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Sample records for 248cm22ne xn270-xsg reaction

  1. Superheavy element chemistry at GARIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Hiromitsu

    2016-12-01

    A gas-jet transport system has been installed to the RIKEN GAs-filled Recoil Ion Separator, GARIS to start up SuperHeavy Element (SHE) chemistry. This system is a promising approach for exploring new frontiers in SHE chemistry: background radioactivities from unwanted by-products are suppressed, a high gas-jet transport yield is achieved, and new chemical reactions can be investigated. Useful radioisotopes of 261Rfa,b, 262Db, and 265Sga,b for chemical studies were produced in the reactions of 248Cm(18O,5n)261Rfa,b, 248Cm(19F,5n)262Db, and 248Cm(22Ne,5n)265Sga,b, respectively. They were successfully extracted to a chemistry laboratory by the gas-jet method. Production and decay properties of 261Rfa,b, 262Db, and 265Sga,b were investigated in detail with the rotating wheel apparatus for α- and spontaneous fission spectrometry. Present status and perspectives of the SHE chemistry at GARIS are also briefly presented.

  2. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is interactions, which may occur between ... more serious. Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin ...

  3. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  4. Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Conditions Anaphylaxis Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... exposed to a foreign substance, some people suffer reactions identical to anaphylaxis, but no allergy (IgE antibody) ...

  5. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  6. Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Conditions Anaphylaxis Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... exposed to a foreign substance, some people suffer reactions identical to anaphylaxis, but no allergy (IgE antibody) ...

  7. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The…

  8. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The…

  9. Skin reactions to sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Nixon, R L; Frowen, K E; Lewis, A E

    1997-06-01

    Sunscreen reactions are said not to be uncommon. A population referred to a patch testing clinic was evaluated for reactions to sunscreen by questionnaire initially and then, if relevant, by patch testing to sunscreen products and their components. Irritant reactions were more common than allergic contact dermatitis. Allergic reactions to sunscreens were less common than to non-sunscreen chemicals present in sunscreen products.

  10. [Reactions to food].

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, R; Eggesb M; Botten, G

    1995-12-10

    Adverse reactions to food occur in about 1-2% of the population, but are reported more frequently by patients. Most reactions to food are not caused by allergy. IgE-mediated food reactions are well known and of major clinical significance owing to their potentially dangerous, even life-threatening character. Adverse reactions to food can also be caused by immunological mechanisms other than IgE-mediated reactions such as, enzyme deficiencies, active pharmacological substances in food and psychological mechanisms. Double-blind provocation is the only way to diagnose a positive reaction to a food item with some certainty. Regretably no objective measures for food reactions exist.

  11. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  12. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  13. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  14. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R; Phelps, Michael E; Quake, Stephen R; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  15. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  16. Modeling Mechanochemical Reaction Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Adams, Heather; Miller, Brendan P; Furlong, Octavio J; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Navarra, Gabriele; Rossi, Antonella; Xu, Yufu; Kotvis, Peter V; Tysoe, Wilfred T

    2017-08-09

    The mechanochemical reaction between copper and dimethyl disulfide is studied under well-controlled conditions in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Reaction is initiated by fast S-S bond scission to form adsorbed methyl thiolate species, and the reaction kinetics are reproduced by two subsequent elementary mechanochemical reaction steps, namely a mechanochemical decomposition of methyl thiolate to deposit sulfur on the surface and evolve small, gas-phase hydrocarbons, and sliding-induced oxidation of the copper by sulfur that regenerates vacant reaction sites. The steady-state reaction kinetics are monitored in situ from the variation in the friction force as the reaction proceeds and modeled using the elementary-step reaction rate constants found for monolayer adsorbates. The analysis yields excellent agreement between the experiment and the kinetic model, as well as correctly predicting the total amount of subsurface sulfur in the film measured using Auger spectroscopy and the sulfur depth distribution measured by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  17. Hypersensitivity reaction to azathioprine.

    PubMed

    Fields, C L; Robinson, J W; Roy, T M; Ossorio, M A; Byrd, R P

    1998-05-01

    Adverse drug reactions can vary from a simple rash to anaphylactic shock. While certain medications including the penicillins are well known to cause such reactions, other drugs are not as commonly recognized. Azathioprine hypersensitivity reactions tend to be benign and self-limiting with cessation of drug ingestion. We report a patient who had a hypersensitivity reaction to azathioprine, which manifested as distributive shock that mimicked sepsis. We also reviewed the English language literature for risk factors for a hypersensitivity reaction to azathioprine and its possible mechanism.

  18. [Adverse reactions to vaccines].

    PubMed

    Eseverri, J L; Ranea, S; Marin, A

    2003-01-01

    Adverse reactions to vaccines are highly varied, ranging from mild local reactions to fatal outcomes. In the last few years many adverse reactions have been attributed to vaccines, often without justification. In agreement with the World Health Organization, these reactions can be classified as follows, depending on the cause: vaccination-induced reactions (due to an effect of the vaccine itself or to an idiosyncrasy); reactions due to errors in storage, manipulation and/or administration; and coincidental reactions (no causal relationship with the vaccine). Hypersensitivity reactions fall into six categories, depending on the causative agent: reactions due to some component of the infectious agent or one of its products; reactions due to adjuvants: aluminium hydroxide; reactions due to stabilizers: gelatin; reactions due to preservatives: thiomersal; reactions due to antibiotics: neomycin; and reactions due to a biological culture medium: chicken embryo cells. Allergic children should not be excluded from the normal vaccine calendar. Immunologically, allergic individuals are more susceptible to infection and to microbial and viral diseases, which often play an aggravating role. Rubella, whooping cough, and influenza usually exacerbate respiratory allergies. Non-vaccination carries a marked risk of contracting serious diseases such as poliomyelitis, tetanus, and diphtheria, etc. In a not too distant future, the techniques of genetic recombination and monoclonal antibody production will allow the creation of vaccines from organisms that cannot be cultivated in the laboratory or that produce small quantities of antigen. These techniques will also lead to identification of the antigens with the greatest immunogenic power and, consequently, to extremely pure vaccines. The adverse reactions to vaccines referred to our service account for between 0.59 % and 1.27 % of first visits in the last three years. We recorded a total of 48 adverse reactions to vaccines. Of

  19. Noncanonical reactions of flavoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-11-05

    Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a "molecular scaffold" in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates.

  20. Reaction spreading on graphs.

    PubMed

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension d{s}, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension d{l}. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)∼t{d{l}}. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)e{αt} with α proportional to ln(k), where (k) is the average degree of the graph.

  1. Nuclear reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ``hot`` nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ``flow`` measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study {sup 40}Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs.

  2. Photoneutron Reactions in Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    Photoneutron reactions are discussed in the context of nucleosynthesis with emphasis on a unified understanding of (γ, n) and (n, γ) reactions for heavy nuclei through the γ-ray strength function and a revisit to explosive nucleosynthesis of 9Be through the reciprocity theorem. The role of photonuclear reactions in nucleosynthesis is supplemented by the photonuclear data project (IAEA-CRP F42032) and will be strengthened in the Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) in the future.

  3. Immune reaction to propanidid.

    PubMed

    Christmas, D

    1984-05-01

    An adverse reaction to the intravenous anaesthetic agent propanidid is described in which the main features were hypotension, facial erythema, and abdominal pain. Changes in serum complement levels and differential white cell counts indicate that this was an immune reaction mediated by the classical complement pathway. The immune reaction apparently involved antibodies other than those of the IgE (reagin) class, and circumstantial evidence suggests that it was specific to propanidid rather than to the entire formulation or to Cremophor EL.

  4. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M Allen; Beeman, Barton V; Benett, William J; Hadley, Dean R; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L; Krulevitch, Peter A

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  5. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  6. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  7. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  8. REUSABLE REACTION VESSEL

    DOEpatents

    Soine, T.S.

    1963-02-26

    This patent shows a reusable reaction vessel for such high temperature reactions as the reduction of actinide metal chlorides by calcium metal. The vessel consists of an outer metal shell, an inner container of refractory material such as sintered magnesia, and between these, a bed of loose refractory material impregnated with thermally conductive inorganic salts. (AEC)

  9. Chemical burn or reaction

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000059.htm Chemical burn or reaction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ...

  10. Oscillating Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes several oscillating chemical reactions which can be used in undergraduate chemistry laboratories. In one such reaction, ferroin oscillates from red (reducing solution) to blue (oxidizing solution) for about an hour at a frequency which can readily be shown to depend on such factors as the temperature, type of solvent, and concentration…

  11. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  12. Photoinduced Multicomponent Reactions.

    PubMed

    Garbarino, Silvia; Ravelli, Davide; Protti, Stefano; Basso, Andrea

    2016-12-12

    The combination of multicomponent approaches with light-driven processes opens up new scenarios in the area of synthetic organic chemistry, where the need for sustainable, atom- and energy-efficient reactions is increasingly urgent. Photoinduced multicomponent reactions are still in their infancy, but significant developments in this area are expected in the near future.

  13. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  14. Chemical Reaction Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the role of chemical-equation problem solving in helping students predict reaction products. Methods for helping students learn this process must be taught to students and future teachers by using pedagogical skills within the content of chemistry. Emphasizes that solving chemical reactions should involve creative cognition where…

  15. Reactions to Attitudinal Deviancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, John M.; Allen, Vernon L.

    This paper presents a critical review of empirical and theoretical treatments of group reaction to attitudinal deviancy. Inspired by Festinger's (1950) ideas on resolution of attitudinal discrepancies in groups, Schachter (1951) conducted an experiment that has greatly influenced subsequent research and theory concerning reaction to attitudinal…

  16. Oscillating Reactions: Two Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Stojanovska, Marina I.; Šoptrajanov, Bojan T.

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are truly spectacular phenomena, and demonstrations are always appreciated by the class. However, explaining such reactions to high school or first-year university students is problematic, because it may seem that no acceptable explanation is possible unless the students have profound knowledge of both physical…

  17. Precompound Reactions: Basic Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2008-04-17

    Because of the non-zero nuclear equilibration time, the compound-nucleus scattering model fails when the incident energy exceeds 10 or 20 MeV, and precompound reactions become important. Basic ideas used in the quantum-statistical approaches to these reactions are described.

  18. Allergic reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wood, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    Anaphylactic reactions to vaccines are rare but do occur, and have been reported for nearly every vaccine. And while the reaction rate per each dose of vaccine is low, this is a common clinical question due in large part to the enormous numbers of vaccines administered. Reactions are most often due to vaccine constituents rather than the microbial components of the vaccine, but in many instances, the specific ingredient triggering the reaction cannot be definitively identified. Evaluation of patients with suspected vaccine reactions should begin by determining whether the symptoms and timing of the reaction were consistent with a true allergic reaction, followed by an assessment to determine whether the patient needs further doses of the vaccine in question, or similar vaccines, in the future. Skin and serologic testing to vaccines and vaccine constituents can then be performed to further assess the potential cause of the reaction and to develop a plan for future immunizations. Specific guidelines for the administration of influenza vaccines to egg allergic patients have been revised to allow virtually all patients to receive this vaccine in a straightforward manner. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Reactions and their management.

    PubMed

    Ganapati, R; Pai, V V

    2004-12-01

    The uneventful response to chemotherapy in leprosy is marked by clinically disturbing episodes encountered in 20-30% of patients and these phenomena are called "reactions". Generally they are classified as reversal reaction (type-1) and erythema nodosum leprosum (type-2). The cutaneous menifestations are: (1) Type-2 reactions in LL, BL types constituting erythema nodosum leprosum, erythema multiforme, erythema necroticans, subcutaneous nodules, lepromatous exacerbation. (2) Type-1 reactions in borderline and tuberculoid leprosy. The other manifestations include: Acute neuritis, lymphadenitis, arthritis, oedema of the hands and feet, ocular lesions, etc. Sequelae of reactions are: Paralytic deformities, non-paralytic deformities, extensive scarring and renal damage. A simple guideline to identify the risk-prone cases has been narrated. Prednisolone in standard dosage schedule as recommended by WHO is now being widely used in control programmes.

  20. Algorithm for reaction classification.

    PubMed

    Kraut, Hans; Eiblmaier, Josef; Grethe, Guenter; Löw, Peter; Matuszczyk, Heinz; Saller, Heinz

    2013-11-25

    Reaction classification has important applications, and many approaches to classification have been applied. Our own algorithm tests all maximum common substructures (MCS) between all reactant and product molecules in order to find an atom mapping containing the minimum chemical distance (MCD). Recent publications have concluded that new MCS algorithms need to be compared with existing methods in a reproducible environment, preferably on a generalized test set, yet the number of test sets available is small, and they are not truly representative of the range of reactions that occur in real reaction databases. We have designed a challenging test set of reactions and are making it publicly available and usable with InfoChem's software or other classification algorithms. We supply a representative set of example reactions, grouped into different levels of difficulty, from a large number of reaction databases that chemists actually encounter in practice, in order to demonstrate the basic requirements for a mapping algorithm to detect the reaction centers in a consistent way. We invite the scientific community to contribute to the future extension and improvement of this data set, to achieve the goal of a common standard.

  1. Enhancing chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  2. Modeling of surface reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical models are used to elucidate properties of the monomer-monomer and monomer-dimer type chemical reactions on a two-dimensional surface. The authors use mean-field and lattice gas models, detailing similarities and differences due to correlations in the lattice gas model. The monomer-monomer, or AB surface reaction model, with no diffusion, is investigated for various reaction rates k. Study of the exact rate equations reveals that poisoning always occurs if the adsorption rates of the reactants are unequal. If the adsorption rates of the reactants are equal, simulations show slow poisoning, associated with clustering of reactants. This behavior is also shown for the two-dimensional voter model. The authors analyze precisely the slow poisoning kinetics by an analytic treatment for the AB reaction with infinitesimal reaction rate, and by direct comparison with the voter model. They extend the results to incorporate the effects of place-exchange diffusion, and they compare the AB reaction with infinitesimal reaction rate and no diffusion to the voter model with diffusion at rate 1/2. They also consider the relationship of the voter model to the monomer-dimer model, and investigate the latter model for small reaction rates. The monomer-dimer, or AB[sub 2] surface reaction model is also investigated. Specifically, they consider the ZGB-model for CO-oxidation, and in generalizations of this model which include adspecies diffusion. A theory of nucleation to describe properties of non-equilibrium first-order transitions, specifically the evolution between [open quote]reactive[close quote] steady states and trivial adsorbing states, is derived. The behavior of the [open quote]epidemic[close quote] survival probability, P[sub s], for a non-poisoned patch surrounded by a poisoned background is determined below the poisoning transition.

  3. Cycloaddition reactions of ICNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasinszki, Tibor; Krebsz, Melinda; Hajgató, Balázs

    2009-05-01

    The mechanism and selectivity of cycloaddition reactions of iodonitrile oxide, ICNO, have been studied with theoretical methods for the first time using MR-AQCC coupled-cluster and B3LYP DFT methods. Calculations have predicted that the favoured ICNO dimerisation process is a multi-step reaction to diiodofuroxan involving dinitrosoethylene-like intermediates. The ICNO cycloaddition with nitriles and ethynyl derivatives is a synchronous process favouring the formation of 1,2,4-oxadiazole and 1,2-oxazole derivatives, respectively. The cycloaddition reactions of ICNO have been studied experimentally by generating ICNO from AgCNO and iodine. Diiodofuroxan is obtained, however, even at the presence of nitriles.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1963-09-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described for breeding fissionable material, including a heat-exchange tank, a high- and a low-pressure chamber therein, heat- exchange tubes connecting these chambers, a solution of U/sup 233/ in heavy water in a reaction container within the tank, a slurry of thorium dioxide in heavy water in a second container surrounding the first container, an inlet conduit including a pump connecting the low pressure chamber to the reaction container, an outlet conduit connecting the high pressure chamber to the reaction container, and means of removing gaseous fission products released in both chambers. (AEC)

  5. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle.

  6. Untoward penicillin reactions

    PubMed Central

    Guthe, T.; Idsöe, O.; Willcox, R. R.

    1958-01-01

    The literature on untoward reactions following the administration of penicillin is reviewed. These reactions, including a certain number of deaths which have been reported, are of particular interest to health administrations and to WHO in view of the large-scale programmes for controlling the treponematoses which are now under way—programmes affecting millions of people in many parts of the world. The most serious problems are anaphylactic sensitivity phenomena and superinfection or cross-infection with penicillin-resistant organisms, and the reactions involved range in intensity from the mildest to the fatal; the incidence of the latter is estimated at 0.1-0.3 per million injections. The authors point out that with increasing use of penicillin, more persons are likely to become sensitized and the number of reactions can therefore be expected to rise. The best prevention against such an increase is the restriction of the unnecessary use of penicillin. PMID:13596877

  7. Translated chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew D

    2014-05-01

    Many biochemical and industrial applications involve complicated networks of simultaneously occurring chemical reactions. Under the assumption of mass action kinetics, the dynamics of these chemical reaction networks are governed by systems of polynomial ordinary differential equations. The steady states of these mass action systems have been analyzed via a variety of techniques, including stoichiometric network analysis, deficiency theory, and algebraic techniques (e.g., Gröbner bases). In this paper, we present a novel method for characterizing the steady states of mass action systems. Our method explicitly links a network's capacity to permit a particular class of steady states, called toric steady states, to topological properties of a generalized network called a translated chemical reaction network. These networks share their reaction vectors with their source network but are permitted to have different complex stoichiometries and different network topologies. We apply the results to examples drawn from the biochemical literature.

  8. Iodine Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a combination of solutions that can be used in the study of kinetics using the iodine clock reaction. The combination slows down degradation of the prepared solutions and can be used successfully for several weeks. (JRH)

  9. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  10. Reaction wheel assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The fabrication and testing of three reaction wheels with associated drive and system monitoring electronics and brushless dc spin motors are discussed; the wheels are intended for use in a teleoperator simulator. Test results are included as graphs.

  11. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  12. Iodine Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a combination of solutions that can be used in the study of kinetics using the iodine clock reaction. The combination slows down degradation of the prepared solutions and can be used successfully for several weeks. (JRH)

  13. An Illuminating Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of carbide lights as an excellent mechanism for introducing or reviewing many basic chemistry concepts including elements and compounds, endothermic and exothermic reactions, physical and chemical changes, and balancing chemical equations. (JRH)

  14. Skin Reactions to Cold

    PubMed Central

    Talpash, Orest

    1976-01-01

    Although skin reactions to cold are seen surprisingly infrequently in Canada, it is important to manage them correctly when they do occur. Frostbite, cold urticarias, Raynaud's disease and phenomenon, and several miscellaneous changes are discussed. PMID:21308019

  15. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  16. An Illuminating Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of carbide lights as an excellent mechanism for introducing or reviewing many basic chemistry concepts including elements and compounds, endothermic and exothermic reactions, physical and chemical changes, and balancing chemical equations. (JRH)

  17. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  18. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  19. [Occurrence of drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Pastorello, E; Qualizza, R M; Luraghi, M T; Ispano, M; Villa, A M; Ortolani, C; Zanussi, C

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the incidence of allergic reactions to drugs compared to other kinds of medical emergencies admitted to the main Hospital in Milan during a 6 months period. At the same time we drew a list of drugs most frequently involved in allergic reactions, and a list of the most frequent symptoms. Using special forms, the medical staff collected patients' data: age, history of atopy, identification of the drug causing the reaction, and any previous reactions. Among 11,407 cases of medical emergencies, we found 163 (1.43%) patients showing drug reactions: the mean age was 27.3; 58.90% were female; atopy was present in 16.56%. The drugs most frequently involved were: pyrazon group (22%); ASA (20.86%); penicillin and derivatives (9.20%); sulfa drugs (6.14%); group B vitamins (4.30%); tetanus toxoid (4.30%); hyposensitizing extracts (3.68%); propionic acid derivatives (2.46%); paracetamol (1.84%); indomethacin (1.23%); rifampicin (1.23%); erythromycin (1.23%); glafenine (1.23%); others (17.80%). Urticaria and/or angioedema were the most frequent symptoms (86.51%), then anaphylactic shock (9.81%) and asthma (3.68%) with regard to anaphylactic shock only 6.20% of the patients had had a previous reaction to the same drug. From these data we can see that the incidence of drug reactions is very low compared to other medical emergencies; penicillin evidenced fewer reactions than expected, while the pyrazon group and ASA confirmed the data from literature.

  20. Anaphylactoid reaction to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Kelso, J M; Keating, M U; Squillace, D L; O'Connell, E J; Yunginger, J W; Sachs, M I

    1990-05-01

    We studied a 14-year-old boy who developed a pruritic rash and facial swelling after ingestion of beer or wine. A blinded challenge with purified ethanol was positive demonstrating ethanol itself to be the offending agent. An IgE-mediated reaction to ethanol or one of its metabolites as a hapten is possible, or the reaction may involve unusual metabolism of ethanol with accumulation of acetaldehyde and/or direct mast cell degranulation.

  1. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  2. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  3. Reaction/Momentum Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    CTA Space Systems, Inc. has been licensed to sell commercially a reaction/momentum wheel originally developed for NASA's scientific satellites. NASA originally identified a need for the wheel in its Small Explorer program. The Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite required extremely low jitter and a reaction/momentum wheel with a torque greater than any comparably sized commercially available wheel to keep the instrument pointed at celestial objects to a high degree of precision. After development, a market assessment by Research Triangle Institute was completed, showing commercial potential for the flywheel technology. A license was granted to CTA in the fall of 1996. The company currently uses the technology in its complete spacecraft fabrication services and has built over 10 reaction/momentum wheels for commercial, scientific, and military customers.

  4. Hipersensitivity Reactions to Corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Berbegal, L; DeLeon, F J; Silvestre, J F

    2016-03-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used drugs in the clinical practice, especially by topic application in dermatology. These substances may act as allergens and produce immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Allergic contact dermatitis is the most frequent presentation of corticosteroid allergy and it should be studied by patch testing in specific units. The corticosteroids included in the Spanish standard battery are good markers but not ideal. Therefore, if those makers are positive, it is useful to apply a specific battery of corticosteroids and the drugs provided by patients. Immediate reactions are relatively rare but potentially severe, and it is important to confirm the sensitization profile and to guide the use of alternative corticosteroids, because they are often necessary in several diseases. In this article we review the main concepts regarding these two types of hypersensitivity reactions in corticosteroid allergy, as well as their approach in the clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  5. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  6. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  7. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  8. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    SciTech Connect

    House, P.A.

    1984-02-07

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  9. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    SciTech Connect

    House, P.A.

    1982-06-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an interrotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal application

  10. Exocharmic Reactions up Close

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramette, R. W.

    2007-01-01

    The exocharmic reactions that can be observed microscopically are discussed. The students can discover the optimal concentration of an acidic lead nitrate solution, so that a crystal of potassium iodide, nudged to the edge of a drop, results in glinting golden hexagons of lead iodide.

  11. Three Reaction Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coop, Richard H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    In reaction papers, Richard H. Coop, an educational psychologist, discusses six themes evident in papers on gifted education; B. J. Cox argues that systems theory is a valuable addition to education of identified and potentially gifted students; and Gary D. Fenstermacher argues for specification of educational entitlements of any learner before…

  12. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  13. Exocharmic Reactions up Close

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramette, R. W.

    2007-01-01

    The exocharmic reactions that can be observed microscopically are discussed. The students can discover the optimal concentration of an acidic lead nitrate solution, so that a crystal of potassium iodide, nudged to the edge of a drop, results in glinting golden hexagons of lead iodide.

  14. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  15. A Superintendent's Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, James H.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a superintendent's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author states that there is a problem with Marshall and Ward's article which begins with the title, particularly with the word "training." The author contends that there is a significant…

  16. The aromatic ene reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Dawen; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The ene reaction is a pericyclic process in which an alkene with an allylic hydrogen atom (the ene donor) reacts with a second unsaturated species (the enophile) to form a new product with a transposed π-bond. The aromatic ene reaction, in which the alkene component is embedded in an aromatic ring, has only been reported in a few (four) instances and has proceeded in low yield (≤6%). Here, we show efficient aromatic ene reactions in which a thermally generated aryne intermediate engages a pendant m-alkylarene substituent to produce a dearomatized isotoluene, itself another versatile but rare reactive intermediate. Our experiments were guided by computational studies that revealed structural features conducive to the aromatic ene process. We proceeded to identify a cascade comprising three reactions: (1) hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (for aryne generation), (2) intramolecular aromatic ene and (3) bimolecular Alder ene. The power of this cascade is evident from the structural complexity of the final products, the considerable scope, and the overall efficiency of these multistage, reagent- and by-product-free, single-pot transformations.

  17. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  18. Online Access: User Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawley, Carolyn

    1982-01-01

    Surveys reactions of students and faculty to the online circulation system at University of Guelph Library, Ontario. Findings concerning status of users, frequency of use, effectiveness of instructions on screen, convenience of terminal locations, type of information required by user, and general comments are noted. Four references are provided.…

  19. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  20. Introducing the Wittig Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstead, D. E. F.

    1979-01-01

    An experiment is described which provides a simple example of the application of the Wittig reaction to the synthesis of unsaturated compounds. The experiment was designed with British HNC chemistry students in mind, but it is also suitable as a project-type exercise for final year GCE A-level students. (Author/BB)

  1. Enantioselective Vinylogous Organocascade Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, Hamish B; Dell'Amico, Luca; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Cascade reactions are powerful tools for rapidly assembling complex molecular architectures from readily available starting materials in a single synthetic operation. Their marriage with asymmetric organocatalysis has led to the development of novel techniques, which are now recognized as reliable strategies for the one-pot enantioselective synthesis of stereochemically dense molecules. In recent years, even more complex synthetic challenges have been addressed by applying the principle of vinylogy to the realm of organocascade catalysis. The key to the success of vinylogous organocascade reactions is the unique ability of the chiral organocatalyst to transfer reactivity to a distal position without losing control on the stereo-determining events. This approach has greatly expanded the synthetic horizons of the field by providing the possibility of forging multiple stereocenters in remote positions from the catalyst's point of action with high selectivity, while simultaneously constructing multiple new bonds. This article critically describes the developments achieved in the field of enantioselective vinylogous organocascade reactions, charting the ideas, the conceptual advances, and the milestone reactions that have been essential for reaching highly practical levels of synthetic efficiency.

  2. Confronting Combat Stress Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-22

    of the scalp, skull , or brain. 4 Combat stress reaction is categorized as a range of behaviors resulting from the stress of battle which decreases...3) experiencing rage aimed at discriminate and indiscriminate targets, (4) psychic numbing or emotional shutdown, (5) alienation from themselves and

  3. Lithium Cell Reactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    Page 1. INVESTIGATION OF CHEMICAL, ELECTROCHEMICAL AND PARASITIC REACTIONS IN LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELLS ....... ................. 1 1.1 INTRODUCTION...OF LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE CELLS. ................ 56 1.4.1 Carbon Limited Overdischarge...............56 1.4.1.1 Background... LITHIUM THIONYL - CHLORIDE CELLS. .. ............ ...... 101 1.5.1 Background. ....... ............ .... 101 1.5.2 Microphotography

  4. Bad Reaction to Cosmetics?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Bad Reaction to Cosmetics? Tell FDA Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... M.D., director of the agency’s Office of Cosmetics and Colors. “So, consumers are one of FDA’s ...

  5. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  6. QUICK REACTION STUDIES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The functional requirements of mission planning of space missions are documented. A discussion of the current applicable computer programs to some part of the mission planning process is included. In particular the Mission Analysis and Trajectory Simulation (MATS) system is described. The applicability of current programs to the demands of mission planning in a Quick Reaction

  7. The aromatic ene reaction

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dawen; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The ene reaction is a pericyclic process in which an alkene having an allylic hydrogen atom (the ene donor) reacts with a second unsaturated species (the enophile) to form a new product with a transposed π-bond. The aromatic ene reaction, in which the alkene component is embedded in an aromatic ring, has only been reported in a few (four) instances and has proceeded in low yield (≤6%). Here we show efficient aromatic ene reactions in which a thermally generated aryne engages a pendant m-alkylarene substituent to produce a dearomatized isotoluene, itself another versatile but rare reactive intermediate. Our experiments were guided by computational studies that revealed structural features conducive to the aromatic ene process. We proceeded to identify a cascade comprising three reactions: (i) hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (for aryne generation), (ii) intramolecular aromatic ene, and (iii) bimolecular Alder ene. The power of this cascade is evident from the structural complexity of the final products, the considerable scope, and the overall efficiency of these multi-stage, reagent- and byproduct-free, single-pot transformations. PMID:24345944

  8. Azlactone Reaction Developments.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Pedro P; Carpanez, Arthur G; Amarante, Giovanni W

    2016-07-18

    Azlactones (also known as oxazolones) are heterocycles usually employed in the stereoselective synthesis of α,α-amino acids, heterocycles and natural products. The versatility of the azlactone scaffold arises from the numerous reactive sites, allowing its application in a diversity of transformations. This review aims to cover classical and recent applications of oxazolones, especially those involving stereoselective processes. After a short introduction on their structures and intrinsic reactivities, dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) processes as well as reactions involving stereoselective formation of a new σ C-C bond, such as alkylation/allylation/arylation, aldol, ene, Michael and Mannich reactions will be exposed. Additionally, cycloadditions, Steglich rearrangement and sulfenylation reactions will also be discussed. Recent developments of the well-known Erlenmeyer azlactones will be described. For the most examples, the proposed mechanism, activation modes and/or key reaction intermediates will be exposed to rationalize both the final product and the observed stereochemistry. Finally, this review gives an overview of the synthetic utility of oxazolones. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Reaction Formulation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Reaction formation was studied by Sigmund Freud. This defense mechanism may be related to repression, substitution, reversal, and compensation (or over-compensation). Alfred Adler considered compensation a basic process in his individual psychology. Anna Freud discussed some defense mechanisms, and Bibring, Dwyer, Huntington, and Valenstein…

  10. Photoneutron reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Varlamov, V. V. Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2014-12-15

    Among key problems in nuclear astrophysics, that of obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of synthesis of chemical elements is of paramount importance. The majority of heavy elements existing in nature are produced in stars via radiative neutron capture in so-called s- and r processes, which are, respectively, slow and fast, in relation to competing β{sup −}-decay processes. At the same time, we know 35 neutron-deficient so-called bypassed p-nuclei that lie between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg and which cannot originate from the aforementioned s- and r-processes. Their production is possible in (γ, n), (γ, p), or (γ, α) photonuclear reactions. In view of this, data on photoneutron reactions play an important role in predicting and describing processes leading to the production of p-nuclei. Interest in determining cross sections for photoneutron reactions in the threshold energy region, which is of particular importance for astrophysics, has grown substantially in recent years. The use of modern sources of quasimonoenergetic photons obtained in processes of inverse Compton laser-radiation scattering on relativistic electronsmakes it possible to reveal rather interesting special features of respective cross sections, manifestations of pygmy E1 and M1 resonances, or the production of nuclei in isomeric states, on one hand, and to revisit the problem of systematic discrepancies between data on reaction cross sections from experiments of different types, on the other hand. Data obtained on the basis of our new experimental-theoretical approach to evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions are invoked in considering these problems.

  11. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  12. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  13. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  14. Concordant Chemical Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shinar, Guy; Feinberg, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We describe a large class of chemical reaction networks, those endowed with a subtle structural property called concordance. We show that the class of concordant networks coincides precisely with the class of networks which, when taken with any weakly monotonic kinetics, invariably give rise to kinetic systems that are injective — a quality that, among other things, precludes the possibility of switch-like transitions between distinct positive steady states. We also provide persistence characteristics of concordant networks, instability implications of discordance, and consequences of stronger variants of concordance. Some of our results are in the spirit of recent ones by Banaji and Craciun, but here we do not require that every species suffer a degradation reaction. This is especially important in studying biochemical networks, for which it is rare to have all species degrade. PMID:22659063

  15. Hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Kathrin; Bircher, Andreas J

    2005-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics cause immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions, and may also affect internal organs and circulating blood cells. The underlying pathomechanisms are only partly understood. The extent of cross-reactivity among different quinolones depends on the type of clinical manifestation and its underlying mechanism. Despite recent advances, reliable diagnostic tests are still lacking. Recent studies have shown quinolone-specific IgE in vitro in more than 50% of patients with immediate-type reactions and a considerable cross-reactivity with related compounds. In maculopapular drug exanthems from ciprofloxacin, specific T-cell clones were identified, and cross-reactivity to related compounds was detected in approximately 50% of the clones. From re-exposure studies in patients with exanthems, cross-reactivity appears to be lower. Cellular tests such as lymphocyte transformation tests are currently not very useful. For prick and intradermal skin tests, widely divergent nonirritant test concentrations have been recommended. Desensitization may be possible in selected patients.

  16. Magnetically suspended reaction wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, A. V.; Stocking, G. L.; Dendy, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic suspensions offer several advantages over conventional bearings, arising because of the contactless nature of the load support. In application to spacecraft reaction wheels, the advantages are low drag torque, wearfree, unlubricated, vacuum-compatible operation, and unlimited life. By the provision of redundancy in the control electronics, single-point failures are eliminated. The rational for selection of a passive radial, active axial, dc magnetic suspension is presented, and the relative merits of 3-loop and single-loop magnetic suspensions are discussed. The design of a .678 N-m-sec (.5 ft-lb-sec) reaction wheel using the single loop magnetic suspension was developed; the design compares favorably with current ball bearing wheels in terms of weight and power.

  17. Aluminum cluster reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Leuchtner, R.E.; Harms, A.C.; Castleman, A.W. Jr. )

    1991-01-15

    Aluminum clusters, both anion and cation, are produced using laser vaporization and reacted under thermal conditions with oxygen in a flow tube reactor. An etching reaction is observed and bimolecular rate constants are reported for Al{sup +}{sub {ital n}}, {ital n}=1--33, and Al{sup {minus}}{sub {ital n}}, {ital n}=5--37. For certain clusters, namely Al{sup +}{sub 7}, Al{sup {minus}}{sub 13}, and Al{sup {minus}}{sub 23}, no apparent reactivity is observed (they are found to be produced from larger species). Interestingly, these correspond to predicted jellium shell closings with 20, 40, and 70 electrons, respectively. Besides these exceptions, and a small odd/even alternation in reaction rates, the overall reactivity is relatively insensitive to cluster size, and is found to range between about 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} and 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 3}/s.

  18. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    PubMed Central

    David, T J

    1987-01-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either by the parents or the nursing staff after the administration of placebo or active substances. Twenty two patients returned to a normal diet without problems, but the parents of two children insisted on continuing the diet. While popular belief has it that additives may have harmful behavioural effects, objective verification is required to prevent overdiagnosis. PMID:3548601

  19. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  20. Electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1989-07-01

    During the tenure of this contract research was performed on a number of aspects of electron transfer reactions (solvent dynamics including vibrational effects, non-Debye solvent dynamics, early steps in bacterial photosynthesis) and of the use of artificial intelligence searching methods, the latter, in part, as a prelude to our current study of electron transfer reactions in structurally complicated systems such as proteins. Seven Technical Reports were issued during this period, and research on several topics was initiated: the study of the relation between charge transfer absorption and fluorescence spectra and the inverted region, a nonadiabatic/adiabatic coherent mechanism for electron transfers, and electron transfers between two immiscible-liquid phases and between a semiconductor and an electrolyte.

  1. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.C.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  2. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  3. Chemical Reactions in Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-04

    NH 3)n, n _> 4, clusters has been attributed to the (solvated) naphtholate anion.3a A single picosecond decay measurement has been reported which...vibrational energy in the cluster Sl state. The data are summarized in Table I. A model to explain these decay results can be constructed based on a proton...11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) Chemical Reactions in Clusters 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Elliot R. Bernstein 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED

  4. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-01

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  5. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-20

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  6. [Skin reactions to bradykinin].

