Science.gov

Sample records for 24um debris population

  1. NASA Orbital Debris Baseline Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has created high fidelity populations of the debris environment. The populations include objects of 1 cm and larger in Low Earth Orbit through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. They were designed for the purpose of assisting debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment is derived directly from the newest ORDEM model populations which include a background derived from LEGEND, as well as specific events such as the Chinese ASAT test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, the RORSAT sodium-potassium droplet releases, and other miscellaneous events. It is the most realistic ODPO debris population to date. In this paper we present the populations in chart form. We describe derivations of the background population and the specific populations added on. We validate our 1 cm and larger Low Earth Orbit population against SSN, Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  2. Benefits of Active Debris Removal on the LEO Debris Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniwa, Kazuaki; Hanada, Toshiya; Kawamoto, Satomi

    Since the launch of Sputnik, orbital debris population continues to increase due to ongoing space activities, on-orbit explosions, and accidental collisions. In the future, a great deal of fragments can be expected to be created by explosions and collisions. In spite of prevention of satellite and rocket upper stage explosions and other mitigation measures, debris population in low Earth orbit may not be stabilized. To better limit the growth of the future debris population, it is necessary to remove the existing debris actively. This paper studies about the effectiveness of active debris removal in low Earth orbit where the collision rate with and between space debris is high. This study does not consider economic problems, but investigates removing debris which may stabilize well the current debris population based on the concept of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

  3. The Population of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Barker, Ed; Buckalew, Brent; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Frith, James; Gomez, Juan; Kaleida, Catherine; Lederer, Susan M.; Lee, Chris H.

    2016-01-01

    The 6.5-m Magellan telescope 'Walter Baade' at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile has been used for spot surveys of the GEO orbital regime to study the population of optically faint GEO debris. The goal is to estimate the size of the population of GEO debris at sizes much smaller than can be studied with 1-meter class telescopes. Despite the small size of the field of view of the Magellan instrument (diameter 0.5-degree), a significant population of objects fainter than R = 19th magnitude have been found with angular rates consistent with circular orbits at GEO. We compare the size of this population with the numbers of GEO objects found at brighter magnitudes by smaller telescopes. The observed detections have a wide range in characteristics starting with those appearing as short uniform streaks. But there are a substantial number of detections with variations in brightness, flashers, during the 5-second exposure. The duration of each of these flashes can be extremely brief: sometimes less than half a second. This is characteristic of a rapidly tumbling object with a quite variable projected size times albedo. If the albedo is of the order of 0.2, then the largest projected size of these objects is around 10-cm. The data in this paper was collected over the last several years using Magellan's IMACS camera in f/2 mode. The analysis shows the brightness bins for the observed GEO population as well as the periodicity of the flashers. All objects presented are correlated with the catalog: the focus of the paper will be on the uncorrelated, optically faint, objects. The goal of this project is to better characterize the faint debris population in GEO that access to a 6.5-m optical telescope in a superb site can provide.

  4. The Population of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitzer, P.; Barker, E.; Buckalew, B.; Burkhardt, A.; Cowardin, H.; Frith, J.; Kaleida, C.; Lederer, S.; Lee, C.

    2016-09-01

    The 6.5-m Magellan telescope, 'Walter Baade', at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile has been used for spot surveys of the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) regime to study the population of optically faint GEO debris. The goal is to estimate the population of GEO debris at sizes much smaller than can be studied with 1-meter class telescopes. Despite the small field of view of the Magellan instrument (diameter 0.5-degree), a significant population of objects fainter than R = 19th magnitude has been found with angular rates consistent with circular orbits at GEO. We compare the size of this population with the numbers of GEO objects found at brighter magnitudes by smaller telescopes. The detections have a wide range of characteristics starting with those appearing as short uniform streaks. But there are a substantial number of detections that vary in brightness ("flashers") during the 5-second exposure. The duration of each of these flashes can be extremely brief: sometimes less than half a second. This is characteristic of a rapidly tumbling object with a quite variable projected product of size * albedo. If the albedo is of the order of 0.2, then the largest projected size of these objects is around 10-cm.

  5. Secondary impact generated particles: implications for the orbital debris population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, J. C.; Rival, M.; Alby, F.

    1999-01-01

    Every time a debris or a meteoroid hits a part of a satellite in orbit, a great amount of secondary particles is ejected in the neighborhood of the impact site. This phenomenon is important for brittle materials, such as used for solar generators. The secondary particles that do not impact other parts of the spacecraft are added to the primary debris population and increase the small debris flux. We present an ejecta production model that gives the size and the velocity distribution of ejected particles as a function of primary impact parameters. We derive the parameters of all ejecta created during one orbital revolution of a satellite. An orbital evolution program is used to extrapolate the secondary debris position at later times. Preliminary results show that spall fragments ejected at low velocities remain in the vicinity of the parent satellite. The ejecta trajectories are similar and their inclination is very close to those of the parent satellite. Their orbital evolution depends mainly on the size of the debris and on the altitude of the parent body: the smallest particles in low earth orbit quickly reenter the earth atmosphere, while the largest spalls have a very slow decay. The antagonistic action of debris production and debris decay by drag leads to an equilibrium for particles within a given size range. Quantitative results on densities and fluxes compared to the primary debris population are presented for the peculiar case of heliosynchronous orbits.

  6. ORDEM2010 and MASTER-2009 Modeled Small Debris Population Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Flegel, S.

    2010-01-01

    The latest versions of the two premier orbital debris engineering models, NASA s ORDEM2010 and ESA s MASTER-2009, have been publicly released. Both models have gone through significant advancements since inception, and now represent the state-of-the-art in orbital debris knowledge of their respective agencies. The purpose of these models is to provide satellite designers/operators and debris researchers with reliable estimates of the artificial debris environment in near-Earth orbit. The small debris environment within the size range of 1 mm to 1 cm is of particular interest to both human and robotic spacecraft programs. These objects are much more numerous than larger trackable debris but are still large enough to cause significant, if not catastrophic, damage to spacecraft upon impact. They are also small enough to elude routine detection by existing observation systems (radar and telescope). Without reliable detection the modeling of these populations has always coupled theoretical origins with supporting observational data in different degrees. This paper details the 1 mm to 1 cm orbital debris populations of both ORDEM2010 and MASTER-2009; their sources (both known and presumed), current supporting data and theory, and methods of population analysis. Fluxes on spacecraft for chosen orbits are also presented and discussed within the context of each model.

  7. ORDEM2010 and MASTER-2009 Modeled Small Debris Population Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Flegel, S.

    2010-01-01

    The latest versions of the two premier orbital debris engineering models, NASA s ORDEM2010 and ESA s MASTER-2009, have been publicly released. Both models have gone through significant advancements since inception, and now represent the state-of-the-art in orbital debris knowledge of their respective agencies. The purpose of these models is to provide satellite designers/operators and debris researchers with reliable estimates of the artificial debris environment in near-Earth orbit. The small debris environment within the size range of 1 mm to 1 cm is of particular interest to both human and robotic spacecraft programs. These objects are much more numerous than larger trackable debris but are still large enough to cause significant, if not catastrophic, damage to spacecraft upon impact. They are also small enough to elude routine detection by existing observation systems (radar and telescope). Without reliable detection the modeling of these populations has always coupled theoretical origins with supporting observational data in different degrees. This paper details the 1 mm to 1 cm orbital debris populations of both ORDEM2010 and MASTER-2009; their sources (both known and presumed), current supporting data and theory, and methods of population analysis. Fluxes on spacecraft for chosen orbits are also presented and discussed within the context of each model.

  8. Contribution of secondary ejecta to the debris population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, J.-C.; Bariteau, M.

    2004-01-01

    When a micro-debris or a micrometeoroid impacts a spacecraft surface, secondary particles, called ejecta, are produced. These ejecta can contribute to a modification of the debris environment: either locally by the occurrence of secondary impacts on the components of complex and large space structures, or at great distances by the formation of a population of small orbital debris. This paper describes the ejecta production mechanism, and shows their orbital evolution. Then, the distribution of ejecta in low earth orbits is given. Some results are presented describing the number of ejecta as a function of size and altitude.

  9. Controlling the growth of future LEO debris populations with active debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Johnson, N. L.; Hill, N. M.

    2010-03-01

    Active debris removal (ADR) was suggested as a potential means to remediate the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment as early as the 1980s. The reasons ADR has not become practical are due to its technical difficulties and the high cost associated with the approach. However, as the LEO debris populations continue to increase, ADR may be the only option to preserve the near-Earth environment for future generations. An initial study was completed in 2007 to demonstrate that a simple ADR target selection criterion could be developed to reduce the future debris population growth. The present paper summarizes a comprehensive study based on more realistic simulation scenarios, including fragments generated from the 2007 Fengyun-1C event, mitigation measures, and other target selection options. The simulations were based on the NASA long-term orbital debris projection model, LEGEND. A scenario where, at the end of mission lifetimes, spacecraft and upper stages were moved to 25-year decay orbits, was adopted as the baseline environment for comparison. Different annual removal rates and different ADR target selection criteria were tested, and the resulting 200-year future environment projections were compared with the baseline scenario. Results of this parametric study indicate that (1) an effective removal strategy can be developed using a selection criterion based on the mass and collision probability of each object, and (2) the LEO environment can be stabilized in the next 200 years with an ADR removal rate of five objects per year.

  10. Controlling the Growth of Future LEO Debris Populations with Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Johnson, N. L.; Hill, N. M.

    2008-01-01

    Active debris removal (ADR) was suggested as a potential means to remediate the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment as early as the 1980s. The reasons ADR has not become practical are due to its technical difficulties and the high cost associated with the approach. However, as the LEO debris populations continue to increase, ADR may be the only option to preserve the near-Earth environment for future generations. An initial study was completed in 2007 to demonstrate that a simple ADR target selection criterion could be developed to reduce the future debris population growth. The present paper summarizes a comprehensive study based on more realistic simulation scenarios, including fragments generated from the 2007 Fengyun-1C event, mitigation measures, and other target selection options. The simulations were based on the NASA long-term orbital debris projection model, LEGEND. A scenario, where at the end of mission lifetimes, spacecraft and upper stages were moved to 25-year decay orbits, was adopted as the baseline environment for comparison. Different annual removal rates and different ADR target selection criteria were tested, and the resulting 200-year future environment projections were compared with the baseline scenario. Results of this parametric study indicate that (1) an effective removal strategy can be developed based on the mass and collision probability of each object as the selection criterion, and (2) the LEO environment can be stabilized in the next 200 years with an ADR removal rate of five objects per year.

  11. Controlling the Growth of Future LEO Debris Populations with Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Johnson, N. L.; Hill, N. M.

    2008-01-01

    Active debris removal (ADR) was suggested as a potential means to remediate the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment as early as the 1980s. The reasons ADR has not become practical are due to its technical difficulties and the high cost associated with the approach. However, as the LEO debris populations continue to increase, ADR may be the only option to preserve the near-Earth environment for future generations. An initial study was completed in 2007 to demonstrate that a simple ADR target selection criterion could be developed to reduce the future debris population growth. The present paper summarizes a comprehensive study based on more realistic simulation scenarios, including fragments generated from the 2007 Fengyun-1C event, mitigation measures, and other target selection options. The simulations were based on the NASA long-term orbital debris projection model, LEGEND. A scenario, where at the end of mission lifetimes, spacecraft and upper stages were moved to 25-year decay orbits, was adopted as the baseline environment for comparison. Different annual removal rates and different ADR target selection criteria were tested, and the resulting 200-year future environment projections were compared with the baseline scenario. Results of this parametric study indicate that (1) an effective removal strategy can be developed based on the mass and collision probability of each object as the selection criterion, and (2) the LEO environment can be stabilized in the next 200 years with an ADR removal rate of five objects per year.

  12. The Small Size Debris Population at GEO from Optical Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Barker, Ed; Buckalew, Brent; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Frith, James; Kaleida, Catherine; Lederer, Susan M.; Lee, Chris H.

    2017-01-01

    We have observed the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) debris population at sizes smaller than 10 cm using optical observations with the 6.5-m Magellan telescope 'Walter Baade' at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The IMACS f/2 imaging camera with a 0.5-degree diameter field of view has been used in small area surveys of the GEO regime to study the population of optically faint GEO debris. The goal is to estimate the population of GEO debris that is fainter than can be studied with 1-meter class telescopes. A significant population of objects fainter than R = 19th magnitude has been found. These objects have observed with angular rates consistent with circular orbits and orbital inclinations up to 15 degrees at GEO. A sizeable number of these objects have significant brightness variations ("flashes") during the 5-second exposure, which suggest rapid changes in the albedo-projected size product.

  13. Investigation of Orbital Debris: Mitigation, Removal, and Modeling the Debris Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotten, Joel

    The population of objects in orbit around Earth has grown since the late 1950s. Today there are over 21,000 objects over 10 cm in length in orbit, and an estimated 500,000 more between 1 and 10 cm. Only a small fraction of these objects are operational satellites. The rest are debris: old derelict spacecraft or rocket bodies, fragments created as the result of explosions or collisions, discarded objects, slag from solid rockets, or even flaked off paint. Traveling at up to 7 km/s, a collision with even a 1 cm piece of debris could severely damage or destroy a satellite. This dissertation examines three aspects of orbital debris. First, the concept of a self-consuming satellite is explored. This nanosatellite would use its own external structure as propellant to execute a deorbit maneuver at the end of its operational life, thus allowing it to meet current debris mitigation standards. Results from lab experiments examining potential materials for this concept have shown favorable results. Second, Particle in Cell techniques are modified and used to model the plasma plume from a micro-cathode arc thruster. This model is then applied to the concept of an ion beam shepherd satellite. This satellite would use its plasma plume to deorbit another derelict satellite. Results from these simulations indicate the micro-cathode arc thruster could potentially deorbit a derelict CubeSat in a matter of a few weeks. Finally, the orbital debris population at geosynchronous orbit is examined, focusing on variations in the density of the population as a function of longitude. New insights are revealed demonstrating that the variation in population density is slightly less than previously reported.

  14. Earth Satellite Population Instability: Underscoring the Need for Debris Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-chyi; Johnson, N. L.

    2006-01-01

    A recent study by NASA indicates that the implementation of international orbital debris mitigation measures alone will not prevent a significant increase in the artificial Earth satellite population, beginning in the second half of this century. Whereas the focus of the aerospace community for the past 25 years has been on the curtailment of the generation of long-lived orbital debris, active remediation of the current orbital debris population should now be reconsidered to help preserve near-Earth space for future generations. In particular, we show in this paper that even if launch operations were to cease today, the population of space debris would continue to grow. Further, proposed remediation techniques do not appear to offer a viable solution. We therefore recommend that, while the aerospace community maintains the current debris-limiting mission regulations and postmission disposal procedures, future emphasis should be placed on finding new remediation technologies for solving this growing problem. Since the launch of Sputnik 1, space activities have created an orbital debris environment that poses increasing impact risks to existing space systems, including human space flight and robotic missions (1, 2). Currently, more than 9,000 Earth orbiting man-made objects (including many breakup fragments), with a combined mass exceeding 5 million kilograms, are tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network and maintained in the US satellite catalog (3-5). Three accidental collisions between cataloged satellites during the period from late 1991 to early 2005 have already been documented (6), although fortunately none resulted in the creation of large, trackable debris clouds. Several studies conducted during 1991-2001 demonstrated, with assumed future launch rates, the unintended growth potential of the Earth satellite population, resulting from random, accidental collisions among resident space objects (7-13). In some low Earth orbit (LEO) altitude regimes where

  15. Local debris congestion in the geosynchronous environment with population augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul V.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2014-02-01

    Forecasting of localized debris congestion in the geostationary (GEO) regime is performed to investigate how frequently near-miss events occur for each of the longitude slots in the GEO ring. The present-day resident space object (RSO) population at GEO is propagated forward in time to determine current debris congestion conditions, and new probability density functions that describe where GEO satellites are inserted into operational orbits are harnessed to assess longitude-dependent congestion in "business-as-usual" launch traffic, with and without re-orbiting at end-of-life. Congestion forecasting for a 50-year period is presented to illustrate the need for appropriately executed mitigation measures in the GEO ring. Results indicate that localized debris congestion will double within 50 years under current 80% re-orbiting success rates.

  16. Modeling of LEO orbital debris populations for ORDEM2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Horstman, M.; Krisko, P. H.; Liou, J.-C.; Matney, M.; Stansbery, E. G.; Stokely, C. L.; Whitlock, D.

    2009-03-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, ORDEM2000, is in the process of being updated to a new version: ORDEM2008. The data-driven ORDEM covers a spectrum of object size from 10 μm to greater than 1 m, and ranging from LEO (low Earth orbit) to GEO (geosynchronous orbit) altitude regimes. ORDEM2008 centimeter-sized populations are statistically derived from Haystack and HAX (the Haystack Auxiliary) radar data, while micron-sized populations are estimated from shuttle impact records. Each of the model populations consists of a large number of orbits with specified orbital elements, the number of objects on each orbit (with corresponding uncertainty), and the size, type, and material assignment for each object. This paper describes the general methodology and procedure commonly used in the statistical inference of the ORDEM2008 LEO debris populations. Major steps in the population derivations include data analysis, reference-population construction, definition of model parameters in terms of reference populations, linking model parameters with data, seeking best estimates for the model parameters, uncertainty analysis, and assessment of the outcomes. To demonstrate the population-derivation process and to validate the Bayesian statistical model applied in the population derivations throughout, this paper uses illustrative examples for the special cases of large-size (>1 m, >32 cm, and >10 cm) populations that are tracked by SSN (the Space Surveillance Network) and also monitored by Haystack and HAX radars operating in a staring mode.

  17. Response of steelhead/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations to debris flows

    Treesearch

    Jason L. White; Bret C. Harvey

    2017-01-01

    To better understand the effects of debris flows on salmonid populations, we studied juvenile steelhead/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations in six streams in the Klamath Mountains of northern California: three affected by debris flows on 01 January 1997 and three that experienced elevated streamflows but no debris flows. We surveyed...

  18. Local Debris Congestion in the Geosynchronous Environment with Population Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P.; Schaub, H.

    2013-08-01

    Forecasting of localized debris congestion in the geostationary (GEO) ring is performed to investigate how frequently near-miss events occur for every longitude slot at GEO. A parallelized propagation routine is used to propagate the current resident space object (RSO) population at GEO forward in time, and representative augmentation of this population is implemented to simulate congestion in "business-as-usual" launch traffic, with and without mitigation at end-of-life. Congestion forecasting for a 50- year time frame is presented to illustrate the need for both appropriately-executed mitigation and active remediation measures at GEO.

  19. Contribution of Secondary Ejecta to the Debris Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, J.; Bariteau, M.

    When a micro-debris or a micrometeoroid impacts a spacecraft surface, a large number of secondary particles, called ejecta, are produced. These particles can contribute to a modification of the debris environment : either locally by the occurrence of secondary impacts on the components of complex and large space structures, or at great distance by the formation of a population of small orbital debris. This paper describes the ejecta overall production, the lifetime and the orbital evolution of the particles. Finally the repartition of ejecta in LEO and GEO is computed. By an extensive use of the spacecraft database DISCOS, satellites and rocket bodies currently in orbit have been identified. The surface area of solar arrays and painted surfaces currently in orbit is estimated, and the primary flux received is computed using the ORDEM 96 model for debris and the Grün model for meteoroids. Afterward, for each representative particle, its orbital evolution is computed. The ejecta are considered to be produced since 1960, and their spatial density is computed in 2000. It is assumed that the area of the primary surfaces increases at a rate of 2% a year. Small particles are ejected with a high velocity, so their initial orbit is very different from the one of the parent object and about 23% of them are ejected on a re-entering or a hyperbolic trajectory. On the other hand, spall and large particles are ejected with low velocity and their initial orbit is close to the parent body. The spatial density of ejected particles is maximum between 800 km and 1400 km of altitude. Below 800 km altitude, the spatial density decreases because of the increase of the atmospheric drag. Above, the spatial density diminishes, because primary surfaces are less numerous. The number of ejecta, in the millimetre size range, reaches 5% of the total debris density at 800 km altitude and about 1 % in GEO. To allows a faster computation, the ejecta number as a function of size, altitude and

  20. Instability of the Current Space Debris Population in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniwa, Kazuaki; Hanada, Toshiya; Kawamoto, Satomi

    Since the launch of Sputnik, orbital debris population continues to increase due to ongoing space activities, on-orbit explosions, and accidental collisions. In the future, it is expected that a great deal of fragments will be created by explosions and collisions. Thus, the number of space debris may increase exponentially (Kessler Syndrome). This paper analyzes the Kessler Syndrome using the Low Earth Orbital Debris Environmental Evolutionary Model (LEODEEM) developed at Kyushu University with collaboration from JAXA. The purpose of the study aims at understanding the issues related to space environment conservation. The results provide effective conditions of Active Debris Removal which is one of the space debris mitigation procedures.

  1. Hypervelocity impacts on HST solar arrays and the debris population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drolshagen, G.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Mandeville, J.-C.; Moussi, A.; Ludwig, H.

    Accurate debris and meteoroid flux models are crucial for the design of manned and unmanned space missions. For the most abundant particle sizes smaller than a few millimetres, knowledge on the populations can only be gained by in-situ detectors or the analysis of retrieved space hardware. The impact flux information, which can be obtained from exposed surfaces, increases with surface area and exposure time. A Post-Flight Impact Investigation was initiated by ESA to record and analyze the impact fluxes and any potential resulting damage on the two flexible solar arrays of the Hubble Space Telescope. They were deployed during the first HST servicing mission in December 1993 and retrieved in March 2002. They have a total exposed surface area of roughly 120 m2, including 41 m2 covered with solar cells. The HST post-flight impact study follows a similar activity undertaken after the retrieval of one of the first HST solar arrays. That analysis has been very successful and already resulted in a validation of certain flux model regimes. For the first time exposed surfaces from more then 600 km altitude could be analysed and impacts from particles larger than 1 mm could be observed. The second set of HST solar arrays provide 4 times the area x time product of the first array and extend the measurements to the largest particle sizes ever recorded. The retrieved HST solar array wings exhibit thousands of craters, which are visible to the naked eye. A few hundred impacts have completely penetrated the 0.7 mm thick array. The largest impact features are about 7-8 mm in diameter. Measured fluxes of craters larger than 10 microns and 1 mm are in the order of 3 x 10-5 m-2 s-1 and 1.3 x 10-7 m-2 s-1, respectively. First results of the impact survey are presented here and compared to model predictions. Flux predictions are based on the latest meteoroid and debris (e.g. MASTER 2001) models and on crater size equations derived specifically for the HST solar arrays. A second paper

  2. Modeling of LEO Orbital Debris Populations in Centimeter and Millimeter Size Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Hill, . M.; Horstman, M.; Krisko, P. H.; Liou, J.-C.; Matney, M.; Stansbery, E. G.

    2010-01-01

    The building of the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, whether ORDEM2000 or its recently updated version ORDEM2010, uses as its foundation a number of model debris populations, each truncated at a minimum object-size ranging from 10 micron to 1 m. This paper discusses the development of the ORDEM2010 model debris populations in LEO (low Earth orbit), focusing on centimeter (smaller than 10 cm) and millimeter size regimes. Primary data sets used in the statistical derivation of the cm- and mm-size model populations are from the Haystack radar operated in a staring mode. Unlike cataloged objects of sizes greater than approximately 10 cm, ground-based radars monitor smaller-size debris only in a statistical manner instead of tracking every piece. The mono-static Haystack radar can detect debris as small as approximately 5 mm at moderate LEO altitudes. Estimation of millimeter debris populations (for objects smaller than approximately 6 mm) rests largely on Goldstone radar measurements. The bi-static Goldstone radar can detect 2- to 3-mm objects. The modeling of the cm- and mm-debris populations follows the general approach to developing other ORDEM2010-required model populations for various components and types of debris. It relies on appropriate reference populations to provide necessary prior information on the orbital structures and other important characteristics of the debris objects. NASA's LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris (LEGEND) model is capable of furnishing such reference populations in the desired size range. A Bayesian statistical inference process, commonly adopted in ORDEM2010 model-population derivations, changes a priori distribution into a posteriori distribution and thus refines the reference populations in terms of data. This paper describes key elements and major steps in the statistical derivations of the cm- and mm-size debris populations and presents results. Due to lack of data for near 1-mm sizes, the model populations of 1- to 3.16-mm

  3. Modeling of LEO Orbital Debris Populations in Centimeter and Millimeter Size Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Hill, . M.; Horstman, M.; Krisko, P. H.; Liou, J.-C.; Matney, M.; Stansbery, E. G.

    2010-01-01

    The building of the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, whether ORDEM2000 or its recently updated version ORDEM2010, uses as its foundation a number of model debris populations, each truncated at a minimum object-size ranging from 10 micron to 1 m. This paper discusses the development of the ORDEM2010 model debris populations in LEO (low Earth orbit), focusing on centimeter (smaller than 10 cm) and millimeter size regimes. Primary data sets used in the statistical derivation of the cm- and mm-size model populations are from the Haystack radar operated in a staring mode. Unlike cataloged objects of sizes greater than approximately 10 cm, ground-based radars monitor smaller-size debris only in a statistical manner instead of tracking every piece. The mono-static Haystack radar can detect debris as small as approximately 5 mm at moderate LEO altitudes. Estimation of millimeter debris populations (for objects smaller than approximately 6 mm) rests largely on Goldstone radar measurements. The bi-static Goldstone radar can detect 2- to 3-mm objects. The modeling of the cm- and mm-debris populations follows the general approach to developing other ORDEM2010-required model populations for various components and types of debris. It relies on appropriate reference populations to provide necessary prior information on the orbital structures and other important characteristics of the debris objects. NASA's LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris (LEGEND) model is capable of furnishing such reference populations in the desired size range. A Bayesian statistical inference process, commonly adopted in ORDEM2010 model-population derivations, changes a priori distribution into a posteriori distribution and thus refines the reference populations in terms of data. This paper describes key elements and major steps in the statistical derivations of the cm- and mm-size debris populations and presents results. Due to lack of data for near 1-mm sizes, the model populations of 1- to 3.16-mm

  4. Statistical Estimation of Orbital Debris Populations with a Spectrum of Object Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yu-Lin; Horstman, Matthew; Krisko, Paula; Liou, J.-C.; Matney, Mark; Stansbery, Eugene; Stokely, Christopher; Whitlock, David

    Orbital debris is a real concern for the safe operations of satellites. In general, the hazard of debris impact is a function of the size and spatial distributions of the debris populations. To describe and characterize the debris environment as reliably as possible, the current NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM2000) is being upgraded to a new version based on new and better-quality data. The data-driven ORDEM model covers a wide range of object sizes from 10 microns to greater than 1 meter. This paper reviews the statistical process for the estimation of the debris populations in the new ORDEM upgrade, and discusses the representation of large-size (≥1 m and ≥10 cm) populations by SSN catalog objects and the validation of the statistical approach. Also, it presents results for the populations with sizes of ≥3.3 cm, ≥1 cm, ≥100 µm, and ≥10 µm. The orbital debris populations used in the new version of ORDEM are inferred from data based upon appropriate reference (or benchmark) populations instead of the binning of the multi-dimensional orbital-element space. This paper describes all of the major steps used in the population-inference procedure for each size-range. Detailed discussions on data analysis, parameter definition, the correlation between parameters and data, and uncertainty assessment are included.

  5. Statistical Estimation of Orbital Debris Populations with a Spectrum of Object Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. -l; Horstman, M.; Krisko, P. H.; Liou, J. -C; Matney, M.; Stansbery, E. G.; Stokely, C. L.; Whitlock, D.

    2008-01-01

    Orbital debris is a real concern for the safe operations of satellites. In general, the hazard of debris impact is a function of the size and spatial distributions of the debris populations. To describe and characterize the debris environment as reliably as possible, the current NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM2000) is being upgraded to a new version based on new and better quality data. The data-driven ORDEM model covers a wide range of object sizes from 10 microns to greater than 1 meter. This paper reviews the statistical process for the estimation of the debris populations in the new ORDEM upgrade, and discusses the representation of large-size (greater than or equal to 1 m and greater than or equal to 10 cm) populations by SSN catalog objects and the validation of the statistical approach. Also, it presents results for the populations with sizes of greater than or equal to 3.3 cm, greater than or equal to 1 cm, greater than or equal to 100 micrometers, and greater than or equal to 10 micrometers. The orbital debris populations used in the new version of ORDEM are inferred from data based upon appropriate reference (or benchmark) populations instead of the binning of the multi-dimensional orbital-element space. This paper describes all of the major steps used in the population-inference procedure for each size-range. Detailed discussions on data analysis, parameter definition, the correlation between parameters and data, and uncertainty assessment are included.

  6. Modeling of the Orbital Debris Population of RORSAT Sodium-Potassium Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Krisko, P. H.; Matney, Mark; Stansbery, E. G.

    2010-01-01

    A large population resident in the orbital debris environment is composed of eutectic sodium-potassium (NaK) droplets, released during the reactor core ejection of 16 nuclear-powered Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellites (RORSATs) launched in the 1980s by the former Soviet Union. These electrically conducting RORSAT debris objects are spherical in shape, generating highly polarized radar returns. Their diameters are mostly in the centimeter and millimeter size regimes. Since the Space Surveillance Network catalog is limited to objects greater than 5 cm in low Earth orbit, our current knowledge about this special class of orbital debris relies largely on the analysis of Haystack radar data. This paper elaborates the simulation of the RORSAT debris populations in the new NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM2010, which replaces ORDEM2000. The estimation of the NaK populations uses the NASA NaK-module as a benchmark. It follows the general statistical approach to developing all other ORDEM2010-required LEO populations (for various types of debris and across a wide range of object sizes). This paper describes, in detail, each major step in the NaK-population derivation, including a specific discussion on the conversion between Haystack-measured radar-cross-sections and object-size distribution for the NaK droplets. Modeling results show that the RORSAT debris population is stable for the time period under study and that Haystack data sets are fairly consistent over the observations of multiple years.

  7. NASA Orbital Debris Large-Object Baseline Population in ORDEM 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisco, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.; Anz-Meador, P. D.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) has created and validated high fidelity populations of the debris environment for the latest Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM 3.0). Though the model includes fluxes of objects 10 um and larger, this paper considers particle fluxes for 1 cm and larger debris objects from low Earth orbit (LEO) through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO). These are validated by several reliable radar observations through the Space Surveillance Network (SSN), Haystack, and HAX radars. ORDEM 3.0 populations were designed for the purpose of assisting, debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment includes a background derived from the LEO-to-GEO ENvironment Debris evolutionary model (LEGEND) with a Bayesian rescaling as well as specific events such as the FY-1C anti-satellite test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, and the Soviet/Russian Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellite (RORSAT) sodium-potassium droplet releases. The environment described in this paper is the most realistic orbital debris population larger than 1 cm, to date. We describe derivations of the background population and added specific populations. We present sample validation charts of our 1 cm and larger LEO population against Space Surveillance Network (SSN), Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  8. Simulation of Micron-Sized Debris Populations in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yu-Lin; Matney, Mark; Liou, J.-C.; Hyde, James; Prior, Thomas G.

    The update of ORDEM2000, the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, to its new version -ORDEM2010, is nearly complete. As a part of the ORDEM upgrade, this paper addresses the simulation of micro-debris (greater than 10 µm and smaller than 1 mm in size) populations in low Earth orbit. The principal data used in the modeling of the micron-sized debris popu-lations are in-situ hypervelocity impact records, accumulated in post-flight damage surveys on the space-exposed surfaces of returned spacecrafts. The development of the micro-debris model populations follows the general approach to deriving other ORDEM2010-required input popu-lations for various components and types of debris. This paper describes the key elements and major steps in the statistical inference of the ORDEM2010 micro-debris populations. A crucial step is the construction of a degradation/ejecta source model to provide prior information on the micron-sized objects (such as orbital and object-size distributions). Another critical step is to link model populations with data, which is rather involved. It demands detailed information on area-time/directionality for all the space-exposed elements of a shuttle orbiter and damage laws, which relate impact damage with the physical properties of a projectile and impact con-ditions such as impact angle and velocity. Also needed are model-predicted debris fluxes as a function of object size and impact velocity from all possible directions. In spite of the very limited quantity of the available shuttle impact data, the population-derivation process is satis-factorily stable. Final modeling results obtained from shuttle window and radiator impact data are reasonably convergent and consistent, especially for the debris populations with object-size thresholds at 10 and 100 µm.

  9. Simulation of Micron-Sized Debris Populations in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Hyde, J. L.; Prior, T.; Matney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The update of ORDEM2000, the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, to its new version ORDEM2010, is nearly complete. As a part of the ORDEM upgrade, this paper addresses the simulation of micro-debris (greater than 10 m and smaller than 1 mm in size) populations in low Earth orbit. The principal data used in the modeling of the micron-sized debris populations are in-situ hypervelocity impact records, accumulated in post-flight damage surveys on the space-exposed surfaces of returned spacecrafts. The development of the micro-debris model populations follows the general approach to deriving other ORDEM2010-required input populations for various components and types of debris. This paper describes the key elements and major steps in the statistical inference of the ORDEM2010 micro-debris populations. A crucial step is the construction of a degradation/ejecta source model to provide prior information on the micron-sized objects (such as orbital and object-size distributions). Another critical step is to link model populations with data, which is rather involved. It demands detailed information on area-time/directionality for all the space-exposed elements of a shuttle orbiter and damage laws, which relate impact damage with the physical properties of a projectile and impact conditions such as impact angle and velocity. Also needed are model-predicted debris fluxes as a function of object size and impact velocity from all possible directions. In spite of the very limited quantity of the available shuttle impact data, the population-derivation process is satisfactorily stable. Final modeling results obtained from shuttle window and radiator impact data are reasonably convergent and consistent, especially for the debris populations with object-size thresholds at 10 and 100 m.

  10. Simulation of Micron-Sized Debris Populations in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Hyde, J. L.; Prior, T.; Matney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The update of ORDEM2000, the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, to its new version ORDEM2010, is nearly complete. As a part of the ORDEM upgrade, this paper addresses the simulation of micro-debris (greater than 10 m and smaller than 1 mm in size) populations in low Earth orbit. The principal data used in the modeling of the micron-sized debris populations are in-situ hypervelocity impact records, accumulated in post-flight damage surveys on the space-exposed surfaces of returned spacecrafts. The development of the micro-debris model populations follows the general approach to deriving other ORDEM2010-required input populations for various components and types of debris. This paper describes the key elements and major steps in the statistical inference of the ORDEM2010 micro-debris populations. A crucial step is the construction of a degradation/ejecta source model to provide prior information on the micron-sized objects (such as orbital and object-size distributions). Another critical step is to link model populations with data, which is rather involved. It demands detailed information on area-time/directionality for all the space-exposed elements of a shuttle orbiter and damage laws, which relate impact damage with the physical properties of a projectile and impact conditions such as impact angle and velocity. Also needed are model-predicted debris fluxes as a function of object size and impact velocity from all possible directions. In spite of the very limited quantity of the available shuttle impact data, the population-derivation process is satisfactorily stable. Final modeling results obtained from shuttle window and radiator impact data are reasonably convergent and consistent, especially for the debris populations with object-size thresholds at 10 and 100 m.

  11. Simulation of Micron-Sized Debris Populations in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Matney, M.; Liou, J.-C.; Hyde, J. L.; Prior, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    The update of ORDEM2000, the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, to its new version . ORDEM2010, is nearly complete. As a part of the ORDEM upgrade, this paper addresses the simulation of micro-debris (greater than 10 micron and smaller than 1 mm in size) populations in low Earth orbit. The principal data used in the modeling of the micron-sized debris populations are in-situ hypervelocity impact records, accumulated in post-flight damage surveys on the space-exposed surfaces of returned spacecrafts. The development of the micro-debris model populations follows the general approach to deriving other ORDEM2010-required input populations for various components and types of debris. This paper describes the key elements and major steps in the statistical inference of the ORDEM2010 micro-debris populations. A crucial step is the construction of a degradation/ejecta source model to provide prior information on the micron-sized objects (such as orbital and object-size distributions). Another critical step is to link model populations with data, which is rather involved. It demands detailed information on area-time/directionality for all the space-exposed elements of a shuttle orbiter and damage laws, which relate impact damage with the physical properties of a projectile and impact conditions such as impact angle and velocity. Also needed are model-predicted debris fluxes as a function of object size and impact velocity from all possible directions. In spite of the very limited quantity of the available shuttle impact data, the population-derivation process is satisfactorily stable. Final modeling results obtained from shuttle window and radiator impact data are reasonably convergent and consistent, especially for the debris populations with object-size thresholds at 10 and 100 micron.

  12. ORDEM 3.0 and MASTER-2009 Modeled Small Debris Population Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, P. H.; Flegel, S.

