and 16 days (microwave ablation) postimplantation with combined therapy of TACE (0.1 mg mitomycin C; 0.1 mg iodized oil; 5.0 mg degradable starch microspheres) and microwave ablation (2450 Mhz; 45 s; 35 W) (study group A), TACE alone (control group B), or microwave ablation alone (control group C). At day 12 and day 25 tumor size was measured via magnetic resonance imaging and the relative growth ratio was calculated. Hepatic specimens were immunohistochemically examined for the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). RESULTS Mean growth rates were 1.34±0.19 in group A, 3.19±0.13 in group B, and 4.18±0.19 in group C. Compared with control groups B and C, tumor growth rate in group A was significantly inhibited (P < 0.01). The VEGF-antibody reaction in peritumoral tissue (staining intensity at portal triad, percent antibody reaction and staining intensity at central vein) was significantly lower in group A compared with group B (P < 0.01). No significant difference between group A and group C could be observed. CONCLUSION This investigation shows improved results of TACE followed by microwave ablation as treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in a rat model, compared with single therapy regimen regarding the inhibition of growth rate and reduction of VEGF-level in peritumoral tissue. PMID:28185998

  17. Investigation of Aggregates as a Model for Titan's Aerosols Using Microwave Analog Experiments and Radiative Transfer Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Osip, J. E.; Gustafson, B. Å. S.

    1996-09-01

    It has been suggested that the aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan have an aggregate morphology (Bar-Nun et al., 1988: West and Smith, 1991). Previous studies were based on formulations of the Discrete Dipole Approximation to calculate the single scattering properties of such aggregates. These studies were limited in the size of the individual spheres and total size of the aggregate. We present microwave to light analog scattering measurements and radiative transfer calculations for aggregates of 250-500 individual spheres near the Raleigh size limit in a plane parallel atmosphere. The advantages of using microwave analog experiments include the possibility of investigating a broad range of particle sizes and morphologies.

  18. Effects of chronic continuous wave microwave radiation (2. 45 GHz) on the foraging behavior of the white-throated sparrow

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, F.E.; Patterson, D.A.; Kunz, T.H.; Battista, S.P.; Byman, D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of chronic continuous wave microwave radiation on the foraging behavior of the White-throated Sparrow was examined using an optimal foraging laboratory technique. Birds were exposed to microwaves for seven days at a frequency of 2.45 GHz and power densities of 0.0, 0.1, 1.0, 10.0, and 25.0 mW/cm/sup 2/. Even though there were differences in foraging behaviors among power densities no trend was found for a dose response effect. Birds showed no significant differences in foraging behaviors among pre-exposure, exposure, and post-exposure periods.

  19. Tissue structure of rat brain after microwave irradiation using maximum magnetic field component.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Y; Okada, M; Maruyama, Y

    1986-05-14

    A novel microwave instrument has recently been designed by New Japan Radio Co. Ltd., to provide more homogeneous distribution of the rapidly deposited heat in the rodent brain. Being the first commercial unit which concentrates the maximum magnetic field component of irradiation, rather than the usual electric field, it provides complete enzymatic inactivation in a typical rat brain when a power of 9 kW (90% of maximum) is applied for 0.80 s at the standard operating frequency of 2450 MHz. Tissue structural integrity was investigated in animals sacrificed by this approach or by the usual decapitation to see if any tissue disruption or pressure-induced spreading, a major problem with other microwave devices, might also be of concern for this new unit. Histological examination of tissue samples employed both light and electron microscopy. Using Luxol Fast Blue in the light microscopy, the microwave irradiated tissues exhibited a decreased affinity for the staining agent, an appearance of slight vacuoles, and the disappearance of fine fibrils in the parenchyma. However, the interfacial areas between distinct brain regions remained well preserved. Electron microscopic observation indicated that microwave irradiated tissue caused protein denaturation accompanied by the aggregation of nuclear chromatin, the disappearance of Nissl bodies, ribosomes and neurofilaments, and noticeably irregular myelin sheaths. However, the essential structure of nerve cell membranes and synaptic membranes were maintained, and synaptic vesicles were clearly defined. These results indicated that the rapid heating of brain tissue with maximal magnetic field concentration of the irradiation does not result in significant tissue disruption, pressure-induced spreading or cell breakdown.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. First results from the microwave air yield beam experiment (MAYBE): Measurement of GHz radiation for ultra-high energy cosmic ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.; Bohacova, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Cataldi, G.; Chemerisov, S.; De Mello Neto, J. R.T.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fox, B.; Gorham, P. W.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Meyhandan, R.; Monasor, M.; D'Orfeuil, B. Rouille; Santos, E. M.; Pochez, J.; Privitera, P.; Spinka, H.; Verzi, V.; Zhou, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of microwave emission from an electron-beam induced air plasma performed at the 3 MeV electron Van de Graaff facility of the Argonne National Laboratory. Results include the emission spectrum between 1 and 15 GHz, the polarization of the microwave radiation and the scaling of the emitted power with respect to beam intensity. MAYBE measurements provide further insight on microwave emission from extensive air showers as a novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

  1. Interstellar cyanogen and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Katherine C.; Meyer, David M.; Hawkins, Isabel

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of a recently completed effort to determine the amount of CN rotational excitation in five diffuse interstellar clouds for the purpose of accurately measuring the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). In addition, we report a new detection of emission from the strongest hyperfine component of the 2.64 mm CN rotational transition (N = 1-0) in the direction toward HD 21483. We have used this result in combination with existing emission measurements toward our other stars to correct for local excitation effects within diffuse clouds which raise the measured CN rotational temperature above that of the CMBR. After making this correction, we find a weighted mean value of T(CMBR) = 2.729 (+0.023, -0.031) K. This temperature is in excellent agreement with the new COBE measurement of 2.726 +/- 0.010 K (Mather et al., 1993). Our result, which samples the CMBR far from the near-Earth environment, attests to the accuracy of the COBE measurement and reaffirms the cosmic nature of this background radiation. From the observed agreement between our CMBR temperature and the COBE result, we conclude that corrections for local CN excitation based on millimeter emission measurements provide an accurate adjustment to the measured rotational excitation.

  2. Microwave Signatures of Melting/Refreezing Snow: Observations and Modeling Using Dense Medium Radiative Transfer Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Marco; Kim, Edward J.; England, Anthony; deRoo, Roger; Hardy, Janet

    2005-01-01

    Microwave brightness temperatures of snow covered terrains can be modeled by means of the Dense Radiative Transfer Medium Theory (DMRT). In a dense medium, such as snow, the assumption of independent scattering is no longer valid and the scattering of correlated scatterers must be considered. In the DMRT, this is done considering a pair distribution function of the particles position. In the electromagnetic model, the snowpack is simulated as a homogeneous layer having effective permittivity and albedo calculated through the DMRT. In order to account for clustering of snow crystals, a model of cohesive particles can be applied, where the cohesion between the particles is described by means of a dimensionless parameters called stickiness (z), representing a measure of the inversion of the attraction of the particles. The lower the z the higher the stickiness. In this study, microwave signatures of melting and refreezing cycles of seasonal snowpacks at high altitudes are studied by means of both experimental and modeling tools. Radiometric data were collected 24 hours per day by the University of Michigan Tower Mounted Radiometer System (TMRS). The brightness temperatures collected by means of the TMRS are simulated by means of a multi-layer electromagnetic model based on the dense medium theory with the inputs to the model derived from the data collected at the snow pits and from the meteorological station. The paper is structured as follows: in the first Section the temperature profiles recorded by the meteorological station and the snow pit data are presented and analyzed; in the second Section, the characteristics of the radiometric system used to collect the brightness temperatures are reported together with the temporal behavior of the recorded brightness temperatures; in the successive Section the multi-layer DMRT-based electromagnetic model is described; in the fourth Section the comparison between modeled and measured brightness temperatures is discussed. We

  3. Microwave Polarized Signatures Generated within Cloud Systems: SSM/I Observations Interpreted with Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prigent, Catherine; Pardo, Juan R.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rossow, Willaim B.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Special Sensor Microwave /Imager (SSM/I) observations in cloud systems are studied over the tropics. Over optically thick cloud systems, presence of polarized signatures at 37 and 85 GHz is evidenced and analyzed with the help of cloud top temperature and optical thickness extracted from visible and IR satellite observations. Scattering signatures at 85 GHz (TbV(85) less than or = 250 K) are associated with polarization differences greater than or = 6 K, approx. 50%, of the time over ocean and approx. 40% over land. In addition. over thick clouds the polarization difference at 37 GHz is rarely negligible. The polarization differences at 37 and 85 GHz do not stem from the surface but are generated in regions of relatively homogeneous clouds having high liquid water content. To interpret the observations, a radiative transfer model that includes the scattering by non-spherical particles is developed. based on the T-matrix approach and using the doubling and adding method. In addition to handling randomly and perfectly oriented particles, this model can also simulate the effect of partial orientation of the hydrometeors. Microwave brightness temperatures are simulated at SSM/I frequencies and are compared with the observations. Polarization differences of approx. 2 K can be simulated at 37 GHz over a rain layer, even using spherical drops. The polarization difference is larger for oriented non-spherical particles. The 85 GHz simulations are very sensitive to the ice phase of the cloud. Simulations with spherical particles or with randomly oriented non-spherical ice particles cannot replicate the observed polarization differences. However, with partially oriented non-spherical particles, the observed polarized signatures at 85 GHz are explained, and the sensitivity of the scattering characteristics to the particle size, asphericity, and orientation is analyzed. Implications on rain and ice retrievals are discussed.

  4. A measurement of the low frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, S.M.

    1987-04-01

    As part of a larger effort to measure the spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR) at low frequencies, the intensity of the CBR has been measured at a frequency of 1.410 GHz. The measurement was made by comparing the power received from the sky with the power received from a specially designed cooled calibration target with known properties. Sources of radiation other than the CBR were then identified and subtracted to calculate the antenna temperature of the CBR at 1.410 GHz. The instrument used to measure the CBR was a total-power microwave radiometer with a 25 MHz bandwidth centered at 1.410 GHz. The radiometer had a noise temperature of 80 K, and sufficient data were taken that radiometer noise did not contribute significantly to the total measurement error. The sources of error were predominantly systematic in nature, and the largest error was due to uncertainty in the reflection characteristics of the cold-load calibrator. Identification and subtraction of signals from the Galaxy (0.7 K) and the Earth's atmosphere (0.8 K) were also significant parts of the data reduction and error analysis. The brightness temperature of the Cosmic Background Radiation at 1.410 GHz is 222. +- 0.55 Kelvin. The spectrum of the CBR, as determined by this measurement and other published results, is consistent with a blackbody spectrum of temperature 2.741 +- 0.016. Constraints on the amount by which the CBR spectrum deviates from Planck spectrum are used to place limits on energy releases early in the history of the universe. 55 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Microwaves and the cell membrane. III. Protein shedding is oxygen and temperature dependent: evidence for cation bridge involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Liburdy, R.P.; Vanek, P.F. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    Microwaves (2450 MHz, 60 mW/g) are shown to result in the release or shedding of at least 11 low-molecular-weight proteins (less than or equal to 31,000 Da) from rabbit erythrocytes maintained in physiological buffer. Protein release was detected by gel electrophoresis of cell-free supernatants using sensitive silver staining. This release is oxygen dependent and occurs in 30 min for exposures conducted within the special temperature region of 17-21 degrees C, which is linked to a structural or conformational transition in the cell membrane. Shedding of 26,000 and 24,000 Da proteins is unique to microwave treatment, with enhanced release of 28,000 and less than or equal to 15,000 Da species during microwave compared to sham exposures. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing further reveals that proteins of less than or equal to 14,000 Da shed during microwave treatment exhibit a pI of 6.8-7.3 not seen in sham-treated cells. Treatment of erythrocytes with a serine-directed protease inhibitor does not prevent release of proteins. However, when erythrocytes are maintained at 17-21 degrees C by conventional heating in the absence of divalent cations, release of 28,000-31,000 and less than or equal to 14,000 Da components is detected. This indicates that cation-bridge stability may be important for release of these proteins. The above results provide evidence that microwaves alter erythrocyte protein composition at temperatures linked to a transition in the cell membrane and that destabilization of salt bridges may play a role in an interaction mechanism for protein release.

  6. Assessment of cytogenetic damage and oxidative stress in personnel occupationally exposed to the pulsed microwave radiation of marine radar equipment.

    PubMed

    Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Gajski, Goran; Pažanin, Senijo; Sarolić, Antonio; Domijan, Ana-Marija; Flajs, Dubravka; Peraica, Maja

    2011-01-01

    Due to increased usage of microwave radiation, there are concerns of its adverse effect in today's society. Keeping this in view, study was aimed at workers occupationally exposed to pulsed microwave radiation, originating from marine radars. Electromagnetic field strength was measured at assigned marine radar frequencies (3 GHz, 5.5 GHz and 9.4 GHz) and corresponding specific absorption rate values were determined. Parameters of the comet assay and micronucleus test were studied both in the exposed workers and in corresponding unexposed subjects. Differences between mean tail intensity (0.67 vs. 1.22) and moment (0.08 vs. 0.16) as comet assay parameters and micronucleus test parameters (micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds) were statistically significant between the two examined groups, suggesting that cytogenetic alterations occurred after microwave exposure. Concentrations of glutathione and malondialdehyde were measured spectrophotometrically and using high performance liquid chromatography. The glutathione concentration in exposed group was significantly lower than in controls (1.24 vs. 0.53) whereas the concentration of malondialdehyde was significantly higher (1.74 vs. 3.17), indicating oxidative stress. Results suggests that pulsed microwaves from working environment can be the cause of genetic and cell alterations and that oxidative stress can be one of the possible mechanisms of DNA and cell damage.

  7. The DMRT-ML Model: Numerical Simulations of the Microwave Emission of Snowpacks Based on the Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picard, Ghislain; Brucker, Ludovic; Roy, Alexandre; DuPont, FLorent; Champollion, Nicolas; Morin, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Microwave radiometer observations have been used to retrieve snow depth and snow water equivalent on both land and sea ice, snow accumulation on ice sheets, melt events, snow temperature, and snow grain size. Modeling the microwave emission from snow and ice physical properties is crucial to improve the quality of these retrievals. It also is crucial to improve our understanding of the radiative transfer processes within the snow cover, and the snow properties most relevant in microwave remote sensing. Our objective is to present a recent microwave emission model and its validation. The model is named DMRT-ML (DMRT Multi-Layer).

  8. The DMRT-ML Model: Numerical Simulations of the Microwave Emission of Snowpacks Based on the Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Picard, Ghislain; Roy, Alexandre; Dupont, Florent; Fily, Michel; Royer, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Microwave radiometer observations have been used to retrieve snow depth and snow water equivalent on both land and sea ice, snow accumulation on ice sheets, melt events, snow temperature, and snow grain size. Modeling the microwave emission from snow and ice physical properties is crucial to improve the quality of these retrievals. It also is crucial to improve our understanding of the radiative transfer processes within the snow cover, and the snow properties most relevant in microwave remote sensing. Our objective is to present a recent microwave emission model and its validation. The model is named DMRT-ML (DMRT Multi-Layer), and is available at http:lgge.osug.frpicarddmrtml.

  9. Lack of effect of 2. 45-GHz microwave radiation on the development of preimplantation embryos of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Inouye, M.; Matsumoto, N.; Galvin, M.J.; McRee, D.I.

    1982-01-01

    The development of preimplantation embryos after exposure to microwave radiation was studied. Female CD-1 mice were induced to superovulate, mated, and exposed to 2.45-GHz microwave or sham radiation for 3 h at power densities of 9 mW/cm2 and 19 mW/cm2 on either day 2 or 3 of pregnancy (plug day was considered day 1). Another group of mice was exposed to heat stress by placing the dams in an environmental room at an ambient temperature of 38 degrees C and relative humidity at 62% for 3 h on day 2 of pregnancy. All groups were euthanized on day 4 of pregnancy and embryos were recovered by flushing excised uterine horns. Embryos were examined for abnormalities and classified by the developmental stages. They were then treated with hypotonic solution and dissociated for counting blastomeres. Heat stress caused stunted development of embryos, but no remarkable effect of microwave radiation could be found on the development of preimplantation embryos.

  10. Variations in the microwave radiation of the mesophere during heating of the ionosphere with high-power radiowaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, Yu. Yu.; Grigor'ev, G. I.; Krasil'nikov, A. A.; Frolov, V. L.

    2012-06-01

    We present the results of microwave observations of ozone radiation in the middle atmosphere during modification of the ionosphere by high-power short radio waves on March 27-28, 2011. The modification was performed on the "Sura" heating facility of the Radiophysical Research Institute (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) by using two ozone meters oriented towards different regions in the sky. The effect of a decrease in the radiation intensity in the ozone line when the ionosphere is heated with high-power short-wave radio emission, which was discovered earlier, has been confirmed, and new data related to its characteristic have been obtained. A possible interpretation of this phenomenon is discussed.

  11. An Analysis of Recent Measurements of the Temperature of theCosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, G.; Levin, S.M.; Witebsky, C.; De Amici, G.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1987-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the results of recent temperature measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). The observations for wavelengths longer than 0.1 cm are well fit by a blackbody spectrum at 2.74 {+-} 0.02 K; however, including the new data of Matsumoto et al. (1987) the result is no longer consistent with a Planckian spectrum. The data are described by a Thomson-distortion parameter u = 0.021 {+-} 0.002 and temperature 2.823 {+-} 0.010 K at the 68% confidence level. Fitting the low-frequency data to a Bose-Einstein spectral distortion yields a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.4 x 10{sup -2} on the chemical potential {mu}{sub 0}. These limits on spectral distortions place restrictions on a number of potentially interesting sources of energy release to the CMBR, including the hot intergalactic medium proposed as the source of the X-ray background.

  12. Kinetic instabilities in a mirror-confined plasma sustained by high-power microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalashov, A. G.; Viktorov, M. E.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Golubev, S. V.

    2017-03-01

    This paper summarizes the studies of plasma kinetic instabilities in the electron cyclotron frequency range carried out over the last decade at the Institute of Applied Physics in Nizhny Novgorod. We investigate the nonequilibrium plasma created and sustained by high-power microwave radiation of a gyrotron under the electron cyclotron resonance condition. Resonant plasma heating results in the formation of at least two electron components, one of which, more dense and cold, determines the dispersion properties of the high-frequency waves, and the other, a small group of energetic electrons with a highly anisotropic velocity distribution, is responsible for the excitation of unstable waves. Dynamic spectra and the intensity of stimulated electromagnetic emission are studied with high temporal resolution. Interpretation of observed data is based on the cyclotron maser paradigm; in this context, a laboratory modeling of non-stationary wave-particle interaction processes has much in common with similar processes occurring in the magnetosphere of Earth, planets, and solar coronal loops.

  13. The relationship between cellular adhesion and surface roughness for polyurethane modified by microwave plasma radiation.

    PubMed

    Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Azhdadi, S Neda Kh; Asefnejad, Azadeh; Asefnezhad, Azadeh; Sadraeian, Mohammad; Montazeri, Mohamad; Biazar, Esmaeil

    2011-01-01

    Surface modification of medical polymers is carried out to improve biocompatibility. In this study, conventional polyurethane was exposed to microwave plasma treatment with oxygen and argon gases for 30 seconds and 60 seconds. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra investigations of irradiated samples indicated the presence of functional groups. Atomic force microscope images of samples irradiated with inert and active gases indicated the nanometric topography of the sample surfaces. Samples irradiated by oxygen plasma indicated high roughness compared with those irradiated by inert plasma for the different lengths of time. In addition, surface roughness increased with time, which can be due to a reduction of contact angle of samples irradiated by oxygen plasma. Contact angle analysis indicated a reduction in samples irradiated with both types of plasma. However, samples irradiated with oxygen plasma indicated lower contact angle compared with those irradiated by argon plasma. Cellular investigations with unrestricted somatic stem cells showed better adhesion, cell growth, and proliferation among samples radiated by oxygen plasma for longer than for normal samples.

  14. Effectiveness of microwave hyperthermia combined with ionizing radiation: clinical results on nieck node metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, G.; Barni, E.; Cividalli, A.; Mauro, F.; Morelli, D.; Nervi, C.; Spano, M.; Tabocchini, A.

    1980-02-01

    Patients with superficial malignant lesions have been treated with local hyperthermia in association with radiation. Heat was applied by means of a newly assembled apparatus with a variable frequency microwave generator (200 to 3000 MHz). The apparatus was operated at a frequency of 500 MHz; heat was delivered with non-contact applicators designed for different surface curvature. Adequate heating for depths up to about 3 cm was demonstrated by isothermal maps in chopped meat phantoms. A group of 15 patients with N/sub 2/-N/sub 3/ multiple cervical nodes from head and neck cancer were treated with a multiple daily fractionation (MDF) radiotherapy, according to our previous clinical experience, and with MDF combined with local hyperthermia. A direct comparison of the two treatments on different nodes was possible for each patient: 17/20 nodes (85%) achieved a complete response with this combined schedule, 6/13 (46%) with MDF alone, and 14/46 (30%) with conventional fractionation (historical series). The same combined treatment also was delivered to a group of 4 patients with other kinds of tumors. Complete or satisfactory responses were also obtained in these patients. The results suggest that MDF can be advantageously combined with local hyperthermia.

  15. Level crossing analysis of cosmic microwave background radiation: a method for detecting cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Movahed, M. Sadegh; Khosravi, Shahram E-mail: khosravi@ipm.ir

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we study the footprint of cosmic string as the topological defects in the very early universe on the cosmic microwave background radiation. We develop the method of level crossing analysis in the context of the well-known Kaiser-Stebbins phenomenon for exploring the signature of cosmic strings. We simulate a Gaussian map by using the best fit parameter given by WMAP-7 and then superimpose cosmic strings effects on it as an incoherent and active fluctuations. In order to investigate the capability of our method to detect the cosmic strings for the various values of tension, Gμ, a simulated pure Gaussian map is compared with that of including cosmic strings. Based on the level crossing analysis, the superimposed cosmic string with Gμ∼>4 × 10{sup −9} in the simulated map without instrumental noise and the resolution R = 1' could be detected. In the presence of anticipated instrumental noise the lower bound increases just up to Gμ∼>5.8 × 10{sup −9}.

  16. Effects of pulse-modulated microwave radiation and conventional heating on sperm production

    SciTech Connect

    Lebovitz, R.M.; Johnson, L.; Samson, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The effects on testicular function of pulse-modulated microwave radiation (PM MWR, 1.3 GHz) and of conventional heating were studied in the rat. Anesthetized adult males (Sprague-Dawley, 400-500 g) were treated then killed at specific intervals with respect to the 13-day cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. PM MWR at 7.7 mW/g (90 min) yielded a modest decline in daily sperm production (DSP) that derived primarily from effects on primary spermatocytes. PM MWR at 4.2 mW/g was ineffective. The mean intratesticular temperature during the former reached 40 degrees C and did not exceed 38 degrees C during the latter. MWR considerably in excess of 7.7 mW/g yielded decrements in virtually all germ cell types, with primary spermatocytes again being most markedly affected. Using conventional heating, intratesticular temperatures in excess of 39 degrees C for 60 min were required for significant decrements in DSP. Levels of circulating follicle-stimulating hormone and of leutinizing hormone were resistant to either treatment. We conclude that the damage threshold and the differential sensitivity of immature germ cells to PM MWR can be adequately explained by the consequent macroscopic heating.

  17. Radio-frequency excitation of harmonic microwave radiation from a Penning reflex discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, J.P.; Wharton, C.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Experimental results on multiple-harmonic emission at 8.8 GHz from a Penning reflex discharge (PRD) are reported. Observations of the frequency spectra of microwave emission showed copius harmonic generation of frequencies having two completely different origins: (1) spontaneously excited high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency and (2) high harmonics of the frequency of an injected signal independent of the magnetic field strength, a phenomenon reported here for the first time. For spontaneous harmonic emission there was a current threshold, whose magnitude depended on gas pressure and magnetic field strength. When a signal was injected, however, high harmonics (up to the 18th) could be seen at discharge currents well below this threshold value. Comparisons between the two types of radiation are made and discussion of possible mechanisms is provided. It is concluded that the coupling efficiency of the radio-frequency (rf)-excited emission is dependent on the relationship between the rf drive frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency. Finite Larmor radius effects may also influence this coupling. The plasma sheath size will also be a factor in the transfer of energy from the probe to the bulk plasma. Results which seek to elucidate these effects are presented.

  18. Reconstructing single-field inflationary actions from cosmic microwave background radiation data

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, Christopher S; Akhoury, Ratindranath E-mail: akhoury@umich.edu

    2008-07-15

    This paper describes a general program for deriving the action of single-field inflation models with non-standard kinetic energy terms using cosmic microwave background radiation power spectrum data. This method assumes that an action depends on a set of undetermined functions, each of which is a function of either the inflaton wavefunction or its time derivative. The scalar, tensor and non-Gaussianity of the curvature perturbation spectrum are used to derive a set of reconstruction equations whose solution set can specify up to three of the undetermined functions. The method is then used to find the undetermined functions in various types of action assuming power law type scalar and tensor spectra. In actions that contain only two unknown functions, the third reconstruction equation implies a consistency relation between the non-Gaussianity, sound speed and slow roll parameters. In particular we focus on reconstructing a generalized Dirac-Born-Infeld action with an unknown potential and warp factor. We find that for realistic scalar and tensor spectra, the reconstructed warp factor and potential are very similar to the theoretically derived result. Furthermore, physical consistency of the reconstructed warp factor and potential imposes strict constraints on the scalar and tensor spectral indices.