    PubMed

    Rihoux, J P; Ramboer, I; Fadel, R

    1995-10-01

    A large series of experiments carried out in animals and humans suggest that histamine release is not involved in the leakage phenomenon induced by bradykinin (BK) challenge. These experiments comprise in vitro studies on skin and bronchial human mast cells and in vivo studies on guinea pig airways and human skin using mepyramine, chlorpheniramine and terfenadine as reference H1-anti-histamines. Nevertheless, it has been shown recently that the H1 antagonist cetirizine 10 mg p.o. markedly inhibits skin reactions induced by BK challenge (intradermal injection of 212 micrograms BK in 10 microL saline and prick test with a solution of 21.2 micrograms/microL). In a guinea pig model, this drug also inhibited the bronchospasm induced by increasing concentrations of BK given by iv route (0.25 to 2 micrograms/Kg) and aerosol (3 to 300 micrograms/Kg). This inhibition was similar to the one obtained with the specific BK antagonist HOE 140 (15 pM/Kg). New data in the literature suggest the existence of various pharmacological mediators possibly involved in the BK-induced reaction: neuromediators, nitric oxyde and PAF. They also suggest that this reaction presents itself as a well defined sequence of pharmacological events. Since we could show that there is no binding of cetirizine to a human recombinant B2 receptor in vitro, some hypotheses are raised in order to explain this unexpected inhibiting effect of cetirizine.

  7. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  8. Polyneutron Chain Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Fisher

    2000-11-12

    Although helium atoms do not form molecules, a sufficiently large number will bind into a stable liquid droplet. A comparable situation is expected for neutrons, with a sufficiently large number binding into a stable droplet of neutron matter. Such polyneutron droplets can be viewed as isotopes of an element with nuclear charge Z=0, tentatively denoted neutrium, symbol Nt. Because of the relatively weak binding of neutrons compared with that of a mix of neutrons and protons, the minimum number of neutrons required for stability of a droplet is fairly large. Early estimates of {approx}60 may be reduced to a dozen or so by the BCS pairing interaction. The Nt entries with N{>=}12 are new to the table of isotopes. Because all of them are beta-unstable, none is expected to persist as a free particle. Yet, some may occasionally be produced by means to be described below, and it is of interest to examine their decay chains and their interactions with charged nuclei to ascertain how their presence might be revealed. Although these reactions are interesting, they cannot be taken seriously without identifying a source for the initial Nt isotope that begins the chain. Here, we consider possible interactions between {sup 16}O and {sup A}Nt. Although there is no strong interaction between them, we can expect a very weak residual attraction that can form a loosely bound {sup 16}O {sup A}Nt nuclear molecule. This is not a compound nucleus in the usual sense because, considered as fluids, the {sup 16}O and {sup A}Nt droplets are immiscible. For a droplet with fewer than about 60 neutrons, beta decay of {sup A}Nt is prevented by the buildup of Coulomb energy associated with transforming {sup A}Nt into {sup A}H in close proximity to {sup 16}O. Thus, it is possible that {sup 16}O {sup A}Nt molecules can persist indefinitely and that a few of them may be present in ordinary water as supermassive oxygen nuclei. Because the binding of these molecules is weak, the {sup A}Nt component can

  9. Well sealing via thermite reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, William Edward; Dunn, Sandra Dalvit

    2016-11-15

    A platform is formed in a well below a target plug zone by lowering a thermite reaction charge into the well and igniting it, whereby the products of the reaction are allowed to cool and expand to form a platform or support in the well. A main thermite reaction charge is placed above the platform and ignited to form a main sealing plug for the well. In some embodiments an upper plug is formed by igniting an upper thermite reaction charge above the main thermite reaction charge. The upper plug confines the products of ignition of the main thermite reaction charge.

  10. Reaction Extrema: Extent of Reaction in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandezande, Jonathon E.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; DeKock, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago de Donder introduced the term "extent of reaction", ?. We build on that work by defining the concept of reagent extrema for an arbitrary chemical reaction, aA + bB [reversible reaction] yY + zZ. The central equation is ?^[subscript i] = -n[subscript i,0]/?[subscript i]. The symbol ?^[subscript i] represents the…

  11. Reaction Extrema: Extent of Reaction in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandezande, Jonathon E.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; DeKock, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago de Donder introduced the term "extent of reaction", ?. We build on that work by defining the concept of reagent extrema for an arbitrary chemical reaction, aA + bB [reversible reaction] yY + zZ. The central equation is ?^[subscript i] = -n[subscript i,0]/?[subscript i]. The symbol ?^[subscript i] represents the…

  12. Procedures for Decomposing a Redox Reaction into Half-Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishtik, Ilie; Berka, Ladislav H.

    2005-01-01

    A simple algorithm for a complete enumeration of the possible ways a redox reaction (RR) might be uniquely decomposed into half-reactions (HRs) using the response reactions (RERs) formalism is presented. A complete enumeration of the possible ways a RR may be decomposed into HRs is equivalent to a complete enumeration of stoichiometrically…

  13. Insect bite reactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay; Mann, Baldeep Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK) disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr) as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some serious adverse effects

  14. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-08

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters.

  15. Reactions of Negative Ions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-17

    AUTHOR(S)* Viggiano , Albert A., Paulson, John F. C 6 UPE E T R O A IOE 18ate SUBo EC TERMS enti t e "Swrme f Ionsar and Efyb l to n in Gases, FIELD...Reactions of Negative Ions Albert A. Viggiano * and John F. Paulson Air Force Geophysics Laboratory Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts 017310 *Air Force Geophysics...an important process in controlling the electron density in a variety of natural plasmas , such as the earth’s ionosphere and interstellar space, and

  16. Hydrogen forming reaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Marianowski, L.G.; Fleming, D.K.

    1989-03-07

    A hydrogen forming process is described, comprising: conducting in a hydrogen production zone a chemical reaction forming mixed gases comprising molecular hydrogen; contacting one side of a hydrogen ion porous and molecular gas nonporous metallic foil with the mixed gases in the hydrogen production zone; dissociating the molecular hydrogen to ionic hydrogen on the one side of the metallic foil; passing the ionic hydrogen through the metallic foil to its other side; and withdrawing hydrogen from the other side of the metallic foil, thereby removing hydrogen from the hydrogen production zone.

  17. Gravitational Radiation Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.

    We give a short personally-biased review on the recent progress in our understanding of gravitational radiation reaction acting on a point particle orbiting a black hole. The main motivation of this study is to obtain sufficiently precise gravitational waveforms from inspiraling binary compact stars with a large mass ratio. For this purpose, various new concepts and techniques have been developed to compute the orbital evolution taking into account the gravitational self-force. Combining these ideas with a few supplementary new ideas, we try to outline a path to our goal here.

  18. The polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Welch, Hazel M

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has had a significant impact on all aspects of the molecular biosciences, from cancer research to forensic science. The sensitivity and specificity inherent in the technique allow minute quantities of genetic material to be detected while the unique properties of thermostable DNA polymerase ensure that abundant copies are reliably reproduced to levels that can be visualized and/or used for further applications. This chapter describes applications of PCR and PCR-RT to investigate primary cancer and metastatic disease at both the DNA and mRNA expression levels.

  19. Demonstration of the Fenton Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luehrs, Dean C.; Roher, Alex E.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates the Fenton reaction, which is carried out using the Fenton reagent that is used for groundwater and soil remediation. The Fenton reaction can be implicated in DNA damage, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease and ageing in general.

  20. Hydrazine decomposition and other reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Warren E. (Inventor); La France, Donald S. (Inventor); Voge, Hervey H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to the catalytic decomposition of hydrazine, catalysts useful for this decomposition and other reactions, and to reactions in hydrogen atmospheres generally using carbon-containing catalysts.

  1. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  2. Demonstration of the Fenton Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luehrs, Dean C.; Roher, Alex E.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates the Fenton reaction, which is carried out using the Fenton reagent that is used for groundwater and soil remediation. The Fenton reaction can be implicated in DNA damage, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease and ageing in general.

  3. [Hypersensitivity reactions to insulin].

    PubMed

    Becerril-Ángeles, Martín; Moctezuma-Trejo, Cristina; Espinosa-Larrañaga, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to insulin are infrequent, yet of clinical importance. The mechanisms of hypersensitivity involved can be of three types: I, III and IV. To describe the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity to insulin, its clinical features and diagnostic and therapeutic approach, that help identify the cases of allergy to insulin and begin a treatment, or if necessary, to refer patients to a specialists or appropriate medical attention. An electronic search of papers related to insulin hypersensitivity was performed in PubMed and the articles selected were those considered the most relevant for this review. Thirty eight papers about pathophysiology, mechanisms of injury and the different types of insulin involved in hypersensitivity reactions were included. Likewise, information for the diagnosis of insulin hypersensitivity and some options of treatment for first contact physicians or the referral of patients to specialists in endocrinology and allergy were included. Insulin hypersensitivity has a low prevalence and diverse clinical manifestations. The different types of insulin suitable allow the majority of cases of hypersensitivity to continue the treatment in a efficient and flexible manner.

  4. Drug dangers and reactions.

    PubMed

    WEILERSTEIN, R W

    1961-01-01

    The protection of the consumer against dangerous, adulterated, and misbranded drugs provided by the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act has failed in some instances. A general program of reporting adverse drug reactions has been initiated on a pilot basis. Arrangements are being made to extend this program into larger hospitals. Better and more complete reporting of adverse drug reactions together with tightening of the Food and Drug law regarding new drugs will improve this situation. Recently the president of the National Academy of Sciences appointed a committee at the request of the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare to review the policies and procedures used by the Food and Drug Administration in reaching decisions and to present recommendations. This committee has completed its work and has made specific recommendations that would give the Food and Drug Administration authority to require proof of efficacy as well as safety of all new drugs, and would provide it with sufficient resources to meet the responsibilities assigned to it.

  5. DRUG DANGERS AND REACTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Weilerstein, Ralph W.

    1961-01-01

    The protection of the consumer against dangerous, adulterated, and misbranded drugs provided by the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act has failed in some instances. A general program of reporting adverse drug reactions has been initiated on a pilot basis. Arrangements are being made to extend this program into larger hospitals. Better and more complete reporting of adverse drug reactions together with tightening of the Food and Drug law regarding new drugs will improve this situation. Recently the president of the National Academy of Sciences appointed a committee at the request of the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare to review the policies and procedures used by the Food and Drug Administration in reaching decisions and to present recommendations. This committee has completed its work and has made specific recommendations that would give the Food and Drug Administration authority to require proof of efficacy as well as safety of all new drugs, and would provide it with sufficient resources to meet the responsibilities assigned to it. PMID:13783849

  6. Reactions of intermetallic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, R.W.; Castleman, A.W. Jr. )

    1990-02-01

    Reaction of bismuth--alkali clusters with closed-shell HX acids provides insight into the structures, formation, and stabilities of these intermetallic species. HC1 and HI are observed to quantitatively strip Bi{sub {ital x}}Na{sub {ital y}} and Bi{sub {ital x}}K{sub {ital y}}, respectively, of their alkali component, leaving bare bismuth clusters as the only bismuth-containing species detected. Product bismuth clusters exhibit the same distribution observed when pure bismuth is evaporated in the source. Though evaporated simultaneously from the same crucible, this suggests alkali atoms condense onto existing bismuth clusters and have negligible effect on their formation and consequent distribution. The indistinguishibility of reacted and pure bismuth cluster distributions further argues against the simple replacement of alkali atoms with hydrogen in these reactions. This is considered further evidence that the alkali atoms are external to the stable bismuth Zintl anionic structures. Reactivities of Bi{sub {ital x}}Na{sub {ital y}} clusters with HC1 are estimated to lie between 3{times}10{sup {minus}13} for Bi{sub 4}Na, to greater than 4{times}10{sup {minus}11} for clusters possessing large numbers of alkali atoms. Bare bismuth clusters are observed in separate experiments to react significantly more slowly with rates of 1--9{times}10{sup {minus}14} and exhibit little variation of reactivity with size. The bismuth clusters may thus be considered a relatively inert substrate upon which the alkali overlayer reacts.

  7. [Abnormal grief reaction].

    PubMed

    Meyer, J E

    1977-01-01

    Pathological grief reactions following the death of a child are reported on the basis of five case studies. In contrast to acute grief reactions these pathological syndromes are of long standing. One parent had not truly accepted the death of the child. The denial of reality is sometimes a defence against aggression towards the deceased, because of his having left one behind. The mourning process comes to no end but remains in its initial phase. At the same time the life of the mourner stands still, as in the house and the family everything is left unchanged. Family interactions alter, particularly between the parents. For the genesis of these grief syndromes the following is of relevance: The death occurs at a time, when another child cannot replace the one who died. Mature independence had not been reached by either parent or child. Death destroyed expectations that this child would succeed in that which the parent had been unable to achieve. The parent had not seen the child after death--a gap in the continuity of experiencing which made acceptance of the irreversibility of the loss even more difficult.

  8. Metallic induction reaction engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Douglas; Mongeau, Peter P.; Kolm, Henry H.

    1985-11-01

    Metal rings placed close to a pulsed field coil have been accelerated at 200 million gee to 5 km/s in a 2 cm length by Bandoletov in the USSR Bandoletov, 1977. We have studied the basic phenomena and ultimate limitations of the pulsed induction process both theoretically and experimentally to determine its usefulness as a reaction engine. It is possible in principle to accelerate metal rings at high efficiency, and impart sufficient energy to ensure melting and evaporation, so that the reaction mass is ultimately ejected in the form of plasma. In practice the process is limited by electrical, mechanical and thermal failure of the induction coil. Over a hundred shots were fired including several in which 12 gram rings were accelerated to over 700 m/s at efficiencies above 30 percent. This is equivalent to the performance of a high power rifle with a one inch long barrel. An unexpected result of these studies is the discovery that to achieve maximum velocity, the mutual inductance gradient between induction coil and projectile ring in the firing position must be reduced to minimize the initial acceleration. This reduces the back voltage and increases the interaction time, resulting in maximum energy transfer.

  9. Lowering energy barriers in surface reactions through concerted reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sakong, Sung; Mosch, Christian; Lozano, Ariel; Busnengo, H Fabio; Gross, Axel

    2012-10-22

    Any technologically important chemical reaction typically involves a number of different elementary reaction steps consisting of bond-breaking and bond-making processes. Usually, one assumes that such complex chemical reactions occur in a step-wise fashion where one single bond is made or broken at a time. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory we show that the barriers of rate-limiting steps for technologically relevant surface reactions are significantly reduced if concerted reaction mechanisms are taken into account.

  10. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    An iodine clock reaction that gives a colorless to black result similar to that of the familiar Landolt iodate-bisulfite clock reaction is described. The vitamin C clock reaction uses chemicals that are readily available on the retail market: vitamin C, tincture of iodine, 3% hydrogen peroxide, and laundry starch. Orange juice may be used as the vitamin C source to give an orange to black reaction.

  11. Enzymatic reactions on immobilised substrates.

    PubMed

    Gray, Christopher J; Weissenborn, Martin J; Eyers, Claire E; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2013-08-07

    This review gives an overview of enzymatic reactions that have been conducted on substrates attached to solid surfaces. Such biochemical reactions have become more important with the drive to miniaturisation and automation in chemistry, biology and medicine. Technical aspects such as choice of solid surface and analytical methods are discussed and examples of enzyme reactions that have been successful on these surfaces are provided.

  12. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an iodine clock reaction that produces an effect similar to the Landolt clock reaction. This reaction uses supermarket chemicals and avoids iodate, bisulfite, and mercury compounds. Ascorbic acid and tincture of iodine are the main reactants with alternate procedures provided for vitamin C tablets and orange juice. (DDR)

  13. Corona reaction method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Lowther, F.E.

    1981-08-11

    Corona induced chemical reactions are conducted in a corona discharge zone in which narrow high voltage pulses are applied along with a relatively low voltage bias potential. It is found that for many corona discharge reactions, such as the conversion of oxygen to ozone, the present method increases the electrical efficiency of the reaction.

  14. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  15. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an iodine clock reaction that produces an effect similar to the Landolt clock reaction. This reaction uses supermarket chemicals and avoids iodate, bisulfite, and mercury compounds. Ascorbic acid and tincture of iodine are the main reactants with alternate procedures provided for vitamin C tablets and orange juice. (DDR)

  16. More on Chemical Reaction Balancing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinehart, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    A previous article stated that only the matrix method was powerful enough to balance a particular chemical equation. Shows how this equation can be balanced without using the matrix method. The approach taken involves writing partial mathematical reactions and redox half-reactions, and combining them to yield the final balanced reaction. (JN)

  17. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  18. Reaction Decoder Tool (RDT): extracting features from chemical reactions

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Torrance, Gilliean; Baldacci, Lorenzo; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Fenninger, Franz; Gopal, Nimish; Choudhary, Saket; May, John W.; Holliday, Gemma L.; Steinbeck, Christoph; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Extracting chemical features like Atom–Atom Mapping (AAM), Bond Changes (BCs) and Reaction Centres from biochemical reactions helps us understand the chemical composition of enzymatic reactions. Reaction Decoder is a robust command line tool, which performs this task with high accuracy. It supports standard chemical input/output exchange formats i.e. RXN/SMILES, computes AAM, highlights BCs and creates images of the mapped reaction. This aids in the analysis of metabolic pathways and the ability to perform comparative studies of chemical reactions based on these features. Availability and implementation: This software is implemented in Java, supported on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX, and freely available at https://github.com/asad/ReactionDecoder Contact: asad@ebi.ac.uk or s9asad@gmail.com PMID:27153692

  19. Reaction Decoder Tool (RDT): extracting features from chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Torrance, Gilliean; Baldacci, Lorenzo; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Fenninger, Franz; Gopal, Nimish; Choudhary, Saket; May, John W; Holliday, Gemma L; Steinbeck, Christoph; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-07-01

    Extracting chemical features like Atom-Atom Mapping (AAM), Bond Changes (BCs) and Reaction Centres from biochemical reactions helps us understand the chemical composition of enzymatic reactions. Reaction Decoder is a robust command line tool, which performs this task with high accuracy. It supports standard chemical input/output exchange formats i.e. RXN/SMILES, computes AAM, highlights BCs and creates images of the mapped reaction. This aids in the analysis of metabolic pathways and the ability to perform comparative studies of chemical reactions based on these features. This software is implemented in Java, supported on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX, and freely available at https://github.com/asad/ReactionDecoder : asad@ebi.ac.uk or s9asad@gmail.com. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Arnhelm, N. ); Levenson, C.H. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) an in-vitro method of amplifying DNA sequences. Beginning with DNA of any origin- bacterial, viral, plant, or animal- PCR can increase the amount of a DNA sequence hundreds of millions to billions of times. The procedure can amplify a targeted sequence even when it makes up less than one part in a million of the total initial sample. PCR is an enzymatic process that is carried out in discrete cycles of amplification, each of which can double the amount of target DNA in the sample. Thus, n cycles can produce 2{sup n} times as much target as was present to begin with. This paper discusses how PCR has had an impact on molecular biology, human genetics, infectious and genetic disease diagnosis, forensic science, and evolutionary biology.

  1. [Bullous drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Hertl-Yazdi, M S; Hertl, M

    2005-01-01

    Bullous drug exanthems are clinically characteristic, usually severe cutaneous and mucosal drug hypersensitivity reactions. Commonly, they appear 5-14 days after onset of drug treatment. Therapy of choice is to avoid the culprit drug and systemic administration of glucocorticoids. A key element in the immune pathogenesis of bullous drug exanthems is presumably the activation of cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes which recognize drug metabolites as nominal antigens. These compounds form spontaneously (e.g. penicillins) or are metabolized by cytochrome P450-dependent enzymes (sulfonamides). The diagnosis of bullous drug exanthems is primarily based on skin tests and in vitro-techniques. Among the skin tests, prick as well as patch tests are important. Patch tests can be also applied at the former skin lesion in fixed drug eruption. In vitro techniques include analysis of drug-specific IgE (only available for anti-penicillin, anti-sulfamethoxazole) and cellular tests with the patients' lymphocytes (lymphocyte transformation test-LTT).

  2. Mixtures and Mineral Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.

    The monograph Mixtures and Mineral Reactions contains a large amount of information of value to mineralogists, petrologists, and geochemists. The first four chapters are a succinct account of the thermodynamic description of crystalline solutions. In these early chapters a comparison is made between different mathematical treatments of activitycomposition models, there is a discussion of the unmixing by exsolution of a single solution into two phases, and methods of computing phase equilibria in assemblages of different minerals are given. If the reader is perplexed by the discussion of standard states (cf. Figure 1.3), not to worry. That is a normal condition for anyone forced to choose between equivalent reference frames yet knowing, somewhere down the line, that the choice will ultimately make one's computational life more or less difficult.

  3. Adverse reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan L; Nelson, Michael R; Hershey, Joyce N; Engler, Renata J M

    2003-06-01

    (The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.) Immunization healthcare is becoming increasingly complex as the number and types of vaccines have continued to expand. Like all prescription drugs, vaccines may be associated with adverse events. The majority of these reactions are self-limited and not associated with prolonged disability. The media, Internet and public advocacy groups have focused on potentially serious vaccine-associated adverse events with questions raised about causal linkages to increasing frequencies of diseases such as autism and asthma. Despite a lack of evidence of a causal relationship to a variety of vaccine safety concerns, including extensive reviews by the Institute of Medicine, questions regarding vaccine safety continue to threaten the success of immunization programs. Risk communication arid individual risk assessment is further challenged by the public health success of vaccine programs creating the perception that certain vaccines are no longer necessary or justified because of the rare reaction risk. There is a need for improved understanding of true vaccine contraindications and precautions as well as host factors and disease threat in order to develop a patient specific balanced risk communication intervention. When they occur, vaccine related adverse events must be treated, documented and reported through the VAERS system. The increasing complexity of vaccination health care has led the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify Vaccine Safety Assessment and Evaluation as a potential new specialty.

  4. Subdiffusion-reaction processes with A→B reactions versus subdiffusion-reaction processes with A+B→B reactions.

    PubMed

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz; Lewandowska, Katarzyna D

    2014-09-01

    We consider the subdiffusion-reaction process with reactions of a type A+B→B (in which particles A are assumed to be mobile, whereas B are assumed to be static) in comparison to the subdiffusion-reaction process with A→B reactions which was studied by Sokolov, Schmidt, and Sagués [Phys. Rev. E 73, 031102 (2006)]. In both processes a rule that reactions can only occur between particles which continue to exist is taken into account. Although in both processes a probability of the vanishing of particle A due to a reaction is independent of both time and space variables (assuming that in the system with the A+B→B reactions, particles B are distributed homogeneously), we show that subdiffusion-reaction equations describing these processes as well as their Green's functions are qualitatively different. The reason for this difference is as follows. In the case of the former reaction, particles A and B have to meet with some probability before the reaction occurs in contradiction with the case of the latter reaction. For the subdiffusion process with the A+B→B reactions we consider three models which differ in some details concerning a description of the reactions. We base the method considered in this paper on a random walk model in a system with both discrete time and discrete space variables. Then the system with discrete variables is transformed into a system with both continuous time and continuous space variables. Such a method seems to be convenient in analyzing subdiffusion-reaction processes with partially absorbing or partially reflecting walls. The reason is that within this method we can determine Green's functions without a necessity of solving a fractional differential subdiffusion-reaction equation with boundary conditions at the walls. As an example, we use the model to find the Green's functions for a subdiffusive reaction system (with the reactions mentioned above), which is bounded by a partially absorbing wall. This example shows how the model

  5. Extent of reaction in open systems with multiple heterogeneous reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    The familiar batch concept of extent of reaction is reexamined for systems of reactions occurring in open systems. Because species concentrations change as a result of transport processes as well as reactions in open systems, the extent of reaction has been less useful in practice in these applications. It is shown that by defining the extent of the equivalent batch reaction and a second contribution to the extent of reaction due to the transport processes, it is possible to treat the description of the dynamics of flow through porous media accompanied by many chemical reactions in a uniform, concise manner. This approach tends to isolate the reaction terms among themselves and away from the model partial differential equations, thereby enabling treatment of large problems involving both equilibrium and kinetically controlled reactions. Implications on the number of coupled partial differential equations necessary to be solved and on numerical algorithms for solving such problems are discussed. Examples provided illustrate the theory applied to solute transport in groundwater flow.

  6. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  7. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  8. NIF Gamma Reaction History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; McEvoy, A. M.; Hoffman, N. M.; Wilson, D. C.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Evans, S.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Lee, A.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Miller, E. K.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.

    2010-11-01

    The primary objective of the NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics is to provide bang time and burn width information based upon measurement of fusion gamma-rays. This is accomplished with energy-thresholded Gas Cherenkov detectors that convert MeV gamma-rays into UV/visible photons for high-bandwidth optical detection. In addition, the GRH detectors can perform γ-ray spectroscopy to explore other nuclear processes from which additional significant implosion parameters may be inferred (e.g., plastic ablator areal density). Implementation is occurring in 2 phases: 1) four PMT-based channels mounted to the outside of the NIF target chamber at ˜6 m from TCC (GRH-6m) for the 3e13-3e16 DT neutron yield range expected during the early ignition-tuning campaigns; and 2) several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at ˜15 m from TCC (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the wall into well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs for the 1e16-1e20 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign. This suite of diagnostics will allow exploration of interesting γ-ray physics well beyond the ignition campaign. Recent data from OMEGA and NIF will be shown.

  9. Formaldehyde reactions in dark clouds.

    PubMed

    Sen, A D; Anicich, V G; Federman, S R

    1992-05-20

    The low-pressure reactions of formaldehyde (H2CO) with D+, D2+, D3+, and He+ have been studied by the ion cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potential loss processes for formaldehyde in cores of dark interstellar clouds. The deuterated reactants, which are easier to study experimentally, represent direct analogs for protons. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels have been measured. Charge transfer is observed to be the dominant reaction of H2CO with D+, D2+, and He+ ions. Only the D3+ reaction exhibits a proton transfer channel. All reactions proceed at rate coefficients near the collision limit. Proton-deuteron exchange reactions were found to be inefficient processes in the formaldehyde system.

  10. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  11. Formaldehyde reactions in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Federman, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    The low-pressure reactions of formaldehyde (H2CO) with D(+), D2(+), D3(+), and He(+) are studied by the ion-cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potential loss processes for formaldehyde in cores of dark interstellar clouds. The deuterated reactants represent direct analogs for protons. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels have been measured. Charge transfer is observed to be the dominant reaction of H2CO with D(+), D2(+), and He(+) ions. Only the D3(+) reaction exhibits a proton-transfer channel. All reactions proceed at rate coefficients near the collision limit. Proton-deuteron exchange reactions are found to be inefficient processes in the formaldehyde system.

  12. Fractional reaction-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Wojcik, Mariusz; Tachiya, M.

    2003-07-01

    A fractional reaction-diffusion equation is derived from a continuous time random walk model when the transport is dispersive. The exit from the encounter distance, which is described by the algebraic waiting time distribution of jump motion, interferes with the reaction at the encounter distance. Therefore, the reaction term has a memory effect. The derived equation is applied to the geminate recombination problem. The recombination is shown to depend on the intrinsic reaction rate, in contrast with the results of Sung et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 2338 (2002)], which were obtained from the fractional reaction-diffusion equation where the diffusion term has a memory effect but the reaction term does not. The reactivity dependence of the recombination probability is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  13. Stochastic Modeling Of Biochemical Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    chemical reactions. Often for these reactions, the dynamics of the first M-order statistical moments of the species populations do not form a closed...results a stochastic model for gene expression is investigated. We show that in gene expression mechanisms , in which a protein inhibits its own...chemical reactions [7, 8, 4, 9, 10]. Since one is often interested in only the first and second order statistical moments for the number of molecules of

  14. Kinematically complete chemical reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippel, S.; Stei, M.; Otto, R.; Hlavenka, P.; Mikosch, J.; Eichhorn, C.; Lourderaj, U.; Zhang, J. X.; Hase, W. L.; Weidemüller, M.; Wester, R.

    2009-11-01

    Kinematically complete studies of molecular reactions offer an unprecedented level of insight into the dynamics and the different mechanisms by which chemical reactions occur. We have developed a scheme to study ion-molecule reactions by velocity map imaging at very low collision energies. Results for the elementary nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction Cl- + CH3I → ClCH3 + I- are presented and compared to high-level direct dynamics trajectory calculations. Furthermore, an improved design of the crossed-beam imaging spectrometer with full three-dimensional measurement capabilities is discussed and characterization measurements using photoionization of NH3 and photodissociation of CH3I are presented.

  15. Pathophysiology of hemolytic transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Robertson D

    2005-07-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTR) are systemic reactions provoked by immunologic red blood cell (RBC) incompatibility. Clinical and experimental observations of such reactions indicate that they proceed through phases of humoral immune reaction, activation of phagocytes, productions of cytokine mediators, and wide-ranging cellular responses. HTR have many features in common with the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Knowledge of the pathophysiologic mechanisms in HTR suggest that newer biological agents that target complement intermediates or proinflammatory cytokines may be effective agents in the treatment of severe HTRs.

  16. Racemization in Prins Cyclization Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jasti, Ramesh

    2008-01-01

    Isotopic labeling experiments were performed in order to elucidate a new mechanism for racemization in Prins cyclization reactions. The loss in optical activity for these reactions was shown to occur by 2-oxonia-Cope rearrangements by way of a (Z)-oxocarbenium ion intermediate. Reaction conditions such as solvent, temperature, and the nucleophile employed played a critical role in whether an erosion in enantiomeric excess was observed. Additionally, certain structural features of Prins cyclization precursors were also shown to be important for preserving optical purity in these reactions. PMID:17031979

  17. [Situational reactions in suicidologic practice].

    PubMed

    Ambrumova, A G; Vrono, E M

    1985-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the description of suicidal manifestations in mentally normal adolescents among typical behavioural disorders characteristic of situational reactions of this age. Three types of suicido-dangerous situational responses of adolescents were specified with regard to their age and auto-and heteaggressiveness ratio: reaction of deprivation, explosive reaction and reaction of auto-elimination. Suicidogenic conflicts were analyzed and spheres of age-specific suicidal conflicts were defined. It is advisable that outpatient management of mentally normal adolescents with a history of a suicidal attempt be conducted in a special room of presentive suicidological service.

  18. Speeding chemical reactions by focusing.

    PubMed

    Lacasta, A M; Ramírez-Piscina, L; Sancho, J M; Lindenberg, K

    2013-04-14

    We present numerical results for a chemical reaction of colloidal particles which are transported by a laminar fluid and are focused by periodic obstacles in such a way that the two components are well mixed and consequently the chemical reaction is speeded up. The roles of the various system parameters (diffusion coefficients, reaction rate, and obstacles sizes) are studied. We show that focusing speeds up the reaction from the diffusion limited rate ∼t(-1/2) to very close to the perfect mixing rate, ∼t(-1).

  19. Speeding chemical reactions by focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasta, A. M.; Ramírez-Piscina, L.; Sancho, J. M.; Lindenberg, K.

    2013-04-01

    We present numerical results for a chemical reaction of colloidal particles which are transported by a laminar fluid and are focused by periodic obstacles in such a way that the two components are well mixed and consequently the chemical reaction is speeded up. The roles of the various system parameters (diffusion coefficients, reaction rate, and obstacles sizes) are studied. We show that focusing speeds up the reaction from the diffusion limited rate ˜t-1/2 to very close to the perfect mixing rate, ˜t-1.

  20. Dynamic Reaction Figures: An Integrative Vehicle for Understanding Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A highly flexible learning tool, referred to as a dynamic reaction figure, is described. Application of these figures can (i) yield the correct chemical equation by simply following a set of menu driven directions; (ii) present the underlying "mechanism" in chemical reactions; and (iii) help to solve quantitative problems in a number of different…

  1. Topologically invariant reaction coordinates for simulating multistate chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Mones, Letif; Csányi, Gábor

    2012-12-27

    Evaluating free energy profiles of chemical reactions in complex environments such as solvents and enzymes requires extensive sampling, which is usually performed by potential of mean force (PMF) techniques. The reliability of the sampling depends not only on the applied PMF method but also the reaction coordinate space within the dynamics is biased. In contrast to simple geometrical collective variables that depend only on the positions of the atomic coordinates of the reactants, the E(gap) reaction coordinate (the energy difference obtained by evaluating a suitable force field using reactant and product state topologies) has the unique property that it is able to take environmental effects into account leading to better convergence, a more faithful description of the transition state ensemble and therefore more accurate free energy profiles. However, E(gap) requires predefined topologies and is therefore inapplicable for multistate reactions, in which the barrier between the chemically equivalent topologies is comparable to the reaction activation barrier, because undesired "side reactions" occur. In this article, we introduce a new energy-based collective variable by generalizing the E(gap) reaction coordinate such that it becomes invariant to equivalent topologies and show that it yields more well behaved free energy profiles than simpler geometrical reaction coordinates.

  2. Dynamic Reaction Figures: An Integrative Vehicle for Understanding Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A highly flexible learning tool, referred to as a dynamic reaction figure, is described. Application of these figures can (i) yield the correct chemical equation by simply following a set of menu driven directions; (ii) present the underlying "mechanism" in chemical reactions; and (iii) help to solve quantitative problems in a number of different…

  3. Participants' Reactions to Computerized Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Kim C.; Johnson, Marilyn F.

    This study investigated participants' reactions to computerized testing and assessed the practicability of this testing method in the classroom. A sample of 315 secondary-level students took a computerized and a printed version of a standardized aptitude test battery and a survey assessing their reactions to the computerized testing. Overall…

  4. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  5. Pharmacogenetics of hypersensitivity drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Simone; Becquemont, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and represent a major burden on the healthcare system. Some of those reactions are immunologically mediated (hypersensitivity reactions) and can be clinically subdivided into two categories: immediate reactions (IgE-related) and delayed reactions (T-cell-mediated). Delayed hypersensitivity reactions include both systemic syndromes and organ-specific toxicities and can be triggered by a wide range of chemically diverse drugs. Recent studies have demonstrated a strong genetic association between human leukocyte antigen alleles and susceptibility to delayed drug hypersensitivity. Most notable examples include human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*57:01 allele and abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome or HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-B*58:01 alleles related to severe cutaneous reactions induced by carbamazepine and allopurinol, respectively. This review aims to explore our current understanding in the field of pharmacogenomics of HLA-associated drug hypersensitivities and its translation into clinical practice for predicting adverse drug reactions. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Statistical Factors in Complexation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chung-Sun

    1985-01-01

    Four cases which illustrate statistical factors in complexation reactions (where two of the reactants are monodentate ligands) are presented. Included are tables showing statistical factors for the reactions of: (1) square-planar complexes; (2) tetrahedral complexes; and (3) octahedral complexes. (JN)

  7. "Greening up" the Suzuki Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aktoudianakis, Evangelos; Chan, Elton; Edward, Amanda R.; Jarosz, Isabel; Lee, Vicki; Mui, Leo; Thatipamala, Sonya S.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rapid, green synthesis of a biaryl compound (4-phenylphenol) via a Pd(0)-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling reaction in water. Mild reaction conditions and operational simplicity makes this experiment especially amenable to both mid- and upper-level undergraduates. The methodology exposes students to purely aqueous…

  8. "Greening up" the Suzuki Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aktoudianakis, Evangelos; Chan, Elton; Edward, Amanda R.; Jarosz, Isabel; Lee, Vicki; Mui, Leo; Thatipamala, Sonya S.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rapid, green synthesis of a biaryl compound (4-phenylphenol) via a Pd(0)-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling reaction in water. Mild reaction conditions and operational simplicity makes this experiment especially amenable to both mid- and upper-level undergraduates. The methodology exposes students to purely aqueous…

  9. Isosinglet approximation for nonelastic reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Group theoretic relations are derived between different combinations of projectile and secondary particles which appear to have a broad range of application in spacecraft shielding or radiation damage studies. These relations are used to reduce the experimental effort required to obtain nuclear reaction data for transport calculations. Implications for theoretical modeling are also noted, especially for heavy-heavy reactions.