    2014-01-01

    The latest versions of the two premier orbital debris engineering models, NASA's ORDEM 3.0 and ESA's MASTER-2009, have been publically released. Both models have gone through significant advancements since inception, and now represent the state-of-the-art in orbital debris knowledge of their respective agencies. The purpose of these models is to provide satellite designers/operators and debris researchers with reliable estimates of the artificial debris environment in low Earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO). The small debris environment within the size range of 1 mm to 1 cm is of particular interest to both human and robotic spacecraft programs, particularly in LEO. These objects are much more numerous than larger trackable debris and can have enough momentum to cause significant, if not catastrophic, damage to spacecraft upon impact. They are also small enough to elude routine detection by existing observation systems (radar and telescope). Without reliable detection the modeling of these populations has always coupled theoretical origins with supporting observational data in different degrees. In this paper, we present and detail the 1 mm to 1 cm orbital debris populations from both ORDEM 3.0 and MASTER-2009 in LEO. We review population categories: particle sources for MASTER-2009, particle densities for ORDEM 3.0. We describe data sources and their uses, and supporting models. Fluxes on spacecraft for chosen orbits are also presented and discussed within the context of each model.

  13. ORDEM 3.0 and MASTER-2009 Modeled Small Debris Population Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, P. H.; Flegel, S.

    2012-01-01

    The latest versions of the two premier orbital debris engineering models, NASA's ORDEM 3.0 and ESA's MASTER-2009, have been publicly released within the last year. Both models have gone through significant advancements since inception, and now represent the state-of-the-art in orbital debris knowledge of their respective agencies. The purpose of these models is to provide satellite designers/operators and debris researchers with reliable estimates of the artificial debris environment in near-Earth orbit. The small debris environment within the size range of 1 mm to 1 cm is of particular interest to both human and robotic spacecraft programs. These objects are much more numerous than larger trackable debris but are still large enough to cause significant, if not catastrophic, damage to spacecraft upon impact. They are also small enough to elude routine detection by existing observation systems (radar and telescope). Without reliable detection the modeling of these populations has always coupled theoretical origins with supporting observational data in different degrees. This paper describes the population generation and categorization of both ORDEM 3.0 and MASTER-2009; their sources (both known and presumed), current supporting data and theory, and methods of population verification. Fluxes on spacecraft for chosen orbits are presented and discussed. Future collaborative analysis is noted.

  14. Resolving LDEF's flux distribution: Orbital (debris?) and natural meteoroid populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonnell, J. A. M.

    1993-01-01

    A consistent methodology for the collation of data from both penetration and perforation experiments and from data in the Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigator Group (M-D SIG) data-base has led to the derivation of the average impact flux over LDEF's exposure history 1984-1990. Data are first presented for LDEF's N,S,E,W and Space faces ('offset' by 8 deg and 'tilted' by 1 deg respectively). A model fit is derived for ballistic limits of penetration from 1 micron to 1mm of aluminium target, corresponding to impactor masses from 10(exp -18) kg (for rho sub p = 2g/cu cm) to 10(exp -10) kg (for rho sub p = 1g/cu cm). A second order harmonic function is fitted to the N,S,E, and W fluxes to establish the angular distribution at regular size intervals; this fit is then used to provide 'corrected' data corresponding to fluxes applicable to true N,S,E,W and Space directions for a LEO 28.5 degree inclination orbit at a mean altitude of 465 km.

  15. The historical contribution of solid rocket motors to the one centimeter debris population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Albert; Eichler, Peter; Reynolds, Robert; Potter, Andrew; Johnson, Nicholas

    1997-01-01

    The measured small particle population in earth orbit contains cm-sized objects that are not accounted for by breakup fragments. It was proposed that slag ejection during solid rocket motor burn is a contributor to this population. The direct evidence for such slag ejection follows from: observations of the exhausts of vehicles in flight, and engineering data from static firings. A source model is presented to account for the contribution of slag expulsion from solid rocket motors to the debris population. The mass and velocity distribution of the slag effluents are taken into account and used as a source term in the debris environment model. The model is based on the available observation data and on models for slag development and ejection.

  16. Debris flow occurrence future changes in high populated mountains (French Alps).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, I.; Jomelli, V.; Brunstein, D.; Grancher, D.

    2010-03-01

    The growth of tourism in recent decades, the dense population and more than 100 large ski areas create a high potential for damage to people, settlements and associated infrastructures in the French Alps. Increasing demographic pressures in mountainous regions and recent catastrophic events have renewed interest in various gravitational hazards predetermination in European countries. Results of the models considering the A2 hypothesis (IPCC 2007) showed that the most significant climatic trends for the end of the century will be a decrease in intense rainy events and an increase in temperature. As it is known that debris flows are often triggered by intense rainy events, a change in global climate in the future could have an impact on the frequency of this process. Our approach is to link the current (1960ies-2000ies) or future climate and the occurrence of debris flows based on statistical modeling. Regional climatic scenarios were computed from the ARPEGE model developed by the Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques of Météo-France. We developed new models using the simulated current climatic data with debris flows. Then we compared the probabilities of the occurrence of debris flows in the current period and in the coming century. Probabilistic models for the end of the twenty-first century were computed by interchanging meteorological parameters used in the statistical models established for the current period by meteorological data simulated for the future period. The future changes should have impacts on the occurrence of debris flows. We expect a decrease in about 10-30% of debris flows occurrence probabilities. From a spatial point of view, the increase in temperature should result in a shift of the 0°C isotherm to a higher elevation which, in turn, should result in a 20% reduction of the number of slopes affected by the process compared to the current period.

  17. EFFECT OF SITE ON BACTERIAL POPULATIONS IN THE SAPWOOD OF COARSE WOODY DEBRIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Emma, G.,; Waldrop, Thomas, A.; McElreath, Susan, D.; Tainter, Frank, H.

    1998-01-01

    Porter, Emma G., T.A. Waldrop, Susan D. McElreath, and Frank H. Tainter. 1998. Effect of site on bacterial populations in the sapwood of coarse woody debris. Pp. 480-484. In: Proc. 9th Bienn. South. Silv. Res. Conf. T.A. Waldrop (ed). USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-20. Abstract: Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important structural component of southeastern forest ecosystems, yet little is known about its dynamics in these systems. This project identified bacterial populations associated with CWD and their dynamics across landscape ecosystem classification (LEC) units. Bolts of red oak and loblolly pine were placed on plots at each of three hydric, mesic, and xeric sites at the Savannah River Station. After the controls were processed, samples were taken at four intervals over a 16-week period. Samples were ground within an anaerobe chamber using nonselective media. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria were identified using the Biolog system and the anaerobes were identified using the API 20A system. Major genera isolated were: Bacillus, Buttiauxella, Cedecea, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Serratia, and Xanthomonas. The mean total isolates were determined by LEC units and sample intervals. Differences occurred between the sample intervals with total isolates of 6.67, 13.33, 10.17, and 9.50 at 3, 6, 10, and 16 weeks, respectively. No significant differences in the numbers of bacteria isolated were found between LEC units.

  18. Hypervelocity impacts on HST solar arrays and the debris and meteoroids population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussi, A.; Drolshagen, G.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Mandeville, J.-C.; Kearsley, A. T.; Ludwig, H.

    Accurate debris and meteoroid flux models are crucial for the design of manned and unmanned space missions. For the most abundant particle sizes smaller than a few millimetres, knowledge of the populations can only be gained from in situ detectors or the analysis of retrieved space hardware. The measurement of impact flux from exposed surfaces improves with increased surface area and exposure time. A post-flight impact investigation was initiated by the European Space Agency to record and analyse the impact fluxes and any potential resulting damage on the two flexible solar arrays of the Hubble Space Telescope. The arrays were deployed during the first Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission in December 1993 and retrieved in March 2002. They have a total exposed surface area of roughly 120 m 2, including 42 m 2 covered with solar cells. This new Hubble post-flight impact study follows a similar activity undertaken after the retrieval of one of the first solar arrays, in 1993. The earlier study provided the first opportunity for a numerical survey of damage to exposed surfaces from more than 600 km altitude, and of impacts from particles larger than 1 mm. The results have proven very valuable in validation of important flux model regimes. The second set of Hubble solar arrays has again provided an unrivalled opportunity to measure the meteoroid and debris environment, now sampled during a long interval in low Earth orbit, and to identify changes in the space debris environment since the previous survey. The retrieved solar array wings exhibit thousands of craters, many of which are visible to the naked eye. A few hundred impacts have completely penetrated the 0.7 mm thick array. The largest impact features are about 7-8 mm in diameter. The cover glass of the solar cells is particularly well suited to the recognition of small impact features by optical and electron microscopy. In this paper, we present the first results of the impact survey. Data upon the abundance

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galactic planetary nebulae 24um observations (Phillips+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. P.; Marquez-Lugo, R. A.

    2015-07-01

    We have acquired 24um profiles images and fluxes for 224 Galactic PNe. The positions of the sources were taken from the Acker et al. (1992, Cat. V/84), MASH I (Parker et al., 2006MNRAS.373...79P, Cat. V/127) and MASH II (Miszalski et al., 2008MNRAS.384..525M, Cat. V/127) catalogues, and correspond to the so-called 'true' PNe whose identification is regarded as being highly probable. Sources designated as 'likely' or 'possible' are excluded from this analysis. The MISPGAL results were taken between 2005 and 2006 using the mips. (1 data file).

  20. Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J. (Compiler); Su, S. Y. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Earth orbital debris issues and recommended future activities are discussed. The workshop addressed the areas of environment definition, hazards to spacecraft, and space object management. It concluded that orbital debris is a potential problem for future space operations. However, before recommending any major efforts to control the environment, more data are required. The most significant required data are on the population of debris smaller than 4 cm in diameter. New damage criteria are also required. When these data are obtained, they can be combined with hypervelocity data to evaluate the hazards to future spacecraft. After these hazards are understood, then techniques to control the environment can be evaluated.

  1. Transfer of 137Cs from Chernobyl debris and nuclear weapons fallout to different Swedish population groups.

    PubMed

    Rääf, C L; Hubbard, L; Falk, R; Agren, G; Vesanen, R

    2006-08-15

    Data from measurements on the body burden of (134)Cs, (137)Cs and (40)K in various Swedish populations between 1959 and 2001 has been compiled into a national database. The compilation is a co-operation between the Departments of Radiation Physics in Malmö and Göteborg, the National Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) and the Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI). In a previous study the effective ecological half time and the associated effective dose to various Swedish populations due to internal contamination of (134)Cs and (137)Cs have been assessed using the database. In this study values of human body burden have been combined with data on the local and regional ground deposition of fallout from nuclear weapons tests (only (137)Cs) and Chernobyl debris (both (134)Cs and (137)Cs), which have enabled estimates of the radioecological transfer in the studied populations. The assessment of the database shows that the transfer of radiocesium from Chernobyl fallout to humans varies considerably between various populations in Sweden. In terms of committed effective dose over a 70 y period from internal contamination per unit activity deposition, the general (predominantly urban) Swedish population obtains 20-30 microSv/kBq m(-2). Four categories of populations exhibit higher radioecological transfer than the general population; i.) reindeer herders ( approximately 700 microSv/kBq m(-2)), ii.) hunters in the counties dominated by forest vegetation ( approximately 100 microSv/kBq m(-2)), iii.) rural non-farming populations living in sub-arctic areas (40-150 microSv/kBq m(-2)), and iv.) farmers ( approximately 50 microSv/kBq m(-2)). Two important factors determine the aggregate transfer from ground deposition to man; i.) dietary habits (intakes of foodstuff originating from natural and semi-natural ecosystems), and ii.) inclination to follow the recommended food restriction by the authorities. The transfer to the general population is considerably lower

  2. Fish populations associated with habitat-modified piers and natural woody debris in Piedmont Carolina reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barwick, R.D.; Kwak, T.J.; Noble, R.L.; Barwick, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    A primary concern associated with reservoir shoreline residential development is reduction of littoral habitat complexity and diversity. One potential approach to compensate for this is the deployment of artificial-habitat modules under existing piers, but the benefit of this practice has not been demonstrated. To evaluate the effect of pier habitat modifications on fish populations in two Piedmont Carolina reservoirs, we studied 77 piers located on forty-seven, 100-m transects that were modified using plastic "fish hab" modules augmented with brush (brushed habs), hab modules alone (habs), or left unaltered for reference purposes. We sampled fish from all piers and transects during April, July, and October 2001 using a boat-mounted electrofisher. With few exceptions, catch rates were higher at brushed-hab piers and piers with habs than at reference piers during all seasons. Similarly, during spring and summer, fish abundance was generally higher on transects containing natural woody debris, brushed habs, and habs than on reference-developed transects; however, during fall, there were exceptions. Therefore, fish abundance associated with shorelines in these reservoirs appears to be related to the structural complexity of available habitat rather than structure composition. One year after installation, 92% of pier owners responding to a mail survey expressed satisfaction with pier modifications. Supplementing piers with habitat structures is recommended to enhance littoral habitat complexity for fishes in residentially developed reservoirs.

  3. Response of a Brook Trout Population and Instream Habitat to a Catastrophic Flood and Debris Flow

    Treesearch

    Criag N. Roghair; C. Andrew Dolloff; Martin K. Underwood

    2002-01-01

    In June 1995, a massive flood and debris flow impacted fish and habitat along the lower 1.9 km of the Staunton River, a headwater stream located in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. In the area affected by debris flow, the stream bed was scoured and new substrate materials were deposited, trees were removed from a 30-m-wide band in the riparian area, and all fish...

  4. Orbital debris and meteoroid population as estimated from LDEF impact data

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Kessler, D.J.

    1995-02-01

    Examination of LDEF`s various surfaces shows numerous craters and holes due to hypervelocity impacts of meteoroids and man-made orbital debris. In this paper, the crater numbers as reported by Humes have been analyzed in an effort to understand the orbital debris and natural meteoroid environment in LEO. To determine the fraction of man-made to natural impacts, the side to top ratio of impacts and results of the Chemistry of Micrometeoroids Experiment are used. For craters in the 100 micron to 500 micron size range, about 25 percent to 30 percent of the impacts on the forward-facing surfaces and about 10 percent of the impacts on the trailing surfaces were estimated due to man-made orbital debris. A technique has been developed to convert crater numbers to particle fluxes, taking the fact into account that the distributions of impact velocity and incidence angle vary over the different surfaces of LDEF, as well as the ratio of the surface area flux to the cross-sectional area flux. Applying this technique, Humes` data concerning craters with limiting lip diameters of 100 micron, 200 micron and 500 micron have been converted into orbital debris and meteoroid fluxes ranging from about 20 micron to 200 micron particle diameter. The results exhibit good agreement with orbital debris model and meteoroid model. The converted meteoroid flux is slightly larger than Grun`s model (by 40 to 70 percent). The converted orbital debris flux is slightly lower than Kessler`s model for particle diameter smaller than about 30 micron and slightly larger than the model for particle diameter larger than about 40 micron. Taking also into account the IDE data point at about 0.8 micron particle diameter, it suggests to change the slope log (flux) versus log (diameter) of orbital debris flux in the 1 micron to 100 micron particle diameter range from 2.5 to 1.9.

  5. Spitzer And Herschel-based Seds Of 24um-bright z 0.3- 3.0 Starbursts And Obscured Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajina, Anna; Yan, L.; Fadda, D.; Dasyra, K.; Huynh, M.

    2012-05-01

    A key legacy of Spitzer are the mid-IR spectra of high-redshift objects - which would not be available again until the JWST. Such spectra have been very useful for disentangling the contribution of AGN and star-formation to the observed dust emission. We have constructed a unique Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopic, nearly 24um flux-limited sample, of 191 sources at z 0.3-2.8 and with log(L_IR/L_sun) 11-13. The size and selection of the sample, allows us to study galaxy evolution from the perspective of the mid-IR where AGN are prominent. Indeed, mid-IR diagnostics suggest that 70% of our sample is AGN-dominated. Without far-IR data however, it is unclear to what degree this conclusion applies to the overall IR emission. Here we extend the earlier mid-IR studies to incorporate Herschel far-IR photometry and address the full IR SED of Spitzer 24um-selected galaxies. This allows for the overall AGN contribution to their power output to be estimated. This also allows for a direct comparison with other populations both locally and at high redshifts - ultimately placing the 24um-bright populations in the wider context of galaxy evolution. Our first conclusion is that indeed mid-IR studies alone underestimate the level of star-formation in these systems -- we now find that only 19% of the sample are AGN-dominated (i.e. where the AGN luminosity is at least 50% of the total L_IR). We also find that sources of comparable L_IR locally, are not good analogs to the our sources -- consistent for example with recent ideas of cold gas accretion vs. mergers as a means of triggering extreme starbursts. Since local sources are not good analogs to high redshift ones, we construct a set of IR SEDs templates for high redshift starbursts and obscured quasars. The templates are public and useful, among others, for interpreting the all-sky mid-IR data from WISE.

  6. OT1_jsimon01_1: A Population of Dusty B Stars in the SMC: The First Extragalactic Debris Disks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, J.

    2010-07-01

    Using data from the Spitzer Survey of the SMC, we have discovered a population of 120 main sequence B stars with large 24 micron excesses. Optical spectroscopy and the IRAC SEDs demonstrate that they are not ordinary YSOs or Be stars. We suggest instead that these objects may be debris disks around massive main sequence stars. Confirmation of this hypothesis would provide one of the only ways to study the process of planet formation in a low-metallicity external galaxy. We have measured the mid-IR SED of the dust emission with IRS spectroscopy and determined that both cold and warm dust is present. We now propose PACS photometry at 70 microns to unambiguously separate the dust into its warm (and therefore circumstellar) and cold (possibly interstellar) components. These data will enable us to determine how much of the dust is warm and better constrain the temperature distribution; any targets with substantial amounts of warm dust are almost certainly debris disks. If the B stars do indeed host debris disks, they provide perhaps the only plausible method for constraining planet formation in an external galaxy for the foreseeable future.

  7. Observations of space debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.

    1991-01-01

    Optical observations of near Earth and deep-space debris conducted at M.I.T.'s artificial satellite observatory will be discussed. A brief review of observing technique, regions of high debris density, and amount of debris in orbit will be given. The unique, duplex facilities of the observatory allow the discrimination of debris from meteors, the construction of an orbital element set, and real-time identification of catalogued artificial satellites. Near-Earth debris is present in large numbers in all the popular near-Earth orbits; at least 5-6 times the 5000-6000 objects in the NORAD catalog. In deep-space, the new presence of Ariane-related debris adds significantly to the existing population which is treble that catalogued by NORAD.

  8. Optical orbital debris spotter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph R.; Bays, J. Timothy; Marr, Kenneth D.; Brown, Charles M.; Nicholas, Andrew C.; Finne, Theodore T.

    2014-11-01

    The number of man-made debris objects orbiting the Earth, or orbital debris, is alarmingly increasing, resulting in the increased probability of degradation, damage, or destruction of operating spacecraft. In part, small objects (<10 cm) in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) are of concern because they are abundant and difficult to track or even to detect on a routine basis. Due to the increasing debris population it is reasonable to assume that improved capabilities for on-orbit damage attribution, in addition to increased capabilities to detect and track small objects are needed. Here we present a sensor concept to detect small debris with sizes between approximately 1.0 and 0.01 cm in the vicinity of a host spacecraft for near real time damage attribution and characterization of dense debris fields and potentially to provide additional data to existing debris models.

  9. Orbital Debris: A Policy Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing orbital debris from a policy perspective is shown. The contents include: 1) Voyage through near-Earth Space-animation; 2) What is Orbital Debris?; 3) Orbital Debris Detectors and Damage Potential; 4) Hubble Space Telescope; 5) Mir Space Station Solar Array; 6) International Space Station; 7) Space Shuttle; 8) Satellite Explosions; 9) Satellite Collisions; 10) NASA Orbital Debris Mitigation Guidelines; 11) International Space Station Jettison Policy; 12) Controlled/Uncontrolled Satellite Reentries; 13) Return of Space Objects; 14) Orbital Debris and U.S. National Space Policy; 15) U.S Government Policy Strategy; 16) Bankruptcy of the Iridium Satellite System; 17) Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC); 18) Orbital Debris at the United Nations; 19) Chinese Anti-satellite System; 20) Future Evolution of Satellite Population; and 21) Challenge of Orbital Debris

  10. Orbital debris issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Man-made orbital debris, identified as a potential hazard to future space activities, is grouped into size categories. At least 79 satellites have broken up in orbit to date and, in combination with exploded rocket casings and antisatellite debris, threaten 10 km/sec collisions with other orbiting platforms. Only 5 percent of the debris is connected to payloads. The total population of orbiting objects over 4 cm in diameter could number as high as 15,000, and at 1 cm in diameter could be 32,000, based on NASA and NORAD studies. NASA has initiated the 10 yr Space Debris Assessment Program to characterize the hazards of orbiting debris, the potential damage to typical spacecraft components, and to identify means of controlling the damage.

  11. Optimizing Orbital Debris Monitoring with Optical Telescopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Continued growth in the orbital debris population has renewed concerns over the long-term use of space. Debris poses an increasing risk to manned...in a catalog. Passive optical systems hold great promise to provide a cost-effective means to monitor orbital debris . Recent advances in optical...non-tracking mode for uncued debris detection. The governing radiometric equations for sensing orbital debris are developed, illustrating the

  12. Woody debris

    Treesearch

    Donna B. Scheungrab; Carl C. Trettin; Russ Lea; Martin F. Jurgensen

    2000-01-01

    Woody debris can be defined as any dead, woody plant material, including logs, branches, standing dead trees, and root wads. Woody debris is an important part of forest and stream ecosystems because it has a role in carbon budgets and nutrient cycling, is a source of energy for aquatic ecosystems, provides habitat for terrestrial and aquatic organisms, and contributes...

  13. Space Debris Modeling at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2001-01-01

    Since the Second European Conference on Space Debris in 1997, the Orbital Debris Program Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center has undertaken a major effort to update and improve the principal software tools employed to model the space debris environment and to evaluate mission risks. NASA's orbital debris engineering model, ORDEM, represents the current and near-term Earth orbital debris population from the largest spacecraft to the smallest debris in a manner which permits spacecraft engineers and experimenters to estimate the frequency and velocity with which a satellite may be struck by debris of different sizes. Using expanded databases and a new program design, ORDEM2000 provides a more accurate environment definition combined with a much broader array of output products in comparison with its predecessor, ORDEM96. Studies of the potential long-term space debris environment are now conducted with EVOLVE 4.0, which incorporates significant advances in debris characterization and breakup modeling. An adjunct to EVOLVE 4.0, GEO EVOLVE has been created to examine debris issues near the geosynchronous orbital regime. In support of NASA Safety Standard 1740.14, which establishes debris mitigation guidelines for all NASA space programs, a set of evaluation tools called the Debris Assessment Software (DAS) is specifically designed for program offices to determine whether they are in compliance with NASA debris mitigation guidelines. DAS 1.5 has recently been released with improved WINDOWS compatibility and graphics functions. DAS 2.0 will incorporate guideline changes in a forthcoming revision to NASA Safety Standard 1740.14. Whereas DAS contains a simplified model to calculate possible risks associated with satellite reentries, NASA's higher fidelity Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) has been upgraded to Version 5.0. With the growing awareness of the potential risks posed by uncontrolled satellite reentries to people and property on Earth, the

  14. Debris Flow

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-14

    This image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows downslope movement of material from the hill at the top of the image. Linear ridges and channels are visible on the surface to the debris flow deposit.

  15. Formation Flying Guidance for Space Debris Observation, Manipulation and Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas V.

    This article provides a brief overview of the space debris population, debris attitude dynamics, technologies for debris removal, followed by a more in-depth discussion of robotic arm based capture of debris. Guidance aspects of active debris removal missions are discussed. Mission phases for active debris removal missions are rendezvous, inspection, attitude synchronization and capture and de-tumbling. The need for attitude synchronization is driven by recent observations of Envisat which exhibits a fairly high rotation rate.

  16. Orbital Debris and Future Environment Remediation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the historical and current orbital debris environment. Included is information about: Projected growth of the future debris population, The need for active debris removal (ADR), A grand challenge for the 21st century and The forward path

  17. Adaptive optics for laser space debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennet, Francis; Conan, Rodolphe; D'Orgeville, Celine; Dawson, Murray; Paulin, Nicolas; Price, Ian; Rigaut, Francois; Ritchie, Ian; Smith, Craig; Uhlendorf, Kristina

    2012-07-01

    Space debris in low Earth orbit below 1500km is becoming an increasing threat to satellites and spacecrafts. Radar and laser tracking are currently used to monitor the orbits of thousands of space debris and active satellites are able to use this information to manoeuvre out of the way of a predicted collision. However, many satellites are not able to manoeuvre and debris-on debris collisions are becoming a signicant contributor to the growing space debris population. The removal of the space debris from orbit is the preferred and more denitive solution. Space debris removal may be achieved through laser ablation, whereby a high power laser corrected with an adaptive optics system could, in theory, allow ablation of the debris surface and so impart a remote thrust on the targeted object. The goal of this is to avoid collisions between space debris to prevent an exponential increase in the number of space debris objects. We are developing an experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of laser ablation for space debris removal. This laser ablation demonstrator utilises a pulsed sodium laser to probe the atmosphere ahead of the space debris and the sun re ection of the space debris is used to provide atmospheric tip{tilt information. A deformable mirror is then shaped to correct an infrared laser beam on the uplink path to the debris. We present here the design and the expected performance of the system.

  18. Genetic identification of macroalgal species on Japanese tsunami marine debris and genetic comparisons with their wild populations.

    PubMed

    Hanyuda, Takeaki; Hansen, Gayle I; Kawai, Hiroshi

    2017-07-03

    Since 2012 a huge amount of marine debris caused by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami has been arriving on Northeastern Pacific shores. Often healthy macroalgae were attached to them, which may become introduced to the Northwestern Pacific coasts and disturb their ecosystems. In order to elucidate the diversity of those macroalgae, and to establish a basis for detecting their new introduction to Northwestern Pacific coasts, we have examined their species diversity by morphology and genetic identifications. We have obtained gene sequences for 205 specimens, and identified 49 species as Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris (JTMD) macroalgae. Most of them are known to be distributed in Japan and showed identical or very closely related genetic types to those of Tohoku, and confirmed to be originated from the area. Several species such as Ceramium sungminbooi, Ectocarpus crouaniorum, Polysiphonia koreana, etc. have not been reported from Japan, but this is explained by the shortage of taxonomic information. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Orbital Debris Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, Eugene G.

    2009-01-01

    The United States has one of the most active programs of research of the orbital debris environment in the world. Much of the research is conducted by NASA s Orbital Debris Program Office at the Johnson Space Center. Past work by NASA has led to the development of national space policy which seeks to limit the growth of the debris population and limit the risk to spacecraft and humans in space and on the Earth from debris. NASA has also been instrumental in developing consistent international policies and standards. Much of NASA's efforts have been to measure and characterize the orbital debris population. The U.S. Department of Defense tracks and catalogs spacecraft and large debris with it's Space Surveillance Network while NASA concentrates on research on smaller debris. In low Earth orbit, NASA has utilized short wavelength radars such as Haystack, HAX, and Goldstone to statistically characterize the population in number, size, altitude, and inclination. For higher orbits, optical telescopes have been used. Much effort has gone into the understanding and removal of observational biases from both types of measurements. NASA is also striving to understand the material composition and shape characteristics of debris to assess these effects on the risk to operational spacecraft. All of these measurements along with data from ground tests provide the basis for near- and long-term modeling of the environment. NASA also develops tools used by spacecraft builders and operators to evaluate spacecraft and mission designs to assess compliance with debris standards and policies which limit the growth of the debris environment.

  20. Space debris: modeling and detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, C.; Lorenz, J.; Radtke, J.; Kebschull, C.; Horstmann, A.; Stoll, E.

    2017-01-01

    High precision orbit determination is required for the detection and removal of space debris. Knowledge of the distribution of debris objects in orbit is necessary for orbit determination by active or passive sensors. The results can be used to investigate the orbits on which objects of a certain size at a certain frequency can be found. The knowledge of the orbital distribution of the objects as well as their properties in accordance with sensor performance models provide the basis for estimating the expected detection rates. Comprehensive modeling of the space debris environment is required for this. This paper provides an overview of the current state of knowledge about the space debris environment. In particular non-cataloged small objects are evaluated. Furthermore, improvements concerning the update of the current space debris model are addressed. The model of the space debris environment is based on the simulation of historical events, such as fragmentations due to explosions and collisions that actually occurred in Earth orbits. The orbital distribution of debris is simulated by propagating the orbits considering all perturbing forces up to a reference epoch. The modeled object population is compared with measured data and validated. The model provides a statistical distribution of space objects, according to their size and number. This distribution is based on the correct consideration of orbital mechanics. This allows for a realistic description of the space debris environment. Subsequently, a realistic prediction can be provided concerning the question, how many pieces of debris can be expected on certain orbits. To validate the model, a software tool has been developed which allows the simulation of the observation behavior of ground-based or space-based sensors. Thus, it is possible to compare the results of published measurement data with simulated detections. This tool can also be used for the simulation of sensor measurement campaigns. It is

  1. Orbiting space debris: Dangers, measurement and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ross T.

    1992-06-01

    Space debris is a growing environmental problem. Accumulation of objects in earth orbit threatens space systems through the possibility of collisions and runaway debris multiplication. The amount of debris in orbit is uncertain due to the lack of information on the population of debris between 1 and 10 centimeters diameter. Collisions with debris even smaller than 1 cm can be catastrophic due to the high orbital velocities involved. Research efforts are under way at NASA, United States Space Command and the Air Force Phillips Laboratory to detect and catalog the debris population in near-earth space. Current international and national laws are inadequate to control the proliferation of space debris. Space debris is a serious problem with large economic, military, technical and diplomatic components. Actions need to be taken now to: determine the full extent of the orbital debris problem; accurately predict the future evolution of the debris population; decide the extent of the debris mitigation procedures required; implement these policies on a global basis via an international treaty. Action must be initiated now, before the loss of critical space systems such as the space shuttle or the space station.

  2. Orbiting space debris: Dangers, measurement, and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ross T.

    1992-01-01

    Space debris is a growing environmental problem. Accumulation of objects in Earth orbit threatens space systems through the possibility of collisions and runaway debris multiplication. The amount of debris in orbit is uncertain due to the lack of information on the population of debris between 1 and 10 centimeters diameter. Collisions with debris even smaller than 1 cm can be catastrophic due to the high orbital velocities involved. Research efforts are under way at NASA, Unites States Space Command and the Air Force Phillips Laboratory to detect and catalog the debris population in near-Earth space. Current international and national laws are inadequate to control the proliferation of space debris. Space debris is a serious problem with large economic, military, technical, and diplomatic components. Actions need to be taken now for the following reasons: determine the full extent of the orbital debris problem; accurately predict the future evolution of the debris population; decide the extent of the debris mitigation procedures required; implement these policies on a global basis via an international treaty. Action must be initiated now, before the the loss of critical space systems such as the Space Shuttle or the Space Station.

  3. Orbital Debris Research in the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, Gene

    2009-01-01

    The presentation includes information about growth of the satellite population, the U.S. Space Surveillance Network, tracking and catalog maintenance, Haystack and HAX radar observation, Goldstone radar, the Michigan Orbital Debris Survey Telescope (MODEST), spacecraft surface examinations and sample of space shuttle impacts. GEO/LEO observations from Kwajalein Atoll, NASA s Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM2008), a LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris Model (LEGEND), Debris Assessment Software (DAS) 2.0, the NASA/JSC BUMPER-II meteoroid/debris threat assessment code, satellite reentry risk assessment, optical size and shape determination, work on more complicated fragments, and spectral studies.

  4. Space debris modeling at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2001-10-01

    Since the Second European Conference on Space Debris in 1997, the Orbital Debris Program Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center has undertaken a major effort to update and improve the principal software tools employed to model the space debris environment and to evaluate mission risks. NASA's orbital debris engineering model, ORDEM, represents the current and near-term Earth orbital debris population from the largest spacecraft to the smallest debris in a manner which permits spacecraft engineers and experimenters to estimate the frequency and velocity with which a satellite may be struck by debris of different sizes. Using expanded databases and a new program design, ORDEM2000 provides a more accurate environment definition combined with a much broader array of output products in comparison with its predecessor, ORDEM96. Studies of the potential long-term space debris environment are now conducted with EVOVLE 4.0, which incorporates significant advances in debris characterization and breakup modeling. An adjunct to EVOLVE 4.0, GEO EVOLVE has been created to examine debris issues near the geosynchronous orbital regime. In support of NASA Safety Standard (NSS) 1740.14, which establishes debris mitigation guidelines for all NASA space programs, a set of evaluation tools called the Debris Assessment Software (DAS) is specifically designed for program offices to determine whether they are in compliance with NASA debris mitigation guidelines. DAS 1.5 has recently been completed with improved WINDOWS compatibility and graphics functions. DAS 2.0 will incorporate guideline changes in a forthcoming revision to NSS 1740.14. Whereas DAS contains a simplified model to calculate possible risks associated with satellite reentries, NASA's higher fidelity Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) has been upgraded to Version 5.0. With the growing awareness of the potential risks posed by uncontrolled satellite reentries to people and property on Earth, the application of

  5. An Introduction to Space Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, David

    2008-04-01

    Space debris is any human-made object in orbit that no longer serves a useful purpose, including defunct satellites, discarded equipment and rocket stages, and fragments from the breakup of satellites and rocket stages. It is a concern because--due to its very high speed in orbit--even relatively small pieces can damage or destroy satellites in a collision. Since debris at high altitudes can stay in orbit for decades or longer, it accumulates as more is produced and the risk of collisions with satellites grows. Since there is currently no effective way to remove large amounts of debris from orbit, controlling the production of debris is essential for preserving the long-term use of space. Today there are 860 active satellites in orbit, supporting a wide range of civil and military uses. The 50 years of space activity since the launch of Sputnik 1 has also resulted in well over half a million pieces of orbiting debris larger than 1 cm in size. There are two main sources of space debris: (1) routine space activity and the accidental breakup of satellites and stages placed in orbit by such activity, and (2) the testing or use of destructive anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons that physically collide with satellites at high speed. The international community is attempting to reduce the first category by developing strict guidelines to limit the debris created as a result of routine space activities. However, the destruction of a single large spy satellite by an ASAT weapon could double the total amount of large debris in low earth orbit, and there are currently no international restrictions on these systems. This talk will give an introduction to what's in space, the origins of space debris, efforts to stem its growth, the threat it poses to satellites in orbit, and the long-term evolution of the debris population.

  6. Columbia Debris

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-06

    George D'Heilly and John Cassanto, scientists with Instrumentation Technology Associates, Inc., display for the media part of the apparatus recovered during the search for Columbia debris. It was part of the Commercial ITA Biomedical Experiments payload on mission STS-107 that included the Growth of Bacterial Biofilm on Surfaces during Spaceflight (GOBBSS) experiment and crystals grown for cancer research. The GOBBSS experiment was sponsored by the Planetary Society, with joint participation of an Israeli and a Palestinian student, and developed by the Israeli Aerospace Medical Institute and JSC Astrobiology Center.

  7. Orbital debris: Technical issues and future directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Andrew (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    An international conference on orbital debris sponsored jointly by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, NASA, and the Department of Defense, was held in Baltimore, Maryland, 16-19 Apr. 1990. Thirty-three papers were presented. The papers were grouped into the areas of measurements, modeling, and implications of orbital debris for space flight. New radar and optical measurements of orbital debris were presented that showed the existence of a large population of small debris. Modeling of potential future environments showed that runaway growth of the debris population from random collisions was a real possibility. New techniques for shielding against orbital debris and methods for removal of satellites from orbit were discussed.

  8. Debris Removal: An Opportunity for Cooperative Research?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-01-01

    Space debris mitigation practices will be insufficient to prevent the continued growth of the Earth satellite population. Removal of orbital debris can improve the reliability of present and future space systems. The challenges of developing an effective, affordable debris removal capability are considerable. The time is right for a new look at space remediation concepts. In concert with or following the current IAA study An international approach to the remediation of the near-Earth space environment will likely be required.

  9. JSC Orbital Debris Website Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2006-01-01

    required. These data also help in the analysis and interpretation of impact features on returned spacecraft surfaces. 4) Mitigation - Controlling the growth of the orbital debris population is a high priority for NASA, the United States, and the major space-faring nations of the world to preserve near-Earth space for future generations. Mitigation measures can take the form of curtailing or preventing the creation of new debris, designing satellites to withstand impacts by small debris, and implementing operational procedures ranging from utilizing orbital regimes with less debris, adopting specific spacecraft attitudes, and even maneuvering to avoid collisions with debris. Downloadable items include several documents in PDF format and executable software.and 5) Reentry - Because of the increasing number of objects in space, NASA has adopted guidelines and assessment procedures to reduce the number of non-operational spacecraft and spent rocket upper stages orbiting the Earth. One method of postmission disposal is to allow reentry of these spacecraft, either from orbital decay (uncontrolled entry) or with a controlled entry. Orbital decay may be achieved by firing engines to lower the perigee altitude so that atmospheric drag will eventually cause the spacecraft to enter. However, the surviving debris impact footprint cannot be guaranteed to avoid inhabited landmasses. Controlled entry normally occurs by using a larger amount of propellant with a larger propulsion system to drive the spacecraft to enter the atmosphere at a steeper flight path angle. It will then enter at a more precise latitude, longitude, and footprint in a nearly uninhabited impact region, generally located in the ocean.

