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Sample records for 248-nm krf laser

  1. Micromachining of polyurethane (PU) polymer using a KrF excimer laser (248 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sarabpreet; Sharma, Sunil

    2014-12-01

    Polyurethane (PU) polymer, due to its biocompatibility, weather resistance, and favorable physical properties, finds a number of applications in medical implants, protective coatings, and as a prototype material for structural components in MEMS devices. An excimer laser (wavelength = 248 nm, FWHM = 25 ns) is employed for micromachining of polyurethane (PU) polymer. For air environment, the ablation rate is 0.18 μm/pulse and for underwater environment, the ablation rate is 0.07 μm/pulse (with underwater ablation threshold as 0.10 J/cm2), which concluded low taper angles (∼32°) for in air as compared to high taper angles (∼65°) with underwater micromachining. The experimental results for air and under water micromachining demonstrate ablation process as a combination of photo-thermal and photo-chemical mechanism.

  2. Analysis of damage threshold of K9 glass irradiated by 248-nm KrF excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Shao, Jingzhen; Li, Hua; Nie, Jinsong; Fang, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical model of K9 glass irradiated by a 248-nm KrF excimer laser was established, and a numerical simulation was performed to calculate temperature and thermal stress fields in the K9 glass sample using the finite element method. The laser-induced damage thresholds were defined and calculated, and the effect of repetition frequency and the number of pulses on the damage threshold were also studied. Furthermore, the experiment research was carried out to confirm the numerical simulation. The damage threshold and damage morphology were analyzed by means of a metallurgical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. The simulation and experimental results indicated that the damage mechanism of K9 glass irradiated by a KrF excimer laser was melting damage and stress damage, and the stress damage first appeared inside the K9 glass sample. The tensile stress damage threshold, the compressive stress damage threshold, and the melting damage threshold were 0.64, 0.76, and 1.05 J/cm2, respectively. The damage threshold decreased with increasing repetition frequency and number of laser pulses. The experimental results indicated that the damage threshold of K9 glass was 2.8 J/cm2.

  3. High average power, narrow band 248 nm alexandrite laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Kuper, J.W.; Chin, T.C.; Papanestor, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    A compact line-narrowed 248 nm solid state laser source operating at 15 mJ {at} 100 Hz PRF was demonstrated. Constraints due to thermal loading of components were addressed. Tradeoffs between pulse energy and repetition rate were investigated. A method for overcoming thermal dephasing in the THG material was achieved by scanning a slab shaped crystal.

  4. Experimental study of 248nm excimer laser etching of alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongtao; Shao, Jingzhen; Wang, Xi; Fang, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    The 248 nm excimer laser etching characteristic of alumina ceramic and sapphire had been studied using different laser fluence and different number of pulses. And the interaction mechanism of 248 nm excimer laser with alumina ceramic and sapphire had been analyzed. The results showed that when the laser fluence was less than 8 J/cm2, the etching depth of alumina ceramic and sapphire were increased with the increase of laser fluence and number of pulses. At the high number pulses and high-energy, the surface of the sapphire had no obvious melting phenomenon, and the alumina ceramic appeared obvious melting phenomenon. The interaction mechanism of excimer laser with alumina ceramics and sapphire was mainly two-photon absorption. But because of the existence of impurities and defects, the coupling between the laser radiation and ceramic and sapphire was strong, and the thermal evaporation mechanism was also obvious.

  5. Multiple-shot ultraviolet laser damage resistance of nonquarterwave reflector designs for 248 NM

    SciTech Connect

    Newnam, B.E.; Foltyn, S.R.; Jolin, L.J.

    1982-01-01

    The damage resistance of multilayer dielectric reflectors designed for 248 nm has been substantially increased by use of nonquarterwave (QW) thicknesses for the top few layers. These designs minimize the peak standing-wave electric field in the high-index layers, which have proven to be weaker than the low-index components. Previous damage tests of infrared- and visible-wavelength reflectors based on these designs have produced variable results. However, at the ultraviolet wavelength of 248 nm, 99% reflectors of Sc/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgF/sub 2/, and SiO/sub 2/ strongly demonstrated the merit of non-QW designs. Four sets of reflectors of each of four designs (all QW thickness; one modified-pair substitution; two modified-pair substitution; one modified pair plus an extra half-wave layer of Sc/sub 2/O/sub 3/) were tested for damage resistance with a KrF laser operating at 35 pps with a pulsewidth of 8 ns and spot-size diameter of 0.6 mm. Each of 50 sites were irradiated for 1000 shots or until damage occurred. On the average, the reflectors with one-modified-thickness pair had a 50% higher threshold (10 to 10 sites survived) than the all-quarterwave design. Addition of a second modified-layer pair resulted in no further increase in threshold but the saturation fluence (10 of 10 sites damage) was 110% higher. Reflectors with an additional half-wave of Sc/sub 2/O/sub 3/ had lower thresholds of the order of 10% as expected. The thresholds correlated best with peak-field models, whereas the best model correlating the saturation fluences involved the sum of the upper two scandia layer thicknesses.

  6. Study on damage of K9 glass under 248nm ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Fang, Xiaodong

    2015-04-01

    The damage of K9 glass under 248nm ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation was studied. The laser pulse energy was kept within the range of 60mJ to 160mJ, and the repetition rate was adjusted within the range of 1Hz to 40Hz. The damage morphologies of single-pulse and multi-pulse laser irradiation were characterized by optical microscope, and the damage mechanism was discussed. The experimental results indicated that the damage of K9 glass irradiated by 248nm ultraviolet laser mainly followed the thermal-mechanical coupling mechanism and the damage threshold of K9 glass was 2.8J/cm2. The intensity of damage area increased gradually with the increase of the laser pulse number. It was shown that accumulation effect of laser induced damage to K9 glass was obvious.

  7. Laser-damage processes in cleaved and polished CaF{sub 2} at 248nm

    SciTech Connect

    Reichling, M.; Gogoll, S.; Stenzel, S.

    1996-12-31

    Single-shot irradiation of single crystal CaF{sub 2} with 248nm/14ns laser light results in various degrees of degradation and damage depending on the applied laser fluence. Phenomena range from subtle, non-topographic surface modification only detectable by secondary electrons of scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM) over cracking along crystallographic directions to the ablation of crystalline material. Significant differences are found for cleaved and polished surfaces. Findings from SEM investigations, in-situ photoacoustic mirage measurements and visual inspection of irradiated samples form a comprehensive picture of the stages of laser-induced damage.

  8. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-01

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  9. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    SciTech Connect

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-15

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  10. The NIKE KrF laser program

    SciTech Connect

    Sethian, J.D.; Bodner, S.E.; Gerber, K.A.; Lehmberg, R.H.; McLean, E.A.; Obenschain, S.P.; Pawley, C.J.; Pronko, M.S.; Stamper, J.A.; Deniz, A.V.; Hardgrove, J.; Lehecka, T.; McGeoch, M.W.

    1994-10-05

    NIKE is a large angularly multiplexed Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) laser under development at the Naval Research Laboratory. It is designed to explore the technical and physics issues of direct drive laser fusion. When completed, NIKE will deliver 2--3 kJ of 248 nm light in a 4 nsec pulse with intensities exceeding 2{times}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} onto a planar target. Spatially and temporally incoherent light will be used to reduce the ablation pressure nonuniformities to less than 2% in the target focal plane. These parameters are predicted to be those required for a high gain ICF pellet. The NIKE system consists of a commercial oscillator/amplifier front end, an array of gas discharge amplifiers, two electron beam pumped amplifiers (one with a 20{times}20 cm{sup 2} aperture, the other with a 60{times}60 cm{sup 2} aperture) and the optics required to relay, encode, and decode the beam. Approximately two-thirds of the system is operational and currently undergoing tests. The output of the smaller e-beam system, the 20 cm Amplifier, exceeds both the uniformity and energy required to drive the final e-beam system, the 60 cm Amplifier. The pulsed power components of the 60 cm Amplifier have been built, and initial tests show the electron beam deposited by the system meets the laser requirements for pumping uniformity and energy deposition. {copyright} 1994 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  11. Time-resolved spectroscopic study of the KrF laser-induced plasma plume created above an YBaCuO superconducting target

    SciTech Connect

    Girault, C.; Damiani, D.; Aubreton, J.; Catherinot, A.

    1989-07-10

    The laser-induced plasma plume created above an YBaCuO superconducting target by a KrF laser beam (248 nm) is investigated by time-resolved spectroscopy. High-resolution spectra are obtained and ejection velocities of ablated species are deduced from temporal evolution of spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements.

  12. Laser ablation of ceramic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at 193 nm and 248 nm: The importance of single-photon ionization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaez, R. J.; Afonso, C. N.; Bator, M.; Lippert, T.

    2013-06-14

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate that single-photon photoionization processes make a significant difference in the expansion and temperature of the plasma produced by laser ablation of ceramic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in vacuum as well as to show their consequences in the kinetic energy distribution of the species that eventually will impact on the film properties produced by pulsed laser deposition. This work compares results obtained by mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy on the composition and features of the plasma produced by laser ablation at 193 nm and 248 nm, i.e., photon energies that are, respectively, above and below the ionization potential of Al, and for fluences between threshold for visible plasma and up to Almost-Equal-To 2 times higher. The results show that the ionic composition and excitation of the plasma as well as the ion kinetic energies are much higher at 193 nm than at 248 nm and, in the latter case, the population of excited ions is even negligible. The comparison of Maxwell-Boltzmann temperature, electron temperatures, and densities of the plasmas produced with the two laser wavelengths suggests that the expansion of the plasma produced at 248 nm is dominated by a single population. Instead, the one produced at 193 nm is consistent with the existence of two populations of cold and hot species, the latter associated to Al{sup +} ions that travel at the forefront and produced by single photon ionization as well as Al neutrals and double ionized ions produced by electron-ion impact. The results also show that the most energetic Al neutrals in the plasma produced at the two studied wavelengths are in the ground state.

  13. L-shell emission from high-Z solid targets by intense 10{sup 19}W/cm{sup 2} irradiation with a 248nm laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.R.; Borisov, A.B.; Boyer, K.

    2000-01-05

    Efficient (1.2% yield) multikilovolt x-ray emission from Ba(L) (2.4--2.8{angstrom}) and Gd(L) (1.7--2.1{angstrom}) is produced by ultraviolet (248nm) laser-excited BaF{sub 2} and Gd solids. The high efficiency is attributed to an inner shell-selective collisional electron ejection. Much effort has been expended recently in attempts to develop an efficient coherent x-ray source suitable for high-resolution biological imaging. To this end, many experiments have been performed studying the x-ray emissions from high-Z materials under intense (>10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2}) irradiation, with the most promising results coming from the irradiation of Xe clusters with a UV (248nm) laser at intensities of 10{sup 18}--10{sup 19}W/cm{sup 2}. In this paper the authors report the production of prompt x-rays with energies in excess of 5keV with efficiencies on the order of 1% as a result of intense irradiation of BaF{sub 2} and Gd targets with a terawatt 248nm laser. The efficiency is attributed to an inner shell-selective collisional electron ejection mechanism in which the previously photoionized electrons are ponderomotively driven into an ion while retaining a portion of their atomic phase and symmetry. This partial coherence of the laser-driven electrons has a pronounced effect on the collisional cross-section for the electron ion interaction.

  14. Aurora project: optical design for a kilojoule class KrF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, J.; McLeod, J.; Sollid, J.E.; Horn, W. III; Carmichael, R.; Kortegaard, B.; Woodfin, G.; Rosocha, L..

    1985-01-01

    Aurora is a 248-nm, 10-kilojoule laser system being built at Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the feasibility of large KrF laser systems for laser fusion. It was designed as a test bed to demonstrate: (1) efficiet energy extraction at 248 nm; (2) an angularly multiplexed optical system that is scaleable to large system designs; (3) the control of parasitics and ASE (amplified spontaneous emission); (4) long path pulse propagation at uv wavelengths; (5) alignment systems for multibeam systems; and (6) new or novel approaches to optical hardware that can lead to cost reduction on large systems. In this paper only issues pertinent to the optical system are addressed. First, a description of the entire system is given. The design constraints on the optical system are explained, concurrent with a discussion of the final design. This is followed by a very brief discussion of coatings; in particular, the use of sol-gels for antireflection coatings is presented.

  15. Dependence of ultraviolet nanosecond laser polymer ablation on polymer molecular weight: Poly(methyl methacrylate) at 248 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounos, Giannis; Selimis, Alexandros; Georgiou, Savas; Rebollar, Esther; Castillejo, Marta; Bityurin, Nikita

    2006-12-01

    We rely on a methodology demonstrated previously for assessing the temperature evolution and polymer viscosity changes in the 248nm irradiation of poly(methyl methacrylate)s (PMMAs) with molecular weights (Mw) ranging from 2.5to996kDa. Briefly, this methodology [G. Bounos et al., J. Appl. Phys. 98, 084317 (2005)] relies on monitoring the formation of aryl products in the irradiation of polymer doped with iodonaphthalene or iodophenanthrene. The results demonstrate that higher temperatures are attained with increasing Mw. The surface temperatures at the corresponding ablation thresholds are estimated to be ˜850-900K for Mw⩾120kDa vs ˜600K for 2.5kDa PMMA. In addition, for all Mw's, melting is demonstrated (viscosity values of ≈101Pas), but it lasts longer for high Mw PMMAs. We ascribe these differences to the fact that low Mw PMMAs dissociate efficiently to desorbing monomers/oligomers, thereby resulting in more efficient energy removal. Even so, the ablation threshold of the high Mw PMMAs is attained at higher fluences. This can be ascribed to the higher fraction of bonds that is required to be broken, and also plausibly to the higher gaseous product pressures that must be attained, for material ejection to be effected. The results are overall well accounted by the bulk photothermal model.

  16. Dependence of ultraviolet nanosecond laser polymer ablation on polymer molecular weight: Poly(methyl methacrylate) at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Bounos, Giannis; Selimis, Alexandros; Georgiou, Savas; Rebollar, Esther; Castillejo, Marta; Bityurin, Nikita

    2006-12-01

    We rely on a methodology demonstrated previously for assessing the temperature evolution and polymer viscosity changes in the 248 nm irradiation of poly(methyl methacrylate)s (PMMAs) with molecular weights (M{sub w}) ranging from 2.5 to 996 kDa. Briefly, this methodology [G. Bounos et al., J. Appl. Phys. 98, 084317 (2005)] relies on monitoring the formation of aryl products in the irradiation of polymer doped with iodonaphthalene or iodophenanthrene. The results demonstrate that higher temperatures are attained with increasing M{sub w}. The surface temperatures at the corresponding ablation thresholds are estimated to be {approx}850-900 K for M{sub w}{>=}120 kDa vs {approx}600 K for 2.5 kDa PMMA. In addition, for all M{sub w}'s, melting is demonstrated (viscosity values of {approx_equal}10{sup 1} Pa s), but it lasts longer for high M{sub w} PMMAs. We ascribe these differences to the fact that low M{sub w} PMMAs dissociate efficiently to desorbing monomers/oligomers, thereby resulting in more efficient energy removal. Even so, the ablation threshold of the high M{sub w} PMMAs is attained at higher fluences. This can be ascribed to the higher fraction of bonds that is required to be broken, and also plausibly to the higher gaseous product pressures that must be attained, for material ejection to be effected. The results are overall well accounted by the bulk photothermal model.

  17. Repetitively pulsed, high energy KrF lasers for inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, M. C.; Sethian, J. D.; Giuliani, J. L.; Lehmberg, R.; Kepple, P.; Wolford, M. F.; Hegeler, F.; Friedman, M.; Jones, T. C.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weidenheimer, D.; Rose, D.

    2004-12-01

    Krypton fluoride (KrF) lasers produce highly uniform beams at 248 nm, allow the capability of 'zooming' the spot size to follow an imploding pellet, naturally assume a modular architecture and have been developed into a pulsed-power-based industrial technology that readily scales to a fusion power plant sized system. There are two main challenges for the fusion power plant application: to develop a system with an overall efficiency of greater than 6% (based on target gains of 100) and to achieve a durability of greater than 3 × 108 shots (two years at 5 Hz). These two issues are being addressed with the Electra (700 J, 5 Hz) and Nike (3000 J, single shot) KrF lasers at the Naval Research Laboratory. Based on recent advances in pulsed power, electron beam generation and transport, hibachi (foil support structure) design and KrF physics, wall plug efficiencies of greater than 7% should be achievable. Moreover, recent experiments show that it may be possible to realize long lived electron beam diodes using ceramic honeycomb cathodes and anode foils that are convectively cooled by periodically deflecting the laser gas. This paper is a summary of the progress in the development of the critical KrF technologies for laser fusion energy.

  18. Investigation of the threshold intensity versus gas pressure in the breakdown of helium by 248 nm laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Abdellatif, Galila

    2014-10-01

    An investigation of the unexpectedly strong dependence of the threshold intensity on the gas pressure in the experimental study on the breakdown of He by short laser wavelength (Turcu et al., in Opt Commun, 134:66-68, 1997) is presented. A modified electron cascade model is applied (Evans and Gamal, in J Phys D Appl Phys, 13:1447-1458, 1980). Computations revealed reasonable agreement between the calculated thresholds and the measured ones. Moreover, the calculated electron energy distribution function and its parameters proved that multiphoton ionization of ground and excited atoms is the main source for the seed electrons, which contributes to the breakdown of helium. The effect of diffusion losses over pressures <1,000 Torr elucidated the origin of the strong dependence of the threshold intensity on the gas pressure. Collisional ionization dominates only at high pressures. No evidence for recombination losses is observed for pressures up to 3,000 Torr.

  19. Mercury: The Los Alamos ICF KrF laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Czuchlewski, S.J.; York, G.W.; Bigio, I.J.; Brucker, J.; Hanson, D.; Honig, E.M.; Kurnit, N.; Leland, W.; McCown, A.W.; McLeod, J.; Rose, E.; Thomas, S.; Thompson, D.

    1993-01-19

    The Mercury KrF laser facility at Los Alamos is being built with the benefit of lessons learned from the Aurora system. An increased understanding of KrF laser engineering, and the designed implementation of system flexibility, will permit Mercury to serve as a tested for a variety of advanced KrF technology concepts.

  20. Evaluation of attenuated PSM photomask blanks with TF11 chrome and FEP-171 resist on a 248 nm DUV laser pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Kezhao; Björnborg, Charles; Karlsson, Henrik; Paulsson, Adisa; Rosendahl, Anna; Beiming, Peter; Vedenpää, Jukka; Walford, Jonathan; Newman, Tom

    2007-10-01

    Tighter requirements on mask resolution, CD and image positioning accuracy at and beyond the 45 nm technology node push the development of improved photomask blanks. One such blank for attenuated phase-shift masks (att-PSM) provides a thinner chrome film, named TF11, with higher chrome etch rate compared to the previous generation Att- PSM blank (NTAR5 chrome film) from the same supplier. Reduced stress in the chrome film also results in less image placement error induced by the material. FEP-171 is the positive chemically amplified resist (PCAR) that is most commonly used in advanced mask manufacturing with both 50 keV variable shaped e-beam (VSB) and DUV laser pattern generators. TF11 allows an FEP-171 resist film down to about 2000 Å thickness with sufficient etch resistance, while the standard resist thickness for NTAR5 is around 3000 Å. This work has experimentally evaluated the use of TF11 chrome and FEP-171 resist together with a 248 nm DUV laser pattern generator, the Sigma7500. First, patterning performance in resist with thicknesses from 2000 Å to 2600 Å, in steps of 100 Å, was tested with respect to swing curve and basic lithographic parameters including resolution, CD linearity, CD iso-dense bias and dose sensitivity. Patterning results on mask showed a swing minimum at around 2200 Å and a swing maximum at around 2500 Å, which correspond to reflectivity measurements for 248 nm wavelength performed by the blank supplier. It was concluded that the overall patterning performance was best close to the swing maximum. Thereafter the patterning performance using TF11 at two resist thicknesses, 2000 Å and 2550 Å, was studied in more detail and compared to performance using NTAR5 with 3200 Å resist. The evaluation showed that the Sigma7500-II offers good compatibility with TF11, especially using the optimized FEP-171 resist thickness of 2550 Å. It also showed that the patterning capability of the Sigma7500-II using TF11 and 2550 Å resist is improved

  1. KrF lasers for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.B.; Cartwright, D.C.; Figueira, J.F.; McDonald, T.E.; Sorem, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    The KrF laser has been proposed for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) since its discovery in 1975. Since that time, the laser has seen significant development and has been increased in energy many orders of magnitude to the several kilojoule energy level. The suitability of the KrF laser as a driver for ICF energy applications has been continually reviewed. The latest assessments indicate that the KrF laser still appears to be the leading laser candidate. A worldwide effort exists to advance the KrF laser for ICF applications. 21 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Development of the Science and Technology of Electron Beam Pumped KrF Lasers for Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethian, John

    2002-11-01

    Electron beam pumped krypton fluoride (KrF) lasers are an attractive driver for inertial fusion energy. They have demonstrated very high beam quality, which is essential for reducing imprint in direct drive targets. Their short wavelength (248 nm) mitigates the growth of plasma instabilities. And they have the potential to meet the fusion needs for repetition rate, efficiency, and cost. This paper reviews the development of e-beam pumped KrF lasers. It will include a description of the fundamental physics and technology, as well as the challenges in developing a fusion system. Although KrF laser development is a multi-disciplinary endeavor, this talk will emphasize areas of interest to plasma physicists: electron beams, KrF kinetics, and pulsed power. The paper will describe experiments and modeling that has identified and mitigated instabilities in the electron beam. It will describe the electron beam propagation experiments, the supporting 3D parallel PIC codes, and how these have been used to design systems for maximum electron energy deposition into the laser gas. KrF kinetics modeling will be discussed. These newly developed time dependent codes can predict the output of several experiments operating under significantly different conditions. They are now being used as a design tool to predict the performance of future KrF systems. Finally, the talk will discuss the development of the pulsed power needed to drive the electron beams. This includes conventional gas switched systems for single shot devices together with the recently demonstrated all solid state switches that have the promise to meet the fusion requirements. The talk will be cast in context of the large, single shot KrF lasers built in the 1990's such as Nike (NRL-US), Ashura (Japan), and Titania (UK), as well as the Electra 700 J, 5 Hz rep-rate laser that is currently under development at NRL.

  3. 248-nm laser photolysis of CHBr3/O-atom mixtures: kinetic evidence for UV CO(A) chemiluminescence in the reaction of methylidyne radicals with atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L

    2005-03-17

    The 4th positive and Cameron band emissions from electronically excited CO have been observed for the first time in 248-nm pulsed laser photolysis of a trace amount of CHBr(3) vapor in an excess of O atoms. O atoms were produced by dissociation of N(2)O (or O(2)) in a cw-microwave discharge cavity in 2.0 Torr of He at 298 K. The CO emission intensity in these bands showed a quadratic dependence on the laser fluence employed. Temporal profiles of the CO(A) and other excited-state products that formed in the photoproduced precursor + O-atom reactions were measured by recording their time-resolved chemiluminescence in discrete vibronic bands. The CO 4th positive transition (A(1)Pi, v' = 0 --> X(1)Sigma(+), v' ' = 2) near 165.7 nm was monitored in this work to deduce the pseudo-first-order decay kinetics of the CO(A) chemiluminescence in the presence of various added substrates (CH(4), NO, N(2)O, H(2), and O(2)). From this, the second-order rate coefficient values were determined for reactions of these substrates with the photoproduced precursors. The measured reactivity trends suggest that the prominent precursors responsible for the CO(A) chemiluminescence are the methylidyne radicals, CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)), whose production requires the absorption of at least 2 laser photons by the photolysis mixture. The O-atom reactions with brominated precursors (CBr, CHBr, and CBr(2)), which also form in the photolysis, are shown to play a minor role in the production of the CO(A or a) chemiluminescence. However, the CBr(2) + O-atom reaction was identified as a significant source for the 289.9-nm Br(2) chemiluminescence that was also observed in this work. The 282.2-nm OH and the 336.2-nm NH chemiluminescences were also monitored to deduce the kinetics of CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)) reactions when excess O(2) and NO were present.

  4. Electra: Repetitively Pulsed Angularly Multiplexed KrF Laser System Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolford, Matthew; Myers, Matthew; Giuliani, John; Sethian, John; Burns, Patrick; Hegeler, Frank; Jaynes, Reginald

    2008-11-01

    As in a full size fusion power plant beam line, Electra is a multistage laser amplifier system. The multistage amplifier system consists of a commercial discharge laser and two doubled sided electron beam pumped amplifiers. Angular multiplexing is used in the optical layout to provide pulse length control and to maximize laser extraction from the amplifiers. Two angularly multiplexed beams have extracted 30 J of KrF laser light with an aperture 8 x 10 cm^2, which is sufficient to extract over 500 J from the main amplifier and models agree. The main amplifier of Electra in oscillator mode has demonstrated single shot and rep-rate laser energies exceeding 700 J with 100 ns pulsewidth at 248 nm with an aperture 29 x 29 cm^2. Continuous operation of the KrF electron beam pumped oscillator has lasted for more than 2.5 hours without failure at 1 Hz and 2.5 Hz. The measured intensity and pulse energy for durations greater than thousand shots are consistent at measurable rep-rates of 1 Hz, 2.5 Hz and 5 Hz.

  5. Observation of parametric instabilities in the quarter critical density region driven by the Nike KrF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J. L.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C. M.; Obenschain, S. P.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Oh, J.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Mclean, E.; Manka, C.; Phillips, L.; Afeyan, B.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    2013-02-15

    The krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser is an attractive choice for inertial confinement fusion due to its combination of short wavelength ({lambda}=248 nm), large bandwidth (up to 3 THz), and superior beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence. These qualities improve the overall hydrodynamics of directly driven pellet implosions and should allow use of increased laser intensity due to higher thresholds for laser plasma instabilities when compared to frequency tripled Nd:glass lasers ({lambda}=351 nm). Here, we report the first observations of the two-plasmon decay instability using a KrF laser. The experiments utilized the Nike laser facility to irradiate solid plastic planar targets over a range of pulse lengths (0.35 ns{<=}{tau}{<=}1.25 ns) and intensities (up to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}). Variation of the laser pulse created different combinations of electron temperature and electron density scale length. The observed onset of instability growth was consistent with the expected scaling that KrF lasers have a higher intensity threshold for instabilities in the quarter critical density region.

  6. Single pulse vibrational Raman scattering by a broadband KrF excimer laser in a hydrogen-air flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitz, Robert W.; Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Bowling, J. M.; Cheng, Tsarng-Sheng

    1990-01-01

    Spontaneous vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) is produced by a broadband excimer laser at 248 nm (KrF) in a H2-air flame, and VRS spectra are recorded for lean, stoichiometric, and rich flames. Except at very lean flame conditions, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) processes interfere with VRS Stokes lines from H2, H2O, and O2. No interference is found for the N2 Stokes and N2 anti-Stokes lines. In a stoichiometric H2/air flame, single-pulse measurements of N2 concentration and temperature (by the VRS Stokes to anti-Stokes ratio) have a relative standard deviation of 7.7 and 10 percent, respectively. These single pulse measurement errors compare well with photon statistics calculations using measured Raman cross sections.

  7. Pulse shaping and energy storage capabilities of angularly multiplexed KrF laser fusion drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmberg, R. H.; Giuliani, J. L.; Schmitt, A. J.

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes a rep-rated multibeam KrF laser driver design for the 500kJ Inertial Fusion test Facility (FTF) recently proposed by NRL, then models its optical pulse shaping capabilities using the ORESTES laser kinetics code. It describes a stable and reliable iteration technique for calculating the required precompensated input pulse shape that will achieve the desired output shape, even when the amplifiers are heavily saturated. It also describes how this precompensation technique could be experimentally implemented in real time on a reprated laser system. The simulations show that this multibeam system can achieve a high fidelity pulse shaping capability, even for a high gain shock ignition pulse whose final spike requires output intensities much higher than the ˜4MW/cm2 saturation levels associated with quasi-cw operation; i.e., they show that KrF can act as a storage medium even for pulsewidths of ˜1ns. For the chosen pulse, which gives a predicted fusion energy gain of ˜120, the simulations predict the FTF can deliver a total on-target energy of 428kJ, a peak spike power of 385TW, and amplified spontaneous emission prepulse contrast ratios IASE/I<3×10-7 in intensity and FASE/F<1.5×10-5 in fluence. Finally, the paper proposes a front-end pulse shaping technique that combines an optical Kerr gate with cw 248nm light and a 1μm control beam shaped by advanced fiber optic technology, such as the one used in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser.

  8. Experimental support for KrF laser modeling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-19

    This paper is the final report for a project to do characterization studies on the KrF laser system. The project did experimental work on KrF lasers in support of modeling studies, with the objective being to see if this technology could be competitive for use in the ICF program. This program has provided LANL with data critical for their model development. Section 2 describes the laser extraction experiments together with the calibration of the diagnostics and the re-examination of the analysis procedure. Section 3 discusses the gain and transient absorption measurements, and Section 4 gives the conclusion for this program.

  9. Preparation of Ultrafine Fe-Pt Alloy and Au Nanoparticle Colloids by KrF Excimer Laser Solution Photolysis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masato; Takamura, Hitoshi; Sugai, Hiroshi

    2009-03-10

    We prepared ultrafine Fe-Pt alloy nanoparticle colloids by UV laser solution photolysis (KrF excimer laser of 248 nm wavelength) using precursors of methanol solutions into which iron and platinum complexes were dissolved together with PVP dispersant to prevent aggregations. From TEM observations, the Fe-Pt nanoparticles were found to be composed of disordered FCC A1 phase with average diameters of 0.5-3 nm regardless of the preparation conditions. Higher iron compositions of nanoparticles require irradiations of higher laser pulse energies typically more than 350 mJ, which is considered to be due to the difficulty in dissociation of Fe(III) acetylacetonate compared with Pt(II) acetylacetonate. Au colloid preparation by the same method was also attempted, resulting in Au nanoparticle colloids with over 10 times larger diameters than the Fe-Pt nanoparticles and UV-visible absorption peaks around 530 nm that originate from the surface plasmon resonance. Differences between the Fe-Pt and Au nanoparticles prepared by the KrF excimer laser solution photolysis are also discussed.

  10. Biocompatible layers fabricated using KrF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomás; Vrbová, Miroslava; Konarík, David; Remsa, Jan

    2008-11-01

    Thin films of hydroxyapatite, hydroxyapatite doped with silver and thin diamond like carbon layers were prepared using KrF excimer laser deposition. Tooth prostheses, textile blood vessels and artificial heart valves were covered and tested. Examples of physical tests, and in vitro and in vivo analysis using minipigs and sheep are presented.

  11. Interaction of wide band gap single crystals with 248 nm excimer laser radiation. XII. The emission of negative atomic ions from alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Kenichi; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2007-12-01

    Many wide band gap materials yield charged and neutral emissions when exposed to sub-band-gap laser radiation at power densities below the threshold for optical breakdown and plume formation. In this work, we report the observation of negative alkali ions from several alkali halides under comparable conditions. We observe no evidence for negative halogen ions, in spite of the high electron affinities of the halogens. Significantly, the positive and negative alkali ions show a high degree of spatial and temporal overlap. A detailed study of all the relevant particle emissions from potassium chloride (KCl) suggests that K{sup -} is formed by the sequential attachment of two electrons to K{sup +}.

  12. High-power, highly stable KrF laser with a 4-kHz pulse repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, V M; El'tsov, A V; Khristoforov, O B

    2015-08-31

    An electric-discharge KrF laser (248 nm) with an average output power of 300 W is developed and studied. A number of new design features are related to the use of a laser chamber based on an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic tube. A high power and pulse repetition rate are achieved by using a volume discharge with lateral preionisation by the UV radiation of a creeping discharge in the form of a homogeneous plasma sheet on the surface of a plane sapphire plate. Various generators for pumping the laser are studied. The maximum laser efficiency is 3.1%, the maximum laser energy is 160 mJ pulse{sup -1}, and the pulse duration at half maximum is 7.5 ns. In the case of long-term operation at a pulse repetition rate of 4 kHz and an output power of 300 W, high stability of laser output energy (σ ≤ 0.7%) is achieved using an all-solid-state pump system. (lasers)

  13. High-power, highly stable KrF laser with a 4-kHz pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, V. M.; El'tsov, A. V.; Khristoforov, O. B.

    2015-08-01

    An electric-discharge KrF laser (248 nm) with an average output power of 300 W is developed and studied. A number of new design features are related to the use of a laser chamber based on an Al2O3 ceramic tube. A high power and pulse repetition rate are achieved by using a volume discharge with lateral preionisation by the UV radiation of a creeping discharge in the form of a homogeneous plasma sheet on the surface of a plane sapphire plate. Various generators for pumping the laser are studied. The maximum laser efficiency is 3.1%, the maximum laser energy is 160 mJ pulse-1, and the pulse duration at half maximum is 7.5 ns. In the case of long-term operation at a pulse repetition rate of 4 kHz and an output power of 300 W, high stability of laser output energy (σ <= 0.7%) is achieved using an all-solid-state pump system.

  14. High-power gas-discharge excimer ArF, KrCl, KrF and XeCl lasers utilising two-component gas mixtures without a buffer gas

    SciTech Connect

    Razhev, A M; Kargapol'tsev, E S; Churkin, D S

    2016-03-31

    Results of an experimental study of the influence of a gas mixture (laser active medium) composition on an output energy and total efficiency of gas-discharge excimer lasers on ArF* (193 nm), KrCl* (222 nm), KrF* (248 nm) and XeCl* (308 nm) molecules operating without a buffer gas are presented. The optimal ratios of gas components (from the viewpoint of a maximum output energy) of an active medium are found, which provide an efficient operation of laser sources. It is experimentally confirmed that for gas-discharge excimer lasers on halogenides of inert gases the presence of a buffer gas in an active medium is not a necessary condition for efficient operation. For the first time, in two-component gas mixtures of repetitively pulsed gas-discharge excimer lasers on electron transitions of excimer molecules ArF*, KrCl*, KrF* and XeCl*, the pulsed energy of laser radiation obtained under pumping by a transverse volume electric discharge in a low-pressure gas mixture without a buffer gas reached up to 170 mJ and a high pulsed output power (of up to 24 MW) was obtained at a FWHM duration of the KrF-laser pulse of 7 ns. The maximal total efficiency obtained in the experiment with two-component gas mixtures of KrF and XeCl lasers was 0.8%. (lasers)

  15. High-power gas-discharge excimer ArF, KrCl, KrF and XeCl lasers utilising two-component gas mixtures without a buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.; Churkin, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Results of an experimental study of the influence of a gas mixture (laser active medium) composition on an output energy and total efficiency of gas-discharge excimer lasers on ArF* (193 nm), KrCl* (222 nm), KrF* (248 nm) and XeCl* (308 nm) molecules operating without a buffer gas are presented. The optimal ratios of gas components (from the viewpoint of a maximum output energy) of an active medium are found, which provide an efficient operation of laser sources. It is experimentally confirmed that for gas-discharge excimer lasers on halogenides of inert gases the presence of a buffer gas in an active medium is not a necessary condition for efficient operation. For the first time, in two-component gas mixtures of repetitively pulsed gas-discharge excimer lasers on electron transitions of excimer molecules ArF*, KrCl*, KrF* and XeCl*, the pulsed energy of laser radiation obtained under pumping by a transverse volume electric discharge in a low-pressure gas mixture without a buffer gas reached up to 170 mJ and a high pulsed output power (of up to 24 MW) was obtained at a FWHM duration of the KrF-laser pulse of 7 ns. The maximal total efficiency obtained in the experiment with two-component gas mixtures of KrF and XeCl lasers was 0.8%.

  16. High Current Cathodes Fabricated by KrF Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilgenbach, Ronald M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Jones, M. C.; Johnston, M. D.; Jordan, N. M.; Hoff, B. W.

    2010-10-08

    In this paper we review several high power laser ablation techniques that have been utilized to fabricate high current (1-80 kA) electron beam cathodes for accelerators and microwave sources: 1) Projection Ablation Lithography (PAL) cathodes, 2) Ablation Line Focus (ALF) cathodes, and 3) Metal-Oxide-Junction (MOJ) cathodes. Laser-ablative micromachining techniques (PAL and ALF) have been utilized to generate micron-scale features on metal substrates that provide electric field (beta) enhancement for Fowler-Nordheim emission and plasma cathodes. Since these laser-ablated patterns are directly, laser-written on the substrate metal they exhibit much higher thermal conductivity for higher current capability and increased damage thresholds. Metal-Oxide-Junction (MOJ) cathodes exploit the triple-point electron emission that occurs at the interface between metal, insulator and vacuum.The ablation laser is a KrF excimer laser with a pulse energy of 600 mJ and pulselength of 20 ns. Cathode experiments were performed on the MELBA-C accelerator: V = -300 kV, pulselength = 0.5 microsecond. Data will be presented for PAL, ALF and MOJ cathodes.

  17. Species-resolved imaging and gated photon counting spectroscopy of laser ablation plume dynamics during KrF- and ArF-laser PLD of amorphous diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, D.B.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-12-01

    Gated photon counting spectroscopy and species-resolved ICCD photography were used to study the weak plasma luminescence following the propagation of the initial ablation plume in vacuum and during the rebound of the plume with a substrate during pulsed laser deposition of amorphous diamond. These methods techniques were required in order to investigate notable differences between amorphous diamond-like carbon films formed by pulsed laser deposition from ArF (193 nm) and KrF (248 nm) irradiation of pyrolytic graphite in vacuum. Three principal regions of plume emission were found: (1) a bright luminescent ball (v {approximately}3--5 cm/{mu}s) displaying nearly entirely C{sup +} emission which appears to result from laser interaction with the initial ejecta, (2) a spherical ball of emission (v {approximately} 1 cm/{mu}s) displaying neutral carbon atomic emission lines and, at early times, jets of excited C{sub 2}, and (3) a well-defined region of broadband emission (v {approximately} 0.3 cm/{mu}s) near the target surface first containing emission bands from C{sub 2}, then weak, continuum emission thought to result from C{sub 3} and higher clusters and/or blackbody emission from hot clusters or nanoparticles.

  18. Design optimization of single-main-amplifier KrF laser-fusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.B.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    KrF lasers appear to be a very promising laser fusion driver for commercial applications. The Large Amplifier Module for the Aurora Laser System at Los Alamos is the largest KrF laser in the world and is currently operating at 5 kJ with 10 to 15 kJ eventually expected. The next generation system is anticipated to be a single-main-amplifier system that generates approximately 100 kJ. This paper examines the cost and efficiency tradeoffs for a complete single-main-amplifier KrF laser fusion experimental facility. It has been found that a 7% efficient $310/joule complete laser-fusion system is possible by using large amplifier modules and high optical fluences.

  19. Observation of atmospheric ozone by dial with Raman lasers pumped by a KrF laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, M.; Shibata, T.

    1986-01-01

    Since the XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) was first used in Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for stratospheric ozone detection, the XeCl ozone lidar became a useful tool for the monitoring of the stratospheric ozone concentration. Shorter wavelength lasers are needed for the observation of ozone in the troposphere where the ozone concentration is about one order of magnitude smaller than in the stratosphere. In 1983, tropospheric ozone was observed with the combination of the second Stokes line (290.4 nm) of stimulated Raman scattering from methane pumped by a KrF laser and the XeCl laser line. The measurement of the ozone distribution from ground to 30 km was reported, using three Stokes lines of Raman lasers pumped by a KrF laser. At wavelengths shorter than 295 nm, the background solar radiation is effectively suppressed by atmospheric ozone. Such a solar-blind effect can be expected when two wavelengths 277 and 290.4 nm are used for DIAL ozone detection. A preliminary measurement of the day time ozone distribution in the troposphere is presented using these wavelengths generated by a KrF laser with a Raman shifter. Analysis using the lidar equation predicts the maximum detectable range is 7 km.

  20. Quantum yield for carbon monoxide production in the 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Z.; Stickel, R. E.; Wine, P. H.

    1995-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been coupled with excimer laser flash photolysis to measure the quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) relative to the well-known quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photolysis of phosgene (Cl2CO2). The temporal resolution of the experiments was sufficient to distinguish CO formed directly by photodissociation from that formed by subsequent S((sup 3)P(sub J)) reaction with OCS. Under the experimental conditions employed, CO formation via the fast S((sup 1)D(sub 2)) + OCS reaction was minimal. Measurements at 297K and total pressures from 4 to 100 Torr N2 + N2O show the CO yield to be greater than 0.95 and most likely unity. This result suggests that the contribution of OCS as a precursor to the lower stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer is somewhat larger than previously thought.

  1. KrF laser-induced ablation and patterning of Y--Ba--Cu--O films

    SciTech Connect

    Heitz, J.; Wang, X.Z.; Schwab, P.; Baeuerle, D. ); Schultz, L. )

    1990-09-01

    The ablation and patterning of Y--Ba--Cu--O films on (100) SrTiO{sub 3} and (100) MgO substrates by KrF excimer-laser light projection was investigated. Three different regimes of laser-material interactions were observed. Transition temperatures and critical current densities in laser-fabricated strip lines were investigated.

  2. Stable formation of ultrahigh power-density 248 nm channels in Xe cluster targets

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, Alex B.; Racz, Ervin; Khan, Shahab F.; Poopalasingam, Sankar; McCorkindale, John C.; Boguta, John; Longworth, James W.; Rhodes, Charles K.

    2012-07-11

    The optimization of relativistic and ponderomotive self-channeling of ultra-powerful 248 nm laser pulses launched in underdense plasmas with an appropriate longitudinal gradient in the electron density profile located at the initial stage of the self-channeling leads to (1) stable channel formation and (2) highly efficient power compression producing power densities in the 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 3} range. The comparison of theoretical studies with experimental results involving the correlation of (a) Thomson images of the electron density with (b) x-ray images of the channel morphology demonstrates that more than 90% of the incident 248 nm power can be trapped in stable channels and that this stable propagation can be extended to power levels significantly exceeding the critical power of the self-channeling process.

  3. Photofragment translation spectroscopy of ClN3 at 248 nm: determination of the primary and secondary dissociation pathways.

    PubMed

    Hansen, N; Wodtke, A M; Goncher, S J; Robinson, J C; Sveum, N E; Neumark, D M

    2005-09-08

    Photofragmentation translational spectroscopy was used to identify the primary and secondary reaction pathways in the KrF laser (248 nm) photodissociation of chlorine azide (ClN(3)) under collision-free conditions. Both the molecular channel producing NCl (X (3)Sigma,a (1)Delta) + N(2) and the radical channel producing Cl ((2)P(J)) + N(3) were analyzed in detail. Consistent with previously reported velocity map ion imaging experiments [N. Hansen and A. M. Wodtke, J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 10608 (2003)] a bimodal translational energy distribution is seen when Cl atoms are monitored at mz = 35(Cl(+)). Momentum-matched N(3) counterfragments can be seen at mz = 42(N(3) (+)). The characteristics of the observed radical-channel data reflect the formation of linear azide radical and another high-energy form of N(3) (HEF-N(3)) that exhibits many of the characteristics one would expect from cyclic N(3). HEF-N(3) can be directly detected by electron-impact ionization more than 100 mus after its formation. Products of the unimolecular dissociation of HEF-N(3) are observed in the mz = 14(N(+)) and mz = 28(N(2) (+)) data. Anisotropy parameters were determined for the primary channels to be beta = -0.3 for the NCl forming channel and beta = 1.7 and beta = 0.4 for the linear N(3) and HEF-N(3) forming channels, respectively. There is additional evidence for secondary photodissociation of N(3) and of NCl.

  4. Recent progress in the Los Alamos KrF Program

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.E.; Cartwright, D.C.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Fenstermacher, C.A.; Figueira, J.F.; Foreman, L.R.; Goldstone, P.D.; Hanson, D.E.; Harris, D.B.; Hauer, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program (ICF) is to develop the ability to ignite and burn small masses of thermonuclear fuel. Although the present near-term objectives of the program are directed toward defense applications, ICF research continues to be carried out with a view to the longer term goal of commercial power production. The characteristics of a KrF laser make it an attractive candidate as an ICF driver. The KrF wavelength of 248 nm provides a target coupling that is very high at intensities of 10/sup 14/w/cm/sup 2/. In addition, the KrF laser can be repetitively operated at frequencies appropriate for a power reactor and has an intrinsically high efficiency, which allows projections to the long-term goal of energy production. The ICF program at Los Alamos consists of driver development, target design and fabrication, and target experimentation. The major effort at present is the investigation and development of KrF technology to determine its applicability for use in a laboratory driver at Los Alamos. Such a driver would be used in defense related technology studies and in areas of scientific study such as highly ionized materials and high-energy-density physics.

  5. Experimental Investigation and Modeling of Kinetic Processes in a KrF Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, Yu. I.; Yastremskii, A. G.; Yampolskaya, S. A.; Losev, V. F.; Dudarev, V. V.; Panchenko, Yu. N.; Puchikin, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    The KrF laser with radiation pulse duration at half maximum of 20 ns is experimentally investigated. A self-consistent model is developed considering the electric circuit, the kinetic processes in the active medium, and the formation of laser radiation in a resonator. Time dependences of the discharge current and voltage on the capacitor and discharge electrodes, plasma particle concentration, and rate constants of the processes determining the characteristics of the discharge and laser radiation are presented. Processes are revealed that determines the characteristics of the space charge and laser radiation. The kinetics of the processes of production and annihilation of KrF excimer molecules is studied in detail. It is demonstrated that high rates of destruction of excimer molecules increases the time of delay of generation thereby decreasing the efficiency of laser generation and limiting the possibility of decreasing laser radiation pulse duration.

  6. KrF laser amplifier with phase-conjugate Brillouin retroreflectors.

    PubMed

    Gower, M C

    1982-09-01

    We have demonstrated the use of phase-conjugate stimulated Brillouin scattering mirrors to produce high-quality, short-pulse KrF laser beams from angular multiplexed and regenerative amplifiers. The mirror was also shown to isolate systems optically from amplifier spontaneous emission. Automatic alignment of targets using this mirror as a retroreflector was also demonstrated.

  7. Laser Plasma Instability Experiments with KrF Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    L. Phillips, A. J. Schmitt, J. D. Sethain, R . K. McCrory, W. Seka, C. Verdon, J. P. Knauer, B. B. Afeyan, H. T . Powell, Physics of Plasmas, 5, 5...Physics of Plasmas. 8 R . Betti, K. Anderson, J. Knauer, T . J. B. Collins, R . L. McCrory, R . W. McKenty, S. Skupsky, Physics of Plasmas, 12, 4, 042703...2005). 9 W. L. Kruer, The Physics of Laser Plasma Interactions (Addison-Wesley, Boulder, 1988). 10 J. M. McMahon, R . P. Burns, T . H. DeRieux, R

  8. Measurement of intensity-dependent rates of above-threshold ionization (ATI) of atomic hydrogen at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, T.D.

    1991-04-01

    Measured rates of multiphoton ionization (MPI) from the ground state of atomic hydrogen by a linearly polarized, subpicosecond KrF laser pulse at 248 nm wavelength are compared to predictions of lowest-order perturbation theory, Floquet theory, and Keldysh-Faisal-Reiss (KFR) theory with and without Coulomb correction for peak irradiance of 3 {times} 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2} to 2 {times} 10{sup 14}W/cm{sup 2}. The Coulomb-corrected Keldysh model falls closest to the measured rates, the others being much higher or much lower. At 5 {times} 10{sup 13}W/cm{sup 2}, the number of ATI electrons decreased by a factor of approximately 40 with each additional photon absorbed. ATI of the molecular hydrogen background and of atoms from photodissociation of the molecules were also observed. The experiment employed a crossed-beam technique at ultrahigh vacuum with an rf-discharge atomic hydrogen source and a magnetic-bottle type electron time-of-flight spectrometer to count the electrons in the different ATI channels separately. The apparatus was calibrated to allow comparison of absolute as well as relative ionization rates to the theoretical predictions. This calibration involved measuring the distribution of irradiance in a focal volume that moved randomly and changed its size from time to time. A data collection system under computer control divided the time-of-flight spectra into bins according to the energy of each laser pulse. This is the first measurement of absolute rates of ATI in atomic hydrogen, and the first measurement of absolute test of MPI in atomic hydrogen without a large factor to account for multiple modes in the laser field. As such, the results of this work are important to the development of ATI theories, which presently differ by orders of magnitude in their prediction of the ionization rates. They are also important to recent calculations of temperatures in laser-heated plasmas, many of which incorporate KFR theory.

  9. Spectrally narrowed lasing of a self-injection KrF excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yasuhiro; Wani, Koichi; Miki, Tadaaki; Kawahara, Hidehito; Mimasu, Mutsumi; Ogata, Yoshiro

    1990-08-01

    Spectrally nantwed lasing of a KrF excimer laser has teen ahieved by a self-injection technique using abeam splitter for power extraction aixi intravity etalons for spectral-narrowing. The laser cavity is divithi into an amplifying branch aix! a spectralnarrowing branch. The spectral bandwidth was narrowed to <3pm FWHM with air-sed etalons placed in the spectral-narrowing branch. A laser propagation model was intrOdUced for describing the laser intensity traveling in the laser cavity. The calculated intensityincident onthe intracavityetalons wassmaller thanthat in theconventional Fabry-Perotcavity withplane-parallel mirrors.

  10. Quantum yield for carbon monoxide production in the 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.; Stickel, R.E.; Wine, P.H.

    1995-03-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been coupled with excimer laser flash photolysis to measure the quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) relative to the well known quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photolysis of phosgene (Cl{sub 2}CO). The temporal resolution of the experiments was sufficient to distinguish CO formed directly by photodissociation from that formed by subsequent S({sup 3}P{sub j}) reaction with OCS. Under the experimental conditions employed, CO formation via the fast S({sup 1}D{sub 2})+OCS reaction was minimal. Measurements at 297K and total pressures from 4 to 100 Torr N{sub 2}+N{sub 2}O show the CO yield to be greater than 0.95 and most likely unity. This result suggests that the contribution of OCS as a precursor to the lower stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer is somewhat larger than previously thought. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. The NIKE 60 cm Electron Beam-Pumped KrF Amplifier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    waveforms are flat to within ±5% for 253 nsec. COMPONENTS The 60 em amplifier is based on a Marx - pulseline- output switch- z stack insulator- field...intermediate amplifier in the NIKE system. Marx : The Marx generators follow the well-proven ANT ARES4 low inductance arrangement. The Marxes have 24 half...erected voltage of 1330 kV. As oil vapor is highly absorbent at the KrF laser wavelength of 248 nm, the Marx oil tanks have to be completely sealed

  12. Progress in the Science and Technology of Direct Drive Laser Fusion with the KrF Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    important parameters KrF technology leads) Direct Laser Drive is a better choice for Energy Indirect Drive (initial path for NIF ) Laser Beams x-rays Hohlraum...Pellet Direct Drive (IFE) Laser Beams Pellet .. • ID Ignition being explored on NIF • Providing high enough gain for pure fusion energy is...challenging. • DD Ignition physics can be explored on NIF . • More efficient use of laser light, and greater flexibility in applying drive provides potential for

  13. Photofragment Translational Spectroscopy of Propargyl Radicals at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Goncher, S.J.; Moore, D.T.; Sveum, N.E.; Neumark, D.M.

    2007-12-21

    The photodissociation of propargyl radical, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}, and its perdeuterated isotopolog was investigated using photofragment translational spectroscopy. Propargyl radicals were produced by 193 nm photolysis of allene entrained in a molecular beam expansion, and then photodissociated at 248 nm. photofragment time-of-flight spectra were measured at a series of laboratory angles using electron impact ionization coupled to a mass spectrometer. Data for ion masses corresponding to C{sub 3}H{sub 2}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sup +}, C{sub 3}{sup +}, and the analogous deuterated species show that both H and H{sub 2} loss occur. The translational energy distributions for these processes have average values = 5.7 and 15.9 kcal/mol, respectively, and are consistent with dissociation on the ground state following internal conversion, with no exit barrier for H loss but a tight transition state for H{sub 2} loss. The translational energy distribution for H atom loss is similar to that in previous work on propargyl in which the H atom, rather than the heavy fragment, was detected. The branching ratio for H loss/H{sub 2} loss was determined to be 97.6/2.4 {+-} 1.2, in good agreement with RRKM results.

  14. Implementation of focal zooming on the Nike KrF laser.

    PubMed

    Kehne, D M; Karasik, M; Aglitsky, Y; Smyth, Z; Terrell, S; Weaver, J L; Chan, Y; Lehmberg, R H; Obenschain, S P

    2013-01-01

    In direct drive inertial confinement laser fusion, a pellet containing D-T fuel is imploded by ablation arising from absorption of laser energy at its outer surface. For optimal coupling, the focal spot of the laser would continuously decrease to match the reduction in the pellet's diameter, thereby minimizing wasted energy. A krypton-fluoride laser (λ = 248 nm) that incorporates beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence has the ability to produce a high quality focal profile whose diameter varies with time, a property known as focal zooming. A two-stage focal zoom has been demonstrated on the Nike laser at the Naval Research Laboratory. In the experiment, a 4.4 ns laser pulse was created in which the on-target focal spot diameter was 1.3 mm (full width at half maximum) for the first 2.4 ns and 0.28 mm for the final 2 ns. These two diameters appear in time-integrated focal plane equivalent images taken at several locations in the amplification chain. Eight of the zoomed output beams were overlapped on a 60 μm thick planar polystyrene target. Time resolved images of self-emission from the rear of the target show the separate shocks launched by the two corresponding laser focal diameters.

  15. Implementation of focal zooming on the Nike KrF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kehne, D. M.; Karasik, M.; Weaver, J. L.; Chan, Y.; Obenschain, S. P.; Aglitsky, Y.; Smyth, Z.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Terrell, S.

    2013-01-15

    In direct drive inertial confinement laser fusion, a pellet containing D-T fuel is imploded by ablation arising from absorption of laser energy at its outer surface. For optimal coupling, the focal spot of the laser would continuously decrease to match the reduction in the pellet's diameter, thereby minimizing wasted energy. A krypton-fluoride laser ({lambda}= 248 nm) that incorporates beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence has the ability to produce a high quality focal profile whose diameter varies with time, a property known as focal zooming. A two-stage focal zoom has been demonstrated on the Nike laser at the Naval Research Laboratory. In the experiment, a 4.4 ns laser pulse was created in which the on-target focal spot diameter was 1.3 mm (full width at half maximum) for the first 2.4 ns and 0.28 mm for the final 2 ns. These two diameters appear in time-integrated focal plane equivalent images taken at several locations in the amplification chain. Eight of the zoomed output beams were overlapped on a 60 {mu}m thick planar polystyrene target. Time resolved images of self-emission from the rear of the target show the separate shocks launched by the two corresponding laser focal diameters.

  16. Development of the pellicle for KrF excimer laser photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasaki, Toru; Kawakami, S.; Hamada, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Kashida, Meguru; Kubota, Yoshihiro

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes development of the pellicle for KrF excimer laser photolithography. The components of KrF excimer pellicle should have high light resistance. Our pellicle membrane consists of amorphous perfluoropolymer. Since this material provides that scattering and absorption of light at deep-UV wavelength region are very small, transmissivity is high at that wavelength and light resistance is strong against KrF excimer laser. Membrane bond and reticle adhesive consist of silicone resin so that the light resistance of them is high. And the bond strength of our pellicle is very high despite the use of fluoro-polymer membrane. This is because the bond consists of silicone resin which contains fluorocarbon-group. Strict particle suppression is required for the excimer pellicle. We have covered the frame with UV resistant fluoropolymer for the purpose to reduce the possibility of particle generation. This treatment has suppressed the particle generation during transportation. Membrane cutting has been achieved by melt-cutting method. The prominency of this method is melting the membrane with heat and cutting it with no contact with pellicle frame, so that the membrane edge becomes smooth and pellicle frame has not been damaged.

  17. Measurements of low-level prepulse on Nike KrF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Max; Mostovych, A. N.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Chan, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2005-09-01

    The krypton fluoride (KrF) laser is a leading candidate driver for inertial fusion energy. Some of the current fusion target designs call for targets with thin metallic coatings. These targets could be particularly susceptible to preheat by a low-level laser prepulse. Knowledge of the prepulse can be important in understanding and modeling the behavior of such targets. This paper presents measurements of low-level prepulse on target with the Nike KrF laser. Sources of prepulse are discussed and measurements are performed under several specific laser conditions in order to evaluate the relative contribution of these sources to the overall prepulse. Prepulse is found to be ˜2×10-7 from peak intensity for approximately 120ns prior to the main laser pulse. Prepulse energy density on target is ˜2J/cm2. The first laser amplifier in the time- and angle-multiplexed section of the laser is found to be the dominant source of prepulse.

  18. Raman shifting of KrF laser radiation for tropospheric ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Ismail, Syed

    1991-01-01

    The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurement of tropospheric ozone requires use of high average power UV lasers operating at two appropriate DIAL wavelengths. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that a KrF excimer laser can be used to generate several wavelengths with good energy conversion efficiencies by stimulated Raman shifting using hydrogen (H2) and deuterium (D2). Computer simulations for an airborne lidar have shown that these laser emissions can be used for the less than 5 percent random error, high resolution measuremment of ozone across the troposphere using the DIAL technique. In the region of strong ozone absorption, laser wavelengths of 277.0 and 291.7 nm were generated using H2 and D2, respectively. In addition, a laser wavelength at 302.0 nm was generated using two cells in series, with the first containing D2 and the second containing H2. The energy conversion efficiency for each wavelength was between 14 and 27 percent.

  19. Nonlinear absorption and optical strength of BaF{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the wavelength of 248 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Nikolai V; Sergeev, P B; Reiterov, V M

    1999-11-30

    An experimental investigation was made of the dependence of the transmission of BaF{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples on the intensity of KrF-laser radiation ({lambda} = 248 nm) pulses of 85 ns duration. The two-photon absorption coefficients were found at {lambda} = 248 nm and their values for these two crystals were 0.5 {+-} 0.2 and 2 {+-} 1 cm Gw{sup -1}. The surface and bulk laser breakdown thresholds were determined for these samples. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  20. Surface modification of dental tissues by KrF excimer laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, M.; Oliveira, V.; Vilar, R.

    2007-02-01

    Laser treatment is a promising technique for dental applications such as caries removal, dental hypersensitivity reduction and improvement of the bond strength between dentin and restoration materials. In this study the topographic and morphological changes induced in enamel and dentin surfaces by treating with KrF excimer laser radiation were studied as a function of the number of laser pulses and radiation fluence by scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. For enamel, independently of the fluence used, material removal occurs preferentially at the prisms sheaths, leading to the formation of surface pits of a few micrometers. For dentin, a cone-like topography develops when the tubules are approximately parallel to the laser beam direction and the radiation fluence is within the range 0.5 to 1.5 J/cm2. For higher fluences, the treated surfaces are flat and covered with a layer of re-solidified materials.

  1. Excimer laser-induced diamond graphitization for high-energy nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemanno, E.; Caricato, A. P.; Chiodini, G.; Martino, M.; Ossi, P. M.; Spagnolo, S.; Perrino, R.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we have studied the structure and the morphology of a graphite layer induced on the surface of a polycrystalline thermal grade CVD diamond by focusing a pulsed excimer laser operating at KrF (wavelength 248 nm) and ArF (wavelength 193 nm) mixtures. By micro-Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies, as well as scanning electron microscopy, we reported the synthesis of a turbostratic t-graphite layer after irradiation with ArF laser. By contrast, irradiating with a KrF laser beam, we obtained a disordered graphite layer with 10 laser shots, while 200 consecutive laser pulses resulted in target ablation.

  2. Surface-pattern geometry, topography, and chemical modifications during KrF excimer laser micro-drilling of p-type Si (111) wafers in ambient environment of HCl fumes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakria Butt, Muhammad; Saher, Sobia; Waqas Khaliq, Muhammad; Siraj, Khurram

    2016-11-01

    Eight mirror-like polished p-type Si (111) wafers were irradiated with 100, 200, 300, 400, 800, 1200, 1600, and 2000 KrF excimer laser pulses in ambient environment of HCl fumes in air. The laser parameters were: wavelength = 248 nm, pulse width = 20 ns, pulse energy = 20 mJ, and repetition rate = 20 Hz. For each set of laser pulses, characterization of the rectangular etched patterns formed on target surface was done by optical/scanning electron microscopy, XRD, and EDX techniques. The average etched depth increased with the increase in number of laser pulses from 100 to 2000 in accord with Sigmoidal (Boltzmann) function, whereas the average etch rate followed an exponential decay with the increase in number of laser pulses. However, the etched area, maximum etched depth, and maximum etch rate were found to increase linearly with the number of laser pulses, but the rate of increase was faster for 100-400 laser pulses (region I) than that for 800-2000 laser pulses (region II). The elemental composition for each etched-pattern determined by EDX shows that both O and Cl contents increase progressively with the increase in the number of laser shots in region I. However, in region II both O and Cl contents attain saturation values of about 39.33 wt.% and 0.14 wt.%, respectively. Perforation of Si wafers was achieved on irradiation with 1200-2000 laser pulses. XRD analysis confirmed the formation of SiO2, SiCl2 and SiCl4 phases in Si (111) wafers due to chemical reaction of silicon with both HCl fumes and oxygen in air.

