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  1. American Veterinary Medical Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Registration opens in February. Career Webinar Careers in Corporate Medicine Need a change? Attend the Veterinary Career ... and earn CE while finding out if a corporate veterinary career is the right move for you. ...

  2. Business education in veterinary schools: the potential role of the Veterinary Business Management Association.

    PubMed

    Kieves, Nina R; Roark, Andrew W; Sparks, Tonya K

    2007-01-01

    Studies have indicated the importance of business education in improving the income level attained by veterinarians and the quality of service they provide. The Veterinary Business Management Association (VBMA), a national organization of veterinary students, has the potential to augment veterinary curricula by providing additional education to help ensure professional success. Local chapters at 27 of the 28 veterinary colleges in the United States (as of 2007) supplement the curriculum by focusing on business topics. A national governing board oversees the chapters, helping to ensure that high-quality educational programs are conducted and providing a conduit for communication.

  3. Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC): 50 Years of History and Service.

    PubMed

    Maccabe, Andrew T; Crawford, Lester; Heider, Lawrence E; Hooper, Billy; Mann, Curt J; Pappaioanou, Marguerite

    2015-01-01

    The mission of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) is to advance the quality of academic veterinary medicine. Founded in 1966 by the 18 US colleges of veterinary medicine and 3 Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine then in existence, the AAVMC is celebrating 50 years of public service. Initially, the AAVMC comprised the Council of Deans, the Council of Educators, and the Council of Chairs. In 1984, the tri-cameral structure was abandoned and a new governing structure with a board of directors was created. In 1997, the AAVMC was incorporated in Washington, DC and a common application service was created. Matters such as workforce issues and the cost of veterinary medical education have persisted for decades. The AAVMC is a champion of diversity in the veterinary profession and a strong advocate for One Health. The AAVMC has adopted a global perspective as more international colleges of veterinary medicine have earned COE accreditation and become members.

  4. The Southeastern Veterinary Surgical Association--A Forum for the Academic Clinician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    The Southeastern Veterinary Surgical Association (SVSA) was formed in 1977 to allow surgeons and anesthesiologists in the veterinary schools of the South and Southeast an opportunity to meet and exchange ideas. The organization of the Association is described and a copy of the program for September 1979 is provided. (Author/MLW)

  5. The history and achievements of the South African Veterinary Association.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Colin M

    2013-09-17

    This article, which was originally designed as a power point presentation, focuses on the role and achievements of the South African Veterinary Association (SAVA). It is an organisation that has fostered functional cohesion not only within the profession, but also with the broader society in providing a socially and economically supportive animal care system. Some major factors that have enabled this achievement include: rational organisational structure of the SAVA; support of the promulgation and implementation of appropriate legislation; pursuance of initial and continued high quality education by various means; effective communication with the public and government bodies; international involvement; continued development of a visionary future to endorse the principle of 'One World One Health'.

  6. Adverse drug reactions in veterinary patients associated with drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Katrina L

    2013-09-01

    For many drugs used in veterinary practice, plasma and tissue concentrations are highly dependent on the activity of drug transporters. This article describes how functional changes in drug transporters, whether mediated by genetic variability or drug-drug interactions, affect drug disposition and, ultimately, drug safety and efficacy in veterinary patients. A greater understanding of species, breed, and individual (genetic) differences in drug transporter function, as well as drug-drug interactions involving drug transporters, will result in improved strategies for drug design and will enable veterinarians to incorporate individualized medicine in their practices.

  7. Adverse drug reactions in veterinary patients associated with drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Katrina L

    2013-09-01

    For many drugs used in veterinary practice, plasma and tissue concentrations are highly dependent on the activity of drug transporters. This article describes how functional changes in drug transporters, whether mediated by genetic variability or drug-drug interactions, affect drug disposition and, ultimately, drug safety and efficacy in veterinary patients. A greater understanding of species, breed, and individual (genetic) differences in drug transporter function, as well as drug-drug interactions involving drug transporters, will result in improved strategies for drug design and will enable veterinarians to incorporate individualized medicine in their practices. PMID:23890239

  8. Introducing DVM: DiVersity Matters (an Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges Initiative).

    PubMed

    Greenhill, Lisa M

    2007-01-01

    Now more than ever, colleges of veterinary medicine (CVMs) are challenged to improve the educational experience, build environments that support long-term student and faculty success, and create a diverse and competitive workforce. Additionally, the nation's fast-evolving racial and ethnic demographics demand that the veterinary medical profession be responsive to the emerging needs of this changing population. In March 2005, during the 15th Iverson Bell Symposium, the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) unveiled its DiVersity Matters (DVM) initiative, designed to bring the CVMs closer to achieving these goals. Several key objectives of the initiative and their possible long-term significance to success of the DiVersity Matters initiative are explored here, and CVMs are encouraged to expand efforts to increase racial and ethnic diversity in academic veterinary medicine.

  9. 78 FR 17679 - Implementation of the Updated American Veterinary Medical Association Guidelines for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Association Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals: 2013 Edition SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health... the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals: 2013... updated Guidelines. DATES: Public concerns regarding the updated AVMA Guidelines for the Euthanasia...

  10. Associations among depressive symptoms, drinking motives, and risk for alcohol-related problems in veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Diulio, Andrea R; Dutta, Nicole M; Gauthier, Jami M; Witte, Tracy K; Correia, Christopher J; Angarano, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Hazardous alcohol consumption among medical students appears to occur at a level comparable to the general population; however, among medical students, it has been found that the motivation to use alcohol partially stems from unique stressors related to their professional training. Although veterinary students may also experience psychological distress in association with their training, little work has focused on the way that these students use alcohol to cope with their distress. The current study sought to examine the severity of depressive symptoms and alcohol consumption among veterinary students as well as students' specific motives for drinking alcohol. The majority of our sample reported experiencing at least one depressive symptom, and a significant proportion engaged in high-risk drinking, with men reporting more harmful alcohol use patterns. Drinking motives related to managing internal bodily and emotional states accounted for variance in drinking patterns. Further, drinking to ameliorate negative emotions partially accounted for the relationship between psychological distress and high-risk drinking. The results of this study suggest that depressive symptoms among veterinary students may be related to harmful drinking patterns, due to alcohol being used as a coping mechanism to regulate emotions. The findings from this study can be used to develop targeted interventions to promote psychological well-being among veterinary students. PMID:25547905

  11. Kenya: the development of private services and the role of the Kenya Veterinary Association.

    PubMed

    Chema, S; Gathuma, J M

    2004-04-01

    Private veterinary practice has existed in Kenya for more than half a century. Between the early 1930s and the mid-1960s, provision of clinical and advisory services almost entirely involved servicing commercial ranches and dairy farms. The Department of Veterinary Services (VSD) was mainly responsible for providing regulatory services in these areas. Until the mid-1960s, public sector veterinary responsibilities were predominantly associated with the prevention of notifiable diseases outside the commercial farming areas. In a major agrarian reform programme initiated in 1954, Kenya initiated an aggressive campaign promoting the dairy industry in the wetter areas of the country among small-scale farmers. In an effort to encourage dairy development, the VSD decided to provide some services, mainly tick control and subsidised artificial insemination. This support had a great positive impact on the 'smallholder' dairy industry. After the end of the colonial administration in 1963, most private practitioners left the country. A decision was therefore taken to transfer the responsibility of providing services of a 'private goods' nature, such as clinical services, temporarily to the public sector through the VSD. This was accompanied by significant expansion of training and the deployment of both professional veterinarians and para-professionals. By 1988, personnel costs had escalated to over 80% of the recurrent budget, leaving little for operational costs. This necessitated a policy change, which led to decreased government involvement in the delivery of animal health services. The private sector, as expected, responded appropriately to the change in policy. The Kenya Veterinary Association (KVA) launched a privatisation scheme (the Kenya Veterinary Association Privatisation Scheme) in 1994 to provide members with credit to set up private practices. The first phase of the scheme (1994-1996) was rated a success, with 100% loan repayments. The second phase of the

  12. Proactive dairy cattle disease control in the UK: veterinary surgeons' involvement and associated characteristics.

    PubMed

    Higgins, H M; Huxley, J N; Wapenaar, W; Green, M J

    2013-09-14

    Characteristics of 94 veterinary surgeons associated with delivering preventive herd-level strategies to control mastitis, lameness and Johne's disease were investigated using two multinomial models. The response variables were 'Gold Standard Monitoring' (including on-going data analysis, risk assessments and laboratory testing), and a lower level of involvement called 'Regular Control Advice'. Although the sample was biased towards those who spend the majority of their time with dairy cows, 69 per cent currently had no involvement in Gold Standard Monitoring for lameness, 60 per cent no involvement with Johne's, and 52 per cent no involvement with mastitis. The final model predicted that an assistant without a postgraduate cattle qualification, who had spent no time on dairy cattle continuous professional development (CPD) in the last year, had an 88 per cent chance of having no involvement with Gold Standard Monitoring for any disease, versus <5 per cent chance for a CPD 'enriched' partner with a postgraduate cattle qualification; there was <1 per cent chance this assistant would be involved with Gold Standard Monitoring of all three diseases on one or more farms, versus a 58 per cent chance for this partner. CPD and employment status were also associated with markedly different probabilities for delivering Regular Control Advice. Increased postgraduate education may further veterinary involvement of this nature.

  13. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians' 2016 Veterinary Medical Care Guidelines for Spay-Neuter Programs.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Brenda; Bushby, Philip A; McCobb, Emily; White, Sara C; Rigdon-Brestle, Y Karla; Appel, Leslie D; Makolinski, Kathleen V; Wilford, Christine L; Bohling, Mark W; Eddlestone, Susan M; Farrell, Kelly A; Ferguson, Nancy; Harrison, Kelly; Howe, Lisa M; Isaza, Natalie M; Levy, Julie K; Looney, Andrea; Moyer, Michael R; Robertson, Sheilah Ann; Tyson, Kathy

    2016-07-15

    As community efforts to reduce the overpopulation and euthanasia of unwanted and unowned cats and dogs have increased, many veterinarians have increasingly focused their clinical efforts on the provision of spay-neuter services. Because of the wide range of geographic and demographic needs, a wide variety of spay-neuter programs have been developed to increase delivery of services to targeted populations of animals, including stationary and mobile clinics, MASH-style operations, shelter services, community cat programs, and services provided through private practitioners. In an effort to promote consistent, high-quality care across the broad range of these programs, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians convened a task force of veterinarians to develop veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs. These guidelines consist of recommendations for general patient care and clinical procedures, preoperative care, anesthetic management, surgical procedures, postoperative care, and operations management. They were based on current principles of anesthesiology, critical care medicine, infection control, and surgical practice, as determined from published evidence and expert opinion. They represent acceptable practices that are attainable in spay-neuter programs regardless of location, facility, or type of program. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians envisions that these guidelines will be used by the profession to maintain consistent veterinary medical care in all settings where spay-neuter services are provided and to promote these services as a means of reducing sheltering and euthanasia of cats and dogs. PMID:27379593

  14. World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP): the 50th anniversary in 2013--history, achievements, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Eckert, J

    2013-08-01

    In 2013 the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) can celebrate its 50th anniversary. At this occasion in this article selected historical data are updated, and the achievements and future perspectives of the WAAVP are discussed. Although the WAAVP is a small association with only a few hundred members, it has been able to develop remarkable activities. Between 1963 and 2011 the WAAVP has organized 23 international scientific congresses, and the 24th conference will take place in Perth, Western Australia, in 2013. These conferences have achieved a high degree of international recognition as indicated by relatively large numbers of participants (up to ~800). Furthermore, the WAAVP has promoted veterinary parasitology in various ways, such as publishing international guidelines (efficacy evaluation of antiparasitic drugs, parasitological methods, standardized nomenclature of animal parasitic diseases "SNOAPAD"), stimulating international discussions on teaching and continued education ("colleges of veterinary parasitology") and by supporting the high quality journal "Veterinary Parasitology" which is the official organ of the WAAVP. In retrospect, the development of the WAAVP can be classified as very successful. New challenges associated with global changes (growth of the world population, urbanization, climate change, new developments in animal and plant production, etc.) will require new efforts in research in various fields, including veterinary parasitology. Future activities of WAAVP may include inter alia: (a) support of international parasitological networks; (b) stimulation of coordinated research aimed at the solution of defined problems; (c) increasing the exposure of WAAVP to parasitology from hitherto neglected regions of the world; (d) strengthening of official links to international organizations (FAO, WHO, etc.); (e) continuation of guideline preparation; and (d) preparation and international distribution of high

  15. Veterinary practice marketeer.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Justin

    2015-01-24

    Justin Phillips is marketing manager at White Cross Vets and the Veterinary Marketing Association's (VMA's) Young Veterinary Marketeer of the Year. Here, he describes what he does and why he believes other practices should embrace marketing to improve their quality and client care.

  16. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs.

    PubMed

    Looney, Andrea L; Bohling, Mark W; Bushby, Philip A; Howe, Lisa M; Griffin, Brenda; Levy, Julie K; Eddlestone, Susan M; Weedon, James R; Appel, Leslie D; Rigdon-Brestle, Y Karla; Ferguson, Nancy J; Sweeney, David J; Tyson, Kathy A; Voors, Adriana H; White, Sara C; Wilford, Christine L; Farrell, Kelly A; Jefferson, Ellen P; Moyer, Michael R; Newbury, Sandra P; Saxton, Melissa A; Scarlett, Janet M

    2008-07-01

    As efforts to reduce the overpopulation and euthanasia of unwanted and unowned dogs and cats have increased, greater attention has been focused on spay-neuter programs throughout the United States. Because of the wide range of geographic and demographic needs, a wide variety of programs have been developed to increase delivery of spay-neuter services to targeted populations of animals, including stationary and mobile clinics, MASH-style operations, shelter services, feral cat programs, and services provided through private practitioners. In an effort to ensure a consistent level of care, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians convened a task force of veterinarians to develop veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs. The guidelines consist of recommendations for preoperative care (eg, patient transport and housing, patient selection, client communication, record keeping, and medical considerations), anesthetic management (eg, equipment, monitoring, perioperative considerations, anesthetic protocols, and emergency preparedness), surgical care (eg, operating-area environment; surgical-pack preparation; patient preparation; surgeon preparation; surgical procedures for pediatric, juvenile, and adult patients; and identification of neutered animals), and postoperative care (eg, analgesia, recovery, and release). These guidelines are based on current principles of anesthesiology, critical care medicine, microbiology, and surgical practice, as determined from published evidence and expert opinion. They represent acceptable practices that are attainable in spay-neuter programs. PMID:18593314

  17. Current Issues and the Veterinary Medical Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nault, Andre J.

    2010-01-01

    Veterinary medical libraries and librarians are unique. There are now 33 veterinary colleges in North America, and in accordance with American Veterinary Medical Association accreditation, each has a library managed by an accredited librarian. Colleges with veterinary programs often maintain specialized branch libraries to support the degree,…

  18. Glucose-nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli associated with clinical veterinary specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, J J; Simpson, R B

    1982-01-01

    Glucose-nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli (NFB) have been recognized recently as opportunistic pathogens of humans. With few exceptions, strains of NFB have not been considered important enough to be identified when isolated from animals. In this study, all NFB isolated during a 1-year period in a clinical veterinary microbiology laboratory were identified to determine their prevalence. Of the 347 strains of NFB obtained, the most common species were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes. Of all clinical veterinary specimens submitted for cultures, 10% contained nonfermenters. PMID:7107835

  19. Microbial community dynamics associated with veterinary antibiotics removal in constructed wetlands microcosms.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Joana P; Almeida, C Marisa R; Pereira, Ana C; Ribeiro, Iolanda L; Reis, Izabela; Carvalho, Pedro; Basto, M Clara P; Mucha, Ana P

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the response of the microbial community from CWs microcosms tested for the removal of two veterinary antibiotics, enrofloxacin (ENR) and tetracycline (TET), from livestock industry wastewater. Three treatments were tested (control, ENR or TET (100 μg L(-1))) over 12 weeks in microcosms unplanted and planted with Phragmites australis. CWs removal efficiency was relatively stable along time, with removals higher than 98% for ENR and 94% for TET. In addition, CWs were able to reduce wastewater toxicity, independently of antibiotics presence. Despite no significant differences were observed in terms of microbial abundance, bacterial richness or diversity, analysis of similarities (two-way crossed ANOSIM) showed a significant effect of both time and treatments in bacterial community structure. This study points to CWs applicability for veterinary antibiotics removal from livestock wastewaters, showing that CWs microbial communities were able to adapt without significant changes in their diversity or depuration capacity.

  20. Determinants associated with veterinary antimicrobial prescribing in farm animals in the Netherlands: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Speksnijder, D C; Jaarsma, A D C; van der Gugten, A C; Verheij, T J M; Wagenaar, J A

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial use in farm animals might contribute to the development of antimicrobial resistance in humans and animals, and there is an urgent need to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. Veterinarians are typically responsible for prescribing and overseeing antimicrobial use in animals. A thorough understanding of veterinarians' current prescribing practices and their reasons to prescribe antimicrobials might offer leads for interventions to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. This paper presents the results of a qualitative study of factors that influence prescribing behaviour of farm animal veterinarians. Semi-structured interviews with eleven farm animal veterinarians were conducted, which were taped, transcribed and iteratively analysed. This preliminary analysis was further discussed and refined in an expert meeting. A final conceptual model was derived from the analysis and sent to all the respondents for validation. Many conflicting interests are identifiable when it comes to antimicrobial prescribing by farm animal veterinarians. Belief in the professional obligation to alleviate animal suffering, financial dependency on clients, risk avoidance, shortcomings in advisory skills, financial barriers for structural veterinary herd health advisory services, lack of farmers' compliance to veterinary recommendations, public health interests, personal beliefs regarding the veterinary contribution to antimicrobial resistance and major economic powers are all influential determinants in antimicrobial prescribing behaviour of farm animal veterinarians. Interventions to change prescribing behaviour of farm animal veterinarians could address attitudes and advisory skills of veterinarians, as well as provide tools to deal with (perceived) pressure from farmers and advisors to prescribe antimicrobials. Additional (policy) measures could probably support farm animal veterinarians in acting as a more independent animal health consultant. PMID:25421456

  1. Determinants associated with veterinary antimicrobial prescribing in farm animals in the Netherlands: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Speksnijder, D C; Jaarsma, A D C; van der Gugten, A C; Verheij, T J M; Wagenaar, J A

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial use in farm animals might contribute to the development of antimicrobial resistance in humans and animals, and there is an urgent need to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. Veterinarians are typically responsible for prescribing and overseeing antimicrobial use in animals. A thorough understanding of veterinarians' current prescribing practices and their reasons to prescribe antimicrobials might offer leads for interventions to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. This paper presents the results of a qualitative study of factors that influence prescribing behaviour of farm animal veterinarians. Semi-structured interviews with eleven farm animal veterinarians were conducted, which were taped, transcribed and iteratively analysed. This preliminary analysis was further discussed and refined in an expert meeting. A final conceptual model was derived from the analysis and sent to all the respondents for validation. Many conflicting interests are identifiable when it comes to antimicrobial prescribing by farm animal veterinarians. Belief in the professional obligation to alleviate animal suffering, financial dependency on clients, risk avoidance, shortcomings in advisory skills, financial barriers for structural veterinary herd health advisory services, lack of farmers' compliance to veterinary recommendations, public health interests, personal beliefs regarding the veterinary contribution to antimicrobial resistance and major economic powers are all influential determinants in antimicrobial prescribing behaviour of farm animal veterinarians. Interventions to change prescribing behaviour of farm animal veterinarians could address attitudes and advisory skills of veterinarians, as well as provide tools to deal with (perceived) pressure from farmers and advisors to prescribe antimicrobials. Additional (policy) measures could probably support farm animal veterinarians in acting as a more independent animal health consultant.

  2. Experience with euthanasia is associated with fearlessness about death in veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Witte, Tracy K; Correia, Christopher J; Angarano, Donna

    2013-04-01

    Veterinarians have an increased risk for suicide compared with the general population, yet there is little consensus regarding why this might be. We hypothesized that veterinarians become relatively fearless about death due to their repeated exposure to euthanasia. Accordingly, we predicted that there would be a positive relationship between experience with euthanasia and fearlessness about death, due to emotional habituation to the process of euthanasia. In a sample of 130 veterinary students, results conformed to expectation and indicated that the relationship with fearlessness about death was specific to euthanasia and did not generalize to experience with surgery or necropsy.

  3. Dissatisfaction with Veterinary Services Is Associated with Leopard (Panthera pardus) Predation on Domestic Animals.

    PubMed

    Khorozyan, Igor; Soofi, Mahmood; Khaleghi Hamidi, Amirhossein; Ghoddousi, Arash; Waltert, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Human-carnivore conflicts challenge biodiversity conservation and local livelihoods, but the role of diseases of domestic animals in their predation by carnivores is poorly understood. We conducted a human-leopard (Panthera pardus) conflict study throughout all 34 villages around Golestan National Park, Iran in order to find the most important conflict determinants and to use them in predicting the probabilities of conflict and killing of cattle, sheep and goats, and dogs. We found that the more villagers were dissatisfied with veterinary services, the more likely they were to lose livestock and dogs to leopard predation. Dissatisfaction occurred when vaccination crews failed to visit villages at all or, in most cases, arrived too late to prevent diseases from spreading. We suggest that increased morbidity of livestock makes them particularly vulnerable to leopard attacks. Moreover, conflicts and dog killing were higher in villages located closer to the boundaries of the protected area than in distant villages. Therefore, we appeal for improved enforcement and coordination of veterinary services in our study area, and propose several priority research topics such as veterinarian studies, role of wild prey in diseases of domestic animals, and further analysis of potential conflict predictors.

  4. Dissatisfaction with Veterinary Services Is Associated with Leopard (Panthera pardus) Predation on Domestic Animals

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghi Hamidi, Amirhossein; Ghoddousi, Arash; Waltert, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Human-carnivore conflicts challenge biodiversity conservation and local livelihoods, but the role of diseases of domestic animals in their predation by carnivores is poorly understood. We conducted a human-leopard (Panthera pardus) conflict study throughout all 34 villages around Golestan National Park, Iran in order to find the most important conflict determinants and to use them in predicting the probabilities of conflict and killing of cattle, sheep and goats, and dogs. We found that the more villagers were dissatisfied with veterinary services, the more likely they were to lose livestock and dogs to leopard predation. Dissatisfaction occurred when vaccination crews failed to visit villages at all or, in most cases, arrived too late to prevent diseases from spreading. We suggest that increased morbidity of livestock makes them particularly vulnerable to leopard attacks. Moreover, conflicts and dog killing were higher in villages located closer to the boundaries of the protected area than in distant villages. Therefore, we appeal for improved enforcement and coordination of veterinary services in our study area, and propose several priority research topics such as veterinarian studies, role of wild prey in diseases of domestic animals, and further analysis of potential conflict predictors. PMID:26114626

  5. Small Non-coding RNAs Associated with Viral Infectious Diseases of Veterinary Importance: Potential Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Samir, Mohamed; Pessler, Frank

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA (sncRNA) molecules that can regulate mRNAs by inducing their degradation or by blocking translation. Considering that miRNAs are ubiquitous, stable, and conserved across animal species, it seems feasible to exploit them for clinical applications. Unlike in human viral diseases, where some miRNA-based molecules have progressed to clinical application, in veterinary medicine, this concept is just starting to come into view. Clinically, miRNAs could represent powerful diagnostic tools to pinpoint animal viral diseases and/or prognostic tools to follow up disease progression or remission. Additionally, the possible consequences of miRNA dysregulation make them potential therapeutic targets and open the possibilities to use them as tools to generate viral disease-resistant livestock. This review presents an update of preclinical studies on using sncRNAs to combat viral diseases that affect pet and farm animals. Moreover, we discuss the possibilities and challenges of bringing these bench-based discoveries to the veterinary clinic. PMID:27092305

  6. World Small Animal Veterinary Association Renal Pathology Initiative: Classification of Glomerular Diseases in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, R E; Mohr, F C; Aresu, L; Brown, C A; James, C; Jansen, J H; Spangler, W L; van der Lugt, J J; Kass, P H; Brovida, C; Cowgill, L D; Heiene, R; Polzin, D J; Syme, H; Vaden, S L; van Dongen, A M; Lees, G E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of canine renal biopsy tissue has generally relied on light microscopic (LM) evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections ranging in thickness from 3 to 5 µm. Advanced modalities, such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunofluorescence (IF), have been used sporadically or retrospectively. Diagnostic algorithms of glomerular diseases have been extrapolated from the World Health Organization classification scheme for human glomerular disease. With the recent establishment of 2 veterinary nephropathology services that evaluate 3-µm sections with a panel of histochemical stains and routinely perform TEM and IF, a standardized objective species-specific approach for the diagnosis of canine glomerular disease was needed. Eight veterinary pathologists evaluated 114 parameters (lesions) in renal biopsy specimens from 89 dogs. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the data revealed 2 large categories of glomerular disease based on the presence or absence of immune complex deposition: The immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) category included cases with histologic lesions of membranoproliferative or membranous patterns. The second category included control dogs and dogs with non-ICGN (glomerular amyloidosis or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). Cluster analysis performed on only the LM parameters led to misdiagnosis of 22 of the 89 cases-that is, ICGN cases moved to the non-ICGN branch of the dendrogram or vice versa, thereby emphasizing the importance of advanced diagnostic modalities in the evaluation of canine glomerular disease. Salient LM, TEM, and IF features for each pattern of disease were identified, and a preliminary investigation of related clinicopathologic data was performed. PMID:25957358

  7. World Small Animal Veterinary Association Renal Pathology Initiative: Classification of Glomerular Diseases in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, R E; Mohr, F C; Aresu, L; Brown, C A; James, C; Jansen, J H; Spangler, W L; van der Lugt, J J; Kass, P H; Brovida, C; Cowgill, L D; Heiene, R; Polzin, D J; Syme, H; Vaden, S L; van Dongen, A M; Lees, G E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of canine renal biopsy tissue has generally relied on light microscopic (LM) evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections ranging in thickness from 3 to 5 µm. Advanced modalities, such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunofluorescence (IF), have been used sporadically or retrospectively. Diagnostic algorithms of glomerular diseases have been extrapolated from the World Health Organization classification scheme for human glomerular disease. With the recent establishment of 2 veterinary nephropathology services that evaluate 3-µm sections with a panel of histochemical stains and routinely perform TEM and IF, a standardized objective species-specific approach for the diagnosis of canine glomerular disease was needed. Eight veterinary pathologists evaluated 114 parameters (lesions) in renal biopsy specimens from 89 dogs. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the data revealed 2 large categories of glomerular disease based on the presence or absence of immune complex deposition: The immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) category included cases with histologic lesions of membranoproliferative or membranous patterns. The second category included control dogs and dogs with non-ICGN (glomerular amyloidosis or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). Cluster analysis performed on only the LM parameters led to misdiagnosis of 22 of the 89 cases-that is, ICGN cases moved to the non-ICGN branch of the dendrogram or vice versa, thereby emphasizing the importance of advanced diagnostic modalities in the evaluation of canine glomerular disease. Salient LM, TEM, and IF features for each pattern of disease were identified, and a preliminary investigation of related clinicopathologic data was performed.

  8. Risk factors associated with calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chika C; Lefebvre, Sandra L; Pearl, David L; Yang, Mingyin; Wang, Mansen; Blois, Shauna L; Lund, Elizabeth M; Dewey, Cate E

    2014-08-01

    Calcium oxalate urolithiasis results from the formation of aggregates of calcium salts in the urinary tract. Difficulties associated with effectively treating calcium oxalate urolithiasis and the proportional increase in the prevalence of calcium oxalate uroliths relative to other urolith types over the last 2 decades has increased the concern of clinicians about this disease. To determine factors associated with the development of calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States, a retrospective case-control study was performed. A national electronic database of medical records of all dogs evaluated between October 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 at 787 general care veterinary hospitals in the United States was reviewed. Dogs were selected as cases at the first-time diagnosis of a laboratory-confirmed urolith comprised of at least 70% calcium oxalate (n=452). Two sets of control dogs with no history of urolithiasis diagnosis were randomly selected after the medical records of all remaining dogs were reviewed: urinalysis examination was a requirement in the selection of one set (n=1808) but was not required in the other set (n=1808). Historical information extracted included urolith composition, dog's diet, age, sex, neuter status, breed size category, hospital location, date of diagnosis, and urinalysis results. Multivariable analysis showed that the odds of first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were significantly (P<0.05) greater for dogs<7 years, males (OR: 7.77, 95% CI: 4.93-12.26), neutered (OR: 2.58, 1.44-4.63), toy- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.15, 1.90-5.22), small- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.05, 1.83-5.08), large- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 0.05, 0.01-0.19), and those with a diagnosis of cystitis within the previous year (OR: 6.49, 4.14-10.16). Urinary factors significantly associated with first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were acidic vs. basic pH (OR: 1.94, 1

  9. Standards for the academic veterinary medical library.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sarah Anne; Bedard, Martha A; Crawley-Low, Jill; Fagen, Diane; Jette, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The Standards Committee of the Veterinary Medical Libraries Section was appointed in May 2000 and charged to create standards for the ideal academic veterinary medical library, written from the perspective of veterinary medical librarians. The resulting Standards for the Academic Veterinary Medical Library were approved by members of the Veterinary Medical Libraries Section during MLA '03 in San Diego, California. The standards were approved by Section Council in April 2005 and received final approval from the Board of Directors of the Medical Library Association during MLA '04 in Washington, DC.

  10. The history of veterinary medicine in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Herbert P

    2012-01-01

    Until the middle of the 19th century, very few references exist regarding the occurrence of animal diseases in Namibia. With the introduction of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in 1859, this picture changed completely and livestock owners implemented various forms of disease control in an effort to contain the spread of this disease and minimise its devastating effects. After the establishment of the colonial administration in 1884, the first animal disease legislation was introduced in 1887 and the first veterinarian, Dr Wilhelm Rickmann, arrived in 1894. CBPP and the outbreak of rinderpest in 1897 necessitated a greatly expanded veterinary infrastructure and the first veterinary laboratory was erected at Gammams near Windhoek in 1897. To prevent the spread of rinderpest, a veterinary cordon line was established, which was the very beginning of the Veterinary Cordon Fence as it is known today. After the First World War, a small but dedicated corps of veterinarians again built up an efficient animal health service in the following decades, with veterinary private practice developing from the mid-1950s. The veterinary profession organised itself in 1947 in the form of a veterinary association and, in 1984, legislation was passed to regulate the veterinary profession by the establishment of the Veterinary Council of Namibia. The outbreak of foot and mouth disease in 1961 was instrumental in the creation of an effective veterinary service, meeting international veterinary standards of quality and performance which are still maintained today.

  11. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27365238

  12. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-06-11

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27288166

  13. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27493045

  14. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-09-10

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27609956

  15. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27687269

  16. Veterinary medical education and veterinary involvement in aquatic-animal health and aquaculture in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ortega S, César

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes curriculum offerings related to aquaculture and/or aquatic-animal health taught in veterinary medical schools or colleges in Mexico. The information database of the Mexican Association of Schools and Colleges of Veterinary Medicine and the Web sites of veterinary institutions indicate that 60% of veterinary colleges include courses related to aquaculture in their curriculum, but most of these are optional courses. There are few specialized continuing education programs or graduate level courses. There is also a lack of veterinary participation, in both public and private sectors, in aquatic-animal health. It is evident that there should be a greater involvement by the veterinary profession in Mexico's aquaculture to ensure food production in a safe and sustainable manner; to achieve this, veterinary medical institutions must include more aquaculture and aquatic-animal health courses in their curricula.

  17. Outcomes Assessment in Veterinary Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Leslie S.; Turnwald, Grant H.; Meldrum, James B.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine's use of outcomes assessment (OA) as part of the accreditation review process for the American Veterinary Medical Association. Discusses its nine OA survey instruments and use of resulting data during accreditation. (EV)

  18. Veterinary Technician Program Director Leadership Style and Program Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renda-Francis, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Program directors of American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) accredited veterinary technician programs may have little or no training in leadership. The need for program directors of AVMA-accredited veterinary technician programs to understand how leadership traits may have an impact on student success is often overlooked. The purpose of…

  19. Nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among Swiss veterinary health care providers: detection of livestock- and healthcare-associated clones.

    PubMed

    Wettstein Rosenkranz, K; Rothenanger, E; Brodard, I; Collaud, A; Overesch, G; Bigler, B; Marschall, J; Perreten, V

    2014-07-01

    We screened a total of 340 veterinarians (including general practitioners, small animal practitioners, large animal practitioners, veterinarians working in different veterinary services or industry), and 29 veterinary assistants for nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) at the 2012 Swiss veterinary annual meeting. MRSA isolates (n = 14) were detected in 3.8 % (95 % CI 2.1 - 6.3 %) of the participants whereas MRSP was not detected. Large animal practitioners were carriers of livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) ST398-t011-V (n = 2), ST398-t011-IV (n = 4), and ST398-t034-V (n = 1). On the other hand, participants working with small animals harbored human healthcare-associated MRSA (HCA-MRSA) which belonged to epidemic lineages ST225-t003-II (n = 2), ST225-t014-II (n = 1), ST5-t002-II (n = 2), ST5-t283-IV (n = 1), and ST88-t186-IV (n = 1). HCA-MRSA harbored virulence factors such as enterotoxins, β-hemolysin converting phage and leukocidins. None of the MRSA isolates carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). In addition to the methicillin resistance gene mecA, LA-MRSA ST398 isolates generally contained additional antibiotic resistance genes conferring resistance to tetracycline [tet(M) and tet(K)], trimethoprim [dfrK, dfrG], and the aminoglycosides gentamicin and kanamycin [aac(6')-Ie - aph(2')-Ia]. On the other hand, HCA-MRSA ST5 and ST225 mainly contained genes conferring resistance to the macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics [erm(A)], to spectinomycin [ant(9)-Ia], amikacin and tobramycin [ant(4')-Ia], and to fluoroquinolones [amino acid substitutions in GrlA (S84L) and GyrA (S80F and S81P)]. MRSA carriage may represent an occupational risk and veterinarians should be aware of possible MRSA colonization and potential for developing infection or for transmitting these strains. Professional exposure to animals should be reported upon hospitalization and before medical

  20. Residues and potential ecological risks of veterinary antibiotics in manures and composts associated with protected vegetable farming.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibo; Luo, Yongming; Wu, Longhua; Huang, Yujuan; Christie, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Veterinary antibiotics (VAs) are emerging contaminants and enter into soil principally by agricultural application of organic fertilizer. A total of 33 solid animal manures and 17 compost samples from protected vegetable farms in nine areas of China were analyzed for the antibiotic classes of tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones, sulfonamides, and macrolides (17 substances in total). Oxytetracycline was found as a dominant compound in the samples, and its highest concentration reached 416.8 mg kg(-1) in a chicken manure sample from Shouguang, Shandong Province. Among the samples, animal manures (especially pig manure) contained higher VA residues than composts. However, fluoroquinolones exhibited higher persistence in the compost samples than other antibiotic classes. This is particularly the case in the rice husk compost, which contained the highest level of ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin (1334.5 and 1717.4 μg kg(-1) on average, respectively). The veterinary antibiotic profile in the risk husk compost had a good relationship with that in the corresponding manures. The refined commercial compost had the lowest VA residues among the compost samples in general. This implied that composting process might be important to reduce the antibiotic residue. High residue of antibiotics in soil was assumed to be a hazard to ecosystem. This is especially noticeable under current application rates (150 t ha(-1) a(-1)) in protected vegetable farming because over half of the samples exhibited a risk quotient (RQ) >1 for one or more antibiotics. PMID:25354434

  1. Residues and potential ecological risks of veterinary antibiotics in manures and composts associated with protected vegetable farming.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibo; Luo, Yongming; Wu, Longhua; Huang, Yujuan; Christie, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Veterinary antibiotics (VAs) are emerging contaminants and enter into soil principally by agricultural application of organic fertilizer. A total of 33 solid animal manures and 17 compost samples from protected vegetable farms in nine areas of China were analyzed for the antibiotic classes of tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones, sulfonamides, and macrolides (17 substances in total). Oxytetracycline was found as a dominant compound in the samples, and its highest concentration reached 416.8 mg kg(-1) in a chicken manure sample from Shouguang, Shandong Province. Among the samples, animal manures (especially pig manure) contained higher VA residues than composts. However, fluoroquinolones exhibited higher persistence in the compost samples than other antibiotic classes. This is particularly the case in the rice husk compost, which contained the highest level of ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin (1334.5 and 1717.4 μg kg(-1) on average, respectively). The veterinary antibiotic profile in the risk husk compost had a good relationship with that in the corresponding manures. The refined commercial compost had the lowest VA residues among the compost samples in general. This implied that composting process might be important to reduce the antibiotic residue. High residue of antibiotics in soil was assumed to be a hazard to ecosystem. This is especially noticeable under current application rates (150 t ha(-1) a(-1)) in protected vegetable farming because over half of the samples exhibited a risk quotient (RQ) >1 for one or more antibiotics.

  2. Hirudotherapy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Natalia; Kantyka, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The saliva of medicinal leeches, e.g., Hirudo medicinalis and Hirudo verbana commonly used in hirudotherapy, contains more than 100 bioactive substances with various therapeutic effects, including anticoagulant, vasodilator, thrombolytic, anti-inflammatory and anaesthetic properties. Recently, leeches have been used very successfully in veterinary medicine to treat many diseases of animals, especially dogs, cats and horses. The most common indications for the use of leeches are hip and elbow dysplasia, acute and chronic arthritis, diseases associated with inflammation of tendons, ligaments, and fascia, diseases of the vertebrae and the treatment of scars. Leech therapy is a painless procedure which takes an average of 30 to 120 minutes, the time being dependent on the size of the animal. All leeches used in medical procedures should originate only from certified biofarms. The maintenance of sterile conditions for the culture, transport and storage of medical leeches is very important to protect animals from microbial infections. Hirudotherapy is successfully used in veterinary medicine, especially when traditional treatment is not effective, the effects of treatment are too slow, or after surgery, when the tissues may be threatened by venous congestion. PMID:25115059

  3. Hirudotherapy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Natalia; Kantyka, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The saliva of medicinal leeches, e.g., Hirudo medicinalis and Hirudo verbana commonly used in hirudotherapy, contains more than 100 bioactive substances with various therapeutic effects, including anticoagulant, vasodilator, thrombolytic, anti-inflammatory and anaesthetic properties. Recently, leeches have been used very successfully in veterinary medicine to treat many diseases of animals, especially dogs, cats and horses. The most common indications for the use of leeches are hip and elbow dysplasia, acute and chronic arthritis, diseases associated with inflammation of tendons, ligaments, and fascia, diseases of the vertebrae and the treatment of scars. Leech therapy is a painless procedure which takes an average of 30 to 120 minutes, the time being dependent on the size of the animal. All leeches used in medical procedures should originate only from certified biofarms. The maintenance of sterile conditions for the culture, transport and storage of medical leeches is very important to protect animals from microbial infections. Hirudotherapy is successfully used in veterinary medicine, especially when traditional treatment is not effective, the effects of treatment are too slow, or after surgery, when the tissues may be threatened by venous congestion.

  4. The attitudes of owners and veterinary professionals in the United Kingdom to the risk of adverse events associated with using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat dogs with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Belshaw, Zoe; Asher, Lucy; Dean, Rachel S

    2016-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed by veterinary surgeons for the treatment of canine osteoarthritis, and affected dogs may receive these drugs for long periods of time. Whilst short term administration of NSAIDs to dogs is linked to adverse events such as gastrointestinal haemorrhage and renal injury, reports of adverse events associated with their long-term administration are limited in the veterinary literature. This study aimed to investigate the attitudes towards the long term use of NSAIDs for canine osteoarthritis held by three groups who manage osteoarthritic dogs in the United Kingdom: dog owners, veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses. A qualitative methodology was adopted, using semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Thematic analysis of these data identified three themes: awareness of potential risks; recognition of adverse events; and influence of risk perception on the use of NSAIDs. Awareness of, and concern about, the risk of adverse events associated with NSAID administration to dogs with osteoarthritis was high in all groups, with veterinary surgeons being one of a variety of information sources used by owners to acquire this knowledge. Veterinary surgeons described difficulty in recognising, managing and avoiding adverse events associated with NSAIDs. When adverse events occurred, a wide range of management approaches were adopted ranging from a brief drug respite to permanent cessation of administration of any NSAIDs to that dog. Commonly employed approaches to minimise risk included dose reduction and screening blood tests. This study describes a high level of concern about the risks associated with long term NSAID administration to dogs with osteoarthritis and highlights a diverse range of strategies employed to minimise these risks. The evidence base for these strategies is poor, and this may present a risk to animal welfare if the affected dogs are not receiving adequate analgesia. In order to

  5. Association of gender and specialty interest with video-gaming, three-dimensional spatial analysis, and entry-level laparoscopic skills in third-year veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Heather R; Towle Millard, Heather A; Millard, Ralph P; Constable, Peter D; Freeman, Lyn J

    2016-06-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether gender or interest in pursuing specialty certification in internal medicine or surgery was associated with video-gaming, 3-D spatial analysis, or entry-level laparoscopic skills in third-year veterinary students. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SAMPLE A convenience sample of 68 (42 female and 26 male) third-year veterinary students. PROCEDURES Participants completed a survey asking about their interest in pursuing specialty certification in internal medicine or surgery. Subsequently, participants' entry-level laparoscopic skills were assessed with 3 procedures performed in box trainers, their video-gaming skills were tested with 3 video games, and their 3-D spatial analysis skills were evaluated with the Purdue University Visualization of Rotations Spatial Test. Scores were assigned for laparoscopic, video-gaming, and 3-D spatial analysis skills. RESULTS Significantly more female than male students were interested in pursuing specialty certification in internal medicine (23/42 vs 7/26), and significantly more male than female students were interested in pursuing specialty certification in surgery (19/26 vs 19/42). Males had significantly higher video-gaming skills scores than did females, but spatial analysis and laparoscopic skills scores did not differ between males and females. Students interested in pursuing specialty certification in surgery had higher video-gaming and spatial analysis skills scores than did students interested in pursuing specialty certification in internal medicine, but laparoscopic skills scores did not differ between these 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE For this group of students, neither gender nor interest in specialty certification in internal medicine versus surgery was associated with entry-level laparoscopy skills. PMID:27270065

  6. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program.

    PubMed

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-01-01

    The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education. PMID:26479234

  7. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program.

    PubMed

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-01-01

    The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

  8. AVMA guide for veterinary medical waste management.

    PubMed

    Brody, M D

    1989-08-15

    Lawmakers have enacted a variety of laws and regulations to ensure proper disposal of certain potentially infectious or otherwise objectionable waste. The veterinary medical profession supports scientifically based regulations that benefit public health. In 1988, Congress passed the Medical Waste Tracking Act, a federal program that mandates tracking certain regulated waste. Several types of waste generated in the typical clinical veterinary medical practice are considered regulated veterinary medical waste. Discarded needles, syringes, and other sharps; vaccines and vials that contained certain live or attenuated vaccines; cultures and stocks of infectious agents and culture plates; research animals that were exposed to agents that are infectious to human beings and their associated waste; and other animal waste that is known to be potentially harmful to human beings should be handled as regulated veterinary medical waste. Regulated veterinary medical waste should be handled with care. It should be decontaminated prior to disposal. The most popular, effective methods of decontamination are steam sterilization (autoclaving) and incineration. Chemical decontamination is appropriate for certain liquid waste. Waste should be packaged so that it does not spill. Sharps require rigid puncture- and leak-resistant containers that can be permanently sealed. Regulated veterinary medical waste that has not been decontaminated should be labeled with the universal biohazard symbol. Generators retain liability for waste throughout the entire disposal process. Therefore, it is essential to ensure that waste transporters and disposal facilities comply with state and federal requirements. Veterinary practices should maintain a written waste management program and accurate records of regulated veterinary medical waste disposal. Contingency planning and staff training are other important elements of a veterinary medical waste management program. The guide includes a model veterinary

  9. Use of information resources by veterinary practitioners.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, N L; Leysen, J M

    1991-01-01

    Veterinary practitioners are often isolated from easy access to information in medical or hospital libraries, making necessary the use of a variety of information resources. A survey was conducted to assess the extent to which various information resources were used within the veterinary profession. Most responding veterinarians were small-animal practitioners who used the veterinary literature, colleagues, diagnostic laboratories, continuing education courses, association meetings, and pharmaceutical representatives as sources of information. Books and other practitioners were the preferred information source in critical-care situations, followed closely by diagnostic laboratories and journals. For keeping up-to-date with current advances in veterinary medicine, journals, books, other practitioners, and continuing education were used. University extension services, veterinary medical libraries, and computer applications to information use were not important resources ot most of the respondents. Many veterinarians indicated that they would use library services if they knew more about them. With the trend toward computerization in veterinary practice, it is possible for libraries to help reduce the information isolation of many veterinary practices.

  10. Veterinary anthropology explored.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Veterinary and social scientists came together at the Centre for Medical Anthropology at the University of Edinburgh in April to discuss areas of common interest and the possibility of defining a new interdisciplinary field of 'veterinary anthropology'. Andrew Gardiner, one of the organisers of the international meeting, reports.

  11. Veterinary anthropology explored.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Veterinary and social scientists came together at the Centre for Medical Anthropology at the University of Edinburgh in April to discuss areas of common interest and the possibility of defining a new interdisciplinary field of 'veterinary anthropology'. Andrew Gardiner, one of the organisers of the international meeting, reports. PMID:27256260

  12. Qualitative study of factors associated with antimicrobial usage in seven small animal veterinary practices in the UK.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Ana L P; Brodbelt, David C; Barber, Nick; Stärk, Katharina D C

    2014-11-01

    Responsible use of antimicrobials by veterinarians is essential to contain antimicrobial resistance in pathogens relevant to public health. Inappropriate antimicrobial use has been previously described in practice. However, there is scarce information on factors influencing antimicrobial usage in dogs and cats. We investigated intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing decision-making of antimicrobial usage in first opinion small animal practices in the UK through the application of qualitative research methods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 veterinarians from seven veterinary first opinion practices in the UK in 2010. Topics investigated included: a) criteria used for selection of antimicrobials, b) influences by colleagues, c) influences by clients, d) pet characteristics, e) sources of knowledge, f) awareness of guidelines and g) protocols implemented in practice that may affect antimicrobial usage by veterinarians. Hypothetical scenarios selected to assess appropriateness of antimicrobial usage were: a) vomiting in a Yorkshire Terrier due to dietary indiscretion, b) deep pyoderma in a Shar-Pei, c) Feline Lower Urinary Tract disease in an 7 year-old male neutered cat and d) neutering of a 6-months dog. Interviews were recorded and transcribed by the interviewer. Thematic analysis was used to analyse content of transcribed interviews. Data management and analysis was conducted with qualitative analysis software NVivo8 (QSR International Pty Ltd). Antimicrobial usage by participants was influenced by factors other than clinical evidence and scientific knowledge. Intrinsic factors included veterinarian's preference of substances and previous experience. Extrinsic factors influencing antimicrobial selection were; perceived efficacy, ease of administration of formulations, perceived compliance, willingness and ability to treat by pet owners, and animal characteristics. Cost of therapy was only perceived as an influential factor in low, mixed

  13. Fifty Years in the Life of Veterinary Students.

    PubMed

    Greenhill, Lisa; Elmore, Ronnie; Stewart, Sherry; Carmichael, K Paige; Blackwell, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Many changes in US veterinary colleges and their student bodies have occurred during the past 50 years. These have reflected US demographics in many ways. With these changes have come many changes in student life. The Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges has played an important role in facilitating and tracking many of the changes by creating numerous opportunities for colleges to work together on issues related to admissions, diversity, and scholarly publication in the Journal of Veterinary Medical Education.

  14. Update on genomics in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Breen, Matthew

    2009-08-01

    The release of an annotated human genome sequence assembly and the emergence of genomics technologies have led to significant advances in our understanding of many human diseases including cancers. As DNA sequencing technology has become less costly, the field of comparative genomics has progressed rapidly and attention has turned now to generating whole genome assemblies and dedicated genomics resources for veterinary species. Such progress brings a whole new series of opportunities to advance veterinary medicine. Many human and animal diseases share a pathogenetic basis, and although veterinary species need advances in biomedical research in their own right, the consideration of companion animals also as good comparative models for human disease saw the emergence of the "one medicine" concept. The future of many areas of human and veterinary biomedical research is very much interdependent, with one of the closest associations being in oncology. It is inevitable that veterinary oncology will benefit enormously from data derived from genomics and that this era will see a huge shift in the ways in which companion animal cancer patients are evaluated and subsequently treated. Here, we will review some of the advancements of genomics as they relate to veterinary oncology. PMID:19732729

  15. The history of the veterinary profession and education in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Priosoeryanto, Bambang Pontjo; Arifiantini, Iis

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of the veterinary profession in Indonesia dates back to the middle of the 19th century. During the Dutch colonization period a development program for large ruminants was started by the 'Nederlandsch-Indië' government. In 1907 this government established a veterinary laboratory, planned by Dr. J.K.F. de Does. The laboratory was then merged with a veterinary training course for Indonesian (bumiputera) 'veterinarians' named 'Cursus tot Opleiding van Inlandsche Veeartsen'. In 1910 the name of the training course was changed to 'Inlandsche Veeartsenschool', and in 1914 the school was named 'Nederlandsch-Indische Veeartsenijschool' (NIVS). During the Japanese occupation (1942-1945) the veterinary school was named 'Bogor Semon Zui Gakko'. After the declaration of independence by Indonesia in August 1945, it became the High School of Veterinary Education. In 1946 the curriculum was extended from 4 to 5 years. Thereafter the school was closed and re-opened a few times due to the changing political circumstances. In 1947 the first Faculty of Veterinary Medicine ('Diergeneeskundige Faculteit') of the University of Indonesia was established in the former building of NIVS at Taman Kencana Campus in Bogor. Between 1948 and 1963, four more veterinary faculties were established in Indonesia: Gajah Mada, Syiahkuala, Airlangga and Udayana. The Indonesian Veterinary Medical Association (IVMA) was established on January 9, 1953. The membership now exceeds 20,000 veterinarians and the association has 15 special interest groups. Since 2008, five new faculties of veterinary medicine have been established, bringing the total to 10.

  16. Fifty Years of Evolving Partnerships in Veterinary Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Kochevar, Deborah T

    2015-01-01

    The Association of American Veterinary Medical College's (AAVMC's) role in the progression of academic veterinary medical education has been about building successful partnerships in the US and internationally. Membership in the association has evolved over the past 50 years, as have traditions of collaboration that strengthen veterinary medical education and the association. The AAVMC has become a source of information and a place for debate on educational trends, innovative pedagogy, and the value of a diverse learning environment. The AAVMC's relationship with the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (AVMA COE), the accreditor of veterinary medical education recognized by the United Sates Department of Education (DOE), is highlighted here because of the key role that AAVMC members have played in the evolution of veterinary accreditation. The AAVMC has also been a partner in the expansion of veterinary medical education to include global health and One Health and in the engagement of international partners around shared educational opportunities and challenges. Recently, the association has reinforced its desire to be a truly international organization rather than an American organization with international members. To that end, strategic AAVMC initiatives aim to expand and connect the global community of veterinary educators to the benefit of students and the profession around the world. Tables in this article are intended to provide historical context, chronology, and an accessible way to view highlights. PMID:26673208

  17. Fifty Years of Evolving Partnerships in Veterinary Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Kochevar, Deborah T

    2015-01-01

    The Association of American Veterinary Medical College's (AAVMC's) role in the progression of academic veterinary medical education has been about building successful partnerships in the US and internationally. Membership in the association has evolved over the past 50 years, as have traditions of collaboration that strengthen veterinary medical education and the association. The AAVMC has become a source of information and a place for debate on educational trends, innovative pedagogy, and the value of a diverse learning environment. The AAVMC's relationship with the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (AVMA COE), the accreditor of veterinary medical education recognized by the United Sates Department of Education (DOE), is highlighted here because of the key role that AAVMC members have played in the evolution of veterinary accreditation. The AAVMC has also been a partner in the expansion of veterinary medical education to include global health and One Health and in the engagement of international partners around shared educational opportunities and challenges. Recently, the association has reinforced its desire to be a truly international organization rather than an American organization with international members. To that end, strategic AAVMC initiatives aim to expand and connect the global community of veterinary educators to the benefit of students and the profession around the world. Tables in this article are intended to provide historical context, chronology, and an accessible way to view highlights.