  10. JSC Orbital Debris Website Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2006-01-01

    required. These data also help in the analysis and interpretation of impact features on returned spacecraft surfaces. 4) Mitigation - Controlling the growth of the orbital debris population is a high priority for NASA, the United States, and the major space-faring nations of the world to preserve near-Earth space for future generations. Mitigation measures can take the form of curtailing or preventing the creation of new debris, designing satellites to withstand impacts by small debris, and implementing operational procedures ranging from utilizing orbital regimes with less debris, adopting specific spacecraft attitudes, and even maneuvering to avoid collisions with debris. Downloadable items include several documents in PDF format and executable software.and 5) Reentry - Because of the increasing number of objects in space, NASA has adopted guidelines and assessment procedures to reduce the number of non-operational spacecraft and spent rocket upper stages orbiting the Earth. One method of postmission disposal is to allow reentry of these spacecraft, either from orbital decay (uncontrolled entry) or with a controlled entry. Orbital decay may be achieved by firing engines to lower the perigee altitude so that atmospheric drag will eventually cause the spacecraft to enter. However, the surviving debris impact footprint cannot be guaranteed to avoid inhabited landmasses. Controlled entry normally occurs by using a larger amount of propellant with a larger propulsion system to drive the spacecraft to enter the atmosphere at a steeper flight path angle. It will then enter at a more precise latitude, longitude, and footprint in a nearly uninhabited impact region, generally located in the ocean.

  11. The Orbital Debris Problem and the Challenges for Environment Remediation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Orbital debris scientists from major international space agencies, including JAXA and NASA, have worked together to predict the trend of the future environment. A summary presentation was given to the United Nations in February 2013. The orbital debris population in LEO will continue to increase. Catastrophic collisions will continue to occur every 5 to 9 years center dot To limit the growth of the future debris population and to better protect future spacecraft, active debris removal, should be considered.

  12. Optical Observations of Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Abercromby, Kira; Rodriquez, Heather; Barker, Edwin S.; Kelecy, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of optical telescopes to observe space debris. .It will present a brief review of how the survey is conducted, and what some of the significant results encompass. The goal is to characterize the population of debris objects at GEO, with emphasis on the faint object population. Because the survey observations extend over a very short arc (5 minutes), a full six parameter orbit can not be determined. Recently we have begun to use a second telescope, the 0.9-m at CTIO, as a chase telescope to do follow-up observations of potential GEO debris candidates found by MODEST. With a long enough sequence of observations, a full six-parameter orbit including eccentricity can be determined. The project has used STK since inception for planning observing sessions based on the distribution of bright cataloged objects and the anti-solar point (to avoid eclipse). Recently, AGI's Orbit Determination Tool Kit (ODTK) has been used to determine orbits, including the effects of solar radiation pressure. Since an unknown fraction of the faint debris at GEO has a high area-to-mass ratio (A/M), the orbits are perturbed significantly by solar radiation. The ODTK analysis results indicate that temporal variations in the solar perturbations, possibly due to debris orientation dynamics, can be estimated in the OD process. Additionally, the best results appear to be achieved when solar forces orthogonal to the object-Sun line are considered. Determining the A/M of individual objects and the distribution of A/M values of a large sample of debris is important to understanding the total population of debris at GEO

  13. Space Telescopes and Orbital Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitzer, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Almost 12,000 artificial objects orbiting the Earth are currently in the public catalog of orbital elements maintained by the USAF. Only a small fraction of them are operational satellites. The remainder is satellites whose missions have ended, rocket bodies, and parts and debris from larger parent objects. And the catalog only contains the biggest and brightest of the objects in orbit. The Low Earth Orbit (LEO) regime where most of this population concentrates is also a regime of incredible interest to astronomers, since it is where flagship missions such as the Hubble Space Telescope and other Great Observatories operate. I'll review the current state of knowledge of the orbital debris population, how it has grown with time, and how this environment could affect current and future space telescopes. There are mitigation measures which many spacecraft operators have adopted which can control the growth of the debris population. Orbital debris research at the University of Michigan is funded by NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office, Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas.

  14. Behavior of tethered debris with flexible appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanov, Vladimir S.; Yudintsev, Vadim V.

    2014-11-01

    Active exploration of the space leads to growth of a near-Earth space pollution. The frequency of the registered collisions of space debris with functional satellites highly increased during last 10 years. As a rule a large space debris can be observed from the Earth and catalogued, then it is possible to avoid collision with the active spacecraft. However every large debris is a potential source of a numerous small debris particles. To reduce debris population in the near Earth space the large debris should be removed from working orbits. The active debris removal technique is considered that intend to use a tethered orbital transfer vehicle, or a space tug attached by a tether to the space debris. This paper focuses on the dynamics of the space debris with flexible appendages. Mathematical model of the system is derived using the Lagrange formalism. Several numerical examples are presented to illustrate the mutual influence of the oscillations of flexible appendages and the oscillations of a tether. It is shown that flexible appendages can have a significant influence on the attitude motion of the space debris and the safety of the transportation process.

  15. Debris impact on Earth-orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    The accumulation of Earth-orbiting space debris leads to important new design considerations. Some 5,000 orbiting objects, many of them explosion fragments, are currently being tracked and future collision of these objects with each other is predicted. These collisions will occur at high velocities. Each collision will be explosive, ejecting thousands, of new orbiting objects, in turn increasing the frequency of future collisions. The debris population may thus become self-regenerative, and the future flux of orbiting debris will exceed that of meteoroids. As a result, a large space structure in Earth-orbit for several years has a significant probability of impact by debris objects. As a design problem, debris impact is significantly different from meteoroid impact. Protection against such large objects may require structural measures. The consideration of debris impact in the design of large, Earth-orbiting spacecraft is recommended.

  16. The impact of debris on marine life.

    PubMed

    Gall, S C; Thompson, R C

    2015-03-15

    Marine debris is listed among the major perceived threats to biodiversity, and is cause for particular concern due to its abundance, durability and persistence in the marine environment. An extensive literature search reviewed the current state of knowledge on the effects of marine debris on marine organisms. 340 original publications reported encounters between organisms and marine debris and 693 species. Plastic debris accounted for 92% of encounters between debris and individuals. Numerous direct and indirect consequences were recorded, with the potential for sublethal effects of ingestion an area of considerable uncertainty and concern. Comparison to the IUCN Red List highlighted that at least 17% of species affected by entanglement and ingestion were listed as threatened or near threatened. Hence where marine debris combines with other anthropogenic stressors it may affect populations, trophic interactions and assemblages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Space Debris Environment Remediation Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Klinkrad, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    Long-term projections of the space debris environment indicate that even drastic measures, such as an immediate, complete halt of launch and release activities, will not result in a stable environment of man-made space objects. Collision events between already existing space hardware will within a few decades start to dominate the debris population, and result in a net increase of the space debris population, also in size regimes which may cause further catastrophic collisions. Such a collisional cascading will ultimately lead to a run-away situation ("Kessler syndrome"), with no further possibility of human intervention. The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) has been investigating the status and the stability of the space debris environment in several studies by first looking into space traffic management possibilities and then investigating means of mitigating the creation of space debris. In an ongoing activity, an IAA study group looks at ways of active space debris environment remediation. In contrast to the former mitigation study, the current activity concentrates on the active removal of small and large objects, such as defunct spacecraft, orbital stages, and mission-related objects, which serve as a latent mass reservoir that fuels initial catastrophic collisions and later collisional cascading. The paper will outline different mass removal concepts, e.g. based on directed energy, tethers (momentum exchange or electrodynamic), aerodynamic drag augmentation, solar sails, auxiliary propulsion units, retarding surfaces, or on-orbit capture. Apart from physical principles of the proposed concepts, their applicability to different orbital regimes, and their effectiveness concerning mass removal efficiency will be analyzed. The IAA activity on space debris environment remediation is a truly international project which involves more than 23 contributing authors from 9 different nations.

  18. Characterization of marine debris in North Carolina salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Viehman, Shay; Vander Pluym, Jenny L; Schellinger, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Marine debris composition, density, abundance, and accumulation were evaluated in salt marshes in Carteret County, North Carolina seasonally between 2007 and 2009. We assessed relationships between human use patterns and debris type. Wave effects on marine debris density were examined using a GIS-based forecasting tool. We assessed the influence of site wave exposure, period, and height on debris quantity. Presence and abundance of debris were related to wave exposure, vegetation type and proximity of the strata to human population and human use patterns. Plastic pieces accounted for the majority of all debris. Small debris (0-5 cm) was primarily composed of foam pieces and was frequently affiliated with natural wrack. Large debris (>100 cm) was encountered in all marsh habitat types surveyed and was primarily composed of anthropogenic wood and derelict fishing gear. Marsh cleanup efforts should be targeted to specific habitat types or debris types to minimize further damage to sensitive habitats.

  19. Removal of orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J.; Talent, David L.

    1989-01-01

    The several methods presently identified for the reduction of orbital debris populations are broadly classifiable as either preventive or remedial, and fall within distinctive operational regimes. For all particles, (1) in the 250-2000-km altitude band, intelligent sweepers may be used; (2) for large objects, in the 80-250-km altitude band, orbital decay renders removal impractical; (3) for the 250-750-km altitude band, deorbit devices should be used; (4) for 750-2500-km altitude, OMV rendezvous for propulsive deorbit package attachment is foreseeable; and beyond 2500 km, (5) propulsive escape from earth orbit is required.

  20. Removal of orbital debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, Andrew J.; Talent, David L.

    The several methods presently identified for the reduction of orbital debris populations are broadly classifiable as either preventive or remedial, and fall within distinctive operational regimes. For all particles, (1) in the 250-2000-km altitude band, intelligent sweepers may be used; (2) for large objects, in the 80-250-km altitude band, orbital decay renders removal impractical; (3) for the 250-750-km altitude band, deorbit devices should be used; (4) for 750-2500-km altitude, OMV rendezvous for propulsive deorbit package attachment is foreseeable; and beyond 2500 km, (5) propulsive escape from earth orbit is required.

  1. Removal of orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J.; Talent, David L.

    1989-01-01

    The several methods presently identified for the reduction of orbital debris populations are broadly classifiable as either preventive or remedial, and fall within distinctive operational regimes. For all particles, (1) in the 250-2000-km altitude band, intelligent sweepers may be used; (2) for large objects, in the 80-250-km altitude band, orbital decay renders removal impractical; (3) for the 250-750-km altitude band, deorbit devices should be used; (4) for 750-2500-km altitude, OMV rendezvous for propulsive deorbit package attachment is foreseeable; and beyond 2500 km, (5) propulsive escape from earth orbit is required.

  2. Space Shuttle Debris Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Reynaldo J., III

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the assessment of debris damage to the Space Shuttle, and the use of computation to assist in the space shuttle applications. The presentation reviews the sources of debris, a mechanism for determining the probability of damaging debris impacting the shuttle, tools used, eliminating potential damaging debris sources, the use of computation to assess while inflight damage, and a chart showing the applications that have been used on increasingly powerful computers simulate the shuttle and the debris transport.

  3. NASA's New Orbital Debris Engineering Model, ORDEM2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, Paula H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the functionality and use of ORDEM2010, which replaces ORDEM2000, as the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) debris engineering model. Like its predecessor, ORDEM2010 serves the ODPO mission of providing spacecraft designers/operators and debris observers with a publicly available model to calculate orbital debris flux by current-state-of-knowledge methods. The key advance in ORDEM2010 is the input file structure of the yearly debris populations from 1995-2035 of sizes 10 micron - 1 m. These files include debris from low-Earth orbits (LEO) through geosynchronous orbits (GEO). Stable orbital elements (i.e., those that do not randomize on a sub-year timescale) are included in the files as are debris size, debris number, material density, random error and population error. Material density is implemented from ground-test data into the NASA breakup model and assigned to debris fragments accordingly. The random and population errors are due to machine error and uncertainties in debris sizes. These high-fidelity population files call for a much higher-level model analysis than what was possible with the populations of ORDEM2000. Population analysis in the ORDEM2010 model consists of mapping matrices that convert the debris population elements to debris fluxes. One output mode results in a spacecraft encompassing 3-D igloo of debris flux, compartmentalized by debris size, velocity, pitch, and yaw with respect to spacecraft ram direction. The second output mode provides debris flux through an Earth-based telescope/radar beam from LEO through GEO. This paper compares the new ORDEM2010 with ORDEM2000 in terms of processes and results with examples of specific orbits.

  4. An Assessment of the Current LEO Debris Environment and the Need for Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2010-01-01

    The anti-satellite test on the Fengun-1 C weather satellite in early 2007 and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 in 2009 dramatically altered the landscape of the human-made orbital debris environment in the low Earth orbit (LEO). The two events generated approximately 5500 fragments large enough to be tracked by the U.S. Space Surveillance Network. Those fragments account for more than 60% increase to the debris population in LEO. However, even before the ASAT test, model analyses already indicated that the debris population (for those larger than 10 cm) in LEO had reached a point where the population would continue to increase, due to collisions among existing objects, even without any future launches. The conclusion implies that as satellites continue to be launched and unexpected breakup events continue to occur, commonly-adopted mitigation measures will not be able to stop the collision-driven population growth. To remediate the debris environment in LEO, active debris removal must be considered. This presentation will provide an updated assessment of the debris environment after the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 collision, an analysis of several future environment projections based on different scenarios, and a projection of collision activities in LEO in the near future. The need to use active debris removal to stabilize future debris environment will be demonstrated and the effectiveness of various active debris removal strategies will be quantified.

  5. Data sharing report characterization of population 7: Personal protective equipment, dry active waste, and miscellaneous debris, surveillance and maintenance project Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Harpenau, Evan M.

    2013-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested that ORAU plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign targeting certain URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) process inventory waste. Eight populations of historical and reoccurring S&M waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been identified in the Waste Handling Plan for Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/OR/01-2565&D2 (WHP) (DOE 2012) for evaluation and processing to determine a final pathway for disposal. Population 7 (POP 7) consists of 56 containers of aged, low-level and potentially mixed S&M waste that has been staged in various locations around ORNL. Several of these POP 7 containers primarily contain personal protective equipment (PPE) and dry active waste (DAW), but may contain other miscellaneous debris. This data sharing report addresses the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) specified waste in a 13-container subpopulation (including eight steel boxes, three 55-gal drums, one sealand, and one intermodal) that lacked sufficient characterization data for possible disposal at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) using the approved Waste Lot (WL) 108.1 profile.

  6. Orbital Debris: A Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portree, Davis S. F. (Editor); Loftus, Joseph P., Jr. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This chronology covers the 37-year history of orbital debris concerns. It tracks orbital debris hazard creation, research, observation, experimentation, management, mitigation, protection, and policy. Included are debris-producing, events; U.N. orbital debris treaties, Space Shuttle and space station orbital debris issues; ASAT tests; milestones in theory and modeling; uncontrolled reentries; detection system development; shielding development; geosynchronous debris issues, including reboost policies: returned surfaces studies, seminar papers reports, conferences, and studies; the increasing effect of space activities on astronomy; and growing international awareness of the near-Earth environment.

  7. Roll Call Debris - Race

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Marine debris degrades ocean habitats, endangers marine and coastal wildlife, causes navigation hazards, results in economic losses to industry and governments, and threatens human health and safety. EPA Pacific Southwest (Region 9) is tapping existing programs and resources to advance the prevention, reduction and clean-up of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean. EPA Pacific Southwest activities build upon specific recommendations of the Interagency Marine Debris Coordinating Committee by targeting threats and sources of debris and responding to debris impacts. EPA is initiating a three-pronged effort to reduce sources of marine debris, prevent trash from entering the oceans, and assess the human and ecosystem impacts and potential for cleanup.

  8. Fleet Debris Levels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Marine debris degrades ocean habitats, endangers marine and coastal wildlife, causes navigation hazards, results in economic losses to industry and governments, and threatens human health and safety. EPA Pacific Southwest (Region 9) is tapping existing programs and resources to advance the prevention, reduction and clean-up of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean. EPA Pacific Southwest activities build upon specific recommendations of the Interagency Marine Debris Coordinating Committee by targeting threats and sources of debris and responding to debris impacts. EPA is initiating a three-pronged effort to reduce sources of marine debris, prevent trash from entering the oceans, and assess the human and ecosystem impacts and potential for cleanup.

  9. Special Report Debris - Race

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Marine debris degrades ocean habitats, endangers marine and coastal wildlife, causes navigation hazards, results in economic losses to industry and governments, and threatens human health and safety. EPA Pacific Southwest (Region 9) is tapping existing programs and resources to advance the prevention, reduction and clean-up of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean. EPA Pacific Southwest activities build upon specific recommendations of the Interagency Marine Debris Coordinating Committee by targeting threats and sources of debris and responding to debris impacts. EPA is initiating a three-pronged effort to reduce sources of marine debris, prevent trash from entering the oceans, and assess the human and ecosystem impacts and potential for cleanup.

  10. Optical surveys for space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Space debris—man-made non-functional objects of all sizes in near-Earth space—has been recognized as an increasing threat for current and future space operations. The debris population in near-Earth space has therefore been extensively studied during the last decade. Information on objects at altitudes higher than about 2,000 km is, however, still comparatively sparse. Debris in this region is best detected by surveys utilizing optical telescopes. Moreover, the instruments and the applied observation techniques, as well as the processing methods, have many similarities with those used in optical surveys for ‘astronomical’ objects like near-Earth objects (NEOs). The present article gives a general introduction to the problem of space debris, presents the used observation and processing techniques emphasizing the similarities and differences compared to optical surveys for NEOs, and reviews the results from optical surveys for space debris in high-altitude Earth orbits. Predictions on the influence of space debris on the future of space research and space astronomy in particular are reported as well.

  11. Space Debris Environent Remediation Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkrad, H.; Johnson, N. L.

    2009-03-01

    Long-term projections of the space debris environment indicate that even drastic measures, such as an immediate, complete halt of launch and release activities, will not result in a stable environment of man-made space objects. Collision events between already existing space hardware will within a few decades start to dominate the debris population, and result in a net increase of the space debris population, also at sizes which may cause further catastrophic collisions. A collisional cascading may ultimately lead to a run-away situation ("Kessler syndrome"), with no further possibility of human intervention.The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) has been investigating the status and the stability of the space debris environment in several studies by first looking into space traffic management possibilities, and then investigating means of mitigating the creation of space debris. In an on-going activity, an IAA study group looks into methods of active space debris environment remediation. In contrast to the former mitigation study, the current activity concentrates on the active removal of large objects, such as defunct spacecraft, orbital stages, and mission-related objects, which serve as a latent mass reservoir that fuels initial castastrophic collisions and later collisional cascading. The paper will outline different mass removal concepts, e.g. based on directed energy, tethers (momentum exchange or electro-dynamic), aerodynamic drag augmentation, solar sails, auxiliary propulsion units, retarding surfaces, or on-orbit capture. Apart from physical principles of the proposed concepts, their applicability to different orbital regimes, and their effectiveness concerning mass removal efficiency will be discussed.

  12. NASA's Long-term Debris Environment and Active Debris Removal Modeling Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the modeling activities for modeling of the long-term debris environment, the updated assessments of the environment, and the necessity to model the effectiveness of the technologies aimed at the removal of orbital debris. The model being used is named a LEO to GEO environment debris (LEGEND). It is a high fidelity three dimensional numerical simulation model with the capability to treat objects individually. It uses a Monte Carlo approach and a collision probability evaluation algorithm to simulate future satellite breakups and the growth of the debris populations.

  13. Report on orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The success of space endeavors depends upon a space environment sufficiently free of debris to enable the safe and dependable operation of spacecraft. An environment overly cluttered with debris would threaten the ability to utilize space for a wide variety of scientific, technological, military, and commercial purposes. Man made space debris (orbital debris) differs from natural meteoroids because it remains in earth orbit during its lifetime and is not transient through the space around the Earth. The orbital debris environment is considered. The space environment is described along with sources of orbital debris. The current national space policy is examined, along with ways to minimize debris generation and ways to survive the debris environment. International efforts, legal issues and commercial regulations are also examined.

  14. Turbomachinery debris remover

    DOEpatents

    Krawiec, Donald F.; Kraf, Robert J.; Houser, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

  15. Debris exhaust system

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Donald D.; Bua, Dominic; Domankevitz, Yacov; Nishioka, Norman

    1998-01-01

    A debris removal system removes debris from a work site by flowing fluid away from the work site toward the periphery of a structure. The fluid flow can be kept constant around the periphery so that debris is removed evenly. The structure can have a reduced cross section between the fluid inlet and the work site so that the resulting increased fluid velocity works to prevent debris from escaping.

  16. Debris exhaust system

    DOEpatents

    McBride, D.D.; Bua, D.; Domankevitz, Y.; Nishioka, N.

    1998-06-23

    A debris removal system removes debris from a work site by flowing fluid away from the work site toward the periphery of a structure. The fluid flow can be kept constant around the periphery so that debris is removed evenly. The structure can have a reduced cross section between the fluid inlet and the work site so that the resulting increased fluid velocity works to prevent debris from escaping. 9 figs.

  17. Assessment of Debris Flow Hazards, North Mountain, Phoenix, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reavis, K. J.; Wasklewicz, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    Urban sprawl in many western U.S. cities has expanded development onto alluvial fans. In the case of metropolitan Phoenix, AZ (MPA), urban sprawl has led to an exponential outward growth into surrounding mountainous areas and onto alluvial fans. Building on alluvial fans places humans at greater risk to flooding and debris flow hazards. Recent research has shown debris flows often supply large quantities of material to many alluvial fans in MPA. However, the risk of debris flows to built environments is relatively unknown. We use a 2D debris flow modeling approach, aided by high-resolution airborne LiDAR and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) topographic data, to examine debris flow behavior in a densely populated portion of the MPA to assess the risk and vulnerability of debris flow damage to the built infrastructure. A calibrated 2D debris flow model is developed for a "known" recent debris flow at an undeveloped site in MPA. The calibrated model and two other model scenarios are applied to a populated area with historical evidence of debris flow activity. Results from the modeled scenarios show evidence of debris flow damage to houses built on the alluvial fan. Debris flow inundation is also evident on streets on the fan. We use housing values and building damage to estimate the costs assocaited with various modeled debris flow scenarios.

  18. Orbital Debris and NASA's Measurement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Africano, J. L.; Stansbery, E. G.

    2002-05-01

    Since the launch of Sputnik in 1957, the number of manmade objects in orbit around the Earth has dramatically increased. The United States Space Surveillance Network (SSN) tracks and maintains orbits on over nine thousand objects down to a limiting diameter of about ten centimeters. Unfortunately, active spacecraft are only a small percentage ( ~ 7%) of this population. The rest of the population is orbital debris or ``space junk" consisting of expended rocket bodies, dead payloads, bits and pieces from satellite launches, and fragments from satellite breakups. The number of these smaller orbital debris objects increases rapidly with decreasing size. It is estimated that there are at least 130,000 orbital debris objects between one and ten centimeters in diameter. Most objects smaller than 10 centimeters go untracked! As the orbital debris population grows, the risk to other orbiting objects, most importantly manned space vehicles, of a collision with a piece of debris also grows. The kinetic energy of a solid 1 cm aluminum sphere traveling at an orbital velocity of 10 km/sec is equivalent to a 400 lb. safe traveling at 60 mph. Fortunately, the volume of space in which the orbiting population resides is large, collisions are infrequent, but they do occur. The Space Shuttle often returns to earth with its windshield pocked with small pits or craters caused by collisions with very small, sub-millimeter-size pieces of debris (paint flakes, particles from solid rocket exhaust, etc.), and micrometeoroids. To get a more complete picture of the orbital-debris environment, NASA has been using both radar and optical techniques to monitor the orbital debris environment. This paper gives an overview of the orbital debris environment and NASA's measurement program.

  19. Small Orbital Debris Mitigation Mission Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegmann, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Small orbital debris in LEO (1-10 cm in size) presents a clear and present danger to operational LEO spacecraft. This debris field has dramatically increased (nearly doubled) in recent years following the Chinese ASAT Test in 2007 and the Iridium/Cosmos collision in 2009. Estimates of the number of small debris have grown to 500,000 objects after these two events; previously the population was 300,000 objects. These small, untracked debris objects (appproximately 500,000) outnumber the larger and tracked objects (appproximately 20,000) by a factor 25 to 1. Therefore, the risk of the small untracked debris objects to operational spacecraft is much greater than the risk posed by the larger and tracked LEO debris objects. A recent study by The Aerospace Corporation found that the debris environment will increase the costs of maintaining a constellation of government satellites by 5%, a constellation of large commercial satellites by 11%, and a constellation of factory built satellites by 26% from $7.6 billion to $9.57 billion. Based upon these facts, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) performed an architecture study on Small Orbital Debris Active Removal (SODAR) using a space-based nonweapons- class laser satellite for LEO debris removal. The goal of the SODAR study was to determine the ability of a space-based laser system to remove the most pieces of debris (1 cm to 10 cm, locations unknown), in the shortest amount of time, with the fewest number of spacecraft. The ESA developed MASTER2005 orbital debris model was used to probabilistically classify the future debris environment including impact velocity, magnitude, and directionality. The study ground rules and assumptions placed the spacecraft into a high inclination Low Earth Orbit at 800 km as an initial reference point. The architecture study results found that a spacecraft with an integrated forward-firing laser is capable of reducing the small orbital debris flux within

  20. Evaluating the impacts of marine debris on cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Baulch, Sarah; Perry, Clare

    2014-03-15

    Global in its distribution and pervading all levels of the water column, marine debris poses a serious threat to marine habitats and wildlife. For cetaceans, ingestion or entanglement in debris can cause chronic and acute injuries and increase pollutant loads, resulting in morbidity and mortality. However, knowledge of the severity of effects lags behind that for other species groups. This literature review examines the impacts of marine debris on cetaceans reported to date. It finds that ingestion of debris has been documented in 48 (56% of) cetacean species, with rates of ingestion as high as 31% in some populations. Debris-induced mortality rates of 0-22% of stranded animals were documented, suggesting that debris could be a significant conservation threat to some populations. We identify key data that need to be collected and published to improve understanding of the threat that marine debris poses to cetaceans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An adaptive strategy for active debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Adam E.; Lewis, Hugh G.

    2014-04-01

    Many parameters influence the evolution of the near-Earth debris population, including launch, solar, explosion and mitigation activities, as well as other future uncertainties such as advances in space technology or changes in social and economic drivers that effect the utilisation of space activities. These factors lead to uncertainty in the long-term debris population. This uncertainty makes it difficult to identify potential remediation strategies, involving active debris removal (ADR), that will perform effectively in all possible future cases. Strategies that cannot perform effectively, because of this uncertainty, risk either not achieving their intended purpose, or becoming a hindrance to the efforts of spacecraft manufactures and operators to address the challenges posed by space debris. One method to tackle this uncertainty is to create a strategy that can adapt and respond to the space debris population. This work explores the concept of an adaptive strategy, in terms of the number of objects required to be removed by ADR, to prevent the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris population from growing in size. This was demonstrated by utilising the University of Southampton’s Debris Analysis and Monitoring Architecture to the Geosynchronous Environment (DAMAGE) tool to investigate ADR rates (number of removals per year) that change over time in response to the current space environment, with the requirement of achieving zero growth of the LEO population. DAMAGE was used to generate multiple Monte Carlo projections of the future LEO debris environment. Within each future projection, the debris removal rate was derived at five-year intervals, by a new statistical debris evolutionary model called the Computational Adaptive Strategy to Control Accurately the Debris Environment (CASCADE) model. CASCADE predicted the long-term evolution of the current DAMAGE population with a variety of different ADR rates in order to identify a removal rate that produced a zero net

  2. The ESA Space Debris Mitigation Handbook 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkrad, H.; Beltrami, P.; Hauptmann, S.; Martin, C.; Sdunnus, H.; Stokes, H.; Walker, R.; Wilkinson, J.

    2004-01-01

    The ESA Space Debris Mitigation Handbook 2002 was jointly produced by an industrial consortium and ESA, under an ESA contract. The Handbook is a non-regulatory, self-standing document, providing technical information in support of European debris mitigation standards. The necessity of debris mitigation is illustrated in the context of historic launch activities and operational practices, which led to the current debris environment, with corresponding collision flux levels. Based on detailed population evolution models, this initial population is analyzed with respect to its growth and stability under different traffic assumptions. The implementation of debris mitigation measures, in particular the de-orbiting of spacecraft and upper stages, is shown to reduce the debris growth to an acceptable level within a few decades. The risk on ground due to re-entering space objects, its assessment, and its control is also analyzed. For on-orbit systems, collision risk reduction by avoidance manoeuvres, and passive protection by shielding is outlined. ESA's Handbook also compares recommended debris mitigation and risk reduction practices proposed by several other space agencies. The Handbook will be available at the begin of 2003.

  3. The ESA Space Debris Mitigation Handbook 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkrad, H.; Beltrami, P.; Hauptmann, S.; Martin, C.; Sdunnus, H.; Stokes, H.; Walker, R.; Wilkinson, J.

    The ESA Space Debris Mitigation Handbook 2002 was jointly produced by an industrial consortium and ESA, under an ESA contract. The Handbook is a non-regulatory, self-standing document, providing technical information in support of European debris mitigation standards. The necessity of debris mitigation is illustrated in the context of historic launch activities and operational practices, which led to the current debris environment, with corresponding collision flux levels. Based on detailed population evolution models, this initial population is analysed with respect to its growth and stability under different traffic assumptions. The implementation of debris mitigation measures, in particular the de-orbiting of spacecraft and upper stages, is shown to reduce the debris growth to an acceptable level within a few decades. The risk on ground due to re-entering space objects, its assessment, and its control is also analysed. For on-orbit systems, collision risk reduction by avoidance manoeuvres, and passive protection by shielding is outlined. ESA's Handbook also compares recommended debris mitigation and risk reduction practices proposed by several other space agencies. The Handbook will be available by the end of 2002.

  4. A proposed in situ debris measurement in GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opiela, J.; Liou, J.; Stansbery, E.

    Unlike the low Earth o bit (LEO) region, the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO)r debris environment is not well characterized. Since there is no natural mechanism to remove debris from GEO, where atmospheric drag is negligible, the GEO debris population will continue to grow. A good environment definition is needed for GEO satellite designers and operators to have reliable debris impact risk assessments and protection for their satellites. The current, general debris mitigation and protection measures may be applied to GEO satellites, but characterizing the GEO debris environment (flux, size distribution, orbit distribution, sources) will also allow measures tailored specifically for that environment. Ground-based GEO optical measurements in general have been limited to objects greater than about 15 cm. It is highly unlikely that any ground-based telescope can detect GEO debris smaller than 1 cm. In situ measurements are required to characterize the particle environment below the threshold of remote sensors. Firsthand knowledge of the untrackable debris population is critical to GEO environment definition. Two specific issues need to be addressed for any effective in situ measurements in GEO: detector type and potential contamination from interplanetary and interstellar dust. In this paper, we will discuss why the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) material makes an ideal GEO debris detector. We will also show that impacts from debris, interplanetary dust, and interstellar dust are very different in many ways (size, impact speed, flux, etc). Debris impacts can be easily distinguished from other impacts.

  5. LEGEND, a LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer Chyi; Hall, Doyle T.

    2013-01-01

    LEGEND (LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris model) is a three-dimensional orbital debris evolutionary model that is capable of simulating the historical and future debris populations in the near-Earth environment. The historical component in LEGEND adopts a deterministic approach to mimic the known historical populations. Launched rocket bodies, spacecraft, and mission-related debris (rings, bolts, etc.) are added to the simulated environment. Known historical breakup events are reproduced, and fragments down to 1 mm in size are created. The LEGEND future projection component adopts a Monte Carlo approach and uses an innovative pair-wise collision probability evaluation algorithm to simulate the future breakups and the growth of the debris populations. This algorithm is based on a new "random sampling in time" approach that preserves characteristics of the traditional approach and captures the rapidly changing nature of the orbital debris environment. LEGEND is a Fortran 90-based numerical simulation program. It operates in a UNIX/Linux environment.

  6. An Assessment of Potential Detectors to Monitor the Man-made Orbital Debris Environment. [space debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R. C.; Ruck, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Observations using NORAD radar showed that man made debris exceeds the natural environment for large objects. For short times (a few days to a few weeks) after solid rocket motor (SRM) firings in LEO, man made debris in the microparticle size range also appears to exceed the meteoroid environment. The properties of the debris population between these size regimes is currently unknown as there has been no detector system able to perform the required observations. The alternatives for obtaining data on this currently unobserved segment of the population are assessed.

  7. Space debris detection and mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Allahdadi, F.

    1993-01-01

    Space debris is defined as all useless man-made objects in space. This conference covers the following areas: debris detection, tracking, and surveillance; orbital debris analytical modeling; debris environment and safety issues; and orbital debris mitigation. Separate abstracts were prepared for 26 papers in this conference.

  8. Debris Disks: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, D.

    2004-12-01

    An overview regarding planetary debris disks: First, more history to complement Low and Aumann's summary appearing elsewhere in this volume. Then, commentary on the nature of debris disks and what we've learned from them: properties of the original ``Fabulous Four" archetypes, results from surveys showing that a large fraction of ordinary stars may be hosts for debris disks, and relatively detailed discussion of β Pictoris, the most prominent disk. Finally, discussion of the connection between debris disks, our solar system's Kuiper Belt, and the zodiacal dust cloud. Open questions about these objects will be highlighted which can lead on to the remainder of the proceedings.

  9. Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Susan H.

    2012-01-01

    Orbital debris in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is an international problem that threatens the success of future space ventures. An analysis of a wide variety of alternative solutions for active debris removal (ADR) has been performed. The solution selected is an efficient, effective, and executable solution to remove large debris in LEO, primarily spent rocket bodies. Removing large debris objects is a critical step in reducing the hazard from orbital debris, because of the large amount of medium and small debris created through large body collisions. Based on the analysis of alternatives, the concept and design for a vehicle which could efficiently address the debris hazard by disposing of several large objects per mission has been developed. This concept establishes a comprehensive, detailed technical approach for an actual end-to-end, on-orbit ADR solution to remove large debris. This robust solution enables the start of solving the problem of debris removal before it reaches a critical and potentially irreversible state by "getting there as soon as possible, as economically as possible, with the most capability".

  10. Radar Measurements of Small Debris from HUSIR and HAX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Joseph; Blackwell, Chris; McSheehy, Richard; Juarez, Quanette

    2017-01-01

    For many years, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has been collecting measurements of the orbital debris environment from the Haystack Ultra-wideband Satellite Imaging Radar (HUSIR) and its auxiliary (HAX). These measurements sample the small debris population in low earth orbit (LEO). This paper will provide an overview of recent observations and highlight trends in selected debris populations. Using the NASA size estimation model, objects with a characteristic size of 1 cm and larger observed from HUSIR will be presented. Also, objects with a characteristic size of 2 cm and larger observed from HAX will be presented.

  11. Engineering Challenges for Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    Recent modeling studies on the instability of the debris population in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 have underlined the need for active debris removal. A 2009 analysis by the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office shows that, in order to maintain the LEO debris population at a constant level for the next 200 years, an active debris removal of about five objects per year is needed. The targets identified for removal are those with the highest mass and collision probability products in the environment. Many of these objects are spent upper stages with masses ranging from 1 to more than 8 metric tons, residing in several altitude regions and concentrated in about 10 inclination bands. To remove five of those objects on a yearly basis, in a cost-effective manner, represents many challenges in engineering, technology development, and operations. This paper outlines a conceptual end-to-end debris removal operation, including launch, precision tracking, rendezvous, stabilization (of the tumbling targets), capture, and deorbit of the targets; and highlights major challenges associated with the operations. Pros and cons of several proposed removal techniques are also evaluated.

  12. Orbital Debris Shape Characterization Project Abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, Jessie

    2016-01-01

    I have been working on a project to further our understanding of orbital debris by helping create a new dataset previously too complex to be implemented in past orbital debris propagation models. I am doing this by creating documentation and 3D examples and illustrations of the shape categories. Earlier models assumed all orbital debris to be spherical aluminum fragments. My project will help expand our knowledge of shape populations to 6 categories: Straight Needle/Rod/Cylinder, Bent Needle/Rod/Cylinder, Flat Plate, Bent Plate, Nugget/Parallelepiped/Spheroid, and Flexible. The last category, Flexible, is still up for discussion and may be modified. These categories will be used to characterize fragments in the DebriSat experiment.

  13. Orbital debris research at NASA Johnson Space Center, 1986-1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Robert C.; Potter, Andrew E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Research on orbital debris has intensified in recent years as the number of debris objects in orbit has grown. The population of small debris has now reached the level that orbital debris has become an important design factor for the Space Station. The most active center of research in this field has been the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. Work is being done on the measurement of orbital debris, development of models of the debris population, and development of improved shielding against hypervelocity impacts. Significant advances have been made in these areas. The purpose of this document is to summarize these results and provide references for further study.