  10. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  11. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  12. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  13. PHENOTHIAZINE ATARAXICS—Extrapyramidal Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Harvey D.; Malcolm, Mary

    1960-01-01

    Thirty-nine cases of extrapyramidal reactions caused by seven chemically different phenothiazine medications are presented. Historical, pharmacological, diagnostic, and therapeutic factors are considered. It is important that the physician prescribing phenothiazines be well aware of the reactions which may occur so that therapy may be discontinued at the first untoward signs. PMID:13806816

  14. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-05

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  15. Fundamental reaction pathways during coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Gatsis, J.G. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the fundamental reaction pathways in coal petroleum residuum coprocessing. Once the reaction pathways are defined, further efforts can be directed at improving those aspects of the chemistry of coprocessing that are responsible for the desired results such as high oil yields, low dihydrogen consumption, and mild reaction conditions. We decided to carry out this investigation by looking at four basic aspects of coprocessing: (1) the effect of fossil fuel materials on promoting reactions essential to coprocessing such as hydrogen atom transfer, carbon-carbon bond scission, and hydrodemethylation; (2) the effect of varied mild conditions on the coprocessing reactions; (3) determination of dihydrogen uptake and utilization under severe conditions as a function of the coal or petroleum residuum employed; and (4) the effect of varied dihydrogen pressure, temperature, and residence time on the uptake and utilization of dihydrogen and on the distribution of the coprocessed products. Accomplishments are described.

  16. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  17. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  18. [Anaphylactic reaction following hair bleaching].

    PubMed

    Babilas, P; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R-M

    2005-12-01

    Ammonium persulphate is a potent bleach and oxidizing agent that is commonly present in hair bleaches. Because bleaching is so commonly performed, hairdressers often develop allergic contact dermatitis to ammonium persulphate. In addition to this delayed reaction, asthma and rhinitis may develop as immediate reactions in those exposed to the fumes. Severe anaphylactic reactions are rare. We report a 24-year-old woman who acquired dermatitis following contact with bleaching substances while working as a hairdresser. After changing her profession, the dermatitis disappeared. Following the private use of a hairdressing bleach containing ammonium persulphate, she suffered a severe anaphylactic reaction with unconsciousness. The patient also developed an anaphylactic reaction three hours following patch testing with the hairdresser battery. The rub test with ammonium persulphate (2.5%) in a 1:100 solution was positive.

  19. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nałecz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  20. Reaction rates for reaction-diffusion kinetics on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2017-02-01

    The reaction-diffusion master equation is a stochastic model often utilized in the study of biochemical reaction networks in living cells. It is applied when the spatial distribution of molecules is important to the dynamics of the system. A viable approach to resolve the complex geometry of cells accurately is to discretize space with an unstructured mesh. Diffusion is modeled as discrete jumps between nodes on the mesh, and the diffusion jump rates can be obtained through a discretization of the diffusion equation on the mesh. Reactions can occur when molecules occupy the same voxel. In this paper, we develop a method for computing accurate reaction rates between molecules occupying the same voxel in an unstructured mesh. For large voxels, these rates are known to be well approximated by the reaction rates derived by Collins and Kimball, but as the mesh is refined, no analytical expression for the rates exists. We reduce the problem of computing accurate reaction rates to a pure preprocessing step, depending only on the mesh and not on the model parameters, and we devise an efficient numerical scheme to estimate them to high accuracy. We show in several numerical examples that as we refine the mesh, the results obtained with the reaction-diffusion master equation approach those of a more fine-grained Smoluchowski particle-tracking model.

  1. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles.

    PubMed

    Nałęcz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miękisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-07

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  2. Effective reaction parameters for mixing controlled reactions in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jian; Dentz, Marco; Carrera, Jesus; Kitanidis, Peter

    2008-02-01

    Sound understanding of mixing-controlled reactions in heterogeneous media is needed for the realistic modeling of contaminant transport in aquifers and is a precondition for the evaluation of natural attenuation processes, the design of nuclear waste disposal, and the engineered remediation of contaminated sites. In this work, we study the bimolecular dissolution-precipitation equilibrium reaction, adapted after De Simoni et al. (2005). Because of advective and dispersive transport of the reacting species, the system is globally in nonequilibrium because the effective reaction rate is limited by the finite rate of transport and thus is affected by the heterogeneity of the formation. We study the macroscopic formulation of such a reactive transport system in terms of mixing-controlled reaction parameters which integrate the impact of spatial heterogeneity. The apparent chemical saturation is found to be a function of the concentration variance and is generally greater than its local-scale equivalent. This explains why water samples taken from pumping wells are normally nonequilibrium with respect to minerals existing in the aquifer, even when local equilibrium is to be expected. The reaction rate is given by the product of a reaction factor, associated with the local equilibrium constant and concentration variance, and a mixing factor, which is the product of the microdispersion coefficient and the square gradient of the mean and perturbation concentration fields. The mixing factor dominates the description of the reaction rate in the upscaled macroscopic models. The reaction rate predicted by macroscopic models is controlled by two competing effects: The large heterogeneity-induced macrodispersion coefficient leads to an increase of reaction rate, while a more smoothed concentration gradient may lead to a decrease of the reaction rate. Macroscopic models may only give a good approximation at large time and away from the plume center of mass because of the balanced

  3. Leukocyte Agglomeration Reaction in Diagnosis of Allergy Reactions from Antibiotics,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    tested in a clinic on 80 patients with serious allergic anamnesis . The results of the studies indicate that the leukocyte agglomeration reaction is a highly sensitive immunological indicator of hypersensitivity to antibiotics.

  4. Interface Reactions and Synthetic Reaction of Composite Systems

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon Sik; Kim, Jeong Min

    2010-01-01

    Interface reactions in composite systems often determine their overall properties, since product phases usually formed at interfaces during composite fabrication processing make up a large portion of the composites. Since most composite materials represent a ternary or higher order materials system, many studies have focused on analyses of diffusion phenomena and kinetics in multicomponent systems. However, the understanding of the kinetic behavior increases the complexity, since the kinetics of each component during interdiffusion reactions need to be defined for interpreting composite behaviors. From this standpoint, it is important to clarify the interface reactions for producing compatible interfaces with desired product phases. A thermodynamic evaluation such as a chemical potential of involving components can provide an understanding of the diffusion reactions, which govern diffusion pathways and product phase formation. A strategic approach for designing compatible interfaces is discussed in terms of chemical potential diagrams and interface morphology, with some material examples.

  5. Hypersensitivity reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Shahid; Bahna, Sami L

    2009-06-01

    To provide an updated concise review on food additives adverse reactions, diagnosis, and management. Despite the common use of food additives, their adverse reactions seem to be very rare in the general population (0.01-0.23%) but higher in atopic individuals (2-7%). Probably because of the difficulty in diagnosis, most of the available information is based on case reports or small series. Reported reactions are mostly mild and may affect the skin, the gastrointestinal tract, or the airways, and rarely anaphylaxis. Food additives should be suspected as the culprit in patients who report a history of reactions to a number of unrelated foods or to a certain food when commercially prepared but not when prepared at home. The major problem in dealing with reactions to additives is the identification of the offending agent(s). Apart from a careful history taking, allergy skin testing or in-vitro testing are rarely useful. Trials of elimination and reintroduction may be more helpful. If the anticipated reaction is severe, a well designed challenge testing should be carried out. Once the offending additive(s) is confirmed, treatment is avoidance. Because accidental exposure often happens, patients with a history of severe reactions should have self-injectable epinephrine and wear MedicAlert (Turlock, California, USA) identification.

  6. Surrogate Nuclear Reactions using STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Church, J A; Ahle, L; Cooper, J R; Hoffman, R D; Moody, K; Punyon, J; Schiller, A; Algin, E; Plettner, C; Ai, H; Beausang, C W; Casten, R F; Hughes, R; Ricard-McCutchan, E; Meyer, D; Ressler, J J; Caggiano, J A; Zamfir, N V; Amro, H; Heinz, A; Fallon, P; McMahan, M A; Macchiavelli, A O; Phair, L W

    2004-10-26

    The results from two surrogate reaction experiments using the STARS (Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies) spectrometer are presented. The surrogate method involves measuring the particle and/or {gamma}-ray decay probabilities of excited nuclei populated via a direct reaction. These probabilities can then be used to deduce neutron-induced reaction cross sections that lead to the same compound nuclei. In the first experiment STARS coupled to the GAMMASPHERE {gamma}-ray spectrometer successfully reproduce surrogate (n,{gamma}), (n,n'{gamma}) and (n,2n{gamma}) cross sections on {sup 155,156}Gd using Gd {sup 3}He-induced reactions. In the second series of experiments an energetic deuteron beam from the ESTU tandem at the Wright Nuclear Structure Lab at Yale University was used to obtain the ratio of fission probabilities for {sup 238}U/ {sup 236}U and {sup 237}U/ {sup 239}U populated using the {sup 236,238}U(d,d'f) and {sup 236,238}U(d,pf) reactions. Results from these experiments are presented and the implications for the surrogate reaction technique are discussed.

  7. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, Christopher R.; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Holst, Gregory L.; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L.; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously—each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel. PMID:26339317

  8. Drug hypersensitivity reactions involving skin.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Oliver; Schnyder, Benno; Pichler, Werner J

    2010-01-01

    Immune reactions to drugs can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, lungs, and other organs. Beside immediate, IgE-mediated reactions of varying degrees (urticaria to anaphylactic shock), many drug hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed, namely hours to days after starting drug treatment, showing a variety of clinical manifestations from solely skin involvement to fulminant systemic diseases which may be fatal. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-specific T cells in patients with delayed reactions confirmed a predominant role for T cells in the onset and maintenance of immune-mediated delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions (type IV reactions). In these reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are stimulated by drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR). Drugs can stimulate T cells in two ways: they can act as haptens and bind covalently to larger protein structures (hapten-carrier model), inducing a specific immune response. In addition, they may accidentally bind in a labile, noncovalent way to a particular TCR of the whole TCR repertoire and possibly also major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules - similar to their pharmacologic action. This seems to be sufficient to reactivate certain, probably in vivo preactivated T cells, if an additional interaction of the drug-stimulated TCR with MHC molecules occurs. The mechanism was named pharmacological interaction of a drug with (immune) receptor and thus termed the p-i concept. This new concept may explain the frequent skin symptoms in drug hypersensitivity to oral or parenteral drugs. Furthermore, the various clinical manifestations of T cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity may be explained by distinct T cell functions leading to different clinical phenotypes. These data allowed a subclassification of the delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) into T cell reactions which, by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines, preferentially activate and recruit

  9. Standard Gibbs Energy of Metabolic Reactions: I. Hexokinase Reaction.

    PubMed

    Meurer, Florian; Bobrownik, Maria; Sadowski, Gabriele; Held, Christoph

    2016-10-11

    The standard Gibbs energy of reaction enables calculation of the driving force of a (bio)chemical reaction. Gibbs energies of reaction are required in thermodynamic approaches to determine fluxes as well as single reaction conversions of metabolic bioreactions. The hexokinase reaction (phosphorylation of glucose) is the entrance step of glycolysis, and thus its standard Gibbs energy of reaction (Δ(R)g°) is of great impact. Δ(R)g° is accessible from equilibrium measurements, and the very small concentrations of the reacting agents cause usually high error bars in data reduction steps. Even worse, works from literature do not account for the nonideal behavior of the reacting agents (activity coefficients were assumed to be unity); thus published Δ(R)g° values are not standard data. Consistent treatment of activity coefficients of reacting agents is crucial for the accurate determination of standard Gibbs energy from equilibrium measurements. In this work, equilibrium molalities of hexokinase reaction were measured with an enzyme kit. These results were combined with reacting agents' activity coefficients obtained with the thermodynamic model ePC-SAFT. Pure-component parameters for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) were fitted to experimental osmotic coefficients (water + Na2ATP, water + NaADP). Δ(R)g° of the hexokinase reaction at 298.15 K and pH 7 was found to be -17.83 ± 0.52 kJ·mol(-1). This value was compared with experimental literature data; very good agreement between the different Δ(R)g° values was obtained by accounting for pH, pMg, and the activity coefficients of the reacting agents.

  10. Freeze Enhanced Halate Halide Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, J. T.; Weaver, K.; Broderick, A.

    2014-12-01

    Relatively little is known about halate ion species (XO3-; X = I, Br, Cl) in atmospheric condensed phases. It was initial thought that iodate was a terminal stable species upon iodide oxidation. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that reactions involving iodate can lead to reactive iodine, and this chemistry is accelerated under acidic conditions. The environmental concentrations and chemistry of bromate and chlorate are largely unexplored in environmental ices. We present results from a series of aqueous phase halate ion reactions with halides under acidic conditions, showing that the kinetics are strongly enhanced upon freezing. The products of these reactions are reactive halogens, which have important implications to marine boundary layer chemistry.

  11. Magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocking, G.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly (MSRWA) is the product of a development effort funded by the Air Force Materials Laboratory (AFML) at Wright Patterson AFB. The specific objective of the project was to establish the manufacturing processes for samarium cobalt magnets and demonstrate their use in a space application. The development was successful on both counts. The application portion of the program, which involves the magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly, is emphasized. The requirements for the reaction wheel were based on the bias wheel requirements of the DSP satellite. The tasks included the design, fabrication, and test of the unit to the DSP program qualification requirements.

  12. Adverse reactions to tetanus toxoid.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R L; Lowe, R S; Lanier, B Q

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective review of 740 charts of patients with a history of adverse reaction to tetanus toxoid immunization was undertaken. The most common reactions, by history, were local edema and tenderness (33%), fever (15%), and anaphylactoid response (33%). Three patients who had a vesicular eruption at the immunization site were found to have delayed hypersensitivity to mercury. Thirty percent of the patients had received tetanus toxoid within one year and 55% within five years of evaluation. Reactive responses to immediate skin tests were exceedingly rare (less than 1%). None of the challenge patients suffered an adverse reaction.

  13. [Arthropod bite reactions and pyodermias].

    PubMed

    Hengge, U R

    2008-08-01

    Tourists in the tropics often develop reactions to bites or stings of mosquitoes, fleas, mites, ants, bedbugs, beetles, larva, millipedes, spiders and scorpions. In addition, they may have fresh or salt water exposure to sponges, corals, jellyfish and sea urchins with resultant injury and inflammation. Bacterial skin infections (pyodermias) can follow bites or stings as well as mechanical trauma. The most common bacteria involved in skin infections are staphylococci and streptococci. For tourists, bacterial infections are often complicating a pruritic bite reaction and scratching. It is important to know the cause of the bite reaction and pyoderma in order to take appropriate therapeutic measures.

  14. Hypersensitivity reactions to biologic agents.

    PubMed

    Vultaggio, Alessandra; Castells, Mariana C

    2014-08-01

    Biologic agents (BAs) are important therapeutic tools; their use has rapidly expanded and they are used in oncology, immunology, and inflammatory diseases. Their use may be limited, however, by adverse drug reactions. This article reviews the current literature on clinical presentation and pathogenic mechanisms of both acute and delayed reactions. In addition, procedures for management of BA-induced reactions, including preventive and diagnostic work-up, are provided. Lastly, this article summarizes the current knowledge of desensitization to several widely used monoclonal antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  16. Coarctate cyclization reactions: a primer.

    PubMed

    Young, Brian S; Herges, Rainer; Haley, Michael M

    2012-10-04

    The cleavage of five-membered heterocycles possessing an exocyclic carbene or nitrene to form conjugated ene-ene-yne systems has been documented for over 40 years; however, the reverse reaction, using a conjugated "ene-ene-yne" precursor to form a heterocycle is a relatively new approach. Over the past decade, the Haley and Herges groups have studied computationally and experimentally the cyclization of the "hetero-ene-ene-yne" motif via an unusual class of concerted reactions known as coarctate reactions. This feature article details our synthetic and mechanistic work involving triazene-arene-alkynes and structurally-related systems to generate heterocycles using coarctate chemistry.

  17. Bioluminescent Reaction by Immobilized Luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryuta; Takahama, Eriko; Iinuma, Masataka; Ikeda, Takeshi; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    We have investigated an effect of immobilization of luciferase molecules at the optical fiber end on a bioluminescent reaction. The time dependence of measured count rates of emitted photons has been analyzed by fitting with numerical solution of differential equations including the effect of the product-inhibitor and the deactivation of the luciferase. Through the analysis, we have successfully extracted kinetic constants such as, reaction rate, number of active luciferase molecules, etc. Ratio of active molecules to total luciferase molecules in immobilization was one order of magnitude lower than that in solution. The reaction rate of the bioluminescent process was also different from the one of free luciferase in solution.

  18. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    PubMed

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Radiative capture reactions in astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Brune, Carl R.; Davids, Barry

    2015-08-07

    Here, the radiative capture reactions of greatest importance in nuclear astrophysics are identified and placed in their stellar contexts. Recent experimental efforts to estimate their thermally averaged rates are surveyed.

  20. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Vasudevan, Biju; Pragasam, Vijendran

    2013-01-01

    Severe cutaneous drug reactions are one of the commonest medical challenges presenting to an emergency room in any hospital. The manifestations range from maculopapular rash to severe systemic symptoms like renal failure and cardiovascular compromise. Toxic epidermal necrolysis, erythroderma, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis and drug induced vasculitis are the common cutaneous drug reactions which can have severe morbidity and even mortality. Careful history taking of the lag period after drug intake and associated symptoms, along with detailed examination of the skin, mucosa and various systems, help in early diagnosis of these reactions. Early stoppage of the incriminating drug, specific therapy including corticosteroids, cyclosporine and intravenous immunoglobulin depending on the case along with supportive therapy and local measures help in salvaging most patients. An overview of these important cutaneous drug reactions along with their management is being reviewed in this article. PMID:24600147

  1. Sarcoid type reaction: medical hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Tchernev, G; Chokoeva, A A; Patterson, J W; Wollina, U; Lotti, T

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoid-type reactions could not always be clearly distinct from the independent disease sarcoidosis. Particular attention should be paid to paraneoplastic type of sarcoid reaction which until recent literature was characterized as 1) sarcoidosis associated with tumor disease or 2) sarcoidosis classified and presented as paraneoplastic disease. The analogy between sarcoidosis and paraneoplastic type of sarcoid reaction are the pure epithelioid cell granulomas. The role of molecular mimicry in paraneoplastic type of reaction is probably significant but not yet fully proven and understood. Future studies on this issue should be directed to identify the genetic defects (regarding the inflammasome and those recently established at EOS and Blau Syndrome) as well as screening programs for early detection of cancers, with a view to optimization of the subsequent therapy.

  2. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-01-05

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  3. Solar-thermal reaction processing

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Alan W; Dahl, Jaimee K; Lewandowski, Allan A; Bingham, Carl; Raska Buechler, Karen J; Grothe, Willy

    2014-03-18

    In an embodiment, a method of conducting a high temperature chemical reaction that produces hydrogen or synthesis gas is described. The high temperature chemical reaction is conducted in a reactor having at least two reactor shells, including an inner shell and an outer shell. Heat absorbing particles are included in a gas stream flowing in the inner shell. The reactor is heated at least in part by a source of concentrated sunlight. The inner shell is heated by the concentrated sunlight. The inner shell re-radiates from the inner wall and heats the heat absorbing particles in the gas stream flowing through the inner shell, and heat transfers from the heat absorbing particles to the first gas stream, thereby heating the reactants in the gas stream to a sufficiently high temperature so that the first gas stream undergoes the desired reaction(s), thereby producing hydrogen or synthesis gas in the gas stream.

  4. Alternative view of enzyme reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Dewar, M J; Storch, D M

    1985-01-01

    Since adsorption of the substrate in the active site of an enzyme can occur only if all solvent is squeezed out from between them, any reaction between them takes place in the absence of any intervening solvent--i.e., as it would in the gas phase. Recent work has shown that ionic reactions in the gas phase often differ greatly from analogous processes in solution. Therefore, current interpretations of enzyme reactions in terms of solution chemistry are misguided. The large rates and specificity of enzyme reactions may be due simply to elimination of the solvent. The cleavage of peptides by chymotrypsin and carboxypeptidase A can be interpreted satisfactorily in this way. PMID:3857576

  5. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  6. Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Brearley, A. J.; Ganguly, J.; Liermann, H.-P.; Keil, K.

    2004-01-01

    Current carbonaceous chondrite parent-body thermal models [1-3] produce scenarios that are inconsistent with constraints on aqueous alteration conditions based on meteorite mineralogical evidence, such as phase stability relationships within the meteorite matrix minerals [4] and isotope equilibration arguments [5, 6]. This discrepancy arises principally because of the thermal runaway effect produced by silicate hydration reactions (here loosely called serpentinization, as the principal products are serpentine minerals), which are so exothermic as to produce more than enough heat to melt more ice and provide a self-sustaining chain reaction. One possible way to dissipate the heat of reaction is to use a very small parent body [e.g., 2] or possibly a rubble pile model. Another possibility is to release this heat more slowly, which depends on the alteration reaction path and kinetics.

  7. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  8. Reaction Dynamics at Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-04-01

    The liquid interface is a narrow, highly anisotropic region, characterized by rapidly varying density, polarity, and molecular structure. I review several aspects of interfacial solvation and show how these affect reactivity at liquid/liquid interfaces. I specifically consider ion transfer, electron transfer, and SN2 reactions, showing that solvent effects on these reactions can be understood by examining the unique structure and dynamics of the liquid interface region.

  9. Radiation reaction reconsidered (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, Hartmut

    2017-05-01

    Starting from first principles the physics of radiation reaction for strong laser fields interacting with electrons and positrons is revisited. With the help of a Wigner formulation of QED a derivation of a system of molecular dynamical (MD) equations of motion with a new radiation reaction term and spin is given. The new equations obtained are delay equations which promise to be void of the problems encountered with the LAD theory.

  10. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics.

  11. Cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, S; Allegra, A; Calapai, G; Musolino, C; Gangemi, S

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) used principally in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), myelodysplastic syndromes (MS) and amyloidosis. Adverse reactions related to lenalidomide include myelosuppression (mainly neutropenia but also thrombocytopenia), gastrointestinal problems, skin eruption, atrial fibrillation and asthenia, decreased peripheral blood stem cell yield during stem cell collection, venous thromboembolism, and secondary malignances. In this review we focused our attention on the cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

  12. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate.

  13. Reaction dynamics at liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-04-01

    The liquid interface is a narrow, highly anisotropic region, characterized by rapidly varying density, polarity, and molecular structure. I review several aspects of interfacial solvation and show how these affect reactivity at liquid/liquid interfaces. I specifically consider ion transfer, electron transfer, and SN2 reactions, showing that solvent effects on these reactions can be understood by examining the unique structure and dynamics of the liquid interface region.

  14. Reaction pathways and possible path bifurcation for the Schmidt reaction.

    PubMed

    Katori, Tetsuji; Itoh, Shuhei; Sato, Makoto; Yamataka, Hiroshi

    2010-03-17

    The N(2) liberation from iminodiazonium ion (2-X) is a key step of the Schmidt rearrangement of ketones. Molecular orbital calculations showed that two concurrent reaction channels, syn-benzyl fragmentation and anti-Me rearrangement, exist for syn-2, whereas anti-2-X proceeds via a single TS. Substituent effect analyses of the reactions of syn-2-X gave concave-upward plots, typical for a concurrent reaction mechanism. On the other hand, the reactions of anti-2-X gave linear Hammett plots, indicative of a single reaction mechanism for all anti-2-X. IRC calculations, however, revealed that the TS led to either an anti-benzyl rearrangement or an anti-benzyl fragmentation product depending on the substituent. Thus, the change of the mechanism (identity of the product) could not be detected by the Hammett plots. Ab initio dynamics simulations for anti-2-X were found to follow the IRC path for X = p-NO(2), giving the rearrangement product, and almost so for X = p-MeO, giving the fragmentation products. However, in borderline cases where X is less donating than p-MeO and less withdrawing than p-NO(2), the trajectories did not follow the minimum energy path on the potential energy surface but gave both rearrangement and fragmentation products directly from the single TS. This is a novel example of path bifurcation for a closed shell anionic reaction. It was concluded that a reactivity-selectivity argument based on the traditional TS theory might not always be applicable even to a well-known textbook organic reaction.

  15. Expert system for predicting reaction conditions: the Michael reaction case.

    PubMed

    Marcou, G; Aires de Sousa, J; Latino, D A R S; de Luca, A; Horvath, D; Rietsch, V; Varnek, A

    2015-02-23

    A generic chemical transformation may often be achieved under various synthetic conditions. However, for any specific reagents, only one or a few among the reported synthetic protocols may be successful. For example, Michael β-addition reactions may proceed under different choices of solvent (e.g., hydrophobic, aprotic polar, protic) and catalyst (e.g., Brønsted acid, Lewis acid, Lewis base, etc.). Chemoinformatics methods could be efficiently used to establish a relationship between the reagent structures and the required reaction conditions, which would allow synthetic chemists to waste less time and resources in trying out various protocols in search for the appropriate one. In order to address this problem, a number of 2-classes classification models have been built on a set of 198 Michael reactions retrieved from literature. Trained models discriminate between processes that are compatible and respectively processes not feasible under a specific reaction condition option (feasible or not with a Lewis acid catalyst, feasible or not in hydrophobic solvent, etc.). Eight distinct models were built to decide the compatibility of a Michael addition process with each considered reaction condition option, while a ninth model was aimed to predict whether the assumed Michael addition is feasible at all. Different machine-learning methods (Support Vector Machine, Naive Bayes, and Random Forest) in combination with different types of descriptors (ISIDA fragments issued from Condensed Graphs of Reactions, MOLMAP, Electronic Effect Descriptors, and Chemistry Development Kit computed descriptors) have been used. Models have good predictive performance in 3-fold cross-validation done three times: balanced accuracy varies from 0.7 to 1. Developed models are available for the users at http://infochim.u-strasbg.fr/webserv/VSEngine.html . Eventually, these were challenged to predict feasibility conditions for ∼50 novel Michael reactions from the eNovalys database (originally

  16. Reciprocity theory of homogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbormbai, Adolf A.

    1990-03-01

    The reciprocity formalism is applied to the homogeneous gaseous reactions in which the structure of the participating molecules changes upon collision with one another, resulting in a change in the composition of the gas. The approach is applied to various classes of dissociation, recombination, rearrangement, ionizing, and photochemical reactions. It is shown that for the principle of reciprocity to be satisfied it is necessary that all chemical reactions exist in complementary pairs which consist of the forward and backward reactions. The backward reaction may be described by either the reverse or inverse process. The forward and backward processes must satisfy the same reciprocity equation. Because the number of dynamical variables is usually unbalanced on both sides of a chemical equation, it is necessary that this balance be established by including as many of the dynamical variables as needed before the reciprocity equation can be formulated. Statistical transformation models of the reactions are formulated. The models are classified under the titles free exchange, restricted exchange and simplified restricted exchange. The special equations for the forward and backward processes are obtained. The models are consistent with the H theorem and Le Chatelier's principle. The models are also formulated in the context of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  17. Reactions of stabilized Criegee Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, Luc; Harder, Hartwig; Novelli, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl oxides (Criegee intermediates) were proposed as key intermediates in the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes in 1975 by Rudolf Criegee. Despite the importance of ozonolysis in atmospheric chemistry, direct observation of these intermediates remained elusive, with only indirect experimental evidence for their role in the oxidation of hydrocarbons, e.g. through scavenging experiments. Direct experimental observation of stabilized CI has only been achieved since 2008. Since then, a concerted effort using experimental and theoretical means is in motion to characterize the chemistry and kinetics of these reactive intermediates. We present the results of theoretical investigations of the chemistry of Criegee intermediates with a series of coreactants which may be of importance in the atmosphere, in experimental setups, or both. This includes the CI+CI cross-reaction, which proceeds with a rate coefficient near the collision limit and can be important in experimental conditions. The CI + alkene reactions show strong dependence of the rate coefficient depending on the coreactants, but is generally found to be rather slow. The CI + ozone reaction is sufficiently fast to occur both in experiment and the free troposphere, and acts as a sink for CI. The reaction of CI with hydroperoxides, ROOH, is complex, and leads both to the formation of oligomers, as to the formation of reactive etheroxides, with a moderately fast rate coefficient. The importance of these reactions is placed in the context of the reaction conditions in different atmospheric environments ranging from unpolluted to highly polluted.

  18. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  19. A Calibration Reaction For NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vande Kolk, B.; Chen, Y.; Deboer, R. J.; Gilardy, G.; Liu, Q.; Lyons, S.; Manukyan, K.; Moran, M.; Seymour, C.; Stech, E.; Strauss, S.; Wiescher, M.

    2016-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) can produce a temperature range imitating that which occurs in a star during its hydrogen burning phase. The 10B(p, α)7Be reaction has been selected as a way to determine the temperatures created at NIF. The advantage of this calibration reaction is the product: Be-7 has a half-life of 53.2 days, sufficient for gathering and studying the abundance created while also decaying within several months. A 10 keV resonance exists which dominates the 10B(p, α)7Be reaction as well as 10B(p, γ)11C, another reaction channel of 10B+p. Additionally, another resonance exists for both reactions at 600 keV. There is not reliable extrapolation to the low energies corresponding to those of NIF due to the two mentioned resonances interfering, with a shared spin-parity 5/2+. Measurements were performed and will be presented for the cross-sections of the 10B(p, α)7Be and 10B(p, γ)11C reactions to more confidently extrapolate to lower energies. Research supported by NSF PHY-1419765 and JINA-CEE PHY-1430152.

  20. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    DOE PAGES

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-19

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model, and show inmore » two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is on the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.« less

  1. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics

    DOE PAGES

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-23

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In thismore » paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. Finally, we show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.« less

  2. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation.

    PubMed

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  3. Concordant chemical reaction networks and the Species-Reaction Graph.

    PubMed

    Shinar, Guy; Feinberg, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In a recent paper it was shown that, for chemical reaction networks possessing a subtle structural property called concordance, dynamical behavior of a very circumscribed (and largely stable) kind is enforced, so long as the kinetics lies within the very broad and natural weakly monotonic class. In particular, multiple equilibria are precluded, as are degenerate positive equilibria. Moreover, under certain circumstances, also related to concordance, all real eigenvalues associated with a positive equilibrium are negative. Although concordance of a reaction network can be decided by readily available computational means, we show here that, when a nondegenerate network's Species-Reaction Graph satisfies certain mild conditions, concordance and its dynamical consequences are ensured. These conditions are weaker than earlier ones invoked to establish kinetic system injectivity, which, in turn, is just one ramification of network concordance. Because the Species-Reaction Graph resembles pathway depictions often drawn by biochemists, results here expand the possibility of inferring significant dynamical information directly from standard biochemical reaction diagrams.

  4. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-23

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. Finally, we show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.

  5. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-19

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model, and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is on the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  6. Concordant Chemical Reaction Networks and the Species-Reaction Graph

    PubMed Central

    Shinar, Guy; Feinberg, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In a recent paper it was shown that, for chemical reaction networks possessing a subtle structural property called concordance, dynamical behavior of a very circumscribed (and largely stable) kind is enforced, so long as the kinetics lies within the very broad and natural weakly monotonic class. In particular, multiple equilibria are precluded, as are degenerate positive equilibria. Moreover, under certain circumstances, also related to concordance, all real eigenvalues associated with a positive equilibrium are negative. Although concordance of a reaction network can be decided by readily available computational means, we show here that, when a nondegenerate network’s Species-Reaction Graph satisfies certain mild conditions, concordance and its dynamical consequences are ensured. These conditions are weaker than earlier ones invoked to establish kinetic system injectivity, which, in turn, is just one ramification of network concordance. Because the Species-Reaction Graph resembles pathway depictions often drawn by biochemists, results here expand the possibility of inferring significant dynamical information directly from standard biochemical reaction diagrams. PMID:22940368

  7. Nuclear Reactions for Astrophysics and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Scielzo, N D; Ressler, J J

    2011-03-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions are required for many applications. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  8. Reaction pathways of propene pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yena; Su, Kehe; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yan; Zeng, Qingfeng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Litong

    2010-05-01

    The gas-phase reaction pathways in preparing pyrolytic carbon with propene pyrolysis have been investigated in detail with a total number of 110 transition states and 50 intermediates. The structure of the species was determined with density functional theory at B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level. The transition states and their linked intermediates were confirmed with frequency and the intrinsic reaction coordinates analyses. The elementary reactions were explored in the pathways of both direct and the radical attacking decompositions. The energy barriers and the reaction energies were determined with accurate model chemistry method at G3(MP2) level after an examination of the nondynamic electronic correlations. The heat capacities and entropies were obtained with statistical thermodynamics. The Gibbs free energies at 298.15 K for all the reaction steps were reported. Those at any temperature can be developed with classical thermodynamics by using the fitted (as a function of temperature) heat capacities. It was found that the most favorable paths are mainly in the radical attacking chain reactions. The chain was proposed with 26 reaction steps including two steps of the initialization of the chain to produce H and CH(3) radicals. For a typical temperature (1200 K) adopted in the experiments, the highest energy barriers were found in the production of C(3) to be 203.4 and 193.7 kJ/mol. The highest energy barriers for the production of C(2) and C were found 174.1 and 181.4 kJ/mol, respectively. These results are comparable with the most recent experimental observation of the apparent activation energy 201.9 +/- 0.6 or 137 +/- 25 kJ/mol. Copyright 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  10. Thermal reactions of brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Bohner, M; Gbureck, U

    2008-02-01

    The thermal reactions of a brushite cement made of beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), and an aqueous solution were followed in situ with an isothermal calorimeter at 37 degrees C. The investigated parameters were the beta-TCP/MCPM weight ratio, the liquid-to-powder ratio, the synthesis route and milling duration of the beta-TCP powder, as well as the presence of sulfate, citrate, and pyrophosphate ions in the mixing liquid. The thermograms were complex, particularly for mixtures containing an excess of MCPM or additives in the mixing solution. Results suggested that the endothermic MCPM dissolution and the highly exothermic beta-TCP dissolution occurred simultaneously, thereby leading to the formation of a large exothermic peak at early reaction time. Both reactions were followed by the exothermic crystallization of brushite and in the presence of an excess of MCPM by the endothermic crystallization of monetite. Additives generally widened the main exothermic reaction peak, or in some cases with pyrophosphate ions postponed the main exothermic peak at late reaction time. Generally, the results could be well explained and understood based on thermodynamic and solubility data. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Dynamical model of surrogate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomo, Y.; Chiba, S.; Nishio, K.

    2011-08-15

    A new dynamical model is developed to describe the whole process of surrogate reactions: Transfer of several nucleons at an initial stage, thermal equilibration of residues leading to washing out of shell effects, and decay of populated compound nuclei are treated in a unified framework. Multidimensional Langevin equations are employed to describe time evolution of collective coordinates with a time-dependent potential energy surface corresponding to different stages of surrogate reactions. The new model is capable of calculating spin distributions of the compound nuclei, one of the most important quantities in the surrogate technique. Furthermore, various observables of surrogate reactions can be calculated, for example, energy and angular distribution of ejectile and mass distributions of fission fragments. These features are important to assess validity of the proposed model itself, to understand mechanisms of the surrogate reactions, and to determine unknown parameters of the model. It is found that spin distributions of compound nuclei produced in {sup 18}O+{sup 238}U{yields}{sup 16}O+{sup 240}*U and {sup 18}O+{sup 236}U{yields}{sup 16}O+{sup 238}*U reactions are equivalent and much less than 10({h_bar}/2{pi}) and therefore satisfy conditions proposed by Chiba and Iwamoto [Phys. Rev. C 81, 044604 (2010)] if they are used as a pair in the surrogate ratio method.

  12. Polymerase chain reaction in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, T; Albrizio, M; Luisi, P L

    1995-10-01

    Compartmentalization of biochemical reactions within a spherically closed bilayer is an important step in the molecular evolution of cells. Liposomes are the most suitable structures to model this kind of chemistry. We have used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to demonstrate that complex biochemical reactions such as DNA replication can be carried out inside these compartments. We describe the first example of DNA amplification by the PCR occurring inside liposomes composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), or of a mixture of POPC and phosphatidylserine. We show that these liposomes are stable even under the high temperature conditions used for PCR. Although only a very small fraction of liposomes contains all eight different reagents together, a significant amount of DNA is produced which can be observed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This work shows that it is possible to carry out complex biochemical reactions within liposomes, which may be germane to the question of the origin of living cells. We have established the parameters and conditions that are critical for carrying out this complex reaction within the liposome compartment.