  18. Making a difference through veterinary public health.

    PubMed

    2016-06-11

    More than 100 people gathered in Birmingham on April 23 for the third joint conference of the Veterinary Public Health Association and the Association of Government Vets. With the theme of 'VPH hands on - making a difference together', the meeting considered the role vets play in society through their work on public health and sustainability. Kathryn Clark reports. PMID:27288163

  19. Superficial veterinary mycoses.

    PubMed

    Bond, Ross

    2010-03-01

    Dermatophytes are significant pathogens in animal health due to their zoonotic potential, the economic consequences of infection in farm animal and fur production systems, and the distressing lesions they cause in small domestic pets. Malassezia spp are normal commensal and occasional pathogens of the skin of many veterinary species. Malassezia pachydermatis is a very common cause of otitis and pruritic dermatitis in dogs but is of less importance in other veterinary species. Dermatophytosis, and Malassezia otitis and dermatitis, represent the superficial mycoses of greatest significance in companion and farm animal health. Although the dermatophytes and Malassezia spp both exist in the stratum corneum of mammalian skin, there are important differences in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical consequences of infection. Dermatophytes are significant due to their zoonotic potential, the economic consequences of infection in farm animal and fur production systems, and the concern for owners of pets with inflammatory skin disease that is sometimes severe. Malassezia spp are normal commensals and occasional pathogens of the skin for many veterinary species, and M pachydermatis is a very common cause of otitis and pruritic dermatitis in dogs. This chapter will focus on the epidemiologic, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of dermatophytosis and Malassezia dermatitis in veterinary species. There are generally only sporadic reports of other superficial mycoses, such as candidiasis, piedra, and Rhodotorula dermatitis in veterinary medicine, and these are not included here. PMID:20347667

  20. Survey of western Canadian veterinary practices: A demographic profile.

    PubMed

    Jelinski, Murray D; Barth, Katrina K

    2015-12-01

    A mixed-mode survey was used to describe the demographics of the veterinary profession in western Canada and to assess the demand for veterinary practitioners. Data were received from 655 practices (response rate = 52%), providing demographic data on 1636 individual practitioners. Most (60%) respondents self-classified their practices as exclusively small animal, while 25% and 4% were mixed animal or exclusively food animal practices, respectively. Across all practices, 77% of practitioners' time was devoted to small animals and the average mixed animal practice devoted 60% of practitioners' time to small animals. After accounting for practices that did not respond, there were ~300 full-time equivalent (FTE) vacant positions for veterinary associates; however, only 12% of practices were in urgent need of hiring an associate veterinarian. This report informs both prospective employees and employers on the state of the marketplace for veterinary associates, and provides an overview of the demographics of the veterinary profession in western Canada. PMID:26663919

  1. Veterinary Forensic Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Gwaltney-Brant, S M

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary pathologists working in diagnostic laboratories are sometimes presented with cases involving animal poisonings that become the object of criminal or civil litigation. Forensic veterinary toxicology cases can include cases involving animal cruelty (malicious poisoning), regulatory issues (eg, contamination of the food supply), insurance litigation, or poisoning of wildlife. An understanding of the appropriate approach to these types of cases, including proper sample collection, handling, and transport, is essential so that chain of custody rules are followed and proper samples are obtained for toxicological analysis. Consultation with veterinary toxicologists at the diagnostic laboratory that will be processing the samples before, during, and after the forensic necropsy can help to ensure that the analytical tests performed are appropriate for the circumstances and findings surrounding the individual case. PMID:27090769

  2. The Risk of Some Veterinary Antimicrobial Agents on Public Health Associated with Antimicrobial Resistance and their Molecular Basis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihong; Sander, Pascal; Iqbal, Zahid; Wang, Yulian; Cheng, Guyue; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The risk of antimicrobial agents used in food-producing animals on public health associated with antimicrobial resistance continues to be a current topic of discussion as related to animal and human public health. In the present review, resistance monitoring data, and risk assessment results of some important antimicrobial agents were cited to elucidate the possible association of antimicrobial use in food animals and antimicrobial resistance in humans. From the selected examples, it was apparent from reviewing the published scientific literature that the ban on use of some antimicrobial agents (e.g., avoparcin, fluoroquinolone, tetracyclines) did not change drug resistance patterns and did not mitigate the intended goal of minimizing antimicrobial resistance. The use of some antimicrobial agents (e.g., virginiamycin, macrolides, and cephalosporins) in food animals may have an impact on the antimicrobial resistance in humans, but it was largely depended on the pattern of drug usage in different geographical regions. The epidemiological characteristics of resistant bacteria were closely related to molecular mechanisms involved in the development, fitness, and transmission of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27803693

  3. In memoriam: Janis Huston Audin, MSc, DVM, 1950-2009. Dynamic editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association and strong One Health advocate dies.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Dr Janis H. Audin (MSc Illinois 1975, DVM Illinois 1979), a champion of progressive veterinary medical journalism and 'One Health' died on 22 April 2009 following a long, courageous and difficult battle with pancreatic cancer. The world has lost a truly significant One Health leader and advocate. Under her guidance, the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA) implemented a 'one-health wonders' column that recognised and highlighted prominent One Health individuals among the medical and veterinary medical professions in the United States. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) has lost a dedicated and gifted editor-in-chief. Dr Audin joined the editorial staff of the AVMA in 1985, as an assistant editor and was promoted to associate editor in 1989 and editor in 1994. She became the editor-in-chief of both the JAVMA and the American Journal of Veterinary Research in 1995. Prior to that, Dr Audin practised as an associate veterinarian in Calumet City, Illinois, for four years. During her tenure, Dr Audin was noted for implementing procedural and technological changes in the journal to reduce costs, improve timeliness of publications and promote readership interest and awareness. New features in the News section introduced under her leadership have made the journals more practical and public health-relevant. For instance, Dr Audin fostered the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) 'Inspection Insights' - a public health-oriented food safety monthly column related to meat, poultry and egg products - from 1996 through 1998. She also increased international manuscript submissions. On 23 March 2009 AVMA Executive Vice President Dr W. Ron DeHaven named Dr Audin as editor-in-chief emeritus of the Publications Division. Wisely, it also meant that Dr Audin could continue contributing to the staff effort to ensure the high quality of the AVMA scientific journals while the Association began a

  4. Veterinary involvement in poultry production.

    PubMed

    Parker, Daniel

    2016-01-16

    The worldwide poultry sector is expected to grow substantially over the next few decades, as the world looks to feed a rapidly expanding population. In a further article in Veterinary Record's series looking at the state of different sectors of the veterinary profession, Daniel Parker looks at veterinary involvement in the poultry sector.

  5. Veterinary involvement in poultry production.

    PubMed

    Parker, Daniel

    2016-01-16

    The worldwide poultry sector is expected to grow substantially over the next few decades, as the world looks to feed a rapidly expanding population. In a further article in Veterinary Record's series looking at the state of different sectors of the veterinary profession, Daniel Parker looks at veterinary involvement in the poultry sector. PMID:26769809

  6. Lessons of history in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald F

    2013-01-01

    The future of veterinary medicine is best understood in the context of history. What began as a profession rooted in urban centers in proximity to horses, physicians, and medical schools, was transformed into a land grant-based agricultural profession with the arrival of the internal combustion engine in the early twentieth century. Most of the United States' current veterinary colleges are still located in towns or small cities in the middle section of the country, outside the largest metropolitan areas where most veterinarians practice companion-animal medicine. Throughout veterinarian history, substantial numbers of US students have been educated in foreign colleges and this continues today, creating an even greater geographic imbalance between the veterinary educational process and US population centers and major medical schools. Three themes deserve special attention as we celebrate the profession's 150th anniversary. We must first move beyond the land-grant culture and develop a more geographically balanced approach to establishing new veterinary colleges that are also in closer association with schools of medicine and public health. We must also facilitate more opportunities for women leadership in organized veterinary medicine, in practice ownership, in academia, and in the corporate structures that educate, hire, and interface with veterinarians. Finally, we need to expand our understanding of One Health to include the concept of zooeyia (the role of animals in promoting human health), as well as continue to emphasize veterinarians' special roles in the control and management of zoonotic diseases and in advancing comparative medicine in the age of the genome.

  7. A Survey of Attitudes of Board-Certified Veterinary Pathologists to Forensic Veterinary Pathology.

    PubMed

    McEwen, B J; McDonough, S P

    2016-09-01

    An electronic survey was conducted to determine the attitudes of veterinary pathologists toward forensic pathology and the adequacy of their training in the discipline. The survey was sent to 1933 diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists and 311 completed responses were analyzed. Of respondents, 80% report receiving at least 1 type of medicolegal case, with cases from law enforcement received most frequently. Most (74%) of the respondents indicated that their previous training did not prepare them adequately to handle forensic cases and almost half of the respondents (48%) indicated that they needed more training on serving as an expert witness. Relative risk ratios (RRR) and odds ratios (OR) were generated to determine the strength of a statistically significant association. Responses from a free-text entry question determining additional training needs could be grouped into 3 main categories: (1) veterinary forensic pathology science and procedures, (2) documentation, evidence collection and handling, and (3) knowledge of the medicolegal system. Last, a field for additional comments or suggestions regarding veterinary forensic pathology was completed by 107 respondents and many reinforced the need for training in the categories previously described. The survey highlights that a significant proportion of diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists are currently engaged in veterinary forensic pathology but feel their training has not adequately prepared them for these cases. Hopefully, the survey results will inform the college and residency training coordinators as they address the training requirements for an important emerging discipline. PMID:26926083

  8. A Survey of Attitudes of Board-Certified Veterinary Pathologists to Forensic Veterinary Pathology.

    PubMed

    McEwen, B J; McDonough, S P

    2016-09-01

    An electronic survey was conducted to determine the attitudes of veterinary pathologists toward forensic pathology and the adequacy of their training in the discipline. The survey was sent to 1933 diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists and 311 completed responses were analyzed. Of respondents, 80% report receiving at least 1 type of medicolegal case, with cases from law enforcement received most frequently. Most (74%) of the respondents indicated that their previous training did not prepare them adequately to handle forensic cases and almost half of the respondents (48%) indicated that they needed more training on serving as an expert witness. Relative risk ratios (RRR) and odds ratios (OR) were generated to determine the strength of a statistically significant association. Responses from a free-text entry question determining additional training needs could be grouped into 3 main categories: (1) veterinary forensic pathology science and procedures, (2) documentation, evidence collection and handling, and (3) knowledge of the medicolegal system. Last, a field for additional comments or suggestions regarding veterinary forensic pathology was completed by 107 respondents and many reinforced the need for training in the categories previously described. The survey highlights that a significant proportion of diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists are currently engaged in veterinary forensic pathology but feel their training has not adequately prepared them for these cases. Hopefully, the survey results will inform the college and residency training coordinators as they address the training requirements for an important emerging discipline.

  9. Veterinary Assistant, Teachers Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station.

    This study guide was developed for use by male and female vocational agriculture cooperative education students, 16 to 20 years old, preparing to become veterinary assistants. It was designed by subject-matter specialists on the basis of state advisory committee recommendations and refined after being tested in operational programs. Units, to be…

  10. 50 Years: Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narlesky, Lynn

    1998-01-01

    Describes the history, research, teaching strategies, and specialties of the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Documents effects of changing societal attitudes toward wildlife, pets, working animals, and food animals on curriculum, the systems approach to disease, comparative genetics, biotechnology, the ecology of…

  11. Applying games technology to veterinary teaching.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Márton

    2014-01-18

    Veterinarian Márton Balogh has been interested in computers, gaming and programming since he was eight years old. Here, he explains how he is using software that is more often associated with the creation of 3D computer games to develop an immersive, virtual consultation room, complete with patient, to help train veterinary students in clinical examination techniques.

  12. New directions for veterinary technology.

    PubMed

    Chadderdon, Linda M; Lloyd, James W; Pazak, Helene E

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary technology has generally established itself well in companion-animal and mixed-animal veterinary medical practice, but the career's growth trajectory is uncertain. Michigan State University (MSU) convened a national conference, "Creating the Future of Veterinary Technology-A National Dialogue," in November 2011 to explore ways to elevate the veterinary technician/technologist's role in the veterinary medical profession and to identify new directions in which the career could expand. Veterinary technicians/technologists might advance their place in private practice by not only improving their clinical skills, but by also focusing on areas such as practice management, leadership training, business training, conflict resolution, information technology, and marketing/communications. Some new employment settings for veterinary technicians/technologists include more participation within laboratory animal medicine and research, the rural farm industry, regulatory medicine, and shelter medicine. Achieving these ends would call for new training options beyond the current 2-year and 4-year degree programs. Participants suggested specialty training programs, hybrid programs of various types, online programs, veterinary technician residency programs of 12-18 months, and more integration of veterinary technician/technology students and veterinary medicine students at colleges of veterinary medicine.

  13. Allergens in veterinary medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, R. S.; Janda, J.; Jensen-Jarolim, E.; Rhyner, C.; Marti, E.

    2015-01-01

    Allergic diseases in animals are increasingly gaining importance in veterinary practice and as research models. For intradermal testing and allergen immunotherapy, a good knowledge of relevant allergens for the individual species is of great importance. Currently, the knowledge about relevant veterinary allergens is based on sensitization rates identified by intradermal testing or serum testing for allergen-specific IgE; crude extracts are the basis for most evaluations. Only a few studies provide evidence about the molecular structure of (particularly) dust mite, insect and mould allergens in dogs and horses, respectively. In those species, some major allergens differ from those in humans. This position paper summarizes the current knowledge about relevant allergens in dogs, cats and horses. PMID:26280544

  14. Laser In Veterinary Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Carlton; Jaggar, David H.

    1982-12-01

    Lasers have been used for some time now on animals for experimental purposes prior to their use in human medical and surgical fields. However the use of lasers in veterinary medicine and surgery per se is a recent development. We describe the application of high and low intensity laser technology in a general overview of the current uses, some limitations to its use and future needs for future inquiry and development.

  15. Nanoscience in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Scott, N R

    2007-08-01

    Nanotechnology, as an enabling technology, has the potential to revolutionize veterinary medicine. Examples of potential applications in animal agriculture and veterinary medicine include disease diagnosis and treatment delivery systems, new tools for molecular and cellular breeding, identity preservation of animal history from birth to a consumer's table, the security of animal food products, major impact on animal nutrition scenarios ranging from the diet to nutrient uptake and utilization, modification of animal waste as expelled from the animal, pathogen detection, and many more. Existing research has demonstrated the feasibility of introducing nanoshells and nanotubes into animals to seek and destroy targeted cells. Thus, building blocks do exist and are expected to be integrated into systems over the next couple of decades on a commercial basis. While it is reasonable to presume that nanobiotechnology industries and unique developments will revolutionize veterinary medicine in the future, there is a huge concern, among some persons and organizations, about food safety and health as well as social and ethical issues which can delay or derail technological advancements.

  16. How is veterinary parasitology taught in China?

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Yi; Wang, Ming; Suo, Xun; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2006-12-01

    Many parasites of domestic animals in China are of major socioeconomic and medical importance. Hence, veterinary parasitology is one of the core subjects for undergraduate and postgraduate students of veterinary science. Here, we review the teaching of veterinary parasitology in Chinese universities, including a description of the veterinary science curricula and measures to improve the quality of veterinary parasitology teaching in China.

  17. Veterinary ethology and animal welfare.

    PubMed

    Odendaal, J S

    1994-03-01

    Renewed interest in veterinary ethology has been stimulated by increasing sensitivity in modern societies with regard to the use of animals, and a concurrent shift in emphasis in the veterinary profession, including veterinary education. Veterinary ethology appears to form the common ground where animal welfare activists and veterinarians can meet. Ethological parameters seem to be adequate when evaluating animal welfare and well-being, as well as for correcting situations of animal abuse. This approach in assessing animal welfare avoids either a mechanistic or an emotional evaluation of the quality of life of an animal. The object of veterinary ethology is to teach responsible animal ownership. A practical checklist is provided which enables the full spectrum of animal welfare and well-being issues to be addressed from a veterinary point of view.

  18. Reaching beyond our walls: library outreach to veterinary practitioners.

    PubMed

    Sewell, Robin R; Funkhouser, Norma F; Foster, Christine L

    2011-01-01

    The Texas A&M University Medical Sciences Library (MSL) supports lifelong learning for Texas veterinarians and College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (CVMBS) alumni through several ongoing outreach efforts. The MSL provides free document delivery and literature search services to practicing veterinarians in support of patient care. The MSL also responded to unique opportunities to expand services and increase its visibility through collaborations with the American Association of Equine Practitioners and CABI, provider of VetMed Resource. The MSL continues to explore ways to expand its mission-critical veterinary outreach work and market library services to veterinarians through participation in continuing education, regional meetings, and veterinary student instruction.

  19. Veterinary medical education in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Khamas, Wael A; Nour, Abdelfattah

    2004-01-01

    Iraq is an agricultural country with a large population of animals: sheep, goats, cattle, water buffaloes, horses, donkeys, mules, and camels. In the 1980s, the successful poultry industry managed to produce enough table eggs and meat to satisfy the needs of the entire population; at one time, the thriving fish industry produced different types of fish for Iraqis' yearly fish consumption. There are four veterinary colleges in Iraq, which have been destroyed along with the veterinary services infrastructure. Understandably, improvements to the quality of veterinary education and services in Iraq will be reflected in a healthy and productive animal industry, better food quality and quantity, fewer zoonotic diseases, and more income-generating activities in rural areas. Thus, if undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education programs are improved, the veterinary medical profession will attract more competent students. This will satisfy the country's increased demand for competent veterinarians in both public and private sectors. Although Iraq has an estimated 5,000-7,000 veterinarians, there is a need for quality veterinary services and for more veterinarians. In addition, there is a need for the improvement of veterinary diagnostic facilities, as zoonotic diseases are always highly probable in this region. This article provides insight into the status of veterinary medical education and veterinary services in Iraq before and after the 1991 Gulf War and gives suggestions for improvement and implementation of new programs. Suggestions are also offered for improving veterinary diagnostic facilities and the quality of veterinary services. Improving diagnostic facilities and the quality of veterinary services will enhance animal health and production in Iraq and will also decrease the likelihood of disease transmission to and from Iraq. Threats of disease transmission and introduction into the country have been observed and reported by several international

  20. Holistic pediatric veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Lisa

    2014-03-01

    Holistic veterinary medicine treats the whole patient including all physical and behavioral signs. The root cause of disease is treated at the same time as accompanying clinical signs. Herbal and nutritional supplements can help support tissue healing and proper organ functioning, thereby reducing the tendency of disease progression over time. Proper selection of homeopathic remedies is based on detailed evaluation of clinical signs. Herbal medicines are selected based on organ(s) affected and the physiologic nature of the imbalance. Many herbal and nutraceutical companies provide support for veterinarians, assisting with proper formula selection, dosing, drug interactions, and contraindications.

  1. Lessons of history in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald F

    2013-01-01

    The future of veterinary medicine is best understood in the context of history. What began as a profession rooted in urban centers in proximity to horses, physicians, and medical schools, was transformed into a land grant-based agricultural profession with the arrival of the internal combustion engine in the early twentieth century. Most of the United States' current veterinary colleges are still located in towns or small cities in the middle section of the country, outside the largest metropolitan areas where most veterinarians practice companion-animal medicine. Throughout veterinarian history, substantial numbers of US students have been educated in foreign colleges and this continues today, creating an even greater geographic imbalance between the veterinary educational process and US population centers and major medical schools. Three themes deserve special attention as we celebrate the profession's 150th anniversary. We must first move beyond the land-grant culture and develop a more geographically balanced approach to establishing new veterinary colleges that are also in closer association with schools of medicine and public health. We must also facilitate more opportunities for women leadership in organized veterinary medicine, in practice ownership, in academia, and in the corporate structures that educate, hire, and interface with veterinarians. Finally, we need to expand our understanding of One Health to include the concept of zooeyia (the role of animals in promoting human health), as well as continue to emphasize veterinarians' special roles in the control and management of zoonotic diseases and in advancing comparative medicine in the age of the genome. PMID:23470241

  2. Comparison of anaesthesia 'Day 1 skills' expectations between veterinary anaesthetists and general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Duncan, J C; Ross, M; Rhind, S; Clutton, E; Shaw, D J

    2015-02-28

    Day One Skills (DOS) were introduced by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) in 2006 as a guideline for minimum skills required by a veterinary graduate. However, the RCVS anaesthesia DOS are broad and do not specify differences in skills required for different species. The aims of this study were: (1) to determine which anaesthesia skills were considered essential for day one practice by UK-based veterinary practitioners (GPs) and anaesthetists; and (2) to explore current opinions on veterinary undergraduate anaesthesia training. Questionnaires for veterinary GPs (QGPs) and veterinary anaesthetists (QVAs) were developed which asked general information on expectations of anaesthesia skills as well as specific expectations for the common veterinary species. Fifty-five UK-based members of the Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists responded, with a random sample of veterinary practices stratified by UK county generating 234 responses and a convenience sample targeted at more specialist veterinary specialities in the UK generating 161 responses. There was close overall agreement between the two groups of GPs and anaesthetists on essential anaesthesia DOS. However, expectations varied with species-greatest in cats and dogs, lowest in exotics. Many respondents commented that new veterinary graduates lack practical skills and should not be expected to be omnicompetent across all species. In conclusion, anaesthesia undergraduate training should prioritise essential practical DOS.

  3. Surgical Lasers In Veterinary Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, H. C.

    1987-03-01

    Veterinary medicine is a latecomer in benefiting from the advent of surgical lasers. It is ironic that although most of the basic work in lasers is carried out in animal species with which we are most conversant, veterinary medicine as a profession has not been very extensively involved.

  4. Implications for Veterinary Medical Education: Postprofessional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahrs, Robert F.

    1980-01-01

    Concern about delivery of veterinary medical services to animal agriculture and implications for postprofessional veterinary medical education are discussed. The individual needs and goals of livestock producers, practicing veterinarians, and veterinary academicians are so varied that actual delivery of veterinary medical services is difficult to…

  5. Recommendations of the German Society for Medical Education and the German Association of Medical Faculties regarding university-specific assessments during the study of human, dental and veterinary medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jünger, Jana; Just, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    The practice of assessing student performance in human, dental and veterinary medicine at universities in German-speaking countries has undergone significant changes in the past decade. Turning the focus to practical requirements regarding medical practice during undergraduate study away from an often theory-dominated curriculum, the academic scrutiny of the basics of teaching medical knowledge and skills, and amendments to legislation, all require ongoing adjustments to curricula and the ways in which assessments are done during undergraduate medical education. To establish quality standards, the Gesellschaft für medizinische Ausbildung (GMA German Society for Medical Education) reached a consensus in 2008 on recommendations for administering medical school-specific exams which have now been updated and approved by the GMA assessments committee, together with the Medizinischer Fakultätentag (MFT German Association of Medical Faculties), as recommendations for the administration of high-quality assessments. PMID:25228936

  6. Renal scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Reid; Daniel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Renal scintigraphy is performed commonly in dogs and cats and has been used in a variety of other species. In a 2012 survey of the members of the Society of Veterinary Nuclear Medicine, 95% of the respondents indicated they perform renal scintigraphy in their practice. Renal scintigraphy is primarily used to assess renal function and to evaluate postrenal obstruction. This article reviews how renal scintigraphy is used in veterinary medicine and describes the methods of analysis. Species variation is also discussed.

  7. Reflections on Modern Veterinary Education

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    In this brief address, I would like to review in very broad terms some of the major quandaries facing the veterinary profession as we hurtle towards what I believe will be a very different earth in the not too distant future. Associated with these, I also wish to express some personal concerns about what we need to prepare our students for and thus fulfill our obligation to the profession at large. Finally I would like to deliver some thoughts on how we might meet these tremendous demands on our curricula. These latter reflections will by no means be all encompassing but will represent some substance for future debate. I must honestly confess that I too am anxious how best to meet several of the challenges but there must be ways and means. We need everyone's sage input and well considered opinions to develop our strategy and to come through as the elegant, humanistic, responsive and accommodating profession for which we are so well known. PMID:17422159

  8. Veterinary education as leader: which alternatives?

    PubMed

    Waldau, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This article suggests that veterinary medicine has a leadership role to play in our society on ethical matters involving non-human animals. The article contrasts two trends within veterinary medicine; the first trend is a continuation of the avowedly utilitarian attitude toward non-humans that has its roots in Western veterinary medicine's eighteenth-century origins, and the second is the implicit view in veterinary practice that animals matter in and of themselves. Using the idea of alternatives in research and teaching, the article suggests that, in the years to come, veterinary medicine's answers to the relationships of these two trends will shape not only the soul of veterinary medicine, veterinary education, and the veterinary profession but, just as importantly, the larger society and culture themselves. This text is based on the keynote address delivered at the AAVMC Education Symposium in Washington, DC, on March 9, 2006, under the title "Ethical Issues Impacting Animal Use in Veterinary Medical Teaching."

  9. Prudent use guidelines: a review of existing veterinary guidelines.

    PubMed

    Teale, C J; Moulin, G

    2012-04-01

    The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) TerrestrialAnimal Health Code considers the prudent use of antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine to comprise a series of practical measures and recommendations which confer benefits to animal and public health while preserving and maintaining the therapeutic efficacy of antimicrobials. This paper reviews some of the main veterinary prudent use guidelines which have been published in English and the responsibilities of those involved at all levels in the administration of antimicrobials to animals, including national regulatory authorities. The OIE guidelines are considered comprehensive and cover all of those levels, from regulatory authorities to veterinarians and food producers. Guidelines produced by national authorities, professional veterinary associations or farming associations and which are targeted at particular individuals, for example veterinarians or food animal producers, will, obviously, restrict their coverage to those aspects considered relevant for their target audience.

  10. District, state or regional veterinary diagnostic laboratories.

    PubMed

    Gosser, H S; Morehouse, L G

    1998-08-01

    The district, regional or state laboratory is the local laboratory to which veterinarian practitioners usually submit samples, and consequently these laboratories are usually the first to observe a suspected disease problem. In most countries, these laboratories are under the jurisdiction of the State or region in which they are located. In the United States of America (USA), most veterinary diagnostic laboratories are State-associated and operate under the aegis of either the State Department of Agriculture or a university. The national laboratory provides reference assistance to the State laboratories. In the USA, the national Laboratory (the National Veterinary Services Laboratories) acts as a consultant to confirm difficult diagnoses and administer performance tests for State-associated laboratories. District, state or regional laboratories need to share information regarding technological advances in diagnostic procedures. This need was met in the USA by the formation of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians (AAVLD) in the late 1950s. Another requirement of district, state or regional diagnostic laboratories is a method to confirm quality assurance, which was fulfilled in the USA by an accreditation programme established through the AAVLD. The Accreditation Committee evaluates laboratories (on request) in terms of organisation, personnel, physical facilities and equipment, records, finance and budget. Those laboratories which meet the standards as established in the 'Essential Requirements for Accreditation' are given accreditation status, which indicates that they have the expertise and facilities to perform tests on food-producing animals for shipment in national or international commerce and on companion, laboratory or zoo animals. While confidentiality of test records is most important, it is becoming necessary to release certain types of animal disease test information if a country is to participate in the exportation of animals

  11. DNA vaccines in veterinary use

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Laurel; Werner, David B

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines represent a new frontier in vaccine technology. One important application of this technology is in the veterinary arena. DNA vaccines have already gained a foothold in certain fields of veterinary medicine. However, several important questions must be addressed when developing DNA vaccines for animals, including whether or not the vaccine is efficacious and cost effective compared with currently available options. Another important question to consider is how to apply this developing technology in a wide range of different situations, from the domestic pet to individual fish in fisheries with several thousand animals, to wildlife programs for disease control. In some cases, DNA vaccines represent an interesting option for vaccination, while in others, currently available options are sufficient. This review will examine a number of diseases of veterinary importance and the progress being made in DNA vaccine technology relevant to these diseases, and we compare these with the conventional treatment options available. PMID:19722897

  12. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines for an integrative veterinary medicine curriculum within veterinary colleges

    PubMed Central

    Memon, M.A.; Shmalberg, J.; Adair, H.S.; Allweiler, S.; Bryan, J.N.; Cantwell, S.; Carr, E.; Chrisman, C.; Egger, C.M.; Greene, S.; Haussler, K.K.; Hershey, B.; Holyoak, G.R.; Johnson, M.; Jeune, S. Le; Looney, A.; McConnico, R.S.; Medina, C.; Morton, A.J.; Munsterman, A.; Nie, G.J.; Park, N.; Parsons-Doherty, M.; Perdrizet, J.A.; Peyton, J.L.; Raditic, D.; Ramirez, H.P.; Saik, J.; Robertson, S.; Sleeper, M.; Dyke, J. Van; Wakshlag, J.

    2016-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine (IVM) describes the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care and is guided by the best available evidence. Veterinarians frequently encounter questions about complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) in practice, and the general public has demonstrated increased interest in these areas for both human and animal health. Consequently, veterinary students should receive adequate exposure to the principles, theories, and current knowledge supporting or refuting such techniques. A proposed curriculum guideline would broadly introduce students to the objective evaluation of new veterinary treatments while increasing their preparation for responding to questions about IVM in clinical practice. Such a course should be evidence-based, unbiased, and unaffiliated with any particular CAVM advocacy or training group. All IVM courses require routine updating as new information becomes available. Controversies regarding IVM and CAVM must be addressed within the course and throughout the entire curriculum. Instructional honesty regarding the uncertainties in this emerging field is critical. Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative. PMID:27200270

  13. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines for an integrative veterinary medicine curriculum within veterinary colleges.

    PubMed

    Memon, M A; Shmalberg, J; Adair, H S; Allweiler, S; Bryan, J N; Cantwell, S; Carr, E; Chrisman, C; Egger, C M; Greene, S; Haussler, K K; Hershey, B; Holyoak, G R; Johnson, M; Jeune, S Le; Looney, A; McConnico, R S; Medina, C; Morton, A J; Munsterman, A; Nie, G J; Park, N; Parsons-Doherty, M; Perdrizet, J A; Peyton, J L; Raditic, D; Ramirez, H P; Saik, J; Robertson, S; Sleeper, M; Dyke, J Van; Wakshlag, J

    2016-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine (IVM) describes the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care and is guided by the best available evidence. Veterinarians frequently encounter questions about complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) in practice, and the general public has demonstrated increased interest in these areas for both human and animal health. Consequently, veterinary students should receive adequate exposure to the principles, theories, and current knowledge supporting or refuting such techniques. A proposed curriculum guideline would broadly introduce students to the objective evaluation of new veterinary treatments while increasing their preparation for responding to questions about IVM in clinical practice. Such a course should be evidence-based, unbiased, and unaffiliated with any particular CAVM advocacy or training group. All IVM courses require routine updating as new information becomes available. Controversies regarding IVM and CAVM must be addressed within the course and throughout the entire curriculum. Instructional honesty regarding the uncertainties in this emerging field is critical. Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative.

  14. From Osler to Olafson. The evolution of veterinary pathology in North America.

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, L Z

    1987-01-01

    Most branches of biological science in North America developed first in the United States, and later were taught and practiced in Canada. An exception was veterinary pathology, which as a discipline taught in veterinary colleges and as a field of research, developed first in Canada, and from there crossed the border to the United States. Pathology was first taught at the Montreal Veterinary College, founded in 1866 by Duncan McEachran, a graduate of the Edinburgh Veterinary College. From the outset, he formed a close association with the medical faculty of McGill University, permitting his students to attend the same classes in the basic subjects with the medical students. Eventually, the Montreal Veterinary College became formally affiliated with McGill University, as the Faculty of Comparative Medicine and Veterinary Science. The McGill veterinary faculty was forced to close for economic reasons in 1903, but it left an enduring legacy, particularly in the field of veterinary pathology. The legacy, a novel concept in the 1870's, was that pathology was the cornerstone of a veterinary education; the place where anatomy, physiology, chemistry and botany met with the clinical subjects, and gave the latter meaning. This tradition was formed at the Montreal Veterinary College by the world renowned physician William Osler, North America's leading medical teacher, whom McEachran had invited to teach at the College in 1876 in addition to his duties in the faculty of medicine. Osler had studied with Virchow in Berlin and applied his methods of autopsy technique and of scientific inquiry to his teaching of both human and veterinary pathology at McGill. Osler also undertook investigations into various diseases of domestic animals, at the request of McEachran, who doubled as Chief Veterinary Inspector for the Dominion Department of Agriculture. Osler left McGill University in 1884. Only after that year did other North American veterinary schools adopt pathology as a discipline

  15. Taking a history on veterinary education.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Andrew; Rhind, Susan

    2013-10-26

    In this article, another in the series marking 125 years of Veterinary Record, Andrew Gardiner and Susan Rhind consider some common themes in the history of veterinary education. They look at how veterinary teaching and education have evolved over time and discuss what may happen in years to come.

  16. The Literature of Veterinary Medicine. CE 60.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerker, Ann E.; Malamud, Judie

    This course guide outlines the objectives and content for a professional continuing education course on the literature of veterinary medicine. Topics covered include: (1) an introduction to veterinary medicine as a discipline, including comparison with other medical sciences, veterinary medicine education, licensure, animal models, veterinary…

  17. Cattle veterinary services in a changing world.

    PubMed

    Statham, Jonathan; Green, Martin

    2015-03-14

    In the first of a series of feature articles in Veterinary Record discussing the state of different sectors of the veterinary profession in the UK and what the future might hold, Jonathan Statham and Martin Green give their perspective on developments affecting the provision of cattle veterinary services.

  18. A Clinical Pharmacology Course for Veterinary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, Lynn Mulcahy

    1983-01-01

    A one-semester, two-credit course is described that was developed cooperatively by the colleges of pharmacy and veterinary medicine at Washington State University to help resolve an acute shortage of clinical pharmacologists in veterinary medicine and veterinary medical education. Course procedures, content, and evaluation are outlined (MSE)

  19. Workplace learning in veterinary education: a sociocultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Emma; Trede, Franziska; Raidal, Sharanne L

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary practice is a broad sphere of professional activity encompassing clinical activity and other vocational opportunities conducted in rapidly changing contemporary social conditions. Workplace learning is an important but resource-intensive component of educating students for practice. This conceptual article argues that literature on workplace learning in the veterinary context is dominated by descriptive accounts and that there is a dearth of theoretically informed research on this topic. Framing veterinary practice as a social, relational, and discursive practice supports the use of workplace learning theories developed from a sociocultural perspective. Situated learning theory, with its associated concepts of communities of practice and legitimate peripheral participation, and workplace learning theory focused on workplace affordances and learner agency are discussed. Two composite examples of student feedback from veterinary clinical learning illustrate the concepts, drawing out such themes as the roles of teachers and learners and the assessment of integrated practice. The theoretical perspective described in this article can be used to inform development of models of workplace learning in veterinary clinical settings; relevant examples from medical education are presented.

  20. Interventional urology: endourology in small animal veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Berent, Allyson C

    2015-07-01

    The use of novel image-guided techniques in veterinary medicine has become more widespread, especially in urologic diseases. With the common incidence of urinary tract obstructions, stones disease, renal disease, and urothelial malignancies, combined with the recognized invasiveness and morbidity associated with traditional surgical techniques, the use of minimally invasive alternatives using interventional radiology and interventional endoscopy techniques has become incredibly appealing to owners and clinicians. This article provides a brief overview of some of the most common procedures done in endourology in veterinary medicine to date, providing as much evidence-based medicine as possible when comparing with traditional surgical alternatives. PMID:26002798

  1. Interventional urology: endourology in small animal veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Berent, Allyson C

    2015-07-01

    The use of novel image-guided techniques in veterinary medicine has become more widespread, especially in urologic diseases. With the common incidence of urinary tract obstructions, stones disease, renal disease, and urothelial malignancies, combined with the recognized invasiveness and morbidity associated with traditional surgical techniques, the use of minimally invasive alternatives using interventional radiology and interventional endoscopy techniques has become incredibly appealing to owners and clinicians. This article provides a brief overview of some of the most common procedures done in endourology in veterinary medicine to date, providing as much evidence-based medicine as possible when comparing with traditional surgical alternatives.

  2. Researching Applicants Online in the Veterinary Program Admissions Process: Perceptions, Practices, and Implications for Curricular Change.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Lori R; Hellyer, Peter W; Stewart, Sherry M; Hendrickson, Dean A; Dowers, Kristy L; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina

    2015-01-01

    As the use of social media websites continues to grow among adults 18-34 years old, it is necessary to examine the consequences of online disclosure to the veterinary admissions processes and to consider the effects on the professional integrity of veterinary schools and on the e-professionalism of DVM graduates. Prior research has shown that employers, across all fields, routinely use information from social media sites to make hiring decisions. In veterinary medicine, a little over one-third of private practitioners reported using online information in the selection of new associates. However, professional academic programs appear to use online information less frequently in the selection processes. The current study examines the behaviors and attitudes of veterinary medical admissions committees toward the use of applicants' online information and profiles in their recruitment and selection process. An online survey was distributed to Associate Deans for Academic Affairs at all AAVMC-affiliated schools of veterinary medicine. A total of 21 schools completed the survey. The results showed that most veterinary schools do not currently use online research in their admissions process; however, most admissions committee members feel that using online social networking information to investigate applicants is an acceptable use of technology. Previous research has suggested that the majority of veterinary student applicants view this as an invasion of their privacy. Given this discordance, future educational efforts should focus on helping veterinary students determine what type of information is appropriate for posting online and how to use privacy settings to control their sharing behaviors.

  3. Masterclass in veterinary public health.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Hannah

    2016-02-01

    Each summer, one student from each vet school in the British Isles gets the chance to attend a week-long masterclass to learn more about veterinary public health. Last year, Hannah Clifford was one of them. Here she explains how her understanding of the relevance and responsibility of vets working in public health has changed. PMID:26851115

  4. The Feminization of Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gose, Ben

    1998-01-01

    In little more than a generation, veterinary medical schools have gone from enrolling a token number of women to having a higher proportion of women than men in some cases. Developments in drugs to control large animals, relatively low pay for veterinarians, and options for part-time employment have served to change the balance of sexes in the…

  5. Veterinary herbal medicines in India

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Shruti; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Prakash, Jai; Sharma, Alok; Singh, Gyanendra Nath

    2015-01-01

    India has a rich and diversified flora. It is seen that synthetic drugs could pose serious problems, are toxic and costly. In contrast to this, herbal medicines are relatively nontoxic, cheaper and are eco-friendly. Moreover, the people have used them for generations. They have also been used in day-to-day problems of healthcare in animals. 25% of the drugs prescribed worldwide come from plants. Almost 75% of the medicinal plants grow naturally in different states of India. These plants are known to cure many ailments in animals like poisoning, cough, constipation, foot and mouth disease, dermatitis, cataract, burning, pneumonia, bone fractures, snake bites, abdominal pains, skin diseases etc. There is scarce review of such information (veterinary herbals) in the literature. The electronic and manual search was made using various key words such as veterinary herbal, ethno-veterinary medicines etc. and the content systematically arranged. This article deals with the comprehensive review of 45 medicinal plant species that are official in Indian Pharmacopoeia (IP) 2014. The botanical names, family, habitat, plant part used and pharmacological actions, status in British Pharmacopoeia 2014, USP 36 are mentioned. Also, a relationship between animal and human dose, standardization and regulatory aspects of these selected veterinary herbals are provided. PMID:26392714

  6. Current Status of Veterinary Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Meeusen, Els N. T.; Walker, John; Peters, Andrew; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre; Jungersen, Gregers

    2007-01-01

    The major goals of veterinary vaccines are to improve the health and welfare of companion animals, increase production of livestock in a cost-effective manner, and prevent animal-to-human transmission from both domestic animals and wildlife. These diverse aims have led to different approaches to the development of veterinary vaccines from crude but effective whole-pathogen preparations to molecularly defined subunit vaccines, genetically engineered organisms or chimeras, vectored antigen formulations, and naked DNA injections. The final successful outcome of vaccine research and development is the generation of a product that will be available in the marketplace or that will be used in the field to achieve desired outcomes. As detailed in this review, successful veterinary vaccines have been produced against viral, bacterial, protozoal, and multicellular pathogens, which in many ways have led the field in the application and adaptation of novel technologies. These veterinary vaccines have had, and continue to have, a major impact not only on animal health and production but also on human health through increasing safe food supplies and preventing animal-to-human transmission of infectious diseases. The continued interaction between animals and human researchers and health professionals will be of major importance for adapting new technologies, providing animal models of disease, and confronting new and emerging infectious diseases. PMID:17630337

  7. Veterinary applications of infrared thermography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abnormal temperature is a major indicator of disease; infrared thermography (IRT) can assess changes in surface temperature quickly and remotely. This technology can be applied to myriad diseases in veterinary medicine, ranging across host species and disease etiologies. It can also be used to deter...

  8. Veterinary Microbiology, 3rd Edition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Veterinary Microbiology, Third Edition is organized into four sections and begins with an updated and expanded introductory section on infectious disease pathogenesis, diagnosis and clinical management. The second section covers bacterial and fungal pathogens, and the third section describes viral d...

  9. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) associated with Staphylococcus spp. bacteremia, responsive to potassium arsenite 0.5% in a veterinary surgeon and his coworking wife, handling with CFS animal cases.

    PubMed

    Tarello, W

    2001-10-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in human patients remain a controversial and perplexing condition with emerging zoonotic aspects. Recent advances in human medicine seem to indicate a bacterial etiology and the condition has already been described in horses, dogs, cats and birds of prey in association with micrococci-like organisms in the blood. To evaluate the possibility of a chronic bacteremia, a veterinary surgeon (the author) and his coworking wife, both diagnosed with CFS and meeting the CDC working case definition, were submitted to rapid blood cultures and fresh blood smears investigations. Blood cultures proved Staph-positive and micrococci-like organisms in the blood were repeatedly observed in the 3-year period preceding the arsenical therapy, during which several medicaments, including antibiotics, proved unsuccessful. Following treatment with a low dosage arsenical drug (potassium arsenite 0.5%, im., 1 ml/12 h, for 10 days) both patients experienced complete remission. At the post-treatment control made 1 month later, micrococci had disappeared from the blood, and the CD4/CD8 ratio was raising. PMID:11561958

  10. Veterinary Homeopathy: The Implications of Its History for Unorthodox Veterinary Concepts and Veterinary Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulter, Dwight B.

    1979-01-01

    The history of veterinary homeopathy, its future and implications are discussed. The need for investigation into the validity of both allopathic and homeopathic claims is stressed and it is suggested that maintenance of quality is the key factor in any approach. (BH)

  11. Driving Success over the Past 50 Years-The Faculty in Academic Veterinary Medicine.

    PubMed

    Buss, Daryl D

    2015-01-01

    The faculty at member schools and colleges of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) are critical for continued progress in veterinary medicine. The success of those faculty members over the past 50 years has positioned veterinary medicine to engage an ever-widening array of opportunities, responsibilities, and societal needs. Yet the array of skills and accomplishments of faculty in academic veterinary medicine are not always visible to the public, or even within our profession. The quality and the wide range of their scholarship are reflected, in part, through the according of national and international awards and honors from organizations relevant to their particular areas of expertise. The goal of this study was to illustrate the breadth of expertise and the quality of the faculty at 34 schools/colleges of veterinary medicine by examining the diversity of organizations that have recognized excellence in faculty achievements through a variety of awards.

  12. Monitoring the Veterinary Medical Student Experience: An Institutional Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Miller, RoseAnn; Mavis, Brian E; Lloyd, James W; Grabill, Chandra M; Henry, Rebecca C; Patterson, Coretta C

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary medical school challenges students academically and personally, and some students report depression and anxiety at rates higher than the general population and other medical students. This study describes changes in veterinary medical student self-esteem (SE) over four years of professional education, attending to differences between high and low SE students and the characteristics specific to low SE veterinary medical students. The study population was students enrolled at the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine from 2006 to 2012. We used data from the annual anonymous survey administered college-wide that is used to monitor the curriculum and learning environment. The survey asked respondents to rate their knowledge and skill development, learning environment, perceptions of stress, skill development, and SE. Participants also provided information on their academic performance and demographics. A contrasting groups design was used: high and low SE students were compared using logistic regression to identify factors associated with low SE. A total of 1,653 respondents met inclusion criteria: 789 low SE and 864 high SE students. The proportion of high and low SE students varied over time, with the greatest proportion of low SE students during the second-year of the program. Perceived stress was associated with low SE, whereas perceived supportive learning environment and skill development were associated with high SE. These data have provided impetus for curricular and learning environment changes to enhance student support. They also provide guidance for additional research to better understand various student academic trajectories and their implications for success.

  13. Occurrence of 13 veterinary drugs in animal manure-amended soils in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ruicheng; Ge, Feng; Zhang, Lili; Hou, Xiang; Cao, Yinan; Gong, Lan; Chen, Ming; Wang, Ran; Bao, Endong

    2016-02-01

    The occurrence of 13 veterinary drugs were studied in soil fertilized with animal manures in Eastern China. The 69 soil samples were obtained from twenty-three vegetable fields in 2009 and analysed for selected veterinary drugs by HPLC-MS/MS at soil depths of 0-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm, and two additional samples were re-analysed from an earlier study from November 2011. Results showed that animal wastes, especially those from poultry farms, were one of pollution sources of veterinary drugs in soil. The detection frequency of veterinary drugs in soil was 83%, 91% and 87% in the three soil depths, respectively. The detection rates for the five classes of drugs in soils followed the rank order cyromazine > tetracyclines > sulfonamides > fluoroquinolones > florfenicol. Veterinary drugs were detected in soil layers at 20-40 and 40-60 cm depth to a greater extent than at 0-20 cm depth. The results of the same point in years 2009 and 2011 indicated that veterinary drugs accumulate easily and persist in the deeper soil. In addition, residue levels of veterinary drugs in soil were related to the animal species the manure was derived from. Overall, the predominance of tetracyclines in sampled soils underscored the need to regulate their veterinary use in order to improve the management and treatment of associated releases. PMID:26610297

  14. Occurrence of 13 veterinary drugs in animal manure-amended soils in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ruicheng; Ge, Feng; Zhang, Lili; Hou, Xiang; Cao, Yinan; Gong, Lan; Chen, Ming; Wang, Ran; Bao, Endong

    2016-02-01

    The occurrence of 13 veterinary drugs were studied in soil fertilized with animal manures in Eastern China. The 69 soil samples were obtained from twenty-three vegetable fields in 2009 and analysed for selected veterinary drugs by HPLC-MS/MS at soil depths of 0-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm, and two additional samples were re-analysed from an earlier study from November 2011. Results showed that animal wastes, especially those from poultry farms, were one of pollution sources of veterinary drugs in soil. The detection frequency of veterinary drugs in soil was 83%, 91% and 87% in the three soil depths, respectively. The detection rates for the five classes of drugs in soils followed the rank order cyromazine > tetracyclines > sulfonamides > fluoroquinolones > florfenicol. Veterinary drugs were detected in soil layers at 20-40 and 40-60 cm depth to a greater extent than at 0-20 cm depth. The results of the same point in years 2009 and 2011 indicated that veterinary drugs accumulate easily and persist in the deeper soil. In addition, residue levels of veterinary drugs in soil were related to the animal species the manure was derived from. Overall, the predominance of tetracyclines in sampled soils underscored the need to regulate their veterinary use in order to improve the management and treatment of associated releases.

  15. Issues of reporting in observational studies in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, Jan M; O'Connor, Annette M

    2014-02-15

    Observational studies are common in veterinary medicine; the results may be used to inform decision-making, future research, or as inputs to systematic reviews or risk assessment. To be of use, the results must be published, all of the outcomes that were assessed must be included in the publication, and the research (methods and results) must be reported in sufficient detail that the reader can evaluate the internal and external validity. In human healthcare, concerns about the completeness of reporting - and evidence that poor reporting is associated with study results - have led to the creation of reporting guidelines; these include the STROBE statement for observational studies. There is evidence from a limited body of research that there also are reporting inadequacies in veterinary observational studies. There are differences between human and veterinary observational studies that might be relevant to recommendations for reporting. Such differences include: the use of observational studies in animal populations for simultaneously estimating disease frequency and risk-factor identification; the distinction between the animal owners who consent to participate and the animals that are the study subjects; and the complexity of organizational levels inherent in animal research (in particular, for studies in livestock species). In veterinary medicine, it is common to have clustering within outcomes (due to animal grouping) and clustering of predictor variables. We argue that there is a compelling need for the scientific community involved in veterinary observational studies to use the STROBE statement, use an amended version of STROBE, or to develop and use reporting guidelines that are specific to veterinary medicine to improve reporting of these studies.

  16. 78 FR 1824 - Notice of Request for Approval of an Information Collection; National Veterinary Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Information Collection; National Veterinary Services Laboratories; Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy... bovine spongiform encephalopathy surveillance program. DATES: We will consider all comments that we... associated with the bovine spongiform encephalopathy surveillance program, contact Dr. Dean Goeldner,...

  17. Teaching and assessing veterinary professionalism.

    PubMed

    Mossop, Liz H; Cobb, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The teaching and assessment of professional behaviors and attitudes are important components of veterinary curricula. This article aims to outline some important considerations and concepts which will be useful for veterinary educators reviewing or developing this topic. A definition or framework of veterinary professionalism must be decided upon before educators can develop relevant learning outcomes. The interface between ethics and professionalism should be considered, and both clinicians and ethicists should deliver professionalism teaching. The influence of the hidden curriculum on student development as professionals should also be discussed during curriculum planning because it has the potential to undermine a formal curriculum of professionalism. There are several learning theories that have relevance to the teaching and learning of professionalism; situated learning theory, social cognitive theory, adult learning theory, reflective practice and experiential learning, and social constructivism must all be considered as a curriculum is designed. Delivery methods to teach professionalism are diverse, but the teaching of reflective skills and the use of early clinical experience to deliver valid learning opportunities are essential. Curricula should be longitudinal and integrated with other aspects of teaching and learning. Professionalism should also be assessed, and a wide range of methods have the potential to do so, including multisource feedback and portfolios. Validity, reliability, and feasibility are all important considerations. The above outlined approach to the teaching and assessment of professionalism will help ensure that institutions produce graduates who are ready for the workplace.

  18. Liver scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Federica

    2014-01-01

    The most common veterinary application of liver scintigraphy is for the diagnosis of portosystemic shunts (PSSs). There has been a continual evolution of nuclear medicine techniques for diagnosis of PSS, starting in the early 1980s. Currently, transplenic portal scintigraphy using pertechnetate or (99m)Tc-mebrofenin is the technique of choice. This technique provides both anatomical and functional information about the nature of the PSS, with high sensitivity and specificity. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy has also been used in veterinary medicine for the evaluation of liver function and biliary patency. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy provides information about biliary patency that complements finding in ultrasound, which may not be able to differentiate between biliary ductal dilation from previous obstruction vs current obstruction. Hepatocellular function can also be determined by deconvolutional analysis of hepatic uptake or by measuring the clearance of the radiopharmaceutical from the plasma. Plasma clearance of the radiopharmaceutical can be directly measured from serial plasma samples, as in the horse, or by measuring changes in cardiac blood pool activity by region of interest analysis of images. The objective of this paper is to present a summary of the reported applications of hepatobiliary scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

  19. Epidemiological analysis of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage among veterinary staff of companion animals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Kanako; Saito, Mieko; Shimokubo, Natsumi; Muramatsu, Yasukazu; Maetani, Shigeki; Tamura, Yutaka

    2014-12-01

    Veterinary staff carrying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) can be a source of MRSA infection in animals. To identify risk factors of MRSA carriage among veterinary staff, MRSA carriage and epidemiological information (sex, career, contact with MRSA-identified animal patients and others) were analyzed from 96 veterinarians and 70 veterinary technicians working at 71 private veterinary clinics in Japan. Univariate analysis determined sex (percentage of MRSA carriage, male (29.2%) vs. female (10%); P=0.002) and career (veterinarians (22.9%) vs. veterinary technicians (10%); P=0.030) as risk factors. Multivariable analysis revealed that sex was independently associated with MRSA carriage (adjusted odds ratio, 3.717; 95% confidence interval, 1.555-8.889; P=0.003). Therefore, male veterinary staff had a higher risk of MRSA carriage than female staff.

  20. Engineering Veterinary Education: A Clarion Call for Reform in Veterinary Education--Let's Do It!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radostits, Otto M.