  19. Optimal width of quasicrystalline slabs of dielectric cylinders to microwave radiation transmission contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andueza, Ángel; Wang, Kang; Pérez-Conde, Jesús; Sevilla, Joaquín

    2016-08-01

    Light confinement induced by resonant states in aperiodic photonic structures is interesting for many applications. A particular case of these resonances can be found in 2D quasicrystalline arrangements of dielectric cylinders. These systems present a rather isotropic band gap as well as isolated in-gap photonic states (as a result of spatially localized resonances). These states are built by high symmetry polygonal clusters that can be regarded as photonic molecules. In this paper, we study the transmission properties of a slab of glass cylinders arranged in approximants of the decagonal quasicrystalline structure. In particular, we investigate the influence of the slab width in the transmission contrast between the states and the gap. The study is both experimental and numerical in the microwave regime. We find that the best transmission contrast is found for a width of around three times the radiation wavelength. The transmission in the band gap region is mediated by the resonances of the photonic molecules. If the samples are thin enough, they become transparent except around a resonance of the photonic molecule which reflects the incoming light.

  20. An Analysis of Recent Measurements of the Temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smoot, G.; Levin, S. M.; Witebsky, C.; De Amici, G.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1987-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the results of recent temperature measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). The observations for wavelengths longer than 0.1 cum are well fit by a blackbody spectrum at 2.74{+ or -}0.0w K; however, including the new data of Matsumoto et al. (1987) the result is no longer consistent with a Planckian spectrum. The data are described by a Thomson-distortion parameter u=0.021{+ or -}0.002 and temperature 2.823{+ or -}0.010 K at the 68% confidence level. Fitting the low-frequency data to a Bose-Einstein spectral distortion yields a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.4 x 10{sup -2} on the chemical potential mu{sub 0}. These limits on spectral distortions place restrictions on a number of potentially interesting sources of energy release to the CMBR, including the hot intergalactic medium proposed as the source of the X-ray background.

  1. A First-Order Radiative Transfer Model for Microwave Radiometry of Forest Canopies at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; Lang, Roger H.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Jackson, Thomas J.; Cosh, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a first-order radiative transfer (RT) model is developed to more accurately account for vegetation canopy scattering by modifying the basic Tau-Omega model (the zero-order RT solution). In order to optimally utilize microwave radiometric data in soil moisture (SM) retrievals over vegetated landscapes, a quantitative understanding of the relationship between scattering mechanisms within vegetation canopies and the microwave brightness temperature is desirable. The first-order RT model is used to investigate this relationship and to perform a physical analysis of the scattered and emitted radiation from vegetated terrain. This model is based on an iterative solution (successive orders of scattering) of the RT equations up to the first order. This formulation adds a new scattering term to the . model. The additional term represents emission by particles (vegetation components) in the vegetation layer and emission by the ground that is scattered once by particles in the layer. The model is tested against 1.4-GHz brightness temperature measurements acquired over deciduous trees by a truck-mounted microwave instrument system called ComRAD in 2007. The model predictions are in good agreement with the data, and they give quantitative understanding for the influence of first-order scattering within the canopy on the brightness temperature. The model results show that the scattering term is significant for trees and modifications are necessary to the . model when applied to dense vegetation. Numerical simulations also indicate that the scattering term has a negligible dependence on SM and is mainly a function of the incidence angle and polarization of the microwave observation. Index Terms Emission,microwave radiometry, scattering, soil, vegetation.

  2. Fundamental Materials Studies for Advanced High Power Microwave and Terahertz Vacuum Electronic Radiation Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-10

    Models for Microstrip Computer-Aided Design,” in Microwave Symposium Digest , 1980 IEEE MTT-S International, 1980, p. 407. [2] B.B. Yang, S.L...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0359 Fundamental Materials Studies for Advanced High Power Microwave and Terahertz John Booske UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM...12-2014 Final Technical Performance Report October 1, 2011 - September 30, 2014 Fundamental Materials Studies for Advanced High Power Microwave and

  3. An analysis of the microwave dielectric properties of solvent-oil feedstock mixtures at 300-3000 MHz.

    PubMed

    Terigar, Beatrice G; Balasubramanian, Sundar; Boldor, Dorin

    2010-08-01

    Microwaves can be a more efficient method than traditional thermal treatment to deliver the energy required for heating in solvent-oil extraction due to its volumetric, direct coupling with the material. An understanding of the behavior of dielectric properties of solvent-feedstock mixtures is important for designing and optimizing any microwave-based extraction process. In this study rice bran and soybean flour were mixed separately with four different solvents (methanol, ethanol, hexane and isopropanol) at different ratios (1:2, 1:1, 2:1 w/w). For the samples mixed with ethanol, the dielectric properties were measured at 23, 30, 40 and 50 degrees C, while for all other sample-solvent mixtures experiments were performed at room temperature. Dielectric properties were determined using a vector network analyzer and dielectric probe kit using the open-ended coaxial probe method in the frequency range of 300 MHz to 3 GHz. Results from the study indicate that dielectric constants were dependent on frequency and were strongly influenced by temperature, mix ratio and solvent type. The dielectric loss of all mixtures except those with hexane (which were virtually zero) varied with frequency and temperature, solvent type, and mix ratio. Most of the results presented are emphasized at 433, 915 and 2450 MHz, frequencies allocated by the Federal Communication Commission (F.C.C.) for microwave applications. The results of the study, presented here for the first time to our knowledge, will help in selection of appropriate solvent, mixing ratio and frequency for designing microwave-assisted oil extraction systems.

  4. High-impedance NbSi TES sensors for studying the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nones, C.; Marnieros, S.; Benoit, A.; Bergé, L.; Bideaud, A.; Camus, P.; Dumoulin, L.; Monfardini, A.; Rigaut, O.

    2012-12-01

    Precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are crucial in cosmology because any proposed model of the universe must account for the features of this radiation. The CMB has a thermal blackbody spectrum at a temperature of 2.725 K, i.e. the spectrum peaks in the microwave range frequency of 160.2 GHz, corresponding to a 1.9-mm wavelength. Of all CMB measurements that the scientific community has not yet been able to perform, the CMB B-mode polarization is probably the most challenging from the instrumental point of view. The signature of primordial gravitational waves, which give rise to a B-type polarization, is one of the goals in cosmology today and amongst the first objectives in the field. For this purpose, high-performance low-temperature bolometric cameras, made of thousands of pixels, are currently being developed by many groups, which will improve the sensitivity to B-mode CMB polarization by one or two orders of magnitude compared to the Planck satellite HFI detectors. We present here a new bolometer structure that is able to increase the pixel sensitivities and to simplify the fabrication procedure. This innovative device replaces delicate membrane-based structures and eliminates the mediation of phonons: the incoming energy is directly captured and measured in the electron bath of an appropriate sensor and the thermal decoupling is achieved via the intrinsic electron-phonon decoupling of the sensor at very low temperature. Reported results come from a 204-pixel array of NbxSi1-x transition edge sensors with a meander structure fabricated on a 2-inch silicon wafer using electron-beam co-evaporation and a cleanroom lithography process. To validate the application of this device to CMB measurements, we have performed an optical calibration of our sample in the focal plane of a dilution cryostat test bench. We have demonstrated a light absorption close to 20% and an optical noise equivalent power of about 7×10-16 W/√Hz, which is highly

  5. Highly biocompatible, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite synthesized in a solvothermal process driven by high energy density microwave radiation

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Dariusz; Chudoba, Tadeusz; Malka, Iwona; Kedzierska, Aleksandra; Lojkowski, Witold; Swieszkowski, Wojciech; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof Jan; Kolodziejczyk-Mierzynska, Małgorzata; Lewandowska-Szumiel, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    A microwave, solvothermal synthesis of highly biocompatible hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanopowder was developed. The process was conducted in a microwave radiation field having a high energy density of 5 W/mL and over a time less than 2 minutes. The sample measurements included: powder X-ray diffraction, density, specific surface area, and chemical composition. The morphology and structure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermal behavior analysis was conducted using a simultaneous thermal analysis technique coupled with quadruple mass spectrometry. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy tests of heated samples were performed. A degradation test and a biocompatibility study in vitro using human osteoblast cells were also conducted. The developed method enables the synthesis of pure, fully crystalline hexagonal HAp nanopowder with a specific surface area close to 240 m2/g and a Ca/P molar ratio equal to 1.57. TEM measurements showed that this method results in particles with an average grain size below 6 nm. A 28-day degradation test conducted according to the ISO standard indicated a 22% loss of initial weight and a calcium ion concentration at 200 μmol/dm3 in the tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane hydrochloride test solution. The cytocompatibility of the obtained material was confirmed in a culture of human bone derived cells, both in an indirect test using the material extract, and in direct contact. A quantitative analysis was based on the 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide. Viability assay as well as on DNA content measurements in the PicoGreen test. Indirect observations were performed at one point in time according to the ISO standard for in vitro cytotoxicity (ie, after 24 hours of cell exposure to the extracts). The direct contact tests were completed at three time points: after 24 hours, on day 7, and on day 14 of a culture in an osteogenic

  6. Analysis of small-scale microwave background radiation anisotropy in the presence of foreground contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Stebbins, Albert

    1994-01-01

    Many of the current round of experiments searching for anisotropies in the microwave background radiation (MBR) are confronting the problem of how to disentangle the cosmic signal from contamination due to Galactic and intergalactic foreground sources. Here we show how commonly used likelihood function techniques can be generalized to account for foreground. Specifically we set some restrictions on the spectrum of foreground contamination but allow the amplitude to vary arbitrarily. The likelihood function thus generalized gives reasonable limits on the MBR anisotropy which, in some cases, are not much less restrictive than what one would get from more detailed modeling of the foreground. Furthermore, the likelihood function is exactly the same as one would obtain by simply projecting out foreground contamination and looking at the reduced data set. We apply this generalized analysis to the recent medium-angle data sets of ACME-HEMT (Gaier et al. 1992; Schuster et al. 1993) and MAX (Meinhold et al. 1993; Gunderson et al. 1993). The resulting analysis constrains the one free parameter in the standard cold dark matter theory to be Q(sub rms-ps) = 18(sub -5 sup +8) microKelvin. This best fit value, although in striking agreement with the normalization from Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), is not a very good fit, with an overall chi-squared/degrees of freedom = 208/168. We also argue against three commonly used methods of dealing with foreground: (1) ignoring it completely; (2) subtracting off a best-fit foreground and treating the residuals as if uncontaminated; and (3) culling data which appears to be contaminated by foreground.

  7. QUaD: A millimeter-wave polarimeter for observation of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderks, James R.

    2005-11-01

    This thesis describes the design and performance of the QUaD experiment and presents some of its earliest results. QUaD is a millimeter-wavelength polarimeter designed for observing the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). QUaD was commissioned at the MAPO observatory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in the Austral Summer of 2004/2005, achieved first light in Feb 2005, and began science observation in May. QUaD observes the CMB with an array of 31 polarization-sensitive Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) germanium bolometers split between two frequency bands centered at 100 and 150 GHz. The telescope is a 2.6 m on-axis Cassegrain design with beam sizes of 6.3' and 4.2' at the two respective observing frequencies. The resolution and scan strategy are optimized to probe the CMB E- mode power spectrum over a multipole range of 100 to 2500. The performance of the system has been characterized with commissioning observations and a high signal-to-noise map of the CMB temperature anisotropy has been made over a ~50 square degree area. CMB polarization anisotropies, only recently detected, promise a wealth of new cosmological information. Their observation complements the many successful temperature anisotropy measurements already performed, confirming our basic understanding of the early universe and leading to tighter constraints on cosmological parameters. Furthermore, polarization observations provide a probe of structure since the last scattering surface and promise unique constraints on inflation through the imprint of relict gravitational radiation.

  8. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields--mechanisms for the effects of pulsed microwave radiation on protein conformation.

    PubMed

    Laurence, J A; French, P W; Lindner, R A; Mckenzie, D R

    2000-09-21

    Microwave exposure under "athermal" conditions occurs when no temperature rise can be measured by conventional thermometry. The existence of biological effects arising from the athermal exposure is still controversial, partly because of a lack of the linear dose response relation. We propose a model in which pulsed microwave radiation causes a triggering of the heat shock or stress response by altering the conformation of proteins through a transient heating of the protein and its close environment. We support this by modelling using the heat diffusion equation and show that pulsed exposure even when athermal can lead to transient temperature excursions outside the normal range. We propose that the power window phenomenon in which biological effects are observed at low power levels may be caused by an incomplete triggering of the heat shock response.

  9. A First-Order Radiative Transfer Model for Microwave Radiometry of Forest Canopies at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; Lang, Roger H.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Jackson, Thomas J.; Cosh, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a new first-order radiative transfer (RT) model is developed to more accurately account for vegetation canopy scattering by modifying the basic r-co model (the zero-order RT solution). In order to optimally utilize microwave radiometric data in soil moisture (SM) retrievals over moderately to densely vegetated landscapes, a quantitative understanding of the relationship between scattering mechanisms within vegetation canopies and the microwave brightness temperature is desirable. A first-order RT model is used to investigate this relationship and to perform a physical analysis of the scattered and emitted radiation from vegetated terrain. The new model is based on an iterative solution (successive orders of scattering) of the RT equations up to the first order. This formulation adds a new scattering term to the i-w model. The additional term represents emission by particles (vegetation components) in the vegetation layer and emission by the ground that is scattered once by particles in the layer. The new model is tested against 1.4 GHz brightness temperature measurements acquired over deciduous trees by a truck-mounted microwave instrument system called ComRAD in 2007. The model predictions are in good agreement with the data and they give quantitative understanding for the influence of first-order scattering within the canopy on the brightness temperature. The model results show that the scattering term is significant for trees and modifications are necessary to the T-w model when applied to dense vegetation. Numerical simulations also indicate that the scattering term has a negligible dependence on SM and is mainly a function of the angle and polarization of the microwave observation.

  10. Validity of actinometry to monitor oxygen atom concentration in microwave discharges created by surface wave in O2-N2 mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granier, A.; Chéreau, D.; Henda, K.; Safari, R.; Leprince, P.

    1994-01-01

    The validity of actinometry to monitor oxygen atom concentration in O2-N2 microwave discharges created by surface wave is investigated. The plasma is created with a gas flow in a quartz tube of inner diameter 16 mm at pressures in the Torr range. First, it is shown that the reliability of actinometry can be deduced from the longitudinal profile of the actinometry signal. Second, absolute concentrations of oxygen atoms are estimated from the experimental actinometry signal and agree satisfactorily with concentrations simultaneously measured by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) absorption downstream from the plasma. Moreover, upon varying the nitrogen percentage (0%-100%), it is evidenced that the actinometry signal is proportional to the concentration measured by VUV absorption. Furthermore, it is evidenced that the oxygen dissociation rate is only 2% in pure oxygen plasmas, while it reaches 15% (433 MHz) or 30% (2450 MHz) for mixtures containing more than 20% of nitrogen. This drastic increase in [O] upon the addition of N2 is extensively discussed and, finally, attributed to a decrease in the recombination frequency of oxygen atoms on the quartz wall, in the presence of nitrogen.

  11. Treatment of lung tumours with high-energy microwave ablation: a single-centre experience.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Coppola, Andrea; Lucchina, Natalie; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to report safety, technical success, effectiveness, local progression-free survival (LPFS) and overall survival of percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) to treat lung tumours unsuitable for surgery. Nineteen patients with thirty-one tumours (mean diameter 2.4 cm) underwent percutaneous MWA in 28 sessions. Microwave ablation was carried out using a 2450-MHz generator (Emprint/Covidien, Boulder, CO, USA). Procedures were performed under cone-beam CT (CBCT) and under fluoro-CT (one session) guidance. Safety, technical success, effectiveness, LPFS and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Safety was defined as the frequency of major and minor complications. The efficacy was evaluated on the basis of imaging characteristics, using RECIST criteria. CT follow-up was performed at 1, 3 and 6 months and yearly. LPFS was defined as the interval between MWA treatment and evidence of local recurrence, if there was any. OS was defined as the percentage of patients who were still alive. We registered one major complication (purulent hydro-pneumothorax). Minor complications were spontaneously resolved (pneumothorax and perilesional haemorrhagic effusion). Technical success was 100%. Residual disease was registered in two cases, one of whom was retreated. Complete ablation was obtained in the remaining cases (90.3%). During available follow-up (mean 9.6 months), 9/31 tumours demonstrated local recurrence. Five tumours were retreated, and none of them presented residual disease during follow-up (LPFS 22.6%). Overall survival was 93.8%. Percutaneous high-energy MWA is a safe, effective and confident technique to treat lung tumours not suitable for surgery.

  12. Three-dimensional inhomogeneous rain fields: implications for the distribution of intensity and polarization of the microwave thermal radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyushin, Yaroslaw; Kutuza, Boris

    Observations and mapping of the upwelling thermal radiation of the Earth is the very promising remote sensing technique for the global monitoring of the weather and precipitations. For reliable interpretation of the observation data, numerical model of the microwave radiative transfer in the precipitating atmosphere is necessary. In the present work, numerical simulations of thermal microwave radiation in the rain have been performed at three wavelengths (3, 8 and 22 mm). Radiative properties of the rain have been simulated using public accessible T-matrix codes (Mishchenko, Moroz) for non-spherical particles of fixed orientation and realistic raindrop size distributions (Marshall-Palmer) within the range of rain intensity 1-100 mm/h. Thermal radiation of infinite flat slab medium and isolated rain cell of kilometer size has been simulated with finite difference scheme for the vectorial radiative transfer equation (VRTE) in dichroic scattering medium. Principal role of cell structure of the rain field in the formation of angular and spatial distribution of the intensity and polarization of the upwelling thermal radiation has been established. Possible approaches to interpretation of satellite data are also discussed. It is necessary that spatial resolution of microwave radiometers be less than rain cell size. At the present time the resolution is approximately 15 km. It can be considerably improved, for example by two-dimensional synthetic aperture millimeter-wave radiometric interferometer for measuring full-component Stokes vector of emission from hydrometeors. The estimates show that in millimeter band it is possible to develop such equipment with spatial resolution of the order of 1-2 km, which is significantly less than the size of rain cell, with sensitivity 0.3-0.5 K. Under this condition the second Stokes parameter may by successfully measured and may be used for investigation of precipitation regions. Y-shaped phased array antenna is the most promising to

  13. A study of the effects of cellular telephone microwave radiation on the auditory system in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Mora, Renzo; Crippa, Barbara; Mora, Francesco; Dellepiane, Massimo

    2006-03-01

    We conducted a study of the effects of mobile cellular telephone microwave radiation on the auditory system in 20 healthy men. After the subjects underwent baseline measurements of transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) and auditory brainstem response (ABR), they participated in three sessions of exposure to an electromagnetic field of 900 to 1,800 MHz produced by a cellular phone. Sessions ranged from 15 to 30 minutes in length. TEOAE and ABR were again measured after or during each exposure. Throughout the study, no significant changes in either measurement were noted. We conclude that the use of cellular phones does not alter the auditory system in the short-term.

  14. Chronic Nonmodulated Microwave Radiations in Mice Produce Anxiety-like and Depression-like Behaviours and Calcium- and NO-related Biochemical Changes in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Singh, Surya P.

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate behavioural and biochemical effects of chronic exposure of amplitude modulated and non-modulated microwave radiation on laboratory mice. Chronic microwave exposures were executed with 2.45 GHz of either modulated (power density, 0.029 mW/cm2; specific absorption rate, 0.019 W/Kg with sinusoidal modulation of 400 Hz) or nonmodulated continuous sinusoidal wave (power density, 0.033 mW/cm2; specific absorption rate, 0.023 W/Kg) for 2 hrs daily for 1 month. Mice subjected to non-modulated microwave exposure had significantly increased acetylcholinesterase activity and increased intracellular calcium and nitric oxide levels in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and also had increased glucose and corticosterone levels in blood compared to control mice. These non-modulated microwave-exposed mice exhibited anxiety-like and depression-like behaviours. In contrast, mice exposed to modulated microwave for the same period did not show such changes in concomitant biochemical and behavioural analyses. These results suggest that chronic non-modulated microwave, but not modulated microwave, radiation may cause anxiety-like and depression-like behaviours and calcium- and NO-related biochemical changes in the brain. PMID:28035182

  15. Single- and double-strand DNA breaks in rat brain cells after acute exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Lai, H; Singh, N P

    1996-04-01

    We investigated the effects of acute (2-h) exposure to pulsed (2-micros pulse width, 500 pulses s(-1)) and continuous wave 2450-MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation on DNA strand breaks in brain cells of rat. The spatial averaged power density of the radiation was 2mW/cm2, which produced a whole-body average-specific absorption rate of 1.2W/kg. Single- and double-strand DNA breaks in individual brain cells were measured at 4h post-exposure using a microgel electrophoresis assay. An increase in both types of DNA strand breaks was observed after exposure to either the pulsed or continuous-wave radiation, No significant difference was observed between the effects of the two forms of radiation. We speculate that these effects could result from a direct effect of radiofrequency electromagnetic energy on DNA molecules and/or impairment of DNA-damage repair mechanisms in brain cells. Our data further support the results of earlier in vitro and in vivo studies showing effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation on DNA.

  16. Basic studies on the treatment of volatile organic pollutant in sand by microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Myoung-Sook; Kim, Dong-Su; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2006-01-01

    The heating characteristics of water and sand were investigated to understand the basic features of a microwave soil pollution treatment system and the reasonableness of this method was examined. The evaporation and temperature change of water by microwave irradiation were dependent on its volume and sand showed a three-fold temperature change compared with water. When microwave energy was applied, water showed an even variation in temperature on the whole, however, there was approximately 30 square difference according to the location inside the sand. Sand temperature was observed to show a larger difference as it was horizontally and vertically closer to the microwave irradiation point and horizontal temperature variations were more evenly distributed than vertical variations. Heating characteristics according to the particle size of sand showed that the temperature change was larger when the particle size became smaller and the moisture content of sand was found to influence its heating behavior. In the conditions of experiment, about 50% of the benzene in sand was volatized after 23 minutes of heating and 85% of the total benzene was removed from the sand after 60 minutes of microwave irradiation. For real soil test, more than 70% of BTEX was successfully removed from the soil after 120 minutes of heating.

  17. Assessment of radiofrequency/microwave radiation emitted by the antennas of rooftop-mounted mobile phone base stations.

    PubMed

    Keow, Man Ah; Radiman, Shahidan

    2006-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) and microwave (MW) radiation exposures from the antennas of rooftop-mounted mobile telephone base stations have become a serious issue in recent years due to the rapidly evolving technologies in wireless telecommunication systems. In Malaysia, thousands of mobile telephone base stations have been erected all over the country, most of which are mounted on the rooftops. In view of public concerns, measurements of the RF/MW levels emitted by the base stations were carried out in this study. The values were compared with the exposure limits set by several organisations and countries. Measurements were performed at 200 sites around 47 mobile phone base stations. It was found that the RF/MW radiation from these base stations were well below the maximum exposure limits set by various agencies.

  18. A search for periodic structure in solar 2 cm microwave radiation. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1973-01-01

    A power spectral analysis of 285 hr of 2 cm microwave intensity data showed no statistically significant ( 96% confidence) periodicities in the frequency range 1 to 15 mHz. No correlation was found between 2 cm periodicities and solar activity in H alpha, X-ray, and several microwave frequencies. A small shift of power toward higher frequencies in the power spectrum of the 2 cm data was found to be correlated with solar H alpha and X-ray activity. Using the statistical properties of power spectra, an expression for the ratio of the minimum detectable peak-to-peak to ambient temperature at chromospheric heights may be derived. Applied to a model for oscillation bursts in quiescent supergranules, and using the most significant results of experiments to detect the microwave periodicities, this expression yields an upper limit of approximately .0015.

  19. Fluctuations in microwave background radiation due to secondary ionization of the intergalactic gas in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunyayev, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Secondary heating and ionization of the intergalactic gas at redshifts z approximately 10-30 could lead to the large optical depth of the Universe for Thomson scattering and could smooth the primordial fluctuations formed at z approximately 1500. It is shown that the gas motions connected with the large scale density perturbations at z approximately 10-15 must lead to the generation of secondary fluctuations of microwave background. The contribution of the rich clusters of galaxies and young galaxies to the fluctuations of microwave background is also estimated.

  20. Quantitative analysis of flare accelerated electrons through their hard X-ray and microwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, K. L.; Trottet, G.

    1985-01-01

    Hard X-ray and microwave modelling that takes into account the temporal evolution of the electron spectrum as well as the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field and the ambient medium in the radio source is presented. This method is illustrated for the June 29 1980 10:41 UT event. The implication on the process of acceleration/injection is discussed.

  1. First results of the COBE satellite measurement of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Aymon, J.; De Amici, G.; Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.; Gulkis, S.; Backus, C.; Galuk, K.; Jackson, P. D.; Keegstra, P.

    1991-01-01

    The concept and operation of the Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument aboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer satellite are reviewed, with emphasis on the software identification and subtraction of potential systematic effects. Preliminary results obtained from the first six months of DMR data are presented, and implications for cosmology are discussed.

  2. Remote, non-contacting personnel bio-identification using microwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, William R. (Inventor); Talukder, Ashit (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system to remotely identify a person by utilizing a microwave cardiogram, where some embodiments segment a signal representing cardiac beats into segments, extract features from the segments, and perform pattern identification of the segments and features with a pre-existing data set. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  3. Shaping and resizing of multifed slot radiators used in conformal microwave antenna arrays for hyperthermia treatment of large superficial diseases.

    PubMed

    Maccarini, Paolo F; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Juang, Titania; De Luca, Valeria; Rangarao, Sneha; Neumann, Daniel; Martins, Carlos Daniel; Craciunescu, Oana; Stauffer, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    It has been recently shown that chestwall recurrence of breast cancer and many other superficial diseases can be successfully treated with the combination of radiation, chemotherapy and hyperthermia. Conformal microwave antenna array for hyperthermia treatment of large area superficial diseases can significantly increase patient comfort while at the same time facilitate treatment of larger and more irregularly shaped disease. A large number of small efficient antennas is preferable for improved control of heating, as the disease can be more accurately contoured and the lower power requirement correlates with system reliability, linearity and reduced cost. Thus, starting from the initially proposed square slot antennas, we investigated new designs for multi-fed slot antennas of several shapes that maximize slot perimeter while reducing radiating area, thus increasing antenna efficiency. Simulations were performed with commercial electromagnetic simulation software packages (Ansoft HFSS) to demonstrate that the antenna size reduction method is effective for several dual concentric conductor (DCC) aperture shapes and operating frequencies. The theoretical simulations allowed the development of a set of design rules for multi-fed DCC slot antennas that facilitate conformal heat treatments of irregular size and shape disease with large multi-element arrays. Independently on the shape, it is shown that the perimeter of 10cm at 915 MHz delivers optimal radiation pattern and efficiency. While the maximum radiation is obtained for a circular pattern the rectangular shape is the one that feels more efficiently the array space.