  13. Urticarial reaction caused by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yukinobu; Sumikawa, Yasuyuki; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Itami, Satoshi; Katayama, Ichiro; Aoki, Toshiyuki

    2006-12-01

    We report a case of an urticarial reaction after drinking alcohol beverages. The patient was a 47-year-old man suffering urticarial and anaphylactoid reaction to alcohol for two years. These reactions were observed at every alcohol beverages intake. We performed a prick test with diluted ethanol, alcohol beverages and their metabolites (acetaldehyde, acetic acid). Only acetic acid showed a positive result. Oral challenge test with diluted-ethanol caused pruritus and swelling of his lips. An oral challenge test with 8% diluted Shochu (Japanese distilled alcohol from rice or wheat) caused wheals on his upper back. Only acetic acid, a metabolite of alcohol, induced a positive prick test in the patient with alcohol-induced urticaria. This result was not observed in normal volunteers. An oral challenge test with diluted-alcohol or Shochu showed a positive wheal reaction in a dose dependent-manner which suggests that urticaria seen in this patient might be induced by alcohol-intolerance. However possible allergic reaction to acetaldehyde could not be excluded.

  14. Quantifying mixing using equilibrium reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, Philip M.; Posner, Jonathan D.

    2009-03-01

    A method of quantifying equilibrium reactions in a microchannel using a fluorometric reaction of Fluo-4 and Ca2+ ions is presented. Under the proper conditions, equilibrium reactions can be used to quantify fluid mixing without the challenges associated with constituent mixing measures such as limited imaging spatial resolution and viewing angle coupled with three-dimensional structure. Quantitative measurements of CaCl and calcium-indicating fluorescent dye Fluo-4 mixing are measured in Y-shaped microchannels. Reactant and product concentration distributions are modeled using Green's function solutions and a numerical solution to the advection-diffusion equation. Equilibrium reactions provide for an unambiguous, quantitative measure of mixing when the reactant concentrations are greater than 100 times their dissociation constant and the diffusivities are equal. At lower concentrations and for dissimilar diffusivities, the area averaged fluorescence signal reaches a maximum before the species have interdiffused, suggesting that reactant concentrations and diffusivities must be carefully selected to provide unambiguous, quantitative mixing measures. Fluorometric equilibrium reactions work over a wide range of pH and background concentrations such that they can be used for a wide variety of fluid mixing measures including industrial or microscale flows.

  15. Enzymatic Reactions in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristenpart, W. D.; Wan, J.; Stone, H. A.

    2008-11-01

    We establish simple scaling laws for enzymatic reactions in microfluidic devices, and we demonstrate that kinetic parameters obtained conventionally using multiple stop-flow experiments may instead be extracted from a single microfluidic experiment. Introduction of an enzyme and substrate species in different arms of a Y-shaped channel allows the two species to diffuse across the parallel streamlines and to begin reacting. Measurements of the product concentration versus distance down the channel provide information about the kinetics of the reaction. In the limit where the enzyme is much larger (and thus less diffusive) than the substrate, we show that near the entrance the total amount of product (P) formed varies as a power law in the distance x down the channel. For reactions that follow standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the power law takes the form P˜(Vmax/Km) x^5/2, where Vmax and Km are the maximum reaction rate and Michaelis constant respectively. If a large excess of substrate is used, then Km is identified by measuring Vmax far downstream where the different species are completely mixed by diffusion. Numerical simulations and experiments using the bioluminescent reaction between luciferase and ATP as a model system are both shown to accord with the model. We discuss the implications for significant savings in the amount of time and enzyme required for determination of kinetic parameters.

  16. Electrocardiographic changes in lepra reaction.

    PubMed

    Zawar, P B; Chawhan, R N; Swami, R M

    1983-04-01

    The electrocardiographic (E.C.G.) changes were evaluated in 54 patients of lepra reaction. Abnormalities of the E.C.G. observed were in the form of prolongation of QTc in 24 (44.44%), ST-T changes in a (16.66%), bundle branch block and ventricular extrasystoles in 2 each (3.70%). The mean QTc interval in 64 normal adults was 0.41 second (S.D. +/- 0.03, range 0.36 to 0.44 second). It was 0.44 second (S.D. +/- 0.05, range 0.38 to 0.52 second) in patients of lepra reaction. The difference in the QTc values in the two groups was statistically significant (P less than 0.01). The E.C.G. abnormalities in patients of lepra reaction appears to be due to myocardial involvement.

  17. Radiation reaction in quantum vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Keita

    2015-02-01

    Since the development of the radiating electron theory by P. A. M. Dirac in 1938 [P. A. M. Dirac, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 167, 148 (1938)], many authors have tried to reformulate this model, called the "radiation reaction". Recently, this equation has become important for ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. In our recent research, we found a stabilized model of the radiation reaction in quantum vacuum [K. Seto et al., Prog. Theor. Exp. Phys. 2014, 043A01 (2014)]. It led us to an updated Fletcher-Millikan charge-to-mass ratio including radiation. In this paper, I will discuss the generalization of our previous model and the new equation of motion with the radiation reaction in quantum vacuum via photon-photon scatterings and also introduce the new tensor d{E}^{μ ν α β }/dm, as the anisotropy of the charge-to-mass ratio.

  18. Photochemical reaction cycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Lanyi, J.K.

    1994-12-31

    The complex spectroscopic transformations during the reaction cycle of the light-driven proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin, are satisfactorily explained with a single-photoreaction scheme, which contains reversible reactions. The proposed model, derived by fitting time-resolved difference spectra, is BR {yields}{sup hv} K {leftrightarrow} L {leftrightarrow} M{sub 1} {yields} M{sub 2} {leftrightarrow} N {leftrightarrow} O {yields} BR. Some of these reactions are correlated with retinal bond motions, others with proton transfers internal and external to the protein. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that mechanistic coupling to proton potential is at the M{sub 1} {yields} M{sub 2} step, which also functions as the switch that confers direction to the net proton translocation. 92 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Photonuclear reactions on titanium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Belyshev, S. S.; Dzhilavyan, L. Z.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M.; Kuznetsov, A. A. Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2015-03-15

    The photodisintegration of titanium isotopes in the giant-dipole-resonance energy region is studied by the photon-activation method. Bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum has the endpoint energy of 55 MeV is used. The yields and integrated cross sections are determined for photoproton reactions on the titanium isotopes {sup 47,48,49,50}Ti. The respective experimental results are compared with their counterparts calculated on the basis of the TALYS code and a combined photonucleon-reaction model. The TALYS code disregards the isospin structure of the giant dipole resonance and is therefore unable to describe the yield of photoproton reactions on the heavy titanium isotopes {sup 49,50}Ti.

  20. Surface reactions of natural glasses

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.F.

    1986-12-31

    Reactions at natural glass surfaces are important in studies involving nuclear waste transport due to chemical control on ground water in host rocks such as basalt and tuff, to potential diffusion into natural hydrated glass surfaces and as natural analogs for waste glass stability. Dissolution kinetics can be described by linear surface reaction coupled with cation interdiffusion with resulting rates similar to those of synthetic silicate glasses. Rates of Cs diffusion into hydrated obsidian surfaces between 25{sup 0} and 75{sup 0}C were determined by XPS depth profiles and loss rates from aqueous solutions. Calculated diffusion coefficients were ten others of magnitude more rapid than predicted from an Arrhenius extrapolation of high temperature tracer diffusion data due to surface hydration reactions.

  1. Reaction theory for exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaccorso, Angela

    2014-05-09

    Exotic nuclei are usually defined as those with unusual N/Z ratios. They can be found in the crust of neutron stars enbedded in a sea of electrons or created in laboratory by fragmentation of a primary beam (in-flight method) or of the target (ISOL method). They are extremely important for nuclear astrophysics, see for example Ref.[1]. Furthermore by studying them we can check the limits of validity of nuclear reaction and structure models. This contribution will be devoted to the understanding of how by using reaction theory and comparing to the data we can extract structure information. We shall discuss the differences between the mechanisms of transfer and breakup reactions, an we will try to explain how nowadays it is possible to do accurate spectroscopy in extreme conditions.

  2. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion.

  3. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms Part II: Homogeneous Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests several mechanisms for catalysis by metal ion complexes. Discusses the principal factors of importance in these catalysis reactions and suggests reactions suitable for laboratory study. (MLH)

  4. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms Part II: Homogeneous Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests several mechanisms for catalysis by metal ion complexes. Discusses the principal factors of importance in these catalysis reactions and suggests reactions suitable for laboratory study. (MLH)

  5. Coupled Reactions "versus" Connected Reactions: Coupling Concepts with Terms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aledo, Juan Carlos

    2007-01-01

    A hallmark of living matter is its ability to extract and transform energy from the environment. Not surprisingly, biology students are required to take thermodynamics. The necessity of coupling exergonic reactions to endergonic processes is easily grasped by most undergraduate students. However, when addressing the thermodynamic concept of…

  6. Coupled Reactions "versus" Connected Reactions: Coupling Concepts with Terms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aledo, Juan Carlos

    2007-01-01

    A hallmark of living matter is its ability to extract and transform energy from the environment. Not surprisingly, biology students are required to take thermodynamics. The necessity of coupling exergonic reactions to endergonic processes is easily grasped by most undergraduate students. However, when addressing the thermodynamic concept of…

  7. Reaction pathway for alkane dehydrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Buchang; Davis, B.H.

    1996-08-01

    Naphtha reforming to produce high octane gasoline is an important process. Many reaction mechanisms are involved in this process. For example, the study of the fundamentals of this process led to the concept of bi- or poly-functional catalysis. The results of this study provide additional mechanistic information about the dehydrocyclization of an n-alkane to produce aromatics. The reaction coordinate diagram advanced to account for the observation of irreversible adsorption should be modified to account for the present results. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Vision 2020. Reaction Engineering Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Klipstein, David H.; Robinson, Sharon

    2001-01-01

    The Reaction Engineering Roadmap is a part of an industry- wide effort to create a blueprint of the research and technology milestones that are necessary to achieve longterm industry goals. This report documents the results of a workshop focused on the research needs, technology barriers, and priorities of the chemical industry as they relate to reaction engineering viewed first by industrial use (basic chemicals; specialty chemicals; pharmaceuticals; and polymers) and then by technology segment (reactor system selection, design, and scale-up; chemical mechanism development and property estimation; dealing with catalysis; and new, nonstandard reactor types).

  9. Some concepts in reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Polanyi, J C

    1987-05-08

    The objective in this work has been one which I have shared with the two other 1986 Nobel lecturers in chemistry, D. R. Herschbach and Y. T. Lee, as well as with a wide group of colleagues and co-workers who have been responsible for bringing this field to its current state. That state is summarized in the title; we now have some concepts relevant to the motions of atoms and molecules in simple reactions, and some examples of the application of these concepts. We are, however, richer in vocabulary than in literature. The great epics of reaction dynamics remain to be written. I shall confine myself to some simple stories.

  10. Reactions Induced by Platelet Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Kiefel, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Summary Platelet transfusions play a central role in therapeutic regimens for patients with hematologic/oncologic diseases who develop severe thrombocytopenia either in the course of their disease or following cytostatic therapy. Like other blood components, platelet transfusions have achieved a high degree of safety as far as transmission of viral diseases is concerned. However, transfusion of platelet concentrates is accompanied by a high frequency of febrile and anaphylactoid reactions. In rare cases, recipients of platelet concentrates are threatened by severe reactions as septic complications due to bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates, transfusion-related acute lung injury and severe anaphylactic episodes. PMID:21512624

  11. Incomplete reactions in nanothermite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Rohit J.; Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L.; Overdeep, Kyle R.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2017-02-01

    Exothermic reactions between oxophilic metals and transition/post transition metal-oxides have been well documented owing to their fast reaction time scales (≈10 μs). This article examines the extent of the reaction in nano-aluminum based thermite systems through a forensic inspection of the products formed during reaction. Three nanothermite systems (Al/CuO, Al/Bi2O3, and Al/WO3) were selected owing to their diverse combustion characteristics, thereby providing sufficient generality and breadth to the analysis. Microgram quantities of the sample were coated onto a fine platinum wire, which was resistively heated at high heating rates (≈105 K/s) to ignite the sample. The subsequent products were captured/quenched very rapidly (≈500 μs) in order to preserve the chemistry/morphology during initiation and subsequent reaction and were quantitatively analyzed using electron microscopy and focused ion beam cross-sectioning followed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Elemental examination of the cross-section of the quenched particles shows that oxygen is predominantly localized in the regions containing aluminum, implying the occurrence of the redox reaction. The Al/CuO system, which has simultaneous gaseous oxygen release and ignition (TIgnition ≈ TOxygen Release), shows a substantially lower oxygen content within the product particles as opposed to Al/Bi2O3 and Al/WO3 thermites, which are postulated to undergo a condensed phase reaction (TIgnition ≪ TOxygen Release). An effective Al:O composition for the interior section was obtained for all the mixtures, with the smaller particles generally showing a higher oxygen content than the larger ones. The observed results were further corroborated with the reaction temperature, obtained using a high-speed spectro-pyrometer, and bomb calorimetry conducted on larger samples (≈15 mg). The results suggest that thermites that produce sufficient amounts of gaseous products generate smaller product particles and

  12. Learning to predict chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Kayala, Matthew A; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H; Baldi, Pierre

    2011-09-26

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles, respectively, are not high throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, and lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry data set consisting of 1630 full multistep reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top-ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of nonproductive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  13. [Allergic reactions to implant materials].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P

    2003-01-01

    The extent of the immune response upon implantation of metallic devices depends on the individual reactivity and on material characteristics. If specific T-cellular sensitization occurs or an allergy to metal preexists, hypersensitive reactions to implant components may develop. They include eczema, impaired wound healing, and sterile osteomyelitis. The existence of allergy-induced implant loosening is still an open question. Further improvement of clinical allergological diagnostics, better understanding of peri-implantar immune reactions, and interdisciplinary collection of epidemiological data concerning allergy to implants will contribute to a better knowledge about tolerance of implant material in humans.

  14. Learning to Predict Chemical Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kayala, Matthew A.; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles respectively are not high-throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, or lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry dataset consisting of 1630 full multi-step reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval, problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of non-productive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  15. Theoretical Studies of Reaction Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    31 Aug 97 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS AASERT93 THEORETICAL STUDIES OF REACTION SURFACES F49620-93-1-0556 3484/XS 6. AUTHOR(S) 61103D DR...DUNCAN AVE ROOM B115 BOLLING AFB DC 20332- 8050 DR MICHAEL R. BERMAN 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12a. DISTRIBUTION i AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved f or pill...reaction14 , and solvation of electrolytes1 5 . The EFP method described in the previous section has one drawback: the repulsive 3 potential relies on

  16. Spallation-induced fission reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlliure, J.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    During the last decade spallation-induced fission reactions have received particular attention because of their impact in the design of spallation-neutron sources or radioactive beam facilities, but also in the understanding of the fission process at high excitation energy. In this paper, we review the main progress brought by modern experimental techniques, in particular those based in the inverse kinematic, as well as the achievements in modelling these reactions. We will also address future possibilities for improving the investigation of fission dynamics.

  17. HADES results in elementary reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstein, B.; Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Arnold, O.; Atomssa, E. T.; Behnke, C.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Biernat, J.; Blanco, A.; Blume, C.; Böhmer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Chernenko, S.; Deveaux, C.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Fonte, P.; Franco, C.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gill, K.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Harabasz, S.; Hennino, T.; Hlavac, S.; Höhne, C.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Kardan, K.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Korcyl, G.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krebs, E.; Kuc, H.; Kugler, A.; Kunz, T.; Kurepin, A.; Kurilkin, A.; Kurilkin, P.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Mahmoud, T.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michel, J.; Müntz, C.; Münzer, R.; Naumann, L.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Petousis, V.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Rehnisch, L.; Reshetin, A.; Rost, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Scheib, T.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Schuldes, H.; Sellheim, P.; Siebenson, J.; Silva, L.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Strzempek, P.; Sturm, C.; Svoboda, O.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Wendisch, C.; Wirth, J.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Zanevsky, Y.; Zumbruch, P.

    2014-11-01

    Recent results obtained with the HADES experimental set-up at GSI are presented with a focus on dielectron production and strangeness in pp and quasi-free np reactions. Perspectives related to the very recent experiment using the pion beam at GSI are also discussed.

  18. Reactions to threatening health messages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Threatening health messages that focus on severity are popular, but frequently have no effect or even a counterproductive effect on behavior change. This paradox (i.e. wide application despite low effectiveness) may be partly explained by the intuitive appeal of threatening communication: it may be hard to predict the defensive reactions occurring in response to fear appeals. We examine this hypothesis by using two studies by Brown and colleagues, which provide evidence that threatening health messages in the form of distressing imagery in anti-smoking and anti-alcohol campaigns cause defensive reactions. Methods We simulated both Brown et al. experiments, asking participants to estimate the reactions of the original study subjects to the threatening health information (n = 93). Afterwards, we presented the actual original study outcomes. One week later, we assessed whether this knowledge of the actual study outcomes helped participants to more successfully estimate the effectiveness of the threatening health information (n = 72). Results Results showed that participants were initially convinced of the effectiveness of threatening health messages and were unable to anticipate the defensive reactions that in fact occurred. Furthermore, these estimates did not improve after participants had been explained the dynamics of threatening communication as well as what the effects of the threatening communication had been in reality. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the effectiveness of threatening health messages is intuitively appealing. What is more, providing empirical evidence against the use of threatening health messages has very little effect on this intuitive appeal. PMID:23171445

  19. Initiation reactions in acetylene pyrolysis

    DOE PAGES

    Zador, Judit; Fellows, Madison D.; Miller, James A.

    2017-05-10

    In gas-phase combustion systems the interest in acetylene stems largely from its role in molecular weight growth processes. The consensus is that above 1500 K acetylene pyrolysis starts mainly with the homolytic fission of the C–H bond creating an ethynyl radical and an H atom. However, below ~1500 K this reaction is too slow to initiate the chain reaction. It has been hypothesized that instead of dissociation, self-reaction initiates this process. Nevertheless, rigorous theoretical or direct experimental evidence is lacking, to an extent that even the molecular mechanism is debated in the literature. In this work we use rigorous abmore » initio transition-state theory master equation methods to calculate pressure- and temperature-dependent rate coefficients for the association of two acetylene molecules and related reactions. We establish the role of vinylidene, the high-energy isomer of acetylene in this process, compare our results with available experimental data, and assess the competition between the first-order and second-order initiation steps. As a result, we also show the effect of the rapid isomerization among the participating wells and highlight the need for time-scale analysis when phenomenological rate coefficients are compared to observed time scales in certain experiments.« less

  20. Multifractality in intracellular enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan S; Salgado, Edgar; Muñoz-Diosdado, Alejandro

    2006-05-21

    Enzymatic kinetics adjust well to the Michaelis-Menten paradigm in homogeneous media with dilute, perfectly mixed reactants. These conditions are quite different from the highly structured cell plasm, so applications of the classic kinetics theory to this environment are rather limited. Cytoplasmic structure produces molecular crowding and anomalous diffusion of substances, modifying the mass action kinetic laws. The reaction coefficients are no longer constant but time-variant, as stated in the fractal kinetics theory. Fractal kinetics assumes that enzymatic reactions on such heterogeneous media occur within a non-Euclidian space characterized by a certain fractal dimension, this fractal dimension gives the dependence on time of the kinetic coefficients. In this work, stochastic simulations of enzymatic reactions under molecular crowding have been completed, and kinetic coefficients for the reactions, including the Michaelis-Menten parameter KM, were calculated. The simulations results led us to confirm the time dependence of michaelian kinetic parameter for the enzymatic catalysis. Besides, other chaos related phenomena were pointed out from the obtained KM time series, such as the emergence of strange attractors and multifractality.

  1. Vibrational Participation in Chemical Reactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-22

    Cesaro Xue-Feng Yang .. V-. V 8. IV. BIBLIOGRAPHY, AFOSR-SPONSORED RESEARCH, 1981 - 1984 1981 Vibrational Excitation of Ozone and Molecular Fluorine...Phys. Chem. 87, 2142 (1983). G.C. Pimentel, S.N. Cesaro and H. Frei. 11. Selective Vibronic Excitation of Singlet Oxygen-Furan Reactions in Cryogenic

  2. Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, Christian; Verbeke, Jerome; Vogt, Ramona; Roundrup, Jorgen

    2016-05-31

    FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) is a code that simulated the decay of a fissionable nucleus at specified excitation energy. In its present form, FREYA models spontaneous fission and neutron-induced fission up to 20 MeV. It includes the possibility of neutron emission from the nuclear prior to its fussion (nth chance fission).

  3. Teachers' Reactions to Children's Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesdale, Drew; Pickering, Kaye

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on social schema theory (Fiske & Taylor, 1991) and social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), this study examined the impact on teachers' reactions to children's aggression of three variables, two of which were related to the aggressors and one was related to the teachers. Experienced female elementary school teachers (N=90) each read…

  4. The Pitfalls of Precipitation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slade, Peter W.; Rayner-Canham, Geoffrey W.

    1990-01-01

    Described are some of the difficulties presented in these reactions by competing equilibria that are usually ignored. Situations involving acid-base equilibria, solubility product calculations, the use of ammonia as a complexing agent, and semiquantitative comparisons of solubility product values are discussed. (CW)

  5. The Pitfalls of Precipitation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slade, Peter W.; Rayner-Canham, Geoffrey W.

    1990-01-01

    Described are some of the difficulties presented in these reactions by competing equilibria that are usually ignored. Situations involving acid-base equilibria, solubility product calculations, the use of ammonia as a complexing agent, and semiquantitative comparisons of solubility product values are discussed. (CW)

  6. Teachers' Reactions to Children's Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesdale, Drew; Pickering, Kaye

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on social schema theory (Fiske & Taylor, 1991) and social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), this study examined the impact on teachers' reactions to children's aggression of three variables, two of which were related to the aggressors and one was related to the teachers. Experienced female elementary school teachers (N=90) each read…

  7. Humanism and science: a reaction.

    PubMed

    Wampold, Bruce E

    2012-12-01

    Authors in this section have noted that humanism is intrinsic to psychotherapy, although disagreements remain. One of the disagreements is about the role of science in humanism. In this reaction, I contend that humanism, as discussed in these articles, is a legitimate theory to be subjected to scientific scrutiny. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Knoevenagel Reaction of Unprotected Sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrmann, Marie-Christine

    The Knoevenagel reaction of unprotected sugars was investigated in the 1950s using zinc chloride as promoter. The so-called Garcia Gonzalez reaction had been almost forgotten for 50 years, until the emergence of new water tolerant catalysts having Lewis acid behavior. The reaction was thus reinvestigated and optimal conditions have been found to prepare trihydroxylated furan derivatives from pentose or β-tetrahydrofuranylfuran from hexoses with non-cyclic β-keto ester or β-diketones. Other valuable compounds such as β-linked tetrahydrobenzofuranyl glycosides or hydroxyalkyl-3,3,6,6,-tetramethyl-3,4,5,6,7,9-hexahydro-1H-xanthene-1,8(2H)-dione can be obtained using cyclic β-dicarbonylic derivatives. Apart from one report in the 1950s, the Knoevenagel reaction of unprotected carbohydrate in basic condition has been studied only in the mid-1980s to prepare C-glycosyl barbiturates from barbituric acids and, later on, from non-cyclic β-diketones, β-C-glycosidic ketones. The efficient method exploited to prepare such compounds has found an industrial development in cosmetics.

  9. Chemoselective Reactions of Functionalized Piperidines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    inert. For a-aminonitriles bearing an amino hydrogen, there is an important competing reaction. Reductive decyanet’on can occur if this proton is removed...A gummy material amounting to 0.03 g after drying was removed, leaving 0.14 g of a white solid. The white solid was boiled for 1 h with 0.03 M HCI

  10. Severe allergic reaction to Dermabond.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arthur W; Sosin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The use of 2-octyl cyanoacrylate (Dermabond; Ethicon, Somerville, NJ) for wound closure is increasingly popular. Problems with Dermabond are generally related to application techniques and rarely relate to the chemical nature of the adhesive. This article describes a severe allergic reaction to Dermabond following breast augmentation/mastopexy.

  11. Reaction profiles in porous electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katan, T.; Carlen, P. J.

    1985-05-01

    An experimental program was conducted to ascertain causes of alkaline zinc electrode shape change and to determine the development of reaction profiles within the pores of porous zinc electrodes. Various analog electrochemical cells were operated to isolate and evaluate the individual processes occurring during charge and discharge. It was found that both edge effects and osmosis can be responsible for the shape change phenomenon.

  12. Reaction to a Campus Confrontation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Yakov M.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Students' reactions to the occupation of a university building were surveyed on the first and last day of the occupation as well as several weeks following the end of the occupation. Results of the survey show that the conflict tended to polarize attitudes about radicals against them and increase attitudes favorable to conventional political…

  13. Intradermal allergy test reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... determine whether an individual is allergic to a specific allergen. The test involves injection of a small amount of the suspected allergen under the surface of the skin. After about 20 minutes the area is examined for a reaction at the site. ...

  14. Interfacial Reaction Studies Using ONIOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we focus on the calculations of the energetics and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions for Organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The work described in this report builds upon our own previous thermochemical and chemical kinetics studies. The first of these articles refers to the prediction of thermochemical properties, and the latter one deals with the prediction of rate constants for gaseous homolytic dissociation reactions. The calculations of this investigation are at the microscopic level. The systems chosen consisted of a gallium nitride (GaN) substrate, and molecular nitrogen (N2) and ammonia (NH3) as adsorbants. The energetics for the adsorption and the adsorbant dissociation processes were estimated, and reaction rate constants for the dissociation reactions of free and adsorbed molecules were predicted. The energetics for substrate decomposition was also computed. The ONIOM method, implemented in the Gaussian98 program, was used to perform the calculations. This approach has been selected since it allows dividing the system into two layers that can be treated at different levels of accuracy. The atoms of the substrate were modeled using molecular mechanics6 with universal force fields, whereas the adsorbed molecules were approximated using quantum mechanics, based on density functional theory methods with B3LYP functionals and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. Calculations for the substrate were performed in slabs of several unit cells in each direction. The N2 and NH3 adsorbates were attached to a central location at the Ga-lined surface.

  15. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  16. Severe immediate reaction to nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Garijo, M A; Cordobés-Duran, C; Lamilla-Yerga, A M; Moreno-Gastón, I

    2007-01-01

    Nabumetone is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory (NSAID) prodrug that inhibits cyclooxygenase-2. It has been recommended as a safe alternative in most patients with hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs. Systemic reactions caused by nabumetone are not frequent. We report 2 cases of immediate systemic reactions due to nabumetone. The first case involved a 68-year-old woman who developed immediate generalized pruritus, erythema, morbilliform eruption, swollen tongue sensation, diarrhea, and hypotension after the ingestion of a single dose of nabumetone. In the second case, a 77-year-old woman developed generalized pruritus, palm erythema, colic abdominal pain, diarrhea, dizziness, tightness of the chest, dyspnea, and hypotension immediately after oral intake of nabumetone. Both patients had previously tolerated this drug. Since these episodes, they have avoided nabumetone. Skin prick tests with nabumetone (10 and 100 mg/mL) were negative. Oral challenge tests with other NSAIDs, even of the same group as nabumetone, were negative in both patients. The mechanisms responsible for the reaction were not established.

  17. Surface science of heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    White, J M

    1982-10-29

    Some of the present and future directions for surface science as a growing and naturally interdisciplinary subject are reviewed. Particular attention is given to surface reaction chemistry as it is related to heterogenous catalysis, a subject area where there are abundant opportunities for detailed measurements of structure and dynamics at the molecular level.

  18. Selective Reaction Times and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubauer, Aljoscha C.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between psychometric intelligence and 2 selective reaction time (RT) tasks was determined for 81 university students (27 males and 54 females). Results generally support the paradigm of W. E. Hick (1952). Some surprising findings are discussed with respect to the specific demands of selective RT tasks. (SLD)

  19. Anaphylactic reactions to tolperisone (Mydocalm).

    PubMed

    Ribi, Camillo; Vermeulen, Christophe; Hauser, Conrad

    2003-06-28

    Four patients with anaphylaxis attributed to the intake of the centrally acting muscle relaxant tolperisone hydrochloride (Mydocalm) were observed at the Emergency Department of the Geneva University Hospital between November 2001 and March 2003. All patients were middle-aged women who took tolperisone for chronic muscular pain. All reactions occurred within an hour after oral intake of this drug frequently prescribed in Switzerland. The severity of anaphylaxis ranged from urticarial reactions to shock with arterial hypotension. Prick-to-prick skin testing performed in one patient with a tablet of tolperisone diluted in water was negative. Its globally restricted commercialisation may explain the lack of reports on such adverse effects in the MedLine database. Anaphylactic reactions to this drug, however, are mentioned in other sources such as the Swiss Drug Compendium and the WHO drug reaction database. Together, these findings suggest that anaphylaxis to tolperisone is not uncommon and should be known to physicians in countries where this drug is available.

  20. FOREIGN BODY REACTION TO BIOMATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James M.; Rodriguez, Analiz; Chang, David T.

    2008-01-01

    The foreign body reaction composed of macrophages and foreign body giant cells is the end-stage response of the inflammatory and wound healing responses following implantation of a medical device, prosthesis, or biomaterial. A brief, focused overview of events leading to the foreign body reaction is presented. The major focus of this review is on factors that modulate the interaction of macrophages and foreign body giant cells on synthetic surfaces where the chemical, physical, and morphological characteristics of the synthetic surface are considered to play a role in modulating cellular events. These events in the foreign body reaction include protein adsorption, monocyte/macrophage adhesion, macrophage fusion to form foreign body giant cells, consequences of the foreign body response on biomaterials, and cross-talk between macrophages/foreign body giant cells and inflammatory/wound healing cells. Biomaterial surface properties play an important role in modulating the foreign body reaction in the first two to four weeks following implantation of a medical device, even though the foreign body reaction at the tissue/material interface is present for the in vivo lifetime of the medical device. An understanding of the foreign body reaction is important as the foreign body reaction may impact the biocompatibility (safety) of the medical device, prosthesis, or implanted biomaterial and may significantly impact short- and long-term tissue responses with tissue-engineered constructs containing proteins, cells, and other biological components for use in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Our perspective has been on the inflammatory and wound healing response to implanted materials, devices, and tissue-engineered constructs. The incorporation of biological components of allogeneic or xenogeneic origin as well as stem cells into tissue-engineered or regenerative approaches opens up a myriad of other challenges. An in depth understanding of how the immune system

  1. Numerical modelling of hydration reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; John, Timm

    2017-04-01

    Mineral reactions are generally accompanied by volume changes. Observations in rocks and thin section indicate that this often occurred by replacement reactions involving a fluid phase. Frequently, the volume of the original rock or mineral seems to be conserved. If the density of the solid reaction products is higher than the reactants, the associated solid volume decrease generates space for a fluid phase. In other words, porosity is created. The opposite is true for an increase in solid volume during reaction, which leads to a porosity reduction. This slows down and may even stop the reaction if it needs fluid as a reactant. Understanding the progress of reactions and their rates is important because reaction generally changes geophysical and rock mechanical properties which will therefore affect geodynamical processes and seismic properties. We studied the case of hydration of eclogite to blueschist in a subduction zone setting. Eclogitized pillow basalt structures from the Tian-Shan orogeny are transformed to blueschist on the rims of the pillow (van der Straaten et al., 2008). Fluid pathways existed between the pillow structures. The preferred hypothesis of blueschist formation is to supply the fluid for hydration from the pillow margins progressing inward. Using numerical modelling we simulate this coupled reaction-diffusion process. Porosity and fluid pressure evolution are coupled to local thermodynamic equilibrium and density changes. The first rim of blueschist that forms around the eclogite pillow increases volume to such a degree that the system is clogged and the reaction stops. Nevertheless, the field evidence suggests the blueschist formation continued. To prevent the system from clogging, a high incoming pore fluid pressure on the pillow boundaries is needed along with removal of mass from the system to accommodate the volume changes. The only other possibility is to form blueschist from any remaining fluid stored in the core of the pillow

  2. Reactions of arsine with hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Hatlelid, K.M.; Brailsford, C.; Carter, D.E.

    1996-02-09

    The mechanism of arsine (AsH{sub 3}) induced hemolysis was studied in vitro using isolated red blood cells (RBCs) from the rat or dog. AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis of dog red blood cells was completely blocked by carbon monoxide (CO) preincubation and was reduced by pure oxygen (O{sub 2}) compared to incubations in air. Since CO and O{sub 2} bind to heme and also reduced hemolysis, these results suggested a reaction between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin in the hemeligand binding pocket or with the heme iron. Further, sodium nitrite induction of methemoglobin (metHb) to 85% and 34% of total Hb in otherwise intact RBCs resulted in 56% and 16% decreases in hemolysis, respectively, after incubation for 4 h. This provided additional evidence for the involvement of hemoglobin in the AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis mechanism. Reactions between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin were studied in solutions of purified dog hemoglobin. Spectrophotometric studies of the reaction of AsH{sub 3} with various purified hemoglobin species revealed that AsH{sub 3} reacted with HbO{sub 2} to produce metHb and, eventually, degraded Hb characterized by gross precipitation of the protein. AsH{sub 3} did not alter the spectrum of deoxyHb and did not cause degradation of metHb in oxygen, but bound to and reduced metHb in the absence of oxygen. These data indicate that a reaction of AsH{sub 3} with oxygenated hemoglobin, HbO{sub 2}, may lead to hemolysis, but there are reactions between AsH{sub 3} and metHb that may not be directly involved in the hemolytic process. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Experimental Demonstrations in Teaching Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Basheer, Sobhi

    2001-01-01

    Presents demonstrations of chemical reactions by employing different features of various compounds that can be altered after a chemical change occurs. Experimental activities include para- and dia-magnetism in chemical reactions, aluminum reaction with base, reaction of acid with carbonates, use of electrochemical cells for demonstrating chemical…

  4. Experimental Demonstrations in Teaching Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Basheer, Sobhi

    2001-01-01

    Presents demonstrations of chemical reactions by employing different features of various compounds that can be altered after a chemical change occurs. Experimental activities include para- and dia-magnetism in chemical reactions, aluminum reaction with base, reaction of acid with carbonates, use of electrochemical cells for demonstrating chemical…

  5. Modeling the complex bromate-iodine reaction.

    PubMed

    Machado, Priscilla B; Faria, Roberto B

    2009-05-07

    In this article, it is shown that the FLEK model (ref 5 ) is able to model the experimental results of the bromate-iodine clock reaction. Five different complex chemical systems, the bromate-iodide clock and oscillating reactions, the bromite-iodide clock and oscillating reactions, and now the bromate-iodine clock reaction are adequately accounted for by the FLEK model.

  6. Finding reaction paths using the potential energy as reaction coordinate.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Mogas, Antoni; Giménez, Xavier; Bofill, Josep Maria

    2008-03-14

    The intrinsic reaction coordinate curve (IRC), normally proposed as a representation of a reaction path, is parametrized as a function of the potential energy rather than the arc-length. This change in the parametrization of the curve implies that the values of the energy of the potential energy surface points, where the IRC curve is located, play the role of reaction coordinate. We use Caratheodory's relation to derive in a rigorous manner the proposed parametrization of the IRC path. Since this Caratheodory's relation is the basis of the theory of calculus of variations, then this fact permits to reformulate the IRC model from this mathematical theory. In this mathematical theory, the character of the variational solution (either maximum or minimum) is given through the Weierstrass E-function. As proposed by Crehuet and Bofill [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 234105 (2005)], we use the minimization of the Weierstrass E-function, as a function of the potential energy, to locate an IRC path between two minima from an arbitrary curve on the potential energy surface, and then join these two minima. We also prove, from the analysis of the Weierstrass E-function, the mathematical bases for the algorithms proposed to locate the IRC path. The proposed algorithm is applied to a set of examples. Finally, the algorithm is used to locate a discontinuous, or broken, IRC path, namely, when the path connects two first order saddle points through a valley-ridged inflection point.

  7. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  8. MEANS FOR TERMINATING NUCLEAR REACTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, C.M.

    1959-02-17

    An apparatus is presented for use in a reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled type for the purpose of quickly terminating the reaction, the coolant being circulated through coolant tubes extending through the reactor core. Several of the tubes in the critical region are connected through valves to a tank containing a poisoning fluid having a high neutron capture crosssection and to a reservoir. When it is desired to quickly terminate the reaction, the valves are operated to permit the flow of the poisoning fluid through these particular tubes and into the reservoir while normal coolant is being circulated through the remaining tubes. The apparatus is designed to prevent contamination of the primary coolant by the poisoning fluid.