    2003-01-01

    Supports an engineering model of tracking programs in veterinary medical education and suggests that undergraduate student quotas need to be considered in order to educate a sufficient number of new veterinary graduates in the different fields needed by society. (SLD)

  1. The veterinary profession and one medicine: some considerations, with particular reference to Italy.

    PubMed

    Battelli, Giorgio; Mantovani, Adriano

    2011-01-01

    The concept of 'one medicine' and its evolution are discussed and some considerations on the relationship between 'one medicine' and veterinary profession are made, with particular reference to Italy. The concept of 'one medicine' is mainly associated with public health and has its roots in the Italian tradition and health organisation. In a future which is already with us, the veterinary profession will be called upon to deal with many problems at worldwide level (e.g. the emergence/re-emergence of new/old zoonotic pathogens, biological and chemical contaminants in food, bacterial resistance to antibiotics, non-epidemic emergencies associated with natural or man-made disasters, animal well-being, etc.), integrating with other professions. In Italy, most of these problems find the Veterinary Services prepared, but not homogeneously throughout the country. At the present time, doubts are expressed on maintaining and improving these services, mainly due to the lack of students interested in veterinary public health (VPH) training. The globalisation of the veterinary profession imposes changes, in both culture and training. The expertise required for 'one medicine' must be considered and aspects of veterinary training should be changed to promote sharing expertise with other professionals, mainly within the Italian Health Service. The public should be informed about professional competence and activities of veterinarians, in both the private and public sectors, in order to offer a true picture of the profession, one that is not limited to the conventional model which the public generally has of veterinary medicine. PMID:22194222

  2. The veterinary profession and one medicine: some considerations, with particular reference to Italy.

    PubMed

    Battelli, Giorgio; Mantovani, Adriano

    2011-01-01

    The concept of 'one medicine' and its evolution are discussed and some considerations on the relationship between 'one medicine' and veterinary profession are made, with particular reference to Italy. The concept of 'one medicine' is mainly associated with public health and has its roots in the Italian tradition and health organisation. In a future which is already with us, the veterinary profession will be called upon to deal with many problems at worldwide level (e.g. the emergence/re-emergence of new/old zoonotic pathogens, biological and chemical contaminants in food, bacterial resistance to antibiotics, non-epidemic emergencies associated with natural or man-made disasters, animal well-being, etc.), integrating with other professions. In Italy, most of these problems find the Veterinary Services prepared, but not homogeneously throughout the country. At the present time, doubts are expressed on maintaining and improving these services, mainly due to the lack of students interested in veterinary public health (VPH) training. The globalisation of the veterinary profession imposes changes, in both culture and training. The expertise required for 'one medicine' must be considered and aspects of veterinary training should be changed to promote sharing expertise with other professionals, mainly within the Italian Health Service. The public should be informed about professional competence and activities of veterinarians, in both the private and public sectors, in order to offer a true picture of the profession, one that is not limited to the conventional model which the public generally has of veterinary medicine.

  3. Pain in veterinary medicine in the new millennium.

    PubMed

    Passantino, Annamaria; Fazio, Alessandra; Quartatone, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    The practice of veterinary medicine has changed radically over the past two decades, new technology and scientific breakthroughs have occurred, in close association with the field of human medicine. This progress has not only increased the capacity of veterinarians to provide high-quality care, it has also served to increase client awareness and expectations regarding animal care. On the legal front, it has finally given a "voice" to animals, now defined as sentient beings, thus imposing a series of duties upon veterinarians to promote their welfare. Preventing and managing pain has become a fundamental element of patient care quality in veterinary medicine, and pharmacotherapy is the basis of pain management. This paper takes this as a starting point to clarify the concept of pain in veterinary medicine and explores the relevance of an ethic to the clinical setting which gives the animal patient a strong right to freedom from unnecessary pain and thus creating moral obligations towards patients on the part of veterinary professionals. There is the duty not to inflict pain and suffering beyond what is necessary for effective diagnosis and treatment on the one hand and a duty to do all that can be done to relieve all the pain and suffering which can be alleviated on the other.

  4. Protecting animal and human health and the nation's food supply through veterinary diagnostic laboratory testing.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Claire B

    2011-03-01

    The current detection system for animal diseases requires coordination between veterinarians; veterinary medical laboratories; and state, federal, and international agencies, as well as associated private sector industries. Veterinary clinical pathologists in clinical and governmental laboratories often have responsibilities and expertise in one or more laboratory disciplines involved in diagnosing zoonotic and/or emerging diseases and diseases exotic to the United States that are important to animal and human health and the nation's food supply. The knowledge and roles of all veterinary laboratory professionals are vital to detect, monitor, and confirm diseases and conditions that affect animal and human health and the nation's animal food supply.

  5. Veterinary clinical nutrition: success stories: an overview.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mike

    2016-08-01

    In this overview of success stories in veterinary clinical nutrition topics in cats and dogs reviewed include the dietary management of chronic kidney disease, dissolution of urinary tract uroliths by dietary modification, the recognition that taurine and L-carnitine deficiencies can cause dilated cardiomyopathy; that clinical signs associated with feline hyperthyroidism (caused by a benign adenoma) can be controlled by a low-iodine diet alone; that dietary management of canine osteoarthritis can also reduce non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug doses; and that disease-free intervals and survival times can be statistically longer in dogs with Stage III lymphoma managed with diet. As we discover more about nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics, and as we expand our basic understanding of idiopathic diseases we are bound to identify more nutritionally related causes, and be able to develop novel dietary strategies to manage disease processes, including the formulation of diets designed to alter gene expression to obtain beneficial clinical outcomes.

  6. Veterinary clinical nutrition: success stories: an overview.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mike

    2016-08-01

    In this overview of success stories in veterinary clinical nutrition topics in cats and dogs reviewed include the dietary management of chronic kidney disease, dissolution of urinary tract uroliths by dietary modification, the recognition that taurine and L-carnitine deficiencies can cause dilated cardiomyopathy; that clinical signs associated with feline hyperthyroidism (caused by a benign adenoma) can be controlled by a low-iodine diet alone; that dietary management of canine osteoarthritis can also reduce non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug doses; and that disease-free intervals and survival times can be statistically longer in dogs with Stage III lymphoma managed with diet. As we discover more about nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics, and as we expand our basic understanding of idiopathic diseases we are bound to identify more nutritionally related causes, and be able to develop novel dietary strategies to manage disease processes, including the formulation of diets designed to alter gene expression to obtain beneficial clinical outcomes. PMID:27269202

  7. Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbert, William T.

    1976-01-01

    The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

  8. Preparing students for careers in food-supply veterinary medicine: a review of educational programs in the United States.

    PubMed

    Posey, R Daniel; Hoffsis, Glen F; Cullor, James S; Naylor, Jonathan M; Chaddock, Michael; Ames, Trevor R

    2012-01-01

    The real and/or perceived shortage of veterinarians serving food-supply veterinary medicine has been a topic of considerable discussion for decades. Regardless of this debate, there are issues still facing colleges of veterinary medicine (CVMs) about the best process of educating future food-supply veterinarians. Over the past several years, there have been increasing concerns by some that the needs of food-supply veterinary medicine have not adequately been met through veterinary educational institutions. The food-supply veterinary medical curriculum offered by individual CVMs varies depending on individual curricular design, available resident animal population, available food-animal caseload, faculty, and individual teaching efforts of faculty. All of the institutional members of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) were requested to share their Food Animal Veterinary Career Incentives Programs. The AAVMC asked all member institutions what incentives they used to attract and educate students interested in, or possibly considering, a career in food-supply veterinary medicine (FSVM). The problem arises as to how we continue to educate veterinary students with ever shrinking budgets and how to recruit and retain faculty with expertise to address the needs of society. Several CVMs use innovative training initiatives to help build successful FSVM programs. This article focuses on dairy, beef, and swine food-animal education and does not characterize colleges' educational efforts in poultry and aquaculture. This review highlights the individual strategies used by the CVMs in the United States.

  9. [Veterinary treatment of pigeon flocks].

    PubMed

    Krautwald-Junghanns, M-E; Hofstetter, S; Schmidt, V

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary treatment of pigeon flocks requires specific knowledge on the management of the various pigeon flocks as well as of common diseases in these birds and important diagnostic and therapeutic measures. In this context, it is important to differentiate between racing pigeons, thoroughbreds and pigeons kept for meat production, that is, between food-supplying and companion animals. The following article provides an overview of the species-specific characteristics of Columba livia f. domestica and frequently occurring diseases as well as common therapeutic and prophylactic measures. PMID:25323217

  10. Ethical dilemmas in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Carol A; McDonald, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Veterinarians frequently encounter situations that are morally charged and potentially difficult to manage. Situation involving euthanasia, end-of-life care, economics, and inadequate provision of care create practical and moral dilemmas. Ethical tension may be attributable to differences in beliefs regarding the moral value of animals, client and veterinary responsibilities, and deciding what is best for an animal. Veterinarians can employ communication skills used in medical situations to explore the reasons underpinning ethical dilemmas and to search for solutions with clients, staff, and colleagues. PMID:17162119

  11. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. [Veterinary treatment of pigeon flocks].

    PubMed

    Krautwald-Junghanns, M-E; Hofstetter, S; Schmidt, V

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary treatment of pigeon flocks requires specific knowledge on the management of the various pigeon flocks as well as of common diseases in these birds and important diagnostic and therapeutic measures. In this context, it is important to differentiate between racing pigeons, thoroughbreds and pigeons kept for meat production, that is, between food-supplying and companion animals. The following article provides an overview of the species-specific characteristics of Columba livia f. domestica and frequently occurring diseases as well as common therapeutic and prophylactic measures.

  13. Therapeutic laser in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Brian; Millis, Darryl L

    2015-01-01

    Laser therapy is an increasingly studied modality that can be a valuable tool for veterinary practitioners. Mechanisms of action have been studied and identified for the reduction of pain and inflammation and healing of tissue. Understanding the basics of light penetration into tissue allows evaluation of the correct dosage to deliver for the appropriate condition, and for a particular patient based on physical properties. New applications are being studied for some of the most challenging health conditions and this field will continue to grow. Additional clinical studies are still needed and collaboration is encouraged for all practitioners using this technology.

  14. The global public good concept: a means of promoting good veterinary governance.

    PubMed

    Eloit, M

    2012-08-01

    At the outset, the concept of a 'public good' was associated with economic policies. However, it has now evolved not only from a national to a global concept (global public good), but also from a concept applying solely to the production of goods to one encompassing societal issues (education, environment, etc.) and fundamental rights, including the right to health and food. Through their actions, Veterinary Services, as defined by the Terrestrial Animal Health Code (Terrestrial Code) of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), help to improve animal health and reduce production losses. In this way they contribute directly and indirectly to food security and to safeguarding human health and economic resources. The organisation and operating procedures of Veterinary Services are therefore key to the efficient governance required to achieve these objectives. The OIE is a major player in global cooperation and governance in the fields of animal and public health through the implementation of its strategic standardisation mission and other programmes for the benefit of Veterinary Services and OIE Member Countries. Thus, the actions of Veterinary Services and the OIE deserve to be recognised as a global public good, backed by public investment to ensure that all Veterinary Services are in a position to apply the principles of good governance and to comply with the international standards for the quality of Veterinary Services set out in the OIE Terrestrial Code (Section 3 on Quality of Veterinary Services) and Aquatic Animal Health Code (Section 3 on Quality of Aquatic Animal Health Services).

  15. The use of relative value studies in the determination of veterinary fees.

    PubMed

    Clarke, R E

    1988-11-01

    This paper discusses the methods which veterinarians in Australia use to calculate their fees and charges. Problems associated with these methods and the tendency to undervalue the professional component of veterinary services are discussed. The paper introduces the concept of a relative value study of veterinary professional services within Australia and recommends the development of a relative value scale and conversion factors, based on appropriate resource cost accounting methodology, as a method to quantify veterinary professional service charges. A relative value scale is a table of "weights" that defines the relative value of procedures or services one to the other. A conversion factor is used to change the relative value unit to a dollar price and thus convert a relative value scale to a fee schedule. The Australian Veterinary Association is suggested as the most appropriate organisation to initiate and co-ordinate the research necessary for the development of these recommendations on a national basis.

  16. 9 CFR 3.110 - Veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Veterinary care. 3.110 Section 3.110 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... Mammals Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.110 Veterinary care. (a) Newly acquired marine...

  17. 9 CFR 3.110 - Veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Veterinary care. 3.110 Section 3.110 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... Mammals Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.110 Veterinary care. (a) Newly acquired marine...

  18. Context is key in veterinary education.

    PubMed

    Mills, Georgina

    2016-01-16

    Debate about whether a veterinary education adequately prepares new graduates for a career in practice is not new, and the way students are taught, and what they are taught, is constantly evolving. A session at the BVA Congress explored how veterinary education might need to change to produce the vets of the future. Georgina Mills reports. PMID:26769807

  19. Veterinary Safety's Conflicts in the EAEU

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalymbek, Bakytzhan; Shulanbekova, Gulmira K.; Madiyarova, Ainur S.; Mirambaeva, Gulnaz Zh.

    2016-01-01

    This article is devoted to the problem of veterinary safety of the countries under the Eurasian Economic Union. Animal health's measures are provided in order to prevent the entry and spread of infectious animal diseases, including common to humans and animals, as well as goods not conforming to the common veterinary and sanitary requirements.…

  20. 9 CFR 3.110 - Veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Veterinary care. 3.110 Section 3.110 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... Mammals Animal Health and Husbandry Standards § 3.110 Veterinary care. (a) Newly acquired marine...

  1. 21 CFR 530.5 - Veterinary records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Veterinary records. 530.5 Section 530.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS EXTRALABEL DRUG USE IN ANIMALS General Provisions § 530.5 Veterinary...

  2. 21 CFR 530.5 - Veterinary records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Veterinary records. 530.5 Section 530.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS EXTRALABEL DRUG USE IN ANIMALS General Provisions § 530.5 Veterinary...

  3. Veterinary Forensic Pathology: The Search for Truth.

    PubMed

    McDonough, S P; McEwen, B J

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary forensic pathology is emerging as a distinct discipline, and this special issue is a major step forward in establishing the scientific basis of the discipline. A forensic necropsy uses the same skill set needed for investigations of natural disease, but the analytical framework and purpose of forensic pathology differ significantly. The requirement of legal credibility and all that it entails distinguishes the forensic from routine diagnostic cases. Despite the extraordinary depth and breadth of knowledge afforded by their training, almost 75% of veterinary pathologists report that their training has not adequately prepared them to handle forensic cases. Many veterinary pathologists, however, are interested and willing to develop expertise in the discipline. Lessons learned from tragic examples of wrongful convictions in medical forensic pathology indicate that a solid foundation for the evolving discipline of veterinary forensic pathology requires a commitment to education, training, and certification. The overarching theme of this issue is that the forensic necropsy is just one aspect in the investigation of a case of suspected animal abuse or neglect. As veterinary pathologists, we must be aware of the roles filled by other veterinary forensic experts involved in these cases and how our findings are an integral part of an investigation. We hope that the outcome of this special issue of the journal is that veterinary pathologists begin to familiarize themselves with not only forensic pathology but also all aspects of veterinary forensic science.

  4. Staying current by searching the veterinary literature.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Robert A; Wooldridge, Anne A

    2011-01-01

    The body of knowledge in veterinary medicine and the biomedical sciences continues to grow logarithmically, and learning about new developments in veterinary medicine requires successful navigation of recently published literature worldwide. This article examines how veterinarians can use different types of automated services from databases and publishers to search the current and past literature, access articles, and manage references that are found.

  5. Pursuing a career in veterinary public health.

    PubMed

    Radakovic, Milorad

    2015-11-14

    Milorad Radakovic is a teaching fellow in veterinary public health (VPH) at the University of Cambridge. Here, he explains why he believes the challenges in this field of veterinary medicine make for an exciting career path. In a second article to be published in Vet Record Careers next week, he will share some of his own experiences of working in this field. PMID:26564896

  6. Graduate Program Organization in Clinical Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Graduate training in clinical veterinary medicine is discussed. The options available to the student and problems that must be dealt with are presented, along with the requirements to accomplish a finely structured program that satisfies the needs of both the trainee and clinical veterinary medicine. (Author/MLW)

  7. 7 CFR 371.4 - Veterinary Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Veterinary Services. 371.4 Section 371.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION, FUNCTIONS, AND DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 371.4 Veterinary...

  8. 7 CFR 371.4 - Veterinary Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Veterinary Services. 371.4 Section 371.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION, FUNCTIONS, AND DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 371.4 Veterinary...

  9. 7 CFR 371.4 - Veterinary Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Veterinary Services. 371.4 Section 371.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION, FUNCTIONS, AND DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 371.4 Veterinary...

  10. The ninth international veterinary immunology symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This Introduction to the special issue of Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology summarizes the Proceedings of the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (9th IVIS) held August, 2010, in Tokyo, Japan. Over 340 delegates from 30 countries discussed research progress analyzing the immune...

  11. 21 CFR 201.105 - Veterinary drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Veterinary drugs. 201.105 Section 201.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 201.105 Veterinary drugs. A drug subject to...

  12. 21 CFR 201.105 - Veterinary drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Veterinary drugs. 201.105 Section 201.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 201.105 Veterinary drugs. A drug subject to...

  13. 21 CFR 201.105 - Veterinary drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Veterinary drugs. 201.105 Section 201.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 201.105 Veterinary drugs. A drug subject to...

  14. 21 CFR 201.105 - Veterinary drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Veterinary drugs. 201.105 Section 201.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 201.105 Veterinary drugs. A drug subject to...

  15. 21 CFR 201.105 - Veterinary drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Veterinary drugs. 201.105 Section 201.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 201.105 Veterinary drugs. A drug subject to...

  16. Is it time to define veterinary professionalism?

    PubMed

    Mossop, Liz H

    2012-01-01

    The medical profession has spent much time and many resources engaging in a discourse of medical professionalism and debating the appropriate attitudes and behavior of physicians, but little has been published concerning the concept of veterinary professionalism. Physicians are commonly examined by social scientists and educationalists to establish definitions of medical professionalism in order to teach and assess these values within curricula. This challenging process has not been without criticism, however, with some calling the numerous definitions unhelpful, especially when these behaviors are not demonstrated in practice or the wider sociological implications of medical professionalism are ignored. Veterinary curricula often include professional skills, and there has been some discussion about their inclusion as well as the scope of veterinary surgeons and their role in society. Despite this, no true definition of veterinary professionalism exists, and the teaching of the values and behaviors expected of veterinary professionals may not be explicit. Regardless of the difficulties of engaging in such a discourse, perhaps it is time that this occurred and a realistic and usable definition of veterinary professionalism is established. This is a period of change for the veterinary profession, and a teachable and assessable definition can provide some clarity and assist educators within ever evolving veterinary curricula. PMID:22433745

  17. Veterinary Forensic Pathology: The Search for Truth.

    PubMed

    McDonough, S P; McEwen, B J

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary forensic pathology is emerging as a distinct discipline, and this special issue is a major step forward in establishing the scientific basis of the discipline. A forensic necropsy uses the same skill set needed for investigations of natural disease, but the analytical framework and purpose of forensic pathology differ significantly. The requirement of legal credibility and all that it entails distinguishes the forensic from routine diagnostic cases. Despite the extraordinary depth and breadth of knowledge afforded by their training, almost 75% of veterinary pathologists report that their training has not adequately prepared them to handle forensic cases. Many veterinary pathologists, however, are interested and willing to develop expertise in the discipline. Lessons learned from tragic examples of wrongful convictions in medical forensic pathology indicate that a solid foundation for the evolving discipline of veterinary forensic pathology requires a commitment to education, training, and certification. The overarching theme of this issue is that the forensic necropsy is just one aspect in the investigation of a case of suspected animal abuse or neglect. As veterinary pathologists, we must be aware of the roles filled by other veterinary forensic experts involved in these cases and how our findings are an integral part of an investigation. We hope that the outcome of this special issue of the journal is that veterinary pathologists begin to familiarize themselves with not only forensic pathology but also all aspects of veterinary forensic science. PMID:27515387

  18. Educating Veterinary Students in Food Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genigeorgis, Constantin A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A survey of domestic and foreign schools of veterinary medicine is analyzed, revealing a general trend toward deemphasis and/or loss of identity in teaching food safety and regulated veterinary public health subjects. It is suggested that minimal standards need to be set for curricula of U.S. schools. (Author/MLW)

  19. ASA24-Australian Version (Under Development)

    Cancer.gov

    In collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), a consortium of Australian Researchers is adapting the ASA24 system to the Australian context to account for variations in food consumed, portion sizes, and nutrient composition.

  20. Commercialization of veterinary viral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Flore, P H

    2004-12-01

    If vaccines are to reliably prevent disease, they must be developed, produced and quality-controlled according to very strict regulations and procedures. Veterinary viral vaccine registrations are governed by different rules in different countries, but these rules all emphasize that the quality of the raw materials--the cells, eggs, animals or plants that are used in production--need to be carefully controlled. The veterinary vaccine business is also very cost-conscious. Emphasis over the last 5-10 years has therefore been to develop culture systems that minimize labor and sterility problems and thus provide for reliable and cost-effective production. Implementing these often more complex systems in a production environment takes considerable effort, first in scale-up trials and further down the line in convincing production personnel to change their familiar system for something new and possibly untried. To complete scale-up trials successfully, it is absolutely necessary to understand the biochemistry of the cells and the influence of the virus on the cells under scale-up and later production conditions. Once a viral product can be produced on a large scale, it is imperative that the quality of the end-product is controlled in an intelligent way. One needs to know whether the end-product performs in the animal as was intended during its conception in the research and development department. The development of the appropriate tests to demonstrate this plays an important role in the successful development of a vaccine.

  1. Codex committee on veterinary drug residues.

    PubMed

    Crawford, L; Kugler, E G

    1986-12-01

    There has been widespread international concern over residues of veterinary drugs in food. However, until recently, there was little international cooperation in trying to find solutions to the problem. Many nations have taken steps to control the increased use of veterinary drugs, but the rules governing their use vary widely from country to country. Sharing of scientific expertise and other resources between countries would markedly improve this situation. With the need for international cooperation mounting, concerned drug regulators from 20 countries met in 1982 and again in 1984 to discuss international use of veterinary drugs. The group repeatedly called for a Codex committee on veterinary drug residues. At its 1983 meeting in Rome the Codex Alimentarius Commission convened an Expert Consultation to consider the need for a new committee. That international group of experts strongly agreed that a standing committee under the sponsorship of the commission should be established. In July of 1985, the commission unanimously voted to establish a new Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Food. The United States was chosen as host country. The committee will work closely with several existing Codex committees, but it has a clear mandate of its own. Its responsibilities will include establishing a list of priority drugs for review, recommending maximum residue levels, developing codes of practice, and reviewing analytical methods used to control veterinary drug residues. This fall, a new Codex committee has met for the first time--the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Food.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Information technology in veterinary pharmacology instruction.

    PubMed

    Kochevar, Deborah T

    2003-01-01

    Veterinary clinical pharmacology encompasses all interactions between drugs and animals and applies basic and clinical knowledge to improve rational drug use and patient outcomes. Veterinary pharmacology instructors set educational goals and objectives that, when mastered by students, lead to improved animal health. The special needs of pharmacology instruction include establishing a functional interface between basic and clinical knowledge, managing a large quantity of information, and mastering quantitative skills essential to successful drug administration and analysis of drug action. In the present study, a survey was conducted to determine the extent to which veterinary pharmacology instructors utilize information technology (IT) in their teaching. Several IT categories were investigated, including Web-based instructional aids, stand-alone pharmacology software, interactive videoconferencing, databases, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and e-book applications. Currently IT plays a largely ancillary role in pharmacology instruction. IT use is being expanded primarily through the efforts of two veterinary professional pharmacology groups, the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology (ACVCP) and the American Academy of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics (AAVPT). The long-term outcome of improved IT use in pharmacology instruction should be to support the larger educational mission of active learning and problem solving. Creation of high-quality IT resources that promote this goal has the potential to improve veterinary pharmacology instruction within and across institutions. PMID:14976618

  3. Veterinary and human vaccine evaluation methods.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, T J D; Edmond, K; Gubbins, S; Paton, D J

    2014-06-01

    Despite the universal importance of vaccines, approaches to human and veterinary vaccine evaluation differ markedly. For human vaccines, vaccine efficacy is the proportion of vaccinated individuals protected by the vaccine against a defined outcome under ideal conditions, whereas for veterinary vaccines the term is used for a range of measures of vaccine protection. The evaluation of vaccine effectiveness, vaccine protection assessed under routine programme conditions, is largely limited to human vaccines. Challenge studies under controlled conditions and sero-conversion studies are widely used when evaluating veterinary vaccines, whereas human vaccines are generally evaluated in terms of protection against natural challenge assessed in trials or post-marketing observational studies. Although challenge studies provide a standardized platform on which to compare different vaccines, they do not capture the variation that occurs under field conditions. Field studies of vaccine effectiveness are needed to assess the performance of a vaccination programme. However, if vaccination is performed without central co-ordination, as is often the case for veterinary vaccines, evaluation will be limited. This paper reviews approaches to veterinary vaccine evaluation in comparison to evaluation methods used for human vaccines. Foot-and-mouth disease has been used to illustrate the veterinary approach. Recommendations are made for standardization of terminology and for rigorous evaluation of veterinary vaccines.

  4. Connecting knowledge resources to the veterinary electronic health record: opportunities for learning at point of care.

    PubMed

    Alpi, Kristine M; Burnett, Heidi A; Bryant, Sheila J; Anderson, Katherine M

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) provide clinical learning opportunities through quick and contextual linkage of patient signalment, symptom, and diagnosis data with knowledge resources covering tests, drugs, conditions, procedures, and client instructions. This paper introduces the EHR standards for linkage and the partners-practitioners, content publishers, and software developers-necessary to leverage this possibility in veterinary medicine. The efforts of the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) Electronic Health Records Task Force to partner with veterinary practice management systems to improve the use of controlled vocabulary is a first step in the development of standards for sharing knowledge at the point of care. The Veterinary Medical Libraries Section (VMLS) of the Medical Library Association's Task Force on Connecting the Veterinary Health Record to Information Resources compiled a list of resources of potential use at point of care. Resource details were drawn from product Web sites and organized by a metric used to evaluate medical point-of-care resources. Additional information was gathered from questions sent by e-mail and follow-up interviews with two practitioners, a hospital network, two software developers, and three publishers. Veterinarians with electronic records use a variety of information resources that are not linked to their software. Systems lack the infrastructure to use the Infobutton standard that has been gaining popularity in human EHRs. While some veterinary knowledge resources are digital, publisher sites and responses do not indicate a Web-based linkage of veterinary resources with EHRs. In order to facilitate lifelong learning and evidence-based practice, veterinarians and educators of future practitioners must demonstrate to veterinary practice software developers and publishers a clinically-based need to connect knowledge resources to veterinary EHRs.

  5. Researching Applicants Online in the Veterinary Program Admissions Process: Perceptions, Practices, and Implications for Curricular Change.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Lori R; Hellyer, Peter W; Stewart, Sherry M; Hendrickson, Dean A; Dowers, Kristy L; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina

    2015-01-01

    As the use of social media websites continues to grow among adults 18-34 years old, it is necessary to examine the consequences of online disclosure to the veterinary admissions processes and to consider the effects on the professional integrity of veterinary schools and on the e-professionalism of DVM graduates. Prior research has shown that employers, across all fields, routinely use information from social media sites to make hiring decisions. In veterinary medicine, a little over one-third of private practitioners reported using online information in the selection of new associates. However, professional academic programs appear to use online information less frequently in the selection processes. The current study examines the behaviors and attitudes of veterinary medical admissions committees toward the use of applicants' online information and profiles in their recruitment and selection process. An online survey was distributed to Associate Deans for Academic Affairs at all AAVMC-affiliated schools of veterinary medicine. A total of 21 schools completed the survey. The results showed that most veterinary schools do not currently use online research in their admissions process; however, most admissions committee members feel that using online social networking information to investigate applicants is an acceptable use of technology. Previous research has suggested that the majority of veterinary student applicants view this as an invasion of their privacy. Given this discordance, future educational efforts should focus on helping veterinary students determine what type of information is appropriate for posting online and how to use privacy settings to control their sharing behaviors. PMID:26291414

  6. Veterinary medicine books recommended for academic libraries

    PubMed Central

    Crawley-Low, Jill

    2004-01-01

    This bibliography of in-print veterinary medical books published in English may be used as an acquisitions or evaluation tool for developing the monograph component of new veterinary medicine collections or existing science, technology, and medicine collections where veterinary medicine is in the scope of the collection. The bibliography is divided into 34 categories and consists of bibliographic information for 419 titles. The appendix contains an author/editor index. Prices for all entries are in US dollars, except where another currency is noted. The total cost of all books in the bibliography is $43,602.13 (US). PMID:15494763

  7. Veterinary medicine books recommended for academic libraries.

    PubMed

    Crawley-Low, Jill

    2004-10-01

    This bibliography of in-print veterinary medical books published in English may be used as an acquisitions or evaluation tool for developing the monograph component of new veterinary medicine collections or existing science, technology, and medicine collections where veterinary medicine is in the scope of the collection. The bibliography is divided into 34 categories and consists of bibliographic information for 419 titles. The appendix contains an author/editor index. Prices for all entries are in US dollars, except where another currency is noted. The total cost of all books in the bibliography is $43,602.13 (US). PMID:15494763

  8. Customer service in equine veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Blach, Edward L

    2009-12-01

    This article explores customer service in equine veterinary medicine. It begins with a discussion about the differences between customers and clients in veterinary medicine. An overview of the nature of the veterinary-client-patient relationship and its effects on the veterinarian's services sheds light on how to evaluate your customer service. The author reviews a study performed in 2007 that evaluated 24 attributes of customer service and their importance to clients of equine veterinarians in their decision to select a specific veterinarian or hospital. The article concludes with an overview of how to evaluate your customer service in an effort to optimize your service to achieve customer loyalty. PMID:19945637

  9. Customer service in equine veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Blach, Edward L

    2009-12-01

    This article explores customer service in equine veterinary medicine. It begins with a discussion about the differences between customers and clients in veterinary medicine. An overview of the nature of the veterinary-client-patient relationship and its effects on the veterinarian's services sheds light on how to evaluate your customer service. The author reviews a study performed in 2007 that evaluated 24 attributes of customer service and their importance to clients of equine veterinarians in their decision to select a specific veterinarian or hospital. The article concludes with an overview of how to evaluate your customer service in an effort to optimize your service to achieve customer loyalty.

  10. [200 years of education in veterinary medicine and veterinary activity in Czechoslovakia].

    PubMed

    Drazan, J

    1985-11-01

    The development of veterinary medicine in the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic is evaluated on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of the first lectures on veterinary science at Charles University in Prague (1784). Efforts to found a special veterinary school in Prague date back to the beginning of the 19th century; more than 20 petitions and interpellations concerning the establishment of such a school had been presented to the Bohemian Diet and the Imperial Parliament since 1841. The efforts for the establishment of this school were gradually conjoined with the national-revivalist and national-liberation movement. However, the veterinary university was established only in 1918, in Brno, when Czechoslovakia won independence. The development of veterinary medicine in the territory of today's Czechoslovakia is appreciated positively, mainly in the last 100 years. However, it was only after 1948--in the process of the transition from small-scale farming to large-scale socialist agricultural production--that all the needed practical and economic conditions were created for the development of veterinary medicine. The veterinary service was nationalized in 1951 and adequate material and technical backgrounds were built. Another veterinary university schools was introduced, and post-graduate studies and veterinary extension activities were started.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Corporate influence and conflicts of interest: assessment of veterinary medical curricular changes and student perceptions.

    PubMed

    Dowers, Kristy L; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina M; Hellyer, Peter W; Kogan, Lori R

    2015-01-01

    The ethics document of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges provides guiding principles for veterinary schools to develop conflict of interest policies. These policies regulate faculty and student interactions with industry, potentially reducing the influence companies have on students' perceptions and future prescribing practices. This paper examines the implementation of a conflict of interest policy and related instructional activities at one veterinary college in the US. To inform policy and curricular development, survey data were collected regarding veterinary students' attitudes toward pharmaceutical marketing, including their perceptions of their own susceptibility to bias in therapeutic decisions. Responses from this group of students later served as control data for assessing the effectiveness of educational programs in the content area. A conflict of interest policy was then implemented and presented to subsequent classes of entering students. Classroom instruction and relevant readings were provided on ethics, ethical decision making, corporate influences, and the issue of corporate influence in medical student training. Within seven days of completing a learning program on conflict of interest issues, another cohort of veterinary students (the treatment group) were administered the same survey that had been administered to the control group. When compared with the control group who received no instruction, survey results for the treatment group showed moderate shifts in opinion, with more students questioning the practice of industry-sponsored events and use of corporate funds to reduce tuition. However, many veterinary students in the treatment group still reported they would not be personally influenced by corporate gifts. PMID:25526761

  12. Good veterinary governance: definition, measurement and challenges.

    PubMed

    Msellati, L; Commault, J; Dehove, A

    2012-08-01

    Good veterinary governance assumes the provision of veterinary services that are sustainably financed, universally available, and provided efficiently without waste or duplication, in a manner that is transparent and free of fraud or corruption. Good veterinary governance is a necessary condition for sustainable economic development insomuch as it promotes the effective delivery of services and improves the overall performance of animal health systems. This article defines governance in Veterinary Services and proposes a framework for its measurement. It also discusses the role of Veterinary Services and analyses the governance dimensions of the performance-assessment tools developed by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). These tools (OIE PVS Tool and PVS Gap Analysis) track the performance of Veterinary Services across countries (a harmonised tool) and over time (the PVS Pathway). The article shows the usefulness of the OIE PVS Tool for measuring governance, but also points to two shortcomings, namely (i) the lack of clear outcome indicators, which is an impediment to a comprehensive assessment of the performance of Veterinary Services, and (ii) the lack of specific measures for assessing the extent of corruption within Veterinary Services and the extent to which demand for better governance is being strengthened within the animal health system. A discussion follows on the drivers of corruption and instruments for perception-based assessments of country governance and corruption. Similarly, the article introduces the concept of social accountability, which is an approach to enhancing government transparency and accountability, and shows how supply-side and demand-side mechanisms complement each other in improving the governance of service delivery. It further elaborates on two instruments--citizen report card surveys and grievance redress mechanisms--because of their wider relevance and their possible applications in many settings, including Veterinary

  13. Good veterinary governance: definition, measurement and challenges.

    PubMed

    Msellati, L; Commault, J; Dehove, A

    2012-08-01

    Good veterinary governance assumes the provision of veterinary services that are sustainably financed, universally available, and provided efficiently without waste or duplication, in a manner that is transparent and free of fraud or corruption. Good veterinary governance is a necessary condition for sustainable economic development insomuch as it promotes the effective delivery of services and improves the overall performance of animal health systems. This article defines governance in Veterinary Services and proposes a framework for its measurement. It also discusses the role of Veterinary Services and analyses the governance dimensions of the performance-assessment tools developed by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). These tools (OIE PVS Tool and PVS Gap Analysis) track the performance of Veterinary Services across countries (a harmonised tool) and over time (the PVS Pathway). The article shows the usefulness of the OIE PVS Tool for measuring governance, but also points to two shortcomings, namely (i) the lack of clear outcome indicators, which is an impediment to a comprehensive assessment of the performance of Veterinary Services, and (ii) the lack of specific measures for assessing the extent of corruption within Veterinary Services and the extent to which demand for better governance is being strengthened within the animal health system. A discussion follows on the drivers of corruption and instruments for perception-based assessments of country governance and corruption. Similarly, the article introduces the concept of social accountability, which is an approach to enhancing government transparency and accountability, and shows how supply-side and demand-side mechanisms complement each other in improving the governance of service delivery. It further elaborates on two instruments--citizen report card surveys and grievance redress mechanisms--because of their wider relevance and their possible applications in many settings, including Veterinary

  14. Tocolytic Drugs for Use in Veterinary Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, L.

    1984-01-01

    The author presents a literature review of two tocolytic agents used in veterinary obstetrics: isoxsuprine and clenbuterol. The medical background from which these drugs emerged for human use and to which is linked their application in animal medicine is described. Each drug is reviewed according to its pharmacology, basic considerations for its clinical use and the reports on its application in the treatment and management of obstetrical disorders in veterinary medicine. PMID:17422462

  15. Lasers in veterinary medicine: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Kenneth E.

    1994-09-01

    As in other facets of medical science, the use of lasers in veterinary medicine is a relatively new phenomenon. Economic aspects of the profession as well as questionable returns on investment have limited laser applications primarily to the academic community, research institutions, and specialty practices. As technology improves and efficacy is proven, costs should decrease and allow further introduction of laser surgical and diagnostic devices into the mainstream of clinical veterinary medicine.

  16. Cultural awareness in veterinary practice: student perceptions.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jennifer N; Volet, Simone; Fozdar, Farida

    2011-01-01

    Australian veterinary classrooms are increasingly diverse and their growing internal diversity is a result of migration and large numbers of international students. Graduates interact with other students and increasingly with clients whose attitudes, beliefs, values, and behaviors differ from their own. An understanding and respect for these differences has an impact on client communication and health care outcomes. The present study explored how students understand and are likely to deal with issues of cultural diversity in veterinary professional practice as well as the educational needs that students feel should be met in regard to preparation to engage productively with diversity in professional practice. The present study also explored the extent to which the rich diversity of the undergraduate student population constitutes an educational resource. A class of final-year veterinary students was invited to participate in a workshop exploring intercultural confidence in veterinary consultation. Twelve groups of six to eight students discussed a fictitious scenario involving a challenging clinical encounter with a client from a different culture. Students were reticent to see the scenario in terms of cultural difference, although they generally recognized that awareness of cultural issues in veterinary practice was important. They also tended to not see their own ethnicity as relevant to their practice. While some felt that veterinary practice should be culture blind, most recognized a need to orient to cultural difference and to respond sensitively. Their suggestions for curricular improvements to address these issues are also included. PMID:22023981

  17. Veterinary vaccine development from an industrial perspective.

    PubMed

    Heldens, J G M; Patel, J R; Chanter, N; Ten Thij, G J; Gravendijck, M; Schijns, V E J C; Langen, A; Schetters, Th P M

    2008-10-01

    Veterinary vaccines currently available in Europe and in other parts of the world are developed by the veterinary pharmaceutical industry. The development of a vaccine for veterinary use is an economic endeavour that takes many years. There are many obstacles along the path to the successful development and launch of a vaccine. The industrial development of a vaccine for veterinary use usually starts after the proof of concept that is based on robust academic research. A vaccine can only be made available to the veterinary community once marketing authorisation has been granted by the veterinary authorities. This review gives a brief description of the regulatory requirements which have to be fulfilled before a vaccine can be admitted to the market. Vaccines have to be produced in a quality controlled environment to guarantee delivery of a product of consistent quality with well defined animal and consumer safety and efficacy characteristics. The regulatory and manufacturing legislative framework in which the development takes place is described, as well as the trend in developments in production systems. Recent developments in bacterial, viral and parasite vaccine research and development are also addressed and the development of novel adjuvants that use the expanding knowledge of immunology and disease pathology are described.

  18. History of the Journal of Veterinary Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Oscar J; Hooper, Billy E; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina

    2015-01-01

    The Journal of Veterinary Medical Education (JVME), with the leadership of seven editors and two interim editors, grew from 33 pages of mostly news and commentary to become the premier source for information exchange in veterinary medical education. The first national publication of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) was a 21-page newsletter published in December 1973. This one-time newsletter was followed by volume 1, issue 1 of JVME, published in spring 1974 and edited by William W. Armistead. Richard Talbot was the second and longest serving editor, and under his leadership, JVME grew in the number and quality of papers. Lester Crawford and John Hubbell served as interim editors, maintaining quality and keeping JVME on track until a new editor was in place. Robert Wilson, Billy Hooper, Donal Walsh, Henry Baker, and the current editor, Daryl Buss, are major contributors to the success of JVME. The early history of the journal is described by Billy Hooper and followed by a brief history of the periods of each of the editors. This history concludes with objective and subjective evaluations of the impacts of JVME.

  19. History of the Journal of Veterinary Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Oscar J; Hooper, Billy E; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina

    2015-01-01

    The Journal of Veterinary Medical Education (JVME), with the leadership of seven editors and two interim editors, grew from 33 pages of mostly news and commentary to become the premier source for information exchange in veterinary medical education. The first national publication of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) was a 21-page newsletter published in December 1973. This one-time newsletter was followed by volume 1, issue 1 of JVME, published in spring 1974 and edited by William W. Armistead. Richard Talbot was the second and longest serving editor, and under his leadership, JVME grew in the number and quality of papers. Lester Crawford and John Hubbell served as interim editors, maintaining quality and keeping JVME on track until a new editor was in place. Robert Wilson, Billy Hooper, Donal Walsh, Henry Baker, and the current editor, Daryl Buss, are major contributors to the success of JVME. The early history of the journal is described by Billy Hooper and followed by a brief history of the periods of each of the editors. This history concludes with objective and subjective evaluations of the impacts of JVME. PMID:26673215

  20. 13 Animal Emergencies That Should Receive Immediate Veterinary Consultation and/or Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room Professional Development Jobs Veterinary Salary Calculator Personal Development Training & Service Opportunities Excellence in Veterinary Medicine Awards Veterinary Education Economics & Practice Economics & Finance Practice Management Client Materials Insurance ...

  1. 78 FR 23742 - Nomination Form of Veterinary Shortage Situations for the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... National Institute of Food and Agriculture Nomination Form of Veterinary Shortage Situations for the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (VMLRP) AGENCY: National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA... Act of 1995, invites the general public to comment on an information collection for the...

  2. 77 FR 77008 - Solicitation of Veterinary Shortage Situation Nominations for the Veterinary Medicine Loan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... shown in Table III. While Federal Lands are widely dispersed within States and Insular Areas across the... status. This is because access to veterinary services is necessary for basic animal health, animal well... a panel of food supply veterinary medicine experts from Federal and state agencies, as well...

  3. Food-supply veterinary medicine and veterinary medical education: an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Rose, Reuben

    2006-01-01

    Food-supply veterinary medicine has been an essential part of veterinary degree programs in Australia since the first veterinary school opened in the late nineteenth century. Australian veterinary schools, like others internationally, are being challenged by the relevance of material in current curricula for modern food-supply veterinary medicine. Additionally, student aspirations are a major issue, as curriculum designers balance companion-animal training with the herd/flock-based issues that focus on productivity and profitability. One of the challenges is to examine the relative balance of education in generic skills (self-knowledge, change management, teamwork, leadership, negotiation) with more technically or scientifically based education. An ongoing process of curriculum review and renewal, which involves input from both external and internal stakeholders and allows regular review and assessment, is needed to ensure continuing curriculum relevance.

  4. The history of veterinary cardiology.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, James W

    2013-03-01

    Throughout civilization, animals have played a pivotal role in the advancement of science and medicine. From as early as 400 BC when Hippocrates recognized that diseases had natural causes, the steadfast advances made by biologists, scientists, physicians and scholars were fueled by timely and important facts and information- much of it gained through animal observations that contributed importantly to understanding anatomy, physiology, and pathology. There have been many breakthroughs and historic developments. For example, William Harvey in the 16th and 17th centuries clarified the importance of the circulatory system, aided by observations in dogs and pigs, which helped to clarify and confirm his concepts. The nineteenth century witnessed advances in physical examination techniques including auscultation and percussion. These helped create the basis for enhanced proficiency in clinical cardiology. An explosion of technologic advances that followed in the 20th century have made possible sophisticated, accurate, and non-invasive diagnostics. This permitted rapid patient assessment, effective monitoring, the development of new cardiotonic drugs, clinical trials to assess efficacy, and multi-therapy strategies. The latter 20th century has marshaled a dizzying array of advances in medical genetics and molecular science, expanding the frontiers of etiologies and disease mechanisms in man, with important implications for animal health. Veterinary medicine has evolved during the last half century, from a trade designed to serve agrarian cultures, to a diverse profession supporting an array of career opportunities ranging from private, specialty practice, to highly organized, specialized medicine and subspecialty academic training programs in cardiology and allied disciplines. PMID:23453139

  5. The organisation of the Department of Veterinary Services in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd Nor, M N; Abu Mustapa, A J; Abu Hassan, M A; Chang, K W

    2003-08-01

    The Department of Veterinary Services (DVS) in Malaysia was established in 1888 as an agency to control exotic and domestic animal diseases. Over the years, the structure and functions of the organisation have evolved to meet the growing demand for veterinary services. The responsibilities of the Veterinary Services are enshrined in the Constitution of Malaysia. The current organisation of the DVS is structured to achieve the following objectives:---to prevent, control and eradicate animal and zoonotic diseases--to facilitate the growth and development of a strong animal industry--to ensure that animal products for human consumption are wholesome, clean, safe and suitable to be consumed--to facilitate the growth and development of the animal feed industry--to ensure the welfare and well-being of all animals. To meet these objectives the DVS has nine different divisions, as follows: Planning and Evaluation, Epidemiology and Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Public Health, Research and Development, Industry Development, Production and Development of Genetic Resources, Human Resource Development (HRD), Enforcement, and Administration. The development of the animal industry is managed through national development policies, including the Third National Agriculture Policy. The basis for current programmes for disease control and animal industry development is the Eighth Development Plan (2001-2005). Over the period of this Plan, Malaysia will address the need for sanitary and phytosanitary measures by developing specific programmes covering all fields of the animal industry. This is just one way in which Malaysia is meeting the challenges of the increased liberalisation of trade created by the World Trade Organization and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Free Trade Area. The development of the industry is focused on the major commodities, namely, beef, mutton, poultry meat, eggs, pork and milk. Other commodities receive support if it is considered economically

  6. Toward harmonization of the European food hygiene/veterinary public health curriculum.

    PubMed

    Smulders, Frans J M; Buncic, Sava; Fehlhaber, Karsten; Huey, Robert J; Korkeala, Hannu; Prieto, Miguel; Steinhauserova, Iva

    2012-01-01

    Prompted by developments in the agri-food industry and associated recent changes in European legislation, the responsibilities of veterinarians professionally active in veterinary public health (VPH), and particularly in food hygiene (FH), have increasingly shifted from the traditional end-product control toward longitudinally integrated safety assurance. This necessitates the restructuring of university training programs to provide starting competence in this area for veterinary graduates or a sub-population of them. To date, there are substantial differences in Europe in the way in which graduate programs in FH/VPH are structured and in the time allocated to this important curricular group of subjects. Having recognized this, the European Association of Establishments for Veterinary Education (EAEVE) recently instituted a working group to analyze the current situation, with a view to produce standard operating procedures allowing fair and transparent evaluations of universities/faculties constituting its membership and in concurrence with explicit European legislation on the professional qualifications deemed necessary for this veterinary discipline. This article summarizes the main conclusions and recommendations of the working group and seeks to contribute to the international efforts to optimize veterinary training in FH/VPH. PMID:22718004

  7. Applicability of the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to Dog and Cat Owners for Teaching Veterinary Clinical Communications.

    PubMed

    Englar, Ryane E; Williams, Melanie; Weingand, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Effective communication in health care benefits patients. Medical and veterinary schools not only have a responsibility to teach communication skills, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Education (COE) requires that communication be taught in all accredited colleges of veterinary medicine. However, the best strategy for designing a communications curriculum is unclear. The Calgary-Cambridge Guide (CCG) is one of many models developed in human medicine as an evidence-based approach to structuring the clinical consultation through 71 communication skills. The model has been revised by Radford et al. (2006) for use in veterinary curricula; however, the best approach for veterinary educators to teach communication remains to be determined. This qualitative study investigated if one adaptation of the CCG currently taught at Midwestern University College of Veterinary Medicine (MWU CVM) fulfills client expectations of what constitutes clinically effective communication. Two focus groups (cat owners and dog owners) were conducted with a total of 13 participants to identify common themes in veterinary communication. Participants compared communication skills they valued to those taught by MWU CVM. The results indicated that while the CCG skills that MWU CVM adopted are applicable to cat and dog owners, they are not comprehensive. Participants expressed the need to expand the skillset to include compassionate transparency and unconditional positive regard. Participants also expressed different communication needs that were attributed to the species of companion animal owned.

  8. Applicability of the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to Dog and Cat Owners for Teaching Veterinary Clinical Communications.

    PubMed

    Englar, Ryane E; Williams, Melanie; Weingand, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Effective communication in health care benefits patients. Medical and veterinary schools not only have a responsibility to teach communication skills, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Education (COE) requires that communication be taught in all accredited colleges of veterinary medicine. However, the best strategy for designing a communications curriculum is unclear. The Calgary-Cambridge Guide (CCG) is one of many models developed in human medicine as an evidence-based approach to structuring the clinical consultation through 71 communication skills. The model has been revised by Radford et al. (2006) for use in veterinary curricula; however, the best approach for veterinary educators to teach communication remains to be determined. This qualitative study investigated if one adaptation of the CCG currently taught at Midwestern University College of Veterinary Medicine (MWU CVM) fulfills client expectations of what constitutes clinically effective communication. Two focus groups (cat owners and dog owners) were conducted with a total of 13 participants to identify common themes in veterinary communication. Participants compared communication skills they valued to those taught by MWU CVM. The results indicated that while the CCG skills that MWU CVM adopted are applicable to cat and dog owners, they are not comprehensive. Participants expressed the need to expand the skillset to include compassionate transparency and unconditional positive regard. Participants also expressed different communication needs that were attributed to the species of companion animal owned. PMID:27075274

  9. Feedlot Pharmaceutical Documentation: Protocols, Prescriptions, and Veterinary Feed Directives.

    PubMed

    Apley, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    The days of oral treatment instructions and loosely associated authorizations for the use of drugs in food animals are gone. Treatment protocols should include case definitions for treatment eligibility, detailed regimens, case definitions for treatment success and failure, directions for animal disposition, and mechanisms to prevent animals entering the food chain with violative residues. Prescriptions and veterinary feed directives (VFDs) will soon be necessary for almost all uses of antimicrobials in food animals. Although VFDs have a regulatory format, prescriptions may vary, but there are basic inclusions that should be present in any prescription. PMID:26139195

  10. Thirtieth Annual Congress on Veterinary Acupuncture: IVAS Report

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    More than 155 participants from 25 countries attended the 30th Annual IVAS Congress, September 8–11, 2004 in Oostende, Belgium. The focus was on veterinary acupuncture (AP) and immunology, and the event was sponsored by the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society (IVAS). IVAS is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting excellence in the practice of veterinary AP as an integral part of the total veterinary health care delivery system. The Society endeavors to establish uniformly high standards of veterinary AP through its educational programs and accreditation examination. IVAS seeks to integrate veterinary AP and the practice of Western veterinary science, while also noting that the science of veterinary AP does not overlook allied health systems, such as homeopathy, herbology, nutrition, chiropractic, kinesiology, etc. ().

  11. The Case for Continuing Education in Veterinary Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Explores why continuing veterinary medical education (CVME) programs can play a vital role in supporting the overall strategy of a veterinary college. Discusses the current and future market for CVME programs and strategies for sustainability and synergy. (EV)

  12. Outcomes Assessment at Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleine, Lawrence J.; Terkla, Dawn Geronimo; Kimball, Grayson

    2002-01-01

    Using a survey, compared relative values assigned by Tufts veterinary alumni to questions about skills, training, attitudes, and behaviors with those of veterinary employers and faculty. Also assessed their perceptions of future employment opportunities. (EV)

  13. Chapter 5. Assessing the Aquatic Hazards of Veterinary Medicines

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, there has been increasing awareness of the widespread distribution of low concentrations of veterinary medicine products and other pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. While aquatic hazard for a select group of veterinary medicines has received previous s...

  14. Graduate Training in Toxicology in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robens, J. F.; Buck, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are an American Board of Veterinary Toxicology survey and evaluation of the training resources available in graduate programs in toxicology located in colleges of veterinary medicine. Regulatory toxicology, number of toxicologists needed, and curriculum are also discussed. (JMD)

  15. 21 CFR 558.6 - Veterinary feed directive drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Veterinary feed directive drugs. 558.6 Section 558... § 558.6 Veterinary feed directive drugs. (a) What conditions must I meet if I am a veterinarian issuing a veterinary feed directive (VFD)? (1) You must be appropriately licensed. (2) You must issue a...