  4. Resonant and Ground Experimental Study on the Microwave Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; He, Hongqing; Mao, Genwang; Qu, Kun; Tang, Jinlan; Han, Xianwei

    2002-01-01

    chemistry. Therefore, the application of EP for the attitude control and station keeping of satellite, the propulsion of deep space exploration craft allows to reduce substantially the mass of on-board propellant and the launching cost. The EP research is now receiving high interest everywhere. microwave generating subsystem, the propellant supplying subsystem and the resonator (the thruster). Its principle is that the magnetron of the microwave generating subsystem transfers electric energy into microwave energy at given frequency which is introduced into a resonant cavity. Microwave will resonate within the cavity when it is adjusted. When the propellant gas (N2, Ar, He, NH3 or H2) is put into the cavity and coupled with microwave energy at the maximal electric intensity place, it will be broken down to form free-floating plasma, which flows from nozzle with high speed to produce thrust. Its characteristic is high efficiency, simple power supply and without electrode ablation, its specific impulse is greater than arcjet. 2450MHz, have been developed. The microwave generating subsystem and resonator of lower power MPT, 70-200W, are coaxial. The resonator with TEM resonating mode is section of coaxial wave-guide, of which one end is shorted, another is semi-opened. The maximal electric intensity field is in the lumped capacity formed between the end surface of inner conductor, retracting in the cavity, and the semi-opened surface of outer conductor. It provides favorable condition for gas breakdown. The microwave generating system and resonator of middle power MPT, 500-1,000W, are wave-guide cavity. The resonator with TM011 resonating mode is cylinder wave-guide cavity, of which two end surface are shorted. The distribution of electromagnetic field is axial symmetry, its maximal electric intensity field locates on the axis and closes to the exit of nozzle, where the propellant gas is breakdown to form free floating plasma. The plasma is free from the wall of

  5. Epitaxy of the bound water phase on hydrophilic surfaces of biopolymers as key mechanism of microwave radiation effects on living objects.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Denis B; Orlova, Ekaterina V; Neschislyaev, Valery A; Volkhin, Igor L; Izmestiev, Igor V; Lunegov, Igor V; Balandina, Alevtina V; Dianova, Dina G

    2017-03-06

    The research investigates the mechanism of microwave radiation effects on biological characteristics and structural-dynamic parameters of a sensor bioluminescence system. The research objects are a sterile growth medium (fish meal hydrolisate) and a bacterial culture. It has been established that irradiation causes changes of the growth medium spectral properties within the range of 200-350nm. Changes take place in the intensity and character of luminescence, as well as in relaxation parameters of nuclear magnetic resonance, growth characteristics of the bacterial culture, its cellular morphology and surface topology. The research results enabled us to establish the mechanisms of primary molecular processes that occur when the bacterial culture is exposed to microwave radiation. Transformation of the dynamic-structural state of adsorbed water phases on biopolymer surfaces has been found to be the key factor in the mechanism of microwave effects on living and water-containing objects.

  6. RTTOV-gb - Adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) is the single most important under-sampled part of the atmosphere. According to the WMO Statement Of Guidance For Global Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), temperature and humidity profiles (in cloudy areas) are among the four critical atmospheric variables not adequately measured in the PBL. Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) provide temperature and humidity profiles in both clear- and cloudy-sky conditions with high temporal resolution and low-to-moderate vertical resolution, with information mostly residing in the PBL. Ground-based MWR offer to bridge this observational gap by providing continuous temperature and humidity information in the PBL. The MWR data assimilation into NWP models may be particularly important in nowcasting and severe weather initiation. The assimilation of thermodynamic profiles retrieved from MWR data has been recently experimented, but a way to possibly increase the impact is to directly assimilate measured radiances instead of retrieved profiles. The assimilation of observed radiances in a variational scheme requires the following tools: (i) a fast radiative transfer (RT) model to compute the simulated radiances at MWR channels from the NWP model fields (ii) the partial derivatives (Jacobians) of the fast radiative transfer model with respect to control variables to optimize the distances of the atmospheric state from both the first guess and the observations. Such a RT model is available from the EUMETSAT NWPSAF (Numerical Weather Prediction Satellite Application Facility) and well accepted in the NWP community: RTTOV. This model was developed for nadir-viewing passive visible, infrared, and microwave satellite radiometers, spectrometers and interferometers. It has been modified to handle ground-based microwave radiometer observations. This version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, provides the tools needed to exploit ground-based upward looking MWR brightness temperatures into NWP variational data

  7. Small-scale primordial magnetic fields and anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jedamzik, Karsten; Abel, Tom E-mail: tabel@slac.stanford.edu

    2013-10-01

    It is shown that small-scale magnetic fields present before recombination induce baryonic density inhomogeneities of appreciable magnitude. The presence of such inhomogeneities changes the ionization history of the Universe, which in turn decreases the angular scale of the Doppler peaks and increases Silk damping by photon diffusion. This unique signature could be used to (dis)prove the existence of primordial magnetic fields of strength as small as B ≅ 10{sup −11} Gauss by cosmic microwave background observations.

  8. Biophysical Techniques for Examining Metabolic, Proliferative, and Genetic Effects of Microwave Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    26 List of Tables Table No. 1 Cell Cycle Distribution of Heat-Treated 244B Calls ....... 13 2 Surface Marker Expression on 244B...requiring verification. Alternatively, if the effect had already been conclusively demonstrated, an investigation of its mechanism would be called for. In...simultaneous low dose rate X-ray exposure and microwave exposure calls for exposure times of 4 h. To study the effects of the exposure on membrane

  9. Microwave-assisted synthesis of Gd3+ doped PbI2 hierarchical nanostructures for optoelectronic and radiation detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkir, Mohd.; AlFaify, S.; Yahia, I. S.; Ganesh, V.; Shoukry, H.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we report the simple, low temperature and rapid microwave-assisted synthesis of undoped and Gadolinium (III) doped lead iodide with different morphologies, i.e. nanorods of average diameter 200 nm and hierarchical (flower-shaped) nanosheets of thicknesses less than 100 nm. Prepared nanostructures were typify in details using a variety of analytical techniques that reveal the well crystallinity with hexagonal structure. We found that by changing the concentrations of Gadolinium (III) one can tailor the size and shape of nanostructures of lead iodide. The presence of Gadolinium (III) doping was assessed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Optical band gap and Photoluminescence intensity are found to be enhanced due to Gadolinium (III) doping. The value of Gamma linear absorption coefficient is found to be enriched with doping, which suggests its application in radiation detection.

  10. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Diener, P.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-15

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 {+-} 0.2.

  11. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Diener, P.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 ± 0.2.

  12. GARLIC - A general purpose atmospheric radiative transfer line-by-line infrared-microwave code: Implementation and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Hedelt, Pascal; Hess, Michael; Mendrok, Jana; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2014-04-01

    A suite of programs for high resolution infrared-microwave atmospheric radiative transfer modeling has been developed with emphasis on efficient and reliable numerical algorithms and a modular approach appropriate for simulation and/or retrieval in a variety of applications. The Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code - GARLIC - is suitable for arbitrary observation geometry, instrumental field-of-view, and line shape. The core of GARLIC's subroutines constitutes the basis of forward models used to implement inversion codes to retrieve atmospheric state parameters from limb and nadir sounding instruments. This paper briefly introduces the physical and mathematical basics of GARLIC and its descendants and continues with an in-depth presentation of various implementation aspects: An optimized Voigt function algorithm combined with a two-grid approach is used to accelerate the line-by-line modeling of molecular cross sections; various quadrature methods are implemented to evaluate the Schwarzschild and Beer integrals; and Jacobians, i.e. derivatives with respect to the unknowns of the atmospheric inverse problem, are implemented by means of automatic differentiation. For an assessment of GARLIC's performance, a comparison of the quadrature methods for solution of the path integral is provided. Verification and validation are demonstrated using intercomparisons with other line-by-line codes and comparisons of synthetic spectra with spectra observed on Earth and from Venus.

  13. RTTOV-gb - adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWRs) offer a new capability to provide continuous observations of the atmospheric thermodynamic state in the planetary boundary layer. Thus, they are potential candidates to supplement radiosonde network and satellite data to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP) models through a variational assimilation of their data. However in order to assimilate MWR observations, a fast radiative transfer model is required and such a model is not currently available. This is necessary for going from the model state vector space to the observation space at every observation point. The fast radiative transfer model RTTOV is well accepted in the NWP community, though it was developed to simulate satellite observations only. In this work, the RTTOV code has been modified to allow for simulations of ground-based upward-looking microwave sensors. In addition, the tangent linear, adjoint, and K-modules of RTTOV have been adapted to provide Jacobians (i.e., the sensitivity of observations to the atmospheric thermodynamical state) for ground-based geometry. These modules are necessary for the fast minimization of the cost function in a variational assimilation scheme. The proposed ground-based version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, has been validated against accurate and less time-efficient line-by-line radiative transfer models. In the frequency range commonly used for temperature and humidity profiling (22-60 GHz), root-mean-square brightness temperature differences are smaller than typical MWR uncertainties (˜ 0.5 K) at all channels used in this analysis. Brightness temperatures (TBs) computed with RTTOV-gb from radiosonde profiles have been compared with nearly simultaneous and co-located ground-based MWR observations. Differences between simulated and measured TBs are below 0.5 K for all channels except for the water vapor band, where most of the uncertainty comes from instrumental errors. The Jacobians calculated with the K-module of RTTOV

  14. Hospital waste sterilization: A technical and economic comparison between radiation and microwaves treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, A.; Beone, F.

    1995-09-01

    Hospital waste (HW) disposal is becoming a problem of increasing importance in almost all industrially advanced countries. In Italy the yearly hospital waste production is about 250,000 tons and only 60,000 tons are treated by incineration at present time. As by a recent Italian law a meaningful percentage of HW (50 to 60%), corresponding to food residuals, plastics, paper, various organic materials, etc., could be landfilled as municipal refuses if preliminarily submitted to a suitable sterilization treatment. Under this perspective, sterilization/sanitation techniques represent now a technically and commercially viable alternative to HW thermal destruction that, besides, is more and more socially and politically less accepted. Electron Beam (EB) and Microwave (MW) treatments are two of the most interesting and emerging HW sterilization techniques, and, based on engineering real data, a technical and economic comparison is carried out, focusing vantages and limits of each process.

  15. Information geometry with correlated data: Bayesian explorations of cosmological predictions for the microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Katherine; de Bernardis, Francesco; Niemack, Michael; Sethna, James

    We developed a new, generalized fitting algorithm for miltiparameter models which incorporates varying and correlated errors. This was combined with geometrical methods of sampling to explore model prediction space, notably to plot geodesics and determine the size and edges of the model manifold. We illustrate this using the microwave background spectra for all possible universes, as described by the standard Λ-cold dark matter (Λ-CDM) cosmological model. In this case, the predicted data are fluctuations and highly correlated with varying errors, resulting in a manifold with a varying metric (as the natural metric to use is given by the Fisher information matrix). Furthermore, the model manifold shares the hyperribbon structure seen in other models, with the edges forming a strongly distorted image of a hypercube. Practical applications of such an analysis include optimizing experimental instrumentation designed to test more detailed cosmological theories. Funding supported in part by NSERC.

  16. Isotropic blackbody cosmic microwave background radiation as evidence for a homogeneous universe.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Timothy; Clarkson, Chris; Bull, Philip

    2012-08-03

    The question of whether the Universe is spatially homogeneous and isotropic on the largest scales is of fundamental importance to cosmology but has not yet been answered decisively. Surprisingly, neither an isotropic primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) nor combined observations of luminosity distances and galaxy number counts are sufficient to establish such a result. The inclusion of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in CMB observations, however, dramatically improves this situation. We show that even a solitary observer who sees an isotropic blackbody CMB can conclude that the Universe is homogeneous and isotropic in their causal past when the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect is present. Critically, however, the CMB must either be viewed for an extended period of time, or CMB photons that have scattered more than once must be detected. This result provides a theoretical underpinning for testing the cosmological principle with observations of the CMB alone.

  17. Galactic synchrotron radiation from radio to microwaves, and its relation to cosmic-ray propagation models: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Galactic synchrotron radiation observed from radio to microwaves is produced by cosmic-ray (CR) electrons propagating in magnetic fields (B-fields). The low-frequency foreground component separated maps by WMAP and Planck depend on the assumed synchrotron spectrum. The synchrotron spectrum varies for different line of sights as a result of changes on the CR spectrum due to propagation effects and source distributions. Our present knowledge of the CR spectrum at different locations in the Galaxy is not sufficient to distinguish various possibilities in the modeling. As a consequence uncertainties on synchrotron emission models complicate the foreground component separation analysis with Planck and future microwave telescopes. Hence, any advancement in synchrotron modeling is important for separating the different foreground components.The first step towards a more comprehensive understanding of degeneracy and correlation among the synchrotron model parameters is outlined in our Strong et al. 2011 and Orlando et al. 2013 papers. In the latter the conclusion was that CR spectrum, propagation models, B-fields, and foreground component separation analysis need to be studied simultaneously in order to properly obtain and interpret the synchrotron foreground. Indeed for the officially released Planck maps, we use only the best spectral model from our above paper for the component separation analysis.Here we present a collections of our latest results on synchrotron, CRs and B-fields in the context of CR propagation, showing also our recent work on B-fields within the Planck Collaboration. We underline also the importance of using the constraints on CRs that we obtain from gamma ray observations. Methods and perspectives for further studies on the synchrotron foreground will be addressed.

  18. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume IV. Number 4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Nikola Tesla , who demonstrated that not feasible to extrapolate data from experimental oscillations around 20 kHz could not be perceived animals to...magnetic field, was used in conjunction decreases until at 2,450 MHz, for an assumed 1-cm fat with steady magnetic fields of less than 0.5 tesla to

  19. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A2, S/N 108, 08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A2, S/N 108, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  20. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 108 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1 SIN 108, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  1. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  2. Simulation of snow microwave radiance observations using a coupled land surface- radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toure, A. M.; Rodell, M.; Hoar, T. J.; Kwon, Y.; Yang, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Beaudoing, H.

    2013-12-01

    Radiance assimilation (RA) has been used in operational numerical weather forecasting for generating realistic initial and boundary conditions for the last two decades. Previous studies have shown that the same approach can be used to characterize seasonal snow. Since the penetration depth of microwaves depends essentially on snow physical properties, studies have also shown that for RA to be successful, it is crucial that the land surface model (LSM) represents with great fidelity snow physical properties such as the effective grain size, the temperature, the stratigraphy, the densification and the melt/refreeze processes. The Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), the land model component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), describes the physical, chemical, biological, and hydrological processes by which terrestrial ecosystems interact with climate across a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Sub-grid heterogeneity of the CLM4 is represented by fractional coverage of glacier, lake, wetland, urban, and vegetation land cover types. The vegetation portion is further divided into mosaic of plant functional types (pfts) each with its own leaf and stem area index and canopy height. Processes such as snow accumulation, depletion, densification, metamorphism, percolation, and refreezing of water are represented by a state-of-the-art multi-layer (up to five layers) snow model. Each snow layer is characterized by its thickness, ice mass, liquid water content, temperature, and effective grain radius. The model is considered to be one of the most sophisticated snow models ever within a general circulation model. One of the main challenges in simulating the radiance observed by a radiometer on-board a satellite is the spatial heterogeneity of the land within the footprint of the radiometer. Since CLM4 has the capability to represent the sub-grid heterogeneity, it is perfect candidate for a model operator for simulating the observed brightness temperature (Tb). The

  3. A possible cold imprint of voids on the microwave background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szapudi, István

    2014-05-10

    We measure the average temperature decrement on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) produced by voids selected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 spectroscopic redshift galaxy catalog, spanning redshifts 0 < z < 0.44. We find an imprint amplitude between 2.6 and 2.9 μK as viewed through a compensated top-hat filter scaled to the radius of each void, we assess the statistical significance of the imprint at ∼2σ, and we make crucial use of N-body simulations to calibrate our analysis. As expected, we find that large voids produce cold spots on the CMB through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. However, we also find that small voids in the halo density field produce hot spots, because they reside in contracting, larger-scale overdense regions. This is an important effect to consider when stacking CMB imprints from voids of different radii. We have found that the same filter radius that gives the largest ISW signal in simulations also yields close to the largest detected signal in the observations. However, although it is low in significance, our measured signal has a much higher amplitude than expected from ISW in the concordance ΛCDM universe. The discrepancy is also at the ∼2σ level. We have demonstrated that our result is robust against the varying of thresholds over a wide range.

  4. Modeling multi-layer effects in passive microwave remote sensing of dry snow using Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory (DMRT) based on quasicrystalline approximation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liang, D.; Xu, X.; Tsang, L.; Andreadis, K.M.; Josberger, E.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Dense Media Radiative Transfer theory (DMRT) of Quasicrystalline Approximation of Mie scattering by sticky particles is used to study the multiple scattering effects in layered snow in microwave remote sensing. Results are illustrated for various snow profile characteristics. Polarization differences and frequency dependences of multilayer snow model are significantly different from that of the single-layer snow model. Comparisons are also made with CLPX data using snow parameters as given by the VIC model. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  5. Radiation losses in the microwave Ku band in magneto-electric nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Talwinder; Kumar, Sachin; Sharma, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Summary A study on radiation losses in conducting polymer nanocomposites, namely La–Co-substituted barium hexaferrite and polyaniline, is presented. The study was performed by means of a vector network analyser, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy and a vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found that the maximum loss occurs at 17.9 GHz (−23.10 dB, 99% loss) which is due to the composition of a conducting polymer and a suitable magnetic material. A significant role of polyaniline has been observed in ESR. The influence of the magnetic properties on the radiation losses is explained. Further studies revealed that the prepared material is a nanocomposite. FTIR spectra show the presence of expected chemical structures such as C–H bonds in a ring system at 1512 cm−1. PMID:26425421

  6. Radiation losses in the microwave Ku band in magneto-electric nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Talwinder; Kumar, Sachin; Sharma, Jyoti; Srivastava, A K

    2015-01-01

    A study on radiation losses in conducting polymer nanocomposites, namely La-Co-substituted barium hexaferrite and polyaniline, is presented. The study was performed by means of a vector network analyser, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy and a vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found that the maximum loss occurs at 17.9 GHz (-23.10 dB, 99% loss) which is due to the composition of a conducting polymer and a suitable magnetic material. A significant role of polyaniline has been observed in ESR. The influence of the magnetic properties on the radiation losses is explained. Further studies revealed that the prepared material is a nanocomposite. FTIR spectra show the presence of expected chemical structures such as C-H bonds in a ring system at 1512 cm(-1).

  7. Intercomparison of three microwave/infrared high resolution line-by-line radiative transfer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, F.; Garcia, S. Gimeno; Milz, M.; Kottayil, A.; Höpfner, M.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G.

    2013-05-01

    An intercomparison of three line-by-line (lbl) codes developed independently for atmospheric sounding - ARTS, GARLIC, and KOPRA - has been performed for a thermal infrared nadir sounding application assuming a HIRS-like (High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder) setup. Radiances for the HIRS infrared channels and a set of 42 atmospheric profiles from the "Garand dataset" have been computed. Results of this intercomparison and a discussion of reasons of the observed differences are presented.

  8. Spontaneous and induced radiation by electrons/positrons in natural and photonic crystals. Volume free electron lasers (VFELs): From microwave and optical to X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshevsky, V. G.

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous and induced radiation produced by relativistic particles passing through natural and photonic crystals has enhanced capabilities for achieving the radiation sources operating in different wavelength ranges. Use of a non-one-dimensional distributed feedback, arising through Bragg diffraction in spatially periodic systems (natural and artificial (electromagnetic, photonic) crystals), establishes the foundation for the development of volume free electron lasers/masers (VFELs/VFEMs) as well as high-energy charged particle accelerators. The analysis of basic principles of VFEL theory demonstrates the promising potential of VFELs as the basis for the development of high-power microwave and optical sources.

  9. Poly(vinylidene fluoride)-based flexible and lightweight materials for attenuating microwave radiations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Maya; Singh, Mahander Pratap; Srivastava, Chandan; Madras, Giridhar; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2014-12-10

    Two unique materials were developed, like graphene oxide (GO) sheets covalently grafted on to barium titanate (BT) nanoparticles and cobalt nanowires (Co-NWs), to attenuate the electromagnetic (EM) radiations in poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)-based composites. The rationale behind using either a ferroelectric or a ferromagnetic material in combination with intrinsically conducting nanoparticles (multiwall carbon nanotubes, CNTs), is to induce both electrical and magnetic dipoles in the system. Two key properties, namely, enhanced dielectric constant and magnetic permeability, were determined. PVDF/BT-GO composites exhibited higher dielectric constant compared to PVDF/BT and PVDF/GO composites. Co-NWs, which were synthesized by electrodeposition, exhibited saturation magnetization (Ms) of 40 emu/g and coercivity (Hc) of 300 G. Three phase hybrid composites were prepared by mixing CNTs with either BT-GO or Co-NWs in PVDF by solution blending. These nanoparticles showed high electrical conductivity and significant attenuation of EM radiations both in the X-band and in the Ku-band frequency. In addition, BT-GO/CNT and Co-NWs/CNT particles also enhanced the thermal conductivity of PVDF by ca. 8.7- and 9.3-fold in striking contrast to neat PVDF. This study open new avenues to design flexible and lightweight electromagnetic interference shielding materials by careful selection of functional nanoparticles.

  10. Statistics of the radiated field of a space-to-earth microwave power transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G. H.; Leininger, G.

    1976-01-01

    Statistics such as average power density pattern, variance of the power density pattern and variance of the beam pointing error are related to hardware parameters such as transmitter rms phase error and rms amplitude error. Also a limitation on spectral width of the phase reference for phase control was established. A 1 km diameter transmitter appears feasible provided the total rms insertion phase errors of the phase control modules does not exceed 10 deg, amplitude errors do not exceed 10% rms, and the phase reference spectral width does not exceed approximately 3 kHz. With these conditions the expected radiation pattern is virtually the same as the error free pattern, and the rms beam pointing error would be insignificant (approximately 10 meters).

  11. Variations in Microwave Radiation of the Nighttime Mesospheric Ozone over Moscow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, S. B.; Zavgorodniy, A. S.; Ignatyev, A. N.; Lukin, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the instrumentation and methods for the nighttime ground-based measurements of the atmospheric-ozone emission line at a frequency of 142.175 GHz. The ozone-radiation spectra were measured in Moscow in the 2014-2016 cold months with a time resolution of about 2 min. We performed a frequency-time analysis of variations in the differences of the brightness temperatures of the ozone-emission line for the frequency offsets 0-50, 50-150, and 150-250 kHz from the line center. Variations with periods from 6 min to 3 h, which can be related to the wave propagation in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere, were revealed using the data windows with halfwidths of 10-60 min.

  12. Fabrication of novel structures to enhance the performance of microwave, millimeter wave and optical radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbele, Kokou

    full depletion-recovery cycle in the nonequilibrium state. The third part discusses work in the microwave and millimeter wave frequency regimes. A new method to fabricate Luneburg lenses was proposed and demonstrated. This type of lens is well known; it is versatile and has been used for many applications, including high power radars, satellite communications, and remote sensing systems. Because the fabrication of such a lens requires intricate and time consuming processes, we demonstrated the design, fabrication and testing of a Luneburg lens prototype using a 3-D printing rapid prototyping technique both at the X and Ka-V frequency bands. The measured results were in very good agreement with their simulated values. The fabricated X-band lens had a 12 cm diameter and produced a beam having a maximum gain of 20 dB and a beam directivity (half-power beam width (HPBW)) ranging from 12° to 19°). The corresponding Ka-V band lens had a 7 cm diameter; it produced a beam with a HPBW about the same as the X-band lens, but with a maximum gain of more than 20 dB.

  13. MICROWAVES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of microwaves, a non-ionizing radiation, on organic reactions is described both in polar solvents and under solvent-free conditions. The special applications are highlighted in the context of solventless organic synthesis which involve microwave (MW) exposure of neat r...

  14. Snow depth and snow cover retrieval from FengYun3B microwave radiation imagery based on a snow passive microwave unmixing method in Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lingjia; Ren, Ruizhi; Zhao, Kai; Li, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    The precision of snow parameter retrieval is unsatisfactory for current practical demands. The primary reason is because of the problem of mixed pixels that are caused by low spatial resolution of satellite passive microwave data. A snow passive microwave unmixing method is proposed in this paper, based on land cover type data and the antenna gain function of passive microwaves. The land cover type of Northeast China is partitioned into grass, farmland, bare soil, forest, and water body types. The component brightness temperatures (CBT), namely unmixed data, with 1 km data resolution are obtained using the proposed unmixing method. The snow depth determined by the CBT and three snow depth retrieval algorithms are validated through field measurements taken in forest and farmland areas of Northeast China in January 2012 and 2013. The results show that the overall of the retrieval precision of the snow depth is improved by 17% in farmland areas and 10% in forest areas when using the CBT in comparison with the mixed pixels. The snow cover results based on the CBT are compared with existing MODIS snow cover products. The results demonstrate that more snow cover information can be obtained with up to 86% accuracy.