  3. Quantum yields for OH production from 193 and 248 nm photolysis of HNO3 and H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffman, A.; Nelson, D. D., Jr.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    1993-05-01

    Flash kinetic spectroscopy in a flow tube is used to measure at room temperature the absolute yields for OH production from 193 and 248 nm photolysis of HNO3 and H2O2. The OH radicals are produced by excimer laser photolysis and probed via direct absorption of high resolution tunable IR laser light. The results indicate quantum yields for both precursors at both wavelengths which are less than the maximum possible values of 1 for H2O2. The present measurements are discussed in light of contrasting results suggested from other work.

  4. Surface, structural and mechanical properties of zirconium ablated by KrF excimer laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nisar; Bashir, Shazia; Umm-i-Kalsoom; Begum, Narjis; Waqas Ahmad, Syed

    2016-11-01

    We study the effect of the ambient - dry (air) and wet (propanol) - environment on the surface, structural and mechanical properties of zirconium samples after irradiation with a KrF excimer laser (wavelength of 248 {\\text{nm}}, pulse duration of 20 {\\text{ns}} and repetition rate of 20 {\\text{Hz}}). The samples are exposed to an increasing number of laser pulses varying from 500 to 2000 in both media. Various features of the treated targets such as surface morphology, chemical composition, crystalline structure and hardness are analysed by complementary characterisation techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and Vickers hardness tester, respectively. Surface morphology and hardness are explained on the basis of modifications in crystalinity, residual pressures and chemical properties of the sample surface after its irradiation.

  5. Electra: durable repetitively pulsed angularly multiplexed KrF laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolford, Matthew F.; Myers, Matthew C.; Giuliani, John L.; Sethian, John D.; Burns, Patrick M.; Hegeler, Frank; Jaynes, Reginald

    2008-02-01

    Electra is a repetitively pulsed, electron beam pumped Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser at the Naval Research Laboratory that is developing the technologies that can meet the Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) requirements for durability, efficiency, and cost. The technologies developed on Electra should be directly scalable to a full size fusion power plant beam line. As in a full size fusion power plant beam line, Electra is a multistage laser amplifier system which, consists of a commercial discharge laser (LPX 305i, Lambda Physik), 175 keV electron beam pumped (40 ns flat-top) preamplifier, and 530 keV (100 ns flat-top) main amplifier. Angular multiplexing is used in the optical layout to provide pulse length control and to maximize laser extraction from the amplifiers. Single shot yield of 452 J has been extracted from the initial shots of the Electra laser system using a relatively low energy preamplifier laser beam. In rep-rate burst of 5 Hz for durations of one second a total energy of 1.585 kJ (average 317 J/pulse) has been attained. Total energy of 2.5 kJ has been attained over a two second period. For comparison, the main amplifier of Electra in oscillator mode has demonstrated at 2.5 Hz rep-rate average laser yield of 270 J over a 2 hour period.

  6. Resonant third harmonic generation of KrF laser in Ar gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, R.; Barna, A.; Suta, T.; Földes, I. B.; Bohus, J.; Szatmári, S.; Mikołajczyk, J.; Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Verona, C.; Verona Rinati, G.; Margarone, D.; Nowak, T.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Investigations of emission of harmonics from argon gas jet irradiated by 700 fs, 5 mJ pulses from a KrF laser are presented. Harmonics conversion was optimized by varying the experimental geometry and the nozzle size. For the collection of the harmonic radiation silicon and solar-blind diamond semiconductor detectors equipped with charge preamplifiers were applied. The possibility of using a single-crystal CVD diamond detector for separate measurement of the 3rd harmonic in the presence of a strong pumping radiation was explored. Our experiments show that the earlier suggested 0.7% conversion efficiency can really be obtained, but only in the case when phase matching is optimized with an elongated gas target length corresponding to the length of coherence.

  7. Iron nanoparticle growth induced by Kr-F excimer laser photolysis of Fe(CO)5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, A. V.; Gurentsov, E. V.; Priemchenko, K. Yu

    2013-06-01

    In this article the process of nanoparticle formation under the condensation of highly supersaturated atomic vapor produced by the photodissociation of metal-bearing compounds was investigated. The iron nanoparticles were synthesized by Kr-F laser pulse photolysis of Fe(CO)5. The measurements of an optical density of condensed phase were performed using a laser light extinction at a wavelength 633 nm. The particle size during their formation process was measured by a two-color time-resolved laser-induced incandescence. The final iron particle sizes and their structure were analyzed by a transmission electron microscopy. It has been shown that the process of iron particle formation in the investigated conditions could be divided onto three stages: the fast nucleation of iron atoms during 1-2 μs, the surface growth of particles up to the sizes of 1-6 nm with increasing volume fraction of condensed phase during 100-250 μs, and the relatively slow particle coagulation up to the final sizes of 5-9 nm. The effective rate constants of iron clusters and particle growth were extracted using laser light extinction measurements. The essential role of the reactions of iron clusters and particles with the parental Fe(CO)5 molecules was established. The kinetic mechanism of iron nanoparticle growth induced by photo-dissociation of Fe(CO)5 at room temperature based on obtained experimental results and known literature data has been suggested. The results obtained could be used for the developments of methods of synthesis of catalysts, magnetic nanopowders, and others nanomaterials at room temperature. Besides that, the presented experimental data could be useful for the validation of kinetic models of gas-phase condensation of supersaturated vapor of solids.

  8. Measurements of laser-imprinted perturbations and Rayleigh-Taylor growth with the Nike KrF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawley, C. J.; Gerber, K.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E. A.; Mostovych, A. N.; Obenschain, S. P.; Sethian, J. D.; Serlin, V.; Stamper, J. A.; Sullivan, C. A.; Bodner, S. E.; Colombant, D.; Dahlburg, J. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Gardner, J. H.; Brown, C.; Seely, J. F.; Lehecka, T.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Deniz, A. V.; Chan, Y.; Metzler, N.; Klapisch, M.

    1997-05-01

    Nike is a 56 beam Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser system using Induced Spatial Incoherence (ISI) beam smoothing with a measured focal nonuniformity <ΔI/I> of 1% rms in a single beam [S. Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 1996 (2098)]. When 37 of these beams are overlapped on the target, we estimate that the beam nonuniformity is reduced by √37 , to (ΔI/I)≅0.15% (excluding short-wavelength beam-to-beam interference). The extraordinary uniformity of the laser drive, along with a newly developed x-ray framing diagnostic, has provided a unique facility for the accurate measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor amplified laser-imprinted mass perturbations under conditions relevant to direct-drive laser fusion. Data from targets with smooth surfaces as well as those with impressed sine wave perturbations agree with our two-dimensional (2-D) radiation hydrodynamics code that includes the time-dependent ISI beam modulations. A 2-D simulation of a target with a 100 Å rms randomly rough surface finish driven by a completely uniform beam gives final perturbation amplitudes similar to the experimental data for the smoothest laser profile. These results are promising for direct-drive laser fusion.

  9. Acetone photolysis at 248 nm revisited: pressure dependence of the CO and CO2 quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Somnitz, H; Ufer, T; Zellner, R

    2009-10-14

    Pressure dependent CO and CO2 quantum yields in the laser pulse photolysis of acetone at 248 nm and T = 298 K have been measured directly using quantitative infrared diode laser absorption. The experiments cover the pressure range from 50 to 900 mbar. It is found that the quantum yields show a significant dependence on total pressure, with Phi(CO) decreasing from around 0.5 at 20 mbar to approximately 0.3 at 900 mbar. The corresponding CO2 yields as observed when O2 exists in the reaction mixture, exhibit exactly the opposite behaviour. For the sum of both a value of 1.05(-0.05)(+0.02) independent of pressure is obtained, showing that the sum of (Phi(CO) + Phi(CO2)) is a measure for the primary quantum yield in the photolysis of acetone. In addition, CO quantum yields and corresponding pressure dependences were measured in experiments using different bath gases including He, Ar, Kr, SF6, and O2 as third body colliders. The theoretical framework in which we discuss these data is based on our previous findings that the pressure dependence of the CO yield is a consequence of a stepwise fragmentation mechanism during which acetone decomposes initially into methyl and a vibrationally 'hot' acetyl radical, with the latter being able to decompose promptly into methyl plus CO. The pressure dependence of the CO yield then originates from the second step and is modelled quantitatively via statistical dynamical calculations using a combination of RRKM theory with a time-dependent master equation (ME) approach. From a comparison of experiment with theory the amount of excess energy in the vibrationally hot acetyl radicals (E* approximately 65 kJ mol(-1)) as well as the characteristic collision parameters for interaction of acetyl with the different bath gases were derived. Values of 90, 280, 310, 545, 550 and 1800 cm(-1) for the average energy transferred per downward collision for the bath gases He, Ar, Kr, O2, N2, and SF6, respectively, are obtained. The calculations also

  10. Cl2O photochemistry: ultraviolet/vis absorption spectrum temperature dependence and O(3P) quantum yield at 193 and 248 nm.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Feierabend, Karl J; Burkholder, James B

    2011-05-28

    The photochemistry of Cl(2)O (dichlorine monoxide) was studied using measurements of its UV/vis absorption spectrum temperature dependence and the O((3)P) atom quantum yield, Φ(Cl(2)O)(O)(λ), in its photolysis at 193 and 248 nm. The Cl(2)O UV/vis absorption spectrum was measured over the temperature range 201-296 K between 200 and 500 nm using diode array spectroscopy. Cl(2)O absorption cross sections, σ(Cl(2)O)(λ,T), at temperatures <296 K were determined relative to its well established room temperature values. A wavelength and temperature dependent parameterization of the Cl(2)O spectrum using the sum of six Gaussian functions, which empirically represent transitions from the ground (1)A(1) electronic state to excited states, is presented. The Gaussian functions are found to correlate well with published theoretically calculated vertical excitation energies. O((3)P) quantum yields in the photolysis of Cl(2)O at 193 and 248 nm were measured using pulsed laser photolysis combined with atomic resonance fluorescence detection of O((3)P) atoms. O((3)P) quantum yields were measured to be 0.85 ± 0.15 for 193 nm photolysis at 296 K and 0.20 ± 0.03 at 248 nm, which was also found to be independent of temperature (220-352 K) and pressure (17 and 28 Torr, N(2)). The quoted uncertainties are at the 2σ (95% confidence) level and include estimated systematic errors. ClO radical temporal profiles obtained following the photolysis of Cl(2)O at 248 nm, as reported previously in Feierabend et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 12052, (2010)], were interpreted to establish a <5% upper-limit for the O + Cl(2) photodissociation channel, which indicates that O((3)P) is primarily formed in the three-body, O + 2Cl, photodissociation channel at 248 nm. The analysis also indirectly provided a Cl atom quantum yield of 1.2 ± 0.1 at 248 nm. The results from this work are compared with previous studies where possible.

  11. Carbon nanotube formation by laser direct writing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.-T.; Su, H.-C.; Tsai, C.-M.; Liu, K.-L.; Chen, G.-D.; Huang, R.-H.; Yew, T.-R.

    2008-07-14

    This letter presents carbon nanotube (CNT) formation by laser direct writing using 248 nm KrF excimer pulsed laser in air at room temperature, which was applied to irradiate amorphous carbon (a-C) assisted by Ni catalysts underneath for the transformation of carbon species into CNTs. The CNTs were synthesized under appropriate combination of laser energy density and a-C thickness. The growth mechanism and key parameters to determine the success of CNT formation were also discussed. The demonstration of the CNT growth by laser direct writing in air at room temperature opens an opportunity of in-position CNT formation at low temperatures.

  12. Absolutely Calibrated Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectra in the 150 nm to 250 nm Range from Plasmas Generated by the NIKE KrF Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-25

    BN, Al, Si, S, Ti, Pd, and Au. Titanium-doped silica aerogels in pyrex cylinders were also irradiated. Spectra of the target elements were observed...silica aerogel targets at 248 nm was typically 6x10-6 the incident NIKE laser energy, and the spectral broadening corresponded to the 1 THz bandwidth of...targets consisted of planar foils of CH, BN, Al, Si, S, Ti, Pd, and Au. Titanium-doped silica aerogels in pyrex cylinders were also irradiated. Spectra of

  13. Ion imaging studies of the photodissociation dynamics of CH2I2 at 248 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Julia H.; Li, Hongwei; Lester, Marsha I.

    2013-12-01

    The photodissociation of CH2I2 at 248 nm is investigated using velocity map ion imaging with photoionization detection of the I∗ (2P1/2) products. The velocity distribution of the I∗ products reveals that only a small fraction of the available energy is released as translational energy, consistent with a simple impulsive model. Most of the excess energy is channeled into internal excitation with = 36.3 kcal mol-1 for CH2I radical fragments produced with I∗ atoms. The anisotropy angular distribution of the I∗ fragments and corresponding positive anisotropy parameter are indicative of prompt dissociation and electronic state mixing.

  14. A novel approach to developer-soluble anti-reflective coatings for 248-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Ramil-Marcelo L.; Lowes, Joyce A.; Washburn, Carlton A.; Guerrero, Douglas J.

    2007-03-01

    A novel approach to developer-soluble bottom anti-reflective coatings (BARCs) for 248-nm lithography was demonstrated. The BARC formulations are photosensitive, dye-filled systems incorporated with a polymer binder. The films are generated by thermally crosslinking the polymer matrix, and are then photochemically decrosslinked in order to render them soluble in developer solutions. The BARCs are compatible with solvents commonly used in the industry. Easy modification of the films with regard to optical properties for potential use with various substrates was also demonstrated. The BARCs exhibit anisotropic development in aqueous tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solutions subsequent to simulated photoresist application, exposure, and post-exposure bake.

  15. Competition between photochemistry and energy transfer in ultraviolet-excited diazabenzenes. I. Photofragmentation studies of pyrazine at 248 nm and 266 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Sevy, Eric T.; Muyskens, Mark A.; Rubin, Seth M.; Flynn, George W.; Muckerman, James T.

    2000-04-01

    The quantum yield for the formation of HCN from the photodissociation of pyrazine excited at 248 nm and 266 nm is determined by IR diode probing of the HCN photoproduct. HCN photoproducts from excited pyrazine are produced via three different dissociation channels, one that is extremely ''prompt'' and two others that are ''late.'' The total quantum yield from all reaction channels obtained at low quencher gas pressures, {phi}=1.3{+-}0.2 for 248 nm and 0.5{+-}0.3 for 266 nm, is in agreement with preliminary studies of this process as well as recent molecular beam studies. To investigate if HCN production is the result of pyrazine multiphoton absorption, this photodissociation process has been further studied by observing the HCN quantum yield as a function of total quencher gas pressure (10 mTorr pyrazine, balance SF{sub 6}) and as a function of 248 nm laser fluence from 2.8 to 82 mJ/cm2. At the highest SF{sub 6} pressures, the HCN quantum yield shows strong positive correlation with laser fluence, indicating that the ''prompt'' channel is the result of multiphoton absorption; however, at low pressure, the HCN quantum yield is affected little by changing laser fluence, indicating that the majority of the HCN photoproducts at low pressure are produced from pyrazine which has absorbed only one UV photon. At the lowest pressures sampled, HCN produced from the one-photon ''late'' process accounts for more than 95% of all HCN formed (at low laser fluence). At high pressures the single photon ''late'' pyrazine dissociation is quenched, and HCN produced at high quencher gas pressures comes only from the multiphoton absorption channel, which can be clearly observed to depend on laser fluence. The HCN quantum yield as a function of laser intensity at high pressure has been fit to a quadratic function that can be used to determine the amount of ''prompt'' ''unquenched'' HCN produced from multiphoton photodissociation. Additionally, the information theoretic prior functions

  16. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Control of laser machining of polycrystalline diamond plates by the method of low-coherence optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, Vitalii V.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Pimenov, S. M.; Volkov, P. V.; Goryunov, A. V.; Ivanov, V. V.; Novikov, M. A.; Markelov, V. A.; Tertyshnik, A. D.; Ustavshchikov, S. S.

    2005-07-01

    The possibility of applying low-coherence fibre optics interferometry for local contactless measurement of the optical thickness of polycrystalline diamond plates during high-power laser-pulse processing of their rough surface is demonstrated. A unique automated experimental system is developed to control the thickness of samples during ablation of their surface by a scanning 248-nm KrF excimer laser beam. It is shown that this technique is suitable for on-line control of laser polishing and for preparing plane-parallel plates.

  17. Photodissociation of pernitric acid (HO2NO2) at 248 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, Helene; Smith, Gregory P.; Golden, David M.

    1989-01-01

    The photodissociation of pernitric acid (PNA) was studied at 248 nm. The quantum yield for production of OH radicals is 34 + or - 16 percent. The yield of OH from PNA was measured relative to that of H2O2. The translational and rotational energy content of the OH photofragment from PNA was characterized. A fluorescent emission was also observed and characterized. It is attributed to electronically excited NO2 produced in the PNA photodissociation. A maximum yield of 30 percent for NO2 production was determined. The intensity of this emission, and a mass spectrometric peak at m/e = 33, were found to be useful means of characterizing the purity of the PNA sample.

  18. Space Resolved XUV Spectroscopy and Shearing Interferometry from a 10 ps KrF Laser-Produced-Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, E. J.; Griem, H. R.; Elton, R. C.; Scott, H. A.; Moreno, J. C.

    1999-11-01

    We produced a plasma using 50 mJ, 10 ps pulses from a KrF laser on boron-carbide targets, with a focal spot size of ≈. 30 μm. We achieved an ≈ 30 μm spatial resolution (along the plasma axis) on spectra obtained using a crossed slit equipped 1 m grazing-incidence spectrograph. We added also a shearing interferometer with an air wedge [Sarkisov, G. S Instruments and Experimental Techniques Vol39, Iss. 5 ,727, 1996] to produce interferograms of the plasma with an ≈ 45 μm background fringe spacing. Correlations between estimated electron densities using both methods: interferometry and emission spectroscopy of Hidrogen and Helium-like Boron and Carbon, will be presented. We will also discuss comparisons between experimental spectra and predicted results using the atomic physics postprocessor CRETIN integrated with TOTAL, a line broadening code.

  19. Difference in the behavior of oxygen deficient defects in Ge-doped silica optical fiber preforms under ArF and KrF excimer laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essid, M.; Brebner, J. L.; Albert, J.; Awazu, K.

    1998-10-01

    Photobleaching of optical absorption bands in the 5 eV region and the creation of others at higher and lower energy have been examined in the case of ArF (6.4 eV) and KrF (5 eV) excimer laser irradiation of 3GeO2:97SiO2 glasses. We report a difference in the transformation process of the neutral oxygen monovacancy and also of the germanium lone pair center (GLPC) into electron trap centers associated with fourfold coordinated Ge ions and Ge-E' centers when we use one or the other laser. Correlations between absorption bands and electron spin resonance signals were made after different steps of laser irradiation. It was found that the KrF laser generates twice as many Ge-E' centers as the ArF laser for the same dose of energy delivered. The main reason for this difference is found to be the more efficient bleaching of the GLPC (5.14 eV) by the KrF laser compared to that by the ArF laser.

  20. The research progress of metrological 248nm deep ultraviolent microscope inspection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-xin; Li, Qi; Gao, Si-tian; Shi, Yu-shu; Li, Wei; Li, Shi

    2016-01-01

    In lithography process, the precision of wafer pattern to a large extent depends on the geometric dimensioning and tolerance of photomasks when accuracy of lithography aligner is certain. Since the minimum linewidth (Critical Dimension) of the aligner exposing shrinks to a few tens of nanometers in size, one-tenth of tolerance errors in fabrication may lead to microchip function failure, so it is very important to calibrate these errors of photomasks. Among different error measurement instruments, deep ultraviolent (DUV) microscope because of its high resolution, as well as its advantages compared to scanning probe microscope restrained by measuring range and scanning electron microscope restrained by vacuum environment, makes itself the most suitable apparatus. But currently there is very few DUV microscope adopting 248nm optical system, means it can attain 80nm resolution; furthermore, there is almost no DUV microscope possessing traceable calibration capability. For these reason, the National Institute of Metrology, China is developing a metrological 248nm DUV microscope mainly consists of DUV microscopic components, PZT and air supporting stages as well as interferometer calibration framework. In DUV microscopic component, the Köhler high aperture transmit condenser, DUV splitting optical elements and PMT pinhole scanning elements are built. In PZT and air supporting stages, a novel PZT actuating flexural hinge stage nested separate X, Y direction kinematics and a friction wheel driving long range air supporting stage are researched. In interferometer framework, a heterodyne multi-pass interferometer measures XY axis translation and Z axis rotation through Zerodur mirror mounted on stage. It is expected the apparatus has the capability to calibrate one dimensional linewidths and two dimensional pitches ranging from 200nm to 50μm with expanded uncertainty below 20nm.

  1. KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption in silica glasses produced by melting synthetic silica powder

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuu, Nobu; Sasaki, Toshiya; Kojima, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Jun-ichiro; Nakamura, Takayuki; Horikoshi, Hideharu

    2013-07-07

    KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption of silica glasses produced by electric melting and flame fusion of synthetic silica powder were investigated. The growth of KrF-laser-induced absorption was more gradual than that of ArF-laser-induced absorption. Induced absorption spectra exhibited a peak at about 5.8 eV, of which the position and width differed slightly among samples and laser species. Widths of ArF-laser-induced absorption spectra were wider than those of KrF-laser-induced spectra. KrF-laser-induced absorption is reproducible by two Gaussian absorption bands peaking at 5.80 eV with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.62 eV and at 6.50 eV with FWHM of 0.74 eV. For reproduction of ArF-laser-induced absorption, Gaussian bands at 5.41 eV with FWHM of 0.62 eV was necessary in addition to components used for reproducing KrF-laser-induced absorption. Based on the discussion of the change of defect structures evaluated from change of absorption components, we proposed that the precursor of the 5.8-eV band ascribed to E Prime center ({identical_to}Si{center_dot}) is {identical_to}Si-H HO-Si{identical_to} structures formed by the reaction between strained Si-O-Si bonds and interstitial H{sub 2} molecules during the irradiation.

  2. Surface foaming of collagen, chitosan and other biopolymer films by KrF excimer laser ablation in the photomechanical regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazare, S.; Tokarev, V.; Sionkowska, A.; Wiśniewski, M.

    2005-08-01

    Collagen, an important material made of a protein of the extracellular matrix, was extracted from rat tail tendons by acetic acid dissolution, and dry glassy films (15% water content) with smooth surfaces were casted from the solution with a thickness of ˜25 μm. Collagen and similar biopolymer films surface were exposed to single pulses of radiation of the KrF laser with increasing fluence. A white damaged area appears on the treated surface at a threshold of 0.5 J/cm2 with a single pulse and becomes more visible for higher fluence. SEM and profilometry of the ablated surface displays an important swelling (˜5 7 μm) and a microscopic foam structure indicative of the laser induced expansion of the excited material. This process is due to the explosive ablation (a critical phenomenon also called explosive boiling or phase explosion) of the irradiated material and produces upon laser heating a high concentration of bubbles within the polymer because of the relatively large absorption depth (20 μm) and the presence of a large amount of water in the material. Further bubble colliding and bursting produces a three-dimensional polymer micro-foam with interconnected pores. This is the first this result has been reported. The laser induced micro-foam may display some interesting properties for new applications.

  3. Effect of KrF Pulsed Excimer Laser Treatment on Surface Microstructure of Al-Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanty, S.; Gouthama

    2016-11-01

    In the present research, the Al-Si alloy surface is treated by KrF excimer pulse laser for different number of laser pulses in ambient condition at energy 4.75 J/cm2. The surface microstructural characterization was done by the optical microscope, in situ video recording during laser pulsing, SEM and TEM. The fretting wear test was undertaken to assess the tribological behavior. In situ video recording showed changes in the surface reflectivity with the number of pulses which is related to progressive changes in the surface compositional homogeneity. After ten pulses, signs of rippled structure were observed. The 15 pulse samples showed star-like morphological feature at the central region. The TEM observations showed high density of stacking faults/twins in Si after first pulse treatment. After 15 pulses, nano-crystalline Si precipitates in the size range <5 nm are seen to be homogeneously distributed. A cellular structure with the cell size <100 nm formed in the matrix. These cell boundaries were decorated with the Si nanocrystals. A positive effect in wear resistance property is observed after the 15 pulses treatment.

  4. Measurements of Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) and Electron Density/Temperature Profiles in Plasmas Produced by the Nike KrF Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    We will present results of simultaneous measurements of LPI-driven light scattering and density/temperature profiles in CH plasmas produced by the Nike krypton fluoride laser (λ = 248 nm). The primary diagnostics for the LPI measurement are time-resolved spectrometers with absolute intensity calibration in spectral ranges relevant to the optical detection of stimulated Raman scattering or two plasmon decay. The spectrometers are capable of monitoring signal intensity relative to thermal background radiation from plasma providing a useful way to analyze LPI initiation. For further understanding of LPI processes, the recently implemented grid image refractometer (Nike-GIR)a is used to measure the coronal plasma profiles. In this experiment, Nike-GIR is equipped with a 5th harmonic probe laser (λ = 213 nm) in attempt to probe into a high density region over the previous peak density with λ = 263 nm probe light ( 4 ×1021 cm-3). The LPI behaviors will be discussed with the measured data sets. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  5. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.

  6. Analysis of KrF excimer laser beam modification resulting from ablation under closed thick film flowing filtered water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowding, Colin; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    The application of a closed thick film flowing filtered water to immerse the ablation etching mechanism of an excimer laser poses interesting possibilities concerning debris control, modification of machined feature topography and modification of the ablation rate. Furthermore, these parameters have been shown to be dependent on flow velocity; hence, offering further user control of machining characteristics. However, the impact of this technique requires investigation. This contribution offers comparison of the calculated ablation pressure and the effect on feature surface characteristics given for laser ablation of bisphenol A polycarbonate using KrF excimer laser radiation in ambient air against laser ablation of the same substrate under closed thick film flowing filtered water immersion. Also, an impact of such immersion equipment on the optical performance of the micromachining centre used is quantified and reviewed. The pressure is calculated to have risen by a magnitude of 48, when using the liquid immersed ablation technique. This increase in pressure is proposed to have an increased surface roughness, promoting the number of asperities with a surface area lower than 16 μm 2; resulting in a diffuse reflection of light and an apparent darkening of features. The focal length of the optical system was accurately predicted to increase by 2.958 mm, when using the closed flowing liquid immersion equipment. This equipment is predicted to have increased the optical depth of focus via reduction in the angle of convergence of the two defining image rays; yet the perceived focus, measured discretely by mean feature wall angle, was found to be 25% smaller when using the closed thick film flowing filtered water immersion technique instead of similar laser ablation in ambient air. A compressed plume interaction is proposed as a contributing factor in this change.

  7. Nanobump arrays fabricated by laser irradiation of polystyrene particle layers on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.M.; Sun, Z.; Luk'yanchuk, B.S.; Hong, M.H.; Shi, L.P.

    2005-04-18

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanobump arrays were fabricated by laser irradiation of a regular lattice of absorptive polystyrene (PS) microspheres on an undoped (100) Si wafer. The experiments were performed with single-pulse 248 nm KrF laser radiation. The structure of the arrays fabricated by this method was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The near-field effects under the absorptive particle are studied. The ablation and thermal processes induced by the optical near-field around the particles are investigated. The formation mechanism of nanobumps is discussed.

  8. Micro-nano scale ripples on metallic glass induced by laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W. D.; Ye, L. M.; Liu, K. X.

    2011-02-15

    A Zr{sub 47.7}Cu{sub 31}Ni{sub 9}Al{sub 12.3} bulk metallic glass was irradiated directly by KrF excimer laser pulses with wavelength 248 nm and duration 10 ns. Scanning electronic microscope photographs indicated that many ripples in micro-nano scale would be generated on the edge of the irradiated area under the action of the higher intensity laser pulse. Detailed observation demonstrated that the ripples exhibited fluidity and became closer and closer out from interior. Theoretical analysis revealed the formation mechanism of the ripples, including melting, subsequent propagation of capillary waves and final solidification.

  9. Pulsed Laser Processing of Functionalized Polysaccharides for Controlled Release Drug Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, R.; Popescu, C.; Popescu, A. C.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I.; Caraene, G.; Albulescu, R.; Buruiana, T.; Chrisey, D.

    We report on the deposition of triacetate-pullulan polysaccharide thin films on drug pellets (diclofenac sodium) by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation method. The radiation generated by a pulsed excimer KrF* laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 20 ns) operated at 2 Hz repetition rate was used for ice targets evaporation. The timed - controlled drug delivery was proved by spectroscopic in vitro studies and in vivo anti-inflammatory investigations on rabbits. We showed that the coating of drug pellets with triacetate-pullulan thin films resulted in the delayed delivery of the drug for up to 30 min.

  10. Ion Imaging Studies of CH_2I_2 Photodissociation at 248 NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Julia H.; Li, Hongwei; Lester, Marsha I.

    2013-06-01

    CH_2I_2 plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry as a significant natural source of organohalide compounds. The photodissociation dynamics of CH_2I_2 in the ultraviolet range of 277-305 nm via the two lowest B_1 excited states has been well studied using one-color velocity map ion imaging (VMI) and photofragment translational spectroscopy. In this two-color experimental study, CH_2I_2 is photodissociated by 248 nm via the B_2 or A_1 excited states to give rise to CH_2I and I (^2P_3_/_2) or I^* (^2P_1_/_2). The iodine atoms are then state selectively ionized using a (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process near 310 nm and detected by VMI. Preliminary results show about 85% of the available energy is being funneled into the internal energy of the CH_2I fragment, consistent with prior infrared emission results of Baughcum and Leone. The anisotropy parameter derived from the image indicates this is a fast dissociation process and reflects the character of the electronic transition. The internal energy distribution of the CH_2I fragment is of particular interest because of its subsequent reaction with O_2 in a near thermo-neutral reaction to produce the smallest Criegee intermediate, CH_2OO. We anticipate that the internal energy contained in CH_2I will likely be carried into CH_2OO. S. L. Baughcum and S. R. Leone, J. Chem. Phys. 72, 6531 (1980).

  11. Photodissociation of dibromoethanes at 248 nm: An ignored channel of Br{sub 2} elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hsin-Lung; Lee, Ping-Chen; Tsai, Po-Yu; Lin, King-Chuen; Kuo, H. H.; Chen, P. H.; Chang, A. H. H.

    2009-05-14

    Br{sub 2} molecular elimination is probed in the photodissociation of 1,1- and 1,2-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}Br{sub 2} isomeric forms at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. Their photodissociation processes differ markedly from each other. The quantum yield of the Br{sub 2} fragment in 1,2-dibromoethane is 0.36{+-}0.18, in contrast to a value of 0.05{+-}0.03 in 1,1-dibromoethane. The vibrational population ratios of Br{sub 2}(v=1)/Br{sub 2}(v=0) are 0.8{+-}0.1 and 0.5{+-}0.2 for 1,2- and 1,1-dibromoethanes, respectively. The Br{sub 2} yield densities are found to increase by a factor of 35% and 190% for 1,2- and 1,1-dibromoethanes within the same temperature increment. In the ab initio potential energy calculations, the transition state (TS) along the adiabatic ground state surface may correlate to the Br{sub 2} products. The TS energy for 1,2-dibromoethane is well below the excitation energy at 483 kJ/mol, whereas that for 1,1-dibromoethane is slightly above. Such a small TS energy barrier impedes the photodissociation of the ground state 1,1-dibromoethane such that the production yield of Br{sub 2} may become relatively low, but rise rapidly with the temperature. The TS structure shows a larger bond distance of Br-Br in 1,2-dibromoethane than that in 1,1-dibromoethane. That explains why the former isomer may result in hotter vibrational population of the Br{sub 2} fragments.

  12. Control of structure and electric properties of amorphous organic semiconductive thin films prepared by excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, S.; Sato, H.; Yamabe, T.

    Excimer laser ablation (ELA) of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) with ArF (193 nm), KrF (248 nm), XeCl (308 nm), and XeF (351 nm) beams under optimized conditions enables us to obtain organic semiconductor thin films with various structures such as amorphous carbon, polyperinaphthalene (PPN), and PTCDA itself. Electric conductivity and carrier species of the films depend strongly on the ablation wavelength, fluence, substrate temperature, and ambient vapor species. It is found that electric conductivities of the films are controllable, ranging from 10-6 to 101 Scm-1 with the selection of appropriate ablation conditions. An organic pn junction is successfully constructed by the change of ablation conditions during ELA. Furthermore, ELA of PTCDA at 248 nm in iodine vapor leads to formation of tetraiodoallene in the film.

  13. Development of a Silicon Based Electron Beam Transmission Window for Use in a KrF Excimer Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Gentile; H.M. Fan; J.W. Hartfield; R.J. Hawryluk; F. Hegeler; P.J. Heitzenroeder; C.H. Jun; L.P. Ku; P.H. LaMarche; M.C. Myers; J.J. Parker; R.F. Parsells; M. Payen; S. Raftopoulos; J.D. Sethian

    2002-11-21

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), in collaboration with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is currently investigating various novel materials (single crystal silicon, <100>, <110> and <111>) for use as electron-beam transmission windows in a KrF excimer laser system. The primary function of the window is to isolate the active medium (excimer gas) from the excitation mechanism (field-emission diodes). Chosen window geometry must accommodate electron energy transfer greater than 80% (750 keV), while maintaining structural integrity during mechanical load (1.3 to 2.0 atm base pressure differential, approximate 0.5 atm cyclic pressure amplitude, 5 Hz repetition rate) and thermal load across the entire hibachi area (approximate 0.9 W {center_dot} cm superscript ''-2''). In addition, the window must be chemically resistant to attack by fluorine free-radicals (hydrofluoric acid, secondary). In accordance with these structural, functional, and operational parameters, a 22.4 mm square silicon prototype window, coated with 500 nm thin-film silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), has been fabricated. The window consists of 81 square panes with a thickness of 0.019 mm {+-} 0.001 mm. Stiffened (orthogonal) sections are 0.065 mm in width and 0.500 mm thick (approximate). Appended drawing (Figure 1) depicts the window configuration. Assessment of silicon (and silicon nitride) material properties and CAD modeling and analysis of the window design suggest that silicon may be a viable solution to inherent parameters and constraints.

  14. Nitryl chloride (ClNO2): UV/vis absorption spectrum between 210 and 296 K and O(3P) quantum yield at 193 and 248 nm.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Buddhadeb; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Talukdar, Ranajit K; Roberts, James M; Burkholder, James B

    2012-06-21

    Recent studies have shown that the UV/vis photolysis of nitryl chloride (ClNO2) can be a major source of reactive chlorine in the troposphere. The present work reports measurements of the ClNO2 absorption spectrum and its temperature dependence between 210 and 296 K over the wavelength range 200–475 nm using diode array spectroscopy. The room temperature spectrum obtained in this work was found to be in good agreement with the results from Ganske et al. (J. Geophys. Res. 1992, 97, 7651) over the wavelength range common to both studies (200–370 nm) but differs systematically from the currently recommended spectrum for use in atmospheric models. The present results lead to a decrease in the calculated atmospheric ClNO2 photolysis rate by 30%. Including the temperature dependence of the ClNO2 spectrum decreases the calculated atmospheric photolysis rate at lower temperatures (higher altitudes) even further. A parametrization of the wavelength and temperature dependence of the ClNO2 spectrum is presented. O(3P) quantum yields, Φ(ClNO2)(O), in the photolysis of ClNO2 at 193 and 248 nm were measured at 296 K using pulsed laser photolysis combined with atomic resonance fluorescence detection of O(3P) atoms. Φ(ClNO2)(O)(λ) was found to be 0.67 ± 0.12 and 0.15 ± 0.03 (2σ error limits, including estimated systematic errors) at 193 and 248 nm, respectively, indicating that multiple dissociation channels are active in the photolysis of ClNO2 at these wavelengths. The Φ(ClNO2)(O)(λ) values obtained in this work are discussed in light of previous ClNO2 photodissociation studies and the differences are discussed.

  15. Conceptual design of a 1. 5-MJ, 2-Hz KrF fusion laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J.; Allen, W.O.; Hipkin, H.G.

    1980-12-01

    The report consists of two major elements: Section II presents an overview of the design study and discusses the major results and conclusions derived from this study; and Section III provides details of the technical analyses and results and presents technical summaries that discuss e-beam pulsed-power conditioning, optical-system design, mechanical-systems design, facilities, overall laser-system efficiency, and capital costs.

  16. The Nike Electron Beam-Pumped KrF Laser Amplifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-01

    enclosed in a sealed tunnel. The design considerations for the amplifier are described in greater detail elsewhere7• SOhm WATER DIELECTRIC PULSE... issues of direct drive laser fusion1• It uses spatially and temporally incoherent light to reduce the low-mode intensity nonuniformities to less than 2...Routine jitter of the switch firing with this arrangement is less than ± 5 nsec. The vacuum insulator is a radial monolithic arrangement which uses

  17. X-ray amplification in intense ultrashort KrF laser-Xe cluster interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Tz. B.; Davis, J.; Whitney, K. G.; Petrov, G. M.

    2012-09-01

    In earlier work, a time-dependent, ionization dynamic model of a cluster of xenon atoms was constructed [2,3] in an effort to determine conditions under which the X-ray line amplification data that was observed experimentally at wavelengths between 2.71 and 2.88 Å[1] could be replicated. Model calculations showed that, at laser intensities greater than 1019 W/cm2, the outermost N-shell electrons of xenon would be stripped away by tunnel ionization in less than a femtosecond. They also showed that L-shell electrons within the resulting cluster of Ni-like ions could be photoionized at a sufficient rate as to generate population inversions between these hole states and the states they radiatively decayed into. These inversions only lasted for several femtoseconds, and they were generated early in time when the cluster was being rapidly heated and the cluster's density was rapidly evolving, but was still high. They were seen to depend on the heating and expansion dynamics of the cluster, which had not been modeled in detail in this early work. In this paper, molecular dynamics calculations are described in which the rapidly evolving temperatures and ion densities of an intensely laser-heated cluster are calculated for different peak laser intensities and for two different sized xenon nano-clusters. This data is then used as an input to the ionization dynamic calculations in order to determine the influence of cluster size and of peak laser intensity on the gain coefficient calculations. In these calculations, inner-shell photoionization rates are shaped by the temperature and density dependence of the bremsstrahlung emissions under the assumption that these emissions drive the photoionizations. This shaping produces calculated gain coefficients that agree well with the measured ones.

  18. Pulse Shaping and Energy Storage Capabilities of Angularly-Multiplexed KrF Laser Fusion Drivers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    the laser cell, including the e-beam pump configuration. Four sets of opposing e-beams are injected by two cathode pairs on each side with an axial...profile snapshots (at 150 nsec) of the e-beams, ASE, internal intensities I(z), and effective saturation intensity ISAT. 4P_ `Y]Y`;a( `J [4 F Q ; 0K L X...a(`V4`Y]Y`Y]Y`;a( `J JJ4 PEB (MW/cm3) IASE (MW/cm2) (a) (b) (c) Q#b#!HP"#$% F#0YL5 %F?K\\XF#0f5 J4P4 JP4 4PJ !4J44 Y8., 02+5 Fig. 7: Total

  19. Effect of acid labile ether protecting groups on the oxide etch resistance and lithographic performance of 248-nm resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanasi, Pushkara R.; Cornett, Kathleen M.; Lawson, Margaret C.

    2000-06-01

    In our attempts to develop etch resistance 248 nm positive resists, we have designed and synthesized thermally stable and acid sensitive methylbenzyl ether (MBE) protected poly(hydroxystyrene) derivatives. Results presented in this paper clearly illustrate that the MBE protecting group provides superior etch resistance to conventional carbonate, ester and acetal/ketal based protecting groups. It is also shown that the MBE protecting group is thermally stable and undergoes acid catalyzed deprotection leading to preferential rearrangement products due to electrophilic ring substitution. Such a rearrangement is shown to provide a unique mechanism to reduce/eliminate resist shrinkage and improve lithographic performance.

  20. Comparative analysis of stable ultrahigh power-density 248 nm channels formed in Kr and Xe cluster targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Alex B.; McCorkindale, John C.; Poopalasingam, Sankar; Longworth, James W.; Rhodes, Charles K.

    2013-09-01

    Comparative single-pulse studies of self-trapped plasma channel formation in Xe and Kr cluster targets produced with 1-2 TW femtosecond 248 nm pulses reveal energy efficient channel formation (>90%) and highly robust stability for the channeled propagation in both materials. Images of the channel morphology produced by Thomson scattering from the electron density and direct visualization of the Xe(M) and Kr(L) x-ray emission from radiating ions illustrate the (1) channel formation, (2) the narrow region of confined trapped propagation, (3) the abrupt termination of the channel that occurs at the point the power falls below the critical power Pcr, and, in the case of Xe channels, (4) the presence of saturated absorption of Xe(M) radiation that generates an extended peripheral zone of ionization. The measured rates for energy deposition per unit length are ˜ 1.46 J cm-1 and ˜ 0.82 J cm-1 for Xe and Kr targets, respectively, and the single pulse Xe(M) energy yield is estimated to be > 50 mJ, a value indicating an efficiency >20% for ˜ 1 keV x-ray production from the incident 248 nm pulse.

  1. X-ray emission analysis of a plasma source using an yttrium and a mylar target for the generation of 2.48 nm wavelength microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palladino, Libero; Lorenzo, Ramon Gimenez De; Emilio, Maurizio Di Paolo; Limongi, Tania

    2013-05-01

    In this work, the characteristics of X-ray beam generated from a plasma produced by focusing a Nd-Yag/glass laser beam on mylar or yttrium target were presented. For each target material, the conversion efficiencies of the soft X-ray emission in two different energy ranges, (i) 300-510 eV (almost coincident with the Water Window), (ii) 450-850 eV were measured. The experimental results of the conversion efficiencies will be utilized at the PLASMA-X laboratory of L'Aquila University for the realization of an intense monochromatic X-ray microbeam to be used in radiobiological and in transmission X-ray microscopy applications. In the presented experimental set-up, at the wavelength of 2.48 nm, a monochromatic soft X-rays beam was collected by multilayer spherical mirrors reflecting at an incidence angle close to the normal of the surface. The optical system geometry, the monochromatic beam intensity and the measures of efficiency of conversion of X-ray were described in this paper [5].

  2. Effects of Laser Wavelength and Fluence in Pulsed Laser Deposition of Ge Films

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Seong Shan; Reenaas, Turid Worren; Siew, Wee Ong; Tou, Teck Yong; Ladam, Cecile

    2011-03-30

    Nanosecond lasers with ultra-violet, visible and infrared wavelengths: KrF (248 nm, 25 ns) and Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm, 5 ns) were used to ablate polycrystalline Ge target and deposit Ge films in vacuum (<10-6 Torr). Time-integrated optical emission spectra were obtained for laser fluence from 0.5-10 J/cm{sup 2}. Neutrals and ionized Ge species in the plasma plume were detected by optical emission spectroscopy. Ge neutrals dominated the plasma plume at low laser fluence while Ge{sup +} ions above some threshold fluence. The deposited amorphous thin-film samples consisted of particulates of size from nano to micron. The relation of the film properties and plume species at different laser fluence and wavelengths were discussed.

  3. A KrF laser electron-beam-pumped at a specific rate of 1.6 GW/l-atm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchnev, V. M.; Klementov, A. D.; Sergeev, P. B.

    1981-06-01

    An electron-beam-pumped KrF laser has been investigated in the gas mixture-pressure range of 1-5 atm. At the optimal pressure of the mixture, Ar:Kr:F2 = 300:30:13.3 atm, in the active volume of 0.45 l, a laser energy of 8.8 J has been obtained (the lasing pulse duration being approximately 70 ns), and a laser efficiency of 4.5% has been recorded. Using the laser efficiency and output results, the intensity saturation for different pressures of the working medium has been computed, and it was shown that laser kinetics is substantially influenced by the heating of the medium during pulsed pumping. It was concluded that lasing with an efficiency of approximately 10% and a power output of approximately 40 to 50 J/l was possible; however, this requires the use of resonator optics with a damage threshold that is greater than 15 MW/sq cm.

  4. Improvement of the atmospheric discharge laser-triggered ability using multiple pulses from a kilohertz KrF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaura, Michiteru

    2005-08-01

    The potential ability of lasers to control lightning can be improved by using a train of pulses with submillisecond separations. Laser-triggered experiments in a small-scale (10-mm gap) atmospheric discharge facility show that the triggering is dramatically enhanced when a five-pulse train of sub-Joule energy is used instead of a single pulse. This effect increases rapidly as the pulse interval is reduced. It appears that at a submillisecond pulse interval, sufficient positive and negative ions survive in subsequent pulses, thus enabling easy deionization. Hence, significant plasma buildup occurs from one pulse to the next. However, this persistence of ions would appear to imply that the rate of recombination (effectively a charge transfer between ions) is considerably lower than previously believed.

  5. High-resolution imaging spectrometer for recording absolutely calibrated far ultraviolet spectra from laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Charles M.; Seely, John F.; Feldman, Uri; Holland, Glenn E.; Weaver, James L.; Obenschain, Steven P.; Kjornrattanawanich, Benjawan; Fielding, Drew

    2008-10-15

    An imaging spectrometer was designed and fabricated for recording far ultraviolet spectra from laser-produced plasmas with wavelengths as short as 155 nm. The spectrometer implements a Cassegrain telescope and two gratings in a tandem Wadsworth optical configuration that provides diffraction limited resolution. Spectral images were recorded from plasmas produced by the irradiation of various target materials by intense KrF laser radiation with 248 nm wavelength. Two pairs of high-resolution gratings can be selected for the coverage of two wavebands, one grating pair with 1800 grooves/mm and covering approximately 155-175 nm and another grating pair with 1200 grooves/mm covering 230-260 nm. The latter waveband includes the 248 nm KrF laser wavelength, and the former waveband includes the wavelength of the two-plasmon decay instability at (2/3) the KrF laser wavelength (165 nm). The detection media consist of a complementary metal oxide semiconductor imager, photostimulable phosphor image plates, and a linear array of 1 mm{sup 2} square silicon photodiodes with 0.4 ns rise time. The telescope mirrors, spectrometer gratings, and 1 mm{sup 2} photodiode were calibrated using synchrotron radiation, and this enables the measurement of the absolute emission from the laser-produced plasmas with temporal, spatial, and spectral resolutions. The spectrometer is capable of measuring absolute spectral emissions at 165 nm wavelength as small as 5x10{sup -7} J/nm from a plasma source area of 0.37 mm{sup 2} and with 0.4 ns time resolution.

  6. Immobilization of urease by laser techniques: synthesis and application to urea biosensors.

    PubMed

    György, E; Sima, F; Mihailescu, I N; Smausz, T; Megyeri, G; Kékesi, R; Hopp, B; Zdrentu, L; Petrescu, S M

    2009-04-01

    Urease thin films have been immobilized using matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation for biosensor applications in clinical diagnostics. The targets exposed to laser radiation were made of frozen composites that had been manufactured by dissolving urease in distilled water. An UV KrF* (lambda = 248 nm, tauFWHM congruent with 30 ns, nu = 10 Hz) excimer source was used for the multipulse laser irradiation of the targets that were cooled down to solidification using Peltier elements. The incident laser fluence was set at 0.4 J/cm2. The surface morphology and chemical bonding states of the laser immobilized urease thin films were investigated by atomic force microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The enzymatic activity and kinetics of the immobilized urease were assayed by the Worthington method, which monitors urea hydrolysis by coupling ammonia production to a glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. Decreased absorbance was found at 340 nm and correlated with the enzymatic activity of urease.

  7. Creatinine biomaterial thin films grown by laser techniques.

    PubMed

    György, E; Axente, E; Mihailescu, I N; Predoi, D; Ciuca, S; Neamtu, J

    2008-03-01

    Creatinine thin films were synthesised by matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques for enzyme-based biosensor applications. An UV KrF* (lambda=248 nm, tau approximately 10 ns) excimer laser source was used for the irradiation of the targets at incident fluence values in the 0.3-0.5 J/cm2 range. For the matrix assisted PLD the targets consisted on a frozen composite obtained by dissolving the biomaterials in distilled water. The surface morphology, chemical composition and structure of the obtained biomaterial thin films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as a function of the target preparation procedure and incident laser fluence.

  8. In situ diagnostics of pulse laser-induced defects in DUV transparent fused silica glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Ch.; Triebel, W.; Bark-Zollmann, S.; Grebner, D.

    2000-05-01

    Excimer laser pulses (λ=248 or 193 nm) induce transient and permanent defects in optical glasses of high UV transparency. Such defects are causing additional absorption and changes of density and refractive index, respectively (compaction). The interaction of each laser pulse with different OH-rich fused silica samples was investigated by real time measurements of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and of Raman spectra excited by the 248 nm KrF-excimer laser. The irradiation of the glasses with energy densities of about 10 mJ/cm2 and more induces E‧ and NBOH defects simultaneously. The laser-induced fluorescence of NBOH defect centres at 650 nm characterises the kinetics of defect generation and relaxation. The primary absorption process is the two-photon absorption of KrF laser pulses. The relaxation of defects in the time interval between the laser pulses is mainly influenced by diffusion limited processes. Locally resolved LIF and Raman spectra allow the investigation of homogeneity and laser damage stability in large area substrates (e.g. for mask blanks). Raman spectra excited by KrF laser pulses are measured to detect precursors and intermediates of laser-induced defects and molecular hydrogen in the glass matrix. The detection limit of H2 molecules is in the range of 1017 cm-3. A correlation between LIF intensities and H2 concentrations is found.

  9. Resonant Infrared Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Deposition of Polymers: Improving the Morphology of As-Deposited Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubb, Daniel; Papantonakis, Michael; Collins, Brian; Brookes, Elijah; Wood, Joshua; Gurudas, Ullas

    2008-03-01

    Resonant infrared matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition has been used to deposit thin films of PMMA, a widely used industrial polymer. This technique is similar to conventional pulsed laser deposition, except that the polymer to be deposited is dissolved in a solvent and the solution is frozen before ablation in a vacuum chamber. The laser wavelength is absorbed by a vibrational band in the frozen matrix. The polymer lands on the substrate to form a film, while the solvent is pumped away. Our preliminary results show that the surface roughness of the as-deposited films depends strongly on the differential solubility radius, as defined by Hansen solubility parameters of the solvent and the solubility radius of the polymer. Our results will be compared with computational and experimental studies of the same polymer using a KrF (248 nm) laser. The ejection mechanism will be discussed as well as the implications of these results for the deposition of smooth high quality films.

  10. Bioactive glass thin films synthesized by advanced pulsed laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailescu, N.; Stan, George E.; Ristoscu, C.; Sopronyi, M.; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive materials play an increasingly important role in the biomaterials industry, and are extensively used in a range of applications, including biodegradable metallic implants. We report on Bioactive Glasses (BG) films deposition by pulsed laser techniques onto biodegradable substrates. The BG coatings were obtained using a KrF* excimer laser source (λ= 248 nm, τFWHM ≤ 25 ns).Their thickness has been determined by Profilometry measurements, whilst their morphology has been analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The obtained coatings fairly preserved the targets composition and structure, as revealed by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy analyses.

  11. Biocompatible and bioactive nanostructured glass coatings synthesized by pulsed laser deposition: In vitro biological tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, A. C.; Sima, F.; Duta, L.; Popescu, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Capitanu, D.; Mustata, R.; Sima, L. E.; Petrescu, S. M.; Janackovic, D.

    2009-03-01

    We report on the synthesis by pulsed laser deposition with a KrF* excimer laser source ( λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns) of bioglass thin films of 6P57 and 6P61 types. Physiology, viability, and proliferation of human osteoblast cells were determined by quantitative in vitro tests performed by flow cytometry on primary osteoblasts cultured on pulsed laser deposited bioglasses. Both types of glass films proved to be appropriate mediums for cell survival and proliferation. In a parallel investigation, cell morphology and adhesion to the surface was studied by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Strong bonds between the materials and cells were found in both cases, as osteoblast pseudopodes penetrated deep into the material. According to our observations, the 6P57 glass films were superior with respect to viability and proliferation performances.

  12. Pulsed laser annealing of Be-implanted GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. T.; Tan, L. S.; Chor, E. F.

    2005-11-01

    Postimplantation thermal processing of Be in molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown GaN by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and pulsed laser annealing (PLA) was investigated. It has been found that the activation of Be dopants and the repair of implantation-induced defects in GaN films cannot be achieved efficiently by conventional RTA alone. On the other hand, good dopant activation and surface morphology and quality were obtained when the Be-implanted GaN film was annealed by PLA with a 248 nm KrF excimer laser. However, observations of off-resonant micro-Raman and high-resolution x-ray-diffraction spectra indicated that crystal defects and strain resulting from Be implantation were still existent after PLA, which probably degraded the carrier mobility and limited the activation efficiency to some extent. This can be attributed to the shallow penetration depth of the 248 nm laser in GaN, which only repaired the crystal defects in a thin near-surface layer, while the deeper defects were not annealed out well. This situation was significantly improved when the Be-implanted GaN was subjected to a combined process of PLA followed by RTA, which produced good activation of the dopants, good surface morphology, and repaired bulk and surface defects well.

  13. Removal of Simulated Dust from Water-Based Acrylic Emulsion Paints by Laser Irradiation at IR, VIS and UV Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westergaard, M.; Pouli, P.; Theodorakopoulos, C.; Zafiropulos, Vassilis; Bredal-Jørgensen, Jørn; Dinesen, U. Staal

    This study aims to investigate whether laser cleaning may be a valuable method for the removal of soiling from water-based acrylic emulsion paints in comparison to traditional cleaning methods. Acrylic-grounded canvas was painted with three different paints (yellow ochre, titanium white and red alizarin) in a polybutyl- acrylate and methyl methacrylate binder. An acrylic binder was used as a reference. The samples were covered with carbon, SiO2 and soot. Cleaning process ablation rate studies were carried out with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1,064, 532 and 355nm and a KrF Excimer laser at 248 nm. The energy densities varied from 0.03 to 0.69 J cm?2. The irradiated tests at 248nm were monitored by LIBS analysis. On the samples irradiated at 1,064 nm, various analytical methods were carried out. A determined alteration of the titanium white paint resulted in a marked decrease in the glass transition temperature (Tg). Furthermore, discoloration (yellowing) occurred on the binder and the titanium white paint. The ochre darkened slightly but the alizarin was unchanged. When compared with the samples cleaned with water-based solvents, the samples cleaned with laser appeared cleaner. However, SEM/EDX and ATR showed that SiO2 was still present on the surface after laser cleaning at the tested conditions.

  14. Matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition of light emitting polymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitz-Gerald, J. M.; Jennings, G.; Johnson, R.; Fraser, C. L.

    2005-02-01

    Matrix assisted laser processing allows for the deposition of functional and fragile materials with a minimum of breakdown and decomposition. In this communication we report on light emitting thin films of ruthenium tris(bipyridine)-centered star-shaped poly(methyl methacrylate), Ru(bpyPMMA2)3(PF6)2, grown by matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition. A pulsed excimer laser (KrF) operating at 248 nm was used for all experiments. Due to the absorption at 248 nm and the solubility characteristics of [Ru(bpyPMMA2)3](PF6)2, dimethoxy-ethane (DME) was used as a solvent [1]. Dilute solutions (2 wt. %) of [Ru(bpyPMMA2)3](PF6)2 and DME were flash frozen in liquid nitrogen producing a solid target. Thin films ranging from 20 to 100 nm were grown on Si in an Ar atmosphere at 200 mTorr at a laser fluence of 0.04 J/cm2. The deposited materials were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) equipped with refractive index (RI), and ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) detection.

  15. KrF pulsed laser ablation of thin films made from fluorinated heterocyclic poly(naphthyl-imide)s.

    PubMed

    Damaceanu, Mariana-Dana; Rusu, Radu-Dan; Olaru, Mihaela Adriana; Timpu, Daniel; Bruma, Maria

    2012-06-01

    Among the many aspects of laser ablation, development of conical structures induced by excimer laser radiation on polyimide surfaces has been thoroughly investigated. Because the mechanisms that produce these surface textures are not fully understood, two theories, photochemical bond breaking and thermal reaction, have been introduced. Here we present the first study of ultraviolet laser ablation behavior of thin films made from fluorinated poly(naphthyl-imide)s containing oxadiazole rings and the investigation of the mechanism of cone-like structure formation at two laser fluences, 57 and 240 mJ/cm(2). The morphology of thin films before and after laser ablation was studied by using various spectroscopy techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, time-resolved emission and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and contact angle measurements. All of the data suggest impurities shielded at low fluence radiation (57 mJ/cm(2)) and a radiation hardening process at high value fluence (240 mJ/cm(2)), which are proposed as the main mechanisms for laser ablation of our polyimide films, and we bring evidence to support them.

  16. From small aromatic molecules to functional nanostructured carbon by pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhale, R. R.; Thakare, V. P.; Warule, S.; Lefez, B.; Hannoyer, B.; Jog, J. P.; Ogale, S. B.

    2012-06-01

    A novel route employing UV laser pulses (KrF Excimer, 248 nm) to cleave small aromatic molecules and stitch the generated free radicals into functional nanostructured forms of carbon is introduced. The process differs distinctly from any strategies wherein the aromatic rings are broken in the primary process. It is demonstrated that this pulsed laser-induced photochemical stitching (PLPS) process when applied to routine laboratory solvents (or toxic chemical wastes when discarded) Chlorobenzene and o-Dichlorobenzene yields Carbon Nanospheres (CNSs) comprising of graphene-like sheets assembled in onion-like configurations. This room temperature process implemented under normal laboratory conditions is versatile and clearly applicable to the whole family of haloaromatic compounds without and with additions of precursors or other nanomaterials. We further bring out its applicability for synthesis of metal-oxide based carbon nanocomposites.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of biopolymer-antibiotic thin films fabricated by advanced pulsed laser methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, R.; Popescu, C.; Dorcioman, G.; Miroiu, F. M.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Gittard, S. D.; Miller, P. R.; Narayan, R. J.; Enculescu, M.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2013-08-01

    We report on thin film deposition by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of two polymer-drug composite thin film systems. A pulsed KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) was used to deposit composite thin films of poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA) containing several gentamicin concentrations. FTIR spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that MAPLE-transferred materials exhibited chemical structures similar to those of drop cast materials. Scanning electron microscopy data indicated that MAPLE may be used to fabricate thin films of good morphological quality. The activity of PDLLA-gentamicin composite thin films against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was demonstrated using drop testing. The influence of drug concentration on microbial viability was also assessed. Our studies indicate that polymer-drug composite thin films prepared by MAPLE may be used to impart antimicrobial activity to implants, medical devices, and other contact surfaces.

  18. Coupling effects of the number of pulses, pulse repetition rate and fluence during laser PMMA ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Feng, Y.; Yi, X.-S.

    2000-10-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was ablated using a 248-nm long-pulsed KrF excimer laser operating at a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of 2 and 10 Hz, and fluence varying from 0.4 to 2 J/cm 2. The coupling effects of multiple shots, PRR, and fluence are found and discussed on the etching depth data and topography of PMMA. An increase in either PRR, or fluence or the number of pulses can accelerate the etching efficiency in terms of ablation rate, as a result of strengthened thermal effects. Quality of the craters such as roughness, porosity and contamination is sensitively dependent on the specific laser operating conditions. Basically, increasing the PRR and the number of pulses gives rise to a crater with smoother and less porous bottom.

  19. Blue inorganic light emitting diode on flexible polyimide substrate using laser lift-off process.

    PubMed

    Barange, Nilesh; Kim, Young Dong; Ko, Hyungduk; Park, Joon-Suh; Park, Byoungnam; Ko, Doo-Hyun; Han, Ii Ki

    2014-11-01

    The fabrication process for the blue GaN inorganic light emitting diode (ILED) on flexible polyimide (PI) substrate by laser lift off (LLO) method was demonstrated. The GaN epi-structure was grown on patterned sapphire wafer. GaN samples were temporary bonded with polyimide substrate by flexible silver epoxy. Separation of the whole GaN LED film from GaN/sapphire wafer was accomplished using a single KrF excimer (248 nm) laser pulse directed through the transparent sapphire wafer. Device fabrication was carried out on both rigid silicon and flexible polyimide substrate, and I-V performance for both devices was measured. The optimized LLO process for the whole GaN LED film transfer would be applicable in flexible LED applications without compromising electrical properties.