  9. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many metamorphic reactions lead to large volume changes, and potentially to reaction-driven cracking [1,2]. Large-scale hydration of mantle peridotite to produce serpentine or talc is invoked to explain the rheology of plate boundaries, the nature of earthquakes, and the seismic properties of slow-spread ocean crust and the 'mantle wedge' above subduction zones. Carbonation of peridotite may be an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Zones of 100% magnesite + quartz replacing peridotite, up to 200 m thick, formed where oceanic mantle was thrust over carbonate-bearing metasediments in Oman. Talc + carbonate is an important component of the matrix in subduction mélanges at Santa Catalina Island , California, and the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. Engineered systems to emulate natural mineral carbonation could provide relatively inexpensive CO2 capture and storage [3]. More generally, engineered reaction-driven cracking could supplement or replace hydraulic fracture in geothermal systems, solution mining, and extraction of tight oil and gas. The controls on reaction-driven cracking are poorly understood. Hydration and carbonation reactions can be self-limiting, since they potentially reduce permeability and armor reactive surfaces [4]. Also, in some cases, hydration or carbonation may take place at constant volume. Small changes in volume due to precipitation of solid products increases stress, destabilizing solid reactants, until precipitation and dissolution rates become equal at a steady state stress [5]. In a third case, volume change due to precipitation of solid products causes brittle failure. This has been invoked on qualitative grounds to explain, e.g., complete serpentinization of mantle peridotite [6]. Below ~ 300°C, the available potential energy for hydration and carbonation of olivine could produce stresses of 100's of MPa [2], sufficient to fracture rocks to 10 km depth or more, causing brittle failure below the steady state stress required

  10. Kinetics of Polymer Interfacial Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Koberstein, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    Germanium crystals modified with high quality azide functional monolayers are used to directly monitor in situ the kinetics of interfacial ``click'' reactions with complementary alkyne end-functional poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PnBA) and polystyrene (PS) by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). In the presence of copper (I), the azide-modified Ge substrates react quantitatively with PnBA and PS via a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Time-resolved ATR-IR measurements show two regimes of kinetic behavior, as predicted by theory. In the first regime the rate is rapid and is controlled by diffusion of the polymer through the solvent, scaling with the square root of time. The rate slows considerably in the second regime, limited by penetration of the reacting polymer through the covalently bound polymer brush layer, scaling with the natural logarithm of time. The influence of polymer size and solvent quality are reported.

  11. Invariant Coordinates in Breakup Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skwira-Chalot, I.; Ciepał, I.; Kistryn, St.; Kozela, A.; Parol, W.; Stephan, E.

    2017-03-01

    Systematic experimental studies of few-nucleon systems expose various dynamical ingredients which play an important role in correct description of observables, such as three-nucleon force, Coulomb force and relativistic effects. A large set of existing experimental data for ^1H(d, p p)n reaction allows for systematic investigations of these dynamical effects, which vary with energy and appear with different strength in certain observables and phase space regions. Moreover, systematic comparisons with exact theoretical calculations, done in variables related to the system dynamics in a possibly direct ways is a very important tool to verify and improve the existing description of the nucleon interaction. Examples of experimental data for a breakup reaction, transformed to the variables based on Lorentz-invariants are compared with modern theoretical calculations.

  12. Propulsive Reaction Control System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Phan, Linh H.; Serricchio, Frederick; San Martin, Alejandro M.

    2011-01-01

    This software models a propulsive reaction control system (RCS) for guidance, navigation, and control simulation purposes. The model includes the drive electronics, the electromechanical valve dynamics, the combustion dynamics, and thrust. This innovation follows the Mars Science Laboratory entry reaction control system design, and has been created to meet the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry, descent, and landing simulation needs. It has been built to be plug-and-play on multiple MSL testbeds [analysis, Monte Carlo, flight software development, hardware-in-the-loop, and ATLO (assembly, test and launch operations) testbeds]. This RCS model is a C language program. It contains two main functions: the RCS electronics model function that models the RCS FPGA (field-programmable-gate-array) processing and commanding of the RCS valve, and the RCS dynamic model function that models the valve and combustion dynamics. In addition, this software provides support functions to initialize the model states, set parameters, access model telemetry, and access calculated thruster forces.

  13. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  14. Adverse drug reactions: part II.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-11-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must be effectively practiced by all health care providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  15. Adverse drug reactions: Part I.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must effectively be practiced by all health providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  16. (Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  17. Strangeness exchange reactions and hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    Recent progress in the spectroscopy of ..lambda.. and ..sigma.. hypernuclei is reviewed. Prospects for the production of doubly strange hypernuclei at a future kaon factory are assessed. It is suggested that the (K/sup -/,K/sup +/) reaction on a nuclear target may afford an optimal way of producing the H dibaryon, a stable six quark object with J/sup ..pi../ = O/sup +/, S = -2.

  18. Molecular screening in nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetinovic, A.; Lipoglavsek, M.; Markelj, S.; Vesic, J.

    2015-12-01

    The dependence of electron screening in nuclear reactions on projectile or target atomic number has been studied by bombarding different hydrogen-containing targets with beams of 7Li , 11B , and 19F . The largest electron screening potentials were obtained in a graphite target containing hydrogen as an impurity. Some measured potentials are almost two orders of magnitude above the theoretical predictions. To explain the measurements, a new concept of electron screening is introduced.

  19. [Pain as adverse drug reaction].

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Birgit; Schaffarzick, Daniel; Nagano, Marietta; Janowitz, Susanne Melitta; Schweitzer, Ekkehard

    2012-09-01

    We present a multidisciplinary (anaesthesiology--clinical pharmacy--bioinformatics) analysis of pain as possible adverse drug reaction taking different manifestations of pain, indication groups, relevance to the Austrian drug market and possible mechanistic influence of drugs on development and apprehension of pain into consideration.We designed an overview that shows how transmitters that play a part in nociception and antinociception can be influenced by drugs. This allows conclusions to the dolorigene potential of therapeutics.

  20. Multicomponent reactions in nucleoside chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Buchowicz, Włodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review covers sixty original publications dealing with the application of multicomponent reactions (MCRs) in the synthesis of novel nucleoside analogs. The reported approaches were employed for modifications of the parent nucleoside core or for de novo construction of a nucleoside scaffold from non-nucleoside substrates. The cited references are grouped according to the usually recognized types of the MCRs. Biochemical properties of the novel nucleoside analogs are also presented (if provided by the authors). PMID:25161730

  1. Statistical Theory of Breakup Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Descouvemont, Pierre; Hussein, Mahir S.

    2014-04-01

    We propose an alternative for Coupled-Channels calculations with looselybound exotic nuclei(CDCC), based on the the Random Matrix Model of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions. The coupled channels equations are divided into two sets. The first set, described by the CDCC, and the other set treated with RMT. The resulting theory is a Statistical CDCC (CDCCs), able in principle to take into account many pseudo channels.

  2. Immediate reactions to rubber products.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, T; Wahl, R

    1992-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of contact urticaria (CU) and systemic reactions to rubber products. Thirty-one patients are presented: most were atopic (20/31) and women (26/31); 71% worked in the medical field; 32.2% (10/31) showed signs of hand dermatitis. In 28 patients (90.3%), rub and/or prick tests with liquid latex in different dilutions and with latex gloves led to an immediate type of positive reaction. The allergen(s) appear in part to be water soluble: 20 of 28 patients (71.4%) revealed positive test reactions to an aqueous glove extract. In two patients, urticarial test reactions to tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD), mercapto mix, and p-phenylenediamine (PPD mix) were considered as possible contributing factors of CU. Cornstarch was negative in all patients (scratch). Sixteen of 27 sera (59.2%) showed radioallergosorbent (RAST) class 0 using latex allergen disks. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacoyl-amide (SDS-PAGE) determined protein bands of less than or equal to 14 kD (not allergen specific) and approx 28 kD. The Western blot detected the 28 kD protein as allergen in the sera of three patients. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) proved no protein bands. Immunoprinting performed with sera of five patients presented allergen bands in a pH range between 3.8 and 4.55. This shows the radio staining (immunoprint) is more sensitive than is the Coomassie blue staining. Although three sera showed RAST class 0, immunoblotting detected allergen bands. In this case the immunoblot appears to be more sensitive than the RAST. A cross reactivity between latex and banana could not be established. Alternative gloves are Neolon (neoprene) or Elastyren (styrene-butadiene polymer).

  3. Anaphylactic reaction after artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Orta, Marta; Ordoqui, Elena; Aranzábal, Ascensión; Fernández, Cristina; Bartolomé, Borja; Sanz, Maria Luisa

    2003-04-01

    Bovine seroalbumin is known as an allergen for human beings, but reactions to it in an artificial insemination procedure are much rarer. We report a case of anaphylaxis after intrauterine insemination (IUI) in which sensitization to bovine serum albumin (BSA) is demonstrated. Report the allergy evaluation performed in a patient who suffered a severe reaction immediately after an IUI procedure. A 33-year-old woman was referred because of an anaphylactic reaction after a second trial of IUI. She developed pruritus, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, bronchospasm, and generalized urticaria. She had an atopic medical history of pollen allergy and sensitization to cat epithelium. She had never had trouble with minor surgery and she usually uses latex material. She had never received heterologous sera before. Her husband's semen for the IUI was processed in a standard fluid medium called upgraded INRA B 2 (Laboratoires CCD, Paris, France), which contains amino acids, lipids, vitamins, BSA, penicillin, and streptomycin in addition to inorganic salts. Skin prick tests with the medium and BSA 10 mg/mL were positive. In vitro studies demonstrated an immunoglobulin E binding protein of 60 to 65 kDa and mast cells and basophil activation (CD63 expression) against BSA contained in the medium. Cutaneous and challenge tests with penicillin and streptomycin were negative. We consider the BSA in the semen culture medium to be the factor which triggered the anaphylactic reaction. This case supports the authors who state that media free from heterologous proteins should be used for human application, especially on atopic patients, to avoid sensitization.

  4. Gold-catalyzed domino reactions.

    PubMed

    Michelet, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Gold-catalyzed reactions have appeared to be highly attractive tools for chemists to promote novel transformations to prepare elaborated structures from simple starting materials. This chapter presents selected and original examples of domino processes in the presence of gold catalysts, highlighting reports implying hydration, hydroxylation, and hydroamination as key starting point for cascade transformations. Domino processes implying 1,n-enynes, asymmetric domino transformations, and applications of all the presented processes in total synthesis are presented.

  5. Force approach to radiation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Gustavo V.

    2016-02-01

    The difficulty of the usual approach to deal with the radiation reaction is pointed out, and under the condition that the radiation force must be a function of the external force and is zero whenever the external force be zero, a new and straightforward approach to radiation reaction force and damping is proposed. Starting from the Larmor formula for the power radiated by an accelerated charged particle, written in terms of the applied force instead of the acceleration, an expression for the radiation force is established in general, and applied to the examples for the linear and circular motion of a charged particle. This expression is quadratic in the magnitude of the applied force, inversely proportional to the speed of the charged particle, and directed opposite to the velocity vector. This force approach may contribute to the solution of the very old problem of incorporating the radiation reaction to the motion of the charged particles, and future experiments may tell us whether or not this approach point is in the right direction.

  6. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  7. Reaction field simulation of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauser, O.

    Two molecular dynamics simulations of 216 molecules interacting by the ST2 water potential were carried out. Apart from technical improvements, the first simulation was identical to that reported by Stillinger and Rahman [4]. In the second, however, the reaction field method was applied and the influence of long range interactions was carefully studied. 7500 time steps (= 7·5 ps) were generated. The temperature given by the average kinetic energy was 120°C. The atom-atom pair correlation functions and the average dipole energy are rather insensitive to the reaction field. The average cosine between two molecular dipoles, however, is strongly influenced and corresponding curves are of different sign in the second and third coordination shell. For the integral of the average cosine, namely the Kirkwood g-factor gK, the situation is even worse : Large errors occur if the long range interactions are neglected. On the other hand, a convergence of gK was achieved by the inclusion of the reaction field. The predicted g-factor, gK = 2·3-3, as well as the dielectric constant, ɛ = 45-60, are in good agreement with experiment (gK = 2·5, ɛ = 51). Finally, the single particle dynamics is analysed with the aid of the mean squared displacement and the reorientational cosine cos ϑ(t). For short times, corresponding curves are close together, but for longer times a maximum deviation of 20 per cent is observed.

  8. Force approach to radiation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    López, Gustavo V.

    2016-02-15

    The difficulty of the usual approach to deal with the radiation reaction is pointed out, and under the condition that the radiation force must be a function of the external force and is zero whenever the external force be zero, a new and straightforward approach to radiation reaction force and damping is proposed. Starting from the Larmor formula for the power radiated by an accelerated charged particle, written in terms of the applied force instead of the acceleration, an expression for the radiation force is established in general, and applied to the examples for the linear and circular motion of a charged particle. This expression is quadratic in the magnitude of the applied force, inversely proportional to the speed of the charged particle, and directed opposite to the velocity vector. This force approach may contribute to the solution of the very old problem of incorporating the radiation reaction to the motion of the charged particles, and future experiments may tell us whether or not this approach point is in the right direction.

  9. Transfer reactions with heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    Transfer reactions for several transuranium elements are studied. (/sup 248/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, /sup 249/CF, /sup 254/Es), /sup 16,18/O, /sup 20,22/Ne, and /sup 40,48/Ca projectiles are used. The production of neutron-rich heavy actinides is enhanced by the use of neutron-rich projectiles /sup 18/O and /sup 22/Ne. The maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at only 2 to 3 mass numbers larger for /sup 48/Ca than for /sup 40/Ca reactions with /sup 248/Cm. The cross sections decrease rapidly with the number of nucleons transferred. The use of neutron-rich targets favors the production of neutron-rich isotopes. ''Cold'' heavy targets are produced. Comparisons with simple calculations of the product excitation energies assuming binary transfers indicate that the maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at the lightest product isotope for which the energy exceeds the reaction barrier. The cross sections for transfer of the same nucleon clusters appear to be comparable for a wide variety of systems. 23 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Y.; Murray, C.J.; Klinman, J.P.

    1989-03-10

    Primary and secondary protium-to-tritium (H/T) and deuterium-to-tritium (D/T) kinetic isotope effects for the catalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde by yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) at 25 degrees Celsius have been determined. Previous studies showed that this reaction is nearly or fully rate limited by the hydrogen-transfer step. Semiclassical mass considerations that do not include tunneling effects would predict that kH/kT = (kD/kT)3.26, where kH, kD, and kT are the rate constants for the reaction of protium, deuterium, and tritium derivatives, respectively. Significant deviations from this relation have now been observed for both primary and especially secondary effects, such that experimental H/T ratios are much greater than those calculated from the above expression. These deviations also hold in the temperature range from 0 to 40 degrees Celsius. Such deviations were previously predicted to result from a reaction coordinate containing a significant contribution from hydrogen tunneling.

  11. Chlorination of Amino Acids: Reaction Pathways and Reaction Rates.

    PubMed

    How, Zuo Tong; Linge, Kathryn L; Busetti, Francesco; Joll, Cynthia A

    2017-05-02

    Chlorination of amino acids can result in the formation of organic monochloramines or organic dichloramines, depending on the chlorine to amino acid ratio (Cl:AA). After formation, organic chloramines degrade into aldehydes, nitriles and N-chloraldimines. In this paper, the formation of organic chloramines from chlorination of lysine, tyrosine and valine were investigated. Chlorination of tyrosine and lysine demonstrated that the presence of a reactive secondary group can increase the Cl:AA ratio required for the formation of N,N-dichloramines, and potentially alter the reaction pathways between chlorine and amino acids, resulting in the formation of unexpected byproducts. In a detailed investigation, we report rate constants for all reactions in the chlorination of valine, for the first time, using experimental results and modeling. At Cl:AA = 2.8, the chlorine was found to first react quickly with valine (5.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) to form N-monochlorovaline, with a slower subsequent reaction with N-monochlorovaline to form N,N-dichlorovaline (4.9 × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)), although some N-monochlorovaline degraded into isobutyraldehyde (1.0 × 10(-4) s(-1)). The N,N-dichlorovaline then competitively degraded into isobutyronitrile (1.3 × 10(-4) s(-1)) and N-chloroisobutyraldimine (1.2 × 10(-4) s(-1)). In conventional drinking water disinfection, N-chloroisobutyraldimine can potentially be formed in concentrations higher than its odor threshold concentration, resulting in aesthetic challenges and an unknown health risk.

  12. Microfabricated electrochemiluminescence cell for chemical reaction detection

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Hsueh, Yun-Tai; Smith, Rosemary L.

    2003-01-01

    A detector cell for a silicon-based or non-silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The detector cell is an electrochemiluminescence cell constructed of layers of silicon with a cover layer of glass, with spaced electrodes located intermediate various layers forming the cell. The cell includes a cavity formed therein and fluid inlets for directing reaction fluid therein. The reaction chamber and detector cell may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The ECL cell may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  13. Electromagnetic wave propagation characteristics in unimolecular reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingpeng; Huang, Kama

    2016-01-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical reactions have attracted interests because of their benefits for enhancement of reaction rates. However, the problems, such as hot spots and thermal runaway, limit the application of microwaves in the chemical industry. To study the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in a chemical reaction is critical to solve the problems. The research on the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction that is a simple model reaction, can be generalized to the research in a chemical reaction. The approximate expressions of the attenuation and dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction are derived by the nonlinear propagation theory. Specially, when the reaction rate is zero, the derived approximate expressions can be reduced to the formulas in low-loss dispersive media. Moreover, a 1D mold is used to validate the feasibility of the approximate expressions. The influences of the reaction rate and initial reactant concentration on the characteristics are obtained.

  14. Visualization of chemical reaction dynamics: Toward understanding complex polyatomic reactions

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Toshinori

    2013-01-01

    Polyatomic molecules have several electronic states that have similar energies. Consequently, their chemical dynamics often involve nonadiabatic transitions between multiple potential energy surfaces. Elucidating the complex reactions of polyatomic molecules is one of the most important tasks of theoretical and experimental studies of chemical dynamics. This paper describes our recent experimental studies of the multidimensional multisurface dynamics of polyatomic molecules based on two-dimensional ion/electron imaging. It also discusses ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids for elucidating nonadiabatic electronic dynamics in aqueous solutions. PMID:23318678

  15. Visualization of chemical reaction dynamics: toward understanding complex polyatomic reactions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshinori

    2013-01-01

    Polyatomic molecules have several electronic states that have similar energies. Consequently, their chemical dynamics often involve nonadiabatic transitions between multiple potential energy surfaces. Elucidating the complex reactions of polyatomic molecules is one of the most important tasks of theoretical and experimental studies of chemical dynamics. This paper describes our recent experimental studies of the multidimensional multisurface dynamics of polyatomic molecules based on two-dimensional ion/electron imaging. It also discusses ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids for elucidating nonadiabatic electronic dynamics in aqueous solutions. (Communicated by Hiroo INOKUCHI, M.J.A.)

  16. The molecular dynamics of atmospheric reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanyi, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed information about the chemistry of the upper atmosphere took the form of quantitative data concerning the rate of reaction into specified states of product vibration, rotation and translation for exothermic reaction, as well as concerning the rate of reaction from specified states of reagent vibration, rotation and translation for endothermic reaction. The techniques used were variants on the infrared chemiluminescence method. Emphasis was placed on reactions that formed, and that removed, vibrationally-excited hydroxyl radicals. Fundamental studies were also performed on exothermic reactions involving hydrogen halides.

  17. [Reactions to insect stings and bites].

    PubMed

    Ljubojević, Suzana; Lipozencić, Jasna

    2011-01-01

    Reaction to insect sting and bite may be local, such as erythema, edema and pruritus, or systemic, such as anaphylactic reaction. Diagnosis can be made by patient history, clinical picture, skin testing, total and specific IgE level, and provocation test. Local reactions are treated with cold compresses, topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines. Oral and intramuscular antihistamines and corticosteroids are used for the treatment of mild systemic reactions, and in severe reaction epinephrine injections are added. Hyposensitization is indicated in patients with severe systemic reaction, positive skin tests and high level of specific IgE antibodies.

  18. Pulp reaction to vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Fugaro, Jessica O; Nordahl, Inger; Fugaro, Orlando J; Matis, Bruce A; Mjör, Ivar A

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the histological changes in dental pulp after nightguard vital bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide gel. Fifteen patients between 12 and 26 years of age with caries-free first premolars scheduled for orthodontic extraction were treated with 10% Opalescence (Ultradent Products, Inc). Tooth #5 had four days of bleaching, tooth #12 was treated for two weeks, tooth #21 was bleached for two weeks followed by two weeks without treatment and tooth #28, serving as the control, was without treatment. All teeth were extracted at the same time. Immediately after extraction, 4 mm of the most apical portion of the root was sectioned off and each specimen was placed in a vial containing 10% neutral buffered formalin. The samples were prepared for histological evaluation at the Scandinavian Institute of Dental Materials (NIOM) and microscopically examined independently at both NIOM and Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD). Pulp reactions were semi-quantitatively graded as none, slight, moderate and severe. Slight pulpal changes were detected in 16 of the 45 bleached teeth. Neither moderate nor severe reactions were observed. The findings indicate that the slight histological changes sometimes observed after bleaching tend to resolve within two weeks post-treatment. Statistical differences existed only between the untreated control and the four-day (p=0.0109) and two-week (p=0.0045) treatment groups. The findings from this study demonstrated that nightguard vital bleaching procedures using 10% carbamide peroxide might cause initial mild, localized pulp reactions. However, the minor histological changes observed did not affect the overall health of the pulp tissue and were reversible within two weeks post-treatment. Therefore, two weeks of treatment with 10% carbamide peroxide used for nightguard vital bleaching is considered safe for dental pulp.

  19. Microfabricated sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M. Allen

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and non-silicon based materials to provide the thermal properties desired. For example, the chamber may combine a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  20. Radiation reaction at ultrahigh intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Richard T.

    2010-06-15

    Intensities of 10{sup 22} W cm{sup -2} have been reached and it is expected that this will be increased by two orders of magnitude in the near future. At these intensities the radiation reaction force is important, especially in calculating the terminal velocity of an electron. The following briefly describes some of the problems of the existing most well-known equations and describes an approach based on conservation of energy. The resulting equation is compared to the Landau Lifshitz and Ford O'Connell equations, and laboratory tests are proposed.

  1. Chemical reactions at aqueous interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecitis, Chad David

    2009-12-01

    Interfaces or phase boundaries are a unique chemical environment relative to individual gas, liquid, or solid phases. Interfacial reaction mechanisms and kinetics are often at variance with homogeneous chemistry due to mass transfer, molecular orientation, and catalytic effects. Aqueous interfaces are a common subject of environmental science and engineering research, and three environmentally relevant aqueous interfaces are investigated in this thesis: 1) fluorochemical sonochemistry (bubble-water), 2) aqueous aerosol ozonation (gas-water droplet), and 3) electrolytic hydrogen production and simultaneous organic oxidation (water-metal/semiconductor). Direct interfacial analysis under environmentally relevant conditions is difficult, since most surface-specific techniques require relatively `extreme' conditions. Thus, the experimental investigations here focus on the development of chemical reactors and analytical techniques for the completion of time/concentration-dependent measurements of reactants and their products. Kinetic modeling, estimations, and/or correlations were used to extract information on interfacially relevant processes. We found that interfacial chemistry was determined to be the rate-limiting step to a subsequent series of relatively fast homogeneous reactions, for example: 1) Pyrolytic cleavage of the ionic headgroup of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) adsorbed to cavitating bubble-water interfaces during sonolysis was the rate-determining step in transformation to their inorganic constituents carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and fluoride; 2) ozone oxidation of aqueous iodide to hypoiodous acid at the aerosol-gas interface is the rate-determining step in the oxidation of bromide and chloride to dihalogens; 3) Electrolytic oxidation of anodic titanol surface groups is rate-limiting for the overall oxidation of organics by the dichloride radical. We also found chemistry unique to the interface, for example: 1

  2. Operationally efficient reaction controls system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanciullo, Thomas J.; Judd, D. C.

    1993-06-01

    The development of the first flight demonstration of a reaction controls system utilizing O2/H2 propellants is reported. The pressure fed system uses four 500 lbf thrusters and a regulated propellant supply; composite overwrapped propellant tanks and mechanical regulators are used in conjunction with thruster modules containing all the electronics. The discussion covers a general description of the O2/H2 system and its main components, including thrusters, heat exchangers, electronic regulators, gas generators, and turbopump; controls and health monitoring; and systems performance and operations.

  3. On nuclear reactions in defects

    SciTech Connect

    Sienes, J.K. )

    1991-05-01

    The variability of results concerning cold fusion, together with the difficulty of explaining the observations, suggests that some nonstandard processes may be occurring. One such possibility is that nuclear reactions occur in defects of a deuterated lattice as a result of transient motions that momentarily bring deuterium atoms into close proximity. In this paper a mechanism involving shear of a one-dimensional lattice is described that illustrates this possibility. Order-of-magnitude estimates indicate that the expected fusion rate is not inconsistent with some experiments.

  4. Nazarov-like cyclization reactions.

    PubMed

    Di Grandi, Martin J

    2014-08-07

    The Nazarov cyclization, a well-known method for the formation of cyclopentenones, mechanistically involves the 4π electrocyclization of a 1,4-pentadienyl cation, generated from cross-conjugated divinyl ketones. Recently, advances related to this cyclization, such as the incorporation of heteroatoms as well as the use of cyclopropanes as double bond equivalents have extended the scope of the original reaction. The modifications discussed in this review, which covers the years 2009-2013, have allowed the realization of both heteroatom- and homo-Nazarov cyclizations.

  5. Radiation reaction at ultrahigh intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Richard T.

    2010-06-01

    Intensities of 1022 W cm-2 have been reached and it is expected that this will be increased by two orders of magnitude in the near future. At these intensities the radiation reaction force is important, especially in calculating the terminal velocity of an electron. The following briefly describes some of the problems of the existing most well-known equations and describes an approach based on conservation of energy. The resulting equation is compared to the Landau Lifshitz and Ford O’Connell equations, and laboratory tests are proposed.

  6. Control Electronics For Reaction Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Keith

    1995-01-01

    Bidirectional operation achieved with single-polarity main power supply. Control circuitry generates pulse-width-modulated 800-Hz waveforms to drive two-phase ac motor and reaction wheel. Operates partly in response to digital magnitude-and-direction torque command generated by external control subsystem and partly in response to tachometric feedback in form of two once-per-revolution sinusoids with amplitudes proportional to speed. Operation in either of two modes called "normal" and "safehold." In normal mode, drive pulses timed so that, on average over one or few cycles, motor applies commanded torque. In safehold mode, pulses timed to keep motor running at set speed in one direction.

  7. Reaction coordinates of biomolecular isomerization

    PubMed Central

    Bolhuis, Peter G.; Dellago, Christoph; Chandler, David

    2000-01-01

    Transition path sampling has been applied to the molecular dynamics of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum and in aqueous solution. The analysis shows that more degrees of freedom than the traditional dihedral angles, φ and ψ, are necessary to describe the reaction coordinates for isomerization of this molecule. In vacuum, an additional dihedral angle is identified as significant. In solution, solvent variables are shown to play a significant role, and this role appears to be more specific than can be captured by friction models. Implications for larger molecules are discussed. PMID:10801977

  8. [Unusual reactions to food additives].

    PubMed

    Novembre, E; Dini, L; Bernardini, R; Resti, M; Vierucci, A

    1992-01-01

    The most important symptoms caused by food additives are urticaria and angioedema, but rhinitis, asthma and gastrointestinal disturbances are also reported. Only seldom food additives have been shown to induce symptoms in other organs such central nervous system or joints and with a sparse objective evidence. In this study, we report two cases of unusual reactions to food additives (tartrazine and benzoates) involving mainly the central nervous system (headache, migraine, overactivity, concentration and learning difficulties, depression) and joints (arthralgias), confirmed with diet and double blind challenge. The possible pathogenetic mechanisms are also discussed.

  9. Control Electronics For Reaction Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Keith

    1995-01-01

    Bidirectional operation achieved with single-polarity main power supply. Control circuitry generates pulse-width-modulated 800-Hz waveforms to drive two-phase ac motor and reaction wheel. Operates partly in response to digital magnitude-and-direction torque command generated by external control subsystem and partly in response to tachometric feedback in form of two once-per-revolution sinusoids with amplitudes proportional to speed. Operation in either of two modes called "normal" and "safehold." In normal mode, drive pulses timed so that, on average over one or few cycles, motor applies commanded torque. In safehold mode, pulses timed to keep motor running at set speed in one direction.

  10. Reaction coordinates of biomolecular isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolhuis, Peter G.; Dellago, Christoph; Chandler, David

    2000-05-01

    Transition path sampling has been applied to the molecular dynamics of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum and in aqueous solution. The analysis shows that more degrees of freedom than the traditional dihedral angles, and , are necessary to describe the reaction coordinates for isomerization of this molecule. In vacuum, an additional dihedral angle is identified as significant. In solution, solvent variables are shown to play a significant role, and this role appears to be more specific than can be captured by friction models. Implications for larger molecules are discussed.

  11. Reaction time in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Evarts, E V; Teräväinen, H; Calne, D B

    1981-03-01

    Both reaction time and movement time tend to be prolonged in Parkinson's disease, but they are often impaired independently of each other. Prolongation of RT is relatively slight, while MT undergoes more substantial and consistent disturbance. Choice RT and kinaesthetic RT do not have any advantage over simple visual RT as measurements of neurological deficit in parkinsonism, since they are all impaired to the same extent. MT is more useful than RT as an objective indicator of therapeutic efficacy, but further studies of RT (with tests requiring programming of displacement, velocity, and accuracy) may provide insights into the nature of the central motor disorder in Parkinson's disease.

  12. Automated Discovery of Complex Reaction Networks: Reaction Topology, Thermochemistry and Kinetics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-08

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0165 Automated Discovery of Complex Reaction Networks Reaction Walter Pfaendtner UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Final Report 07/08/2015...01-04-2012 to 31-03-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Automated Discovery of Complex Reaction Networks Reaction 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER...incoming airflow, short lifetime of intermediates, the complexity of combustion reaction networks, and the difficulty to identify important reaction

  13. Competing reaction channels in IR-laser-induced unimolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    The competing reaction channels in the unimolecular decomposition of two molecules, formaldehyde and tetralin were studied. A TEA CO/sub 2/ laser was used as the excitation source in all experiments. The dissociation of D/sub 2/CO was studied by infrared multiphoton dissociation (MPD) and the small-molecule nature of formaldehyde with regard to MPD was explored. The effect of collisions in MPD were probed by the pressure dependence of the MPD yield and ir fluorescence from multiphoton excited D/sub 2/CO. MPD yield shows a near cubic dependence in pure D/sub 2/CO which is reduced to a 1.7 power dependence when 15 torr of NO is added. The peak amplitude of 5 ..mu..m ir fluorescence from D/sub 2/CO is proportional to the square of the D/sub 2/CO pressure in pure D/sub 2/CO or in the presence of 50 torr of Ar. Results are explained in terms of bottlenecks to excitation at the v = 1 level which are overcome by a combination of vibrational energy transfer and rotational relaxation. The radical/molecule branching ratio in D/sub 2/CO MPD was 0.10 +- 0.02 at a fluence of 125 J/cm/sup 2/ at 946.0 cm/sup -1/. The barrier height to molecular dissociation was calculated to be 3.6 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 85.0 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state of D/sub 2/CO. In H/sub 2/CO, this corresponds to 2.5 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 83.8 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state. Comparison with uv data indicate that RRKM theory is an acceptable description of formaldehyde dissociation in the 5 to 10 torr pressure range. The unimolecular decomposition of tetralin was studied by MPD and SiF/sub 4/ - sensitized pyrolysis. Both techniques induce decomposition without the interference of catalytic surfaces. Ethylene loss is identified as the lowest energy reaction channel. Dehydrogenation is found to result from step-wise H atom loss. Isomerization via disproportionation is also identified as a primary reaction channel.

  14. The carbon (formerly dark) reactions of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Bob B

    2016-05-01

    In this brief account, I describe the background for dividing photosynthesis into "light" and "dark" reactions and show how this concept changed to "light" and "carbon" reactions as science in the field advanced.

  15. Physical chemistry: The fingerprints of reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallance, Claire

    2017-06-01

    Small changes to molecular structures can transform how reactions occur, but studying reaction mechanisms directly is difficult. An imaging technique that provides direct insights into competing mechanisms might improve matters.

  16. Heavy atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paneth, Piotr

    1994-05-01

    The theory of isotope effects, which has proved to be extremely useful in providing geometrical details of transition states in a variety of chemical reactions, has recently found an application in studies of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. These reactions are multistep in nature with few steps being partially rate-limiting, thus interpretation of these isotope effects is more complex. The theoretical framework of heavy-atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions is critically analyzed on the basis of recent results of: carbon kinetic isotope effects on carbonic anhydrase and catalytic antibodies; multiple carbon, deuterium isotope effects on reactions catalyzed by formate decarboxylase; oxygen isotope effects on binding processes in reactions catalyzed by pyruvate kinase; and equilibrium oxygen isotope effect on binding an inhibitor to lactate dehydrogenase. The advantages and disadvantages of reaction complexity in learning details of formal and molecular mechanisms are discussed in the examples of reactions catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, orotidine decarboxylase and glutamine synthetase.

  17. A Light-Activated Reaction Manifold.

    PubMed

    Hiltebrandt, Kai; Elies, Katharina; D'hooge, Dagmar R; Blinco, James P; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2016-06-08

    We introduce an efficient reaction manifold where the rate of a thermally induced ligation can be controlled by a photonic field via two competing reaction channels. The effectiveness of the reaction manifold is evidenced by following the transformations of macromolecular chain termini via high-resolution mass spectrometry and subsequently by selective block copolymer formation. The light-controlled reaction manifold consists of a so-called o-quinodimethane species, a photocaged diene, that reacts in the presence of light with suitable enes in a Diels-Alder reaction and undergoes a transformation into imines with amines in the absence of light. The chemical selectivity of the manifold is controlled by the amount of ene present in the reaction and can be adjusted from 100% imine formation (0% photo product) to 5% imine formation (95% photo product). The reported light-controlled reaction manifold is highly attractive because a simple external field is used to switch the selectivity of specific reaction channels.

  18. [Adverse reaction to not iodinated contrast].

    PubMed

    Palma-Gómez, Samuel; González-Díaz, Sandra Nora; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Macías-Weinmann, Alejandra; Amaro-Vivian, Laura Elizabeth; Pérez-Vanzzini, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Mujica, José Julio; Yong-Rodríguez, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    Adverse reactions to drugs are relatively frequent in clinical practice, and some of them can be life threatening. Reactions to contrast material (CM) represent an important percentage of these adverse reactions. It has been found that 70% of reactions to contrast material happen within the first five minutes of their administration. Despite the fact that hypersensitivity reactions are traditionally classified as non-allergic, in recent years investigators have reported positive skin prick tests in patients with immediate and late reactions to contrast material. This paper reports the case of a female patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has presented on two distinct occasions adverse reactions to contrast material. We discuss on the type of reaction, severity, suggested prophylaxis, prognosis and recommendations, keeping in mind the underlying disease and the need to have further image studies performed.

  19. A New Look at Reaction Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvitas, Tomislav

    1999-11-01

    Both rates of radioactive decays and rates of chemical reactions can be thought of as numbers of transformations per time. The rate of reaction, as an intensive quantity characteristic of the process, is obtained by dividing the amount of chemical transformations per time by the volume of the reaction system. The practical definition of the reaction rate found in the literature can then be derived by defining the stoichiometric numbers as changes in the number of specific molecules taking part in the reaction per chemical transformation. The name concentration of chemical transformations is introduced for what was previously called reaction variable. It is suggested that the conceptual definition of the advancement of reaction and reaction rate be introduced in general chemistry courses.