  15. Dosimetry associated with exposure to non-ionizing radiation: very low frequency to microwaves.

    PubMed

    Guy, A W

    1987-12-01

    The interpretation of the effects in biological systems exposed to electromagnetic (EM) fields requires knowledge of the internal fields and absorbed energy. The quantification of the specific absorption rate (SAR) is called dosimetry. The SAR given in units of watts per kilogram is a complex function of the source configuration, shape and size of the exposed subjects, orientation of the subject with respect to the source, and the frequency. The average and maximum SAR in the exposed subject may vary over many orders of magnitude for a given exposure level. In order to relate observed biological effects in exposed laboratory animals to safe exposure levels for man, both the fields within the environment and SAR within the exposed tissues must be determined. The environmental fields and the SAR can often be determined from EM theory, but in most cases one must rely on instrumentation such as field survey meters for quantifying the exposure fields and electric field probes, thermocouples, thermistors, fiber optic probes, thermography, and calorimetry for quantifying the SAR in the tissues or equivalent models. A combination of techniques, each valid for a particular model over a particular frequency range, have been used to determine average and peak SARs in humans and animals exposed to plane wave radiation. Though it has been considerably more difficult to quantify these quantities for near field and partial-body exposure conditions, progress is continually being made in this area.

  16. Effects of radiofrequency radiation and simultaneous exposure with mitomycin C on the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaravino, V.; Meltz, M.L.; Erwin, D.N.

    1987-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed for 2 hr with and without mitomycin C (MMC) to pulsed wave radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at 2450 MHz. The repetition rate of 25,000 pulses per sec (pps), and exposure geometry used, resulted in a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 33.8 W/kg. The following exposure regimens were used: 1) a 37 C water bath control; 2) a water bath temperature control (TC) in which the continuously monitored medium temperature closely followed teh temperature rise in the RFR-exposed flasks; and 3) the RFR-exposed cells in a water bath set at 37 C prior to exposure. RFR exposure resulted in a maximum cell culture medium temperature of 39.2 C. In the absence of MMC, there was no significant increase in sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in the RFR-exposed or TC groups over that of teh 37 C control. When a simultaneous treatment of RFR and MMC occurred there was no statistical difference in SCE frequency from that caused by chemical treatment alone.

  17. Effects of radiofrequency radiation and simultaneous exposure with mitomycin C on the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaravino, V.; Meltz, M.L.; Erwin, D.N.

    1987-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed for 2 hr with and without mitomycin C (MMC) (1 X 10(-8)M) to pulsed wave radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at 2450 MHz. The repetition rate of 25,000 pulses per sec (pps), pulse width of 10 microseconds, and exposure geometry used, resulted in a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 33.8 W/kg. The following exposure regimens were used: a 37 degrees C water bath control; a water bath temperature control (TC) in which the continuously monitored medium temperature closely followed the temperature rise in the RFR-exposed flasks; and the RFR-exposed cells in a water bath set at 37 degrees C prior to exposure. RFR exposure resulted in a maximum cell culture medium temperature of 39.2 degrees C. In the absence of MMC, there was no significant increase in sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in the RFR-exposed or TC groups over that of the 37 degrees C control. When a simultaneous treatment of RFR and MMC occurred there was no statistical difference in SCE frequency from that caused by chemical treatment alone.

  18. Design of a microwave calorimeter for the microwave tokamak experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Marinak, M. )

    1988-10-07

    The initial design of a microwave calorimeter for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment is presented. The design is optimized to measure the refraction and absorption of millimeter rf microwaves as they traverse the toroidal plasma of the Alcator C tokamak. Techniques utilized can be adapted for use in measuring high intensity pulsed output from a microwave device in an environment of ultra high vacuum, intense fields of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and intense magnetic fields. 16 refs.

  19. Disinfection of Wastewater by Microwaves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    temperature of the cells before treatment with microwaves nor the temperature of the diluent buffer showed any effect on the rate and extent of...suspension on the sur- vival of E. coli B cells subjected to microwave treatment. 11 2. Effect of the temperature of diluent upon the survival of microwave...the surface of the material to be heated by conduction, convection, and/or radiation. While microwave energy is recognized to have bactericidal ability

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Iron-impregnated Pre-oxidized Activated Carbon Prepared by Microwave Radiation for As(V) Removal from Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurum, Yuda; Yurum, Alp; Ozlem Kocabas, Zuleyha; Semiat, Raphael

    2013-04-01

    One of the most efficient ways to treat water is probably by adsorption and catalytic oxidation. Surely, for such a process to be economical, the catalyst and the adsorber should have a high catalytic activity and adsorption capacity, and be inexpensive. One of these materials is iron oxide, which is studied and used in areas like catalysis and environmental applications. It is known that synthesizing iron oxides in nano size enhances the catalytic activity. Pre-oxidized activated carbons impregnated with iron-based nanoparticles are prepared in a single step under hydrothermal conditions with microwave radiation. The hydrothermal treatment provides an important advantage by forming fine particles that can easily impregnate deep in to the porous support by the help of water. Their efficiency for the removal of As(V) from water was compared with the pure pre-oxidized activated carbon and iron oxide nanoparticles impregnated without microwave radiation. The synthesized nanomaterials with different iron oxide loadings were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer. Iron loadings were calculated using flame atomic absorbance. Microwave radiation provided much faster iron impregnation on the active carbon surface. At the first stage of microwave radiation iron oxide impregnation is low but after 6 minutes, iron oxide nanoparticles of 100 nm size started to cover the surface homogeneously. Further treatment with microwave increased the size of particles and the amount of surface coverage. Additionally, with microwave hydrothermal treatment, relatively higher iron oxide loadings were achieved within 10 minutes. From the XRD characterization it was seen that at the first stage of radiation, iron deposited in the form of β-FeOOH, but after the first stage the structure became Fe2O3. While radiation increased the surface area of the material during the first stages, at the last stage

  1. Impact of temperature, microwave radiation and organic loading rate on methanogenic community and biogas production during fermentation of dairy wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Zieliński, Marcin; Dębowski, Marcin

    2013-02-01

    This study analyzed dairy wastewater fermentation in convection- and microwave-heated hybrid reactors at loadings of 1 and 2 kg COD/(m3 d) and temperatures of 35 and 55 °C. The biomass was investigated at a molecular level to determine the links between the operational parameters of anaerobic digestion and methanogenic Archaea structure. The highest production of biogas with methane content of ca. 67% was noted in the mesophilic microwave-heated reactors. The production of methane-rich biogas and the overall diversity of Archaea was determined by Methanosarcinaceae presence. The temperature and the application of microwaves were the main factors explaining the variations in the methanogen community. At 35 °C, the microwave heating stimulated the growth of highly diverse methanogen assemblages, promoting Methanosarcina barkeri presence and excluding Methanosarcina harudinacea from the biomass. A temperature increase to 55 °C lowered Methanosarcinaceae abundance and induced a replacement of Methanoculleus palmolei by Methanosarcina thermophila.

  2. A comparative study of microwave radiometer observations over snowfields with radiative transfer model calculations. [for water runoff estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Shiue, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Truck mounted microwave instrumentation was used to study the microwave emission characteristics of the Colorado Rocky Mountain snowpack in the vicinity of Fraser, Colorado during the winter of 1978. The spectral signatures of 5.0, 10.7, 18, and 37 GHz radiometers with dual polarization were used to measure the snowpack density and temperature profiles, rain profile, and free water content. These data were compared with calculated results based on microscopic scattering models for dry, surface melting, and very wet snowpacks.

  3. Differential response of the permeability of the rat liver canalicular membrane to sucrose and mannitol following in vivo acute single and multiple exposures to microwave radiation (2.45 GHz) and radiant-energy thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Lange, D G; D'Antuono, M E; Timm, R R; Ishii, T K; Fujimoto, J M

    1993-04-01

    Both acute and chronic exposures to microwave radiation altered the function of the rat canalicular membrane. A single acute exposure to microwave radiation [80 mW/cm2, 2.45 GHz, continuous wave, 30 min exposure (SAR approximately equal to 72 W/kg)] or a matched radiant-energy thermal load, both designed to raise core body temperature approximately 3 degrees C, decreased the permeability of the canalicular membrane of male Sprague-Dawley rats to sucrose. The change in canalicular membrane permeability was demonstrated by a significant increase in the percentage of [3H]sucrose recovered in bile following its administration by a segmented retrograde intrabiliary injection. Similar acute exposures to microwave and radiant-energy thermal sources produced no significant alterations in canalicular membrane permeability to [14C]mannitol. In both acute exposure protocols, a rapidly reversible increase in bile flow rate was observed. Four exposures (30 min/day x 4 days) to either microwave radiation (80 mW/cm2) or a matched radiant-energy thermal load resulted in a significant depression in bile flow rate at normothermic temperatures. Animals receiving multiple exposures to microwave radiation had significant decreases in canalicular membrane permeability to both [3H]sucrose and [14C]mannitol, while similar exposure to radiant-energy thermal load alone altered canalicular membrane permeability to [3H]sucrose. An examination of the hepatic clearance of sucrose and mannitol following acute microwave exposure demonstrated no significant differences. Thus acute single exposure to microwave and radiant-energy thermal loads produced similar alterations in canalicular membrane permeability. Conversely, multiple exposures produced nonreversible changes in bile flow rate and canalicular membrane permeability, with microwave exposure producing greater alterations in the function of the canalicular membrane than an equivalent radiant-energy thermal load.

  4. The temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation at 3.8 GHz - Results of a measurement from the South Pole site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Amici, Giovanni; Limon, Michele; Smoot, George F.; Bersanelli, Marco; Kogut, AL; Levin, Steve

    1991-01-01

    As part of an international collaboration to measure the low-frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, its temperature was measured at a frequency of 3.8 GHz, during the austral spring of 1989, obtaining a brightness temperature, T(CMB), of 2.64 +/-0.07 K (68 percent confidence level). The new result is in agreement with previous measurements at the same frequency obtained in 1986-88 from a very different site and has comparable error bars. Combining measurements from all years, T(CMB) = 2.64 +/-0.06 K is obtained.

  5. Microwave drying of seed cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A small lab dryer was designed for use in drying seed cotton with components of a microwave generator mounted thereon. The magnetron emitted radiation directly into the seed cotton and a fan directed air cross-flow to the radiation direction. The microwave components were a 1.1 kW magnetron, trans...

  6. Towards coherent combining of X-band high power microwaves: phase-locked long pulse radiations by a relativistic triaxial klystron amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jinchuan; Zhang, Jun; Qi, Zumin; Yang, Jianhua; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Jiande; Zhong, Huihuang

    2016-01-01

    The radio-frequency breakdown due to ultrahigh electric field strength essentially limits power handling capability of an individual high power microwave (HPM) generator, and this issue becomes more challenging for high frequency bands. Coherent power combining therefore provides an alternative approach to achieve an equivalent peak power of the order of ∼100 GW, which consequently provides opportunities to explore microwave related physics at extremes. The triaxial klystron amplifier (TKA) is a promising candidate for coherent power combing in high frequency bands owing to its intrinsic merit of high power capacity, nevertheless phase-locked long pulse radiation from TKA has not yet been obtained experimentally as the coaxial structure of TKA can easily lead to self-excitation of parasitic modes. In this paper, we present investigations into an X-band TKA capable of producing 1.1 GW HPMs with pulse duration of about 103 ns at the frequency of 9.375 GHz in experiment. Furthermore, the shot-to-shot fluctuation standard deviation of the phase shifts between the input and output microwaves is demonstrated to be less than 10°. The reported achievements open up prospects for accomplishing coherent power combining of X-band HPMs in the near future, and might also excite new development interests concerning high frequency TKAs. PMID:27481661

  7. Towards coherent combining of X-band high power microwaves: phase-locked long pulse radiations by a relativistic triaxial klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jinchuan; Zhang, Jun; Qi, Zumin; Yang, Jianhua; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Jiande; Zhong, Huihuang

    2016-08-01

    The radio-frequency breakdown due to ultrahigh electric field strength essentially limits power handling capability of an individual high power microwave (HPM) generator, and this issue becomes more challenging for high frequency bands. Coherent power combining therefore provides an alternative approach to achieve an equivalent peak power of the order of ∼100 GW, which consequently provides opportunities to explore microwave related physics at extremes. The triaxial klystron amplifier (TKA) is a promising candidate for coherent power combing in high frequency bands owing to its intrinsic merit of high power capacity, nevertheless phase-locked long pulse radiation from TKA has not yet been obtained experimentally as the coaxial structure of TKA can easily lead to self-excitation of parasitic modes. In this paper, we present investigations into an X-band TKA capable of producing 1.1 GW HPMs with pulse duration of about 103 ns at the frequency of 9.375 GHz in experiment. Furthermore, the shot-to-shot fluctuation standard deviation of the phase shifts between the input and output microwaves is demonstrated to be less than 10°. The reported achievements open up prospects for accomplishing coherent power combining of X-band HPMs in the near future, and might also excite new development interests concerning high frequency TKAs.

  8. [Activity of cytochromes P-450p and P-450h in liver microsomes and blood corticosteroid levels in experimental animals under the action of physical factors].

    PubMed

    Zolotareva, T A; Gorchakova, G A; Konovalenko, V L; Konovalenko, L N; Grishanova, A Iu; Guliaeva, L F; Liakhovich, V V

    1992-05-01

    In experiments on male Wistar rats it has been found that physical factors applied in medicine (laser radiation of low intensity with wave length 0.89 microns, microwaves of centimeter range of 2450 MHz, and ultrasound of low intensity 880 KHz) changed catalytic activity of liver microsomal and rostenedione 16 alpha- and 6 beta-hydroxylating cytochromes P-450h and P-450p and blood corticosteroids level. Activities of these two steroid-metabolizing cytochromes decreased under ultrasonic skin application on liver region and increased under microwave and laser action. Contents of physiologically inactive form of corticosterone were not changed by the physical factors action while level of active hormone was increased under ultrasonic and microwave action. These findings suggest association of the activity of liver steroid-metabolizing cytochromes P-450 and level of physiologically active form of corticosterone in blood under physical factors skin application on liver region.

  9. An investigation of the thermal shock resistance of lunar regolith and the recovery of hydrogen from lunar soil heated using microwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, T. T.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to develop a better understanding of the thermal shock properties of lunar regolith sintered using 2.45 GHz electromagnetic radiation and to do a preliminary study into the recovery of bound hydrogen in lunar soil heated using 2.45 GHz radiation. During the first phase of this work, lunar simulant material was used to test whether or not microhardness data could be used to infer thermal shock resistance and later actual lunar regolith was used. Results are included on the lunar regolith since this is of primary concern and not the simulant results. They were similar, however. The second phase investigated the recovery of hydrogen from lunar regolith and results indicate that microwave heating of lunar regolith may be a good method for recovery of bound gases in the regolith.

  10. Microwave Radiation and Thermoregulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    temperature changes due to circadian variation, febrile disease , exercise, etc. In experimental animals, highly localized temperature changes in specific...cm x 70 cm plane ortho- gonal to the K vector centered on the antenna boresight 1.42 meters from the front edge of the antenna. Dashed outline shows...primates, and man) activate sweat glands over some or all of the body surface, thereby increasing heat lost from the skin by evaporation. In man, the

  11. Characterisation of Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSM/T-2) radiances using radiative transfer simulations from global atmospheric reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Poli, Paul; John, Viju O.

    2017-02-01

    The near-global and all-sky coverage of satellite observations from microwave humidity sounders operating in the 183 GHz band complement radiosonde and aircraft observations and satellite infrared clear-sky observations. The Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSM/T-2) of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program began operations late 1991. It has been followed by several other microwave humidity sounders, continuing today. However, expertise and accrued knowledge regarding the SSM/T-2 data record is limited because it has remained underused for climate applications and reanalyses. In this study, SSM/T-2 radiances are characterised using several global atmospheric reanalyses. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim), the first ECMWF reanalysis of the 20th-century (ERA-20C), and the Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55) are projected into SSM/T-2 radiance space using a fast radiative transfer model. The present study confirms earlier indications that the polarisation state of SSM/T-2 antenna is horizontal (not vertical) in the limit of nadir viewing. The study also formulates several recommendations to improve use of the SSM/T-2 measurement data in future fundamental climate data records or reanalyses. Recommendations are (1) to correct geolocation errors, especially for DMSP 14; (2) to blacklist poor quality data identified in the paper; (3) to correct for inter-satellite biases, estimated here on the order of 1 K, by applying an inter-satellite recalibration or, for reanalysis, an automated (e.g., variational) bias correction; and (4) to improve precipitating cloud filtering or, for reanalysis, consider an all-sky assimilation scheme where radiative transfer simulations account for the scattering effect of hydrometeors.

  12. All-sky radiance simulation of Megha-Tropiques SAPHIR microwave sensor using multiple scattering radiative transfer model for data assimilation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhulatha, A.; George, John P.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2017-03-01

    Incorporation of cloud- and precipitation-affected radiances from microwave satellite sensors in data assimilation system has a great potential in improving the accuracy of numerical model forecasts over the regions of high impact weather. By employing the multiple scattering radiative transfer model RTTOV-SCATT, all-sky radiance (clear sky and cloudy sky) simulation has been performed for six channel microwave SAPHIR (Sounder for Atmospheric Profiling of Humidity in the Inter-tropics by Radiometry) sensors of Megha-Tropiques (MT) satellite. To investigate the importance of cloud-affected radiance data in severe weather conditions, all-sky radiance simulation is carried out for the severe cyclonic storm `Hudhud' formed over Bay of Bengal. Hydrometeors from NCMRWF unified model (NCUM) forecasts are used as input to the RTTOV model to simulate cloud-affected SAPHIR radiances. Horizontal and vertical distribution of all-sky simulated radiances agrees reasonably well with the SAPHIR observed radiances over cloudy regions during different stages of cyclone development. Simulated brightness temperatures of six SAPHIR channels indicate that the three dimensional humidity structure of tropical cyclone is well represented in all-sky computations. Improved correlation and reduced bias and root mean square error against SAPHIR observations are apparent. Probability distribution functions reveal that all-sky simulations are able to produce the cloud-affected lower brightness temperatures associated with cloudy regions. The density scatter plots infer that all-sky radiances are more consistent with observed radiances. Correlation between different types of hydrometeors and simulated brightness temperatures at respective atmospheric levels highlights the significance of inclusion of scattering effects from different hydrometeors in simulating the cloud-affected radiances in all-sky simulations. The results are promising and suggest that the inclusion of multiple scattering

  13. Simulation of the Microwave Emission of Multi-layered Snowpacks Using the Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory: the DMRT-ML Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picard, G.; Brucker, Ludovic; Roy, A.; Dupont, F.; Fily, M.; Royer, A.; Harlow, C.

    2013-01-01

    DMRT-ML is a physically based numerical model designed to compute the thermal microwave emission of a given snowpack. Its main application is the simulation of brightness temperatures at frequencies in the range 1-200 GHz similar to those acquired routinely by spacebased microwave radiometers. The model is based on the Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT) theory for the computation of the snow scattering and extinction coefficients and on the Discrete Ordinate Method (DISORT) to numerically solve the radiative transfer equation. The snowpack is modeled as a stack of multiple horizontal snow layers and an optional underlying interface representing the soil or the bottom ice. The model handles both dry and wet snow conditions. Such a general design allows the model to account for a wide range of snow conditions. Hitherto, the model has been used to simulate the thermal emission of the deep firn on ice sheets, shallow snowpacks overlying soil in Arctic and Alpine regions, and overlying ice on the large icesheet margins and glaciers. DMRT-ML has thus been validated in three very different conditions: Antarctica, Barnes Ice Cap (Canada) and Canadian tundra. It has been recently used in conjunction with inverse methods to retrieve snow grain size from remote sensing data. The model is written in Fortran90 and available to the snow remote sensing community as an open-source software. A convenient user interface is provided in Python.

  14. Microwaving of normally opaque and semi-opaque substances

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    Method of heating small particles using microwave radiation which are not normally capable of being heated by microwaves. The surfaces of the particles are coated with a material which is transparent to microwave radiation in order to cause microwave coupling to the particles and thus accomplish heating of the particles.

  15. Microwaving of normally opaque and semi-opaque substances

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-07-17

    Disclosed is a method of heating small particles using microwave radiation which are not normally capable of being heated by microwaves. The surfaces of the particles are coated with a material which is transparent to microwave radiation in order to cause microwave coupling to the particles and thus accomplish heating of the particles.

  16. [Analysis of pulsed bioelectric activity of rabbit cerebral cortex in response to low-intensity microwave radiation].

    PubMed

    Luk'ianova, S N; Monseeva, N V

    1998-01-01

    In experiments on 22 rabbits the influence of a pulse microwave irradiation on extracellular activity of separate nervous cells of sensorimotori and occipital areas of a cortex brain is shown. The reaction could consist in activation or in braking frequency of the discharges, that was connected to frequency impulsation in an initial background. The researched mode of a microwave irradiation (1.5 GHz, duration of a pulsed-0.4 microsecond, frequency of their recurrence 1000 Hz, DFEpulsed-300 microW/sm2) had a corrigizing action.

  17. [Experimental research on the biological action of the pulse-modulated microwave radiation created by shipboard radar stations].

    PubMed

    Kaliada, T V; Nikitina, V N; Liashko, G G; Masterova, I Iu; Shaposhnikova, E S

    1995-01-01

    The article represents experimental data on influence of impulse modulated microwave irradiation with discontinuous effects varying in intensity and exposure. Becavior, peripheral blood, biochemical and morphologic parameters were assessed in the laboratory animals exposed. The response appeared to correlate with individual and typologic features of the examinees.

  18. Microwave radiation as heating method in the synthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles from hexafluorotitanate-organic salts

    SciTech Connect

    Estruga, Marc; Domingo, Concepcion; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2010-09-15

    Nanocrystalline anatase was obtained from ionic liquid-like precursors containing hexafluorotitanate-organic salts and less than 25 wt.% of water, and using boric acid as fluoride scavenger. Two alternative heating methods were explored using either a conventional oven or a domestic microwave apparatus. A significant reduction in the reaction time from 24 h to only few minutes was obtained using the microwave route. The as-prepared materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen sorption analysis, and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared, X-ray photoelectronic and Raman spectroscopes. The convenience of using the microwave heating option was a function of the organic cation present in the precursor. Thus, organic ammonium cations containing only hydrocarbon substituents, such as diethylammonium, phenylammonium and benzyltrimethylammonium led to the precipitation of nanocrystalline anatase powder with high specific surface area (up to 120 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) in a short processing time (1-3 min). Otherwise, alcohol and carboxylate functionalized cations decomposed under microwave treatment. Moreover, the choice of the organic cation allowed tuning several properties of the end material, such as particle size and pore morphology.

  19. Maps of Dust Infrared Emission for Use in Estimation of Reddening and Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Foregrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Davis, Marc

    1998-06-01

    standard reddening law and use the colors of elliptical galaxies to measure the reddening per unit flux density of 100 μm emission. We find consistent calibration using the B-R color distribution of a sample of the 106 brightest cluster ellipticals, as well as a sample of 384 ellipticals with B-V and Mg line strength measurements. For the latter sample, we use the correlation of intrinsic B-V versus Mg2 index to tighten the power of the test greatly. We demonstrate that the new maps are twice as accurate as the older Burstein-Heiles reddening estimates in regions of low and moderate reddening. The maps are expected to be significantly more accurate in regions of high reddening. These dust maps will also be useful for estimating millimeter emission that contaminates cosmic microwave background radiation experiments and for estimating soft X-ray absorption. We describe how to access our maps readily for general use.

  20. Microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Thomae, Rainer W.

    2005-07-26

    A compact microwave ion source has a permanent magnet dipole field, a microwave launcher, and an extractor parallel to the source axis. The dipole field is in the form of a ring. The microwaves are launched from the middle of the dipole ring using a coaxial waveguide. Electrons are heated using ECR in the magnetic field. The ions are extracted from the side of the source from the middle of the dipole perpendicular to the source axis. The plasma density can be increased by boosting the microwave ion source by the addition of an RF antenna. Higher charge states can be achieved by increasing the microwave frequency. A xenon source with a magnetic pinch can be used to produce intense EUV radiation.

  1. Microwave emissions from snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation emitted from dry and wet snowpack in the microwave region (1 to 100 GHz) is discussed and related to ground observations. Results from theoretical model calculations match the brightness temperatures obtained by truck mounted, airborne and spaceborne microwave sensor systems. Snow wetness and internal layer structure complicate the snow parameter retrieval algorithm. Further understanding of electromagnetic interaction with snowpack may eventually provide a technique to probe the internal snow properties

  2. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  3. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  4. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9–4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  5. Microwave Accelerated Green Synthesis of Stable Silver Nanoparticles with Eucalyptus globulus Leaf Extract and Their Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activity on Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Ali, Khursheed; Ahmed, Bilal; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microwave assisted method of green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed using aqueous leaf extract of Eucalyptus globulus(ELE), and their antibacterial and antibiofilm potential investigated. With this aim, the aqueous solutions of ELE and AgNO3(1 mM) were mixed (1:4 v/v), and microwave irradiated at 2450 Mhz, for 30 sec. The instant color change of the ELE-AgNO3 mixture from pale yellow to dark brown indicated ELE-AgNPs synthesis. The intensity of peak at 428 nm in UV-Vis spectra, due to the surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs, varied with the amount of ELE, AgNO3 concentration, pH and time of incubation. The biosynthesized ELE-AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX, FTIR and TGA analyses. The size of ELE-AgNPs was determined to be in range of 1.9-4.3 nm and 5-25 nm, with and without microwave treatment, respectively. SEM exhibited the capping of AgNPs with the ELE constituents, and validated by FTIR analysis. The FTIR data revealed the presence of plant organic constituents and metabolites bound to ELE-AgNPs, which contributes for their stability. The antimicrobial activity of ELE-AgNPs was assessed by growth and biofilm inhibition of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) clinical bacterial isolates. The results demonstrated that S. aureus were more sensitive to ELE-AgNPs than E. coli and P. aeruginosa. MRSA exhibited higher sensitive than MSSA, whereas P. aeruginosa were more sensitive than E. coli to ELE-AgNPs treatment. Also, significant (83 ± 3% and 84 ± 5%) biofilm inhibition was observed in case of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The results elucidated environmentally friendly, economical and quick method for production of colloidal bio-functionalized ELE-AgNPs, for effectual clinical applications, as broad spectrum

  6. Investigation of mechanical and thermal properties of microwave-sintered lunar simulant materials using 2.45 GHz radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanical and thermal properties of lunar simulant material were investigated. An alternative method of examining thermal shock in microwave-sintered lunar samples was researched. A computer code was developed that models how the fracture toughness of a thermally shocked lunar simulant sample is related to the sample hardness as measured by a micro-hardness indentor apparatus. This technique enables much data to be gathered from a few samples. Several samples were sintered at different temperatures and for different times at the temperatures. The melting and recrystallization characteristics of a well-studied binary system were also investigated to see if the thermodynamic barrier for the nucleation of a crystalline phase may be affected by the presence of a microwave field. The system chosen was the albite (sodium alumino silicate) anorthite system (calcium alumino silicate). The results of these investigations are presented.