  20. Fabrication and investigation of 1D and 2D structures in LiNbO 3 thin films by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriche, F.; Boudrioua, A.; Kremer, R.; Dogheche, E.; Neiss-Clauss, E.; Mouras, R.; Fischer, A.; Beghoul, M.-R.; Fogarassy, E.; Boutaoui, N.

    2010-09-01

    Lithium niobate thin films were deposited on sapphire substrate by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique. One and two dimensional structures have been made using a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm and 6 ns pulse width, under various conditions of ablation, in order to assess the applicability of laser direct-writing of photonic waveguides. The optical and waveguiding properties of LiNbO 3 thin films were studied by prism-coupling technique, while micro-Raman spectroscopy was used for structural and composition characterization, as well as laser processing mechanism investigation. The surface morphology of the processed structures was obtained by a Nomarski optical microscope, an atomic force microscope and a White Light Interferometer Microscope.

  1. High Resolution Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging of Targets Irradiated by the Nike KrF Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Brown, C.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Obenschain, S.; Bodner, S.; Pawley, C.; Gerber, K.; Sethian, J.; Holland, G.

    1996-11-01

    Planar CH foils were accelerated by the main Nike laser driving beams and were backlit by Si plasmas. A spherically-bent quartz crystal (R=25cm, 2d=6.68703 Åimaged the radiation of He-like Si resonance line that was transmitted through the target foil. The intensity of the backlighted image (6 beams, 250 J) was 160 times greater than the self emission from a driven CH foil. The magnified (X9.6) images on DEF film had the resolution about 5 μ m (3 μ m with R=10cm). The resulting 10 μ m spatial resolution in the gated images was determined by 100 μ m resolution of the framing camera. Images of CH targets were recorded 2 nsec after the peak of the laser pulse and revealed the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities that were seeded by patterns with amplitude as small as 0.25 μ m. The image of driven smooth CH target was quite smooth compared to those of the patterned CH foil. A future imaging instrument will have multiple backlighter plasmas and better quality bent crystals that can be bent into a toroidal shape. Up to four images with higher magnification and spatial resolution of 5 μ m may be recorded on the framing camera. This work supported by the US Department of Energy

  2. Photolysis of CH₃CHO at 248 nm: evidence of triple fragmentation from primary quantum yield of CH₃ and HCO radicals and H atoms.

    PubMed

    Morajkar, Pranay; Bossolasco, Adriana; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa

    2014-06-07

    Radical quantum yields have been measured following the 248 nm photolysis of acetaldehyde, CH3CHO. HCO radical and H atom yields have been quantified by time resolved continuous wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy in the near infrared following their conversion to HO2 radicals by reaction with O2. The CH3 radical yield has been determined using the same technique following their conversion into CH3O2. Absolute yields have been deduced for HCO radicals and H atoms through fitting of time resolved HO2 profiles, obtained under various O2 concentrations, to a complex model, while the CH3 yield has been determined relative to the CH3 yield from 248 nm photolysis of CH3I. Time resolved HO2 profiles under very low O2 concentrations suggest that another unknown HO2 forming reaction path exists in this reaction system besides the conversion of HCO radicals and H atoms by reaction with O2. HO2 profiles can be well reproduced under a large range of experimental conditions with the following quantum yields: CH3CHO + hν(248nm) → CH3CHO*, CH3CHO* → CH3 + HCO ϕ(1a) = 0.125 ± 0.03, CH3CHO* → CH3 + H + CO ϕ(1e) = 0.205 ± 0.04, CH3CHO*[Formula: see text]CH3CO + HO2 ϕ(1f) = 0.07 ± 0.01. The CH3O2 quantum yield has been determined in separate experiments as ϕ(CH₃) = 0.33 ± 0.03 and is in excellent agreement with the CH3 yields derived from the HO2 measurements considering that the triple fragmentation (R1e) is an important reaction path in the 248 nm photolysis of CH3CHO. From arithmetic considerations taking into account the HO2 and CH3 measurements we deduce a remaining quantum yield for the molecular pathway: CH3CHO* → CH4 + CO ϕ(1b) = 0.6. All experiments can be consistently explained with absence of the formerly considered pathway: CH3CHO* → CH3CO + H ϕ(1c) = 0.

  3. I{sub 2} molecular elimination in single-photon dissociation of CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shun-Yi; Tsai, Po-Yu; Lin, Hsiang-Chin; Wu, Chia-Ching; Lin, King-Chuen; Sun, B. J.; Chang, A. H. H.

    2011-01-21

    Following single-photon dissociation of CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} at 248 nm, I{sub 2} molecular elimination is detected by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. The technique comprises two laser beams propagating in a perpendicular configuration, in which a tunable laser beam along the axis of the ring-down cell probes the I{sub 2} fragment in the B {sup 3}{Pi}{sub ou}{sup +}- X {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} transition. The nascent vibrational populations for v = 0, 1, and 2 levels are obtained with a population ratio of 1:(0.65 {+-} 0.10):(0.30 {+-} 0.05), corresponding to a Boltzmann-like vibrational temperature of 544 {+-} 73 K. The quantum yield of the ground state I{sub 2} elimination reaction is determined to be 0.0040 {+-} 0.0025. With the aid of ab initio potential energy calculations, the pathway of molecular elimination is proposed on the energetic ground state CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} via internal conversion, followed by asynchronous three-center dissociation. A positive temperature effect supports the proposed mechanism.

  4. Br{sub 2} molecular elimination in photolysis of (COBr){sub 2} at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy: A photodissociation channel being ignored

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chia-Ching; Lin, Hsiang-Chin; Chang, Yuan-Bin; Tsai, Po-Yu; Yeh, Yu-Ying; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen; Francisco, J. S.

    2011-12-21

    A primary dissociation channel of Br{sub 2} elimination is detected following a single-photon absorption of (COBr){sub 2} at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. The technique contains two laser beams propagating in a perpendicular configuration. The tunable laser beam along the axis of the ring-down cell probes the Br{sub 2} fragment in the B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub ou}{sup +}-X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} transition. The measurements of laser energy- and pressure-dependence and addition of a Br scavenger are further carried out to rule out the probability of Br{sub 2} contribution from a secondary reaction. By means of spectral simulation, the ratio of nascent vibrational population for v = 0, 1, and 2 levels is evaluated to be 1:(0.65 {+-} 0.09):(0.34 {+-} 0.07), corresponding to a Boltzmann vibrational temperature of 893 {+-} 31 K. The quantum yield of the ground state Br{sub 2} elimination reaction is determined to be 0.11 {+-} 0.06. With the aid of ab initio potential energy calculations, the pathway of molecular elimination is proposed on the energetic ground state (COBr){sub 2} via internal conversion. A four-center dissociation mechanism is followed synchronously or sequentially yielding three fragments of Br{sub 2}+ 2CO. The resulting Br{sub 2} is anticipated to be vibrationally hot. The measurement of a positive temperature effect supports the proposed mechanism.

  5. Laser energy density, structure and properties of pulsed-laser deposited zinc oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoutsouva, M. G.; Panagopoulos, C. N.; Kompitsas, M.

    2011-05-01

    Zinc oxide thin films were deposited on soda lime glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition in an oxygen-reactive atmosphere at 20 Pa and a constant substrate temperature at 300 °C. A pulsed KrF excimer laser, operated at 248 nm with pulse duration 10 ns, was used to ablate the ceramic zinc oxide target. The structure, the optical and electrical properties of the as-deposited films were studied in dependence of the laser energy density in the 1.2-2.8 J/cm 2 range, with the aid of X-ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscope, Transmission Spectroscopy techniques, and the Van der Pauw method, respectively. The results indicated that the structural and optical properties of the zinc oxide films were improved by increasing the laser energy density of the ablating laser. The surface roughness of the zinc oxide film increased with the decrease of laser energy density and both the optical bang gap and the electrical resistivity of the film were significantly affected by the laser energy density.

  6. 100 nm half-pitch double exposure KrF lithography using binary masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, S.; Bauer, J.; Haak, U.; Stolarek, D.; Schulz, K.; Wolf, H.; Meier, W.; Trojahn, M.; Matthus, E.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the process margin for the 100nm half - pitch double exposure KrF lithography using binary masks for different illumination settings. The application of Double Exposure Lithography (DEL) would enlarge the capability of 248 nm exposure technique to smaller pitch e.g. for the integration of dedicated layers into 0.13 μm BiCMOS with critical dimension (CD) requirements exceeding the standard 248 nm lithography specification. The DEL was carried out with a KrF Scanner (Nikon S207D, NA Lens = 0.82) for a critical dimension (CD) of 100nm half pitch. The chemical amplified positive resists SL4800 or UV2000 (Rohm & Haas) with a thickness of 325nm were coated on a 70 nm AR10L (Rohm & Haas) bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC). With a single exposure and using binary masks it is not possible to resolve 100nm lines with a pitch of 200 nm, due to the refraction and the resolution limit. First we investigated the effect of focus variation. It is shown that the focus difference of 1st and 2nd exposure is one critical parameter of the DEL. This requires a good focus repeatability of the scanner. The depth of focus (DOF) of 360 nm with the coherence parameter σ = 0.4 was achieved for DEL with SL4800 resist. The influence of the better resist resolution of UV2000 on the process window will be shown (DOF = 460 nm). If we change the focus of one of the exposures the CD and DOF performance of spaces is reduced with simultaneous line position changing. Second we investigated the effect of different illumination shapes and settings. The results for conventional illumination with different values for σ and annular illumination with σ inner = 0.57 and σ outer = 0.85 will be shown. In summary, the results show that DEL has the potential to be a practical lithography enhancement method for device fabrication using high NA KrF tool generation.

  7. Laser-based techniques for living cell pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Béla; Smausz, Tomi; Papdi, Bence; Bor, Zsolt; Szabó, András; Kolozsvári, Lajos; Fotakis, Costas; Nógrádi, Antal

    2008-10-01

    In the production of biosensors or artificial tissues a basic step is the immobilization of living cells along the required pattern. In this paper the ability of some promising laser-based methods to influence the interaction between cells and various surfaces is presented. In the first set of experiments laser-induced patterned photochemical modification of polymer foils was used to achieve guided adherence and growth of cells to the modified areas: (a) Polytetrafluoroethylene was irradiated with ArF excimer laser ( λ=193 nm, FWHM=20 ns, F=9 mJ/cm2) in presence of triethylene tetramine liquid photoreagent; (b) a thin carbon layer was produced by KrF excimer laser ( λ=248 nm, FWHM=30 ns, F=35 mJ/cm2) irradiation on polyimide surface to influence the cell adherence. It was found that the incorporation of amine groups in the PTFE polymer chain instead of the fluorine atoms can both promote and prevent the adherence of living cells (depending on the applied cell types) on the treated surfaces, while the laser generated carbon layer on polyimide surface did not effectively improve adherence. Our attempts to influence the cell adherence by morphological modifications created by ArF laser irradiation onto polyethylene terephtalate surface showed a surface roughness dependence. This method was effective only when the Ra roughness parameter of the developed structure did not exceed the 0.1 micrometer value. Pulsed laser deposition with femtosecond KrF excimer lasers ( F=2.2 J/cm2) was effectively used to deposit structured thin films from biomaterials (endothelial cell growth supplement and collagen embedded in starch matrix) to promote the adherence and growth of cells. These results present evidence that some surface can be successfully altered to induce guided cell growth.

  8. Double exposure technology for KrF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, S.; Bauer, J.; Haak, U.; Stolarek, D.; Schulz, K.; Wolf, H.; Meier, W.; Trojahn, M.; Matthus, E.; Beyer, H.; Old, G.; Marschmeyer, St.; Kuck, B.

    2008-04-01

    The application of Double Exposure Lithography (DEL) would enlarge the capability of 248 nm exposure technique to smaller pitch. We will use the DEL for the integration of critical layers for dedicated applications requiring resolution enhancement into 0.13 μm BiCMOS technology. In this paper we present the overlay precision and the focus difference of 1st and 2nd exposure as critical parameters of the DEL for k I <= 0.3 lithography (100 nm half pitch) with binary masks (BIM). The realization of excellent overlay (OVL) accuracy is a main key of double exposure and double patterning techniques. We show the DEL requires primarily a good mask registration, when the wafer stays in the scanner for both exposures without alignment between 1st and 2nd exposure. The exposure tool overlay error is more a practical limit for double patterning lithography (DPL). Hence we prefer the DEL for the resolution enhancement, especially if we use the KrF high NA lithography tool for 130 nm generation. Experimental and simulated results show that the critical dimension uniformity (CDU) depends strongly on the overlay precision. The DEL results show CDU is not only affected by the OVL but also by an optical proximity effect of 1st and 2nd exposure and the mask registration. The CD uniformity of DEL demands a low focus difference between 1st and 2nd exposure and therefore requires a good focus repeatability of the exposure tool. The Depth of Focus (DOF) of 490 nm at stable CD of lines was achieved for DEL. If we change the focus of one of the exposures the CD-focus performance of spaces was reduced with simultaneous line position changing. CDU vs. focus difference between 1st and 2nd exposure demands a focus repeatability <100 nm for the exposure tool. Summary, the results show DEL has the potential to be a practical lithography enhancement method for device fabrication using high NA KrF tool generation.

  9. Frequency doubling of copper lasers using temperature-tuned ADP

    SciTech Connect

    Molander, W.A.

    1994-03-01

    The ability to generate high average power uv at 255 nm by frequency doubling the green line (510.6 nm) of copper lasers would greatly extend the utility of copper lasers. Material processing and microlithography are two areas of interest. The frequency-doubled copper laser could replace the KrF excimer laser, which has a similar wavelength (248 nm), in some applications. The frequency-doubled copper laser has a narrow linewidth and excellent beam quality at a competitive cost. Other attractive features are high reliability, low operating costs, and the absence of toxic gases. This paper will report recent progress in high-efficiency, high-average-power harmonic generation of the copper laser green line using noncritical phase matching in ADP. Frequency doubling of the yellow line (578.2 nm) and sum-frequency mixing of the two lines are also of interest. These processes, however, cannot be phase-matched in ADP and, therefore, will not be discussed here. The results reported and the issues identified here would be important in these other processes and also in many other frequency conversion schemes in the uv such as 4{omega} conversion of Nd{sup 3+}:YAG lasers.

  10. Measurements of electron density and temperature profiles in plasma produced by Nike KrF laser for laser plasma instability research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L. Y.

    2015-08-01

    A grid image refractometer (GIR) has been implemented at the Nike krypton fluoride laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory. This instrument simultaneously measures propagation angles and transmissions of UV probe rays (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) refracted through plasma. We report results of the first Nike-GIR measurement on a CH plasma produced by the Nike laser pulse (˜1 ns FWHM) with the intensity of 1.1 × 1015 W/cm2. The measured angles and transmissions were processed to construct spatial profiles of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) in the underdense coronal region of the plasma. Using an inversion algorithm developed for the strongly refracted rays, the deployed GIR system probed electron densities up to 4 × 1021 cm-3 with the density scale length of 120 μm along the plasma symmetry axis. The resulting ne and Te profiles are verified to be self-consistent with the measured quantities of the refracted probe light.

  11. The thermodynamic response of soft biological tissues to pulsed ultraviolet laser irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, V; Nishioka, N S; Mikić, B B

    1995-01-01

    The physical mechanisms that enable short pulses of high-intensity ultraviolet laser radiation to remove tissue, in a process known as laser ablation, remain obscure. The thermodynamic response of biological tissue to pulsed laser irradiation was investigated by measuring and subsequently analyzing the stress transients generated by pulsed argon fluorine (ArF, lambda = 193 nm) and krypton fluorine (KrF, lambda = 248 nm) excimer laser irradiation of porcine dermis using thin-film piezoelectric transducers. For radiant exposures that do not cause material removal, the stress transients are consistent with rapid thermal expansion of the tissue. At the threshold radiant exposure for ablation, the peak stress amplitude generated by 248 nm irradiation is more than an order of magnitude larger than that produced by 193 nm irradiation. For radiant exposures where material removal is achieved, the temporal structure of the stress transient indicates that the onset of material removal occurs during irradiation. In this regime, the variation of the peak compressive stress with radiant exposure is consistent with laser-induced rapid surface vaporization. For 193 nm irradiation, ionization of the ablated material occurs at even greater radiant exposures and is accompanied by a change in the variation of peak stress with radiant exposure consistent with a plasma-mediated ablation process. These results suggest that absorption of ultraviolet laser radiation by the extracellular matrix of tissue leads to decomposition of tissue on the time scale of the laser pulse. The difference in volumetric energy density at ablation threshold between the two wavelengths indicates that the larger stresses generated by 248 nm irradiation may facilitate the onset of material removal. However, once material removal is achieved, the stress measurements demonstrate that energy not directly responsible for target decomposition contributes to increasing the specific energy of the plume (and plasma

  12. Photodissociation of gaseous CH{sub 3}COSH at 248 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Observation of three dissociation channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, En-Lan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen

    2013-01-07

    Upon one-photon excitation at 248 nm, gaseous CH{sub 3}C(O)SH is dissociated following three pathways with the products of (1) OCS + CH{sub 4}, (2) CH{sub 3}SH + CO, and (3) CH{sub 2}CO + H{sub 2}S that are detected using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The excited state {sup 1}(n{sub O}, {pi}{sup *}{sub CO}) has a radiative lifetime of 249 {+-} 11 ns long enough to allow for Ar collisions that induce internal conversion and enhance the fragment yields. The rate constant of collision-induced internal conversion is estimated to be 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Among the primary dissociation products, a fraction of the CH{sub 2}CO moiety may undergo further decomposition to CH{sub 2}+ CO, of which CH{sub 2} is confirmed by reaction with O{sub 2} producing CO{sub 2}, CO, OH, and H{sub 2}CO. Such a secondary decomposition was not observed previously in the Ar matrix-isolated experiments. The high-resolution spectra of CO are analyzed to determine the ro-vibrational energy deposition of 8.7 {+-} 0.7 kcal/mol, while the remaining primary products with smaller rotational constants are recognized but cannot be spectrally resolved. The CO fragment detected is mainly ascribed to the primary production. A prior distribution method is applied to predict the vibrational distribution of CO that is consistent with the experimental findings.

  13. Laser-modified nanostructures of PET films and cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, Hamid; Moghadam, Ehsan Vahedi; Mivehchi, Houri

    2011-07-01

    The surface of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films was irradiated using KrF excimer laser (λ = 248 nm) with different number of pulses at constant repetition rate. The adhesion behavior of L-929 fibroblast cells on the irradiated surface was investigated. The changes in films' morphology were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The hydrophilicity and both polar and dispersion components of the surface tension of the treated films were evaluated by contact angle and surface tension measurement techniques. The films roughness was evaluated by atomic force microscopy. AFM and SEM observations showed that a specific nanostructure was created on the laser-treated polyethylene terephthalate surface. Contact angle and surface energy measurements have indicated an increase in wettability of the laser treated samples up to 5 pulses as optimum result; while, by increasing the laser pulses beyond 5 pulses the hydrophilicity of laser treated samples dropped and the surface energy of the treated films was leveled off. Data from in vitro assays showed significant cell attachment and cell growth onto laser treated samples in comparison with the untreated films. Moreover, a number of fibroblast cells attached and proliferated onto treated PET films were achieved under optimum condition of 5 pulses which was significantly higher than the other treated samples.

  14. Characterization of excimer laser ablation generated pepsin particles using multi-wavelength photoacoustic instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Kecskeméti, G.; Smausz, T.; Ajtai, T.; Filep, A.; Utry, N.; Kohut, A.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2012-05-01

    Preparation of organic thin layers on various special substrates using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique is an important task from the point of view of bioengineering and biosensor technologies. Earlier studies demonstrated that particle ejection starts during the ablating laser pulse resulting in significant shielding effects which can influence the real fluence on the target surface and consequently the efficiency of layer preparation. In this study, we introduce a photoacoustic absorption measurement technique for in-situ characterization of ablated particles during PLD experiments. A KrF excimer laser beam ( λ=248 nm, FWHM=18 ns) was focused onto pepsin targets in a PLD chamber; the applied laser fluences were 440 and 660 mJ/cm2. We determined the wavelength dependence of optical absorption and mass specific absorption coefficient of laser ablation generated pepsin aerosols in the UV-VIS-NIR range. On the basis of our measurements, we calculated the absorbance at the ablating laser wavelength, too. We demonstrated that when the laser ablation generated pepsin aerosols spread through the whole PLD chamber the effect of absorptivity is negligible for the subsequent pulses. However, the interaction of the laser pulse and the just formed particle cloud generated by the same pulse is more significant.

  15. KrF amplifier design issues and application to ICF system design

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.A.; Allen, G.R.; Berggren, R.R.; Czuchlewski, S.J.; Harris, D.B.; Jones, M.E.; Krohn, B.J.; Kurnit, N.A.; Leland, W.T.; Mansfield, C.; McLeod, J.; McCown, A.W.; McLeod, J.; Pendergrass, J.H.; Rose, E.A.; Rosocha, L.A.; Thomas, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has assembled an array of experimental and theoretical tools to optimize amplifier design for future KrF lasers. The next opportunity to exercise these tools is with the design of the second generation NIKE system under construction at the Naval Research Laboratory with the collaboration of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major issues include laser physics (energy extraction in large modules with amplified spontaneous emission) and diode performance and efficiency. High efficiency and low cost are increasingly important for larger future KrF amplifiers. In this paper we present our approach to amplifier scaling and discuss the more important design considerations for large KrF amplifiers. We point out where improvements in the fundamental data base for KrF amplifiers could lead to increased confidence in performance predictions for large amplifiers, and we address the currently unresolved issues of anomalous absorption near line center and the possibility of diode instabilities for low impedance designs. Los Alamos has designed a 100-kJ KrF laser-fusion system for both direct- and indirect-drive target physics experiments using 60-kJ amplifier modules. The design of this system will be reviewed. 38 refs., 110 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Insertion effects of various acid sensitive groups into acetal-type polymer on the profile of 248-nm chemically amplified resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Cho, Sook H.; Lee, Dong H.; Im, Kwang H.; Yim, Yun-Gill; Kim, Deog-Bae; Kim, Jae-Hyun

    2002-07-01

    Various derivatives of modified poly(4-hydoxystyrene-co-4-(1-ethylethoxystyrene))(M-EEPHS) were synthesized by insertion of third monomer unit such as styrene, 4-acetoxystyrene, 4-methoxycarbonyloxystyrene, tertbutoxycarbonyloxystyrene, tert-butyl acrylate, and 4-(1-cyclohexylethoxy)styrene. Their dissolution rate behavior was investigated with different blocking level. From the average dissolution rate of M-EEPHS in a 2.38wt% TMAH solution as a function of the total protection%, hydrophobicity was proven as more influential factor for the dissolution inhibition rather than hydrogen bonding by ester or carbonate functionality in a blocking group. To study structural effect on KRF lithographic performance, resists containing M-EEPHS were formulated and testified. Defects that are found in EEPHS based resist, such as LER (Line Edge Roughness) and top surface erosion at defocus can be solved by incorporation of carbornate, bulky acetal functionality or dissolution inhibition group. When hybrid system, which contained both M-EEPHS and poly[4-hydroxystyrene-co-tert-butyl acrylate-co-4-(3-cyano-1,5-di-tert-butyl carbonyl pentyl styrene)](P(HS-TBA-CBPS)) as an annealing type resin, were compared with the lithographic results of single polymeric system (M-EEPHS only), their performances were directly projected to those of blends of high activation type and low activation type resin.

  17. Absorbing film assisted laser induced forward transfer of fungi (Trichoderma conidia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Smausz, T.; Antal, Zs.; Kresz, N.; Bor, Zs.; Chrisey, D.

    2004-09-01

    We present an investigation on absorbing film assisted laser induced forward transfer (AFA-LIFT) of fungus (Trichoderma) conidia. A KrF excimer laser beam [λ =248nm,FWHM=30ns (FWHM, full width at half maximum)] was directed through a quartz plate and focused onto its silver coated surface where conidia of the Trichoderma strain were uniformly spread. The laser fluence was varied in the range of 0-2600mJ/cm2 and each laser pulse transferred a pixel of target material. The average irradiated area was 8×10-2mm2. After the transfer procedure, the yeast extract medium covered glass slide and the transferred conidia patterns were incubated for 20 h and then observed using an optical microscope. The transferred conidia pixels were germinated and the areas of the culture medium surfaces covered by the pixels were evaluated as a function of laser fluence. As the laser fluence was increased from 0 to 355mJ/cm2 the transferred and germinated pixel area increased from 0 to 0.25mm2. Further increase in fluence resulted in a drastic decrease down to an approximately constant value of 0.06mm2. The yield of successful transfer by AFA-LIFT and germination was as much as 75% at 355mJ/cm2. The results prove that AFA-LIFT can successfully be applied for the controlled transfer of biological objects.

  18. Structuring of glass fibre surfaces by laser-induced front side etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Pierre; Ehrhardt, Martin; Zimmer, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    The fabrication of sub-μm structures on glass fibre surfaces poses a big challenge for the laser processing. However, the laser-induced front side etching (LIFE) method has a great potential for the fast, nm-precision, and cost-effective production of surface structures. LIFE is a method for laser etching of transparent materials using thin absorber layers with a high absorption coefficient like metal layers. The LIFE process of the front surface of a fused silica wafer as well as of a glass fibre is studied in dependence on the laser parameters. A KrF excimer laser with a wavelength of 248 nm and a pulse duration of 25 ns was used. The resultant structures were analysed with microscopic methods (white light interferometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)). The analysing of the surface structures presented that the LIFE methods allow the fabrication of well-defined periodic sub-μm structures. Furthermore, the structuring process was simulated by a thermodynamic equation including an approach of the laser-plasma interaction. The theoretically predicted results presented a good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Production of submicrometre fused silica gratings using laser-induced backside dry etching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Vass, Cs; Smausz, T.; Bor, Zs

    2006-11-01

    Laser micromachining of transparent materials is a promising technique for producing micro-optical elements. Several types of both direct (e.g. ablation) and indirect (e.g. laser-induced backside wet etching: LIBWE) procedures have already been developed and presented in the last two decades. Here we present a new method (laser-induced backside dry etching (LIBDE)) in the analogy of LIBWE for the micro and nanoprocessing of transparent materials. In our experiments 1 mm thick fused silica plates were used as transparent work pieces. The plates were covered with 100 nm thick silver layers. The metal absorbing films were irradiated through the fused silica by a KrF excimer laser beam (λ = 248 nm, FWHM = 30 ns). The illuminated area was 1.05 mm2 and the fluence on the silver-quartz interface varied in the range 0-1800 mJ cm-2. We have provided evidence that LIBDE is more effective and simple than LIBWE, its etch rate being much higher at a given laser fluence. Our interference experiments proved that the LIBDE etching technique is suitable to fabricate gratings displaying submicrometre periods in transparent materials. On the basis of all these, it is suggested that this method may be useful to produce other nano and microoptical elements, too.

  20. Rapid-melt-mediated recrystallization of ZnO thin films grown at low temperature by using KrF excimer laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Min-Suk; Seo, Inseok

    2015-11-01

    ZnO thin films with thickness of 150 nm were grown on ITO/glass (ITO-coated glass) substrates by using the radio-frequency (RF) sputtering technique at 400 °C in an Ar atmosphere. An excimer laser irradiation (ELI) treatment was performed on the surface of ZnO thin films at different excimer laser energy densities of 150, 200, and 250 mJ/cm2 in a N2 atmosphere. The ELI treatment promoted the lateral recystallization of the surface area of the ZnO, resulting in a significant improvement of the crystallinity of the ZnO thin films without substrate damage. As-grown ZnO and ELI-treated ZnO thin films were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The analyses showed that the ZnO thin film treated with ELI at an excimer laser energy density of 150 mJ/cm2 exhibited the best structural properties.

  1. Initial development of efficient, low-debris laser targets for the Sandia soft x-ray projection lithography effort

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, P.D.; Hunter, J.A.; Kubiak, G.D.

    1997-03-01

    During the fiscal years 92-94 a joint group from Sandia/New Mexico and Sandia/California studied the development of new laser-plasma targets for projection x-ray or EUV (extreme ultraviolet) lithography. Our experimental and theoretical analyses incorporated target design as an integral part of the lithographic optical system. Targets studied included thick solid targets, thin-foil metal-coated targets, and cryogenic targets. Our complete measurement suite consisted of x-ray conversion efficiency measurements, source size imaging, source x-ray angular distribution measurements, debris collection, and source EUV spectrum. Target evaluation also included the variation of laser characteristics, such as, laser intensity, spot size, wavelength, pulselength, and pulseshape. Over the course of these experiments we examined targets using KrF (248nm), XeCl (308nm), and CO{sub 2} (10.6 {mu}m) lasers. While debris issues now dominate research in this area, final details were concluded on our understanding of material spectra and radiation transport of 13 run light in laser-plasmas. Additionally, conclusive results were obtained with 308 rim light, showing the pulselength threshold below which plumes no longer limited the transmission of (and thus the conversion efficiency to) 13 nm radiation.

  2. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotný, K.; Staňková, A.; Häkkänen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J.; Otruba, V.; Kanický, V.

    2007-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r2 > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r2 = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  3. Transparent Conducting Nb-Doped TiO2 Electrodes Activated by Laser Annealing for Inexpensive Flexible Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Hsiang; Lin, Chia-Chi; Lin, Yi-Chang

    2012-01-01

    A KrF excimer laser (λ= 248 nm) has been adopted for annealing cost-effective Nb-doped TiO2 (NTO) films. Sputtered NTO layers were annealed on SiO2-coated flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates. This local laser annealing technique is very useful for the formation of anatase NTO electrodes used in flexible organic solar cells (OSCs). An amorphous NTO film with a high resistivity and a low transparency was transformed significantly into a conductive and transparent anatase NTO electrode by laser irradiation. The 210 nm anatase NTO film shows a sheet resistance of 50 Ω and an average optical transmittance of 83.5% in the wavelength range from 450 to 600 nm after annealing at 0.25 J/cm2. The activation of Nb dopants and the formation of the anatase phase contribute to the high conductivity of the laser-annealed NTO electrode. Nb activation causes an increase in the optical band gap due to the Burstein-Moss effect. The electrical properties are in agreement with the material characteristics determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The irradiation energy for the NTO electrode also affects the performance of the organic solar cell. The laser annealing technique provides good properties of the anatase NTO film used as a transparent electrode for flexible organic solar cells (OSCs) without damage to the PET substrate or layer delamination from the substrate.

  4. Excimer laser micromachining of TiN films from chromium and copper sacrificial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, A. J.; Ghantasala, M. K.; Hayes, J. P.; Harvey, E. C.; Doyle, E. D.

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents results on the laser micromachining of TiN films. Machining performance was evaluated in terms of patterning quality and the ability to remove TiN with minimal interference with an underlying sacrificial layer. TiN was arc-deposited onto (100) silicon substrate with chromium (Cr) and copper (Cu) sacrificial layers. Films were also deposited onto bare silicon substrates under the same conditions. These films were analysed for their composition and structure using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction techniques. Laser micromachining was performed using a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm. The effect of fluence and number of shots on the machined features has been investigated in detail. The patterned features were examined using optical, confocal and scanning electron microscopes. The characteristics observed were analysed and compared in all three sets of samples. The results showed selective removal of TiN films from Cr and Cu sacrificial layers under different conditions. The machining of TiN from (100) silicon showed relatively poor definition of patterned features. The analysis of these results indicated that laser machining of TiN from Cr and Cu layers is best explained using the explosion mechanism of removal.

  5. Time-resolved spatial distribution of plasma in the ablation of a Ba₀.₆Sr₀.₄TiO₃ target by 25 ns KrF ultraviolet laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, J. F.; Wolfman, J.; Motret, O.; Hermann, J.

    2014-10-07

    We performed radially and longitudinally time-resolved plasma analysis during pulsed laser deposition of Ba₀.₆Sr₀.₄TiO₃ thin films. The plasma is shown to be optically thick and strongly non-uniform during the early expansion phase and the resonance line Ba II (455.4 nm) is strongly self-reversed during this time. Plasma temperature and electron density were obtained by comparing experimental emission spectra with the spectral radiance computed for a non-uniform plasma in local thermal equilibrium.

  6. Laser induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summonte, C.; Rizzoli, R.; Servidori, M.; Milita, S.; Nicoletti, S.; Bianconi, M.; Desalvo, A.; Iencinella, D.

    2004-10-01

    Laser induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy (a-Si1-xCx:H) films has been investigated by means of synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The a-Si1-xCx:H films were deposited on (100) silicon wafers by very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 100MHz in hydrogen diluted silane-methane gas mixtures. The substrate was kept at 250°C or 350°C and the stoichiometry was changed from x =0.20 to 0.63. The structural characterization of the as-grown films has been carried out by Rutherford backscattering (hydrogen concentration) and infrared spectroscopy (film ordering). The films were irradiated by a KrF excimer laser (248nm ) with varying energy density and number of pulses. After irradiation, the formation of SiC crystallites has been revealed by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Besides SiC nanocrystals, the formation of crystalline Si and graphite is observed for under- (x <0.50) and over-stoichiometric (x>0.50) samples, respectively. The essential role played by hydrogen concentration and hydrogen bonding configuration in determining the melting threshold and the consequent SiC grain formation is highlighted.

  7. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire—KrF laser. Part 1. Regenerative amplification of subpicosecond pulses in a wide-aperture electron beam pumped KrF amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Mesyats, Gennadii A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, Igor V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2013-04-01

    Regenerative amplification of single and multiple ultrashort subpicosecond UV pulses in a wide-aperture KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator was investigated on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid laser system. Amplitude-modulated 100-ns long UV radiation pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were obtained at the output of the system. The pulses were a combination of a quasi-stationary oscillation pulse and a train of amplified ultrashort pulses (USPs) with a peak power of 0.2-0.3 TW, which exceeded the power of free-running lasing pulse by three orders of magnitude. The population inversion recovery time in the active KrF laser medium was estimated: τc <= 2.0 ns. Trains of USPs spaced at an interval Δt ≈ τc were shown to exhibit the highest amplification efficiency. The production of amplitude-modulated UV pulses opens up the way to the production and maintenance of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air.

  8. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire-KrF laser. Part 1. Regenerative amplification of subpicosecond pulses in a wide-aperture electron beam pumped KrF amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V D; Ionin, Andrei A; Levchenko, A O; Mesyats, Gennadii A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Smetanin, Igor V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Ustinovskii, N N; Shutov, A V

    2013-04-30

    Regenerative amplification of single and multiple ultrashort subpicosecond UV pulses in a wide-aperture KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator was investigated on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid laser system. Amplitude-modulated 100-ns long UV radiation pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were obtained at the output of the system. The pulses were a combination of a quasi-stationary oscillation pulse and a train of amplified ultrashort pulses (USPs) with a peak power of 0.2-0.3 TW, which exceeded the power of free-running lasing pulse by three orders of magnitude. The population inversion recovery time in the active KrF laser medium was estimated: {tau}{sub c} {<=} 2.0 ns. Trains of USPs spaced at an interval {Delta}t Almost-Equal-To {tau}{sub c} were shown to exhibit the highest amplification efficiency. The production of amplitude-modulated UV pulses opens up the way to the production and maintenance of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  9. Linear and NLO spectroscopy of GaSe and InSe nanoparticles formed via laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashayev, A.; Tunaboylu, B.; Allahverdiyev, K.; Salayev, E.; Tagiyev, B.

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles of layered GaSe, InSe were fabricated by laser ablation (LA) method (KrF laser, λ = 248 nm, 50 Hz, maximum energy 200 mJ, τ = 4 ns) and characterized by: •XRF •GDOES •SEM and TEM; •UV-, VIS-, and IRabsorption; •Raman and PL spectroscopy (also in confocal geometry). Results are discussed in relation to the particle size. Absorption spectra of particles with diameter 20 nm and less turned out to be blue shifted and is consisted with a weak confinement effect on Wannier-Mott type excitons. It is shown, that with decreasing the particle size the energy position of the low-frequency Raman active phonons in both compounds are shifted to lower frequencies (21 and 18 cm-1 in bulk GaSe and InSe and 8 and 7 cm-1 in particles with sizes 5 and 7 nm, respectively). From the low frequency Raman data, decrease of the force constants ca. 25 % (for GaSe) due to the formation of the nanoparticles are estimated, and the origin is suggested. Second harmonic generation (SHG) with 1064 nm line of a mode locked Nd : YAG laser was observed for nanoparticles ablated on different substrates. Potential for using these structures for laser light visualizators are discussed.

  10. Preparation and antibacterial properties of laser-generated silver-anatase nanocomposite film against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joya, Yasir F.; Liu, Zhu; Joya, K. S.; Wang, Tao

    2012-12-01

    Anatase-based titanium dioxide (TiO2) naturally possesses a well recognized antibacterial effect under ultraviolet excitation. However, anatase modified with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) exhibits even stronger antibacterial action in natural daylight. The purpose of our present research is to evaluate the photocatalytic antibacterial effects of laser-generated silver-anatase nanocomposite film against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). A sol-gel TiO2 precursor was spin-coated on a clean glass slide and silver ions were self-adsorbed from aqueous solution. A pulsed beam of KrF excimer laser (248 nm, 13 ns) was traversed over the amorphous film, leading to the crystallization of the anatase and formation of cubic as well as hexagonal Ag NPs. A scanning transmission electron microscope analysis revealed a 30-40 nm anatase crystallite size, whereas an average size of 9.6 nm was obtained from Ag NPs. The photo-absorption of plain anatase was red-shifted to 516 nm with the addition of Ag NPs after the laser treatment. Moreover, no colonies of E. coli and S. aureus cells were observed to survive after 60 min of contact with the laser-modified silver-anatase films in the dark and in daylight conditions.

  11. Richtmyer-Meshkov jet formation from rear target ripples in plastic and plastic/aluminum laser targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Velikovich, A. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    We report experimental observations of jets produced from the rear surface of laser targets after a passage of the laser-driven shock wave. As in our previous work, Aglitskiy et al., Phys. Plasmas (2012), the jets are produced via the shaped-charge mechanism, a manifestation of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for a particular case of the Atwood number A =-1. The experiments done on the KrF Nike laser facility with laser wavelength 248 nm, a 4 ns pulse, and low-energy drive regime that used only 1 to 3 overlapping Nike beams and generated ablative pressure below 1 Mbar. Our 50 um thick planar targets were rippled on the rear side with wavelength 45 μm and peak-to-valley amplitude 15 μm. The targets were made either of solid plastic or of aluminum with a 10 μm thick plastic ablator attached to avoid the radiation preheat. The jets were extremely well collimated, which made possible our side-on observations with monochromatic x-ray imaging. We saw a regular set of jets, clearly separated along the 500 μm line of sight. Aluminum jets were found to be slightly better collimated than plastic jets. A quasi-spherical late-time expansion of Al jets starting from the tips has not been previously seen in experiments or simulations. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  12. Pulsed laser ablation of borax target in vacuum and hydrogen DC glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, A. N.; Miotello, A.; Mosaner, P.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of our experiment was to produce a material with B sbnd H bonds for applications in hydrogen storage and generation. By using KrF excimer laser ( λ = 248 nm) ablation of borax (Na 2B 4O 7) target, thin films were deposited on KBr and silicon substrates. Ablation was performed both in vacuum and in hydrogen atmosphere. DC glow discharge technique was utilized to enhance hydrogen gas ionization. Experiments were performed using laser fluence from 5 to 20 J/cm 2. Films were deposited under gas pressure of 1 × 10 -5 to 5 × 10 -2 mbar and substrate temperatures of 130-450 °C. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of films showed presence of circular particulates. Film thickness, roughness and particulates number increased with increase in laser fluence. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis shows that sodium content in the particulates is higher than in the target. This effect is discussed in terms of atomic arrangements (both at surface and bulk) in systems where ionic and covalent bonds are present and by looking at the increased surface/bulk ratio of the particulates with respect to the deposited films. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements showed presence of B sbnd O stretching and B sbnd O sbnd B bending bonds. Possible reasons for absence of B sbnd H bonds are attributed to binding enthalpy of the competing molecules.

  13. Synthesis of functionally graded bioactive glass-apatite multistructures on Ti substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaskovic, D.; Jokic, B.; Socol, G.; Popescu, A.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Petrovic, R.; Janackovic, Dj.

    2007-12-01

    Functionally graded glass-apatite multistructures were synthesized by pulsed laser deposition on Ti substrates. We used sintered targets of hydroxyapatite Ca 10(PO 4) 6(OH) 2, or bioglasses in the system SiO 2-Na 2O-K 2O-CaO-MgO-P 2O 5 with SiO 2 content of either 57 wt.% (6P57) or 61 wt.% (6P61). A UV KrF* ( λ = 248 nm, τ > 7 ns) excimer laser source was used for the multipulse laser ablation of the targets. The hydroxyapatite thin films were obtained in H 2O vapors, while the bioglass layers were deposited in O 2. Thin films of 6P61 were deposited in direct contact with Ti, because Ti and this glass have similar thermal expansion behaviors, which ensure good bioglass adhesion to the substrate. This glass, however, is not bioactive, so yet more depositions of 6P57 bioglass and/or hydroxyapatite thin films were performed. All structures with hydroxyapatite overcoating were post-treated in a flux of water vapors. The obtained multistructures were characterized by various techniques. X-ray investigations of the coatings found small amounts of crystalline hydroxyapatite in the outer layers. The scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed homogeneous coatings with good adhesion to the Ti substrate. Our studies showed that the multistructures we had obtained were compatible with further use in biomimetic metallic implants with glass-apatite coating applications.

  14. Bombyx mori silk protein films microprocessing with a nanosecond ultraviolet laser and a femtosecond laser workstation: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazare, S.; Sionkowska, A.; Zaborowicz, M.; Planecka, A.; Lopez, J.; Dijoux, M.; Louména, C.; Hernandez, M.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Laser microprocessing of several biopolymers from renewable resources is studied. Three proteinic materials were either extracted from the extracellular matrix like Silk Fibroin/Sericin and collagen, or coming from a commercial source like gelatin. All can find future applications in biomedical experimentation, in particular for cell scaffolding. Films of ˜hundred of microns thick were made by aqueous solution drying and laser irradiation. Attention is paid to the properties making them processable with two laser sources: the ultraviolet and nanosecond (ns) KrF (248 nm) excimer and the infrared and femtosecond (fs) Yb:KGW laser. The UV radiation is absorbed in a one-photon resonant process to yield ablation and the surface foaming characteristics of a laser-induced pressure wave. To the contrary, resonant absorption of the IR photons of the fs laser is not possible and does not take place. However, the high field of the intense I>˜1012 W/cm2 femtosecond laser pulse ionizes the film by the multiphoton absorption followed by the electron impact mechanism, yielding a dense plasma capable to further absorb the incident radiation of the end of the pulse. The theoretical model of this absorption is described in detail, and used to discuss the presented experimental effects (cutting, ablation and foaming) of the fs laser. The ultraviolet laser was used to perform simultaneous multiple spots experiments in which energetic foaming yields melt ejection and filament spinning. Airborne nanosize filaments "horizontally suspended by both ends" (0.25 μm diameter and 10 μm length) of silk biopolymer were observed upon irradiation with large fluences.

  15. Substrate effect of laser surface sub-micro patterning by means of self-assembly SiO2 microsphere array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Ji, Lingfei; Lin, Zhenyuan; Li, Qiurui; Jiang, Yijian

    2015-12-01

    Close-packed monolayer silica spheres organized through a self-assembly process have been widely used in micro/nano fabrications. In this study, we present the effects of substrate on the near-field enhancement of microsphere-assisted laser processing. There are significant differences in the surface morphology of sub-micro hole arrays on substrates with different refractive indices, which were fabricated at the same laser fluence by a KrF excimer laser (λ = 248 nm). It is found that the position of the maximum enhancement removes from the exit surface of the silica sphere into the sphere as the refractive index of substrate increased based on the simulation. In addition, the field distribution curve oscillates when there is a substrate under the microsphere, and oscillation spreads deeper into the substrate with a high refractive index. The results contribute toward the optimization of the process conditions of the microsphere-assisted laser micro/nano patterning technique and make the modification profile of the material more controllable.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of freestanding ultrathin diamond-like carbon targets for high-intensity laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Timothy T.; Gupta, Manisha; Chowdhury, Fatema Rezwana; Chen, Zhijiang; Tsui, Ying Yin

    2013-12-01

    Here, we report the fabrication of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). PLD is a well-established technique for deposition of high-quality DLC thin films. Carbon tape target was ablated using a KrF (248 nm, 25 ns, 20 Hz) excimer laser to deposit DLC films on soap-coated substrates. A laser fluence between 8.5 and 14 J/cm2 and a target to substrate distance of 10 cm was used. These films were then released from substrates to obtain freestanding DLC thin foils. Foil thicknesses from 20 to 200 nm were deposited using this technique to obtain freestanding targets of up to 1-inch square area. Typically, 100-nm-thick freestanding DLC films were characterized using different techniques such as AFM, XPS, and nano-indentation. AFM was used to obtain the film surface roughness of 9 nm rms of the released film. XPS was utilized to obtain 74 % sp2, 23 % sp3, and 3 % C-O bond components. Nano-indentation was used to characterize the film hardness of 10 GPa and Young's modulus of 110 GPa. Damage threshold properties of the DLC foils were studied (1,064 nm, 6 ns) and found to be 7 × 1010 W/cm2 peak intensity for our best ultrathin DLC foils.

  17. Pulsed UV Laser-Induced Stationary Capillary Vibration for Highly Sensitive and Direct Detection of Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Odake, T; Kitamori, T; Sawada, T

    1997-07-01

    A stationary wave of the capillary vibration effect was successfully induced by a series of short laser pulses. This wave could be applied to highly sensitive detection of capillary electrophoresis as well as the already reported capillary vibration induced by an intensity-modulated CW laser (CVL effect). Generally, pulses with much shorter width than the period of the natural frequency of the vibrating system cannot induce a standing vibration. However, utilizing the time constant of CVL determined by heat dissipation time, we found conditions which could induce a stable stationary wave of the capillary by a series of nanosecond light pulses. We used the KrF excimer laser operated at 248 nm with a pulse width of 60 ns and output of ∼10 μJ/pulse as the CVL excitation source and applied it to highly sensitive detection of nonderivatized amino acids at the femtomole level. The sensitivity was at least 2 orders of magnitude superior to that of a commercially available UV absorbance detector. This technique extends the CVL's spectral regions. For example, in the UV region, where many biological materials have significant absorption bands, this technique will extend analytical applications in capillary electrophoresis by eliminating the need for a derivatization process.

  18. Photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO at 248 nm: Evidence of triple fragmentation from primary quantum yield of CH{sub 3} and HCO radicals and H atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Morajkar, Pranay; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa; Bossolasco, Adriana

    2014-06-07

    Radical quantum yields have been measured following the 248 nm photolysis of acetaldehyde, CH{sub 3}CHO. HCO radical and H atom yields have been quantified by time resolved continuous wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy in the near infrared following their conversion to HO{sub 2} radicals by reaction with O{sub 2}. The CH{sub 3} radical yield has been determined using the same technique following their conversion into CH{sub 3}O{sub 2}. Absolute yields have been deduced for HCO radicals and H atoms through fitting of time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles, obtained under various O{sub 2} concentrations, to a complex model, while the CH{sub 3} yield has been determined relative to the CH{sub 3} yield from 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}I. Time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles under very low O{sub 2} concentrations suggest that another unknown HO{sub 2} forming reaction path exists in this reaction system besides the conversion of HCO radicals and H atoms by reaction with O{sub 2}. HO{sub 2} profiles can be well reproduced under a large range of experimental conditions with the following quantum yields: CH{sub 3}CHO + hν{sub 248nm} → CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 3} + HCO ϕ{sub 1a} = 0.125 ± 0.03, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 3} + H + CO ϕ{sub 1e} = 0.205 ± 0.04, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}→{sup o{sub 2}}CH{sub 3}CO + HO{sub 2} ϕ{sub 1f} = 0.07 ± 0.01. The CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} quantum yield has been determined in separate experiments as ϕ{sub CH{sub 3}} = 0.33 ± 0.03 and is in excellent agreement with the CH{sub 3} yields derived from the HO{sub 2} measurements considering that the triple fragmentation (R1e) is an important reaction path in the 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO. From arithmetic considerations taking into account the HO{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} measurements we deduce a remaining quantum yield for the molecular pathway: CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 4} + CO ϕ{sub 1b} = 0.6. All experiments can be

  19. Substrate dependent structural and magnetic properties of pulsed laser deposited Fe3O4 thin films.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Rajendra N; Kaur, Davinder; Pandey, Ashish K

    2010-12-01

    Nanocrystalline iron oxide thin films have been deposited on various substrates such as quartz, MgO(100), and Si(100) by pulsed laser deposition technique using excimer KrF laser (248 nm). The orientations, crystallite size and lattice parameters were studied using X-ray diffraction. The XRD results show that the films deposited on MgO and Si substrates are highly oriented and show only (400) and (311) reflections respectively. On the other hand, the orientation of the films deposited on quarts substrate changed from (311) to (400) with an increase in the substrate temperature from 400 degrees C to 600 degrees C, indicating thereby that the film growth direction is highly affected with nature of substrate and substrate temperature. The surface morphology of the deposited films was studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and spherical ball like regular features of nanometer size grains were obtained. The magnetic properties were studied by Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer in the magnetic field +/- 6 Tesla. The magnetic field dependent magnetization (M-H) curves of all the Fe3O4 thin films measured at 5 K and 300 K show the ferrimagnetic nature. The electrochemical sensing of dopamine studied for these films shows that the film deposited on MgO substrate can be used as a sensing electrode.

  20. Nanosecond laser-induced nanostructuring of thin metal layers and dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, P.; Klöppel, M.; Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K.; Schwaller, P.

    2015-03-01

    Nanostructuring of dielectric surfaces has a widespread field of applications. In this work the recently introduced laser method validates this novel concept for complex nanostructuring of dielectric surfaces. This concept combines the mechanism of self-assembly of metal films due to laser irradiation with the concept of laser-assisted transfer of these patterns into the underlying material. The present work focuses on pattern formation in fused silica near the border of the laser spot, where distorted nested ring-like patterns were found in contrast to concentric ring patterns at homogeneous laser irradiation. For the experiments a lateral homogeneous spot of a KrF excimer laser (λ = 248 nm) and a Gaussian beam Yb fiber laser (λ = 1064 nm) was used for irradiation of a thin chromium layer onto fused silica resulting in the formation of different ring structures into the fused silica surface. The obtained structures were analysed by AFM and SEM. It is found that the mechanism comprises laser-induced metal film melting, contraction of the molten metal, and successive transfer of the metal hole geometry to the fused silica. Simulations taking into account the heat and the Navier-Stokes equations were compared with the experimental results. A good agreement of simulation results with experimental data was found. These first results demonstrate that the variation of the laser beam profile allows the local control of the melt dynamics which causes changes of the shape and the size of the ring patterns. Hence, a light-controlled self-assembly is feasible.

  1. Deposition of epitaxial Cu 2O films on (100) MgO by laser ablation and their processing using ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogale, S. B.; Bilurkar, P. G.; Mate, Nitant; Parikh, Nalin; Patnaik, B.

    1993-03-01

    Epitaxial thin films of Cu2O have been deposited on (100) MgO substrates by pulsed excimer laser ablation technique. Chemical polishing of the substrates by etching them in hot phosphoric acid prior to film deposition is found to be a critical step in realizing epitaxy. A KrF excimer laser operating at 248 nm wavelengths was used for ablation. The depositions were carried out at the laser energy density of 2 J/cm2 and the pulse repetition rate of 5 Hz. The substrate temperature was held at 700°C and the oxygen partial pressure during deposition and cooling was 10-3 Torr. The epitaxial nature of the deposited films was established via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford back-scattering (RBS) channelling measurements. The epitaxial films thus obtained were then subjected to ion bombardment for studies of damage formation. Implantations were carried out using 110 keV Ar+ ions over a dose range between 5 x 1014 and 1.5 x 1016 ions/cmz. The as-grown and implanted samples were subjected to resistivity versus temperature measurements in view of the importance of the Cu-O system in the context of the phenomenon of high temperature superconductivity.

  2. Evaluation of the performance of small diode pumped UV solid state (DPSS) Nd:YAG lasers as new radiation sources for atmospheric pressure laser ionization mass spectrometry (APLI-MS).

    PubMed

    Kersten, Hendrik; Lorenz, Matthias; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten

    2011-06-01

    The performance of a KrF* bench top excimer laser and a compact diode pumped UV solid state (DPSS) Nd:YAG laser as photo-ionizing source in LC-APLI MS is compared. The commonly applied bench-top excimer laser, operating at 248 nm, provides power densities of the order of low MW/cm(2) on an illuminated area of 0.5 cm(2) (8 mJ/pulse, 5 ns pulse duration, beam waist area 0.5 cm(2), 3 MW/cm(2)). The DPSS laser, operating at 266 nm, provides higher power densities, however, on a two orders of magnitude smaller illuminated area (60 μJ/pulse, 1 ns pulse duration, beam waist area 2 × 10(-3) cm(2), 30 MW/cm(2)). In a common LC-APLI MS setup with direct infusion of a 10 nM pyrene solution, the DPSS laser yields a significantly smaller ion signal (0.9%) and signal to noise ratio (1.4%) compared with the excimer laser. With respect to the determined low detection limits (LODs) for PAHs of 0.1 fmol using an excimer laser, LODs in DPSS laser LC-APLI MS in the low pmol regime are expected. The advantages of the DPSS laser with respect to applicability (size, cost, simplicity) may render this light source the preferred one for APLI applications not focusing on ultimately high sensitivities. Furthermore, the impact of adjustable ion source parameters on the performance of both laser systems is discussed in terms of the spatial sensitivity distribution described by the distribution of ion acceptance (DIA) measurements. Perspectives concerning the impact on future APLI-MS applications are given.

  3. Local laser-induced crystallization of lanthanum boron germanate glass near LaBGeO5 composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotarev, S. V.; Gelmanova, T. O.; Priseko, Yu. S.; Paleari, A.; Sigaev, V. N.

    2012-02-01

    Local crystallization of glasses induced by laser irradiation is an efficient technique of fabricating regular structures (arrays of dots, lines, gratings) which can be used as waveguides and other elements in the novel glass-based devices of integrated optics and photonics. One of the most important cases is local laser-induced crystallization of nonlinear optical crystals which can form a base for integrated active elements for optical frequency conversion or electrooptical modulation. We report a comparative study on laser-induced crystallization of lanthanum borogermanate glasses with different additives using different types of lasers. A stillwellite-like crystalline LaBGeO5 phase possessing ferroelectric and nonlinear optical properties or its solid solutions with partial substitution of La by Nd or Sm depending on the additive are shown to precipitate as well-formed crystals a few microns in size near the glass surface under radiation of the continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm), the continuous wave copper vapor laser (510,6 nm and 578,2 nm). To enhance optical absorption of the basic glass we added Sm2O3 oxide for irradiation at 1064 nm and Nd2O3 for irradiation at 510,6 nm and 578,2 nm whereas pure glass was subjected to KrF laser irradiation due to high native absorption at 248 nm. A copper vapor laser which almost has not been applied to this technique before is shown to be an effective tool for laser-induced crystallization providing short times of crystal growth and high speed of laser writing.

  4. Local laser-induced crystallization of lanthanum boron germanate glass near LaBGeO5 composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotarev, S. V.; Gelmanova, T. O.; Priseko, Yu. S.; Paleari, A.; Sigaev, V. N.

    2011-09-01

    Local crystallization of glasses induced by laser irradiation is an efficient technique of fabricating regular structures (arrays of dots, lines, gratings) which can be used as waveguides and other elements in the novel glass-based devices of integrated optics and photonics. One of the most important cases is local laser-induced crystallization of nonlinear optical crystals which can form a base for integrated active elements for optical frequency conversion or electrooptical modulation. We report a comparative study on laser-induced crystallization of lanthanum borogermanate glasses with different additives using different types of lasers. A stillwellite-like crystalline LaBGeO5 phase possessing ferroelectric and nonlinear optical properties or its solid solutions with partial substitution of La by Nd or Sm depending on the additive are shown to precipitate as well-formed crystals a few microns in size near the glass surface under radiation of the continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm), the continuous wave copper vapor laser (510,6 nm and 578,2 nm). To enhance optical absorption of the basic glass we added Sm2O3 oxide for irradiation at 1064 nm and Nd2O3 for irradiation at 510,6 nm and 578,2 nm whereas pure glass was subjected to KrF laser irradiation due to high native absorption at 248 nm. A copper vapor laser which almost has not been applied to this technique before is shown to be an effective tool for laser-induced crystallization providing short times of crystal growth and high speed of laser writing.

  5. Effect of phase transformation on optical and dielectric properties of pulsed laser deposited ZnTiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Praveen K.; Salim, Mohammad; Kaur, Davinder

    2016-04-01

    Zinc titanate (ZnTiO3) ceramics were prepared by conventional solid state reaction method using ZnO and TiO2 in a molar ratio of 1:1 with optimized parameters. It was found that the sample sintered at 800 °C for 12 h exhibit single hexagonal phase of ZnTiO3. ZnTiO3 thin film have been deposited on ITO coated glass substrate using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique employing a KrF laser source (λ = 248 nm). In present work, the effect of substrate temperature, which leads to transformation of hexagonal phase to cubic phase, has been studied. The XRD pattern revealed that pure hexagonal phase of ZnTiO3 appear upto 400 °C and more increment in substrate temperature leads to transformation of hexagonal phase to cubic phase. We have observed the blue shift in absorption edge at lower temperature. When the substrate temperature increases from 300 to 400 °C the band gap decreases due to strong hexagonal phase, but more increment in substrate temperature increases the band gap causes by change of phase from hexagonal to cubic. The dielectric constant of ZnTiO3 thin film increases as the substrate temperature increases due to the enhancement in crystallinity and improved morphology.

  6. Early Stages of Pulsed-Laser Growth of Silicon Microcolumns and Microcones in Air and SF6

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, Douglas H.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Pedraza, Antonio J.

    1999-07-29

    Dense arrays of high-aspect-ratio silicon microcolumns and microcones are formed by cumulative nanosecond pulsed excimer laser irradiation of single-crystal silicon in oxidizing atmospheres such as air and SF6. Growth of such surface microstructures requires a redeposition model and also involves elements of self-organization. The shape of the microstructures, i.e. straight columns vs steeply sloping cones and connecting walls, is governed by the type and concentration of the oxidizing species, e.g. oxygen vs fluorine. Growth is believed to occur by a "catalyst-free" VLS (vapor-liquid-solid) mechanism that involves repetitive melting of the tips of the columns/cones and deposition there of the ablated flux of Si-containing vapor. Results are presented of a new investigation of how such different final microstructures as microcolumns or microcones joined by walls nucleate and develop. The changes in silicon surface morphology were systematically determined and compared as the number of pulsed KrF (248 nm) laser shots was increased from 25 to several thousand in both air and SF6. The experiments in air and SF6 reveal significant differences in initial surface cracking and pattern formation. Consequently, local protrusions are first produced and column or cone/wall growth is initiated by different processes and at different rates. Differences in the spatial organization of column or cone/wall growth also are apparent.

  7. Antiresorption implant coatings based on calcium alendronate and octacalcium phosphate deposited by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation.

    PubMed

    Boanini, Elisa; Torricelli, Paola; Forte, Lucia; Pagani, Stefania; Mihailescu, Natalia; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N; Bigi, Adriana

    2015-12-01

    The integration of an implant material with bone tissue depends on the chemistry and physics of the implant surface. In this study we applied matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) in order to synthesize calcium alendronate monohydrate (a bisphosphonate obtained by calcium sequestration from octacalcium phosphate by alendronate) and calcium alendronate monohydrate/octacalcium phosphate composite thin films on titanium substrates. Octacalcium phosphate coatings were prepared as reference material. The powders, which were synthesized in aqueous medium, were suspended in deionised water, frozen at liquid nitrogen temperature and used as targets for MAPLE experiments. The transfer was conducted with a KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τFWHM ≤ 25 ns) in mild conditions of temperature and pressure. XRD, FTIR and SEM analyses confirmed that the coatings contain the same crystalline phases as the as-prepared powder samples. Osteoblast derived from stem cells and osteoclast derived from monocytes of osteoporotic subjects were co-cultured on the coatings up to 14 days. Osteoclast displayed significantly reduced proliferation and differentiation in the presence of calcium alendronate monohydrate, pointing to a clear role of the coatings containing this bisphosphonate on inhibiting excessive bone resorption. At variance, osteoblast production of alkaline phosphatase and type I pro-collagen were promoted by the presence of bisphosphonate, which also decreased the production of interleukin 6. The positive influence towards osteoblast differentiation was even more enhanced in the composite coatings, thanks to the presence of octacalcium phosphate.