  16. Entrepreneurship Education and Veterinary Medicine: Enhancing Employable Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Colette; Treanor, Lorna

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper has the purpose of exploring the potential for entrepreneurship education within veterinary medicine. It aims to examine some of the key themes in the entrepreneurship education literature, discuss the make-up of the UK veterinary sector, consider veterinary curricula requirements and illustrate how entrepreneurship education…

  17. Survey of Saskatchewan beef cattle producers regarding management practices and veterinary service usage

    PubMed Central

    Jelinski, Murray; Campbell, John; Hendrick, Steven; Waldner, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Saskatchewan cow-calf producers (n = 2000) were surveyed to determine what factors were associated with their uptake of veterinary services; how and where they access nutritional information and animal health advice; and whether they were comfortable with having non-veterinarians perform veterinary procedures. The survey response rate was 18.1%. Veterinarians were seen as a primary source of nutritional information and animal health advice. Over the past decade producers have shifted their veterinary service usage from individual animal events to herd-level procedures. Producers who pregnancy check were more likely to be large producers (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.2 to 3.1; P = 0.007), to semen test their bulls (OR = 3.4; 95% CI = 2.0 to 5.8: P < 0.001), analyze their forages (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.7 to 4.0; P = 0.006), and to farm in the brown versus the gray or dark brown soil zones (P = 0.004). Most (94.0%) respondents had adequate veterinary services within an hour’s drive of the farm and 90.4% were satisfied with their veterinary service provider. Approximately 25% of respondents would be comfortable with having a non-veterinarian pregnancy check and attend to prolapses. PMID:25565718

  18. Survey of Saskatchewan beef cattle producers regarding management practices and veterinary service usage.

    PubMed

    Jelinski, Murray; Campbell, John; Hendrick, Steven; Waldner, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Saskatchewan cow-calf producers (n = 2000) were surveyed to determine what factors were associated with their uptake of veterinary services; how and where they access nutritional information and animal health advice; and whether they were comfortable with having non-veterinarians perform veterinary procedures. The survey response rate was 18.1%. Veterinarians were seen as a primary source of nutritional information and animal health advice. Over the past decade producers have shifted their veterinary service usage from individual animal events to herd-level procedures. Producers who pregnancy check were more likely to be large producers (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.2 to 3.1; P = 0.007), to semen test their bulls (OR = 3.4; 95% CI = 2.0 to 5.8: P < 0.001), analyze their forages (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.7 to 4.0; P = 0.006), and to farm in the brown versus the gray or dark brown soil zones (P = 0.004). Most (94.0%) respondents had adequate veterinary services within an hour's drive of the farm and 90.4% were satisfied with their veterinary service provider. Approximately 25% of respondents would be comfortable with having a non-veterinarian pregnancy check and attend to prolapses.

  19. Evaluating the economic and noneconomic impacts of the veterinary medical profession in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, J W; Dartt, B A

    2000-01-01

    This study reaffirms the diversity and breadth of the veterinary profession. As it turns out, some of the furthest-reaching impacts of the veterinary medical profession were largely non-quantifiable. The veterinary medical profession had a substantial direct economic impact in Michigan during 1995. The total economic contribution of the veterinary medical profession to Michigan during 1995 that was attributable to expenditures on salaries, supplies, services, and their multiplier effect was approximately $500 million. In addition, the profession was associated with nearly 8,500 jobs (combined professional and lay positions). The veterinary medical profession was also considered to have an impact on the prosperity of the live-stock, equine, and pet food industries in Michigan, even though the economic contribution in these areas could not be directly quantified. Economic well-being of the individual businesses in these industries is directly related to the health and productivity of the associated animals, and improvements in output or productivity that accompany improved animal health likely carry substantial economic benefits in these sectors. In addition, progressive animal health management provides a crucial method of managing risk in the animal industries. Similarly, although the economic contribution could not be quantified, the veterinary medical profession enhances the safety and quality of human food through research, regulation, and quality assurance programs in livestock production, minimizing the risk of drug residues and microbial contamination. During 1995, approximately 5.3 million Michigan residents benefitted from the physical, psychological, and emotional well-being that accompanies companion animal ownership. By preserving the health and longevity of companion animals, veterinarians sustain and enhance these aspects of the human-animal bond. As Michigan enters a new century, it is likely that the state's veterinary medical profession will

  20. Guidelines for zoo and aquarium veterinary medical programs and veterinary hospitals.

    PubMed

    Backues, Kay; Clyde, Vickie; Denver, Mary; Fiorello, Christine; Hilsenroth, Rob; Lamberski, Nadine; Larson, Scott; Meehan, Tom; Murray, Mike; Ramer, Jan; Ramsay, Ed; Suedmeyer, Kirk; Whiteside, Doug

    2011-03-01

    These guidelines for veterinary medical care and veterinary hospitals are written to conform with the requirements of the Animal Welfare Act, which states that programs of disease prevention and parasite control, euthanasia, and adequate veterinary care shall be established and maintained under the supervision of a veterinarian. Ideally the zoo and aquarium should be providing the best possible veterinary medical care for the animals in their collections. Many of these animals are rare and endangered and the institutions should endeavor both to provide for the long term health and well being of these animals and to advance the field of non-domestic animal medicine. It is hoped that this publication will aid in this process. PMID:22946394

  1. 76 FR 5131 - Solicitation of Nomination of Veterinary Shortage Situations for the Veterinary Medicine Loan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (VMLRP; [75 FR 20239- 20248]), as authorized under the National... with a potential avalanche of nominations and dilute highest need situations with lower-level...

  2. 76 FR 80878 - Solicitation of Veterinary Shortage Situation Nominations for the Veterinary Medicine Loan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (VMLRP; [75 FR 20239- 20248]) for fiscal year (FY) 2012, as... with a potential avalanche of nominations and dilute highest need situations with lower- level...

  3. Guidelines for zoo and aquarium veterinary medical programs and veterinary hospitals.

    PubMed

    Backues, Kay; Clyde, Vickie; Denver, Mary; Fiorello, Christine; Hilsenroth, Rob; Lamberski, Nadine; Larson, Scott; Meehan, Tom; Murray, Mike; Ramer, Jan; Ramsay, Ed; Suedmeyer, Kirk; Whiteside, Doug

    2011-03-01

    These guidelines for veterinary medical care and veterinary hospitals are written to conform with the requirements of the Animal Welfare Act, which states that programs of disease prevention and parasite control, euthanasia, and adequate veterinary care shall be established and maintained under the supervision of a veterinarian. Ideally the zoo and aquarium should be providing the best possible veterinary medical care for the animals in their collections. Many of these animals are rare and endangered and the institutions should endeavor both to provide for the long term health and well being of these animals and to advance the field of non-domestic animal medicine. It is hoped that this publication will aid in this process.

  4. 7 CFR 371.4 - Veterinary Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... 9701), and sections 2508 and 2509 of the Food, Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990, as... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Veterinary Services. 371.4 Section 371.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  5. [Aggressive clients in Dutch veterinary practice].

    PubMed

    Barbonis, T S A E; Endenburg, N

    2007-05-15

    Aggressive clients seem to be becoming more common. This article describes a study in which questionnaires on client behaviour were sent to veterinary assistants and veterinarians in randomly selected practices in the Netherlands. Results showed that 26.4% of the veterinarians and 29.3% of the assistants had experienced aggressive clients in the last year. Age, experience, and sex of the veterinarian or assistant did not influence the frequency with which aggressive clients were encountered. The same was true for the type of veterinary practice (companion animals, farm animals, horses, etc). The risk of encountering aggressive clients was higher among practices in large towns and in practices with a small turnover Of the veterinarians who had encountered aggressive clients at least once in their career, 31% has taken some kind of action after the aggressive encounter Nearly a quarter (24.9%) of veterinary practices have adopted a Risk Inventarization and Evaluation (RI&E) approach to preventing client aggression and 26.6% of practices have adopted another approach. While veterinarians tend not to consider aggression a big problem, they are often open to the suggestion that more attention should be paid to aggression in veterinary practice. PMID:17578228

  6. Teaching Nutrition in the Veterinary Medical Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lon D.

    1976-01-01

    The author describes why many of the present or older approaches to teaching nutrition in the veterinary medical curriculum are unsatisfactory, and presents a new approach that is integrated into the general curriculum. Such a program at Colorado State University is detailed. (LBH)

  7. Veterinary Fusarioses within the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multilocus DNA sequence data was used to retrospectively assess the genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships of 67 Fusarium strains from veterinary sources, most of which were from the United States. Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed that the strains comprised 23 phylogenetically dist...

  8. Career identity in the veterinary profession.

    PubMed

    Page-Jones, S; Abbey, G

    2015-04-25

    This research investigates vet and vet nurse career identity through the qualitative methodology of narrative enquiry. It derives learning and understanding from these empirical data to assist the veterinary profession to adjust to the changing industry landscape. Through a case series of 20 vets and vet nurses' career stories, this paper seeks understanding about career identity and its impact on individuals and organisations in the light of industry consolidation. Findings suggest that career is central to identity for many veterinary professionals who tend to have a strong sense of self; this is particularly evident around self as learner and technically competent, teacher and educator, ethical and moral and dedicated and resilient. Consequently, mismatches between 'who I am' and 'what I do' tend not to lead to identity customisation (to fit self into role or organisation) but to the search for alternative, more identity-compatible employment. This study offers a valuable insight for employers, veterinary professionals and universities. It suggests that businesses can gain competitive advantage and employees achieve validation and enrichment by working towards organisational and individual identity congruence and that teaching veterinary professionals with contemporary business in mind may develop graduates with a more sustainable identity.

  9. Registration of veterinary products in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Butler, E; Cané, B G

    1995-12-01

    A scheme for registering pharmaceutical and biological products for veterinary use was introduced in Argentina in 1994, as part of a joint scheme for countries of the Common Market of the South (Mercado Común del Sur: "Mercosur'). The authors describe the main features of these regulations, and the process which led to their development.

  10. 9 CFR 3.110 - Veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Veterinary care. 3.110 Section 3.110 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of...

  11. 9 CFR 3.110 - Veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Veterinary care. 3.110 Section 3.110 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of...

  12. Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health Technology Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern professional veterinary medicine and animal health technology practice in the state are presented. Licensure requirements are described, and complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a licensed veterinarian and…

  13. PET and SPECT imaging in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Amy K; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2014-01-01

    Veterinarians have gained increasing access to positron emission tomography (PET and PET/CT) imaging facilities, allowing them to use this powerful molecular imaging technique for clinical and research applications. SPECT is currently being used more in Europe than in the United States and has been shown to be useful in veterinary oncology and in the evaluation of orthopedic diseases. SPECT brain perfusion and receptor imaging is used to investigate behavioral disorders in animals that have interesting similarities to human psychiatric disorders. This article provides an overview of the potential applications of PET and SPECT. The use of commercially available and investigational PET radiopharmaceuticals in the management of veterinary disease has been discussed. To date, most of the work in this field has utilized the commercially available PET tracer, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose for oncologic imaging. Normal biodistribution studies in several companion animal species (cats, dogs, and birds) have been published to assist in lesion detection and interpretation for veterinary radiologists and clinicians. Studies evaluating other (18)F-labeled tracers for research applications are underway at several institutions and companion animal models of human diseases are being increasingly recognized for their value in biomarker and therapy development. Although PET and SPECT technologies are in their infancy for clinical veterinary medicine, increasing access to and interest in these applications and other molecular imaging techniques has led to a greater knowledge and collective body of expertise for veterinarians worldwide. Initiation and fostering of physician-veterinarian collaborations are key components to the forward movement of this field.

  14. Veterinary Medical Education and a Changing Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, James R.

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that veterinary medicine needs greater participation by minority groups to incorporate their worldview into the field. Discusses how this community-oriented view is at odds with the manner in which the academy typically assesses performance, and why teaching and service should therefore be more readily and effectively evaluated and…

  15. Examining why ethics is taught to veterinary students: a qualitative study of veterinary educators' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, Manuel; Lassen, Jesper; Millar, Kate M; Sandøe, Peter; Olsson, I Anna S

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely agreed that veterinary students need to be introduced to ethics, there is limited empirical research investigating the reasons why veterinary ethics is being taught. This study presents the first extensive investigation into the reasons for teaching veterinary ethics and reports data collected in semi-structured interviews with educators involved in teaching undergraduate veterinary ethics at three European schools: the University of Copenhagen, the University of Nottingham, and the Technical University of Lisbon (curricular year 2010-2011). The content of the interview transcripts were analyzed using Toulmin's argumentative model. Ten objectives in teaching veterinary ethics were identified, which can be grouped into four overarching themes: ethical awareness, ethical knowledge, ethical skills, and individual and professional qualities. These objectives include recognizing values and ethical viewpoints, identifying norms and regulations, developing skills of communication and decision making, and contributing to a professional identity. Whereas many of the objectives complement each other, there is tension between the view that ethics teaching should promote knowledge of professional rules and the view that ethics teaching should emphasize critical reasoning skills. The wide range of objectives and the possible tensions between them highlight the challenges faced by educators as they attempt to prioritize among these goals of ethics teaching within a crowded veterinary curriculum.

  16. Veterinary education: a basis for good governance leading to effective veterinary services.

    PubMed

    Sabin, E A; DeHaven, W R

    2012-08-01

    Veterinary education serves as the foundation on which a country can build effective Veterinary Services (VS). In addition, an appropriately well-educated animal health workforce will be better poised to actively participate in and advance good governance practices. Good governance, in turn, will lead to improved animal and veterinary public heath infrastructures and help advance economic development across the globe. A crucial first step in establishing a strong educational foundation is to define minimum competencies for both public- and private-practice veterinarians to perform veterinary service tasks. Defining minimum competencies will also assist veterinary education establishments (VEEs) in developing and implementing curricula to allow graduates to achieve those competencies. Incorporating veterinary educational prerequisites and requirements into governance documents that regulate VS will help to ensure that those who deliver VS have an adequate knowledge and skills base to do so. Public-private partnerships may be particularly effective in designing and implementing curricula that address defined minimum competencies and assure the quality of VEEs. Through these partnerships, a system of continuous quality improvement is established that embodies the qualities essential to good governance practices. Such practices will ultimately strengthen national VS, better protect animal and public health, and ensure food security. PMID:23413731

  17. Teaching veterinary professionalism in the Face(book) of change.

    PubMed

    Coe, Jason B; Weijs, Cynthia A; Muise, Amy; Christofides, Emily; Desmarais, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Facebook has been identified as the preferred social networking site among postsecondary students. Repeated findings in the social networking literature have suggested that postsecondary students practice high personal self-disclosure on Facebook and tend not to use privacy settings that would limit public access. This study identified and reviewed Facebook profiles for 805 veterinarians-in-training enrolled at four veterinary colleges across Canada. Of these, 265 (32.9%) were categorized as having low exposure, 286 (35.5%) were categorized as having medium exposure, and 254 (31.6%) were categorized as having high exposure of information. Content analysis on a sub-sample (n=80) of the high-exposure profiles revealed publicly available unprofessional content, including indications of substance use and abuse, obscene comments, and breaches of client confidentiality. Regression analysis revealed that an increasing number of years to graduation and having a publicly visible wall were both positively associated with having a high-exposure profile. Given the rapid uptake of social media in recent years, veterinary educators should be aware of and begin to educate students on the associated risks and repercussions of blurring one's private life and one's emerging professional identity through personal online disclosures. PMID:22130411

  18. A Collaborative Bovine Artificial Insemination Short Course for Students Attending a Caribbean Veterinary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Joseph C.; Robinson, James Q.; DeJarnette, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Artificial insemination (AI) of cattle is a critical career skill for veterinarians interested in food animal practice. Consequently, Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Student Chapter of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, Select Sires, and University of Idaho Extension have partnered to offer an intensive 2-day course to…

  19. The importance of governance and reliable veterinary certification.

    PubMed

    Pastoret, P P; Chaisemartin, D

    2011-04-01

    Good veterinary certification is possible only if a country's veterinary governance complies with the quality standards of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). The standards in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code stipulate that the main prerequisite for good veterinary governance is for Veterinary Services to be independent, that is to say they are able to carry out their mandate while remaining autonomous and free from any commercial, financial, hierarchical or political pressures that could lead them to make technical decisions that were contrary to OIE standards. Veterinary Services should include, in particular, a veterinary administration with nationwide jurisdiction for implementing the animal health measures and veterinary certification procedures recommended by the OIE and for overseeing or auditing their implementation. They should also include veterinary authorities and persons authorised by the veterinary statutory body to perform tasks under the responsibility and supervision of a veterinarian (veterinary paraprofessionals). This veterinary governance must be sustainable over time in order to administer long-term animal health policies. Good governance relies on appropriate legislation that is in compliance with OIE guidelines and on the requisite human and financial resources for ensuring its enforcement. The evaluation of this governance, either by an importing country in the context of international trade, as authorised by OIE standards, or by the country itself (self-evaluation or an evaluation requested from the OIE [using the OIE Tool for the Evaluation of Performance of Veterinary Services]), helps to facilitate the proper operation of Veterinary Services and to ensure the reliability of any certification granted under the authority of the veterinary administration.

  20. Effect of waste anesthetic gas and vapor exposure on reproductive outcome in veterinary personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate potential adverse reproductive outcome in veterinary personnel who are exposed to waste anesthetic gas and vapor at levels near the NIOSH recommended standards. Subjects for this case-control study of births with congenital abnormalities and spontaneous abortion, selected from the American Veterinary Medical Association roster, were contacted by mail and asked to complete a screening questionnaire regarding reproductive history. Crude prevalence rates for spontaneous abortion, births with congenital abnormalities and stillbirths, determined on the basis of the responses to the screening questionnaire, showed no excess rates when compared with national statistics. All pregnancies resulting in spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, or birth with congenital abnormality were selected as cases. Controls were selected from the reported normal births on a stratified random basis to match maternal age and pregnancy number for cases. Occupational exposure to waste anesthetic gas and vapor in general was not found to be significantly associated with adverse reproductive outcome when adjustment was made for radiation exposure. For nitrous oxide exposure, however, an odds ratio significantly greater than one was found for spontaneous abortion among female veterinary assistants and wives of exposed male veterinarians. Use of diagnostic x-rays in veterinary practice was associated with spontaneous abortion in exposed females with a statistically significant dose response effect observed in female veterinarians.

  1. Integrating the issues of global and veterinary public health into the veterinary education curriculum: an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, S G; Robertson, L; Wilks, C R

    2009-08-01

    This article discusses the integration of global and veterinary public health issues into the Australian veterinary curriculum. Formal veterinary education in Australia has a history of over 100 years and veterinarians have played a major role in the control of zoonotic and transboundary diseases for an even longer period. Australia is the largest exporter of red meat and live animals in the world. Therefore, educating veterinarians to promote and ensure food safety and animal welfare is prominent in Australian veterinary curricula. Veterinary degrees are accredited to allow Australian graduates to work professionally overseas, including in the United Kingdom and United States of America, and, in recent years, globalisation of the student body at Australian veterinary schools has occurred. For this reason, an appropriately broad curriculum is required to produce graduates who are able to address challenges in veterinary public health throughout the world. A Public Health University Network has been established to harmonise the veterinary public health curricula at the various veterinary schools and to develop the 'Australian veterinary public health philosophy', with its links to global issues and the 'One World, One Health' concept. Finally, conclusions are drawn on the implications of veterinary public health teaching in Australia and the preparation of Australian graduates for the global profession.

  2. Understanding veterinary students' use of and attitudes toward the social networking site, Facebook, to assist in developing curricula to address online professionalism.

    PubMed

    Coe, Jason B; Weijs, Cynthia A; Muise, Amy; Christofides, Emily; Desmarais, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Social media is an increasingly common form of communication, with Facebook being the preferred social-networking site among post-secondary students. Numerous studies suggest post-secondary students practice high self-disclosure on Facebook. Research evaluating veterinary students' use of social media found a notable proportion of student-posted content deemed inappropriate. Lack of discretion in posting content can have significant repercussions for aspiring veterinary professionals, their college of study, and the veterinary profession they represent. Veterinarians-in-training at three veterinary colleges across Canada were surveyed to explore their use of and attitude toward the social networking site, Facebook. Students were invited to complete an online survey with questions relating to their knowledge of privacy in relation to using Facebook, their views on the acceptability of posting certain types of information, and their level of professional accountability online. Linear regression modeling was used to further examine factors related to veterinary students' disclosure of personal information on Facebook. Need for popularity (p<.01) and awareness of consequences (p<.001) were found to be positively and negatively associated, respectively, with students' personal disclosure of information on Facebook. Understanding veterinary students' use of and attitudes toward social media, such as Facebook, reveals a need, and provides a basis, for developing educational programs to address online professionalism. Educators and administrators at veterinary schools may use this information to assist in developing veterinary curricula that addresses the escalating issue of online professionalism. PMID:22951465

  3. Understanding veterinary students' use of and attitudes toward the social networking site, Facebook, to assist in developing curricula to address online professionalism.

    PubMed

    Coe, Jason B; Weijs, Cynthia A; Muise, Amy; Christofides, Emily; Desmarais, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Social media is an increasingly common form of communication, with Facebook being the preferred social-networking site among post-secondary students. Numerous studies suggest post-secondary students practice high self-disclosure on Facebook. Research evaluating veterinary students' use of social media found a notable proportion of student-posted content deemed inappropriate. Lack of discretion in posting content can have significant repercussions for aspiring veterinary professionals, their college of study, and the veterinary profession they represent. Veterinarians-in-training at three veterinary colleges across Canada were surveyed to explore their use of and attitude toward the social networking site, Facebook. Students were invited to complete an online survey with questions relating to their knowledge of privacy in relation to using Facebook, their views on the acceptability of posting certain types of information, and their level of professional accountability online. Linear regression modeling was used to further examine factors related to veterinary students' disclosure of personal information on Facebook. Need for popularity (p<.01) and awareness of consequences (p<.001) were found to be positively and negatively associated, respectively, with students' personal disclosure of information on Facebook. Understanding veterinary students' use of and attitudes toward social media, such as Facebook, reveals a need, and provides a basis, for developing educational programs to address online professionalism. Educators and administrators at veterinary schools may use this information to assist in developing veterinary curricula that addresses the escalating issue of online professionalism.

  4. Invited review--neuroimaging response assessment criteria for brain tumors in veterinary patients.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, John H; Garcia, Paulo A; Daniel, Gregory B; Bourland, John Daniel; Debinski, Waldemar; Dervisis, Nikolaos; Klahn, Shawna

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of therapeutic response using cross-sectional imaging techniques, particularly gadolinium-enhanced MRI, is an integral part of the clinical management of brain tumors in veterinary patients. Spontaneous canine brain tumors are increasingly recognized and utilized as a translational model for the study of human brain tumors. However, no standardized neuroimaging response assessment criteria have been formulated for use in veterinary clinical trials. Previous studies have found that the pathophysiologic features inherent to brain tumors and the surrounding brain complicate the use of the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) assessment system. Objectives of this review are to describe strengths and limitations of published imaging-based brain tumor response criteria and propose a system for use in veterinary patients. The widely used human Macdonald and response assessment in neuro-oncology (RANO) criteria are reviewed and described as to how they can be applied to veterinary brain tumors. Discussion points will include current challenges associated with the interpretation of brain tumor therapeutic responses such as imaging pseudophenomena and treatment-induced necrosis, and how advancements in perfusion imaging, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown promise in differentiating tumor progression from therapy-induced changes. Finally, although objective endpoints such as MR imaging and survival estimates will likely continue to comprise the foundations for outcome measures in veterinary brain tumor clinical trials, we propose that in order to provide a more relevant therapeutic response metric for veterinary patients, composite response systems should be formulated and validated that combine imaging and clinical assessment criteria. PMID:24219161

  5. INVITED REVIEW – NEUROIMAGING RESPONSE ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR BRAIN TUMORS IN VETERINARY PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Rossmeisl, John H.; Garcia, Paulo A.; Daniel, Gregory B.; Bourland, John Daniel; Debinski, Waldemar; Dervisis, Nikolaos; Klahn, Shawna

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of therapeutic response using cross-sectional imaging techniques, particularly gadolinium-enhanced MRI, is an integral part of the clinical management of brain tumors in veterinary patients. Spontaneous canine brain tumors are increasingly recognized and utilized as a translational model for the study of human brain tumors. However, no standardized neuroimaging response assessment criteria have been formulated for use in veterinary clinical trials. Previous studies have found that the pathophysiologic features inherent to brain tumors and the surrounding brain complicate the use of the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) assessment system. Objectives of this review are to describe strengths and limitations of published imaging-based brain tumor response criteria and propose a system for use in veterinary patients. The widely used human Macdonald and Response Assessment in Neuro-oncology (RANO) criteria are reviewed and described as to how they can be applied to veterinary brain tumors. Discussion points will include current challenges associated with the interpretation of brain tumor therapeutic responses such as imaging pseudophenomena and treatment-induced necrosis, and how advancements in perfusion imaging, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown promise in differentiating tumor progression from therapy-induced changes. Finally, although objective endpoints such as MR-imaging and survival estimates will likely continue to comprise the foundations for outcome measures in veterinary brain tumor clinical trials, we propose that in order to provide a more relevant therapeutic response metric for veterinary patients, composite response systems should be formulated and validated that combine imaging and clinical assessment criteria. PMID:24219161

  6. Implementation of Online Veterinary Hospital on Cloud Platform.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Chen, Tzer-Long; Chung, Yu-Fang; Huang, Yao-Min; Chen, Tao-Chieh; Wang, Huihui; Wei, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Pet markets involve in great commercial possibilities, which boost thriving development of veterinary hospital businesses. The service tends to intensive competition and diversified channel environment. Information technology is integrated for developing the veterinary hospital cloud service platform. The platform contains not only pet medical services but veterinary hospital management and services. In the study, QR Code andcloud technology are applied to establish the veterinary hospital cloud service platform for pet search by labeling a pet's identification with QR Code. This technology can break the restriction on veterinary hospital inspection in different areas and allows veterinary hospitals receiving the medical records and information through the exclusive QR Code for more effective inspection. As an interactive platform, the veterinary hospital cloud service platform allows pet owners gaining the knowledge of pet diseases and healthcare. Moreover, pet owners can enquire and communicate with veterinarians through the platform. Also, veterinary hospitals can periodically send reminders of relevant points and introduce exclusive marketing information with the platform for promoting the service items and establishing individualized marketing. Consequently, veterinary hospitals can increase the profits by information share and create the best solution in such a competitive veterinary market with industry alliance. PMID:27129312

  7. Ethics teaching in European veterinary schools: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, M

    2014-12-13

    Veterinary ethics is recognised as a relevant topic in the undergraduate veterinary curriculum. However, there appears to be no widely agreed view on which contents are best suited for veterinary ethics teaching and there is limited information on the teaching approaches adopted by veterinary schools. This paper provides an inside perspective on the diversity of veterinary ethics teaching topics, based on an in-depth analysis of three European veterinary schools: Copenhagen, Lisbon and Nottingham. The case study approach integrated information from the analysis of syllabi contents and interviews with educators (curricular year 2010-2011). These results show that the curriculum of veterinary ethics is multidimensional and can combine a wide range of scientific, regulatory, professional and philosophical subjects, some of which may not be explicitly set out in the course descriptors. A conceptual model for veterinary ethics teaching is proposed comprising prominent topics included within four overarching concepts: animal welfare science, laws/regulations, professionalism, and theories/concepts. It is intended that this work should inform future curriculum development of veterinary ethics in European schools and assist ethical deliberation in veterinary practice.

  8. Implementation of Online Veterinary Hospital on Cloud Platform.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Chen, Tzer-Long; Chung, Yu-Fang; Huang, Yao-Min; Chen, Tao-Chieh; Wang, Huihui; Wei, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Pet markets involve in great commercial possibilities, which boost thriving development of veterinary hospital businesses. The service tends to intensive competition and diversified channel environment. Information technology is integrated for developing the veterinary hospital cloud service platform. The platform contains not only pet medical services but veterinary hospital management and services. In the study, QR Code andcloud technology are applied to establish the veterinary hospital cloud service platform for pet search by labeling a pet's identification with QR Code. This technology can break the restriction on veterinary hospital inspection in different areas and allows veterinary hospitals receiving the medical records and information through the exclusive QR Code for more effective inspection. As an interactive platform, the veterinary hospital cloud service platform allows pet owners gaining the knowledge of pet diseases and healthcare. Moreover, pet owners can enquire and communicate with veterinarians through the platform. Also, veterinary hospitals can periodically send reminders of relevant points and introduce exclusive marketing information with the platform for promoting the service items and establishing individualized marketing. Consequently, veterinary hospitals can increase the profits by information share and create the best solution in such a competitive veterinary market with industry alliance.

  9. Parasitic zoonoses; public health and veterinary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Tadeusz K; Tamang, Leena; Doocy, Shannon C

    2005-01-01

    The importance of parasitic zoonoses continues to increase on both local and global scales as interactions between people and animals become more frequent through global travel, intensification of agriculture, habitat devastation, and changes in world trade patterns. A current and real threat is the potential for a deliberate introduction of a zoonotic disease through the prospect of bioterrorism. Parasitic zoonoses represent significant problems in public health, animal agriculture and conservation, and the meat industry. There is an urgent need for integration of medical and veterinary services, continuous disease surveillance in both humans and animals, the teaching of zoonoses to medical doctors, and intensified research on zoonotic agents and diseases. The convergence of both public health and veterinary services currently represents a real challenge for managing zoonotic diseases. PMID:16841682

  10. Resident and graduate training in veterinary nutrition.

    PubMed

    Fascetti, Andrea J

    2008-01-01

    Training programs for veterinarians seeking board certification by the American College of Veterinary Nutrition (ACVN) are structured in one of two ways: (1) as programs similar to specialty training in other clinical disciplines or (2) as graduate programs leading to advanced degrees combined with clinical training. Residency training occurs through a variety of approaches, including didactic coursework, case-based and applied learning, clinical training, teaching, research, and self-study. Challenges to successful residency and graduate training include low numbers of diplomates, particularly at veterinary schools; low numbers of applicants; small numbers of funded programs; and faculty promotion systems that do not reward residency or graduate training and program development. The mentoring of individuals seeking both board certification and a graduate degree presents additional considerations, including recruitment of individuals motivated in research and structuring a combined program that facilitates completion of both tasks in a timely fashion. PMID:18723818

  11. Forensic veterinary pathology, today's situation and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ottinger, T; Rasmusson, B; Segerstad, C H A; Merck, M; Goot, F V D; Olsén, L; Gavier-Widén, D

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the current status of forensic veterinary pathology, a survey was composed directed at pathology laboratories and institutes, mostly in Europe. The questions included number of and type of cases, resources available, level of special training of the investigating pathologists and the general view on the current status and future of the discipline. The surveys were sent to 134 laboratories and were returned by 72 respondents of which 93 per cent work on forensic pathology cases. The results indicate scarcity of training opportunities and special education, and insufficient veterinary-specific reference data and information on forensic analyses. More cooperation with human forensic pathology was desired by many respondents, as was more interaction across country borders.

  12. Rinderpest: the veterinary perspective on eradication

    PubMed Central

    Roeder, Peter; Mariner, Jeffrey; Kock, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Rinderpest was a devastating disease of livestock responsible for continent-wide famine and poverty. Centuries of veterinary advances culminated in 2011 with the UN Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Organization for Animal Health declaring global eradication of rinderpest; only the second disease to be eradicated and the greatest veterinary achievement of our time. Conventional control measures, principally mass vaccination combined with zoosanitary procedures, led to substantial declines in the incidence of rinderpest. However, during the past decades, innovative strategies were deployed for the last mile to overcome diagnostic and surveillance challenges, unanticipated variations in virus pathogenicity, circulation of disease in wildlife populations and to service remote and nomadic communities in often-unstable states. This review provides an overview of these challenges, describes how they were overcome and identifies key factors for this success. PMID:23798687

  13. Financing and organisation of veterinary services.

    PubMed

    Gallacher, M; Barcos, L

    2012-08-01

    This paper analyses the different ways of financing official Veterinary Services (VS) and the effects of these choices on the performance of such Services. The links between governance, organisational effectiveness and financing arrangements are seen as particularly important. The paper comments on some of the advantages and disadvantages of financing VS with service fees, as compared to budget transfers from general government revenues. Evidence is presented on the considerable heterogeneity in the size of VS and on the impact of this heterogeneity on organisation and financing. The paper concludes with a stylised case study, which emphasises the importance of collaboration and the division of labour between the official and the private sector of the veterinary profession.

  14. Improving the delivery of veterinary services in India.

    PubMed

    Rao, S V N; Rasheed Sulaiman, V; Natchimuthu, K; Ramkumar, S; Sasidhar, P V K

    2015-12-01

    In pursuit of effective veterinary service delivery, the objectives of this study were threefold: (i) reduce the shortage of technical personnel in veterinary universities (VUs) and animal husbandry departments (AHDs), (ii) identify collaborative areas between VUs and AHDs, and (iii) build the capacity of the veterinary and animal husbandry sector. Primary data were collected from all the 16 veterinary colleges and AHDs in five south Indian states on: (i) student intake and the out-turn of veterinary graduates, (ii) technical personnel--existing and required at various levels, (iii) specific areas of collaboration where VUs and AHDs need each other and can extend support to each other, and (iv) areas in which university faculty and field veterinarians would benefit from further training. Two focus group discussions were held with top administrators of VUs and AHDs to collect qualitative data. The results revealed that there are not enough veterinary graduates to meet the needs of the system and that there is a shortage of faculty, field veterinarians and para-veterinarians. Both focus groups identified areas for collaboration and capacity building to improve veterinary service delivery. The results conclusively demonstrated that India's veterinary service delivery is constrained, not due to a lack of organisations or programmes, but due to the inability of the organisations to collaborate with each other. To improve the effectiveness of veterinary service delivery it will be necessary to: admit more graduate students, support the establishment of new colleges; recruit faculty, field veterinarians and para-veterinarians; remandate the Directorates of Extension at VUs to develop linkages with AHDs; allocate funds ('special central grants') for infrastructure development to all AHDs and veterinary colleges; establish one model veterinary college that follows international standards on veterinary education and create four regional academic staff training colleges

  15. Improving the delivery of veterinary services in India.

    PubMed

    Rao, S V N; Rasheed Sulaiman, V; Natchimuthu, K; Ramkumar, S; Sasidhar, P V K

    2015-12-01

    In pursuit of effective veterinary service delivery, the objectives of this study were threefold: (i) reduce the shortage of technical personnel in veterinary universities (VUs) and animal husbandry departments (AHDs), (ii) identify collaborative areas between VUs and AHDs, and (iii) build the capacity of the veterinary and animal husbandry sector. Primary data were collected from all the 16 veterinary colleges and AHDs in five south Indian states on: (i) student intake and the out-turn of veterinary graduates, (ii) technical personnel--existing and required at various levels, (iii) specific areas of collaboration where VUs and AHDs need each other and can extend support to each other, and (iv) areas in which university faculty and field veterinarians would benefit from further training. Two focus group discussions were held with top administrators of VUs and AHDs to collect qualitative data. The results revealed that there are not enough veterinary graduates to meet the needs of the system and that there is a shortage of faculty, field veterinarians and para-veterinarians. Both focus groups identified areas for collaboration and capacity building to improve veterinary service delivery. The results conclusively demonstrated that India's veterinary service delivery is constrained, not due to a lack of organisations or programmes, but due to the inability of the organisations to collaborate with each other. To improve the effectiveness of veterinary service delivery it will be necessary to: admit more graduate students, support the establishment of new colleges; recruit faculty, field veterinarians and para-veterinarians; remandate the Directorates of Extension at VUs to develop linkages with AHDs; allocate funds ('special central grants') for infrastructure development to all AHDs and veterinary colleges; establish one model veterinary college that follows international standards on veterinary education and create four regional academic staff training colleges

  16. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations for a veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol.

    PubMed

    Rusbridge, Clare; Long, Sam; Jovanovik, Jelena; Milne, Marjorie; Berendt, Mette; Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Farqhuar, Robyn G; Fischer, Andrea; Matiasek, Kaspar; Muñana, Karen; Patterson, Edward E; Pakozdy, Akos; Penderis, Jacques; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases in veterinary practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as an important diagnostic test to reach the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. However, given that the diagnosis requires the exclusion of other differentials for seizures, the parameters for MRI examination should allow the detection of subtle lesions which may not be obvious with existing techniques. In addition, there are several differentials for idiopathic epilepsy in humans, for example some focal cortical dysplasias, which may only apparent with special sequences, imaging planes and/or particular techniques used in performing the MRI scan. As a result, there is a need to standardize MRI examination in veterinary patients with techniques that reliably diagnose subtle lesions, identify post-seizure changes, and which will allow for future identification of underlying causes of seizures not yet apparent in the veterinary literature.There is a need for a standardized veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol which will facilitate more detailed examination of areas susceptible to generating and perpetuating seizures, is cost efficient, simple to perform and can be adapted for both low and high field scanners. Standardisation of imaging will improve clinical communication and uniformity of case definition between research studies. A 6-7 sequence epilepsy-specific MRI protocol for veterinary patients is proposed and further advanced MR and functional imaging is reviewed. PMID:26319136

  17. Errors in veterinary practice: preliminary lessons for building better veterinary teams.

    PubMed

    Kinnison, T; Guile, D; May, S A

    2015-11-14

    Case studies in two typical UK veterinary practices were undertaken to explore teamwork, including interprofessional working. Each study involved one week of whole team observation based on practice locations (reception, operating theatre), one week of shadowing six focus individuals (veterinary surgeons, veterinary nurses and administrators) and a final week consisting of semistructured interviews regarding teamwork. Errors emerged as a finding of the study. The definition of errors was inclusive, pertaining to inputs or omitted actions with potential adverse outcomes for patients, clients or the practice. The 40 identified instances could be grouped into clinical errors (dosing/drugs, surgical preparation, lack of follow-up), lost item errors, and most frequently, communication errors (records, procedures, missing face-to-face communication, mistakes within face-to-face communication). The qualitative nature of the study allowed the underlying cause of the errors to be explored. In addition to some individual mistakes, system faults were identified as a major cause of errors. Observed examples and interviews demonstrated several challenges to interprofessional teamworking which may cause errors, including: lack of time, part-time staff leading to frequent handovers, branch differences and individual veterinary surgeon work preferences. Lessons are drawn for building better veterinary teams and implications for Disciplinary Proceedings considered.

  18. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force recommendations for a veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol.

    PubMed

    Rusbridge, Clare; Long, Sam; Jovanovik, Jelena; Milne, Marjorie; Berendt, Mette; Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Farqhuar, Robyn G; Fischer, Andrea; Matiasek, Kaspar; Muñana, Karen; Patterson, Edward E; Pakozdy, Akos; Penderis, Jacques; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases in veterinary practice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as an important diagnostic test to reach the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy. However, given that the diagnosis requires the exclusion of other differentials for seizures, the parameters for MRI examination should allow the detection of subtle lesions which may not be obvious with existing techniques. In addition, there are several differentials for idiopathic epilepsy in humans, for example some focal cortical dysplasias, which may only apparent with special sequences, imaging planes and/or particular techniques used in performing the MRI scan. As a result, there is a need to standardize MRI examination in veterinary patients with techniques that reliably diagnose subtle lesions, identify post-seizure changes, and which will allow for future identification of underlying causes of seizures not yet apparent in the veterinary literature.There is a need for a standardized veterinary epilepsy-specific MRI protocol which will facilitate more detailed examination of areas susceptible to generating and perpetuating seizures, is cost efficient, simple to perform and can be adapted for both low and high field scanners. Standardisation of imaging will improve clinical communication and uniformity of case definition between research studies. A 6-7 sequence epilepsy-specific MRI protocol for veterinary patients is proposed and further advanced MR and functional imaging is reviewed.

  19. Anesthesia and analgesia for geriatric veterinary patients.

    PubMed

    Baetge, Courtney L; Matthews, Nora S

    2012-07-01

    The number of geriatric veterinary patients presented for anesthesia appears to be increasing. This article summarizes physiologic changes that occur in geriatric patients that are relevant to anesthesia. Proper patient preparation and vigilant monitoring are the best defense against anesthetic problems in the geriatric animal. The authors also discuss particular anesthetic problems as they relate to geriatric patients and seek to present solutions to these problems.

  20. Veterinary medicine on the information superhighway.

    PubMed

    Boschert, K

    1996-05-01

    The Internet, the world's computer-networking backbone, links thousands of networks on every continent and is used by over 25 million people. This "information superhighway" is much more than its physical interconnection of computers. It is also an efficient and, convenient global interconnection of people, institutions, and businesses that facilitates communication and information exchange. It is important to understand the main communication methods and information-retrieval tools currently used on the Internet. This overview examines various Internet tools and their importance, particularly ones most useful to veterinarians and other animal-related professionals. The major Internet communication tools are those that send and receive electronic mail, connect and run programs on remote computers, transfer computer files, and search databases for information. Recently, two navigation tools, Gopher and the World Wide Web (WWW), have revolutionized ways of finding information on the Internet. Gopher uses a text-based menu of choices, whereas the WWW has a point-and click interface combining text, graphics, sound, and video. The WWW is undergoing explosive growth, both in terms of new servers and new users accessing WWW servers. In the fields of veterinary medicine and animal welfare, a similarly rapid expansion of internut resources is occurring. One experimental project to collect these resources and make them centrally available is NetVet Veterinary Resources (http:// netvet.wustl.edu/). From this site, many other veterinary. Internet services are easily located. This discussion will provide details about the Internet's communication tools and utilities and demonstrate several relevant veterinary and animal-related computer sites. PMID:8898571

  1. [Veterinary double-monsters historically viewed].

    PubMed

    Baljet, B; Heijke, G C

    1997-01-01

    A large number of duplication monstrosities have been observed in cattle, sheep, pigs, horses, goats, cats and dogs, ever since the publication of the famous woodcut of a swine double monster by J. S. Brant in Basel in 1496, better known as the "wunderbare Sau von Landser im Elsass". Albrecht Dürer also made a woodcut of this double monster in front of the village Landser in 1496. A picture of a deer double monster was published in 1603 by Heinrich Ulrich in Germany. In the monograph De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis ..., published by the Italian Fortunius Licetus in 1616 pictures of double monsters being half man half dog are found. These fantasy figures have been popular for a long time and were supposed to be really in existence. Apart from these fantasy figures many pictures are known from real veterinary double monsters. U. Aldrovandus described in 1642 in his Monstrorum historia, besides many fantasy figures, also real human and veterinary double monsters and he gave also good pictures of them. In the 19th century examples of veterinary duplication monstrosities were published by I. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1832-37), E. F. Gurlt (1832), W. Vrolik (1840) and C. Taruffi (1881); they proposed also concepts concerning the etiology. In the second volume of his famous handbook of teratology (1907), E. Schwalbe described many veterinary double monsters and discussed the theories of the genesis of congenital malformations. Various theories concerning the genesis of double monsters have been given since Aristotle (384-322 B.C.). ...

  2. Veterinary Medicine Needs New Green Antimicrobial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Ferran, Aude A.; Bousquet-Melou, Alain; Pelligand, Ludovic; Lees, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Given that: (1) the worldwide consumption of antimicrobial drugs (AMDs) used in food-producing animals will increase over the coming decades; (2) the prudent use of AMDs will not suffice to stem the rise in human antimicrobial resistance (AMR) of animal origin; (3) alternatives to AMD use are not available or not implementable, there is an urgent need to develop novel AMDs for food-producing animals. This is not for animal health reasons, but to break the link between human and animal resistomes. In this review we establish the feasibility of developing for veterinary medicine new AMDs, termed “green antibiotics,” having minimal ecological impact on the animal commensal and environmental microbiomes. We first explain why animal and human commensal microbiota comprise a “turnstile” exchange, between the human and animal resistomes. We then outline the ideal physico-chemical, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties of a veterinary green antibiotic and conclude that they can be developed through a rational screening of currently used AMD classes. The ideal drug will be hydrophilic, of relatively low potency, slow clearance and small volume of distribution. It should be eliminated principally by the kidney as inactive metabolite(s). For oral administration, bioavailability can be enhanced by developing lipophilic pro-drugs. For parenteral administration, slow-release formulations of existing eco-friendly AMDs with a short elimination half-life can be developed. These new eco-friendly veterinary AMDs can be developed from currently used drug classes to provide alternative agents to those currently used in veterinary medicine and mitigate animal contributions to the human AMR problem. PMID:27536285

  3. Veterinary medicine on the information superhighway.

    PubMed

    Boschert, K

    1996-05-01

    The Internet, the world's computer-networking backbone, links thousands of networks on every continent and is used by over 25 million people. This "information superhighway" is much more than its physical interconnection of computers. It is also an efficient and, convenient global interconnection of people, institutions, and businesses that facilitates communication and information exchange. It is important to understand the main communication methods and information-retrieval tools currently used on the Internet. This overview examines various Internet tools and their importance, particularly ones most useful to veterinarians and other animal-related professionals. The major Internet communication tools are those that send and receive electronic mail, connect and run programs on remote computers, transfer computer files, and search databases for information. Recently, two navigation tools, Gopher and the World Wide Web (WWW), have revolutionized ways of finding information on the Internet. Gopher uses a text-based menu of choices, whereas the WWW has a point-and click interface combining text, graphics, sound, and video. The WWW is undergoing explosive growth, both in terms of new servers and new users accessing WWW servers. In the fields of veterinary medicine and animal welfare, a similarly rapid expansion of internut resources is occurring. One experimental project to collect these resources and make them centrally available is NetVet Veterinary Resources (http:// netvet.wustl.edu/). From this site, many other veterinary. Internet services are easily located. This discussion will provide details about the Internet's communication tools and utilities and demonstrate several relevant veterinary and animal-related computer sites.

  4. Teaching and learning communication in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on extensive evidence and experience in human medicine, this article offers a practical conceptual framework for thinking more precisely about how to teach and learn communication systematically and intentionally in veterinary medicine. The overarching goal is to promote the development of communication programs so as to improve communication in veterinary practice to a professional level of competence. A three-part conceptual framework is presented that first explores the rationale behind teaching and learning communication, including the evidence base regarding the impact of communication on clinician-client interactions and outcomes of care and the research on teaching and learning communication skills in medicine. The second part considers four ways to conceptualize what to teach and learn, as explicated by (a) the domains of communication in veterinary medicine; (b) ''first principles'' of effective communication; (c) evidence-based goals or outcomes for communication programs; and (d) delineation and definition of the specific individual skills that research evidence supports, as presented in the Calgary-Cambridge Guides. The last part of the conceptual framework examines how to teach communication, including the use of models, a primary focus on skill development as the backbone of communication programs, and the value of other methods supported by the evidence, such as simulated patients, videotape, small groups, and feedback and facilitation skills. Communication impacts the clinician- client interaction and outcomes of care in very significant ways. Communication can and should be taught and learned with as much rigor as other aspects of clinical competence. Veterinary programs at all levels should include the teaching of communication.

  5. Veterinary Medicine Needs New Green Antimicrobial Drugs.

    PubMed

    Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Ferran, Aude A; Bousquet-Melou, Alain; Pelligand, Ludovic; Lees, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Given that: (1) the worldwide consumption of antimicrobial drugs (AMDs) used in food-producing animals will increase over the coming decades; (2) the prudent use of AMDs will not suffice to stem the rise in human antimicrobial resistance (AMR) of animal origin; (3) alternatives to AMD use are not available or not implementable, there is an urgent need to develop novel AMDs for food-producing animals. This is not for animal health reasons, but to break the link between human and animal resistomes. In this review we establish the feasibility of developing for veterinary medicine new AMDs, termed "green antibiotics," having minimal ecological impact on the animal commensal and environmental microbiomes. We first explain why animal and human commensal microbiota comprise a "turnstile" exchange, between the human and animal resistomes. We then outline the ideal physico-chemical, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties of a veterinary green antibiotic and conclude that they can be developed through a rational screening of currently used AMD classes. The ideal drug will be hydrophilic, of relatively low potency, slow clearance and small volume of distribution. It should be eliminated principally by the kidney as inactive metabolite(s). For oral administration, bioavailability can be enhanced by developing lipophilic pro-drugs. For parenteral administration, slow-release formulations of existing eco-friendly AMDs with a short elimination half-life can be developed. These new eco-friendly veterinary AMDs can be developed from currently used drug classes to provide alternative agents to those currently used in veterinary medicine and mitigate animal contributions to the human AMR problem. PMID:27536285

  6. Veterinary Medicine Needs New Green Antimicrobial Drugs.

    PubMed

    Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Ferran, Aude A; Bousquet-Melou, Alain; Pelligand, Ludovic; Lees, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Given that: (1) the worldwide consumption of antimicrobial drugs (AMDs) used in food-producing animals will increase over the coming decades; (2) the prudent use of AMDs will not suffice to stem the rise in human antimicrobial resistance (AMR) of animal origin; (3) alternatives to AMD use are not available or not implementable, there is an urgent need to develop novel AMDs for food-producing animals. This is not for animal health reasons, but to break the link between human and animal resistomes. In this review we establish the feasibility of developing for veterinary medicine new AMDs, termed "green antibiotics," having minimal ecological impact on the animal commensal and environmental microbiomes. We first explain why animal and human commensal microbiota comprise a "turnstile" exchange, between the human and animal resistomes. We then outline the ideal physico-chemical, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties of a veterinary green antibiotic and conclude that they can be developed through a rational screening of currently used AMD classes. The ideal drug will be hydrophilic, of relatively low potency, slow clearance and small volume of distribution. It should be eliminated principally by the kidney as inactive metabolite(s). For oral administration, bioavailability can be enhanced by developing lipophilic pro-drugs. For parenteral administration, slow-release formulations of existing eco-friendly AMDs with a short elimination half-life can be developed. These new eco-friendly veterinary AMDs can be developed from currently used drug classes to provide alternative agents to those currently used in veterinary medicine and mitigate animal contributions to the human AMR problem.

  7. International Evidence-Based Medicine Survey of the Veterinary Profession: Information Sources Used by Veterinarians

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Selene J.; Dean, Rachel S.; Massey, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Veterinarians are encouraged to use evidence to inform their practice, but it is unknown what resources (e.g. journals, electronic sources) are accessed by them globally. Understanding the key places veterinarians seek information can inform where new clinically relevant evidence should most effectively be placed. An international survey was conducted to gain understanding of how veterinary information is accessed by veterinarians worldwide. There were 2137 useable responses to the questionnaire from veterinarians in 78 countries. The majority of respondents (n = 1835/2137, 85.9%) undertook clinical work and worked in a high income country (n = 1576/1762, 89.4%). Respondents heard about the survey via national veterinary organisations or regulatory bodies (31.5%), online veterinary forums and websites (22.7%), regional, discipline-based or international veterinary organisations (22.7%) or by direct invitation from the researchers or via friends, colleagues or social media (7.6%). Clinicians and non-clinicians reportedly used journals most commonly (65.8%, n = 1207/1835; 75.6%, n = 216/286) followed by electronic resources (58.7%, n = 1077/1835; 55.9%, n = 160/286), respectively. Respondents listed a total of 518 journals and 567 electronic sources that they read. Differences in veterinarian preference for resources in developed, and developing countries, were found. The nominated journals most read were the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (12.7% of nominations) for clinicians and the Veterinary Record (5.7%) for non-clinicians. The most accessed electronic resource reported was the Veterinary Information Network (25.6%) for clinicians and PubMed (7.4%) for non-clinicians. In conclusion, a wide array of journals and electronic resources appear to be accessed by veterinarians worldwide. Veterinary organisations appear to play an important role in global communication and outreach to veterinarians and consideration should be given to how these

  8. International Evidence-Based Medicine Survey of the Veterinary Profession: Information Sources Used by Veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Selene J; Dean, Rachel S; Massey, Andrew; Brennan, Marnie L

    2016-01-01

    Veterinarians are encouraged to use evidence to inform their practice, but it is unknown what resources (e.g. journals, electronic sources) are accessed by them globally. Understanding the key places veterinarians seek information can inform where new clinically relevant evidence should most effectively be placed. An international survey was conducted to gain understanding of how veterinary information is accessed by veterinarians worldwide. There were 2137 useable responses to the questionnaire from veterinarians in 78 countries. The majority of respondents (n = 1835/2137, 85.9%) undertook clinical work and worked in a high income country (n = 1576/1762, 89.4%). Respondents heard about the survey via national veterinary organisations or regulatory bodies (31.5%), online veterinary forums and websites (22.7%), regional, discipline-based or international veterinary organisations (22.7%) or by direct invitation from the researchers or via friends, colleagues or social media (7.6%). Clinicians and non-clinicians reportedly used journals most commonly (65.8%, n = 1207/1835; 75.6%, n = 216/286) followed by electronic resources (58.7%, n = 1077/1835; 55.9%, n = 160/286), respectively. Respondents listed a total of 518 journals and 567 electronic sources that they read. Differences in veterinarian preference for resources in developed, and developing countries, were found. The nominated journals most read were the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (12.7% of nominations) for clinicians and the Veterinary Record (5.7%) for non-clinicians. The most accessed electronic resource reported was the Veterinary Information Network (25.6%) for clinicians and PubMed (7.4%) for non-clinicians. In conclusion, a wide array of journals and electronic resources appear to be accessed by veterinarians worldwide. Veterinary organisations appear to play an important role in global communication and outreach to veterinarians and consideration should be given to how these

  9. Veterinary diclofenac threatens Africa's endangered vulture species.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Wolter, K; Cuthbert, R; Duncan, N

    2009-04-01

    Veterinary diclofenac has been responsible for the devastation of three species of Gyps vulture on the Indian subcontinent, and it is now regarded as one of the worst environmental contaminants in the recent past. While measures have been taken to control the manufacture of veterinary diclofenac in South Asia, the promotion of diclofenac on the African continent poses a risk to vultures in this region. In Southern Africa, the species of greatest conservation concern is the Cape Griffon Vulture (Gyps coprotheres), as only 2900 breeding pairs remain in the wild. The objective of this study was to test if this species is toxicologically sensitive to diclofenac. In a single dose-toxicity study, two adult Cape Griffon Vultures with severe injuries, that were considered to have a very poor prognostic outcome, were dosed intravenously with diclofenac at 0.8mg/kg. The changes in the clinical pathology were compared to the normal reference range established for 24 healthy Cape Griffon Vultures. Both birds died within 48h of dosing. The clinical signs, clinical pathology, gross pathology and histopathological finding were typical for diclofenac toxicity. It would appear that the sensitivity of the Cape Griffon is similar to that of their Asian counterparts and the African White-backed Vulture (Gyps africanus). Diclofenac is almost certainly toxic to all Gyps vultures species and strong efforts must be taken to ensure that veterinary diclofenac products are not licensed or introduced to the African continent. PMID:19545505

  10. The career path choices of veterinary radiologists.

    PubMed

    Jelinski, Murray D; Silver, Tawni I

    2015-01-01

    Concerns of a shortage of board certified specialists willing to work in academia have shadowed the medical and veterinary communities for decades. As a result, a number of studies have been conducted to determine how to foster, attract, and retain specialists in academia. More recently, there has been a growing perception that it is difficult for academic institutions to hire board certified veterinary radiologists. The objective of this study was to describe the career paths (academia vs. private sector) of veterinary radiologists and to determine what factors influenced their career path decisions. A mixed mode cross-sectional survey was used to survey ACVR radiologists and residents-in-training, 48% (255/529) of which responded. There was a near unidirectional movement of radiologists from academia to the private sector: 45.7% (59/129) of the respondents who began their careers in academia had switched to the private sector while only 8% (7/88) had left the private sector for academia. If a shortage of academic radiologists exists, then perhaps the issue should be framed as a problem with retention vs. recruitment. The most influential factors in the decision to leave academia were remuneration (wages and benefits), lack of interest/enjoyment in research, geographical location, and family considerations. It is salient that average salaries increased by twofold after leaving academia for the private sector.