  20. Laser-induced tissue reactions and dermatology.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rebecca J; Taylor, Brent R; Engelman, Dendy E

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of laser tissue reactions and tissue properties allows the practitioner to tailor a treatment to an individual patient's need and goals. A laser's power, spot size and pulse duration may be manipulated to yield different tissue reactions. Five tissue reactions, each the result of varying laser pulse durations and energy densities, may be achieved. They are photochemical, photothermal, photoablation, plasma-induced ablation and photomechanical. Of these, photothermal reactions are most utilized in dermatology. When higher powered pulses are applied, tissue often undergoes multiple reactions simultaneously. An understanding of these reactions allows their effects to be predicted. In this chapter, the various reactions are reviewed, and the reactions caused by many of the most commonly used lasers in dermatology are discussed.

  1. Understanding the physics and chemistry of reaction mechanisms from atomic contributions: a reaction force perspective.

    PubMed

    Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2012-07-12

    Studying chemical reactions involves the knowledge of the reaction mechanism. Despite activation barriers describing the kinetics or reaction energies reflecting thermodynamic aspects, identifying the underlying physics and chemistry along the reaction path contributes essentially to the overall understanding of reaction mechanisms, especially for catalysis. In the past years the reaction force has evolved as a valuable tool to discern between structural changes and electrons' rearrangement in chemical reactions. It provides a framework to analyze chemical reactions and additionally a rational partition of activation and reaction energies. Here, we propose to separate these energies further in atomic contributions, which will shed new insights in the underlying reaction mechanism. As first case studies we analyze two intramolecular proton transfer reactions. Despite the atom based separation of activation barriers and reaction energies, we also assign the participation of each atom in structural changes or electrons' rearrangement along the intrinsic reaction coordinate. These participations allow us to identify the role of each atom in the two reactions and therfore the underlying chemistry. The knowledge of the reaction chemistry immediately leads us to suggest replacements with other atom types that would facilitate certain processes in the reaction. The characterization of the contribution of each atom to the reaction energetics, additionally, identifies the reactive center of a molecular system that unites the main atoms contributing to the potential energy change along the reaction path.

  2. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculationsmore » of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.« less

  3. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  4. Radiation Reaction and Thomson Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, James

    2007-07-11

    In recent years high power high irradiance lasers of peta-watt order have been or are under construction. In addition, in the next 10 years lasers of unprecedented powers, exa-watt, could be built If lasers such as these are focused to very small spot sizes, extremely high laser irradiances will be achieved. When electrons interact with such a laser, they become highly relativistic over very short time and spatial scales. Usually the motion of an electron under the influence of electromagnetic fields is influenced to a small extent by radiation emission from acceleration. However, under such violent acceleration the amount of radiation emitted by electrons can become so large that significant damping of the electron motion by the emission of this radiation can occur. In this lecture note we will study this problem of radiation reaction by first showing how the equations of motion are obtained. Then, we will examine the problems with such equations and what approximations are made. We will specifically examine the effects of radiation reaction on the Thomson scattering of radiation from counter-streaming laser pulses and high energy electrons through the numerical integration of the equations of motion. We will briefly address the fundamental physics, which can be addressed by using such high irradiance lasers interacting with high energy electrons.

  5. ACUTE CATATONIC REACTION OF ADOLESCENCE

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, Leonard; Teicher, Joseph D.

    1963-01-01

    In a study of 21 cases of catatonic schizophrenic reaction of adolescence, sexual conflict situations and stern religious orientation of the family were noted in most cases. Incest was a factor in four of the female patients and masturbatory guilt was a prominent reaction in the remainder. Sex education was mostly misinformation and threats of dire consequences for sexual activity. Fourteen of the cases involved broken homes for significant periods of childhood or adolescence. It was hypothesized that sexual conflict situations grew out of incompatible socio-cultural attitudes and normal adolescent psychological and physiological drives. We formulated the “defined body contact” technique as a means of facilitating the reversal of the catatonic behavior, which we saw as the primary device whereby the patient limited physical contacts. The contacts we used in this technique were defined explicitly and implicitly as non-sexual. The catatonic symptoms remitted in days to several weeks in 13 of the cases. Seven patients required electroshock therapy. Twenty of the 21 patients returned to their homes or to non-institutional residences. The length of hospitalization was materially influenced by the degree of readiness of the outside environment to accept the returnee. PMID:14081775

  6. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-02-01

    One of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three-nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between LQCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from LQCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  7. Affective reactions to acoustic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Bradley, M M; Lang, P J

    2000-03-01

    Emotional reactions to naturally occurring sounds (e.g., screams, erotica, bombs, etc.) were investigated in two studies. In Experiment 1, subjects rated the pleasure and arousal elicited when listening to each of 60 sounds, followed by an incidental free recall task. The shape of the two-dimensional affective space defined by the mean ratings for each sound was similar to that previously obtained for pictures, and, like memory for pictures, free recall was highest for emotionally arousing stimuli. In Experiment 2, autonomic and facial electromyographic (EMG) activity were recorded while a new group of subjects listened to the same set of sounds; the startle reflex was measured using visual probes. Listening to unpleasant sounds resulted in larger startle reflexes, more corrugator EMG activity, and larger heart rate deceleration compared with listening to pleasant sounds. Electrodermal reactions were larger for emotionally arousing than for neutral materials. Taken together, the data suggest that acoustic cues activate the appetitive and defensive motivational circuits underlying emotional expression in ways similar to pictures.

  8. Redox reaction rates using potentiostatic coulometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ramette, R.W.; Harris, R.Z.; Bengali, A.A.; Noll, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new method based on potentiostatic coulometry was used to study the kinetics of the aqueous redox reactions between the ions chlorate/iodide, bromate/iodide, and bromate/bromide. The halogen product was continuously and rapidly reduced back to halide at a large platinum gauze cathode, the current being a direct measure of reaction rate and the accumulated charge serving to measure the extent of reaction. The reactions were studied at several temperatures, and activation entropies and enthalpies were calculated.

  9. Hypersensitivity reactions associated with endovascular devices.

    PubMed

    Honari, Golara; Ellis, Stephen G; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Aronica, Mark A; Svensson, Lars G; Taylor, James S

    2008-07-01

    Allergic reactions to endoprostheses are uncommon and reported in association with orthopaedic, dental, endovascular and other implanted devices. Hypersensitivity reactions to the biomaterials used in endovascular prostheses are among the infrequent reactions that may lead to local or systemic complications following cardiovascular therapeutic interventions. This article reviews potential immunotoxic effects of commonly used biomaterials. Reports of putative hypersensitivity reactions to endovascular devices, including coronary stents, perforated foramen occluders, pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators are also reviewed.

  10. The chlorate-iodine clock reaction.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, André P; Faria, Roberto B

    2005-12-28

    A clock reaction produced by mixing chlorate and iodine solutions in perchloric acid media is reported. This is the first example of a clock reaction using chlorate as a reagent. Increasing chlorate and acid concentration reduces the induction period. Changing the initial iodine concentration does not affect the length of the induction period. The discovery of this clock reaction opens the possibility that a new family of oscillation reactions can be built using chlorate as reagent.

  11. Chemotherapy and biotherapy-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Van Gerpen, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Nearly all chemotherapy and biotherapy drugs used in cancer treatment today can cause hypersensitivity reactions. Certain groups of drugs frequently associated with these reactions include the asparaginases, taxanes, platinum compounds, epipodophyllotoxins, and the monoclonal antibodies. Recognizing and managing hypersensitivity reactions are critical when caring for patients receiving these drugs because the reactions are potentially life-threatening. A thorough understanding of the drugs is necessary to assist the nurse in prevention, early recognition, and timely management.

  12. Reactions of Tributylstannyl Anioniods with Alkyl Bromides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-28

    g (12 mmol) of cesium tert-butoxide was added to the reaction vessel before the addition of n-butyllithium. Alkylation of Tributylstannyl Anionoids...Dry reaction vessels were purged with argon. The desired alkyl halide (1.0 mmol unless noted) and any desired additive were added to the reaction ...OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Contract N00014-79-C-0584 Task No. NR 053-714 TECHNICAL REPORT No. 2 Reactions of Tributylstannyl Anionoids with Alkyl

  13. REVERSIBILITY OF RADICAL-OLEFIN REACTIONS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ALKENES, *STYRENES, *POLYVINYL CHLORIDE, CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM, POLYMERIZATION, POLYMERIZATION, FREE RADICALS , MOLECULAR ISOMERISM, TRACER STUDIES, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, DECOMPOSITION, SYNTHESIS(CHEMISTRY).

  14. Infrared Emission from Gas-Aerosol Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Gaseous Amonia Infrared (IR) "Gas-aerosol Reactions Sulfuric Acid- amonia IR Luminescence Exothermic Reactions Octanoic Acid- amonia IR Laser Acid-base...of radiation observed from the reactions of chloro- sulfuric acid aerosol with gaseous amonia and water. Other systems which were screened including...phase diffusion, diffusion of reactants and/or products in the particle, by the bulk chemical reaction, or by processes occurring in the droplet

  15. Reactions of butadiyne. 1: The reaction with hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwanebeck, W.; Warnatz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen (H) atoms with butadiene (C4H2) was studied at room temperature in a pressure range between w mbar and 10 mbar. The primary step was an addition of H to C4H2 which is in its high pressure range at p 1 mbar. Under these conditions the following addition of a second H atom lies in the transition region between low and high pressure range. Vibrationally excited C4H4 can be deactivated to form buten-(1)-yne-(3)(C4H4) or decomposes into two C2H2 molecules. The rate constant at room temperature for primary step is given. The second order rate constant for the consumption of buten-(1)-yne-(3) is an H atom excess at room temperature is given.

  16. Surface catalyzed mercury transformation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanasi, Patanjali

    Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with five different oxidation catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 mug

  17. An Iodine Fluorescence Quenching Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Richard B.; Muyskens, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Clock reactions based upon competing oxidation and reduction reactions of iodine and starch as the most popular type of chemistry example is presented to illustrate the redox phenomena, reaction kinetics, and principles of chemical titration. The examination of the photophysical principles underlying the iodine fluorescence quenching clock…

  18. 'GREENER' CHEMICAL SYNTHESES USING ALTERNATE REACTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave (MW) irradiation in conjunction with water as reaction media has proven to be a greener chemical approach for expeditious N-alkylation reactions of amines and hydrazines wherein the reactions under mildly basic conditions afford tertiary amines and double N-alkylation t...

  19. Modified triglyceride oil through reactions with phenyltriazolinedione

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The synthesis of a modified triglyceride oil was achieved through the reactions with 4-phenyl-1,2-4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD). 1H NMR was used for structure determination and to monitor the reactions. Several reaction products were produced, and their relative yields depended on the stoichiometry ...

  20. Relay cross metathesis reactions of vinylphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Malla, Raj K; Ridenour, Jeremy N; Spilling, Christopher D

    2014-01-01

    Dimethyl (β-substituted) vinylphosphonates do not readily undergo cross metathesis reactions with Grubbs catalyst and terminal alkenes. However, the corresponding mono- or diallyl vinylphosphonate esters undergo facile cross metathesis reactions. The improved reactivity is attributed to a relay step in the cross metathesis reaction mechanism.

  1. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah

    This literature review examines parental reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child, focusing primarily on the mother's reactions. The research studies cited have explored such influences on maternal reactions as her feelings of lack of control over external forces and her feelings of guilt that the deformity was her fault. Delays…

  2. Emotional and Behavioral Reaction to Intrusive Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Lisa-Marie; May, Jon; Andrade, Jackie; Kavanagh, David

    2010-01-01

    A self-report measure of the emotional and behavioral reactions to intrusive thoughts was developed. The article presents data that confirm the stability, reliability, and validity of the new seven-item measure. Emotional and behavioral reactions to intrusions emerged as separate factors on the Emotional and Behavioral Reactions to Intrusions…

  3. Hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Butani, Lavjay; Calogiuri, Gianfranco

    2017-06-01

    To describe hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. PubMed search of articles published during the past 30 years with an emphasis on publications in the past decade. Case reports and review articles describing hypersensitivity reactions in the context of hemodialysis. Pharmacologic agents are the most common identifiable cause of hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving hemodialysis. These include iron, erythropoietin, and heparin, which can cause anaphylactic or pseudoallergic reactions, and topical antibiotics and anesthetics, which lead to delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Many hypersensitivity reactions are triggered by complement activation and increased bradykinin resulting from contact system activation, especially in the context of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use. Several alternative pharmacologic preparations and dialyzer membranes are available, such that once an etiology for the reaction is established, recurrences can be prevented without affecting the quality of care provided to patients. Although hypersensitivity reactions are uncommon in patients receiving hemodialysis, they can be life-threatening. Moreover, considering the large prevalence of the end-stage renal disease population, the implications of such reactions are enormous. Most reactions are pseudoallergic and not mediated by immunoglobulin E. The multiplicity of potential exposures and the complexity of the environment to which patients on dialysis are exposed make it challenging to identify the precise cause of these reactions. Great diligence is needed to investigate hypersensitivity reactions to avoid recurrence in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reaction Order Ambiguity in Integrated Rate Plots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Integrated rate plots are frequently used in reaction kinetics to determine orders of reactions. It is often emphasised, when using this methodology in practice, that it is necessary to monitor the reaction to a substantial fraction of completion for these plots to yield unambiguous orders. The present article gives a theoretical and statistical…

  5. Reactions to Termination of Individual Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortune, Anne E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Queried 69 social workers about termination reactions in most recently terminated individual cases. Clients' strongest reactions were positive affect, evaluation of success, evaluation of therapeutic experience, and positive flight. Least strong client reactions were nihilistic flight, regression, denial, recapitulation, and expression of need for…

  6. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOEpatents

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Furth, Harold P.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Goldhaber, Maurice

    1988-01-01

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  7. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOEpatents

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Furth, Harold P.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Goldhaber, Maurice

    1988-03-01

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  8. An Iodine Fluorescence Quenching Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Richard B.; Muyskens, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Clock reactions based upon competing oxidation and reduction reactions of iodine and starch as the most popular type of chemistry example is presented to illustrate the redox phenomena, reaction kinetics, and principles of chemical titration. The examination of the photophysical principles underlying the iodine fluorescence quenching clock…

  9. Infant Defensive Reactions to Visual Occlusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Lauren; Tronick, Edward

    This paper describes the initial organization of the infant's reaction to having his vision occluded by an opaque cloth; traces the development of this reaction over the first six months; and probes the role the occlusion of vision plays in provoking the reaction. Fifty videotaped sessions of infants during two conditions - eyes covered with an…

  10. Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murov, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry lists all the most commonly studied reactions in organic chemistry on one page. The discussed Reaction-Map will act as another learning aide for the students, making the study of organic chemistry much easier.

  11. Modelling Students' Visualisation of Chemical Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Gilbert, John K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a model-based notion of "submicro representations of chemical reactions". Based on three structural models of matter (the simple particle model, the atomic model and the free electron model of metals), we suggest there are two major models of reaction in school chemistry curricula: (a) reactions that are simple…

  12. Emotional and Behavioral Reaction to Intrusive Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Lisa-Marie; May, Jon; Andrade, Jackie; Kavanagh, David

    2010-01-01

    A self-report measure of the emotional and behavioral reactions to intrusive thoughts was developed. The article presents data that confirm the stability, reliability, and validity of the new seven-item measure. Emotional and behavioral reactions to intrusions emerged as separate factors on the Emotional and Behavioral Reactions to Intrusions…

  13. 'GREENER' CHEMICAL SYNTHESES USING ALTERNATE REACTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave (MW) irradiation in conjunction with water as reaction media has proven to be a greener chemical approach for expeditious N-alkylation reactions of amines and hydrazines wherein the reactions under mildly basic conditions afford tertiary amines and double N-alkylation t...

  14. The Rate Laws for Reversible Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Edward L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the rate laws for reversible reactions. Indicates that although prediction of the form of the rate law for a reverse reaction given the rate law for the forward reaction is not certain, the number of possibilities is limited because of relationships described. (JN)

  15. Reactions to Termination of Individual Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortune, Anne E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Queried 69 social workers about termination reactions in most recently terminated individual cases. Clients' strongest reactions were positive affect, evaluation of success, evaluation of therapeutic experience, and positive flight. Least strong client reactions were nihilistic flight, regression, denial, recapitulation, and expression of need for…

  16. Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murov, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry lists all the most commonly studied reactions in organic chemistry on one page. The discussed Reaction-Map will act as another learning aide for the students, making the study of organic chemistry much easier.

  17. Indirect Methods for Nuclear Reaction Data

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Dietrich, F S

    2005-11-18

    Several indirect approaches for obtaining reaction cross sections are briefly reviewed. The Surrogate Nuclear Reactions method, which aims at determining cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions, is discussed in some detail. The validity of the Weisskopf-Ewing approximation in the Surrogate approach is studied for the example of neutron-induced fission of an actinide nucleus.

  18. Reaction Order Ambiguity in Integrated Rate Plots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Integrated rate plots are frequently used in reaction kinetics to determine orders of reactions. It is often emphasised, when using this methodology in practice, that it is necessary to monitor the reaction to a substantial fraction of completion for these plots to yield unambiguous orders. The present article gives a theoretical and statistical…

  19. New reaction tester accurate within 56 microseconds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H.

    1972-01-01

    Testing device measures simple and disjunctive reaction time of human subject to light stimuli. Tester consists of reaction key, logic card, panel mounted neon indicators, and interconnecting wiring. Device is used for determining reaction times of patients undergoing postoperative neurological therapy.

  20. Nonadiabatic reaction of energetic molecules.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Atanu; Guo, Yuanqing; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2010-12-21

    Energetic materials store a large amount of chemical energy that can be readily converted into mechanical energy via decomposition. A number of different ignition processes such as sparks, shocks, heat, or arcs can initiate the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic materials. Experiments have demonstrated the essential role of excited electronic state decomposition in the energy conversion process. A full understanding of the mechanisms for the decomposition of energetic materials from excited electronic states will require the investigation and analysis of the specific topography of the excited electronic potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these molecules. The crossing of multidimensional electronic PESs creates a funnel-like topography, known as conical intersections (CIs). CIs are well established as a controlling factor in the excited electronic state decomposition of polyatomic molecules. This Account summarizes our current understanding of the nonadiabatic unimolecular chemistry of energetic materials through CIs and presents the essential role of CIs in the determination of decomposition pathways of these energetic systems. Because of the involvement of more than one PES, a decomposition process involving CIs is an electronically nonadiabatic mechanism. Based on our experimental observations and theoretical calculations, we find that a nonadiabatic reaction through CIs dominates the initial decomposition process of energetic materials from excited electronic states. Although the nonadiabatic behavior of some polyatomic molecules has been well studied, the role of nonadiabatic reactions in the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic molecules has not been well investigated. We use both nanosecond energy-resolved and femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to determine the decomposition mechanism and dynamics of energetic species experimentally. Subsequently, we employ multiconfigurational methodologies (such as, CASSCF

  1. Scratching the surface of allergic transfusion reactions

    PubMed Central

    Savage, William J; Tobian, Aaron AR; Savage, Jessica H; Wood, Robert A; Schroeder, John T; Ness, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) are a spectrum of hypersensitivity reactions that are the most common adverse reaction to platelets and plasma, occurring in up to 2% of transfusions. Despite the ubiquity of these reactions, little is known about their mechanism. In a small subset of severe reactions, specific antibody has been implicated as causal, although this mechanism does not explain all ATRs. Evidence suggests that donor, product, and recipient factors are involved, and it is possible that many ATRs are multi-factorial. Further understanding of the mechanisms of ATRs is necessary so that rationally designed and cost-effective prevention measures can be developed. PMID:22998777

  2. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  3. Inherent peculiarities in nuclear reaction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Arafah, D.; Meyer, J.D.

    1988-08-01

    A detailed description of the kinematics governing a nuclear reaction analysis is presented for exothermic reactions. In particular, the peculiar behavior demonstrated when the emitted particle energy decreases with increasing bombarding energy is emphasized. The method is applied to /sup 16/O(d,p)/sup 17/O and D(d,p)T reactions from SiO/sub 2/ and D/sub 2/O targets, respectively. Moreover, an algorithm was written to compute reaction cross sections as a function of energy or concentration as a function of depth from the measured reaction yields.

  4. Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R.

    1991-12-31

    Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

  5. Interfacial reactions in titanium-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.M.; Jeng, S.M. )

    1989-11-01

    A study of the interfacial reaction characteristics of SiC fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide and disordered titanium alloy composites has determined that the matrix alloy compositions affect the microstructure and the distribution of the reaction products, as well as the growth kinetics of the reaction zones. The interfacial reaction products in the ordered titanium aluminide composite are more complicated than those in the disordered titanium-alloy composite. The activation energy of the interfacial reaction in the ordered titanium aluminide composite is also higher than that in the disordered titanium alloy composite. Designing an optimum interface is necessary to enhance the reliability and service life at elevated temperatures. 16 refs.

  6. Electromagnetic effects on explosive reaction and plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, Douglas G; Whitley, Von H; Mace, Jonathan L; Pemberton, Steven J; Sandoval, Thomas D; Lee, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    A number of studies have reported that electric fields can have quantifiable effects on the initiation and growth of detonation, yet the mechanisms of these effects are not clear. Candidates include Joule heating of the reaction zone, perturbations to the activation energy for chemical reaction, reduction of the Peierls energy barrier that facilitates dislocation motion, and acceleration of plasma projected from the reaction zone. In this study the possible role of plasma in the initiation and growth of explosive reaction is investigated. The effects of magnetic and electric field effects on reaction growth will be reviewed and recent experiments reported.

  7. Adverse Reactions of Ferric Carboxymaltose

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Navin; Shenoy, Smita; Bairy, K L; Sarma, Yashdeep

    2014-01-01

    The author reports a 55-year-old female diagnosed of chronic kidney disease grade-5 with associated co-morbidities like type 2 diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy and hypothyroidism was admitted for arteriovenous fistula construction. She was started on ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of anaemia. She was given a test dose before administering the drug intravenously and she did not develop any reaction. The drug ferric carboxymaltose was then administered over a period of one hour. About half an hour after drug administration, the patient developed breathlessness and myalgia. After half hour of the above episode of breathlessness and myalgia she also developed vomiting (one episode). Patient was managed with oxygen therapy, IV fluids and other drugs like corticosteroids, phenaramine maleate and nalbuphine which controlled the above symptoms. PMID:25478369

  8. [Periodontal reaction versus dental movement].

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Ecaterina; Preoteasa, Elena; Duduca, Ioana

    2005-01-01

    In orthodontics the relation between the force (natural or artificial) and the structures that must be modified or led towards a normal situation is in fact a complex equation would multiple aspects determined by the biological part. The orthodontic forces imply, both in action as in effect, all the elements of the dental system, meaning bones, teeth, periodontal tissue. On the other side, the structures of the dental system may help, limit ate, or even erase the action of the orthodontic forces. Our article brings into discussion the relation between the teeth' sustaining structures and their movements determined by the orthodontic forces both as a reaction to a therapeutical treatment and as their direct implication into the result and the stability of the orthodontic treatment, on a long-term.

  9. Can Reaction Mechanisms Be Proven?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskirk, Allen; Baradaran, Hediyeh

    2009-05-01

    "Can Reaction Mechanisms Be Proven?" generated spirited responses from its reviewers. The reviews were approximately evenly divided, and all were of very high quality. The authors agreed with the editor’s proposal that the reviewers convert their reviews into rebuttals or affirmations of the authors’ position for publication along with the article, which has been revised based on the reviews. Most agreed to such a process and their comments appear here. We hope that publication of this paper and well-reasoned rebuttals such as those provided here will initiate a wide-ranging discussion. JCE will provide an online forum for further discussion of the issue. Our hope is that both faculty and students will contribute their opinions and ideas to this discussion. See Reviewer Comments: Brown Lewis Yoon Wade

  10. The OH + HBr reaction revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravishankara, A. R.; Wine, P. H.; Wells, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Variable-temperature measurements of the rate coefficient /k(1)/ for the reaction OH + HBr yield Br + H2O are presented. The measurements are verified by two techniques: one involved a 266-nm pulsed-laser photolysis of O3/H2O/HBr/He mixtures in conjunction with time-resolved resonance fluorescence detection of OH, the second comprised pulsed laser-induced fluorescence detection of OH following 248-nm pulsed-laser photolysis of H2O2/HBr/Ar mixtures. It is reported that k(1) = (11.9 + or -1.4 x 10 to the -12th (cu cm)/(molecule)(s) independent of temperature. The measurements are compared with other available results.

  11. A reversible nanoconfined chemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Thomas K; Bösenberg, Ulrike; Gosalawit, Rapee; Dornheim, Martin; Cerenius, Yngve; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2010-07-27

    Hydrogen is recognized as a potential, extremely interesting energy carrier system, which can facilitate efficient utilization of unevenly distributed renewable energy. A major challenge in a future "hydrogen economy" is the development of a safe, compact, robust, and efficient means of hydrogen storage, in particular, for mobile applications. Here we report on a new concept for hydrogen storage using nanoconfined reversible chemical reactions. LiBH4 and MgH2 nanoparticles are embedded in a nanoporous carbon aerogel scaffold with pore size Dmax approximately 21 nm and react during release of hydrogen and form MgB2. The hydrogen desorption kinetics is significantly improved compared to bulk conditions, and the nanoconfined system has a high degree of reversibility and stability and possibly also improved thermodynamic properties. This new scheme of nanoconfined chemistry may have a wide range of interesting applications in the future, for example, within the merging area of chemical storage of renewable energy.

  12. Chemical reactions in endoreversible thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Katharina; Hoffmann, Karl Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Endoreversible thermodynamics is a theory for the (approximate) description of thermodynamic non-equilibrium systems, which allows us to capture the ever present irreversibilities of real processes. For instance in heat engines the dissipation due to finite heat transport capabilities, as well as the resulting limitations in the energy fluxes, can be incorporated into the theory. It has thus been very successful in closing the gap between observed and theoretically predicted efficiencies. Here an extension of the theory is provided, with which chemical reactions can be included in the formalism. This opens up a wide field of applications for endoreversible modeling and the investigation of dissipative processes, for instance in fuel cells or batteries.

  13. [Paranoid syndrome, paranoid reaction, paranoia].

    PubMed

    Pavlovský, P

    2006-01-01

    The term paranoid is derived from the Greek word paranoia meaning nadnese. It does not only mean self-reference, but there are various personality features as they are hostility, a tendency towards aggressiveness, irritability, a lack of sense of humour, feelings of overestimation of one-self and a tendency towards accusations. These features may appear also within normal psychology and they becomeclinically important after thein increase of intensity and conspicuousness (los sof hearing, long-term abuse of alcohol and psychostimulants) and organic disorders of the brain may contribute to the development of paranoidity. A mechanism of projection is considered as a decivise factor from the point of view of dynamic psychiatry. Clinically unimportant sign sof paranoidity can be observed due to unusual situations. If a paranoid reaction becomes more serious, formation of a paranoid delusion should be taken to account. In our koncept the term paranoid and paranoidity should be used only as a psychopathological term.

  14. Transport and Reactions of Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekas, Vassilis; Paraskaki, Ioanna

    The aim of this chapter is to provide the food scientist and engineer with tools for understanding the principles of transport and reaction of pollutants and their fate after being released or deposited into the environment. Furthermore, on the grounds of this understanding of basic principles, the food scientist and engineer will possess the ability to model these processes. Mathematical modeling nowadays is facilitated through the use of appropriate computer software programs. There are, generally speaking, a large number of programs available for such modeling and especially for the prediction of the fate of pollutants. When working with these programs it is advisable to understand the principles behind the program rather than treating it as a black box

  15. Epidemiology of cutaneous drug-induced reactions.

    PubMed

    Naldi, L; Crotti, S

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous reactions represent in many surveillance systems, the most frequent adverse events attributable to drugs. The spectrum of clinical manifestations is wide and virtually encompasses any known dermatological disease. The introduction of biological agents and so-called targeted therapies has further enlarged the number of reaction patterns especially linked with cytokine release or in balance. The frequency and clinical patterns of cutaneous reactions are influenced by drug use, prevalence of specific conditions (e.g., HIV infection) and pharmacogenetic traits of a population, and they may vary greatly among the different populations around the world. Studies of reaction rates in cohorts of hospitalized patients revealed incidence rates ranging from, 1 out 1000 to 2 out 100 of all hospitalized patients. For drugs such as aminopenicillines and sulfamides the incidence of skin reactions is in the order of 3-5 cases out of 100 exposed people. Although the majority of cutaneous reactions are mild and self-limiting, there are reactions such as Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) which are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Surveillance systems routed on sound epidemiologic methodology, are needed to raise signals and to assess risks associated with specific reactions and drug exposures. Identification of risk factors for adverse reactions and appropriate genetic screening of groups at higher risk may improve the outcomes of skin reactions.

  16. Benign hypersensitivity reactions to smallpox vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bessinger, G Todd; Smith, Sidney B; Olivere, Joseph W; James, Bruce L

    2007-05-01

    With the reinstitution of smallpox vaccinations, physicians are seeing significant numbers of adverse events for the first time since the 1980s. The most common adverse events seen in our large military population are benign. We observed a clinically and histopathologically distinct reaction pattern that has not been fully characterized previously. All smallpox-vaccinated patients at Fort Hood, Texas with adverse cutaneous reactions were referred to the dermatology clinic at Darnall Army Community Hospital. Patients were evaluated by a staff dermatologist who performed a skin biopsy and took clinical photographs. If the patients had intact vesicles or pustules, direct fluorescent antibody testing, viral and bacterial cultures, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were also performed. Three hypersensitivity reaction patterns were seen: exanthematous, erythema multiforme-like (EM-like), and urticarial. The patterns had distinct clinical and histopathologic findings. Of the 11,058 vaccinees, six had the exanthematous reaction pattern, two had the urticarial reaction pattern, and one had the EM-like pattern. We describe a new exanthematous type of hypersensitivity reaction to the smallpox vaccine. Hypersensitivity reactions occur at a rate higher than previously reported. In a carefully screened military population, these three hypersensitivity reactions are much more common than life-threatening or serious reactions. Although the reactions have distinct clinical and pathologic features, they are all characterized by mild or absent systemic symptoms and a benign outcome.

  17. The ozone-iodine-chlorate clock reaction.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T P; Monteiro, Emily V; Pereira, Juliano R T; Faria, Roberto B

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new clock reaction based on ozone, iodine, and chlorate that differs from the known chlorate-iodine clock reaction because it does not require UV light. The induction period for this new clock reaction depends inversely on the initial concentrations of ozone, chlorate, and perchloric acid but is independent of the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism considers the reaction of ozone and iodide to form HOI, which is a key species for producing non-linear autocatalytic behavior. The novelty of this system lies in the presence of ozone, whose participation has never been observed in complex systems such as clock or oscillating reactions. Thus, the autocatalysis demonstrated in this new clock reaction should open the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions.

  18. The Ozone-Iodine-Chlorate Clock Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T. P.; Monteiro, Emily V.; Pereira, Juliano R. T.; Faria, Roberto B.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new clock reaction based on ozone, iodine, and chlorate that differs from the known chlorate-iodine clock reaction because it does not require UV light. The induction period for this new clock reaction depends inversely on the initial concentrations of ozone, chlorate, and perchloric acid but is independent of the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism considers the reaction of ozone and iodide to form HOI, which is a key species for producing non-linear autocatalytic behavior. The novelty of this system lies in the presence of ozone, whose participation has never been observed in complex systems such as clock or oscillating reactions. Thus, the autocatalysis demonstrated in this new clock reaction should open the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions. PMID:24386257

  19. A Networks Approach to Modeling Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Imhof, P

    2016-01-01

    Modeling enzymatic reactions is a demanding task due to the complexity of the system, the many degrees of freedom involved and the complex, chemical, and conformational transitions associated with the reaction. Consequently, enzymatic reactions are not determined by precisely one reaction pathway. Hence, it is beneficial to obtain a comprehensive picture of possible reaction paths and competing mechanisms. By combining individually generated intermediate states and chemical transition steps a network of such pathways can be constructed. Transition networks are a discretized representation of a potential energy landscape consisting of a multitude of reaction pathways connecting the end states of the reaction. The graph structure of the network allows an easy identification of the energetically most favorable pathways as well as a number of alternative routes.

  20. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to obtain accurate potential energy surfaces (PES's) for a number of reactions which are important in the H/N/O combustion process. The interest in this is centered around the design of the SCRAM jet engine for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which was envisioned as an air-breathing hydrogen-burning vehicle capable of reaching velocities as large as Mach 25. Preliminary studies indicated that the supersonic flow in the combustor region of the scram jet engine required accurate reaction rate data for reactions in the H/N/O system, some of which was not readily available from experiment. The most important class of combustion reactions from the standpoint of the NASP project are radical recombinaton reactions, since these reactions result in most of the heat release in the combustion process. Theoretical characterizations of the potential energy surfaces for these reactions are presented and discussed.

  1. Allergic or Hypersensitivity Reactions to Orthopaedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Timothy T; Haines, Colin M; Uhl, Richard L

    2017-10-01

    Allergic or hypersensitivity reactions to orthopaedic implants can pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Although 10% to 15% of the population exhibits cutaneous sensitivity to metals, deep-tissue reactions to metal implants are comparatively rare. Nevertheless, the link between cutaneous sensitivity and clinically relevant deep-tissue reactions is unclear. Most reactions to orthopaedic devices are type IV, or delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. The most commonly implicated allergens are nickel, cobalt, and chromium; however, reactions to nonmetal compounds, such as polymethyl methacrylate, antibiotic spacers, and suture materials, have also been reported. Symptoms of hypersensitivity to implants are nonspecific and include pain, swelling, stiffness, and localized skin reactions. Following arthroplasty, internal fixation, or implantation of similarly allergenic devices, the persistence or early reappearance of inflammatory symptoms should raise suspicions for hypersensitivity. However, hypersensitivity is a diagnosis of exclusion. Infection, as well as aseptic loosening, particulate synovitis, instability, and other causes of failure must first be eliminated.

  2. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  3. An Iodine Fluorescence Quenching Clock Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Richard B.

    2007-05-01

    A fluorescent clock reaction is described that is based on the principles of the Landolt iodine reaction but uses the potent fluorescence quenching properties of triiodide to abruptly extinguish the ultraviolet fluorescence of optical brighteners present in liquid laundry detergents. The reaction uses easily obtained household products. One variation illustrates the sequential steps and mechanisms of the reaction; other variations maximize the dramatic impact of the demonstration; and a variation that uses liquid detergent in the Briggs Rauscher reaction yields a striking oscillating luminescence. The iodine fluorescence quenching clock reaction can be used in the classroom to explore not only the principles of redox chemistry and reaction kinetics, but also the photophysics of fluorescent pH probes and optical quenching.

  4. Adverse drug reactions in Sjögren's syndrome. Frequent allergic reactions and a specific trimethoprim-associated systemic reaction.

    PubMed

    Antonen, J A; Markula, K P; Pertovaara, M I; Pasternack, A I

    1999-01-01

    Trimethoprim-associated systemic reactions, including aseptic meningitis, have been reported to be very rare adverse drug reactions. Patients with Sjögren's syndrome have been overrepresented, but no epidemiological surveys of the reaction have been conducted. To study the overall frequency of adverse drug reactions, and especially trimethoprim-associated reactions, we interviewed 85 primary Sjögren's syndrome patients and compared the results with those of 45 similarly interviewed osteoarthritis patients. Antimicrobial allergy was more common among Sjögren's syndrome patients than in osteoarthritis patients (46% vs. 27%). Eleven Sjögren's syndrome patients (13%), but no osteoarthritis patient, had experienced at least a partial, non-allergic systemic reaction with trimethoprim. Of them five (6%) had had a full-blown systemic reaction including both chills/fever and headache/backache and at least one of the following: malaise, vomiting, dizziness, confusion or meningeal irritation. Our findings confirm that allergic reactions to antimicrobials are frequent in Sjögren's syndrome. In addition to allergic reactions Sjögren's syndrome patients are prone to a specific trimethoprim-associated systemic reaction. This should be remembered when prescribing antimicrobials.

  5. Subdiffusion-reaction processes with A →B reactions versus subdiffusion-reaction processes with A +B→B reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz; Lewandowska, Katarzyna D.