  8. Cost-effective SU-8 micro-structures by DUV excimer laser lithography for label-free biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanza, F. J.; Laguna, M. F.; Casquel, R.; Holgado, M.; Barrios, C. A.; Ortega, F. J.; López-Romero, D.; García-Ballesteros, J. J.; Bañuls, M. J.; Maquieira, A.; Puchades, R.

    2011-04-01

    Cost-effective SU-8 micro-structures on a silicon substrate were developed using 248 nm excimer laser KrF projection, studying the influence of the different variables on the final pattern geometry, finding out that the most critical are exposure dose and post-bake condition. Also a novel and cost effective type of photomask based on commercial polyimide Kapton produced by 355 nm DPSS laser microprocessing was developed, studying the influence of the cutting conditions on the photomask. Finally, as a likely application the biosensing capability with a standard BSA/antiBSA immunoassay over a 10 × 10 micro-plates square lattice of around 10 μm in diameter, 15 μm of spacing and 400 nm in height was demonstrated, finding a limit of detection (LOD) of 33.4 ng/ml which is in the order of magnitude of bioapplications such as detection of cortisol hormone or insulin-like growth factor. Low cost fabrication and vertical interrogation characterization techniques lead to a promising future in the biosensing technology field.

  9. Nanosecond laser-induced back side wet etching of fused silica with a copper-based absorber liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Pierre; Zehnder, Sarah; Ehrhardt, Martin; Frost, Frank; Zimmer, Klaus; Schwaller, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Cost-efficient machining of dielectric surfaces with high-precision and low-roughness for industrial applications is still challenging if using laser-patterning processes. Laser induced back side wet etching (LIBWE) using UV laser pulses with liquid heavy metals or aromatic hydrocarbons as absorber allows the fabrication of well-defined, nm precise, free-form surfaces with low surface roughness, e.g., needed for optical applications. The copper-sulphatebased absorber CuSO4/K-Na-Tartrate/NaOH/formaldehyde in water is used for laser-induced deposition of copper. If this absorber can also be used as precursor for laser-induced ablation, promising industrial applications combining surface structuring and deposition within the same setup could be possible. The etching results applying a KrF excimer (248 nm, 25 ns) and a Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 20 ns) laser are compared. The topography of the etched surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), white light interferometry (WLI) as well as laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The chemical composition of the irradiated surface was studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For the discussion of the etching mechanism the laser-induced heating was simulated with finite element method (FEM). The results indicate that the UV and IR radiation allows micro structuring of fused silica with the copper-based absorber where the etching process can be explained by the laser-induced formation of a copper-based absorber layer.

  10. Average sequential water molecule binding enthalpies of M(H2O)(19-124)2+ (M = Co, Fe, Mn, and Cu) measured with ultraviolet photodissociation at 193 and 248 nm.

    PubMed

    Donald, William A; Leib, Ryan D; Demireva, Maria; Negru, Bogdan; Neumark, Daniel M; Williams, Evan R

    2011-01-13

    The average sequential water molecule binding enthalpies to large water clusters (between 19 and 124 water molecules) containing divalent ions were obtained by measuring the average number of water molecules lost upon absorption of an UV photon (193 or 248 nm) and using a statistical model to account for the energy released into translations, rotations, and vibrations of the products. These values agree well with the trend established by more conventional methods for obtaining sequential binding enthalpies to much smaller hydrated divalent ions. The average binding enthalpies decrease to a value of ~10.4 kcal/mol for n > ~40 and are insensitive to the ion identity at large cluster size. This value is close to that of the bulk heat of vaporization of water (10.6 kcal/mol) and indicates that the structure of water in these clusters may more closely resemble that of bulk liquid water than ice, owing either to a freezing point depression or rapid evaporative cooling and kinetic trapping of the initial liquid droplet. A discrete implementation of the Thomson equation using parameters for liquid water at 0 °C generally fits the trend in these data but provides values that are ~0.5 kcal/mol too low.

  11. Inorganic-organic thin implant coatings deposited by lasers.

    PubMed

    Sima, Felix; Davidson, Patricia M; Dentzer, Joseph; Gadiou, Roger; Pauthe, Emmanuel; Gallet, Olivier; Mihailescu, Ion N; Anselme, Karine

    2015-01-14

    The lifetime of bone implants inside the human body is directly related to their osseointegration. Ideally, future materials should be inspired by human tissues and provide the material structure-function relationship from which synthetic advanced biomimetic materials capable of replacing, repairing, or regenerating human tissues can be produced. This work describes the development of biomimetic thin coatings on titanium implants to improve implant osseointegration. The assembly of an inorganic-organic biomimetic structure by UV laser pulses is reported. The structure consists of a hydroxyapatite (HA) film grown onto a titanium substrate by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) and activated by a top fibronectin (FN) coating deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). A pulsed KrF* laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns) was employed at fluences of 7 and 0.7J/cm(2) for HA and FN transfer, respectively. Films approximately 1500 and 450 nm thick were obtained for HA and FN, respectively. A new cryogenic temperature-programmed desorption mass spectrometry analysis method was employed to accurately measure the quantity of immobilized protein. We determined that less than 7 μg FN per cm(2) HA surface is adequate to improve adhesion, spreading, and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells. We believe that the proposed fabrication method opens the door to combining and immobilizing two or more inorganic and organic materials on a solid substrate in a well-defined manner. The flexibility of this method enables the synthesis of new hybrid materials by simply tailoring the irradiation conditions according to the thermo-physical properties of the starting materials.

  12. Microscopic and macroscopic material property effects on ultraviolet-laser-induced flashover of angled insulators in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Enloe, C.L.; Gilgenbach, R.M.

    1988-06-01

    Flashover of electrically stressed polymeric insulators in vacuum has been induced by ultraviolet radiation from an excimer laser (KrF). Flashover behavior is a relatively strong function of integrated fluence up to the time of flashover initiation, and virtually independent of applied power or pulse time. Flashover is induced by moderate fluence (10 - 150 mJ/cm/sup 2/) of intense (0.4 - 6 MW/cm/sup 2/) ultraviolet at 248 nm at electric field stress considerably below the static breakdown stress. The critical fluence required to initiate flashover is a function of the electric field stress, the insulating material, and the geometry of the dielectric/vacuum interface. The unconventional insulator geometry (in which electrons are accelerated toward the insulator surface) is more tolerant than the conventional geometry by nearly a factor of 2 in fluence. Insulator materials tested were polyethylene, polystyrene, acrylic, nylon-6, acetal, PVC, and teflon. The critical fluence is correlated to the microscopic and macroscopic material properties; results show that insulating materials with high dielectric constants and low secondary electron emission coefficients exhibit superior tolerance to ultraviolet radiation. Of the materials tested, nylon exhibited the highest critical fluence in both the conventional and the unconventional geometries. A theory of ultraviolet-induced insulator flashover is developed.

  13. Molecular elimination of Br{sub 2} in photodissociation of CH{sub 2}BrC(O)Br at 248 nm using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fan He; Tsai, Po-Yu; Lin, King-Chuen; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Yan, Chi-Yu; Yang, Shu-Wei; Chang, A. H. H.

    2012-12-07

    The primary elimination channel of bromine molecule in one-photon dissociation of CH{sub 2}BrC(O)Br at 248 nm is investigated using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. By means of spectral simulation, the ratio of nascent vibrational population in v = 0, 1, and 2 levels is evaluated to be 1:(0.5 {+-} 0.1):(0.2 {+-} 0.1), corresponding to a Boltzmann vibrational temperature of 581 {+-} 45 K. The quantum yield of the ground state Br{sub 2} elimination reaction is determined to be 0.24 {+-} 0.08. With the aid of ab initio potential energy calculations, the obtained Br{sub 2} fragments are anticipated to dissociate on the electronic ground state, yielding vibrationally hot Br{sub 2} products. The temperature-dependence measurements support the proposed pathway via internal conversion. For comparison, the Br{sub 2} yields are obtained analogously from CH{sub 3}CHBrC(O)Br and (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CBrC(O)Br to be 0.03 and 0.06, respectively. The trend of Br{sub 2} yields among the three compounds is consistent with the branching ratio evaluation by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus method. However, the latter result for each molecule is smaller by an order of magnitude than the yield findings. A non-statistical pathway so-called roaming process might be an alternative to the Br{sub 2} production, and its contribution might account for the underestimate of the branching ratio calculations.

  14. Femtosecond pulsed laser deposition of biological and biocompatible thin layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Smausz, T.; Kecskeméti, G.; Klini, A.; Bor, Zs.

    2007-07-01

    In our study we investigate and report the femtosecond pulsed laser deposition of biological and biocompatible materials. Teflon, polyhydroxybutyrate, polyglycolic-acid, pepsin and tooth in the form of pressed pellets were used as target materials. Thin layers were deposited using pulses from a femtosecond KrF excimer laser system (FWHM = 450 fs, λ = 248 nm, f = 10 Hz) at different fluences: 0.6, 0.9, 1.6, 2.2, 2.8 and 3.5 J/cm 2, respectively. Potassium bromide were used as substrates for diagnostic measurements of the films on a FTIR spectrometer. The pressure in the PLD chamber was 1 × 10 -3 Pa, and in the case of tooth and Teflon the substrates were heated at 250 °C. Under the optimized conditions the chemical structure of the deposited materials seemed to be largely preserved as evidenced by the corresponding IR spectra. The polyglycolic-acid films showed new spectral features indicating considerable morphological changes during PLD. Surface structure and thickness of the layers deposited on Si substrates were examined by an atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a surface profilometer. An empirical model has been elaborated for the description of the femtosecond PLD process. According to this the laser photons are absorbed in the surface layer of target resulting in chemical dissociation of molecules. The fast decomposition causes explosion-like gas expansion generating recoil forces which can tear off and accelerate solid particles. These grains containing target molecules without any chemical damages are ejected from the target and deposited onto the substrate forming a thin layer.

  15. Nanostructuring and texturing of pulsed laser deposited hydroxyapatite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunbin; Catledge, Shane; Vohra, Yogesh; Camata, Renato; Lacefield, William

    2003-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) [Ca_10(PO_4)_6(OH)_2] is commonly deposited onto orthopedic and dental metallic implants to speed up bone formation around devices, allowing earlier stabilization in a patient. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a suitable means of placing thin HA films on these implants because of its control over stoichiometry, crystallinity, and nanostructure. These characteristics determine the mechanical properties of the films that must be optimized to improve the performance of load-bearing implants and other devices that undergo bone insertion. We have used PLD to produce nanostructured and preferentially oriented HA films and evaluated their mechanical properties. Pure, highly crystalline HA films on Ti-6Al-4V substrates were obtained using a KrF excimer laser (248nm) with energy density of 4-8 J/cm^2 and deposition temperature of 500-700^rcC. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopies reveal that our careful manipulation of energy density and substrate temperature has led to films made up of HA grains in the nanometer scale. Broadening of x-ray diffraction peaks as a function of deposition temperature suggests it may be possible to control the film nanostructure to a great extent. X-ray diffraction also shows that as the laser energy density is increased in the 4-8 J/cm^2 range, the hexagonal HA films become preferentially oriented along the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. Texture, nanostructure, and phase make-up all significantly influence the mechanical properties. We will discuss how each of these factors affects hardness and Young's modulus of the HA films as measured by nanoindentation.

  16. Effect of dry and wet ambient environment on the pulsed laser ablation of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nisar; Bashir, Shazia; Umm-i-Kalsoom; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq

    2013-04-01

    Surface and structural properties of the laser irradiated titanium targets have been investigated under dry and wet ambient environments. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser of wavelength 248 nm, pulse duration of 20 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. The targets were exposed for various number of laser pulses ranging from 500 to 2000 in the ambient environment of air, de-ionized water and propanol at a fluence of 3.6 J/cm2. The surface morphology, chemical composition and crystallographical analysis were performed by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD), respectively. For both central and peripheral ablated areas, significant difference in surface morphology has been observed in case of dry and wet ambient conditions. Large sized and diffused grains are observed in case of dry ablation. Whereas, in case of wet ablation, small sized, and well defined grains with distinct grain boundaries and significantly enhanced density are revealed. This difference is ascribed to the confinement effects of the liquid. The peripheral ablated area shows redeposition in case of dry ablation whereas small sized grain like structures are formed in case of wet ablation. EDS analysis exhibits variation in chemical composition under both ambient conditions. When the targets are treated in air environment, enhancement of the oxygen as well as nitrogen content is observed while in case of de-ionized water and propanol only increase in content of oxygen is observed. X-ray diffraction analysis exhibits formation of oxides and nitrides in case of air, whereas, in case of de-ionized water and propanol only oxides along with hydrides are formed. For various number of laser pulses the variation in the peak intensity, crystallinity and d-spacing is observed under both ambient conditions.

  17. Characterization of sputtered iridium oxide thin films on planar and laser micro-structured platinum thin film surfaces for neural stimulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanawala, Sachin

    Electrical stimulation of neurons provides promising results for treatment of a number of diseases and for restoration of lost function. Clinical examples include retinal stimulation for treatment of blindness and cochlear implants for deafness and deep brain stimulation for treatment of Parkinsons disease. A wide variety of materials have been tested for fabrication of electrodes for neural stimulation applications, some of which are platinum and its alloys, titanium nitride, and iridium oxide. In this study iridium oxide thin films were sputtered onto laser micro-structured platinum thin films by pulsed-DC reactive sputtering of iridium metal in oxygen-containing atmosphere, to obtain high charge capacity coatings for neural stimulation applications. The micro-structuring of platinum films was achieved by a pulsed-laser-based technique (KrF excimer laser emitting at lambda=248nm). The surface morphology of the micro-structured films was studied using different surface characterization techniques. In-vitro biocompatibility of these laser micro-structured films coated with iridium oxide thin films was evaluated using cortical neurons isolated from rat embryo brain. Characterization of these laser micro-structured films coated with iridium oxide, by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy has revealed a considerable decrease in impedance and increase in charge capacity. A comparison between amorphous and crystalline iridium oxide thin films as electrode materials indicated that amorphous iridium oxide has significantly higher charge capacity and lower impedance making it preferable material for neural stimulation application. Our biocompatibility studies show that neural cells can grow and differentiate successfully on our laser micro-structured films coated with iridium oxide. This indicates that reactively sputtered iridium oxide (SIROF) is biocompatible.

  18. Linkage of oxygen deficiency defects and rare earth concentrations in silica glass optical fiber probed by ultraviolet absorption and laser excitation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-S; Galvin, T C; Hawkins, T; Ballato, J; Dong, L; Foy, P R; Dragic, P D; Eden, J G

    2012-06-18

    Ultraviolet absorption measurements and laser excitation spectroscopy in the vicinity of 248 nm provide compelling evidence for linkages between the oxygen deficiency center (ODC) and rare earth concentrations in Yb and Er-doped glass optical fibers. Investigations of YAG-derived and solution-doped glass fibers are described. For both Yb and Er-doped fibers, the dependence of Type II ODC absorption on the rare earth number density is approximately linear, but the magnitude of the effect is greater for Yb-doped fibers. Furthermore, laser excitation spectra demonstrate unambiguously the existence of an energy transfer mechanism coupling an ODC with Yb(3+). Photopumping glass fibers with a Ti:sapphire laser/optical parametric amplifier system, tunable over the 225-265 nm region, or with a KrF laser at 248.4 nm show: 1) emission features in the 200-1100 nm interval attributable only to the ODC (Type II) defect or Yb(3+), and 2) the excitation spectra for ODC (II) emission at ~280 nm and Yb(3+) fluorescence (λ ~1.03 μm) to be, within experimental uncertainty, identical. The latter demonstrates that, when irradiating Yb-doped silica fibers between ~240 and 255 nm, the ODC (II) defect is at least the primary precursor to Yb(3+) emission. Consistent with previous reports in the literature, the data show the ODC (II) absorption spectrum to have a peak wavelength and breadth of ~246 nm and ~19 nm (FWHM). Experiments also reveal that, in the absence of Yb, incorporating either Al(2)O(3) or Y(2)O(3) into glass fibers has a negligible impact on the ODC concentration. Not only do the data reported here demonstrate the relationship between the ODC (II) number density and the Yb doping concentration, but they also suggest that the appearance of ODC defects in the fiber is associated with the introduction of Yb and the process by which the fiber is formed.

  19. Excimer laser produced plasmas in copper wire targets and water droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo-Dong; Alexander, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Elastically scattered incident radiation (ESIR) from a copper wire target illuminated by a KrF laser pulse at lambda = 248 nm shows a dinstinct two-peak structure which is dependent on the incident energy. The time required to reach the critical electron density (n(sub c) approximately = 1.8 x 10(exp 22) electrons/cu cm) is estimated at 11 ns based on experimental results. Detailed ESIR characteristics for water have been reported previously by the authors. Initiation of the broadband emission for copper plasma begins at 6.5 +/- 1.45 ns after the arrival of the laser pulse. However, the broadband emission occurs at 11 +/- 0.36 ns for water. For a diatomic substance such as water, the electron energy rapidly dissipates due to dissociation of water molecules, which is absent in a monatomic species such as copper. When the energy falls below the excitation energy of the lowest electron state for water, it becomes a subexcitation electron. Lifetimes of the subexcited electrons to the vibrational states are estimated to be of the order of 10(exp -9) s. In addition, the ionization potential of copper (440-530 nm) is approximately 6 eV, which is about two times smaller than the 13 eV ionization potential reported for water. The higher ionization potential contributes to the longer observed delay time for plasma formation in water. After initiation, a longer time is required for copper plasma to reach its peak value. This time delay in reaching the maximum intensity is attributed to the energy loss during the interband transition in copper.

  20. Temperature dependence of the dielectric function of laser deposited YBCO thin film at 3392nm

    SciTech Connect

    Walmsley, D.G.; Bade, T.; McCafferty, P.G.; Rea, C.; Dawson, P.; Wallace, R.J.; Bowman, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have excited surface plasmons in an YBCO thin film at different temperatures using attenuated total reflection of light. The 300nm thick c-axis film was fabricated using pulsed laser deposition onto an MgO (100) substrate with 248nm KrF excimer radiation. Critical temperature of the film was 89.6K and its roughness, as shown by atomic force microscopy, 20nm rms, without droplets over areas of 10 {micro}m x 10{micro}m. The sample was mounted in Otto geometry on a cooled stage which allowed the temperature to be varied between 300K and 70K. An infrared HeNe laser at 3,392nm was used to excite the surface plasmons. The dielectric function of the film was determined between room temperature and 80K. The imaginary part of the dielectric function decreased substantially with reduction in temperature. Results obtained were: {var_epsilon}{sub r} = {minus}24.1 + 0.0013T and {var_epsilon}{sub i} = 7.7 + 0.067T where T is the temperature in kelvin. The ratio {var_epsilon}{sub i}{sup 300}/{var_epsilon}{sub i}{sup 80} at 2.13 is less than the resistance ratio R{sup 300}/R{sup 80} at 2.81. An explanation is offered in terms of two temperature independent mechanisms operative at optical frequencies: enhanced Rayleigh scattering of surface plasmons at grain boundaries and intraband/interband transitions. The real part of the dielectric function, {var_epsilon}{sub r}, was found to be only slightly temperature dependent. It was, however, highly sample dependent when comparison was made with the results of other films, a feature attributed to surface and grain boundary contamination.

  1. Conceptual design of a KrF scaling module. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    A conceptual design of an angular multiplexed 50 kJ KrF laser module for Inertial Confinement Fusion is presented. Optical designs for encoding, beam packing and beam transfer between amplifier stages are developed; emphasis is placed on reducing prepulse problems and achieving acceptable optical quality. An axisymmetric optical design is identified as optimum in terms of simplicity, optical quality, cost and alignment. A kinetic code model was developed for the KrF amplifier and was used to derive scaling maps for the 50 kJ module. Attention was given to reducing parasitics, achieving acceptable extraction efficiency and accounting for amplified spontaneous emission effects. The size of the module is constrained by parasitic suppression and damage thresholds; the power gain is constrained by demanding 40% extraction efficiency in a double pass extraction geometry; and, the run time is constrained by the pulsed power technology (PFN or PFL) and acceptable values of g/sub 0/L. The bounds imposed on the design by the pulsed power technology were examined. Both PFLs and PFNs were considered along with their associated diode, hibachi and guide field requirements. A base line design for a 50 kJ module including amplifier staging, layout and overall size is discussed. Cost analysis and scaling for optical components, pulsed power technology and the guide field are also presented.

  2. Laser ablated high T(sub c) superconducting thin YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films on substrates suitable for microwave applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, J. D.; Meola, J. E.; Jenkins, K. A.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1990-01-01

    The development of high temperature superconducting YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films on substrates suitable for microwave applications is of great interest for evaluating their applications for space radar, communication, and sensor systems. Thin films of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) were formed on SrTiO3, ZrO2, MgO, and LaAlO3 substrates by laser ablation. The wavelength used was 248 nm from a KrF excimer laser. During deposition the films were heated to 600 C in a flowing oxygen environment, and required no post annealing. The low substrate temperature during deposition with no post annealing gave films which were smooth, which had their c-axis aligned to the substrates, and which had grains ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 microns in size. The films being c-axis aligned gave excellent surface resistance at 35 GHz which was lower than that of copper at 77 K. At present, LaAlO3 substrates with a dielectric constant of 22, appears suitable as a substrate for microwave and electronic applications. The films were characterized by resistance-temperature measurements, scanning electron microscopy, and x ray diffraction. The highest critical transition temperatures (T sub c) are above 89 K for films on SrTiO3 and LaAlO3, above 88 K for ZrO2, and above 86 K for MgO. The critical current density (J sub c) of the films on SrTiO3 is above 2 x 10(exp 6) amperes/sq cm at 77 K. The T(sub c) and J(sub c) are reported as a function of laser power, composition of the substrate, and temperature of the substrate during deposition.

  3. Laser measurements for experiments on the TROLL accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogeland, S.

    1992-06-01

    Propagation of an electron beam over long distances can be accomplished by using a laser produced plasma channel. In experiments at the EPOCH Laboratory, a krypton/fluoride laser, lasing at 248 nm, is used to ionize trimethylamine gas to create a 91 m long channel. The laser radius was measured as 2.4 cm. Laser energy was measured and ranged from 0.5 to 6 J.

  4. Films minces ferroélectriques Ba{2/3}Sr{1/3}TiO3 par ablation laser pour applications hyperfréquences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delage, T.; Champeaux, C.; Catherinot, A.; Seaux, J. F.; Madrangeas, V.; Cros, D.

    2003-06-01

    Les matériaux oxydes ferroélectriques semblent des candidats potentiels intéressants pour les composants d'application dans le domaine des télécommunications. Parmi les matériaux ferroélectriques, le Titanate de Baryum Strontium BaxSr(1-x)TiO3 a l'avantage d'avoir une température de transition qui varie suivant son taux x de substitution en baryum. Les films de Ba{2/3}Sr{1/3}TiO3 sont élaborés sur substrats monocristallins MgO par ablation laser pulsée avec un laser KrF (248 nm, durée d'impulsion 14 ns), à un taux de répétition de 10 Hz avec une fluence de 3 J/cm^2 sur la surface de la cible et sous une atmosphère d'oxygène de 3.10^{-1} mbar. Les échantillons réalisés ont été étudiés en diffraction des rayons X en configuration 0-20 afin de déterminer l'orientation des films déposés. Les échantillons sont ensuite caractérisés dans une cavité résonante en hyperfréquence (12,5 GHz) afin de déterminer leur permittivité diélectrique. L'introduction d'une sous-couche de Ba{2/3}Sr{1/3}TiO3 déficitaire en oxygène permet d'obtenir des filnis d'épaisseur micronique possédant de bonnes caractéristiques cristallines et diélectriques.

  5. Hemodynamic recovery after hypovolemic shock with lactated Ringer's and keratin resuscitation fluid (KRF), a novel colloid.

    PubMed

    Nunez, Fiesky A; Callahan, Michael F; Trach, Simon; Burnett, Luke R; Kislukhin, Victor; Smith, Thomas L; Van Dyke, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Death after severe hemorrhage remains an important cause of mortality in people under 50 years of age. Keratin resuscitation fluid (KRF) is a novel resuscitation solution made from keratin protein that may restore cardiovascular stability. This postulate was tested in rats that were exsanguinated to 40% of their blood volume. Test groups received either low or high volume resuscitation with either KRF or lactated Ringer's solution. KRF low volume was more effective than LR in recovering cardiac function, blood pressure and blood chemistry. Furthermore, in contrast to LR-treated rats, KRF-treated rats exhibited vital signs that resembled normal controls at 1-week.

  6. Surface and morphological features of laser-irradiated silicon under vacuum, nitrogen and ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Asma; Bashir, Shazia; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced surface and structural modification of silicon (Si) has been investigated under three different environments of vacuum, nitrogen (100 Torr) and ethanol. The interaction of 1000 pulses of KrF (λ ≈ 248 nm, τ ≈ 18 ns, repetition rate ≈ 30 Hz) Excimer laser at two different fluences of 2.8 J/cm2 and 4 J/cm2 resulted in formation of various kinds of features such as laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), spikes, columns, cones and cracks. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets is explored by Raman spectroscopy. SEM analysis exhibits a non-uniform distribution of micro-scale pillars and spikes at the central ablated regime of silicon irradiated at low laser fluence of 2.8 J/cm2 under vacuum. Whereas cones, pits, cavities and ripples like features are seen at the boundaries. At higher fluence of 4 J/cm2, laser induced periodic structures as well as micro-columns are observed. In the case of ablation in nitrogen environment, melting, splashing, self-organized granular structures and cracks along with redeposition are observed at lower fluence. Such types of small scaled structures in nitrogen are attributed to confinement and shielding effects of nitrogen plasma. Whereas, a crater with multiple ablative layers is formed in the case of ablation at higher fluence. Significantly different surface morphology of Si is observed in the case of ablation in ethanol. It reveals the formation of cavities along with small scale pores and less redeposition. These results reveal that the growth of surface and morphological features of irradiated Si are strongly dependent upon the laser fluence as well as environmental conditions. The difference in surface morphology is attributable to cooling, confinement and shielding effects as well as difference in plasma temperature, density and pressure of environmental media that corresponds to different energy deposition

  7. UV laser ablation of parylene films from gold substrates

    SciTech Connect

    O. R. Musaev, P. Scott, J. M. Wrobel, and M. B. Kruger

    2009-11-19

    Parylene films, coating gold substrates, were removed by laser ablation using 248 nm light from an excimer laser. Each sample was processed by a different number of pulses in one of three different environments: air at atmospheric pressure, nitrogen at atmospheric pressure, and vacuum. The laser-induced craters were analyzed by optical microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Multi-pulse ablation thresholds of gold and parylene were estimated.

  8. Synergic effect of acetal-based resin by blending with poly[4-hydroxy styrene-co-tert-butyl acrylate-co-4-(3-cyano-1,5-di-tert-butyl carbonyl pentyl styrene)] (P(HS-TBA-CBPS)) on the profiles of 248 nm chemically amplified resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Chung, Yoon-Sik; Lee, Dong H.; Cho, Sook H.; Im, Kwang H.; Yim, Yun-Gill; Kim, Deog-Bae; Kim, Jae-Hyun

    2002-07-01

    We prepared ter-polymer of hydroxystyrene, tert-butyl acrylate and 4-(3-cyano-1,5-di-tert-butyl carbonyl pentyl styrene) (P(HS-TBA-CBPS)) and discussed a characteristic of prepared polymer. As TBA, newly introduced monomer increases, contrast of resist is improved. And the prepared polymer was blended with poly(4-hydroxystyrene-co-4-(1-ethylethoxystyrene)) (EE-PHS). The synergic effect on a resist performance in KrF lithography by the combination of high and low activation energy system was shown. A resist using blending polymer was shown a good performance on resolution and LER(Line Edge Roughness) than resist using polymer separately. Based on the results, it was found that high performance KrF resist could be obtained by optimization of polymer blending.

  9. In situ analysis of Titan's tholins by Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilan, Y.; Carrasco, N.; Cernogora, G.; Gazeau, M.; Mahjoub, A.; Szopa, C.; Schwell, M.

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of the whole project developed in collaboration (LISA/LATMOS) is to provide a better understanding of the chemical composition of Titan aerosols laboratory analogs, called tholins, and thereby of their formation pathways. The tholins are produced in the PAMPRE reactor (French acronyme for Aerosols Microgravity Production by Reactives Plasmas) developed at LATMOS. These tholins are generated in levitation (wall effects are thus limited) in a low pressure radiofrequency plasma. Up to now, the determination of the physical and chemical properties of these tholins was achieved after their collection and ex-situ analysis by several methods. Their bulk composition was then determined but their insoluble part is still unknown. Other studies were performed after the transfer of the soluble part of the aerosols to different analytical instruments. Therefore, possible artifacts could have influenced the results. We present the SMARD (a French acronym for Mass Spectrometry of Aerosols by InfraRed Laser Desorption) program. A challenging issue of our work is to perform the soluble and unsoluble parts of PAMPRE tholins' analysis in real time and in situ. The coupling of the PAMPRE reactor to a unique instrument (Single Particle Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry) developed at LISA should allow determining in real time and in situ the characteristics (chemical composition together with granulometry) of the nanometric aerosols. The later are introduced in the analytical instrument using an aerodynamic lens device. Their detection and aerodynamic diameter are determined using two continuous diode lasers operating at λ = 403 nm. Then, the L2DI (Laser 2 steps Desorption Ionisation) technique is used in order to access to the chemical composition of individual particles: they are vaporized using a 10 μm CO2 pulsed laser and the gas produced is then ionized by a 248 nm KrF Excimer laser. Finally, the molecular ions are analyzed by a 1 m linear time-of-flight mass

  10. High-energy krypton fluoride lasers for inertial fusion.

    PubMed

    Obenschain, Stephen; Lehmberg, Robert; Kehne, David; Hegeler, Frank; Wolford, Matthew; Sethian, John; Weaver, James; Karasik, Max

    2015-11-01

    Laser fusion researchers have realized since the 1970s that the deep UV light from excimer lasers would be an advantage as a driver for robust high-performance capsule implosions for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Most of this research has centered on the krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser. In this article we review the advantages of the KrF laser for direct-drive ICF, the history of high-energy KrF laser development, and the present state of the art and describe a development path to the performance needed for laser fusion and its energy application. We include descriptions of the architecture and performance of the multi-kilojoule Nike KrF laser-target facility and the 700 J Electra high-repetition-rate KrF laser that were developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. Nike and Electra are the most advanced KrF lasers for inertial fusion research and energy applications.

  11. Anthracene-organosiloxane spin-on antireflective coating for KrF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Joseph T.; Baldwin-Hendricks, Teri; Hebert, Mello; Suedmeyer, Arlene

    2003-06-01

    A sacrificial, spin-on 248nm UV absorbing organosiloxane film has been developed to enable via first trench last (VFTL) dual-damascene patterning. Amongst other design objectives one key material requirement was that the film be SiO based to facilitate trench etch. Because our starting organosiloxane polymer is transparent a chromophores that absorbs at 248 nm had to be included. Anthracene was selected as it offered the largest amount of absorption per mole. Unfortunately, commercially available anthracene moieties with different functional groups when added directly to the organosiloxane polymer solution resulted in films of very marginal quality. The primary issue was the poor solubility and thermal stability of the anthracene compound within the organosiloxane matrix. To address this fundamental problem the chromophore was stabilized by chemically attaching it to ethyl-orthosilicate. The resulting molecule, 9-anthracene carboxy-methyl triethoxysilane (TESAC) was developed. By combining the appropriate amounts of TESAC, TEOS and other organo-TEOS monomers with the appropriate solvents and a catalyst a stable, 248nm light absorbing anthracene-organosiloxane polymer was developed. This work has led to the development of Duo248 organosiloxane based bottom antireflective coatings. Topics such as the development of TESAC, lithography, plasma etch and selective removal will be discussed.

  12. Growth of centimeter-scale atomically thin MoS{sub 2} films by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Gene; Venkata Subbaiah, Y. P.; Prestgard, Megan C.; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-05-01

    We are reporting the growth of single layer and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films on single crystal sapphire substrates using a pulsed-laser deposition technique. A pulsed KrF excimer laser (wavelength: 248 nm; pulse width: 25 ns) was used to ablate a polycrystalline MoS{sub 2} target. The material thus ablated was deposited on a single crystal sapphire (0001) substrate kept at 700 °C in an ambient vacuum of 10{sup −6} Torr. Detailed characterization of the films was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The ablation of the MoS{sub 2} target by 50 laser pulses (energy density: 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}) was found to result in the formation of a monolayer of MoS{sub 2} as shown by AFM results. In the Raman spectrum, A{sub 1g} and E{sup 1}{sub 2g} peaks were observed at 404.6 cm{sup −1} and 384.5 cm{sup −1} with a spacing of 20.1 cm{sup −1}, confirming the monolayer thickness of the film. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum exhibited two exciton absorption bands at 672 nm (1.85 eV) and 615 nm (2.02 eV), with an energy split of 0.17 eV, which is in excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted value of 0.15 eV. The monolayer MoS{sub 2} exhibited a PL peak at 1.85 eV confirming the direct nature of the band-gap. By varying the number of laser pulses, bi-layer, tri-layer, and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films were prepared. It was found that as the number of monolayers (n) in the MoS{sub 2} films increases, the spacing between the A{sub 1g} and E{sup 1}{sub 2g} Raman peaks (Δf) increases following an empirical relation, Δf=26.45−(15.42)/(1+1.44 n{sup 0.9}) cm{sup −1}.

  13. Excimer laser surface processing of titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T.R.; Hubbard, K.M.; Zocco, T.G.; Foster, L.; Nastasi, M.; Tesmer, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    We have examined the effect of laser surface processing of Ti alloys using pulsed excimer laser light at 248 nm. Thermal transformations of the surface are accomplished by heating the surface and rapid cooling. Alloying and formation of compounds can be obtained by melting and mixing surface layers into the material and by gas alloying. Multiple melting-resolidification cycles result in the inter-diffusion of surface layers in the liquid state and the diffusion of gas species into the material. The effect of alloying from both solid and gas sources and the effects of thermal transformations on the microstructure and surface hardness properties of these alloys will be examined.

  14. Excimer laser surface processing of titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T.R.; Hubbard, K.M.; Zocco, T.G.; Foster, L.; Nastasi, M.; Tesmer, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the effect of laser surface processing of Ti alloys using pulsed excimer laser light at 248 nm. Thermal transformations of the surface are accomplished by heating the surface and rapid cooling. Alloying and formation of compounds can be obtained by melting and mixing surface layers into the material and by gas alloying. Multiple melting-resolidification cycles result in the inter-diffusion of surface layers in the liquid state and the diffusion of gas species into the material. The effect of alloying from both solid and gas sources and the effects of thermal transformations on the microstructure and surface hardness properties of these alloys will be examined.

  15. Surface 3D Micro Free Forms: Multifunctional Microstructured Mesoporous α-Alumina by in Situ Slip Casting Using Excimer Laser Ablated Polycarbonate Molds.

    PubMed

    Rowthu, Sriharitha; Böhlen, Karl; Bowen, Paul; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2015-11-11

    Ceramic surface microstructuring is a rapidly growing field with a variety of applications in tribology, wetting, biology, and so on. However, there are limitations to large-area microstructuring and fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) micro free forms. Here, we present a route to obtain intricate surface structures through in situ slip casting using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) negative molds which are replicated from excimer laser ablated polycarbonate (PC) master molds. PC sheets are ablated with a nanosecond KrF (λ = 248 nm) excimer laser mask projection system to obtain micron-scale 3D surface features over a large area of up to 3 m(2). Complex surface structures that include 3D free forms such as 3D topography of Switzerland, shallow structures such as diffractive optical elements (60 nm step) and conical micropillars have been obtained. The samples are defect-free produced with thicknesses of up to 10 mm and 120 mm diameter. The drying process of the slip cast alumina slurry takes place as a one-dimensional process, through surface evaporation and water permeation through the PDMS membrane. This allows homogeneous one-dimensional shrinkage during the drying process, independent of the sample's lateral dimensions. A linear mass diffusion model has been proposed to predict and explain the drying process of these ceramic colloidal suspensions. The calculated drying time is linearly proportional to the height of the slurry and the thickness of the negatively structured PDMS and is validated by the experimental results. An experimentally observed optimum Sylgard PDMS thickness range of ∼400 μm to 1 mm has achieved the best quality microstructured green compacts. Further, the model predicts that the drying time is independent of the microstructured areas and was validated using experimental observations carried out with microstructured areas of 300 mm(2), 1200 mm(2), and 120 cm(2). Therefore, in principle, the structures can be further replicated in areas up

  16. Resonant Laser Ignition Study of HAN-HEHN Propellant Mixture (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-17

    threshold for pulsed, nonresonant laser experiments. d) Unconfined droplets were typically shattered and not completely ignited by thermal or optical...115 mJ) and 248 nm (250 mJ). An argon, fluorine, and helium mixture provided the ArF excimer emission at 193 nm. A krypton, fluorine, and helium ...V., and Shaw, B.D. (2002) Studies of HAN-based monopropellant droplet combustion, Combust. Sci. and Tech., 174, 71. 3.Carleton, F.B., Klein, N

  17. Correlation of AC Loss Data from Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements with YBCO Film Quality (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    excimer laser operating at the KrF, 248 nm , wavelength. Substrates included LaAlO3 ( 100 ) and SrTiO3 ( 100 ) single crystal substrates as well as buffered...AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2012-0100 CORRELATION OF AC LOSS DATA FROM MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY MEASUREMENTS WITH YBCO FILM QUALITY (POSTPRINT) Paul N...CORRELATION OF AC LOSS DATA FROM MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY MEASUREMENTS WITH YBCO FILM QUALITY (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT

  18. The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) laser system and its associated optics

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.

    1992-07-01

    Generating a 100 nC, 15 ps pulse length electron beam at the AWA requires a stable laser system capable of producing 1--3 ps, 5 mJ at 248 nm with the ability to shape the wave front. We have installed a combined Coherent ultra fast 702 dye laser and Lambda Physik excimer pulsed amplification system which meets these requirements. A device has been built to produce shaped laser pulses. Detailed characterizations of the laser system, its associated optics development, and timing/amplitude stabilization are presented.

  19. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Optical breakdown of quartz glass by XeF laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amosov, A. V.; Barabanov, V. S.; Gerasimov, S. Yu; Morozov, Nikolai V.; Sergeev, P. B.; Stepanchuk, V. N.

    1994-04-01

    The bulk optical strengths of KU1 and KUVI quartz glasses were determined for pulses of 85 ns duration at the wavelength of 353 nm. The damage thresholds of these materials were the same and amounted to 280 GW cm-2. The optical breakdown thresholds of KU1 at λ = 248 nm and λ = 193 nm, obtained earlier for the same samples under otherwise identical conditions, were used together with the present results to plot the wavelength dependence of the damage threshold of this material. These results showed that nonlinear absorption is the main mechanism responsible for damage to quartz glass in high-intensity ultraviolet laser radiation fields.

  20. High power DUV lasers for material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, Toshio; Kakizaki, Kouji; Oizumi, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Fujimoto, Junichi; Matsunaga, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2016-11-01

    A frontier in laser machining has been required by material processing in DUV region because it is hard to get high power solid-state lasers in this spectral region. DUV excimer lasers are the only solution, and now the time has come to examine the new applications of material processing with DUV excimer lasers. The excimer lasers at 193nm and 248nm have been used in the semiconductor manufacturing for long years, and have field-proven stability and reliability. The high photon energy of 6.4 eV at 193nm is expected to interact directly with the chemical bond of hard-machining materials, such as CFRP, diamond and tempered glasses. We report the latest results of material processing by 193nm high power DUV laser.

  1. A comparative study of corneal incisions induced by diamond and steel knives and two ultraviolet radiations from an excimer laser.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, J; Trokel, S; Rothery, S; Krueger, R R

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential role of excimer lasers in corneal surgery. The morphology of incisions induced by two wavelengths of excimer laser radiation, 193 nm and 248 nm, are compared with the morphology of incisions produced by diamond and steel knives. Analysis suggests that ablation induced by excimer laser results from highly localised photochemical reactions and that 193 nm is the optimal wavelength for surgery. The only significant complication of laser surgery is loss of endothelial cells when incisions are within 40 micron of Descemet's membrane. Images PMID:3013283

  2. Nanosecond laser photolysis studies of vitamin K 3 in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. F.; Ge, X. W.; Chu, G. S.; Zhang, Z. C.; Zhang, M. W.; Yao, S. D.; Lin, N. Y.

    1999-06-01

    Vitamin K 3 in aqueous solution was investigated by 248 nm laser flash photolysis. Laser-induced transient species were characterized according to kinetic analysis and quenching experiments by Mn 2+ and O 2. In neutral solutions, the intermediates recorded were assigned to excited triplet states and dehydrogenated radicals of vitamin K 3. In comparison with the results of pulse radiolytical experiment, vitamin K 3 not only has strong electron affinity but could also could be photoionized by UV laser light. All this shows that vitamin K 3 acts as an effective electron carrier and electron transfer agent.

  3. Comparative analysis of post-focal filamentation of focused UV and IR laser pulses in air

    SciTech Connect

    Geints, Yu E; Zemlyanov, A A; Ionin, A A; Mokrousova, D V; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Sunchugasheva, E S

    2015-04-30

    We report the results of laboratory experiments and numerical calculations of the spatial position and structure of a plasma channel produced in air by high-power focused femtosecond laser radiation with wavelengths of 740 and 248 nm as a result of its self-focusing and filamentation. A comparative analysis of the physical patterns of filamentation of IR and UV laser beams with variations in the beam focal length, transverse size and power is performed. It is found that a plasma channel beyond the linear focal waist of the laser beam is formed differently for two different spectral ranges. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  4. The influence of UV laser radiation on the absorption and luminescence of photothermorefractive glasses containing silver ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat'ev, A. I.; Ignat'ev, D. A.; Nikonorov, N. V.; Sidorov, A. I.

    2015-08-01

    It is experimentally shown that irradiation of silver-containing glasses by nanosecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 248 nm leads to the formation of unstable point defects (having absorption bands in the UV and visible spectral ranges) in the irradiated region and causes the transition of ions and charged molecular silver clusters to the neutral state, which is accompanied by an increase in the luminescence intensity in the visible spectral range. The influence of pulsed laser irradiation is compared with the effect of exposure to cw UV light of a mercury lamp. Some models are proposed to explain the influence of the laser effect on the optical properties of glasses.

  5. Influence of pulse width and target density on pulsed laser deposition of thin YBaCuO film.

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, S.

    1999-01-20

    We have studied the effects of temporal pulse width and target density on the deposition of thin films of YBaCuO. A 248nm excimer laser and an 825nm Ti-sapphire laser were used to conduct the experiments with pulse widths of 27 ns, 16 ns, and 150 fs, and target densities of 80% and 90%. Scanning electron microscope photomicrographs and profilometer traces show a striking difference between nanosecond and femtosecond laser irradiation. Shortening the pulse width reduced particulate formation, provided stoichiometry, and improved the film properties. Decreasing the target density raised the ablation rate, produced thicker but nonuniform films, and reduced particulate formation.

  6. Ion-molecule processes in lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Three classes of molecular electronic transition lasers produced by hybrid pumping of high pressure rate gas mixtures are discussed. These are (1) rare gas dimer lasers (such as excited Ar2, Kr2, and Xe2) lasing in the VUV, (2) rare gas halide lasers or excimer lasers (such as KrF, ArF, and XeCl excimers) lasing in the UV, and (3) the charge transfer molecular ion laser (such as N2/+/) lasing in the visible range. Laser excitation methods and kinetic sequences are examined for these lasers.

  7. 90nm node contact hole patterning through applying model based OPC in KrF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Young-Doo; Lee, Sang-Uk; Choi, Jaeyoung; Kim, Jeahee; Han, Jaewon

    2008-03-01

    As semiconductor technologies move toward 90nm generation and below, contact hole is one of the most challenging features to print in the semiconductor manufacturing process. There are two principal difficulties in order to define small contact hole pattern on wafer. One is insufficient process margin besides poor resolution compared with line & space pattern. The other is that contact hole should be made through pitches and sometimes random contact hole pattern should be fabricated. Therefore advanced ArF lithography scanner should be used for small contact hole printing with RETs (Resolution Enhancement Techniques) such as immersion lithography, OPC(Optical Proximity Correction), PSM(Phase Shift Mask), high NA(Numerical Aperture), OAI(Off-Axis Illumination), SRAF(Sub-resolution Assistant Feature), mask biasing and thermal flow. Like this, ArF lithography propose the method of enhancing resolution, however, we must spend an enormous amount of CoC(cost of ownership) to utilize ArF photolithography process than KrF. In this paper, we suggest the method of contact holes patterning by using KrF lithography tool in 90nm sFlash(stand alone Flash)devices. For patterning of contact hole, we apply RETs which combine OAI and Model based OPC. Additionally, in this paper we present the result of hole pattern images which operate ArF lithography equipment. Also, this study describes comparison of two wafer images that ArF lithography process which is used mask biasing and Rule based OPC, KrF lithography process which is applied hybrid OPC.

  8. Green synthesis of selenium nanoparticles by excimer pulsed laser ablation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Overschelde, O.; Guisbiers, G.; Snyders, R.

    2013-10-01

    Pure selenium nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by Liquid Phase - Pulsed Laser Ablation (LP-PLA) in de-ionized water. Excimer laser (248 nm) operating at low fluence (F ˜ 1 J/cm2) was used to generate colloidal solutions of selenium nanoparticles. The obtained selenium nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering, and Transmission Electron Microscopy. We describe the multi-modal size distributions generated and use the centrifugation method to isolate the smallest nanoparticles (˜60 nm in diameter).

  9. Development of Electron Beam Pumped KrF Lasers for Fusion Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    McLean, VA F. Hegeler , Commonwealth Technology, Inc, Alexandria, VA S. Swanekamp, JAYCOR, Alexandria, VA D. Weidenheimer, Titan-Pulse Sciences...Obenschain, F. Hegeler , S. Swanekamp, in Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications, edited by K.A. Tanaka, D.D. Meyerhoffer and J. Meyer-ter-Vehn...Albuquerque, NM 87110; http://www.mrcabq.com. [19] D. V. Rose, D. R. Welch, F. Hegeler , S. B. Swanekamp, M. C. Myers, and J. D. Sethian, submitted to J

  10. Performance of an Advanced Repetitively Pulsed Electron Beam Pumped KrF Laser Driver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    meet the IFE requirements. The initial system employs a gas switched Marx with improved reliability and maintenance schedule. The Marx will later be retrofitted (circa 2006) with advanced solid state switches, presently un

  11. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  12. Patterning of 90nm node flash contact hole with assist feature using KrF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yeonah; Jun, Sungho; Choi, Jaeyoung; Choi, Kwangseon; Han, Jae-won; Wang, Kechang; McCarthy, John; Xiao, Guangming; Dai, Grace; Son, DongHwan; Zhou, Xin; Cecil, Thomas; Kim, David; Baik, KiHo

    2009-10-01

    Patterning of contact holes using KrF lithography system is one of the most challenging tasks for the sub-90nm technology node,. Contact hole patterns can be printed with a KrF lithography system using Off-Axis Illumination (OAI) such as Quasar or Quadrupole. However, such a source usually offers poor image contrast and poor depth of focus (DOF), especially for isolated contact holes. In addition to image contrast and DOF, circularity of hole shape is also an important parameter for device performance. Sub-resolution assist features (SRAF) can be used to improve the image contrast, DOF and circularity for isolated contact holes. Application of SRAFs, modifies the intensity profile of isolated features to be more like dense ones, improving the focal response of the isolated feature. The insertion of SRAFs in a contact design is most commonly done using rule-based scripting, where the initial rules for configuring the SRAFs are derived using a simulation tool to determining the distance of assist features to main feature, and the size and number of assist features to be used.. However in the case of random contact holes, rule-based SRAF placement is a nearly impossible task. To address this problem, an inverse lithography technique was successfully used to treat random contact holes. The impact of SRAF configuration on pattern profile, especially circularity and process margin, is demonstrated. It is also shown that the experimental data are easily predicted by calibrating aerial image simulation results. Finally, a methodology for optimizing SRAF rules using inverse lithography technology is described.

  13. Improvement of KrF contact layer by inverse lithography technology with assist feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Sungho; Shim, Yeon-Ah; Choi, Jaeyoung; Choi, Kwangsun; Han, Jae-won; Wang, Kechang; McCarthy, John; Xiao, Guangming; Dai, Grace; Son, DongHwan; Zhou, Xin; Cecil, Tom; Kim, David; Baik, KiHo

    2010-05-01

    Patterning of contact holes using KrF lithography system is one of the most challenging tasks for the sub-90nm technology node,. Contact hole patterns can be printed with a KrF lithography system using Off-Axis Illumination (OAI) such as Quasar or Quadrupole. However, such a source usually offers poor image contrast and poor depth of focus (DOF), especially for isolated contact holes. In addition to image contrast and DOF, circularity of hole shape is also an important parameter for device performance. Sub-resolution assist features (SRAF) can be used to improve the image contrast, DOF and circularity for isolated contact holes. Application of SRAFs, modifies the intensity profile of isolated features to be more like dense ones, improving the focal response of the isolated feature. The insertion of SRAFs in a contact design is most commonly done using rule-based scripting, where the initial rules for configuring the SRAFs are derived using a simulation tool to determining the distance of assist features to main feature, and the size and number of assist features to be used. However in the case of random contact holes, rule-based SRAF placement is a nearly impossible task. To address this problem, an inverse lithography technique was successfully used to treat random contact holes. The impact of SRAF configuration on pattern profile, especially circularity and process margin, is demonstrated. It is also shown that the experimental data are easily predicted by calibrating aerial image simulation results. Finally, a methodology for optimizing SRAF rules using inverse lithography technology is described.

  14. Research on radiation induced laser plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Rowe, M. J.; Carter, B. D.; Walters, R. A.; Cox, J. D.; Liang, R.; Roxey, T.; Zapata, L.

    1979-01-01

    The development of high power nuclear pumped lasers is discussed. The excitation mechanism of continuous wave (CW) HeNe nuclear pumped lasers is studied and a CO2 nuclear pumped laser is used to demonstrate the CW output in the order of watts. The assumption that high power densities are only achievable by volume fission fragment sources is used to identify laser gases which are compatible with UF6 by excited states lifetime measurements. The examination of Xe2, XeF, and KrF under nuclear irradiation to determine if they are good candidates for nuclear-pumped lasers is described.

  15. Applications of the 308-nm excimer laser in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, A.; Kemeny, L.

    2006-05-01

    Excimer lasers contain a mixture of a noble inert gas and a halogen, which form excited dimers only in the activated state. High-energy current is used to produce these dimers, which have a very short lifetime, and after their fast dissociation they release the excitation energy through ultraviolet photons. The application of these lasers proved to be successful in medicine, including the field of ophthalmology, cardiology, angiology, dentistry, orthopaedics, and, in recent years, dermatology. For medical purposes, the 193-nm argon fluoride, the 248-nm krypton fluoride, the 351-nm xenon fluoride, and the 308-nm xenon chloride lasers are used. Recently, the 308-nm xenon chloride laser has gained much attention as a very effective treatment modality in dermatological disorders. It was successfully utilized in psoriasis; later, it proved to be useful in handling other lightsensitive skin disorders and even in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review summarizes the possible applications of this promising tool in dermatology.

  16. The research on mechanical effect etching Si in pulsed laser micromaching under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuhong, Long; Liangcai, Xiong; Tielin, Shi

    2011-02-01

    To explore further the influencing of mechanical effects on laser machining in the liquid, in the process of great-energy and short-pulsed laser irradiating matter in the liquid, the experiments of 248 nm laser etching n-Si under water were carried out. The removal mechanism of brittle material etched by mechanical effects, which is induced during high-energy and short-pulsed laser machining in the liquid, was discussed. In the paper, the approximate mechanics model of indentation fracture was used to analyze the mechanical effects for removing brittle materials of silicon when laser machining in the liquid. Based on this, a theoretical model of material removal rate was proposed; the experiment of laser machining under water was adopted to validate the model. The experimental results indicate that the removal rate of brittle material caused by shock forces is relatively great.

  17. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  18. UV-laser investigation of dielectric thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ettrich, K.; Blaschke, H.; Welsch, E.

    1996-12-31

    Utilizing thermal Mirage technique, UV laser damage resistivity studies on LaF{sub 3}/MgF{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2}, and HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer stacks have been performed at {lambda} = 248nm, {tau} = 20ns. Investigating these stacks by changing the number of (HL) pairs and the substrate material, optical and thermal coating properties were shown to be responsible for UV single-shot laser damage. Similarly, the damage threshold of selected samples is to be influenced by the deposition technique. Furthermore, multishot damage measurements on LaF{sub 3}/MgF{sub 2} high-reflecting multilayer coatings reveal the accumulation of laser energy in the predamage range.

  19. Pulsed-laser deposition of crystalline Teflon (PTFE) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. T.; Arenholz, E.; Heitz, J.; Bäuerle, D.

    1998-01-01

    Thin films of crystalline polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were prepared by pulsed-laser deposition using 248 nm UV-excimer-laser radiation. Pressed powder pellets and bulk PTFE have been employed as target material. The films were analyzed by means of optical polarization microscopy, stylus profilometry, capacity measurements, XRD, and IR spectroscopy. The effect of substrate temperature Ts on the morphology and crystallinity of the films was studied. Films deposited from pressed powder targets at sufficiently high Ts consist mainly of spherulite-like microcrystallites. These films are continuous, pinhole-free, well adherent to the substrate, and have a composition which is similar to that of the target material. It is suggested that film formation is based on laser-assisted material transfer with subsequent melting and crystallization. They are superior to films deposited from PTFE bulk targets, cut from a solid rod, with respect to film morphology, deposition rate, film cohesion, and optical and electrical properties.

  20. Laser micromachining of chemically altered polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.

    1998-08-01

    During the last decade laser processing of polymers has become an important field of applied and fundamental research. One of the most promising proposals, to use laser ablation as dry etching technique in photolithography, has not yet become an industrial application. Many disadvantages of laser ablation, compared to conventional photolithography, are the result of the use of standard polymers. These polymers are designed for totally different applications, but are compared to the highly specialized photoresist. A new approach to laser polymer ablation will be described; the development of polymers, specially designed for high resolution laser ablation. These polymers have photolabile groups in the polymer backbone, which decompose upon laser irradiation or standard polymers are modified for ablation at a specific irradiation wavelength. The absorption maximum can be tailored for specific laser emissino lines, e.g. 351, 308 and 248 nm lines of excimer lasers. The authors show that with this approach many problems associated with the application of laser ablation for photolithography can be solved. The mechanism of ablation for these photopolymers is photochemical, whereas for most of the standard polymers this mechanism is photothermal. The photochemical decomposition mechanism results in high resolution ablation with no thermal damage at the edges of the etched structures. In addition there are no redeposited ablation products or surface modifications of the polymer after ablation.

  1. Fluid mechanics of fusion lasers. Final report, September 11, 1978-June 5, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Shwartz, J; Kulkarny, V A; Ausherman, D A; Legner, H H; Sturtevant, B

    1980-01-01

    Flow loop components required to operate continuous-flow, repetitively-pulsed CO/sub 2/ and KrF laser drivers for ICF were identified and their performance requirements were specified. It was found that the laser flow loops can have a major effect on the laser beam quality and overall efficiency. The pressure wave suppressor was identified as the most critical flow loop component. The performance of vented side-wall suppressors was evaluated both analytically and experimentally and found capable of meeting the performance requirements of the CO/sub 2/ and KrF fusion lasers. All other laser flow loop components are essentially similar to those used in conventional, low speed wind tunnels and are therefore well characterized and can be readily incorporated into fusion laser flow systems designs.

  2. ''Runaway'' electron current and formation of spatial structures in excimer laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dresvyannikov, V.G.; Fisun, O.I.

    1983-10-01

    Results are presented of a nonlinear analysis of runaway plasma current observed in KrF( electrodischarge laser plasmas maintained by an electron beam. It is shown that under these conditions, a uniform plasma is unstable with respect to pinching, which results in arc formation.

  3. Laser interactions with embedded Ca metal nanoparticles in single crystal CaF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, L.P.; Schubert, B.E.; Petite, P.S.; Langford, S.C.; Dickinson, J.T.

    2005-04-01

    Single crystal calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) is an important material for vacuum-ultraviolet optics. Nevertheless, prolonged exposure to energetic radiation can color the material by producing calcium metal nanoparticles. We compare the effectiveness of laser conditioning treatments at wavelengths ranging from the near infrared to the deep ultraviolet in removing this coloration. Treatments at 157, 532, and 1064 nm can significantly reduce the visible coloration due to nanoparticles. In contrast, irradiation at 248 nm has little effect at fluences below the damage threshold for the material employed in this work. We present evidence that the effect of laser irradiation on coloration is principally thermal and is largely confined to the first 50 ns after each laser pulse. We attribute the wavelength dependence of the bleaching process to the wavelength dependence associated with Mie absorption by metal nanoparticles. The consequences of these observations with regard to laser conditioning processes in bulk optical materials are discussed.

  4. Biaxially Textured Constantan Alloy (Cu 55 wt%, Ni 44 wt%, Mn 1 wt%) Substrates for YBa2Cu3O7-x Coated Conductors (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    deposit YBCO and other buffer layers using a Lambda Physic KrF (λ = 248 nm ) excimer laser. Typical processing parameters that were used for oxide...nearly 100 % as the annealing temperature of the rolled substrates was increased from 750 to 1200 ◦C. A full width half maximum (FWHM) of 6.5◦ in (111...phi scans and an FWHM of 4.9◦ in ( 100 ) omega scans were observed in the substrates annealed at 1200 ◦C for 2 h. These substrates were found to have a

  5. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, L.; Mihailescu, I.; Radu, S.; Gazdaru, D.

    2007-09-01

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m 2 was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy.

  6. DARPA-NRL Laser Program - Semiannual Technical Report to Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency - 1 July 1975 to 31 December 1975

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    Electron Beam Initiated Visible/ UV Transition Lasers 90 2. Discharge XeF and KrF Lasers 103 3. Chemical Ba Laser 104 4. Collisional Quenching of...the boil-off rate of liquid helium in the detector dewar, minimizes heating effects in the sample, and provides a trigger signal to the nanosecond ...diagram of SF6. The double arrow represents pumping by the nanosecond laser . The levels in the upper right hand part of the diagram are in rapid

  7. Particle Generation by Pulsed Excimer Laser Ablation in Liquid: Hollow Structures and Laser-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zijie

    2011-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is a powerful method to fabricate micro-/nanoparticles, which has attracted much interest in the past decade. It represents a combinatorial library of constituents and interactions, and one can explore disparate regions of parameter space with outcomes that are impossible to envision a priori. In this work, a pulsed excimer laser (wavelength 248 nm, pulse width 30 ns) has been used to ablate targets in liquid media with varying laser fluences, frequencies, ablation times and surfactants. It is observed that hollow particles could be fabricated by excimer laser ablation of Al, Pt, Zn, Mg, Ag, Si, TiO2, and Nb2O5 in water or aqueous solutions. The hollow particles, with sizes from tens of nanometers to micrometers, may have smooth and continuous shells or have morphologies demonstrating that they were assembled from nanoparticles. A new mechanism has been proposed to explain the formation of these novel particle geometries. They were formed on laser-produced bubbles through bubble interface pinning by laser-produced solid species. Considering the bubble dynamics, thermodynamic and kinetic requirements have been discussed in the mechanism that can explain some phenomena associated with the formation of hollow particles, especially (1) larger particles are more likely to be hollow particles; (2) Mg and Al targets have stronger tendency to generate hollow particles; and (3) the 248 nm excimer laser is more beneficial to fabricate hollow particles in water than other lasers with longer wavelengths. The work has also demonstrated the possiblities to fabricate novel nanostructures through laser-induced reactions. Zn(OH)2/dodecyl sulfate flower-like nanostructures, AgCl cubes, and Ag2O cubes, pyramids, triangular plates, pentagonal rods and bars have been obtained via reactions between laser-produced species with water, electrolyes, or surfactant molecules. The underlying mechanisms of forming these structures have been

  8. Crystallization of silicon carbide thin films by pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, G.; La Monica, S.; Maiello, G.; Masini, G.; Proverbio, E.; Ferrari, A.; Chitica, N.; Dinescu, M.; Alexandrescu, R.; Morjan, I.; Rotiu, E.