  11. [Marketing in veterinary practice; a theoretical framework].

    PubMed

    Schuurmans, A J; Smidts, A

    1990-03-15

    An increase in the number of veterinarians, while at the same time the number of animals has remained constant, has resulted in growing competition. By extending the range of products and by enlarging the veterinarians' scope of activities this competition can be decreased. A marketing-orientation will be helpful in this respect. This article indicates in which way marketing concepts can be used in a veterinary practice. The services of the veterinarian will be looked at by means of the Abell approach. This focuses on the functions performed by the services and examines, per function performed, for whom this might be interesting and which alternatives there might be. Next the concept of market segmentation is filled in for a veterinary practice by means of a hypothetical example. The marketing mix (product, place, price, promotion and personnel) is given considerable attention. The last element of marketing in a veterinary practice that is discussed here is the marketing information system. In a next article the question will be answered how marketing-directed the Dutch veterinarian works nowadays. To find this out research has been done; 166 vets were interviewed by telephone for approximately 40 minutes each.

  12. A conceptual holding model for veterinary applications.

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Nicola; Kuhn, Werner; Rumor, Massimo; Marangon, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Spatial references are required when geographical information systems (GIS) are used for the collection, storage and management of data. In the veterinary domain, the spatial component of a holding (of animals) is usually defined by coordinates, and no other relevant information needs to be interpreted or used for manipulation of the data in the GIS environment provided. Users trying to integrate or reuse spatial data organised in such a way, frequently face the problem of data incompatibility and inconsistency. The root of the problem lies in differences with respect to syntax as well as variations in the semantic, spatial and temporal representations of the geographic features. To overcome these problems and to facilitate the inter-operability of different GIS, spatial data must be defined according to a \\"schema\\" that includes the definition, acquisition, analysis, access, presentation and transfer of such data between different users and systems. We propose an application \\"schema\\" of holdings for GIS applications in the veterinary domain according to the European directive framework (directive 2007/2/EC--INSPIRE). The conceptual model put forward has been developed at two specific levels to produce the essential and the abstract model, respectively. The former establishes the conceptual linkage of the system design to the real world, while the latter describes how the system or software works. The result is an application \\"schema\\" that formalises and unifies the information-theoretic foundations of how to spatially represent a holding in order to ensure straightforward information-sharing within the veterinary community. PMID:24893036

  13. Veterinary diclofenac threatens Africa's endangered vulture species.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Wolter, K; Cuthbert, R; Duncan, N

    2009-04-01

    Veterinary diclofenac has been responsible for the devastation of three species of Gyps vulture on the Indian subcontinent, and it is now regarded as one of the worst environmental contaminants in the recent past. While measures have been taken to control the manufacture of veterinary diclofenac in South Asia, the promotion of diclofenac on the African continent poses a risk to vultures in this region. In Southern Africa, the species of greatest conservation concern is the Cape Griffon Vulture (Gyps coprotheres), as only 2900 breeding pairs remain in the wild. The objective of this study was to test if this species is toxicologically sensitive to diclofenac. In a single dose-toxicity study, two adult Cape Griffon Vultures with severe injuries, that were considered to have a very poor prognostic outcome, were dosed intravenously with diclofenac at 0.8mg/kg. The changes in the clinical pathology were compared to the normal reference range established for 24 healthy Cape Griffon Vultures. Both birds died within 48h of dosing. The clinical signs, clinical pathology, gross pathology and histopathological finding were typical for diclofenac toxicity. It would appear that the sensitivity of the Cape Griffon is similar to that of their Asian counterparts and the African White-backed Vulture (Gyps africanus). Diclofenac is almost certainly toxic to all Gyps vultures species and strong efforts must be taken to ensure that veterinary diclofenac products are not licensed or introduced to the African continent.

  14. Prevalence of hazardous exposures in veterinary practice

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, P.; Schenker, M.B.; Green, R.; Samuels, S.

    1989-01-01

    All female graduates of a major U.S. veterinary school were surveyed by mailed questionnaire to obtain details of work practice and hazard exposure during the most recent year worked and during all pregnancies. Exposure questions were based on previously implicated occupational hazards which included anesthetic gases, radiation, zoonoses, prostaglandins, vaccines, physical trauma, and pesticides. The response rate was 86% (462/537). We found that practice type and pregnancy status were major determinants of hazard exposure within the veterinary profession. Small-animal practitioners reported the highest rates of exposure to anesthetic gas (94%), X-ray (90%), and pesticides (57%). Large-animal practitioners reported greater rates of trauma (64%) and potential exposure to prostaglandins (92%), Brucella abortus vaccine (23%), and carbon monoxide (18%). Potentially hazardous workplace practices or equipment were common. Forty-one percent of respondents who reported taking X-rays did not wear film badges, and 76% reported physically restraining animals for X-ray procedures. Twenty-seven percent of the respondents exposed to anesthetic gases worked at facilities which did not have waste anesthetic gas scavenging systems. Women who worked as veterinarians during a pregnancy attempted to reduce exposures to X-rays, insecticides, and other potentially hazardous exposures. Some potentially hazardous workplace exposures are common in veterinary practice, and measures to educate workers and to reduce these exposures should not await demonstration of adverse health effects.

  15. Changes in Veterinary Students' Attitudes Toward the Rural Environment and Rural Veterinary Practice: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Cary T; Woloschuk, Wayne; Hecker, Kent G

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of research regarding veterinary students' attitudes toward the rural environment and rural veterinary practice and how these attitudes might change over the course of a veterinary medicine program that includes rural clinical experience. Using a 23-item questionnaire, attitudes toward rural lifestyle, rural work-life balance, opportunities for career and skill development in rural veterinary practice, and inter-professional teamwork in the rural environment were assessed at the beginning and completion of a four-year veterinary medicine program. Eighty-six students (74.4% female) were included in this Canadian study over a six-year period. Thirty-one participants (36.1%) were rural students. Overall, students' attitudes toward the rural lifestyle, rural work-life balance, and inter-professional teamwork in rural veterinary practice all significantly decreased (p<.001) over the course of the program. As compared to urban students, rural students had significantly higher rural lifestyle scores at both the beginning (p<.001) and end (p<.01) of the veterinary medicine program. A less positive attitude toward living and working in a rural environment could influence students to exclude rural veterinary practice as a career choice. Rural clinical experiences designed to sustain or increase veterinary student interest in rural practice may not be sufficient to support positive rural attitudes. Given the demand for rural veterinary services in developed countries, the implications of this study may extend beyond Canada. PMID:25631883

  16. Evidence-based veterinary medicine: evolution, revolution, or repackaging of veterinary practice?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Peggy L

    2007-05-01

    Over time, evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) should integrate with normal clinical practice. Also, clinical knowledge increases with EBVM, reducing the need for information in one area and allowing veterinarians to explore new areas of specialty or cutting-edge advances in the profession. Textbooks, journals, veterinary conferences, and web sites provide nearly unlimited information about EBVM for the practicing veterinarian to help with the transition to EBVM use in daily practice life. EBVM should continue to change and improve how we, as veterinarians, provide the best available care to our clients and patients.

  17. Contact precautions and hand hygiene in veterinary clinics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Maureen E C

    2015-03-01

    Hand hygiene, contact precautions, and other basic infection control measures are crucial in veterinary clinics, because these facilities can be community mixing pots of animals and people with a wide range of health and disease-carrier states. Veterinary staff must be knowledgeable and well trained regarding when and how to apply situation-appropriate contact precautions and to properly perform hand hygiene. The limited information on the use of contact precautions and hand hygiene practices among veterinary staff suggests that compliance is low. Improving the infection control culture in clinics and in veterinary medicine is critical to achieving better compliance with these practices.

  18. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology.

  19. 75 FR 52605 - Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... overview of Atlantic salmon, its natural history, aquaculture, and genetic engineering'' and ``The VMAC...Veterinary/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/GeneticEngineering/GeneticallyEngineeredAnimals/default.htm . Please...

  20. Applications of Metal Additive Manufacturing in Veterinary Orthopedic Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrysson, Ola L. A.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J.; Horn, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Veterinary medicine has undergone a rapid increase in specialization over the last three decades. Veterinarians now routinely perform joint replacement, neurosurgery, limb-sparing surgery, interventional radiology, radiation therapy, and other complex medical procedures. Many procedures involve advanced imaging and surgical planning. Evidence-based medicine has also become part of the modus operandi of veterinary clinicians. Modeling and additive manufacturing can provide individualized or customized therapeutic solutions to support the management of companion animals with complex medical problems. The use of metal additive manufacturing is increasing in veterinary orthopedic surgery. This review describes and discusses current and potential applications of metal additive manufacturing in veterinary orthopedic surgery.

  1. Virchow's contributions to veterinary medicine: celebrated then, forgotten now.

    PubMed

    Saunders, L Z

    2000-05-01

    In 1858, Rudolf Virchow, the professor of pathology in Berlin University, published the book "Cellular Pathology". A compendium of his lectures to physicians and medical students, he introduced the use of microscopy for the study of human diseases. To an astonishing extent Rudolf Virchow was helpful to the disciplines of veterinary medicine (and veterinary pathology). Considered a scientific genius in several disciplines, this essay deals exclusively with the devotion of Virchow, a scholarly physician, to the profession of veterinary medicine. He respected veterinary research, supported governmental veterinary education, and provided a role model for the veterinarians who were drafting control legislation of contagious diseases in livestock. Repeatedly, he responded in help when seemingly irretrievable problems arose. Examples of Virchow's activities in the realms of veterinary medicine and pathology are marshalled here to shed light on this pioneer "veterinary pathologist". In celebration of 50 years of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists in 1999, it is timely to remember that Rudolf Virchow, the father of cellular pathology, also fathered veterinary pathology, whose offsprings in Canada and the U.S.A. (Osler, Clement, Williams, Olafson, Jones) had enabled them to form and foster the A.C.V.P.

  2. Committee on Veterinary Medicine at the Society for Medical Education: Skills Labs in Veterinary Medicine - a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Dilly, Marc; Gruber, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012, skills labs have been set up to teach practical skills at veterinary training facilities in the German-speaking world. In addition to didactic considerations, ethical points of view in terms of animal protection form the basis of the increasing significance of skills labs in veterinary medicine. Not least because of the quality standards in veterinary medicine training which apply across Europe, the link between veterinary medicine training facilities is particularly significant when it comes to the setting up and development of skills labs. The Committee on Veterinary Medicine is therefore not only interested in exchange and cooperation within veterinary medicine, but also sees an opportunity for mutual gain in the link with the Society for Medical Education Committee "Practical Skills". PMID:27579349

  3. Committee on Veterinary Medicine at the Society for Medical Education: Skills Labs in Veterinary Medicine – a brief overview

    PubMed Central

    Dilly, Marc; Gruber, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012, skills labs have been set up to teach practical skills at veterinary training facilities in the German-speaking world. In addition to didactic considerations, ethical points of view in terms of animal protection form the basis of the increasing significance of skills labs in veterinary medicine. Not least because of the quality standards in veterinary medicine training which apply across Europe, the link between veterinary medicine training facilities is particularly significant when it comes to the setting up and development of skills labs. The Committee on Veterinary Medicine is therefore not only interested in exchange and cooperation within veterinary medicine, but also sees an opportunity for mutual gain in the link with the Society for Medical Education Committee “Practical Skills”. PMID:27579349

  4. Committee on Veterinary Medicine at the Society for Medical Education: Skills Labs in Veterinary Medicine - a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Dilly, Marc; Gruber, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012, skills labs have been set up to teach practical skills at veterinary training facilities in the German-speaking world. In addition to didactic considerations, ethical points of view in terms of animal protection form the basis of the increasing significance of skills labs in veterinary medicine. Not least because of the quality standards in veterinary medicine training which apply across Europe, the link between veterinary medicine training facilities is particularly significant when it comes to the setting up and development of skills labs. The Committee on Veterinary Medicine is therefore not only interested in exchange and cooperation within veterinary medicine, but also sees an opportunity for mutual gain in the link with the Society for Medical Education Committee "Practical Skills".

  5. 75 FR 61504 - Global Implementation of the Veterinary Medicinal Products Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Global Implementation of the Veterinary Medicinal Products... OIE's services and activities that are needed to carry out OIE's Veterinary International Conference... level. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Program Contact: Merton V. Smith, Center for Veterinary...

  6. 77 FR 22284 - Notice of Establishment of a Veterinary Services Stakeholder Registry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Establishment of a Veterinary Services Stakeholder... announces the availability of a new Veterinary Services email subscription service. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... Inspection Service (APHIS) has established a Veterinary Services (VS) Stakeholder Registry, an...

  7. 75 FR 48303 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Veterinary Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... Collection; Veterinary Services; Customer Service Survey AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service....gov ). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For information on the Veterinary Services customer service... Coordinator, at (301) 851-2908. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Veterinary Services; Customer Service......

  8. Reviewing the undergraduate veterinary curriculum in Finland for control tasks in veterinary public health.

    PubMed

    Maijala, Riitta; Korkeala, Hannu

    2008-01-01

    To review and develop the undergraduate veterinary curriculum on official control in veterinary public health, an electronic survey was sent to 204 Finnish veterinarians employed in the field of food hygiene in 2005. The response rate was 44%. Most frequently cited as strengths of the current curriculum were extensive education and good knowledge. Respondents considered the main challenges in their work to be a wide field of activity, organizational changes, financial resources, organization of substitutes, and collaboration with decision makers. Of the 23 items to be included in the undergraduate curriculum, therefore, respondents prioritized state and local decision making, the role of the public servant, and leadership and management in the area of social factors; in the field of practical control work, in-house control systems, organizations and responsibilities, control techniques, and planning and targeting of controls were prioritized. Of areas traditionally covered in the undergraduate curriculum, legislation; legal proceedings and implications of controls; risks to human, animal, and plant health; and hazards in feed, animal, and food production were stated to be the most important. Although respondents were generally content with their career choice, veterinary public health tasks were not their first choice of career path immediately after graduation. Based on these findings, more attention should be focused on social aspects and practical training in official control in the undergraduate veterinary curriculum. The survey results also highlight the contrasts between society's needs and veterinarians' motivations and career-path expectations, which pose a significant challenge for future curricula.

  9. Veterinary school consortia as a means of promoting the food-supply veterinary medicine pipeline.

    PubMed

    Moore, Dale A

    2006-01-01

    Ideas about centers of emphasis and veterinary medical teaching consortia have resurfaced to attract students into food-supply veterinary medicine (FSVM). From 1988 to 2000 a multiple veterinary school consortium approach to food-animal production medicine (FAPM) teaching was conducted to handle regional differences in case load, faculty strengths, and student interests. Six universities developed a memorandum of understanding to provide a wide variety of in-depth, species-specific clinical experiences in FAPM to balance their individual strengths and weakness in addressing food-animal agriculture, to provide for student exchange and faculty development, and to conduct research in food safety. Changes in leadership, redirection of funds, failure to publicize the program to faculty and students, and a focus on research as opposed to teaching led to dissolution of the consortium. However, this approach could work to improve recruitment and retention of students in FSVM if it focused on student exchange, fostered a more integrated curriculum across schools, encouraged faculty involvement, garnered institutional support, and used modern technology in teaching. Private veterinary practices as well as public/corporate practices could be integrated into a broader food-animal curriculum directed at building competency among FSVM students by providing the in-depth training they require. Requirements for the success of this type of program will include funding, marketing, leadership, communication, coordination, integration, and dedicated people with the time to make it work.

  10. 75 FR 3697 - Solicitation of Nomination of Veterinary Shortage Situations for the Veterinary Medicine Loan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (VMLRP; [74 FR 32788- 32798]), as authorized under the National... Solicitation Notice Changes in Response On July 9, 2009, NIFA published a Federal Register Notice [74 FR 32788... with a potential avalanche of nominations and dilute highest need situations with lower-level...

  11. Pre-Veterinary Medical Grade Point Averages as Predictors of Academic Success in Veterinary College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julius, Marcia F.; Kaiser, Herbert E.

    1978-01-01

    A five-year longitudinal study was designed to find the best predictors of academic success in veterinary school at Kansas State University and to set up a multiple regression formula to be used in selecting students. The preveterinary grade point average was found to be the best predictor. (JMD)

  12. Veterinary school consortia as a means of promoting the food-supply veterinary medicine pipeline.

    PubMed

    Moore, Dale A

    2006-01-01

    Ideas about centers of emphasis and veterinary medical teaching consortia have resurfaced to attract students into food-supply veterinary medicine (FSVM). From 1988 to 2000 a multiple veterinary school consortium approach to food-animal production medicine (FAPM) teaching was conducted to handle regional differences in case load, faculty strengths, and student interests. Six universities developed a memorandum of understanding to provide a wide variety of in-depth, species-specific clinical experiences in FAPM to balance their individual strengths and weakness in addressing food-animal agriculture, to provide for student exchange and faculty development, and to conduct research in food safety. Changes in leadership, redirection of funds, failure to publicize the program to faculty and students, and a focus on research as opposed to teaching led to dissolution of the consortium. However, this approach could work to improve recruitment and retention of students in FSVM if it focused on student exchange, fostered a more integrated curriculum across schools, encouraged faculty involvement, garnered institutional support, and used modern technology in teaching. Private veterinary practices as well as public/corporate practices could be integrated into a broader food-animal curriculum directed at building competency among FSVM students by providing the in-depth training they require. Requirements for the success of this type of program will include funding, marketing, leadership, communication, coordination, integration, and dedicated people with the time to make it work. PMID:17220493

  13. Veterinary service missions and good governance.

    PubMed

    Brückner, G K

    2012-08-01

    The rationale for the existence of official Veterinary Services (VS) has seldom been under such intensive public scrutiny as over the past two decades when the world has been confronted with outbreaks of major animal diseases that have posed a potential threat not only to human health but also to animal health and national food security. The mere existence of VS is not enough. The mission statement of the VS can no longer be cast in stone but needs to adapt and be amended continually to cope with new demands. The ability to ensure not only acceptance but also sustainability of the delivery of VS as a global public good, thereby demonstrating good governance, is becoming and will remain a challenge in terms of keeping it a non-rivalrous and non-excludable service to a demanding public clientele. Mission statements to improve the health and welfare of animals will, however, remain no more than noble normative statements of intent if further refinement on how this should be done and governed is not encompassed in the strategic plans, vision and goals of the Veterinary Authority. They will also remain but noble statements if cognisance is not taken of the increased sensitivity, nationally and internationally, around animal welfare issues during transport, movement, housing, treatment and slaughter of animals and if this sensitivity is not reflected or addressed in national animal health and veterinary public health legislation. The author describes some of the ways in which currently accepted critical functions of the VS need to change to demonstrate good governance and respond to the challenges of new or amended missions in order to meet the demands of an ever-changing VS environment.

  14. Survey of western Canadian beef producers regarding calf-hood diseases, management practices, and veterinary service usage.

    PubMed

    Waldner, Cheryl; Jelinski, Murray D; McIntyre-Zimmer, Katelyn

    2013-06-01

    Cow-calf producers in western Canada were surveyed in June 2010 regarding calf-hood diseases and veterinary service usage; 310 producers responded. Use of veterinary services, particularly herd-health related services, increased with herd size as did neonatal diarrhea and clostridial vaccine usage. Administration of clostridial vaccines to pregnant dams before calving was associated with a reduction in neonatal diarrhea treatments; however, there was no association between neonatal diarrhea vaccine usage and a reduction in diarrhea treatments. Producers with > 220 breeding females were more likely than those with < 85 breeding females to seek veterinary advice regarding treating sick calves, have a veterinarian necropsy dead calves, have a veterinarian pregnancy check their bred females, and evaluate their herd bulls for breeding soundness.

  15. Survey of western Canadian beef producers regarding calf-hood diseases, management practices, and veterinary service usage

    PubMed Central

    Waldner, Cheryl; Jelinski, Murray D.; McIntyre-Zimmer, Katelyn

    2013-01-01

    Cow-calf producers in western Canada were surveyed in June 2010 regarding calf-hood diseases and veterinary service usage; 310 producers responded. Use of veterinary services, particularly herd-health related services, increased with herd size as did neonatal diarrhea and clostridial vaccine usage. Administration of clostridial vaccines to pregnant dams before calving was associated with a reduction in neonatal diarrhea treatments; however, there was no association between neonatal diarrhea vaccine usage and a reduction in diarrhea treatments. Producers with > 220 breeding females were more likely than those with < 85 breeding females to seek veterinary advice regarding treating sick calves, have a veterinarian necropsy dead calves, have a veterinarian pregnancy check their bred females, and evaluate their herd bulls for breeding soundness. PMID:24155446

  16. Maggot-therapy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gemma; Wall, Richard

    2008-10-01

    Maggot-therapy is the application of disinfected fly larvae to chronic wounds to debride the wound bed of necrotic tissue, reduce bacterial contamination and enhance the formation of healthy granulation tissue. Interest in the use of maggot-therapy in human medicine is growing as a result of the prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Maggot therapy, however, is used relatively little in veterinary medicine. Nevertheless, concern over antibiotic resistance and the increase in demand for organic husbandry and residue-free meat and milk, suggest that it is an option which merits further consideration.

  17. [The in vitro activity of veterinary antiseptics].

    PubMed

    Maris, P

    1990-01-01

    The in vitro activity of 28 veterinary antiseptic drugs was studied on 4 bacterial strains either with or without calf serum. Eight preparations (VT Dose, Dulcidrine, Collyre Clément, Cronic, Detecaïne, Lotion Maudor, Tano-Patt, Aurikan), half of which were eye-lotions, were found to be non antiseptic according to AFNOR standards. In the presence of calf serum, 4 other preparations (Albacetine, Nybocaïne, Pediplasme, Pedifort) did not meet the standard NF T 72.171 criteria.

  18. Acupuncture for analgesia in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Fry, Lindsey M; Neary, Susan M; Sharrock, Joseph; Rychel, Jessica K

    2014-06-01

    Acupuncture for analgesia is growing rapidly in popularity with veterinarians and pet owners. This article summarizes the mechanisms of analgesia derived from acupuncture and reviews current literature on the topic. Areas covered include the local effects at area of needle insertion, systemic effects secondary to circulating neurotransmitters and changes in cell signaling, central nervous system effects including the brain and spinal cord, and myofascial trigger point and pathology treatment. Clinical applications are discussed and suggested in each section. When used by appropriately trained professionals, acupuncture offers a compelling and safe method for pain management in our veterinary patients and should be strongly considered as a part of multimodal pain management plans. PMID:25454374

  19. [Adjuvants in modern medicine and veterinary].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, V G; Ozherelkov, S V; Sanin, A V; Kozhevnikova, T N

    2014-01-01

    The review is dedicated to immunologic adjuvants--various natural and synthetics substances that are added to vaccines for stimulation of specific immune response, but they do not induce specific response themselves. Critically important is the selection of the correct adjuvants, for which mechanisms of effect on immune system are studied the most. The majority of these mechanisms as well as physical-chemical and biological features of modern adjuvants are analyzed in the review. The problem of safety of adjuvants, types of immune response induced by adjuvants of various nature, excipients that are being verified or already in use in modern medicine and veterinary are also examined.

  20. Nutritional concepts for the veterinary practitioner.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Marjorie L; Takashima, Gregg

    2014-07-01

    Although veterinary practitioners know that nutrition can make a difference in the health and recovery from disease or illness in dogs and cats, they may feel poorly equipped to provide unbiased information on nutrition. This article provides information about evaluating and recommending diets and interpreting a pet food label to allow for comparisons among pet foods and discussion about how to do a nutritional assessment. It provides an example of how nutritional assessment and recommendation were successfully introduced into a busy private practice. Finally, some of the myths and misperceptions about nutrition are discussed with information provided from evidence-based research.

  1. PET-Computed Tomography in Veterinary Medicine.

    PubMed

    Randall, Elissa K

    2016-05-01

    PET/CT is an advanced imaging modality that is becoming more commonly used in veterinary medicine. It is most commonly used to image patients with cancer, and the most frequently used radiopharmaceutical is F-18 FDG. F-18 FDG is a glucose analog that highlights areas of increased glucose metabolism on the PET images. CT images provide excellent anatomic depiction and aid in interpretation of the PET data. Many types of cancer are hypermetabolic on PET/CT scans, but normal structures and areas of inflammation are also hypermetabolic, so knowledge of normal imaging and cytologic or histopathologic evaluation of lesions is essential.

  2. Genetic & virulence profiling of ESBL-positive E. coli from nosocomial & veterinary sources.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, J M; Wootton, M; Toleman, M A; Howe, R A; Woodward, M; Walsh, T R

    2016-04-15

    CTX-M genes are the most prevalent ESBL globally, infiltrating nosocomial, community and environmental settings. Wild and domesticated animals may act as effective vectors for the dissemination of CTX-producing Enterobacteriaceae. This study aimed to contextualise blaCTX-M-14-positive, cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae human infections and compared resistance and pathogenicity markers with veterinary isolates. Epidemiologically related human (n=18) and veterinary (n=4) blaCTX-M-14-positive E. coli were fully characterised. All were typed by XbaI pulsed field gel electrophoresis and ST. Chromosomal/plasmidic locations of blaCTX-M-14 were deduced by S1-nuclease digestion, and association with ISEcp1 was investigated by sequencing. Conjugation experiments assessed transmissibility of plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-14. Presence of virulence determinants was screened by PCR assay and pathogenicity potential was determined by in vitro Galleria mellonella infection models. 84% of clinical E. coli originated from community patients. blaCTX-M-14 was found ubiquitously downstream of ISEcp1 upon conjugative plasmids (25-150 kb). blaCTX-M-14 was also found upon the chromosome of eight E. coli isolates. CTX-M-14-producing E. coli were found at multiple hospital sites. Clonal commonality between patient, hospitals and livestock microbial populations was found. In vivo model survival rates from clinical isolates (30%) and veterinary isolates (0%) were significantly different (p<0.05). Co-transfer of blaCTX-M-14 and virulence determinants was demonstrated. There is evidence of clonal spread of blaCTX-M-14-positive E. coli involving community patients and farm livestock. blaCTX-M-14 positive human clinical isolates carry a lower intrinsic pathogenic potential than veterinary E. coli highlighting the need for greater veterinary practices in preventing dissemination of MDR E. coli among livestock.

  3. How does emotional intelligence fit into the paradigm of veterinary medical education?

    PubMed

    Timmins, Richard P

    2006-01-01

    The term ''emotional intelligence'' (EI) has become very popular in the business world and has recently infiltrated veterinary medical education. The term purports to encompass those qualities and skills that are not measured by IQ tests but do play an important role in achieving success in life. Veterinary medical educators often incorporate these in a category called ''non-technical competencies'' (which includes, for example, communication skills) and acknowledge that veterinarians need more training in this area in order to be successful. Although EI looks promising as a means for teaching these non-technical competencies to students and practitioners, there are some challenges to its application. To begin with, there are three competing models of EI that differ in definition and measuring instruments. Although some research has suggested that high EI is associated with success in school and in business, there are no studies directly correlating high EI with greater success in the veterinary profession. Nor have any studies confirmed that increasing a student's EI will improve eventual outcomes for that student. It is important that educators approach the implementation of new techniques and concepts for teaching non-technical competencies the same way they would approach teaching a new surgical technique or drug therapy. EI is an intriguing and promising construct and deserves dedicated research to assess its relevance to veterinary medical education. There are opportunities to investigate EI using case control studies that will either confirm or discredit the benefits of incorporating EI into the veterinary curriculum. Implementing EI training without assessment risks wasting limited resources and alienating students.

  4. How does emotional intelligence fit into the paradigm of veterinary medical education?

    PubMed

    Timmins, Richard P

    2006-01-01

    The term ''emotional intelligence'' (EI) has become very popular in the business world and has recently infiltrated veterinary medical education. The term purports to encompass those qualities and skills that are not measured by IQ tests but do play an important role in achieving success in life. Veterinary medical educators often incorporate these in a category called ''non-technical competencies'' (which includes, for example, communication skills) and acknowledge that veterinarians need more training in this area in order to be successful. Although EI looks promising as a means for teaching these non-technical competencies to students and practitioners, there are some challenges to its application. To begin with, there are three competing models of EI that differ in definition and measuring instruments. Although some research has suggested that high EI is associated with success in school and in business, there are no studies directly correlating high EI with greater success in the veterinary profession. Nor have any studies confirmed that increasing a student's EI will improve eventual outcomes for that student. It is important that educators approach the implementation of new techniques and concepts for teaching non-technical competencies the same way they would approach teaching a new surgical technique or drug therapy. EI is an intriguing and promising construct and deserves dedicated research to assess its relevance to veterinary medical education. There are opportunities to investigate EI using case control studies that will either confirm or discredit the benefits of incorporating EI into the veterinary curriculum. Implementing EI training without assessment risks wasting limited resources and alienating students. PMID:16767641

  5. 21 CFR 558.6 - Veterinary feed directive drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR USE IN ANIMAL FEEDS General Provisions... notification letter to the Center for Veterinary Medicine, Division of Animal Feeds (HFV-220), 7500 Standish Pl... Veterinary Medicine at the above address within 30 days of any change in name or business address. (2) If...

  6. 21 CFR 558.6 - Veterinary feed directive drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR USE IN ANIMAL FEEDS General Provisions... notification letter to the Center for Veterinary Medicine, Division of Animal Feeds (HFV-220), 7500 Standish Pl... Veterinary Medicine at the above address within 30 days of any change in name or business address. (2) If...

  7. Some Observations on Veterinary Undergraduate Training in Surgical Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittick, William G.

    1978-01-01

    The undergraduate surgery course of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Universiti Pertanian Malaysia, is described with focus on its experential method of teaching surgical techniques. Also discussed are the benefits of veterinary school cooperation with a large city Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA). (JMD)

  8. Perspectives and research challenges in veterinary infectious diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Veterinary Infectious Disease specialty section seeks to become an outlet for veterinary research into infectious diseases through the study of the pathogen or its host or the host's environment or by addressing combinations of these aspects of the disease system. We vision research in this are...

  9. Student Perceptions of the First Year of Veterinary Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    A brief survey was conducted of nearly 900 first-year students in 14 U.S. veterinary medical schools in order to gather impressions of the first year of veterinary medical education. Although some students reported that conditions were stressful, the majority did not feel that they were inordinately so. Overall, most students were quite positive…

  10. Internationalizing Veterinary Education in the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jost, Christine C.; Memon, Mushtaq A.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed colleges of veterinary medicine to assess their international activities. Found that 86 percent have international veterinary medicine (IVM) programs and most have faculty involved in internationally oriented research, in teaching IVM, in mentoring students in IVM, and in international consultancies. Foreign animal diseases are the most…

  11. Highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Veterinary immunologists have expanded understanding of the immune systems for our companion animals and developed new vaccines and therapeutics. This manuscript summarizes the highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (8 th IVIS) held August 15th-19th, 2007, in Ouro Preto,...

  12. Animals in Society: A New Focus for Veterinary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weer, Joan C.

    1993-01-01

    Presents a curriculum for veterinary schools developed by the Center for Animals and Public Policy at Tufts School of Veterinary Medicine that fosters an understanding of the facets of the human/animal relationship. Includes sections on animal demographics, the history of the animal protection movement, and the use of companion animals in…

  13. 75 FR 4576 - Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee. General Function of the... Medicine (HFV-3), Food and Drug Administration, 7519 Standish Pl., Rockville, MD 20855, 240-276-9004,...

  14. 78 FR 69991 - Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... established on April 24, 1984 (49 FR 20809; May 17, 1984). The purpose of the Committee was to review and... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 14 Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the termination of the Veterinary Medicine...

  15. Women in Veterinary Medicine: The Myths and the Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andberg, Wendy L.

    1976-01-01

    For the years 1969-75, there was no significant difference in the proportions of male and female applicants admitted to the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Minnesota. It is hoped that the sex-typing of veterinary medicine by counselors, teachers, parents, and veterinarians will diminish. (LBH)

  16. Extremophiles and their application to veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Jane Ann

    2010-01-01

    Extremophiles can be defined as organisms that can survive in extreme environments that cannot support mammalian life. They include microorganisms that can tolerate temperature extremes, extremes of pH, salinity, hydrostatic pressure and ionizing radiation, as well as low oxygen tension, desiccation and the presence of heavy metals. Psychrophilic organisms also include fish in polar waters and animals that withstand freezing. Rare examples of thermophilic pathogens exist, and the main category of extremophilic animal pathogens comprises psychrophilic and psychrotrophic microorganisms that cause fish diseases, e.g. Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Moritella viscosa, Aliivibrio wodanis and Aliivibrio salmonicida. The most widely known application of an extremophile product in veterinary medicine is DNA polymerase from thermophiles, which is a mainstay of PCR-based diagnostics for an extensive range of animal pathogens. DNA polymerases and other extremophile enzymes are also used in many molecular biology applications and animal genomics. Other extremophile products may find application in veterinary medicine in the future. These include enzymes in biosensors, compatible solutes in skin care products, drug excipients, treatments for respiratory disease, radioprotectants, peptide antibiotics, archaeal lipids for drug delivery and anti-cancer therapeutics.

  17. Preferential sampling in veterinary parasitological surveillance.

    PubMed

    Cecconi, Lorenzo; Biggeri, Annibale; Grisotto, Laura; Berrocal, Veronica; Rinaldi, Laura; Musella, Vincenzo; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Catelan, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    In parasitological surveillance of livestock, prevalence surveys are conducted on a sample of farms using several sampling designs. For example, opportunistic surveys or informative sampling designs are very common. Preferential sampling refers to any situation in which the spatial process and the sampling locations are not independent. Most examples of preferential sampling in the spatial statistics literature are in environmental statistics with focus on pollutant monitors, and it has been shown that, if preferential sampling is present and is not accounted for in the statistical modelling and data analysis, statistical inference can be misleading. In this paper, working in the context of veterinary parasitology, we propose and use geostatistical models to predict the continuous and spatially-varying risk of a parasite infection. Specifically, breaking with the common practice in veterinary parasitological surveillance to ignore preferential sampling even though informative or opportunistic samples are very common, we specify a two-stage hierarchical Bayesian model that adjusts for preferential sampling and we apply it to data on Fasciola hepatica infection in sheep farms in Campania region (Southern Italy) in the years 2013-2014.

  18. Views of professionalism: a veterinary institutional perspective.

    PubMed

    Roder, C; Whittlestone, K; May, S A

    2012-12-01

    In many western countries, there has been a marked change in the demographic profile of those entering the veterinary profession, with a shift from a predominantly male to a predominantly female intake. There have been parallel changes in society, with greater emphasis on human rights and work-life balance. It is, therefore, timely to consider what constitutes correct professional conduct for the profession, as there is the potential for problems to arise over the interpretation of 'professionalism' due to cultural and generational differences. A cross-section of staff and students within one veterinary institution were invited to take part in a survey exploring their prioritisation of 10 aspects of the professional role. A cluster analysis was performed, and four distinctly different profiles were established according to the views held by the cluster members. Cluster membership was found to significantly correlate to career stage, with altruism and social justice progressively giving way to professional autonomy and dominance. All four clusters in this educational environment prioritised technical and interpersonal competences above all other aspects of the professional role.

  19. Reconsidering the lecture in modern veterinary education.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Michelangelo; Lygo-Baker, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Those teaching in the higher-education environment are now increasingly meeting with larger cohorts of students. The result is additional pressure on the resources available and on the teacher and learners. Against this backdrop, discussions and reflections took place between a practitioner, within a UK veterinary school, and an educational researcher with extensive experience in observing teaching in veterinary medicine. The result was an examination of the lecture as a method of teaching to consider how to resolve identified challenges. The focus of much of the literature is on technical aspects of teaching and learning, reverting to a range of tips to resolve particular issues recognized in large-group settings. We suggest that while these tips are useful, they will only take a practitioner so far. To be able to make a genuine connection to learners and help them connect directly to the discipline, we need to take account of the emotional aspects of our role as teachers, without which, delivery of knowledge may be undermined.

  20. Veterinary use of new quinolones in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S

    1995-01-01

    Five new quinolones are used as veterinary medicines in Japan. Benofloxacin and ofloxacin are orally given in feed or in drinking water for respiratory diseases due to Mycoplasma spp. and Escherichia coli in poultry. Enrofloxacin is subcutaneously, intramuscularly or orally administered to cattle and swine for pneumonia due to Pasteurella spp., Mycoplasma spp. and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and diarrhoea due to E. coli, and is used orally for respiratory diseases in poultry. Danofloxacin is similar to enrofloxacin except that the former is not approved for diarrhoea in cattle and swine. Orbifloxacin is given intramuscularly for pneumonia and diarrhoea in cattle and swine but not for poultry diseases. They are effective and safe in animals, and disappear from edible tissues after appropriate drug withdrawal times. The quinolones are indicated only when first-choice drugs are ineffective, only under the direction of veterinarians and only for periods of less than 5 days. Under these conditions, it appears unlikely that quinolone use in veterinary practice will be detrimental to human chemotherapy.

  1. Extremophiles and their application to veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Jane Ann

    2010-01-01

    Extremophiles can be defined as organisms that can survive in extreme environments that cannot support mammalian life. They include microorganisms that can tolerate temperature extremes, extremes of pH, salinity, hydrostatic pressure and ionizing radiation, as well as low oxygen tension, desiccation and the presence of heavy metals. Psychrophilic organisms also include fish in polar waters and animals that withstand freezing. Rare examples of thermophilic pathogens exist, and the main category of extremophilic animal pathogens comprises psychrophilic and psychrotrophic microorganisms that cause fish diseases, e.g. Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Moritella viscosa, Aliivibrio wodanis and Aliivibrio salmonicida. The most widely known application of an extremophile product in veterinary medicine is DNA polymerase from thermophiles, which is a mainstay of PCR-based diagnostics for an extensive range of animal pathogens. DNA polymerases and other extremophile enzymes are also used in many molecular biology applications and animal genomics. Other extremophile products may find application in veterinary medicine in the future. These include enzymes in biosensors, compatible solutes in skin care products, drug excipients, treatments for respiratory disease, radioprotectants, peptide antibiotics, archaeal lipids for drug delivery and anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:20662377

  2. Applied photonic therapy in veterinary medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Terry R.; McLaren, Brian C.

    2005-04-01

    There can be no question that specific systemic physiological results occur, when red light (660nm) is applied to the skin, it is now more a question of detailed mechanisms. Before gathering statistically signifcant clinical trial data, it is important to first enumerate the type of results observed in practice. Case histories are presented highlighting the use of photonic therapy in veterinary medicine. Over 900 surgical procedures have been performed and documented, utilizing the principles of photonic therapy, and while hemostasis, pain relief, and nausea relief, were the primary goals, the peri-operative death rate, the post-operative seroma, and post-operative infection were reduced to almost zero, and there was a noticeable increase in the healing rate. Scientifically applied photonic therapy, rather than supplanting conventional veterinary medicine, compliments and increases the veterinarian's set of skills. This paper proposes a hypothesis of how 660 nm light applied to specific points on the skin, produces various physiological changes in animals. By using animals, there can be no placebo, hypnotic or psychosomatic confounding effects.

  3. Career attitudes of first-year veterinary students before and after a required course on veterinary careers.

    PubMed

    Fish, Richard E; Griffith, Emily H

    2014-01-01

    Careers in Veterinary Medicine is a required, one-credit-hour course at the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine (NCSU-CVM), which meets once weekly during veterinary students' first semester. Lectures in this course are presented by one or more veterinarians representing diverse career areas. A voluntary, anonymous survey was distributed before the first class meeting in 2011 (PRE) and at the end of the semester (POST) to assess if students' career interests changed during the semester. The survey collected basic demographic data and students' preferences (on a Likert scale) for 17 veterinary career paths. Out of 63 students, 36 (57%) in the POST survey said that their career interests had changed during the semester, and 17 of the 26 students (65%) who gave a reason credited the careers course as one factor in reconsidering their career choice. Only 3 of the 17 career paths had statistically significant PRE/POST survey differences in Likert response frequency (equine practice, pathology, and wildlife medicine), but both informal discussions with students and responses to open-ended survey questions indicated that many students valued the introduction to unfamiliar veterinary career areas. Careers in Veterinary Medicine is a vital component of recent career-planning initiatives in the college, which will be especially important to veterinary students as they face continued changes in the profession, such as the increased debt load of the new graduate and the threat of veterinary workforce oversupply.

  4. [The Veterinary Historical Museum at the Hannover School of Veterinary Medicine--history, conception, duties and problems].

    PubMed

    Schäffer, J

    1994-08-01

    The Veterinary Historical Museum at the School of Veterinary Medicine was founded in 1973. It is the only museum of this kind in Germany at the moment this is open to the public. More than 600 exhibits give information on the history of the School of Veterinary Medicine since 1778 as well as on the development of the different veterinary working fields and the diagnosis and treatment methods during the last centuries. The academic collection contains about 2500 objects that keep the veterinary cultural possessions out of the areas: science, practices, administration and personal sphere. A certain military historical collection also belongs to the museum, the so-called "Sammlung Wens". The Institute for Veterinary History is responsible for the administration and the maintenance of the museum. Like in every other museum it was and is still tried to fulfill the basic tasks of museum work, there are: collecting, keeping, exhibiting, exploring and teaching. These working fields leave a lot of problems due to the "hermaphroditic" position of the museum as a part of the School of Veterinary Medicine on the one hand and as a public museum on the other hand. The result is that the museum has neither specialist staff nor an independent budget until today. A guided tour in the museum and the critical representation of its tasks explain a stalemate situation that should absolutely be avoided at the conception of a future museum for veterinary medicine as it is planned in Berlin. PMID:7924978

  5. Changing the Face of Veterinary Medicine: Research and Clinical Developments at AAVMC Institutions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald F; Hagstrom, Melena R

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a 50-year overview of research and clinical advances in AAVMC member colleges in four representative fields of veterinary medicine: oncology, vaccine development, production medicine, and public health. Though emphasis is on the progress since the mid-1960s, the salient background and associated personnel in each field are also identified to the extent that their description informs more recent events. Advances in board certification and post-graduate clinical and research educational opportunities are also described.

  6. Integrating the issues of world animal health and world public health into the veterinary curriculum: a Southeast Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Zamri-Saad, M; Romziah, S; Kunavongkrit, A; Valdez, C A; Thien, M

    2009-08-01

    The authors analysed the curricula of five veterinary schools in Southeast Asia to determine how successfully they integrate the issues of global animal health and global public health into their programmes. Two schools offer a five-year programme while the remaining three offer a six-year programme. The core courses within the curricula range from 145 to 224 credit hours, in total. In general, world animal health and world public health are well integrated into the veterinary curriculum. Most curricula allocate approximately 3% of their total credit hours to subjects associated with animal and public health, but other subjects that may contain discussions on these issues range between 6% and 10%. Most veterinary schools in Southeast Asia offer a Master's programme in Veterinary Public Health, with detailed emphasis on animal and public health but focusing principally on topics of local importance. At the same time, undergraduate and post-graduate veterinary students are exposed to current issues in animal and public health through regional and international scientific meetings. PMID:20128483

  7. Prevalence of IgG Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in Veterinary and Undergraduate Students at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia.

    PubMed

    Rosypal, A C; Houk, A E; Zajac, A M; Lindsay, D S

    2015-11-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a globally distributed parasitic protozoan that infects humans and other warm-blooded vertebrates. Felids are the only definitive host for T. gondii, and they excrete oocysts in their faeces. The national prevalence in humans is declining in the United States. This zoonotic organism is of particular interest due to its importance in pregnant women, in individuals with altered immune systems, and in reactivated ocular infections. Exposure to the parasite in humans is usually associated with consumption of raw or undercooked meat or by accidental ingestion of oocysts. It was hypothesized that veterinary students would have a greater chance at exposure to the parasite than an average population of undergraduate students due to increased contact with cats who are infected. A commercially available ELISA was used to examine serum samples from 336 students (252 veterinary students and 84 undergraduate students) at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine for serum IgG antibodies to T. gondii antigen. The prevalence of T. gondii in these subjects was 5.6% in veterinary school students (n = 252) and 2.4% in undergraduates (n = 84). There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the prevalence of T. gondii antibodies in veterinary versus undergraduate students. The overall prevalence of 4.8% in all students in this study reflects the continuing decline of antibodies to T. gondii in humans in the United States.

  8. Student Preparation and the Power of Visual Input in Veterinary Surgical Education: An Empirical Study.

    PubMed

    Langebæk, Rikke; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Koch, Bodil Cathrine; Berendt, Mette

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, veterinary educational institutions have implemented alternative teaching methods, including video demonstrations of surgical procedures. However, the power of the dynamic visual input from videos in relation to recollection of a surgical procedure has never been evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate how veterinary surgical students perceived the influence of different educational materials on recollection of a surgical procedure. Furthermore, we investigated if surgical technique was associated with a certain method of recollection or use of educational material. During a basic surgical skills course, 112 fourth-year veterinary students participated in the study by completing a questionnaire regarding method of recollection, influence of individual types of educational input, and homework preparation. Furthermore, we observed students performing an orchiectomy in a terminal pig lab. Preparation for the pig lab consisted of homework (textbook, online material, including videos), lecture, cadaver lab, and toy animal models in a skills lab. In the instructional video, a detail was used that was not described elsewhere. Results show that 60% of the students used a visual dynamic method as their main method of recollection and that video was considered the most influential educational input with respect to recollection of a specific procedure. Observation of students' performance during the orchiectomy showed no clear association with students' method of recollection but a significant association (p=.002) with educational input. Our results illustrate the power of a visual input and support prior findings that knowledge is constructed from multiple sources of information. PMID:27152494

  9. Workshop report: the 2012 antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine: exploring the consequences of antimicrobial drug use: a 3-D approach.

    PubMed

    Martinez, M; Blondeau, J; Cerniglia, C E; Fink-Gremmels, J; Guenther, S; Hunter, R P; Li, X-Z; Papich, M; Silley, P; Soback, S; Toutain, P-L; Zhang, Q

    2014-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global challenge that impacts both human and veterinary health care. The resilience of microbes is reflected in their ability to adapt and survive in spite of our best efforts to constrain their infectious capabilities. As science advances, many of the mechanisms for microbial survival and resistance element transfer have been identified. During the 2012 meeting of Antimicrobial Agents in Veterinary Medicine (AAVM), experts provided insights on such issues as use vs. resistance, the available tools for supporting appropriate drug use, the importance of meeting the therapeutic needs within the domestic animal health care, and the requirements associated with food safety and food security. This report aims to provide a summary of the presentations and discussions occurring during the 2012 AAVM with the goal of stimulating future discussions and enhancing the opportunity to establish creative and sustainable solutions that will guarantee the availability of an effective therapeutic arsenal for veterinary species.

  10. Study to compare veterinarians’ exposure to Toxoplasma gondii to that of veterinary staff and the general public

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasmosis has been epidemiologically linked with the serious mental illness that is schizophrenia. Toxoplasmosis has also been associated with the risk of suicide. The suicide rate in the veterinary population has reached a level of concern. To assess the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii exposure...

  11. Veterinary drugs in the environment and their toxicity to plants.

    PubMed

    Bártíková, Hana; Podlipná, Radka; Skálová, Lenka

    2016-02-01

    Veterinary drugs used for treatment and prevention of diseases in animals represent important source of environmental pollution due to intensive agri- and aquaculture production. The drugs can reach environment through the treatment processes, inappropriate disposal of used containers, unused medicine or livestock feed, and manufacturing processes. Wide scale of veterinary pharmaceuticals e.g. antibiotics, antiparasitic and antifungal drugs, hormones, anti-inflammatory drugs, anaesthetics, sedatives etc. enter the environment and may affect non-target organisms including plants. This review characterizes the commonly used drugs in veterinary practice, outlines their behaviour in the environment and summarizes available information about their toxic effect on plants. Significant influence of many antibiotics and hormones on plant developmental and physiological processes have been proved. However, potential phytotoxicity of other veterinary drugs has been studied rarely, although knowledge of phytotoxicity of veterinary drugs may help predict their influence on biodiversity and improve phytoremediation strategies. Moreover, additional topics such as long term effect of low doses of drugs and their metabolites, behaviour of mixture of veterinary drugs and other chemicals in ecosystems should be more thoroughly investigated to obtain complex information on the impact of veterinary drugs in the environment. PMID:26606183

  12. Bactericidal properties of pradofloxacin against veterinary pathogens.

    PubMed

    Silley, Peter; Stephan, Bernd; Greife, Heinrich A; Pridmore, Andrew

    2012-05-25

    Pradofloxacin is a new veterinary 8-cyano-fluoroquinolone developed for use against bacterial infections in dogs and cats involving both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The minimal bactericidal concentrations have been determined against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, Streptococcus canis, Proteus spp., Fusobacterium spp., Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella species. A subset of these species was selected, and the in vitro rate of kill by pradofloxacin was determined. For 27 of the 30 tested aerobic strains the pradofloxacin MBC was within two doubling dilutions of the MIC. For the remaining strains, the MIC and MBC were within three to four doubling dilutions. Pradofloxacin also demonstrated bactericidal activity against all anaerobic strains, and the MBC was equal to the MIC for four of the strains, within 1 doubling dilution for three strains, within 2 dilutions for a further 3 strains and within 3 dilutions for the remaining five strains. As pradofloxacin concentration was increased, a faster rate of killing was observed; bactericidal effects were seen in all cases at concentrations ≤ 0.25 μg/mL. The bactericidal activity against the anaerobic strains was marked, of particular relevance was the complete absence of regrowth even at 48 h at concentrations as low as 0.125 μg/mL. In conclusion, pradofloxacin exhibits clear bactericidal activity in terms of MBC and kill kinetics against aerobic and anaerobic clinical isolates from dogs and cats at concentrations that are greatly exceeded within the systemic circulation after administration of the recommended therapeutic doses to the target animals. It is expected that such a rapid rate of kill will play a significant role in clinical efficacy. These data demonstrate the complete and rapid killing of anaerobic bacteria by a veterinary 8-cyano-fluoroquinolone. PMID:22209121

  13. The use of information and communication technology in veterinary education.

    PubMed

    Short, N

    2002-02-01

    The internet provides new opportunities to deliver distance and e-learning to the veterinary profession both at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. There are now numerous examples of successful computer-based educational projects in UK higher education, which provide useful models for veterinary science. This will present challenges for academics who will need to adapt their teaching methodologies and students who will have to develop new ways of learning. The future of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the veterinary sector is difficult to predict but it is likely to have far reaching effects on the profession. PMID:12002631

  14. [Leibniz and veterinary medicine--a contribution to Leibniz research].