  7. Mass spectroscopy of laser ablated samples ionized by a microwave induced plasma and off-resonant laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Uebbing, J.; Niemax, K.

    1995-04-01

    The technique laser ablation of solid samples into a low pressure argon microwave induced plasma (MIP) is coupled with mass spectrometry. Additionally, an excimer laser or a dye laser are used for off-resonant and resonant ionization, respectively. It is demonstrated with copper, steel, brass, glass and ceramic samples, that, in first approximation, matrix-independent analysis is possible if internal standardization is applied.

  8. Effect of microwave radiation on surface charge, surface sites and ionic state of iron, and the activity of crocidolite asbestos fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulumian, M.; Pollak, H.

    1998-12-01

    Surface charge, surface sites, and the content of ferrous ions of crocidolite asbestos fibres are some of the properties which are considered to play a role in determining their activity in biological systems. Any treatment which changes these properties may therefore change their activity and subsequently increase or decrease their toxicity in biological surroundings. Surfaces of crocidolite fibres are shown to be negatively charged. In the present study, microwave radiation at 300°C was able to increase the number of positive charges within the bulk of the crocidolite fibres. In the presence of atmospheric oxygen, this increase could simultaneously reduce the hydroxyl groups on the surface of the fibres. The increase in positive charge was monitored by: (i) Mössbauer spectroscopy, where a change in the oxidation state of iron from ferrous to ferric was observed, (ii) visual microscopic observations of the irradiated fibres where there was an increase in their aggregation, and (iii) the difficulty to suspend these radiated fibres in solution. A decrease in the number of the surface hydroxyl groups on the other hand, was monitored by infrared spectroscopy. The reduction in the activity of the radiated crocidolite fibres was investigated by studying their ability to peroxidize lipids. Results have shown that changes in their surface charge, surface site and a reduction of the content of ferrous ions produce a concomitant decrease in their ability to initiate lipid peroxidation.

  9. Temperature changes associated with radiofrequency exposure near authentic metallic implants in the head phantom--a near field simulation study with 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz dipole.

    PubMed

    Matikka Virtanen, H; Keshvari, J; Lappalainen, R

    2010-10-07

    Along with increased use of wireless communication devices operating in the radiofrequency (RF) range, concern has been raised about the related possible health risks. Among other concerns, the interaction of medical implants and RF devices has been studied in order to assure the safety of implant carriers under various exposure conditions. In the RF range, the main established quantitative effect of electromagnetic (EM) fields on biological tissues is heating due to vibrational movements of water molecules. The temperature changes induced in tissues also constitute the basis for the setting of RF exposure limits and recommendations. In this study, temperature changes induced by electromagnetic field enhancements near passive metallic implants have been simulated in the head region. Furthermore, the effect of the implant material on the induced temperature change was evaluated using clinically used metals with the highest and the lowest thermal conductivities. In some cases, remarkable increases in maximum temperatures of tissues (as much as 8 °C) were seen in the near field with 1 W power level whereas at lower power levels significant temperature increases were not observed.

  10. Physical retrieval of precipitation water contents from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. Part 1: A cloud ensemble/radiative parameterization for sensor response (report version)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Raymond, William H.

    1990-01-01

    The physical retrieval of geophysical parameters based upon remotely sensed data requires a sensor response model which relates the upwelling radiances that the sensor observes to the parameters to be retrieved. In the retrieval of precipitation water contents from satellite passive microwave observations, the sensor response model has two basic components. First, a description of the radiative transfer of microwaves through a precipitating atmosphere must be considered, because it is necessary to establish the physical relationship between precipitation water content and upwelling microwave brightness temperature. Also the spatial response of the satellite microwave sensor (or antenna pattern) must be included in the description of sensor response, since precipitation and the associated brightness temperature field can vary over a typical microwave sensor resolution footprint. A 'population' of convective cells, as well as stratiform clouds, are simulated using a computationally-efficient multi-cylinder cloud model. Ensembles of clouds selected at random from the population, distributed over a 25 km x 25 km model domain, serve as the basis for radiative transfer calculations of upwelling brightness temperatures at the SSM/I frequencies. Sensor spatial response is treated explicitly by convolving the upwelling brightness temperature by the domain-integrated SSM/I antenna patterns. The sensor response model is utilized in precipitation water content retrievals.

  11. Reduced growth of soybean seedlings after exposure to weak microwave radiation from GSM 900 mobile phone and base station.

    PubMed

    Halgamuge, Malka N; Yak, See Kye; Eberhardt, Jacob L

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study possible effects of environmental radiation pollution on plants. The association between cellular telephone (short duration, higher amplitude) and base station (long duration, very low amplitude) radiation exposure and the growth rate of soybean (Glycine max) seedlings was investigated. Soybean seedlings, pre-grown for 4 days, were exposed in a gigahertz transverse electromagnetic cell for 2 h to global system for mobile communication (GSM) mobile phone pulsed radiation or continuous wave (CW) radiation at 900 MHz with amplitudes of 5.7 and 41 V m(-1) , and outgrowth was studied one week after exposure. The exposure to higher amplitude (41 V m(-1)) GSM radiation resulted in diminished outgrowth of the epicotyl. The exposure to lower amplitude (5.7 V m(-1)) GSM radiation did not influence outgrowth of epicotyl, hypocotyls, or roots. The exposure to higher amplitude CW radiation resulted in reduced outgrowth of the roots whereas lower CW exposure resulted in a reduced outgrowth of the hypocotyl. Soybean seedlings were also exposed for 5 days to an extremely low level of radiation (GSM 900 MHz, 0.56 V m(-1)) and outgrowth was studied 2 days later. Growth of epicotyl and hypocotyl was found to be reduced, whereas the outgrowth of roots was stimulated. Our findings indicate that the observed effects were significantly dependent on field strength as well as amplitude modulation of the applied field.

  12. Microwave sintering of multiple articles

    DOEpatents

    Blake, Rodger D.; Katz, Joel D.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing articles of alumina and of alumina and silicon carbide in which the articles are sintered at high temperatures using microwave radiation. The articles are placed in a sintering container which is placed in a microwave cavity for heating. The rates at which heating and cooling take place is controlled.

  13. More Experiments with Microwave Ovens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter; Karstadt, Detlef

    2004-01-01

    Microwave ovens can be used to perform exciting demonstrations that illustrate a variety of physics topics. Experiments discussed here show superheating, visualize the inhomogeneous heating that takes place in a microwave and also show how to use a mobile phone to detect radiation leaking from the oven. Finally eggs can give some spectacular…

  14. Large-scale and shape-controlled synthesis and characterization of nanorod-like nickel powders under microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yajie; Wang, Guangjian; Wang, Yuran; Huang, Yanhong; Wang, Fei

    2012-01-15

    Graphical abstract: The nanorod-like pure nickel were fabricated via hydrothermal liquid phase reduction route under microwave irradiation with hydrazine hydrate as a reducing agent as well as polyvinyl alcohol as a dispersant and/or structure directing agent. The materials were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS, HRTEM, and selected-area electron diffraction, etc. The lattice expansion for Ni powders was explained in detail. As-prepared Ni sample was of obvious shape anisotropy with length diameter ratio of 5. Magnetic measurements shown that the magnetic properties of Ni nanorod-like (fcc) were quite different from those of hexagonal closed-packed (hcp) Ni nanoparticles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesis of nanorod-like nickel under microwave irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen generated in reaction as a shielding gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lattice expansion for Ni powders was explained in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic properties of Ni were quite different from those of Ni nanoparticles. -- Abstract: The nanorod-like nickel powders were fabricated via hydrothermal liquid phase reduction route under microwave irradiation with hydrazine hydrate as a reducing agent as well as polyvinyl alcohol as a dispersant and/or structure directing agent. The morphology and structure of as-prepared products could be easily tuned by adjusting process parameters such as pH value and microwave irradiation time. The resulting materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED). The results demonstrated that pure nickel powders with face-centered cubic (fcc) structure were prepared at relatively mild condition and no characteristic peaks of nickel oxide in the XRD pattern were found. The phenomenon of lattice expansion for Ni powders was explained in details according to the XRD theory. As-prepared Ni sample was

  15. Scanning tip microwave near field microscope

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Schultz, Peter G.; Wei, Tao

    1998-01-01

    A microwave near field microscope has a novel microwave probe structure wherein the probing field of evanescent radiation is emitted from a sharpened metal tip instead of an aperture or gap. This sharpened tip, which is electrically and mechanically connected to a central electrode, extends through and beyond an aperture in an endwall of a microwave resonating device such as a microwave cavity resonator or a microwave stripline resonator. Since the field intensity at the tip increases as the tip sharpens, the total energy which is radiated from the tip and absorbed by the sample increases as the tip sharpens. The result is improved spatial resolution without sacrificing sensitivity.

  16. Scanning tip microwave near field microscope

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, X.D.; Schultz, P.G.; Wei, T.

    1998-10-13

    A microwave near field microscope has a novel microwave probe structure wherein the probing field of evanescent radiation is emitted from a sharpened metal tip instead of an aperture or gap. This sharpened tip, which is electrically and mechanically connected to a central electrode, extends through and beyond an aperture in an end wall of a microwave resonating device such as a microwave cavity resonator or a microwave stripline resonator. Since the field intensity at the tip increases as the tip sharpens, the total energy which is radiated from the tip and absorbed by the sample increases as the tip sharpens. The result is improved spatial resolution without sacrificing sensitivity. 17 figs.

  17. Single-crystalline Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x detectors for direct detection of microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Winkler, D.; Yurgens, A.

    2015-04-01

    We test radiation detectors made from single-crystalline Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x flakes put on oxidized Si substrates. The 100-nm-thick flakes are lithographically patterned into 4 ×12 μm2 large rectangles embedded in thin-film log-spiral antennas. The SiO2 layer weakens the thermal link between the flakes and the bath. Two modes of radiation detection have been observed. For a bolometric type of sensors a responsivity of ˜300 V/W and a noise equivalent power of 30 nW/ √{Hz } has been deduced at 70 K. Much more sensitive is the non-bolometric device showing characteristics similar to a Golay-type detector while being at least a thousand times faster. Making smaller (sub-μm) structures is expected to significantly improve the performance of these devices and makes them very competitive among other microwave and terahertz detectors.

  18. Biophysical techniques for examining metabolic, proliferative, and genetic effects of microwave radiation. Final report, 1 Oct 89-30 Aug 90

    SciTech Connect

    Meltz, M.L.

    1991-09-01

    This project was undertaken to prepare for a comprehensive research effort examining metabolic, proliferative, and genetic effects of microwave radiation. To accomplish this task, preliminary studies have been performed with 4 cells systems; Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, AS52 Chinese hamster cells (heterozygous at the xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (XGPRT) locus), 244B proliferating human lymphoblastoid cells, and freshly isolated peripheral lymphocytes. The thermal response of the 244B cells has been carefully examined, and an initial characterization of the membrane markers, membrane permeability, and cell cycle distribution of these cells undertaken. The absence of the induction of chromosome aberrations in CHO cells, after exposure to 850 MHz pulsed wave (PW), 18mW/cm2 (specific absorption rate (SAR) 14.4 W/kg) radiofrequency radiation (RFR), or after exposure to 1,200 MHz PW (220 W -300 W) net forward power; SAR 24.33 W/kg RFR, is reported. The survival response of the AS52 cells, after simultaneous treatment at 37 C or 40 C, with and without mitomycin or adriamycin, is described. The survival of the AS52 cells after X-ray exposure at low and high dose rates is also described.

  19. Single-crystalline Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x} detectors for direct detection of microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M. Winkler, D.; Yurgens, A.

    2015-04-13

    We test radiation detectors made from single-crystalline Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x} flakes put on oxidized Si substrates. The 100-nm-thick flakes are lithographically patterned into 4×12 μm{sup 2} large rectangles embedded in thin-film log-spiral antennas. The SiO{sub 2} layer weakens the thermal link between the flakes and the bath. Two modes of radiation detection have been observed. For a bolometric type of sensors a responsivity of ∼300 V/W and a noise equivalent power of 30 nW/√(Hz) has been deduced at 70 K. Much more sensitive is the non-bolometric device showing characteristics similar to a Golay-type detector while being at least a thousand times faster. Making smaller (sub-μm) structures is expected to significantly improve the performance of these devices and makes them very competitive among other microwave and terahertz detectors.

  20. Quantification of allicin by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet analysis with effect of post-ultrasonic sound and microwave radiation on fresh garlic cloves

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Sankhadip; Laha, Bibek; Banerjee, Subhasis

    2014-01-01

    Background: Garlic (Allium sativum L.) has been accepted universally to be applied in food, spice and traditional medicine. The medicinal and other beneficial properties of garlic are attributed to organosulfur compounds. Objective: As of today no simultaneous analysis has been performed; hence the transformation of allicin to its degraded products during cultivation and storage is open into doubt. Materials and Methods: In our present work, we have tried to develop a sensitive and reproducible analytical method to measure allicin by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet analysis with effect of post-acoustic waves and microwave radiation on fresh garlic cloves. Results: The process revealed the effect of different radiation techniques on fresh garlic retains the principle component, allicin in its pure form and generated higher yield than the conventional way of extraction. Conclusion: Therefore, materializing these techniques in the pharmaceutical industry will definitely be proved beneficial in term of time as well as money. Most interestingly, the methods ruled out possibilities of degradation of organosulfur compounds as well. PMID:24991105

  1. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Sagripanti, J L; Swicord, M L; Davis, C C

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  2. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sagripanti, J.L.; Swicord, M.L.; Davis, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  3. Outgoing long-wave radiation computed from HIRS2/MSU soundings. [High InfraRed Spectrometer/Microwave Sounding Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.C.; Susskind, J. )

    1990-05-20

    Fields of outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) have been computed using geophysical parameters retrieved from analysis of HIRS2/MSU sounding data as input to a modified version of the Wu-Kaplan radiation code used in the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres fourth-order general circulation model. Monthly mean results for 1979 agree with monthly mean OLR fields measured by the Nimbus 7 Earth radiation budget (ERB) broadband narrow field of view instrument within standard deviations of 6.3 W/m{sup 2} but with a global mean bias of 8.0 W/m{sup 2}. Results are shown for July 1979. The areas of disagreement between high-resolution infrared radiation sounder OLR and ERB OLR are small but spatially coherent with patterns which may be related to sampling differences. The difference patterns are much less extensive than those between OLR derived from advanced very high resolution radiometer 11-{mu}m observations and ERB OLR. The ability to compute OLR from geophysical parameters is complementary to direct measurement of OLR because it enables one to attribute changes in OLR in space and time to changes in other geophysical parameters. In addition, it allows one to compute fields not directly measurable from satellite, such as the difference of the upward long-wave flux between the surface and the top of the atmosphere and the long-wave cloud radiative forcing.

  4. Translational anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation and far-infrared emission by galactic dust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    The predicted emission spectrum of galactic dust at about 10 K is compared with the spectrum of 2.8-K universal blackbody radiation and with the spectrum of the anisotropy expected in the 2.8-K radiation due to motion of earth with respect to the coordinate system in which the radiation was last scattered. The extremely anisotropic galactic-dust emission spectrum may contribute a significant background to anisotropy measurements which scan through the galactic plane. The contamination would appear in an 8-mm scan around the celestial equator, for example, as a spurious 200 km/s velocity toward declination 0 deg, right ascension 19 hr, if predictions are correct. The predicted spectrum of dust emission in the galactic plane at longitudes not exceeding about 30 deg falls below the total 2.8-K cosmic background intensity at wavelengths of at least 1 mm.

  5. Organic Synthesis Using Microwaves and Supported Reagents

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the electromagnetic radiation region, microwaves (0.3GHz-300GHz) lie between radiowave (Rf) and infrared (IR) frequencies with relatively large wavelengths (1 mm-1 m). Microwaves, non-ionizing radiation incapable of breaking bonds, are a form of energy that manifest as heat t...

  6. GSM 900 MHz Microwave Radiation-Induced Alterations of Insulin Level and Histopathological Changes of Liver and Pancreas in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Owji, S.M.; Shojaei-fard, M.B.; Ghader-Panah, M.; Mortazavi, S.A.R.; Tavakoli-Golpayegani, A.; Haghani, M.; Taeb, S.; Shokrpour, N.; Koohi, O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The rapidly increasing use of mobile phones has led to public concerns about possible health effects of these popular communication devices. This study is an attempt to investigate the effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation produced by GSM mobile phones on the insulin release in rats. Methods: Forty two female adult Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups. Group1 were exposed to RF radiation 6 hours per day for 7 days. Group 2 received sham exposure (6 hours per day for 7 days). Groups 3 and 4 received RF radiation 3 hours per day for 7 days and sham exposure (3 hours per day), respectively. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of RF was 2.0 W/kg. Results: Our results showed that RF radiations emitted from mobile phone could not alter insulin release in rats. However, mild to severe inflammatory changes in the portal spaces of the liver of rats as well as damage in the cells of islet of Langerhans were observed. These changes were linked with the duration of the exposures. Conclusion: RF exposure can induce inflammatory changes in the liver as well causing damage in the cells of islet of Langerhans. PMID:28144593

  7. FT-IR and FT-Raman studies of cross-linking processes with Ca2+ ions, glutaraldehyde and microwave radiation for polymer composition of poly(acrylic acid)/sodium salt of carboxymethyl starch - Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowska, Beata; Sitarz, Maciej; Olejnik, Ewa; Kaczmarska, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic methods allowed to identify the cross-linking process of the aqueous composition of poly(acrylic acid)/sodium salt of carboxymethyl starch (PAA/CMS-Na) applied as a binder for moulding sands. The cross-linking was performed by chemical methods by introducing cross-linking substances with Ca2+ ions or glutaraldehyde and by physical way, applying the microwave radiation. It was found that Ca2+ ions cause formation of cross-linking ionic bonds within carboxyl and carboxylate groups. Glutaraldehyde generates formation of cross-linking bonds with hemiacetal and acetal structures. Whereas in the microwave radiation field, due to dehydration, lattices are formed by anhydride bonds.

  8. FT-IR and FT-Raman studies of cross-linking processes with Ca(2+) ions, glutaraldehyde and microwave radiation for polymer composition of poly(acrylic acid)/sodium salt of carboxymethyl starch--part I.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Beata; Sitarz, Maciej; Olejnik, Ewa; Kaczmarska, Karolina

    2015-01-25

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic methods allowed to identify the cross-linking process of the aqueous composition of poly(acrylic acid)/sodium salt of carboxymethyl starch (PAA/CMS-Na) applied as a binder for moulding sands. The cross-linking was performed by chemical methods by introducing cross-linking substances with Ca(2+) ions or glutaraldehyde and by physical way, applying the microwave radiation. It was found that Ca(2+) ions cause formation of cross-linking ionic bonds within carboxyl and carboxylate groups. Glutaraldehyde generates formation of cross-linking bonds with hemiacetal and acetal structures. Whereas in the microwave radiation field, due to dehydration, lattices are formed by anhydride bonds.

  9. Enhanced absorption of microwave radiations through flexible polyvinyl alcohol-carbon black/barium hexaferrite composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sushil; Datt, Gopal; Santhosh Kumar, A.; Abhyankar, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    Flexible microwave absorber composite films of carbon black (CB)/barium hexaferrite nano-discs (BaF) in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix, fabricated by gel casting, exhibit ˜99.5% attenuation of electromagnetic waves in the entire 8-18 GHz (X and Ku-band) range. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy studies confirm the formation of CB-BaF-PVA composite films. The electromagnetic absorption properties of composite films are found to be enhanced with CB content due to the synergetic effect of multiple dielectric and magnetic losses. The 25 wt. % CB grafted PVA-BaF flexible composite films with a thickness of ˜ 2 mm exhibit effective electromagnetic shielding of 23.6 dB with a dominant contribution from absorption mechanism (SEA ˜ 21 dB). The dielectric properties of composite films are further discussed by using the Debye model. The detailed analysis reveals that major contribution to dielectric losses is from dipolar and interfacial polarizations, whereas magnetic losses are predominantly from domain wall displacement.

  10. Radiation losses in microwave Ku region by conducting pyrrole/barium titanate and barium hexaferrite based nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Talwinder; Kumar, Sachin; Narang, S. B.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Nanocomposites of substituted barium hexaferrite and barium titanate embedded in a polymer were synthesized via emulsion polymerization. The study was performed by using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, a vibrating sample magnetometer and a vector network analyzer. It is found that maximum radiation loss occur at 16.09 GHz (-14.23 dB) frequency owing to the combined effect of conducting polymer, suitable dielectric and magnetic material. This suggests that prepared material is suitable for radiation losses. Micro structural study reveals the presence of all the phases of the compounds comprises composite. Benzene ring absorption band (at 1183 cm-1) in FT-IR spectra illustrates the presence of polymer. Surface morphology reveals the presence of array of particles encapsulated by the polymer.

  11. Anisotropy and polarization of the microwave background radiation as a test of nonequilibrium ionization of the pregalactic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nasel'skii, P.D.; Polnarev, A.G.

    1987-11-01

    The formation of small-scale anisotropy and polarization in a model of nonstationary ionization of the pregalactic plasma is considered. It is shown that the ratio of the degree of polarization to the degree of anisotropy is rather insensitive to the actual regime of ionization and is 7-8%. However, the characteristic correlation angle is in the distribution of the anisotropy and polarization of the background radiation on the celestial sphere depends strongly on the parameters of the nonequilibrium.

  12. Design, fabrication and testing of a CFA for use in the solar power satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    A crossed field amplifier was designed to meet the performance objectives of high signal to noise ratio, an efficiency of 85%, a CW microwave power output of 5-8 kW, and a frequency of 2450 MHz. The signal to noise ratio achieved was better than 69 db/MHz in a 2000 MHz band centered on the carrier. High circuit efficiency of 97% and a sharp knee on voltage current characteristic were achieved. The basic problem of maintaining good transfer of heat to the external radiator while providing for adequate connections to input and output was solved. Maximum efficiency achieved was 70.5% and gain and power level were below objectives. An investigation of causes of reduced performance indicated the poor field pattern in the cathode anode interaction area of the tube was a major cause.

  13. Using Microwave and Infrared Radiances from Off-Nadir Pixels: Application of Radiative Transfer to Slanted Line-of-Sight and Comparisons with NASA EOS Aqua Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna

    2005-01-01

    The passive infrared and microwave nadir sounders such as (A)TOVS observe the atmosphere from a polar orbit by directing their scan pointed at the ground up to about 49 degrees from nadir. Except for the pixels located right on the satellite ground track, the radiance measurements collected by these instruments characterize hence atmospheric emission paths which are slanted with respect to the zenithal direction at the ground. At the outer swath edges, the deviations from nadir reach about 60 degrees in terms of Satellite Zenith Angle (SZA). The radiative transfer codes used in operational Numerical Weather Prediction applications make the appropriate corrections to account for the extra path induced by the non-zero SZA. However, no corrections are made to account for the fact that the atmospheric profiles along the slanted line-of-sight (LOS) are different from the vertical because of horizontal gradients in the atmosphere. Using NASA EOS Aqua satellite's orbits, zenith and azimuth angles, as well as three-dimensional fields of temperature, water vapor, and ozone produced by the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, we extracted slanted atmospheric profiles for actual soundings performed by the AIRS and AMSU-A instruments onboard EOS Aqua. We will present the results of our study comparing the calculated brightness temperatures along slanted LOS and vertical LOS with AIRS and AMSU-A observations.

  14. Volumetric pattern analysis of fuselage-mounted airborne antennas. Ph.D. Thesis; [prediction analysis techniques for antenna radiation patterns of microwave antennas on commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A volumetric pattern analysis of fuselage-mounted airborne antennas at high frequencies was investigated. The primary goal of the investigation was to develop a numerical solution for predicting radiation patterns of airborne antennas in an accurate and efficient manner. An analytical study of airborne antenna pattern problems is presented in which the antenna is mounted on the fuselage near the top or bottom. Since this is a study of general-type commercial aircraft, the aircraft was modeled in its most basic form. The fuselage was assumed to be an infinitely long perfectly conducting elliptic cylinder in its cross-section and a composite elliptic cylinder in its elevation profile. The wing, cockpit, stabilizers (horizontal and vertical) and landing gear are modeled by "N" sided bent or flat plates which can be arbitrarily attached to the fuselage. The volumetric solution developed utilizes two elliptic cylinders, namely, the roll plane and elevation plane models to approximate the principal surface profile (longitudinal and transverse) at the antenna location. With the belt concept and the aid of appropriate coordinate system transformations the solution can be used to predict the volumetric patterns of airborne antennas in an accurate and efficient manner. Applications of this solution to various airborne antenna problems show good agreement with scale model measurements. Extensive data are presented for a microwave landing antenna system.

  15. Size reduction and radiation pattern shaping of multi-fed DCC slot antennas used in conformal microwave array hyperthermia applicators.