  14. Space debris impact experiment (S0001)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The specific objectives of this experiment are to establish the population and size distribution of meteoroids in the mass range from 10 to the minus 10 power to 10 to the minus 4 power G, to establish the current population of man-made debris in the same mass range, and to obtain data on the physical properties (composition and density) of meteoroids.

  15. Threats to U.S. National Security Interests in Space: Orbital Debris Mitigation and Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-08

    platforms in space from collisions with orbital debris . Some experts maintain the population growth of debris in space will be primarily driven by catastrophic collisions that are likely to occur every five to nine years.

  16. Orbital Debris Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Jarkey, D. R.; Stansbery, G.

    2014-01-01

    Policies on limiting orbital debris are found throughout the US Government, many foreign space agencies, and as adopted guidelines in the United Nations. The underlying purpose of these policies is to ensure the environment remains safe for the operation of robotic and human spacecraft in near- Earth orbit. For this reason, it is important to consider orbital debris mitigation during the design of all space vehicles. Documenting compliance with the debris mitigation guidelines occurs after the vehicle has already been designed and fabricated for many CubeSats, whereas larger satellites are evaluated throughout the design process. This paper will provide a brief explanation of the US Government Orbital Debris Mitigation Standard Practices, a discussion of international guidelines, as well as NASA's process for compliance evaluation. In addition, it will discuss the educational value of considering orbital debris mitigation requirements as a part of student built satellite design.

  17. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  18. Modeling debris-covered glaciers: response to steady debris deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Leif S.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2016-05-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are common in rapidly eroding alpine landscapes. When thicker than a few centimeters, surface debris suppresses melt rates. If continuous debris cover is present, ablation rates can be significantly reduced leading to increases in glacier length. In order to quantify feedbacks in the debris-glacier-climate system, we developed a 2-D long-valley numerical glacier model that includes englacial and supraglacial debris advection. We ran 120 simulations on a linear bed profile in which a hypothetical steady state debris-free glacier responds to a step increase of surface debris deposition. Simulated glaciers advance to steady states in which ice accumulation equals ice ablation, and debris input equals debris loss from the glacier terminus. Our model and parameter selections can produce 2-fold increases in glacier length. Debris flux onto the glacier and the relationship between debris thickness and melt rate strongly control glacier length. Debris deposited near the equilibrium-line altitude, where ice discharge is high, results in the greatest glacier extension when other debris-related variables are held constant. Debris deposited near the equilibrium-line altitude re-emerges high in the ablation zone and therefore impacts melt rate over a greater fraction of the glacier surface. Continuous debris cover reduces ice discharge gradients, ice thickness gradients, and velocity gradients relative to initial debris-free glaciers. Debris-forced glacier extension decreases the ratio of accumulation zone to total glacier area (AAR). Our simulations reproduce the "general trends" between debris cover, AARs, and glacier surface velocity patterns from modern debris-covered glaciers. We provide a quantitative, theoretical foundation to interpret the effect of debris cover on the moraine record, and to assess the effects of climate change on debris-covered glaciers.

  19. Detection of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, P.; Lederer, S.; Barker, E.; Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Silha, J.; Burkhardt, A.

    2014-01-01

    There have been extensive optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) conducted with meter-class telescopes, such as those conducted with MODEST (the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope, a 0.6-m telescope located at Cerro Tololo in Chile), and the European Space Agency's 1.0-m space debris telescope (SDT) in the Canary Islands. These surveys have detection limits in the range of 18th or 19th magnitude, which corresponds to sizes larger than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. All of these surveys reveal a substantial population of objects fainter than R = 15th magnitude that are not in the public U.S. Satellite Catalog. To detect objects fainter than 20th magnitude (and presumably smaller than 10 cm) in the visible requires a larger telescope and excellent imaging conditions. This combination is available in Chile. NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office has begun collecting orbital debris observations with the 6.5-m (21.3-ft diameter) "Walter Baade" Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. The goal is to detect objects as faint as possible from a ground-based observatory and begin to understand the brightness distribution of GEO debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude.

  20. Current orbital debris environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    NASA has instituted a plan for the definition of activities and resources required over the coming decade for the deepening of current understanding of anthropogenic orbital debris, and its effects on future mission operations. This understanding will be the basis of policy definition and policy implementation efforts. The most immediate requirement is the definition of the debris environment, with emphasis on data for debris sizes smaller than 4 cm. Systems-damage criteria and hypervelocity-impact theory will then be used to define the hazard to specific spacecraft.

  1. SPECS: Orbital debris removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The debris problem has reached a stage at which the risk to satellites and spacecraft has become substantial in low Earth orbit (LEO). This research discovered that small particles posed little threat to spacecraft because shielding can effectively prevent these particles from damaging the spacecraft. The research also showed that, even though collision with a large piece of debris could destroy the spacecraft, the large pieces of debris pose little danger because they can be tracked and the spacecraft can be maneuvered away from these pieces. Additionally, there are many current designs to capture and remove large debris particles from the space environment. From this analysis, it was decided to concentrate on the removal of medium-sized orbital debris, that is, those pieces ranging from 1 cm to 50 cm in size. The current design incorporates a transfer vehicle and a netting vehicle to capture the medium-sized debris. The system is based near an operational space station located at 28.5 deg inclination and 400 km altitude. The system uses ground-based tracking to determine the location of a satellite breakup or debris cloud. These data are uploaded to the transfer vehicle, which proceeds to rendezvous with the debris at a lower altitude parking orbit. Next, the netting vehicle is deployed, tracks the targeted debris, and captures it. After expending the available nets, the netting vehicle returns to the transfer vehicle for a new netting module and continues to capture more debris in the target area. Once all the netting modules are expended, the transfer vehicle returns to the space station's orbit where it is resupplied with new netting modules from a space shuttle load. The new modules are launched by the shuttle from the ground and the expended modules are taken back to Earth for removal of the captured debris, refueling, and repacking of the nets. Once the netting modules are refurbished, they are taken back into orbit for reuse. In a typical mission, the

  2. Space traffic hazards from orbital debris mitigation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, N. N.; Kiselev, A. B.; Smirnova, M. N.; Nikitin, V. F.

    2015-04-01

    The paper gives coverage of recent advances in mathematical modeling of long term orbital debris evolution within the frames of continua approach. Under the approach the evolution equations contain a number of source terms responsible for the variations of quantities of different fractions of orbital debris population due to fragmentations and collisions. Mechanisms of hypervelocity collisions of debris fragments with pressurized vessels are investigated. The spacecraft shield honeycomb concept is suggested based on principles of impact energy conversion and redistribution and consumption by destroyable structures. The paper is devoted to the 100th anniversary of the founder of space debris research in Moscow State University Prof. G.A. Tyulin.

  3. Orbital Debris: the Growing Threat to Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2010-01-01

    For nearly 50 years the amount of man-made debris in Earth orbit steadily grew, accounting for about 95% of all cataloged space objects over the past few decades. The Chinese anti-satellite test in January 2007 and the accidental collision of two spacecraft in February 2009 created more than 4000 new cataloged debris, representing an increase of 40% of the official U.S. Satellite Catalog. The frequency of collision avoidance maneuvers for both human space flight and robotic operations is increasing along with the orbital debris population. However, the principal threat to space operations is driven by the smaller and much more numerous uncataloged debris. Although the U.S. and the international aerospace communities have made significant progress in recognizing the hazards of orbital debris and in reducing or eliminating the potential for the creation of new debris, the future environment is expected to worsen without additional corrective measures.

  4. Orbiting meteoroid and debris counting experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Armstrong, Dwayne; Crockett, Sharon K.; Jones, James L., Jr.; Kassel, Philip C., Jr.; Wortman, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Orbiting Meteoroid and Debris Counting Experiment (OMDC) flew for approximately 90 days in a highly elliptical earth orbit onboard the Clementine Interstage Adapter (ISA) Spacecraft. This experiment obtained data on the impact flux of natural micrometeoroids and it provided limited information on the population of small mass man-made debris as a function of altitude in near earth space. The flight of the OMDC experiment on the ISA spacecraft also demonstrated that the ultra-lightweight, low-power, particle impact detector system that was used is a viable system for flights on future spacecraft to monitor the population of small mass man-made debris particles and to map the cosmic dust environment encountered on interplanetary missions. An overview of the ISA spacecraft mission, the approach to the OMDC experiment, and the data obtained by the experiment are presented.

  5. Orbital debris: A technical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleghorn, George; Asay, James; Atkinson, Dale; Flury, Walter; Johnson, Nicholas; Kessler, Donald; Knowles, Stephen; Rex, Dietrich; Toda, Susumu; Veniaminov, Stanislav

    1995-01-01

    To acquire an unbiased technical assessment of (1) the research needed to better understand the debris environment, (2) the necessity and means of protecting spacecraft against the debris environment, and (3) potential methods of reducing the future debris hazard, NASA asked the National Research Council to form an international committee to examine the orbital debris issue. The committee was asked to draw upon available data and analyses to: characterize the current debris environment, project how this environment might change in the absence of new measures to alleviate debris proliferation, examine ongoing alleviation activities, explore measures to address the problem, and develop recommendations on technical methods to address the problems of debris proliferation.

  6. Debris flow, debris avalanche and flood hazards at and downstream from Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Kevin M.; Vallance, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Mount Rainier volcano has produced many large debris flows and debris avalanches during the last 10,000 years. These flows have periodically traveled more than 100 kilometers from the volcano to inundate parts of the now-populated Puget Sound Lowland. Meteorological floods also have caused damage, but future effects will be partly mitigated by reservoirs. Mount Rainier presents the most severe flow risks of any volcano in the United States. Volcanic debris flows (lahars) are of two types: (1) cohesive, relatively high clay flows originating as debris avalanches, and (2) noncohesive flows with less clay that begin most commonly as meltwater surges. Three case histories represent important subpopulations of flows with known magnitudes and frequencies. The risks of each subpopulation may be considered for general planning and design. A regional map illustrates the extent of inundation by the case-history flows, the largest of which originated as debris avalanches and moved from Mount Rainier to Puget Sound. The paleohydrologic record of these past flows indicates the potential for inundation by future flows from the volcano. A map of the volcano and its immediate vicinity shows examples of smaller debris avalanches and debris flows in the 20th century.

  7. Searching for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Lederer, Susan M.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Barker, Edwin S.; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Krisko, Paula; Silha, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    We report on results from a search for optically faint debris (defined as R > 20th magnitude, or smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175)) at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescope "Walter Baade" at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to characterize the brightness distribution of debris to the faintest limiting magnitude possible. Our data was obtained during 6 hours of observing time during the photometric nights of 26 and 27 March 2011 with the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a field of view (fov) of 0.5 degrees in diameter. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r filter, and calibrated by observations of Landolt standard stars. Our primary objective was to search for optically faint objects from one of the few known fragmentations at GEO: the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for unknown objects on similar orbits but with different mean anomalies. To establish the bright end of the debris population, calibrated observations were acquired on the same field centers, telescope rates, and time period with a similar filter on the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will show the calibrated brightness distributions from both telescopes, and compare the observed brightness distributions with that predicted for various population models of debris of different sizes.

  8. Disposal of Cleaning Debris

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    trees. In addition, the debris contains some plastic bottles , balls, rubber items, and glass . The wood debris is in various stages of...the upper portion, which contains vegetation falls into the river. Plastic bottles and various other discarded objects periodically float into the...the reservoir includes tree stumps, tree branches, tree trunks, tires, oil drums, plastic bottles , signs from recreational areas in the White

  9. Orbital Debris Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation outlne: (1) The NASA Orbital Debris (OD) Engineering Model -- A mathematical model capable of predicting OD impact risks for the ISS and other critical space assets (2) The NASA OD Evolutionary Model -- A physical model capable of predicting future debris environment based on user-specified scenarios (3) The NASA Standard Satellite Breakup Model -- A model describing the outcome of a satellite breakup (explosion or collision)

  10. Albedo estimates for debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E.; Henize, Karl G.; Talent, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The albedo of upper-stage breakup debris is proposed as an accurate discriminator among the various possible causes of breakup, which encompass residual fuel explosions and hypervelocity particle impacts. The fragments from an impact are covered with a thin layer of soot deposited from the destruction of polymeric circuit boards, while pressure vessel explosion fragments can be expected to remain soot-free. Albedo also facilitates the interpretation of small-debris optical telescope measurements.

  11. Comparison of debris flux models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sdunnus, H.; Beltrami, P.; Klinkrad, H.; Matney, M.; Nazarenko, A.; Wegener, P.

    The availability of models to estimate the impact risk from the man-made space debris and the natural meteoroid environment is essential for both, manned and unmanned satellite missions. Various independent tools based on different approaches have been developed in the past years. Due to an increased knowledge of the debris environment and its sources e.g. from improved measurement capabilities, these models could be updated regularly, providing more detailed and more reliable simulations. This paper addresses an in-depth, quantitative comparison of widely distributed debris flux models which were recently updated, namely ESA's MASTER 2001 model, NASA's ORDEM 2000 and the Russian SDPA 2000 model. The comparison was performed in the frame of the work of the 20t h Interagency Debris Coordination (IADC) meeting held in Surrey, UK. ORDEM 2000ORDEM 2000 uses careful empirical estimates of the orbit populations based onthree primary data sources - the US Space Command Catalog, the H ystackaRadar, and the Long Duration Exposure Facility spacecraft returned surfaces.Further data (e.g. HAX and Goldstone radars, impacts on Shuttle windows andradiators, and others) were used to adjust these populations for regions in time,size, and space not covered by the primary data sets. Some interpolation andextrapolation to regions with no data (such as projections into the future) wasprovided by the EVOLVE model. MASTER 2001The ESA MASTER model offers a full three dimensional description of theterrestrial debris distribution reaching from LEO up to the GEO region. Fluxresults relative to an orbiting target or to an inertial volume can be resolved intosource terms, impactor characteristics and orbit, as well as impact velocity anddirection. All relevant debris source terms are considered by the MASTERmodel. For each simulated source, a corresponding debris generation model interms of mass/diameter distribution, additional velocities, and directionalspreading has been developed. A

  12. Shielding against debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G.; Avans, Sherman L.

    1988-01-01

    The damage to spacecraft caused by debris and design of the Space Station to minimize damage from debris are discussed. Although current estimates of the debris environment show that fragments bigger than 2 cm are not likely to hit the Space Station, orbital debris from about 0.5 mm to 2 cm will pose a hazard, especially on brittle surfaces, such as glass. Spacesuits are being designed to reduce debris caused dangers to astronauts during EVA. About 5 cm of high-strength aluminum are needed to prevent penetration by a 1 cm piece of aluminum with a mass near 1.5 g colliding at 10 km/sec. Because aluminum bumpers have the drawback of metallic debris ejected outward after a hypervelocity collision, the use of nonmetallic materials for bumpers is being studied. Methods of reducing the weight and volume of the shield for the Space Station are also being researched. A space station habitation module using bumpers has a 99.6 percent chance of avoiding penetration during its lifetime.

  13. The New NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Matney, Mark J.; Anz-Meador, Phillip D.; Kessler, Donald; Jansen, Mark; Theall, Jeffery R.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office at Johnson Space Center has developed a new computer-based orbital debris engineering model, ORDEM2000, which describes the orbital debris environment in the low Earth orbit region between 200 and 2000 km altitude. The model is appropriate for those engineering solutions requiring knowledge and estimates of the orbital debris environment (debris spatial density, flux, etc.). ORDEM2000 can also be used as a benchmark for ground-based debris measurements and observations. We incorporated a large set of observational data, covering the object size range from 10 mm to 10 m, into the ORDEM2000 debris database, utilizing a maximum likelihood estimator to convert observations into debris population probability distribution functions. These functions then form the basis of debris populations. We developed a finite element model to process the debris populations to form the debris environment. A more capable input and output structure and a user-friendly graphical user interface are also implemented in the model. ORDEM2000 has been subjected to a significant verification and validation effort. This document describes ORDEM2000, which supersedes the previous model, ORDEM96. The availability of new sensor and in situ data, as well as new analytical techniques, has enabled the construction of this new model. Section 1 describes the general requirements and scope of an engineering model. Data analyses and the theoretical formulation of the model are described in Sections 2 and 3. Section 4 describes the verification and validation effort and the sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Finally, Section 5 describes the graphical user interface, software installation, and test cases for the user.

  14. Estimated probabilities and volumes of postwildfire debris flows, a prewildfire evaluation for the upper Blue River watershed, Summit County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, John G.; Flynn, Jennifer L.; Bossong, Clifford R.; Char, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    The subwatersheds with the greatest potential postwildfire and postprecipitation hazards are those with both high probabilities of debris-flow occurrence and large estimated volumes of debris-flow material. The high probabilities of postwildfire debris flows, the associated large estimated debris-flow volumes, and the densely populated areas along the creeks and near the outlets of the primary watersheds indicate that Indiana, Pennsylvania, and Spruce Creeks are associated with a relatively high combined debris-flow hazard.

  15. Characterization of Debris from the DebriSat Hypervelocity Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivero, M.; Kleespies, J.; Patankar, K.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Krisko, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    The DebriSat project is an effort by NASA and the DoD to update the standard break-up model for objects in orbit. The DebriSat object, a 56 kg representative LEO satellite, was subjected to a hypervelocity impact in April 2014. For the hypervelocity test, the representative satellite was suspended within a "soft-catch" arena formed by polyurethane foam panels to minimize the interactions between the debris generated from the hypervelocity impact and the metallic walls of the test chamber. After the impact, the foam panels and debris not caught by the panels were collected and shipped to the University of Florida where the project has now advanced to the debris characterization stage. The characterization effort has been divided into debris collection, measurement, and cataloguing. Debris collection and cataloguing involves the retrieval of debris from the foam panels and cataloguing the debris in a database. Debris collection is a three-step process: removal of loose debris fragments from the surface of the foam panels; X-ray imaging to identify/locate debris fragments embedded within the foam panel; extraction of the embedded debris fragments identified during the X-ray imaging process. As debris fragments are collected, they are catalogued into a database specifically designed for this project. Measurement involves determination of size, mass, shape, material, and other physical properties and well as images of the fragment. Cataloguing involves a assigning a unique identifier for each fragment along with the characterization information.

  16. Linking effects of anthropogenic debris to ecological impacts

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Mark Anthony; Underwood, A. J.; Chapman, M. G.; Williams, Rob; Thompson, Richard C.; van Franeker, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    Accelerated contamination of habitats with debris has caused increased effort to determine ecological impacts. Strikingly, most work on organisms focuses on sublethal responses to plastic debris. This is controversial because (i) researchers have ignored medical insights about the mechanisms that link effects of debris across lower levels of biological organization to disease and mortality, and (ii) debris is considered non-hazardous by policy-makers, possibly because individuals can be injured or removed from populations and assemblages without ecological impacts. We reviewed the mechanisms that link effects of debris across lower levels of biological organization to assemblages and populations. Using plastic, we show microplastics reduce the ‘health’, feeding, growth and survival of ecosystem engineers. Larger debris alters assemblages because fishing-gear and tyres kill animals and damage habitat-forming plants, and because floating bottles facilitate recruitment and survival of novel taxa. Where ecological linkages are not known, we show how to establish hypothetical links by synthesizing studies to assess the likelihood of impacts. We also consider how population models examine ecological linkages and guide management of ecological impacts. We show that by focusing on linkages to ecological impacts rather than the presence of debris and its sublethal impacts, we could reduce threats posed by debris. PMID:25904661

  17. Linking effects of anthropogenic debris to ecological impacts.

    PubMed

    Browne, Mark Anthony; Underwood, A J; Chapman, M G; Williams, Rob; Thompson, Richard C; van Franeker, Jan A

    2015-05-22

    Accelerated contamination of habitats with debris has caused increased effort to determine ecological impacts. Strikingly, most work on organisms focuses on sublethal responses to plastic debris. This is controversial because (i) researchers have ignored medical insights about the mechanisms that link effects of debris across lower levels of biological organization to disease and mortality, and (ii) debris is considered non-hazardous by policy-makers, possibly because individuals can be injured or removed from populations and assemblages without ecological impacts. We reviewed the mechanisms that link effects of debris across lower levels of biological organization to assemblages and populations. Using plastic, we show microplastics reduce the 'health', feeding, growth and survival of ecosystem engineers. Larger debris alters assemblages because fishing-gear and tyres kill animals and damage habitat-forming plants, and because floating bottles facilitate recruitment and survival of novel taxa. Where ecological linkages are not known, we show how to establish hypothetical links by synthesizing studies to assess the likelihood of impacts. We also consider how population models examine ecological linkages and guide management of ecological impacts. We show that by focusing on linkages to ecological impacts rather than the presence of debris and its sublethal impacts, we could reduce threats posed by debris.

  18. Space Debris & its Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, Sourabh; Arora, Nishant

    2012-07-01

    Space debris has become a growing concern in recent years, since collisions at orbital velocities can be highly damaging to functioning satellites and can also produce even more space debris in the process. Some spacecraft, like the International Space Station, are now armored to deal with this hazard but armor and mitigation measures can be prohibitively costly when trying to protect satellites or human spaceflight vehicles like the shuttle. This paper describes the current orbital debris environment, outline its main sources, and identify mitigation measures to reduce orbital debris growth by controlling these sources. We studied the literature on the topic Space Debris. We have proposed some methods to solve this problem of space debris. We have also highlighted the shortcomings of already proposed methods by space experts and we have proposed some modification in those methods. Some of them can be very effective in the process of mitigation of space debris, but some of them need some modification. Recently proposed methods by space experts are maneuver, shielding of space elevator with the foil, vaporizing or redirecting of space debris back to earth with the help of laser, use of aerogel as a protective layer, construction of large junkyards around international space station, use of electrodynamics tether & the latest method proposed is the use of nano satellites in the clearing of the space debris. Limitations of the already proposed methods are as follows: - Maneuvering can't be the final solution to our problem as it is the act of self-defence. - Shielding can't be done on the parts like solar panels and optical devices. - Vaporizing or redirecting of space debris can affect the human life on earth if it is not done in proper manner. - Aerogel has a threshold limit up to which it can bear (resist) the impact of collision. - Large junkyards can be effective only for large sized debris. In this paper we propose: A. The Use of Nano Tubes by creating a mesh

  19. Observations of Human-Made Debris in Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardia, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Orbital debris is defined as any human-made object in orbit about the Earth that no longer serves a useful purpose. Beginning in 1957 with the launch of Sputnik 1, there have been more than 4,700 launches, with each launch increasing the potential for impacts from orbital debris. Almost 55 years later there are over 16,000 catalogued objects in orbit over 10 cm in size. Agencies world-wide have realized this is a growing issue for all users of the space environment. To address the orbital debris issue, the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) was established to collaborate on monitoring, characterizing, and modeling orbital debris, as well as formulating policies and procedures to help control the risk of collisions and population growth. One area of fundamental interest is measurements of the space debris environment. NASA has been utilizing radar and optical measurements to survey the different orbital regimes of space debris for over 25 years, as well as using returned surfaces to aid in determining the flux and size of debris that are too small to detect with ground-based sensors. This paper will concentrate on the optical techniques used by NASA to observe the space debris environment, specifically in the Geosynchronous earth Orbit (GEO) region where radar capability is severely limited.

  20. Active Debris Removal and the Challenges for Environment Remediation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent modeling studies on the instability of the debris population in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 have underlined the need for active debris removal. A 2009 analysis by the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office shows that, in order to maintain the LEO debris population at a constant level for the next 200 years, an active debris removal of about five objects per year is needed. The targets identified for removal are those with the highest mass and collision probability products in the environment. Many of these objects are spent upper stages with masses ranging from 1 to more than 8 metric tons, residing in several altitude regions and concentrated in about 7 inclination bands. To remove five of those objects on a yearly basis, in a cost-effective manner, represents many challenges in technology development, engineering, and operations. This paper outlines the fundamental rationale for considering active debris removal and addresses the two possible objectives of the operations -- removing large debris to stabilize the environment and removing small debris to reduce the threat to operational spacecraft. Technological and engineering challenges associated with the two different objectives are also discussed.

  1. Space debris detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eather, Robert H.

    1992-12-01

    A feasibility study on the possibility of detecting less than or = 10 cm space debris using a large-aperture ground-based telescope (with an intensified CCD detector) was completed, showing that detection should be possible. A detector system was designed and built, and installed on the 2.54 m WRDC telescope at Wright Patterson AFB. Bad seeing conditions in the Dayton area prevented the expected debris detection. Subsequently, a small 40 cm telescope was built and operated from the Haystack Observatory (Groton, MA). Known objects were used to test pointing and acquisition procedures, and the system was then shipped to Rattlesnake Observatory (Richland, WA) for participation in the ODERAC's debris calibration experiment from the Space Shuttle. This experiment failed, and our instrument has been stored at Rattlesnake in anticipation of a new ODERAC's flight in late 1993.

  2. Design of Spacecraft Missions to Remove Multiple Orbital Debris Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Brent W.; Alfano, Salvatore; Pinon, Elfego; Gold, Kenn; Gaylor, David

    2012-01-01

    The amount of hazardous debris in Earth orbit has been increasing, posing an evergreater danger to space assets and human missions. In January of 2007, a Chinese ASAT test produced approximately 2600 pieces of orbital debris. In February of 2009, Iridium 33 collided with an inactive Russian satellite, yielding approximately 1300 pieces of debris. These recent disastrous events and the sheer size of the Earth orbiting population make clear the necessity of removing orbital debris. In fact, experts from both NASA and ESA have stated that 10 to 20 pieces of orbital debris need to be removed per year to stabilize the orbital debris environment. However, no spacecraft trajectories have yet been designed for removing multiple debris objects and the size of the debris population makes the design of such trajectories a daunting task. Designing an efficient spacecraft trajectory to rendezvous with each of a large number of orbital debris pieces is akin to the famous Traveling Salesman problem, an NP-complete combinatorial optimization problem in which a number of cities are to be visited in turn. The goal is to choose the order in which the cities are visited so as to minimize the total path distance traveled. In the case of orbital debris, the pieces of debris to be visited must be selected and ordered such that spacecraft propellant consumption is minimized or at least kept low enough to be feasible. Emergent Space Technologies, Inc. has developed specialized algorithms for designing efficient tour missions for near-Earth asteroids that may be applied to the design of efficient spacecraft missions capable of visiting large numbers of orbital debris pieces. The first step is to identify a list of high priority debris targets using the Analytical Graphics, Inc. SOCRATES website and then obtain their state information from Celestrak. The tour trajectory design algorithms will then be used to determine the itinerary of objects and v requirements. These results will shed light

  3. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  4. Applied Astronomy: An Optical Survey for Space Debris at GEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Barker, Edwin S.; Abercromby, K.; Rodriquez, H.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph is presented to discuss space debris at Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). The topics include: 1) Syncom1 launched February 14, 1963 Failed on orbit insertion 1st piece of GEO debris!; 2) Example of recent GEO payload: XM-2 Rock satellite for direct broadcast radio; 3) MODEST Michigan Orbital DEbrisSurvey Telescope the telescope formerly known as the Curtis-Schmidt; 4) GEO Debris Survey; 5) Examples of Detections; 6) Brightness Variations Common; 7) Observed Angular Rates; 8) Two Populations at GEO; 9) High Area-to-Mass Ratio Material (A/M); 10) Examples of MLI; 11) Examples of MLI Release in LEO; 12) Liou & Weaver (2005) models; 13) ESA 1-m Telescope Survey; 14) Two Telescopes March 2007 Survey and Follow-up; 15) Final Eccentricity; and 16) How control Space Debris?

  5. Space Debris Mitigation Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of national and international space debris mitigation guides is to promote the preservation of near-Earth space for applications and exploration missions far into the future. To accomplish this objective, the accumulation of objects, particularly in long-lived orbits, must be eliminated or curtailed.

  6. Space Debris and Space Safety - Looking Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailor, W.; Krag, H.

    Man's activities in space are creating a shell of space debris around planet Earth which provides a growing risk of collision with operating satellites and manned systems. Including both the larger tracked objects and the small, untracked debris, more than 98% of the estimated 600,000 objects larger than 1 cm currently in orbit are “space junk”--dead satellites, expended rocket stages, debris from normal operations, fragments from explosions and collisions, and other material. Recognizing the problem, space faring nations have joined together to develop three basic principles for minimizing the growth of the debris population: prevent on-orbit breakups, remove spacecraft and orbital stages that have reached the end of their mission operations from the useful densely populated orbit regions, and limit the objects released during normal operations. This paper provides an overview of what is being done to support these three principles and describes proposals that an active space traffic control service to warn satellite operators of pending collisions with large objects combined with a program to actively remove large objects may reduce the rate of future collisions. The paper notes that cost and cost effectiveness are important considerations that will affect the evolution of such systems.

  7. Value analysis for orbital debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Leonard; Mense, Allan

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents methods for deriving first order monetary benefits from removing individual debris objects in high value sun-synchronous orbits. These analyses are intended to serve as an economic metric by which competing debris removal methods can be evaluated. Orbital debris flux level estimates from NASA’s updated ORDEM2000 model are used to establish small debris population estimates. When combined with the replacement cost of satellites in sun-synchronous orbit, the present value of removing individual small (0.5 cm-2.0 cm) objects from orbit is derived. Large object removal value is more complicated due to the necessity of incorporating effects of impact fragmentation observed with any object about 10 cm or larger. Breakup models published by NASA (Johnson, N.L., Krisko, P.H., Liou, J.C., Anz-Meador, P.D. NASA’s new breakup model of evolve 4.0. Adv. Space Res. 28 (9), 1377-1384, 2001.) provide a basis for establishing fragmentation statistics. Assuming the current population of operational sun-synchronous satellites, removal value is then derived via present value analysis.

  8. Activities on space debris in U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2001-10-01

    In the U.S. space debris activities are addressed at all government levels, from the Executive Office of the President to the individual federal agencies to specialized centers, laboratories, organizations, and research groups. U.S. Space Policy specifically challenges government agencies to seek to minimize the creation of space debris and to promote debris minimization practices, both domestically and internationally. A set of space debris mitigation standard practices has been developed and adopted by relevant U.S. government agencies, and their application by the commercial aerospace community is highly encouraged. A growing number of U.S. government agencies have issued their own space debris mitigation policies, directives, regulations, and standards. Space debris research, including the definition and modeling of the current and future near-Earth space environment and the development of debris protection technologies, is principally conducted by NASA and the Department of Defense. The U.S. Space Surveillance Network continues to provide the most complete and timely characterization of the population of space debris larger than 10 cm. During the past several years major advancements have been achieved in extending this environment definition in LEO to include particles as small as only a few millimeters. The inspection of returned spacecraft surfaces continues to shed light on the even smaller debris population. With improvements in computer technology, new and more capable programs have been and are being developed to solve a number of operational and research problems. Finally, the academic and industrial sectors of the U.S. are also increasing their participation in and contributions to space debris operations and research. The cooperation of spacecraft and launch vehicle developers and operators is essential to the U.S. objective of promoting the preservation of the space environment for future generations.

  9. Activities on Space Debris in U.S.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2001-01-01

    In the U.S. space debris activities are addressed at all government levels, from the Executive Office of the President to the individual federal agencies to specialized centers, laboratories, organizations, and research groups. U.S. Space Policy specifically challenges government agencies to seek to minimize the creation of space debris and to promote debris minimization practices both domestically and internationally. A set of space debris mitigation standard practices has been developed and adopted by relevant US government agencies, and their application by the commercial aerospace community is highly encouraged. A growing number of US government agencies have issued their own space debris mitigation policies, directives, regulations, and standards. Space debris research, including the definition and modeling of the current and future near-Earth space environment and the development of debris protection technologies, is principally conducted by NASA and the Department of Defense. The U.S. Space Surveillance Network continues to provide the most complete and timely characterization of the population of space debris larger than 10 cm. During the past several years major advancements have been achieved in extending this environment definition in LEO to include particles as small as only a few millimeters. The inspection of returned spacecraft surfaces continues to shed light on the even smaller debris population. With improvements in computer technology, new and more capable programs have been and are being developed to solve a number of operational and research problems. Finally, the academic and industrial sectors of the U.S. are also increasing their participation in and contributions to space debris operations and research. The cooperation of satellite and launch vehicle developers and operators is essential to the U.S. objective of promoting the preservation of the space environment for future generations.

  10. Improvements to NASA's Debris Assessment Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opiela, J.; Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Debris Assessment Software (DAS) has been substantially revised and expanded. DAS is designed to assist NASA programs in performing orbital debris assessments, as described in NASA s Guidelines and Assessment Procedures for Limiting Orbital Debris. The extensive upgrade of DAS was undertaken to reflect changes in the debris mitigation guidelines, to incorporate recommendations from DAS users, and to take advantage of recent software capabilities for greater user utility. DAS 2.0 includes an updated environment model and enhanced orbital propagators and reentry-survivability models. The ORDEM96 debris environment model has been replaced by ORDEM2000 in DAS 2.0, which is also designed to accept anticipated revisions to the environment definition. Numerous upgrades have also been applied to the assessment of human casualty potential due to reentering debris. Routines derived from the Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool, Version 6 (ORSAT 6), determine which objects are assessed to survive reentry, and the resulting risk of human casualty is calculated directly based upon the orbital inclination and a future world population database. When evaluating reentry risks, the user may enter up to 200 unique hardware components for each launched object, in up to four nested levels. This last feature allows the software to more accurately model components that are exposed below the initial breakup altitude. The new DAS 2.0 provides an updated set of tools for users to assess their mission s compliance with the NASA Safety Standard and does so with a clear and easy-to-understand interface. The new native Microsoft Windows graphical user interface (GUI) is a vast improvement over the previous DOS-based interface. In the new version, functions are more-clearly laid out, and the GUI includes the standard Windows-style Help functions. The underlying routines within the DAS code are also improved.

  11. Space Surveillance, Asteroids and Comets, and Space Debris. Volume 3: Space Debris Summary Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    Kessler (“Collisional Cascading: The Limits of Population Growth in Low Earth Orbit,” Advances in Space Research , Vol. 11, No. 12, 1991), pp. 63–66... Advances in Space Research , Vol. 11, No. 12, 1991, pp. 63–66. Volume 3: Space Debris Summary Report Summary Report 5 attachment to this calculation

  12. Ecological half-time and effective dose from chernobyl debris and from nuclear weapons fallout of 137Cs as measured in different Swedish populations.

    PubMed

    Rääf, C L; Hubbard, L; Falk, R; Agren, G; Vesanen, R

    2006-05-01

    The fallout in Sweden of radiocesium from nuclear weapons tests during the 1960's (137Cs) and from the Chernobyl accident in 1986 (134Cs and 137Cs) has transferred to humans through different ecological pathways. Data from whole-body burden measurements of 134Cs, 137Cs, and 40K in various Swedish populations between 1964 and 2002 have been compiled. This database enables an evaluation of the temporal and geographical dependence of the transfer of radiocesium from ground deposition to humans and the associated absorbed dose. The body burdens of 137Cs gradually decrease after the peak values reached in 1965 from nuclear weapons fallout and in 1987 from the Chernobyl fallout, but at a varying rate depending on the population. Assuming a dual exponential decrease, a short-term component of typically 1-2 y and a long-term component of 5-10 y are found in urban populations in Sweden. Among reindeer herders and hunters the effective ecological half-time is mono-exponential with a half-time of 5-7 y. The estimated time-integrated effective dose to an individual during a period of 50 y from the Chernobyl fallout is, on average, approximately 10 mSv for reindeer herders, which is 10-100 times higher than the estimated dose received by urban populations in the three major Swedish urban areas (Malmö, Göteborg, and Stockholm).

  13. A modelling of ejecta as a space debris source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bariteau, Muriel; Mandeville, Jean-Claude

    2001-10-01

    When a micro-debris or a micrometeoroid impacts a spacecraft surface, secondary particles, called ejecta, are produced. These ejecta can contributes to a modification of the debris environment: either locally by the occurrence of secondary impacts on the components of complex and large space structures, or at great distances by the formation of a population of small orbital debris. This paper describes, firstly, the ejecta production, and secondly, their lifetime and orbit propagation. Then, the repartition of ejecta in LEO is given. Results describing the ejecta number as a function of size and altitude are presented.

  14. Final Report of the Haystack Orbital Debris Data Review Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, David K.; Brillinger, David; McDaniel, Patrick; Pollock, Kenneth H.; El-Shaarawi, A. H.; Tuley, Michael T.

    1998-01-01

    The Haystack Orbital Debris Data Review Panel was established in December 1996 to consider the adequacy of the data on orbital debris gathered over the past several years with the Haystack radar, and the accuracy of the methods used to estimate the flux vs. size relationship for this debris. The four specific issues addressed for the Panel were: 1. The number of observations relative to the estimated population of interest 2. The inherent ambiguity between the measured radar cross section (RCS) and the inferred physical size of the object 3. The inherent aspect angle limitation in viewing each object and its relationship to object geometry 4. The adequacy of the sample data set to characterize the debris population's potential geometry. Further discussion and interpretation of these issues, and identification of the detailed questions contributing to them, are discussed in this report.