    PubMed

    Wens, H M

    1992-06-01

    This study examines LEIBNIZ' idea of Veterinary medicine in a biographical context. It is based on material from the Leibniz-Archives of the Niedersächsische Landesbibliothek Hannover, primary sources as well as the correspondence between LEIBNIZ and F. HOFFMANN and B. RAMAZZINI. Critical analysis of LEIBNIZ' proposal to establish a medical administrative authority and an analysis of further sources corroborate the view of LEIBNIZ as a progressive thinker who included the epidemiology of veterinary medicine (the preventive approach) in his conception. In this way he conceived of veterinary medicine in scientific terms which is going to be the relevant approach today.

  15. [Veterinary Drug 'what'? Various marginal notes by an 'industrial veterinarian'].

    PubMed

    Hoftijzer, J

    1987-04-15

    A retrospective view of the history of the Veterinary Medicinal Products Act and the current situation of the trade in veterinary drugs is followed by a discussion of a number of changes which will have to be made in the fields of production, packing, distribution and the trade in these drugs. With regard to these last-named items, a connection with the Act on the Practice of Veterinary Medicine should be made. In general it can be stated that the innovating industry is not dissatisfied, but only the actual enforcement of the act will provide genuine replies to questions which are still unanswered. PMID:3576584

  16. [Veterinary Drug 'what'? Various marginal notes by an 'industrial veterinarian'].

    PubMed

    Hoftijzer, J

    1987-04-15

    A retrospective view of the history of the Veterinary Medicinal Products Act and the current situation of the trade in veterinary drugs is followed by a discussion of a number of changes which will have to be made in the fields of production, packing, distribution and the trade in these drugs. With regard to these last-named items, a connection with the Act on the Practice of Veterinary Medicine should be made. In general it can be stated that the innovating industry is not dissatisfied, but only the actual enforcement of the act will provide genuine replies to questions which are still unanswered.

  17. Reputation management on facebook: awareness is key to protecting yourself, your practice, and the veterinary profession.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Cynthia A; Coe, Jason B; Muise, Amy; Christofides, Emily; Desmarais, Serge

    2014-01-01

    From the Social media use by health professionals occurs in a digital environment where etiquette has yet to be solidly defined. The objectives of this study were to explore veterinarians' personal use of Facebook, knowledge of privacy settings, and factors related to sharing personal information online. All American Animal Hospital Association member veterinarians with a valid e-mail address (9469) were invited to complete an online survey about Facebook (e.g., time spent on Facebook, awareness of consequences, types of information posted). Questions assessing personality dimensions including trust, popularity, self-esteem and professional identity were included. The response rate was 17% (1594 of 9469); 72% of respondents (1148 of 1594) had a personal Facebook profile. Veterinarians were more likely to share information on Facebook than they would in general. Trust, need for popularity, and more time spent on Facebook predicted more disclosure of personal information on Facebook. Awareness of consequences and increased veterinary experience predicted lesser disclosure. As veterinary practices use Facebook to improve client services, they need also to manage risks associated with online disclosure by staff. Raising awareness of reputation management and consequences of posting certain types of information to Facebook is integral to protecting the individual, the practice, and the veterinary profession. PMID:24855091

  18. Reputation management on facebook: awareness is key to protecting yourself, your practice, and the veterinary profession.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Cynthia A; Coe, Jason B; Muise, Amy; Christofides, Emily; Desmarais, Serge

    2014-01-01

    From the Social media use by health professionals occurs in a digital environment where etiquette has yet to be solidly defined. The objectives of this study were to explore veterinarians' personal use of Facebook, knowledge of privacy settings, and factors related to sharing personal information online. All American Animal Hospital Association member veterinarians with a valid e-mail address (9469) were invited to complete an online survey about Facebook (e.g., time spent on Facebook, awareness of consequences, types of information posted). Questions assessing personality dimensions including trust, popularity, self-esteem and professional identity were included. The response rate was 17% (1594 of 9469); 72% of respondents (1148 of 1594) had a personal Facebook profile. Veterinarians were more likely to share information on Facebook than they would in general. Trust, need for popularity, and more time spent on Facebook predicted more disclosure of personal information on Facebook. Awareness of consequences and increased veterinary experience predicted lesser disclosure. As veterinary practices use Facebook to improve client services, they need also to manage risks associated with online disclosure by staff. Raising awareness of reputation management and consequences of posting certain types of information to Facebook is integral to protecting the individual, the practice, and the veterinary profession.

  19. What is the veterinary professional identity? Preliminary findings from web-based continuing professional development in veterinary professionalism.

    PubMed

    Armitage-Chan, E; Maddison, J; May, S A

    2016-03-26

    Professionalism and professional skills are increasingly being incorporated into veterinary curricula; however, lack of clarity in defining veterinary professionalism presents a potential challenge for directing course outcomes that are of benefit to the veterinary professional. An online continuing education course in veterinary professionalism was designed to address a deficit in postgraduate support in this area; as part of this course, delegates of varying practice backgrounds participated in online discussions reflecting on the implications of professional skills for their clinical practice. The discussions surrounding the role of the veterinary professional and reflecting on strengths and weaknesses in professional skills were analysed using narrative methodology, which provided an understanding of the defining skills and attributes of the veterinary professional, from the perspectives of those involved (i.e. how vets understood their own career identity). The veterinary surgeon was understood to be an interprofessional team member, who makes clinical decisions in the face of competing stakeholder needs and works in a complex environment comprising multiple and diverse challenges (stress, high emotions, financial issues, work-life balance). It was identified that strategies for accepting fallibility, and those necessary for establishing reasonable expectations of professional behaviour and clinical ability, are poorly developed. PMID:26857071

  20. The role of the Jotello F. Soga Library in the digital preservation of South African veterinary history.

    PubMed

    Breytenbach, Amelia; Lourens, Antoinette; Marsh, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The history of veterinary science in South Africa can only be appreciated, studied, researched and passed on to coming generations if historical sources are readily available. In most countries, material and sources with historical value are often difficult to locate, dispersed over a large area and not part of the conventional book and journal literature. The Faculty of Veterinary Science of the University of Pretoria and its library has access to a large collection of historical sources. The collection consists of photographs, photographic slides, documents, proceedings, posters, audio-visual material, postcards and other memorabilia. Other institutions in the country are also approached if relevant sources are identified in their collections. The University of Pretoria's institutional repository, UPSpace, was launched in 2006. This provided the Jotello F. Soga Library with the opportunity to fill the repository with relevant digitised collections of diverse heritage and learning resources that can contribute to the long-term preservation and accessibility of historical veterinary sources. These collections are available for use not only by historians and researchers in South Africa but also elsewhere in Africa and the rest of the world. Important historical collections such as the Arnold Theiler collection, the Jotello F. Soga collection and collections of the Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research and the Journal of the South African Veterinary Association are highlighted. The benefits of an open access digital repository, the importance of collaboration across the veterinary community and other prerequisites for the sustainability of a digitisation project and the importance of metadata to enhance accessibility are covered. PMID:23718694

  1. The role of the Jotello F. Soga Library in the digital preservation of South African veterinary history.

    PubMed

    Breytenbach, Amelia; Lourens, Antoinette; Marsh, Susan

    2013-04-26

    The history of veterinary science in South Africa can only be appreciated, studied, researched and passed on to coming generations if historical sources are readily available. In most countries, material and sources with historical value are often difficult to locate, dispersed over a large area and not part of the conventional book and journal literature. The Faculty of Veterinary Science of the University of Pretoria and its library has access to a large collection of historical sources. The collection consists of photographs, photographic slides, documents, proceedings, posters, audio-visual material, postcards and other memorabilia. Other institutions in the country are also approached if relevant sources are identified in their collections. The University of Pretoria's institutional repository, UPSpace, was launched in 2006. This provided the Jotello F. Soga Library with the opportunity to fill the repository with relevant digitised collections of diverse heritage and learning resources that can contribute to the long-term preservation and accessibility of historical veterinary sources. These collections are available for use not only by historians and researchers in South Africa but also elsewhere in Africa and the rest of the world. Important historical collections such as the Arnold Theiler collection, the Jotello F. Soga collection and collections of the Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research and the Journal of the South African Veterinary Association are highlighted. The benefits of an open access digital repository, the importance of collaboration across the veterinary community and other prerequisites for the sustainability of a digitisation project and the importance of metadata to enhance accessibility are covered.

  2. Risk Assessment Considerations for Veterinary Medicines in Aquatic Ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides a critical evaluation of prospective and retrospective risk assessment approaches for veterinary medicines in aquatic ecosystems and provides recommendations for possible alternative approaches for hazard characterization.

  3. Financial dimensions of veterinary medical education: an economist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, James W

    2013-01-01

    Much discussion has transpired in recent years related to the rising cost of veterinary medical education and the increasing debt loads of graduating veterinarians. Underlying these trends are fundamental changes in the funding structure of higher education in general and of academic veterinary medicine specifically. As a result of the ongoing disinvestment by state governments in higher education, both tuition rates and academic programs have experienced a substantial impact across US colleges and schools of veterinary medicine. Programmatically, the effects have spanned the entire range of teaching, research, and service activities. For graduates, both across higher education and in veterinary medicine specifically, the impact has been steadily increasing levels of student debt. Although the situation is clearly worrisome, viable repayment options exist for these escalating debt loads. In combination with recent income and employment trends for veterinarians, these options provide a basis for cautious optimism for the future. PMID:23709105

  4. Learning of veterinary professionals in communities: a thesis report.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Esther

    2013-09-01

    Veterinary professionals can improve on how they continue learning through critically reflective work behaviour in communities. In this way participation in communities might support the transition to evidence-based practice.

  5. Prioritizing veterinary pharmaceuticals for aquatic environment in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younghee; Jung, Jinyong; Kim, Myunghyun; Park, Jeongim; Boxall, Alistair B A; Choi, Kyungho

    2008-09-01

    Pharmaceutical residues may have serious impacts on nontarget biological organisms in aquatic ecosystems, and have therefore precipitated numerous investigations worldwide. Many pharmaceutical compounds available on the market need to be prioritized based on their potential ecological and human health risks in order to develop sound management decisions. We prioritized veterinary pharmaceuticals in Korea by their usage, potential to enter the environment, and toxicological hazard. Twenty compounds were identified in the top priority class, most of which were antibiotics. Among these compounds, 8 were identified as deserving more immediate attention: amoxicillin, enramycin, fenbendazole, florfenicol, ivermectin, oxytetracycline, tylosin, and virginiamycin. A limitation of this study is that we initially screened veterinary pharmaceuticals by sales tonnage for veterinary use only. However, this is the first attempt to prioritize veterinary pharmaceuticals in Korea, and it provides important concepts for developing environmental risk management plans for such contaminants in aquatic systems. PMID:21783906

  6. [Tropical veterinary medicine and education in The Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Uilenberg, Gerrit

    2008-01-01

    in this lecture an overview is given of the development of tropical veterinary medicine and education in The Netherlands after the Dutch colonial period. The starting point is the development of tropical veterinary medicine in general, especially in Europe and Africa. It is pointed out that just now it is very important to have specialists in tropical diseases not only in the tropics but also in the western world since globalization involves the import of a lot of tropical diseases. The speaker is an advocate of a course on tropical veterinary medicine on an European level, but at the same time he is sceptical about it. In the second part he gives an overview of the education programme on tropical veterinary medicine from the foundation of the Institute at Utrecht University in 1948 until its decline.

  7. Maximising canine welfare in veterinary practice and research: a review.

    PubMed

    Yeates, James W

    2012-06-01

    This article looks at the existing evidence-base by which veterinary surgeons can make welfare-focused treatment choices. Narrative and structured reviews were conducted. Papers were categorised under headings based on (1) themes in the UK Animal Welfare Act (AWA 2006) - behaviour, environment, nutrition, company and health; (2) iatrogenic harm induced by treatment; (3) decision-making methods, and (4) the subjects' context (e.g. home versus laboratory). There is more information available about 'overt' problems (e.g. acute disease), than 'covert' issues (e.g. chronic pain, lack of company and obesity). Forty of 109 papers covered pain, suffering, injury and disease, compared to 69 across four other themes in the AWA. Twelve papers were identified as focusing on welfare assessment and clinical decision-making. Veterinary surgeons should consider each of the five welfare themes described in the AWA in both veterinary practice and in determining veterinary research priorities.

  8. The Northwest Regional Program in Veterinary Medical Education: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bustad, L. K.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Results of a four-year cooperative effort to develop the Washington-Oregon-Idaho Regional Program in Veterinary Medicine (WOI) are summarized. Special admissions policies, curriculum, administrative procedures, and funding approaches are reviewed. (LBH)

  9. Evaluation of Teaching Veterinary Medicine at the University of Nairobi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, U. B.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of graduates from the University of Nairobi, Kenya in the field of veterinary medicine is reported. Areas covered include curriculum; teaching techniques; quality of faculty; and examinations. (JMF)

  10. Financial dimensions of veterinary medical education: an economist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, James W

    2013-01-01

    Much discussion has transpired in recent years related to the rising cost of veterinary medical education and the increasing debt loads of graduating veterinarians. Underlying these trends are fundamental changes in the funding structure of higher education in general and of academic veterinary medicine specifically. As a result of the ongoing disinvestment by state governments in higher education, both tuition rates and academic programs have experienced a substantial impact across US colleges and schools of veterinary medicine. Programmatically, the effects have spanned the entire range of teaching, research, and service activities. For graduates, both across higher education and in veterinary medicine specifically, the impact has been steadily increasing levels of student debt. Although the situation is clearly worrisome, viable repayment options exist for these escalating debt loads. In combination with recent income and employment trends for veterinarians, these options provide a basis for cautious optimism for the future.

  11. A survey of the awareness, knowledge, policies and views of veterinary journal Editors-in-Chief on reporting guidelines for publication of research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wider adoption of reporting guidelines by veterinary journals could improve the quality of published veterinary research. The aims of this study were to assess the knowledge and views of veterinary Editors-in-Chief on reporting guidelines, identify the policies of their journals, and determine their information needs. Editors-in-Chief of 185 journals on the contact list for the International Association of Veterinary Editors (IAVE) were surveyed in April 2012 using an online questionnaire which contained both closed and open questions. Results The response rate was 36.8% (68/185). Thirty-six of 68 editors (52.9%) stated they knew what a reporting guideline was before receiving the questionnaire. Editors said they had found out about reporting guidelines primarily through articles in other journals, via the Internet and through their own journal. Twenty of 57 respondents (35.1%) said their journal referred to reporting guidelines in its instructions to authors. CONSORT, REFLECT, and ARRIVE were the most frequently cited. Forty-four of 68 respondents (68.2%) believed that reporting guidelines should be adopted by all refereed veterinary journals. Qualitative analysis of the open questions revealed that lack of knowledge, fear, resistance to change, and difficulty in implementation were perceived as barriers to the adoption of reporting guidelines by journals. Editors suggested that reporting guidelines be promoted through communication and education of the veterinary community, with roles for the IAVE and universities. Many respondents believed a consensus policy on guideline implementation was needed for veterinary journals. Conclusions Further communication and education about reporting guidelines for editors, authors and reviewers has the potential to increase their adoption by veterinary journals in the future. PMID:24410882

  12. Evaluation of a primary-care setting at a veterinary teaching hospital by a student business group: implementing business training within the curriculum.

    PubMed

    Louisa Poon, W Y; Covington, Jennifer P; Dempsey, Lauren S; Goetgeluck, Scott L; Marscher, William F; Morelli, Sierra C; Powell, Jana E; Rivers, Elizabeth M; Roth, Ira G

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the use of students' business skills in optimizing teaching opportunities, student learning, and client satisfaction in a primary health care setting at a veterinary teaching hospital. Seven veterinary-student members of the local chapter of the Veterinary Business Management Association (VBMA) evaluated the primary-care service at the University of Georgia (UGA) veterinary teaching hospital and assessed six areas of focus: (1) branding and marketing, (2) client experience, (3) staff and staffing, (4) student experience, (5) time management, and (6) standard operating procedures and protocols. For each area of focus, strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats were identified. Of the six areas, two were identified as areas in need of immediate improvement, the first being the updating of standard operating protocols and the second being time management and the flow of appointments. Recommendations made for these two areas were implemented. Overall, the staff and students provided positive feedback on the recommended changes. Through such a student-centered approach to improving the quality of their education, students are empowered and are held accountable for their learning environment. The fact that the VBMA functions without a parent organization and that the primary-care service at UGA functions primarily as a separate entity from the specialty services at the College of Veterinary Medicine allowed students to have a direct impact on their learning environment. We hope that this model for advancing business education will be studied and promoted to benefit both veterinary education and business practice within academia. PMID:24531532

  13. Evaluation of a primary-care setting at a veterinary teaching hospital by a student business group: implementing business training within the curriculum.

    PubMed

    Louisa Poon, W Y; Covington, Jennifer P; Dempsey, Lauren S; Goetgeluck, Scott L; Marscher, William F; Morelli, Sierra C; Powell, Jana E; Rivers, Elizabeth M; Roth, Ira G

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the use of students' business skills in optimizing teaching opportunities, student learning, and client satisfaction in a primary health care setting at a veterinary teaching hospital. Seven veterinary-student members of the local chapter of the Veterinary Business Management Association (VBMA) evaluated the primary-care service at the University of Georgia (UGA) veterinary teaching hospital and assessed six areas of focus: (1) branding and marketing, (2) client experience, (3) staff and staffing, (4) student experience, (5) time management, and (6) standard operating procedures and protocols. For each area of focus, strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats were identified. Of the six areas, two were identified as areas in need of immediate improvement, the first being the updating of standard operating protocols and the second being time management and the flow of appointments. Recommendations made for these two areas were implemented. Overall, the staff and students provided positive feedback on the recommended changes. Through such a student-centered approach to improving the quality of their education, students are empowered and are held accountable for their learning environment. The fact that the VBMA functions without a parent organization and that the primary-care service at UGA functions primarily as a separate entity from the specialty services at the College of Veterinary Medicine allowed students to have a direct impact on their learning environment. We hope that this model for advancing business education will be studied and promoted to benefit both veterinary education and business practice within academia.

  14. Vet Futures: taking account of the wider veterinary team.

    PubMed

    2016-08-13

    A summit meeting held at the Royal Veterinary College in July saw the launch of an action plan to take forward the six key ambitions set out in the 2015 Vet Futures report. Developed by an action group following publication of the report, the plan outlines an ambitious programme of work. The summit also saw the launch of a VN Futures report setting out a vision for the veterinary nursing profession over the next five years. Laura Honey reports. PMID:27516558

  15. Ethno – veterinary Plants of Nadurbar district of Maharashtra, India

    PubMed Central

    Ramalah, P.V.; Patil, M B

    2005-01-01

    A survey of medicinal plants of Nandurbar district of Maharashtra, India in regard to their veterinary uses, has been done. While collecting the data, special emphasis is given to the foot and Mouth disease, Haemorrhagic Septicaemia, Maggotted Wounds, Retention of Placcenta, Timpany and Worms, which are the most common animal ailment in the district. After short listing, about 29 plant species are found to be in regular use by various tribal veterinary doctors in the district. PMID:22557165

  16. A veterinary guide to the fish gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Weber, E Scott

    2014-05-01

    For veterinarians to better understand aquatic animal health, the most basic veterinary foundation begins with understanding piscine anatomy and physiology. General observations of fish behavior, anatomy, and food apprehension can provide more valuable diagnostic information than advanced laboratory testing alone. This article highlights anatomic differences of fish species occupying different environmental niches, using a case to show the use of modern veterinary diagnostics, and introduces additional topics in piscine gastroenterology related to toxins, nutrition, probiotics, and infectious diseases.

  17. Biosafety principles and practices for the veterinary diagnostic laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kozlovac, Joseph; Schmitt, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Good biosafety and biocontainment programs and practices are critical components of the successful operation of any veterinary diagnostic laboratory. In this chapter we provide information and guidance on critical biosafety management program elements, facility requirements, protective equipment, and procedures necessary to ensure that the laboratory worker and the environment are adequately protected in the challenging work environment of the veterinary diagnostic laboratory in general and provide specific guidance for those laboratories employing molecular diagnostic techniques. PMID:25399086

  18. Fosfomycin: Uses and potentialities in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Pérez, D S; Tapia, M O; Soraci, A L

    2014-01-01

    Fosfomycin (FOS) is a natural bactericidal broad-spectrum antibiotic which acts on proliferating bacteria by inhibiting cell wall and early murein/peptidoglycan synthesis. Bactericidal activity is evident against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and can also act synergistically with other antibiotics. Bacterial resistance to FOS may be natural or acquired. Other properties of this drug include inhibition of bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells, exopolysaccharide biofilm penetration, immunomodulatory effect, phagocytosis promotion and protection against the nephrotoxicity caused by other drugs. FOS has chemical characteristics not typically observed in organic phosphoric compounds and its molecular weight is almost the lowest of all the antimicrobials. It tends to form salts easily due to its acidic nature (disodium salt, for intravenous (IV), intramuscular (IM) and subcutaneous (SC) administration; calcium and trometamol salt: for oral (PO) administration). FOS has a very low protein binding (<0.5%) which, along with its low molecular weight and water solubility, contributes to its good diffusion into fluids (cerebrospinal fluid, aqueous and vitreous humor, interstitial fluid) and tissues (placenta, bone, muscle, liver, kidney and skin/fat). In all species, important differences in the bioavailability have been found after administration in relation to the various derivatives of FOS salts. Pharmacokinetic profiles have been described in humans, chickens, rabbits, cows, dogs, horses and weaning piglets. The low toxicity and potential efficacy of FOS are the main factors that contribute to its use in humans and animals. Thus, it has been used to treat a broad variety of bacterial infections in humans, such as localized peritonitis, brain abscesses, severe soft tissue infections, cystitis and other conditions. In veterinary medicine, FOS is used to treat infectious diseases of broiler chickens and pigs. In broilers, it is administered for the treatment of E

  19. Fosfomycin: Uses and potentialities in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Pérez, D S; Tapia, M O; Soraci, A L

    2014-01-01

    Fosfomycin (FOS) is a natural bactericidal broad-spectrum antibiotic which acts on proliferating bacteria by inhibiting cell wall and early murein/peptidoglycan synthesis. Bactericidal activity is evident against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and can also act synergistically with other antibiotics. Bacterial resistance to FOS may be natural or acquired. Other properties of this drug include inhibition of bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells, exopolysaccharide biofilm penetration, immunomodulatory effect, phagocytosis promotion and protection against the nephrotoxicity caused by other drugs. FOS has chemical characteristics not typically observed in organic phosphoric compounds and its molecular weight is almost the lowest of all the antimicrobials. It tends to form salts easily due to its acidic nature (disodium salt, for intravenous (IV), intramuscular (IM) and subcutaneous (SC) administration; calcium and trometamol salt: for oral (PO) administration). FOS has a very low protein binding (<0.5%) which, along with its low molecular weight and water solubility, contributes to its good diffusion into fluids (cerebrospinal fluid, aqueous and vitreous humor, interstitial fluid) and tissues (placenta, bone, muscle, liver, kidney and skin/fat). In all species, important differences in the bioavailability have been found after administration in relation to the various derivatives of FOS salts. Pharmacokinetic profiles have been described in humans, chickens, rabbits, cows, dogs, horses and weaning piglets. The low toxicity and potential efficacy of FOS are the main factors that contribute to its use in humans and animals. Thus, it has been used to treat a broad variety of bacterial infections in humans, such as localized peritonitis, brain abscesses, severe soft tissue infections, cystitis and other conditions. In veterinary medicine, FOS is used to treat infectious diseases of broiler chickens and pigs. In broilers, it is administered for the treatment of E

  20. Fosfomycin: Uses and potentialities in veterinary medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, D.S.; Tapia, M.O.; Soraci, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Fosfomycin (FOS) is a natural bactericidal broad-spectrum antibiotic which acts on proliferating bacteria by inhibiting cell wall and early murein/peptidoglycan synthesis. Bactericidal activity is evident against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and can also act synergistically with other antibiotics. Bacterial resistance to FOS may be natural or acquired. Other properties of this drug include inhibition of bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells, exopolysaccharide biofilm penetration, immunomodulatory effect, phagocytosis promotion and protection against the nephrotoxicity caused by other drugs. FOS has chemical characteristics not typically observed in organic phosphoric compounds and its molecular weight is almost the lowest of all the antimicrobials. It tends to form salts easily due to its acidic nature (disodium salt, for intravenous (IV), intramuscular (IM) and subcutaneous (SC) administration; calcium and trometamol salt: for oral (PO) administration). FOS has a very low protein binding (<0.5%) which, along with its low molecular weight and water solubility, contributes to its good diffusion into fluids (cerebrospinal fluid, aqueous and vitreous humor, interstitial fluid) and tissues (placenta, bone, muscle, liver, kidney and skin/fat). In all species, important differences in the bioavailability have been found after administration in relation to the various derivatives of FOS salts. Pharmacokinetic profiles have been described in humans, chickens, rabbits, cows, dogs, horses and weaning piglets. The low toxicity and potential efficacy of FOS are the main factors that contribute to its use in humans and animals. Thus, it has been used to treat a broad variety of bacterial infections in humans, such as localized peritonitis, brain abscesses, severe soft tissue infections, cystitis and other conditions. In veterinary medicine, FOS is used to treat infectious diseases of broiler chickens and pigs. In broilers, it is administered for the treatment of E

  1. Optimizing biomedical science learning in a veterinary curriculum: a review.

    PubMed

    Warren, Amy L; Donnon, Tyrone

    2013-01-01

    As veterinary medical curricula evolve, the time dedicated to biomedical science teaching, as well as the role of biomedical science knowledge in veterinary education, has been scrutinized. Aside from being mandated by accrediting bodies, biomedical science knowledge plays an important role in developing clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic reasoning skills in the application of clinical skills, in supporting evidence-based veterinary practice and life-long learning, and in advancing biomedical knowledge and comparative medicine. With an increasing volume and fast pace of change in biomedical knowledge, as well as increased demands on curricular time, there has been pressure to make biomedical science education efficient and relevant for veterinary medicine. This has lead to a shift in biomedical education from fact-based, teacher-centered and discipline-based teaching to applicable, student-centered, integrated teaching. This movement is supported by adult learning theories and is thought to enhance students' transference of biomedical science into their clinical practice. The importance of biomedical science in veterinary education and the theories of biomedical science learning will be discussed in this article. In addition, we will explore current advances in biomedical teaching methodologies that are aimed to maximize knowledge retention and application for clinical veterinary training and practice.

  2. The changing role of veterinary expertise in the food chain.

    PubMed

    Enticott, Gareth; Donaldson, Andrew; Lowe, Philip; Power, Megan; Proctor, Amy; Wilkinson, Katy

    2011-07-12

    This paper analyses how the changing governance of animal health has impacted upon veterinary expertise and its role in providing public health benefits. It argues that the social sciences can play an important role in understanding the nature of these changes, but also that their ideas and methods are, in part, responsible for them. The paper begins by examining how veterinary expertise came to be crucial to the regulation of the food chain in the twentieth century. The relationship between the veterinary profession and the state proved mutually beneficial, allowing the state to address the problems of animal health, and the veterinary profession to become identified as central to public health and food supply. However, this relationship has been gradually eroded by the application of neoliberal management techniques to the governance of animal health. This paper traces the impact of these techniques that have caused widespread unease within and beyond the veterinary profession about the consequences for its role in maintaining the public good of animal health. In conclusion, this paper suggests that the development of the social sciences in relation to animal health could contribute more helpfully to further changes in veterinary expertise. PMID:21624916

  3. The changing role of veterinary expertise in the food chain

    PubMed Central

    Enticott, Gareth; Donaldson, Andrew; Lowe, Philip; Power, Megan; Proctor, Amy; Wilkinson, Katy

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses how the changing governance of animal health has impacted upon veterinary expertise and its role in providing public health benefits. It argues that the social sciences can play an important role in understanding the nature of these changes, but also that their ideas and methods are, in part, responsible for them. The paper begins by examining how veterinary expertise came to be crucial to the regulation of the food chain in the twentieth century. The relationship between the veterinary profession and the state proved mutually beneficial, allowing the state to address the problems of animal health, and the veterinary profession to become identified as central to public health and food supply. However, this relationship has been gradually eroded by the application of neoliberal management techniques to the governance of animal health. This paper traces the impact of these techniques that have caused widespread unease within and beyond the veterinary profession about the consequences for its role in maintaining the public good of animal health. In conclusion, this paper suggests that the development of the social sciences in relation to animal health could contribute more helpfully to further changes in veterinary expertise. PMID:21624916

  4. The changing role of veterinary expertise in the food chain.

    PubMed

    Enticott, Gareth; Donaldson, Andrew; Lowe, Philip; Power, Megan; Proctor, Amy; Wilkinson, Katy

    2011-07-12

    This paper analyses how the changing governance of animal health has impacted upon veterinary expertise and its role in providing public health benefits. It argues that the social sciences can play an important role in understanding the nature of these changes, but also that their ideas and methods are, in part, responsible for them. The paper begins by examining how veterinary expertise came to be crucial to the regulation of the food chain in the twentieth century. The relationship between the veterinary profession and the state proved mutually beneficial, allowing the state to address the problems of animal health, and the veterinary profession to become identified as central to public health and food supply. However, this relationship has been gradually eroded by the application of neoliberal management techniques to the governance of animal health. This paper traces the impact of these techniques that have caused widespread unease within and beyond the veterinary profession about the consequences for its role in maintaining the public good of animal health. In conclusion, this paper suggests that the development of the social sciences in relation to animal health could contribute more helpfully to further changes in veterinary expertise.

  5. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers general principles regarding the evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs within the terms of reference of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), including comments on documents under elaboration for the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods (CCRVDF), information on registration/approval status of veterinary drugs, extrapolation of maximum residue limits (MRLs), dietary exposure assessment methodologies, the decision-tree approach to the evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs and guidance for JECFA experts. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two antimicrobial agents (amoxicillin, apramycin), four anthelminthics (derquantel, ivermectin, monepantel, triclabendazole) and two antimicrobial agents and production aids (monensin and narasin). Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and proposed MRLs. PMID:22953379

  6. Application of PK/PD Modeling in Veterinary Field: Dose Optimization and Drug Resistance Prediction.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ijaz; Huang, Lingli; Hao, Haihong; Sanders, Pascal; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Among veterinary drugs, antibiotics are frequently used. The true mean of antibiotic treatment is to administer dose of drug that will have enough high possibility of attaining the preferred curative effect, with adequately low chance of concentration associated toxicity. Rising of antibacterial resistance and lack of novel antibiotic is a global crisis; therefore there is an urgent need to overcome this problem. Inappropriate antibiotic selection, group treatment, and suboptimal dosing are mostly responsible for the mentioned problem. One approach to minimizing the antibacterial resistance is to optimize the dosage regimen. PK/PD model is important realm to be used for that purpose from several years. PK/PD model describes the relationship between drug potency, microorganism exposed to drug, and the effect observed. Proper use of the most modern PK/PD modeling approaches in veterinary medicine can optimize the dosage for patient, which in turn reduce toxicity and reduce the emergence of resistance. The aim of this review is to look at the existing state and application of PK/PD in veterinary medicine based on in vitro, in vivo, healthy, and disease model. PMID:26989688

  7. The use of standardized clients in research in the veterinary clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Nogueira Borden, Leandra J; Adams, Cindy L; Ladner, Lynda D

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the first use of undisclosed standardized clients (SCs) for research in the veterinary clinical setting. The study described here used SCs to investigate veterinarian-client communication during euthanasia discussions. Use of this methodology allowed us to avoid several ethical and logistical challenges associated with gathering observational data on sensitive subject matter. In medicine, standardized patients (SPs) are used extensively in teaching, medical school examinations, and licensing examinations. Increasingly, SPs are being used in research to evaluate physicians' performance in the clinical setting, including assessment of physician-patient communication. Several veterinary schools have recently introduced SCs for teaching and evaluation of student veterinarians. Until now, however, SCs have not been used for research in the veterinary clinical setting. Two cases were designed to reflect common reasons for discussion of euthanasia in private practice. A random sample of 32 consenting veterinarians in southern Ontario saw each case. Appointments were audio-recorded and analyzed using a communication assessment tool adapted from human medicine. At the end of each appointment, the SC disclosed his or her identity and both veterinarian and SC completed questionnaires to describe their perceptions of the communication that took place. This article describes in detail the use of SCs in this study, including case design, training, preparation for visits, use of animal patients, and challenges faced. The use of SCs was shown to be a feasible method of assessing veterinarian-client communication in the clinical setting. PMID:19066360

  8. Veterinary surgeons and suicide: a structured review of possible influences on increased risk.

    PubMed

    Bartram, D J; Baldwin, D S

    2010-03-27

    Veterinary surgeons are known to be at a higher risk of suicide compared with the general population. There has been much speculation regarding possible mechanisms underlying the increased suicide risk in the profession, but little empirical research. A computerised search of published literature on the suicide risk and influences on suicide among veterinarians, with comparison to the risk and influences in other occupational groups and in the general population, was used to develop a structured review. Veterinary surgeons have a proportional mortality ratio (PMR) for suicide approximately four times that of the general population and around twice that of other healthcare professions. A complex interaction of possible mechanisms may occur across the course of a veterinary career to increase the risk of suicide. Possible factors include the characteristics of individuals entering the profession, negative effects during undergraduate training, work-related stressors, ready access to and knowledge of means, stigma associated with mental illness, professional and social isolation, and alcohol or drug misuse (mainly prescription drugs to which the profession has ready access). Contextual effects such as attitudes to death and euthanasia, formed through the profession's routine involvement with euthanasia of companion animals and slaughter of farm animals, and suicide 'contagion' due to direct or indirect exposure to suicide of peers within this small profession are other possible influences. PMID:20348468

  9. A comparison of veterinary students enrolled and not enrolled in an animal-welfare course.

    PubMed

    Lord, Linda K; Walker, Jennifer B; Croney, Candace C; Golab, Gail C

    2010-01-01

    An online survey was conducted to compare 46 veterinary students who previously enrolled in a discussion-based animal-welfare elective with 45 veterinary students who did not take the course. Students were asked a series of questions about their attitudes toward animal welfare and were presented with animal-use scenarios that had not previously been discussed in the elective course: greyhound racing, veal calf production, and the use of genetically engineered mice in research. For each scenario, students' actual knowledge was scored on the basis of open-ended factual questions. Students were also asked how comfortable they were with educating themselves about each topic and to describe factors they would use to evaluate the welfare of animals in each scenario. Factors were classified as being associated with (a) biological functioning, (b) ability to exist in a natural state, or (c) measures of affective state or feelings. There was no significant difference in actual knowledge of the three scenarios between students who took the course and those who did not. Students who took the course were significantly more likely to be comfortable about educating themselves on each of the three animal-use scenarios and scored significantly higher in identifying welfare-affecting factors than students who did not take the course. The results suggest that this approach to instruction is an effective way to teach veterinary students about how to educate themselves about animal-welfare issues and to increase their confidence in appropriately evaluating novel animal-welfare topics. PMID:20378877

  10. 40 years of veterinary papers in JAC - what have we learnt?

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefan; Enne, Virve I; van Duijkeren, Engeline

    2016-10-01

    This review, for the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (JAC), gives an overview of the manuscripts related to veterinary bacteriology published in the journal in the past 40 years with a focus on 'One Health' aspects. From 1975 to 2000 the number of manuscripts related to veterinary medicine was limited, but thereafter, the number steadily increased. Most manuscripts published were related to food-producing animals, but companion animals and minor species were also covered. Subjects included antimicrobial usage in animals and the consequences for human medicine, new resistance genes and mechanisms, the prevalence and epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance, and the emergence of resistant bacteria in animals with zoonotic potential such as livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) and ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. These manuscripts have added to our knowledge on the risks of transmission of resistant bacteria from animals to humans and the importance of the prudent use of antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine. PMID:27660260

  11. Application of PK/PD Modeling in Veterinary Field: Dose Optimization and Drug Resistance Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Ijaz; Huang, Lingli; Hao, Haihong; Sanders, Pascal; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Among veterinary drugs, antibiotics are frequently used. The true mean of antibiotic treatment is to administer dose of drug that will have enough high possibility of attaining the preferred curative effect, with adequately low chance of concentration associated toxicity. Rising of antibacterial resistance and lack of novel antibiotic is a global crisis; therefore there is an urgent need to overcome this problem. Inappropriate antibiotic selection, group treatment, and suboptimal dosing are mostly responsible for the mentioned problem. One approach to minimizing the antibacterial resistance is to optimize the dosage regimen. PK/PD model is important realm to be used for that purpose from several years. PK/PD model describes the relationship between drug potency, microorganism exposed to drug, and the effect observed. Proper use of the most modern PK/PD modeling approaches in veterinary medicine can optimize the dosage for patient, which in turn reduce toxicity and reduce the emergence of resistance. The aim of this review is to look at the existing state and application of PK/PD in veterinary medicine based on in vitro, in vivo, healthy, and disease model. PMID:26989688

  12. Evaluation of medical and veterinary students' attitudes toward a one health interprofessional curricular exercise.

    PubMed

    Winer, Jenna Nicole; Nakagawa, Keisuke; Conrad, Patricia A; Brown, Lauren; Wilkes, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates whether medical and veterinary students' attitudes toward "One Health" and interprofessional education changed after participating in a joint small group learning exercise focused on risk factors associated with zoonotic disease. A survey was distributed to third-year medical students (n = 98) and second-year veterinary students (n = 140), each with a 95% response rate. Overall, 92% of veterinary students and 73% of medical students agreed or strongly agreed that "One Health" was relevant to their desired specialty. Students from both schools largely agreed that interprofessional education should be a goal of the curriculum for their school, and that interprofessional approaches strengthen their overall education. Students reported increased confidence in their communication skills and improved ability to contribute to One Health collaborative teams. This educational intervention, built around a patient case, focused on a variety of learning objectives including skills (such as communication), knowledge (of zoonotic toxoplasmosis) and attitudes (toward collaborative learning and practice). By sparking an interest in One Health during their early professional education, we sought to encourage a new generation of physicians and veterinarians to adopt a more collaborative spirit to their clinical practice, which will ultimately benefit human, animal and environmental health.

  13. Evidence-based medicine: the design and interpretation of noninferiority clinical trials in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Freise, K J; Lin, T-L; Fan, T M; Recta, V; Clark, T P

    2013-01-01

    Noninferiority trials are clinical studies designed to demonstrate that an investigational drug is at least as effective as an established treatment within a predetermined margin. They are conducted, in part, because of ethical concerns of administering a placebo to veterinary patients when an established effective treatment exists. The use of noninferiority trial designs has become more common in veterinary medicine with the increasing number of established veterinary therapeutics and the desire to eliminate potential pain or distress in a placebo-controlled study. Selecting the appropriate active control and an a priori noninferiority margin between the investigational and active control drug are unique and critical design factors for noninferiority studies. Without reliable historical knowledge of the disease response in the absence of treatment and of the response to the selected active control drug, proper design and interpretation of a noninferiority trial is not possible. Despite the appeal of conducting noninferiority trials to eliminate ethical concerns of placebo-controlled studies, there are real limitations and possible ethical conundrums associated with noninferiority trials. The consequences of incorrect study conclusions because of poor noninferiority trial design need careful attention. Alternative trial designs to typical noninferiority studies exist, but these too have limitations and must also be carefully considered.

  14. Geographic trends in research output and citations in veterinary medicine: insight into global research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bibliographic data can be used to map the research quality and productivity of a discipline. We hypothesized that bibliographic data would identify geographic differences in research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships within the veterinary profession that corresponded with demographic and economic indices. Results Using the SCImago portal, we retrieved veterinary journal, article, and citation data in the Scopus database by year (1996–2011), region, country, and publication in species-specific journals (food animal, small animal, equine, miscellaneous), as designated by Scopus. In 2011, Scopus indexed 165 journals in the veterinary subject area, an increase from 111 in 1996. As a percentage of veterinary research output between 1996 and 2010, Western Europe and North America (US and Canada) together accounted for 60.9% of articles and 73.0% of citations. The number of veterinary articles increased from 8815 in 1996 to 19,077 in 2010 (net increase 66.6%). During this time, publications increased by 21.0% in Asia, 17.2% in Western Europe, and 17.0% in Latin America, led by Brazil, China, India, and Turkey. The United States had the highest number of articles in species-specific journals. As a percentage of regional output, the proportion of articles in small animal and equine journals was highest in North America and the proportion of articles in food animal journals was highest in Africa. Based on principal component analysis, total articles were highly correlated with gross domestic product (based on World Bank data). The proportion of articles in small animal and equine journals was associated with gross national income, research and development, and % urban population, as opposed to the proportion of food animal articles, agricultural output, and % rural population. Co-citations linked veterinary medicine with medicine in the United States, with basic sciences in Eastern Europe and the Far East, and with agriculture

  15. Beyond NAVMEC: competency-based veterinary education and assessment of the professional competencies.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jennifer L; Pelzer, Jacquelyn M; Inzana, Karen D

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of competency-based curricula within the health sciences has been an important paradigm shift over the past 30 years. As a result, one of the five strategic goals recommended by the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium (NAVMEC) report was to graduate career-ready veterinarians who are proficient in, and have the confidence to use, an agreed-upon set of core competencies. Of the nine competencies identified as essential for veterinary graduates, seven could be classified as professional or non-technical competencies: communication; collaboration; management (self, team, system); lifelong learning, scholarship, value of research; leadership; diversity and multicultural awareness; and adaptation to changing environments. Traditionally, the professional competencies have received less attention in veterinary curricula and their assessment is often sporadic or inconsistent. In contrast, the same or similar competencies are being increasingly recognized in other health professions as essential skills and abilities, and their assessment is being undertaken with enhanced scrutiny and critical appraisal. Several challenges have been associated with the assessment of professional competencies, including agreement as to their definition and therefore their evaluation, the fact that they are frequently complex and require multiple integrative assessments, and the ability and/or desire of faculty to teach and assess these competencies. To provide an improved context for assessment of the seven professional competencies identified in the NAVMEC report, this article describes a broad framework for their evaluation as well as specific examples of how these or similar competencies are currently being measured in medical and veterinary curricula. PMID:23709107

  16. Environmental Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Veterinary Teaching Hospital During a Nonoutbreak Period

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amanda; Nava-Hoet, Rocio C.; Bateman, Shane; Hillier, Andrew; Dyce, John; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A.; Wittum, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Concurrent to reports of zoonotic and nosocomial transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in veterinary settings, recent evidence indicates that the environment in veterinary hospitals may be a potential source of MRSA. The present report is a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of MRSA on specific human and animal contact surfaces at a large veterinary hospital during a nonoutbreak period. A total of 156 samples were collected using Swiffers® or premoistened swabs from the small animal, equine, and food animal sections. MRSA was isolated and identified by pre-enrichment culture and standard microbiology procedures, including growth on Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with NaCl and oxacillin, and by detection of the mecA gene. Staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile were also determined. MRSA was detected in 12% (19/157) of the hospital environments sampled. The prevalence of MRSA in the small animal, equine, and food animal areas were 16%, 4%, and 0%, respectively. Sixteen of the MRSA isolates from the small animal section were classified as USA100, SCCmec type II, two of which had pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern that does not conform to any known type. The one isolate obtained from the equine section was classified as USA500, SCCmec type IV. The molecular epidemiological analysis revealed a very diverse population of MRSA isolates circulating in the hospital; however, in some instances, multiple locations/surfaces, not directly associated, had the same MRSA clone. No significant difference was observed between animal and human contact surfaces in regard to prevalence and type of isolates. Surfaces touched by multiple people (doors) and patients (carts) were frequently contaminated with MRSA. The results from this study indicate that MRSA is present in the environment even during nonoutbreak periods. This study also identified specific surfaces in

  17. Environmental methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a veterinary teaching hospital during a nonoutbreak period.

    PubMed

    Hoet, Armando E; Johnson, Amanda; Nava-Hoet, Rocio C; Bateman, Shane; Hillier, Andrew; Dyce, John; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A; Wittum, Thomas E

    2011-06-01

    Concurrent to reports of zoonotic and nosocomial transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in veterinary settings, recent evidence indicates that the environment in veterinary hospitals may be a potential source of MRSA. The present report is a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of MRSA on specific human and animal contact surfaces at a large veterinary hospital during a nonoutbreak period. A total of 156 samples were collected using Swiffers(®) or premoistened swabs from the small animal, equine, and food animal sections. MRSA was isolated and identified by pre-enrichment culture and standard microbiology procedures, including growth on Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with NaCl and oxacillin, and by detection of the mecA gene. Staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile were also determined. MRSA was detected in 12% (19/157) of the hospital environments sampled. The prevalence of MRSA in the small animal, equine, and food animal areas were 16%, 4%, and 0%, respectively. Sixteen of the MRSA isolates from the small animal section were classified as USA100, SCCmec type II, two of which had pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern that does not conform to any known type. The one isolate obtained from the equine section was classified as USA500, SCCmec type IV. The molecular epidemiological analysis revealed a very diverse population of MRSA isolates circulating in the hospital; however, in some instances, multiple locations/surfaces, not directly associated, had the same MRSA clone. No significant difference was observed between animal and human contact surfaces in regard to prevalence and type of isolates. Surfaces touched by multiple people (doors) and patients (carts) were frequently contaminated with MRSA. The results from this study indicate that MRSA is present in the environment even during nonoutbreak periods. This study also identified specific surfaces in a

  18. Probabilistic risk assessment of veterinary medicines applied to four major aquaculture species produced in Asia.

    PubMed

    Rico, Andreu; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2014-01-15

    Aquaculture production constitutes one of the main sources of pollution with veterinary medicines into the environment. About 90% of the global aquaculture production is produced in Asia and the potential environmental risks associated with the use of veterinary medicines in Asian aquaculture have not yet been properly evaluated. In this study we performed a probabilistic risk assessment for eight different aquaculture production scenarios in Asia by combining up-to-date information on the use of veterinary medicines and aquaculture production characteristics. The ERA-AQUA model was used to perform mass balances of veterinary medicinal treatments applied to aquaculture ponds and to characterize risks for primary producers, invertebrates, and fish potentially exposed to chemical residues through aquaculture effluents. The mass balance calculations showed that, on average, about 25% of the applied drug mass to aquaculture ponds is released into the environment, although this percentage varies with the chemical's properties, the mode of application, the cultured species density, and the water exchange rates in the aquaculture pond scenario. In general, the highest potential environmental risks were calculated for parasitic treatments, followed by disinfection and antibiotic treatments. Pangasius catfish production in Vietnam, followed by shrimp production in China, constitute possible hot-spots for environmental pollution due to the intensity of the aquaculture production and considerable discharge of toxic chemical residues into surrounding aquatic ecosystems. A risk-based ranking of compounds is provided for each of the evaluated scenarios, which offers crucial information for conducting further chemical and biological field and laboratory monitoring research. In addition, we discuss general knowledge gaps and research priorities for performing refined risk assessments of aquaculture medicines in the near future.

  19. Blunt Force Trauma in Veterinary Forensic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Ressel, L; Hetzel, U; Ricci, E

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary pathologists commonly encounter lesions of blunt trauma. The development of lesions is affected by the object's mass, velocity, size, shape, and angle of impact and by the plasticity and mobility of the impacted organ. Scrape, impact, and pattern abrasions cause localized epidermal loss and sometimes broken hairs and implanted foreign material. Contusions are best identified after reflecting the skin, and must be differentiated from coagulopathies and livor mortis. Lacerations-traumatic tissue tears-may have irregular margins, bridging by more resilient tissue, deviation of the wound tail, crushed hairs, and unilateral abrasion. Hanging or choking can cause circumferential cervical abrasions, contusions and rupture of hairs, hyoid bone fractures, and congestion of the head. Other special forms of blunt trauma include fractured nails, pressure sores, and dog bites. Ocular blunt trauma causes extraocular and intraocular hemorrhages, proptosis, or retinal detachment. The thoracic viscera are relatively protected from blunt trauma but may develop hemorrhages in intercostal muscles, rib fractures, pulmonary or cardiac contusions or lacerations with subsequent hemothorax, pneumothorax, or cardiac arrhythmia. The abdominal wall is resilient and moveable, yet the liver and spleen are susceptible to traumatic laceration or rupture. Whereas extravasation of blood can occur after death, evidence of vital injury includes leukocyte infiltration, erythrophagocytosis, hemosiderin, reparative lesions of fibroblast proliferation, myocyte regeneration in muscle, and callus formation in bone. Understanding these processes aids in the diagnosis of blunt force trauma including estimation of the age of resulting injuries. PMID:27381403

  20. Extremophiles and their application to veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Jane A; Baird, Alan W

    2004-06-01

    : Extremophiles are organisms that can grow and thrive in harsh conditions, e.g., extremes of temperature, pH, salinity, radiation, pressure and oxygen tension. Thermophilic, halophilic and radiation-resistant organisms are all microbes, some of which are able to withstand multiple extremes. Psychrophiles, or cold-loving organisms, include not only microbes, but fish that live in polar waters and animals that can withstand freezing. Extremophiles are structurally adapted at a molecular level to withstand these conditions. Thermophiles have particularly stable proteins and cell membranes, psychrophiles have flexible cellular proteins and membranes and/or antifreeze proteins, salt-resistant halophiles contain compatible solutes or high concentrations of inorganic ions, and acidophiles and alkaliphiles are able to pump ions to keep their internal pH close to neutrality. Their interest to veterinary medicine resides in their capacity to be pathogenic, and as sources of enzymes and other molecules for diagnostic and pharmaceutical purposes. In particular, thermostable DNA polymerases are a mainstay of PCR-based diagnostics.

  1. Cryptosporidium parvum: From foal to veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Galuppi, R; Piva, S; Castagnetti, C; Sarli, G; Iacono, E; Fioravanti, M L; Caffara, M

    2016-03-30

    This paper describes the transmission of a zoonotic subtype of Cryptosporidium parvum between two foals hospitalized in an Equine Perinatology Unit (EPU) linked to an outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in veterinary students. Fecal specimens of 36 mares (105 samples) and 28 foals (122 samples) were subjected to Ziehl-Neelsen staining, nested PCR of 18S rDNA. Two foals tested positive for Cryptosporidium; PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis and subtyping by nested PCR of the 60kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene revealed C. parvum subtype IIdA23G1. The introduction of Cryptosporidium into the EPU is suspected to be in a foal showing no initial clinical signs that tested positive for C. parvum during an asymptomatic phase. A second foal, hospitalized afterwards for perinatal asphyxia syndrome complicated with failure of passive transfer and sepsis, showed severe watery diarrhea after 4 days of hospitalization and was positive for the same subtype. During this period, six students attending the EPU complained of abdominal pain and diarrhea and were positive for the same subtype of C. parvum. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of this subtype in foals and the first report of evidence of zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis from foals to human. PMID:26921039

  2. Avoiding sexual harassment liability in veterinary practices.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, C A; Wilson, J F

    1996-05-15

    Harassment based on gender violates the rule of workplace equality established by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and enforced by the EEOC. In 1986, the US Supreme Court, in Meritor Savings Bank v Vinson, established the criteria that must be met for a claim of hostile environment sexual harassment to be considered valid. Plaintiffs must show that they were subjected to conduct based on their gender, that it was unwelcome, and that it was severe and pervasive enough to alter their condition of employment, resulting in an abusive working environment. There have been few sexual harassment cases involving veterinary professionals, and it is our goal to help keep the number of filed actions to a minimum. The most effective way to avoid hostile environment sexual harassment claims is to confront the issue openly and to adopt a sexual harassment policy for the practice. When it comes to sexual harassment, an ounce of prevention is unquestionably worth a pound of cure. PMID:8641947

  3. Veterinary drugs: disposition, biotransformation and risk evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fink-Gremmels, J; van Miert, A S

    1994-12-01

    Veterinary drugs may only be produced, distributed and administered after being licensed. This implies that, prior to marketing, a critical evaluation of the pharmaceutical quality, the clinical efficacy and the over-all pharmacological and toxicological properties of the active substances will be performed by national and/or supranational authorities. However, despite a sophisticated legal (harmonized) framework, a number of factors involved in residue formation and safety assessment remain unpredictable or dependant on the current 'state of the art' in the understanding of molecular pharmacology and toxicology. For example, drug disposition and residue formation in the target animal species may be influenced by a broad variety of physiological parameters including age, sex and diet, as well as by pathological conditions especially the acute phase response to infection. These factors affect both drug disposition and metabolite formation. Furthermore, current thinking in toxicological risk assessment is influenced by recent developments in molecular toxicology and thus by an increased but still incomplete understanding of the interaction of a toxic compound with the living organism. General recognized principles in the evaluation of potential toxicants are applied in the recommendation of withdrawal times and the establishment of maximum residue limits (MRL values). Apart from toxicological-based assessment, increasing awareness is directed to other than toxicological responses, especially the potential risk of effects of antimicrobial residues on human gastrointestinal microflora. Thus, the methodology of risk assessment is discussed in the context of the recently established legal framework within the European Union.