    1996-10-01

    Pulsed laser irradiation at low incident fluences was demonstrated to be effective for the crystallization of amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films deposited on Si wafers. The amorphous films, with a carbon content in the range 30-50%, were deposited on (100) Si wafers by low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The crystallization treatment was carried out by a multipulse KrF excimer laser. The crystallinity modifications induced by the laser treatment were evidenced by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. An important increase of the microhardness was evidenced as an effect of the laser treatment.

  9. Positive ion emission from oxidized aluminum during ultraviolet excimer laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Enamul; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2011-07-15

    We report quadrupole mass-selected time-of-flight measurements of positive ions from oxidized aluminum metal (and for comparison, single-crystal sapphire) during pulsed excimer laser irradiation at 193 and 248 nm. This work focuses on laser fluences well below onset of rapid etching or optical breakdown. By far the most intense emissions are due to Al{sup +}. On previously unexposed material, the ion kinetic energies are initially well above the photon energy, consistent with the ejection of Al{sup +} sorbed at surface electron traps. During prolonged irradiation, the emission intensities and kinetic energies gradually fall. Emission from patches of oxide would account for previous reports of laser-induced Al{sup +} emission from metallic aluminum surfaces cleaned by ion etching if patches of thin oxide were to survive the etching treatment.

  10. Excimer laser ablation of thick SiOx-films: Etch rate measurements and simulation of the ablation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihlemann, J.; Meinertz, J.; Danev, G.

    2012-08-01

    Excimer laser ablation of 4.5 μm thick SiOx-films with x ≈ 1 is investigated at 193 nm, 248 nm, and 308 nm. Strong absorption enables precisely tunable removal depths. The ablation rates correlate with laser penetration depths calculated from low level absorption coefficients. The experimental ablation thresholds are in agreement with numerical simulations on the basis of linear absorption and one-dimensional heat flow. This behaviour is similar to that of strongly UV-absorbing polymers, leading to well controllable micro machining prospects. After laser processing, SiOx can be converted to SiO2, opening a route to laser based fabrication of micro optical components.

  11. Effects of excitation laser wavelength on Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} line emission from nitrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S.; Miloshevsky, G. V.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-01-15

    Laser-produced nitrogen plasmas emitting radiation at 2.48 nm (Ly-{alpha}) and 2.88 nm (He-{alpha}) are considered potential efficient sources for water-window (WW) microscopy. The atomic and optical properties of nitrogen plasma and influence of the laser wavelength on the line emission in the WW range are investigated. It is found that the optimal temperatures for maximum emission from Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} spectral lines are 40-60 eV and 80-100 eV, respectively. The WW line emission and the conversion efficiency (CE) are estimated for three distinct Nd:YAG laser wavelengths (1064 nm, 532 nm, and 266 nm). The calculated CEs are compared with experimentally observed CE values. It is found that 1064 nm wavelength provides the highest CE from laser to Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} radiation.

  12. High power, short pulses ultraviolet laser for the development of a new x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Meixler, L.; Nam, C.H.; Robinson, J.; Tighe, W.; Krushelnick, K.; Suckewer, S.; Goldhar, J.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    1989-04-01

    A high power, short pulse ultraviolet laser system (Powerful Picosecond-Laser) has been developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) as part of experiments designed to generate shorter wavelength x-ray lasers. With the addition of pulse compression and a final KrF amplifier the laser output is expected to have reached 1/3-1/2 TW (10/sup 12/ watts) levels. The laser system, particularly the final amplifier, is described along with some initial soft x-ray spectra from laser-target experiments. The front end of the PP-Laser provides an output of 20--30 GW (10/sup 9/ watts) and can be focussed to intensities of /approximately/10/sup 16/ W/cm/sup 2/. Experiments using this output to examine the effects of a prepulse on laser-target interaction are described. 19 refs., 14 figs.

  13. Chromosome mutations and tissue regeneration in the cornea after the UV laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, Alexander M.; Bagayev, Sergei N.; Lebedeva, Lidya I.; Akhmametyeva, Elena M.; Zhupikov, Andrey A.

    2003-06-01

    In present paper the findings on chromosome mutations, the nature of damage and the repair of the cornea tissue after UV irradiation by excimer lasers at 193, 223 and 248 nm were made. Structural mutations induced by short-pulses UV irradiation were shown to be similar to spontaneous ones by the type, time of formation in the mitotic cycle and location of acentrics. Ten hours after irradiation of the cornea with doses of 0,09 to 1,5 J/cm2 the incidence of cells with chromosome aberrations increased linearly with dose and amounted to 11,7% at 248 nm, 5,5% at 223 nm and 2,6% at 193 nm per 1 J/cm2. No induced chromosome aberrations occurred 72 hour following irradiation. Within the dose range from 3,0 to 18 J/cm2 the cytogenesis effect of radiation was less manifest than that with the doses mentioned above, the frequency of chromosome aberrations being independent of either radiation wavelength or radiation dose and amounted of 2,5 to 3,0%. Thus, large doses of powerful short-pulse UV radiation are safe according to the structural mutation criterion.

  14. Laser direct writing of GaN-based light-emitting diodes—The suitable laser source for mesa definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Rüdiger; Goßler, Christian; Kunzer, Michael; Köhler, Klaus; Pletschen, Wilfried; Brunne, Jens; Schwarz, Ulrich T.; Wagner, Joachim

    2013-03-01

    The development of a process chain allowing for rapid prototyping of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is presented, which does not rely on photolithography. Structuring of the epitaxial layers is realized by direct-writing laser ablation, allowing a flexible chip layout that can be changed rapidly and at low cost. Besides contact metallization and trench formation, mesa definition is the most critical processing step. For mesa formation and to expose the n-GaN contact layer, the epitaxial grown p-GaN layer together with the active region has to be removed completely without forming cracks or crystal defects in the n-GaN layer or the mesa sidewalls, which would cause sidewall leakage currents. In developing an appropriate laser ablation process that meets these requirements, three different laser systems have been employed in a comparative study. These are a frequency-tripled picosecond (ps) Nd:YVO4 laser emitting at a wavelength of 355 nm and a pulse length of 10 ps and two 20 nanosecond (ns) pulse length laser systems, operating at a wavelength of 248 nm (Excimer laser) and 355 nm (frequency-tripled Nd:YVO4 laser), respectively. First, the laser sources are compared regarding the morphological properties of the resulting laser trenches. Due to band filling effects resulting in optical bleaching of the GaN material when irradiating with ps-laser pulses at 355 nm, the resulting ablation process suffers from cracking. Laser ablation using ns-pulses at both 355 nm and 248 nm leads to crack-free material removal up to a well-defined depth. To keep reverse-bias leakage currents at a level comparable to that of conventional dry-etched mesa-LEDs, subsequent wet etching is essential to remove residues in the mesa-trenches irrespective of the laser source used. Besides wet etching, an additional annealing step has to be applied to mesa-trenches fabricated using ns- and ps-laser pulses at a wavelength of 355 nm. Due to the larger penetration depth at 355 nm, defects

  15. A Laser Based Fusion Test Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    particular Robert Lehmberg and Frank Hegeler for providing simulations of the new FTF amplifier. We thank Riccardo Betti and John Perkins for very...ROSE, et al, “Numerical modeling of large-area electron-beam diodes for KrF lasers,” Journal Appl Phys, 94, pp 5343-5349, (2003). 24 F. Hegeler ...et al. “Efficient Electron Beam Deposition in the Gas Cell of the Electra laser,” Physics of Plasmas, 11, pp 5010-5021 (2004). 25 F. HEGELER

  16. UV-laser-assisted liquid phase fluorination of PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wochnowski, C.; Di Ferdinando, M.; Giolli, C.; Vollertsen, F.; Bardi, U.

    2007-10-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrate was covered with liquid 1,2,3,5-tetrafluorobenzene by spin coating. Then the sample was irradiated by a KrF-excimer laser ( λ = 248 nm). Thus, fluorine is released from the fluorine-containing precursor diffusing into the polymeric substrate material where it is expected to substitute the hydrogen atoms of the polymeric molecule and form a water-repellent (hydrophobic) fluorinated polymer. After drying out the polymeric substrate, the sample surface was investigated by SEM, EDX, XPS and contact angle measurement method in order to determine the fluorine content and the wettability of the treated polymeric surface as well as the substitution sites inside the polymeric molecule. The measurements indicate some chemically bonded fluorine at the top of the sample layer. A UV-photochemical fluorination mechanism is proposed based on the XPS spectra evaluation.

  17. Surface treatments by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, A. L.; Benzerga, R.; Basillais, Armelle; Georges, Cecile; Fariaut, Francois; Semmar, Nadjib; Boulmer-Leborgne, Chantal

    2003-07-01

    Laser treatments of various metals are studying depending on the laser wavelength, pulse time duration and shape, and fluence (laser/metal interaction regime). Low fluence excimer UV laser melting process of gold layer is shown to improve the corrosion resistance of multilayer (Au/Ni/Cu alloy) electrical contacts. For this application the homogenity of the laser beam as well as the initial Cu substrate roughness are found to be limiting parameters of the process. Carburization of Al alloy, performed in C3H6 atmosphere with a KrF laser induces the incorporation of carbon atoms over about 4 μm depth. The crystalline Al4C3 synthesized at the surface leads to a strengthening of the light Al alloy, which is of great interest for application in car industry. The study shows that diffusion of C atom in the target is possible because of a plasma presence on the surface which supports the molten bath life time and induces dissociation of the ambient gas. In the last example of laser metal surface treatment presented in that paper, a commonly used steel is treated in air with different lasers at a fluence above the plasma formation threshold. It is seen that the machining oils covering the surface before the treatment can be efficiently removed and that new compounds (nitride, carbide and oxides) are formed at the surface.

  18. Review of structural influences on the laser damage thresholds of oxide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, E.; Lauth, H.; Weibbrodt, P.

    1996-12-31

    The laser damage thresholds (LDT) of optical coatings lie, as a rule, markedly below those of the respective bulk materials. This is due to diverse specific real structure properties with regard to composition, crystallography, microstructure and the physico-chemical structure of the interfaces. These properties depend in a highly complex and sensitive way on the substrate treatment, coating techniques and deposition conditions. With evaporated and sputtered oxide coatings as example, some correlations between structural thin film properties (e.g. crystallography, microstructure, anisotropy, chemical composition, defects) and the ultraviolet (248 nm) or near infrared (1064 nm) laser damage thresholds are discussed with concern to a further increase of the damage resistance. It is evident from data that an approach to the problem requires complex investigations of the technology-structure-properties relationships.

  19. Tuning of cross-linking and mechanical properties of laser-deposited poly (methyl methacrylate) films

    SciTech Connect

    Sueske, Erik; Scharf, Thorsten; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich; Panchenko, Elena; Junkers, Thomas; Egorov, Mark; Buback, Michael; Kijewski, Harald

    2005-03-15

    The chemical composition, amount of cross-linking and its influence on the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin films produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at a wavelength of 248 nm under ultrahigh vacuum were investigated by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, thermogravimetric analysis, and nanoindentation experiments. The films consist of two components, one fraction with a molecular weight well below that of the target material and a second fraction, which is cross-linked. Compared to bulk material, the Young's modulus of the film is increased. The amount of cross-linking in the film can be tuned by the applied laser fluence leading to changes of the mechanical properties.

  20. Tuning of cross-linking and mechanical properties of laser-deposited poly (methyl methacrylate) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süske, Erik; Scharf, Thorsten; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich; Panchenko, Elena; Junkers, Thomas; Egorov, Mark; Buback, Michael; Kijewski, Harald

    2005-03-01

    The chemical composition, amount of cross-linking and its influence on the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin films produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at a wavelength of 248nm under ultrahigh vacuum were investigated by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, thermogravimetric analysis, and nanoindentation experiments. The films consist of two components, one fraction with a molecular weight well below that of the target material and a second fraction, which is cross-linked. Compared to bulk material, the Young's modulus of the film is increased. The amount of cross-linking in the film can be tuned by the applied laser fluence leading to changes of the mechanical properties.

  1. Time-resolved diagnostics of excimer laser-generated ablation plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    Characteristics of laser plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films are examined with four in situ diagnostic techniques: Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, ion probe studies, and gated ICCD (intensified charge-coupled-device array) fast photography. These four techniques are complementary and permit simultaneous views of the transport of ions, excited states, ground state neutrals and ions, and hot particulates following KrF laser ablation of YBCO, BN, graphite and Si in vacuum and background gases. The implementation and advantages of the four techniques are first described in order to introduce the key features of laser plasmas for pulsed laser deposition. Aspects of the interaction of the ablation plume with background gases (i.e., thermalization, attenuation, shock formation) and the collision of the plasma plume with the substrate heater are then summarized. The techniques of fast ICCD photography and gated photon counting are then applied to investigate the temperature, velocity, and spatial distribution of hot particles generated during KrF ablation of YBCO, BN, Si and graphite. Finally, key features of fast imaging of the laser ablation of graphite into high pressure rare gases are presented in order to elucidate internal reflected shocks within the plume, redeposition of material on a surface, and formation of hot nanoparticles within the plume.

  2. Electra: A Repetitively Pulsed, Electron Beam Pumped KrF Laser to Develop the Technologies for Fusion Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    primary source of beam electrons comes from the inside of the capillary wall, and not explosive emission from the cathode material itself. This should...emitted from a field emission cathode driven by a fast pulsed power system. The electron beam propagates through a thin foil, which serves as the...pressure after the shot was reduced about five fold. In the case of the carbon fiber cathode , the RMS non-uniformity of the electron beam dropped

  3. Predictions and Observations of Two-Plasmon Decay on the NIKE Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Lee; Weaver, James; Oh, J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S.; Velikovich, A.

    2011-10-01

    NIKE is a Krf laser system at the Naval Research Laboratory used to explore hydrodynamic stability, equation of state, and other physics problems arising in IFE research. The short wavelength and large bandwidth of the NIKE laser is predicted to raise the threshold of parametric instabilities such as two-plasmon decay (TPD). We report on simulations performed using the FAST3d radiation hydrocode to design TPD experiments that have allowed us to explore the validity of simple threshold formulas and demonstrate the advantages of the KrF wavelength in suppressing LPI. We consider proposed high-gain shock ignition designs and show, through analytic estimates and simulations, that we can explore the relevant scalelength-temperature regime, providing an experimental method to study the LPI threat to these targets at a small fraction of their designed input energies. This research is funded by the US DOE, NRL, and ONR.

  4. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  5. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  6. Formation of single crystalline tellurium supersaturated silicon pn junctions by ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiyuan, Wang; Yongguang, Huang; Dewei, Liu; Xiaoning, Zhu; Xiao, Cui; Hongliang, Zhu

    2013-06-01

    Pn junctions based on single crystalline tellurium supersaturated silicon were formed by ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting (PLM). P type silicon wafers were implanted with 245 keV 126Te+ to a dose of 2 × 1015 ions/cm2, after a PLM process (248 nm, laser fluence of 0.30 and 0.35 J/cm2, 1-5 pulses, duration 30 ns), an n+ type single crystalline tellurium supersaturated silicon layer with high carrier density (highest concentration 4.10 × 1019 cm-3, three orders of magnitude larger than the solid solution limit) was formed, it shows high broadband optical absorption from 400 to 2500 nm. Current—voltage measurements were performed on these diodes under dark and one standard sun (AM 1.5), and good rectification characteristics were observed. For present results, the samples with 4-5 pulses PLM are best.

  7. Phosphorus doping of 4H SiC by liquid immersion excimer laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Akihiro; Nishi, Koji; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Asano, Tanemasa

    2013-02-04

    Phosphorus doping of 4H SiC is performed by KrF excimer laser irradiation of 4H SiC immersed in phosphoric acid. Phosphorus is incorporated to a depth of a few tens of nanometers at a concentration of over 10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3} without generating significant crystal defects. Formation of a pn junction diode with an ideality factor of 1.06 is demonstrated.

  8. Peculiarities of radiation formation in laser systems for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yury N.; Andreev, M. V.; Losev, V. F.; Puchikin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The study results of a high-quality radiation formation in the UV and IR spectral ranges for using in lidar systems to detect the vapors of nitric oxide and complex molecules, including data radicals, are discussed. The influence of the existing cavity losses on the radiation formation in the dispersion cavity is studied.The development of KrF laser with a broad spectral band adjustment of 247.5-249.5 nm and high energy are presented about. The possibility of pulse formation with duration of 30 ns in CO2 laser is shown.

  9. Spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Sun, J.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-08-20

    The spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown of aluminum (Al) targets in air have been investigated both by optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography. A KrF excimer laser was used to produce plasmas from Al targets in air. Al atomic emission lines show an obvious enhancement in the emission intensity when a pair of Al-plate walls were placed to spatially confine the plasma plumes. Images of the Al plasma plumes showed that the plasma plumes evolved into a torus shape and were compressed in the Al walls. The mechanism for the confinement effects was discussed using shock wave theory.

  10. Influence of beam incidence angle on dry laser cleaning of surface particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecke, G.; Röhr, E.; Heyns, M. M.

    2000-03-01

    Dry laser cleaning is envisaged by semiconductor companies to replace wet-cleans. The influence of beam incidence angle was studied in the case of the removal of weakly absorbing particles on absorbing Si wafers by 248 nm DUV light pulses. By decreasing the beam incidence angle from 80° to 10°, the removal efficiency of 0.15-0.30 μm Si 3N 4 particles was increased by 30-45%, while no improvement was observed with 0.3 μm SiO 2 particles. Based on theoretical calculations, it is proposed that the enhanced removal of particles at grazing incidence is caused by the horizontal component of the beam radiation pressure. The difference between Si 3N 4 and SiO 2 particles is attributed to the influence of particle shape on van der Waals adhesion forces.

  11. XeCl Avalanche discharge laser employing Ar as a diluent

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.

    1981-01-01

    A XeCl avalanche discharge exciplex laser which uses a gaseous lasing starting mixture of: (0.2%-0.4% chlorine donor/2.5%-10% Xe/97.3%-89.6% Ar). The chlorine donor normally comprises HCl but can also comprise CCl.sub.4 BCl.sub.3. Use of Ar as a diluent gas reduces operating pressures over other rare gas halide lasers to near atmospheric pressure, increases output lasing power of the XeCl avalanche discharge laser by 30% to exceed KrF avalanche discharge lasing outputs, and is less expensive to operate.

  12. XeCl avalanche discharge laser employing Ar as a diluent

    DOEpatents

    Sze, R.C.

    1979-10-10

    A XeCl avalanche discharge exciplex laser which uses a gaseous lasing starting mixture of: 0.2 to 0.4% chlorine donor/2.5% to 10% Xe/97.3% to 89.6% Ar) is provided. The chlorine donor normally comprises HCl but can also comprise CCl/sub 4/ BCl/sub 3/. Use of Ar as a diluent gas reduces operating pressures over other rare gas halide lasers to near atmospheric pressure, increases output lasing power of the XeCl avalanche discharge laser by 30% to exceed KrF avalanche discharge lasing outputs, and is less expensive to operate.

  13. Functional polyethylene glycol derivatives nanostructured thin films synthesized by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, R.; Popescu, C.; Popescu, A.; Grigorescu, S.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Mihaiescu, D.; Gittard, S. D.; Narayan, R. J.; Buruiana, T.; Stamatin, I.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2009-09-01

    We report the thin film deposition by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of a polymer conjugate with an hydrophilic sequence between metronidazole molecules that was covalently attached to both oligomer ends of carboxylate poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG 1.5-metronidazole). A pulsed KrF* excimer laser was used to deposit the drug-polymer composite films. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that MAPLE-transferred materials exhibited chemical properties similar to the starting materials. The dependence of the surface morphology on incident laser fluence is given.

  14. Arrayed narrow linewidth erbium-doped waveguide-distributed feedback lasers on an ultra-low-loss silicon-nitride platform.

    PubMed

    Belt, Michael; Huffman, Taran; Davenport, Michael L; Li, Wenzao; Barton, Jonathon S; Blumenthal, Daniel J

    2013-11-15

    We demonstrate an array of erbium-doped waveguide-distributed feedback lasers on an ultra-low-loss Si(3)N(4) platform. Sidewall gratings providing the lasing feedback are defined in the silicon-nitride layer using 248 nm stepper lithography, while the gain is provided by a reactive co-sputtered erbium-doped aluminum-oxide layer. We observe lasing output over a 12 nm wavelength range (1531-1543 nm) from the array of five separate lasers. Output powers of 8 μW and lasing linewidths of 501 kHz are obtained. Single-mode operation is confirmed, with side-mode suppression ratios over 35 dB for all designs.

  15. Femtosecond laser printing of living cells using absorbing film-assisted laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Béla; Smausz, Tomi; Szabó, Gábor; Kolozsvári, Lajos; Kafetzopoulos, Dimitris; Fotakis, Costas; Nógrádi, Antal

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of a femtosecond KrF laser in absorbing film-assisted, laser-induced forward transfer of living cells was studied. The absorbing materials were 50-nm-thick metal films and biomaterials (gelatine, Matrigel, each 50 μm thick, and polyhydroxybutyrate, 2 μm). The used cell types were human neuroblastoma, chronic myeloid leukemia, and osteogenic sarcoma cell lines, and primary astroglial rat cells. Pulses of a 500-fs KrF excimer laser focused onto the absorbing layer in a 250-μm diameter spot with 225 mJ/cm2 fluence were used to transfer the cells to the acceptor plate placed at 0.6 mm distance, which was a glass slide either pure or covered with biomaterials. While the low-absorptivity biomaterial absorbing layers proved to be ineffective in transfer of cells, when applied on the surface of acceptor plate, the wet gelatine and Matrigel layers successfully ameliorated the impact of the cells, which otherwise did not survive the arrival onto a hard surface. The best short- and long-term survival rate was between 65% and 70% for neuroblastoma and astroglial cells. The long-term survival of the transferred osteosarcoma cells was low, while the myeloid leukemia cells did not tolerate the procedure under the applied experimental conditions.

  16. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin; Zhong, Xiang Li

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser-material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 0.087 J/cm2) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 1.576 J/cm2), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α-1 = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α-1 = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the Cdbnd C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas Cdbnd C bond is partially eliminated through the femtosecond laser treatment due to the difference in photon energy of the two laser beams. A reduction in the Cdbnd C bond through the chain scission process creates free radical carbons which then form crosslinks with each other or react with oxygen, nitrogen and water in air producing oxygen-rich (Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bond) and nitrogen-rich (Csbnd N) functional groups.

  17. A computer modeling study of isotopically selective, laser photodissociation of OCS in cryogenic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zittel, P.F.

    1991-12-23

    Computer model calculations are presented for enrichments of carbon, oxygen, and sulfur isotopes by two-step, IR/UV, laser photodissociation of OCS in rare gas liquid solutions. The model calculations are based on previously measured fundamental physical properties, including spectroscopic parameters of the IR absorption bands of OCS in cryogenic solution, UV photodissociation cross sections for specific vibrational levels of OCS, and rates for vibrational relaxation of OCS by cryogenic solvents. Results are presented for both pulsed and continuous wave laser sources. Photodissociation through both the 2{nu}{sub 2} and {nu}{sub 1} intermediate vibrational levels of OCS is investigated. The laser characteristics required to obtain optimum enrichments are determined by modeling the dependence of enrichment on laser wavelength and intensity, as well as pulse width and timing for pulsed sources. Optimum carbon and oxygen isotope enrichment factors of 9--14 are found for two-step photodissociation through the OCS(2{nu}{sub 2}) vibrational level, using pulsed CO{sub 2} and KrF excimer laser sources. Optimum sulfur isotope enrichment factors of 5--6 are found for photodissociation through the OCS({nu}{sub 1}) level, using a pulsed 12 {mu}m laser and a KrF excimer laser. The enrichments found for continuous wave laser sources are smaller than those for pulsed sources. 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Hollow light guide and optical fiber for UV laser transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Uichi; Hashishin, Yuichi; Nakano, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    1997-12-01

    The applications of ultraviolet lasers in medicine and surgery are expected to produce new therapies since UV laser is strongly absorbed by lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The suitable tools for the UV laser power delivery, however, have not been developed yet. In an effort to make efficient delivery of UV laser, we have proposed hollow light guide which consists of an aluminum-phosphor bronze reflector and a teflon E-type rail spacer. The delivery characteristics of the hollow light guide have been investigated using the ArF and KrF excimer lasers. In case of the KrF laser, the transmittance and delivery energy reached 77%/m and 110 mJ/pulse, respectively. In the ArF laser, the transmittance and delivery energy were obtained to be 56%/m and 40 mJ/pulse, respectively. It is known that 193 nm radiation by the ArF laser are absorbed by the air. Thus, the ArF laser beam delivery were examined in the helium gas. The transmittance and the delivery energy were obtained to be 72%/m and 50 mJ/pulse using helium-filled hollow light guide, which were greatly improved for comparison with the case of the air. We have also tried the quartz fiber with OH ion doped core. The effects of a lightly doped core with Cl and a clad with B-F on the laser transmittance have been investigated. In these result, the Cl was not good core dopant. The B and F were useful clad dopants for the excimer laser transmission.

  19. Hollow light guide and optical fiber for UV laser transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Uichi; Hashishin, Yuichi; Nakano, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    1998-01-01

    The applications of ultraviolet lasers in medicine and surgery are expected to produce new therapies since UV laser is strongly absorbed by lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The suitable tools for the UV laser power delivery, however, have not been developed yet. In an effort to make efficient delivery of UV laser, we have proposed hollow light guide which consists of an aluminum-phosphor bronze reflector and a teflon E-type rail spacer. The delivery characteristics of the hollow light guide have been investigated using the ArF and KrF excimer lasers. In case of the KrF laser, the transmittance and delivery energy reached 77%/m and 110 mJ/pulse, respectively. In the ArF laser, the transmittance and delivery energy were obtained to be 56%/m and 40 mJ/pulse, respectively. It is known that 193 nm radiation by the ArF laser are absorbed by the air. Thus, the ArF laser beam delivery were examined in the helium gas. The transmittance and the delivery energy were obtained to be 72%/m and 50 mJ/pulse using helium-filled hollow light guide, which were greatly improved for comparison with the case of the air. We have also tried the quartz fiber with OH ion doped core. The effects of a lightly doped core with Cl and a clad with B-F on the laser transmittance have been investigated. In these result, the Cl was not good core dopant. The B and F were useful clad dopants for the excimer laser transmission.

  20. Excimer lasers for superhigh NA 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzel, Rainer; Albrecht, Hans S.; Lokai, Peter; Zschocke, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Thomas; Bragin, Igor; Schroeder, Thomas; Reusch, Christian; Spratte, Stefan

    2003-06-01

    Excimer lasers are widely used as the light source for microlithography scanners. The volume shipment of scanner systems using 193nm is projected to begin in year 2003. Such tools will directly start with super high numerical aperture (NA) in order to take full advantage of the 193nm wavelength over the advanced 248nm systems. Reliable high repetition rate laser light sources enabling high illumination power and wafer throughput are one of the fundamental prerequisites. In addition these light sources must support a very high NA imaging lens of more than 0.8 which determines the output spectrum of the laser to be less than 0.30 pm FWHM. In this paper we report on our recent progress in the development of high repetition rate ultra-narrow band lasers for high NA 193nm microlithography scanners. The laser, NovaLine A4003, is based on a Single Oscillator Ultral Line-narrowed (SOUL) design which yields a bandwidth of less than 0.30pm FWHM. The SOUL laser enables superior optical performance without adding complexity or cost up to the 4 kHz maximum repetition rate. The A4003's high precision line-narrowing optics used in combination with the high repetition rate of 4 kHz yields an output power of 20 W at an extremely narrow spectral bandwidth of less than 0.30 pm FWHM and highest spectral purity of less than 0.75 pm for the 95% energy content. We present performance and reliability data and discuss the key laser parameters. Improvements in the laser-internal metrology and faster regulation control result in better energy stability and improved overall operation behavior. The design considerations for line narrowing and stable laser operation at high repetition rates are discussed.

  1. Absolute I(asterisk) quantum yields for the ICN A state by diode laser gain-vs-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute I(asterisk) quantum yields have been measured as a function of wavelength for room temperature photodissociation of the ICN A state continuum. The yields are obtained by the technique of time-resolved diode laser gain-vs-absorption spectroscopy. Quantum yields are evaluated at seven wavelengths from 248 to 284 nm. The yield at 266 nm is 66.0 + or - 2 percent and it falls off to 53.4 + or - 2 percent and 44.0 + or - 4 percent at 284 and 248 nm, respectively. The latter values are significantly higher than those obtained by previous workers using infrared fluorescence. Estimates of I(asterisk) quantum yields obtained from analysis of CN photofragment rotational distributions, as discussed by other workers, are in good agreement with the I(asterisk) yields reported here. The results are considered in conjunction with recent theoretical and experimental work on the CN rotational distributions and with previous I(asterisk) quantum yield results.

  2. A Moiré Cavity Plasmonic Dye Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karademir, Ertugrul; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2015-03-01

    From its first conception to its first demonstration, plasmonic lasers have been an intriguing topic of research. In this work, Moiré gratings which manifest a cavity state in the SPP dispersion curve. We used a reverse Kretschmann setup to decouple the amplified light component of SPPs. We employed a Moiré cavity with 250 +256 nm periodicity together with a Styryl 7 laser dye dissolved in ethylene glycol in 5 mM concentration and obtained a lasing at 718 nm. Pumping threshold was 1.5 mJ/cm2 with FWHM of 2.8 nm. Furthermore, periodicities of 242 +248 nm and 260 +266 nm resulted in proportional shift of the lasing peak. We did not observe any lasing action on samples with Au and Ti coatings, although solely Au coated samples showed plasmonic modes in the spectrum. Resulting lasing peak is highly TM polarized. Reflection map measurements confirm that lasing mode is supported with the cavity state of the metallic Moiré cavity and simulations support reflection map measurements. Thus, we demonstrated, to our knowledge, the first plasmonic dye laser on a Moiré cavity. TUBITAK 110T790, 110T589, 112T091.

  3. Generation of solid-density ultraintense ion beams by a picosecond laser pulse of circular polarization.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, S; Badziak, J

    2012-02-01

    This contribution reports particle-in-cell numerical studies of deuteron beam acceleration by a picosecond laser pulse of circular polarization. The effect of laser wavelength λ and the I(L)λ(2) product (I(L) is laser intensity) on the ion beam parameters is investigated. It is shown that at the I(L)λ(2) product fixed, the beam parameters (, I(i), F(i)) as well as the laser-ions energy conversion efficiency quickly increase with a decrease in the laser wavelength and the best results are achieved for a KrF laser (λ = 0.248 μm). In particular, a 2-ps KrF laser pulse of I(L)λ(2) ∼ 2 × 10(20) Wcm(-2) μm(2) interacting with a 10-μm deuteron target produces a quasi-monoenergetic, solid-density deuteron beam of parameters approaching those required for inertial confinement fusion fast ignition.

  4. Mechanical spectroscopy of laser deposited polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschede, Andreas; Scharf, Thorsten; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich; Samwer, Konrad

    2008-11-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at 248 nm in ultra high vacuum was used to produce thin poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA) films. The ablation and deposition mechanisms were found to be similar in both systems. Having the same backbone, these polymers differ in the size of their polar side groups leading to changes in their dynamics. Studies of the relaxation processes were performed using mechanical torsion and bending spectroscopy by means of a double-paddle oscillator (DPO) and an in-situ plasma plume excited reed (PPXR), respectively. A strong increase of the mechanical damping was observed during annealing of the polymer films well above the glass transition temperature T g, while in-situ X-ray measurements did not reveal any structural changes. For PEMA, the glass transition temperature T g=335 K and the main absorption maximum appear at lower temperatures compared to PMMA ( T g=380 K), allowing one to measure the mechanical properties in a much wider range above T g.

  5. Megabar Pressure Waves Through Low Density Foams And Low Density Foams Filled With Liquid Deuterium(Supported By U.S. Department of Energy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethian, J. D.; Bodner, S. E.; Dahlburg, J. P.; Gerber, K. A.; McLean, E. A.; Obenschain, S. P.; Pawley, C. J.; Serlin, V.; Sullivan, C. A.; Gardner, J. H.; Chan, Y.

    1997-07-01

    We are using the Nike KrF laser (248 nm) to generate megabar pressure waves in low density Resorcinol-Formaldehyde foams. Peak intensity on target is between 0.8 and 1.1 x 10^14 W/cm^3 with less than 0.3non-uniformities in the focal plane. The foam density ranges from 40 - 100 mg/cm^3). The foams are either evacuated or filled with liquid deuterium. The front of the foam has a thin (approx. 2 μ m) foil or a relatively thick (60 μ m) aluminum plate to allow us to distinguish between a wave that is driven directly by the laser from one driven solely by a hydrodynamic piston. The wave velocity is determined by measuring the onset of visible light from the rear surfaces of the target. Our results will be compared with modeling in a companion paper at this meeting.

  6. Damage precursor measurements on UV-optical coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ettrich, K.; Blaschke, H.; Welsch, E.

    1995-12-31

    For application in UV thin film optics the thermal contribution to the laser-induced optical breakdown was investigated utilizing time-resolved photothermal probe beam deflection (MIRAGE) technique. The potentiality of this method for the determination of both the subdamage range and the onset of single-shot-damage of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} and LaF{sub 3}/MgF{sub 2} high-reflective coatings by using the thermal branch of the MIRAGE technique could be demonstrated. Examining the dielectric mirrors by 248 nm KrF laser irradiation, distinct damage precursor features were found. Thus, the physical origin of the UV pulsed radiation breakdown in HR coatings can be elucidated.

  7. Characterization of MAPLE deposited WO3 thin films for electrochromic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyadjiev, S. I.; Stefan, N.; Szilágyi, I. M.; Mihailescu, N.; Visan, A.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Stan, G. E.; Besleaga, C.; Iliev, M. T.; Gesheva, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is a widely studied material for electrochromic applications. The structure, morphology and optical properties of WO3 thin films, grown by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) from monoclinic WO3 nano-sized particles, were investigated for their possible application as electrochromic layers. A KrF* excimer (λ=248 nm, ζFWHM=25 ns) laser source was used in all experiments. The MAPLE deposited WO3 thin films were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Cyclic voltammetry measurements were also performed, and the coloring and bleaching were observed. The morpho-structural investigations disclosed the synthesis of single-phase monoclinic WO3 films consisting of crystalline nano-grains embedded in an amorphous matrix. All thin films showed good electrochromic properties, thus validating application of the MAPLE deposition technique for the further development of electrochromic devices.

  8. Electro-optic tunable Bragg gratings in chromophore doped polymer waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogunovic, D.; Raymond, S. G.; Swanson, A.; Simpson, M. C.

    2016-09-01

    Tunable waveguide Bragg gratings were demonstrated in PYR-3 chromophore doped polymers. We report on the fabrication and the performance of the device. Polycarbonate thin films were doped with PYR-3 (2-{3- Cyano-4- [3-(1-decyl-1 H-pyridin-4-ylidene)-propenyl]-5,5-dimethyi-5 H-furan-2-ylidene}-malononitrile) chromophore, consisting of a dihydropyridinylidene donor and three carbon atoms in the conjugated linker between donor and acceptor. Ridge waveguides were laser micro-machined into the polycarbonate film with a JPSA micromachining system equipped with a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm. Bragg gratings were inscribed into the waveguide by permanently photobleaching the PYR-3 chromophores using a phase mask to achieve narrowband reflections at wavelengths around 1550 nm. Electro-optic properties were introduced by contact poling. Applying a static external electric field leads to the shift of the reflection peak.

  9. Structural characterization and electronic structure of laser treated TiN thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Sheetal; Nair, K. G. M.; Phase, D. M.; Gupta, Ratnesh

    2012-06-05

    TiN thin films prepared by laser treatment using Kr-F excimer laser in the controlled atmosphere. The depth distribution and composition of nitrogen and contaminated oxygen have been determined by non-Rutherford proton backscattering using 1.7 MeV Tendetron accelerator. The electronic structure of TiN thin film have been characterized by resonant photoelectron spectroscopy using indus-I synchrotron radiation. Specifically, complex resonance profile that shows the enhancement at 45 eV which is consistent with the resonant photoemission of Ti 3d states involved in the Titanium nitride and oxide.

  10. Preparation and characterization of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) SiC films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y. H.; Sham, T.-K.; Yang, D.; Xue, L.

    2006-03-01

    Si K-edge XAFS was used to characterize a stoichiometric SiC film prepared by pulsed KrF laser deposition. The film was deposited on a p-type Si(1 0 0) wafer at a substrate temperature of 250 °C in high vacuum with a laser fluence of ˜5 J/cm 2. The results reveal that the film contains mainly a SiC phase with an amorphous structure in which the Si atoms are bonded to C atoms in its first shell similar to that of crystalline SiC powder but with significant disorder.

  11. Structural characterization and electronic structure of laser treated TiN thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Sheetal; Nair, K. G. M.; Phase, D. M.; Gupta, Ratnesh

    2012-06-01

    TiN thin films prepared by laser treatment using Kr-F excimer laser in the controlled atmosphere. The depth distribution and composition of nitrogen and contaminated oxygen have been determined by non-Rutherford proton backscattering using 1.7 MeV Tendetron accelerator. The electronic structure of TiN thin film have been characterized by resonant photoelectron spectroscopy using indus-I synchrotron radiation. Specifically, complex resonance profile that shows the enhancement at 45 eV which is consistent with the resonant photoemission of Ti 3d states involved in the Titanium nitride and oxide.

  12. Biomolecular papain thin films growth by laser techniques.

    PubMed

    György, Enikö; Santiso, Jose; Figueras, Albert; Socol, Gabriel; Mihailescu, Ion N

    2007-08-01

    Papain thin films were synthesised by matrix assisted and conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques. The targets submitted to laser radiation consisted on a frozen composite obtained by dissolving the biomaterials in distilled water. For the deposition of the thin films by conventional PLD pressed biomaterial powder targets were submitted to laser irradiation. An UV KrF* excimer laser source was used in the experiments at 0.5 J/cm(2) incident fluence value, diminished one order of magnitude as compared to irradiation of inorganic materials. The surface morphology of the obtained thin films was studied by atomic force profilometry and atomic force microscopy. The investigations showed that the growth mode and surface quality of the deposited biomaterial thin films is strongly influenced by the target preparation procedure.

  13. Pulsed laser facilities operating from UV to IR at the Gas Laser Lab of the Lebedev Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, Andrei; Kholin, Igor; Vasil'Ev, Boris; Zvorykin, Vladimir

    2003-05-01

    Pulsed laser facilities developed at the Gas Lasers Lab of the Lebedev Physics Institute and their applications for different laser-matter interactions are discussed. The lasers operating from UV to mid-IR spectral region are as follows: e-beam pumped KrF laser (λ= 0.248 μm) with output energy 100 J; e-beam sustained discharge CO2(10.6 μm) and fundamental band CO (5-6 μm) lasers with output energy up to ~1 kJ; overtone CO laser (2.5-4.2 μm) with output energy ~ 50 J and N2O laser (10.9 μm) with output energy of 100 J; optically pumped NH3 laser (11-14 μm). Special attention is paid to an e-beam sustained discharge Ar-Xe laser (1.73 μm ~ 100 J) as a potential candidate for a laser-propulsion facility. The high energy laser facilities are used for interaction of laser radiation with polymer materials, metals, graphite, rocks, etc.

  14. Excimer laser annealing to fabricate low cost solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The objective is to show whether or not pulsed excimer laser annealing (PELA) of ion-implanted junctions is a cost effective replacement for diffused junctions in fabricating crystalline silicon solar cells. The preliminary economic analysis completed shows that the use of PELA to fabricate both the front junction and back surface field (BSF) would cost approximately 35 cents per peak watt (Wp), compared to a cost of 15 cents/Wp for diffusion, aluminum BSF and an extra cleaning step in the baseline process. The cost advantage of the PELA process depends on improving the average cell efficiency from 14% to 16%, which would lower the overall cost of the module by about 15 cents/Wp. An optimized PELA process compatible with commercial production is to be developed, and increased cell efficiency with sufficient product for adequate statistical analysis demonstrated. An excimer laser annealing station was set-up and made operational. The first experiment used 248 nm radiation to anneal phosphorus implants in polished and texture-etched silicon.

  15. Unsupervised verification of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy dataset clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Michał R.; Zdunek, Rafał; Antończak, Arkadiusz J.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a versatile, optical technique used in a wide range of qualitative and quantitative analyses conducted with the use of various chemometric techniques. The aim of this research is to demonstrate the possibility of unsupervised clustering of an unknown dataset using K-means clustering algorithm, and verifying its input parameters through investigating generalized eigenvalues derived with linear discriminant analysis. In all the cases, principal component analyses have been applied to reduce data dimensionality and shorten computation time of the whole operation. The experiment was conducted on a dataset collected from twenty four different materials divided into six groups: metals, semiconductors, ceramics, rocks, metal alloys and others with the use of a three-channel spectrometer (298.02-628.73nm overall spectral range) and a UV (248nm) excimer laser. Additionally, two more complex groups containing all specimens and all specimens excluding rocks were created. The resulting spaces of eigenvalues were calculated for every group and three different distances in the multidimensional space (cosine, square Euclidean and L1). As expected, the correct numbers of specimens within groups with small deviations were obtained, and the validity of the unsupervised method has thus been proven.

  16. Excimer laser ablation for spatially controlled protein patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, Helmut; Hayes, Jason P.; Kingshott, Peter; Johnson, Graham; Harvey, Erol C.; Griesser, Hans J.

    2001-11-01

    Two-dimensional control over the location of proteins on surfaces is desired for a number of applications including diagnostic tests and tissue engineered medical devices. Many of these applications require patterns of specific proteins that allow subsequent two-dimensionally controlled cell attachment. The ideal technique would allow the deposition of specific protein patterns in areas where cell attachment is required, with complete prevention of unspecific protein adsorption in areas where cells are not supposed to attach. In our study, collagen I was used as an example for an extracellular matrix protein known to support the attachment of bovine corneal epithelial cells. An allylamine plasma polymer was deposited on a silicon wafer substrate, followed by grafting of poly(ethylene oxide). Two-dimensional control over the surface chemistry was achieved using a 248 nm excimer laser. Results obtained by XPS and AFM show that the combination of extremely low-fouling surfaces with excimer laser ablation can be used effectively for the production of spatially controlled protein patterns with a resolution of less than 1 micrometers . Furthermore, it was shown that bovine corneal epithelial cell attachment followed exactly the created protein patterns. The presented method is an effective tool for a number of in vitro and in vivo applications.

  17. Non-Uniform Distribution of Defects and Effects of Excimer Laser Radiation on Bulk Silica and Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Sriraman

    The presence of defects in bulk silica and optical fibers, their distribution and the subsequent effect of ultraviolet excimer laser on their properties are the subjects of this research. Bulk silica rods manufactured by different methods which varied with respect to water content and oxygen stoichiometry were selected for the study. Absorbance and luminescence measurements were made in the UV and visible regions of the spectrum, which revealed the presence of an absorption band centered at about 5 eV (248 nm) in certain types of low water content silica. The presence of absorption bands and the effect of 248 nm excimer laser irradiation are presented and discussed for these latter samples as well as silicas of moderate to high water content. Investigations were carried out in the fiber form, which yielded results in conformity with the conclusions derived from studies on bulk silica, with respect to issues relating to the oxygen stoichiometry, water content and laser radiation effects. In addition, the draw induced 630 nm absorption band was also observed in certain types of fibers and results pertaining to this aspect are also presented. For the first time, spatially variant emissions generated by UV laser radiation in fluorine doped silica clad fibers with pure silica cores were reported through this work. Spatial and spectral correlations are made and the defects contributing to the various emissions are identified for each fiber type. Longitudinal effects observed in fibers with oxygen deficient cores are also presented and discussed. High sensitivity X-band electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments were carried out on different types of fibers, to probe into the origins of the spatially variant luminescence recorded in the laser irradiation studies. The fibers were successively etched down to lower diameters and ESR measurements were carried out at each step at low temperatures (typically at 110 K). By this cross-sectional profiling of the ESR defect signals

  18. Numerical simulation of microwave amplification in a plasma channel produced in a gas via multiphoton ionisation by a femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatskaya, A V; Popov, A M; Volkova, E A

    2014-12-31

    This paper examines the evolution of a nonequilibrium plasma channel produced in xenon by a femtosecond KrF laser pulse. We demonstrate that such a channel can be used to amplify microwave pulses over times of the order of the relaxation time of the photoelectron energy spectrum in xenon. Using the slowly varying amplitude approximation, we analyse the propagation and amplification of an rf pulse in a plasma channel, in particular when the rf field influences the electron energy distribution function in the plasma. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  19. Influence of barrier absorption properties on laser patterning thin organic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naithani, Sanjeev; Mandamparambil, Rajesh; van Assche, Ferdie; Schaubroeck, David; Fledderus, Henri; Prenen, An; Van Steenberge, Geert; Vanfleteren, Jan

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a study of selective ablation of thin organic films (LEP- Light Emitting Polymer, PEDOT:PSS- Poly 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene: polystyrene sulfonate) by using 248 nm Excimer laser, on various kinds of multilayered SiN barrier foils for the development of Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLED). Different Silicon Nitride (SiN) barrier foils with dedicated absorption spectra are taken into account for this purpose. The drive for looking into different types of SiN originates from the fact that the laser selective removal of a polymer without damage to the barrier layer underneath is challenging in the dynamic laser processing of thin films. The barrier is solely responsible for the proper encapsulation of the OLED stack. The main limitation of current OLED design is its shorter life span, which is directly related to the moisture or water permeation into the stack, leading to black spots. An optimization of laser parameters like fluence and number of shots has been carried out for the various types of SiN barrier foils. We are able to obtain a wider working process window for the selective removal of LEP and PEDOT:PSS from SiN barrier, by variation of the different types of SiN.

  20. Survey of Laser Markets Relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy Drivers, information for National Research Council

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A J; Deri, R J; Erlandson, A C

    2011-02-24

    Development of a new technology for commercial application can be significantly accelerated by leveraging related technologies used in other markets. Synergies across multiple application domains attract research and development (R and D) talent - widening the innovation pipeline - and increases the market demand in common components and subsystems to provide performance improvements and cost reductions. For these reasons, driver development plans for inertial fusion energy (IFE) should consider the non-fusion technology base that can be lveraged for application to IFE. At this time, two laser driver technologies are being proposed for IFE: solid-state lasers (SSLs) and KrF gas (excimer) lasers. This document provides a brief survey of organizations actively engaged in these technologies. This is intended to facilitate comparison of the opportunities for leveraging the larger technical community for IFE laser driver development. They have included tables that summarize the commercial organizations selling solid-state and KrF lasers, and a brief summary of organizations actively engaged in R and D on these technologies.

  1. Photo-detrapping of solvated electrons in an ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kenji; Suda, Kayo; Seto, Takafumi; Katsumura, Yosuke; Katoh, Ryuzi; Crowell, Robert A.; Wishart, James F.

    2009-12-01

    We studied the dynamics of photo-detrapped solvated electrons in the ionic liquid trimethyl- N-propylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TMPA-TFSI) using laser flash photolysis. The solvated electrons were produced by the electron photodetachment from iodide via a 248 nm KrF excimer laser. The solvated electron decayed by first-order kinetics with a lifetime of about 240 ns. The spectrum of the solvated electron in the ionic liquid TMPA-TFSI is very broad with a peak around 1100 nm. After the 248 nm pulse, a 532 nm pulse was used to subsequently detrap the solvated electrons. After the detrapping pulse, quasi-permanent bleaching was observed. The relative magnitude of the bleaching in the solvated electron absorbance was measured from 500 to 1000 nm. The amount of bleaching depends on the probe wavelength. The fraction of bleached absorbance was larger at 500 nm than that at 1000 nm, suggesting that there are at least two species that absorb 532 nm light. We discuss the present results from viewpoint of the heterogeneity of ionic liquids.

  2. Crystallographic texture in pulsed laser deposited hydroxyapatite bioceramic coatings

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunbin; Camata, Renato P.; Lee, Sukbin; Rohrer, Gregory S.; Rollett, Anthony D.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2008-01-01

    The orientation texture of pulsed laser deposited hydroxyapatite coatings was studied by X-ray diffraction techniques. Increasing the laser energy density of the KrF excimer laser used in the deposition process from 5 to 7 J/cm2 increases the tendency for the c-axes of the hydroxyapatite grains to be aligned perpendicular to the substrate. This preferred orientation is most pronounced when the incidence direction of the plume is normal to the substrate. Orientation texture of the hydroxyapatite grains in the coatings is associated with the highly directional and energetic nature of the ablation plume. Anisotropic stresses, transport of hydroxyl groups and dehydroxylation effects during deposition all seem to play important roles in the texture development. PMID:18563207

  3. Deposition of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veligdan, James; Branch, D.; Vanier, P. E.; Barietta, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000 C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing involved the use of a CO2 laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl5 gas near the substrate. The results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  4. Nonequilibrium vibrational population measurements in an expanding flow using spontaneous Raman scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Ruffin, Stephen M.; Gillespie, Walter D.; Meyer, Scott A.

    1992-01-01

    Vibrational relaxation of nitrogen in a 2D nozzle flow is studied using spontaneous Raman scattering. An electric arc driven shock tube operating as a reflected shock tunnel produces stagnation conditions of 5600 K and 100 atm. A 248 nm KrF laser pulse is focused into the nozzle to produce spatially resolved spontaneous Raman spectra. Vibrational population distributions are derived from the spectra for the states v = 0 to v = 8. The experimental results are compared with two theoretical models: the Landau-Teller relaxation model and a numerical solution of the master equations using transition rates derived from SSH theory. The Landau-Teller correction factor has been measured at 1.0 - 1.5.

  5. Observation of Broadband Ultraviolet Emission From Hg 3 *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenting; Glavin, Thomas; Eden, James; LaboratoryOptical Physics; Engineering Team

    2016-05-01

    A previously-unobserved emission continuum, peaking at ~ 380 nm, has been observed when Hg vapor is photoexcited at 248 nm (KrF laser). Attributed to the mercury trimer, Hg3, this emission continuum has a spectral breadth (FWHM) which increases from ~ 65 nm to ~ 90 nm when the Hg number density rises from ~1016 cm-3 to ~ 2 ×1019 cm-3. Over the same interval in [Hg], the emission decay rate increases only slightly (~ 6 ×103 s-1 to ~ 7 ×103 s-1). Comparisons of the observed spectrum with theory suggest that the observed continuum is the result of transitions between pairs of electronic states having a linear or equilateral triangular configuration.

  6. Observation of Broadband Ultraviolet Emission from Hg3*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenting Wendy; Galvin, Thomas C.; Eden, J. Gary

    2016-06-01

    A previously-unobserved emission continuum, peaking at ˜ 380 nm, has been observed when Hg vapor is photoexcited at 248 nm (KrF laser). Attributed to the mercury trimer, Hg3, this emission continuum has a spectral breadth (FWHM) increased from ˜ 65 to ˜ 90 nm and a decay rate growed from ˜ 6 × 10^3 to ˜ 7 × 10^3 second-1, corresponding to Hg vapor density rising from ˜ 1016 to ˜ 2 × 1019 cm-3. Comparisons of the observed spectra with theory suggest that continuum arises from transitions of the molecule of D∞ h symmetrical linear, D3h equilateral triangular and C2h equilateral triangular configurations. Kitamura, Hikaru. "Theoretical potential energy surfaces for excited mercury trimers." Chemical physics 325.2 (2006): 207-219

  7. Internal photopumping of Nd3+ (2H9/2, 4F5/2) states in yttrium aluminum garnet by excitation transfer from oxygen deficiency centers and Fe3+ continuum emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, J. D.; Spinka, T. M.; Senin, A. A.; Eden, J. G.

    2011-07-01

    Photoexcitation of Nd3+ (2H9/2, 4F5/2) states by the broad (˜70 nm FWHM), near-infrared continuum provided by Fe3+ has been observed at 300 K in bulk yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) crystals doped with trace concentrations (<50 ppm) of Fe, Cr, and Eu. Irradiation of YAG at 248 nm with a KrF laser, which excites the oxygen deficiency center (ODC) in YAG having peak absorption at ˜240 nm, culminates in ODC→Fe3+ excitation transfer and subsequent Fe3+ emission. This internal optical pumping mechanism for rare earth ions is unencumbered by the requirement for donor-acceptor proximity that constrains conventional Förster-Dexter excitation transfer in co-doped crystals.

  8. On the role of multiphoton light absorption in pulsed laser nanoablation of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Komlenok, M S; Kononenko, V V; Gololobov, V M; Konov, V I

    2016-02-28

    The rates of multipulse nanoablation of the diamond surface in air by pico- and nanosecond laser pulses that cause singlephoton, two-photon, three-photon and four-photon absorption in diamond are measured. In the experiments the radiation of ArF, KrF and Ti : Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} lasers and the second harmonic of the Yb : YAG laser was used. The power dependence of the material etching rate on the fluence of laser pulses was found. The power exponent of this dependence appeared to be twice lower than that found earlier for femtosecond pulses. We discuss the causes of the difference in the nanoablation regularities for 'short' and 'long' laser pulses.

  9. Crystallization to polycrystalline silicon thin film and simultaneous inactivation of electrical defects by underwater laser annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Emi; Horita, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ikenoue, Hiroshi

    2012-12-17

    We propose a low-temperature laser annealing method of a underwater laser annealing (WLA) for polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films. We performed crystallization to poly-Si films by laser irradiation in flowing deionized-water where KrF excimer laser was used for annealing. We demonstrated that the maximum value of maximum grain size of WLA samples was 1.5 {mu}m, and that of the average grain size was 2.8 times larger than that of conventional laser annealing in air (LA) samples. Moreover, WLA forms poly-Si films which show lower conductivity and larger carrier life time attributed to fewer electrical defects as compared to LA poly-Si films.

  10. Crystallization to polycrystalline silicon thin film and simultaneous inactivation of electrical defects by underwater laser annealing.

    PubMed

    Machida, Emi; Horita, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ikenoue, Hiroshi

    2012-12-17

    We propose a low-temperature laser annealing method of a underwater laser annealing (WLA) for polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films. We performed crystallization to poly-Si films by laser irradiation in flowing deionized-water where KrF excimer laser was used for annealing. We demonstrated that the maximum value of maximum grain size of WLA samples was 1.5 μm, and that of the average grain size was 2.8 times larger than that of conventional laser annealing in air (LA) samples. Moreover, WLA forms poly-Si films which show lower conductivity and larger carrier life time attributed to fewer electrical defects as compared to LA poly-Si films.

  11. Biocompatible nanocrystalline octacalcium phosphate thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Socol, G; Torricelli, P; Bracci, B; Iliescu, M; Miroiu, F; Bigi, A; Werckmann, J; Mihailescu, I N

    2004-06-01

    We extended for the first time pulsed laser ablation to the deposition of octacalcium phosphate Ca8H2(PO4)6.5H2O (OCP) thin films. The depositions were performed with a pulsed UV laser source (lambda=248 nm, tau> or =20 ns) in a flux of hot water vapors. The targets were sintered from crystalline OCP powder and the laser ablation fluence was set at values of 1.5-2 J/cm2. During depositions the collectors, Si or Ti substrates, were maintained at a constant temperature within the range 20-200 degrees C. The resulting structures were submitted to heat treatment in hot water vapors for up to 6 h. The best results were obtained at a substrate temperature of 150 degrees C during both deposition and post-deposition treatment. High-resolution electron microscopy and XRD at grazing incidence indicated that the coatings obtained were made of nanocrystalline OCP. Cross-section TEM investigations showed that the coatings contained droplets stacked on Ti substrates as well as distributed across the entire thickness of the arborescence-like structure layers. The results of WST-1 assay, cell adherence, DNA replication, and caspase-1 activity confirmed the good biocompatibility of the coatings.

  12. Characterization of particulates accompanying laser ablation of pressed polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitz, J.; Dickinson, J. T.

    We present observations of sub-micron- to micron-sized particles generated by high fluence ( 2 J/cm2) 248-nm laser ablation of pressed polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) targets in air at atmospheric pressure. The original target material was hydrostatically compressed 7 μm PTFE powder, sintered at 275 °C. Collected ejecta due to laser irradiation consists of four basic particle morphologies ranging from small particles 50-200 nm in diameter to larger particles 10 μm in diameter. Many particles formed in air carry electric charge. Using charged electrodes we are able to collect charged particles to determine relative numbers of +/- charge. We observe roughly equal numbers of positively and negatively charged particles except for the largest particles which were predominantly negative. For a range of particle sizes we are able to measure the sign and magnitude of this charge with a Millikan-oil-drop technique and determine surface charge densities. The implications of these observations with respect to pulsed laser deposition of PTFE thin films and coatings are discussed.

  13. A new insight into defect-induced laser damage in UV multilayer coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Reichling, M.; Bodemann, A.; Kaiser, N.

    1995-12-31

    High performance Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}SiO{sub 2} mirror coatings for 248 nm have been investigated with respect to their excimer laser damage resistivity. Global damage thresholds (in the range of 10-20 J/cm{sup 2}) averaged over large areas were determined with the pulsed photoacoustic mirage detection method. With a raster scanning technique utilizing the same detection scheme, the local damage behaviour was studied with 100 {mu}m spatial resolution. It was found that the local damage threshold at specific sites was lower than the global damage threshold and it was assumed that this phenomenon was associated with micrometer-scale defects in the multilayer coating. To test this hypothesis photothermal displacement microscopy with {mu}m lateral resolution was performed on the investigated regions prior to excimer laser light irradiation. Photothermal images revealed an extremely small background absorption and a small number of absorbing defect sites. For a number of such sites a clear correlation between the local absorption and the onset of laser damage at that specific location was found. We conclude that the crucial factor determining the damage resistivity of the high quality coating systems are defects and contaminants and that it will be possible to predict their damage thresholds by a complete microscopic photothermal inspection.

  14. Excimer laser machining of microvias in glass substrates for the manufacture of high density interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, D.; Hutt, D. A.; Conway, P. P.

    2012-07-01

    Machining of microvias in 100-50 μm thick CMZ glass using an excimer laser (248 nm) was investigated. The effect of various laser process parameters: pulse energy, repetition rate, irradiation time were studied to optimise the microvia drilling process and a process window was identified. Through-hole drilling of 100 μm diameter (entry hole) microvias was achieved at a fluence (energy density) as low as 2.3 J/cm2 with an irradiation time of 30-40 s at a repetition rate of 20 Hz, giving a taper angle between 22-24∘ relative to the vertical. However, by increasing the fluence to 4.5 J/cm2, this reduced the machining time to 5-10 s and taper angle to 14∘, giving an exit hole diameter of around 45-50 μm. With 50 μm thick glass, it was possible to machine through-hole microvias with smaller entry hole diameters down to 40 μm. Machined microvias were characterised to investigate debris, recast layer and microcrack formation. Debris and recast layer around the machined features was minimised by using a protective photoresist layer coating on the glass and through appropriate operating parameter selection. Microcracks along the sidewalls of the microvias could not be avoided, but their severity depended on the laser machining parameters used.

  15. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A.

    1983-09-27

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm/sup -1/, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs.

  16. Polysiloxanes with a Phenol Moiety for Bilayer Photoresist Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishi, Yasunobu; Ushirogouchi, Touru; Horiguchi, Rumiko; Hayase, Shuzi

    1989-08-01

    Novel Polysiloxanes with a phenol pendant group were synthesized and applied to bilayer photoresists for g-line and deep-UV (248 nm) lithography. These polymers had adequate aqueous-base solubility and oxygen-RIE resistance to serve as the base resin component for top imaging resists in bilayer resist systems. One of these polysiloxanes was synthesized from chlorodiethoxyphenylsilane and m-trimethylsiloxychlobenzene. Others were synthesized from dichlorophenylsilane and phenol and phenols with a double bond moiety (eugenol, isoeugenol and m-isopropenylphenol). These polysiloxanes had from 9.8 wt.% to 13.1 wt.X Si content and displayed an oxygen-RIE resistance 10 times greater than novolak resin. The m.p. values for these polymers ranged from 30°C to 90°C. The UV transmittance value (at 248 nm, 1 micron thickness) were from 7 % to 76 X. Resists were prepared from these polysiloxanes and sensitizers. In g-line lithography, the sensitizer was naphthoquinonediazide. In deep-UV (248 nm) lithography, the sensitizer was selected from naphtoquinonediazide, diazide and diazo compounds. 0.5 micron line and space patterns were obtained, when the resist was exposed using a g-line stepper, and using a tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution (ca. 1.3 %). 0.4 micron line and space patterns were resolved, when the resist was exposed using a KrF excimer laser stepper, and developed using the same solution. The top layer pattern could be transferred to the bottom layer (hard baked positive resist OFPR-5000) using oxygen-RIE. The etching rate for the silicon containing resist was 35 nm/min, while that for OFPR-5000 was 555 nm/min. These polysiloxanes make it possible to obtain the fine pattern resolution required in VLSI processing.