  15. Volcanic debris flows in developing countries - The extreme need for public education and awareness of debris-flow hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; ,

    2003-01-01

    In many developing countries, volcanic debris flows pose a significant societal risk owing to the distribution of dense populations that commonly live on or near a volcano. At many volcanoes, modest volume (up to 500,000 m 3) debris flows are relatively common (multiple times per century) and typically flow at least 5 km along established drainages. Owing to typical debris-flow velocities there is little time for authorities to provide effective warning of the occurrence of a debris flow to populations within 10 km of a source area. Therefore, people living, working, or recreating along channels that drain volcanoes must learn to recognize potentially hazardous conditions, be aware of the extent of debris-flow hazard zones, and be prepared to evacuate to safer ground when hazardous conditions develop rather than await official warnings or intervention. Debris-flow-modeling and hazard-assessment studies must be augmented with public education programs that emphasize recognizing conditions favorable for triggering landslides and debris flows if effective hazard mitigation is to succeed. ?? 2003 Millpress,.

  16. STS-125 Orbital Debris

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-02

    JSC2010-E-054445 (2 July 2009) --- Members of the Orbital Debris Program Office and the Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility at JSC record images of impact craters and other surface data on the returned Wide Field and Planetary Camera (WFPC-2) of the Hubble Space Telescope. Inspection took place at the Goddard Space Flight Center during the summer of 2009. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  17. Debris - Onboard GT-10

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-07-18

    S66-46241 (18 July 1966) --- Debris on spacecraft window in picture taken from inside the Gemini-10 spacecraft. At this time Gemini-10 was docked with the Agena Target Docking Vehicle 5005. Taken with a modified 70mm Hasselblad camera, using Eastman Kodak, Ektachrome, MS (S.O. 217) color film. The Gemini-10 crew is astronaut John W. Young, command pilot, and Michael Collins, pilot. Photo credit: NASA

  18. Orbital debris issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, D. J.

    Orbital debris issues fall into three major topics: Environment Definition, Spacecraft Hazard, and Space Object Management. The major issue under Environment Definition is defining the debris flux for sizes smaller (10 cm in diameter) than those tracked by the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Sources for this size debris are fragmentation of larger objects, either by explosion or collision, and solid rocket motor products. Modeling of these sources can predict fluxes in low Earth orbit which are greater than the meteoroid environment. Techniques to measure the environment in the size interval between 1 mm and 10 cm are being developed, including the use of telescopes and radar both on the ground and in space. Some impact sensors designed to detect meteoroids may have detected solid rocket motor products. Once the environment is defined, it can be combined with hypervelocity impact data and damage criteria to evaluate the Spacecraft Hazard. Shielding may be required to obtain an acceptable damage level. Space Object Management includes techniques to control the environment and the desired policy to effectively minimize the hazard to spacecraft. One control technique - reducing the likelihood of future explosions in space - has already been implemented by NASA. The effectiveness of other techniques has yet to be evaluated.

  19. Autonomous space processor for orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar; Marine, Micky; Colvin, James; Crockett, Richard; Sword, Lee; Putz, Jennifer; Woelfle, Sheri

    1991-01-01

    The development of an Autonomous Space Processor for Orbital Debris (ASPOD) was the goal. The nature of this craft, which will process, in situ, orbital debris using resources available in low Earth orbit (LEO) is explained. The serious problem of orbital debris is briefly described and the nature of the large debris population is outlined. The focus was on the development of a versatile robotic manipulator to augment an existing robotic arm, the incorporation of remote operation of the robotic arms, and the formulation of optimal (time and energy) trajectory planning algorithms for coordinated robotic arms. The mechanical design of the new arm is described in detail. The work envelope is explained showing the flexibility of the new design. Several telemetry communication systems are described which will enable the remote operation of the robotic arms. The trajectory planning algorithms are fully developed for both the time optimal and energy optimal problems. The time optimal problem is solved using phase plane techniques while the energy optimal problem is solved using dynamic programming.

  20. Innovative and Cost Effective Remediation of Orbital Debris

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-25

    NASA) Orbital Debris Program Office prioritized the hazard posed by thousands of large objects in orbit as a function of object mass and collision...Earth orbit (LEO) and this value is expected to increase significantly in the next decades. 1 The resulting hazard to operational spacecraft could... debris population growth that would render certain altitudes too hazardous for satellite operations. NASA researchers also determined that the

  1. The motion of tethered tug-debris system with fuel residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanov, Vladimir S.; Yudintsev, Vadim V.

    2015-10-01

    Active debris removal using a space tug with a tether is one of the promising techniques to decrease the population of large non-functional satellites and orbital stages in near Earth orbits. Properties of debris should be taken into account in the development of the space tugs. In this paper we consider the motion of a debris objects with fuel residuals that can affect the safety of the debris transportation process. The equations of the attitude motion of the tug-debris system in a central gravitational field are derived. Stationary solutions of the equations are found. The system of linearized equations are introduced that can be used for short term analysis. The numerical simulation results are provided that show good accuracy of the linearized equations. Proposed equations can be used to analyze the attitude motion of the tug-debris system and to determine the conventional parameters for safe tethered transportation of space debris.

  2. External tank space debris considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfer, N.; Baillif, F.; Robinson, J.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital debris issues associated with maintaining a Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) on orbit are presented. The first issue is to ensure that the ET does not become a danger to other spacecraft by generating space debris, and the second is to protect the pressurized ET from penetration by space debris or meteoroids. Tests on shield designs for penetration resistance showed that when utilized with an adequate bumper, thermal protection system foam on the ET is effective in preventing penetration.

  3. DEBRIS FLOWS AND HYPERCONCENTRATED STREAMFLOWS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Gerald F.

    1986-01-01

    Examination of recent debris-flow and hyperconcentrated-streamflow events in the western United States reveals (1) the topographic, geologic, hydrologic, and vegetative conditions that affect initiation of debris flows and (2) the wide ranging climatic conditions that can trigger debris flows. Recognition of these physiographic and climatic conditions has aided development of preliminary methods for hazard evaluation. Recent developments in the application of electronic data gathering, transmitting, and processing systems shows potential for real-time hazard warning.

  4. Recent Developments in Space Debris Mitigation Policy and Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, emphasis has shifted from national efforts to control the space debris population to international ones. Here, too, great progress has been made, most notably by the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) and the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) of the United Nations. Today, a firm international consensus is rapidly building on the principal space debris mitigation measures. The IADC is an association of the space agencies of ten countries (China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Russia, Ukraine, the United Kingdom, and the United States) and the European Space Agency, representing 17 countries of which four (France, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom) are also full IADC members. At the 17th meeting of the IADC in October 1999, a new Action Item (AI 17.2) was adopted to develop a set of consensus space debris mitigation guidelines. The purpose of the activity was to identify the most valuable space debris mitigation measures and to reach an international agreement on common directives. The IADC Space Debris Mitigation Guidelines (www.iadc-online.org/index.cgi?item=docs_pub) were formally adopted in October 2002 during the Second World Space Congress in Houston, Texas. Two years later a companion document, entitled Support to the IADC Space Debris Mitigation Guidelines, was completed to provide background and clarification for the guidelines.

  5. Orbital debris hazard insights from spacecraft anomalies studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, Darren S.

    2016-09-01

    Since the dawning of the space age space operators have been tallying spacecraft anomalies and failures then using these insights to improve the space systems and operations. As space systems improved and their lifetimes increased, the anomaly and failure modes have multiplied. Primary triggers for space anomalies and failures include design issues, space environmental effects, and satellite operations. Attempts to correlate anomalies to the orbital debris environment have started as early as the mid-1990's. Early attempts showed tens of anomalies correlated well to altitudes where the cataloged debris population was the highest. However, due to the complexity of tracing debris impacts to mission anomalies, these analyses were found to be insufficient to prove causation. After the fragmentation of the Chinese Feng-Yun satellite in 2007, it was hypothesized that the nontrackable fragments causing anomalies in LEO would have increased significantly from this event. As a result, debris-induced anomalies should have gone up measurably in the vicinity of this breakup. Again, the analysis provided some subtle evidence of debris-induced anomalies but it was not convincing. The continued difficulty in linking debris flux to satellite anomalies and failures prompted the creation of a series of spacecraft anomalies and failure workshops to investigate the identified shortfalls. These gatherings have produced insights into why this process is not straightforward. Summaries of these studies and workshops are presented and observations made about how to create solutions for anomaly attribution, especially as it relates to debris-induced spacecraft anomalies and failures.

  6. Spacecraft Robustness to Orbital Debris: Guidelines & Recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, S.; Legloire, D.; Tromba, A.; Tholot, M.; Nold, O.

    2013-09-01

    The ever increasing number of orbital debris has already led the space community to implement guidelines and requirements for "cleaner" and "safer" space operations as non-debris generating missions and end of mission disposal in order to get preserved orbits rid of space junks. It is nowadays well-known that man-made orbital debris impacts are now a higher threat than natural micro-meteoroids and that recent events intentionally or accidentally generated so many new debris that may initiate a cascade chain effect known as "the Kessler Syndrome" potentially jeopardizing the useful orbits.The main recommendations on satellite design is to demonstrate an acceptable Probability of Non-Penetration (PNP) with regard to small population (<5cm) of MMOD (Micro-Meteoroids and Orbital Debris). Compliance implies to think about spacecraft robustness as redundancies, segregations and shielding devices (as implemented in crewed missions but in a more complex mass - cost - criticality trade- off). Consequently the need is non-only to demonstrate the PNP compliance requirement but also the PNF (probability of Non-Failure) per impact location on all parts of the vehicle and investigate the probabilities for the different fatal scenarios: loss of mission, loss of spacecraft (space environment critical) and spacecraft fragmentation (space environment catastrophic).The recent THALES experience known on ESA Sentinel-3, of increasing need of robustness has led the ALTRAN company to initiate an internal innovative working group on those topics which conclusions may be attractive for their prime manufacturer customers.The intention of this paper is to present a status of this study : * Regulations, requirements and tools available * Detailed FMECA studies dedicated specifically to the MMOD risks with the introduction of new of probability and criticality classification scales. * Examples of design risks assessment with regard to the specific MMOD impact risks. * Lessons learnt on

  7. Current Issues in Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    During the past two decades, great strides have been made in the international community regarding orbital debris mitigation. The majority of space-faring nations have reached a consensus on an initial set of orbital debris mitigation measures. Implementation of and compliance with the IADC and UN space debris mitigation guidelines should remain a high priority. Improvements of the IADC and UN space debris mitigation guidelines should continue as technical consensus permits. The remediation of the near-Earth space environment will require a significant and long-term undertaking.

  8. A search for debris disks in the Herschel-ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. A.; Smith, D. J. B.; Stevens, J. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Vidal Perez, E.; Marshall, J.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; White, G. J.; Leeuw, L.; Sibthorpe, B.; Baes, M.; González-Solares, E.; Scott, D.; Vieiria, J.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Bonfield, D. G.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Frayer, D.; Fritz, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Herranz, D.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Lagache, G.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Maddox, S.; Negrello, M.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E.; Rodighiero, G.; Samui, S.; Serjeant, S.; Temi, P.; Valtchanov, I.; Verma, A.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: We aim to demonstrate that the Herschel-ATLAS (H-ATLAS) is suitable for a blind and unbiased survey for debris disks by identifying candidate debris disks associated with main sequence stars in the initial science demonstration field of the survey. We show that H-ATLAS reveals a population of far-infrared/sub-mm sources that are associated with stars or star-like objects on the SDSS main-sequence locus. We validate our approach by comparing the properties of the most likely candidate disks to those of the known population. Methods: We use a photometric selection technique to identify main sequence stars in the SDSS DR7 catalogue and a Bayesian Likelihood Ratio method to identify H-ATLAS catalogue sources associated with these main sequence stars. Following this photometric selection we apply distance cuts to identify the most likely candidate debris disks and rule out the presence of contaminating galaxies using UKIDSS LAS K-band images. Results: We identify 78 H-ATLAS sources associated with SDSS point sources on the main-sequence locus, of which two are the most likely debris disk candidates: H-ATLAS J090315.8 and H-ATLAS J090240.2. We show that they are plausible candidates by comparing their properties to the known population of debris disks. Our initial results indicate that bright debris disks are rare, with only 2 candidates identified in a search sample of 851 stars. We also show that H-ATLAS can derive useful upper limits for debris disks associated with Hipparcos stars in the field and outline the future prospects for our debris disk search programme. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  9. Material Density Distribution of Small Debris in Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, P. H.; Xu, Y.-l.; Opiela, J. N.; Hill, N. M.; Matney, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Over 200 spacecraft and rocket body breakups in Earth orbit have populated that regime with debris fragments in the sub-micron through meter size range. Though the largest debris fragments can cause significant collisional damage to active (operational) spacecraft, these are few and trackable by radar. Fragments on the order of a millimeter to a centimeter in size are as yet untrackable. But this smaller debris can result in damage to critical spacecraft systems and, under the worst conditions, fragmenting collision events. Ongoing research at the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office on the sources of these small fragments has focused on the material components of spacecraft and rocket bodies and on breakup event morphology. This has led to fragment material density estimates, and also the beginnings of shape categorizations. To date the NASA Standard Breakup Model has not considered specific material density distinctions of small debris. The basis of small debris in that model is the fourth hypervelocity impact event of the Satellite Orbital Debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT) series. This test targeted a flight-ready, U.S. Transit navigation satellite with a solid aluminum sphere impactor. Results in this event yield characteristic length (size) and area-to-mass distributions of fragments smaller than 10 cm in the NASA model. Recent re-analysis of the SOCIT4 small fragment dataset highlighted the material-specific characteristics of metals and non-metals. Concurrent analysis of Space Shuttle in-situ impact data showed a high percentage of aluminum debris in shuttle orbit regions. Both analyses led to the definition of three main on-orbit debris material density categories -low density (< 2 g/cc), medium density (2 to 6 g/cc), and high density (> 6 g/cc). This report considers the above studies in an explicit extension of the NASA Standard Breakup Model where separate material densities for debris are generated and these debris fragments are propagated in

  10. Space Debris Hazard Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davison, Elmer H.; Winslow, Paul C., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The hazard to space vehicles from natural space debris has been explored. A survey of the available information pertinent to this problem is presented. The hope is that this presentation gives a coherent picture of the knowledge to date in terms of the topic covered. The conclusion reached is that a definite hazard exists but that it can only be poorly assessed on the basis of present information. The need for direct measurement of this hazard is obvious, and some of the problems involved in making these direct measurements have been explored.

  11. Microplastic debris in sandhoppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolini, A.; Ungherese, G.; Ciofini, M.; Lapucci, A.; Camaiti, M.

    2013-09-01

    Adults of the sandhopper Talitrus saltator were fed with dry fish food mixed with polyethylene microspheres (diameter 10-45 μm). Observations of homogenized guts revealed the presence of microspheres independently of their dimensions. The gut resident time (GRT) was recorded and most of the microspheres are expelled in 24 h. Microspheres are totally expelled in one week. Preliminary investigations did not show any consequence of microsphere ingestion on the survival capacity in the laboratory. FT-IR analyses carried out on faeces of freshly collected individuals revealed the presence of polyethylene and polypropylene. This confirms that microplastic debris could be swallowed by T. saltator in natural conditions.

  12. Monitoring the abundance of plastic debris in the marine environment

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Peter G.; Moore, Charles J.; van Franeker, Jan A.; Moloney, Coleen L.

    2009-01-01

    Plastic debris has significant environmental and economic impacts in marine systems. Monitoring is crucial to assess the efficacy of measures implemented to reduce the abundance of plastic debris, but it is complicated by large spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the amounts of plastic debris and by our limited understanding of the pathways followed by plastic debris and its long-term fate. To date, most monitoring has focused on beach surveys of stranded plastics and other litter. Infrequent surveys of the standing stock of litter on beaches provide crude estimates of debris types and abundance, but are biased by differential removal of litter items by beachcombing, cleanups and beach dynamics. Monitoring the accumulation of stranded debris provides an index of debris trends in adjacent waters, but is costly to undertake. At-sea sampling requires large sample sizes for statistical power to detect changes in abundance, given the high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Another approach is to monitor the impacts of plastics. Seabirds and other marine organisms that accumulate plastics in their stomachs offer a cost-effective way to monitor the abundance and composition of small plastic litter. Changes in entanglement rates are harder to interpret, as they are sensitive to changes in population sizes of affected species. Monitoring waste disposal on ships and plastic debris levels in rivers and storm-water runoff is useful because it identifies the main sources of plastic debris entering the sea and can direct mitigation efforts. Different monitoring approaches are required to answer different questions, but attempts should be made to standardize approaches internationally. PMID:19528052

  13. Monitoring the abundance of plastic debris in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Peter G; Moore, Charles J; van Franeker, Jan A; Moloney, Coleen L

    2009-07-27

    Plastic debris has significant environmental and economic impacts in marine systems. Monitoring is crucial to assess the efficacy of measures implemented to reduce the abundance of plastic debris, but it is complicated by large spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the amounts of plastic debris and by our limited understanding of the pathways followed by plastic debris and its long-term fate. To date, most monitoring has focused on beach surveys of stranded plastics and other litter. Infrequent surveys of the standing stock of litter on beaches provide crude estimates of debris types and abundance, but are biased by differential removal of litter items by beachcombing, cleanups and beach dynamics. Monitoring the accumulation of stranded debris provides an index of debris trends in adjacent waters, but is costly to undertake. At-sea sampling requires large sample sizes for statistical power to detect changes in abundance, given the high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Another approach is to monitor the impacts of plastics. Seabirds and other marine organisms that accumulate plastics in their stomachs offer a cost-effective way to monitor the abundance and composition of small plastic litter. Changes in entanglement rates are harder to interpret, as they are sensitive to changes in population sizes of affected species. Monitoring waste disposal on ships and plastic debris levels in rivers and storm-water runoff is useful because it identifies the main sources of plastic debris entering the sea and can direct mitigation efforts. Different monitoring approaches are required to answer different questions, but attempts should be made to standardize approaches internationally.

  14. CLEANSPACE 'Small Debris Removal By Laser Illumination And Complementary Technologies'

    SciTech Connect

    Esmiller, Bruno; Jacquelard, Christophe

    2011-11-10

    Studies show that the number of debris in Low Earth Orbit is exponentially growing despite future debris release mitigation measures considered. Especially, the already existing population of small and medium debris (between 1 cm and several dozens of cm) is today a concrete threat to operational satellites. A ground based laser solution which can remove at low expense and in a non-destructive way hazardous debris of decimetric size around selected space assets appears as one highly promising answer. This solution will be studied in the frame of CLEANSPACE project which is a part of the FP7 space theme. The overall CLEANSPACE objective is threefold: to propose an efficient and affordable global system architecture, to tackle safety regulation aspects, political implications and future collaborations, to develop affordable technological bricks and to establish roadmap for the development and the future implantation of a fully functional laser protection system. This paper will present the CLEANSPACE project.

  15. CLEANSPACE ``Small Debris Removal By Laser Illumination And Complementary Technologies''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmiller, Bruno; Jacquelard, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    Studies show that the number of debris in Low Earth Orbit is exponentially growing despite future debris release mitigation measures considered. Especially, the already existing population of small and medium debris (between 1 cm and several dozens of cm) is today a concrete threat to operational satellites. A ground based laser solution which can remove at low expense and in a non-destructive way hazardous debris of decimetric size around selected space assets appears as one highly promising answer. This solution will be studied in the frame of CLEANSPACE project which is a part of the FP7 space theme. The overall CLEANSPACE objective is threefold: to propose an efficient and affordable global system architecture, to tackle safety regulation aspects, political implications and future collaborations, to develop affordable technological bricks and to establish roadmap for the development and the future implantation of a fully functional laser protection system. This paper will present the CLEANSPACE project.

  16. Approaches to dealing with meteoroid and orbital debris protection on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs and discussion on approaches to dealing with meteoroid and orbital debris protection on the space station are presented. The National Space Policy of February, 1988, included the following: 'All sectors will seek to minimize the creation of space debris. Design and operations of space tests, experiments, and systems will strive to minimize or reduce accumulation of space debris consistent with mission requirements and cost effectiveness.' The policy also tasked the National Security Council, which established an Interagency Group, which in turn produced an Interagency Report. NASA and DoD tasks to establish a joint plan to determine techniques to measure the environment, and techniques to reduce the environment are addressed. Topics covered include: orbital debris environment, meteoroids, orbital debris population, cataloged earth satellite population, USSPACECOM cataloged objects, and orbital debris radar program.

  17. Debris Dispersion Model Using Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar; Bardina, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes web based simulation of Shuttle launch operations and debris dispersion. Java 3D graphics provides geometric and visual content with suitable mathematical model and behaviors of Shuttle launch. Because the model is so heterogeneous and interrelated with various factors, 3D graphics combined with physical models provides mechanisms to understand the complexity of launch and range operations. The main focus in the modeling and simulation covers orbital dynamics and range safety. Range safety areas include destruct limit lines, telemetry and tracking and population risk near range. If there is an explosion of Shuttle during launch, debris dispersion is explained. The shuttle launch and range operations in this paper are discussed based on the operations from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA.

  18. Space debris executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.; Judd, O.; Naka, R.F.

    1996-09-01

    Spacecraft, boosters, and fragments are potential hazards to space vehicles, and it is argued that collisions between them could produce a cascade that could preclude activity in LEO in 25 to 50 years. That has generated pressure for constraints on military space operations, so the AF SAB performed a study of technical aspects of the debris problem. The Study was independent of the efforts of the Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) as well as those of and NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), which is the principal advocate for cascades and constraints. Most work on space debris has been performed by AFSPC and JSC, so the Study was in part an assessment of their efforts, in which both have been cooperative. The Study identified the main disagreements and quantified their impacts. It resolved some issues and provided bounds for the rest. It treated radar and optical observations; launch, explosion, and decay rates; and the number and distribution of fragments from explosions and collisions. That made it possible to address hazard to manned spacecraft at low altitudes and the possibility of cascading at higher altitudes, both of which now appear less likely.

  19. Latest Pleistocene-Holocene debris flow activity, Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona; Implications for modern debris-flow hazards under a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youberg, Ann M.; Webb, Robert H.; Fenton, Cassandra R.; Pearthree, Philip A.

    2014-08-01

    Hazard mitigation for extreme events such as debris flows requires geologic mapping and chronologic information, particularly for alluvial fans near mountain fronts in the southwestern United States. In July 2006, five consecutive days of monsoonal storms caused hundreds of debris flows in southeastern Arizona, particularly in the southern Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson. Before 2006, no historical debris flows from the Santa Catalina Mountains reached the populated mountain front, although abundant evidence of prehistoric debris flows is present on downslope alluvial fans. We used a combination of surficial geologic mapping and 10Be exposure dating to produce a debris-flow history for Pima and Finger Rock Canyons. The largest debris flows, of latest Pleistocene to early Holocene age, covered much of the apices of alluvial fans formed at the mouths of these canyons and extended up to 3 km downslope. These debris-flow deposits were inset against higher and older alluvial surfaces with few debris-flow deposits of late Pleistocene age. The 10Be ages in this study have considerable scatter for surfaces believed to be of uniform age, indicating the dual possibilities of inheritance from previous cosmic-ray exposure, as well as the potential for composite deposits derived from numerous debris flows. We then used an empirical inundation model, LAHARZ, to assess probable magnitudes of the older debris flows to evaluate possible initiation mechanisms. In-channel and terrace storage within the canyons is not sufficient to generate volumes likely needed to produce the larger late Pleistocene to early Holocene debris-flow deposits. The abundance of latest Pleistocene and early Holocene deposits suggests that large debris flows were generated during the instability associated with climate and vegetation changes at the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. Under present watershed conditions with limited sediment supplies, modern debris-flow hazards are generally limited to

  20. Characterizing Longitude-Dependent Orbital Debris Congestion in the Geosynchronous Orbit Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul V.

    The geosynchronous orbit (GEO) is a unique commodity of the satellite industry that is becoming increasingly contaminated with orbital debris, but is heavily populated with high-value assets from the civil, commercial, and defense sectors. The GEO arena is home to hundreds of communications, data transmission, and intelligence satellites collectively insured for an estimated 18.3 billion USD. As the lack of natural cleansing mechanisms at the GEO altitude renders the lifetimes of GEO debris essentially infinite, conjunction and risk assessment must be performed to safeguard operational assets from debris collisions. In this thesis, longitude-dependent debris congestion is characterized by predicting the number of near-miss events per day for every longitude slot at GEO, using custom debris propagation tools and a torus intersection metric. Near-miss events with the present-day debris population are assigned risk levels based on GEO-relative position and speed, and this risk information is used to prioritize the population for debris removal target selection. Long-term projections of debris growth under nominal launch traffic, mitigation practices, and fragmentation events are also discussed, and latitudinal synchronization of the GEO debris population is explained via node variations arising from luni-solar gravity. In addition to characterizing localized debris congestion in the GEO ring, this thesis further investigates the conjunction risk to operational satellites or debris removal systems applying low-thrust propulsion to raise orbit altitude at end-of-life to a super-synchronous disposal orbit. Conjunction risks as a function of thrust level, miss distance, longitude, and semi-major axis are evaluated, and a guidance method for evading conjuncting debris with continuous thrust by means of a thrust heading change via single-shooting is developed.

  1. Eliminating Space Debris: Applied Technology and Policy Prescriptions, Fall 2007 - Project 07-02

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    C . Liou and titled “A Sensitivity Study of the Effectiveness of Active Debris Removal in LEO,” suggests that the orbital debris population can be... The Hazard Millions of tiny space debris particles orbit the earth today, some travelling ten times faster than a high-powered rifle bullet.29 30...40 40 Hanada, T, Y. Tsuruda, and J.- C . Liou . "New Satellite Impact

  2. Remote Sensing of Plastic Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaba, S. P.; Dierssen, H. M.

    2016-02-01

    Plastic debris is becoming a nuisance in the environment and as a result there has been a dire need to synoptically detect and quantify them in the ocean and on land. We investigate the possible utility of spectral information determined from hand held, airborne and satellite remote sensing tools in the detection and identification polymer source of plastic debris. Sampled debris will be compared to our derived spectral library of typical raw polymer sources found at sea and in household waste. Additional work will be to determine ways to estimate the abundance of plastic debris in target areas. Implications of successful remote detection, tracking and quantification of plastic debris will be towards validating field observations over large areas and at repeated time intervals both on land and at sea.

  3. The Challenge of Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Since the dawn of the Space Age more than 50 years ago, humans have been launching objects into the space environment faster than they have been removed by active means or natural decay. This has led to a proliferation of debris -- derelict satellites, discarded rocket upper stages, and pieces from satellite breakups -- in Earth orbit, especially in well-used orbital regimes. This talk will summarize the current knowledge of the debris environment and describe plans to address the challenges orbital debris raises for the future usability of near-Earth space. The talk will be structured around 4 categories: Measurements, Modeling, Shielding, and Mitigation. This will include discussions of the long-term prognosis of debris growth (i.e., the "Kessler Syndrome") as well as plans for active debris removal.

  4. Trends in marine debris along the U.S. Pacific Coast and Hawai'i 1998-2007.

    PubMed

    Ribic, Christine A; Sheavly, Seba B; Rugg, David J; Erdmann, Eric S

    2012-05-01

    We assessed amounts, composition, and trends of marine debris for the U.S. Pacific Coast and Hawai'i using National Marine Debris Monitoring Program data. Hawai'i had the highest debris loads; the North Pacific Coast region had the lowest debris loads. The Southern California Bight region had the highest land-based debris loads. Debris loads decreased over time for all source categories in all regions except for land-based and general-source loads in the North Pacific Coast region, which were unchanged. General-source debris comprised 30-40% of the items in all regions. Larger local populations were associated with higher land-based debris loads across regions; the effect declined at higher population levels. Upwelling affected deposition of ocean-based and general-source debris loads but not land-based loads along the Pacific Coast. LNSO decreased debris loads for both land-based and ocean-based debris but not general-source debris in Hawai'i, a more complex climate-ocean effect than had previously been found. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Trends in Marine Debris along the U.S. Pacific Coast and Hawai’i 1998-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ribic, Christine; Seba B. Sheavly,; Rugg, David J.; Erdmann, Eric S.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed amounts, composition, and trends of marine debris for the U.S. Pacific Coast and Hawai’i using National Marine Debris Monitoring Program data. Hawai’i had the highest debris loads; the North Pacific Coast region had the lowest debris loads. The Southern California Bight region had the highest land-based debris loads. Debris loads decreased over time for all source categories in all regions except for land-based and general-source loads in the North Pacific Coast region, which were unchanged. General-source debris comprised 30–40% of the items in all regions. Larger local populations were associated with higher land-based debris loads across regions; the effect declined at higher population levels. Upwelling affected deposition of ocean-based and general-source debris loads but not land-based loads along the Pacific Coast. LNSO decreased debris loads for both land-based and ocean-based debris but not general-source debris in Hawai’i, a more complex climate-ocean effect than had previously been found.

  6. Implementation of the hazardous debris rule

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, J.E.

    1993-01-05

    Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

  7. Evolution of gas in debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Quentin; Wyatt, Mark; Pringle, Jim

    2015-12-01

    A non negligible quantity of gas has been discovered in an increasing number of debris disc systems. ALMA high sensitivity and high resolution is changing our perception of the gaseous component of debris discs as CO is discovered in systems where it should be rapidly photodissociated. It implies that there is a replenishment mechanism and that the observed gas is secondary. Past missions such as Herschel probed the atomic part of the gas through O I and C II emission lines. Gas science in debris discs is still in its infancy, and these new observations raise a handful of questions concerning the mechanisms to create the gas and about its evolution in the planetary system when it is released. The latter question will be addressed in this talk as a self-consistent gas evolution scenario is proposed and is compared to observations for the peculiar case of β Pictoris.Our model proposes that carbon and oxygen within debris discs are created due to photodissociation of CO which is itself created from the debris disc dust (due to grain-grain collisions or photodesorption). The evolution of the carbon atoms is modelled as viscous spreading, with viscosity parameterised using an α model. The temperature, ionisation fraction and population levels of carbon are followed with a PDR model called Cloudy, which is coupled to the dynamical viscous α model. Only carbon gets ionised due to its lower ionisation potential than oxygen. The carbon gas disc can end up with a high ionisation fraction due to strong FUV radiation field. A high ionisation fraction means that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is very active, so that α is very high. Gas density profiles can be worked out for different input parameters such as the α value, the CO input rate, the location of the input and the incoming radiation field. Observability predictions can be made for future observations, and our model is tested on β Pictoris observations. This new gas evolution model fits the carbon and CO

  8. A Parametric Study on Using Active Debris Removal to Stabilize the Future LEO Debris Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent analyses of the instability of the orbital debris population in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 have reignited the interest in using active debris removal (ADR) to remediate the environment. There are; however, monumental technical, resources, operational, legal, and political challenges in making economically viable ADR a reality. Before a consensus on the need for ADR can be reached, a careful analysis of the effectiveness of ADR must be conducted. The goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of using ADR to preserve the future environment and to guide its implementation to maximize the benefit-cost ratio. This paper describes a comprehensive sensitivity study on using ADR to stabilize the future LEO debris environment. The NASA long-term, orbital debris evolutionary model, LEGEND, is used to quantify the effects of many key parameters. These parameters include (1) the starting epoch of ADR implementation, (2) various target selection criteria, (3) the benefits of collision avoidance maneuvers, (4) the consequence of targeting specific inclination or altitude regimes, (5) the consequence of targeting specific classes of vehicles, and (6) the timescale of removal. Additional analyses on the importance of postmission disposal and how future launches might affect the requirements to stabilize the environment are also included.

  9. A Parametric Study on Using Active Debris Removal to Stabilize the Future LEO Debris Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent analyses of the instability of the orbital debris population in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 have reignited the interest in using active debris removal (ADR) to remediate the environment. There are; however, monumental technical, resources, operational, legal, and political challenges in making economically viable ADR a reality. Before a consensus on the need for ADR can be reached, a careful analysis of the effectiveness of ADR must be conducted. The goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of using ADR to preserve the future environment and to guide its implementation to maximize the benefit-cost ratio. This paper describes a comprehensive sensitivity study on using ADR to stabilize the future LEO debris environment. The NASA long-term, orbital debris evolutionary model, LEGEND, is used to quantify the effects of many key parameters. These parameters include (1) the starting epoch of ADR implementation, (2) various target selection criteria, (3) the benefits of collision avoidance maneuvers, (4) the consequence of targeting specific inclination or altitude regimes, (5) the consequence of targeting specific classes of vehicles, and (6) the timescale of removal. Additional analyses on the importance of postmission disposal and how future launches might affect the requirements to stabilize the environment are also included.

  10. Environment Characterisation by Using Innovative Debris Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, W.; Barschke, M.; Romberg, O.

    The knowledge about small (> 100 µm) but abundant objects in space is low. To analyze the quantity of space debris and micrometeoroids in space, an innovative in-situ impact detection method has been developed at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Bremen, Germany. The Solar generator based Impact Detector, SOLID, uses solar panels for impact detection. Since solar panels provide large detection areas, this method allows the collection of large amounts of data. Such data enhances space debris and micrometeoroid population datasets and permits for related model validation. A ground verification of the detection method has been performed by Hypervelocity Impact (HVI) tests at Fraunhofeŕs Ernst-Mach-Institut (EMI), Freiburg, Germany. The objective of this investigation was to test the applicability of the developed method concerning in-situ detection of space debris and micrometeoroids. The achieved test results are in agreement with ESA developed damage equations and the functionality of the detector has clearly been demonstrated. This paper presents the already manufactured hardware planned for on orbit test on the Technische Universität Berlin's TechnoSat mission in early 2016. The expected impact frequencies at corresponding probabilities and uncertainties regarding object size estimation are also outlined.

  11. Improving satellite vulnerability assessment to untrackable orbital debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Nathan; Schaefer, Frank; Rudolph, Martin; Destefanis, Roberto; Grassi, Lilith

    2012-07-01

    The projected growth in the untrackable orbital debris population will place an increased emphasis on satellite vulnerability assessments during both design and mission operations. This study presents an enhanced method for assessing satellite vulnerability to untrackable orbital debris that expands on traditional practices. By looking beyond structural penetration of the spacecraft, the method predicts the survivability of individual components and the associated degradation of system functionality resulting from untrackable debris impacts. A new risk assessment tool, the Particle Impact Risk and Vulnerability Assessment Tool (PIRAT), has been developed based on this method and is also presented here. It interfaces with both the NASA ORDEM2000 and ESA MASTER-2009 debris models and has been validated against the benchmark test cases from the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC). This study concludes with an example vulnerability assessment using PIRAT for a generic Earth observation satellite in a Sun-synchronous low-Earth orbit. The results illustrate the additional insight provided by this method that can be used to improve the robustness of future satellite designs and mitigate the overall mission risk posed by untrackable orbital debris.

  12. Spatial patterns of plastic debris along Estuarine shorelines.

    PubMed

    Browne, Mark A; Galloway, Tamara S; Thompson, Richard C

    2010-05-01

    The human population generates vast quantities of waste material. Macro (>1 mm) and microscopic (<1 mm) fragments of plastic debris represent a substantial contamination problem. Here, we test hypotheses about the influence of wind and depositional regime on spatial patterns of micro- and macro-plastic debris within the Tamar Estuary, UK. Debris was identified to the type of polymer using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and categorized according to density. In terms of abundance, microplastic accounted for 65% of debris recorded and mainly comprised polyvinylchloride, polyester, and polyamide. Generally, there were greater quantities of plastic at downwind sites. For macroplastic, there were clear patterns of distribution for less dense items, while for microplastic debris, clear patterns were for denser material. Small particles of sediment and plastic are both likely to settle slowly from the water-column and are likely to be transported by the flow of water and be deposited in areas where the movements of water are slower. There was, however, no relationship between the abundance of microplastic and the proportion of clay in sediments from the strandline. These results illustrate how FT-IR spectroscopy can be used to identify the different types of plastic and in this case was used to indicate spatial patterns, demonstrating habitats that are downwind acting as potential sinks for the accumulation of debris.

  13. Active Space Debris Charging for Contactless Electrostatic Disposal Maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, H.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2013-08-01

    We assess the feasibility of removing large space debris from geosynchronous orbit (GEO) by means of a tug spacecraft that uses electrostatic forces to pull the debris without touching. The advantage of this method is that it can operate with a separation distance of multiple craft radii, thus reducing the risk of collision. Further, the debris does not have to be detumbled first to engage the re-orbit maneuver. The charging of the tug-debris system to high potentials is achieved by active charge transfer using a directed electron beam and an auxiliary ion bleeder. Our simple charging model takes into account the primary electron beam current, UV induced photoelectron emission, collection of plasma particles, secondary electron emission and the recapture of emitted particles. The results show that by active charging high potentials can be both achieved and maintained. The resulting mN level electrostatic force is sufficient for the safe re-orbiting of debris objects over an acceptable period of a few months. The capability of debris removal is becoming a pressing need as the increasing population of dysfunctional satellites poses a threat to the future of satellite operations at GEO.