    PubMed

    Maccarini, Paolo F; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Martins, Carlos D; Stauffer, Paul R

    2009-02-23

    The use of conformal antenna array in the treatment of superficial diseases can significantly increase patient comfort while enhancing the local control of large treatment area with irregular shapes. Originally a regular square multi-fed slot antenna (Dual Concentric Conductor - DCC) was proposed as basic unit cell of the array. The square DCC works well when the outline of the treatment area is rectangular such as in the main chest or back area but is not suitable to outline diseases spreading along the armpit and neck area. In addition as the area of the patch increases, the overall power density decreases affecting the efficiency and thus the ability to deliver the necessary thermal dose with medium power amplifier (<50W). A large number of small efficient antennas is preferable as the disease is more accurately contoured and the lower power requirement for the amplifiers correlates with system reliability, durability, linearity and overall reduced cost. For such reason we developed a set of design rules for multi-fed slot antennas with irregular contours and we implemented a design that reduce the area while increasing the perimeter of the slot, thus increasing the antenna efficiency and the power density. The simulation performed with several commercial packages (Ansoft HFSS, Imst Empire, SemcadX and CST Microwave Studio) show that the size reducing method can be applied to several shapes and for different frequencies. The SAR measurements of several DCCs are performed using an in-house high resolution scanning system with tumor equivalent liquid phantom both at 915 MHz for superficial hyperthermia systems in US) and 433 MHz (Europe). The experimental results are compared with the expected theoretical predictions and both simulated and measured patterns of single antennas of various size and shapes are then summed in various combinations using Matlab to show possible treatment irregular contours of complex diseases. The local control is expected to

  16. Size reduction and radiation pattern shaping of multi-fed DCC slot antennas used in conformal microwave array hyperthermia applicators

    PubMed Central

    Maccarini, Paolo F.; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Martins, Carlos D.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    The use of conformal antenna array in the treatment of superficial diseases can significantly increase patient comfort while enhancing the local control of large treatment area with irregular shapes. Originally a regular square multi-fed slot antenna (Dual Concentric Conductor - DCC) was proposed as basic unit cell of the array. The square DCC works well when the outline of the treatment area is rectangular such as in the main chest or back area but is not suitable to outline diseases spreading along the armpit and neck area. In addition as the area of the patch increases, the overall power density decreases affecting the efficiency and thus the ability to deliver the necessary thermal dose with medium power amplifier (<50W). A large number of small efficient antennas is preferable as the disease is more accurately contoured and the lower power requirement for the amplifiers correlates with system reliability, durability, linearity and overall reduced cost. For such reason we developed a set of design rules for multi-fed slot antennas with irregular contours and we implemented a design that reduce the area while increasing the perimeter of the slot, thus increasing the antenna efficiency and the power density. The simulation performed with several commercial packages (Ansoft HFSS, Imst Empire, SemcadX and CST Microwave Studio) show that the size reducing method can be applied to several shapes and for different frequencies. The SAR measurements of several DCCs are performed using an in-house high resolution scanning system with tumor equivalent liquid phantom both at 915 MHz for superficial hyperthermia systems in US) and 433 MHz (Europe). The experimental results are compared with the expected theoretical predictions and both simulated and measured patterns of single antennas of various size and shapes are then summed in various combinations using Matlab to show possible treatment irregular contours of complex diseases. The local control is expected to

  17. Workshop on Microwave Power Transmission and Reception. Workshop Paper Summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Microwave systems performance and phase control are discussed. Component design and reliability are highlighted. The power amplifiers, radiating elements, rectennas, and solid state configurations are described. The proper sizing of microwave transmission systems is also discussed.

  18. [Comparative estimation of the effects of continuous and intermittent cyclical microwave radiation on the behavior of rats in the extraordinary situation].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, L N; Kolganova, O I; Dubovik, B V; Zhavoronkov, L P; Glushako va, V S

    2003-01-01

    Research has been carried out to investigate the effects of pulsed microwave exposure without pause (7 GHz, 400 pps, 100 microseconds, 70-150 mW/cm2, exposure 10 min) and pulsed interrupted cyclical microwave exposure (5 min exposure--4 min pause--5 min exposure) on learned behaviors of rats in the paradigm of extraordinary situation (the rescue of the life). It was shown that reductions in conditioned behavior after acute pulsed microwave exposure occurred at SAR of 21 W/kg (100 mW/cm2) and after cyclical pulsed microwave exposure at SAR of 28.4 W/kg (135 mW/cm2).

  19. Quantitative measurement of VUV radiation related to polymer pre-treatment in a microwave driven low pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitschker, Felix; Iglesias, Enrique; Fiebrandt, Marcel; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter; InstituteElectrical Engineering; Plasma Technology Team

    2016-09-01

    Plasma pre-treatment of polymers is used for a wide range of applications, e.g. prior to deposition of thin SiOx barrier films. At this, plasma generated particles and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation can reach the polymer surface. Both have a severe impact on the polymer interface, resulting in the production of e.g. dangling bonds. These modifications govern subsequent thin film growth. For understanding of pre-treatment processes, VUV radiation has to be quantified. Absolute VUV photon fluences are determined in situ, at the substrate holder, applying sodium salicylate (NaSal) as a scintillator. Therefore, VUV photons are quantified from 50 nm to 325 nm, due to constant quantum efficiency of NaSal, as integrals over defined wavelength ranges (50-110, 110-170, 170-200 and 200-325 nm). The set up allows for measurement with three scintillators. Each is equipped with optical filters. Observation of the fluorescence band is performed by means of optical fibers and a photomultiplier. Quantification is achieved by simultaneous measurement with an absolutely calibrated echelle spectrometer in the spectral range from 200 nm to 325 nm, taking into account observed plasma volumes. VUV photons are quantified for argon and oxygen plasmas as well as mixtures of both. Support by the German Research Foundation (DFG) within the framework of the SFB TRR 87/1 is acknowledged.

  20. Microwave off-gas treatment apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Rebecca L.; Clark, David E.; Wicks, George G.

    2003-01-01

    The invention discloses a microwave off-gas system in which microwave energy is used to treat gaseous waste. A treatment chamber is used to remediate off-gases from an emission source by passing the off-gases through a susceptor matrix, the matrix being exposed to microwave radiation. The microwave radiation and elevated temperatures within the combustion chamber provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the gas waste stream.

  1. The Detection of a Striking Increase in the Microwave Emission from Jupiter's Radiation Belts in June and July 2003.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M. J.; Bolton, S. J.; Levin, S. M.; Mac Laren, D.

    2004-12-01

    Synchrotron emission from energetic electrons in Jupiter's radiation belts has been routinely measured by ground-based radio telescopes for three decades. The NASA-JPL Jupiter Patrol, using NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas at Goldstone, CA., has reported significant (5 %-to-30 %) variations in Jupiter's flux density near 13-cm wavelength with timescales from a few days to several months. In this paper we report observations of an unusually sudden increase in flux density from 3.8 to 4.3 Jy that occurred between 20 June and 15 July 2003. The rate of increase (approximately 0.6 percent per day) is the steepest increase that we have detected with the exception of the increase in 1994 following the impacts of fragments from comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. More than half of the reported observations were conducted by middle- and high school students from classrooms across the nation. The students and their teachers are participants in the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) science education project, which is a partnership involving NASA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Lewis Center for Educational Research (LCER) in Apple Valley, CA. Working with the Lewis Center over the Internet, GAVRT students conduct remotely controlled radio astronomy observations using 34-m antennas at Goldstone. We also report preliminary results from a special GAVRT observing campaign conducted in the fall of 2003 before, during and after the controlled impact of the Galileo spacecraft into the Jovian atmosphere. Simultaneous observations were made at 3.5 and 13 cm wavelengths three-to-four days per week. These data are being incorporated into synchrotron emission studies of the state of the radiation belts during the last weeks of the Galileo mission. The JPL contribution to this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  3. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  4. The effects of layers in dry snow on its passive microwave emissions using dense media radiative transfer theory based on the quasicrystalline approximation (QCA/DMRT)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liang, D.; Xu, X.; Tsang, L.; Andreadis, K.M.; Josberger, E.G.

    2008-01-01

    A model for the microwave emissions of multilayer dry snowpacks, based on dense media radiative transfer (DMRT) theory with the quasicrystalline approximation (QCA), provides more accurate results when compared to emissions determined by a homogeneous snowpack and other scattering models. The DMRT model accounts for adhesive aggregate effects, which leads to dense media Mie scattering by using a sticky particle model. With the multilayer model, we examined both the frequency and polarization dependence of brightness temperatures (Tb's) from representative snowpacks and compared them to results from a single-layer model and found that the multilayer model predicts higher polarization differences, twice as much, and weaker frequency dependence. We also studied the temporal evolution of Tb from multilayer snowpacks. The difference between Tb's at 18.7 and 36.5 GHz can be S K lower than the single-layer model prediction in this paper. By using the snowpack observations from the Cold Land Processes Field Experiment as input for both multi- and single-layer models, it shows that the multilayer Tb's are in better agreement with the data than the single-layer model. With one set of physical parameters, the multilayer QCA/DMRT model matched all four channels of Tb observations simultaneously, whereas the single-layer model could only reproduce vertically polarized Tb's. Also, the polarization difference and frequency dependence were accurately matched by the multilayer model using the same set of physical parameters. Hence, algorithms for the retrieval of snowpack depth or water equivalent should be based on multilayer scattering models to achieve greater accuracy. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  5. Microwave superheaters for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.B.; Hoffman, M.A.; Logan, B.G.

    1987-10-16

    The microwave superheater uses the synchrotron radiation from a thermonuclear plasma to heat gas seeded with an alkali metal to temperatures far above the temperature of material walls. It can improve the efficiency of the Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine (CFAR) cycle described elsewhere in these proceedings. For a proof-of-principle experiment using helium, calculations show that a gas superheat ..delta..T of 2000/sup 0/K is possible when the wall temperature is maintained at 1000/sup 0/K. The concept can be scaled to reactor grade systems. Because of the need for synchrotron radiation, the microwave superheater is best suited for use with plasmas burning an advanced fuel such as D-/sup 3/He. 5 refs.

  6. Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample

    DOEpatents

    Maerefat, N.L.; Parmeswar, R.; Brinkmeyer, A.D.; Honarpour, M.

    1994-08-23

    A system is described for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample. 11 figs.

  7. Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample

    DOEpatents

    Maerefat, Nicida L.; Parmeswar, Ravi; Brinkmeyer, Alan D.; Honarpour, Mehdi

    1994-01-01

    A system for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample.

  8. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  9. Method and apparatus for thickness measurement using microwaves

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul [Bedford, MA; Lamar, David A [West Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The method for measuring the thickness of a material which transmits a detectable amount of microwave radiation includes irradiating the material with coherent microwave radiation tuned over a frequency range. Reflected microwave radiation is detected, the reflected radiation having maxima and minima over the frequency range as a result of coherent interference of microwaves reflected from reflecting surfaces of the material. The thickness of the material is determined from the period of the maxima and minima along with knowledge of the index of refraction of the material.

  10. Container for heat treating materials in microwave ovens

    SciTech Connect

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Mills, J.E.

    1989-03-07

    This patent describes a container for heating refractory material in a microwave oven to receive microwave radiation from microwave radiation emitting means disposed on at least one of vertically separated sides of a volume in the oven. The container positionable within and essentially filling the vertical expanse of the volume and comprising top wall means and bottom wall means each formed of a material substantially transparent to and non-coupling with microwave radiation, vertical wall means disposed between and contacting the top wall means and the bottom wall means for defining therewith an enclosed chamber. The vertical wall means being formed of graphite or a graphite composite characterized by being substantially opaque to and non-coupling with microwave radiation for reflecting microwave radiation inwardly into the chamber.

  11. Microwave detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1986-12-02

    A detector is described for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations, the detector comprising: a B-dot loop linking the magnetic field of the microwave pulse; a biased ferrite, that produces a magnetization field flux that links the B-dot loop. The ferrite is positioned within the B-dot loop so that the magnetic field of the microwave pulse interacts with the ferrite and thereby participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux; and high-frequency insensitive means for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop.

  12. Solar Power Satellite Microwave Transmission and Reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Numerous analytical and experimental investigations related to SPS microwave power transmission and reception are reported. Aspects discussed include system performance, phase control, power amplifiers, radiating elements, rectenna, solid state configurations, and planned program activities.

  13. Microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  14. Combined microwave heating and surface cooling of the cornea.

    PubMed

    Trembly, B S; Keates, R H

    1991-01-01

    We investigated a nonsurgical means of reshaping the cornea to correct hyperopia, keratoconus, or myopia. The object was to heat the central stroma of the cornea to the shrinkage temperature of collagen, 55-58 degrees C. The heating device was an open-ended, coaxial, near-field applicator driven at 2450 MHz; it incorporates cooling of the cornea surface by flow of saline. We investigated the system theoretically by computing the 2-D, axisymmetric temperature distribution with the finite element method. We investigated the system experimentally by heating excised steer corneas. Histology showed the system could shrink the stroma to a depth of 0.6 mm while sparing the epithelium in 75% of cases; the diameter of shrinkage was 1.3 mm. Theory predicted a significantly deeper and narrower region of shrinkage than was observed.

  15. Resonance microwave volume plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Malykh, N. I.; Misakyan, M. A.; Taktakishvili, M. I.; Temchin, S. M.; Lee, Young Dong

    2007-07-15

    A conceptual design of a microwave gas-discharge plasma source is described. The possibility is considered of creating conditions under which microwave energy in the plasma resonance region would be efficiently converted into the energy of thermal and accelerated (fast) electrons. Results are presented from interferometric and probe measurements of the plasma density in a coaxial microwave plasmatron, as well as the data from probe measurements of the plasma potential and electron temperature. The dynamics of plasma radiation was recorded using a streak camera and a collimated photomultiplier. The experimental results indicate that, at relatively low pressures of the working gas, the nonlinear interaction between the microwave field and the inhomogeneous plasma in the resonance region of the plasmatron substantially affects the parameters of the ionized gas in the reactor volume.

  16. Photon Statistics of Propagating Thermal Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J.; Pogorzalek, S.; Deppe, F.; Fedorov, K. G.; Eder, P.; Fischer, M.; Wulschner, F.; Xie, E.; Marx, A.; Gross, R.

    2017-03-01

    In experiments with superconducting quantum circuits, characterizing the photon statistics of propagating microwave fields is a fundamental task. We quantify the n2+n photon number variance of thermal microwave photons emitted from a blackbody radiator for mean photon numbers, 0.05 ≲n ≲1.5 . We probe the fields using either correlation measurements or a transmon qubit coupled to a microwave resonator. Our experiments provide a precise quantitative characterization of weak microwave states and information on the noise emitted by a Josephson parametric amplifier.

  17. Microwave Supported Treatment of Sewage Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janíček, František; Perný, Milan; Šály, Vladimír; Giemza, Markus; Hofmann, Peter

    2016-07-01

    This work is focused on microwave treatment of sewage sludge. The aim of our experiments was to investigate the impact of microwave radiation upon different sewage sludge parameters such as concentration of nitrates and nitrites, phosphates, COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand), SVI (Sludge Volume Index) and the microscopic structure of sludge. The experiments with microwave irradiation of sewage sludge indicate that moderate microwave power causes visible effects on the chemical, physical and biological properties of the sludge. The calculation of profitability and energy efficiency is also presented.

  18. Microwave applicators for BPH thermotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, Jan; Hlavac, R.; Herza, Jan; Chovanec, Roman; Cvek, Jakub; Oppl, L.

    2004-04-01

    Paper deals with new results in the field of intracavitary microwave applicators used for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) treatment. We demonstrate here that it is necessary to use more sophisticated applicators than a simple monopole radiating structure. One of the good possibilities for safe and efficient treatments we propose here is a helix structure.

  19. Microwave Propagation in Dielectric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonc, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate experiment designed to verify quantitatively the effect of a dielectric fluid's dielectric constant on the observed wavelength of microwave radiation propagating through the fluid. The fluid used is castor oil, and results agree with the expected behavior within 5 percent. (Author/CS)

  20. Ceramic matrix composites by microwave assisted CVI

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, R.P.; Devlin, D.J.

    1993-05-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) processes for producing continuously reinforced ceramic composites are reviewed. The potential advantages of microwave assisted CVI are noted. Recent numerical studies of microwave assisted CVI are then reviewed. These studies predict inverted thermal gradients in fibrous ceramic preforms subjected to microwave radiation and suggest processing strategies for achieving uniformly dense composites. Comparisons are made to experimental results obtained using silicon based composite systems. The importance of microwave-material interactions is stressed. In particular, emphasis is placed on the role played by the relative ability of fiber and matrix to dissipate microwave energy. Results suggest that microwave induced inverted gradients can in fact be exploited using the CVI technique to promote inside-out densification.

  1. Ceramic matrix composites by microwave assisted CVI

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, R.P.; Devlin, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) processes for producing continuously reinforced ceramic composites are reviewed. The potential advantages of microwave assisted CVI are noted. Recent numerical studies of microwave assisted CVI are then reviewed. These studies predict inverted thermal gradients in fibrous ceramic preforms subjected to microwave radiation and suggest processing strategies for achieving uniformly dense composites. Comparisons are made to experimental results obtained using silicon based composite systems. The importance of microwave-material interactions is stressed. In particular, emphasis is placed on the role played by the relative ability of fiber and matrix to dissipate microwave energy. Results suggest that microwave induced inverted gradients can in fact be exploited using the CVI technique to promote inside-out densification.

  2. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Janney, M.A.; Ferber, M.K.

    1992-03-24

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy. 2 figs.

  3. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, Jr., Harold D.; Janney, Mark A.; Ferber, Mattison K.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy.

  4. Effects of Long-Term Low-Level Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure on Rats. Volume 2. Average SAR and SAR Distribution in Man Exposed to 450-MHz RFR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    FREQUENCIES . . . . . . . ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 List of Illustrations Figure Page 1. Klystron tube mounted on cart for easy...with an 1800- to 2450-MHz, 1O-kW klystron. Installed on a portable cart , the klystron (Fig. 1) could be easily wheeled into the klystron amplifier... cart for easy installation. AA v Fiqure 2. Klystron tube completely interfaced to amplifier system. 19 ( !a Fiqure 3. Interior of anechoic chamber

  5. Measurements of integrated water vapor and cloud liquid water from microwave radiometers at the DOE ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Liljegren, J.C.; Lesht, B.M.

    1996-06-01

    The operation and calibration of the ARM microwave radiometers is summarized. Measured radiometric brightness temperatures are compared with calculations based on the model using co-located radiosondes. Comparisons of perceptible water vapor retrieved from the radiometer with integrated soundings and co-located GPS retrievals are presented. The three water vapor sensing systems are shown to agree to within about 1 mm.

  6. FT-IR and FT-Raman studies of cross-linking processes with Ca²⁺ ions, glutaraldehyde and microwave radiation for polymer composition of poly(acrylic acid)/sodium salt of carboxymethyl starch - In moulding sands, Part II.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Beata; Sitarz, Maciej; Olejnik, Ewa; Kaczmarska, Karolina; Tyliszczak, Bozena

    2015-12-05

    The hardening process of moulding sands on quartz matrices bound by polymer binders containing carboxyl and hydroxyl groups can be carried out by using physical (microwave radiation, thermal holding) and chemical (Ca(2+) cations, glutaraldehyde) cross-linking agents. The highest hardening level obtain moulding sand samples containing binders in a form of the aqueous composition of poly(acrylic acid)/sodium salt of carboxymethyl starch (PAA/CMS-Na) within the microwave radiation field, for which the bending strength is of 1.6 MPa value even after 24h from ending the agent activity. The authors focused, in this study, on finding the reason of this effect. It was shown, by means of the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic methods, that the chemical adsorption process activated by microwaves plays an essential role. The applied microwaves activate the polar groups present in the polymer composition structure as well as the quartz crystals surfaces (silane groups). Then the chemical adsorption occurs in the binder-matrix system within the microwave radiation field and intermolecular lattices are formed with a participation of hydrogen bridges (SiOH⋯OC, SiOH⋯OH) and COSi type bonds.

  7. Active microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D.; Vidal-Madjar, D.

    1994-01-01

    Research on the use of active microwaves in remote sensing, presented during plenary and poster sessions, is summarized. The main highlights are: calibration techniques are well understood; innovative modeling approaches have been developed which increase active microwave applications (segmentation prior to model inversion, use of ERS-1 scatterometer, simulations); polarization angle and frequency diversity improves characterization of ice sheets, vegetation, and determination of soil moisture (X band sensor study); SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry potential is emerging; use of multiple sensors/extended spectral signatures is important (increase emphasis).

  8. 2.45 GHz Microwave Radiation Impairs Learning and Spatial Memory via Oxidative/Nitrosative Stress Induced p53-Dependent/Independent Hippocampal Apoptosis: Molecular Basis and Underlying Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Saba; Banerjee, Somanshu; Singh, Surya Pal; Chaturvedi, Chandra Mohini

    2015-12-01

    A close association between microwave (MW) radiation exposure and neurobehavioral disorders has been postulated but the direct effects of MW radiation on central nervous system still remains contradictory. This study was performed to understand the effect of short (15 days) and long-term (30 and 60 days) low-level MW radiation exposure on hippocampus with special reference to spatial learning and memory and its underlying mechanism in Swiss strain male mice, Mus musculus. Twelve-weeks old mice were exposed to 2.45 GHz MW radiation (continuous-wave [CW] with overall average power density of 0.0248 mW/cm(2) and overall average whole body specific absorption rate value of 0.0146 W/Kg) for 2 h/day over a period of 15, 30, and 60 days). Spatial learning and memory was monitored by Morris Water Maze. We have checked the alterations in hippocampal oxidative/nitrosative stress, neuronal morphology, and expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (p53 and Bax), inactive executioner Caspase- (pro-Caspase-3), and uncleaved Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in the hippocampal subfield neuronal and nonneuronal cells (DG, CA1, CA2, and CA3). We observed that, short-term as well as long-term 2.45 GHz MW radiation exposure increases the oxidative/nitrosative stress leading to enhanced apoptosis in hippocampal subfield neuronal and nonneuronal cells. Present findings also suggest that learning and spatial memory deficit which increases with the increased duration of MW exposure (15 < 30 < 60 days) is correlated with a decrease in hippocampal subfield neuronal arborization and dendritic spines. These findings led us to conclude that exposure to CW MW radiation leads to oxidative/nitrosative stress induced p53-dependent/independent activation of hippocampal neuronal and nonneuronal apoptosis associated with spatial memory loss.

  9. Study of federal microwave standards

    SciTech Connect

    David, L.

    1980-08-01

    Present and future federal regulatory processes which may impact the permissible levels of microwave radiation emitted by the SPS Microwave Power Transmission (MPTS) were studied. An historical development of US occupational and public microwave standards includes an overview of Western and East European philosophies of environmental protection and neurophysiology which have led to the current widely differing maximum permissible exposure limits to microwaves. The possible convergence of microwave standards is characterized by a lowering of Western exposure levels while Eastern countries consider standard relaxation. A trend toward stricter controls on activities perceived as harmful to public health is under way as is interest in improving the federal regulatory process. Particularly relevant to SPS is the initiation of long-term, low-level microwave exposure programs. Coupled with new developments in instrumentation and dosimetry, the results from chronic exposure program and population exposure studies could be expected within the next five to ten years. Also discussed is the increasing public concern that rf energy is yet another hazardous environmental agent.

  10. Microwave PASER Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Antipov, S.; Poluektov, O.; Jing, C.

    2009-01-22

    The PASER (Particle Acceleration by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) concept for particle acceleration entails the direct transfer of energy from an active medium to a charged particle beam. The PASER was originally formulated for optical (laser) media; we are planning a PASER demonstration experiment based on an optically pumped X-band paramagnetic medium consisting of porphyrin or fullerene (C{sub 60}) derivatives in a toluene solution or polystyrene matrix. We discuss the background of this project and report on the status of the experiment to measure the acceleration of electrons using the microwave PASER.

  11. [Modification of the effects of microwave irradiation on biochemical processes by using foreign protein].

    PubMed

    Podkovkin, V G; Uglova, I B

    1998-01-01

    The biochemical data on the influence of electromagnetic fields in microwave range on the hormonal-mediator regulation systems are presented. The possibility of biological effects modification under combined action of microwave radiation and foreign protein is discussed.

  12. Microwave treatment of vulcanized rubber

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.; Schulz, Rebecca L.; Clark, David E.; Folz, Diane C.

    2002-07-16

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a vulcanized solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has select chemical bonds broken by microwave radiation. The direct application of microwaves in combination with uniform heating of the crumb rubber renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger particle sizes and/or loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures to produce recycled composite products with good properties.

  13. Prenatal microwave exposure and behavior

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The hypotheses for the initial investigation was based on the idea that failure to observe structural teratogenesis following microwave exposure did not preclude the possibility that such exposure would result in behavioral changes. We also proposed that such exposure might specifically alter some aspect of thermoregulatory behavior. The results of these studies support both of these hypotheses. Whether the studies show enhanced thermal sensitivity or enhanced development, they do support the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to microwave radiation is more likely to alter postnatal sensitivity to thermally related stimuli or conditions as compared to stimuli that are thermally neutral.

  14. A container for heat treating materials in microwave ovens

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Mills, J.E.

    1988-01-26

    The efficiency of a microwave oven of a conventional two-source configuration and energy level is increased by providing the oven with a container for housing a refractory material to be treated. The container is formed to top and bottom walls transparent to microwaves while the sidewalls, in a circular configuration, are formed of a nonmetallic material opaque to microwave radiation for reflecting the radiation penetrating the top and bottom walls radially inwardly into the center of the container wherein a casket of heat-insulating material is provided for housing the material to be heat treated. The reflection of the microwave radiation from the sidewalls increases the concentration of the microwaves upon the material being heat treated while the concentration of the microwaves upon the material being heat treated while the casket retains the heat to permit the heating of the material to a substantially higher temperature than achievable in the oven without the container.