  17. Amorphous and excimer laser annealed SiC films for TFT fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, B.; Estrada, M.; Albertin, K. F.; Carreño, M. N. P.; Pereyra, I.; Resendiz, L.

    2006-02-01

    The characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films prepared by PECVD and crystallized by KrF UV excimer laser annealing (ELA), for different annealing conditions, are studied to determine particulate size, surface roughness, band gap and resistivity in order to apply them to TFTs fabrication. Raman spectra for ELA SiC films indicate the presence of 6H-SiC polytype together with Si and C crystallites. We also describe the fabrication process to obtain a-Si 1- xC x:H TFTs and ELA TFTs on the same wafer, comparing their output and transfer characteristics.

  18. Kinetic modelling of krypton fluoride laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jancaitis, K.S.

    1983-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed for the KrF* rare gas halide laser system, specifically for electron-beam pumped mixtures of krypton, fluorine, and either helium or argon. The excitation produced in the laser gas by the e-beam was calculated numerically using an algorithm checked by comparing the predicted ionization yields in the pure rare gases with their experimental values. The excitation of the laser media by multi-kilovolt x-rays was also modeled and shown to be similar to that produced by high energy electrons. A system of equations describing the transfer of the initial gas excitation into the laser upper level was assembled using reaction rate constants from both experiment and theory. A one-dimensional treatment of the interaction of the laser radiation with the gas was formulated which considered spontaneous and stimulated emission and absorption. The predictions of this model were in good agreement with the fluorescence signals and gain and absorption measured experimentally.

  19. Characterization and improvement of field CD uniformity for implementation of 0.15-μm technology device using KrF stepper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Dong-Joo; Koh, Cha-Won; Park, Sung-Nam; Kwon, Won-Taik

    2003-06-01

    xAs the design rule of semiconductor device shrinks, the field CD uniformity gets more important. For mass production of 0.15 μm technology device using KrF stepper having 0.63NA, the improvement of field CD uniformity was one of key issues because field CD uniformity is directly related to device characteristics in some layers. We have experienced steppers that show poor illumination uniformity. With those steppers there was large CD difference of about 10nm between field center and field edges as shown in Figure 1. Although we were using verified reticles, we could not get an acceptable CD uniformity in a field with those steppers. The Field CD uniformity is dominantly dependent of the illumination uniformity of stepper and mask quality. With these optimization, we could control DICD difference between field center and edge to be less than 5nm. In this paper, we characterized the dependency of field CD uniformity according to illumination systems with stepper and scanner, annular illumination uniformity at various stigma, mask CD uniformity and the several types of novel gray filter specifically developed.

  20. Simulation-based formulation of a nonchemically amplified resist for 257-nm laser mask fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathsack, Benjamen M.; Tabery, Cyrus E.; Stachowiak, Timothy B.; Albelo, Jeff A.; Willson, C. Grant

    2000-06-01

    The demand for smaller and more uniform features on photomasks has inspired consideration of a DUV (257 nm) resist process for optical pattern generation. Chemically amplified resists require storage and exposure in carbon filtered environments, and they require post-exposure bakes. Few mask facilities are set up to handle chemically amplified resists commonly used in deep UV wafer fabrication process. Hence, it is appropriate to explore the lithographic performance of non-chemically amplified resist materials for 257 nm laser photomask lithography. Resist characterization and lithography simulation were used to formulate a 257 nm resist from DNQ/novolak materials provided by a commercial resist supplier. Diazonaphthoquinone (DNQ)/novolak resists have not been used for DUV Integrated Circuit (IC) applications mainly due to the low sensitivity and the strong absorbance of the DNQ photoactive compound (PAC) at 248 nm. However, a 2,1,4 DNQ based resist has been characterized that bleaches at 257 nm and inhibits novolak. The photoproduct of the 2,1,4 DNQ PAC is much more transparent at 257 nm than 248 nm. Novolak resin also has an absorbance minimum in the DUV at 257 nm that provides transparency similar to poly (hydroxystyrene). Traditional photoresist formulation requires tedious, iterative, and expensive manufacturing trials. Resist characterization and lithography simulation can be used to relate lithographic performance (resolution, sidewall and process latitude) to resist formulation parameters (PAC concentration, developer concentration, etc.), thereby supporting the formulation optimization. An exposure system using a 257 nm frequency doubled argon laser system has been constructed to study the resist photokinetics. Dill exposure parameters (A, B and C) have been extracted for a 2,1,4 DNQ/novolak based resist. Dissolution rate measurements have been made with a development rate monitor developed at the University of Texas at Austin. Simulation using the

  1. Structure and mechanical properties of low stress tetrahedral amorphous carbon films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonelli, M.; Ferrari, A. C.; Fioravanti, A.; Li Bassi, A.; Miotello, A.; Ossi, P. M.

    2002-02-01

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon films have been produced by pulsed laser deposition, at a wavelength of 248 nm, ablating highly oriented pyrolytic graphite at room temperature, in a 10-2 Pa vacuum, at fluences ranging between 0.5 and 35 Jcm-2. Both (100) Si wafers and wafers covered with a SiC polycrystalline interlayer were used as substrates. Film structure was investigated by Raman spectroscopy at different excitation wavelength from 633 nm to 229 nm and by transmission Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy. The films, which are hydrogen-free, as shown by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, undergo a transition from mainly disordered graphitic to up to 80% tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) above a threshold laser fluence of 5 J cm-2. By X-ray reflectivity roughness, density and cross-sectional layering of selected samples were studied. Film hardness as high as 70 GPa was obtained by nanoindentation on films deposited with the SiC interlayer. By scratch test film adhesion and friction coefficients between 0.06 and 0.11 were measured. By profilometry we obtained residual stress values not higher than 2 GPa in as-deposited 80% sp3 ta-C films.

  2. Tunable stoichiometry of SiOx-BaTiOy-BOz fabricated by multitarget pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, John G.; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Smith, Steven R.; Landis, Gerald R.; Grazulis, Lawrence; Sun, Lirong; Murphy, Neil R.; Kozlowski, Gregory; Jakubiak, Rachel; Stutz, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Oxide materials of desired stoichiometry are challenging to make in small quantities. Nanostructured thin films of multiple oxide materials were obtained by using pulsed laser deposition and multiple independent targets consisting of Si, BaTiO3, and B. Programmable stoichiometry of nanostructured thin films was achieved by synchronizing a 248-nm krypton fluoride excimer laser at an energy of 300 mJ/pulse, a galvanometer mirror system, and the three independent target materials with a background pressure of oxygen. Island growth occurred on a per pulse basis; some 500 pulses are required to deposit 1 nm of material. The number of pulses on each target was programmed with a high degree of precision. Trends in material properties were systematically identified by varying the stoichiometry of multiple nanostructured thin films and comparing the resulting properties measured using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, capacitance measurements including relative permittivity and loss, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Films were deposited ˜150 to 907 nm thickness, and in situ ellipsometry data were modeled to calculate thickness n and k. A representative atomic force microscopy measurement was also collected. EDS, ellipsometry, and capacitance measurements were all performed on each of the samples, with one sample having a calculated permittivity greater than 20,000 at 1 kHz.

  3. Negative charge emission due to excimer laser bombardment of sodium trisilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, S.C.; Jensen, L.C.; Dickinson, J.T. ); Pederson, L.R. )

    1990-10-15

    We describe measurements of negative charge emission accompanying irradiation of sodium trisilicate glass (Na{sub 2}O{center dot}3SiO{sub 2}) with 248-nm excimer laser light at fluences on the order of 2 J/cm{sup 2} per pulse, i.e., at the threshold for ablative etching of the glass surface. The negative charge emission consists of a very prompt photoelectron burst coincident with the laser pulse, followed by a much slower plume of electrons and negative ions traveling with a high density cloud of positive ions, previously identified as primarily Na{sup +}. Using combinations of {bold E} and {bold B} fields in conjunction with time-of-flight methods, the negative ions were successfully separated from the plume and tentatively identified as O{sup {minus}}, Si{sup {minus}}, NaO{sup {minus}}, and perhaps NaSi{sup {minus}}. These negative species are probably formed by gas phase collisions in the near-surface region which result in electron attachment.

  4. Guiding of Long-Distance Electric Discharges by Combined Femtosecond and Nanosecond Pulses Emitted by Hybrid KrF Laser System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-30

    Here and thereafter, unless otherwise specified, all the measurements are carried out with “fresh” (newly-prepared) gas mixtures in the amplifiers...plane of F=2 m lens. Beam diameter at FWHM is d~100 m. To measure plasma photoconductivity in different gases and at reduced gas pressures, the... measurement facility is placed inside a chamber which is equipped with a vacuum pump and gas -filling system (Fig. 5.4). Figure 5.4. The chamber for

  5. Modifications in surface, structural and mechanical properties of brass using laser induced Ni plasma as an ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Shahbaz; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, M. Shahid; Yousaf, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Laser induced Ni plasma has been employed as source of ion implantation for surface, structural and mechanical properties of brass. Excimer laser (248 nm, 20 ns, 120mJ and 30 Hz) was used for the generation of Ni plasma. Thomson parabola technique was employed to estimate the energy of generated ions using CR39 as a detector. In response to stepwise increase in number of laser pulses from 3000 to 12000, the ion dose varies from 60 × 1013 to 84 × 1016 ions/cm2 with constant energy of 138 KeV. SEM analysis reveals the growth of nano/micro sized cavities, pores, pits, voids and cracks for the ion dose ranging from 60 × 1013 to 70 × 1015 ions/cm2. However, at maximum ion dose of 84 × 1016 ions/cm2 the granular morphology is observed. XRD analysis reveals that new phase of CuZnNi (200) is formed in the brass substrate after ion implantation. However, an anomalous trend in peak intensity, crystallite size, dislocation line density and induced stresses is observed in response to the implantation with various doses. The increase in ion dose causes to decrease the Yield Stress (YS), Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) and hardness. However, for the maximum ion dose the highest values of these mechanical properties are achieved. The variations in the mechanical properties are correlated with surface and crystallographical changes of ion implanted brass.

  6. The formation of the two-way shape memory effect in rapidly quenched TiNiCu alloy under laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelyakov, A. V.; Sitnikov, N. N.; Sheyfer, D. V.; Borodako, K. A.; Menushenkov, A. P.; Fominski, V. Yu

    2015-11-01

    The effect of pulsed laser radiation (λ = 248 nm, τ = 20 ns) on structural properties and shape memory behavior of the rapidly quenched Ti50Ni25Cu25 alloy ribbon was studied. The radiation energy density was varied from 2 to 20 mJ mm-2. The samples were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, microhardness measurements and shape memory bending tests. It was ascertained that the action of the laser radiation leads to the formation of a structural composite material due to amorphization or martensite modification in the surface layer of the ribbon. Two methods are proposed which allow one to generate the pronounced two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) in a local area of the ribbon by using only a single pulse of the laser radiation. With increasing energy density of laser treatment, the magnitude of the reversible angular displacement with realization of the TWSME increases. The developed techniques can be used for the creation of various micromechanical devices.

  7. Summary of the laser working group

    SciTech Connect

    Bigio, I.J.; Kurnit, N.A. ); Donaldson, W.R. . Lab. for Laser Energetics); Geissler, K. ); Srinivasan-Rao, T. )

    1988-10-01

    The laser working group considered several options to deliver synchronized laser pulses of the required energy to the photocathode and laser triggered switches. These requirements actually decreased during the course of the workshop, and the values finally settled upon (<10 {mu}J in 100 fs at {approximately}250 nm for the photocathode and {approximately}20 mJ in 2 ps near either 250 nm or 1 {mu}m for the switches) were considered to be well within the state of the art. Some development work may be required, however, to provide a system that has the desirable characteristics of stability, ease of use and low maintenance. The baseline concept, which is similar to a number of existing systems, utilizes doubled Nd:YAG-pumped dye oscillator/amplifiers to produce an upconverted picosecond pulse that can be amplified to tens of mJ in a KrF excimer laser. A fraction of the dye oscillator output is also compressed by means of a fiber-grating compressor and further amplified in a dye amplifier before being upconverted to produce the synchronized pulse for the photocathode. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Compact 36 kJ electron beam system for laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlitt, L. G.

    1981-05-01

    An electron beam machine consisting of six modules is being constructed for the B amplifier of a KrF laser system. Each module consists of a diode, a 5 omega positive charged water dielectric Blumlein pulse forming line, and a five stage Marx generator. Separate 25 cm by 41 cm electron beams are formed in magnetically isolated diodes which when arranged in groups of three produce two nearly continuous 25 cm by 125 cm beams that enter the laser cell from opposite sides. The pulse forming lines operate at 450 keV and Produce 150 ns long pulses. The lines employ electrically triggered annular SF6 output switches. The two concentric transmission lines of each pulse forming line are charged in 1 microsec through symmetric circuits to reduce diode prepulse voltage. The six modules together with the laser cell occupy less than 15 sq m of floor space.

  9. Active protein and calcium hydroxyapatite bilayers grown by laser techniques for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Motoc, M M; Axente, E; Popescu, C; Sima, L E; Petrescu, S M; Mihailescu, I N; Gyorgy, E

    2013-09-01

    Active protein and bioceramic calcium hydroxyapatite (HA) bilayers were grown by combining conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) techniques. A pulsed UV KrF* excimer laser was used for the irradiations. The HA layers were grown by PLD. Proteins with antimicrobial action were attached to the bioceramic layers using MAPLE. The composite MAPLE targets were obtained by dissolving the proteins powder in distilled water. The crystalline status and chemical composition of the obtained structures were studied by X-ray diffractometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The layers were grown for the design of advanced future metal implants coatings, ensuring both enhanced bone formation and localized antimicrobial therapy. Our results demonstrated that protein coatings improve bone cell proliferation in vitro. Immunofluorescence experiments show that actin filaments stretch throughout bone cells and sustain their optimal spreading.

  10. Pulsed laser ablation of Ni in vacuum and N{sub 2} atmosphere at various fluences

    SciTech Connect

    Shazia Bashir; Shazaib Khurshid; Mahreen Akram; Nisar Ali; Umm-i-Kalsoom; Shahbaz Ahmad; Daniel Yousaf

    2015-07-31

    Mechanisms of Ni ablation in vacuum and N{sub 2} atmosphere at various fluences ranging from 2.1 J cm{sup -2} to 3.4 J cm{sup -2} are studied by using a KrF excimer laser. The formation of various conical microstructures, ripples, large-sized irregular shaped cavities and pits is found. It is shown that no new phases are formed in the case of Ni ablation in vacuum, while new phases of nitrides and nitrooxides appear in the N{sub 2} environment. The microhardness analysis of targets irradiated in vacuum shows a decreasing trend with increasing fluence, whereas in the case of the N{sub 2} environment, a monotonic increase in hardness with increasing fluence is observed. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  11. Deposition and modification of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.; Branch, D.; Vanier, P.E.; Barletta, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000[degrees]C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing, involved the use of a CO[sub 2] laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl[sub 5] gas near the substrate. Results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  12. Deposition and modification of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.; Branch, D.; Vanier, P.E.; Barletta, R.E.

    1992-12-31

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000{degrees}C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing, involved the use of a CO{sub 2} laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl{sub 5} gas near the substrate. Results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  13. Extended plasma channels created by UV laser in air and their application to control electric discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V. D. Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2015-02-15

    Results are presented from a series of experimental and theoretical studies on creating weakly ionized extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by 248-nm UV laser radiation and their application to control long high-voltage discharges. The main mechanisms of air ionization by UV laser pulses with durations from 100 fs to 25 ns and intensities in the ranges of 3×10{sup 11}–1.5×10{sup 13} and 3×10{sup 6}–3×10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}, respectively, which are below the threshold for optical gas breakdown, as well as the main relaxation processes in plasma with a density of 10{sup 9}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}, are considered. It is shown that plasma channels in air can be efficiently created by amplitude-modulated UV pulses consisting of a train of subpicosecond pulses producing primary photoelectrons and a long UV pulse suppressing electron attachment and sustaining the density of free electrons in plasma. Different modes of the generation and amplification of trains of subterawatt subpicosecond pulses and amplitude-modulated UV pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were implemented on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid Ti:sapphire-KrF laser facility. The filamentation of such UV laser beams during their propagation in air over distances of up to 100 m and the parameters of the corresponding plasma channels were studied experimentally and theoretically. Laser initiation of high-voltage electric discharges and control of their trajectories by means of amplitude-modulated UV pulses, as well as the spatiotemporal structure of breakdowns in air gaps with length of up to 80 cm, were studied.

  14. Nanosecond laser-induced ablation and laser-induced shockwave structuring of polymer foils down to sub-μm patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, P.; Bayer, L.; Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K.; Engisch, L.

    2015-03-01

    Micro- and nanostructures exhibit a growing commercial interest where a fast, cost-effective, and large-area production is attainable. Laser methods have a great potential for the easy fabrication of surface structures into flexible polymer foils like polyimide (PI). In this study two different concepts for the structuring of polymer foils using a KrF excimer laser were tested and compared: the laser-induced ablation and the laser-induced shock wave structuring. The direct front side laser irradiation of these polymers allows the fabrication of different surface structures. For example: The low laser fluence treatment of PI results in nano-sized cone structures where the cone density can be controlled by the laser parameters. This allows inter alia the laser fabrication of microscopic QR code and high-resolution grey-tone images. Furthermore, the laser treatment of the front side of the polymer foil allows the rear side structuring due to a laserinduced shock wave. The resultant surface structures were analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as white light interferometry (WLI).

  15. Excimer laser annealing to fabricate low cost solar cells. Quarterly technical report No. 1, 26 March-30 June 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    The objective of this research is to show whether or not pulsed excimer laser annealing (PELA) of ion-implanted junctions is a cost effective replacement for diffused junctions in fabricating crystalline silicon solar cells. The preliminary economic analysis completed during the first quarter of this program shows that the use of PELA to fabricate both the front junction and back surface field (BSF) would cost approximately 35 cents per peak watt (Wp), compared to a cost of 15 cents/Wp for diffusion, aluminum BSF and an extra cleaning step in the baseline process described by JPL. The cost advantage of the PELA process depends on improving the average cell efficiency from 14% to 16%, which would lower the overall cost of the module by about 15 cents/Wp. The technical goal of this research is to develop an optimized PELA process compatible with commercial production, and to demonstrate increased cell efficiency with sufficient product for adequate statistical analysis. During the first quarter of this program an excimer laser annealing station was set-up and made operational. The first experiment used 248 nm radiation to anneal phosphorus implants in polished and texture-etched silicon. Preliminary results showed that the PELA processed cells had overall efficiencies comparable to furnace annealed ion implanted controls, and that texture-etched material requires lower fluence for annealing than polished silicon. Process optimization will be carried out in the second quarter.

  16. Enhanced electrical and optical properties of room temperature deposited Aluminium doped Zinc Oxide (AZO) thin films by excimer laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El hamali, S. O.; Cranton, W. M.; Kalfagiannis, N.; Hou, X.; Ranson, R.; Koutsogeorgis, D. C.

    2016-05-01

    High quality transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) often require a high thermal budget fabrication process. In this study, Excimer Laser Annealing (ELA) at a wavelength of 248 nm has been explored as a processing mechanism to facilitate low thermal budget fabrication of high quality aluminium doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films. 180 nm thick AZO films were prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature on fused silica substrates. The effects of the applied RF power and the sputtering pressure on the outcome of ELA at different laser energy densities and number of pulses have been investigated. AZO films deposited with no intentional heating at 180 W, and at 2 mTorr of 0.2% oxygen in argon were selected as the optimum as-deposited films in this work, with a resistivity of 1×10-3 Ω.cm, and an average visible transmission of 85%. ELA was found to result in noticeably reduced resistivity of 5×10-4 Ω.cm, and enhancing the average visible transmission to 90% when AZO is processed with 5 pulses at 125 mJ/cm2. Therefore, the combination of RF magnetron sputtering and ELA, both low thermal budget and scalable techniques, can provide a viable fabrication route of high quality AZO films for use as transparent electrodes.

  17. Femtosecond UV laser non-ablative surface structuring of ZnO crystal: impact on exciton photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Museur, Luc; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Portes, Patrick; Kanaev, Andrei V.; Englezis, Apostolis; Stassinopoulos, Andreas; Anglos, Demetrios

    2010-03-15

    The ultraviolet (UV) laser irradiation (248 nm) of monocrystalline wurtzite ZnO with 450 fs pulses results in surface modification. A formation of two orthogonal ripple structures with a period of 400-500 nm was observed oriented parallel and perpendicular to the laser beam polarization. The UV exciton emission obtained on the irradiated domains is found greatly enhanced locally up to {approx}10{sup 3} times. The photoluminescence band is redshifted by 2-3 nm and 40% narrower (full width at half-maximum), while at the same time the E{sub 2} (439 cm{sup -1}) Raman band intensity increases up to {approx}50 times. The process is found irreversible with the threshold fluence of 11 mJ/cm{sup 2}, which is considerably lower than the ablation threshold 115 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Fine surface nanostructuring on the scale of {approx}10 nm may be responsible for the observed effect. (c) 2008 Optical Society of America.

  18. One-shot deep-UV pulsed-laser-induced photomodification of hollow metal nanoparticles for high-density data storage on flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Wan, Dehui; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Tseng, Shao-Chin; Wang, Lon A; Chen, Yung-Pin

    2010-01-26

    In this paper, we report a new optical data storage method: photomodification of hollow gold nanoparticle (HGN) monolayers induced by one-shot deep-ultraviolet (DUV) KrF laser recording. As far as we are aware, this study is the first to apply HGNs in optical data storage and also the first to use a recording light source for the metal nanoparticles (NPs) that is not a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) wavelength. The short wavelength of the recording DUV laser improved the optical resolution dramatically. We prepared HGNs exhibiting two absorbance regions: an SPR peak in the near-infrared (NIR) region and an intrinsic material extinction in the DUV region. A single pulse from a KrF laser heated the HGNs and transformed them from hollow structures to smaller solid spheres. This change in morphology for the HGNs was accompanied by a significant blue shift of the SPR peak. Employing this approach, we demonstrated its patterning ability with a resolving power of a half-micrometer (using a phase mask) and developed a readout method (using a blue-ray laser microscope). Moreover, we prepared large-area, uniform patterns of monolayer HGNs on various substrates (glass slides, silicon wafers, flexible plates). If this spectral recording technique could be applied onto thin flexible tapes, the recorded data density would increase significantly relative to that of current rigid discs (e.g., compact discs).

  19. Thermoelectric conversion via laser-induced voltage in highly textured polycrystalline Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, G. W.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, H.; Yu, L.; Zhang, P. X.; Habermeier, H.-U.

    2011-11-15

    We have studied and analyzed the laser-induced voltage effect in highly c-axis-oriented polycrystalline Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2}. The textured and layered stacking Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} (x {approx} 0.7) bulks were prepared by a solid-state reaction process. Under the irradiation on Na{sub 0.67}CoO{sub 2} bulk surface with pulsed laser ({lambda} = 248 nm), the induced voltage signals were observed on the inclined surface with rise time 30 ns-43 ns and peak voltage 200 mV-500 mV; the voltage peak values show a linear dependence of laser energy densities. The crystal grains orientation plays a critical role in voltage peak value whether in film or texture bulk. The transverse voltage signal brings the information of thermoelectric anisotropy. In Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} band structure, the Fermi surface is different in the ab plane and along the c axis, leading to anisotropy of Seebeck coefficient. Additionally, the artificial structure of the inclined surface for highly textured bulk enables us to obtain a transverse voltage on inclined surface. These results demonstrated the layered textured bulk has potential applications in waste-heat conversion via transverse thermoelectric effect.

  20. Photoinitiator-free 3D scaffolds fabricated by excimer laser photocuring.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Balázs; Dante, Silvia; Brandi, Fernando

    2017-01-20

    Photoinitiator-free fabrication of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) scaffolds is achieved using a novel three-dimensional (3D) printing method called mask projected excimer laser stereolithography (MPExSL). The spatial resolution of photoinitiator-free curing is suitable for 3D layer-by-layer fabrication with a single layer thickness well controllable at tens to hundreds of microns using 248 nm wavelength for the irradiation. The photoinitiator-free scaffolds are superior compared to their counterparts fabricated by using photoinitiator molecules, showing a higher level of biocompatibility. A release of toxic chemicals from the photoinitiator containing scaffolds is proven by cell proliferation tests. In contrast, no toxic release is found from the photoinitiator-free scaffolds, resulting in the very same level of cell proliferation as the control sample. The demonstration of photoinitiator-free PEGDA scaffolds enables the fabrication of 3D scaffolds with the highest level of biocompatibility for both in vitro and in vivo applications.

  1. Photoinitiator-free 3D scaffolds fabricated by excimer laser photocuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Balázs; Dante, Silvia; Brandi, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Photoinitiator-free fabrication of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) scaffolds is achieved using a novel three-dimensional (3D) printing method called mask projected excimer laser stereolithography (MPExSL). The spatial resolution of photoinitiator-free curing is suitable for 3D layer-by-layer fabrication with a single layer thickness well controllable at tens to hundreds of microns using 248 nm wavelength for the irradiation. The photoinitiator-free scaffolds are superior compared to their counterparts fabricated by using photoinitiator molecules, showing a higher level of biocompatibility. A release of toxic chemicals from the photoinitiator containing scaffolds is proven by cell proliferation tests. In contrast, no toxic release is found from the photoinitiator-free scaffolds, resulting in the very same level of cell proliferation as the control sample. The demonstration of photoinitiator-free PEGDA scaffolds enables the fabrication of 3D scaffolds with the highest level of biocompatibility for both in vitro and in vivo applications.

  2. Transformation of medical grade silicone rubber under Nd:YAG and excimer laser irradiation: First step towards a new miniaturized nerve electrode fabrication process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupas-Bruzek, C.; Robbe, O.; Addad, A.; Turrell, S.; Derozier, D.

    2009-08-01

    Medical grade silicone rubber, poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a widely used biomaterial. Like for many polymers, its surface can be modified in order to change one or several of its properties which further allow this surface to be functionalized. Laser-induced surface modification of PDMS under ambient conditions is an easy and powerful method for the surface modification of PDMS without altering its bulk properties. In particular, we profit from both UV laser inducing surface modification and of UV laser micromachining to develop a first part of a new process aiming at increasing the number of contacts and tracks within the same electrode surface to improve the nerve selectivity of implantable self sizing spiral cuff electrodes. The second and last part of the process is to further immerse the engraved electrode in an autocatalytic Pt bath leading in a selective Pt metallization of the laser irradiated tracks and contacts and thus to a functionalized PDMS surface. In the present work, we describe the different physical and chemical transformations of a medical grade PDMS as a function of the UV laser and of the irradiation conditions used. We show that the ablation depths, chemical composition, structure and morphology vary with (i) the laser wavelength (using an excimer laser at 248 nm and a frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm), (ii) the conditions of irradiation and (iii) the pulse duration. These different modified properties are expected to have a strong influence on the nucleation and growth rates of platinum which govern the adhesion and the thickness of the Pt layer on the electrodes and thus the DC resistance of tracks.

  3. Thin film passivation of laser generated 3D micro patterns in lithium manganese oxide cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pröll, J.; Kohler, R.; Bruns, M.; Oberst, V.; Weidler, P. G.; Heißler, S.; Kübel, C.; Scherer, T.; Prang, R.; Seifert, H. J.; Pfleging, W.

    2013-03-01

    The increasing need for long-life lithium-ion batteries requires the further development of electrode materials. Especially on the cathode side new materials or material composites are needed to increase the cycle lifetime. On the one hand, spinel-type lithium manganese oxide is a promising candidate to be used as cathode material due to its non-toxicity, low cost and good thermal stability. On the other hand, the spinel structure suffers from change in the oxidation state of manganese during cycling which is also accompanied by loss of active material into the liquid electrolyte. The general trend is to enhance the active surface area of the cathode in order to increase lithium-ion mobility through the electrode/electrolyte interface, while an enhanced surface area will also promote chemical degradation. In this work, laser microstructuring of lithium manganese oxide thin films was applied in a first step to increase the active surface area. This was done by using 248 nm excimer laser radiation and chromium/quartz mask imaging techniques. In a second step, high power diode laser-annealing operating at a wavelength of 940 nm was used for forming a cubic spinel-like battery phase. This was verified by means of Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetric measurements. In a last step, the laser patterned thin films were coated with indium tin oxide (ITO) layers with a thickness of 10 nm to 50 nm. The influence of the 3D surface topography as well as the ITO thickness on the electrochemical performance was studied by cyclic voltammetry. Post-mortem studies were carried out by using scanning electron microscopy and focused ion beam analysis.

  4. Atmospheric-pressure laser ionization: a novel ionization method for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Constapel, M; Schellenträger, M; Schmitz, O J; Gäb, S; Brockmann, K J; Giese, R; Benter, Th

    2005-01-01

    We report on the development of a new laser-ionization (LI) source operating at atmospheric pressure (AP) for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) applications. APLI is introduced as a powerful addition to existing AP ionization techniques, in particular atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI), electrospray ionization (ESI), and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Replacing the one-step VUV approach in APPI with step-wise two-photon ionization strongly enhances the selectivity of the ionization process. Furthermore, the photon flux during an ionization event is drastically increased over that of APPI, leading to very low detection limits. In addition, the APLI mechanism generally operates primarily directly on the analyte. This allows for very efficient ionization even of non-polar compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The APLI source was characterized with a MicroMass Q-Tof Ultima II analyzer. Both the effluent of an HPLC column containing a number of PAHs (benzo[a]pyrene, fluoranthene, anthracene, fluorene) and samples from direct syringe injection were analyzed with respect to selectivity and sensitivity of the overall system. The liquid phase was vaporized by a conventional APCI inlet (AP probe) with the corona needle removed. Ionization was performed through selective resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization schemes using a high-repetition-rate fixed-frequency excimer laser operating at 248 nm. Detection limits well within the low-fmol regime are readily obtained for various aromatic hydrocarbons that exhibit long-lived electronic states at the energy level of the first photon. Only molecular ions are generated at the low laser fluxes employed ( approximately 1 MW/cm(2)). The design and performance of the laser-ionization source are presented along with results of the analysis of aromatic hydrocarbons.

  5. Laser action in the IR, UV and VUV in runaway electron preionized discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Alexei N.; Panchenko, Nikolai A.; Sorokin, Dmitry A.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.

    2017-01-01

    Laser action in run-away electron preionized discharge (REP DD) was studied. Efficient laser emission was obtained in wide spectral range from IR to VUV. It was shown that ultimate efficiency of non-chain chemical lasers on HF (DF) molecules and N2 laser at 337.1 nm can be achieved in REP DD. New mode of N2 laser operation with 2 or 3 peaks in successive REP DD current oscillations was found. Efficient lasing on KrF* and XeF* excimer molecules with parameter close to laser parameters of lasers pumped by conventional transverse discharge were demonstrated for the first time. Laser action on F2* at 157 nm and rare gas fluorides under REP DD pumping was obtained for the first time, as well. The efficiency and pulse duration of VUV F2* laser under REP DD excitation are comparable with those obtained in transverse discharges with preionization. VUV emission of REP DD in binary and ternary Ar-Xe-(He) and Ar-Kr-(He) mixtures at wavelength close to 147 nm was measured. Possibility of VUV lasing in mixtures of rare gases is considered.

  6. Ionic alkali halide XUV laser feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.T.; Gylys, V.T.; Bower, R.D.; Harris, D.G.; Blauer, J.A.; Turner, C.E.; Hindy, R.N.

    1989-11-10

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of a select set of ionic alkali halide XUV laser concepts by obtaining the relevant kinetic and spectroscopic parameters required for a proof-of-principle and conceptual design. The proposed lasers operate in the 80--200 nm spectral region and do not require input from outside radiation sources for their operation. Frequency up-conversion and frequency mixing techniques and therefore not considered in the work to be described. An experimental and theoretical study of a new type of laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region has been conducted. The lasing species are singly ionized alkali halide molecules such as Rb{sup 2+}F{sub {minus}}, Rb{sup 2+}Br{sup {minus}} and Cs{sup 2+}F{sup {minus}}. These species are similar in electronic structure to the rare gas halide excimers, such as XeF and Krf, except that the ionic molecules emit at wavelengths of 80--200 nm, much shorter than the conventional rare-gas halide excimer laser. The radiative lifetime of these molecules are typically near 1 ns, which is about an order of magnitude shorter than that for rare-gas halide systems. The values of the cross section for stimulated emission are on the order of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}16}cm{sup 2}. Because of the fundamental similarity to existing UV lasers, these systems show promise as a high power, efficient XUV lasers. 55 refs., 50 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Laser-intensity requirements for generating enhanced kilovolt bremsstrahlung emission in intense laser-cluster interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J.; Petrova, Tz. B.; Petrov, G. M.

    2012-06-01

    The effects of ultrahigh-intensity laser radiation on dynamical processes such as electron scattering, bremsstrahlung emission, and pair production, have received growing theoretical interest as laser intensities in the laboratory continue to increase. Recently, for example, a calculation was published that predicted resonant increases of more than four orders of magnitude in bremsstrahlung emission in the presence of intense optical laser radiation [A. A. Lebed and S. P. Roshchupkin, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.81.033413 81, 033413 (2010)]. The analysis in that paper was limited to laser intensities of ≤1017 W/cm2, and it was applied only to bremsstrahlung emissions at the laser frequency. In the present paper, we extend this Lebed and Roshchupkin analysis in order to assess the possibility of achieving some enhancement in bremsstrahlung emissions at significantly higher harmonics of the optical laser photon energies (˜6 keV) and thereby to appraise whether or not enhanced bremsstrahlung emissions may have played a hidden role in producing the population inversions and kilovolt x-ray amplifications that have been seen experimentally [A. B. Borisov , J. Phys. B 40, F307 (2007)]. In those experiments, light from a KrF laser was focused onto a gas of xenon clusters to intensities ≳1019 W/cm2. A model of the expansion and ionization dynamics of a xenon cluster when heated by such laser intensities has been constructed [Tz. B. Petrova , High Energy Density Phys.1574-181810.1016/j.hedp.2012.03.007 8, 209 (2012)]. It is capable of replicating the x-ray gains seen experimentally, but only under the assumption that sufficiently high inner-shell photoionization rates are generated in the experiments. We apply this model to show that such photoionization rates are achievable, but only if there are enhancements of the Bethe-Heitler bremsstrahlung emission rate of three to four orders of magnitude. Our extended analysis of the Lebed and Roshchupkin work

  8. Experimental and numerical investigations of heat transport and crystallization kinetics in laser-induced modification of barium strontium titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldus, O.; Waser, R.

    2005-04-01

    Barium strontium titanate (BST) has a large application potential in microelectronics due to its implementation as a high-permittivity dielectric in thin-film capacitors. Technologies are therefore being investigated for the deposition of the ceramics as thin films onto semiconductor components. A two-step process will be presented in this paper: first, the deposition of an amorphous ceramic thin film on a platinum-coated silicon wafer and, secondly, the laser sintering of this film. A laser process with pulsed UV light of 248-nm and 193-nm wavelength and approximately 20-ns pulse length allows us to reduce the thermal load on the substrate during the sintering process by minimizing the interaction time between the heating source and the ceramic layer. The goal of this work is to investigate fundamental aspects of the solid-state physics and process technology during the laser sintering of amorphous, electroceramic thin films. Adjusting the film thicknesses prevents damage to the ceramic thin films by the laser treatment. Planar test structures are manufactured and characterized structurally and electrically. Characterization of the BST films reveals clearly improved dielectric properties in comparison to the amorphous films. The real part of the dielectric constant can be raised three- to fivefold at 10 kHz, while the imaginary part decreases by nearly an order of magnitude. Chemical analysis does not indicate any significant changes in the stoichiometry of the thin films due to the laser process. The laser-induced changes proceed similarly to the crystallization of the amorphous films in the furnace. Parallel to the experimental work, a numerical simulation model is developed, which, on the basis of thermal conduction, the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami crystallization kinetics, and thermoelasticity, models the temperature, crystallization, and mechanical load of the thin films. The simulation calculations are correlated with the results of the analysis of the laser

  9. Optical and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline ZrC thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Craciun, D.; Socol, G.; Lambers, E.; McCumiskey, E. J.; Taylor, C. R.; Martin, C.; Argibay, Nicolas; Craciun, V.; Tanner, D. B.

    2015-01-17

    Thin ZrC films (<500 nm) were grown on (100) Si substrates at a substrate temperature of 500 °C by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using a KrF excimer laser under different CH4 pressures. Glancing incidence X-ray diffraction showed that films were nanocrystalline, while X-ray reflectivity studies found out films were very dense and exhibited a smooth surface morphology. Optical spectroscopy data shows that the films have high reflectivity (>90%) in the infrared region, characteristic of metallic behavior. Nanoindentation results indicated that films deposited under lower CH4 pressures exhibited slightly higher nanohardness and Young modulus values than films deposited under higher pressures. As a result, tribological characterization revealed that these films exhibited relatively high wear resistance and steady-state friction coefficients on the order of μ = 0.4.

  10. Correlation of plume dynamics and oxygen pressure with VO2 stoichiometry during pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafane, S.; Kerdja, T.; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Khereddine, Y.; Kechouane, M.; Nemraoui, O.

    2013-07-01

    Vanadium dioxide thin films have been deposited on Corning glass substrates by a KrF laser ablation of V2O5 target at the laser fluence of 2 J cm-2. The substrate temperature and the target-substrate distance were set to 500 ∘C and 4 cm, respectively. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that pure VO2 is only obtained at an oxygen pressure range of 4×10-3-2×10-2 mbar. A higher optical switching contrast was obtained for the VO2 films deposited at 4×10-3-10-2 mbar. The films properties were correlated to the plume-oxygen gas interaction monitored by fast imaging of the plume.

  11. Optical and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline ZrC thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition.

    DOE PAGES

    Craciun, D.; Socol, G.; Lambers, E.; ...

    2015-01-17

    Thin ZrC films (<500 nm) were grown on (100) Si substrates at a substrate temperature of 500 °C by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using a KrF excimer laser under different CH4 pressures. Glancing incidence X-ray diffraction showed that films were nanocrystalline, while X-ray reflectivity studies found out films were very dense and exhibited a smooth surface morphology. Optical spectroscopy data shows that the films have high reflectivity (>90%) in the infrared region, characteristic of metallic behavior. Nanoindentation results indicated that films deposited under lower CH4 pressures exhibited slightly higher nanohardness and Young modulus values than films deposited undermore » higher pressures. As a result, tribological characterization revealed that these films exhibited relatively high wear resistance and steady-state friction coefficients on the order of μ = 0.4.« less

  12. Direct-drive laser target designs for sub-megajoule energies

    SciTech Connect

    Colombant, D. G.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Zalesak, S. T.; Velikovich, A. L.; Bates, J. W.; Fyfe, D. E.; Gardner, J. H.; Manheimer, W.

    2007-05-15

    New direct-drive laser target designs with KrF laser light take advantage of the shorter wavelength to lower the laser energy required for substantial gain (>30x) to sub-MJ level. These low laser-energy pellets are useful in systems that could form an intermediate step towards fusion energy, such as the proposed Fusion Test Facility [S. P. Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 056320 (2006)]. The short wavelength laser should allow higher intensity (and higher pressure) without increasing the risk of laser-plasma instabilities. The higher pressure in turn allows higher velocities to be achieved while keeping the low aspect ratios required for hydrodynamic stability. The canonical laser energy has been chosen to be 500 kJ. A target design is presented with various laser pulse shapes and both 1D and 2D simulation results are shown. The sensitivity of these targets to both low-mode and high-mode perturbations is examined. The analysis and simulations in this paper indicate that significant gain (G=57) can be achieved for these targets even in the presence of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  13. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Plasma-mediated surface evaporation of an aluminium target in vacuum under UV laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhukin, V. I.; Nosov, V. V.

    2005-05-01

    Mathematical simulation is employed to investigate the dynamics of evaporation and condensation on the surface of a metal target under the conditions of plasma production in the vaporised material exposed to the 0.248-μm UV radiation of a KrF laser with the intensity G0= 2×108—109 W cm-2, and a pulse duration τ= 20 ns. A transient two-dimensional mathematical model is used, which includes, for the condensed medium, the heat conduction equation with the Stefan boundary condition and additional kinetic conditions at the evaporation surface and, for the vapour, the equations of radiative gas dynamics and laser radiation transfer supplemented with tabular data for the parameters of the equations of state and absorption coefficients. The target evaporation in vacuum induced by the UV radiation was found to occur during the laser pulse and is divided into two characteristic stages: initial evaporation with a sound velocity and subsonic evaporation after the plasma production. At the subsonic evaporation stage, one part of the laser radiation passes through the plasma and is absorbed by the target surface and another part is absorbed in a thin plasma layer near the surface to produce a high pressure, which significantly moderates the vapour ejection. After completion of the pulse, a part of the vaporised material is condensed on the surface, both in the evaporation region and some distance away from it due to the lateral expansion of the plasma cloud.

  14. Electron stimulated desorption of the metallic substrate at monolayer coverage: Sensitive detection via 193 nm laser photoionization of neutral aluminum desorbed from CH3O/Al(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. E.; Whitten, J. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Jones, P. L.

    A fortuitous overlap between the gain profile of the 193 nm ArF excimer laser and the Al autoionizing transition (sup 2)S(sub 1/2) (512753/cm) yields to the left (sup 2)P(sup 0)J has been exploited in the direct observation of substrate metal atoms in an electron simulated desorption (ESD) process from the monolayer adsorbate system CH3O/Al(111). The identity of the mass 27 photoion was established as Al(+) by (1) isotopic substitution of C-13 in the methanol employed for methoxy formation, and (2) tunable laser scans utilizing the DJ-2 (J = 3/2, 5/2) intermediate levels at approximately 32436/cm and a 248 nm ionization step. An ESD yield of approximately x 10(exp -6) Al atoms/(electron at 1 keV) was established by comparison with a sputtering experiment in the same apparatus. Velocity distributions measured for the desorbed Al species showed some differences in comparison with methoxy velocity data: a slightly lower peak velocity and a significantly less prominent high-velocity component.

  15. Submicro foaming in biopolymers by UV pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oujja, Mohamed; Rebollar, Esther; Gaspard, Solenne; Abrusci, Concepción; Catalina, Fernando; Lazare, Sylvain; Castillejo, Marta

    2006-05-01

    Microstructuring of polymers and biopolymers is of application in medical technology and biotechnology. Using different fabrication techniques three-dimensionally shaped and micro structured constructs can be developed for drug release and tissue engineering. As an alternative method, laser microstructuring offers a series of advantages including high resolution capability, low heat deposition in the substrate and high level of flexibility. In this work we present evidence of laser microfoam formation in collagen and gelatine by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation in the UV at 248 and 266 nm. Irradiation at 355 nm produces melting followed by resolidification of the substrate, whereas irradiation at 532 and 1064 nm induces the formation of craters of irregular contours. Single pulse irradiation of a collagen film with an homogenized KrF microbeam yields a 20 μm thick expanded layer, which displays the interesting features of a nanofibrous 3-dimensional network with open cells. In gelatine, irradiation at 248 and 266 nm produces similar morphological modifications. The effect of the structural properties of the substrate on the laser induced microfoam is studied by comparing gelatines differing in gel strength (Bloom values 225 and 75) and in crosslinking degree. While results are discussed on the basis of thermal and photomechanical mechanisms and of the role played by the water content of the substrates, it is thought that such structures could have a biomimic function in future 3D cell culture devices for research.

  16. Proton extraction by laser ablation of transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velardi, L.; Delle Side, D.; Krása, J.; Nassisi, V.

    2014-07-01

    A study on the proton beams extraction from a plasma generated by pulsed laser ablation by targets containing transition metals is presented. The targets used were pure disks of titanium and tantalum and disks of TiH2, obtained by compression of TiH2 powder. The plasma was produced by means of a nanosecond excimer KrF laser operating at low irradiance (109-1010 W/cm2). The proton and ions emission was analyzed by the time-of-flight technique using a Faraday cup as ion collector. Studies on the produced protons and ions at different laser irradiances from 2 to 15 GW/cm2 were performed. The characterization showed that it is possible to obtain good proton fluxes from these targets, up to 1011 proton/pulse. The results obtained are very interesting if compared with those available in literature where proton fluxes per pulse ranging from 108 to 109 by hydride targets were obtained, at the same laser irradiances.

  17. Large area electron beam pumped krypton fluoride laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Sethian, J.D.; Obenschain, S.P.; Gerber, K.A.; Pawley, C.J.; Serlin, V.; Sullivan, C.A.; Webster, W.; Deniz, A.V.; Lehecka, T.; McGeoch, M.W.; Altes, R.A.; Corcoran, P.A.; Smith, I.D.; Barr, O.C.

    1997-06-01

    Nike is a recently completed multi-kilojoule krypton fluoride (KrF) laser that has been built to study the physics of direct drive inertial confinement fusion. This paper describes in detail both the pulsed power and optical performance of the largest amplifier in the Nike laser, the 60 cm amplifier. This is a double pass, double sided, electron beam-pumped system that amplifies the laser beam from an input of 50 J to an output of up to 5 kJ. It has an optical aperture of 60 cm {times} 60 cm and a gain length of 200 cm. The two electron beams are 60 cm high {times} 200 cm wide, have a voltage of 640 kV, a current of 540 kA, and a flat top power pulse duration of 250 ns. A 2 kG magnetic field is used to guide the beams and prevent self-pinching. Each electron beam is produced by its own Marx/pulse forming line system. The amplifier has been fully integrated into the Nike system and is used on a daily basis for laser-target experiments. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Intense ultrashort laser-Xe cluster interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J.; Whitney, K. G.; Petrova, Tz. B.; Petrov, G. M.

    2012-09-01

    -shell, n = 4 electrons are striped from a xenon atom in less than a femtosecond. Because of the abundance of these ground states, large numbers of n = 2, inner-shell hole states and large population inversions can be created when the Ni-like ground states are photo- or collisionally ionized. Once the M-shell is entered, tunneling ionization slows down as does collisional ionization due to the fall in ion density as the cluster expands. Moreover, as the cluster density goes down, our combined MD and ID calculations show that so do the calculated population inversions. Thus, our calculations do not support the initial experimental data interpretations in which the measured gains have been associated with double holes in more highly ionized stages of xenon (Xe32+, Xe34+, Xe35+, and Xe37+), which our calculations suggest would require laser intensities in excess of 1.5 × 1020 W/cm2, for a 248 nm, ˜250 fs laser pulse focused in a gas of xenon clusters. At laser intensities used in the experiment, such ionization stages would be reached, but only later in time when cluster densities have fallen by several orders of magnitude from their initial values to values where pumping rates are too low and gains cannot be generated.

  19. Density and lifetime evaluation of weakly ionized plasma for laser-triggered lightning by means of laser absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaura, Michiteru

    2006-10-01

    The potential ability of lasers to control lightning can be improved by using a train of pulses with sub-millisecond separations [1-2]. Laser-triggered experiments in a small-scale (10 mm gap) atmospheric discharge facility show that the triggering is dramatically enhanced when a five-pulse train of sub-Joule energy is used instead of a single pulse. This effect increases rapidly as the pulse interval is reduced. In order to evaluate the trigger effect quantitatively, the plasma density produced by a pulsed KrF excimer laser with high repetition rate of kHz order was measured by means of laser absorption [3-4]. It appears that at a sub-millisecond pulse interval, sufficient positive and negative ions survive in subsequent pulses, thus enabling easy deionization. Hence, significant plasma build-up occurs from one pulse to the next. However, this persistence of ions would appear to imply that the rate of recombination (effectively a charge transfer between ions) is considerably lower than previously believed. References [1] M.Yamaura, et al: J.Appl.Phys. 95, 6007 (2004). [2] M.Yamaura,et al : Appl.Phys Lett. 86 131502 (2005). [3] M.Yamaura: J.Appl.Phys.98 043101 (2005) [4] M.Yamaura,et al : Appl.Phys Lett. 88 to be appeared in June (2006)

  20. Effects of picosecond terawatt UV laser beam filamentation and a repetitive pulse train on creation of prolonged plasma channels in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Shutov, A. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.

    2013-08-01

    Amplitude-modulated UV laser pulse of up to 30 J energy was produced at hybrid Ti:Sapphire/KrF GARPUN-MTW laser facility when a preliminary amplified train of short pulses was injected into unstable resonator cavity of the main e-beam-pumped KrF amplifier. The combined radiation consisted of regeneratively amplified picosecond pulses with subTW peak power overlapped with 100-ns pulse of a free-running lasing. The advantages of combined radiation for production of long-lived prolonged plasma channels in air and HV discharge triggering were demonstrated: photocurrent sustained by modulated pulse is two orders of magnitude higher and HV breakdown distance is twice longer than for a smooth UV pulse. It was found that in contrast to IR radiation multiple filamentation of high-power UV laser beam does not produce extended nonlinear focusing of UV radiation.

  1. Influence of grid control on beam quality in laser ion source generating high-current low-charged copper ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, J.; Yoshida, M.; Ogawa, M.; Oguri, Y.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.; Kwan, J.

    2003-08-01

    We examined grid-controlled extraction for a laser ion source using a KrF laser. By using grid-controlled extraction in the over-dense regime, we found that the ion beam current waveforms were stabilized more significantly as the grid bias raised from -90 V to -280 V. The normalized emittance of 0.08 {pi}mm-mrad measured without the grid control was improved to 0.06 {pi}mm-mrad with the grid control. In contrast to this observation, the grid bias disturbed the pattern of the beam extracted in the source-limited regime. Fast extraction was carried out using a high-voltage pulse with a rise time of {approx} 100 ns. The grid control suppressed successfully the beam pedestal originating from the plasma pre-filled in the extraction gap.

  2. Room-temperature laser annealing for solid-phase epitaxial crystallization of β-Ga2O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiojiri, Daishi; Fukuda, Daiji; Yamauchi, Ryosuke; Tsuchimine, Nobuo; Koyama, Koji; Kaneko, Satoru; Matsuda, Akifumi; Yoshimoto, Mamoru

    2016-10-01

    The epitaxial crystallization of β-Ga2O3 thin films on NiO-buffered α-Al2O3(0001) substrates via the solid-phase crystallization of amorphous Ga2O3 thin films by KrF excimer laser annealing at room temperature (RT) was examined. The results of X-ray and reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements indicated that the epitaxial β-Ga2O3 (\\bar{2}01) thin films were fabricated by RT laser annealing. The optical bandgap of the thin films was estimated to be 4.9 eV from the results of UV/vis transmittance measurements. In the cathodoluminescence spectrum, UV-green luminescence was observed for the thin films. These optical properties are similar to those of bulk β-Ga2O3.

  3. Synthesis of carbon films using pulsed laser deposition method with frozen CH 4 and CO 2 targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Takashi; Esaki, Kotaro; Hiroshima, Yasushi

    1998-05-01

    A novel pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process with frozen CH 4 and/or CO 2 is developed. Frozen CH 4 and/or CO 2 formed on the graphitic carbon (GC) target at 12 K, then co-ablated with the GC target, using a KrF excimer laser. The present method is effective in enhancing the dissociation of raw materials and suppressing the large splashing particles. The characteristics of the deposited carbon films depend on the target material and on the substrate temperature. Under the proper conditions, the films show the characteristics of diamond-like carbon in the Raman spectrum. According to the high resolution transmission electron microscopy, these films contain nanometer-sized diamond embryos.

  4. Selective structuring of multi-layer functional thin films using a laser-induced shockwave delamination process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, M.; Lorenz, P.; Bayer, L.; Molpeceres, C.; Ramirez, C. Antonio Herrera; Zimmer, K.

    2016-03-01

    The laser assisted micro structuring of thin films especially for electronic applications without influence the functionality of the multi-layer system e.g. due to melting products is a challenge for the laser micro machining techniques. The P2 scribing of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells on stainless steel carrier foil was studied using shockwave- induced film delamination (SWIFD) patterning. The delamination process is induced by a shock wave generated by the laser ablation of the rear side of the carrier foil. In the present study UV nanosecond laser pulses provided by a KrF excimer laser were used to induce the SWIFD process. The morphology and size of the achieved thin-film structures were studied in dependence on various laser irradiation parameters by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the materials composition after the laser patterning was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The temporal sequences of processes involved in the SWIFD process were analyzed with high speed shadowgraph experiments. The results of the present study shows that in dependence on the laser parameter used a large process window exist in which the CIGS thin film can be removed from the substrate without visible thermal modification of the CIGS thin film.

  5. Micromachining of transparent materials by laser ablation of organic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Niino, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Akira

    2000-11-01

    Transparent materials such as fused silica, quartz, calcium fluoride, and fluorocarbon polymer were etched upon irradiation of organic solution containing pyrene with a conventional KrF excimer laser. Threshold fluence for etching was 240 mJ/cm2 for fused silica. Etch rate remarkably depended on a concentration of pyrene: higher etch rate with the increase of pyrene concentration. It means that pyrene molecules play an important role in this process. The etch rate can be easily controlled through changing a laser pulse number, a laser fluence and a concentration of solution. The mechanism for this process is discussed by cyclic multiphotonic absorption of pyrene in the excited states, thermal relaxation, and formation of super-heated solution. As the results, it is suggested that the process is based on the combination of two processes in the interface between the transparent materials and the liquid: one is a heating process by a super-heated liquid and the other is an attacking process by a high temperature and pressure vapor.

  6. Laser apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, G. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A laser apparatus having a pump laser device for producing pump laser energy upon being excited is disclosed. The pump laser device has a resonating cavity for oscillating and amplifying the pump laser energy. A source laser device is used for producing source laser energy upon being excited by the pump laser energy. The source laser device has a resonating cavity for oscillating and amplifying the source laser energy. The source laser's resonating cavity is coupled within a portion of the pump laser's resonating cavity.

  7. Infrared absorption of cyclic- and trans-NaNO2 and KNO2 in solid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen-Jui; Shen, Min-yi; Yu, Chin-hui; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    1996-01-01

    Sodium nitrite dispersed in solid argon exhibited infrared absorption at 1293.0, 1222.8, and 825.6 cm-1, corresponding, respectively, to symmetric and asymmetric stretching, and bending, modes of the NO-2 moiety in a bidentate planar cyclic structure of C2v symmetry (designated cyclic-NaNO2). After irradiation of the matrix sample with emission from the KrF laser at 248 nm, new lines at 1446.2, 1159.1, and 787.1 cm-1 were recorded. A sample containing Na15NO2 absorbed at 1272.1, 1198.2, and 821.7 cm-1 before irradiation; new lines at 1419.6, 1136.9, and 782.8 cm-1 were observed after irradiation. New lines observed after irradiation are assigned to sodium nitrite with a monodentate planar trans structure (designated trans-NaNO2). Ab initio calculations according to density functional theory at Becke3LYP/6-311+G* level predicted line positions, isotopic shifts, and relative IR intensities similar to those observed experimentally for both isomers. Similar results were obtained for cyclic-KNO2 at (1313.4, 1310.8), (1217.3, 1207.9), and (807.2, 809.5) cm-1 before irradiation, and for trans-KNO2 at (1412.4, 1413.2), (1171.0, 1178.2, 1176.4), and 783.1 cm-1 after irradiation at 248 nm; the numbers grouped in parentheses reflect line splitting.

  8. Direct laser writing of thermally stabilized channel waveguides with Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Isamu; Matsumoto, Shin-Ichi; Saito, Mitsunori; Kintaka, Kenji; Nishii, Junji

    2004-09-20

    Thermally stabilized photo-induced channel waveguides with Bragg gratings were fabricated in Ge-B-SiO2 thin glass films by exposure with KrF excimer laser and successive annealing at 600 degrees C. The annealing reversed the photo-induced refractive index pattern and also enhanced its thermal stability. The stabilized channel waveguide with a Bragg grating showed diffraction efficiency of 18.0 dB and 18.7 dB for TE- and TM-like modes, respectively. The diffraction efficiencies and wavelengths for both modes never changed after heat treatment at 500 degrees C, whereas the conventional photo-induced grating decayed even at 200 degrees C.

  9. Direct laser writing of thermally stabilized channel waveguides with Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Isamu; Matsumoto, Shin-Ichi; Saito, Mitsunori; Kintaka, Kenji; Nishii, Junji

    2004-09-01

    Thermally stabilized photo-induced channel waveguides with Bragg gratings were fabricated in Ge-B-SiO2 thin glass films by exposure with KrF excimer laser and successive annealing at 600°C. The annealing reversed the photo-induced refractive index pattern and also enhanced its thermal stability. The stabilized channel waveguide with a Bragg grating showed diffraction efficiency of 18.0 dB and 18.7 dB for TE- and TM-like modes, respectively. The diffraction efficiencies and wavelengths for both modes never changed after heat treatment at 500°C, whereas the conventional photo-induced grating decayed even at 200°C.

  10. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy by combining spatial confinement and dual-pulse irradiation.

    PubMed

    Guo, L B; Zhang, B Y; He, X N; Li, C M; Zhou, Y S; Wu, T; Park, J B; Zeng, X Y; Lu, Y F

    2012-01-16

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), a pair of aluminum-plate walls were used to spatially confine the plasmas produced in air by a first laser pulse (KrF excimer laser) from chromium (Cr) targets with a second laser pulse (Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm, 360 mJ/pulse) introduced parallel to the sample surface to re-excite the plasmas. Optical emission enhancement was achieved by combing the spatial confinement and dual-pulse LIBS (DP-LIBS), and then optimized by adjusting the distance between the two walls and the interpulse delay time between both laser pulses. A significant enhancement factor of 168.6 for the emission intensity of the Cr lines was obtained at an excimer laser fluence of 5.6 J/cm(2) using the combined spatial confinement and DP-LIBS, as compared with an enhancement factor of 106.1 was obtained with DP-LIBS only. The enhancement mechanisms based on shock wave theory and reheating in DP-LIBS are discussed.

  11. Excimer laser-induced formation of metallic microstructures by electroless copper plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Pan, C.-T.

    2002-03-01

    Micro-patterns created by the excimer laser and activated by reactants for electroless copper plating are described in this paper. The generated micro-patterns are transformed into copper patterns on the substrate and copper microstructures are formed. This method simplifies the manufacturing process of making circuits on boards compared with the conventional lithography process of forming copper patterns on the substrate. Micro-patterns generated by the excimer laser cause changes of surface electric properties and activation selectively. A chemical reaction through these activated areas may deposit metal, such as copper. The KrF excimer laser not only provides simple and fast machining patterns, but also uses its high-energy density to drill holes and circuits directly. Palladium ions are added as mediators in the electroless plating solution to enable a continuous electroless copper deposition. According to the experiment of excimer laser-assisted electroless copper plating, the procedures of pretreatment and post-cleaning are the key factors that resulted in excellent selective plating. The samples were pretreated by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and post-cleaned by acetone and diluted nitric acid resulting in distinct micro-patterns. The deposition area is confined to the excimer laser-ablated portion resulting in good selective plating.

  12. Quantitative Imaging of Ozone Vapor Using Photofragmentation Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF).

    PubMed

    Larsson, Kajsa; Hot, Dina; Ehn, Andreas; Lantz, Andreas; Weng, Wubin; Aldén, Marcus; Bood, Joakim

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, the spectral properties of gaseous ozone (O3) have been investigated aiming to perform quantitative concentration imaging of ozone by using a single laser pulse at 248 nm from a KrF excimer laser. The O3 molecule is first photodissociated by the laser pulse into two fragments, O and O2. Then the same laser pulse electronically excites the O2 fragment, which is vibrationally hot, whereupon fluorescence is emitted. The fluorescence intensity is found to be proportional to the concentration of ozone. Both emission and absorption characteristics have been investigated, as well as how the laser fluence affects the fluorescence signal. Quantitative ozone imaging data have been achieved based on calibration measurements in known mixtures of O3. In addition, a simultaneous study of the emission intensity captured by an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera and a spectrograph has been performed. The results show that any signal contribution not stemming from ozone is negligible compared to the strong fluorescence induced by the O2 fragment, thus proving interference-free ozone imaging. The single-shot detection limit has been estimated to ∼400 ppm. The authors believe that the presented technique offers a valuable tool applicable in various research fields, such as plasma sterilization, water and soil remediation, and plasma-assisted combustion.