  14. Debris disks: a theorist's view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivov, A. V.

    2007-08-01

    Debris disks are roughly solar system-sized, optically thin, gas-poor dust disks that encircle a notable fraction of main-sequence stars at ages ranging from about 10 Myr to several Gyr. They are thought to be continuously replenished by collisions between "exoasteroids" and activity of "exocomets", small bodies left over from the planet formation process. I will first outline main physical mechanisms operating in debris disks and compare them with other dusty systems: protoplanetary disks, dusty planetary rings, and classical Saturn's rings. I will then review basic methods and essential results of debris disks modeling, covering both steady-state and stochastic models of axisymmetric and structured disks.

  15. A Review of the Recent NASA Long-Term Orbital Debris Environment Projection and Active Debris Removal Modeling Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) developed a high fidelity debris evolutionary model, LEGEND (a LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris model), in 2004 to enhance its capability to better model the near-Earth environment. LEGEND can mimic the growth of the historical debris population and project it into the future based on user-defined scenarios. The first major LEGEND study concluded that even without any future launches, the LEO population would continue to increase due to mutual collisions among existing objects. In reality, the increase will be worse than this prediction because of ongoing satellite launches and unexpected major breakups. Even with a full implementation of the commonly-adopted mitigation measures, the LEO population growth is inevitable. To preserve the near-Earth environment for future generations, active debris removal (ADR) must be considered. A follow-up LEGEND ADR study was completed recently. The main results indicate that (1) the mass and collision probability of each object can be used to establish an effective removal selection criterion and (2) a removal rate of 5 objects per year is sufficient to stabilize the LEO environment. Due to the limitation of removal techniques, however, different target selection criteria (in size, altitude, inclination, etc.) may be more practical. A careful evaluation of the effectiveness of different proposed techniques must be carried out to maximize the long-term benefit to the environment.

  16. Herschel DEBRIS survey of debris discs around A stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thureau, N.

    2014-11-01

    The Herschel DEBRIS survey (Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre) brings a unique perspective to the study of debris discs around main-sequence A-type stars. We have observed a sample of 89 A-stars with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) on the Herschel space telescope at 100 and 160 μm. A statistical analysis of the data shows a lower debris disc rate than has previously been found. The drop is due in part to the fact that some excess sources were resolved as background objects by the superior angular resolution (a factor of 2.5) of PACS-100 relative to that of Spitzer (MIPS-70). We found a 3-σ detection rate of 23 myblue which is similar to the the detection rate around main-sequence F, G and K stars. Most of the debris discs were detected around the youngest and hottest stars in our sample. The incidence of discs in single and multiple systems was similar. The debris discs in multiple systems ware found either in tight binary systems (<1 AU) or wide ones (>100 AU). Debris discs in both tight and wide binary systems have physical properties that are statistically similar to those of discs around single stars. We did not detect any debris discs in binary systems with intermediate separation, in which the orbit and the debris disc would be on the same scale. One possible explanation is that discs in intermediate systems have evolved much faster owing to the disc-companion interactions and they are now undetectable.

  17. Modeling the transport and accumulation floating debris generated by the 11 March 2011 Tohoku tsunami.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Laurent C-M; Borrero, Jose C

    2013-01-15

    A global ocean circulation model is coupled to a particle-tracking model to simulate the transport of floating debris washed into the North Pacific Ocean by the Tohoku tsunami. A release scenario for the tsunami debris is based on coastal population and measured tsunami runup. Archived 2011/2012 hindcast current data is used to model the transport of debris since the tsunami, while data from 2008 to 2012 is used to investigate the distribution of debris on timescales up to 4years. The vast amount of debris pushed into ocean likely represents thousands of years worth of 'normal' litter flux from Japan's urbanized coastline. This is important since a significant fraction of the debris will be comprised of plastics, some of which will degrade into tiny particles and be consumed by marine organisms, thereby allowing adsorbed organic pollutants to enter our food supply in quantities much higher than present. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Ghosts of Galaxies: Tidal Debris and the Formation of Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Michael

    2004-07-01

    Intergalactic stellar populations and tidal debris are now recognized as important components of galaxy clusters. This project examines the interrelated processes of galaxy destruction, recycling of tidal debris, and creation of dwarf galaxies and intergalactic star clusters, all of which are part of the grand scheme of cluster formation. We propose deep multicolor imaging of two examples of newly created tidal debris, the spectacular plumes in the Centaurus and Coma clusters. The Centaurus observations will extend our earlier work, which demonstrated the existence of tidal debris dwarf galaxies and star cluster in the body of the Centaurus plume. Deep ACS/WFC observations can determine rough ages and cluster membership, better characterizing the new debris. The Coma observations will reproduce this work for a second plume feature, in the quintessential rich cluster of galaxies. Parallel WFPC2 observations will investigate the central intracluster spaces at the bottom of the each cluster's potential, where older debris is thickest.

  19. 44 CFR 206.224 - Debris removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Debris removal. 206.224... Debris removal. (a) Public interest. Upon determination that debris removal is in the public interest, the Regional Administrator may provide assistance for the removal of debris and wreckage from publicly...

  20. 44 CFR 206.224 - Debris removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Debris removal. 206.224... Debris removal. (a) Public interest. Upon determination that debris removal is in the public interest, the Regional Administrator may provide assistance for the removal of debris and wreckage from publicly...

  1. 44 CFR 206.224 - Debris removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Debris removal. 206.224... Debris removal. (a) Public interest. Upon determination that debris removal is in the public interest, the Regional Administrator may provide assistance for the removal of debris and wreckage from publicly...

  2. 44 CFR 206.224 - Debris removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Debris removal. 206.224... Debris removal. (a) Public interest. Upon determination that debris removal is in the public interest, the Regional Administrator may provide assistance for the removal of debris and wreckage from publicly...

  3. Ground-Based Observing Campaign of Briz-M Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lederer, S. M.; Buckalew, B.; Frith, J.; Cowardin, H. M.; Hickson, P.; Matney, M.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2017-01-01

    the 3.8m UKIRT telescope has also allowed for investigating this break-up in the near-infrared at wavelengths where debris is often much more reflective, allowing for the potential detection of a smaller population of these debris. In addition, a suite of near-IR reflectance spectroscopy (0.8-2.5 micrometers) and thermal-IR (8-15 micrometers) of individual in-tact and debris Briz-M objects has been collected. Analysis of the survey data will be discussed.

  4. Debris flow hazards and risks on Cheekye Fan, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, M.

    2009-04-01

    Natural hazard and risk assessments hinge fundamentally on a detailed understanding of the relationship between frequency and magnitude of the hazardous process under investigation. When information is sought from the deep past (i.e. several thousand years), continuous event records do not exist and the researcher has to rely on proxy data to develop the F-M model. Such work is often prohibitively expensive and few well researched examples for mass movement are available worldwide. Cheekye fan is a desirable location for land development and has a depth and breadth of previous research unprecedented on any debris flow fan in Canada. We pursued two principal strains of research to formulate a reliable frequency-magnitude relationship. The first focuses on stratigraphic analyses combined with radiometric dating and dendrochronology to reconstruct a comprehensive picture of Holocene debris flow activity. The second approach examines hydrological limitations of rock avalanche evolution into debris flows through either entrainment of saturated sediments or by failure of a landslide-generated dam and upstream impoundment. We thus hypothesize that debris flows from Cheekye River can be separated into two quasi homogenous populations: those that are typically triggered by relatively small debris avalanches, slumps or rock falls or simply by progressive bulking of in-stream erodible sediments; and those that are thought to result from transformation of rock avalanches. Our work suggests that debris flows exceeding some 3 million cubic metres in volume are unlikely to reach Cheekye fan due to limited water available to fully fluidize a rock avalanche. This analysis has also demonstrated that in order to arrive at reasonable estimates for the frequency and magnitude of debris flows on a complex alluvial fan, significant multidisciplinary efforts are required. As a second step in the analysis, we model the design debris flow using a two-dimensional debris flow runout model

  5. Effects of basal debris on glacier flow.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Neal R; Cohen, Denis; Hooyer, Thomas S; Fischer, Urs H; Jackson, Miriam; Moore, Peter L; Lappegard, Gaute; Kohler, Jack

    2003-07-04

    Glacier movement is resisted partially by debris, either within glaciers or under glaciers in water-saturated layers. In experiments beneath a thick, sliding glacier, ice containing 2 to 11% debris exerted shear traction of 60 to 200 kilopascals on a smooth rock bed, comparable to the total shear traction beneath glaciers and contrary to the usual assumption that debris-bed friction is negligible. Imposed pore-water pressure that was 60 to 100% of the normal stress in a subglacial debris layer reduced shear traction on the debris sufficiently to halt its deformation and cause slip of ice over the debris. Slip resistance was thus less than debris shearing resistance.

  6. Unravelling the evolution and avulsion mechanisms of debris-flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haas, Tjalling; Densmore, Alex; Stoffel, Markus; Ballesteros-Cánovas, Juan; Suwa, Hiroshi; Imaizumi, Fumitoshi; Wasklewicz, Thad

    2017-04-01

    Debris flows are water-laden masses of soil and fragmented rock that rush down mountainsides and spill out onto valley floors and alluvial fans, where they can devastate people and property. Expansion of human population into mountainous regions and the effects of global warming have increased the hazardous effects of debris flows over the last decades. Debris-flow channel avulsions (channel shifts) are critical to debris-flow fan evolution and hazard mitigation, because avulsions distribute debris flows and associated hazards through space and time. However, both the long-term evolution of debris-flow fans and their avulsion process are poorly understood. We aim to unravel the spatio-temporal patterns of debris-flow fan evolution and their avulsion mechanisms and tendency. Here we present a combined analysis of laboratory experiments; field data (repeat topographic analyses and dendrogeomorphological and lichenometrical reconstructions from debris-flow fans in Japan, USA, Switserland and France) and numerical modelling, identifying the main drivers of avulsion on debris-flow fans and their associated spatio-temporal evolution. We show that there are two main processes driving avulsions on debris-flow fans operating at two distinct timescales. (1) Channel plugs locally block channels forcing subsequent flows to avulse and follow alternative flow paths. The frequent but stochastic nature of channel-plug formation leads to a partly unpredictable avulsion and spatial depositional patterns on timescales of a few events. (2) Nevertheless, over timescales of tens of events the average locus of debris-flow deposition is observed to gradually shift towards the topographically lower parts of a fan, highlighting the importance of topographic compensation in the avulsion process on debris-flow fans. We further show that the magnitude-frequency distribution of the debris flows feeding a fan strongly affects the spatio-temporal patterns of deposition. Our results have strong

  7. DIAGNOSING CIRCUMSTELLAR DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    2010-08-20

    A numerical model of a circumstellar debris disk is developed and applied to observations of the circumstellar dust orbiting {beta} Pictoris. The model accounts for the rates at which dust is produced by collisions among unseen planetesimals, and the rate at which dust grains are destroyed due to collisions. The model also accounts for the effects of radiation pressure, which is the dominant perturbation on the disk's smaller but abundant dust grains. Solving the resulting system of rate equations then provides the dust abundances versus grain size and dust abundances over time. Those solutions also provide the dust grains' collisional lifetime versus grain size, and the debris disk's optical depth and surface brightness versus distance from the star. Comparison to observations then yields estimates of the unseen planetesimal disk's radius, and the rate at which the disk sheds mass due to planetesimal grinding. The model can also be used to measure or else constrain the dust grain's physical and optical properties, such as the dust grains' strength, their light-scattering asymmetry parameter, and the grains' efficiency of light scattering Q{sub s}. The model is then applied to optical observations of the edge-on dust disk orbiting {beta} Pictoris, and good agreement is achieved when the unseen planetesimal disk is broad, with 75 {approx}< r {approx}< 150 AU. If it is assumed that the dust grains are bright like Saturn's icy rings (Q{sub s} = 0.7), then the cross section of dust in the disk is A{sub d} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 20} km{sup 2} and its mass is M{sub d} {approx_equal} 11 lunar masses. In this case, the planetesimal disk's dust-production rate is quite heavy, M-dot {sub d{approx}}9 M {sub +} Myr{sup -1}, implying that there is or was a substantial amount of planetesimal mass there, at least 110 Earth masses. If the dust grains are darker than assumed, then the planetesimal disk's mass-loss rate and its total mass are heavier. In fact, the apparent dearth

  8. Imaging Debris Disks with CCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, John M.; Bryden, G.; Matthews, B. C.; Isella, A.; Ricci, L.; Swift, J.

    2013-01-01

    Debris disks are sustained by the collisional grinding of planetesimals down to micron-sized particles. The mechanisms by which the planetesimals are perturbed include stirring by planetary mass bodies, which interact gravitationally to sculpt the disk by scattering dust particles out of the disk, and capturing dust in mean motion resonances as particles drift inwards from Poynting-Robertson drag or as planets migrate. Thus the location of the debris dust can trace where planetesimals have formed, as well as the dynamical history of the disk. With high angular resolution and high sensitivity at submillimeter wavelengths, CCAT will be a powerful telescope to discover and image the structure of debris disks around nearby stars. This poster will describe various surveys that CCAT will conduct to search for new debris disks.

  9. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  10. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  11. Costs and benefits of space debris mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neish, Michael J.; Goka, Tateo

    2001-10-01

    We have conducted a series of simulations of several low-Earth orbit (LEO) missions to examine the cost effect of a growing debris population for several different mitigation scenarios. By comparing the best and worst of these, we find that it is cost-effective to raise mission costs by about 1-1.5% now, and still save money by reducing mission costs in the long run. This compares with 3-4% according to an earlier estimate by Greenberg and Reynolds. We have also made a simple calculation of the cost of end of life (EOL) orbit-raising of geostationary (GEO) satellites.

  12. Hydraulic System Wear Debris Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-03

    drawn. Each one-=L sample was drawn with a clean plastic pipette of one-mL capacity. The samples were placed in clean Ferrogram preparation bottles ...and from cavities in a block which held linear seals into sampling bottles . Several photographs of this debris , which was deposited on Ferro- grams...silicon in the glass overshadowed the elements of the wear debris . To overcome this difficulty, the Ferrogram should be pre- pared on a carbon-filled

  13. DebriSat Laboratory Analyses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    thomas.huynh@us.af.mil Jesse Edwards SMC/ENC jesse.edwards.4@us.af.mil J.-C. Liou NASA-JSC jer -chyi.l iou-1 @nasa.gov John Opiela NASA-JSC...DebriSat Team Members: J.-C. Liou : NASA Space Debris Program Office, NASA JSC AEDC Range G Light Gas Gun Staff Charles Griffice: Aerospace Marlon

  14. Backwater development by woody debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geertsema, Tjitske; Torfs, Paul; Teuling, Ryan; Hoitink, Ton

    2017-04-01

    Placement of woody debris is a common method for increasing ecological values in river and stream restoration, and is thus widely used in natural environments. Water managers, however, are afraid to introduce wood in channels draining agricultural and urban areas. Upstream, it may create backwater, depending on hydrodynamic characteristics including the obstruction ratio, the Froude number and the surface level gradient. Patches of wood may trigger or counter morphological activity, both laterally, through bank erosion and protection, and vertically, with pool and riffle formation. Also, a permeable construction composed of wood will weather over time. Both morphodynamic activity and weathering cause backwater effects to change in time. The purpose of this study is to quantify the time development of backwater effects caused by woody debris. Hourly water levels gauged upstream and downstream of patches and discharge are collected for five streams in the Netherlands. The water level drop over the woody debris patch relates to discharge in the streams. This relation is characterized by an increasing water level difference for an increasing discharge, up to a maximum. If the discharge increases beyond this level, the water level difference reduces to the value that may represent the situation without woody debris. This reduction depends primarily on the obstruction ratio of the woody debris in the channel cross-section. Morphologic adjustments in the stream and reorientation of the woody material reduce the water level drop over the patches in time. Our results demonstrate that backwater effects can be reduced by optimizing the location where woody debris is placed and manipulating the obstruction ratio. Current efforts are focussed on representing woody debris in a one-dimensional numerical model, aiming to obtain a generic tool to achieve a stream design with woody debris that minimizes backwater.

  15. Debris flows susceptibility mapping under tropical rain conditions in Rwanda.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nduwayezu, Emmanuel; Nsengiyumva, Jean-Baptiste; BUgnon, Pierre-Charles; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Derron, Marc-Henri

    2017-04-01

    Rwanda is a densely populated country. It means that all the space is exploited, including sometimes areas with very steep slopes. This has as for consequences that during the rainy season slopes with human activities are affected by gravitational processes, mostly debris and mud flows and shallow landslides. The events of early May 2016 (May 8 and 9), with more than 50 deaths, are an illustration of these frequents landslides and inundations. The goal of this work is to produce a susceptibility map for debris/mud flows at regional/national scale. Main available pieces of data are a national digital terrain model at 10m resolution, bedrock and soil maps, and information collected during field visits on some specific localities. The first step is the characterization of the slope angle distribution for the different types of bedrock or soils (decomposition in Gaussian populations). Then, the combination of this information with other geomorphic and hydrologic parameters is used to define potential source areas of debris flows. Finally, propagation maps of debris flows are produced using FLOW-R (Horton et al. 2013). Horton, P., Jaboyedoff, M., Rudaz, B., and Zimmermann, M.: Flow-R, a model for susceptibility mapping of debris flows and other gravitational hazards at a regional scale, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 869-885, doi:10.5194/nhess-13-869-2013, 2013. The paper is in open access.

  16. Space Debris Birth to Death Analysis from Concern to Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkleman, D.; Alfano, S.; Johnson, T.; Kelso, T.; Vallado, D.; Oltrogge, D.

    We present the space debris operational process in the context of real circumstances that would have required early assessment, prompt warning, and responsive mitigations. We have applied several widely used collision and explosion models to the prompt debris environment, short term moderation of the debris cloud through reentry, mid-term assessment of conjunctions with operational satellites, and identification of the long term persistent aftermath. We provide distributions of fragment sizes, masses, and radar cross sections which we use to identify the trackable population and the remaining population which is either imperceptible to space surveillance radars. We examine predicted conjunctions between FY1C Debris (Catalog 31473)/Meteor 2-2, FY1C Debris (31379)/Meteor 2-12, and ISIS-2/Cosmos 2271. These illustrate early assessment of collision probability and consequences, triage among high probability conjunctions to conduct additional analysis judiciously, and the consequences of collisions between objects of disparate masses. We highlight deficiencies in essential analytical tools and databases. We offer guidance for further investigation and seek better capabilities to serve this important need.

  17. Decision time on orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, Joseph P.; Tilton, Lee E.; Temple, L. Parker, III

    1988-01-01

    The problem of orbital debris, especially in LEO is discussed, stressing ways to minimize hazards caused by debris. There are over 7,000 objects making up 2.4 X 10 to the 6th kg of debris in LEO with velocities up to 7 km/sec. The least costly way of minimizing hazards from debris is to make spent rocket stages inert, to preclude failures after their useful life, by insuring that all residual propellants and pressurant gases are vented while the stage is still subject to command. A more costly option is the actively controlled deorbit of spent stages and spacecraft at the end of their useful mission life. The removal of inert stages or spacecraft is too costly to be practical. The least expensive methods of removal are deorbit for altitudes below 25,000 km and placing the object in earth-escape trajectory for objects at higher altitudes. NASA is developing a special radar to measure the existing small-particle debris and its changes over time, and international agreements are expected to set standards of operational practices to minimize debris.

  18. Debris flow hazard mapping, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazengarb, Colin; Rigby, Ted; Stevenson, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Our mapping on the many dolerite capped mountains in Tasmania indicates that debris flows are a significant geomorphic process operating there. Hobart, the largest city in the State, lies at the foot of one of these mountains and our work is focussed on identifying areas that are susceptible to these events and estimating hazard in the valley systems where residential developments have been established. Geomorphic mapping with the benefit of recent LiDAR and GIS enabled stereo-imagery has allowed us to add to and refine a landslide inventory in our study area. In addition, a dominant geomorphic model has been recognised involving headward gully retreat in colluvial materials associated with rainstorms explains why many past events have occurred and where they may occur in future. In this paper we will review the landslide inventory including a large event (~200 000m3) in 1872 that affected a lightly populated area but since heavily urbanised. From this inventory we have attempted volume-mobility relationships, magnitude-frequency curves and likelihood estimates. The estimation of volume has been challenging to determine given that the area of depletion for each debris flow feature is typically difficult to distinguish from the total affected area. However, where LiDAR data exists, this uncertainty is substantially reduced and we develop width-length relationships (area of depletion) and area-volume relationships to estimate volume for the whole dataset exceeding 300 features. The volume-mobility relationship determined is comparable to international studies and in the absence of reliable eye-witness accounts, suggests that most of the features can be explained as single event debris flows, without requiring more complex mechanisms (such as those that form temporary debris dams that subsequently fail) as proposed by others previously. Likelihood estimates have also been challenging to derive given that almost all of the events have not been witnessed, some are

  19. The physics of debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in theory and experimentation motivate a thorough reassessment of the physics of debris flows. Analyses of flows of dry, granular solids and solid-fluid mixtures provide a foundation for a comprehensive debris flow theory, and experiments provide data that reveal the strengths and limitations of theoretical models. Both debris flow materials and dry granular materials can sustain shear stresses while remaining static; both can deform in a slow, tranquil mode characterized by enduring, frictional grain contacts; and both can flow in a more rapid, agitated mode characterized by brief, inelastic grain collisions. In debris flows, however, pore fluid that is highly viscous and nearly incompressible, composed of water with suspended silt and clay, can strongly mediate intergranular friction and collisions. Grain friction, grain collisions, and viscous fluid flow may transfer significant momentum simultaneously. Both the vibrational kinetic energy of solid grains (measured by a quantity termed the granular temperature) and the pressure of the intervening pore fluid facilitate motion of grains past one another, thereby enhancing debris flow mobility. Granular temperature arises from conversion of flow translational energy to grain vibrational energy, a process that depends on shear rates, grain properties, boundary conditions, and the ambient fluid viscosity and pressure. Pore fluid pressures that exceed static equilibrium pressures result from local or global debris contraction. Like larger, natural debris flows, experimental debris flows of ???10 m3 of poorly sorted, water-saturated sediment invariably move as an unsteady surge or series of surges. Measurements at the base of experimental flows show that coarse-grained surge fronts have little or no pore fluid pressure. In contrast, finer-grained, thoroughly saturated debris behind surge fronts is nearly liquefied by high pore pressure, which persists owing to the great compressibility and moderate

  20. A quantification of the standing stock of macro-debris in Majuro lagoon and its effect on hard coral communities.

    PubMed

    Richards, Zoe T; Beger, Maria

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of debris is an insidious problem throughout the world's oceans. Here we document 234.24 items of macro-debris/km2 in the shallow populated parts of Majuro lagoon (Republic of the Marshall Islands) which is the second highest standing stock of macro-debris recorded to date in any benthic marine habitat in the world. The majority of macro-debris was from household sources (78.7%) with the peak abundance recorded in areas of medium affluence. Marine debris causes suffocation, shading, tissue abrasion and mortality of corals and we show a significant negative correlation exists between the level of hard coral cover and coverage of marine debris. Given long decomposition times, even if the input of rubbish to Majuro lagoon is stopped immediately, the standing stock of debris will persist for centuries. Multiple new initiatives are needed to curtail the direct and indirect dumping of waste in Majuro lagoon.

  1. An efficient algorithm for orbital evolution of space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aziz, Y.; Abd El-Salam, F.

    More than four decades of space exploration have led to accumulation of significant quantities of debris around the Earth. These objects range in size from a tiny piece of junk to a large inoperable satellite, although these objects that have small size they have high are-to-mass ratios, and consequently their orbits are strongly influenced by solar radiation pressure and atmospheric drag. So the increasing population of space debris object in the LEO, MEO and GEO present growing with time, serious hazard for the survival of operating spacecrafts, particularly satellites and astronomical observatories. Since the average collision velocity between any spacecraft orbiting in the LOE and debris objects is about 10 km/s and about 3 km/s in the GEO. Space debris may significantly disturb any satellite operations or cause catastrophic damage to a spacecraft itself. Applying different shielding techniques spacecraft my be protected against impacts of space debris with diameters smaller than 1 cm. For larger debris objects, only one effective method to avoid catastrophic consequence of collision is a manoeuvre that will change the spacecraft orbit. The necessary conditions in this case is to evaluate and predict future positions of the spacecraft and space debris with sufficient accuray. Numerical integration of equations of motion are used until now. Existing analytical methods can solve this problem only with low accuracy. Difficulties are caused mainly by the lack of satisfying analytical solution of the resonance problem for geosynchronous orbit as well as from the lack of efficient analytical theory combining luni-solar perturbation and solar radiation pressure with geopotential attraction. Numerical integration is time consuming in some cases, and then for qualitative analysis of the satellite's and debris's motion it is necessary to apply analytical solution. This is the reason for searching for an accurate model to evaluate the orbital position of the operating

  2. Current and Near-Term Future Measurements of the Orbital Debris Environment at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, Gene; Liou, J.-C.; Mulrooney, M.; Horstman, M

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office places great emphasis on obtaining and understanding direct measurements of the orbital debris environment. The Orbital Debris Program Office's environmental models are all based on these measurements. Because OD measurements must cover a very wide range of sizes and altitudes, one technique realistically cannot be used for all measurements. In general, radar measurements have been used for lower altitudes and optical measurements for higher altitude orbits. For very small debris, in situ measurements such as returned spacecraft surfaces are utilized. In addition to receiving information from large debris (> 5-10 cm diameter) from the U.S. Space Surveillance Network, NASA conducts statistical measurements of the debris population for smaller sizes. NASA collects data from the Haystack and Goldstone radars for debris in low Earth orbit as small as 2- 4 mm diameter and from the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope for debris near geosynchronous orbit altitude for sizes as small as 30-60 cm diameter. NASA is also currently examining the radiator panel of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 which was exposed to space for 16 years and was recently returned to Earth during the STS- 125 Space Shuttle mission. This paper will give an overview of these on-going measurement programs at NASA as well as discuss progress and plans for new instruments and techniques in the near future.

  3. Probability of collision during the early evolution of debris clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkin, Alan B.

    1996-02-01

    It has been a common practice in the literature to use the kinetic theory of gases, in order to obtain an estimate of the probability of collision posed to an orbital asset by the background debris population. This has been advantageous, because it features the use of the Poisson distribution to model encounters between an asset and background objects. This model yields a very simple method for computing probability of collision. It is fairly accurate in earth orbital studies over periods of several years in certain orbital regimes. It also has been the practice to use the Poisson model for debris clouds while they still are in their early evolutionary phase. However, newly formed debris clouds resulting from orbital fragmentations are characterized by fragments with relative motion that is highly correlated by the central gravitational field, thereby eliminating any resemblance to a gas. While the use of the Poisson model in this context has been criticized, it generally has been used anyway due to the lack of a well-known and accepted alternative model. A precise probabilistic assessment generally involves Monte Carlo analysis. This method is effective but often is computationally burdensome. By making some simple assumptions that hold in the vast majority of scenarios, it is shown that collision hazard for short-term debris cloud evolution can in fact be described by a Poisson model. These assumptions concern the way in which a fragmentation process is modeled and the orbital geometry between assets and a debris cloud. The derivation of this result is quite different from that used in kinetic gas theory but is nonetheless a direct application of standard probability theory. The ramification for short term debris cloud modeling is a theoretical substantiation of formulations in software like program DEBRIS. The purpose of this paper is to present the derivation and substantiation of this result.

  4. Biological response to prosthetic debris

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Diana; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty had revolutionized the outcome of orthopaedic surgery. Extensive and collaborative work of many innovator surgeons had led to the development of durable bearing surfaces, yet no single material is considered absolutely perfect. Generation of wear debris from any part of the prosthesis is unavoidable. Implant loosening secondary to osteolysis is the most common mode of failure of arthroplasty. Osteolysis is the resultant of complex contribution of the generated wear debris and the mechanical instability of the prosthetic components. Roughly speaking, all orthopedic biomaterials may induce a universal biologic host response to generated wear débris with little specific characteristics for each material; but some debris has been shown to be more cytotoxic than others. Prosthetic wear debris induces an extensive biological cascade of adverse cellular responses, where macrophages are the main cellular type involved in this hostile inflammatory process. Macrophages cause osteolysis indirectly by releasing numerous chemotactic inflammatory mediators, and directly by resorbing bone with their membrane microstructures. The bio-reactivity of wear particles depends on two major elements: particle characteristics (size, concentration and composition) and host characteristics. While any particle type may enhance hostile cellular reaction, cytological examination demonstrated that more than 70% of the debris burden is constituted of polyethylene particles. Comprehensive understanding of the intricate process of osteolysis is of utmost importance for future development of therapeutic modalities that may delay or prevent the disease progression. PMID:25793158

  5. Modeling UHMWPE wear debris generation.

    PubMed

    Baudriller, H; Chabrand, P; Moukoko, D

    2007-02-01

    It is widely recognized that polyethylene wear debris is one of the main causes of long-term prosthesis loosening. The noxious bioreactivity associated with this debris is determined by its size, shape, and quantity. The aim of this study was to develop a numerical tool that can be used to investigate the primary polyethylene wear mechanisms involved. This model illustrates the formation of varying flow of polyethylene debris with various shapes and sizes caused by elementary mechanical processes. Instead of using the classical continuum mechanics formulation for this purpose, we used a divided materials approach to simulate debris production and release. This approach involves complex nonlinear bulk behaviors, frictional adhesive contact, and characterizes material damage as a loss of adhesion. All the associated models were validated with various benchmark tests. The examples given show the ability of the numerical model to generate debris of various shapes and sizes such as those observed in implant retrieval studies. Most of wear mechanisms such as abrasion, adhesion, and the shearing off of micro-asperities can be described using this approach. Furthermore, it could be applied to study the effects of friction couples, macroscopic geometries, and material processing (e.g. irradiation) on wear. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Hydroplaning and submarine debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Blasio, Fabio V.; Engvik, Lars; Harbitz, Carl B.; ElverhøI, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Examination of submarine clastic deposits along the continental margins reveals the remnants of holocenic or older debris flows with run-out distances up to hundreds of kilometers. Laboratory experiments on subaqueous debris flows, where typically one tenth of a cubic meter of material is dropped down a flume, also show high velocities and long run-out distances compared to subaerial debris flows. Moreover, they show the tendency of the head of the flow to run out ahead of the rest of the body. The experiments reveal the possible clue to the mechanism of long run-out. This mechanism, called hydroplaning, begins as the dynamic pressure at the front of the debris flow becomes of the order of the pressure exerted by the weight of the sediment. In such conditions a layer of water can intrude under the sediment with a lubrication effect and a decrease in the resistance forces between the sediment and the seabed. A physical-mathematical model of hydroplaning is presented and investigated numerically. The model is applied to both laboratory- and field-scale debris flows. Agreement with laboratory experiments makes us confident in the extrapolation of our model to natural flows and shows that long run-out distances can be naturally attained.

  7. Geosynchronous Earth orbital debris campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Africano, John L.; Sydney, Paul F.; Talent, David L.; Stansbery, Eugene G.; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Monet, David G.; Seitzer, Patrick

    2000-10-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) is conducting systematic searches of the Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) environment as part of an international measurement campaign under the auspices of the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC). The objectives for this survey are to determine the extent and character of debris in GEO, buy obtaining distributions for the brightness, inclination, Right Ascension of Ascending Node (RAAN), and mean motion of the debris. The Charged Coupled Device (CCD) Debris Telescope (CDT), an automated 0.32 meter aperture, transportable Schmidt telescope presently located at Cloudcroft, New Mexico, is used nightly to monitor the GEO debris environment. The CDT is equipped with a CCD camera capable of detecting 17th magnitude objects in a 20 second exposure. This corresponds to a 0.6 meter diameter object having a 0.2 albedo at 36000 km. Two other larger telescopes have been used for this purpose, the United States Naval Observatory's new 1.3 meter telescope located in Flagstaff Arizona and a 0.6 m Schmidt telescope located at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) near La Serena Chile. Data reduction and analysis software used to reduce this data exploit tools developed by both the astronomical and DoD communities. These tools and data results are presented.

  8. Numerical modelling of floating debris in the world's oceans.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, L C-M; Greer, S D; Borrero, J C

    2012-03-01

    A global ocean circulation model is coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking model to simulate 30 years of input, transport and accumulation of floating debris in the world ocean. Using both terrestrial and maritime inputs, the modelling results clearly show the formation of five accumulation zones in the subtropical latitudes of the major ocean basins. The relative size and concentration of each clearly illustrate the dominance of the accumulation zones in the northern hemisphere, while smaller seas surrounded by densely populated areas are also shown to have a high concentration of floating debris. We also determine the relative contribution of different source regions to the total amount of material in a particular accumulation zone. This study provides a framework for describing the transport, distribution and accumulation of floating marine debris and can be continuously updated and adapted to assess scenarios reflecting changes in the production and disposal of plastic worldwide.

  9. Orbital debris size estimation from radar cross section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, N.; Morgan, T.; Lambour, R.; Kupiec, I.

    2001-10-01

    MIT Lincoln Laboratory has conducted a measurememt program for man-made orbital debris since 1991 in response to NASA's need to characterize the orbital debris population and facilitate manned spaceflight activities. The primary sensors used in that effort are the Haystack and Haystack Auxiliary (HAX) radars located at the Lincoln Space Surveillance Complex (LSSC) in Westford, Massachusetts. This paper will describe the first year results from a new effort being conducted at LSSC, the objective of which is to assess NASA's current procedure for the determination of debris size from RCS data. RCS data will be acquired from NASA-selected 43 Resident Space Objects (RSO). Results will be compared to the size estimates from the FPS-85 radar, an asset of the Space Surveillance Network.

  10. Analysis of the fragmentation debris environment between 2005 and 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegel, Sven Kevin; Stabroth, Sebastian; Wiedemann, Carsten; Klinkrad, Heiner; Krag, Holger; Vörsmann, Peter

    Several fragmentation events have occurred in the years since the release of the ESA space debris model MASTER-2005 (Meteoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference). During this period some notable events took place which resulted in an unusually large increase in the spatial debris density. A compilation of the fragmentation events between 2005 and 2008 is presented based on data gathered from the literature. Event parameters such as object type and location are discussed. The spatial object density is then simulated using the MASTER- 2005 population generation tool POEM (Program for Orbital Debris Environment Modelling). The NASA Breakup Model implemented in POEM is used to determine the properties of the initial cloud of fragments for each event. Propagating the orbital elements of all fragments yields the time dependent evolution of the object clouds. Spatial densities are then calculated from the distribution of the fragments. The results are discussed for all events in the detailed time frame. The changes in the orbital fragment environment since 2005 as a consequence of the presented events are of further interest. To this end, the overall density which is obtained from the simulations with POEM is compared to the predicted growth of the total spatial density. The prediction for the fragmentation debris is generated with MASTER-2005 on the basis of a business-as-usual scenario for the year 2005. Deviations between the resulting spatial density distributions are discussed in terms of fragmentation rates, breakup locations and breakup cause.

  11. Marine debris contamination along undeveloped tropical beaches from northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Isaac R; Friedrich, Ana Cláudia; Ivar do Sul, Juliana Assunção

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesize that floating debris leaving polluted coastal bays accumulate on nearby pristine beaches. We examined composition, quantities and distribution of marine debris along approximately 150 km of relatively undeveloped, tropical beaches in Costa do Dendê (Bahia, Brazil). The study site is located south of Salvador City, the largest urban settlement from NE Brazil. Strong spatial variations were observed. Plastics accounted for 76% of the sampled items, followed by styrofoam (14%). Small plastic fragments resultant from the breakdown of larger items are ubiquitous all over the area. Because the dominant littoral drift in Bahia is southward, average beach debris densities (9.1 items/m) along Costa do Dendê were threefold higher than densities previously observed north of Salvador City. River-dominated and stable beaches had higher debris quantities than unstable, erosional beaches. Areas immediately south of the major regional embayments (Camamu and Todos os Santos) were the preferential accumulation sites, indicating that rivers draining populous areas are the major source of debris to the study site. Our results provide baseline information for future assessments. Management actions should focus on input prevention at the hydrographic basin level rather than on cleaning services on beaches.

  12. Marine debris accumulation in the nearshore marine habitat of the endangered Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi 1999-2001.

    PubMed

    Boland, Raymond C; Donohue, Mary J

    2003-11-01

    Large amounts of marine debris are present in shallow reefs adjacent to beach haulouts of the critically endangered Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus schauinslandi. These areas serve as seal pup nurseries, and injury and death caused by entanglement in marine debris are undermining population recovery efforts. We investigated the extent of this threat by measuring the accumulation of potentially entangling derelict fishing gear in nursery zones, 1999-2001. Plots of reef 1.0-1.3 km2 at three Northwestern Hawaiian Islands were initially cleaned of derelict fishing gear in 1999 then resurveyed in 2000 and 2001. Submerged debris densities across sites ranged from 16 to 165 debris items/km2. Resurveyed sites yielded annual marine debris accumulation rates from 0 to 141 debris items/km2. This large range was attributed to the physiography of reef areas surveyed. Trawl net webbing was significantly more common than other types of debris recovered and represented 84% of all debris encountered, suggesting that much of the debris originated from distant North Pacific Ocean fisheries. The likely source of most debris is the multinational trawl fisheries of the North Pacific Ocean. An international solution to this problem is needed. Targeted marine debris removal is a short-term, successful, entanglement mitigation strategy.