  4. Forensic Veterinary Pathology: Sharp Injuries in Animals.

    PubMed

    de Siqueira, A; Cuevas, S E Campusano; Salvagni, F A; Maiorka, P C

    2016-09-01

    Sharp-force injuries are injuries caused by a mechanical force using sharp objects against the skin. Sharp-force injuries are mainly classified as stab, incised, chop, and therapeutic wounds and are less frequent than blunt-force injuries in animals. The analysis of the edges of the wound is crucial, especially if more than one type of lesion is involved. It may be difficult to differentiate between sharp trauma and blunt trauma, because lacerations can resemble incised wounds. The accurate documentation and examination of these injuries may indicate the instrument involved, the relationship between the animal and the perpetrator, and the force of the stab. Situations in which this type of trauma occurs may involve social violence, accidents, hunting, veterinary medical management, and religious rituals. The causes of death related to this type of trauma include hypovolemic shock, pneumothorax, or asphyxiation due to aspiration of blood. Necropsy findings should provide objective and unbiased information about the cause and manner of death to aid the investigation and further judgment of a possible crime. PMID:27418586

  5. Veterinary urban hygiene: a challenge for India.

    PubMed

    Singh, B B; Ghatak, S; Banga, H S; Gill, J P S; Singh, B

    2013-12-01

    India is confronted with many hygiene problems in urban areas that are related to animal populations. While some of these issues have been present for many years, others are only now emerging. A livestock census in 2003 and another in 2007 revealed that populations of crossbred cattle, goats and poultry are all increasing in urban areas, since this enables easy market access, which, in turn, reduces transportation costs and adds to profits. The canine population has increased along with the human population, largely due to a lack of control measures such as impounding stray animals and euthanasia. These increases in populations of both food-producing animals and stray animals in cities exacerbate such public health hazards as the transmission of zoonoses, vector-borne diseases, occcupational health hazards and environmental pollution, as well as compromising animal welfare. At present, public health hazards due to urban animal husbandry practices are considerably under-estimated. To improve veterinary-related urban hygiene and to facilitate livestock production operations in urban areas, there is an urgent need to develop sound, science-based strategies enforced through stringent regulations. The use of One Health teams may provide an answer to these highly integrated public health problems. PMID:24761721

  6. Extremophiles and their application to veterinary medicine

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Extremophiles are organisms that can grow and thrive in harsh conditions, e.g., extremes of temperature, pH, salinity, radiation, pressure and oxygen tension. Thermophilic, halophilic and radiation-resistant organisms are all microbes, some of which are able to withstand multiple extremes. Psychrophiles, or cold-loving organisms, include not only microbes, but fish that live in polar waters and animals that can withstand freezing. Extremophiles are structurally adapted at a molecular level to withstand these conditions. Thermophiles have particularly stable proteins and cell membranes, psychrophiles have flexible cellular proteins and membranes and/or antifreeze proteins, salt-resistant halophiles contain compatible solutes or high concentrations of inorganic ions, and acidophiles and alkaliphiles are able to pump ions to keep their internal pH close to neutrality. Their interest to veterinary medicine resides in their capacity to be pathogenic, and as sources of enzymes and other molecules for diagnostic and pharmaceutical purposes. In particular, thermostable DNA polymerases are a mainstay of PCR-based diagnostics. PMID:21851659

  7. Veterinary urban hygiene: a challenge for India.

    PubMed

    Singh, B B; Ghatak, S; Banga, H S; Gill, J P S; Singh, B

    2013-12-01

    India is confronted with many hygiene problems in urban areas that are related to animal populations. While some of these issues have been present for many years, others are only now emerging. A livestock census in 2003 and another in 2007 revealed that populations of crossbred cattle, goats and poultry are all increasing in urban areas, since this enables easy market access, which, in turn, reduces transportation costs and adds to profits. The canine population has increased along with the human population, largely due to a lack of control measures such as impounding stray animals and euthanasia. These increases in populations of both food-producing animals and stray animals in cities exacerbate such public health hazards as the transmission of zoonoses, vector-borne diseases, occcupational health hazards and environmental pollution, as well as compromising animal welfare. At present, public health hazards due to urban animal husbandry practices are considerably under-estimated. To improve veterinary-related urban hygiene and to facilitate livestock production operations in urban areas, there is an urgent need to develop sound, science-based strategies enforced through stringent regulations. The use of One Health teams may provide an answer to these highly integrated public health problems.

  8. The preanalytic phase in veterinary clinical pathology.

    PubMed

    Braun, Jean-Pierre; Bourgès-Abella, Nathalie; Geffré, Anne; Concordet, Didier; Trumel, Cathy

    2015-03-01

    This article presents the general causes of preanalytic variability with a few examples showing specialists and practitioners that special and improved care should be given to this too often neglected phase. The preanalytic phase of clinical pathology includes all the steps from specimen collection to analysis. It is the phase where most laboratory errors occur in human, and probably also in veterinary clinical pathology. Numerous causes may affect the validity of the results, including technical factors, such as the choice of anticoagulant, the blood vessel sampled, and the duration and conditions of specimen handling. While the latter factors can be defined, influence of biologic and physiologic factors such as feeding and fasting, stress, and biologic and endocrine rhythms can often not be controlled. Nevertheless, as many factors as possible should at least be documented. The importance of the preanalytic phase is often not given the necessary attention, although the validity of the results and consequent clinical decision making and medical management of animal patients would likely be improved if the quality of specimens submitted to the laboratory was optimized.

  9. Basic list of veterinary medical serials, third edition: using a decision matrix to update the core list of veterinary journals

    PubMed Central

    Ugaz, Ana G; Boyd, C. Trenton; Croft, Vicki F; Carrigan, Esther E; Anderson, Katherine M

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This paper presents the methods and results of a study designed to produce the third edition of the “Basic List of Veterinary Medical Serials,” which was established by the Veterinary Medical Libraries Section in 1976 and last updated in 1986. Methods: A set of 238 titles were evaluated using a decision matrix in order to systematically assign points for both objective and subjective criteria and determine an overall score for each journal. Criteria included: coverage in four major indexes, scholarly impact rank as tracked in two sources, identification as a recommended journal in preparing for specialty board examinations, and a veterinary librarian survey rating. Results: Of the 238 titles considered, a minimum scoring threshold determined the 123 (52%) journals that constituted the final list. The 36 subject categories represented on the list include general and specialty disciplines in veterinary medicine. A ranked list of journals and a list by subject category were produced. Conclusion: Serials appearing on the third edition of the “Basic List of Veterinary Medical Serials” met expanded objective measures of quality and impact as well as subjective perceptions of value by both librarians and veterinary practitioners. PMID:20936066

  10. Assessment of unnecessary suffering in animals by veterinary experts.

    PubMed

    Baumgaertner, H; Mullan, S; Main, D C J

    2016-09-24

    Veterinary surgeons are often asked to provide reports to courts describing factual observations and their expert opinion on the presence or absence of unnecessary suffering in animals. This study reviewed 42 expert witness reports in order to describe the approach taken to the assessment of unnecessary suffering. While most reports suitably described factual observations, there was significant variation in the opinions on suffering and the actions of the owner. Severity and duration of potential suffering was commented upon in 26 and 29 reports, respectively. Experts used terms associated with negative mental states and physical states in 28 and 27 reports, respectively. The necessity of suffering was commented upon in 27 reports, with minimal commentary on the actions of the owner. External references supporting the opinion of the expert were only provided in 13 reports. There was evidence of disputes between experts concerning the definition of suffering, the significance of clinical findings and the relevance of different assessment methods. It is suggested that expert witness reports should include a systematic consideration of the animal's mental and physical states, severity of harm, duration of harm and a commentary on the necessity of suffering as defined by legislation.

  11. Veterinary Forensics: Firearms and Investigation of Projectile Injury.

    PubMed

    Bradley-Siemens, N; Brower, A I

    2016-09-01

    Projectile injury represents an estimated 14% of reported animal cruelty cases in the United States. Cases involving projectiles are complicated by gross similarities to other common types of injury, including bite wounds and motor vehicle injuries, by weapons and ammunition not commonly recognized or understood by veterinary medical professionals, and by required expertise beyond that employed in routine postmortem examination. This review describes the common types of projectile injuries encountered within the United States, as well as firearms and ammunition associated with this form of injury. The 3 stages of ballistics-internal, external, and terminal-and wounding capacity are discussed. A general understanding of firearms, ammunition, and ballistics is necessary before pursuing forensic projectile cases. The forensic necropsy is described, including gunshot wound examination, projectile trajectories, different imaging procedures, collection and storage of projectile evidence, and potential advanced techniques for gunpowder analysis. This review presents aspects of projectile injury investigation that must be considered in tandem with standard postmortem practices and procedures to ensure reliable conclusions are reached for medicolegal as well as diagnostic purposes.

  12. Veterinary Forensics: Firearms and Investigation of Projectile Injury.

    PubMed

    Bradley-Siemens, N; Brower, A I

    2016-09-01

    Projectile injury represents an estimated 14% of reported animal cruelty cases in the United States. Cases involving projectiles are complicated by gross similarities to other common types of injury, including bite wounds and motor vehicle injuries, by weapons and ammunition not commonly recognized or understood by veterinary medical professionals, and by required expertise beyond that employed in routine postmortem examination. This review describes the common types of projectile injuries encountered within the United States, as well as firearms and ammunition associated with this form of injury. The 3 stages of ballistics-internal, external, and terminal-and wounding capacity are discussed. A general understanding of firearms, ammunition, and ballistics is necessary before pursuing forensic projectile cases. The forensic necropsy is described, including gunshot wound examination, projectile trajectories, different imaging procedures, collection and storage of projectile evidence, and potential advanced techniques for gunpowder analysis. This review presents aspects of projectile injury investigation that must be considered in tandem with standard postmortem practices and procedures to ensure reliable conclusions are reached for medicolegal as well as diagnostic purposes. PMID:27312366

  13. An essential need: creating opportunities for veterinary students and graduates to gain an appreciation of responsibilities and opportunities in global veterinary issues.

    PubMed

    Malone, J B; Bavia, M E; Stromberg, B E; Valadao, C; Wiles, W T; Diaz, J H; Bergquist, R

    2009-08-01

    Globalisation trends and bioterrorism issues have led to new concerns relating to public health, animal health, international trade and food security. There is an imperative to internationalise and strengthen global public health capacity by renewed emphasis on veterinary public health in veterinary education and increasing opportunities for elective experiential learning in public practice programmes for veterinary students. Recent experience with a US-Brazil Higher Education Consortia Program is used as an example of potential ways in which veterinary students can gain an appreciation for global veterinary issues.

  14. Innovation in veterinary medical education: the concept of 'One World, One Health' in the curriculum of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Calgary.

    PubMed

    Cribb, A; Buntain, B

    2009-08-01

    'One World, One Health' is a foundation concept in veterinary medicine, much like comparative medicine. However, teachers of veterinary medicine often fail to identify it or speak of its importance within the veterinary curriculum. The resurgence of interest in the 'One World, One Health' concept aligns well with the underlying principles on which the University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (UCVM) has been newly founded. This concept is therefore a key component of the UCVM programme, and one that is well highlighted for those studying in the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) course and graduate students.

  15. Enhancing human-animal relationships through veterinary medical instruction in animal-assisted therapy and animal-assisted activities.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Caroline Brunsman

    2008-01-01

    Instruction in animal-assisted therapy (AAT) and animal-assisted activities (AAAs) teaches veterinary medical students to confidently and assertively maximize the benefits and minimize the risks of this union of animals and people. Instruction in AAT/AAA also addresses requirements by the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education that accredited schools/colleges of veterinary medicine include in their standard curriculum the topics of the human-animal bond, behavior, and the contributions of the veterinarian to the overall public and professional health care teams. Entry-level veterinarians should be prepared to: (1) assure that animals who provide AAT/AAA are healthy enough to visit nursing homes, hospitals, or other institutions; (2) promote behavior testing that selects animals who will feel safe, comfortable, and connected; (3) advise facilities regarding infection control and ways to provide a safe environment where the animals, their handlers, and the people being visited will not be injured or become ill; and (4) advocate for their patients and show compassion for their clients when animals are determined to be inappropriate participants in AAT/AAA programs. This article presents AAT/AAA terminology, ways in which veterinarians can advocate for AAT/AAA, the advantages of being involved in AAT/AAA, a model AAT/AAA practicum from Tuskegee University's School of Veterinary Medicine (TUSVM), and examples of co-curricular activities in AAT/AAA by TUSVM's student volunteers.

  16. Stem cell-based tissue engineering in veterinary orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Walter; Burk, Janina; Delling, Uta; Gittel, Claudia; Ribitsch, Iris

    2012-01-28

    Regenerative medicine is one of the most intensively researched medical branches, with enormous progress every year. When it comes to translating research from bench to bedside, many of the pioneering innovations are achieved by cooperating teams of human and veterinary medical scientists. The veterinary profession has an important role to play in this new and evolving technology, holding a great scientific potential, because animals serve widely as models for human medicine and results obtained from animals may serve as preclinical results for human medicine. Regenerative veterinary medicine utilizing mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for the treatment of acute injuries as well as chronic disorders is gradually turning into clinical routine. As orthopaedic disorders represent a major part of all cases in veterinary clinical practice, it is not surprising that they are currently taking a leading role in MSC therapies. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to give an overview on past and current achievements as well as future perspectives in stem cell-based tissue engineering in veterinary orthopaedics. PMID:22287044

  17. Exposure assessment of veterinary medicines in aquatic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metcalfe, Chris; Boxall, Alistair; Fenner, Kathrin; Kolpin, Dana W.; Silberhorn, Eric; Staveley, Jane

    2008-01-01

    The release of veterinary medicines into the aquatic environment may occur through direct or indirect pathways. An example of direct release is the use of medicines in aquaculture (Armstrong et al. 2005; Davies et al. 1998), where chemicals used to treat fish are added directly to water. Indirect releases, in which medicines make their way to water through transport from other matrices, include the application of animal manure to land or direct excretion of residues onto pasture land, from which the therapeutic chemicals may be transported into the aquatic environment (Jørgensen and Halling-Sørensen 2000; Boxall et al. 2003, 2004). Veterinary medicines used to treat companion animals may also be transported into the aquatic environment through disposal of unused medicines, veterinary waste, or animal carcasses (Daughton and Ternes 1999, Boxall et al. 2004). The potential for a veterinary medicine to be released to the aquatic environment will be determined by several different criteria, including the method of treatment, agriculture or aquaculture practices, environmental conditions, and the properties of the veterinary medicine.

  18. Privatization of veterinary services in developing countries: a review.

    PubMed

    Sen, A; Chander, M

    2003-06-01

    Increasing fiscal constraints on the government, a lackadaisical performance by public sector animal health and breeding services and pressure from donor partners have prompted the governments of various developing countries to rethink the role of the public sector in the provision of veterinary services. Various countries have started to implement, or have already implemented, privatization of some veterinary services. The results are mixed. It is established that private provision alone is not optimal, and a blend of private and public sector veterinary services is required to utilize the virtues of both. The privatization process has also begun in India. Certain state governments in India are pursuing a cost recovery approach and are encouraging private practitioners to cope with the financial constraints and to deliver broad and effective animal health and breeding services. This paper considers the global aspects of the privatization of veterinary services as well as the scenario in India, so as to gain an insight into the very complex and debatable issue of privatization of veterinary services.

  19. Terminology and classification of seizures and epilepsy in veterinary patients.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Christopher L

    2013-05-01

    The classification of epileptic seizures and epilepsy is a controversial and dynamic topic that has undergone many iterations in human medicine. The International League against Epilepsy is a multinational organization that has formed a number of task forces and subcommittees to study this issue, and has ratified several reports outlining recommended terminology and classification schemes for human patients. Veterinary publications on this issue have generally adapted these schemes to fit small animal patients, but a formally endorsed system to classify seizures and epilepsy has never been developed for veterinary patients. This review outlines the classification systems that have been published for human patients and summarizes previous efforts by veterinary authors to utilize these methods. Finally, a set of definitions and terminology for use in veterinary patients is proposed, which includes a glossary of descriptive terminology for ictal semiology and a diagnostic scheme for classification of individual patients. This document is intended as a starting point of discussion, which will hopefully eventually result in a formally ratified document that will be useful for communication between health professionals, the design of clinical trials and for guiding treatment decisions and prognostication for veterinary patients with seizures.

  20. Risk factors for occupational brucellosis among veterinary personnel in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Murat; Ergonul, Onder; Sayin-Kutlu, Selda; Guven, Tumer; Ustun, Cemal; Alp-Cavus, Sema; Ozturk, Serife Barcın; Acicbe, Ozlem; Akalin, Serife; Tekin, Recep; Tekin-Koruk, Suda; Demiroglu, Yusuf Ziya; Keskiner, Ramazan; Gönen, Ibak; Sapmaz-Karabag, Sevil; Bosnak, Vuslat; Kazak, Esra

    2014-11-01

    Veterinarians and veterinary technicians are at risk for occupational brucellosis. We described the risk factors of occupational brucellosis among veterinary personnel in Turkey. A multicenter retrospective survey was performed among veterinary personnel who were actively working in the field. Of 712 veterinary personnel, 84 (11.8%) had occupational brucellosis. The median number of years since graduation was 7 (interquartile ranges [IQR], 4-11) years in the occupational brucellosis group, whereas this number was 9 (IQR, 4-16) years in the non-brucellosis group (p<0.001). In multivariable analysis, working in the private sector (odds ratio [OR], 2.8; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.55-5.28, p=0.001), being male (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.05-18.84, p=0.041), number of performed deliveries (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.002-1.02, p=0.014), and injury during Brucella vaccine administration (OR, 5.4; 95% CI, 3.16-9.3, p<0.001) were found to be risk factors for occupational brucellosis. We suggest that all veterinary personnel should be trained on brucellosis and the importance of using personal protective equipment in order to avoid this infection.

  1. Veterinary Students' Recollection Methods for Surgical Procedures: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Langebæk, Rikke; Tanggaard, Lene; Berendt, Mette

    2016-01-01

    When veterinary students face their first live animal surgeries, their level of anxiety is generally high and this can affect their ability to recall the procedure they are about to undertake. Multimodal teaching methods have previously been shown to enhance learning and facilitate recall; however, student preferences for recollection methods when translating theory into practice have not been documented. The aim of this study was to investigate veterinary students' experience with recollection of a surgical procedure they were about to perform after using multiple methods for preparation. From a group of 171 veterinary students enrolled in a basic surgery course, 26 students were randomly selected to participate in semi-structured interviews. Results showed that 58% of the students used a visual, dynamic method of recollection, mentally visualizing the video they had watched as part of their multimodal preparation. A mental recipe was used by 15%, whereas 12% mentally visualized their own notes. The study provides new information regarding veterinary students' methods of recollection of surgical procedures and indicates that in Danish veterinary students, a visual dynamic method is the most commonly used. This is relevant information in the current educational situation, which uses an array of educational tools, and it stresses the importance of supporting the traditional surgical teaching methods with high-quality instructional videos. PMID:26560545

  2. Incorporating Inter-Professional Education into a Veterinary Medical Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Amara H; Behar-Horenstein, Linda; Estrada, Daniel J; Black, Erik; Kwiatkowski, Alison; Bzoch, Annie; Blue, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Inter-professional education (IPE) is identified as an important component of health profession training and is listed in the accreditation requirements for many fields, including veterinary medicine. The goals of IPE are to develop inter-professional skills and to improve patient-oriented care and community health outcomes. To meet these goals, IPE relies on enhanced teamwork, a high level of communication, mutual planning, collective decision making, and shared responsibilities. One Health initiatives have also become integral parts of core competencies for veterinary curricular development. While the overall objectives of an IPE program are similar to those of a One Health initiative, they are not identical. There are unique differences in expectations and outcomes for an IPE program. The purpose of this study was to explore veterinary medical students' perceptions of their interprofessional experiences following participation in a required IPE course that brought together beginning health profession students from the colleges of medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, nutrition, public health and health professions, and veterinary medicine. Using qualitative research methods, we found that there is powerful experiential learning that occurs for both the veterinary students and the other health profession students when they work together at the beginning of their curriculum as an inter-professional team. PMID:27075273

  3. Assessing competence in veterinary medical education: where's the evidence?

    PubMed

    Rhind, Susan M; Baillie, Sarah; Brown, Fiona; Hammick, Marilyn; Dozier, Marshall

    2008-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was carried out to determine the evidence for the reliability and validity of the assessment methods used in veterinary medical education. The review followed the approach used by the Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) group. This process has established baseline data on published evidence and found that a relatively small number of articles exist relating to assessment specific to veterinary medical education. These articles include a number of general discussion papers, employer observations on graduate competence, and descriptions of methods to assess particular attributes--in particular, clinical skills. However, only five of the papers retrieved in this comprehensive search provide evidence relating to evaluation of the assessment method itself. There is a need for more research on assessment of clinical competence in veterinary medical education.

  4. Problems in veterinary ultrasonographic analysis of acquired heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bond, B R

    1991-12-01

    Echocardiography in veterinary medicine has both enhanced our ability to diagnose and treat cardiac diseases in small animals and added confusion to what we already know. Because we can actually see the heart beating and visualize blood flows within the cardiac chambers as well as measure velocities of blood flows, we have a tool that increases our non-invasive diagnostic abilities. On the other hand, the lines between different heart diseases are not always clear-cut, and the more we learn about heart disease the more we see the shades of distinction between different diseases become blurred. This chapter will look at the main abnormalities we see in veterinary medicine (mitral regurgitation, pericardial disease, and the different feline and canine cardiomyopathies) and will attempt to help the veterinary echocardiographer avoid common problems encountered in acquired heart disease as well as use echocardiographic information to gain a better understanding of the disease process occurring in animals. PMID:1839366

  5. What Can Veterinary Educators Learn from PE Teachers?

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Erik H; McCullick, Bryan A

    2016-01-01

    Veterinary education requires the training of students in cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains. However, the veterinary education literature tends to focus more on the cognitive domain, with less emphasis on the affective and psychomotor domains. Physical education (PE) teachers have been teaching psychomotor skills to students for decades using a variety of teaching models. Teaching models provide a framework encompassing theory, student and teacher interactions, instructional themes, research support, and valid assessments. This paper reviews some of the models used by PE teachers, including the Direct Instruction Model, the Cooperative Learning Model, the Personalized System for Instruction, and the Peer Teaching Model. We posit that these models might be particularly helpful for novice teachers in veterinary education settings, providing a structure for the teaching and assessment of psychomotor skills. PMID:27075278

  6. Current status of DNA vaccines in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, B R

    2000-09-15

    DNA vaccination entails administration of the DNA itself encoding antigen to direct synthesis of the antigen directly in the target organism. The target organism's immune system recognizes the antigen, and generates humoral (antibody)- and/or cell-mediated immune response. DNA vaccines afford numerous advantages over conventional vaccines, including ease of production, stability and transport. They overcome the need to cultivate dangerous infectious agents, and provide a possibility to vaccinate against multiple pathogens in a single shot. DNA vaccination is beginning to be explored for many pathogens of veterinary interest. The status of DNA vaccines in poultry, livestock and companion animals is reviewed here. While examples of DNA vaccines being tested in the veterinary field are not numerous, the early studies highlight the potential DNA vaccinology offers in veterinary medicine.

  7. A look into the Medical and Veterinary Entomology crystal ball.

    PubMed

    Dantas-Torres, F; Cameron, M M; Colwell, D D; Otranto, D

    2014-08-01

    Medical and Veterinary Entomology (MVE) represents a leading periodical in its field and covers many aspects of the biology and control of insects, ticks, mites and other arthropods of medical and veterinary importance. Since the first issue of the journal, researchers working in both developed and developing countries have published in MVE, with direct impact on current knowledge in the field. An increasing number of articles dealing with the epidemiology and transmission of vector-borne pathogens have been published in MVE, reflecting rapid changes in vector distribution, pathogen transmission and host-arthropod interactions. This article represents a gaze into the crystal ball in which we identify areas of increasing interest, discuss the main changes that have occurred in the epidemiology of parasitic arthropods since the first issue of MVE, and predict the principal scientific topics that might arise in the next 25 years for scientists working in medical and veterinary entomology.

  8. What Can Veterinary Educators Learn from PE Teachers?

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Erik H; McCullick, Bryan A

    2016-01-01

    Veterinary education requires the training of students in cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains. However, the veterinary education literature tends to focus more on the cognitive domain, with less emphasis on the affective and psychomotor domains. Physical education (PE) teachers have been teaching psychomotor skills to students for decades using a variety of teaching models. Teaching models provide a framework encompassing theory, student and teacher interactions, instructional themes, research support, and valid assessments. This paper reviews some of the models used by PE teachers, including the Direct Instruction Model, the Cooperative Learning Model, the Personalized System for Instruction, and the Peer Teaching Model. We posit that these models might be particularly helpful for novice teachers in veterinary education settings, providing a structure for the teaching and assessment of psychomotor skills.

  9. Recent Developments in Liposome-Based Veterinary Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in nanomedicine have been studied in the veterinary field and have found a wide variety of applications. The past decade has witnessed a massive surge of research interest in liposomes for delivery of therapeutic substances in animals. Liposomes are nanosized phospholipid vesicles that can serve as delivery platforms for a wide range of substances. Liposomes are easily formulated, highly modifiable, and easily administered delivery platforms. They are biodegradable and nontoxic and have long in vivo circulation time. This review focuses on recent and ongoing research that may have relevance for veterinary medicine. By examining the recent developments in liposome-based therapeutics in animal cancers, vaccines, and analgesia, this review depicts the current significance and future directions of liposome-based delivery in veterinary medicine. PMID:24222862

  10. US market for food animal veterinary medical services.

    PubMed

    Wise, J K

    1987-06-15

    American agribusiness is undergoing significant change and stress. In the future, agriculture faces continued instability and uncertainty because of ever-changing global economic conditions, rapid technological advances, increasing production efficiencies, shifts in demand for agricultural products, and a growing dependence of US producers on increasingly competitive world markets. In order to better understand changes and trends facing food animal veterinarians, the AVMA's Executive Board at its March 1986 meeting approved a proposal from the Council on Public Relations for a study of the US food animal market for veterinary medical services. The objectives of the study were to describe the current market for veterinary medical services, products, and information; determine and explain the demand for food animal veterinary services provided by private practicing veterinarians; and identify markets representing potential demand for which marketing strategies could be developed.

  11. How to teach pet loss to veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan Phillips

    2008-01-01

    This paper covers the history of teaching pet loss, the skills new veterinarians should know, suggestions for who might teach those skills, and a sample curriculum. In the last 25 years, the veterinary profession has become more aware of the needs of clients who have lost pets and more skilled at meeting those needs. To maximize the ability of practitioners to handle pet loss, veterinary colleges and teaching hospitals can prepare students to do four things: explain a bad medical situation, assess the client, help a client to make a good decision, and support a client through their loss. These skills can and should be taught by a variety of experts, including veterinary faculty and practitioners, mental health professionals, clients, and peers. PMID:19228902

  12. Organization of veterinary public health in the United States of America and Canada.

    PubMed

    Held, J R; Gregory, D J

    1992-03-01

    Veterinarians in the United States of America and Canada are involved in a variety of activities which contribute to improving human health and well-being. Some of these activities can be considered as a part of veterinary public health (VPH), including: zoonoses control, food safety, environmental protection, comparative medicine, disaster medicine and animal welfare. Both countries have federal systems, and their VPH activities are dependent on close interaction between health and agricultural agencies at the national, state or provincial, and local levels. In addition to governmental agencies, other entities such as academic institutions and various professional associations are also important contributors to VPH activities in the two countries.

  13. MRI of brain disease in veterinary patients part 1: Basic principles and congenital brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Silke; Adams, William H

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly being used in the diagnosis of central nervous system disorders in veterinary patients and is quickly becoming the imaging modality of choice in evaluation of brain and intracranial disease. This article provides an overview of the basic principles of MRI, a description of sequences and their applications in brain imaging, and an approach to interpretation of brain MRI. A detailed discussion of imaging findings in general intracranial disorders including hydrocephalus, vasogenic edema, brain herniation, and seizure-associated changes, and the MR diagnosis of congenital brain disorders is provided. MRI evaluation of acquired brain disorders is described in a second companion article.

  14. Occupational health and safety in small animal veterinary practice: Part I — Nonparasitic zoonotic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Weese, J. S.; Peregrine, A. S.; Armstrong, J.

    2002-01-01

    Zoonotic diseases are an ever-present concern in small animal veterinary practice and are often overlooked. A variety of nonparasitic zoonotic diseases may be encountered in small animal practice, including cat scratch disease (bartonellosis), cat bite abscesses, rabies, leptospirosis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, salmonellosis, avian chlamydiosis, campylobacteriosis, dermatophytosis, and blastomycosis. These may cause human disease ranging from mild and self-limiting to fatal. The risk of development of a zoonotic disease can be lessened by early recognition of infected animals, proper animal handling, basic biosecurity precautions, and, most importantly, personal hygiene. PMID:12170843

  15. [Developments in tropical veterinary medicine at the Utrecht Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (1915-2013)].

    PubMed

    Paling, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Education in livestock diseases in the tropics at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of Utrecht University started in 1915 at the Institute for Parasitic and Infectious Diseases. Subsequently, the Institute for Tropical and Protozoon Diseases was established in 1948 and here students and veterinarians were trained in tropical animal health. Research and training were mainly focused on African livestock diseases such as tick borne diseases and trypanosomosis. Training possibilities for students included an elective course ('Tropencursus'), membership of a debating club ('Tropische Kring'), and a traineeship in a project in a tropical country. From 1987 onwards training, education, research, and management of international collaborative projects in tropical animal health became the shared responsibility of the Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology and the Office for International Cooperation. This article focuses on the last 50 years and highlights activities such as education, research, newsletters, networks, and project with African and Asian countries.

  16. 76 FR 67746 - Revised Guidance for Industry on Impurities: Residual Solvents in New Veterinary Medicinal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... Veterinary Medicine, Food and Drug Administration, 7519 Standish Pl., Rockville, MD 20855. Send one self... INFORMATION CONTACT: Mai Huynh, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-142), Food and Drug Administration, 7500... member representatives from the European Commission, European Medicines Evaluation Agency,...

  17. The effectiveness of marketing concepts in veterinary practices.

    PubMed

    Molhoek, A W I; Endenburg, N

    2009-01-01

    What makes pet owners chose one veterinary practice and not another? This survey was performed to gain insight into what factors influence new clients' choice of veterinary practice, and consequently the most effective way to promote veterinary practices. To this end, a questionnaire was completed by 129 pet owners who became new clients of one of eight selected veterinary practices in January 2005 or later. All selected practices are members of the Dierenartsen Dienstgroep Domstad, Utrecht, The Netherlands. This survey showed word-of-mouth referral to be the most effective way to increase a practice client base: 32.8% of all respondents first heard of their practice of choice through a fellow pet owner. Other pet owners first 'heard' of their practice by passing the practice (17.2%), seeing an advertisement in the Yellow Pages (14.1%), visiting the veterinary practice website (13.3%), and looking in the phone book (10.9%). These information sources should be considered for promotional activities. However this is not the case for advertisements in newspapers or magazines: none of the respondents became acquainted with the practice through these media. Respondents primarily based their choice on personnel and product (the total package of services and its quality) and less on location, but many prospective clients also based their choice on promotional activities and prices. Because pet owners apparently take so many aspects into consideration when choosing a veterinary practice, the marketing orientation (focusing on the client with her/his wishes and problems) is crucial. PMID:19256213

  18. Survey of animal shelter managers regarding shelter veterinary medical services.

    PubMed

    Laderman-Jones, B E; Hurley, K F; Kass, P H

    2016-04-01

    Veterinary services are increasingly used in animal shelters, and shelter medicine is an emerging veterinary specialty. However, little is known about working relationships between animal shelters and veterinarians. The aims of this survey were to characterize working relationships that shelter personnel have and want with veterinarians, identify opinions that shelter managers have regarding the veterinarians they work with, and determine areas for relationship growth between veterinarians and shelter managers. An electronic survey was distributed to 1373 managers of North American animal shelters; 536 (39.0%) responded. Almost all shelters had some veterinary relationship, and most had regular relationships with veterinarians. The proportion of shelters that used local clinics (73.9%) was significantly higher than the proportion that retained on-site paid veterinarians (48.5%). The proportion of respondents who did not have but wanted a paid on-site veterinarian (42%) was significantly higher than the proportion of respondents who did not use local clinics but wanted to (7.9%). These data suggest shelter managers valued veterinary relationships, and wished to expand on-site veterinary services. Almost all shelters in this study provided some veterinary care, and all respondents identified at least one common infectious disease, which, for most, had a substantial negative impact on shelter successes. Respondents indicated that the most important roles and greatest expertise of veterinarians were related to surgery, diagnosis and treatment of individual animals. Education of both veterinarians and shelter managers may help ensure that shelters benefit from the full range of services veterinarians can provide, including expertise in disease prevention and animal behavior. PMID:26965085

  19. American veterinary history: before the nineteenth century. 1940.

    PubMed

    Bierer, Bert W

    2014-11-01

    With the development of our present day domesticated animals in America (during the 16th and 17th centuries), it was not long before animal diseases became troublesome and destructive (especially during the latter half of the 18th century). Though veterinary medicine became rather firmly established in many European countries (including England) during the latter half of the 18th century, veterinary medicine was relatively nonexistent in America, with only self-styled animal doctors and farriers (with their empirical and often destructive remedies).

  20. The role of undergraduate research experiences in producing veterinary scientists.

    PubMed

    Dale, Vicki H M; Pierce, Stephanie E; May, Stephen A

    2010-01-01

    This study retrospectively examined the influence of a science-based, research-oriented degree on the career choices of a group of "early emerger" students who had aspired from an early age to become veterinarians but chose instead to pursue an alternative career in veterinary research. This transformation was in large part because of active participation in research, with supervisors acting as role models and mentors. This finding has important implications for teachers and course designers seeking to influence career decision making in both bioveterinary science and professional veterinary programs.

  1. How do swine practitioners and veterinary pathologists arrive at a diagnosis of Clostridium perfringens type A enteritis in neonatal piglets?

    PubMed

    Chan, Gloria; Farzan, Abdolvahab; Prescott, John F; Friendship, Robert

    2013-05-01

    A questionnaire was administered to 22 veterinary practitioners and 17 veterinary pathologists to investigate the methods used for diagnosis of Clostridium perfringens type A enteritis in neonatal pigs. Practitioners generally diagnosed C. perfringens type A associated enteritis by age of onset of diarrhea (between 1 to 7 days of age). Most practitioners (95%) were moderately to very confident in their diagnosis. Pathologists generally diagnosed C. perfringens type A associated enteritis by combinations of isolation of the organism, genotyping or detecting the toxins of the organism, and ruling out other pathogens through histopathology. Almost half (41%) of the pathologists were not confident of their diagnosis. This study reports that the current diagnostic method for C. perfringens type A enteritis is not specific, and although many pathologists expressed reservations about making a diagnosis of C. perfringens type A enteritis, most practitioners were confident in their diagnosis, even though reported clinical signs of clostridial diarrhea are similar to those of a number of other enteric diseases.

  2. Potential barriers to veterinary student access to counselling and other support systems: perceptions of staff and students at a UK veterinary school.

    PubMed

    Pickles, K J; Rhind, S M; Miller, R; Jackson, S; Allister, R; Philp, J; Waterhouse, L; Mellanby, R J

    2012-02-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that veterinary surgeons' mental health is often poorer than comparable populations and that the incidence of suicide is higher among veterinary surgeons than the general public. Veterinary students also appear to suffer from high levels of anxiety and stress, and may possess inadequate coping strategies when faced with adversity. Veterinary students may find it difficult to access central university support systems due to their heavy workload and geographical isolation on some veterinary campuses. A previous study of University of Edinburgh fourth-year veterinary students found that support services located several miles from the main veterinary campus was a barrier to students accessing counselling services. Consequently, a pilot project was initiated, which provided a counselling service at the University of Edinburgh's rural Easter Bush veterinary campus one afternoon a week during 2010. As part of the evaluation of this service, web-based questionnaires were delivered via e-mail to all veterinary staff and students towards the end of the 12-month pilot period to evaluate perceptions of barriers to student counselling and to investigate student-valued support services. Questionnaire responses were received from 35 per cent of veterinary students and 52 per cent of staff. Stigmatisation of being unable to cope was a potent inhibitor of seeking support within the veterinary environment, but counselling was perceived as valuable by the majority of staff and students. Provision of an on-site counselling service was considered important for increasing ease of access; however, students viewed friends and family as their most important support mechanism. Workload was cited as the main cause of veterinary student stress. The majority of staff and student respondents perceived veterinary students as having an increased need for counselling support compared with other students. PMID:22186377

  3. 75 FR 63143 - Solicitation of Input From Stakeholders Regarding Administration of the Veterinary Medicine Loan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... Policy Act of 1977 (NARETPA). This law established a new Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (7 U... Administration of the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (VMLRP) AGENCY: National Institute of Food and... Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (VMLRP) authorized under section 1415A of the...

  4. Veterinary Specialist, 1-2. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    These military-developed curriculum materials consist of five volumes of text information, student workbooks, and supplements for use in training veterinary specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are the following topics: the veterinary airman, administration, and statistical procedures; veterinary microbiology, consumer-level quality…

  5. 37 CFR 1.779 - Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... extension for a veterinary biological product. 1.779 Section 1.779 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a veterinary biological product is eligible for extension, the...

  6. 37 CFR 1.779 - Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... extension for a veterinary biological product. 1.779 Section 1.779 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a veterinary biological product is eligible for extension, the...

  7. 9 CFR 102.4 - U.S. Veterinary Biologics Establishment License.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false U.S. Veterinary Biologics... LICENSES FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 102.4 U.S. Veterinary Biologics Establishment License. (a) Before a U.S. Veterinary Biologics Establishment License will be issued by the Administrator for any establishment,...

  8. 9 CFR 161.6 - Suspension or revocation of veterinary accreditation and reaccreditation; criminal and civil...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Suspension or revocation of veterinary... SUSPENSION OR REVOCATION OF SUCH ACCREDITATION § 161.6 Suspension or revocation of veterinary accreditation... veterinarian is licensed or legally able to practice veterinary medicine in the State in which the...

  9. 9 CFR 102.5 - U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false U.S. Veterinary Biological Product... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 102.5 U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License. (a) Authorization to produce each biological product shall be specified on a U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License, issued by...

  10. 9 CFR 161.4 - Suspension or revocation of veterinary accreditation; criminal and civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension or revocation of veterinary... REVOCATION OF SUCH ACCREDITATION § 161.4 Suspension or revocation of veterinary accreditation; criminal and... to practice veterinary medicine in at least one State. (c) Accreditation shall be...

  11. 75 FR 3193 - Application Package and Reporting Requirements for the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (VMLRP) AGENCY: National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA... Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program (VMLRP). This Notice initiates a 60-day comment period and... INFORMATION CONTACT: Gary Sherman; National Program Leader, Veterinary Science; National Institute of Food...

  12. 75 FR 58411 - Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public Workshop; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public...: ``Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) eSubmitter Workshop.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to..., Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-100), Food and Drug Administration, 7520 Standish Pl., Rockville,...

  13. 37 CFR 1.779 - Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... extension for a veterinary biological product. 1.779 Section 1.779 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a veterinary biological product is eligible for extension, the...

  14. Exploring the Veterinary Literature: A Bibliometric Methodology for Identifying Interdisciplinary and Collaborative Publications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Jessica R.; Moberly, Heather K.; Youngen, Gregory K.; Hamel, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary medical research traditionally focuses on animal health and wellness; however, research activities at veterinary colleges extend beyond these traditional areas. In this study, we analyzed eleven years of Web of Knowledge-indexed peer-reviewed articles from researchers at the twenty-eight United States American Veterinary Medical…

  15. 37 CFR 1.779 - Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... extension for a veterinary biological product. 1.779 Section 1.779 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a veterinary biological product is eligible for extension, the...

  16. Client Perspectives on Desirable Attributes and Skills of Veterinary Technologists in Australia: Considerations for Curriculum Design.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Patricia M; Al-Alawneh, John; Pitt, Rachael E; Schull, Daniel N; Coleman, Glen T

    2015-01-01

    Client or service user perspectives are important when designing curricula for professional programs. In the case of veterinary technology, an emerging profession in the veterinary field in Australasia, client views on desirable graduate attributes, skills, and knowledge have not yet been explored. This study reports on a survey of 441 veterinary clients (with 104 responses) from four veterinary practices in Brisbane, Queensland, conducted between October 2008 and February 2009. The included veterinary practices provided clinical placements for veterinary technology undergraduates and employment for veterinary technology graduates (2003-2007). Client socio-demographic data along with ratings of the importance of a range of technical (veterinary nursing) skills, emotional intelligence, and professional attributes for veterinary technology graduates were collected and analyzed. Overall, the majority of clients viewed technical skills, emotional intelligence, and professional attributes as important in the clinical practice of veterinary technology graduates with whom they interacted in the veterinary practice. Client interviews (n=3) contextualized the survey data and also showed that clients attached importance to graduates demonstrating professional competence. Agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis revealed four distinct groupings of clients within the data based on their differing perceptions. Using a multivariable proportional-odds regression model, it was also found that some client differences were influenced by demographic factors such as gender, age, and number of visits annually. For example, the odds of female clients valuing emotionality and sociability were greater than males. These findings provide useful data for the design of a professionalizing and market-driven veterinary technology curriculum.

  17. 21 CFR 510.112 - Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine and for nonmedical purposes; required data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine and for... DRUGS Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 510.112 Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine... advise the Commissioner on, the use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine and for various...

  18. 21 CFR 510.112 - Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine and for nonmedical purposes; required data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine and for... DRUGS Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 510.112 Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine... advise the Commissioner on, the use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine and for various...

  19. 21 CFR 510.112 - Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine and for nonmedical purposes; required data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine and for... DRUGS Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 510.112 Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine... advise the Commissioner on, the use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine and for various...

  20. 21 CFR 510.112 - Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine and for nonmedical purposes; required data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine and for... DRUGS Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 510.112 Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine... advise the Commissioner on, the use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine and for various...

  1. 21 CFR 510.112 - Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine and for nonmedical purposes; required data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine and for... DRUGS Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 510.112 Antibiotics used in veterinary medicine... advise the Commissioner on, the use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine and for various...

  2. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  3. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  4. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  5. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  6. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  7. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  8. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  9. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  10. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  11. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  12. Establishment of the European College of Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ECVCP) and the current status of veterinary clinical pathology in Europe.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P J; Fournel-Fleury, C; Bolliger, A P; Freeman, K P; Braun, J-P; Archer, J; Paltrinieri, S; Tvedten, H; Polizopoulou, Z S; Jensen, A L; Pastor, J; Lanevschi-Pietersma, A; Thoren-Tolling, K; Schwendenwien, I; Thoresen, S I; Bauer, N B; Ledieu, D; Cerón, J J; Palm, M; Papasouliotis, K; Gaál, T; Vajdovich, P

    2007-12-01

    After 5 years of development, the European College of Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ECVCP) was formally recognized and approved on July 4, 2007 by the European Board of Veterinary Specialisation (EBVS), the European regulatory body that oversees specialization in veterinary medicine and which has approved 23 colleges. The objectives, committees, basis for membership, constitution, bylaws, information brochure and certifying examination of the ECVCP have remained unchanged during this time except as directed by EBVS. The ECVCP declared full functionality based on the following criteria: 1) a critical mass of 65 members: 15 original diplomates approved by the EBVS to establish the ECVCP, 37 de facto diplomates, 7 diplomates certified by examination, and 5 elected honorary members; 2) the development and certification of training programs, laboratories, and qualified supervisors for residents; currently there are 18 resident training programs in Europe; 3) administration of 3 annual board-certifying examinations thus far, with an overall pass rate of 70%; 4) European consensus criteria for assessing the continuing education of specialists every 5 years; 5) organization of 8 annual scientific congresses and a joint journal (with the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology) for communication of scientific research and information; the College also maintains a website, a joint listserv, and a newsletter; 6) collaboration in training and continuing education with relevant colleges in medicine and pathology; 7) development and strict adherence to a constitution and bylaws compliant with the EBVS; and 8) demonstration of compelling rationale, supporting data, and the support of members and other colleges for independence as a specialty college. Formal EBVS recognition of ECVCP as the regulatory body for the science and practice of veterinary clinical pathology in Europe will facilitate growth and development of the discipline and compliance of academic

  13. Effective Learning & Teaching in Medical, Dental & Veterinary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, John, Ed.; Huttly, Sharon, Ed.; Taylor, Ian, Ed.

    This collection of papers includes: (1) "Opportunities in Medical, Dental and Veterinary (MDV) Educational Development" (John Sweet); (2) "Culture, Collegiality, and Collaborative Learning" (George Brown, Madeline Rohin, and Michael Manogue); (3) "Communication Skills: On Being Patient-Centered" (Jeff Wilson); (4) "Curriculum" (John Sweet); (5)…

  14. Tuberculosis Diagnosis: Relevancy of Veterinary Applications to Human Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Veterinary applications of tuberculosis (TB) tests may provide insight into the diagnostic potential and technical development of emerging tests for human TB. Interferon (IFN)-gamma release assays (IGRA) were developed initially for bovine TB eradication programs. As the test relies on functional le...

  15. 9 CFR 107.1 - Veterinary practitioners and animal owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Veterinary practitioners and animal owners. 107.1 Section 107.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... animal owners. Products prepared as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section and...

  16. 9 CFR 107.1 - Veterinary practitioners and animal owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Veterinary practitioners and animal owners. 107.1 Section 107.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... animal owners. Products prepared as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section and...

  17. [Veterinary aspects of the raising of mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus)].

    PubMed

    Seidel, B

    1991-03-01

    An empirical report outlines veterinary problems in Rocky Mountain Goats kept in climatic conditions of Central Europe. Described are therapeutic findings in the treatment of infections, parasitosis, disorders of the extremities, disturbances of reproduction, and injuries as well as haematological findings and experiences made during immobilization of Rocky Mountain Goats.

  18. 9 CFR 107.1 - Veterinary practitioners and animal owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Veterinary practitioners and animal owners. 107.1 Section 107.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... animal owners. Products prepared as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section and...

  19. Illness severity scores in veterinary medicine: what can we learn?

    PubMed

    Hayes, G; Mathews, K; Kruth, S; Doig, G; Dewey, C

    2010-01-01

    Illness severity scores are gaining increasing popularity in veterinary medicine. This article discusses their applications in both clinical medicine and research, reviews the caveats pertaining to their use, and discusses some of the issues that arise in appropriate construction of a score. Illness severity scores can be used to decrease bias and confounding and add important contextual information to research by providing a quantitative and objective measure of patient illness. In addition, illness severity scores can be used to benchmark performance, and establish protocols for triage and therapeutic management. Many diagnosis-specific and diagnosis-independent veterinary scores have been developed in recent years. Although score use in veterinary research is increasing, the scores available are currently underutilized, particularly in the context of observational studies. Analysis of treatment effect while controlling for illness severity by an objective measure can improve the validity of the conclusions of observational studies. In randomized trials, illness severity scores can be used to demonstrate effective randomization, which is of particular utility when group sizes are small. The quality of veterinary scoring systems can be improved by prospective multicenter validation. The prevalence of euthanasia in companion animal medicine poses a unique challenge to scores based on a mortality outcome. PMID:20337914

  20. Comparing Veterinary Student and Faculty Perceptions of Academic Misconduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal, Kenneth D.; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina M.; Flammer, Keven

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess veterinary students' and faculty perceptions of a variety of academic and classroom behaviors, and the degree to which these are acceptable or not. Two instruments were developed for this purpose: 1) The Exams and Assignments Scale (EAS), consisted of 23 items measuring the extent to which a variety of examination…

  1. 75 FR 36588 - Veterinary Feed Directive; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... in the Federal Register of March 29, 2010 (75 FR 15387). In the ANPRM, FDA requested comments on the... March 29, 2010 (75 FR 15387), FDA published an ANPRM with a 90-day comment period to request comments on... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 510, 514, and 558 Veterinary Feed...

  2. Genomic approaches for veterinary pest control and eradication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arthropod pests of veterinary importance remain a threat to the health of livestock herds in the United States (US) and contribute to global food insecurity because they impact animal agriculture productivity directly through their parasitic habits and indirectly, in specific cases, due to the disea...

  3. 9 CFR 107.1 - Veterinary practitioners and animal owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Veterinary practitioners and animal owners. 107.1 Section 107.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  4. Weighing the impact (factor) of publishing in veterinary journals.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Mary M

    2015-06-01

    The journal in which you publish your research can have a major influence on the perceived value of your work and on your ability to reach certain audiences. The impact factor, a widely used metric of journal quality and prestige, has evolved into a benchmark of quality for institutions and graduate programs and, inappropriately, as a proxy for the quality of individual authors and articles, affecting tenure, promotion, and funding decisions. As a result, despite its many limitations, publishing decisions by authors often are based solely on a journal's impact factor. This can disadvantage journals in small disciplines, such as veterinary medicine, and limit the ability of authors to reach key audiences. In this article, factors that can influence the impact factor of a journal and its applicability, including precision, citation practices, article type, editorial policies, and size of the research community will be reviewed. The value and importance of veterinary journals such as the Journal of Veterinary Cardiology for reaching relevant audiences and for helping shape disciplinary specialties and influence clinical practice will also be discussed. Lastly, the efforts underway to develop alternative measures to assess the scientific quality of individual authors and articles, such as article-level metrics, as well as institutional measures of the economic and social impact of biomedical research will be considered. Judicious use of the impact factor and the implementation of new metrics for assessing the quality and societal relevance of veterinary research articles will benefit both authors and journals. PMID:26007711

  5. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Veterinary Clinics, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Weiss, Reinhard; van der Reijden, Tanny; van den Broek, Peterhans; Baljer, Georg; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2011-01-01

    An increase in prevalence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter spp. in hospitalized animals was observed at the Justus-Liebig-University (Germany). Genotypic analysis of 56 isolates during 2000–2008 showed 3 clusters that corresponded to European clones I–III. Results indicate spread of genotypically related strains within and among veterinary clinics in Germany. PMID:21888812

  6. 21 CFR 558.6 - Veterinary feed directive drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Veterinary feed directive drugs. 558.6 Section 558.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR USE IN ANIMAL FEEDS General...

  7. 21 CFR 558.6 - Veterinary feed directive drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Veterinary feed directive drugs. 558.6 Section 558.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR USE IN ANIMAL FEEDS General...