    2014-09-01

    We consider the subdiffusion-reaction process with reactions of a type A +B→B (in which particles A are assumed to be mobile, whereas B are assumed to be static) in comparison to the subdiffusion-reaction process with A →B reactions which was studied by Sokolov, Schmidt, and Sagués [Phys. Rev. E 73, 031102 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.031102]. In both processes a rule that reactions can only occur between particles which continue to exist is taken into account. Although in both processes a probability of the vanishing of particle A due to a reaction is independent of both time and space variables (assuming that in the system with the A +B→B reactions, particles B are distributed homogeneously), we show that subdiffusion-reaction equations describing these processes as well as their Green's functions are qualitatively different. The reason for this difference is as follows. In the case of the former reaction, particles A and B have to meet with some probability before the reaction occurs in contradiction with the case of the latter reaction. For the subdiffusion process with the A +B→B reactions we consider three models which differ in some details concerning a description of the reactions. We base the method considered in this paper on a random walk model in a system with both discrete time and discrete space variables. Then the system with discrete variables is transformed into a system with both continuous time and continuous space variables. Such a method seems to be convenient in analyzing subdiffusion-reaction processes with partially absorbing or partially reflecting walls. The reason is that within this method we can determine Green's functions without a necessity of solving a fractional differential subdiffusion-reaction equation with boundary conditions at the walls. As an example, we use the model to find the Green's functions for a subdiffusive reaction system (with the reactions mentioned above), which is bounded by a partially absorbing wall

  6. RxnFinder: biochemical reaction search engines using molecular structures, molecular fragments and reaction similarity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qian-Nan; Deng, Zhe; Hu, Huanan; Cao, Dong-Sheng; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2011-09-01

    Biochemical reactions play a key role to help sustain life and allow cells to grow. RxnFinder was developed to search biochemical reactions from KEGG reaction database using three search criteria: molecular structures, molecular fragments and reaction similarity. RxnFinder is helpful to get reference reactions for biosynthesis and xenobiotics metabolism. RxnFinder is freely available via: http://sdd.whu.edu.cn/rxnfinder. qnhu@whu.edu.cn.

  7. Explorations into Chemical Reactions and Biochemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Gasteiger, Johann

    2016-12-01

    A brief overview of the work in the research group of the present author on extracting knowledge from chemical reaction data is presented. Methods have been developed to calculate physicochemical effects at the reaction site. It is shown that these physicochemical effects can quite favourably be used to derive equations for the calculation of data on gas phase reactions and on reactions in solution such as aqueous acidity of alcohols or carboxylic acids or the hydrolysis of amides. Furthermore, it is shown that these physicochemical effects are quite effective for assigning reactions into reaction classes that correspond to chemical knowledge. Biochemical reactions constitute a particularly interesting and challenging task for increasing our understanding of living species. The BioPath.Database is a rich source of information on biochemical reactions and has been used for a variety of applications of chemical, biological, or medicinal interests. Thus, it was shown that biochemical reactions can be assigned by the physicochemical effects into classes that correspond to the classification of enzymes by the EC numbers. Furthermore, 3D models of reaction intermediates can be used for searching for novel enzyme inhibitors. It was shown in a combined application of chemoinformatics and bioinformatics that essential pathways of diseases can be uncovered. Furthermore, a study showed that bacterial flavor-forming pathways can be discovered.

  8. Chemical Reactions in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wai, Chien M.; Hunt, Fred; Ji, Min; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    1998-12-01

    Utilizing supercritical fluids as environmentally benign solvents for chemical synthesis is one of the new approaches in the "greening" of chemistry. Carbon dioxide is the most widely used gas for supercritical fluid studies because of its moderate critical constants, nontoxic nature, and availability in pure form. One unique property of supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) is its high solubility for fluorinated compounds. Thus sc-CO2 can be used to replace Freons that are conventionally used as solvents for synthesis of perfluoro-polymers. Another property of sc-CO2 is its miscibility with gases such as H2. Heterogeneous reactions involving these gases may become homogeneous reactions in sc-CO2. Reactions in sc-CO2 may offer several advantages including controlling phase behavior and products, increasing speed of reactions, and obtaining specific reaction channels. This paper describes the following nine types of chemical reactions reported in the literature utilizing sc-CO2 as a solvent to illustrate the unique properties of the supercritical fluid reaction systems: (i) hydrogenation and hydroformylation, (ii) synthesis of organometallic compounds, (iii) metal chelation and extraction, (iv) preparation of inorganic nanoparticles, (v) stereo-selectivity of lipase-catalyzed reactions, (vi) asymmetric catalytic hydrogenation, (vii) polymerization, (viii) Diels-Alder reaction, and (ix) free radical reactions.

  9. Trimolecular reactions of uranium hexafluoride with water.

    PubMed

    Lind, Maria C; Garrison, Stephen L; Becnel, James M

    2010-04-08

    The hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride (UF(6)) is a key step in the synthesis of uranium dioxide (UO(2)) powder for nuclear fuels. Mechanisms for the hydrolysis reactions are studied here with density functional theory and the Stuttgart small-core scalar relativistic pseudopotential and associated basis set for uranium. The reaction of a single UF(6) molecule with a water molecule in the gas phase has been previously predicted to proceed over a relatively sizable barrier of 78.2 kJ x mol(-1), indicating this reaction is only feasible at elevated temperatures. Given the observed formation of a second morphology for the UO(2) product coupled with the observations of rapid, spontaneous hydrolysis at ambient conditions, an alternate reaction pathway must exist. In the present work, two trimolecular hydrolysis mechanisms are studied with density functional theory: (1) the reaction between two UF(6) molecules and one water molecule, and (2) the reaction of two water molecules with a single UF(6) molecule. The predicted reaction of two UF(6) molecules with one water molecule displays an interesting "fluorine-shuttle" mechanism, a significant energy barrier of 69.0 kJ x mol(-1) to the formation of UF(5)OH, and an enthalpy of reaction (DeltaH(298)) of +17.9 kJ x mol(-1). The reaction of a single UF(6) molecule with two water molecules displays a "proton-shuttle" mechanism, and is more favorable, having a slightly lower computed energy barrier of 58.9 kJ x mol(-1) and an exothermic enthalpy of reaction (DeltaH(298)) of -13.9 kJ x mol(-1). The exothermic nature of the overall UF(6) + 2H(2)O trimolecular reaction and the lowering of the barrier height with respect to the bimolecular reaction are encouraging.

  10. Intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, C.; Tamain, B.

    The intermediate energy heavy ion induced reactions are extensively studied for several years. In this paper, we try to summarize the present knowledge. The peripheral reactions appear to be intermediate between the fragmentation and the deep inelastic regimes. Many questions remain open concerning the energy relaxation mechanisms and an eventual participant zone creation. In the case of central collisions, it has been shown that very hot nuclei can be built. The fusion limits are discussed and the very hot nuclei properties are considered. In some cases, hot spot formation or compression effects could play a role. Multifragmentation is discussed as a possible decay channel. In all these aspects, a difficult question concerns the validity of the temperature concept and more generally of collective thermodynamical variables. Such collective effects have been investigated in pion production experiments. Les réactions induites par ions lourds d'énergie intermédiaire sont très étudiées depuis quelques années. Dans cet article, nous essayons de résumer l'état actuel des connaissances. Les mécanismes mis en jeu dans les collisions périphériques sont intermédiaires entre les collisions très inélastiques et la fragmentation. La cible joue clairement un rôle déterminant et des effets importants de champ moyen demeurent. De nombreuses questions restent sans réponse comme par exemple les mécanismes de relaxation d'énergie ou l'existence d'une éventuelle zone participante. Dans le cas des collisions centrales, il a pu être montré que des noyaux très chauds sont fabriqués. Les limites au processus de fusion et les propriétés des noyaux très chauds sont discutées. Dans certains cas, des effets de compression ou de points chauds peuvent être envisagés. La multifragmentation est une voie de désexcitation possible. Une importante question concerne la validité du concept de température et plus généralement la notion de variable collective

  11. ReactionPredictor: prediction of complex chemical reactions at the mechanistic level using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Kayala, Matthew A; Baldi, Pierre

    2012-10-22

    Proposing reasonable mechanisms and predicting the course of chemical reactions is important to the practice of organic chemistry. Approaches to reaction prediction have historically used obfuscating representations and manually encoded patterns or rules. Here we present ReactionPredictor, a machine learning approach to reaction prediction that models elementary, mechanistic reactions as interactions between approximate molecular orbitals (MOs). A training data set of productive reactions known to occur at reasonable rates and yields and verified by inclusion in the literature or textbooks is derived from an existing rule-based system and expanded upon with manual curation from graduate level textbooks. Using this training data set of complex polar, hypervalent, radical, and pericyclic reactions, a two-stage machine learning prediction framework is trained and validated. In the first stage, filtering models trained at the level of individual MOs are used to reduce the space of possible reactions to consider. In the second stage, ranking models over the filtered space of possible reactions are used to order the reactions such that the productive reactions are the top ranked. The resulting model, ReactionPredictor, perfectly ranks polar reactions 78.1% of the time and recovers all productive reactions 95.7% of the time when allowing for small numbers of errors. Pericyclic and radical reactions are perfectly ranked 85.8% and 77.0% of the time, respectively, rising to >93% recovery for both reaction types with a small number of allowed errors. Decisions about which of the polar, pericyclic, or radical reaction type ranking models to use can be made with >99% accuracy. Finally, for multistep reaction pathways, we implement the first mechanistic pathway predictor using constrained tree-search to discover a set of reasonable mechanistic steps from given reactants to given products. Webserver implementations of both the single step and pathway versions of Reaction

  12. Demisable Reaction-Wheel Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell; Ahronovich, Eliezer; Davis, Milton C., III

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the concept of a demisable motor-drive-and-flywheel assembly [reaction-wheel assembly (RWA)] used in controlling the attitude of a spacecraft. Demisable as used here does not have its traditional legal meaning; instead, it signifies susceptible to melting, vaporizing, and/or otherwise disintegrating during re-entry of the spacecraft into the atmosphere of the Earth so as not to pose a hazard to anyone or anything on the ground. Prior RWAs include parts made of metals (e.g., iron, steel, and titanium) that melt at high temperatures and include structures of generally closed character that shield some parts (e.g., magnets) against re-entry heating. In a demisable RWA, the flywheel would be made of aluminum, which melts at a lower temperature. The flywheel web would not be a solid disk but would have a more open, nearly-spoke-like structure so that it would disintegrate more rapidly; hence, the flywheel rim would separate more rapidly so that parts shielded by the rim would be exposed sooner to re-entry heating. In addition, clearances between the flywheel and other components would be made greater, imparting a more open character and thus increasing the exposure of those components.

  13. Human collective reactions to threat.

    PubMed

    Dezecache, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    A common assumption regarding mass emergency situations is that individuals in such contexts behave in a way that maximizes their likelihood to escape, at the expense, or with little concern for, the welfare and survival of their neighbors. Doing so, they might even compromise the effectiveness of group evacuation. This conception follows the views of early works on crowd psychology, a tradition born with Gustave Le Bon's The Crowd: a study of the Popular Mind, first published in 1895, and which has had a tremendous impact on scientific representations of people's behavior in mass emergency contexts. Indeed, this work has greatly contributed to the idea that, in such situations, people revert to a primitive, impulsive, irrational, and antisocial nature, causing the breakdown of social order. However, more empirically oriented studies have consistently reported little collective panic, as well as a great deal of solidarity and pro-social behavior during mass emergency situations. Because of institutional barriers, such views have remained largely unknown to cognitive psychologists. Yet these are important results in that they show that human individual and collective reactions to threat are primarily affiliative. Indeed, far from leading to the breakdown of the social fabrics, the presence of a common threat can strengthen social bonds. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Interfacial reactions in lithium batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Rachid; Ma, Zi-Feng; ...

    2017-06-29

    The lithium-ion battery was first commercially introduced by Sony Corporation on 1991 using LiCoO2 as the cathode material and mesocarbon microbeads as the anode material. After continuous research and development for 25 years, lithium-ion batteries have been the dominant energy storage devices for modern portable electronics, as well as for the emerging application for electric vehicles and smart grids. It has been a common sense that the success of lithium-ion technologies is rooted to the existence of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that kinetically suppresses the parasitic reactions between the lithiated 2 graphitic anodes and the carbonate-based non-aqueous electrolytes. Recently,more » major attention has been paid to the importance of a similar passivation/protection layer on the surface of cathode materials, aiming for rational design of high-energy-density lithiumion batteries with extended cycle/calendar life. In this article, the physical model of the solid electrolyte interphase, as well as the recent research effort to under the nature and role SEI are summarized, and future perspectives on this important research field will also be presented.« less

  15. 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cynthia M. Friend

    2006-03-14

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Ventura Beach Marriott, Ventura California from February 13, 2005 through February 18, 2005. The Conference was well-attended with 124 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  16. Fusion reactions at low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Fusion measurement methods at low energies are briefly described, and experimental and theoretical fusion cross sections for /sup 58/Ni + /sup 58/Ni, /sup 58/Ni + /sup 64/Ni and /sup 64/Ni + /sup 64/Ni reactions are discussed. It is shown that quantal tunneling calculations do not describe the near- and sub-barrier behavior of the fusion data. Instead, the WKB predictions fall progressively further blow the experimental results as the energy is lowered. At far subbarrier energies the measured cross sections exceed the WKB predictions by more than three orders of magnitude. The unexpectedly strong dependence of the fusion probability upon the nuclear valence structure is illustrated and discussed. The relationship of channel coupling and quantal tunneling is discussed. In conclusion, it was established that atomic nuclei fuse far more readily at low energies that would be expected from quantal tunneling considerations alone. It was found that the behavior of the cross sections for fusion depends strongly upon the valence structure of the collision partners. This structural dependence extends from light 1p-shell systems to systems involving nearly 200 nucleons. These new phenomena may be viewed as characterizing the tunneling of a quantal system with many degrees of freedom. The failure of standard tunneling models may be understood as resulting from the ability of the dinuclear system to tunnel into the classically forbidden region by means of couplings to intrinsic degrees of freedom. 38 refs. (WHK)

  17. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  18. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  19. Glycation Reactions of Casein Micelles.

    PubMed

    Moeckel, Ulrike; Duerasch, Anja; Weiz, Alexander; Ruck, Michael; Henle, Thomas

    2016-04-13

    After suspensions of micellar casein or nonmicellar sodium caseinate had been heated, respectively, in the presence and absence of glucose for 0-4 h at 100 °C, glycation compounds were quantitated. The formation of Amadori products as indicators for the "early" Maillard reaction were in the same range for both micellar and nonmicellar caseins, indicating that reactive amino acid side chains within the micelles are accessible for glucose in a comparable way as in nonmicellar casein. Significant differences, however, were observed concerning the formation of the advanced glycation end products (AGEs), namely, N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML), pyrraline, pentosidine, and glyoxal-lysine dimer (GOLD). CML could be observerd in higher amounts in nonmicellar casein, whereas in the micelles the pyrraline formation was increased. Pentosidine and GOLD were formed in comparable amounts. Furthermore, the extent of protein cross-linking was significantly higher in the glycated casein micelles than in the nonmicellar casein samples. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy showed that glycation has no influence on the size of the casein micelles, indicating that cross-linking occurs only in the interior of the micelles, but altered the surface morphology. Studies on glycation and nonenzymatic cross-linking can contribute to the understanding of the structure of casein micelles.

  20. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxide treatment of organic materials are oxidized species, some of which also contain chlorine. The relative amounts of species types may depend on the amount of chlorine dioxide residual maintained and the concentration and nature of the organic material present in the source water. The trend toward lower concentrations of chlorinated by-products with increasing ClO2 concentration, which was observed with phenols, has not been observed with natural humic materials as measured by the organic halogen parameter. Organic halogen concentrations have been shown to increase with increasing chlorine dioxide dose, but are much lower than those observed when chlorine is applied. Aldehydes have been detected as apparent by-products of chlorine dioxide oxidation reactions in a surface water that is a drinking water source. Some other nonchlorinated products of chlorine dioxide treatment may be quinones and epoxides. The extent of formation of these moieties within the macromolecular humic structure is also still unknown. PMID:7151750

  1. Myofibroblasts reaction in urothelial carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Alexa, Aurora; Baderca, Flavia; Lighezan, Rodica; Izvernariu, D

    2009-01-01

    The myofibroblast is a connective tissue cell with intermediate features between the fibroblast and the smooth muscle cell and unknown origin, which normally is present in only a few organs, but with increased incidence in malignancies. The patterns of myofibroblastic reaction may be synchronous, metachronous and mixed. The presence of the myofibroblasts has been demonstrated into the stroma of breast carcinomas, particularly in firm, retracted tumors with no inflammatory infiltrate. The present literature lacks data regarding the presence and the behavior of the myofibroblasts in urothelial carcinomas. Fifty-nine urothelial carcinoma specimens from patients admitted into the Urology Clinic of the Emergency County Hospital of Timisoara between 1999 and 2004 were stained with usual HE stain for the morphological diagnosis and immunohistochemically stained with smooth muscle actin, vimentin, and desmin for the detection of myofibroblasts. In biopsies sampled from normal urinary bladder and in urothelial carcinomas of the superior urinary tract Ta, we have not noticed any cells with myofibroblast morphology or immunophenotype. In Ta tumors, no matter the differentiation grade, we have not noticed myofibroblasts neither between the tumor cells nor at distance. The myofibroblasts were identified in seven of the 26 (26.92%) tumors in T1 stage. In T2 and T3 stage tumors the number of myofibroblasts differs from case to case, being significantly higher in tumors with high differentiation grade, G3.

  2. Interfacial reactions in lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Rachid; Ma, Zi-Feng; Amine, Khalil

    2017-08-01

    The lithium-ion battery was first commercially introduced by Sony Corporation in 1991 using LiCoO2 as the cathode material and mesocarbon microbeads (MCMBs) as the anode material. After continuous research and development for 25 years, lithium-ion batteries have been the dominant energy storage device for modern portable electronics, as well as for emerging applications for electric vehicles and smart grids. It is clear that the success of lithium-ion technologies is rooted to the existence of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that kinetically suppresses parasitic reactions between the lithiated graphitic anodes and the carbonate-based non-aqueous electrolytes. Recently, major attention has been paid to the importance of a similar passivation/protection layer on the surface of cathode materials, aiming for a rational design of high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries with extended cycle/calendar life. In this article, the physical model of the SEI, as well as recent research efforts to understand the nature and role of the SEI are summarized, and future perspectives on this important research field will also be presented.

  3. Anaphylactic reaction to lupine flour.

    PubMed

    Brennecke, Sabine; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Lepp, Ute; Jappe, Uta

    2007-09-01

    Roasted lupine seeds have been used as snack food in Mediterranean countries for years. Since the 1990s, lupine flour has been used as a substitute for or additive to other flours in countries of the European Union; usually the amount is so low that no declaration is required. Since 1994, a number of cases of immediate-type allergy to lupine flour-containing products have been published. A 52-year-old woman developed facial and mucosal edema, followed by dizziness and shortness of breath a few minutes after ingestion of a nut croissant containing lupine flour; she required emergency care. Allergy diagnostic tests revealed a total IgE of 116 kU/l, a highly elevated concentration of IgE specific for lupine seed (42.9 kU/l) and birch pollen IgE of 2.57 kU/l. Skin prick test with native lupine flour was strongly positive. Allergy against lupine seeds may develop de novo or via cross-reactivity to legumes, particularly peanuts, the latter being detectable in up to 88% of cases, founded on a strong sequence similarity between lupine and peanut allergens. In our patient, no cross-reactivity could be detected via immunoblotting, indicating a rare monovalent sensitization to lupine flour. Treatment consists of avoidance of lupine flour-containing products. Patients with proven peanut allergy should also avoid lupine flour because of the major risk of cross-reaction.

  4. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests.

    PubMed

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-27

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  5. Reaction zone structure in supracompressed detonating explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Green, L.G.; Tarver, C.M.; Erskine, D.J.

    1989-08-18

    Nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of supracompressed detonation waves in TNT-, TATB-, and HMX-based explosives are measured using a VISAR laser velocimeter and calculated using the ignition and growth reactive flow hydrodynamic computer code model. The Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) detonation wave structure is observed at pressures more than twice the self-sustaining detonation wave pressure. TNT and TATB exhibited a fast reaction which liberates approximately 80% of the total available exothermicity within 50 ns, followed by a slower reaction which lasts another 100--200 ns. These reaction rates are not strongly dependent on the initial shock pressure. The slower reaction is attributed to diffusion controlled solid carbon coagulation. The ignition and growth model using a ZND type model with a fast reaction preceding a slower reaction to the fully reacted product state accurately calculates the VISAR experimental data for TNT, LX-17, PBX 9404 and RX-26-AF. 21 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Anatomy of an Elementary Chemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Andrew J.; Zare, Richard N.

    1998-09-01

    The alchemists of old sought the knowledge to transform one material to another-for example, base metals into gold-as a path to the elixir of life. As chemists have concerned themselves with the transformation from compound to compound, so they have become involved in trying to uncover the structures of molecules and the pathways that reactions follow. Classically, the study of reaction mechanisms in chemistry encompasses reaction kinetics, the study of velocities or rates of reactions, and reaction dynamics, the study of the nanoscopic motion and rearrangement of atoms during a reactive event. An essential aim of this article is to bring the reader to a favorable vantage point with a brief introduction to reactive dynamics, and from there to describe some examples of recent strategies that have been employed to promote a fundamental understanding of the anatomy of elementary chemical reactions. In the final section we ponder future directions for this rapidly evolving field of research.

  7. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-01

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  8. Triple click reaction strategy for macromolecular diversity.

    PubMed

    Tunca, Umit

    2013-01-11

    This Feature Article focuses on the rapidly emerging concept of the "triple click reactions" towards the design and synthesis of macromolecules with well-defined topology and chemical composition, and also precise molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution. The term "triple click reaction" used in this feature article is based on the utilization of three chemically and mechanistically different click reactions for polymer-polymer conjugation and post-modification of the polymers. Three sequential click reactions of which two are identical should not be considered to be triple click reactions. The triple click reaction strategy for polymer conjugation and post-modification of polymers is classified in this article based on the resultant architectures: linear and non-linear structures. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Antibody-mediated cofactor-driven reactions

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions capable of being rate-enhanced by auxiliary species which interact with the reactants but do not become chemically bound to them in the formation of the final product are performed in the presence of antibodies which promote the reactions. The antibodies contain regions within their antigen binding sites which recognize the auxiliary species in a conformation which promotes the reaction. The antigen binding site frequently recognizes a particular transition state complex or other high energy complex along the reaction coordinate, thereby promoting the progress of the reaction along the desired route as opposed to other less favorable routes. Various classes of reaction together with appropriate antigen binding site specificities tailored for each are disclosed.

  10. Surface reactions in microelectronics process technology.

    PubMed

    Levitin, Galit; Hess, Dennis W

    2011-01-01

    Current integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing consists of more than 800 process steps, nearly all of which involve reactions at surfaces that significantly impact device yield and performance. From initial surface preparation through film deposition, patterning, etching, residue removal, and metallization, an understanding of surface reactions and interactions is critical to the successful continuous scaling, yield, and reliability of electronic devices. In this review, some of the most important surface reactions that drive the development of microelectronic device fabrication are described. The reactions discussed do not constitute comprehensive coverage of this topic in IC manufacture but have been selected to demonstrate the importance of surface/interface reactions and interactions in the development of new materials, processing sequences, and process integration challenges. Specifically, the review focuses on surface reactions related to surface cleaning/preparation, semiconductor film growth, dielectric film growth, metallization, and etching (dry and wet).

  11. A clock reaction based on molybdenum blue.

    PubMed

    Neuenschwander, Ulrich; Negron, Arnaldo; Jensen, Klavs F

    2013-05-30

    Clock reactions are rare kinetic phenomena, so far limited mostly to systems with ionic oxoacids and oxoanions in water. We report a new clock reaction in cyclohexanol that forms molybdenum blue from a noncharged, yellow molybdenum complex as precursor, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Interestingly, the concomitant color change is reversible, enabling multiple clock cycles to be executed consecutively. The kinetics of the clock reaction were experimentally characterized, and by adding insights from quantum chemical calculations, a plausible reaction mechanism was postulated. Key elementary reaction steps comprise sigmatropic rearrangements with five-membered or bicyclo[3.1.0] transition states. Importantly, numerical kinetic modeling demonstrated the mechanism's ability to reproduce the experimental findings. It also revealed that clock behavior is intimately connected to the sudden exhaustion of hydrogen peroxide. Due to the stoichiometric coproduction of ketone, the reaction bears potential for application in alcohol oxidation catalysis.

  12. Estimating the Backup Reaction Wheel Orientation Using Reaction Wheel Spin Rates Flight Telemetry from a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2013-01-01

    A report describes a model that estimates the orientation of the backup reaction wheel using the reaction wheel spin rates telemetry from a spacecraft. Attitude control via the reaction wheel assembly (RWA) onboard a spacecraft uses three reaction wheels (one wheel per axis) and a backup to accommodate any wheel degradation throughout the course of the mission. The spacecraft dynamics prediction depends upon the correct knowledge of the reaction wheel orientations. Thus, it is vital to determine the actual orientation of the reaction wheels such that the correct spacecraft dynamics can be predicted. The conservation of angular momentum is used to estimate the orientation of the backup reaction wheel from the prime and backup reaction wheel spin rates data. The method is applied in estimating the orientation of the backup wheel onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The flight telemetry from the March 2011 prime and backup RWA swap activity on Cassini is used to obtain the best estimate for the backup reaction wheel orientation.

  13. Diamine Ligands in Copper-Catalyzed Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Surry, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The utility of copper-mediated cross-coupling reactions has been significantly increased by the development of mild reaction conditions and the ability to employ catalytic amounts of copper. The use of diamine-based ligands has been important in these advances and in this review we discuss these systems, including the choice of reaction conditions and applications in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, natural products and designed materials. PMID:22384310

  14. Reactions in silicon-nitrogen plasma.

    PubMed

    Kovačević, Goran; Pivac, Branko

    2017-02-01

    Reaction mechanisms that lead to creation of silicon-nitrogen bonds are studied in detail. These reactions are of fundamental importance for silicon nitride synthesis by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition from the gas mixture of silane (SiH4) and ammonia (NH3). All reactions in SiH4-NH3 plasma can be categorised as some of the basic types of reactions: bond dissociation, neutral nucleophilic substitution, radical neutralisation, neutral-radical addition, silylene addition, silylene rearrangement, radical nucleophilic addition or hydrogen abstraction reaction. Energetics of these reactions is analysed in detail for a great number of reactions belonging to these categories, by using theoretical modelling. Geometry optimisations are carried out with the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory and energetics is further determined with high level ab initio calculations at the CASPT2/aug-cc-pVTZ level, which enabled confirmation of relevance of several mechanisms as reactions that lead to silicon nitride growth from plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition, as well as introduction of new, energetically favourable mechanisms. Besides amine radical assisted eliminative addition and proton transfer reactions, silylene addition reactions are thermodynamically and kinetically favourable since they lack energy barriers. A new reaction pathway for synthesis of silicon nitride from plasma is proposed. This pathway is enabled by the ability of silylene to create two weak dative bonds, which enables silylene-amine complexes to stick to the silicon nitride surface. Upon dissociation of amine from the surface-bound complex, silylene remains on the surface, available for reaction with other reactive species from plasma.

  15. The quantum dynamics of chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppermann, A.

    1983-03-01

    In this project, we developed accurate and approximate methods for calculating cross sections of elementary reactions. These methods were applied to systems of importance for the fundamental aspects of chemical dynamics and for advanced technologies of interest to the United States Air Force. The application included calculations of three-atom exchange reactions, break-up and three-body recombination collisions and vibrational quenching by reaction. These calculations improved our understanding of such processes and permitted an assessment of some approximate methods.

  16. Negative Temperature Coefficient in Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenson, I. A.; Sergeev, Gleb B.

    1984-05-01

    A systematic analysis of reactions whose rate decreases with increase of temperature is presented. The possibility of a negative temperature coefficient in the elementary reactions is examined from the standpoint of the transition state theory and of collision theory. The mechanisms of complex reactions in which the temperature dependence of the rate is anomalous are discussed, and possible reasons for the anomaly are examined. The bibliography contains 175 references.

  17. AMSD Reaction Structure Cryo Deformation Test Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Hraba, John; Thornton, Gary; Baker, Mark; Haight, Harlan; Hadaway, James; Blackwell, Lisa; Stahl, Phil (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The method developed for measuring both in-plane & out-of-plane cryo deformations of AMSD reaction structures at the XRCF will be presented. For in-plane measurements, a theodolite is used to track the positions of several (up to ten) targets on the reaction structure. For out-of-plane measurements, the Leica ADM is used to measure the change in distance to several (up to ten) corner cubes attached to the reaction structure.

  18. Mechanisms and Kinetics of Catalytic Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    CHEMICAL RESEARCH, r- DEVELOPMENT 5 N ENGINEERING CRDE-R-084 "" CENTER CENER(GC-TR-1728-008) ’ 04 N MECHANISMS AND KINETICS OF CATALYTIC REACTIONS Q...and Kinetics of Catalytic Reactions &AUTHOR(S) Garlick, Stephanie M. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(ES) . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Tables........................87 vi MECHANISMS AND KINETICS OF CATALYTIC REACTIONS 1. INTRODUCTION The hydrolysis of phosphate esters in microemulsion

  19. Catalytic reactions in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Tomášik, B.

    2012-06-01

    We discuss a new type of reactions of a ϕ-meson production on hyperons, πY → ϕY and antikaons -KN → ϕY. These reactions are not suppressed according to Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule and can be a new efficient source of ϕ mesons in a nucleus-nucleus collision. We discuss how these reactions can affect the centrality dependence and the rapidity distributions of the ϕ yield.

  20. Novel Reagents for Multi-Component Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanguang; Basso, Andrea; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Gulevich, Anton V.; Krasavin, Mikhail; Bushkova, Ekaterina; Parchinsky, Vladislav; Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; Cerulli, Valentina; Guanti, Giuseppe; Riva, Renata; Rozentsveig, Igor B.; Rozentsveig, Gulnur N.; Popov, Aleksandr V.; Serykh, Valeriy J.; Levkovskaya, Galina G.; Cao, Song; Shen, Li; Liu, Nianjin; Wu, Jingjing; Li, Lina; Qian, Xuhong; Chen, Xiaopeng; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Jinwu; Wang, Yanguang; Lu, Ping; Heravi, Majid M.; Sadjadi, Samaheh; Kazemizadeh, Ali Reza; Ramazani, Ali; Kudyakova, Yulia S.; Goryaeva, Marina V.; Burgart, Yanina V.; Saloutin, Victor I.; Mossetti, Riccardo; Pirali, Tracey; Tron, Gian Cesare; Rozhkova, Yulia S.; Mayorova, Olga A.; Shklyaev, Yuriy V.; Zhdanko, Alexander G.; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Stryapunina, Olga G.; Plekhanova, Irina V.; Glushkov, Vladimir A.; Shklyaev, Yurii V.

    Ketenimines are a class of versatile and highly reactive intermediates that can participate in a variety of organic reactions, such as nucleophilic additions, radical additions, [2 + 2] and [2 + 4] cycloadditions, and sigmatropic rearrangements. In this presentation, we report on a series of multi-component reactions that involve a ketenimine intermediate. These reactions could furnish diverse heterocyclic compounds, including functionalized iminocoumarin, iminodihydroqunolines, iminothiochromens, pyrrolines, isoquinolines, pyridines, β-lactams, imino-1,2-dihydrocoumarins, and benzimidazoles.

  1. Reaction torque minimization techniques for articulated payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kral, Kevin; Aleman, Roberto M.

    1988-01-01

    Articulated payloads on spacecraft, such as antenna telemetry systems and robotic elements, impart reaction torques back into the vehicle which can significantly affect the performance of other payloads. This paper discusses ways to minimize the reaction torques of articulated payloads through command-shaping algorithms and unique control implementations. The effects of reaction torques encountered on Landsat are presented and compared with simulated and measured data of prototype systems employing these improvements.

  2. Reactions and Spectroscopy of Excited Nitrenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-05

    34- Reactions and Spectroscopy of Excited Nitrenes 12. PERSONAL AUTHORIS) Robert D. Coombe 13.. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT IYr.. Mo...reversee iftnecei •ry and identify by block numanbers FIELD GROUP SUB. G. chernical lasers, reactions, energy transfer, haloý:en nitrenes , iodine laser...THIS PACE INTRODUCTION This report describes progress made on the research program "Reactions and Spectroscopy of Excited Nitrenes " during the eighteen

  3. Hydrazones as substrates for cycloaddition reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belskaya, N. P.; Eliseeva, A. I.; Bakulev, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The [2+2]-, [4+2]- and [3+2]-cycloaddition reactions of hydrazones and 1,2-diazabuta-1,3-dienes, azomethine imines, nitrile imines and azomethine ylides formed upon hydrazone transformations with dienophiles, dipolarophiles and dienes are considered. The principal issues of structure and reactivity of active substrates and the influence of the reaction conditions and catalysts on the reaction regioselectivity and efficiency are discussed. The bibliography includes 288 references.

  4. Physical organic studies of organometallic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, Robert G.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms of reactions of organotransition metal complexes have only begun to be understood in detail during the last ten years. The complementary interaction of techniques and concepts developed earlier in studies of organic reaction mechanisms, with those commonly used in inorganic chetnistry, has played a crucial role in helping to elucidate organor.1etall.ic reaction mechanisms. A few systems in which this interaction has proved especially fruitful are discussed in this article.

  5. [Rare, severe hypersensitivity reaction to potassium iodide].

    PubMed

    Korsholm, Anne Sofie; Ebbehøj, Eva; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2014-07-07

    The literature reports a large variety of adverse reactions to potassium iodide. A severe hypersensitivity reaction to potassium iodide in a 51-year-old woman with Graves' thyrotoxicosis is described. Following administration the patient developed sialadenitis, conjunctivitis, stomatitis and acneiform iododerma that responded dramatically to withdrawal of the potassium iodide and administration with corticosteroids. Awareness of these adverse reactions may prevent prolonged hospitalization and unnecessary tests and treatments.

  6. Computing reaction paths of a bifurcation reaction: an action wave-front-based perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Bijoy K.; Kapsch, Taylor; Truex, Nathan; Fick, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Application of Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) equation to reaction systems which involve energy barrier(s) leading to the product is relatively new. Such problems are described by a new class of HJ equation, called the generalised HJ equation. This new HJ equation renders an anisotropic propagation for the wave front. In this paper, we describe the adaptation of the fast marching method (FMM) and the generalised HJ equation to understand a new class of reaction process where the energy barrier does not lead to the product; instead, a new class of states are detected along the reaction path of such reactions. These states are valley-ridge inflection point, branching point and potential energy ridge. Such reactions are characterised as bifurcation reactions. We have identified a new classical wave front, called the reaction action front (RAF) which distinctly separates the reaction system into a reactant zone and a product zone connected by a third zone, called 'neck'. The RAF is an important tool to understand the bifurcation reaction and the associated reaction paths. We have also introduced a convenient way to compute the reaction path force (RPF) using the FMM. The RPF for a bifurcation reaction significantly differs from the reactions with energy barrier, and so, the RPF provides vital information about the occurrence of branching of a path. The method has been tested for the isomerisation reaction of methoxy radical (H3C) to hydroxymethylene radical (H2ĊOH).

  7. Special Issue: "Organic Reactions in Green Solvents".

    PubMed

    Sperry, Jonathan; García-Álvarez, Joaquín

    2016-11-15

    To overcome the well-established drawbacks of conventional organic solvents (toxicity, non-biodegradability, flammability, accumulation in the atmosphere) remarkable research efforts have been recently devoted to the replacement of traditional organic reaction media by the so-called Green Solvents. In this sense, the choice of a safe, non-toxic, biorenewable and cheap reaction media is a crucial goal in organic synthesis. Thus, this Special Issue on "Organic Reactions in Green Solvents" has been aimed to showcase a series of stimulating contributions from international experts within different sub-areas of organic synthesis in Green Solvents (ranging from metal- to organo-catalyzed organic reactions).