  13. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Recovery

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations, landfills and recycling facilities for construction and demolition materials, electronics, household hazardous waste, metals, tires, and vehicles in the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, West Virginia and Wisconsin.In this update, facilities in the 7 states that border the EPA Region 5 states were added to assist interstate disaster debris management. Also, the datasets for composters, construction and demolition recyclers, demolition contractors, and metals recyclers were verified and source information added for each record using these sources: AGC, Biocycle, BMRA, CDRA, ISRI, NDA, USCC, FEMA Debris Removal Contractor Registry, EPA Facility Registry System, and State and local listings.

  14. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Landfills

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations, landfills and recycling facilities for construction and demolition materials, electronics, household hazardous waste, metals, tires, and vehicles in the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, West Virginia and Wisconsin.In this update, facilities in the 7 states that border the EPA Region 5 states were added to assist interstate disaster debris management. Also, the datasets for composters, construction and demolition recyclers, demolition contractors, and metals recyclers were verified and source information added for each record using these sources: AGC, Biocycle, BMRA, CDRA, ISRI, NDA, USCC, FEMA Debris Removal Contractor Registry, EPA Facility Registry System, and State and local listings.

  15. Summary of Orbital Debris Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    An Orbital Debris Workshop was conducted in July 1982. The working groups established were related to measurements of large particles, modeling of large particles, measurements of small particles, spacecraft hazard and shielding requirements, and space object management. The results of the Orbital Debris Workshop reaffirm the need for research to better understand the character of orbital debris, its effects on future spacecraft, and the related requirements for policy. A clear charter is required for this research to receive the necessary support, focus, and coordination. It was recommended that NASA assume the role of lead agency. The first task is to develop an overall plan with both Department of Defense and the North American Aerospace Defense Command participation.

  16. Atomic gas in debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Antonio S.; Barlow, M. J.; Crawford, I. A.; Casassus, S.

    2017-04-01

    We have conducted a search for optical circumstellar absorption lines in the spectra of 16 debris disc host stars. None of the stars in our sample showed signs of emission line activity in either Hα, Ca II or Na I, confirming their more evolved nature. Four stars were found to exhibit narrow absorption features near the cores of the photospheric Ca II and Na I D lines (when Na I D data were available). We analyse the characteristics of these spectral features to determine whether they are of circumstellar or interstellar origins. The strongest evidence for circumstellar gas is seen in the spectrum of HD 110058, which is known to host a debris disc observed close to edge-on. This is consistent with a recent ALMA detection of molecular gas in this debris disc, which shows many similarities to the β Pictoris system.

  17. Looking inside a debris flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Elisabeth; Sanvitale, Nicoletta; Bird, Joshua

    2014-05-01

    Debris flows, masses of saturated, channelized, granular materials that flow at high speeds downslope, present a hazard to lives and infrastructure in regions of high relief and runoff. They also present a challenge to modelling due to the heterogeneous, multi-phase, nature of the constituent materials, with particles ranging from boulder-size to silt-size and fluid viscosity being altered by the presence of fine particles and clay. As a debris flow travels on its flow path, it will tend to segregate, with larger particles being focused to the flow front and fluid being concentrated in the tail - resulting in different rheological behaviour in time and space. It will also tend to erode and deposit material as it moves through different channel segments or reaches, with this behaviour influenced by the confinement of the channel and the angle of the slope within each reach. Flume studies offer the potential to examine in detail the behaviour of model debris flows within the penultimate and final (deposit fan area) reaches - zones which are generally of most interest in terms of human risk. Flume studies which are conducted using transparent debris offer additional benefits to more traditional methods that use opaque materials, enabling insights to the flow behaviour that are inaccessible via other physical methods. We present flume model work which has been designed to capture some essential aspects of debris flow behaviour using well graded (polydisperse) transparent debris, albeit at reduced scale. These aspects include the final deposit spread or runout increasing for a lower concentration of solids and a higher penultimate reach slope angle, and observable particle size segregation during downslope motion. We present time-varying measurements made internally and externally at a point in the channel via Plane Laser Induced Fluorescence and Particle Image Velocimetry, PIV. The measurements enable velocity distributions of the segregating flows over time to be

  18. DebriSat Project Update and Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorge, M.; Krisko, P. H.

    2016-01-01

    DebriSat Reporting Topics: DebriSat Fragment Analysis Calendar; Near-term Fragment Extraction Strategy; Fragment Characterization and Database; HVI (High-Velocity Impact) Considerations; Requirements Document.

  19. Physical Properties of Supraglacial Debris on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. M. H.; Carter, L. M.

    2016-09-01

    The thickness and physical properties of surface debris preserving glacial ice in the mid-latitudes of Mars is assessed using crater morphology and radar sounding data. We suggest that this debris layer is much thicker than has been hypothesized.

  20. NASA Orbital Debris Requirements and Best Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Limitation of orbital debris accumulation is an international and national concern, reflectedin NASA debris limitation requirements. These requirements will be reviewed, along with some practices that can be employed to achieve the requirements.

  1. Plant growth on debris covered glacier surfaces - ecology, vegetation patterns and implications for debris mantled glaciers serving as cold and warm stage plant refugia in the past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fickert, Thomas; Friend, Donald; Grüninger, Friederike; Molnia, Bruce; Richter, Michael

    2017-04-01

    As stated at the International Conference on Debris-Covered Glaciers in 2000, "debris-covered glaciers comprise a significant fraction of the global population of glaciers...." Given a minimum of debris thickness and sufficient stability, these surfaces host surprisingly diverse plant assemblages, both floristically and structurally. Observations of plant growth on glacier surfaces are reported from around the world - including mature forests with trees more than 50cm in diameter. Debris covered glacier surfaces are mobile habitats for plants, which migrate downhill with glacier movement, but are able to spread upward with strong anabatic valley winds. Plant growth is possible even on a very shallow debris cover. Depending on site conditions, floristic composition and structure of vegetation on debris covered glaciers represent a mosaic of environments, including subnival pioneer communities, glacier foreland early- to late-successional stages, and morainal locations. The taxa involved display a wide spectrum of adaptations to habitat conditions with particular migration and dispersal strategies. With a shallow debris cover, alpine/subnival taxa can grow considerably below their usual altitudinal niche due to the cooler subsurface soil temperatures. In contrast, a greater thickness of debris cover allows even thermophilous plants of lower elevations to grow on glacier surfaces. Employing the principle of actualism, debris covered glaciers provided important and previously undocumented refugia for plants during the Pleistocene cold stages from which alpine and arctic plant species were able to re-establish and spread in post-glacial time. This assumption is complementary to the two competing ideas to explain the fate of alpine and/or arctic taxa during the Pleistocene, the nunatak hypothesis (i.e. in-situ survival of plants on unglaciated summits) and tabula rasa theory (i.e. displacement of plants and subsequent remigration). Vice versa debris covered glaciers

  2. Space Debris: Its Causes and Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2002-01-01

    Orbital debris is internationally recognized as an environmental issue which needs to be addressed today to preserve near-Earth space for future generations. All major space agencies are committed to mitigating the growth of the debris environment. Many commercial space system operators have responded positively to orbital debris mitigation principles and recommendations. Orbital debris mitigation measures are most cost-effective if included in the design development phase.

  3. A Search for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American...Examples are the results from the European Space Debris Facility in the Canary Islands, MODEST (the Michigan orbital DEbris Survey Telescope at Cerro ...filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American

  4. Orbital Debris: Cost Impact on Setting Policy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    As the exploration of space increases, the problems associated with orbital debris also increase. 0rbital debris continues to grow at a linear rate...and at worst, unusable. When mitigating orbital debris , cost and policy issues must be addressed. Currently no policy exists that makes the mitigation...of orbital debris mandatory but it only strongly recommends mitigation as long as it is cost effective. This thesis addresses the cost impact of

  5. Applying Knowledge from Terrestrial Debris-Covered Glaciers to Constrain the Evolution of Martian Debris-Covered Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutnik, M. R.; Pathare, A. V.; Todd, C.; Waddington, E.; Christian, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    We will discuss the application of terrestrial knowledge on debris emplacement, the effects of debris on glacier-surface topography, debris transport by ice flow, deformation of debris-laden ice, and atmosphere-glacier feedbacks to Mars ice.

  6. Geosynchronous Debris Conjunction Lead-Time Requirements for Autonomous Low-Thrust Disposal Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul V.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2016-12-01

    Autonomous, low-thrust guidance for active disposal of geosynchronous debris, subject to collision avoidance with the local debris population, is studied. A bisection method is employed to determine trajectory modifications to avoid a conjuncting debris object by a range of distances, assuming a range of collision lead times. A parametric study is performed, in which re-orbit thrust accelerations are varied from 10-6 to 10-3 m/s 2, to demonstrate how the continuous-thrust level impacts the required lead time to achieve a desired debris miss distance. The lowest thrust levels considered show that a 6-12 hour lead time is required to achieve a 1-10 km debris separation at the predicted collision time.

  7. Geosynchronous Debris Conjunction Lead-Time Requirements for Autonomous Low-Thrust Disposal Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul V.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2017-06-01

    Autonomous, low-thrust guidance for active disposal of geosynchronous debris, subject to collision avoidance with the local debris population, is studied. A bisection method is employed to determine trajectory modifications to avoid a conjuncting debris object by a range of distances, assuming a range of collision lead times. A parametric study is performed, in which re-orbit thrust accelerations are varied from 10-6 to 10-3 m/s 2, to demonstrate how the continuous-thrust level impacts the required lead time to achieve a desired debris miss distance. The lowest thrust levels considered show that a 6-12 hour lead time is required to achieve a 1-10 km debris separation at the predicted collision time.

  8. Contribution of explosion and future collision fragments to the orbital debris environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, S.-Y.; Kessler, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The time evolution of the near-earth man-made orbital debris environment modeled by numerical simulation is presented in this paper. The model starts with a data base of orbital debris objects which are tracked by the NORAD ground radar system. The current untrackable small objects are assumed to result from explosions and are predicted from data collected from a ground explosion experiment. Future collisions between earth orbiting objects are handled by the Monte Carlo method to simulate the range of collision possibilities that may occur in the real world. The collision fragmentation process between debris objects is calculated using an empirical formula derived from a laboratory spacecraft impact experiment to obtain the number versus size distribution of the newly generated debris population. The evolution of the future space debris environment is compared with the natural meteoroid background for the relative spacecraft penetration hazard.

  9. Contribution of explosion and future collision fragments to the orbital debris environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, S.-Y.; Kessler, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The time evolution of the near-earth man-made orbital debris environment modeled by numerical simulation is presented in this paper. The model starts with a data base of orbital debris objects which are tracked by the NORAD ground radar system. The current untrackable small objects are assumed to result from explosions and are predicted from data collected from a ground explosion experiment. Future collisions between earth orbiting objects are handled by the Monte Carlo method to simulate the range of collision possibilities that may occur in the real world. The collision fragmentation process between debris objects is calculated using an empirical formula derived from a laboratory spacecraft impact experiment to obtain the number versus size distribution of the newly generated debris population. The evolution of the future space debris environment is compared with the natural meteoroid background for the relative spacecraft penetration hazard.

  10. ORDEM 3.0 and the Risk of High-Density Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark; Anz-Meador, Philip

    2014-01-01

    NASA’s Orbital Debris Engineering Model was designed to calculate orbital debris fluxes on spacecraft in order to assess collision risk. The newest of these models, ORDEM 3.0, has a number of features not present in previous models. One of the most important is that the populations and fluxes are now broken out into material density groups. Previous models concentrated on debris size alone, but a particle’s mass and density also determine the amount of damage it can cause. ORDEM 3.0 includes a high-density component, primarily consisting of iron/steel particles that drive much of the risk to spacecraft. This paper will outline the methods that were used to separate and identify the different densities of debris, and how these new densities affect the overall debris flux and risk.

  11. Signatures of planets in circumstellar debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro-Martin, Maria Amaya

    2004-12-01

    Main sequence stars are commonly surrounded by debris disks, composed of cold dust continuously replenished by a reservoir of undetected dust-producing planetesimals. In the outer Solar System, Kuiper Belt (KB) objects produce dust by mutual or interstellar grain collisions. The orbital evolution of KB dust has been numerically modeled. Its equilibrium radial density distribution can be accurately estimated even though there are inherent uncertainties in the prediction of structure, owing to the chaotic dynamics of dust orbital evolution imposed by resonant gravitational perturbations of the planets. The particle size distribution of dust is greatly changed from the distribution at production, as a result of radiation forces and the perturbations of the planets. The contribution of KB dust to the population of interplanetary dust particles collected at Earth may be as low as a few percent. Gravitational scattering by giant planets creates an outflow of large grains. We quantify the characteristics of this large-particle outflow in different planetary architectures, discuss its implications for exo-planetary debris disks, and for the interpretation of in-situ dust detection experiments in space probes traveling in the outer Solar System. These outflows may contribute to the clearing of circumstellar debris in planetary systems, affecting the particle size distribution of their local ISM. In anticipation of future observations of unresolved debris disks with Spitzer , we are interested in studying how the structure carved by planets affects the shape of the disk's spectral energy distribution (SED), and consequently if the SED can be used to infer the presence of planets. We numerically calculate the equilibrium spatial density distributions and SEDs of dust disks originated by an outer belt of planetesimals (35-50 AU) in the presence of different planetary configurations, and for a representative sample of chemical compositions. The dynamical models are needed to

  12. Microchemical Analysis Of Space Operation Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Virginia J.; Kim, Hae Soo

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses techniques used in analyzing debris relative to space shuttle operations. Debris collected from space shuttle, expendable launch vehicles, payloads carried by space shuttle, and payloads carried by expendable launch vehicles. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectrometry, analytical electron microscopy with wavelength-dispersive spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction chosen as techniques used in examining samples of debris.

  13. Simulations of SSLV Ascent and Debris Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart; Aftosmis, Michael; Murman, Scott; Chan, William; Gomez, Ray; Gomez, Ray; Vicker, Darby; Stuart, Phil

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Simulation of Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle (SSLV) ascent and debris transport analysis is shown. The topics include: 1) CFD simulations of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle ascent; 2) Debris transport analysis; 3) Debris aerodynamic modeling; and 4) Other applications.

  14. RTF Analysis-Shuttle Debris Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This demo will rewew the findings of the Shuttle's Debris Transport analysis. The demo focuses on aero analysis of the entlre vehicle in ascent (orbiter, SRB and ET together at low Mach number) for debris transoort and determining maximum allowable debris sizes from various sources. We will present analysis results along with performance data of the simulation runs on Supercomputers such as Columbia.

  15. Engineering and Technology Challenges for Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    After more than fifty years of space activities, the near-Earth environment is polluted with man-made orbital debris. The collision between Cosmos 2251 and the operational Iridium 33 in 2009 signaled a potential collision cascade effect, also known as the "Kessler Syndrome", in the environment. Various modelling studies have suggested that the commonly-adopted mitigation measures will not be sufficient to stabilize the future debris population. Active debris removal must be considered to remediate the environment. This paper summarizes the key issues associated with debris removal and describes the technology and engineering challenges to move forward. Fifty-four years after the launch of Sputnik 1, satellites have become an integral part of human society. Unfortunately, the ongoing space activities have left behind an undesirable byproduct orbital debris. This environment problem is threatening the current and future space activities. On average, two Shuttle window panels are replaced after every mission due to damage by micrometeoroid or orbital debris impacts. More than 100 collision avoidance maneuvers were conducted by satellite operators in 2010 to reduce the impact risks of their satellites with respect to objects in the U.S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN) catalog. Of the four known accident collisions between objects in the SSN catalog, the last one, collision between Cosmos 2251 and the operational Iridium 33 in 2009, was the most significant. It was the first ever accidental catastrophic destruction of an operational satellite by another satellite. It also signaled the potential collision cascade effect in the environment, commonly known as the "Kessler Syndrome," predicted by Kessler and Cour-Palais in 1978 [1]. Figure 1 shows the historical increase of objects in the SSN catalog. The majority of the catalog objects are 10 cm and larger. As of April 2011, the total objects tracked by the SSN sensors were more than 22,000. However, approximately 6000 of

  16. Debris Discs: Modeling/theory review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thébault, P.

    2012-03-01

    An impressive amount of photometric, spectroscopic and imaging observations of circumstellar debris discs has been accumulated over the past 3 decades, revealing that they come in all shapes and flavours, from young post-planet-formation systems like Beta-Pic to much older ones like Vega. What we see in these systems are small grains, which are probably only the tip of the iceberg of a vast population of larger (undetectable) collisionally-eroding bodies, leftover from the planet-formation process. Understanding the spatial structure, physical properties, origin and evolution of this dust is of crucial importance, as it is our only window into what is going on in these systems. Dust can be used as a tracer of the distribution of their collisional progenitors and of possible hidden massive pertubers, but can also allow to derive valuable information about the disc's total mass, size distribution or chemical composition. I will review the state of the art in numerical models of debris disc, and present some important issues that are explored by current modelling efforts: planet-disc interactions, link between cold (i.e. Herschel-observed) and hot discs, effect of binarity, transient versus continuous processes, etc. I will finally present some possible perspectives for the development of future models.

  17. Stellar Multiplicity in the DEBRIS disk sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, David R.; Duchene, Gaspard; Tom, Henry; Kennedy, Grant; Matthews, Brenda C.; Butner, Harold M.

    2015-01-01

    Circumstellar disks around young stars serve as the sites of planet formation. A common outcome of the star formation process is that of stellar binary systems. How does the presence of multiple stars affect the properties of disks, and thus of planet formation? To examine the frequency of disks around stellar binaries we carried out a multiplicity survey on stars in the DEBRIS sample. This sample consists of 451 stars of spectral types A-M observed with the Herschel Space Telescope. We have examined the stellar multiplicity of this sample by gathering information from the literature and performing an adaptive optics imaging survey at Lick Observatory. We identify 189 (42%) binary or multiple star systems.In our sample, we find that debris disks are less common around binaries than single stars, though the disk detection frequency is comparable among A stars regardless of multiplicity. Nevertheless, the period distribution of disk-bearing binaries is consistent with that of non-disk binaries and with comparison field samples. Although the frequency of disk-bearing binaries may be lower than in single star systems, the processes behind disk formation are comparable among both single and multiple-star populations.This work is supported in part by a Chile Fondecy grant #3130520.

  18. Space Debris Detection and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-28

    7F AD-A282 012 PL.-TR-94-206 Space Debris Detection and Analysis Robert H. Eather Ron Siewert Keo Consultants 27 Irving St. Brookline MA 02146 28...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Keo Consultants 27 Irving St. Brookline MA 02146 9. SPONSORINGI MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING

  19. A Passive Nuclear Debris Collector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, John J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a nuclear debris collector which removes trace substances from the lower atmosphere during rainfall. Suggests that the collector could be implemented into courses at various educational levels and could result in developing a network for monitoring the geographical extent of nuclear contamination. (Author/SA)

  20. A Passive Nuclear Debris Collector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, John J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a nuclear debris collector which removes trace substances from the lower atmosphere during rainfall. Suggests that the collector could be implemented into courses at various educational levels and could result in developing a network for monitoring the geographical extent of nuclear contamination. (Author/SA)

  1. Review of uncertainty sources affecting the long-term predictions of space debris evolutionary models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolado-Perez, J. C.; Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano

    2015-08-01

    Since the launch of Sputnik-I in 1957, the amount of space debris in Earth's orbit has increased continuously. Historically, besides abandoned intact objects (spacecraft and orbital stages), the primary sources of space debris in Earth's orbit were (i) accidental and intentional break-ups which produced long-lasting debris and (ii) debris released intentionally during the operation of launch vehicle orbital stages and spacecraft. In the future, fragments generated by collisions are expected to become a significant source as well. In this context, and from a purely mathematical point of view, the orbital debris population in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) should be intrinsically unstable, due to the physics of mutual collisions and the relative ineffectiveness of natural sink mechanisms above~700 km. Therefore, the real question should not be "if", but "when" the exponential growth of the space debris population is supposed to start. From a practical point of view, and in order to answer the previous question, since the end of the 1980's several sophisticated long-term debris evolutionary models have been developed. Unfortunately, the predictions performed with such models, in particular beyond a few decades, are affected by considerable uncertainty. Such uncertainty comes from a relative important number of variables that being either under the partial control or completely out of the control of modellers, introduce a variability on the long-term simulation of the space debris population which cannot be captured with standard Monte Carlo statistics. The objective of this paper is to present and discuss many of the uncertainty sources affecting the long-term predictions done with evolutionary models, in order to serve as a roadmap for the uncertainty and the statistical robustness analysis of the long-term evolution of the space debris population.

  2. Photometric Studies of GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Horstman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The photometric signature of a debris object can be useful in determining what the physical characteristics of a piece of debris are. We report on optical observations in multiple filters of debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the SMARTS (Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System) 0.9-m at CTIO for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 th magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. At this magnitude the distribution of observed angular rates changes significantly from that of brighter objects. There are two objectives: 1. Estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: brightness (magnitude) and angular rates. 2. Obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. What is the faint debris likely to be? In this paper we report on the photometric results. For a sample of 50 objects, more than 90 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes have been obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could be that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus

  3. Brute Force Modeling of the Orbital Debris Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, S.; Phillion, D.; Horsley, M.; Johnson, N.

    2012-09-01

    The Kessler Syndrome (runaway increase in the number of orbiting debris fragments through cascading collisions) presents a serious danger to future space missions. To understand its implications and study the effectiveness of various proposed debris mitigation strategies, long-term evolutionary models for near-Earth space environment (e.g. NASA's LEGEND, ESA's MASTER-2009) are used. Because of the long timescales involved, existing models represent the orbiting population by some average spatial density functions, resulting in a limited spatial and temporal resolution of such models. Here, we present the brute force approach to evolutionary debris modeling, by propagating and monitoring every object in orbit for the length of the simulation (100+ years). The approach involved designing a custom, efficient orbital propagator, coupled with a fast conjunction analysis module. The resulting highly parallel simulation code was run on LLNL's supercomputers, due to the extremely demanding computing power requirements. Here we present some of the results of these high-fidelity simulations. This approach allows unprecedented, high-resolution view of the evolution of orbiting populations, and establishes new state of the art in evolutionary debris modeling.

  4. Secondary Crater-Initiated Debris Flow on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Wells, K. S.; Campbell, D. B.; Campbell, B. A.; Carter, L. M.; Fox, Q.

    2016-01-01

    In recent work, radar circular polarization echo properties have been used to identify "secondary" craters without distinctive secondary morphologies. Because of the potential for this method to improve our knowledge of secondary crater population-in particular the effect of secondary populations on crater- derived ages based on small craters-it is important to understand the origin of radar polarization signatures associated with secondary impacts. In this paper, we utilize Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera photographs to examine the geomorphology of secondary craters with radar circular polarization ratio enhancements. Our investigation reveals evidence of dry debris flow with an impact melt component at such secondary craters. We hypothesize that these debris flows were initiated by the secondary impacts themselves, and that they have entrained blocky material ejected from the secondaries. By transporting this blocky material downrange, we propose that these debris flows (rather than solely ballistic emplacement) are responsible for the tail-like geometries of enhanced radar circular polarization ratio associated with the secondary craters investigated in this work. Evidence of debris flow was observed at both clustered and isolated secondary craters, suggesting that such flow may be a widespread occurrence, with important implications for the mixing of primary and local material in crater rays.

  5. Secondary crater-initiated debris flow on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Wells, K. S.; Campbell, D. B.; Campbell, B. A.; Carter, L. M.; Fox, Q.

    2017-07-01

    In recent work, radar circular polarization echo properties have been used to identify secondary craters without distinctive ;secondary; morphologies. Because of the potential for this method to improve our knowledge of secondary crater populations-in particular the effect of secondary populations on crater-derived ages based on small craters-it is important to understand the origin of radar polarization signatures associated with secondary impacts. In this paper, we utilize Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera photographs to examine the geomorphology of secondary craters with radar circular polarization ratio enhancements. Our investigation reveals evidence of dry debris flow with an impact melt component at such secondary craters. We hypothesize that these debris flows were initiated by the secondary impacts themselves, and that they have entrained blocky material ejected from the secondaries. By transporting this blocky material downrange, we propose that these debris flows (rather than solely ballistic emplacement) are responsible for the tail-like geometries of enhanced radar circular polarization ratio associated with the secondary craters investigated in this work. Evidence of debris flow was observed at both clustered and isolated secondary craters, suggesting that such flow may be a widespread occurrence, with important implications for the mixing of primary and local material in crater rays.

  6. Effects of Low Activity Solar Cycle on Orbital Debris Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Samual B.; Sutton, Eric K.; Lin, chin S.; Liou, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    Long duration of low solar activity in the last solar minimum has an undesirable consequence of extending the lifetime of orbital debris. The AFRL TacSat-2 satellite decommissioned in 2008 has finally re-entered into the atmosphere on February 5th after more than one year overdue. Concerning its demise we have monitored its orbital decay and monthly forecasted Tacsat-2 re-entry since September 2010 by using the Orbital Element Prediction (OEP) model developed by the AFRL Orbital Drag Environment program. The model combines estimates of future solar activity with neutral density models, drag coefficient models, and an orbit propagator to predict satellite lifetime. We run the OEP model with solar indices forecast by the NASA Marshall Solar Activity Future Estimation model, and neutral density forecast by the MSIS-00 neutral density model. Based on the two line elements in 2010 up to mid September, we estimated at a 50% confidence level TacSat-2's re-entry time to be in early February 2011, which turned out to be in good agreement with Tacsat-2's actual re-entry date. The potential space weather effects of the coming low activity solar cycle on satellite lifetime and orbital debris population are examined. The NASA long-term orbital debris evolutionary model, LEGEND, is used to quantify the effects of solar flux on the orbital debris population in the 200-600 km altitude environment. The results are discussed for developing satellite orbital drag application product.

  7. Segregation dynamics in debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Fei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Debris flows are massive flows consisting of mixtures of particles of different sizes and interstitial fluids such as water and mud. In sheared mixtures of different-sized (same density) particles, it is well known that larger particles tend to go up (toward the free surface), and the smaller particles, down, commonly referred to as the "Brazil-nut problem" or "kinetic sieving". When kinetic sieving fluxes are combined with advection in flows, they can give rise to a spectacular range of segregation patterns. These segregation / advection dynamics are recognized as playing a role in the coarsening of a debris flow front (its "snout") and the coarsening of the self-formed channel sides or levees. Since particle size distribution influences the flow dynamics including entrainment of bed materials, modeling segregation dynamics in debris flows is important for modeling the debris flows themselves. In sparser systems, the Brazil-nut segregation is well-modeled using kinetic theory applied to dissipative systems, where an underlying assumption involves random, uncorrelated collisions. In denser systems, where kinetic theory breaks down we have recently developed a new mixture model that demonstrates the segregation fluxes are driven by two effects associated with the kinetic stress or granular temperature (the kinetic energy associated with velocity fluctuations): (1) the difference between the partitioning of kinetic and contact stresses among the species in the mixture and (2) a kinetic stress gradient. Both model frameworks involve the temperature gradient as a driving force for segregation, but kinetic theory sends larger particles toward lower temperatures, and our mixture model sends larger particles away from lower temperatures. Which framework works under what conditions appears to depend on correlations in the flow such as those manifested in clusters and force chains. We discuss the application of each theoretical framework to representing segregation dynamics

  8. HEO space debris orbit predictions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorowicz, Dorota; Pospieszynski, Remigiusz; Golembiewska, Justyna; Wnuk, Edwin

    2012-07-01

    HEO (Highly Elliptical Orbit) satellites are objects with an elliptic orbit with a low-altitude perigee and a high-altitude apogee. Perigee mainly cross the LEO orbits and apogee reaches regions above GEO orbits. Number of satellites on the orbits are old racket bodies and other space debris. Most of HEO objects has the eccentricity more than 0.7. Many trackable objects are included in the NORAD TLE Catalogue but much more small debris exist which we could not track. Objects on as highly elliptical orbit are very danger for satellites in LEO region because of increasing velocity near the perigee. In order to calculate the trajectory of space debris we have to take into account force model consisting of geopotential, luni-solar effects, solar radiation pressure and for objects with low-altitude of perigee, atmospheric drag. This last perturbation is very important to calculate orbits with high accuracy but also one of the hardest to predict. Many atmospheric space debris objects parameters should be taken into account in this case, but we do not have sufficient data from observations, in particular S/M (area-to-mass) ratio. Fortunately we have some archival data for some debris included in TLE Catalogue, which are very helpful to estimate the approximate value of the parameter. In this paper we present the results of calculations of orbit predictions for short and medium time span (up to several weeks). We tried to designate the S/M parameter for some HEO objects from archival data from the TLE Catalogue and predict its orbital elements for several weeks. With better knowledge about approximate mean value of the S/M parameter we are able to improve the accuracy of predicted orbits.

  9. Debris Flux Comparisons From The Goldstone Radar, Haystack Radar, and Hax Radar Prior, During, and After the Last Solar Maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokely, C. L.; Stansbery, E. G.; Goldstein, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    The continual monitoring of low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment using highly sensitive radars is essential for an accurate characterization of these dynamic populations. Debris populations are continually evolving since there are new debris sources, previously unrecognized debris sources, and debris loss mechanisms that are dependent on the dynamic space environment. Such radar data are used to supplement, update, and validate existing orbital debris models. NASA has been utilizing radar observations of the debris environment for over a decade from three complementary radars: the NASA JPL Goldstone radar, the MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL) Long Range Imaging Radar (known as the Haystack radar), and the MIT/LL Haystack Auxiliary radar (HAX). All of these systems are highly sensitive radars that operate in a fixed staring mode to statistically sample orbital debris in the LEO environment. Each of these radars is ideally suited to measure debris within a specific size region. The Goldstone radar generally observes objects with sizes from 2 mm to 1 cm. The Haystack radar generally measures from 5 mm to several meters. The HAX radar generally measures from 2 cm to several meters. These overlapping size regions allow a continuous measurement of cumulative debris flux versus diameter from 2 mm to several meters for a given altitude window. This is demonstrated for all three radars by comparing the debris flux versus diameter over 200 km altitude windows for 3 nonconsecutive years from 1998 through 2003. These years correspond to periods before, during, and after the peak of the last solar cycle. Comparing the year to year flux from Haystack for each of these altitude regions indicate statistically significant changes in subsets of the debris populations. Potential causes of these changes are discussed. These analysis results include error bars that represent statistical sampling errors, and are detailed in this paper.

  10. Debris flow grain size scales with sea surface temperature over glacial-interglacial timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda Boluda, Duna C.; Whittaker, Alexander C.; Araújo, João Paulo C.

    2015-04-01

    Debris flows are common erosional processes responsible for a large volume of sediment transfer across a range of landscapes from arid settings to the tropics. They are also significant natural hazards in populated areas. However, we lack a clear set of debris flow transport laws, meaning that: (i) debris flows remain largely neglected by landscape evolution models; (ii) we do not understand the sensitivity of debris flow systems to past or future climate changes; and (iii) it remains unclear how to interpret debris flow stratigraphy and sedimentology, for example whether their deposits record information about past tectonics or palaeoclimate. Here, we take a grain size approach to characterising debris flow deposits from 35 well-dated alluvial fan surfaces in Owens Valley, California. We show that the average grain sizes of these granitic debris flow sediments precisely scales with sea surface temperature throughout the entire last glacial-interglacial cycle, increasing by ~ 7 % per 1 ° C of climate warming. We compare these data with similar debris flow systems in the Mediterranean (southern Italy) and the tropics (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), and find equivalent signals over a total temperature range of ~ 14 ° C. In each area, debris flows are largely governed by rainfall intensity during triggering storms, which is known to increase exponentially with temperature. Therefore, we suggest that these debris flow systems are transporting predictably coarser-grained sediment in warmer, stormier conditions. This implies that debris flow sedimentology is governed by discharge thresholds and may be a sensitive proxy for past changes in rainfall intensity. Our findings show that debris flows are sensitive to climate changes over short timescales (≤ 104 years) and therefore highlight the importance of integrating hillslope processes into landscape evolution models, as well as providing new observational constraints to guide this. Finally, we comment on what grain size

  11. Population

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population growth influences many stressors on Narragansett Bay and its Watershed, including all landscape and chemical stressors discussed in other chapters of this report. In numerous ways, population growth affects the condition of the Bay ecosystem, Watershed ecosystem, and h...

  12. Detecting debris flows using ground vibrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaHusen, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    Debris flows are rapidly flowing mixtures of rock debris, mud, and water that originate on steep slopes. During and following volcanic eruptions, debris flows are among the most destructive and persistent hazards. Debris flows threaten lives and property not only on volcanoes but far downstream in valleys that drain volcanoes where they arrive suddenly and inundate entire valley bottoms. Debris flows can destroy vegetation and structures in their path, including bridges and buildings. Their deposits can cover roads and railways, smother crops, and fill stream channels, thereby reducing their flood-carrying capacity and navigability.

  13. An optimal trajectory design for debris deorbiting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Dong, Xin; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The problem of deorbiting debris is studied in this paper. As a feasible measure, a disposable satellite would be launched, attach to debris, and deorbit the space debris using a technology named electrodynamic tether (EDT). In order to deorbit multiple debris as many as possible, a suboptimal but feasible and efficient trajectory set has been designed to allow a deorbiter satellite tour the LEO small bodies per one mission. Finally a simulation given by this paper showed that a 600 kg satellite is capable of deorbiting 6 debris objects in about 230 days.

  14. [Population].

    PubMed

    1979-01-01

    Data on the population of Venezuela between 1975 and 1977 are presented in descriptive tables and graphs. Information is included on the employed population according to category, sex, and type of economic activity, and by sex, age, and area on the employment rate and the total, the economically active, and the unemployed population.

  15. Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Pat; Landahl, John

    This pamphlet has been prepared in response to a new problem, a rapidly increasing population, and a new need, population education. It is designed to help teachers provide their students with some basic population concepts with stress placed on the elements of decision making. In the first section of the pamphlet, some of the basic concepts of…

  16. The fast debris evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, H. G.; Swinerd, G. G.; Newland, R. J.; Saunders, A.

    2009-09-01

    The 'particles-in-a-box' (PIB) model introduced by Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] removed the need for computer-intensive Monte Carlo simulation to predict the gross characteristics of an evolving debris environment. The PIB model was described using a differential equation that allows the stability of the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment to be tested by a straightforward analysis of the equation's coefficients. As part of an ongoing research effort to investigate more efficient approaches to evolutionary modelling and to develop a suite of educational tools, a new PIB model has been developed. The model, entitled Fast Debris Evolution (FADE), employs a first-order differential equation to describe the rate at which new objects ⩾10 cm are added and removed from the environment. Whilst Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] based the collision theory for the PIB approach on collisions between gas particles and adopted specific values for the parameters of the model from a number of references, the form and coefficients of the FADE model equations can be inferred from the outputs of future projections produced by high-fidelity models, such as the DAMAGE model. The FADE model has been implemented as a client-side, web-based service using JavaScript embedded within a HTML document. Due to the simple nature of the algorithm, FADE can deliver the results of future projections immediately in a graphical format, with complete user-control over key simulation parameters. Historical and future projections for the ⩾10 cm LEO debris environment under a variety of different scenarios are possible, including business as usual, no future launches, post-mission disposal and remediation. A selection of results is presented with comparisons with predictions made using the DAMAGE environment model

  17. Predicting spatial distribution of postfire debris flows and potential consequences for native trout in headwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedell, Edwin R; Gresswell, Bob; McMahon, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and degradation and invasion of nonnative species have restricted the distribution of native trout. Many trout populations are limited to headwater streams where negative effects of predicted climate change, including reduced stream flow and increased risk of catastrophic fires, may further jeopardize their persistence. Headwater streams in steep terrain are especially susceptible to disturbance associated with postfire debris flows, which have led to local extirpation of trout populations in some systems. We conducted a reach-scale spatial analysis of debris-flow risk among 11 high-elevation watersheds of the Colorado Rocky Mountains occupied by isolated populations of Colorado River Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus). Stream reaches at high risk of disturbance by postfire debris flow were identified with the aid of a qualitative model based on 4 primary initiating and transport factors (hillslope gradient, flow accumulation pathways, channel gradient, and valley confinement). This model was coupled with a spatially continuous survey of trout distributions in these stream networks to assess the predicted extent of trout population disturbances related to debris flows. In the study systems, debris-flow potential was highest in the lower and middle reaches of most watersheds. Colorado River Cutthroat Trout occurred in areas of high postfire debris-flow risk, but they were never restricted to those areas. Postfire debris flows could extirpate trout from local reaches in these watersheds, but trout populations occupy refugia that should allow recolonization of interconnected, downstream reaches. Specific results of our study may not be universally applicable, but our risk assessment approach can be applied to assess postfire debris-flow risk for stream reaches in other watersheds.