  15. A Direct Spectral Domain Method for Near-ground Microwave Radiation by a Vertical Dipole above Earth in the Presence of Atmospheric Refractivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) modeling of refractive and terrain effects over long links has been mod- eled by ray tracing [1, 17, 20] or by using the parabolic...REFERENCES 1. Akbarpour, R. and A. R. Webster, “ Ray - tracing and parabolic equation methods in the mod- eling of a tropospheric microwave link,” IEEE...No. 2, 131–140, Jan. 2008. 20. Valtr, P. and P. Pechac, “Analytic tropospheric ray - tracing model for constant refractivity gradient profiles,” First

  16. Activities of the Division of Microwave Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewerentz, Birgitta

    1989-11-01

    Multistatic radar technology requirements are very high for antennas, where a maximum of flexibility is desired. Multilobes are often used, or groups of antennas which are electrically operated. Electronics and other electrical equipment were studied for supporting ionizing radiation and several forms of electromagnetic radiation. Ferrite components were studied. For microwave and optical technology, applications are reported. High effect Pulse Microwave radiation (HPM) emitting from an antenna and creating trouble in the electronic equipment, or destruction of this equipment is discussed. The defense against HPM is studied.

  17. Tandem microwave waste remediation and decontamination system

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.; Clark, David E.; Schulz, Rebecca L.

    1999-01-01

    The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

  18. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on microwave processing of ceramics: Microwave-material interactions; anticipated advantage of microwave sintering; ceramic sintering; and ceramic joining. 24 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  19. Distortion of the microwave blackbody background radiation implied by the baryon-symmetric cosmology of omnes and the galaxy formation theory of Stecker and Puget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Theories on the distortion of microwave black body spectrum are presented. Data suggest that continuous annihilation of matter-antimatter, during all stages of universe evolution cause distortion by thermal energy distribution at red shifts less than 10,000. Data also show distortions in the Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum are caused by energy depositions at red shifts between 10,000 and 1,000 while those in the Wien spectrum are due to energy deposition at lower red shifts after the cosmic gas cools to its atomic state and thermalization does not take place properly.

  20. Microwave Radiometric Signatures of Different Surface Types in Deserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prigent, Catherine; Rossow, William B.; Matthews, Elaine; Marticorena, Beatrice

    1999-01-01

    In arid environments, specific microwave signatures have been observed with the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). For a given diurnal change in surface skin temperature, the corresponding change in the microwave brightness temperature is smaller than expected. With the help of a 1D, time-dependent heat conduction model, this behavior is explained by microwave radiation coming from different depths in the soil, depending on the soil type and on the microwave radiation frequency. Using the eight-times daily estimates of the surface skin temperature by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) and a simple Fresnel model, collocated month-long time series of the SSM/I brightness temperatures and the surface skin temperatures give a consistent estimate of the effective microwave emissivity and penetration depth parameters. Results are presented and analyzed for the Sahara and the Arabian Peninsula, for July and November 1992. The case of the Australian desert is also briefly mentioned. Assuming a reasonable thermal diffusivity for the soil in desert areas, the microwave radiation is estimated to come from soil layers down to depths of at least five wavelengths in some locations. Regions where the microwave radiation comes from deeper soil layers also have large microwave emissivity polarization differences and large visible reflectances, suggesting that these areas correspond to sand dune fields.

  1. Microwave heating of porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Gori, F.; Martini, L. ); Gentili, G.B. )

    1987-05-01

    The technique actually used for recycling in place asphaltic concrete pavements is the following: heating of the surface layer of the pavement with special infrared lamps (gas-fed); hot removal and remixing in place of the materials with the addition of new binder; in-line reconstruction of the pavement layer with rolling. Such a technique is highly efficient and economic but it suffers an important disadvantage: The low thermal conductivity of the asphalt causes a strong temperature decrease with depth. Further on, the infrared radiation produces carbonization of the pavement skin with possible modification of the rheological properties of the bitumen. The technology of microwave generators (Magnetron, Klystron, and Amplitron) has registered some recent advances. It is now possible, and in some cases convenient, to use microwave energy for industrial heating of low-thermal-conductivity materials. Actually the microwaves are employed for drying wood, paper, and textiles, and for freeze-drying, cooking, and defrosting foods. One of the most interesting features of the microwave process is the rate and uniformity of the heating inside the material. Some preliminary experiments have been carried out for recycling in place asphaltic concrete pavements. The goal of the present paper is to propose a theoretical model capable of describing the phenomena occurring in a soil during a microwave heating process.

  2. Microwave radiometry for cement kiln temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Karl D; Wang, Lingyun; Ryza, Eric

    2007-01-01

    The maximum temperature inside a cement kiln is a critical operating parameter, but is often difficult or impossible to measure. We present here the first data that show a correlation between cement kiln temperature measured using a microwave radiometer and product chemistry over an eight-hour period. The microwave radiometer senses radiation in the 12-13 GHz range and has been described previously [Stephan and Pearce (2002), JMPEE 37: 112-124].

  3. Transcatheter Antenna For Microwave Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor); Karasack, Vincent G. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor); Pieper, Carl F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue to treat ventricular tachycardia and other arrhythmias while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In operation, microwave energy between about 1 Gigahertz and 12 Gigahertz is applied to monopole microwave radiation having a surface wave limiter. A test setup provides physical testing of microwave radiators to determine the temperature profile created in actual heart tissue or ersatz heart tissue. Saline solution pumped over the heart tissue with a peristaltic pump simulates blood flow. Optical temperature sensors disposed at various tissue depths within the heart tissue detect the temperature profile without creating any electromagnetic interference. The method may he used to produce a desired temperature profile in other body tissues reachable by catheter such as tumors and the like.

  4. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue to treat ventricular tachycardia and other arrhythmias while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In operation, microwave energy between about 1 Gigahertz and 12 Gigahertz is applied to monopole microwave radiator having a surface wave limiter. A test setup provides physical testing of microwave radiators to determine the temperature profile created in actual heart tissue or ersatz heart tissue. Saline solution pumped over the heart tissue with a peristaltic pump simulates blood flow. Optical temperature sensors disposed at various tissue depths within the heart tissue detect the temperature profile without creating any electromagnetic interference. The method may be used to produce a desired temperature profile in other body tissues reachable by catheter such as tumors and the like.

  5. Microwave ablation devices for interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert C; Healey, Terrance T; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-03-01

    Microwave ablation is one of the several options in the ablation armamentarium for the treatment of malignancy, offering several potential benefits when compared with other ablation, radiation, surgical and medical treatment modalities. The basic microwave system consists of the generator, power distribution system and antennas. Often under image (computed tomography or ultrasound) guidance, a needle-like antenna is inserted percutaneously into the tumor, where local microwave electromagnetic radiation is emitted from the probe's active tip, producing frictional tissue heating, capable of causing cell death by coagulation necrosis. Half of the microwave ablation systems use a 915 MHz generator and the other half use a 2450 MHz generator. To date, there are no completed clinical trials comparing microwave devices head-to-head. Prospective comparisons of microwave technology with other treatment alternatives, as well as head-to-head comparison with each microwave device, is needed if this promising field will garner more widespread support and use in the oncology community.

  6. Systems analysis for DSN microwave antenna holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed systems for Deep Space Network (DSN) microwave antenna holography are analyzed. Microwave holography, as applied to antennas, is a technique which utilizes the Fourier Transform relation between the complex far-field radiation pattern of an antenna and the complex aperture field distribution to provide a methodology for the analysis and evaluation of antenna performance. Resulting aperture phase and amplitude distribution data are used to precisely characterize various crucial performance parameters, including panel alignment, subreflector position, antenna aperture illumination, directivity at various frequencies, and gravity deformation. Microwave holographic analysis provides diagnostic capacity as well as being a powerful tool for evaluating antenna design specifications and their corresponding theoretical models.

  7. Microwaves and nanoparticles: from synthesis to imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Kenith E.; Majithiaa, Ravish; Brown, R. A.; Wang, Lihong V.; Maffeis, T. G. G.

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the use of energy delivery using microwave radiation for both synthesis of nanoparticles as well as a hybrid imaging technique known as thermoacoustic tomography (TAT). In each instance, the absorption of microwave radiation is converted into heat. In the case of nanoparticle synthesis, water is used as the solvent and heated to induce synthesis of the nanostructures. For this aqueous synthesis technique, we demonstrate the use of both pulsed and continuous wave (CW) microwave systems operating at 2.45 GHz. In this report, we concentrate on ZnO nanostructures including nanorods, nanowire arrays and nanobelts. These are compared with nanowire arrays and nanobelts grown by vapor transport through both electron microscopy and photo-excited luminescence. We also review the use of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as contrast agents in TAT as previously reported. Here, we measured the properties of the colloidal nanoparticles in the microwave regime and compared the absorption with the TAT signal produced by our thermoacoustic imaging system at 3 GHz. The nanoparticles directly absorb the microwave radiation and produce a thermo-acoustic signal. The results from nanoparticles are compared to the signal produced by deionized water. The results demonstrate that microwaves represent an efficient method for the delivery of energy for both synthesis and biomedical imaging.

  8. Green hemoprotein of erythrocytes: methemoglobin superoxide transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Kiel, J.L.; McQueen, C.; Erwin, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    Influences of base (pH 10), heat (50 degrees C), microwave radiation (2450 MHz, 103 +/- 4 W/kg), and hydrogen peroxide (5.6 mM) generated by glucose oxidase on oxidation of human oxyhemoglobin to methemoglobin were examined. Conversion of oxyhemoglobin to methemoglobin was followed by the difference in absorbancy of 540 or 542 nm and 576 nm wavelength light versus time. Fresh basic hemolysates auto-oxidized on heating with a zero order rate constant, implying that hemoglobin or another protein saturated with oxyhemoglobin catalyzed the oxidation. Simultaneous microwave irradiation inhibited thermally induced auto-oxidation on the average by 28.6%. However, there was great variability among samples and a decrease in auto-oxidation with aging of individual samples. The auto-oxidation rate was independent of initial oxyhemoglobin concentration. Oxidation of partially purified oxyhemoglobin by hydrogen peroxide was not influenced by microwave irradiation. Adding green hemoprotein isolated from human erythrocytes to the oxyhemoglobin/glucose oxidase reaction mixture yielded absorption spectra (500-600 nm) that were a combination of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and methemoglobin spectra. Green hemoprotein was labile in hemolysates but stable in a partially purified ferric form. These results imply that thermally unstable reduced green hemoprotein can reverse oxidation of oxyhemoglobin by hydrogen peroxide and could mediate the thermally induced and microwave inhibited auto-oxidation of oxyhemoglobin.

  9. Interaction of microwaves with carbon nanotubes to facilitate modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Stephenson, Jason J. (Inventor); Yakobson, Boris I. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of crosslinking carbon nanotubes to each other using microwave radiation, articles of manufacture produced by such methods, compositions produced by such methods, and applications for such compositions and articles of manufacture. The present invention is also directed toward methods of radiatively modifying composites and/or blends comprising carbon nanotubes with microwaves, and to the compositions produced by such methods. In some embodiments, the modification comprises a crosslinking process, wherein the carbon nanotubes serve as a conduit for thermally and photolytically crosslinking the host matrix with microwave radiation.

  10. Note: Cryogenic coaxial microwave filters

    SciTech Connect

    Tancredi, G.; Meeson, P. J.; Schmidlin, S.

    2014-02-15

    The careful filtering of microwave electromagnetic radiation is critical for controlling the electromagnetic environment for experiments in solid-state quantum information processing and quantum metrology at millikelvin temperatures. We describe the design and fabrication of a coaxial filter assembly and demonstrate that its performance is in excellent agreement with theoretical modelling. We further perform an indicative test of the operation of the filters by making current-voltage measurements of small, underdamped Josephson junctions at 15 mK.

  11. Microwave-enhanced chemical processes

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Ravi

    1990-01-01

    A process for disposal of toxic wastes including chlorinated hydrocarbons, comprising, establishing a bed of non-metallic particulates having a high dielectric loss factor. Effecting intimate contact of the particulates and the toxic wastes at a temperature in excess of about 400.degree. C. in the presence of microwave radiation for a time sufficient to break the hydrocarbon chlorine bonds and provide detoxification values in excess of 80 and further detoxifying the bed followed by additional disposal of toxic wastes.

  12. Microwave processing of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Akerman, M.A.; Baity, F.W. Jr.; Caughman, J.B.; Forrester, S.C.; Kass, M.D.; Morrow, M.S.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Moyer, M.W.; Dews, T.W.

    1994-12-31

    Reaction-bonded silicon carbide ({alpha}-SiC) armor tiles were annealed at 2100{degree}C using microwave radiation at 2.45 GHz. Ultrasonic velocity measurements showed that the longitudinal and shear velocities, acoustic impedances, and acoustic moduli of the post-annealed tiles were statistically higher than for the unannealed tiles. However, the exposed surfaces of the annealed tiles experienced slight degradation, which was attributed to the high annealing temperatures.

  13. Directional microwave applicator and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A miniature microwave antenna is disclosed which may be utilized for biomedical applications such as, for example, radiation induced hyperthermia through catheter systems. One feature of the antenna is that it possesses azimuthal directionality despite its small size. This directionality permits targeting of certain tissues while limiting thermal exposure of adjacent tissue. One embodiment has an outer diameter of about 0.095'' (2.4 mm) but the design permits for smaller diameters.

  14. LiteBIRD: lite satellite for the study of B-mode polarization and inflation from cosmic microwave background radiation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishino, H.; Akiba, Y.; Arnold, K.; Barron, D.; Borrill, J.; Chendra, R.; Chinone, Y.; Cho, S.; Cukierman, A.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M.; Dominjon, A.; Dotani, T.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fujino, T.; Fuke, H.; Funaki, T.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Halverson, N.; Harvey, P.; Hasebe, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hattori, M.; Hazumi, M.; Hidehira, N.; Hill, C.; Hilton, G.; Holzapfel, W.; Hori, Y.; Hubmayr, J.; Ichiki, K.; Imada, H.; Inatani, J.; Inoue, M.; Inoue, Y.; Irie, F.; Irwin, K.; Ishitsuka, H.; Jeong, O.; Kanai, H.; Karatsu, K.; Kashima, S.; Katayama, N.; Kawano, I.; Kawasaki, T.; Keating, B.; Kernasovskiy, S.; Keskitalo, R.; Kibayashi, A.; Kida, Y.; Kimura, N.; Kimura, K.; Kisner, T.; Kohri, K.; Komatsu, E.; Komatsu, K.; Kuo, C.-L.; Kuromiya, S.; Kusaka, A.; Lee, A.; Li, D.; Linder, E.; Maki, M.; Matsuhara, H.; Matsumura, T.; Matsuoka, S.; Matsuura, S.; Mima, S.; Minami, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Nagai, M.; Nagasaki, T.; Nagata, R.; Nakajima, M.; Nakamura, S.; Namikawa, T.; Naruse, M.; Nishibori, T.; Nishijo, K.; Nishino, H.; Noda, A.; Noguchi, T.; Ogawa, H.; Ogburn, W.; Oguri, S.; Ohta, I.; Okada, N.; Okamoto, A.; Okamura, T.; Otani, C.; Pisano, G.; Rebeiz, G.; Richards, P.; Sakai, S.; Sakurai, Y.; Sato, Y.; Sato, N.; Segawa, Y.; Sekiguchi, S.; Sekimoto, Y.; Sekine, M.; Seljak, U.; Sherwin, B.; Shimizu, T.; Shinozaki, K.; Shu, S.; Stompor, R.; Sugai, H.; Sugita, H.; Suzuki, J.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, A.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takakura, S.; Takano, K.; Takatori, S.; Takei, Y.; Tanabe, D.; Tomaru, T.; Tomita, N.; Turin, P.; Uozumi, S.; Utsunomiya, S.; Uzawa, Y.; Wada, T.; Watanabe, H.; Westbrook, B.; Whitehorn, N.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, R.; Yamasaki, N.; Yamashita, T.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshida, M.; Yotsumoto, K.

    2016-07-01

    LiteBIRD is a next generation satellite aiming for the detection of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) B-mode polarization imprinted by the primordial gravitational waves generated in the era of the inflationary universe. The science goal of LiteBIRD is to measure the tensor-to-scaler ratio r with a precision of δr < 10-3♢, offering us a crucial test of the major large-single-field slow-roll inflation models. LiteBIRD is planned to conduct an all sky survey at the sun-earth second Lagrange point (L2) with an angular resolution of about 0.5 degrees to cover the multipole moment range of 2 <= l <= 200. We use focal plane detector arrays consisting of 2276 superconducting detectors to measure the frequency range from 40 to 400 GHz with the sensitivity of 3.2 μK·arcmin. including the ongoing studies.

  15. Microwave assisted crystallization of zeolite A from dense gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorsi, Lucio; Proverbio, Edoardo

    2003-01-01

    Pure zeolite NaA has been obtained, in a total processing time of 1 h, by exposing the reaction mixture to a microwave electromagnetic field under atmospheric pressure. The strong effect of microwave radiation has been used to progressively reduce the water content in the formulation, up to 86.9 mol%, with a 30% (in weight) yield in dried product. SEM images of microwave-produced zeolite have shown peculiar morphological differences from the zeolite obtained by conventional synthesis.

  16. Container for heat treating materials in microwave ovens

    SciTech Connect

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Mills, J.E.

    1989-03-07

    The efficiency of a microwave oven of a conventional two-source configuration and energy level is increased by providing the oven with a container for housing a refractory material to be treated. The container is formed of top and bottom walls transparent to microwaves while the sidewalls, in a circular configuration, are formed of a nonmetallic material opaque to microwave radiation reflecting the radiation penetrating the top and bottom walls radially inwardly into the center of the container wherein a casket of heat-insulating material is provided for housing the material to be heat treated. The reflection of the microwave radiation from the sidewalls increases the concentration of the microwaves upon the material being heat treated while the casket retains the heat to permit the heating of the material to a substantially higher temperature than achieveable in the oven without the container.

  17. Container for heat treating materials in microwave ovens

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Kimrey, Jr., Harold D.; Mills, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The efficiency of a microwave oven of a conventional two-source configuration and energy level is increased by providing the oven with a container for housing a refractory material to be treated. The container is formed of top and bottom walls transparent to microwaves while the sidewalls, in a circular configuration, are formed of a nonmetallic material opaque to microwave radiation reflecting the radiation penetrating the top and bottom walls radially inwardly into the center of the container wherein a casket of heat-insulating material is provided for housing the material to be heat treated. The reflection of the microwave radiation from the sidewalls increases the concentration of the microwaves upon the material being heat treated while the casket retains the heat to permit the heating of the material to a substantially higher temperature than achieveable in the oven without the container.

  18. Application of hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation to the preparation of industrial effluent samples prior to free and total cyanide determinations by spectrophotometric flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Maria Cristina Baptista; de Carvalho, Maria de Fátima Batista; Meirelles, Francis Assis; Santiago, Vânia Maria Junqueira; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal

    2007-02-01

    A sample preparation procedure for the quantitative determination of free and total cyanides in industrial effluents has been developed that involves hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation. Hydrocyanic acid vapor was generated from free cyanides using only 5 min of irradiation time (90 W power) and a purge time of 5 min. The HCN generated was absorbed into an accepting NaOH solution using very simple glassware apparatus that was appropriate for the microwave oven cavity. After that, the cyanide concentration was determined within 90 s using a well-known spectrophotometric flow injection analysis system. Total cyanide analysis required 15 min irradiation time (90 W power), as well as chemical conditions such as the presence of EDTA-acetate buffer solution or ascorbic acid, depending on the effluent to be analyzed (petroleum refinery or electroplating effluents, respectively). The detection limit was 0.018 mg CN l(-1) (quantification limit of 0.05 mg CN l(-1)), and the measured RSD was better than 8% for ten independent analyses of effluent samples (1.4 mg l(-1) cyanide). The accuracy of the procedure was assessed via analyte spiking (with free and complex cyanides) and by performing an independent sample analysis based on the standard methodology recommended by the APHA for comparison. The sample preparation procedure takes only 10 min for free and 20 min for total cyanide, making this procedure much faster than traditional methodologies (conventional heating and distillation), which are time-consuming (they require at least 1 h). Samples from oil (sour and stripping tower bottom waters) and electroplating effluents were analyzed successfully.

  19. Microwave emission from polar firn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    The microwave emission from a half-space medium, characterized by coordinate dependent scattering and absorbing centers, was calculated by numerically solving the radiative transfer equation by the method of invariant imbedding. Rayleigh scattering phase functions and scattering induced polarization of the radiation were included in the calculation. Using the scattering and extinction data of polar firn the brightness temperature was calculated for the 1.55 cm wavelength. This study was the first quantitative comparison of the results of numerical calculation using the actual measured information of crystal size with the observed data.

  20. Microwave Frequency Multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazco, J. E.

    2017-02-01

    High-power microwave radiation is used in the Deep Space Network (DSN) and Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) for uplink communications with spacecraft and for monitoring asteroids and space debris, respectively. Intense X-band (7.1 to 8.6 GHz) microwave signals are produced for these applications via klystron and traveling-wave microwave vacuum tubes. In order to achieve higher data rate communications with spacecraft, the DSN is planning to gradually furnish several of its deep space stations with uplink systems that employ Ka-band (34-GHz) radiation. Also, the next generation of planetary radar, such as Ka-Band Objects Observation and Monitoring (KaBOOM), is considering frequencies in the Ka-band range (34 to 36 GHz) in order to achieve higher target resolution. Current commercial Ka-band sources are limited to power levels that range from hundreds of watts up to a kilowatt and, at the high-power end, tend to suffer from poor reliability. In either case, there is a clear need for stable Ka-band sources that can produce kilowatts of power with high reliability. In this article, we present a new concept for high-power, high-frequency generation (including Ka-band) that we refer to as the microwave frequency multiplier (MFM). The MFM is a two-cavity vacuum tube concept where low-frequency (2 to 8 GHz) power is fed into the input cavity to modulate and accelerate an electron beam. In the second cavity, the modulated electron beam excites and amplifies high-power microwaves at a frequency that is a multiple integer of the input cavity's frequency. Frequency multiplication factors in the 4 to 10 range are being considered for the current application, although higher multiplication factors are feasible. This novel beam-wave interaction allows the MFM to produce high-power, high-frequency radiation with high efficiency. A key feature of the MFM is that it uses significantly larger cavities than its klystron counterparts, thus greatly reducing power density and arcing

  1. Microwave-Based Water Decontamination System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Byerly, Diane (Inventor); Sognier, Marguerite (Inventor); Dusl, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system for decontaminating a medium. The system can include a medium having one or more contaminants disposed therein. The contaminants can be or include bacteria, fungi, parasites, viruses, and combinations thereof. A microwave energy radiation device can be positioned proximate the medium. The microwave energy radiation device can be adapted to generate a signal having a frequency from about 10 GHz to about 100 GHz. The signal can be adapted to kill one or more of the contaminants disposed within the medium while increasing a temperature of the medium by less than about 10 C.

  2. Microwave sintering of single plate-shaped articles

    DOEpatents

    Katz, J.D.; Blake, R.D.

    1995-07-11

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for high temperature sintering of plate-shaped articles of alumina, magnesia, silica, yttria, zirconia, and mixtures thereof using microwave radiation. An article is placed within a sintering structure located within a sintering container which is placed in a microwave cavity for heating. The rates at which heating and cooling take place is controlled. 2 figs.

  3. Microwave sintering of single plate-shaped articles

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Joel D.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus and method for high temperature sintering of plate-shaped articles of alumina, magnesia, silica, yttria, zirconia, and mixtures thereof using microwave radiation. An article is placed within a sintering structure located within a sintering container which is placed in a microwave cavity for heating. The rates at which heating and cooling take place is controlled.

  4. 5 Tips for Using Your Microwave Oven Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Generally, you should not use metal pans or aluminum foil because microwaves reflect off them, causing food ... Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting Products Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & ...

  5. Imaging the cosmic microwave background: The BEAST experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natoli, P.; Bersanelli, M.; Childers, J.; Figueiredo, N.; Halevi, D.; Kangas, M.; Levy, A.; Lubin, P.; Mandolesi, N.; Meinhold, P.; Parendo, S.; Staren, J.; Villela, T.; Wuensche, C.

    2001-02-01

    We describe the Santa Barbara BEAST experiment, a balloon borne telescope to image the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation anisotropy pattern. Some aspects of the map making pipeline are also discussed. .

  6. Measurements of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation at degree angular scales near the stars Sigma Herculis and Iota Draconis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, A. C.; Devlin, M. J.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hagmann, C. A.; Hristov, V. V.; Lange, A. E.; Lim, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Meinhold, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    We present results from two four-frequency observations centered near the stars Sigma Herculis and Iota Draconis during the fourth flight of the Millimeter-wave Anisotropy eXperiment (MAX). The observations were made of 6 deg x 0.6 deg strips of the sky with a 1.4 deg peak to peak sinusoidal chop in all bands. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) beam sizes were calculated 0.55 deg +/- 0.05 deg at 3.5/cm and a 0.75 deg +/- 0.05 deg at 6, 9, and 14/cm. Significant correlated structures were observed at 3.5, 6, and 9/cm. The spectra of these signals are inconsistent with thermal emission from known interstellar dust populations. The extrapolated amplitudes of synchrotron and free-free emission are too small to account for the amplitude of the observed structures. If the observed structures are attributed to cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy with a Gaussian autocorrelation function and a coherence angle of 25 min, then the most probable values at Delta T/T(sub CMB) = 3.1 (sup +1.7 sub -1.3) x 10(exp -5) for the Sigma Herculis scan, and Delta T/T(sub CMB) = 3.3(sup +1.1 sub -1.1) x 10(exp -5) for the Iota Draconis scan (95% confidence upper, lower limits).

  7. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  8. Microwave generator for scientific and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, V.; Surducan, E.; Ciupa, R.; Neamtu, C.