  8. Experimental studies of quasi-fission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.

    1988-01-01

    A large number of recent experimental studies have shown that a substantial fraction of the total reaction cross section in heavy-ion reactions is found in fission-like processes, which do not result from the fission decay of a completely fused system. Following the suggestion of Swiatecki such processes, which represents a complete relaxation of the relative kinetic energy and a substantial amount of net mass transfer between the two fragments, are denoted quasi-fission reactions. They are distinct from compound fission reactions by bypassing the stage of a completely fused-system. This typically means that they are associated with short reaction times, which results in several measurable characteristics such as broken forward-backward symmetries, large anisotropies of the angular distributions and increased widths of the fragment mass distributions. The distinction between quasi-fission and deep inelastic reactions is less stringent and has the character of a gradual evolution from one reaction type to the other, as found also as quasi-elastic reaction evolves into deeply inelastic processes as a function of the total kinetic energy loss. In the present paper some of the experimental data characterizing quasi-fission reactions are reviewed and discussed. 22 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Nuclear reaction modeling for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick

    2008-10-01

    We discuss how nuclear reaction theories are utilized in the nuclear energy applications. The neutron-induced compound nuclear reactions, which take place from in the sub-eV energy range up to tens of MeV, are the most important mechanism to analyze the experimental data, to predict unknown reaction cross-sections, to evaluate the nuclear data for databases such as ENDF (Evaluated Nuclear Data File), and (4) to reduce the uncertainties. To improve the predictive-power of nuclear reaction theories in future, further development of compound nuclear reaction theories for fission and radiative capture processes is crucial, since these reaction cross sections are especially important for nuclear technology. An acceptable accuracy of these cross-sections has been achieved only if they were experimentally confirmed. However, the compound reaction theory is getting more important nowadays as many rare nuclides, such as americium, are involved in applications. We outline future challenges of nuclear reaction modeling in the GNASH/McGNASH code, which may yield great improvements in prediction of nuclear reaction cross-sections.

  10. Energy distribution among reaction products. V.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anlauf, K. G.; Horne, D. S.; Macdonald, R. G.; Polanyi, J. C.; Woodall, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of three reactions, one point of theoretical interest being the predicted correlation between barrier height and barrier location. The H + Br 2 reaction having a lower activation barrier than H + Cl 2, should have an earlier barrier, and hence a greater percentage attractive energy release and higher efficiency of vibrational excitation. Information is developed concerning the effect of isotopic substitution in the pair of reactions H + Cl 2 and D + Cl 2. The 'arrested relaxation' method was used. Essentially, the method involves reacting two diffuse reagent beams in a reaction vessel with background pressure less than 0.001 torr, and with walls cooled by liquid nitrogen or liquid helium.

  11. EXFOR Library of Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The EXFOR library contains an extensive compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data up to 1 GeV. Neutron reactions have been compiled systematically since the discovery of the neutron, while charged particle(up to carbon) and photon reactions have been covered less extensively. Files contain nuclear reaction data such as cross sections, spectra, angular distributions, polarizations, etc, along with information on experimental technique, error analysis, and applied standards. Numerous search parameters include: target, beam, product, experimental method, and even author and publication names. The library contains data from more than 20,000 experiments. (Specialized Interface)

  12. Chemical-reaction model for Mexican wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2003-05-01

    We present a chemical-reaction model to describe the Mexican wave ( La Ola) in football stadia. The spectator's action is described in terms of chemical reactions. The model is governed by three reaction rates k 1, k 2, and k3. We study the nonlinear waves on one- and two-dimensional lattices. The Mexican wave is formulated as a clockwise forwardly propagating wave. Waves are growing or disappear, depending on the values of reaction rates. In the specific case of k1= k2= k3=1, the nonlinear-wave equation produces a propagating pulse like soliton.

  13. Chemical reactions in low-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Facemire, B. R.

    1978-01-01

    The Apollo-Soyuz flight experiment, 'Chemical Foams' demonstrated that foams and air/liquid dispersions are much more stable in low-gravity than on the ground. It thus should be possible to conduct unique chemical reactions in space foams. The low-g results and subsequent ground work on the formaldehyde clock reaction indicate that the reaction is strongly influenced by (1) dissociated and undissociated solution species being adsorbed at solid/liquid and gas/liquid surfaces and (2) chemical reaction rates apparently being affected by long-range forces determined by the liquid mass and the extent and nature of all surface interfaces.

  14. Categorization of some oscillatory enzymatic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, I.; Hung, Y.F.; Ross, J.

    1996-05-16

    We investigate the categorization of two or more proposed reaction mechanisms for each of the following oscillatory enzymatic reactions: (1) the peroxidase-oxidase reaction; (2) glycolytic oscillations; (3) oscillations of cyclic AMP in smile mold cells; (4) enzymatic pH oscillations; (5) calcium spiking in cytosol. We use prior work in stoichiometric network analysis and categorization of oscillatory reactions to identify in each proposed reaction mechanism essential and nonessential species, the specific role of each essential species, the connectivity of the essential species, including the identification of the reactions leading to oscillatory instabilities, and the category. For each model, we predict the result of several experiments including relative amplitudes, quench amplitudes, phase shifts, and sign symbolic concentration shifts and compare them with those from available experiments. These and several other experiments such as bifurcation analysis, phase response curves, entrainment experiments, qualitative and quantitative pulsed species response, delay experiments, and external periodic perturbation provide stringent tests of proposed reaction mechanisms, and appropriate ones are suggested to discriminate among competing mechanisms for a given reaction. We find the necessity for introducing a new subcategory in our categorization of oscillatory reactions. 45 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Managing negative reactions in forensic trainees.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Desirae J; Schatte, Dawnelle J

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of adolescent offenders often provokes strong feelings in providers on the treatment team. These feelings, or countertransference reactions, can hinder effective patient care. However, with supervision and acknowledgment, these reactions can also be used effectively in becoming aware of the patient's internal state. In this article, a resident and her supervisor discuss reactions to a particular patient on a subacute unit for adolescent offenders. We also discuss methods of teaching trainees to recognize these countertransference reactions and to work through them to provide more effective patient care.

  16. [Dental materials can cause oral allergic reactions].

    PubMed

    Røn Larsen, Kristine; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Arenholt-Bindslev, Dorthe; Reibel, Jesper; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2013-06-17

    A large number of materials used in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of dental, periodontal and oral mucosal diseases may induce acute or chronic reactions in the oral cavity including allergic reactions. Clinically, it may be difficult to discriminate oral mucosal changes caused by dental materials from changes related to oral mucosal diseases. Diagnosis and management of allergic reactions in the oral mucosa may therefore be a major challenge. The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to commonly used dental materials, which can trigger typical, but also atypical, symptoms and clinical signs of an allergic reaction.

  17. Atmospheric pressure microwave assisted heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Chemat-Djenni, Zoubida; Hamada, Boudjema; Chemat, Farid

    2007-07-11

    The purpose of the study was to investigate microwave selective heating phenomena and their impact on heterogeneous chemical reactions. We also present a tool which will help microwave chemists to answer to such questions as "My reaction yields 90% after 7 days at reflux; is it possible to obtain the same yield after a few minutes under microwaves?" and to have an approximation of their reactions when conducted under microwaves with different heterogeneous procedures. This model predicting reaction kinetics and yields under microwave heating is based on the Arrhenius equation, in agreement with experimental data and procedures.

  18. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Zhiqi

    2016-01-01

    This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines. PMID:28144327

  19. Chemical reactions in low-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Facemire, B. R.

    1978-01-01

    The Apollo-Soyuz flight experiment, 'Chemical Foams' demonstrated that foams and air/liquid dispersions are much more stable in low-gravity than on the ground. It thus should be possible to conduct unique chemical reactions in space foams. The low-g results and subsequent ground work on the formaldehyde clock reaction indicate that the reaction is strongly influenced by (1) dissociated and undissociated solution species being adsorbed at solid/liquid and gas/liquid surfaces and (2) chemical reaction rates apparently being affected by long-range forces determined by the liquid mass and the extent and nature of all surface interfaces.

  20. Carbon-Fixing Reactions of Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Summaryplantcell;28/7/tpc.116.tt0716/FIG1F1fig1Photosynthesis in plants converts the energy of sunlight into chemical energy. Although photosynthesis involves many proteins and catalytic processes, it often is described as two sets of reactions, the light-dependent reactions and the carbon-fixing reactions. This lesson introduces the core biochemistry of the carbon-fixing reactions of photosynthesis, as well as its variations, C4 and CAM. Finally, it addresses how and why plants are affected by rising atmospheric CO2 levels, and research efforts to increase photosynthetic efficiency in current and future conditions. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  1. Process for operating equilibrium controlled reactions

    DOEpatents

    Nataraj, Shankar; Carvill, Brian Thomas; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard

    2001-01-01

    A cyclic process for operating an equilibrium controlled reaction in a plurality of reactors containing an admixture of an adsorbent and a reaction catalyst suitable for performing the desired reaction which is operated in a predetermined timed sequence wherein the heating and cooling requirements in a moving reaction mass transfer zone within each reactor are provided by indirect heat exchange with a fluid capable of phase change at temperatures maintained in each reactor during sorpreaction, depressurization, purging and pressurization steps during each process cycle.

  2. Time scale in quasifission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Paul, P.; Nestler, J.

    1995-08-01

    The quasifission process arises from the hindrance of the complete fusion process when heavy-ion beams are used. The strong dissipation in the system tends to prevent fusion and lead the system towards reseparation into two final products of similar mass reminiscent of a fission process. This dissipation slows down the mass transfer and shape transformation and allows for the emission of high energy {gamma}-rays during the process, albeit with a low probability. Giant Dipole {gamma} rays emitted during this time have a characteristic spectral shape and may thus be discerned in the presence of a background of {gamma} rays emitted from the final fission-like fragments. Since the rate of GDR {gamma} emission is very well established, the strength of this component may therefore be used to measure the timescale of the quasifission process. In this experiment we studied the reaction between 368-MeV {sup 58}Ni and a {sup 165}Ho target, where deep inelastic scattering and quasifission processes are dominant. Coincidences between fission fragments (detected in four position-sensitive avalanche detectors) and high energy {gamma} rays (measured in a 10{close_quotes} x 10{close_quotes} actively shielded NaI detector) were registered. Beams were provided by the Stony Brook Superconducting Linac. The {gamma}-ray spectrum associated with deep inelastic scattering events is well reproduced by statistical cooling of projectile and target-like fragments with close to equal initial excitation energy sharing. The y spectrum associated with quasifission events is well described by statistical emission from the fission fragments alone, with only weak evidence for GDR emission from the mono-nucleus. A 1{sigma} limit of t{sub ss} < 11 x 10{sup -21} s is obtained for the mono-nucleus lifetime, which is consistent with the lifetime obtained from quasifission fragment angular distributions. A manuscript was accepted for publication.

  3. Reaction of oxygen with allene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Sheng-yu

    1988-07-01

    Elastic scattering studies carried out independently of the work related to the title forms the first section of the dissertation. The low-energy elastic scattering of He with Ar, Kr, Xe has been studied by molecular beam techniques. Two potential forms, exponential-spline-Morse-Morse-spline-van de Waals (ESMMSV) and Simon-Parr-Finlan-Dunham (SPFD), have been used to fit the measured differential cross section. Elastic scattering theory and experimental details are introduced. The reactive scattering of O(/sup 3/P) with allene has been studied using crossed molecular beams. Differing from the well known central-carbon-attack (CCA) mechanism in which the final products, carbon monoxide and ethylene, are obtained via a ring intermediate, a new mechanism, terminal-carbon-attack (TCA), has been observed. The production of O(/sup 3/P) atoms by radio frequency discharge is also introduced. To assist understanding of the experiments a multi-configuration self-consistent field (MCSCF) study of the reaction of O(/sup 3/P) with allene has been carried out. The key feature of the oxygen-allene potential energy surface for both CCA and TCA channels has been calculated with single-zeta (SZ), double-zeta (DZ), and double-zeta plus polarization (DZP) basis sets. Finally, an algorithm for optimizing the trial wavefunction in quantum Monte Carlo calculations has been developed. With the application of group theory, a symmetry-constrained optimization process can yield an improved trial wavefunction for the calculation of excited electronic state energies as well as the ground-state energy. Several applications are discussed. 145 refs.

  4. Some Concepts in Reaction Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polannyi, John C.

    1972-01-01

    In 1929 London 1 published a very approximate solution of the Schroedinger equation for a system of chemical interest: H3. To the extent that chemistry can be regarded as existing separately from physics, this was a landmark in the history of chemistry, comparable in importance to the landmark in the history of physics marked by the appearance of the Heitler-London equation for H2. The expression for H3, was, of necessity, even less accurate than that for H2, but chemists, like the habitual poor, were accustomed to this sort of misfortune. Together with the physicists they enjoyed the sensation of living in a renaissance. The physicists still could not calculate a great deal that was of interest to them, and the chemists could calculate less, but both could now dream. It would be too easy to say that their dreams were dreams of unlimited computer time. Their dreams were a lot more productive than that. Two years after London published his equation, H. Eyring and M. Polanyi obtained the first numerical energy surface for H3. They infused the London equation with a measure of empiricism to produce an energy surface which, whether or not it was correct in its details, provided a basis for further speculations of an important sort. The existence of a tangible energy surface in 1931 stimulated speculation along two different lines. The following year Pelzer and Wigner used this London-Eyring-Polanyi (LEP) energy surface for a thermodynamic treatment of the reaction rate in H + H2. This important development reached its full flowering a few years later. In these remarks I shall be concerned with another line of development. A second more-or-less distinct category of speculation that began with (and, indeed, in) the 1931 paper has to do with the dynamics of individual reactive encounters under the influence of specified interaction potentials.

  5. Some Concepts in Reaction Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polannyi, John C.

    1972-01-01

    In 1929 London 1 published a very approximate solution of the Schroedinger equation for a system of chemical interest: H3. To the extent that chemistry can be regarded as existing separately from physics, this was a landmark in the history of chemistry, comparable in importance to the landmark in the history of physics marked by the appearance of the Heitler-London equation for H2. The expression for H3, was, of necessity, even less accurate than that for H2, but chemists, like the habitual poor, were accustomed to this sort of misfortune. Together with the physicists they enjoyed the sensation of living in a renaissance. The physicists still could not calculate a great deal that was of interest to them, and the chemists could calculate less, but both could now dream. It would be too easy to say that their dreams were dreams of unlimited computer time. Their dreams were a lot more productive than that. Two years after London published his equation, H. Eyring and M. Polanyi obtained the first numerical energy surface for H3. They infused the London equation with a measure of empiricism to produce an energy surface which, whether or not it was correct in its details, provided a basis for further speculations of an important sort. The existence of a tangible energy surface in 1931 stimulated speculation along two different lines. The following year Pelzer and Wigner used this London-Eyring-Polanyi (LEP) energy surface for a thermodynamic treatment of the reaction rate in H + H2. This important development reached its full flowering a few years later. In these remarks I shall be concerned with another line of development. A second more-or-less distinct category of speculation that began with (and, indeed, in) the 1931 paper has to do with the dynamics of individual reactive encounters under the influence of specified interaction potentials.

  6. Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

  7. Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

  8. Normobaric hypoxia overnight impairs cognitive reaction time.

    PubMed

    Pramsohler, Stephan; Wimmer, Stefan; Kopp, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes; Faulhaber, Martin; Burtscher, Martin; Netzer, Nikolaus Cristoph

    2017-05-15

    Impaired reaction time in patients suffering from hypoxia during sleep, caused by sleep breathing disorders, is a well-described phenomenon. High altitude sleep is known to induce periodic breathing with central apneas and oxygen desaturations, even in perfectly healthy subjects. However, deficits in reaction time in mountaineers or workers after just some nights of hypoxia exposure are not sufficiently explored. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the impact of sleep in a normobaric hypoxic environment on reaction time divided by its cognitive and motoric components. Eleven healthy non acclimatized students (5f, 6m, 21 ± 2.1 years) slept one night at a simulated altitude of 3500 m in a normobaric hypoxic room, followed by a night with polysomnography at simulated 5500 m. Preexisting sleep disorders were excluded via BERLIN questionnaire. All subjects performed a choice reaction test (SCHUHFRIED RT, S3) at 450 m and directly after the nights at simulated 3500 and 5500 m. We found a significant increase of cognitive reaction time with higher altitude (p = 0.026). No changes were detected in movement time (p = n.s.). Reaction time, the combined parameter of cognitive- and motoric reaction time, didn't change either (p = n.s.). Lower SpO2 surprisingly correlated significantly with shorter cognitive reaction time (r = 0.78, p = 0.004). Sleep stage distribution and arousals at 5500 m didn't correlate with reaction time, cognitive reaction time or movement time. Sleep in hypoxia does not seem to affect reaction time to simple tasks. The component of cognitive reaction time is increasingly delayed whereas motoric reaction time seems not to be affected. Low SpO2 and arousals are not related to increased cognitive reaction time therefore the causality remains unclear. The fact of increased cognitive reaction time after sleep in hypoxia, considering high altitude workers and mountaineering operations with overnight stays, should be further investigated.

  9. Combined online spectroscopic, calorimetric, and chemometric analysis: reaction enthalpy determinations in single and parallel reactions.

    PubMed

    Tjahjono, Martin; Widjaja, Effendi; Garland, Marc

    2009-06-02

    Calorimetry and signal processing: Vibrational spectroscopies, heat-flow microcalorimetry, and multivariate analysis are combined to decouple the reaction enthalpies of parallel reactions [picture: see text]. This methodology allows the evaluation of reaction enthalpy from complex systems without recourse to conventional kinetic modeling. Simultaneous in situ/online spectroscopy and heat-flow measurements as well as multivariate analyses are performed, apparently for the first time, to determine heats of reaction for single and parallel reactions. Two different vibrational spectroscopy techniques, namely Raman and FTIR spectroscopy, are used in conjunction with flow-through TAM III microcalorimetry. With respect to the spectroscopic analysis, the reaction spectra are first analyzed to determine the pure-component spectra and the corresponding concentrations without recourse to external calibration. With respect to the calorimetric analysis, a soft modeling approach is employed to determine the heats of reaction without recourse to any conventional kinetic models. This combined approach is implemented to determine the extents of reaction as well as the corresponding heats of reaction at 298.15 K and 0.1 MPa for a) the hydrolysis of acetic anhydride (single reaction) and b) the hydrolysis of methyl paraben and ethyl paraben in alkaline solution (both single and parallel reactions). In the latter case, the heat-flow contributions from the two simultaneous reactions are successfully decoupled. Taken together, these results demonstrate proof of concept for the present approach. The newly developed methodology appears to be quite general and particularly useful for investigating complex reaction systems. This is particularly true for multiple simultaneous reactions and reactions where the detailed kinetic expressions are not available, or cannot be easily determined. The use of extents of reaction is also very helpful where there is high variability in reaction rates

  10. First trial postural reactions to unexpected balance disturbances: a comparison with the acoustic startle reaction.

    PubMed

    Oude Nijhuis, Lars B; Allum, John H J; Valls-Solé, Josep; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2010-11-01

    Unexpected support-surface movements delivered during stance elicit "first trial" postural reactions, which are larger and cause greater instability compared with habituated responses. The nature of this first trial reaction remains unknown. We hypothesized that first trial postural reactions consist of a generalized startle reaction, with a similar muscle synergy as the acoustic startle response, combined with an automatic postural reaction. Therefore we compared acoustic startle responses to first trial postural reactions. Eight healthy subjects stood on a support surface that unexpectedly rotated backwards 10 times, followed by 10 startling acoustic stimuli, or vice versa. Outcome measures included full body kinematics and surface EMG from muscles involved in startle reactions or postural control. Postural perturbations and startling acoustic stimuli both elicited a clear first trial reaction, as reflected by larger kinematic and EMG responses. The ensuing habituation rate to repeated identical stimuli was comparable for neck and trunk muscles in both conditions. Onset latencies in neck muscles occurred significantly later for first trial perturbations compared with startle responses, but earlier in trunk muscles. Our results show that platform tilting initially induces reactions larger than needed to maintain equilibrium. For neck and trunk muscles, these first trial postural reactions resembled acoustic startle reflexes. First trial postural reactions may be triggered by interaction of afferent volleys formed by somatosensory and vestibular inputs. Acoustic startle reactions may also be partially triggered by vestibular inputs. Similar muscle activation driven by vestibular inputs may be the common element of first trial postural responses and acoustic startle reactions.

  11. Reaction energetics on long-range corrected density functional theory: Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raman K; Tsuneda, Takao

    2013-02-15

    The possibility of quantitative reaction analysis on the orbital energies of long-range corrected density functional theory (LC-DFT) is presented. First, we calculated the Diels-Alder reaction enthalpies that have been poorly given by conventional functionals including B3LYP functional. As a result, it is found that the long-range correction drastically improves the reaction enthalpies. The barrier height energies were also computed for these reactions. Consequently, we found that dispersion correlation correction is also crucial to give accurate barrier height energies. It is, therefore, concluded that both long-range exchange interactions and dispersion correlations are essentially required in conventional functionals to investigate Diels-Alder reactions quantitatively. After confirming that LC-DFT accurately reproduces the orbital energies of the reactant and product molecules of the Diels-Alder reactions, the global hardness responses, the halves of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy gaps, along the intrinsic reaction coordinates of two Diels-Alder reactions were computed. We noticed that LC-DFT results satisfy the maximum hardness rule for overall reaction paths while conventional functionals violate this rule on the reaction pathways. Furthermore, our results also show that the HOMO-LUMO gap variations are close to the reaction enthalpies for these Diels-Alder reactions. Based on these results, we foresee quantitative reaction analysis on the orbital energies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Reliability of a Shuttle reaction timer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Russell D.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Rashid, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    Reaction, movement, and task times refer to the times needed to initially respond to a stimulus, make the specific movement, and complete the entire task. This study evaluated the reliability of a simple reaction timer designed to mimic a Space Shuttle task (turning on an overhead switch).

  13. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus of this project is the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms known as Heliobacteria. These organisms are the only known photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reaction centers suggest that they might be the decendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes have been isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii. The absorption and fluorescence properties of membranes and reaction centers are almost identical, suggesting that a single pigment-protein complex serves as both antenna and reaction center. Experiments in progress include sequence determination of the 48,000 Mr reaction center protein, and evolutionary comparisons with other reaction center proteins.

  14. Oxygen reduction reaction: A framework for success

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.

    2016-05-06

    Oxygen reduction at the cathode of fuel cells typically requires a platinum-based material to catalyse the reaction, but lower-cost, more stable catalysts are sought. Here, an intrinsically conductive metal–organic framework based on cheaper elements is shown to be a durable, structurally well-defined catalyst for this reaction.

  15. Disinhibitory reactions to benzodiazepines: a review.

    PubMed

    van der Bijl, P; Roelofse, J A

    1991-05-01

    This article reviews some of the important aspects of benzodiazepine-induced disinhibitory reactions. Although reactions of this type are relatively rare, they may sometimes manifest themselves in aggressive behavior accompanied by suicidal or homicidal tendencies. It appears that these reactions occur more commonly in younger patients, although the elderly (above 65 years) may also be at risk. Many mechanisms have been postulated, but none truly explain how these reactions arise. The concept that central cholinergic mechanisms may play a role, however, remains attractive and stems primarily from physostigmine's ability to successfully reverse this type of reaction. The potential role of the benzodiazepine antagonists, eg, flumazenil, in reversing disinhibitory reactions is also discussed. Apart from patients who previously exhibited poor impulse control, there are no reliable indicators for recognizing potential candidates for this type of reaction. To minimize the occurrence of disinhibitory reactions, some guidelines, which include the avoidance of certain drug combinations, the use of low doses of benzodiazepines, slow incremental intravenous administration, and good rapport with patients, are presented.

  16. pH & Rate of Enzymatic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative and inexpensive way to measure the rate of enzymatic reaction is provided. The effects of different pH levels on the reaction rate of an enzyme from yeast are investigated and the results graphed. Background information, a list of needed materials, directions for preparing solutions, procedure, and results and discussion are…

  17. Reaction mechanisms: Stripping down SN2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.

    2012-07-01

    The mechanism of the SN2 reaction is fundamental to understanding and controlling the stereochemistry of organic reactions, but surrounding solvent molecules may complicate the textbook picture. Micro-solvation studies have now explored the stereochemical consequences of the presence of one or two solvent molecules.

  18. A reusable prepositioned ATP reaction chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Luminescence biometer detects presence of life by means of light-emitting chemical reaction of luciferin and luciferase with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that occurs in all living cells. Amount of light in reaction chamber is measured to determine presence and extent of life.

  19. Nuclear excitation and precompound nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Ray, S.; Ghosh, S.K.

    1988-06-01

    The angular distribution of nucleons emitted in nucleon-induced precompound nuclear reactions are calculated taking into account the effect of excitation on the kinematics of nucleon-nucleon scattering inside the target-plus-projectile system. The results are compared with quantum mechanical calculations and those of reaction models based on a pure nucleon-nucleon collision picture.

  20. Enzyme Substrate Reactions in High Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Maling, J. E.; Weissbluth, M.; Jacobs, E. E.

    1965-01-01

    The reaction rates of two enzyme substrate systems, ribonuclease-RNA and succinate-cytochrome c reductase, were followed as a function of magnetic field from zero to 48,000 gauss. The reaction rates remained constant to within 10 per cent. PMID:5884011

  1. The Thermit Reaction: A Dazzling Thermochemical Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an outdoor scientific demonstration of metal reduction, a reaction known as the thermit process. Heat from an ignition mixture is required to initiate the reaction, which then becomes self-sustaining. The demonstration provides a dazzling introduction to such fundamental general chemistry topics as oxidation-reduction, metallurgy,…

  2. Entropy Generation in a Chemical Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, E. N.

    2010-01-01

    Entropy generation in a chemical reaction is analysed without using the general formalism of non-equilibrium thermodynamics at a level adequate for advanced undergraduates. In a first approach to the problem, the phenomenological kinetic equation of an elementary first-order reaction is used to show that entropy production is always positive. A…

  3. The Iodine Clock Reaction and Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gennaro, Gene; Munson, Bruce

    1988-01-01

    Explains an activity which can be used to compare the effect of temperature on the rate of chemical reactions to the metabolic reactions that take place within the body. Outlines directions and materials needed to perform the experiment. Lists a number of the body's defenses against extremely low temperatures. (RT)

  4. Solvent effect in the Walden inversion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaume, J.; Lluch, J. M.; Oliva, A.; Bertrán, J.

    1984-04-01

    The solvent effect on the fluoride exchange reaction has been studied by means of ab initio calculations using the 3-21G basis set. It is shown that the motion of the solvent molecules is an important part of the reaction coordinate.

  5. Infliximab-Related Infusion Reactions: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Yulia; Kivity, Shmuel; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Israeli, Eran; Fraser, Gerald M.; Dotan, Iris; Chowers, Yehuda; Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Weiss, Batia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Administration of infliximab is associated with a well-recognised risk of infusion reactions. Lack of a mechanism-based rationale for their prevention, and absence of adequate and well-controlled studies, has led to the use of diverse empirical administration protocols. The aim of this study is to perform a systematic review of the evidence behind the strategies for preventing infusion reactions to infliximab, and for controlling the reactions once they occur. Methods: We conducted extensive search of electronic databases of MEDLINE [PubMed] for reports that communicate various aspects of infusion reactions to infliximab in IBD patients. Results: We examined full texts of 105 potentially eligible articles. No randomised controlled trials that pre-defined infusion reaction as a primary outcome were found. Three RCTs evaluated infusion reactions as a secondary outcome; another four RCTs included infusion reactions in the safety evaluation analysis; and 62 additional studies focused on various aspects of mechanism/s, risk, primary and secondary preventive measures, and management algorithms. Seven studies were added by a manual search of reference lists of the relevant articles. A total of 76 original studies were included in quantitative analysis of the existing strategies. Conclusions: There is still paucity of systematic and controlled data on the risk, prevention, and management of infusion reactions to infliximab. We present working algorithms based on systematic and extensive review of the available data. More randomised controlled trials are needed in order to investigate the efficacy of the proposed preventive and management algorithms. PMID:26092578

  6. The Thermit Reaction: A Dazzling Thermochemical Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an outdoor scientific demonstration of metal reduction, a reaction known as the thermit process. Heat from an ignition mixture is required to initiate the reaction, which then becomes self-sustaining. The demonstration provides a dazzling introduction to such fundamental general chemistry topics as oxidation-reduction, metallurgy,…

  7. Steric Control of Complex Chemical Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-31

    reactants. When the infrared (IR) laser was directed in the source chamber to excite the methane reactants, we probed the stereodynamics by...The reaction of Cl + CH4 is of great importance in atmosphere chemistry as being a primary competing process to the ozone -hole catalytic reaction

  8. Psychological factors that predict reaction to abortion.

    PubMed

    Moseley, D T; Follingstad, D R; Harley, H; Heckel, R V

    1981-04-01

    Investigated demographic and psychological factors related to positive or negative reactions to legal abortions performed during the first trimester of pregnancy in 62 females in an urban southern community. Results suggest that the social context and the degree of support from a series of significant persons rather than demographic variables were most predictive of a positive reaction.

  9. Rebinding in biochemical reactions on membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawley, Sean D.; Keener, James P.

    2017-10-01

    The behavior of many biochemical processes depends crucially on molecules rapidly rebinding after dissociating. In the case of multisite protein modification, the importance of rebinding has been demonstrated both experimentally and through several recent computational studies involving stochastic spatial simulations. As rebinding stems from spatio-temporal correlations, theorists have resorted to models that explicitly include space to properly account for the effects of rebinding. However, for reactions in three space dimensions it was recently shown that well-mixed ordinary differential equation (ODE) models can incorporate rebinding by adding connections to the reaction network. The rate constants for these new connections involve the probability that a pair of molecules rapidly rebinds after dissociation. In order to study biochemical reactions on membranes, in this paper we derive an explicit formula for this rebinding probability for reactions in two space dimensions. We show that ODE models can use the formula to replicate detailed stochastic spatial simulations, and that the formula can predict ultrasensitivity for reactions involving multisite modification of membrane-bound proteins. Further, we compute a new concentration-dependent rebinding probability for reactions in three space dimensions. Our analysis predicts that rebinding plays a much larger role in reactions on membranes compared to reactions in cytoplasm.

  10. REACTIONS OF FREE RADICALS CONTAINING NITROGEN.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    deduced. The reactions of methyl and ethyl radicals with a variety of amino compounds were studied. The reactions of difluoroamino radicals in the...Hydrazines, Anilines and Cyanides were pyrolysed and the heats of formation of the resultant radicals and the strengths of the bonds formed by them

  11. What is a "DNA-Compatible" Reaction?

    PubMed

    Malone, Marie L; Paegel, Brian M

    2016-04-11

    DNA-encoded synthesis can generate vastly diverse screening libraries of arbitrarily complex molecules as long as chemical reaction conditions do not compromise DNA's informational integrity, a fundamental constraint that "DNA-compatible" reaction development does not presently address. We devised DNA-encoded reaction rehearsal, an integrated analysis of reaction yield and impact on DNA, to acquire these key missing data. Magnetic DNA-functionalized sensor beads quantitatively report the % DNA template molecules remaining viable for PCR amplification after exposure to test reaction conditions. Analysis of solid-phase bond forming (e.g., Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling, reductive amination) and deprotection reactions (e.g., allyl esters, silyl ethers) guided the definition and optimization of DNA-compatible reaction conditions (>90% yield, >30% viable DNA molecules), most notably in cases that involved known (H(+), Pd) and more obscure (Δ, DMF) hazards to DNA integrity. The data provide an empirical yet mechanistically consistent and predictive framework for designing successful DNA-encoded reaction sequences for combinatorial library synthesis.

  12. Adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media.

    PubMed

    Morcos, S K; Thomsen, H S

    2001-01-01

    Adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media (ICM) are more likely to develop in patients with asthma, a history of allergy or contrast reaction and in those who are debilitated or medically unstable. These reactions can be divided into renal and general, and the latter are subdivided into acute and delayed. Acute general reactions can be minor, intermediate or severe. Fatal reactions are rare. The introduction of low-osmolality agents has caused an overall reduction in the number of non-fatal contrast reactions. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute adverse side effects to ICM is invaluable and may prevent a reaction from becoming severe. Familiarity with cardiopulmonary resuscitation is essential for successful management of life-threatening reactions. Contrast-media-induced renal impairment can be reduced with the use of low-osmolality contrast media and extracellular volume expansion. The use of ICM in diabetic patients receiving metformin should be carried out with care to avoid metformin-induced lactic acidosis. However, this problem is mainly observed in patients with diabetic nephropathy.

  13. Asthma and anaphylactoid reactions to food additives.

    PubMed Central

    Tarlo, S. M.; Sussman, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    Presumed allergic reactions to hidden food additives are both controversial and important. Clinical manifestations include asthma, urticaria, angioedema, and anaphylactic-anaphylactoid events. Most adverse reactions are caused by just a few additives, such as sulfites and monosodium glutamate. Diagnosis is suspected from the history and confirmed by specific challenge. The treatment is specific avoidance. PMID:8499792

  14. Resonant structures in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, S.J.; Henning, W.; Ernst, H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Jachcinski, C.; Kovar, D.G.; Paul, M.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of heavy-ion resonance structures using the /sup 24/Mg(/sup 16/O, /sup 12/C)/sup 28/Si reaction is presented. The data are analyzed in the context of Breit-Wigner resonances added to a direct-reaction background.

  15. Oxygen reduction reaction: A framework for success

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.

    2016-05-06

    Oxygen reduction at the cathode of fuel cells typically requires a platinum-based material to catalyse the reaction, but lower-cost, more stable catalysts are sought. Here, an intrinsically conductive metal–organic framework based on cheaper elements is shown to be a durable, structurally well-defined catalyst for this reaction.

  16. Reactions to Stranger and Acquaintance Rape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetreault, Patricia A.; Barnett, Mark A.

    1987-01-01

    Investigated reactions to a woman who presumably had been raped by a stranger or an acquaintance. Undergraduates read one of two rape descriptions prior to watching a videotape of the woman who (they were led to believe) had been the victim of the rape. Females and males showed markedly different reactions to stranger and acquaintance rape and…

  17. Pediatric bupropion-induced serum sicknesslike reaction.

    PubMed

    Hack, Sabine

    2004-01-01

    This reports the first 2 cases of serum sicknesslike reaction to bupropion in children (age 12 and 14). Serum sicknesslike reactions are an example of immune-complex medicated disease. The cardinal symptoms of serum sickness are fever, lymphadenopathy, arthralgias or arthritis, and urticaria. Symptoms usually resolve without long-term sequela following discontinuation of the exogenous antigen. It is likely that serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion are either relatively rare or underrecognized and underreported. Between May 1998 and May 2001, GlaxoSmith Kline received 172 reports of seizures (a well-known adverse drug reaction) and only 37 reports of serum sicknesslike reactions (Wooltorton 2002). We do not know if children and adolescents are more prone than adults to develop serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion. Luckily, the reported cases of serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion have not caused irreversible morbidity or mortality. Nevertheless, the symptoms are painful, temporarily disfiguring and disabling, and warrant prompt medical attention. Parents and patients should be educated about this potential side effect at the onset of treatment, because symptoms are similar to many infectious childhood illnesses, and the treatment of serum sicknesslike reactions to bupropion should include the discontinuation of bupropion.

  18. Chemical Principles Revisited: Annotating Reaction Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tykodi, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Urges chemistry teachers to have students annotate the chemical reactions in aqueous-solutions that they see in their textbooks and witness in the laboratory. Suggests this will help students recognize the reaction type more readily. Examples are given for gas formation, precipitate formation, redox interaction, acid-base interaction, and…

  19. Organic Reaction Mechanisms at A-Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, R. O. C.; Waddington, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Advocates teaching of organic reaction mechanisms through the methods which are used in elucidating them. This also provides a useful way of illustrating the theories and methods of physical chemistry. Describes an approach to teaching three reaction mechanisms: substitution in alkanes; addition to alkenes; and ester hydrolysis. (Author/GA)

  20. The Iodine Clock Reaction and Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gennaro, Gene; Munson, Bruce

    1988-01-01

    Explains an activity which can be used to compare the effect of temperature on the rate of chemical reactions to the metabolic reactions that take place within the body. Outlines directions and materials needed to perform the experiment. Lists a number of the body's defenses against extremely low temperatures. (RT)