  8. Educational approaches aimed at preparing students for professional veterinary practice.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, A D C; Dolmans, D H J M; Scherpbier, A J J A; van Beukelen, P

    2009-08-01

    Changes in society and dissatisfaction with current educational practices have led to changes in undergraduate veterinary curricula. New approaches that are thought to better prepare students for future professional veterinary practice are being introduced. One such change is a transition from conventional teacher-centred curricula to student-centred curricula. In student-centred curricula, students are actively involved in learning and teachers not only transmit knowledge but help students to obtain a deep understanding. Furthermore, learning within these curricula takes place in a multi-disciplinary context which is more relevant for the future of the profession. Another change is that more emphasis is put on training in academic skills, for instance, by establishing research internships. Finally, a new emphasis is being placed on training in more generic competencies, such as communication and business skills. These changes are assumed to better suit the profile of veterinary students today and in the future and to better prepare them for future veterinary practice. PMID:20128494

  9. Development of a moral judgment measure for veterinary education.

    PubMed

    Verrinder, Joy M; Phillips, Clive J C

    2014-01-01

    Veterinarians increasingly face animal ethics issues, conflicts, and dilemmas, both in practice and in policy, such as the tension between clients' and animals' interests. Little has been done to measure the capacity of veterinarians to make ethical judgments to prevent and address these issues or to identify the effectiveness of strategies to build this capacity. The objectives of this study were, first, to develop a test to identify the capacity of veterinarians to make ethical decisions in relation to animal ethics issues and, second, to assess students' perceptions of the usefulness of three methods for the development of ethical decision making. The Veterinary Defining Issues Test (VetDIT) was piloted with 88 first-year veterinary students at an Australian university. The veterinary students were at a variety of reasoning stages in their use of the Personal Interest (PI), Maintaining Norms (MN), and Universal Principles (UP) reasoning methods in relation to both human ethics and animal ethics issues and operated at a higher level of reasoning for animal than human ethics. Thirty-eight students assessed three methods for developing ethical decision-making skills and identified these as being helpful in clarifying their positions, clarifying others' positions, increasing awareness of the complexity of making ethical decisions, using ethical frameworks and principles, and improving moral reasoning skills, with two methods identified as most helpful. These methods and the VetDIT have the potential to be used as tools for development and assessment of moral judgment in veterinary education to address animal ethics issues.

  10. Weighing the impact (factor) of publishing in veterinary journals.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Mary M

    2015-06-01

    The journal in which you publish your research can have a major influence on the perceived value of your work and on your ability to reach certain audiences. The impact factor, a widely used metric of journal quality and prestige, has evolved into a benchmark of quality for institutions and graduate programs and, inappropriately, as a proxy for the quality of individual authors and articles, affecting tenure, promotion, and funding decisions. As a result, despite its many limitations, publishing decisions by authors often are based solely on a journal's impact factor. This can disadvantage journals in small disciplines, such as veterinary medicine, and limit the ability of authors to reach key audiences. In this article, factors that can influence the impact factor of a journal and its applicability, including precision, citation practices, article type, editorial policies, and size of the research community will be reviewed. The value and importance of veterinary journals such as the Journal of Veterinary Cardiology for reaching relevant audiences and for helping shape disciplinary specialties and influence clinical practice will also be discussed. Lastly, the efforts underway to develop alternative measures to assess the scientific quality of individual authors and articles, such as article-level metrics, as well as institutional measures of the economic and social impact of biomedical research will be considered. Judicious use of the impact factor and the implementation of new metrics for assessing the quality and societal relevance of veterinary research articles will benefit both authors and journals.

  11. Veterinary antibiotic effects on atrazine degradation and soil microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Veterinary antibiotics (VAs) in manure applied to agricultural lands may change agrichemical degradation by altering soil microbial community structure or function. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of two VAs, sulfamethazine (SMZ) and oxytetracycline (OTC), on atrazine ...

  12. Application of laser technology to exotic veterinary practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clipsham, Robert C.

    1993-07-01

    Exotic veterinary practice has evolved in connection with the importation industry, development of zoological collections and rising private pet ownership to the point that laser technology is in demand. The specific needs of the many species presented for surgical care and the expectations of owners are examined in relationship to the currently understood diseases of exotic animals.

  13. A Tool for Helping Veterinary Students Learn Diagnostic Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielson, Jared A.; Bender, Holly S.; Mills, Eric M.; Vermeer, Pamela J.; Lockee, Barbara B.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the result of implementing the Problem List Generator, a computer-based tool designed to help clinical pathology veterinary students learn diagnostic problem solving. Findings suggest that student problem solving ability improved, because students identified all relevant data before providing a solution. (MES)

  14. 75 FR 57658 - National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Correcting Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    .... List of Subjects 9 CFR Part 91 Animal diseases, Animal welfare, Exports, Livestock, Reporting and... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 91 and 162 RIN 0579-AC04 National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Correcting Amendment AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA....

  15. The Veterinary Forensic Necropsy: A Review of Procedures and Protocols.

    PubMed

    Brownlie, H W Brooks; Munro, R

    2016-09-01

    Investigation of animal-related crime, and therefore submission of forensic cases to veterinary pathology facilities, is increasing, yet many veterinary pathologists are unfamiliar and often uncomfortable with involvement in the forensic necropsy. This article discusses various aspects of the forensic necropsy without specific attention to any particular species group or crime. General advice is given on procedures, documentation, and recording of the examination, and the article indicates how these features may differ from those used in investigation of natural disease. It also discusses evidence management, including recordkeeping, identification of evidence, labeling of photographs, and use of standard operating procedures and protocols. Various written and visual methods for documentation of the forensic necropsy are covered, and adjunctive topics such as sample collection, assessment, and description of wounds and taphonomy are included. Cause, mechanism, and manner of death are defined, and guidance to the use of these terms is given. The aim of this article is to offer guidance on procedural aspects of the forensic necropsy that will help those developing their forensic services, contribute to standardization of the provision of forensic veterinary pathology, and build the confidence of the "uncomfortable" forensic veterinary pathologist.

  16. Medicinal plants used for traditional veterinary in the Sierras de Córdoba (Argentina): An ethnobotanical comparison with human medicinal uses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This is a first description of the main ethnoveterinary features of the peasants in the Sierras de Córdoba. The aim of this study was to analyze the use of medicinal plants and other traditional therapeutic practices for healing domestic animals and cattle. Our particular goals were to: characterize veterinary ethnobotanical knowledge considering age, gender and role of the specialists; interpret the cultural features of the traditional local veterinary medicine and plant uses associated to it; compare the plants used in traditional veterinary medicine, with those used in human medicine in the same region. Methods Fieldwork was carried out as part of an ethnobotanic regional study where 64 informants were interviewed regarding medicinal plants used in veterinary medicine throughout 2001-2010. Based participant observation and open and semi-structured interviews we obtained information on the traditional practices of diagnosis and healing, focusing on the veterinary uses given to plants (part of the plant used, method of preparation and administration). Plants speciemens were collected with the informants and their vernacular and scientific names were registered in a database. Non-parametric statistic was used to evaluate differences in medicinal plant knowledge, use, and valorization by local people. A comparison between traditional veterinary medicine and previous human medicine studies developed in the region was performed by analyzing the percentages of common species and uses, and by considering Sorensen's Similarity Index. Results A total of 127 medicinal uses were registered, corresponding to 70 species of plants belonging to 39 botanic families. Veterinary ethnobotanical knowledge was specialized, restricted, in general, to cattle breeders (mainly men) and to a less degree to healers, and was independent of the age of the interviewees. Native plants were mostly used as skin cicatrizants, disinfectants or for treating digestive disorders. Together

  17. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in a Veterinary Teaching Hospital▿

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takashi; Kikuchi, Ken; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Namiko; Kamata, Shinichi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2007-01-01

    We surveyed methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococcus (MRCPS) strains from 57 (26 inpatient and 31 outpatient) dogs and 20 veterinary staff in a veterinary teaching hospital. From the staff, three MRCPS strains were isolated, and two were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In contrast, 18 MRCPS strains were detected in both inpatient (12 of 26 [46.2%]) and outpatient (6 of 31 [19.4%]) dogs. Among them, only one strain was MRSA. Using direct sequencing of sodA and hsp60 genes, the 18 MRCPS strains other than MRSA from a staff and 17 dogs, were finally identified as Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, a novel species of Staphylococcus from a cat. All of the methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) strains were multidrug resistant to erythromycin, clindamycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and levofloxacin. Most of the MRSP strains showed high-level resistance to oxacillin (≥128 μg/ml, 15 of 18 [83.3%]), and 10 of 15 (66.7%) high-level oxacillin-resistant MRSP strains carried type III SCCmec. DNA fingerprinting of MRSP strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis yielded eight clusters: clone A with four subtypes, clone B with four subtypes, clone C with three subtypes, and five other different single clones. MRSP strains from the staff and some inpatient and outpatient dogs shared three major clones (clones A, B, and C), but the strains of the other five different clusters were distributed independently among inpatient or outpatient dogs. This genetic diversity suggested that the MRSP strains were not only acquired in this veterinary teaching hospital but also acquired in primary veterinary clinics in the community. To our knowledge, this is the first report of MRSP in dogs and humans in a veterinary institution. PMID:17267624

  18. Occurrence of veterinary pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment in Flanders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servaes, K.; Vanermen, G.; Seuntjens, P.

    2009-04-01

    There is a growing interest in the occurrence of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. Pharmaceuticals are classified as so-called ‘emerging pollutants'. ‘Emerging pollutants' are not necessarily new chemical compounds. Often these compounds are already present in the environment for a long time. But, their occurrence and especially their impact on the environment has only recently become clear. Consequently, data on their occurrence are rather scarce. In this study, we focus on the occurrence of veterinary pharmaceuticals in surface water in Flanders. We have only considered active substances administered to cattle, pigs and poultry. Based on the literature and information concerning the use in Belgium, a selection of 25 veterinary pharmaceuticals has been made. This selection consists of the most important antibiotics and antiparasitic substances applied in veterinary medicine in Belgium. We develop an analytical methodology based on UPLC-MS/MS for the detection of these veterinary pharmaceuticals in surface water. Therefore, the mass characteristics as well as the optimum LC conditions will be determined. To obtain limits of detection as low as possible, the samples are concentrated prior to analysis using solid phase extraction (SPE). Different SPE cartridges will be tested during the method development. At first, this SPE sample pre-treatment is performed off-line. In a next step, online SPE is optimized for this purpose. The analytical procedure will be subject to an in-house validation study, thereby determining recovery, repeatability (% RSD), limits of detection and limits of quantification. Finally, the developed methodology will be applied for monitoring the occurrence of veterinary pharmaceuticals in surface water and groundwater in Flanders. These water samples will be taken in areas characterized by intensive cattle breeding. Moreover, the samples will be collected during springtime. In this season, farmers apply manure, stored during winter

  19. A survey of reading, writing, and oral communication skills in North American veterinary medical colleges.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, C M; Thompson, I K; Mann, C J

    2001-01-01

    In the 1989 report by the Pew National Veterinary Education Program (PNVEP), communication skills topped the list of characteristics the veterinary graduate should possess in order to function effectively in the twenty-first century. To determine the reading, writing, and oral communication requirements and opportunities in veterinary curricula in the US and Canada, and to determine the perceived communication tasks that might be commonly required of practicing veterinarians in the next century, we sent a 15-item communications skills questionnaire to the academic deans of the 31 veterinary curricula in the US and Canada. The results reinforce the importance of communication skills in veterinary medicine, as detailed by the PNVEP over 10 years ago. Based on the responses to our questionnaire and on our own experiences with veterinary medical students, we make several recommendations to enhance communication instruction in veterinary medical curricula.

  20. Veterinary Medical Education in Florida. Report and Recommendations of the Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Report No. 3, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Commission, Tallahassee.

    A report on veterinary medical education in Florida and the need for veterinary care in Florida is presented. Overviews of the veterinary profession and veterinary medical education are also given, including the areas of history, careers in the field, licensure, salaries, animal disease research, accreditation, curriculum, enrollment, educational…

  1. Veterinary education in the area of food safety (including animal health, food pathogens and surveillance of foodborne diseases).

    PubMed

    Vidal, S M; Fajardo, P I; González, C G

    2013-08-01

    The animal foodstuffs industry has changed in recent decades as a result of factors such as: human population growth and longer life expectancy, increasing urbanisation and migration, emerging zoonotic infectious diseases and foodborne diseases (FBDs), food security problems, technological advances in animal production systems, globalisation of trade and environmental changes. The Millennium Development Goals and the 'One Health' paradigm provide global guidelines on efficiently addressing the issues of consumer product safety, food security and risks associated with zoonoses. Professionals involved in the supply chain must therefore play an active role, based on knowledge and skills that meet current market requirements. Accordingly, it is necessary for the veterinary medicine curriculum, both undergraduate and postgraduate, to incorporate these skills. This article analyses the approach that veterinary education should adopt in relation to food safety, with an emphasis on animal health, food pathogens and FBD surveillance. PMID:24547647

  2. Veterinary education in the area of food safety (including animal health, food pathogens and surveillance of foodborne diseases).

    PubMed

    Vidal, S M; Fajardo, P I; González, C G

    2013-08-01

    The animal foodstuffs industry has changed in recent decades as a result of factors such as: human population growth and longer life expectancy, increasing urbanisation and migration, emerging zoonotic infectious diseases and foodborne diseases (FBDs), food security problems, technological advances in animal production systems, globalisation of trade and environmental changes. The Millennium Development Goals and the 'One Health' paradigm provide global guidelines on efficiently addressing the issues of consumer product safety, food security and risks associated with zoonoses. Professionals involved in the supply chain must therefore play an active role, based on knowledge and skills that meet current market requirements. Accordingly, it is necessary for the veterinary medicine curriculum, both undergraduate and postgraduate, to incorporate these skills. This article analyses the approach that veterinary education should adopt in relation to food safety, with an emphasis on animal health, food pathogens and FBD surveillance.

  3. Satellite teaching hospitals and public-private collaborations in veterinary medical clinical education.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, James W; Fingland, Roger; Arighi, Mimi; Thompson, James; de Laforcade, Armelle; McManus, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Veterinary teaching hospitals (VTHs) are facing more and greater challenges than at any time in the past. Changes in demand, expanding information, improving technology, an evolving workforce, declining state support, and an increasingly diverse consumer base have combined to render many traditional VTH modes of operation obsolete. In pursuit of continued success in achieving their academic mission, VTHs are exploring new business models, including innovative collaborations with the private sector. This report provides details on existing models for public-private collaboration at several colleges and schools of veterinary medicine, including those at Kansas State University, Purdue University, the University of Florida, and Tufts University. Although each of these institutions' models is unique, several commonalities exist, related to expansion of the case load available for teaching, the potential positive impact on recruitment and retention of clinical faculty, and the potential for easing financial pressures on the associated VTH. These new models represent innovative approaches that work to meet many of the key emerging challenges facing VTHs today.

  4. Pain management in veterinary patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Timothy M

    2014-09-01

    Pain is a widespread clinical symptom in companion animals with cancer, and its aggressive management should be a priority. Education and skills can be acquired by health care professionals and caregivers to better understand, recognize, and treat cancer-associated pain. The early and rational institution of multimodality analgesic protocols can be highly effective and maximize the chances of improving quality of life in dogs and cats with cancer. This article describes the pathophysiology of pain in companion animals diagnosed with cancer. The foundational causes of cancer-associated pain and treatment strategies for alleviating discomfort in companion animals with cancer are discussed.

  5. A Perspective on Veterinary Forensic Pathology and Medicine in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Newbery, S G; Cooke, S W; Martineau, H M

    2016-09-01

    Internationally, forensic medicine and pathology are increasingly recognized as an important aspect of work done by veterinary clinicians and veterinary pathologists. In this article, a forensic veterinary clinician, a forensic veterinary pathologist in private practice, and a forensic veterinary pathologist at a veterinary school discuss the interactions among veterinary clinicians, veterinary pathologists, and law enforcement agencies and how future interactions can be improved. The focus is on the United Kingdom, but many of the principles, challenges, and suggestions are applicable to other jurisdictions. Clinicians and pathologists require forensic training to enable them to apply their veterinary knowledge to suspected cases of animal abuse and to subsequently present their findings and conclusions to a court of law in a concise, professional, and unbiased manner, and some opportunities for such advanced training in the United Kingdom are indicated. It is important that forensic veterinary clinicians and pathologists interact in an unbiased and collegial manner to answer the questions posed by courts of law. Opportunities for improved training, communication, and interaction among forensic veterinarians, forensic scientists, and law enforcement are discussed.

  6. A Perspective on Veterinary Forensic Pathology and Medicine in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Newbery, S G; Cooke, S W; Martineau, H M

    2016-09-01

    Internationally, forensic medicine and pathology are increasingly recognized as an important aspect of work done by veterinary clinicians and veterinary pathologists. In this article, a forensic veterinary clinician, a forensic veterinary pathologist in private practice, and a forensic veterinary pathologist at a veterinary school discuss the interactions among veterinary clinicians, veterinary pathologists, and law enforcement agencies and how future interactions can be improved. The focus is on the United Kingdom, but many of the principles, challenges, and suggestions are applicable to other jurisdictions. Clinicians and pathologists require forensic training to enable them to apply their veterinary knowledge to suspected cases of animal abuse and to subsequently present their findings and conclusions to a court of law in a concise, professional, and unbiased manner, and some opportunities for such advanced training in the United Kingdom are indicated. It is important that forensic veterinary clinicians and pathologists interact in an unbiased and collegial manner to answer the questions posed by courts of law. Opportunities for improved training, communication, and interaction among forensic veterinarians, forensic scientists, and law enforcement are discussed. PMID:27371542

  7. Integrating the issues of global and public health into the veterinary education curriculum: a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Lipman, L J A; van Knapen, F

    2009-08-01

    Veterinary public health is an essential field in public health activities, based upon veterinary skills, knowledge and resources and which aims to protect and improve human health and welfare. This discipline has evolved through three stages, beginning with the fight against animal diseases, moving on to include meat inspection and control of zoonoses and now encompassing a much broader health sciences education, with the goal of guaranteeing a safe and wholesome food supply, protecting human wellbeing and conserving the environment. Within the veterinary medicine curriculum, veterinary public health has undergone a similar development. At first, it was mainly concerned with slaughterhouse-based courses but in time it included the teaching of such subjects as epidemiology, the control of communicable (zoonotic) diseases and emergency preparedness. Veterinary medical faculties in Europe have adjusted their curricula over the past few years to reflect these changes in the subject and to meet the need for specialisation. It could be said that veterinary public health education has literally moved from the local abattoir to the global community. In this paper, the authors briefly discuss examples of veterinary medicine curricula at different universities. The veterinary public health curriculum of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht, is then discussed in detail, as an example of the European perspective on integrating global and public health issues into the veterinary curriculum.

  8. Intrigues of biofilm: A perspective in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Abdullahi, Umar Faruk; Igwenagu, Ephraim; Mu'azu, Anas; Aliyu, Sani; Umar, Maryam Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm has a tremendous impact in the field of veterinary medicine, especially the livestock industry, leading to a serious economic loss. Over the years, little attention has been given to biofilm in animals with most of the research geared toward human biofilm diseases. The greatest challenge posed by biofilm is in its incredible ability to resist most of the currently existing antibiotics. This mystery can best be demystified through understanding the mechanism of the quorum sensing which regulate the pathophysiology of biofilm. Ability of biofilm formation in a variety of inanimate surfaces such as animal food contact surfaces is responsible for a host of biofilm diseases affecting animals and humans. In this review, we highlighted some of the challenges of biofilm in livestock and food industries. Also highlighted are; mechanisms of biofilm development, best diagnostic approach and possible novel therapeutic measures needed to combat the menace of biofilm in veterinary medicine. PMID:27051178

  9. Oral vaccination of fish: Lessons from humans and veterinary species.

    PubMed

    Embregts, Carmen W E; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-11-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen breakdown in the harsh gastric environment, but also to the high tolerogenic gut environment and to inadequate vaccine design. In this review we discuss current approaches used to develop oral vaccines for mass vaccination of farmed fish species. Furthermore, using various examples from the human and veterinary vaccine development, we propose additional approaches to fish vaccine design also considering recent advances in fish mucosal immunology and novel molecular tools. Finally, we discuss the pros and cons of using the zebrafish as a pre-screening animal model to potentially speed up vaccine design and testing for aquaculture fish species. PMID:27018298

  10. Animal behavior as a subject for veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Houpt, K A

    1976-01-01

    Knowledge of animal behavior is an important asset for the veterinarian; therefore a course in veterinary animal behavior is offered at the New York State College of Veterinary Medicine as an elective. The course emphasizes the behavior of those species of most interest to the practicing veterinarian: cats, dogs, horses, cows, pigs and sheep. Dominance heirarchies, animal communication, aggressive behavior, sexual behavior and maternal behavior are discussed. Play, learning, diurnal cycles of activity and sleep, and controls of ingestive behavior are also considered. Exotic and zoo animal behaviors are also presented by experts in these fields. The critical periods of canine development are related to the optimum management of puppies. The behavior of feral dogs and horses is described. The role of the veterinarian in preventing cruelty to animals and recognition of pain in animals is emphasized. Whenever possible behavior is observed in the laboratory or on film. PMID:767053

  11. Intrigues of biofilm: A perspective in veterinary medicine

    PubMed Central

    Abdullahi, Umar Faruk; Igwenagu, Ephraim; Mu’azu, Anas; Aliyu, Sani; Umar, Maryam Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm has a tremendous impact in the field of veterinary medicine, especially the livestock industry, leading to a serious economic loss. Over the years, little attention has been given to biofilm in animals with most of the research geared toward human biofilm diseases. The greatest challenge posed by biofilm is in its incredible ability to resist most of the currently existing antibiotics. This mystery can best be demystified through understanding the mechanism of the quorum sensing which regulate the pathophysiology of biofilm. Ability of biofilm formation in a variety of inanimate surfaces such as animal food contact surfaces is responsible for a host of biofilm diseases affecting animals and humans. In this review, we highlighted some of the challenges of biofilm in livestock and food industries. Also highlighted are; mechanisms of biofilm development, best diagnostic approach and possible novel therapeutic measures needed to combat the menace of biofilm in veterinary medicine. PMID:27051178

  12. Animal behavior as a subject for veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Houpt, K A

    1976-01-01

    Knowledge of animal behavior is an important asset for the veterinarian; therefore a course in veterinary animal behavior is offered at the New York State College of Veterinary Medicine as an elective. The course emphasizes the behavior of those species of most interest to the practicing veterinarian: cats, dogs, horses, cows, pigs and sheep. Dominance heirarchies, animal communication, aggressive behavior, sexual behavior and maternal behavior are discussed. Play, learning, diurnal cycles of activity and sleep, and controls of ingestive behavior are also considered. Exotic and zoo animal behaviors are also presented by experts in these fields. The critical periods of canine development are related to the optimum management of puppies. The behavior of feral dogs and horses is described. The role of the veterinarian in preventing cruelty to animals and recognition of pain in animals is emphasized. Whenever possible behavior is observed in the laboratory or on film.

  13. Effective information design for PDAs in veterinary medical education.

    PubMed

    Swarts, Jason; Vannorman, Maggie

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, personal digital assistants (PDAs) have been ignominiously characterized as a solution without a problem. To many, they were glorified versions of calendars, address books, notepads, and calculators that appeared only minimally more useful than their paper predecessors. Today's PDAs cater to a wider range of mobile computing needs, especially in the veterinary field, where they support mobile, information-centric work. Despite the PDA's resurgent popularity, hardware constraints limit its wide-scale integration. Most notably, small screen sizes limit the PDA designers who compose texts, videos, and images for PDA delivery. This article addresses the problem of designing for small screens by re-characterizing the issue as an information design problem rather than a hardware problem. By analyzing how fourth-year students in a veterinary medicine program use their PDAs in their clinical education, we offer suggestions for designing information to meet their needs.

  14. Emergency deployment of genetically engineered veterinary vaccines in Europe.

    PubMed

    Ramezanpour, Bahar; de Foucauld, Jean; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2016-06-24

    On the 9th of November 2015, preceding the World Veterinary Vaccine Congress, a workshop was held to discuss how veterinary vaccines can be deployed more rapidly to appropriately respond to future epizootics in Europe. Considering their potential and unprecedented suitability for surge production, the workshop focussed on vaccines based on genetically engineered viruses and replicon particles. The workshop was attended by academics and representatives from leading pharmaceutical companies, regulatory experts, the European Medicines Agency and the European Commission. We here outline the present regulatory pathways for genetically engineered vaccines in Europe and describe the incentive for the organization of the pre-congress workshop. The participants agreed that existing European regulations on the deliberate release of genetically engineered vaccines into the environment should be updated to facilitate quick deployment of these vaccines in emergency situations. PMID:27208587

  15. Using genomics for surveillance of veterinary infectious agents.

    PubMed

    Mathijs, E; Vandenbussche, F; Van Borm, S

    2016-04-01

    Factors such as globalisation, climate change and agricultural intensification can increase the risk of microbial emergence. As a result, there is a growing need for flexible laboratory-based surveillance tools to rapidly identify, characterise and monitor global (re-)emerging diseases. Although many tools are available, novel sequencing technologies have launched a new era in pathogen surveillance. Here, the authors review the potential applications of high-throughput genomic technologies for the surveillance of veterinary pathogens. They focus on the two types of surveillance that will benefit most from these new tools: hazard-specific surveillance (pathogen identification and typing) and early-warning surveillance (pathogen discovery). The paper reviews how the resulting sequencing data can be used to improve diagnosis and concludes by highlighting the major challenges that hinder the routine use of this technology in the veterinary field. PMID:27217175

  16. Using genomics for surveillance of veterinary infectious agents.

    PubMed

    Mathijs, E; Vandenbussche, F; Van Borm, S

    2016-04-01

    Factors such as globalisation, climate change and agricultural intensification can increase the risk of microbial emergence. As a result, there is a growing need for flexible laboratory-based surveillance tools to rapidly identify, characterise and monitor global (re-)emerging diseases. Although many tools are available, novel sequencing technologies have launched a new era in pathogen surveillance. Here, the authors review the potential applications of high-throughput genomic technologies for the surveillance of veterinary pathogens. They focus on the two types of surveillance that will benefit most from these new tools: hazard-specific surveillance (pathogen identification and typing) and early-warning surveillance (pathogen discovery). The paper reviews how the resulting sequencing data can be used to improve diagnosis and concludes by highlighting the major challenges that hinder the routine use of this technology in the veterinary field.

  17. Teaching Veterinary Histopathology: A Comparison of Microscopy and Digital Slides.

    PubMed

    Brown, Peter J; Fews, Debra; Bell, Nick J

    2016-01-01

    Virtual microscopy using digitized slides has become more widespread in teaching in recent years. There have been no direct comparisons of the use of virtual microscopy and the use of microscopes and glass slides. Third-year veterinary students from two different schools completed a simple objective test, covering aspects of histology and histopathology, before and after a practical class covering relevant material presented as either glass slides viewed with a microscope or as digital slides. There was an overall improvement in performance by students at both veterinary schools using both practical formats. Neither format was consistently better than the other, and neither school consistently outperformed the other. In a comparison of student appraisal of use of digital slides and microscopes, the digital technology was identified as having many advantages.

  18. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers risk assessment principles and presents the views of the Committee on the FAO/WHO Project to update principles and methods for the risk assessment of chemicals in food. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: three anthelminthic agents (doramectin, ivermectin and tiabendazole), seven antimicrobial agents (cefuroxime, dihydrostreptomycin and streptomycin, lincomycin, neomycin, oxytetracycline and thiamphenicol), four insecticides (cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and alpha-cypermethrin, and phoxim) and one production aid (melengestrol acetate). Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including Acceptable Daily Intakes and Maximum Residue Limits and further information required. PMID:12592988

  19. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    The first part of the report presents the views of the Committee on assessment of carcinogenic risk, quality of data, marker residues, and the Joint FAO/WHO Project to update the principles and methods for the risk assessment of chemicals in food. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two antimicrobial agents (neomycin and flumequine), an antiprotozoal agent (imidocarb), three insecticides (deltamethrin, dicyclanil, and trichlorfon) and one production aid (carbadox). Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including Acceptable Daily Intakes and Maximum Residue Limits. Corrigenda to WHO Technical Report Series 911: Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food, 2002, are also included. PMID:12970947

  20. The informatics imperative in veterinary medicine: collaboration across disciplines.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Layne M; Ames, Trevor R; Jacko, Julie A; Watson, Linda A

    2011-01-01

    Information and data management are essential to support the collaborative and interdisciplinary pursuits of an academic veterinary medicine enterprise, ranging from research conducted by individual investigators, education processes, clinical care, and outreach to administration and management. Informatics is an academic discipline that focuses on the creation, management, storage, retrieval, and use of information and data and how technology can be applied to improve access to and use of these resources. In this article, we discuss the challenges in integrating informatics across a large academic enterprise from a veterinary medicine point of view. As a case study, we describe an example program of informatics at the University of Minnesota designed to support interdisciplinary collaboration. PMID:21805929

  1. Intrigues of biofilm: A perspective in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Abdullahi, Umar Faruk; Igwenagu, Ephraim; Mu'azu, Anas; Aliyu, Sani; Umar, Maryam Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm has a tremendous impact in the field of veterinary medicine, especially the livestock industry, leading to a serious economic loss. Over the years, little attention has been given to biofilm in animals with most of the research geared toward human biofilm diseases. The greatest challenge posed by biofilm is in its incredible ability to resist most of the currently existing antibiotics. This mystery can best be demystified through understanding the mechanism of the quorum sensing which regulate the pathophysiology of biofilm. Ability of biofilm formation in a variety of inanimate surfaces such as animal food contact surfaces is responsible for a host of biofilm diseases affecting animals and humans. In this review, we highlighted some of the challenges of biofilm in livestock and food industries. Also highlighted are; mechanisms of biofilm development, best diagnostic approach and possible novel therapeutic measures needed to combat the menace of biofilm in veterinary medicine.

  2. The role of veterinary epidemiology and veterinary services in complying with the World Trade Organization SPS agreement.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, C; Salman, M; Thiermann, A; Kellar, J; Rojas, H; Willeberg, P

    2005-02-01

    The agreement on the application of sanitary and phytosanitary measures (SPS agreement) was one of the major products of the GATT's Uruguay round of multilateral trade negotiations, signed in Marrakesh on 15 April 1994. This agreement and others are part of the treaty that established the World Trade Organization (WTO). The WTO superseded the GATT as the umbrella organization for international trade (WTO, 1998a). The SPS agreement's main intent is to provide guidelines and provisions to member countries to facilitate trade while taking measures to protect human, animal or plant life or health. The agreement dictates that all sanitary measures must be scientifically based and not more restrictive than required to avoid the risk identified. The agreement recommends the use of international standards from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), Codex Alimentarius (CAC) and the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) as the basis for import requirements. If a country chooses to apply more restrictive measures than those in the international standards, it has to justify its position through a risk analysis, thus avoiding the use of sanitary and phytosanitary measures as unjustified barriers to trade. More than ever, veterinary services worldwide are faced with having to fulfill a crucial role in protecting their country's animal health status, provide sound surveillance information on the occurrence of diseases within their territories, and conduct scientifically valid risk analyses to establish justified import requirements. During the past two decades, most countries have experienced resource reduction in their veterinary services. The effect of these policies has been severe, in many cases leading to an inability of veterinary services to conduct their disease prevention and control duties. There is a clear inconsistency between the demands placed on veterinary services and the current level of funding and support they are receiving, particularly in

  3. Evaluation of radiation safety in 29 central Ohio veterinary practices.

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, S A; Wilkins, J R; Hueston, W D

    1989-01-01

    A sample of 29 veterinary practices in Central Ohio were visited to assess radiation safety practices and observance of state regulations. Lead aprons and gloves were usually available, but gloves were not always worn. Protective thyroid collars and lead glasses were not available in any practice, lead shields in only five practices, and lead-lined walls and doors in only two practices. Eighteen practices had none of the required safety notices posted. PMID:2735484

  4. The Changing Fiscal Environment for Academic Veterinary Medicine.

    PubMed

    Zimmel, Dana N; Lloyd, James W

    2015-01-01

    The fiscal environment for academic veterinary medicine has changed substantially over the past 50 years. Understanding the flux of state and federal government support and the implications for student debt, academic programs, and scholarly work is critical for planning for the future. The recent precipitous decline in public funding highlights the urgent need to develop and maintain an economically sustainable model that can adapt to the changing landscape and serve societal needs.

  5. Dissolution test for ivermectin in oral veterinary paste.

    PubMed

    Sznitowska, M; Pietkiewicz, J; Stokrocka, M; Janicki, S

    2004-10-01

    A dissolution test for oral veterinary pastes with ivermectin using the Ph. Eur. paddle apparatus was developed. Sink conditions were achieved with sodium lauryl sulphate in a concentration of 0.5% as dissolution medium. By means of HPLC fast degradation of ivermectin was observed in HCl 0.1 M solution. Rotation speed of the paddle at 75 rpm was appropriate as demonstrated in a study comparing two different products. PMID:15544065

  6. Detection of bacterial contamination and DNA quantification in stored blood units in 2 veterinary hospital blood banks.

    PubMed

    Stefanetti, Valentina; Miglio, Arianna; Cappelli, Katia; Capomaccio, Stefano; Sgariglia, Elisa; Marenzoni, Maria L; Antognoni, Maria T; Coletti, Mauro; Mangili, Vittorio; Passamonti, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    Blood transfusions in veterinary medicine have become increasingly more common and are now an integral part of lifesaving and advanced treatment in small and large animals. Important risks associated with transfusion of blood products include the transmission of various infectious diseases. Several guidelines suggest what infectious agents to screen for in canine and feline transfusion medicine. However, while the risk of bacterial contamination of blood products during storage and administration has not been documented in veterinary medicine, it has emerged as a cause of morbidity and mortality in human transfusion medicine. Clinical experience shows that the majority of blood component bacterial contaminations are caused by only a few species. Unlike other types of bacteria, psychrotolerant species like Pseudomonas spp. and Serratia spp. can proliferate during the storage of blood units at 4°C from a very low titer at the time of blood collection to a clinically significant level (> 10(5) CFU/mL) causing clinical sepsis resulting from red blood cell concentrate transfusions in human medicine. The purpose of this report was to describe the detection and quantification procedures applied in 4 cases of bacterial contamination of canine and feline blood units, which suggest the need for further investigations to optimize patients' safety in veterinary transfusion medicine. PMID:27642138

  7. Occurrence of residues of the veterinary drug malachite green in eels caught downstream from municipal sewage treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Schuetze, Andrea; Heberer, Thomas; Juergensen, Susanne

    2008-08-01

    Residues of malachite green (MG), a veterinary drug illegally used for the treatment of aquacultured fish, have been found in wild eels caught from surface waters downstream from the sewers of different municipal sewage treatment plants (STPs). MG and its metabolite leucomalachite green (LMG) were detected with total concentrations up to 0.765 microg kg(-1) fresh weight in the tissues of 25 out of 45 eels caught from different lakes, a river and a canal in Berlin, Germany. In all cases, the occurrence of the residues could directly be linked to the presence of discharges by municipal STPs into the receiving surface waters. MG is a multiple-use compound that is also used to color materials. Thus, it appears to be reasonable that the residues of MG found in the eel samples originate from such uses, e.g. by wash off from clothes or paper towels colored with MG. Additional loads from legal uses of MG as veterinary drug for the treatment of ornamental fish (private aquaria) are possible. The results obtained from this study are the first proof of background contaminations of a veterinary drug found in samples of fish not intentionally treated with such agents. MG and LMG are regarded as potential genotoxic carcinogens making it impossible to establish a tolerable daily intake. A margin of exposure (MOE) approach was applied to evaluate the human health risk associated with the consumption of the eels investigated in this study. With a MOE of 3.4 million the chronic risk was classified as being very low. Nevertheless, due to their potential to act as genotoxic carcinogens, any oral exposure to residues of MG and LMG should be avoided. According to European Union law, zero tolerance applies to all residues of MG and LMG found in food for human consumption as MG is not registered for use as veterinary drug. PMID:18602134

  8. Tropical veterinary parasites at Harvard University's Museum of Comparative Zoology.

    PubMed

    Conn, David Bruce

    2008-12-01

    Tropical veterinary parasites have been maintained by the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ) at Harvard University since the mid 1800s. Most of these are maintained by the Department of Invertebrate Zoology, but many vectors and intermediate hosts are maintained by the Departments of Entomology and Malacology. The largest collections are of avian and mammalian ticks (Acarina) that are important as both parasites and vectors. Nematodes are second in numbers, followed by cestodes, trematodes, and several minor helminth groups, crustacean parasites of fish, and protozoan parasites of various hosts. The MCZ directed or participated in several major expeditions to tropical areas around the globe in the early 1900s. Many of these expeditions focused on human parasites, but hundreds of veterinary and zoonotic parasites were also collected from these and numerous, smaller, tropical expeditions. Host sources include companion animals, livestock, laboratory species, domestic fowl, reptiles, amphibians, exotics/zoo animals, commercially important fishes, and other wildlife. Specimens are curated, either fixed whole in vials or mounted on slides as whole mounts or histopathological sections. The primary emphasis of MCZ's current work with tropical veterinary parasites is on voucher specimens from epidemiological, experimental, and clinical research.

  9. Purdue University graduate certificate program in Veterinary Homeland Security.

    PubMed

    Amass, Sandra F; Blossom, Thaddaeus D; Ash, Marianne; McCay, Don; Mattix, Marc E

    2008-01-01

    Our nation lacks a critical mass of professionals trained to prevent and respond to food- and animal-related emergencies. Training veterinarians provides an immediate means of addressing this shortage of experts. Achievement of critical mass to effectively address animal-related emergencies is expedited by concurrent training of professionals and graduate students in related areas. Purdue University offers a Web-based Graduate Certificate in Veterinary Homeland Security to address this special area of need. The program is a collaborative effort among the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine, the Purdue Homeland Security Institute, the Indiana State Board of Animal Health, the Indiana State Police, and others with the overall goal of increasing capacity and preparedness to manage animal-related emergencies. Individuals with expertise in veterinary medicine, public health, animal science, or homeland security are encouraged to participate. The Web-based system allows courses to be delivered efficiently and effectively around the world and allows participants to continue their graduate education while maintaining full-time jobs. Participants enhance their understanding of natural and intentional threats to animal health, strengthen their skills in managing animal-health emergencies, and develop problem-solving expertise to become effective members of animal emergency response teams and of their communities. Students receive graduate credit from Purdue University that can be used toward the certificate and toward an advanced graduate degree. Currently, 70 participants from 28 states; Washington, DC; Singapore; and Bermuda are enrolled. PMID:18723810

  10. Veterinary public health in India: current status and future needs.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, S; Singh, B B

    2015-12-01

    Veterinary public health (VPH) assumes huge significance in developing countries such as India. However, the implementation of VPH services throughout the country is still in its infancy. From 1970 onwards, many institutes, national and international organisations, professional societies, policies and personalities have contributed towards the development of VPH in India. Nevertheless, there is an urgent need to develop VPH still further as there are many issues, such as high population density, the re-emergence of zoonotic pathogens, environmental pollution and antimicrobial resistance, that require attention. The time has surely come to involve all stakeholders, ranging from primary producers (e.g., farmers) to policy-makers, so as to garner support for the holistic implementation of VPH services in India. To improve VPH activities and services, science-based policies enforced through stringent regulation are required to improve human, animal and environmental health. The emergence of the 'One Health' concept has ushered in new hopes for the resurrection of VPH in India. Applying tools such as the World Organisation for Animal Health (OlE) Day One Competencies and the OlE Tool for the Evaluation of Performance of Veterinary Services (PVS Tool) is essential to improve the quality of national Veterinary Services and to identify gaps and weaknesses in service provision, which can be remedied to comply with the OlE international standards. VPH initiatives started modestly but they continue to grow. The present review is focused on the current status and future needs of VPH in India.

  11. Avian scavengers and the threat from veterinary pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, Richard J; Taggart, Mark A; Prakash, Vibhu; Chakraborty, Soumya S; Deori, Parag; Galligan, Toby; Kulkarni, Mandar; Ranade, Sachin; Saini, Mohini; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Shringarpure, Rohan; Green, Rhys E

    2014-11-19

    Veterinary use of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac on domesticated ungulates caused populations of resident Gyps vultures in the Indian sub-continent to collapse. The birds died when they fed on carrion from treated animals. Veterinary diclofenac was banned in 2006 and meloxicam was advocated as a 'vulture-safe' alternative. We examine the effectiveness of the 2006 ban, whether meloxicam has replaced diclofenac, and the impact of these changes on vultures. Drug residue data from liver samples collected from ungulate carcasses in India since 2004 demonstrate that the prevalence of diclofenac in carcasses in 2009 was half of that before the ban and meloxicam prevalence increased by 44%. The expected vulture death rate from diclofenac per meal in 2009 was one-third of that before the ban. Surveys at veterinary clinics show that diclofenac use in India began in 1994, coinciding with the onset of rapid Gyps declines ascertained from measured rates of declines. Our study shows that one pharmaceutical product has had a devastating impact on Asia's vultures. Large-scale research and survey were needed to detect, diagnose and quantify the problem and measure the response to remedial actions. Given these difficulties, other effects of pharmaceuticals in the environment may remain undetected. PMID:25405963

  12. Purdue University graduate certificate program in Veterinary Homeland Security.

    PubMed

    Amass, Sandra F; Blossom, Thaddaeus D; Ash, Marianne; McCay, Don; Mattix, Marc E

    2008-01-01

    Our nation lacks a critical mass of professionals trained to prevent and respond to food- and animal-related emergencies. Training veterinarians provides an immediate means of addressing this shortage of experts. Achievement of critical mass to effectively address animal-related emergencies is expedited by concurrent training of professionals and graduate students in related areas. Purdue University offers a Web-based Graduate Certificate in Veterinary Homeland Security to address this special area of need. The program is a collaborative effort among the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine, the Purdue Homeland Security Institute, the Indiana State Board of Animal Health, the Indiana State Police, and others with the overall goal of increasing capacity and preparedness to manage animal-related emergencies. Individuals with expertise in veterinary medicine, public health, animal science, or homeland security are encouraged to participate. The Web-based system allows courses to be delivered efficiently and effectively around the world and allows participants to continue their graduate education while maintaining full-time jobs. Participants enhance their understanding of natural and intentional threats to animal health, strengthen their skills in managing animal-health emergencies, and develop problem-solving expertise to become effective members of animal emergency response teams and of their communities. Students receive graduate credit from Purdue University that can be used toward the certificate and toward an advanced graduate degree. Currently, 70 participants from 28 states; Washington, DC; Singapore; and Bermuda are enrolled.

  13. Veterinary public health in India: current status and future needs.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, S; Singh, B B

    2015-12-01

    Veterinary public health (VPH) assumes huge significance in developing countries such as India. However, the implementation of VPH services throughout the country is still in its infancy. From 1970 onwards, many institutes, national and international organisations, professional societies, policies and personalities have contributed towards the development of VPH in India. Nevertheless, there is an urgent need to develop VPH still further as there are many issues, such as high population density, the re-emergence of zoonotic pathogens, environmental pollution and antimicrobial resistance, that require attention. The time has surely come to involve all stakeholders, ranging from primary producers (e.g., farmers) to policy-makers, so as to garner support for the holistic implementation of VPH services in India. To improve VPH activities and services, science-based policies enforced through stringent regulation are required to improve human, animal and environmental health. The emergence of the 'One Health' concept has ushered in new hopes for the resurrection of VPH in India. Applying tools such as the World Organisation for Animal Health (OlE) Day One Competencies and the OlE Tool for the Evaluation of Performance of Veterinary Services (PVS Tool) is essential to improve the quality of national Veterinary Services and to identify gaps and weaknesses in service provision, which can be remedied to comply with the OlE international standards. VPH initiatives started modestly but they continue to grow. The present review is focused on the current status and future needs of VPH in India. PMID:27044147

  14. [Behavior of selected veterinary preparations during industrial milk processing].

    PubMed

    Konrad, H; Gabro, T; Dedek, W

    1977-01-01

    Since the extensive veterinary-hygienic treatment of herds with insecticidal veterinary preparations may lead to milk contamination, the authors studied the behaviour of some active agents (butonate, dichlorvos (DDVP), trichlorphon, naled, carbaryl, hexachloro-p-xylene and rafoxanide) during the industrial processing of milk to fluid milk, cream, butter, cheese and milk powder, and during the storage of these products. Small-scale model experiments served to investigate the effects of pasteurization (74 and 95 degrees C.), separation and churning as well as of the processing to milk powder and cheese. Analyses for residues were performed by thin-layer chromatography, colorimetry and with the aid of the isotope technique. From the viewpoint of milk processing, the use of TCP and, in part, that of DDVP may be considered as less critical due to their hydrophilic properties and rapid degradation. In view of their lipophilic behaviour, the use of butonate, carbaryl, rafoxanide and hexachloro-p-xylene as active agents in veterinary preparations for milk cows must be regarded as problematic. The utilization of naled is also problematic due to the fact that the toxicology of its metabolites is not yet sufficiently known. PMID:404556

  15. Assessment of a novel method for teaching veterinary parasitology.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mary Mauldin; Yvorchuk-St Jean, Kathleen E; Wallace, Charles E; Krecek, Rosina C

    2014-01-01

    A student-centered innovative method of teaching veterinary parasitology was launched and evaluated at the Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) in St. Kitts, where Parasitology is a required course for second-semester veterinary students. A novel method, named Iron Parasitology, compared lecturer-centered teaching with student-centered teaching and assessed the retention of parasitology knowledge of students in their second semester and again when they reached their seventh semester. Members of five consecutive classes chose to participate in Iron Parasitology with the opportunity to earn an additional 10 points toward their final grade by demonstrating their knowledge, communication skills, clarity of message, and creativity in the Iron Parasitology exercise. The participants and nonparticipants were assessed using seven parameters. The initial short-term study parameters used to evaluate lecturer- versus student-centered teaching were age, gender, final Parasitology course grade without Iron Parasitology, RUSVM overall grade point average (GPA), RUSVM second-semester GPA, overall GPA before RUSVM, and prerequisite GPA before RUSVM. The long-term reassessment study assessed retention of parasitology knowledge in members of the seventh-semester class who had Iron Parasitology as a tool in their second semester. These students were invited to complete a parasitology final examination during their seventh semester. There were no statistically significant differences for the parameters measured in the initial study. In addition, Iron Parasitology did not have an effect on the retention scores in the reassessment study.

  16. Avian scavengers and the threat from veterinary pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, Richard J; Taggart, Mark A; Prakash, Vibhu; Chakraborty, Soumya S; Deori, Parag; Galligan, Toby; Kulkarni, Mandar; Ranade, Sachin; Saini, Mohini; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Shringarpure, Rohan; Green, Rhys E

    2014-11-19

    Veterinary use of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac on domesticated ungulates caused populations of resident Gyps vultures in the Indian sub-continent to collapse. The birds died when they fed on carrion from treated animals. Veterinary diclofenac was banned in 2006 and meloxicam was advocated as a 'vulture-safe' alternative. We examine the effectiveness of the 2006 ban, whether meloxicam has replaced diclofenac, and the impact of these changes on vultures. Drug residue data from liver samples collected from ungulate carcasses in India since 2004 demonstrate that the prevalence of diclofenac in carcasses in 2009 was half of that before the ban and meloxicam prevalence increased by 44%. The expected vulture death rate from diclofenac per meal in 2009 was one-third of that before the ban. Surveys at veterinary clinics show that diclofenac use in India began in 1994, coinciding with the onset of rapid Gyps declines ascertained from measured rates of declines. Our study shows that one pharmaceutical product has had a devastating impact on Asia's vultures. Large-scale research and survey were needed to detect, diagnose and quantify the problem and measure the response to remedial actions. Given these difficulties, other effects of pharmaceuticals in the environment may remain undetected.

  17. Culture and propagation of microsporidia of veterinary interest

    PubMed Central

    LALLO, Maria Anete; VIDOTO DA COSTA, Lidiana Flora; ALVARES-SARAIVA, Anuska Marcelino; ROCHA, Paulo Ricardo Dell’Armelina; SPADACCI-MORENA, Diva Denelle; KONNO, Fabiana Toshie de Camargo; SUFFREDINI, Ivana Barbosa

    2015-01-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular mitochrondria-lacking pathogens that rely on host cells to grow and multiply. Microsporidia, currently classified as fungi, are ubiquitous in nature and are found worldwide. They infect a large number of mammals and are recognized as opportunistic infection agents in HIV-AIDS patients. Its importance for veterinary medicine has been unveiled in recent years through the description of clinical and subclinical forms of infection in domestic and wild animals. Domestic and wild birds may be infected by the same human microsporidia, reinforcing their zoonotic potential. Microsporidiosis in fish is prevalent and causes significant economic losses for fish farming. Some species of microsporidia have been propagated in cell cultures, which may provide conditions for the development of diagnostic techniques, understanding of pathogenesis and immune responses and for the discovery of potential therapies. Unfortunately, the cultivation of these parasites is not fully standardized in most research laboratories, especially in the veterinary field. The aim of this review is to relate the most important microsporidia of veterinary interest and demonstrate how these pathogens can be grown and propagated in cell culture for diagnostic purposes or for pathogenesis studies. Cultivation of microsporidia allowed the study of its life cycle, metabolism, pathogenesis and diagnosis, and may also serve as a repository for these pathogens for molecular, biochemical, antigenic and epidemiological studies. PMID:26346746

  18. [Behavior of selected veterinary preparations during industrial milk processing].

    PubMed

    Konrad, H; Gabro, T; Dedek, W

    1977-01-01

    Since the extensive veterinary-hygienic treatment of herds with insecticidal veterinary preparations may lead to milk contamination, the authors studied the behaviour of some active agents (butonate, dichlorvos (DDVP), trichlorphon, naled, carbaryl, hexachloro-p-xylene and rafoxanide) during the industrial processing of milk to fluid milk, cream, butter, cheese and milk powder, and during the storage of these products. Small-scale model experiments served to investigate the effects of pasteurization (74 and 95 degrees C.), separation and churning as well as of the processing to milk powder and cheese. Analyses for residues were performed by thin-layer chromatography, colorimetry and with the aid of the isotope technique. From the viewpoint of milk processing, the use of TCP and, in part, that of DDVP may be considered as less critical due to their hydrophilic properties and rapid degradation. In view of their lipophilic behaviour, the use of butonate, carbaryl, rafoxanide and hexachloro-p-xylene as active agents in veterinary preparations for milk cows must be regarded as problematic. The utilization of naled is also problematic due to the fact that the toxicology of its metabolites is not yet sufficiently known.

  19. Culture and propagation of microsporidia of veterinary interest.

    PubMed

    Lallo, Maria Anete; Vidoto Da Costa, Lidiana Flora; Alvares-Saraiva, Anuska Marcelino; Rocha, Paulo Ricardo Dell'Armelina; Spadacci-Morena, Diva Denelle; Konno, Fabiana Toshie de Camargo; Suffredini, Ivana Barbosa

    2016-02-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular mitochondria-lacking pathogens that rely on host cells to grow and multiply. Microsporidia, currently classified as fungi, are ubiquitous in nature and are found worldwide. They infect a large number of mammals and are recognized as opportunistic infection agents in HIV-AIDS patients. Its importance for veterinary medicine has been unveiled in recent years through the description of clinical and subclinical forms of infection in domestic and wild animals. Domestic and wild birds may be infected by the same human microsporidia, reinforcing their zoonotic potential. Microsporidiosis in fish is prevalent and causes significant economic losses for fish farming. Some species of microsporidia have been propagated in cell cultures, which may provide conditions for the development of diagnostic techniques, understanding of pathogenesis and immune responses and for the discovery of potential therapies. Unfortunately, the cultivation of these parasites is not fully standardized in most research laboratories, especially in the veterinary field. The aim of this review is to relate the most important microsporidia of veterinary interest and demonstrate how these pathogens can be grown and propagated in cell culture for diagnostic purposes or for pathogenesis studies. Cultivation of microsporidia allowed the study of its life cycle, metabolism, pathogenesis and diagnosis, and may also serve as a repository for these pathogens for molecular, biochemical, antigenic and epidemiological studies. PMID:26346746

  20. Avian scavengers and the threat from veterinary pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, Richard J.; Taggart, Mark A.; Prakash, Vibhu; Chakraborty, Soumya S.; Deori, Parag; Galligan, Toby; Kulkarni, Mandar; Ranade, Sachin; Saini, Mohini; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Shringarpure, Rohan; Green, Rhys E.

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary use of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac on domesticated ungulates caused populations of resident Gyps vultures in the Indian sub-continent to collapse. The birds died when they fed on carrion from treated animals. Veterinary diclofenac was banned in 2006 and meloxicam was advocated as a ‘vulture-safe’ alternative. We examine the effectiveness of the 2006 ban, whether meloxicam has replaced diclofenac, and the impact of these changes on vultures. Drug residue data from liver samples collected from ungulate carcasses in India since 2004 demonstrate that the prevalence of diclofenac in carcasses in 2009 was half of that before the ban and meloxicam prevalence increased by 44%. The expected vulture death rate from diclofenac per meal in 2009 was one-third of that before the ban. Surveys at veterinary clinics show that diclofenac use in India began in 1994, coinciding with the onset of rapid Gyps declines ascertained from measured rates of declines. Our study shows that one pharmaceutical product has had a devastating impact on Asia's vultures. Large-scale research and survey were needed to detect, diagnose and quantify the problem and measure the response to remedial actions. Given these difficulties, other effects of pharmaceuticals in the environment may remain undetected. PMID:25405963