  13. A 3-level Model for Schumann-Runge O2 Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Glenn S.; Lempert, Walter R.; Miles, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    A three level model has been developed for the analysis of Schumann-Runge band (B(sup 3)Sigma(sup -)(sub u ) <- X(sup 3)Sigma(sup -)(sub g)) laser-induced fluorescence of molecular oxygen, O2. Such a model is required due to the severe lower state depletion which can occur when transitions having relatively large absorption cross-sections are excited. Such transitions are often utilized via ArF* or KrF* excimer or dye-laser excitation in high temperature environments. The rapid predissociation of the upper state prevents substantial repopulation of the lower state by collisional processes, and the lower state may be largely depleted, even at laser fluences as low as 10-100 mJ/sq cm. The resulting LIF signal in such cases no longer varies linearly with laser pulse energy, and the extent of the sublinear behavior varies with the particular rovibrational transition of interest. Relating the measured signal to the lower state population, then, necessitates the use of exceedingly low laser fluences. These low fluences in turn lead to the need to compromise spatial resolution in order to generate sufficient signal.

  14. Pulsed laser deposition of adherent hexagonal/cubic boron nitride layer systems at high growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weißmantel, Steffen; Reiße, Günter

    2002-09-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films were prepared by ion-beam-assisted pulsed laser deposition (IAPLD) using a KrF excimer laser for ablation. The c-BN growth rates of 50 nm/min at relatively low substrate temperatures of 250 °C were achieved by using high laser energy densities of more than 30 J/cm 2 and at ion beam energies of 600-700 eV. Main advantage of IAPLD for the deposition of c-BN films is that at high laser energy densities the ratio of ions from the ion beam to ablated atoms and ions necessary for cubic film growth can be reduced to 0.14, since the ablated boron and nitrogen species themselves have high mean kinetic energies of 130-180 eV. By using pulsed laser deposited h-BN intermediate layers, 300-420 nm thick well-adherent c-BN films can be prepared on Si and WC hard metal substrates. The maximum c-BN film thickness of some 0.5 μm is limited by the accumulation of particulates, formed during the ablation process, in the films. The microstructure, stress, hardness and adhesion of such layer systems deposited at high growth rates are presented.

  15. The Quantum Yield of NO3 from Peroxyacetyl Nitrate Photolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazely, Troy L.; Friedl, Randall R.; Sander, Stanley P.

    1997-01-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) vapor was photolyzed at 248nm and the NO3 photoproduct was detected by laser induced fluorescence. The excited state flourescence contributions were investigated and a data analysis methodology was established to minimize their effects.

  16. Characterization of aromaticity in analogues of titan's atmospheric aerosols with two-step laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Schwell, Martin; Carrasco, Nathalie; Benilan, Yves; Cernogora, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Gazeau, Marie-Claire

    2016-10-01

    The role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and Nitrogen containing PAH (PANH) as intermediates of aerosol production in the atmosphere of Titan has been a subject of controversy for a long time. An analysis of the atmospheric emission band observed by the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) at 3.28 μm suggests the presence of neutral polycyclic aromatic species in the upper atmosphere of Titan. These molecules are seen as the counter part of negative and positive aromatics ions suspected by the Plasma Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft, but the low resolution of the instrument hinders any molecular speciation. In this work we investigate the specific aromatic content of Titan's atmospheric aerosols through laboratory simulations. We report here the selective detection of aromatic compounds in tholins, Titan's aerosol analogs, produced with a capacitively coupled plasma in a N2:CH4 95:5 gas mixture. For this purpose, Two-Step Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (L2DI-TOF-MS) technique is used to analyze the so produced analogs. This analytical technique is based on the ionization of molecules by Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI) using a λ=248 nm wavelength laser which is selective for aromatic species. This allows for the selective identification of compounds having at least one aromatic ring. Our experiments show that tholins contain a trace amount of small PAHs with one to three aromatic rings. Nitrogen containing PAHs (PANHs) are also detected as constituents of tholins. Molecules relevant to astrobiology are detected as is the case of the substituted DNA base adenine.

  17. Surface modification of biomaterials by pulsed laser ablation deposition and plasma/gamma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Kaustubh R.

    ablation was developed for the 248 nm laser irradiation of silicone. The model demonstrated a good fit to the experimental data and showed that silicone underwent ablation by a thermal mechanism. In addition to PLAD studies, functionalization of stainless steel was carried out by a combined plasma/gamma method involving deposition of a hexane plasma polymer by RF plasma polymerization, followed by gamma radiation graft polymerization of methacrylic acid. The hydrograft modified surfaces were further modified by chemisorption reactions with poly(ethylene imine) to produce amine-rich surfaces. Bovine serum albumin was then bound via amino groups using glutaraldehyde coupling. A streaming potential cell was also built and used to measure the zeta potential of these ionic surfaces.

  18. Excimer-laser-induced surface treatments on metal and ceramic materials: applications to automotive, aerospace, and microelectronic industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autric, Michel L.

    1999-09-01

    Surface treatments by laser irradiation can improve materials properties in terms of mechanical and physico- chemical behaviors, these improvements being related to the topography, the hardness, the microstructure, the chemical composition. Up to now, the use of excimer lasers for industrial applications remained marginal in spite of the interest related to the short wavelength (high photon energy and better energetic coupling with materials and reduced thermal effects in the bulk material). Up to now, the main limitations concerned the beam quality, the beam delivery, the gas handling and the relatively high investment cost. At this time, the cost of laser devices is going down and the ultraviolet radiation can be conducted through optical fibers. These two elements give new interest in using excimer laser for industrial applications. The main objective of this research program which we are involved in, is to underline some materials processing applications for automotive, aerospace or microelectronic industries for which it could be more interesting to use excimer lasers (minimized thermal effects). This paper concerns the modifications of the roughness, porosity, hardness, structure, phase, residual stresses, chemical composition of the surface of materials such as metallic alloys (aluminum, steel, cast iron, titanium, and ceramics (oxide, nitride, carbide,...) irradiated by KrF and XeCl excimer lasers.

  19. Pulsed Laser Deposition of High Temperature Protonic Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred W.; Berger, M. H.; Sayir, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to fabricate nanostructured BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3- sigma) films. Protonic conduction of fabricated BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films was compared to sintered BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma). Sintered samples and laser targets were prepared by sintering BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) powders derived by solid state synthesis. Films 1 to 8 micron thick were deposited by KrF excimer laser on porous Al2O3 substrates. Thin films were fabricated at deposition temperatures of 700 to 950 C at O2 pressures up to 200 mTorr using laser pulse energies of 0.45 - 0.95 J. Fabricated films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and electrical impedance spectroscopy. Single phase BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films with a columnar growth morphology are observed with preferred crystal growth along the [100] or [001] direction. Results indicate [100] growth dependence upon laser pulse energy. Electrical conductivity of bulk samples produced by solid state sintering and thin film samples were measured over a temperature range of 100 C to 900 C. Electrical conduction behavior was dependent upon film deposition temperature. Maximum conductivity occurs at deposition temperature of 900 oC; the electrical conductivity exceeds the sintered specimen. All other deposited films exhibit a lower electrical conductivity than the sintered specimen. Activation energy for electrical conduction showed dependence upon deposition temperature, it varied

  20. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of gold nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricato, A. P.; Fernàndez, M.; Leggieri, G.; Luches, A.; Martino, M.; Romano, F.; Tunno, T.; Valerini, D.; Verdyan, A.; Soifer, Y. M.; Azoulay, J.; Meda, L.

    2007-07-01

    We report on the growth and characterization of gold nitride thin films on Si <1 0 0> substrates at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation. A pure (99.95%) Au target was ablated with KrF excimer laser pulses in nitrogen containing atmosphere (N 2 or NH 3). The gas ambient pressure was varied in the range 0.1-100 Pa. The morphology of the films was studied by using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, evidencing compact films with RMS roughness in the range 3.6-35.1 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to detect the nitrogen concentration into the films. The EDS nitrogen peak does not decrease in intensity after 2 h annealing at 250 °C. Film resistivity was measured using a four-point probe and resulted in the (4-20) × 10 -8 Ω m range, depending on the ambient pressure, to be compared with the value 2.6 × 10 -8 Ω m of a pure gold film. Indentation and scratch measurements gave microhardness values of 2-3 GPa and the Young's modulus close to 100 GPa. X-ray photoemission spectra clearly showed the N 1s peak around 400 eV and displaced with respect to N 2 phase. All these measurements point to the formation of the gold nitride phase.

  1. Synthesis of nanostructured lean-NO x catalysts by direct laser deposition of monometallic Pt-, Rh- and bimetallic PtRh-nanoparticles on SiO2 support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savastenko, N.; Volpp, H.-R.; Gerlach, O.; Strehlau, W.

    2008-02-01

    Monometallic Pt and Rh and bimetallic PtRh catalysts with a highly dispersed noble metal weight loading of ca. 1 wt% were produced via the direct deposition of nanoparticles on different SiO2 supports by means of pulsed ultra-violet (248 nm) excimer laser ablation of Pt, Rh bulk metal and PtRh alloy targets. Backscattered electron microscopy (BSE), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to characterize the deposited nanoparticles, which were found to exhibit narrow size distribution centred around 2.5 nm. The catalytic activities for lean NO x reduction of the monometallic and bimetallic catalyst samples were investigated in a flow reactor setup in the temperature range 100-400°C using a test gas mixture representative of oxygen rich diesel engine exhaust gas. For comparison a Rh/SiO2 reference catalyst prepared by a conventional impregnation method was also tested. Further experiments were performed in which PtRh nanoparticles were deposited on a Rh/SiO2 reference catalyst sample to study the possibility for controlled modification of its activity. The catalytic activity measurements revealed that among the samples solely prepared by laser deposition the PtRh-SiO2 nanoparticle catalyst showed the highest activity for NO x reduction at low temperatures 100-300°C. In addition, it could be demonstrated that the initially low NO x reduction activity and the N2 selectivity of the Rh/SiO2 reference catalyst sample for temperatures below 250°C can be enhanced by post laser deposition of PtRh nanoparticles.

  2. Estimation of Al2O3 critical temperature using a Langmuir probe in laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahiaoui, K.; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Messaoud Aberkane, S.; Kellou, A.

    2016-11-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has demonstrated its capacity in thin films growing under the moderate laser intensity. But when the laser intensity increases, the presence of droplets on the thin film limits the PLD efficiency such that the process needs an optimization study. In this way, an experimental study has been conducted in order to correlate between the appearance of those droplets and the laser fluence. The comprehension of the physical mechanism during ablation and the control of the deposition parameters allowed to get a safe process. Our experiment consists in measuring the amount of ejected matter from polycrystalline alumina target as a function of the laser fluence when irradiated by a KrF laser. According to laser fluence, several kinds of ablation regimes have been identified. Below a threshold value found as 12 J/cm2, the mechanism of ablation was assigned to normal evaporation, desorption and nonthermal processes. While above this threshold value, the mechanism of ablation was assigned to phase explosion phenomenon which is responsible of droplets formation when the surface temperature approaches the critical temperature T tc. A negative charge collector was used to collect the positive ions in the plume. Their times of flight (TOF) signal were used to estimate the appropriate T tc for alumina target. Ions yield, current as well as kinetic energy were deduced from the TOF signal. Their evolutions show the occurrence of an optical breakdown in the vapor plume which is well correlated with the onset of the phase explosion phenomenon. At 10 J/cm2, the ions velocities collected by the probe have been compared to those obtained from optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic and were discussed. To prove the occurrence of phase explosion by the appearance of droplets, several thin films were elaborated on Si (100) substrate at different laser fluence into vacuum. They have been characterized by scanning electron microscope. The results were well

  3. High-Z Coating Experiments on Omega EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Max; Oh, J.; Stoeckl, C.; Schmitt, A. J.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Previous experiments on Nike KrF laser (λ=248nm) at NRL found that a thin (400-800 Å) high-Z (Au or Pd) overcoat on the target is effective in suppressing broadband imprint. Implementation of this technique on the tripled Nd:glass (351nm) NIF would enable higher uniformity direct-drive experiments there. To this end, we are carrying out experiments using the NIF-like beams of Omega EP. On Nike, a low-intensity, highly smooth prepulse heats and pre-expands the low thermal mass metallic coating to 100 um scale length. This likely improves imprint reduction for longer spatial scales because of increased distance between laser absorption and the ablation surface. The 3 ω beams of Omega EP do not have this feature due to nonlinear harmonic conversion. We introduced a means of pre-expanding the high-Z coating to similar length scale on Omega EP using a soft x-ray prepulse, generated by irradiating an auxiliary Au foil 1cm in front of the main target tens of ns prior to the main target drive. Coating dynamics are measured using side-on radiography. The effectiveness of pre-expansion on imprint reduction will be assessed by measurements of the RT-amplified imprint using monochromatic curved crystal radiography. Work supported by the Department of Energy/NNSA.

  4. Impact of Argon gas on optical and electrical properties of Carbon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Arslan; Rafique, M. S.; Shaukat, S. F.; Siraj, Khurram; Ashfaq, Afshan; Anjum, Safia; Imran, Muhammad; Sattar, Abdul

    2016-12-01

    Nanostructured thin films of carbon were synthesized and investigated for their electrical, optical, structural and surface properties. Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique was used for the preparation of these films under Argon gas environment. A KrF Laser (λ=248 nm) was used as source of ablation and plasma formation. It was observed that the carbon ions and the background gas environment has deep impact on the morphology as well as on the microstructure of the films. Time of Flight (TOF) method was used to determine the energies of the ablated carbon ions. The morphology of film surfaces deposited at various argon pressure was analysed using an atomic force microscope. The Raman spectroscopic measurement reveal that there is shift in phase from sp3 to sp2 and a decrease in FWHM of G band, which is a clear indication of enhanced graphitic clusters. The electrical resistivity was also reduced from 85.3×10-1 to 2.57×10-1 Ω-cm. There is an exponential decrease in band gap Eg of the deposited films from 1.99 to 1.37 eV as a function of argon gas pressure.

  5. Transport characteristics of Co-doped BaFe2As2 epitaxial thin film 24deg grain-boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panyajirawut, P.; Smith, N.; Tarantini, C.; Lee, S.; Jiang, J.; Bark, C. W.; Weiss, J. D.; Folkman, C. M.; Baek, S. H.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Eom, C. B.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Rzchowski, M. S.

    2010-03-01

    We investigate [001] 24deg tilt GBs of epitaxial thin film of the pnictide superconductor Co-doped Ba(Fe0.92Co0.08)2As2 on (001) SrTiO3 bicrystal substrates. The films were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with KrF (248 nm) UW excimer laser in vacuum at a base pressure of 2x10-7 Torr. The chemical composition of the films determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (WDS) is Ba : Fe : Co : As : O = 1 : 1.7 : 0.13 : 1.7 : 0.3. Four-circle x-ray diffraction exhibits excellent expitaxy with cube-on cube in-plane epitaxial relationship. The films have an onset Tc of 20.5 K, and a Tco of 19.8K. The intragrain Jc is over 1 MA/cm^2 (4.2K, self field) which is significantly higher than in previously reported thin films. The grain boundary couples at a slightly lower temperature of 19.7 K. We discuss magnetic field and temperature dependence of the IV characteristics, and microwave response.

  6. Observation of wavelength-sensitive mass-independent sulfur isotope effects during SO2 photolysis: Implications for the early atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquhar, James; Savarino, Joel; Airieau, Sabine; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2001-12-01

    Mass-independent isotopic signatures for δ33S, δ34S, and δ36S produced in the photolysis of sulfur dioxide exhibit a strong wavelength dependence. Photolysis experiments with three light sources (ArF excimer laser (193 nm), mercury resonance lamp (184.9 and 253.7 nm), and KrF excimer laser (248 nm) are presented. Products of sulfur dioxide photolysis undertaken with 193-nm radiation exhibit characteristics that are similar to sulfur multiple-isotope data for terrestrial sedimentary rock samples older than 2450 Ma (reported by Farquhar et al. [2000a]), while photolysis experiments undertaken with radiation at other wavelengths (longer than 220 nm and at 184.9 nm) exhibit different characteristics. The spectral window between 190 and 220 nm falls between the Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen and the Hartley bands of ozone, and its absorption is therefore more sensitive to changes in altitude and atmospheric oxygen content than neighboring wavelengths. These two observations are used to suggest a link between sulfur dioxide photolysis at 193 nm and sulfur isotope anomalies in Archean rocks. This hypothesis includes the suggestion that UV wavelengths shorter than 200 nm penetrated deep in the Earth's atmosphere during the Archean. Potential implications of this hypothesis for the chemistry, composition, and UV absorption of the atmosphere are explored. We also explore the implications of these observations for documentation of bacterial sulfur metabolisms early in Earth's history.

  7. Microbial colonization of biopolymeric thin films containing natural compounds and antibiotics fabricated by MAPLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, R.; Surdu, A. V.; Grumezescu, A. M.; Oprea, A. E.; Trusca, R.; Vasile, O.; Dorcioman, G.; Visan, A.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Mihaiescu, D.; Enculescu, M.; Chifiriuc, M. C.; Boehm, R. D.; Narayan, R. J.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2015-05-01

    Although a great number of antibiotics are currently available, they are often rendered ineffective by the ability of microbial strains to develop genetic resistance and to grow in biofilms. Since many antimicrobial agents poorly penetrate biofilms, biofilm-associated infections often require high concentrations of antimicrobial agents for effective treatment. Among the various strategies that may be used to inhibit microbial biofilms, one strategy that has generated significant interest involves the use of bioactive surfaces that are resistant to microbial colonization. In this respect, we used matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) involving a pulsed KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) to obtain thin composite biopolymeric films containing natural (flavonoid) or synthetic (antibiotic) compounds as bioactive substances. Chemical composition and film structures were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Films morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The antimicrobial assay of the microbial biofilms formed on these films was assessed by the viable cell counts method. The flavonoid-containing thin films showed increased resistance to microbial colonization, highlighting their potential to be used for the design of anti-biofilm surfaces.

  8. Molybdenum oxide nanosheets prepared by an anodizing-exfoliation process and observation of photochromic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, M.; Delalat, F.; Salamati, H.

    2017-02-01

    Anodizing-exfoliation of molybdenum foil was performed in 0.02 M HCl electrolyte at 30 V. In this process, the electrolyte rapidly turned into a blue colloidal solution of molybdenum oxide nanosheets with fragmented edges observed on transmission electron microscope (TEM). X-ray Diffraction (XRD) pattern of particles was free of peak while annealing at a temperature range of 100-500 °C led to formation of monoclinic (for T < 300 °C) and orthorhombic (for T > 300 °C) phases of MoO3. Moreover, addition of PdCl2 (0.2 g/l) salt solution caused a spontaneous bleaching of the initial blue colloid. Annealing of powders extracted from these bleached solutions with different PdCl2 concentrations at 500 °C led to a preferential growth of (0k0) orientation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the blue nanosheets solution contains mainly Mo5+ with slightly Mo6+ oxidation states and each of annealing or salt bleaching procedures can entirely convert Mo5+ to Mo6+. When the bleached solutions was exposed to KrF laser beam (λ = 248 nm) a strong photochromic coloration with a deep blue color was occurred. Regardless of Pd:Mo ratio, the primary and laser irradiated solutions showed analogues optical absorption bands in the 1-3 nm photon energy range while the photochromic process led to a broader absorption band.

  9. Stress analysis of transferred thin-GaN LED by Au-Si wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S. C.; Liu, C. Y.

    2005-09-01

    Nowadays, the high power GaN-based LED has attracted serious attention for the lighting application. One of key issues for high power GaN-base LED to achieve sufficient lighting efficiency over the traditional light sources, such as, white incandescent and halogen light bulb is the efficiency of heat dissipation. Typically, GaN epi-layer is grown on sapphire substrates. The poor thermal conductivity of sapphire substrate has been identified to be the main limitation for the application of high power GaN LED. To improve the heat dissipation and lighting efficiency, we report a thin GaN structure by using Au-Si wafer bonding and Laser lift-off (LLO) technique. The GaN wafer was first deposited with a Au bonding layer and bonded onto a good thermal conduction substrate, i.e., heavy-doped Si. Then, 248nm KrF excimer Laser was used to strip the original sapphire substrate. To assure a successful GaN epi-layer transferring, Raman spectrum on the transferred GaN layer was performed and the result shows no quality change in the transferred GaN layer. In this work, we also fabricated the vertical LED devices on the transferred GaN epi-layer. Therefore, L-I-V result was obtained which will be presented in this talk. Moreover, we will discuss the effects and advantages of Au-Si bonding on the efficiency of lighting.

  10. Kerr self-defocusing of multiple filaments in TW peak power UV laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Goncharov, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Mokrousova, D. V.; Ryabchuk, S. V.; Seleznev, L. V.; Shutov, A. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Ustinovskii, N. N.

    2016-12-01

    An effective suppression of multiple filamentation of the sub-TW peak power supercritical laser beam in xenon gas was demonstrated in direct amplification of subpicosecond UV pulses at Ti:sapphire/KrF laser facility GARPUN-MTW. A large negative nonlinear refractive index due to a two-photon resonance of KrF laser radiation with Xe 6p{{≤ft[1/2\\right]}0} state ensured Kerr self-defocusing of a few hundred filaments with a local peak intensity of ~0.2 TW cm-2, 200-fold higher than the average one over the beam cross section, and thus homogenized the laser beam. UV filaments in Xe produced a narrow-angle monochromatic coherent cone emission at 828 nm wavelength due to stimulated hyper-Raman scattering and amplified spontaneous emission at the transition 6p{{≤ft[1/2\\right]}0}\\to 6s≤ft[3/2\\right]10 .

  11. Laser-induced circular nanostructures in fused silica assisted by a self-assembling chromium layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Pierre; Klöppel, Michael; Frost, Frank; Ehrhardt, Martin; Zimmer, Klaus; Li, Pu

    2013-09-01

    Nanostructures have a widespread field of applications and are of growing industrial importance. However, the economic fabrication of nanostructures poses a critical challenge. In this work, a fundamental research of a laser-induced surface nanostructuring of fused silica using the dynamic self-assembling structure formation in metal layers is presented. This method may offer promising opportunities for nanostructuring of dielectrics. This new approach is demonstrated by the formation of randomly distributed concentric nanostructures into fused silica. The irradiation of chromium-covered fused silica samples with a KrF excimer laser results in melting, partial ablation, restructuring, and resolidification of both the metal layer and the dielectric surface. In this way, concentric circular structures into the dielectric were formed with dimensions that can be controlled by the laser fluence Φ and by the pulse number N. The distance of the concentric rings increases with increasing laser fluence. The experimental results were compared with simulated structure dimensions taking into account the heat equation and the Navier-Stokes equation. Despite the currently applied decoupled approach for the simulations, i.e. separating the heat equation and the fluid flow, a good agreement of simulation results with experimental data was achieved.

  12. Laser-induced modification of transport properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O step-edge weak links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, R.; Kula, W.; Sobolewski, Roman; Murduck, J. M.; Pettiette-Hall, C.

    1995-12-01

    We report on the laser-induced permanent changes of the critical current (Ic) and normal resistance (Rn) of YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) step-edge Josephson junctions. The 2- to 20-μm-wide junctions were prepared from a 200-nm-thick YBCO film deposited by a pulsed KrF excimer laser onto 300-nm-high steps etched in the LaAlO3 substrate. The laser modification experiments were performed by illuminating the junctions at 50 K with a focused Ar-ion laser beam of various intensities. Depending on the illumination power density, either increase or decrease of the junction Ic has been observed. In particular, after illumination at the 0.6×105 W/cm2 power level, a 75% enhancement of Ic and increase of the IcRn product up to 25% were obtained without a measurable change in the junction critical temperature. The laser-induced modifications were very reproducible and remained unchanged even after a subsequent room-temperature/helium thermal cycling of the sample. Photoassisted, thermally activated oxygen redistribution in the YBCO grain boundary region is proposed to explain the observed behavior.

  13. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO2: the effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M; Powell, Amber L; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO2 and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm(-1)) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E' = ∼41,000 cm(-1) was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S1→S0*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO2 via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO2 using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO2 were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E') was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E') and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E') and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E'). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  14. Formation of short high-power laser radiation pulses in excimer mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losev, V. F., Sr.; Ivanov, N. G.; Panchenko, Yu. N.

    2007-06-01

    Presently an excimer mediums continue are examined as one of variants for formation of powerful and over powerful pulses of laser radiation with duration from units of nanosecond up to tens femtosecond. The researches on such powerful installations as "NIKE" (USA) and << SUPER ASHURA >>, Japan) proceed in this direction. The main advantage of excimer mediums is the opportunity to work in a frequency mode, absence of restriction on the size of active area, high uniformity of a gas working medium, high efficiency (up to 10 %) and wide spectral range of laser radiation (KrF, XeCl ~ 2nm, XeF (C-A), Xe IICl ~ 50-100 nanometers). Research in area of high quality laser beams formation in excimer mediums and its amplification in high power amplifiers are carried out the long time in Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk, Russia. The wide aperture XeCl laser system of MELS-4k is used for these investigations. Last time we take part in program on development of high power excimer laser system with a petawatt level of power. This system supposes the formation and amplification high quality laser beams with different pulse duration from units of nanosecond up to tens femtosecond. We research the possibility of laser beams formation in excimer mediums with ps-ns pulse duration having the low noise and divergence near to diffraction limit. In other hand, we are developing the wide aperture XeF(C-A) amplifier with optical pump on base electron accelerator. According to our estimations of the XeF(C-A) amplifier based on the converter of e-beam energy to the Xe II* fluorescence at 172 nm will allow to obtain up to 100 TW peak power in a 30 fs pulse.

  15. Electrical properties of Sb-doped epitaxial SnO2 thin films prepared using excimer-laser-assisted metal-organic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Tetsuo; Nakajima, Tomohiko; Shinoda, Kentaro

    2013-12-01

    Excimer-laser-assisted metal-organic deposition (ELAMOD) was used to prepare Sb-doped epitaxial (001) SnO2 thin films on (001) TiO2 substrates at room temperature. The effects of laser fluence, the number of shots with the laser, and Sb content on the electrical properties such as resistivity, carrier concentration, and carrier mobility of the films were investigated. The resistivity of the Sb-doped epitaxial (001) SnO2 thin film prepared using an ArF laser was lower than that of the film prepared using a KrF laser. The van der Pauw method was used to measure the resistivity, carrier concentration, and carrier mobility of the Sb-doped epitaxial (001) SnO2 thin films in order to determine the effect of Sb content on the electrical resistivity of the films. The lowest resistivity obtained for the Sb-doped epitaxial (001) SnO2 thin films prepared using ELAMOD with the ArF laser and 2 % Sb content was 2.5 × 10-3 Ω cm. The difference between the optimal Sb concentrations and resistivities of the films produced using either ELAMOD or conventional thermal MOD was discussed.

  16. Excimer laser fragmentation fluorescence spectroscopy for real-time monitoring of combustion generated pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, Christopher John

    Toxic pollutant emissions from combustion pose a hazard to public and environmental health. Better diagnostic techniques would benefit emissions monitoring programs and aid research aimed at understanding toxic pollutant formation and behavior. Excimer Laser Fragmentation Fluorescence Spectroscopy (ELFFS) provides sensitive, real-time, in situ measurements of several important combustion related pollutants. This thesis demonstrates the capabilities of ELFFS for detecting amines in combustion exhausts and carbonaceous particulate matter from engines. ELFFS photofragments target species using a 193 nm excimer laser to form fluorescent signature species. The NH (A--X) band at 336 nm is used to monitor ammonia, ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate. There are no major interferences in this spectral region. The sensitivity is approximately 100 ppb (1 second measurement) for ammonia in post flame gases and 100 ppb (mole fraction) for ammonium nitrate/sulfate in ambient air. Quenching of NH by the major combustion products does not limit the applicability of the detection method. Fluorescence from excited carbon atoms at 248 nm (1P 0 → 1S0) following photofragmentation measures particulate matter in a two-stroke gasoline engine and a four-stroke diesel engine. Fluorescence from CH (A2Delta → X 2pi, 431 nm) C2 (d3pig → a3piu, 468 nm) fragments is also observed. The atomic carbon fluorescence signal is proportional to the mass concentration of particles in the laser interrogation region. The 100-shot (1 second) detection limit for particles in the two-stroke gasoline engine exhaust is 0.5 ppb (volume fraction). The 100-shot detection limit for four-stroke diesel particulate matter is 0.2 ppb. Interferences from carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are negligible. The ratios of atomic carbon, C2, and CH peaks provide information on the molecular forms of compounds condensed on or contained within the particles measured. The C/C2 signal ratio can be used to distinguish

  17. Laser clock

    SciTech Connect

    Facklam, R.L.

    1983-05-26

    A laser clock includes a linear laser in one embodiment of the clock and a ring laser gyro in the other embodiment. The linear laser is frequency stabilized and utilizes a single active medium in the form of a low pressure gas, such as He-Ne, with a Doppler broadened gain curve. The ring laser gyro is a four frequency laser with a Faraday rotor. Detector and electronic circuitry associated with the laser of each embodiment detects a beat frequency and convert it to a clock signal.

  18. Laser induced densification of cerium gadolinium oxide: Application to single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariño, Mariana; Rieu, Mathilde; Viricelle, Jean-Paul; Garrelie, Florence

    2016-06-01

    In single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFC), anode and cathode are placed in a gas chamber where they are exposed to a fuel/air mixture. Similarly to conventional dual-chamber SOFC, the anode and the cathode are separated by an electrolyte. However, as in the SC-SOFC configuration the electrolyte does not play tightness role between compartments, this one can be a porous layer. Nevertheless, it is necessary to have a diffusion barrier to prevent the transportation of hydrogen produced locally at the anode to the cathode that reduces fuel cell performances. This study aims to obtain directly a diffusion barrier through the surface densification of the electrolyte Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) by a laser treatment. KrF excimer laser and Yb fiber laser irradiations were used at different fluences and number of pulses to modify the density of the electrolyte coating. Microstructural characterizations confirmed the modifications on the surface of the electrolyte for appropriate experimental conditions showing either grain growth or densified but cracked surfaces. Gas permeation and electrical conductivities of the modified electrolyte were evaluated. Finally SC-SOFC performances were improved for the cells presenting grain growth at the electrolyte surface.

  19. Élaboration de films de molécules organiques par ablation par laser UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Perez, M. A.; Garapon, C.; Champeaux, C.; Coleman, A. W.

    2006-12-01

    Les potentialités des méthodes de dépôt par ablation laser (PLD) pour la préparation de films minces de matériaux organiques sont illustrées par un bref rappel bibliographique et par des résultats expérimentaux concernant des molécules d'intérêt biologique (acides aminés, calix-arènes, protéines). Les films sont préparés par PLD avec un laser KrF sans dégradation de la structure chimique des molécules dans une gamme de fluences de quelques dizaines à quelques centaines de mJ/cm2. Les propriétés structurales et optiques des films sont étudiées en fonction de la fluence du laser et mettent en évidence des arrangements moléculaires particuliers induits par cette méthode de dépôt. Le guidage optique a été obtenu pour des films de toutes ces molécules.

  20. Blue Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION 13 4. EXPERIENCE WITH THE BLUE LASER 18 4.1 Operational and Processing Experience 18 4.2 Performance Testing 20 5...34 -. - . •. SECTION 3 BLUE HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION This section presents an overview of the steps taken in creating a HCL. There is...to the laser assembly. These steps can actually be considered as the final steps in laser fabrication because some of them involve adding various

  1. Fiber Bragg grating sensors in hollow single- and two-core eccentric fibers.

    PubMed

    Mao, Guopei; Yuan, Tingting; Guan, Chunying; Yang, Jing; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Zheng; Shi, Jinhui; Yuan, Libo

    2017-01-09

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in a hollow eccentric fiber (HEF) have been proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The single-core and two-core HEF FBGs have been inscribed successfully using KrF excimer laser (248 nm), respectively. The temperature and axial strain sensing properties of the two samples have been measured. The experimental results indicate that the temperature and axial strain sensitivities of the two samples are similar, but they are smaller than that of conventional SMF-FBGs. Furthermore, the bending characteristics of the two-core HEF-FBG strongly depend on the bending direction due to the asymmetry of the fiber. Therefore, the proposed two-core HEF-FBGs facilitate temperature-compensated vector-bending sensing by measuring the difference between peak shifts of the two gratings. In addition, the two-core HEF-FBG can be a promising candidate for achieving two-channel filter since the signal crosstalk between the two cores can be largely eliminated by the central air hole.

  2. Structural and Magnetoresistive Properties of Nanometric Films Based on Iron and Chromium Oxides on the Si Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Aleksey B.; Kryvyi, Serhii B.; Mulenko, Sergii A.; Sadovnikova, Maria L.; Savkina, Rada K.; Stefan, Nicolaie

    2016-10-01

    Ultraviolet photons of KrF laser (248 nm) was used for the synthesis of nanometric films based on iron and chromium oxides (Fe2O3 - X (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) and Cr3 - X O3 - Y (0 ≤ x ≤ 2; 0 ≤ y ≤ 2)) with variable thickness, stoichiometry, and electrical properties. Film deposition was carried out on the silicon substrate Si < 100 > at the substrate's temperature T S = 293 K. X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectometry analysis were used for the obtained structure characterization. Such a combined investigation reveals the composition and texture for samples investigated and provides useful information about layer thickness and roughness. Fe2O3 - X (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) nanometric films demonstrate the negative magnetoresistance in magnetic fields up 7 kOe. At the same time, for hybrid systems of the alternate layers Fe2O3 - X (0 ≤ x ≤ 1)/Cr3 - X O3 - Y (0 ≤ x ≤ 2; 0 ≤ y ≤ 2), the positive magnetoresistance as well as the magnetic hysteresis and magnetoresistivity switching effect in the low magnetic fields were observed.

  3. Excimer laser irradiation of metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsman, Grant

    In this work a new method of enhancing CO2 laser processing by modifying the radiative properties of a metal surface is studied. In this procedure, an excimer laser (XeCl) or KrF) exposes the metal surface to overlapping pulses of high intensity, 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 9) W cm(exp -2), and short pulse duration, 30 nsec FWHM (Full Width Half Maximum), to promote structural and chemical change. The major processing effect at these intensities is the production of a surface plasma which can lead to the formation of a laser supported detonation wave (LSD wave). This shock wave can interact with the thin molten layer on the metal surface influencing to a varying degree surface oxidation and roughness features. The possibility of the expulsion, oxidation and redeposition of molten droplets, leading to the formation of micron thick oxide layers, is related to bulk metal properties and the incident laser intensity. A correlation is found between the expulsion of molten droplets and a Reynolds number, showing the interaction is turbulent. The permanent effects of these interactions on metal surfaces are observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transient calorimetric measurements and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Observed surface textures are related to the scanning procedures used to irradiate the metal surface. Fundamental radiative properties of a metal surface, the total hemispherical emissivity, the near-normal spectral absorptivity, and others are examined in this study as they are affected by excimer laser radiation. It is determined that for heavily exposed Al surface, alpha' (10.6 microns) can be increased to values close to unity. Data relating to material removal rates and chemical surface modification for excimer laser radiation is also discussed. The resultant reduction in the near-normal reflectivity solves the fundamental problem of coupling laser radiation into highly reflective and conductive metals such as copper and aluminum. The

  4. Prepulse-induced shock waves in the gas jet target of a laser plasma EUV radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaruk, A. V.; Gritskevich, M. S.; Kalmykov, S. G.; Mozharov, A. M.; Sasin, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    In experiments with a laser-plasma EUV-radiation source, the main IR Nd:YAG laser pulse was preceded by that of a UV KrF excimer laser. Dramatic modulations of EUV plasma emissivity have been observed at long interpulse times, from hundreds of nanoseconds up to microseconds. To discover the nature of these prepulse-produced long-living perturbations of the target, a fluid dynamics numerical simulation of the Xe gas jet has been carried out. The prepulse has been found to generate a quasi-spherical shock wave with a thin dense front layer and a vast rarefied inside area. In the course of time, the front expands and simultaneously drifts downstream along with the gas. Depending on the interpulse time, the IR laser beam either intersects the dense layer or propagates within the rarefied gas cavity whereby the above-mentioned variations in the plasma emission can be explained. The possibilities of making use of the discovered phenomena to enhance the observed EUV plasma brightness are discussed.

  5. Experimental studies of laser target interactions in an ambient gas, under IFE conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper, J. A.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Lehecka, T.; Deniz, A. V.; McLean, E. A.; Sethian, J. D.

    2004-07-01

    Studies of reactor designs for inertial fusion energy (IFE) have indicated that some of the material requirements can be alleviated if the target chamber is filled with a low-pressure inert gas (<1 Torr). The experiments described in this paper examine the effects of such an ambient gas on the laser-target interactions relevant to laser-driven IFE. These experiments used the Nike KrF laser facility at the Naval Research Laboratory to irradiate uncoated 78 µm thick polystyrene (CH) foil targets at focal intensities around 1014 W cm-2. They compared the laser-target interactions in different inert gases (xenon, argon or krypton) at several ambient pressures up to 1 Torr with that of the vacuum (reference) case. The diagnostics included streaked rear-surface emission at wavelengths 460-540 nm and side-on shadowgraphy at 263 nm. The results of this study were encouraging. In spite of initial concerns about resonantly enhanced nonlinear optical effects in the Xe gas, we found no evidence of laser beam break-up, spreading, or attenuation. The shock breakout profiles (from emitted light) and the front and rear surface plasma profiles (from shadowgraphy) remained smooth and symmetric in all cases. The central shock breakout times, and thus the central laser irradiances, were about the same for the target in an inert gas as in vacuum. Our analysis indicates that the large nonlinear optical processes in atomic Xe are self-limiting because the converging beam ionizes the gas, thereby removing the atoms from the most intense part.

  6. Propagation velocities of laser-produced plasmas from copper wire targets and water droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo-Dong; Alexander, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the plasma propagation velocities resulting from KrF laser irradiation of copper wire target (75 microns diameter) and water droplets (75 microns diameter) at irradiance levels ranging from 25 to 150 GW/sq cm. Plasma propagation velocities were measured using a streak camera system oriented orthogonally to the high-energy laser propagation axis. Plasma velocities were studied as a function of position in the focused beam. Results show that both the shape of the plasma formation and material removal from the copper wire are different and depend on whether the targets are focused or slightly defocused (approximately = 0.5 mm movement in the beam axis). Plasma formation and its position relative to the target is an important factor in determining the practical focal point during high-energy laser interaction with materials. At irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm, the air plasma has two weak-velocity components which propagate toward and away from the incident laser while a strong-velocity component propagates away from the laser beam as a detonation wave. Comparison of the measured breakdown velocities (in the range of 2.22-2.27 x 10(exp 5) m/s) for air and the value calculated by the nonlinear breakdown wave theory at irradiance of 100 GW/sq cm showed a quantitative agreement within approximately 50% while the linear theory and Gaussian pulse theory failed. The detonation wave velocities of plasma generated from water droplets and copper wire targets for different focused cases were measured and analyzed theoretically. The propagation velocities of laser-induced plasma liquid droplets obtained by previous research are compared with current work.

  7. Design challenges for matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation and infrared resonant laser evaporation equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, James A.

    2011-11-01

    for several reasons. The first reason is that the polymer/solvent mix as well as the sample holder are both exposed to the humidity in the air which will coat the entire surface of the holder and target with water vapor. Some polymer and/or solvent materials may not react well with water vapor. Also, the layer of water vapor absorbed on the target surface may then absorb the incident laser radiation until it is removed from the surface. Thus, it may be unclear when the water vapor is fully removed from the polymer/solvent surface and the MAPLE deposition process actually occurs. This makes deposition of specific polymer thickness difficult to calculate. While it is well known that Quartz crystal microbalances do not work well for PLD of oxide materials it can be used for the deposition of MAPLE materials. However, with rastered laser beams the tooling factor becomes a dynamic number making interpretation of final thickness potentially difficult without careful pre-calibration. Another serious issue with the initial MAPLE process was related to the use of UV lasers such as an excimer operating at 193- or 248-nm or frequency tripled, Nd:YAG lasers at 355 nm. These lasers have high energy per photon (between about 6.4 to 3.5 eV) which can lead to a variety of deleterious photochemical mechanisms that can damage the polymer chains or organic structure. Such mechanisms can be direct photo-decomposition by photochemical bond breaking and photothermal effects. Alternative lasers, such as a Er:YAG laser operating at 2.9 microns produce photons with energy of ˜0.43 eV. Such longer wavelength lasers have been used for the IR-MAPLE process and may be very useful for future MAPLE systems. A third issue with the initial approach to MAPLE was that the process did not lend itself easily to growing multilayer films. Most standard pulsed laser deposition tools have "multi-target" carousels that allow for easy target changes and multilayer film growth. This is true for sputtering, MBE

  8. Lasers of All Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcou, Philippe; Forget, Sébastien Robert-Philip, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    * Introduction * The Laser in All Its Forms * Gas lasers * Dye lasers * Solid-state lasers * Lasers for Every Taste * The rise of lasers * Lasers of all sizes * The colors of the rainbow... and beyond * Shorter and shorter lasers * Increasingly powerful lasers * Lasers: A Universal Tool? * Cutting, welding, and cleaning * Communicating * Treating illnesses * Measuring * Supplying energy? * Entertaining * Understanding * Conclusion

  9. Characterization and antibacterial functions of Ag-TiO2 and W-TiO2 nanostructured thin films prepared by sol-gel/laser-induced technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joya, Y. F.; Liu, Z.; Wang, T.

    2011-11-01

    A novel sol-gel/laser-induced technique (SGLIT) has been developed to form nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) based thin films with an improved antibacterial performance. TiO2 precursor films loaded with W+6 and Ag+2 ions (W-TiO2, Ag-TiO2) were prepared separately by sol-gel method and spin-coated on microscopic glass slides. As-dried films were subjected to KrF excimer laser pulses at optimized parameters to generate mesoporous anatase and rutile phases at room temperature. The anatase phase was obtained after irradiation with 10 laser pulses only at 75-85 mJ/cm2 fluence in W-TiO2 films. However, higher number of laser pulses and higher W+6 content favored the formation of rutile. Whereas Ag-TiO2 films exhibited anatase up to 200 laser pulses at the same fluence. The films were characterized by using XRD, FEG-SEM, TEM and UV-Vis spectrophotometer to investigate the crystallographic structure, phase transformation, surface morphology, film thickness and the optical properties. A crystallite size of approximately 20 nm was achieved from the anatase prepared by SGLIT. The films exhibited an enhanced antibacterial function against E-Coli cells under the UV excitation.

  10. Selective area in situ conversion of Si (0 0 1) hydrophobic to hydrophilic surface by excimer laser irradiation in hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Neng; Huang, Xiaohuan; Dubowski, Jan J.

    2014-09-01

    We report on a method of rapid conversion of a hydrophobic to hydrophilic state of an Si (0 0 1) surface irradiated with a relatively low number of pulses of an excimer laser. Hydrophilic Si (0 0 1), characterized by the surface contact angle (CA) of near 15°, is fabricated following irradiation with either KrF or ArF excimer lasers of hydrophobic samples (CA ˜ 75°) immersed in a 0.01% H2O2/H2O solution. The chemical and structural analysis carried with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements confirmed the formation of OH-terminated Si (0 0 1) surface with no detectable change in the surface morphology of the laser-irradiated material. To investigate the efficiency of this laser-induced hydrophilization process, we demonstrate a selective area immobilization of biotin-conjugated fluorescein-stained nanospheres outside of the laser-irradiated area. The results demonstrate the potential of the method for the fabrication of biosensing architectures and advancements of the Si-based microfluidic device technology.

  11. Laser microphone

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2000-11-14

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  12. Numerical analysis of excimer laser-induced breakdown of Kr gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamam, Kholoud A.; Elsayed, Khaled A.; Gamal, Yosr E. E.

    2017-03-01

    The present paper displays a numerical study on the role of electron dynamics in relation to the dependence of the threshold intensity on the pressure in the breakdown of gases by laser radiation. The analysis aimed to find out the origin of the steep slope observed in the measurements of threshold intensity against gas pressure in the breakdown of Kr induced by an excimer laser source (Opt. Commun. 13:66-68, 1). The experiment was carried out using wavelength 248 nm and pulse width of 18 ns for a gas pressure range 4.5-300 torr. The investigation centered on an adaptation of our previously developed electron cascade model given in Evans and Gamal (J. Phys. D Appl. Phys. 13:1447-1458, 2). This model solves numerically a time-dependent energy equation simultaneously with a set of rate equations that describe the change of the population of the formed excited states. The modifications introduced into the model the realistic structure of the krypton gas atom as well as electron diffusion as a loss process to inspect the experimentally tested low-pressure regime. A computer program is undertaken to determine the breakdown threshold intensity as a function of gas pressure. Reasonable agreement is obtained between the calculated thresholds and measured ones, corresponding to the examined pressure range. This agreement validates the applicability of the model. The relationship between the role of the physical mechanisms and gas pressure is studied by analyzing the EEDF and its parameters at selected pressure values that cover the experimentally tested range. The result of this study clarified that electron diffusion out of the focal region is responsible for the steep slope of the threshold intensities for pressures <75 torr. For higher pressures (75-300 torr), collisional excitation of ground-state atoms followed by their ionization via multiphoton and collisional processes acts to convert the Kr gas in the interaction region into the state of breakdown. Investigation of

  13. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  14. Laser sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatenko, A. A.; Revina, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    The review is devoted to the major advances in laser sampling. The advantages and drawbacks of the technique are considered. Specific features of combinations of laser sampling with various instrumental analytical methods, primarily inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, are discussed. Examples of practical implementation of hybrid methods involving laser sampling as well as corresponding analytical characteristics are presented. The bibliography includes 78 references.

  15. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO{sub 2}: The effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M.; Powell, Amber L.; Mitchell, Deborah G.; Sevy, Eric T.

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO{sub 2} and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm{sup −1}) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E′ = ∼41 000 cm{sup −1} was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S{sub 1}→S{sub 0}*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO{sub 2} via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO{sub 2} using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO{sub 2} were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E′), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E′) was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E′) and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E′) and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E′). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  16. CW laser pumped emerald laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Lai, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    A CW laser-pumped emerald laser is reported. A 34 percent output power slope efficiency is observed with longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity. The laser has been tuned from 728.8 to 809.0 nm. Losses in emerald are larger than those of alexandrite determined in a similar cavity. The present data also indicate that the excited state absorption minimum is shifted from that of alexandrite. 13 references.

  17. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  18. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  19. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  20. Rotationally resolved IR-diode laser studies of ground-state CO2 excited by collisions with vibrationally excited pyridine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremy A; Kim, Kilyoung; Mayhew, Maurine; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2008-03-27

    Relaxation of highly vibrationally excited pyridine (C5NH5) by collisions with carbon dioxide has been investigated using diode laser transient absorption spectroscopy. Vibrationally hot pyridine (E' = 40,660 cm(-1)) was prepared by 248 nm excimer laser excitation followed by rapid radiationless relaxation to the ground electronic state. Pyridine then collides with CO2, populating the high rotational CO2 states with large amounts of translational energy. The CO2 nascent rotational population distribution of the high-J (J = 58-80) tail of the 00(0)0 state was probed at short times following the excimer laser pulse to measure rate constants and probabilities for collisions populating these CO2 rotational states. Doppler spectroscopy was used to measure the CO2 recoil velocity distribution for J = 58-80 of the 00(0)0 state. The energy-transfer distribution function, P(E,E'), from E' - E approximately 1300-7000 cm(-1) was obtained by re-sorting the state-indexed energy-transfer probabilities as a function of DeltaE. P(E,E') is fit to an exponential or biexponential function to determine the average energy transferred in a single collision between pyridine and CO2. Also obtained are fit parameters that can be compared to previously studied systems (pyrazine, C6F6, methylpyrazine, and pyrimidine/CO2). Although the rotational and translational temperatures that describe pyridine/CO2 energy transfer are similar to previous systems, the energy-transfer probabilities are much smaller. P(E,E') fit parameters for pyridine/CO2 and the four previously studied systems are compared to various donor molecular properties. Finally, P(E,E') is analyzed in the context of two models, one indicating that P(E,E') shape is primarily determined by the low-frequency out-of-plane donor vibrational modes, and the other that indicates that P(E,E') shape can be determined from how the donor molecule final density of states changes with DeltaE.

  1. Micromachining of optically transparent materials by laser ablation of a solution containing pyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Akira; Niino, Hiroyuki; Wang, Jun

    2001-01-01

    Optically transparent materials such as fused silica, quartz crystal, calcium fluoride, and fluorocarbon polymer were etched upon irradiation of organic solution containing pyrene with a conventional KrF or XeCl excimer laser. Threshold fluences for etching were 240 mJ/cm2 for fused silica, 330 mJ/cm2 for quartz crystal, 740 mJ/cm2 for calcium fluoride, and 45 mJ/cm2 for fluorocarbon polymer. These threshold values were remarkably low compared with those of direct ablation by using conventional lasers. Their etch rates remarkably depended on a concentration of pyrene: the etch rate became higher as the pyrene concentration increased. It means that pyrene molecules play an important role in this process. The mechanisms for this process is discussed by cyclic multiphotonic absorption of pyrene in the excited states, thermal relaxation, and formation of super-heated solution. As the results suggest, the process is based on the combination of two physical processes in the interface between the transparent materials and the liquid: one is a heating process by a super-heated liquid and the other is an attacking process by a high temperature and pressure vapor. The mechanism is also referred to thermal properties of materials.

  2. Laser Raman diagnostics in subsonic and supersonic turbulent jet diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, T. S.; Wehrmeyer, J. A.; Pitz, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) spontaneous vibrational Raman scattering combined with laser-induced predissociative fluorescence (LIPF) is developed for temperature and multi-species concentration measurements. Simultaneous measurements of temperature, major species (H2, O2, N2, H2O), and minor species (OH) concentrations are made with a 'single' narrow band KrF excimer laser in subsonic and supersonic lifted turbulent hydrogen-air diffusion flames. The UV Raman system is calibrated with a flat-flame diffusion burner operated at several known equivalence ratios from fuel-lean to fuel-rich. Temperature measurements made by the ratio of Stokes/anti-Stokes signal and by the ideal gas law are compared. The single shot measurement precision for concentration and temperature measurement is 5 to 10 pct. Calibration constants and bandwidth factors are determined from the flat burner measurements and used in a data reduction program to arrive at temperature and species concentration measurements. These simultaneous measurements of temperature and multi-species concentrations allow a better understanding of the complex turbulence-chemistry interactions and provide information for the input and validation of CFD models.

  3. Pulsed laser photolysis study of the reaction between O(3P) and HO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravishankara, A. R.; Wine, P. H.; Nicovich, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that bimolecular reactions involving two free radicals are of great interest because both reactants have unpaired electrons and hence could interact at distances longer than those typical of radical-molecule encounters. A method based on laser photolysis is being developed to produce selectively free radicals in the homogeneous gas phase. This is to be done in such a way as to isolate the reaction of interest and subsequently follow the course of the reaction using spectroscopic techniques. The present investigation is concerned with a study in which the rate coefficient for the reaction of O(3P) with HO2, has been measured at N2 pressures ranging from 10 to 500 torr, taking into account the reaction O(3P)+HO2 yields OH-O2. In the described study, O(3P) and HO2 were produced by cophotolysis of O3 and H2O2 in N2 at 248.5 nm using a KrF excimer laser.

  4. Laser ablated coupling structures for stacked optical interconnections on printed circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickx, Nina; Van Steenberge, Geert; Geerinck, Peter; Van Erps, Jürgen; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Daele, Peter

    2006-04-01

    Laser ablation is presented as a versatile technology that can be used for the definition of arrays of multimode waveguides and coupling structures in a stacked two layer optical structure, integrated on a printed circuit board (PCB). The optical material, Truemode Backplane TM Polymer, is fully compatible with standard PCB manufacturing and shows excellent ablation properties. A KrF excimer laser is used for the ablation of both waveguides and coupling structures into the optical layer. The stacking of individual optical layers containing waveguides, that guide the light in the plane of the optical layer, and coupling structures, that provide out-of-plane coupling and coupling between different optical layers, is very interesting since it allows us to increase the integration density and routing possibilities and limit the number of passive components that imply a certain loss. Experimental results are presented, and surface roughness and profile measurements are performed on the structured elements for further characterization. Numerical simulations are presented on the tolerance on the angle of the coupling structures and the influence of tapering on the coupling efficiency of the waveguides.

  5. Inspection of transparent polymers by photothermal detection of ultraviolet-laser generated thermal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickmeier, Achim; Bahners, Thomas; Schollmeyer, Eckhard

    1991-11-01

    The concept of photothermal wave imaging has been adapted to the nondestructive inspection of transparent polymeric samples by specific generation of thermal waves. Utilization of light sources according to the absorption properties of the material secured pure surface heating which is necessary for sensible measurements. Thickness profiles of thin films made of poly(ethylene terephthalate), which are transparent in the visible spectrum, could be measured using a pulsed KrF laser. Examples for the nondestructive inspection of complex textile samples such as coated fabrics are presented.The photothermal analysis (PTA) of optically generated thermal waves is a powerful tool for nondestructive, contactless inspection and evaluation of intrinsic properties of a sample.1,2 The method has been used for the observation of dynamic processes in adhesives, for the inspection of coatings on metal and of carbon fiber composites. A modulated light source, e.g., a chopped HeNe- or Ar+ laser, is used for local, modulated heating at the sample's surface resulting in a time- and space-dependent temperature modulation which propagates through the material. In the case of a homogeneous layer heated only in a small volume at the surface the solution of the heat diffusion equation gives a heavily damped thermal wave T(x,y,z;t). In a one-dimensional model3 only the direction z perpendicular to the surface is considered and we obtain

  6. Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH in the exhaust of a bi-propellant thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Phillip H.; Clemens, N. T.; Makel, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of the hydroxyl radical has been performed on the flow produced by the exhaust of a subscale H2/O2 fueled bi-propellant rocket engine. Measurements were made to test the feasibility of OH (0,0) and (3,0) excitation strategies by using injection seeded XeCl and KrF excimer lasers, respectively. The flow is produced with hydrogen and oxygen reacting at a combustor chamber pressure of 5 atm which then exhausts to the ambient. The hydroxyl concentration in the exhaust flow is approximately 8 percent. Fluorescence images obtained by pumping the Q1(3) transition in the (0,0) band exhibited very high signals but also showed the effect of laser beam absorption. To obtain images when pumping the P1(8) transition in the (3,0) band it was necessary to use exceptionally fast imaging optics and unacceptably high intensifier gains. The result was single-shot images which displayed a signal-to-noise ratio of order unity or less when measured on a per pixel basis.

  7. Pulsed Laser Deposition of BaCe(sub 0.85)Y(sub 0.15)0(sub 3) FILMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.; Sayir, A.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to grow nanostructured BaCe(sub 0.85)Y(sub 0.15)0(sub 3) films. The objective is to enhance protonic conduction by reduction of membrane thickness. Sintered samples and laser targets were prepared by sintering BaCe(sub 0.85)Y(sub 0.15)O(sub 3) powders derived by solid state synthesis. Films 2 to 6 m thick were deposited by KrF excimer laser on Si and porous Al2O3 substrates. Nanocrystalline films were fabricated at deposition temperatures of 600-800 C deg at O2 pressure of 30 mTorr and laser fluence of 1.2 J/cm square. Films were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and electrical impedance spectroscopy. Dense single phase BaCe(sub 0.85)Y((sub 0.15) 0(sub 3) films with a columnar growth morphology is observed, preferred crystal growth was found to be dependent upon deposition temperature and substrate type. Electrical conductivity of bulk samples produced by solid state sintering and thin film samples were measured over a temperature range of 100 C deg to 900 C deg in moist argon. Electrical conduction of the fabricated films was 1 to 4 orders of magnitude lower than the sintered bulk samples. With respect to the film growth direction, activation energy for electrical conduction is 3 times higher in the perpendicular direction than the parallel direction.

  8. Biocavity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    2000-10-05

    Laser technology has advanced dramatically and is an integral part of today's healthcare delivery system. Lasers are used in the laboratory analysis of human blood samples and serve as surgical tools that kill, burn or cut tissue. Recent semiconductor microtechnology has reduced the size o f a laser to the size of a biological cell or even a virus particle. By integrating these ultra small lasers with biological systems, it is possible to create micro-electrical mechanical systems that may revolutionize health care delivery.

  9. Laser apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Owen; Stogran, Edmund M.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus is described wherein an active laser element, such as the disc of a face-pumped laser, is mounted in a housing such that the weight of the element is supported by glass spheres which fill a chamber defined in the housing between the walls of the housing and the edges of the laser element. The uniform support provided by the spheres enable the chamber and the pump side of the laser element to be sealed without affecting the alignment or other optical properties of the laser element. Cooling fluid may be circulated through the sealed region by way of the interstices between the spheres. The spheres, and if desired also the cooling fluid may contain material which absorbs radiation at the wavelength of parasitic emissions from the laser element. These parasitic emissions enter the spheres through the interface along the edge surface of the laser element and it is desirable that the index of refraction of the spheres and cooling fluid be near the index of refraction of the laser element. Thus support, cooling, and parasitic suppression functions are all accomplished through the use of the arrangement.

  10. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  11. Multimegajoule laser design. [Glass lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, K.R.; Ozarski, R.G.; Hagen, W.F.; Holzrichtr, J.F.

    1985-08-01

    New technologies make multimegajoule glass lasers economically feasible. We have devised new laser architectures using harmonic switchout, target-plane holographic injection, phase conjugation, continuous apodization, and higher amplifier efficiencies. Our plan for building a multimegajoule laser for a recurring cost under $300 million relies on the following manufacturing economies of scale: high-volume glass production, rapid harmonic-crystal growth, capacitor sizing and packing to increase energy capacity, and part standardization.

  12. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire—KrF laser. Part 2. Accumulation of plasma electrons and electric discharge control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Mesyats, Gennadii A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, Igor V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2013-04-01

    The problem of the production of extended (~1 m) plasma channels is studied in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated laser pulses of UV radiation, which are a superposition of a subpicosecond USP train amplified in a regenerative KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator and a quasi-stationary lasing pulse. The USPs possess a high (0.2-0.3 TW) peak power and efficiently ionise oxygen molecules due to multiphoton ionisation, and the quasi-stationary lasing pulse, which has a relatively long duration (~100 ns), maintains the electron density at a level ne = (3-5) × 1014 cm—3 by suppressing electron attachment to oxygen. Experiments in laser triggering of high-voltage electric discharges suggest that the use of combined pulses results in a significant lowering of the breakdown threshold and enables controlling the discharge trajectory with a higher efficiency in comparison with smooth pulses. It was shown that controlled breakdowns may develop with a delay of tens of microseconds relative to the laser pulse, which is many orders of magnitude greater than the lifetime of free electrons in the laser-induced plasma. We propose a mechanism for this breakdown, which involves speeding-up of the avalanche ionisation of the air by negative molecular oxygen ions with a low electron binding energy (~0.5 eV) and a long lifetime (~1 ms), which are produced upon cessation of the laser pulse.