    2012-02-01

    Nowadays power microwave radiation is widely used in medical applications as hyperthermia, diathermy or ablation and for scientific applications such as plasma generation, digestion, or as a catalyst in green chemistry. Nevertheless, designing a suitably adapted microwave generator that meets both the scientific and the more restrictive medical criteria remains a difficult task. We present here a simplified approach in designing such a microwave generator, according to the IEC60601 medical standard. The generator, based on a continuous wave (CW) magnetron, is coupled via a TE10 waveguide to feed either a hyperthermia applicator or a reactor chamber. Microwave interactions with the probe (or the tissue) depend strongly on the magnetron's power supply parameters and the impedance match of the entire microwave circuit. Any unmatched elements (magnetron to waveguide, waveguide to applicator, applicator to patient) give rise to a large voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) which loads the generator with a surplus energy, converted to heat. Extra heating of the magnetron will deteriorate the amplitude of the generated microwave power field. We show here that, by using a proprietary patented temperature sensor sheet, we were able to detect and improve the impedance matching of the microwave circuit.

  9. Magnetometer Based on Optoelectronic Microwave Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Strekalov, Dmitry; Matsko, Andrey

    2005-01-01

    proposed instrument, intended mainly for use as a magnetometer, would include an optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) stabilized by an atomic cell that could play the role of a magnetically tunable microwave filter. The microwave frequency would vary with the magnetic field in the cell, thereby providing an indication of the magnetic field. The proposed magnetometer would offer a combination of high accuracy and high sensitivity, characterized by flux densities of less than a picotesla. In comparison with prior magnetometers, the proposed magnetometer could, in principle, be constructed as a compact, lightweight instrument: It could fit into a package of about 10 by 10 by 10 cm and would have a mass <0.5 kg. As described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, an OEO is a hybrid of photonic and electronic components that generates highly spectrally pure microwave radiation, and optical radiation modulated by the microwave radiation, through direct conversion between laser light and microwave radiation in an optoelectronic feedback loop. As used here, "atomic cell" signifies a cell containing a vapor, the constituent atoms of which can be made to undergo transitions between quantum states, denoted hyperfine levels, when excited by light in a suitable wavelength range. The laser light must be in this range. The energy difference between the hyperfine levels defines the microwave frequency. In the proposed instrument (see figure), light from a laser would be introduced into an electro-optical modulator (EOM). Amplitude-modulated light from the exit port of the EOM would pass through a fiber-optic splitter having two output branches. The light in one branch would be sent through an atomic cell to a photodiode. The light in the other branch would constitute the microwave-modulated optical output. Part of the light leaving the atomic cell could also be used to stabilize the laser at a frequency in the vicinity of the desired hyperfine or other quantum transition. The

  10. Microwave diagnostics of laser-induced avalanche ionization in air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhili; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2006-10-01

    This work presents a simplified model of microwave scattering during the avalanche ionization stage of laser breakdown and corresponding experimental results of microwave scattering from laser breakdown in room air. The model assumes and measurements confirm that the breakdown regime can be viewed as a point dipole scatterer of the microwave radiation and thus directly related to the time evolving number of electrons. The delay between the laser pulse and the rise of the microwave scattering signal is a direct measure of the avalanche ionization process.

  11. The microwave effects on the properties of alumina at high frequencies of microwave sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudiana, I. Nyoman; Mitsudo, Seitaro; Sako, Katsuhide; Inagaki, Shunsuke; Ngkoimani, La Ode; Usman, Ida; Aripin, H.

    2016-03-01

    Microwave sintering of materials has attracted much research interest because of its significant advantages (e.g. reduced sintering temperatures and soaking times) over the conventional heating. Most researchers compared processes that occurred during the microwave and conventional heating at the same temperature and time. The enhancements found in the former method are indicated as a `non-thermal effect` which is usually used for explaining the phenomena in microwave processing. Numerous recent studies have been focused on the effect to elucidate the microwave interaction mechanism with materials. Moreover, recent progress on microwave sources such as gyrotrons has opened the possibility for processing materials by using a higher microwave frequency. Therefore, the technology is expected to exhibit a stronger non-thermal effect. This paper presents results from a series of experiments to study the non-thermal effect on microwave sintered alumina. Sintering by using a wide rage of microwave frequencies up to 300 GHz as well as a conventional furnace was carried out. The linear shrinkages of samples for each sintering method were measured. Pores and grains taken from scanning electron microstructure (SEM) images of cut surfaces were also examined. The results of a comparative study of the shrinkages and microstructure evolutions of the sintered samples under annealing in microwave heating systems and in an electric furnace were analyzed. A notably different behavior of the shrinkages and microstructures of alumina after being annealed was found. The results suggested that microwave radiations provided an additional force for mass transports. The results also indicated that the sintering process depended on microwave frequencies.

  12. Total microwave processing using microwave technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, P.J.; Kingston, H.M.

    1995-12-31

    The implementation of total microwave processing of samples involves all processes after the collection of a sample up to but not including the analysis. These processes are often time consuming and a primary source of critical analytical errors. The use of microwave technology has been shown to improve sample digestion while also reducing contamination. However, microwave technology can also be used in the preparation of representative samples and matrix modifications; essentially total sample preparation. The concept of total microwave processing will be discussed as applied to the routine analysis of samples according to proposed Environmental Protection Agency Method 3052. This method requires microwave digestion and provides for several methods of post-digestion removal of hydrofluoric acid. Microwave technologies will be shown to efficiently dry, digest, and perform matrix modifications.

  13. Measurements of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation at 0.5 deg angular scales near the star gamma ursae minoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devlin, M. J.; Clapp, A. C.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hagmann, C. A.; Hristov, V. V.; Lange, A. E.; Lim, M. A.; Lubin, P. M.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Meinhold, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    We present results from a four-frequency observation of a 6 deg x 0.6 deg strip of the sky centered near the star Gamma Ursae Minoris (GUM) during the fourth flight of the Millimeter-wave Anistropy experiment(MAX). The observation was made with a 1.4 deg peak-to-peak sinusoidal chop in all bands. The FWHM beam sizes were 0.55 deg +/- 0.05 deg at 3.5 per cm and 0.75 deg +/- 0.05 deg at 6, 9, and 14 per cm. During this observation significant correlated structure was observed at 3.5, 6 and 9 per cm with amplitudes similar to those observed in the GUM region during the second and third fligts of MAX. The frequency spectrum is consistent with cosmic microwave background (CMB) and inconsistent with thermal emission from interstellar dust. The extrapolated amplitudes of synchrotron and free-free emission are too small to account for the amplitude of the observed structure, If all of the structure is attributed to CMB anisotropy with a Gaussian autocorrelation function and a coherence angle of 25 min, then the most probable values of delta T/T(sub CMB) in the 3.5, 6 and 9 per cm bads are (4.3 +2.7/-1.6) x 10(exp -5), 2.8 (+4.3/-1/1) x 10(exp -5), and 3.5 (+3.0/-1.6) x 10(exp -5) (95% confidence upper and lower limits), respectively.

  14. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Boron and Nitrogen co-doped Reduced Graphene Oxide for the Protection of Electromagnetic Radiation in Ku-Band.

    PubMed

    Umrao, Sima; Gupta, Tejendra K; Kumar, Shiv; Singh, Vijay K; Sultania, Manish K; Jung, Jung Hwan; Oh, Il-Kwon; Srivastava, Anchal

    2015-09-09

    The electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding of reduced graphene oxide (MRG), B-doped MRG (B-MRG), N-doped MRG (N-MRG), and B-N co-doped MRG (B-N-MRG) have been studied in the Ku-band frequency range (12.8-18 GHz). We have developed a green, fast, and cost-effective microwave assisted route for synthesis of doped MRG. B-N-MRG shows high electrical conductivity in comparison to MRG, B-MRG and N-MRG, which results better electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding ability. The co-doping of B and N significantly enhances the electrical conductivity of MRG from 21.4 to 124.4 Sm(-1) because N introduces electrons and B provides holes in the system and may form a nanojunction inside the material. Their temperature-dependent electrical conductivity follows 2D-variable range hopping (2D-VRH) and Efros-Shklovskii-VRH (ES-VRH) conduction model in a low temperature range (T<50 K). The spatial configuration of MRG after doping of B and N enhances the space charge polarization, natural resonance, dielectric polarization, and trapping of EM waves by internal reflection leading to a high EMI shielding of -42 dB (∼99.99% attenuation) compared to undoped MRG (-28 dB) at a critical thickness of 1.2 mm. Results suggest that the B-N-MRG has great potential as a candidate for a new type of EMI shielding material useful in aircraft, defense industries, communication systems, and stealth technology.

  15. Snow water equivalent determination by microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Rango, A.; Hartline, B. K.

    1981-01-01

    One of the most important parameters for accurate snowmelt runoff prediction is snow water equivalent (SWE) which is contentionally monitored using observations made at widely scattered points in or around specific watersheds. Remote sensors which provide data with better spatial and temporal coverage can be used to improve the SWE estimates. Microwave radiation, which can penetrate through a snowpack, may be used to infer the SWE. Calculations made from a microscopic scattering model were used to simulate the effect of varying SWE on the microwave brightness temperature. Data obtained from truck mounted, airborne and spaceborne systems from various test sites were studied. The simulated SWE compares favorable with the measured SWE. In addition, whether the underlying soil is frozen or thawed can be discriminated successfully on the basis of the polarization of the microwave radiation.

  16. MICROWAVE SOLID-STATE GENERATORS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    RADIOFREQUENCY GENERATORS , *SEMICONDUCTOR DIODES, *TRANSISTORS, MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, X BAND, FREQUENCY MULTIPLIERS, MICROWAVE OSCILLATORS, CIRCUITS, BROADBAND, NARROWBAND, RADIOFREQUENCY POWER, TRANSISTOR AMPLIFIERS.

  17. Coupled microwave/photoassisted methods for environmental remediation.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Satoshi; Serpone, Nick

    2014-11-05

    The microwave-induced acceleration of photocatalytic reactions was discovered serendipitously in the late 1990s. The activity of photocatalysts is enhanced significantly by both microwave radiation and UV light. Particularly relevant, other than as a heat source, was the enigmatic phenomenon of the non-thermal effect(s) of the microwave radiation that facilitated photocatalyzed reactions, as evidenced when examining various model contaminants in aqueous media. Results led to an examination of the possible mechanism(s) of the microwave effect(s). In the present article we contend that the microwaves' non-thermal effect(s) is an important factor in the enhancement of TiO2-photoassisted reactions involving the decomposition of organic pollutants in model wastewaters by an integrated (coupled) microwave-/UV-illumination method (UV/MW). Moreover, such coupling of no less than two irradiation methods led to the fabrication and ultimate investigation of microwave discharged electrodeless lamps (MDELs) as optimal light sources; their use is also described. The review focuses on the enhanced activity of photocatalytic reactions when subjected to microwave radiation and concentrates on the authors' research of the past few years.

  18. Objective Characterization of Snow Microstructure for Microwave Emission Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, Michael; Kim, Edward J.; Molotch, Noah P.; Margulis, Steven A.; Courville, Zoe; Malzler, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Passive microwave (PM) measurements are sensitive to the presence and quantity of snow, a fact that has long been used to monitor snowcover from space. In order to estimate total snow water equivalent (SWE) within PM footprints (on the order of approx 100 sq km), it is prerequisite to understand snow microwave emission at the point scale and how microwave radiation integrates spatially; the former is the topic of this paper. Snow microstructure is one of the fundamental controls on the propagation of microwave radiation through snow. Our goal in this study is to evaluate the prospects for driving the Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks with objective measurements of snow specific surface area to reproduce measured brightness temperatures when forced with objective measurements of snow specific surface area (S). This eliminates the need to treat the grain size as a free-fit parameter.

  19. Handbook of microwave integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Reinmut K.

    The design and operation of ICs for use in the 0.5-20-GHz range are described in an introductory and reference work for industrial engineers. Chapters are devoted to an overview of microwave IC (MIC) technology, general stripline characteristics, microwave transmission line (MTL) parameters for microstrips with isotropic dielectric substrates, higher-order modes on a microstrip, the effects of metallic enclosure on MTL transmission parameters, losses in microstrips, the measurement of MTL parameters, and MTLs on anisotropic dielectric substrates. Consideration is given to coupled microstrips on dielectric substrates, microstrip discontinuities, radiation from microstrip circuits, MTL variations, coplanar MTLs, slotlines, and spurious modes in MTL circuits. Diagrams, drawings, graphs, and a glossary of symbols are provided.

  20. Carbon nanotubes and microwaves: interactions, responses, and applications.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Ester; Prato, Maurizio

    2009-12-22

    The interaction of microwaves with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is an interesting topic for a variety of potential applications. Microwaves have been used for the purification of CNTs and for their chemical functionalization, providing a technique for simple, green, and large-scale protocols. In addition, the selective destruction of metallic CNTs under microwave irradiation could potentially result in a batch of semiconducting-only nanotubes. As an innovative application, the combination of microwaves with well-aligned CNTs could produce a new illumination technology. Moreover, the microwave absorbing properties of CNTs and their different behavior from typical organic compounds may open the door to the preparation of a wide range of new materials useful in many fields. A few examples of practical applications include electromagnetic interference for protecting the environment from radiation and microwave hyperthermia for cancer treatment as well as other medical therapies requiring precise heating of biological tissues.

  1. Microwave Workshop for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin

    1998-01-01

    "Microwave Workshop for Windows" consists of three programs that act as teaching aid and provide a circuit design utility within the field of microwave engineering. The first program is a computer representation of a graphical design tool; the second is an accurate visual and analytical representation of a microwave test bench; the third…

  2. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, VR

    2006-08-01

    The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

  3. Low-level exposure to pulsed 900 MHz microwave radiation does not cause deficits in the performance of a spatial learning task in mice.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, Z J; Blackwell, R P; Haylock, R G; Saunders, R D; Cobb, B L

    2000-04-01

    There is some concern that short-term memory loss or other cognitive effects may be associated with the use of mobile cellular telephones. In this experiment, the effect of repeated, acute exposure to a low intensity 900 MHz radiofrequency (RF) field pulsed at 217 Hz was explored using an appetitively-motivated spatial learning and working memory task. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed under far field conditions in a GTEM cell for 45 min each day for 10 days at an average whole-body specific energy absorption rate (SAR) of 0.05 W/kg. Their performance in an 8-arm radial maze was compared to that of sham-exposed control animals. All behavioral assessments were performed without handlers having knowledge of the exposure status of the animals. Animals were tested in the maze immediately following exposure or after a delay of 15 or 30 min. No significant field-dependent effects on performance were observed in choice accuracy or in total times to complete the task across the experiment. These results suggest that exposure to RF radiation simulating a digital wireless telephone (GSM) signal under the conditions of this experiment does not affect the acquisition of the learned response. Further studies are planned to explore the effects of other SARs on learned behavior. Bioelectromagnetics 21:151-158, 2000. Published 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Microwave sintering of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    Successful adaptation of microwave heating to the densification of ceramic materials require a marriage of microwave and materials technologies. Using an interdisciplinary team of microwave and materials engineers, we have successfully demonstrated the ability to density ceramic materials over a wide range of temperatures. Microstructural evolution during microwave sintering has been found to be significantly different from that observed in conventional sintering. Our results and those of others indicate that microwave sintering has the potential to fabricate components to near net shape with mechanical properties equivalent to hot pressed or hot isostatically pressed material. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Microwave-enhanced chemical processes

    DOEpatents

    Varma, R.

    1990-06-19

    A process is disclosed for the disposal of toxic wastes including chlorinated hydrocarbons, comprising, establishing a bed of non-metallic particulates having a high dielectric loss factor. Intimate contact of the particulates and the toxic wastes at a temperature in excess of about 400 C in the presence of microwave radiation for a time sufficient breaks the hydrocarbon chlorine bonds. Detoxification values in excess of 80 are provided and further detoxification of the bed is followed by additional disposal of toxic wastes. 1 figure.

  6. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  7. Sensitivity of Forward Radiative Transfer Model on Spectroscopic Assumptions and Input Geophysical Parameters at 23.8 GHz and 183 GHz Channels and its Impact on Inter-calibration of Microwave Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, S.; Jones, W. L.; Ebrahimi, H.; Chen, R.; Payne, V.; Kroodsma, R.

    2014-12-01

    The first step in radiometric inter-calibration is to ascertain the self-consistency and reasonableness of the observed brightness temperature (Tb) for each individual sensor involved. One of the widely used approaches is to compare the observed Tb with a simulated Tb using a forward radiative transfer model (RTM) and input geophysical parameters at the geographic location and time of the observation. In this study we intend to test the sensitivity of the RTM to uncertainties in the input geophysical parameters as well as to the underlying physical assumptions of gaseous absorption and surface emission in the RTM. SAPHIR, a cross track scanner onboard Indo-French Megha-Tropique Satellite, gives us a unique opportunity of studying 6 dual band 183 GHz channels at an inclined orbit over the Tropics for the first time. We will also perform the same sensitivity analysis using the Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) 23 GHz and five 183 GHz channels. Preliminary analysis comparing GDAS and an independent retrieved profile show some sensitivity of the RTM to the input data. An extended analysis of this work using different input geophysical parameters will be presented. Two different absorption models, the Rosenkranz and the MonoRTM will be tested to analyze the sensitivity of the RTM to spectroscopic assumptions in each model. Also for the 23.8 GHz channel, the sensitivity of the RTM to the surface emissivity model will be checked. Finally the impact of these sensitivities on radiometric inter-calibration of radiometers at sounding frequencies will be assessed.

  8. Behavioral effects of microwave reinforcement schedules and variations in microwave intensity on albino rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vitulli, W.F.; Lambert, J.K.; Brown, S.W.; Quinn, J.M.

    1987-12-01

    The objective of this exploratory investigation was to determine the interactive effects of fixed-ratio scheduling of microwave reinforcement in tandem with changes in microwave intensity. Nine albino rats were conditioned to regulate their thermal environment with microwave radiation while living in a Skinner (operant conditioning) Box in which the ambient temperature was about 27.13 degrees F at the beginning of the session. Each rat obtained a 6-sec. exposure of microwave radiation on a fixed-ratio schedule of MW reinforcement, the values of which varied from FR-1 to FR-30. Intensities of MW radiation were 62.5 W, 125 W, 250 W, and 437.5 W. Sessions lasted for 8 to 9 hr. over an approximate 13-mo. period. The effects of the intensity of microwave reinforcement varied as a function of the ratio value of the schedule used. Continuous reinforcement (FR-1) produced the lowest over-all rates, whereas FR-15, and FR-25 produced the highest over-all rates. Relatively higher thermal-behavior rates occurred under 62.5 W than under any of the other MW intensities for FR-1, FR-15, and FR-25, whereas FR-10 and FR-30 ratios produced intermediate rates of thermal responding which were constant for all values of MW intensity. These data are explained in terms of interactive effects between the local satiation or deprivation properties of the MW intensity and the ratio requirements of the schedule of MW reinforcement.

  9. Microwaves and cellular immunity. II. Immunostimulating effects of microwaves and naturally occurring antioxidant nutrients.

    PubMed

    Novoselova, E G; Fesenko, E E; Makar, V R; Sadovnikov, V B

    1999-10-01

    The effect of 8.15-18 GHz (1 Hz within) microwave radiation at a power density of 1 microW/cm2 on the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production and immune response was tested. A single 5 h whole-body exposure induced a significant increase in TNF production in peritoneal macrophages and splenic T cells. The mitogenic response in T lymphocytes increased after microwave exposure. The activation of cellular immunity was observed within 3 days after exposure. The diet containing lipid-soluble nutrients (beta-carotene, alpha-tocopherol and ubiquinone Q9) increased the activity of macrophages and T cells from irradiated mice. These results demonstrate that irradiation with low-power density microwaves stimulates the immune potential of macrophages and T cells, and the antioxidant treatment enhances the effect of microwaves, in particular at later terms, when the effect of irradiation is reduced.

  10. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  11. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  12. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by particle simulations. The many known properties of ball lightning, such as the occurrence site, relation to the lightning channels, appearance in aircraft, its shape, size, sound, spark, spectrum, motion, as well as the resulting injuries and damages, are also explained. Our theory suggests that ball lighting can be created in the laboratory or triggered during thunderstorms. Our results should be useful for lightning protection and aviation safety, as well as stimulate research interest in the relativistic regime of microwave physics.

  13. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by particle simulations. The many known properties of ball lightning, such as the occurrence site, relation to the lightning channels, appearance in aircraft, its shape, size, sound, spark, spectrum, motion, as well as the resulting injuries and damages, are also explained. Our theory suggests that ball lighting can be created in the laboratory or triggered during thunderstorms. Our results should be useful for lightning protection and aviation safety, as well as stimulate research interest in the relativistic regime of microwave physics. PMID:27328835

  14. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-C

    2016-06-22

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by particle simulations. The many known properties of ball lightning, such as the occurrence site, relation to the lightning channels, appearance in aircraft, its shape, size, sound, spark, spectrum, motion, as well as the resulting injuries and damages, are also explained. Our theory suggests that ball lighting can be created in the laboratory or triggered during thunderstorms. Our results should be useful for lightning protection and aviation safety, as well as stimulate research interest in the relativistic regime of microwave physics.

  15. The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Andrews, Stephen F.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe mission is designed to produce a map of the cosmic microwave background radiation over the entire celestial sphere by executing a fast spin and a slow precession of its spin axis about the Sun line to obtain a highly interconnected set of measurements. The spacecraft attitude is sensed and controlled using an inertial reference unit, two star trackers, a digital sun sensor, twelve coarse sun sensors, three reaction wheel assemblies, and a propulsion system. This paper presents an overview of the design of the attitude control system to carry out this mission and presents some early flight experience.

  16. The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Andrews, Stephen F.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.; Ericsson, Aprille J.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe mission is designed to produce a map of the cosmic microwave background radiation over the entire celestial sphere by executing a fast spin and a slow precession of its spin axis about the Sun line to obtain a highly interconnected set of measurements. The spacecraft attitude is sensed and controlled using an Inertial Reference Unit, two Autonomous Star Trackers, a Digital Sun Sensor, twelve Coarse Sun Sensors, three Reaction Wheel Assemblies, and a propulsion system. This paper describes the design of the attitude control system that carries out this mission and presents some early flight experience.

  17. Microwave heating of lunar materials. Appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, Thomas T.

    1992-01-01

    Microwave heating of nonmetallic inorganic material has been of interest for many years. Von Hippel in the late 1940's and early 1950's investigated how microwave radiation up to 10 GHz couples to various insulator materials. Perhaps the most work has been done by Wayne Tinga at the University of Edmonton. Most of the work to date has been done at the two frequency bands allowed in industrial use (0.915 GHz and 2.45 GHz). However some work has recently been carried out at 28 GHz and 60 GHz. Work done in this area at Los Alamos National Laboratory is discussed.

  18. Effects of continuous and pulsed chronic microwave exposure on rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chung-Kwang; Guy, Arthur W.; McDougall, John A.; Han, Lock-Fong

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen young adult New Zealand rabbits (nine males, nine females) were equally divided into three groups. One group was exposed to CW 2450-MHz fields at an incident power density of 1.5 mW/cm2 for 2 hours daily for 3 months. Another group was exposed to pulsed fields with pulses of 10 μ s duration occurring 100 times per second. The third group was sham exposed. Each rabbit was placed in a Plexiglas cage and exposed in a miniature plane wave exposure chamber. An S band horn was mounted 1 m above the animal. Thermographic data showed a peak specific absorption rate of 1.64 W/kg in the head and 2.1 W/kg in the back. Body weights were measured every other day. Electroencephalogram and evoked potentials were recorded weekly via implanted carbon-loaded Teflon electrodes. Blood samples were taken monthly for hematological, chemical, and morphological studies. Eyes were examined for cataract formation. Before the animals were sacrificed, apomorphine-induced behavioral excitation and hyperthermia were studied. Finally, pathological examinations on many tissues and organs were performed. Statistically, there were no significant differences in measured parameters observed between the exposed and sham animals.

  19. Behavioral effects of chlorpromazine and diazepam combined with low-level microwaves. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.R.; Schrot, J.; Banvard, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Previous research findings on the interaction between drugs and microwave radiation were extended to chlorpromazine and to diazepam. The drugs were combined with a 1 mW/cm/sub 2/ pulsed microwave field (2.8 GHz) and effects were measured on a fixed interval (FI 1) schedule of food reinforcement with rats. Dose-effect functions with and without sham irradiation were established for each drug. At effective doses chlorpromazine consistently decreased rate of responding and reduced with-interval response patterning. Low to moderate doses of diazepam produced little change or increases in response rate, and higher doses produced a decline in response rate. Response patterning within intervals was reduced by increasing doses of diazepam. The animals were exposed to the microwave field alone before test sessions combining the drugs with microwave radiation. Microwave exposure alone did not affect FI performance. Microwave radiation in combination with either drug did not produce any alterations in the dose-effect functions.

  20. Microwave amplification with nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Massel, F; Heikkilä, T T; Pirkkalainen, J-M; Cho, S U; Saloniemi, H; Hakonen, P J; Sillanpää, M A

    2011-12-14

    The sensitive measurement of electrical signals is at the heart of modern technology. According to the principles of quantum mechanics, any detector or amplifier necessarily adds a certain amount of noise to the signal, equal to at least the noise added by quantum fluctuations. This quantum limit of added noise has nearly been reached in superconducting devices that take advantage of nonlinearities in Josephson junctions. Here we introduce the concept of the amplification of microwave signals using mechanical oscillation, which seems likely to enable quantum-limited operation. We drive a nanomechanical resonator with a radiation pressure force, and provide an experimental demonstration and an analytical description of how a signal input to a microwave cavity induces coherent stimulated emission and, consequently, signal amplification. This generic scheme, which is based on two linear oscillators, has the advantage of being conceptually and practically simpler than the Josephson junction devices. In our device, we achieve signal amplification of 25 decibels with the addition of 20 quanta of noise, which is consistent with the expected amount of added noise. The generality of the model allows for realization in other physical systems as well, and we anticipate that near-quantum-limited mechanical microwave amplification will soon be feasible in various applications involving integrated electrical circuits.