  13. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency and the like, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  14. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  15. Co Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    newsletter setvice covering the moj-t recent research findings in 25 areas of industrial, technological , and sociological interest— invaluable information...service will be backdated to furnish you microfiche of reports issued earlier. Because of contractual arrangements with several Special Technology ...pressure electrical CO laser and, thereby, to develop the technology for high pres- sure, scalable, electric CO lasers exhibiting properties of

  16. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2008-08-19

    A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

  17. Laser Materials and Laser Spectroscopy - A Satellite Meeting of IQEC '88

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhijiang; Zhang, Zhiming

    1989-03-01

    Highly Excited Vibrational State * Investigation of the Stark Effect in Xenon Autoionizing Rydberg Series with the Use of Coherent Tunable XUV Radiation * Laser Spectroscopy of Autoionising 5 dnf J = 4.5 Rydberg Series of Ba I * Resonance Photoionization Spectroscopy of Atoms: Autoionization and Highly Excited States of Kr and U * Stark Spectra of Strontium and Calcium Atoms * Observation of Bidirectional Stimulated Radiation at 330 nm, 364 nm and 718 nm with 660 nm Laser Pumping in Sodium Vapour * Study of Molecular Rydberg States and their Discriminations in Na2 * The Measurement of the High Excited Spectra of Samarium by using Stepwise Laser Excitation Method * Product Analysis in the Reaction of the Two-photon Excited Xe(5p56p) States with Freons * Photoionization Spectra of Ca and Sr Atoms above the Classical Field-ionization Threshold * Effect of Medium Background on the Hydrogen Spectrum * Photoemission and Photoelectron Spectra from Autoionizing Atoms in Strong Laser Field * Natural Radiative Lifetime Measurements of High-lying States of Samarium * Two-step Laser Excitation of nf Rydberg States in Neutral Al and Observation of Stark Effect * Measurements of Excited Spectra of the Refractory Metal Elements using Discharge Synchronized with the Laser Pulse * Multiphoton Ionization of Atomic Lead at 1.06μ * Kinetic Processes in the Electron-beam pumped KrF Laser * Laser-induced Fluorescence of Zn2 Excimer * Calculation of Transition Intensity in Heteronuclear Dimer NaK: Comparison with Experiment * Laser-induced Fluorescence of CCl2 Carbene * Study of Multiphoton Ionization Spectrum of Benzene and Two-photon Absorption Cross Section * Dicke Narrowing of N2O Linewidth Perturbed by N2 at 10 μm Band * Polyatomic Molecular Ions Studied by Laser Photodissociation Spectroscopy * Transverse-optically Pumped Ultraviolet S2 Laser * Multiphoton Ionization of Propanal by High Power Laser * UV MPI Mass Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Photodissociation of SO2 * Multiphoton

  18. High throughput laser processing

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2016-12-27

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  19. Comparing study of subpicosecond and nanosecond wet etching of fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vass, Cs.; Sebők, D.; Hopp, B.

    2006-04-01

    The effectiveness of the laser induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) of fused silica produced by subpicosecond (600 fs) and nanosecond (30 ns) KrF excimer laser pulses (248 nm) was studied. Fused silica plates were the transparent targets, and naphthalene-methyl-methacrylate ( c = 0.85, 1.71 M) and pyrene-acetone ( c = 0.4 M) solutions were used as liquid absorbents. We did not observe etching using 600 fs laser pulses, in contrast with the experiments at 30 ns, where etched holes were found. The threshold fluences of the LIBWE at nanosecond pulses were found to be in the range of 360-450 mJ cm -2 depending on the liquid absorbers and their concentrations. On the basis of the earlier results the LIBWE procedure can be explain by the thermal heating of the quartz target and the high-pressure bubble formation in the liquid. According to the theories, these bubbles hit and damage the fused silica surface. The pressure on the irradiated quartz can be derived from the snapshots of the originating and expanding bubbles recorded by fast photographic setup. We found that the bubble pressure at 460 mJ cm -2 fluence value was independent of the pulse duration (600 fs and 30 ns) using pyrene-acetone solution, while using naphthalene-methyl-methacrylate solutions this pressure was 4, 5 times higher at 30 ns pulses than it was at 600 fs pulses. According to the earlier studies, this result refers to that the pressure should be sufficiently high to remove a thin layer from the quartz surface using pyrene-acetone solution. These facts show that the thermal and chemical phenomena in addition to the mechanical effects also play important role in the LIBWE procedure.

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering study of organic pigments using silver and gold nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, E.; Trusso, S.; Ponterio, R. C.

    2013-05-01

    The identification of pigments used in ancient times represents an interesting task in order to discriminate a production of a precise geographic area or to trace out the ancient commercial networks. Conventional micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS), being a non-destructiveness technique, has been largely used for the analysis of dyes. Nevertheless several pigments, especially of organic origin, show weak Raman activity beside a strong a fluorescence that prevents their identification. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can address such difficulties. The presence of noble metal nanoparticles induces a giant amplification of the Raman signal beside the fluorescence quenching. In this work we present the use of gold and silver nanoparticles to enhance the Raman signal of some commercial red organic dyes: bazilwood, dragon's blood, carmine and madder lake. The nanoparticles were prepared adopting two approaches: (1) ablating metallic targets in water using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm and (2) depositing the nanoparticles on glass substrates by means of a KrF excimer laser ablation process, performed in a controlled argon atmosphere.

  1. Laser goniometer

    DOEpatents

    Fairer, George M.; Boernge, James M.; Harris, David W.; Campbell, DeWayne A.; Tuttle, Gene E.; McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1993-01-01

    The laser goniometer is an apparatus which permits an operator to sight along a geologic feature and orient a collimated lamer beam to match the attitude of the feature directly. The horizontal orientation (strike) and the angle from horizontal (dip), are detected by rotary incremental encoders attached to the laser goniometer which provide a digital readout of the azimuth and tilt of the collimated laser beam. A microprocessor then translates the square wave signal encoder outputs into an ASCII signal for use by data recording equipment.

  2. Laser propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rom, F. E.; Putre, H. A.

    1972-01-01

    The use of an earth-based high-power laser beam to provide energy for earth-launched rocket vehicle is investigated. The laser beam energy is absorbed in an opaque propellant gas and is converted to high-specific-impulse thrust by expanding the heated propellant to space by means of a nozzle. This laser propulsion scheme can produce specific impulses of several thousand seconds. Payload to gross-weight fractions about an order of magnitude higher than those for conventional chemical earth-launched vehicles appear possible. There is a potential for a significant reduction in cost per payload mass in earth orbit.

  3. Explosive laser

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Davis, W.C.; Sullivan, J.A.

    1975-09-01

    This patent relates to a laser system wherein reaction products from the detonation of a condensed explosive expand to form a gaseous medium with low translational temperature but high vibration population. Thermal pumping of the upper laser level and de-excitation of the lower laser level occur during the expansion, resulting in a population inversion. The expansion may be free or through a nozzle as in a gas-dynamic configuration. In one preferred embodiment, the explosive is such that its reaction products are CO$sub 2$ and other species that are beneficial or at least benign to CO$sub 2$ lasing. (auth)

  4. [Laser myringotomy].

    PubMed

    Hassmann-Poznańska, Elzbieta; Skotnicka, Bozena

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was assessment of the qualities of laser-assisted myringotomy (LAM) as a treatment for acute and secretory otitis media. Laser-assisted myringotomy was performed on 65 children (113 ears) mean age 6.2 years diagnosed with secretory otitis media (80%), recurrent secretory otitis media (11%) and acute otitis media (9%). Myringotomy was performed under general anesthesia using the OtoLAM device (ESC/Sharplan, Israel). In 64 ears pressure equalisation tubes were inserted after fenestration of the tympanic membrane with laser. Adenoidectomy alone or with tonsillectomy was performed at the same time in 51 cases. Laser tympanostomies remained patent for 7-32 days. All tympanostomies healed with no noticeable scarring. LAM appears to be a safe, and easy to performed, alternative technique in the treatment of otitis media.

  5. Laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, W.A.; Boskma, P.

    1980-12-01

    Unrestricted laser fusion offers nations an opportunity to circumvent arms control agreements and develop thermonuclear weapons. Early laser weapons research sought a clean radiation-free bomb to replace the fission bomb, but this was deceptive because a fission bomb was needed to trigger the fusion reaction and additional radioactivity was induced by generating fast neutrons. As laser-implosion experiments focused on weapons physics, simulating weapons effects, and applications for new weapons, the military interest shifted from developing a laser-ignited hydrogen bomb to more sophisticated weapons and civilian applications for power generation. Civilian and military research now overlap, making it possible for several countries to continue weapons activities and permitting proliferation of nuclear weapons. These countries are reluctant to include inertial confinement fusion research in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. 16 references. (DCK)

  6. Laser barometer

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, K.R.; Shiels, D.; Rash, T.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes an invention of a pressure measuring instrument which uses laser radiation to sense the pressure in an enclosed environment by means of measuring the change in refractive index of a gas - which is pressure dependent.

  7. Laser Cutting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    lasers that are optically modified to produce high beam quality at reduced power levels for precision drilling and trepanning. * Nd:YAG lasers with...a smooth, dross-free cut face while the marking consists of a series of precisely placed shallow pits where surface finish and dross are not usually...neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) pulsed cutting data because the technique is considered vital in meeting the detailed precision cutting

  8. Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Amoco Laser Company, a subsidiary of Amoco Corporation, has developed microlasers for the commercial market based on a JPL concept for optical communications over interplanetary distances. Lasers emit narrow, intense beams of light or other radiation. The beams transmit communication signals, drill, cut or melt materials or remove diseased body tissue. The microlasers cover a broad portion of the spectrum, and performance is improved significantly. Current applications include medical instrumentation, color separation equipment, telecommunications, etc.

  9. Laser Angioplasty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The principal method of dealing with coronary artery blockage is bypass surgery. A non-surgical alternative available to some patients is balloon angioplasty. For several years, medical researchers have been exploring another alternative that would help a wider circle of patients than the balloon treatment and entail less risk than bypass surgery. A research group is on the verge of an exciting development: laser angioplasty with a 'cool' type of laser, called an excimer laser, that does not damage blood vessel walls and offers non-surgical cleansing of clogged arteries with extraordinary precision. The system is the Dymer 200+ Excimer Laser Angioplasty System, developed by Advanced Intraventional Systems. Used in human clinical tests since 1987, the system is the first fully integrated 'cool' laser capable of generating the requisite laser energy and delivering the energy to target arteries. Thirteen research hospitals in the U.S. have purchased Dymer 200+ systems and used them in clinical trials in 121 peripheral and 555 coronary artery cases. The success rate in opening blocked coronary arteries is 85 percent, with fewer complications than in balloon angioplasty. Food and Drug Administration approval for the system is hoped for in the latter part of 1990. * Advanced Intraventional Systems became Spectranetics in 1994 and discontinued the product.

  10. Laser optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weijian; Adair Gerke, Stephen; Wei Ng, Kar; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the interaction between optical field and mechanical motion. So far, this interaction has relied on the detuning between a passive optical resonator and an external pump laser. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator supporting the mirror of a laser and the optical field generated by the laser itself. The optically active cavity greatly enhances the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we use an electrically-pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity. We observe >550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micromechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical, and correspondingly a 23 nm laser wavelength sweep. In addition to its immediate applications as a high-speed wavelength-swept source, this scheme also offers a new approach for integrated on-chip sensors. PMID:26333804

  11. Laser Physics and Laser Spectroscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    effect which limits the power throughout of a device; terbium qallium garnet (TGG), a Faraday isolator material; potassium niobate (KNbO 31 a nonlinear...extending the range of materials grown in fiber form. Two materials to be emphasized are terbium gallium garnet for optical isolators and potassium niobate...for doubling gallium arsenide diode lasers. References 1. R.H. Stolen, "Fiber Raman Lasers", Fiber and Integrated Optics, 3 (1980). 2. E. Ipoen and

  12. Laser therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000905.htm Laser therapy for cancer To use the sharing features ... Lasers are also used on the skin. How Laser Therapy is Used Laser therapy can be used ...

  13. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  14. Laser Physics and Laser-Tissue Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Welch, A. J.; Torres, Jorge H.; Cheong, Wai-Fung

    1989-01-01

    Within the last few years, lasers have gained increasing use in the management of cardiovascular disease, and laser angioplasty has become a widely performed procedure. For this reason, a basic knowledge of lasers and their applications is essential to vascular surgeons, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists. To elucidate some fundamental concepts regarding laser physics, we describe how laser light is generated and review the properties that make lasers useful in medicine. We also discuss beam profile and spotsize, as well as dosimetric specifications for laser angioplasty. After considering laser-tissue interaction and light propagation in tissue, we explain how the aforementioned concepts apply to direct laser angioplasty and laser-balloon angioplasty. An understanding of these issues should prove useful not only in performing laser angioplasty but in comparing the reported results of various laser applications. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1989;16:141-9) PMID:15227198

  15. Direct detection of pyridine formation by the reaction of CH (CD) with pyrrole: a ring expansion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Soorkia, Satchin; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2010-03-16

    The reaction of the ground state methylidyne radical CH (X2Pi) with pyrrole (C4H5N) has been studied in a slow flow tube reactor using Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometry coupled to quasi-continuous tunable VUV synchrotron radiation at room temperature (295 K) and 90 oC (363 K), at 4 Torr (533 Pa). Laser photolysis of bromoform (CHBr3) at 248 nm (KrF excimer laser) is used to produce CH radicals that are free to react with pyrrole molecules in the gaseous mixture. A signal at m/z = 79 (C5H5N) is identified as the product of the reaction and resolved from 79Br atoms, and the result is consistent with CH addition to pyrrole followed by Helimination. The Photoionization Efficiency curve unambiguously identifies m/z = 79 as pyridine. With deuterated methylidyne radicals (CD), the product mass peak is shifted by +1 mass unit, consistent with the formation of C5H4DN and identified as deuterated pyridine (dpyridine). Within detection limits, there is no evidence that the addition intermediate complex undergoes hydrogen scrambling. The results are consistent with a reaction mechanism that proceeds via the direct CH (CD) cycloaddition or insertion into the five-member pyrrole ring, giving rise to ring expansion, followed by H atom elimination from the nitrogen atom in the intermediate to form the resonance stabilized pyridine (d-pyridine) molecule. Implications to interstellar chemistry and planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as well as in gas-phase combustion processes, are discussed.

  16. Functionalized Antimicrobial Composite Thin Films Printing for Stainless Steel Implant Coatings.

    PubMed

    Floroian, Laura; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Badea, Mihaela; Ursutiu, Doru; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Urzica, Iuliana; Dyia, Hussien Mohammed; Bleotu, Coralia; Mihailescu, Ion N

    2016-06-09

    In this work we try to address the large interest existing nowadays in the better understanding of the interaction between microbial biofilms and metallic implants. Our aimed was to identify a new preventive strategy to control drug release, biofilm formation and contamination of medical devices with microbes. The transfer and printing of novel bioactive glass-polymer-antibiotic composites by Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation into uniform thin films onto 316 L stainless steel substrates of the type used in implants are reported. The targets were prepared by freezing in liquid nitrogen mixtures containing polymer and antibiotic reinforced with bioglass powder. The cryogenic targets were submitted to multipulse evaporation by irradiation with an UV KrF* (λ = 248 nm, τFWHM ≤ 25 ns) excimer laser source. The prepared structures were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and profilometry, before and after immersion in physiological fluids. The bioactivity and the release of the antibiotic have been evaluated. We showed that the incorporated antibiotic underwent a gradually dissolution in physiological fluids thus supporting a high local treatment efficiency. Electrochemical measurements including linear sweep voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy studies were carried out to investigate the corrosion resistance of the coatings in physiological environments. The in vitro biocompatibility assay using the MG63 mammalian cell line revealed that the obtained nanostructured composite films are non-cytotoxic. The antimicrobial effect of the coatings was tested against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strains, usually present in implant-associated infections. An anti-biofilm activity was evidenced, stronger against E. coli than the S. aureus strain. The results proved that the applied method allows for the fabrication of implantable biomaterials which shield metal ion release and possess

  17. Bioglass thin films for biomimetic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbecaru, C.; Alexandru, H. V.; Ianculescu, Adelina; Popescu, A.; Socol, G.; Sima, F.; Mihailescu, Ion

    2009-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method was used to obtain bioglass (BG) thin film coatings on titanium substrates. An UV excimer laser KrF* ( λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns) was used for the multi-pulse irradiation of the BG targets with 57 or 61 wt.% SiO 2 content (and Na 2O-K 2O-CaO-MgO-P 2O 5 oxides). The depositions were performed in oxygen atmosphere at 13 Pa and for substrates temperature of 400 °C. The PLD films displayed typical BG of 2-5 μm particulates nucleated on the film surface or embedded in. The PLD films stoichiometry was found to be the same as the targets. XRD spectra have shown, the glass coatings obtained, had an amorphous structure. One set of samples, deposited in the same conditions, were dipped in simulated body fluids (SBFs) and subsequently extracted one by one after several time intervals 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days. After washing in deionized water and drying, the surface morphology of the samples and theirs composition were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). After 3-7 days the Si content substantially decreases in the coatings and PO 43- maxima start to increase in FTIR spectra. The XRD spectra also confirm this evolution. After 14-21 days the XRD peaks show a crystallized fraction of the carbonated hydroxyapatite (HAP). The SEM micrographs show also significant changes of the films surface morphology. The coalescence of the BG droplets can be seen. The dissolution and growth processes could be assigned to the ionic exchange between BG and SBFs.

  18. Microfabricated surface designs for cell culture and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, T; Chung, D J

    1994-01-01

    Grooved and holed surfaces with a well fabricated design may serve as microsubstrates for cell culture and microreactors for diagnosis. In this study, the authors prepared chemically treated, micrometer scale grooved and holed glass surfaces by combined surface modification and ultraviolet (UV) excimer laser ablation techniques, as follows. 1) Microcell-culture substrate: Amino group attached glass surfaces, prepared by the treatment with an aminopropylsilane, were condensed with a carboxylated radical initiator. Subsequently, polyacrylamide was grafted by surface initiated radical polymerization to create a very hydrophilic surface layer. Ultraviolet excimer laser beams (KrF: 248 nm) were irradiated through a microscope onto surfaces to create grooves or holes that were 10 and 50 microns in width or diameter, respectively. The depth, depending on the irradiation light strength, ranged from a few to several tenths of a micrometer. On endothelial cell (EC) seeding, ECs adhered and grew on the bottoms of the grooved or holed surface where glass was exposed on ablation. Little cell adhesion was observed on non ablated, grafted surfaces. Endothelial cells aligned along the groove, resulting in very narrow tube like tissue formation, whereas ECs tended to form a multilayered spherical aggregate in a hole. A single cell resided in a 10 microns square hole. 2) Microreactor for diagnosis: The glass surface, treated with a fluorinated silane, was ablated to create round holes. On addition of a few microliters of water, water could be quantitatively transferred into a hole because of the water repellent characteristics of non ablated, fluorinated glass. As a model of a microreactor, enzyme reactions to affect different levels of glucose were carried out in tiny holed surfaces.

  19. Laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  20. Laser construction

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.W.; Osterhage, R.J.; Summa, K.M.

    1989-02-14

    A laser device is described comprising an elongated laser medium of crystal material having a cylindrical shape modified to have a flat face formed on one side thereof, a highly heat conducting mounting member having a flat surface on a portion thereof, the medium being mounted on the mounting member with the flat face of the medium in face-to-face relation with the flat surface on the mounting member, a heat sink member having a surface for attaching the mounting member to, a pump source including an array of laser diodes each having opposite ends and positioned in side-by-side single file relation, a second highly heat conducting mounting member having a surface on which the array of laser diodes is positioned, the second mounting member being mounted on the heat sink member wherein the array of laser diodes are in substantial alignment with the axis of the medium along the side thereof opposite from the flat face of the medium.

  1. Tunable solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerling, R.; Budgor, A.B.; Pinto, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on solid state lasers. Topics considered at the conference included transition-metal-doped lasers, line-narrowed alexandrite lasers, NASA specification, meteorological lidars, laser materials spectroscopy, laser pumped single pass gain, vibronic laser materials growth, crystal growth methods, vibronic laser theory, cross-fertilization through interdisciplinary fields, and laser action of color centers in diamonds.

  2. Temporal and spectral analysis of laser induced plasma in the ablation process of flexible printed circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryoo, Hoon C.; Kim, Seok; Hahn, Jae W.

    2008-02-01

    Flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), consisting of copper sheets laminated onto non conductive film substrates with multiple structures, are core elements in electronics with their flexibility and capability of high density 3 dimensional wiring characteristics. In laser applied FPCB processing, a better understanding of the ablation mechanism leads to precision control of the depth processing especially by monitoring of the material transition layer. For this purpose, here we investigate the temporal and spectral behavior of the plasma plum generated on the single sided structure of FPCB using the technique of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Using KrF excimer laser, the characteristic spectral emission lines of C II swan band at the wavelength of 516.5 nm and neutral copper at the wavelength range from 510 nm to 522 nm are acquired under ambient pressure in the ablation process of polyimide film and copper coated layer respectively. From a time delay from 50 ns to 4.05 μs from the beginning of the laser pulse, the temporal profiles of the spectral intensity are obtained in steps of 200 ns, which have a tendency of exponential decrease on both C II and neutral copper. In particular, we concentrate our attention on the temporal intensity behavior of the Bremsstrahlung continuum emission that decides the proper set of detection time window, by which the monitoring sensitivity of LIBS is determined. Finally, using the information of the temporal analysis for each molecular, atomic, and continuum emission, the transition layer between polyimide and copper film is distinguished by their characteristic peak information.

  3. Laser cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.

    2014-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in our understanding of the cosmos, which in turn points to even deeper questions to be further addressed. Concurrently the laser technology has undergone dramatic revolutions, providing exciting opportunity for science applications. History has shown that the symbiosis between direct observations and laboratory investigation is instrumental in the progress of astrophysics. We believe that this remains true in cosmology. Current frontier phenomena related to particle astrophysics and cosmology typically involve one or more of the following conditions: (1) extremely high energy events;(2) very high density, high temperature processes; (3) super strong field environments. Laboratory experiments using high intensity lasers can calibrate astrophysical observations, investigate underlying dynamics of astrophysical phenomena, and probe fundamental physics in extreme limits. In this article we give an overview of the exciting prospect of laser cosmology. In particular, we showcase its unique capability of investigating frontier cosmology issues such as cosmic accelerator and quantum gravity.

  4. Laser barometer

    DOEpatents

    Abercrombie, Kevin R.; Shiels, David; Rash, Tim

    2001-02-06

    A pressure measuring instrument that utilizes the change of the refractive index of a gas as a function of pressure and the coherent nature of a laser light to determine the barometric pressure within an environment. As the gas pressure in a closed environment varies, the index of refraction of the gas changes. The amount of change is a function of the gas pressure. By illuminating the gas with a laser light source, causing the wavelength of the light to change, pressure can be quantified by measuring the shift in fringes (alternating light and dark bands produced when coherent light is mixed) in an interferometer.

  5. Excimer lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Hess, L. D.; Stephens, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation into the possibility of achieving CW discharge pumped excimer laser oscillation is reported. Detailed theoretical modeling of capillary discharge pumping of the XeF and KXe and K2 excimer systems was carried out which predicted the required discharge parameters for reaching laser threshold on these systems. Capillary discharge pumping of the XeF excimer system was investigated experimentally. The experiments revealed a lower excimer level population density than predicted theoretically by about an order of magnitude. The experiments also revealed a fluorine consumption problem in the discharge in agreement with theory.

  6. Graviton laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the possibility of creating a graviton laser. The lasing medium would be a system of contained, ultra cold neutrons. Ultra cold neutrons are a quantum mechanical system that interacts with gravitational fields and with the phonons of the container walls. It is possible to create a population inversion by pumping the system using the phonons. We compute the rate of spontaneous emission of gravitons and the rate of the subsequent stimulated emission of gravitons. The gain obtainable is directly proportional to the density of the lasing medium and the fraction of the population inversion. The applications of a graviton laser would be interesting.

  7. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  8. Enhanced photocatalytic efficiency in zirconia buffered n-NiO/p-NiO single crystalline heterostructures by nanosecond laser treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Molaei, R.; Bayati, M. R.; Alipour, H. M.; Nori, S.; Narayan, J.

    2013-06-21

    We report the formation of NiO based single crystalline p-n junctions with enhanced photocatalytic activity induced by pulsed laser irradiation. The NiO epilayers were grown on Si(001) substrates buffered with cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (c-YSZ) by using pulsed laser deposition. The NiO/c-YSZ/Si heterostructures were subsequently laser treated by 5 pulses of KrF excimer laser (pulse duration = 25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} s) at lower energies. Microstructural studies, conducted by X-ray diffraction ({theta}-2{theta} and {phi} techniques) and high resolution transmission electron microscope, showed a cube-on-cube epitaxial relationship at the c-YSZ/Si interface; the epitaxial relationship across the NiO/c-YSZ interface was established as NiO<111 > Double-Vertical-Line Double-Vertical-Line c-YSZ<001> and in-plane NiO<110> Double-Vertical-Line Double-Vertical-Line c-YSZ<100>. Electron microscopy studies showed that the interface between the laser annealed and the pristine region as well as the NiO/c-YSZ interface was atomically sharp and crystallographically continuous. The formation of point defects, namely oxygen vacancies and NiO, due to the coupling of the laser photons with the NiO epilayers was confirmed by XPS. The p-type electrical characteristics of the pristine NiO epilayers turned to an n-type behavior and the electrical conductivity was increased by one order of magnitude after laser treatment. Photocatalytic activity of the pristine (p-NiO/c-YSZ/Si) and the laser-annealed (n-NiO/p-NiO/c-YSZ/Si) heterostructures were assessed by measuring the decomposition rate of 4-chlorophenol under UV light. The photocatalytic reaction rate constants were determined to be 0.0059 and 0.0092 min{sup -1} for the as-deposited and the laser-treated samples, respectively. The enhanced photocatalytic efficiency was attributed to the suppressed charge carrier recombination in the NiO based p-n junctions and higher electrical conductivity. Besides, the oxygen vacancies

  9. Excimer lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Hess, L. D.; Stephens, R. R.; Pepper, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a two-year investigation into the possibility of developing continuous wave excimer lasers are reported. The program included the evaluation and selection of candidate molecular systems and discharge pumping techniques. The K Ar/K2 excimer dimer molecules and the xenon fluoride excimer molecule were selected for study; each used a transverse and capillary discharges pumping technique. Experimental and theoretical studies of each of the two discharge techniques applied to each of the two molecular systems are reported. Discharge stability and fluorine consumption were found to be the principle impediments to extending the XeF excimer laser into the continuous wave regime. Potassium vapor handling problems were the principal difficulty in achieving laser action on the K Ar/K2 system. Of the four molecular systems and pumping techniques explored, the capillary discharge pumped K Ar/K2 system appears to be the most likely candidate for demonstrating continuous wave excimer laser action primarily because of its predicted lower pumping threshold and a demonstrated discharge stability advantage.

  10. Laser Balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical Technology, Incorporated developed a fully automatic laser machining process that allows more precise balancing removes metal faster, eliminates excess metal removal and other operator induced inaccuracies, and provides significant reduction in balancing time. Manufacturing costs are reduced as a result.

  11. Superconducting Thin Films of Bismuth-Strontium Calcium-Copper by Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedekar, Milind Mukund

    The discovery in 1986 of a new class of copper oxide superconductors has led to the development of three major systems that exhibit superconducting properties. Among these systems, the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors offer intrinsic advantages due to the high T_ {rm c}, chemical inertness and tolerance for a range of compositions. However due to the problems in pure phase formation, thin film research on these materials has progressed more slowly than the other cuprate systems. This dissertation examines the film growth, by laser ablation, of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors and the effect of the deposition parameters such as the laser target interaction, substrate temperature, target to substrate distance, deposition and cooling pressure, target type and processing and the substrate type. CO_2 laser ablation was shown to give rise to a non-stoichiometric material transfer due to the low fluences and long pulse lengths. In situ superconducting thin films with T_{ rm c(0)}'s of 76 K could be deposited using the KrF laser at substrate temperatures of 5 ^circC to 20^circ C below melting. Lower temperatures gave rise to a mixture of 2201 and glassy phases. An increase in the target to substrate distance led to a deterioration of the electrical and structural properties of the films due to a decrease in the energy for film formation. A maximum in T_{rm c(0)} was observed at 450 mtorr as the deposition pressure was varied between 200 to 700 mtorr. Optimum oxygen incorporation could be achieved by cooling the films in high oxygen pressures and the best films were obtained with 700 torr cooling pressure. The oxygen deficiency of the hot pressed targets led to inferior properties compared to the conventionally sintered targets. The films displayed FWHM's of 1 ^circ in the omega scan and AFM studies indicated the presence of 1/2 μm grains. The microwave surface resistance of the films measured at 35 GHz showed an onset at 80 K and dropped below that of copper at 30 K. The

  12. Reduction potential of the sulfhydryl radical: Pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis studies of the formation and reactions of {sm_bullet}SH and HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}} in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Das, T.N.; Huie, R.E.; Neta, P.; Padmaja, S.

    1999-07-08

    H{sub 2}S, which is a very toxic gas, has a large number of natural and anthropogenic sources, and the safe removal of this substance has been a matter of ongoing industrial concern. Formation and reactions of the {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} and HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}}/HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}} radicals in aqueous solutions have been studied by excimer laser flash photolysis and by pulse radiolysis. Acidic H{sub 2}S solutions can be photolyzed with 193 nm laser pulses and produce a transient species with {lambda}{sub max} at 240 nm, ascribed to the {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} radical. Solutions of SH{sup {minus}} can be photolyzed also with 248 nm laser pulses to produce the {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} reacts with SH{sup {minus}} ({kappa}{sub f} = 4 {times} 10{sup 9} L/mol s, {kappa}{sub r} = 5 {times} 10{sup 5} s{sup {minus}1}) to form HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}}/HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}}, with {lambda}{sub max} at 380 nm. Both {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} and HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}}/HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}} react rapidly with O{sub 2}; the former produces SO{sub 2}{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}} ({kappa} = 5 {times} 10{sup 9} L/mol s), and the latter produces O{sub 2}{sm_bullet} ({kappa} = 4 {times} 10{sup 8} L/mol s). Both radicals react with olefinic compounds. The monomeric radical oxidizes Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 4{minus}}, SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, ClO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, and chlorpromazine. The dimeric radical is a weaker oxidant toward ferrocyanide but reduces N-methylpyridinium compounds. The reduction potential for the dimeric radical at pH 7 was determined from one-electron transfer equilibria with Mo(CN){sub 8}{sup 3{minus}} and with the 4-methoxyaniline radical cation and found to be 0.69 V vs NHE. From the equilibrium constant K = [HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}}]/[SH{sup {minus}}][{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}}] = 8 {times} 10{sup 3} L/mol, the reduction potential for ({sm_bullet}S{sup {minus

  13. Effect of excimer laser annealing on a-InGaZnO thin-film transistors passivated by solution-processed hybrid passivation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermundo, Juan Paolo; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Fujii, Mami N.; Nonaka, Toshiaki; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of excimer laser annealing (ELA) as a low temperature annealing alternative to anneal amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) passivated by a solution-processed hybrid passivation layer. Usually, a-IGZO is annealed using thermal annealing at high temperatures of up to 400 °C. As an alternative to high temperature thermal annealing, two types of ELA, XeCl (308 nm) and KrF (248 nm) ELA, are introduced. Both ELA types enhanced the electrical characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs leading to a mobility improvement of ~13 cm2 V-1 s-1 and small threshold voltage which varied from ~0-3 V. Furthermore, two-dimensional heat simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics was used to identify possible degradation sites, analyse laser heat localization, and confirm that the substrate temperature is below 50 °C. The two-dimensional heat simulation showed that the substrate temperature remained at very low temperatures, less than 30 °C, during ELA. This implies that any flexible material can be used as the substrate. These results demonstrate the large potential of ELA as a low temperature annealing alternative for already-passivated a-IGZO TFTs.

  14. Structural and biological evaluation of lignin addition to simple and silver-doped hydroxyapatite thin films synthesized by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation.

    PubMed

    Janković, A; Eraković, S; Ristoscu, C; Mihailescu Serban, N; Duta, L; Visan, A; Stan, G E; Popa, A C; Husanu, M A; Luculescu, C R; Srdić, V V; Janaćković, Dj; Mišković-Stanković, V; Bleotu, C; Chifiriuc, M C; Mihailescu, I N

    2015-01-01

    We report on thin film deposition by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation of simple hydroxyapatite (HA) or silver (Ag) doped HA combined with the natural biopolymer organosolv lignin (Lig) (Ag:HA-Lig). Solid cryogenic target of aqueous dispersions of Ag:HA-Lig composite and its counterpart without silver (HA-Lig) were prepared for evaporation using a KrF* excimer laser source. The expulsed material was assembled onto TiO2/Ti substrata or silicon wafers and subjected to physical-chemical investigations. Smooth, uniform films adherent to substratum were observed. The chemical analyses confirmed the presence of the HA components, but also evidenced traces of Ag and Lig. Deposited HA was Ca deficient, which is indicative of a film with increased solubility. Recorded X-ray Diffraction patterns were characteristic for amorphous films. Lig presence in thin films was undoubtedly proved by both X-ray Photoelectron and Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy analyses. The microbiological evaluation showed that the newly assembled surfaces exhibited an inhibitory activity both on the initial steps of biofilm forming, and on mature bacterial and fungal biofilm development. The intensity of the anti-biofilm activity was positively influenced by the presence of the Lig and/or Ag, in the case of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida famata biofilms. The obtained surfaces exhibited a low cytotoxicity toward human mesenchymal stem cells, being therefore promising candidates for fabricating implantable biomaterials with increased biocompatibility and resistance to microbial colonization and further biofilm development.

  15. Laser Photochemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    reaction due to decreased adsorption of the species on the catalytic surface. For example, i. . . 41 in the catalytic decomposition of formic acid ...over platinum (Ulmstead and Lin, 1978), the preexcitation of the gaseous formic acid molecules (by a 10 W/cm2 CW CO2 laser) resulted in a 50% increase...attention is given to selective and thermal excitation and the role of multiphonon couplings, heterogeneous catalysis , and chemical vapor deposition and

  16. Making a Laser Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Harry

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how to construct a laser level. This laser level can be made using a typical 4' (or shorter) bubble level and a small laser point. The laser unit is detachable, so the bubble level can also be used in the conventional way. However, the laser level works better than a simple bubble level. Making this inexpensive device is an…

  17. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  18. Project LASER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA formally launched Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering and Research) in March 1990, a program designed to help teachers improve science and mathematics education and to provide 'hands on' experiences. It featured the first LASER Mobile Teacher Resource Center (MTRC), is designed to reach educators all over the nation. NASA hopes to operate several MTRCs with funds provided by private industry. The mobile unit is a 22-ton tractor-trailer stocked with NASA educational publications and outfitted with six work stations. Each work station, which can accommodate two teachers at a time, has a computer providing access to NASA Spacelink. Each also has video recorders and photocopy/photographic equipment for the teacher's use. MTRC is only one of the five major elements within LASER. The others are: a Space Technology Course, to promote integration of space science studies with traditional courses; the Volunteer Databank, in which NASA employees are encouraged to volunteer as tutors, instructors, etc; Mobile Discovery Laboratories that will carry simple laboratory equipment and computers to provide hands-on activities for students and demonstrations of classroom activities for teachers; and the Public Library Science Program which will present library based science and math programs.

  19. Metal-oxide-junction, triple point cathodes in a relativistic magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, N. M.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Hoff, B. W.; Lau, Y. Y.

    2008-06-15

    Triple point, defined as the junction of metal, dielectric, and vacuum, is the location where electron emission is favored in the presence of a sufficiently strong electric field. To exploit triple point emission, metal-oxide-junction (MOJ) cathodes consisting of dielectric ''islands'' over stainless steel substrates have been fabricated. The two dielectrics used are hafnium oxide (HfO{sub x}) for its high dielectric constant and magnesium oxide (MgO) for its high secondary electron emission coefficient. The coatings are deposited by ablation-plasma-ion lithography using a KrF laser (0-600 mJ at 248 nm) and fluence ranging from 3 to 40 J/cm{sup 2}. Composition and morphology of deposited films are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, as well as x-ray diffraction. Cathodes are tested on the Michigan Electron Long-Beam Accelerator with a relativistic magnetron, at parameters V=-300 kV, I=1-15 kA, and pulse lengths of 0.3-0.5 {mu}s. Six variations of the MOJ cathode are tested, and are compared against five baseline cases. It is found that particulate formed during the ablation process improves the electron emission properties of the cathodes by forming additional triple points. Due to extensive electron back bombardment during magnetron operation, secondary electron emission also may play a significant role. Cathodes exhibit increases in current densities of up to 80 A/cm{sup 2}, and up to 15% improvement in current start up time, as compared to polished stainless steel cathodes.

  20. Biomedical properties and preparation of iron oxide-dextran nanostructures by MAPLE technique

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this work the chemical structure of dextran-iron oxide thin films was reported. The films were obtained by MAPLE technique from composite targets containing 10 wt. % dextran with 1 and 5 wt.% iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). The IONPs were synthesized by co-precipitation method. A KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τFWHM≅25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) was used for the growth of the hybrid, iron oxide NPs-dextran thin films. Results Dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles thin films were indexed into the spinel cubic lattice with a lattice parameter of 8.36 Å. The particle sized calculated was estimated at around 7.7 nm. The XPS shows that the binding energy of the Fe 2p3/2 of two thin films of dextran coated iron oxide is consistent with Fe3+ oxides. The atomic percentage of the C, O and Fe are 66.71, 32.76 and 0.53 for the films deposited from composite targets containing 1 wt.% maghemite and 64.36, 33.92 and 1.72 respectively for the films deposited from composite targets containing 5 wt.% maghemite. In the case of cells cultivated on dextran coated 5% maghemite γ-Fe2O3, the number of cells and the level of F-actin were lower compared to the other two types of thin films and control. Conclusions The dextran-iron oxide continuous thin films obtained by MAPLE technique from composite targets containing 10 wt.% dextran as well as 1 and 5 wt.% iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method presented granular surface morphology. Our data proved a good viability of Hep G2 cells grown on dextran coated maghemite thin films. Also, no changes in cells morphology were noticed under phase contrast microscopy. The data strongly suggest the potential use of iron oxide-dextran nanocomposites as a potential marker for biomedical applications. PMID:22410001

  1. Isomers of OCS{sub 2}: IR absorption spectra of OSCS and O(CS{sub 2}) in solid Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, W.-J.; Chen, H.-F.; Chou, P.-H.; Lee, Y.-P.

    2004-12-22

    Irradiation of an Ar matrix sample containing O{sub 3} and CS{sub 2} with a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm yielded new lines at 1402.1 (1404.7), 1056.2 (1052.7), and 622.3 (620.5) cm-1; numbers in parentheses correspond to species in a minor matrix site. Secondary photolysis at 308 nm diminished these lines and produced mainly OCS and SO{sub 2}. Annealing of this matrix to 30 K yielded a second set of new lines at 1824.7 and 617.8 cm-1. The first set of lines are assigned to C=S stretching, O-S stretching, and S-C stretching modes of carbon disulfide S-oxide, OSCS; and the second set of lines are assigned to C=O stretching and OCS bending modes of dithiiranone, O(CS{sub 2}), respectively, based on results of {sup 34}S- and {sup 18}O-isotopic experiments and quantum-chemical calculations. These calculations using density-functional theory (B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ) predict four stable isomers of OCS{sub 2}: O(CS{sub 2}), SSCO, OSCS, and SOCS, listed in order of increasing energy. According to calculations, O(CS{sub 2}) has a cyclic CS{sub 2} moiety and is the most stable isomer of OCS{sub 2}. OSCS is planar, with bond angles anguprOSC congruent with 111.9 deg. and anguprSCS congruent with 177.3 deg.; it is less stable than SSCO and O(CS{sub 2}) by {approx}102 and 154 kJ mol-1, respectively, and more stable than SOCS by {approx}26 kJ mol-1. Calculated vibrational wave numbers, IR intensities, {sup 34}S- and {sup 18}O-isotopic shifts for OSCS and O(CS{sub 2}) fit satisfactorily with experimental results.

  2. Ultra-Violet Induced Insulator Flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Javedani, J B; Houck, T L; Kelly, B T; Lahowe, D A; Shirk, M D; Goerz, D A

    2008-05-21

    Insulators are critical components in high-energy, pulsed power systems. It is known that the vacuum surface of the insulator will flashover when illuminated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation depending on the insulator material, insulator cone angle, applied voltage and insulator shot-history. A testbed comprised of an excimer laser (KrF, 248 nm, {approx} 2 MW/cm{sup 2}, 30 ns FWHM,), a vacuum chamber (low 1.0E-6 torr), and dc high voltage power supply (<60 kV) was assembled for insulator testing to measure the UV dose during a flashover event. Five in-house developed and calibrated fast D-Dot probes (>12 GHz, bandwidth) were embedded in the anode electrode underneath the insulator to determine the time of flashover with respect to UV arrival. A commercial energy meter were used to measure the UV fluence for each pulse. Four insulator materials High Density Polyethylene, Rexolite{reg_sign} 1400, Macor{trademark} and Mycalex with side-angles of 0, {+-}30, and {+-}45 degrees, 1.0 cm thick samples, were tested with a maximum UV fluence of 75 mJ/cm{sup 2} and at varying electrode charge (10 kV to 60 kV). This information clarified/corrected earlier published studies. A new phenomenon was observed related to the UV power level on flashover that as the UV pulse intensity was increased, the UV fluence on the insulator prior to flashover was also increased. This effect would bias the data towards higher minimum flashover fluence.

  3. Laser nitriding and laser carburizing of surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Peter

    2003-11-01

    Laser irradiation of surfaces with short pulses in reactive atmospheres (nitrogen, methane) can lead to very effective nitrification and carburization via complicated laser-surface-gas-plasma-interactions. This laser nitriding and laser carburizing and their basic underlying phenomena will be presented and partly explained by results of example materials (iron, titanium, aluminum, silicon) where nitride and carbide coatings can be formed by fast and easily by Excimer Laser, Nd:YAG laser, Free Electron Laser and also by femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. This implies laser pulse durations from the nanosecond to the femtosecond regime and wavelengths from ultra-violet to infrared. The resulting surfaces, thin films, coatings and their properties are investigated by combining Mossbauer Spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, Nanoindentation, Resonant Nuclear Reaction Analysis, and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy.

  4. Superconducting thin films of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Bedekar, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    The discovery of a new class of copper oxide superconductors has led to the development of three major systems that exhibit superconducting properties. The Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors offer intrinsic advantages due to the high [Tc], chemical inertness and tolerance for a range of compositions. However, thin film research on these materials has progressed more slowly than the other cuprate systems. This dissertation examines the film growth, by laser ablation, of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors and the effect of the deposition parameters such as the laser target interaction, substrate temperature, target to substrate distance, deposition and cooling pressure, target type and processing and the substrate type. CO[sub 2] laser ablation was shown to give rise to a non-stoichiometric material transfer due to the low fluences and long pulse lengths. In situ superconducting thin films with T[sub c(0)]'s of 76 K could be deposited using the KrF laser at substrate temperatures of 5[degrees]C to 20[degrees]C below phases. Lower temperatures gave rise to a mixture of 2201 and glassy phases. An increase in the target to substrate distance led to a deterioration of the electrical and structural properties of the films due to a decrease in the energy for film formation. A maximum in T[sub c(0)] was observed at 450 mtorr as the deposition pressure was varied between 200 to 700 mtorr. Optimum oxygen incorporation could be achieved by cooling the films in high oxygen pressures and the best films were obtained with 700 torr cooling pressure. The oxygen deficiency of the hot pressed targets led to inferior properties compared to the conventionally sintered targets. The microwave surface resistance of the films measured at 35 GHz showed an onset at 80 K and dropped below that of copper at 30 K. The study of the laser ablation process in this system revealed the presence of a stoichiometric forward directed component and a diffuse evaporation component.

  5. Laser therapy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A laser is used for many medical purposes. Because the laser beam is so small and precise, it enables ... without injuring surrounding tissue. Some uses of the laser are retinal surgery, excision of lesions, and cauterization ...

  6. Lasers in Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Described are the characteristics of the laser and its effects on the body. Discussed are examples of laser treatments, including angioplasty, ophthalmology, and dermatology. A discussion of lasers of clinical interest and their applications is presented. (YP)

  7. Laser-Driven Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of laser-driven fusion. Current research (which is classified under three main headings: laser-matter interaction processes, compression, and laser development) is also presented. (HM)

  8. Diode Laser Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Dan; Scifres, Don R.

    2005-11-01

    Contributors; 1. Monolithic phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays D. Botez; 2. High power coherent, semiconductor laser master oscillator power amplifiers and amplifier arrays D. F. Welch and D. G. Mehuys; 3. Microoptical components applied to incoherent and coherent laser arrays J. R. Leger; 4. Modeling of diode laser arrays G. R. Hadley; 5. Dynamics of coherent semiconductor laser arrays H. G. Winfuland and R. K. Defreez; 6. High average power semiconductor laser arrays and laser array packaging with an emphasis for pumping solid state lasers R. Solarz; 7. High power diode laser arrays and their reliability D. R. Scifres and H. H. Kung; 8. Strained layer quantum well heterostructure laser arrays J. J. Coleman; 9. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser arrays C. J. Chang-Hasnain; 10. Individually addressed arrays of diode lasers D. Carlin.

  9. Lasers in Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat cancer: carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) lasers, argon lasers, and neodymium: yttrium -aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) ... can be used with endoscopes. CO 2 and argon lasers can cut the skin’s surface without going ...

  10. Laser Weapons for Naval Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-27

    IPG fiber lasers , 10 kW/ fiber 7 • Output wavelength is tunable (can operate in atmospheric window) Free Electron Lasers ...Multiple kilowatts over multiple kilometers • Laser power converters can be highly efficient, > 60 % • Fiber lasers are highly compact and... lasers - Free electron lasers • Background • Laser candidates • Additional capabilities - Power beaming 3 Laser Lethality -

  11. Laser accidents: Being Prepared

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2003-01-24

    The goal of the Laser Safety Officer and any laser safety program is to prevent a laser accident from occurring, in particular an injury to a person's eyes. Most laser safety courses talk about laser accidents, causes, and types of injury. The purpose of this presentation is to present a plan for safety offices and users to follow in case of accident or injury from laser radiation.

  12. Handbook of molecular lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheo, Peter K.

    The technology and applications of molecular lasers (MLs) are examined in chapters contributed by leading experts. Topics addressed include ML emission spectra, CO2 TEA lasers, RF-discharge-excited CO2 lasers, high-energy short-pulse CO2 lasers, high-power electron-beam-controlled CO2 lasers, HF/DF chemical lasers, optically pumped FIR MLs, and transients and instabilities in FIR MLs. Extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, photographs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  13. New laser protective eyewear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLear, Mark

    1996-04-01

    Laser technology has significantly impacted our everyday life. Lasers are now used to correct your vision, clear your arteries, and are used in the manufacturing of such diverse products as automobiles, cigarettes, and computers. Lasers are no longer a research tool looking for an application. They are now an integral part of manufacturing. In the case of Class IV lasers, this explosion in laser applications has exposed thousands of individuals to potential safety hazards including eye damage. Specific protective eyewear designed to attenuate the energy of the laser beam below the maximum permissible exposure is required for Class 3B and Class IV lasers according to laser safety standards.

  14. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  15. [Laser physics].

    PubMed

    Banús Gassol, J M

    2008-11-01

    The commission of this article plunged me into doubt. First I should confess that I don't find excuse to escape this part if somebody wants to minimally deepen in the knowledge of the biological effects of this energy source. Secondly, when we talk about results, we use terms made and defined by Physics. Often we have polemics about results, and what really happens is that we don't reach agreements because we refer to different terms to explain the same observation; in conclusion we cannot understand each other because we do not know the adequate terms; for example, hypoxemia as oxygen deficit, which is true in an anemic patient as well as in a low oxygen saturation rate. In consequence, a good review of these concepts seems necessary to me. The third reason is the confusion that exists in our environment, I think sometimes of interest, about properties and effects of different types of laser. Only a minimal knowledge of physics will help us to state the scientific basis for understanding. The problems, nevertheless, accumulate due to the fact that the universe to which this article is directed is formed by urologists. What Physics education should we suppose they have? Superficial? Medium? Is it a collective with a uniform knowledge, being it whatever it is? The implication is clear. The article depth will depend on the answers to these questions. Nevertheless, the aim of the authors is to give a base enough to know what the laser is and how it acts. For that, the answer I gave to my questions is that the reader should understand the article and have enough base for, at least, reading critically the articles about laser published in urological journals.

  16. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afzal, R. S.; Dallas, J. L.; Yu, A. W.; Mamakos, W. A.; Lukemire, A.; Schroeder, B.; Malak, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), scheduled to launch in 2001, is a laser altimeter and lidar for tile Earth Observing System's (EOS) ICESat mission. The laser transmitter requirements, design and qualification test results for this space- based remote sensing instrument are presented.

  17. Studies on lasers and laser devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Siegman, A. E.; Young, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of this grant was to study lasers, laser devices, and uses of lasers for investigating physical phenomena are studied. The active projects included the development of a tunable, narrowband XUV light source and its application to the spectroscopy of core excited atomic states, and the development of a technique for picosecond time resolution spectroscopy of fast photophysical processes.

  18. Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katori, H.; Yoneda, H.; Nakagawa, K.; Shimizu, F.

    2010-02-01

    .] -- Ultracold Ytterbium atoms in optical lattices / S. Sugawa ... [et al.] -- Ultracold polar molecules in the rovibrational ground state / J. Deiglmayr ... [et al.] -- Polar molecules near quantum degeneracy / J. Ye and D. S. Jin -- Production of a quantum gas of rovibronic ground-state molecules in an optical lattice / J. G. Danzl ... [et al.] -- Recent progress in x-ray nonlinear optics / K. Tamasaku, K. Sawada, and T. Ishikawa -- Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy - laser spectroscopy in unconventional environments / S. Svanberg -- Laser spectroscopy on relativistic ion beams / S. Reinhardt ... [et al.] -- Single frequency microcavity lasers and applications / L. Xu ... [et al.].

  19. Reverse laser drilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Thomas R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    This invention provides a method for laser drilling small diameter, closely-spaced, and accurately located holes in a body of material which is transparent or substantially transparent to the laser radiation employed whereby the holes are drilled through the thickness of the body from the surface opposite to that on which the laser beam impinges to the surface of laser beam impingement.

  20. Laser photobiology and photomedicine

    SciTech Connect

    Martellucci, S.; Chester, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the physical and biological basis of photobiology and photomedicine; the biological effects and applications of laser technology; photochemotherapy; photobiology and dermatology; surgical and ophthalmological applications of lasers; laser safety; and diagnostics and technological aspects of recent laser developments.

  1. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  2. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  3. Obstacles to Laser Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2005-04-25

    The growth of laser development & technology has been remarkable. Unfortunately, a number of traps or obstacles to laser safety have also developed with that growth. The goal of this article is to highlight those traps, in the hope that an aware laser user will avoid them. These traps have been the cause or contributing factor of many a preventable laser accident.

  4. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  5. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-06-07

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam. 1 fig.

  6. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam.

  7. Solar driven lasers for power satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taussio, R.; Cassady, P.; Klosterman, E.

    1980-01-01

    The technological feasibility of using multimagawatt lasers for space power transmission is discussed. Candidate lasers include electric discharge lasers, direct optically pumped lasers, and free electron lasers.

  8. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire-KrF laser. Part 2. Accumulation of plasma electrons and electric discharge control

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V D; Ionin, Andrei A; Levchenko, A O; Mesyats, Gennadii A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Smetanin, Igor V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Ustinovskii, N N; Shutov, A V

    2013-04-30

    The problem of the production of extended ({approx}1 m) plasma channels is studied in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated laser pulses of UV radiation, which are a superposition of a subpicosecond USP train amplified in a regenerative KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator and a quasi-stationary lasing pulse. The USPs possess a high (0.2-0.3 TW) peak power and efficiently ionise oxygen molecules due to multiphoton ionisation, and the quasi-stationary lasing pulse, which has a relatively long duration ({approx}100 ns), maintains the electron density at a level n{sub e} = (3-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} by suppressing electron attachment to oxygen. Experiments in laser triggering of high-voltage electric discharges suggest that the use of combined pulses results in a significant lowering of the breakdown threshold and enables controlling the discharge trajectory with a higher efficiency in comparison with smooth pulses. It was shown that controlled breakdowns may develop with a delay of tens of microseconds relative to the laser pulse, which is many orders of magnitude greater than the lifetime of free electrons in the laser-induced plasma. We propose a mechanism for this breakdown, which involves speeding-up of the avalanche ionisation of the air by negative molecular oxygen ions with a low electron binding energy ({approx}0.5 eV) and a long lifetime ({approx}1 ms), which are produced upon cessation of the laser pulse. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  9. What is a Laser?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, Lucile; Schwob, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    The first laser was built more than 50 years ago, inMay 1960: it was a pulsed ruby laser. It was a simple laboratory curiosity and nobody knew what its usefulness could be. Other devices were rapidly demonstrated, and the variety and number of lasers in the world increased at a huge rate. Currently, the annual laser world market is worth about 6 billion dollars. Thanks to the remarkable properties of laser light, laser applications increase steadily in the domains of industry, building, medicine, telecommunications, etc. One can find many lasers in research laboratories, and they are used more and more in our everyday life and almost everybody has already seen a laser beam. The goal of the first chapter of this book is to explain simply what a laser is, how it is built and how it operates. Firstly, let us point out the outstanding properties of the laser light.

  10. Tunable lasers- an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, B.D.; Buser, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    This overview of tunable lasers describes their applicability to spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and middle infrared ranges; to rapid on-line diagnostics by ultrashort cavity lasers; to exploration, by the free electron laser, for its wide tuning in the far infrared to submillimeter region; to remote detection, in areas such as portable pollution monitors, on-line chemical analyzers, auto exhaust analyzers, and production line controls; to photochemistry; and to other potential areas in diagnostics, communications, and medical and biological sciences. The following lasers are characterized by their tunability: solid state lasers, primarily alexandrite, with a tuning range of ca 1000 Angstroms; color center lasers; semiconductor lasers; dye lasers; gas lasers, where high-pressure CO/sub 2/ discharges are the best known example for a wide tunability range, and research is continuing in systems such as the alkali dimers; and, at wavelengths beyond 10 micrometers, the possibilities beyond Cerenkov and free electron lasers.

  11. Lasers in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William G

    2011-01-01

    Laser technology has advanced tremendously since the first gas lasers were incorporated into early flow cytometers. Gas lasers have been largely replaced by solid-state laser technology, making virtually any desirable visible light wavelength available for flow cytometry. Multiwavelength, white light, and wavelength tunable lasers are poised to enhance our analytical capabilities even further. In this chapter, I summarize the role that lasers play in cytometry, and the practical characteristics that make a laser appropriate for flow cytometry. I then review the latest single wavelength lasers available for flow cytometry, and how they can be used to excite the ever-expanding array of available fluorochromes. Finally, I review the contribution and potential of the latest tunable laser technology to flow cytometry, and show several examples of these novel sources integrated into production instruments. Technical details and critical parameters for successful application of these lasers for biomedical analysis are covered in depth.

  12. Surgical lasers in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Nowakowski, Wlodzimierz; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Michalska, I.; Mindak, Marek K.

    1997-10-01

    Almost every laser for medical applications was first tried in dermatology. The efficiency of YAG, CO2, and Argon lasers on this area and their potential advantages over conventional methods were mostly evaluated by cosmetic effect of laser therapy. The indications for different laser treatment in such dermatological cases as: angiomas, telangiectasias, pigmented lesions, nevus flammeus congenitus, deep cavernous angiomas, skin neoplasms and condylomata acuminata are discussed in this paper and the results of the laser therapy are also presented.

  13. Laser Reliability Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    Lasers, Quality Level 1 - Group 2 32 5.3-3 Kolmogorov-Smirnoff Test - Helium/Neon Lasers, Quality Level 1 33 5.3-4 Welbull Analysis...institutions through- out the United States and Canada. The collected laser data were grouped, analyzed, and statistically tested for homogeneity...sources were Initially contacted by letter questionnaires In which personnel were requested to describe any laser component life test or laser system

  14. Intracavity Raman lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y.B.; Ackerhalt, J.R.; Krasinski, J.S.; Heller, D.F.

    1989-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of intracavity Raman lasers are presented. Advantages of intracavity Raman lasers, particularly for low-emission cross section and broadly tunable vibronic gain media, are described. Experimental studies of a hydrogen gas Raman laser pumped inside the cavity of an alexandrite laser are presented. A theoretical model of the dynamics of a unidirectional intracavity Raman ring laser is developed and solved analytically. This model is adapted to simulate experiments.

  15. Mercury Bromide Laser Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-04

    Discharge", Optics Lett., 2(3), (March 1978). 7. R. Burnham, "Discharge Pumped Mercuric Halide Dissociation Lasers", Appl. Phys. Lett., 33: 15 (July 1978...laser and fluorescence signals. Neutral density filters served to prevent saturation of the detector during the laser measurements. F. Laser Output as a...REFERENCES . E. J. Schimitschek and J. E. Celto, " Mercuric Bromide Dissociation Laser in an Electric Discharge," Optics Lett. 2(3), March 1978. This

  16. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of high-k silicon dioxide and silicon oxynitride thin films for gate-dielectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbiens, E.; Dolbec, R.; El Khakani, M. A.

    2002-05-01

    We have successfully developed two reactive pulsed laser deposition (PLD) processes for the growth of high-k SiO2 and SiOxNy thin films. At a KrF laser intensity of 3×108 W/cm2, both SiO2 and SiOxNy films have been deposited by ablating a silicon target in a reactive gas atmosphere (O2 and O2/N2 mixture, respectively) on both Si (100) and Pt-coated Si substrates. Two key issues are presented here, namely (i) the effect of the deposition temperature (Td in the 20-450 °C range) and (ii) the effect of the N incorporation (in the 0.3-20 at. % concentration range) on the microstructure and electrical properties of PLD SiO2 and SiOxNy thin films, respectively. For the PLD-SiO2 films, 300 °C has been identified as the optimal deposition temperature that yields stoichiometric ([O]/[Si]~1.9), hydrogen-free films with a low local disorder, a highly dense microstructure and a dielectric constant (k) higher than that quoted for thermally grown SiO2. On the other hand, the PLD SiOxNy films containing 20 at. % of N have exhibited a dielectric constant as high as ~7. A rather good agreement is obtained between the k values deduced from the Poole-Frenkel emission (PFE) model and those obtained from direct impedance measurements, confirming thereby that the PFE remains the predominant conduction mechanism in the PLD SiOxNy films.

  17. Excimer laser micropatterning of freestanding thermo-responsive hydrogel layers for cells-on-chip applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santaniello, Tommaso; Martello, Federico; Tocchio, Alessandro; Gassa, Federico; Webb, Patrick; Milani, Paolo; Lenardi, Cristina

    2012-10-01

    We report a novel reliable and repeatable technologic manufacturing protocol for the realization of micro-patterned freestanding hydrogel layers based on thermo-responsive poly-(N-isopropyl)acrylamide (PNIPAAm), which have potential to be employed as temperature-triggered smart surfaces for cells-on-chip applications. PNIPAAm-based films with controlled mechanical properties and different thicknesses (100-300 µm thickness) were prepared by injection compression moulding at room temperature. A 9 × 9 array of 20 µm diameter through-holes is machined by means of the KrF excimer laser on dry PNIPAAm films which are physically attached to flat polyvinyl chloride (PVC) substrates. Machining parameters, such as fluence and number of shots, are optimized in order to achieve highly resolved features. Micro-structured freestanding films are then easily obtained after hydrogels are detached from PVC by gradually promoting the film swelling in ethanol. In the PNIPAAm water-swollen state, the machined holes’ diameter approaches a slight larger value (30 µm) according to the measured hydrogel swelling ratio. Thermo-responsive behaviour and through-hole tapering characterization are carried out by metrology measurements using an optical inverted and confocal microscope setup, respectively. After the temperature of freestanding films is raised above 32 °C, we observe that the shrinkage of the whole through-hole array occurs, thus reducing the holes’ diameter to less than a half its original size (about 15 µm) as a consequence of the film dehydration. Different holes’ diameters (10 and 30 µm) are also obtained on dry hydrogel employing suitable projection masks, showing similar shrinking behaviour when hydrated and undergone thermo-response tests. Thermo-responsive PNIPAAm-based freestanding layers could then be integrated with other suitable micro-fabricated thermoplastic components in order to preliminary test their feasibility in operating as temperature

  18. Nanocrystal waveguide (NOW) laser

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Withrow, Stephen P.; White, Clark W.; Jaiswal, Supriya L.

    2005-02-08

    A solid state laser includes an optical waveguide and a laser cavity including at least one subwavelength mirror disposed in or on the optical waveguide. A plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals are disposed in the laser cavity. The reflective subwavelength mirror can be a pair of subwavelength resonant gratings (SWG), a pair of photonic crystal structures (PC), or a distributed feedback structure. In the case of a pair of mirrors, a PC which is substantially transmissive at an operating wavelength of the laser can be disposed in the laser cavity between the subwavelength mirrors to improve the mode structure, coherence and overall efficiency of the laser. A method for forming a solid state laser includes the steps of providing an optical waveguide, creating a laser cavity in the optical waveguide by disposing at least one subwavelength mirror on or in the waveguide, and positioning a plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals in the laser cavity.

  19. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph

    1982-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  20. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph S.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.