  18. Laser Remote Maneuver of Space Debris at the Space Environment Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bold, M.

    2016-09-01

    Active satellites have the ability to maneuver to avoid collision with other space objects. Unfortunately the majority of objects in space are debris objects that do not have the ability to maneuver. In the future the population of debris objects will grow and the probability of collision will increase. This paper will provide details on plans to use a ground based laser with uplink adaptive optics compensation to apply photon pressure to debris objects and maneuver them out of harm's way. This work is ongoing at the Space Environment Research Centre at Mt. Stromlo Australia with collaborative efforts from Lockheed Martin, Electro-Optics Systems Inc. and the Australian National University.

  19. Laser remote maneuver of space debris at the Space Environment Research Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bold, Matthew M.

    2016-09-01

    Active satellites have the ability to maneuver to avoid collision with other space objects. Unfortunately the majority of objects in space are debris objects that do not have the ability to maneuver. In the future the population of debris objects will grow and the probability of collision will increase. This paper will provide details on plans to use a ground based laser with uplink adaptive optics compensation to apply photon pressure to debris objects and maneuver them out of harm's way. This work is ongoing at the Space Environment Research Centre at Mt. Stromlo Australia with collaborative efforts from Lockheed Martin, Electro-Optics Systems Inc. and the Australian National University.

  20. Comparison of space debris estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.; Judd, O.P.; Naka, R.F.

    1996-10-01

    Debris is thought to be a hazard to space systems through impact and cascading. The current environment is assessed as not threatening to defense systems. Projected reductions in launch rates to LEO should delay concerns for centuries. There is agreement between AFSPC and NASA analyses on catalogs and collision rates, but not on fragmentation rates. Experiments in the laboratory, field, and space are consistent with AFSPC estimates of the number of fragments per collision. A more careful treatment of growth rates greatly reduces long-term stability issues. Space debris has not been shown to be an issue in coming centuries; thus, it does not appear necessary for the Air Force to take additional steps to mitigate it.

  1. Debris flow study in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrin Jaafar, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    The phenomenon of debris flow occurs in Malaysia occasionally. The topography of Peningsular Malysia is characterized by the central mountain ranges running from south to north. Several parts of hilly areas with steep slopes, combined with high saturation of soil strata that deliberately increase the pore water pressure underneath the hill slope. As a tropical country Malaysia has very high intensity rainfall which is triggered the landslide. In the study area where the debris flow are bound to occur, there are a few factors that contribute to this phenomenon such as high rainfall intensity, very steep slope which an inclination more than 35 degree and sandy clay soil type which is easily change to liquidity soil. This paper will discuss the study of rainfall, mechanism, modeling and design of mitigation measure to avoid repeated failure in future in same area.

  2. Debris Disks and Hidden Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2008-01-01

    When a planet orbits inside a debris disk like the disk around Vega or Beta Pictoris, the planet may be invisible, but the patterns it creates in the disk may give it away. Observing and decoding these patterns may be the only way we can detect exo-Neptunes orbiting more than 20 AU from their stars, and the only way we can spot planets in systems undergoing the late stages of planet formation. Fortunately, every few months, a new image of a debris disk appears with curious structures begging for explanation. I'll describe some new ideas in the theory of these planet-disk interactions and provide a buyers guide to the latest models (and the planets they predict).

  3. Formation of lobate debris aprons on Mars: Assessment of regional ice sheet collapse and debris-cover armoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastook, James L.; Head, James W.; Marchant, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Lobate debris aprons (LDA) are lobate-shaped aprons surrounding scarps and isolated massifs that are concentrated in the vicinity of the northern Dichotomy Boundary on Mars. LDAs have been interpreted as (1) ice-cemented talus aprons undergoing viscous flow, (2) local debris-covered alpine-like glaciers, or (3) remnants of the collapse of a regional retreating ice sheet. We investigate the plausibility that LDAs are remnants of a more extensive regional ice sheet by modeling this process. We find that as a regional ice sheet collapses, the surface drops below cliff and massif bedrock margins, exposing bedrock and regolith, and initiating debris deposition on the surface of a cold-based glacier. Reduced sublimation due to debris-cover armoring of the proto-LDA surface produces a surface slope and consequent ice flow that carries the armoring debris away from the rock outcrops. As collapse and ice retreat continue the debris train eventually reaches the substrate surface at the front of the glacier, leaving the entire LDA armored by debris cover. Using a simplified ice flow model we are able to characterize the temperature and sublimation rate that would be necessary to produce LDAs with a wide range of specified lateral extents and thicknesses. We then apply this method to a database of documented LDA parameters (height, lateral extent) from the Dichotomy Boundary region, and assess the implications for predicted climate conditions during their formation and the range of formation times implied by the model. We find that for the population examined here, typical temperatures are in the range of -85 to -40 °C and typical sublimation rates lie in the range of 6-14 mm/a. Lobate debris apron formation times (from the point of bedrock exposure to complete debris cover) cluster near 400-500 ka. These results show that LDA length and thickness characteristics are consistent with climate conditions and a formation scenario typical of the collapse of a regional retreating

  4. Workers Search for Columbia's Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Members of a US Forest Service search team walk a grid during a Columbia recovery search near the Hemphill, Texas site. The group is accompanied by a space program worker able to identify potential hazards of Shuttle parts. Workers from every NASA Center and numerous federal, state, and local agencies searched for Columbia's debris in the recovery effort. For more information on STS-107, please see GRIN Columbia General Explanation

  5. Net Catches Debris From Explosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B.; Schneider, William C.

    1992-01-01

    Device restrains fragments and absorbs their kinetic energy. Net of stitched webbing folds compactly over honeycomb plug. Attaches to frame mounted on wall around rectangular area to be cut out by explosion. Honeycomb panel absorbs debris from explosion and crumples into net. Dissipates energy by ripping about 9 in. of stitched net. Developed for emergency escape system in Space Shuttle, adaptable to restraint belts for vehicles; subjecting passengers to more gradual deceleration and less shock.

  6. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Zuckerman, B.

    2012-02-01

    We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.

  7. Orbital Debris Observations with WFCAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, R.; Mann, B.; Read, M.; Kerr, T.; Irwin, M.; Cross, N.; Bold, M.,; Varricatt, W.; Madsen, G.

    2014-09-01

    The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope has been operating for 35 years on the summit of Mauna Kea as a premier Infrared astronomical facility. In its 35th year the telescope has been turned over to a new operating group consisting of University of Arizona, University of Hawaii and the LM Advanced Technology Center. UKIRT will continue its astronomical mission with a portion of observing time dedicated to orbital debris and Near Earth Object detection and characterization. During the past 10 years the UKIRT Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) has been performing large area astronomical surveys in the J, H and K bands. The data for these surveys have been reduced by the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit in Cambridge, England and archived by the Wide Field Astronomy Unit in Edinburgh, Scotland. During January and February of 2014 the Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) was used to scan through the geostationary satellite belt detecting operational satellites as well as nearby debris. Accurate photometric and astrometric parameters have been developed by CASU for each of the detections and all data has been archived by WFAU. This paper will present the January and February results of the orbital debris surveys with WFCAM.

  8. Lightcurves of Extreme Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Meng, Huan; Su, Kate

    2012-12-01

    We have recently discovered that some planetary debris disks with extreme fractional luminosities are variable on the timescale of a few years. This behavior opens a new possibility to understand planet building. Two of the known variable disks are around solar-like stars in the age range of 30 to 100+ Myr, which is the expected era of the final stages of terrestrial planet building. Such variability can be attributed to violent collisions (up to ones on the scale of the Moon-forming event between the proto-Earth and another proto-planet). The collisional cascades that are the aftermaths of these events can produce large clouds of tiny dust grains, possibly even condensed from silica vapor. A Spitzer pilot program has obtained the lightcurve of such a debris disk and caught two minor outbursts. Here we propose to continue the lightcurve monitoring with higher sampling rates and to expand it to more disks. The proposed time domain observations are a new dimension of debris disk studies that can bring unique insight to their evolution, providing important constraints on the collisional and dynamical models of terrestrial planet formation.

  9. Active space debris removal by a hybrid propulsion module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, L. T.; Bernelli, F.; Maggi, F.; Tadini, P.; Pardini, C.; Anselmo, L.; Grassi, M.; Pavarin, D.; Francesconi, A.; Branz, F.; Chiesa, S.; Viola, N.; Bonnal, C.; Trushlyakov, V.; Belokonov, I.

    2013-10-01

    During the last 40 years, the mass of the artificial objects in orbit increased quite steadily at the rate of about 145 metric tons annually, leading to a total tally of approximately 7000 metric tons. Now, most of the cross-sectional area and mass (97% in LEO) is concentrated in about 4600 intact objects, i.e. abandoned spacecraft and rocket bodies, plus a further 1000 operational spacecraft. Simulations and parametric analyses have shown that the most efficient and effective way to prevent the outbreak of a long-term exponential growth of the catalogued debris population would be to remove enough cross-sectional area and mass from densely populated orbits. In practice, according to the most recent NASA results, the active yearly removal of approximately 0.1% of the abandoned intact objects would be sufficient to stabilize the catalogued debris in low Earth orbit, together with the worldwide adoption of mitigation measures. The candidate targets for removal would have typical masses between 500 and 1000 kg, in the case of spacecraft, and of more than 1000 kg, in the case of rocket upper stages. Current data suggest that optimal active debris removal missions should be carried out in a few critical altitude-inclination bands. This paper deals with the feasibility study of a mission in which the debris is removed by using a hybrid propulsion module as propulsion unit. Specifically, the engine is transferred from a servicing platform to the debris target by a robotic arm so to perform a controlled disposal. Hybrid rocket technology for de-orbiting applications is considered a valuable option due to high specific impulse, intrinsic safety, thrust throttle ability, low environmental impact and reduced operating costs. Typically, in hybrid rockets a gaseous or liquid oxidizer is injected into the combustion chamber along the axial direction to burn a solid fuel. However, the use of tangential injection on a solid grain Pancake Geometry allows for more compact design of

  10. How giant planets sculpt terrestrial exoplanets and debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, S. N.; Armitage, P. J.; Moro-Martin, A.; Booth, M.; Wyatt, M. C.; Armstrong, J. C.; Mandell, A.; Selsis, F.; West, A. A.

    2011-10-01

    There exists strong circumstantial evidence from their eccentric orbits that most of the known giant exoplanet systems are the survivors of violent dynamical instabilities. We numerically simulate the evolution of planetary systems around Sun-like stars with three components: (i) an inner disk of planetesimals and planetary embryos, (ii) three giant planets at Jupiter- Saturn distances, and (iii) an outer disk of planetesimals comparable to the primitive Kuiper belt. We calculate the dust production and spectral energy distribution of each system by assuming that each planetesimal particle represents an ensemble of smaller bodies in collisional equilibrium. Our main result is a strong correlation between the presence of terrestrial planets and debris disks. Strong giant planet instabilities that produce very eccentric surviving planets destroy all rocky material in the system, including fully-formed terrestrial planets if the instabilities occur late, and also destroy the icy planetesimal population. Stable or weakly unstable systems allow terrestrial planets to accrete in their inner regions and significant dust to be produced in their outer regions, detectable at midinfrared wavelengths as debris disks. Stars older than ˜ 100 Myr with bright cold dust emission (in particular at ? ˜ 70μm) signpost dynamically calm environments that were conducive to efficient terrestrial accretion. Such emission is present around ˜16% of billion-year old Solar-type stars. We make two predictions. First, eccentric giant planets should be anticorrelated with both debris disks and terrestrial exoplanets. Second, the presence of debris disks and terrestrial exoplanets should be correlated.

  11. The Orbital Debris Problem and the Challenges for Environment Remediation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.

    2014-01-01

    LEO debris population will continue to increase even with a good implementation of the commonly-adopted mitigation measures. The root-cause of the increase is catastrophic collisions involving large/massive intact objects (rocket bodies or spacecraft). The major mission-ending risks for most operational spacecraft, however, come from impacts with debris just above the threshold of the protection shields (5-mm to 1-cm). A solution-driven approach is to seek: Concepts for removal of massive intacts with high P(collision); Concepts capable of preventing collisions involving intacts; Concepts for removal of 5-mm to 1-cm debris; Enhanced impact protection shields for valuable space assets. Key questions for remediation consideration of orbital debris: What is the acceptable threat level? What are the mission objectives? What is the appropriate roadmap/timeframe for remediation? Support advanced technology development when an economically viable approach is identified. Address non-technical issues, such as policy, coordination, ownership, legal, and liability at the national and international levels.

  12. Man-Made Debris In and From Lunar Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    During 1966-1976, as part of the first phase of lunar exploration, 29 manned and robotic missions placed more than 40 objects into lunar orbit. Whereas several vehicles later successfully landed on the Moon and/or returned to Earth, others were either abandoned in orbit or intentionally sent to their destruction on the lunar surface. The former now constitute a small population of lunar orbital debris; the latter, including four Lunar Orbiters and four Lunar Module ascent stages, have contributed to nearly 50 lunar sites of man's refuse. Other lunar satellites are known or suspected of having fallen from orbit. Unlike Earth satellite orbital decays and deorbits, lunar satellites impact the lunar surface unscathed by atmospheric burning or melting. Fragmentations of lunar satellites, which would produce clouds of numerous orbital debris, have not yet been detected. The return to lunar orbit in the 1990's by the Hagoromo, Hiten, Clementine, and Lunar Prospector spacecraft and plans for increased lunar exploration early in the 21st century, raise questions of how best to minimize and to dispose of lunar orbital debris. Some of the lessons learned from more than 40 years of Earth orbit exploitation can be applied to the lunar orbital environment. For the near-term, perhaps the most important of these is postmission passivation. Unique solutions, e.g., lunar equatorial dumps, may also prove attractive. However, as with Earth satellites, debris mitigation measures are most effectively adopted early in the concept and design phase, and prevention is less costly than remediation.

  13. Man-Made Debris In and From Lunar Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    During 1966-1976, as part of the first phase of lunar exploration, 29 manned and robotic missions placed more than 40 objects into lunar orbit. Whereas several vehicles later successfully landed on the Moon and/or returned to Earth, others were either abandoned in orbit or intentionally sent to their destruction on the lunar surface. The former now constitute a small population of lunar orbital debris; the latter, including four Lunar Orbiters and four Lunar Module ascent stages, have contributed to nearly 50 lunar sites of man's refuse. Other lunar satellites are known or suspected of having fallen from orbit. Unlike Earth satellite orbital decays and deorbits, lunar satellites impact the lunar surface unscathed by atmospheric burning or melting. Fragmentations of lunar satellites, which would produce clouds of numerous orbital debris, have not yet been detected. The return to lunar orbit in the 1990's by the Hagoromo, Hiten, Clementine, and Lunar Prospector spacecraft and plans for increased lunar exploration early in the 21st century, raise questions of how best to minimize and to dispose of lunar orbital debris. Some of the lessons learned from more than 40 years of Earth orbit exploitation can be applied to the lunar orbital environment. For the near-term, perhaps the most important of these is postmission passivation. Unique solutions, e.g., lunar equatorial dumps, may also prove attractive. However, as with Earth satellites, debris mitigation measures are most effectively adopted early in the concept and design phase, and prevention is less costly than remediation.

  14. Catastrophic failure of stored energy modules following orbital debris penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamsen, Joel E.; Goodwin, Charles J.

    1996-10-01

    The population of dangerous orbital debris particles in low Earth orbit is growing, resulting in a need for improved risk assessment and risk management of critical space station elements from this hypervelocity impact threat. The effects of micrometeoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) penetration on space station equipment can very from a local damage problem to a possible catastrophic system failure (i.e., crew or station loss). Given this possibility, a preliminary study was undertaken by Meyer Analytics and NASA-MSFC to quantify and reduce the likelihood of catastrophic failure following orbital debris penetration of two Russian supplied modules: the FGB Energy Block module and the SPP-1 gyrodyne module. Each of these modules contains stored energy in the form of chemical propellants (UDMH), high pressure tanks, or kinetic energy (gyrodynes) that may release energy and propagate damage to the rest of the space station if impacted by a sufficiently energetic orbital debris particle. The study recommended design improvements to lower these probabilities, including spall blankets around the gyrodynes to lower the probability of gyrodyne penetration and fragment damage given gyrodyne rupture.

  15. Detection Of Exocomets Within Edge-on Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Sharon Lynn; Welsh, B.

    2011-01-01

    The youngest circumstellar debris disks in orbit around main sequence stars are thought to represent the last stage in the formation of a planetary system. Dust and gas continues to be replenished in these systems when planetesimals reach sizes of around 2000 km. Dynamical instabilities can "stir" the population of smaller planetesimals such that they undergo violent dust-generating collisions with each other. The same instabilities may send comets on highly eccentric orbits toward the star in these debris disk systems. Four stars, including the protypical debris disk star Beta Pic, have already been shown to exhibit short-term (i.e., night-to-night) variability in Ca II, which is widely believed to be due to infalling evaporating bodies (FEBs or exocomets). We have collected moderately high-resolution spectra of ten young, A-type, rapidly-rotating stars with excess infrared continuum emission using the Cassegrain-Echelle spectrograph of the 2.1m Otto Struve Telescope. Here, we report the detection of two new gas disk systems with short-term variability in CaII: 5 Vul and 49 Cet. While the circumstellar disks of both stars have been previously described in the literature, this is the first report of night-to-night variability within the debris disk gas. Velocity arguments have allowed us to place some constraints on the dynamics of the absorbing gas.

  16. An active debris removal parametric study for LEO environment remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, J.-C.

    2011-06-01

    Recent analyses on the instability of the orbital debris population in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 have reignited interest in using active debris removal (ADR) to remediate the environment. There are, however, monumental technical, resource, operational, legal, and political challenges in making economically viable ADR a reality. Before a consensus on the need for ADR can be reached, a careful analysis of its effectiveness must be conducted. The goal is to demonstrate the need and feasibility of using ADR to better preserve the future environment and to explore different operational options to maximize the benefit-to-cost ratio. This paper describes a new sensitivity study on using ADR to stabilize the future LEO debris environment. The NASA long-term orbital debris evolutionary model, LEGEND, is used to quantify the effects of several key parameters, including target selection criteria/constraints and the starting epoch of ADR implementation. Additional analyses on potential ADR targets among the existing satellites and the benefits of collision avoidance maneuvers are also included.

  17. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Debris Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Kristin; Kanner, Howard; Yu, Weiping

    2006-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia Accident revealed a fundamental problem of the Space Shuttle Program regarding debris. Prior to the tragedy, the Space Shuttle requirement stated that no debris should be liberated that would jeopardize the flight crew and/or mission success. When the accident investigation determined that a large piece of foam debris was the primary cause of the loss of the shuttle and crew, it became apparent that the risk and scope of - damage that could be caused by certain types of debris, especially - ice and foam, were not fully understood. There was no clear understanding of the materials that could become debris, the path the debris might take during flight, the structures the debris might impact or the damage the impact might cause. In addition to supporting the primary NASA and USA goal of returning the Space Shuttle to flight by understanding the SRB debris environment and capability to withstand that environment, the SRB debris assessment project was divided into four primary tasks that were required to be completed to support the RTF goal. These tasks were (1) debris environment definition, (2) impact testing, (3) model correlation and (4) hardware evaluation. Additionally, the project aligned with USA's corporate goals of safety, customer satisfaction, professional development and fiscal accountability.

  18. Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    In an effort to help meet the growing interest and concern about the problems created by the rapid growth of population, The International Planned Parenthood Federation has prepared this booklet with the aim of assisting the study of the history and future trends of population growth and its impact on individual and family welfare, national,…

  19. The New NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, P. H.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) has released its latest Orbital Debris Engineering Model, ORDEM 3.0. It supersedes ORDEM 2.0. This newer model encompasses the Earth satellite and debris flux environment from altitudes of low Earth orbit (LEO) through geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Debris sizes of 10 microns through 1 m in non-GEO and 10 cm through 1 m in GEO are modeled. The inclusive years are 2010 through 2035. The ORDEM model series has always been data driven. ORDEM 3.0 has the benefit of many more hours from existing data sources and from new sources that weren't available to past versions. Returned surfaces, ground tests, and remote sensors all contribute data. The returned surface and ground test data reveal material characteristics of small particles. Densities of fragmentation debris particles smaller than 10 cm are grouped in ORDEM 3.0 in terms of high-, medium-, and lowdensities, along with RORSAT sodium-potassium droplets. Supporting models have advanced significantly. The LEO-to-GEO ENvironment Debris model (LEGEND) includes an historical and a future projection component with yearly populations that include launched and maneuvered intacts, mission related debris (MRD), and explosion and collision fragments. LEGEND propagates objects with ephemerides and physical characteristics down to 1 mm in size. The full LEGEND yearly population acts as an a priori condition for a Bayesian statistical model. Specific, well defined populations are added like the Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellite (RORSAT) sodium-potassium (NaK) droplets, recent major accidental and deliberate collision fragments, and known anomalous debris event fragments. For microdebris of sizes 10 microns to 1 mm the ODPO uses an in-house Degradation/Ejecta model in which a MLE technique is used with returned surface data to estimate populations. This paper elaborates on the upgrades of this model over previous versions highlighting the material density splits and consequences of

  20. Debris Flow Distributed Propagation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoretti, C.

    The debris flow distributed propagation model is a DEM-based model. The fan is dis- cretized by square cells and each cell is assigned an altitude on the sea level. The cells of the catchment are distinguished in two categories: the source cells and the stripe cells. The source cells receive the input hydograph: the cells close to the torrent which are flooded by the debris flow overflowing the torrent embankment are source cells. The stripes cells are the cells flooded by debris flow coming from the surrounding cells. At the first time step only the source cells are flooded by debris flow coming from the torrent. At the second time step a certain number of cells are flooded by de- bris flow coming from the source cells. These cells constitute a stripe of cells and are assigned order two. At the third time step another group of cells are flooded by the debris flow coming from the cells whose order is two. These cells constitute another stripe and are assigned order three. The cell order of a stripe is the time step number corresponding to the transition from dry to flooded state. The mass transfer or mo- mentum exchange between cells is governed by two different mechanisms. The mass transfer is allowed only by a positive or equal to zero flow level difference between the drained cell and the receiving cell. The mass transfer is limited by a not negative final flow level difference between the drained cell and the receiving cells. This limitation excludes the case of possible oscillations in the mass transfer. Another limitation is that the mass drained by a cell should be less than the available mass in that cell. This last condition provides the respect of mass conservation. The first mechanism of mass transfer is the gravity. The mass in a cell is transferred to the neighbouring cells with lower altitude and flow level according to an uniform flow law: The second mecha- nism of mass transfer is the broad crested weir. The mass in a cell is transferred to the

  1. Risk analysis reveals global hotspots for marine debris ingestion by sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Schuyler, Qamar A; Wilcox, Chris; Townsend, Kathy A; Wedemeyer-Strombel, Kathryn R; Balazs, George; van Sebille, Erik; Hardesty, Britta Denise

    2016-02-01

    Plastic marine debris pollution is rapidly becoming one of the critical environmental concerns facing wildlife in the 21st century. Here we present a risk analysis for plastic ingestion by sea turtles on a global scale. We combined global marine plastic distributions based on ocean drifter data with sea turtle habitat maps to predict exposure levels to plastic pollution. Empirical data from necropsies of deceased animals were then utilised to assess the consequence of exposure to plastics. We modelled the risk (probability of debris ingestion) by incorporating exposure to debris and consequence of exposure, and included life history stage, species of sea turtle and date of stranding observation as possible additional explanatory factors. Life history stage is the best predictor of debris ingestion, but the best-fit model also incorporates encounter rates within a limited distance from stranding location, marine debris predictions specific to the date of the stranding study and turtle species. There is no difference in ingestion rates between stranded turtles vs. those caught as bycatch from fishing activity, suggesting that stranded animals are not a biased representation of debris ingestion rates in the background population. Oceanic life-stage sea turtles are at the highest risk of debris ingestion, and olive ridley turtles are the most at-risk species. The regions of highest risk to global sea turtle populations are off of the east coasts of the USA, Australia and South Africa; the east Indian Ocean, and Southeast Asia. Model results can be used to predict the number of sea turtles globally at risk of debris ingestion. Based on currently available data, initial calculations indicate that up to 52% of sea turtles may have ingested debris.

  2. Risk Analysis Reveals Global Hotspots for Marine Debris Ingestion by Sea Turtles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuyler, Q. A.; Wilcox, C.; Townsend, K.; Wedemeyer-Strombel, K.; Balazs, G.; van Sebille, E.; Hardesty, B. D.

    2016-02-01

    Plastic marine debris pollution is rapidly becoming one of the critical environmental concerns facing wildlife in the 21st century. Here we present a risk analysis for plastic ingestion by sea turtles on a global scale. We combined global marine plastic distributions based on ocean drifter data with sea turtle habitat maps to predict exposure levels to plastic pollution. Empirical data from necropsies of deceased animals were then utilised to assess the consequence of exposure to plastics. We modelled the risk (probability of debris ingestion) by incorporating exposure to debris and consequence of exposure, and included life history stage, species of sea turtle, and date of stranding observation as possible additional explanatory factors. Life history stage is the best predictor of debris ingestion, but the best-fit model also incorporates encounter rates within a limited distance from stranding location, marine debris predictions specific to the date of the stranding study, and turtle species. There was no difference in ingestion rates between stranded turtles vs. those caught as bycatch from fishing activity, suggesting that stranded animals are not a biased representation of debris ingestion rates in the background population. Oceanic life-stage sea turtles are at the highest risk of debris ingestion, and olive ridley turtles are the most at-risk species. The regions of highest risk to global sea turtle populations are off of the east coasts of the USA, Australia, and South Africa; the east Indian Ocean, and Southeast Asia. Model results can be used to predict the number of sea turtles globally at risk of debris ingestion. Based on currently available data, initial calculations indicate that up to 52% of sea turtles may have ingested debris.

  3. Orbital debris characterization with impact flash signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, J.A.

    1991-12-31

    Orbital debris is recognized as a serious and growing threat to man`s utilization and exploration of space. While some information is available on the material composition of orbital debris, most measurements of orbital debris size and velocity distributions do not distinguish material type. The analysis and understanding of impact flash signatures can lead to an in-situ detector system with the ability to determine size and impact velocity distribution for orbital debris segregated by material type. This detector concept is based on an understanding of how material shock properties govern the flash signature arising from the impact of a piece of orbital debris (impactor) against a witness plate (target). Analytical results are presented that identify the most promising witness plate materials with respect to producing impact flash signatures that characterize the orbital debris material. 7 refs.

  4. Orbital debris characterization with impact flash signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Orbital debris is recognized as a serious and growing threat to man's utilization and exploration of space. While some information is available on the material composition of orbital debris, most measurements of orbital debris size and velocity distributions do not distinguish material type. The analysis and understanding of impact flash signatures can lead to an in-situ detector system with the ability to determine size and impact velocity distribution for orbital debris segregated by material type. This detector concept is based on an understanding of how material shock properties govern the flash signature arising from the impact of a piece of orbital debris (impactor) against a witness plate (target). Analytical results are presented that identify the most promising witness plate materials with respect to producing impact flash signatures that characterize the orbital debris material. 7 refs.

  5. Evaluating tsunami hazards from debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, P.; Walder, J.S.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Debris flows that enter water bodies may have significant kinetic energy, some of which is transferred to water motion or waves that can impact shorelines and structures. The associated hazards depend on the location of the affected area relative to the point at which the debris flow enters the water. Three distinct regions (splash zone, near field, and far field) may be identified. Experiments demonstrate that characteristics of the near field water wave, which is the only coherent wave to emerge from the splash zone, depend primarily on debris flow volume, debris flow submerged time of motion, and water depth at the point where debris flow motion stops. Near field wave characteristics commonly may be used as & proxy source for computational tsunami propagation. This result is used to assess hazards associated with potential debris flows entering a reservoir in the northwestern USA. ?? 2003 Millpress,.

  6. Orbiting Space Debris: Dangers, Measurement and Mitigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    B.5 Raw Video Signal of Debris Streak - Single Frame 281 Figure B.6 50 Shifted and Added Video Frames After 282 Background Subtraction Figure B.7...caused collisions. The leading candidate for a hyper-velocity collision with debris is the Cosmos 1275 fragmentation in 1981 which created 281 ...sensitivity. 280 SA ~ .0 . n I I4 MOM- Figure B.5 Raw Video Signal of Debris Streak - Single Frame 281 Figure B.6 50 Shifted and Added Video Frames After

  7. Debris dams and the relief of headwater streams.

    Treesearch

    S.T. Lancaster; G.E. Grant

    2005-01-01

    In forested, mountain landscapes where debris flows are common, valley-spanning debris dams formed by debris-flow deposition are a common feature of headwater valleys. In this paper, we examine how wood and boulder steps, i.e., debris dams, affect longitudinal profile relief and gradient at the debris-flow-fluvial transition in three sites in the Oregon Coast Range,...

  8. Best Mitigation Paths To Effectively Reduce Earth's Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegman, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some ways to reduce the problem posed by debris in orbit around the Earth. It reviews the orbital debris environment, the near-term needs to minimize the Kessler syndrome, also known as collisional cascading, a survey of active orbital debris mitigation strategies, the best paths to actively remove orbital debris, and technologies that are required for active debris mitigation.

  9. Variations in debris distribution and thickness on Himalayan debris-covered glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Morgan; Rowan, Ann; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram; Quincey, Duncan; Glasser, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Many Himalayan glaciers are characterised by extensive supraglacial debris coverage; in Nepal 33% of glaciers exhibit a continuous layer of debris covering their ablation areas. The presence of such a debris layer modulates a glacier's response to climatic change. However, the impact of this modulation is poorly constrained due to inadequate quantification of the impact of supraglacial debris on glacier surface energy balance. Few data exist to describe spatial and temporal variations in parameters such as debris thickness, albedo and surface roughness in energy balance calculations. Consequently, improved understanding of how debris affects Himalayan glacier ablation requires the assessment of surface energy balance model sensitivity to spatial and temporal variability in these parameters. Measurements of debris thickness, surface temperature, reflectance and roughness were collected across Khumbu Glacier during the pre- and post-monsoon seasons of 2014 and 2015. The extent of the spatial variation in each of these parameters are currently being incorporated into a point-based glacier surface energy balance model (CMB-RES, Collier et al., 2014, The Cryosphere), applied on a pixel-by-pixel basis to the glacier surface, to ascertain the sensitivity of glacier surface energy balance and ablation values to these debris parameters. A time series of debris thickness maps have been produced for Khumbu Glacier over a 15-year period (2000-2015) using Mihalcea et al.'s (2008, Cold Reg. Sci. Technol.) method, which utilised multi-temporal ASTER thermal imagery and our in situ debris surface temperature and thickness measurements. Change detection between these maps allowed the identification of variations in debris thickness that could be compared to discrete measurements, glacier surface velocity and morphology of the debris-covered area. Debris thickness was found to vary spatially between 0.1 and 4 metres within each debris thickness map, and temporally on the order of 1

  10. Debris about asteroids: Where and how much?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Hamilton, Douglas P.

    1992-01-01

    We summarize several recent findings on the size and shape of the region within which material can stably orbit an asteroid. If the asteroid (with assumed density 2.38 g/cu cm) circles the Sun at 2.55 AU, co-planar prograde material will remain trapped whenever started on unperturbed circular orbits at less than about 220 R(sub A) (asteroid radii); co-planar retrograde particles are stable out twice as far. Our 3-D stability surface, which encloses several hundred numerically calculated orbits that start with various inclinations, is shaped like a sphere with its top and bottom sliced off; its dimensions scale like the Hill radius =(mu/3)(exp 1/3)R, where mu is the asteroid-to-solar mass ratio and R is the asteroid's orbital radius. If the asteroid moves along an elliptical orbit, a fairly reliable indicator of the dimensions of the hazard zone is the size of its Hill sphere at the orbit's pericenter. Grains with radii less than a few mm will be lost through the action of radiation forces which can induce escape or cause collisions with the asteroid on times scales of a few years; interplanetary micrometeoroids produce collisional break-up of these particles in approximately 10(exp 4) yrs. The effects of Jupiter and of asteroids that pass close to the target asteroid allow particles to diffuse from the system, again shrinking the hazard zone. None of the considered sources-primordial formation, debris spalled off the asteroid during micrometeoroid impact, captured interplanetary particles, feeder satellites, etc., seem capable of densely populating distant orbits from the asteroid. No certain detections of debris clouds or of binary asteroids have been made. Thus, it seems highly unlikely that a spacecraft fly-by targeted at 100 R(sub A) from the asteroid over its orbital pole would encounter any material.

  11. LAD-C: A large area debris collector on the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Giovane, F. J.; Corsaro, R. D.; Burchell, M. J.; Drolshagen, G.; Kawai, H.; Stansbery, E. G.; Tabata, M.; Westphal, A. J.; Yano, H.

    2006-01-01

    The Large Area Debris Collector (LAD-C) is a 10 sq m aerogel and acoustic sensor system under development by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) with main collaboration from the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office at Johnson Space Center, JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Chiba University (Japan), ESA Space Debris Office, University of California at Berkeley, and University of Kent at Canterbury (UK). The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Space Test Program (STP) has assumed the responsibility for having the system manifested and deployed on the International Space Station (ISS), and then having it retrieved and returned to Earth after one to two years. LAD-C will attempt to utilize the ISS as a scientific platform to characterize the near-Earth meteoroid and orbital debris environment in the size regime where little data exist. In addition to meteoroid and orbital debris sample return, the acoustic sensors will record impact time, location, signal strength, and acoustic waveform data of the largest collected samples. A good time-dependent meteoroid and orbital debris flux estimate can be derived. Analysis of the data will also enable potential source identification of some of the collected samples. This dynamical link can be combined with laboratory composition analysis of impact residuals extracted from aerogel to further our understanding of orbital debris population, and the sources of meteoroids, asteroids and comets.

  12. A Survey for Massive Giant Planets in Debris Disks with Evacuated Inner Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, D.; Janson, M.; Moro-Martín, A.; Meyer, M. R.; Mamajek, E. E.; Masciadri, E.; Henning, Th.; Pascucci, I.; Kim, J. S.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Kasper, M.; Biller, B.

    2008-01-01

    The commonality of collisionally replenished debris around main-sequence stars suggests that minor bodies are frequent around Sun-like stars. Whether or not debris disks in general are accompanied by planets is yet unknown, but debris disks with large inner cavities—perhaps dynamically cleared—are considered to be prime candidates for hosting large-separation massive giant planets. We present here a high-contrast VLT/NACO angular differential imaging survey for eight such cold debris disks. We investigated the presence of massive giant planets in the range of orbital radii where the inner edge of the dust debris is expected. Our observations are sensitive to planets and brown dwarfs with masses >3-7 Jupiter mass, depending on the age and distance of the target star. Our observations did not identify any planet candidates. We compare the derived planet mass upper limits to the minimum planet mass required to dynamically clear the inner disks. While we cannot exclude that single giant planets are responsible for clearing out the inner debris disks, our observations constrain the parameter space available for such planets. The nondetection of massive planets in these evacuated debris disks further reinforces the notion that the giant planet population is confined to the inner disk (<15 AU). Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory at Paranal, Chile (ESO programs P078.C-0412(A) and P077.C-0391(A)).

  13. Debris On Herschel: An Overview Of The Search For Kuiper Belts Around The Nearest Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butner, Harold M.; Matthews, B.; DEBRIS Survey Team

    2010-01-01

    Building on the recent success of Spitzer in detecting debris disks around the nearest stars and the SCUBA instrument at the JCMT in imaging cold disks, DEBRIS (Disk Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre) is an open time key project on Herschel which aims to conduct an unbiased statistical survey for debris disks around the nearest stars to unprecedented mass limits. The survey is driven by 100 and 160 micron observations and is flux-limited. The sample is drawn from a database of nearby stars of spectral types A0 through M7 and totals 446 primaries, 348 of which will be observed by the DEBRIS team and 98 of which are covered by another project, the DUNES (DUst disks around NEarby Stars) team. Each target will be observed to a 100 micron rms of 1.2 mJy, allowing the detection of disks with dust masses comparable that of our own Kuiper belt towar the nearest stars. The superior resolution of Herschel should provide resolved images of many of the closest disks, and even our most distant disks may be resolvable. We will discuss the current state of debris disk research and highlight the areas in which Herschel will make the biggest impacts: establishing the true incidence of debris disks; characterizing the debris disk population, resolving disks and modeling their structure for evidence of long period planets; and the placing of our own Solar System in context

  14. The DEBRIS Project: Searching for Kuiper Belts around the Nearest Stars with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Brenda

    Building on the recent success of Spitzer in detecting debris disks around the nearest stars and the SCUBA instrument at the JCMT in imaging cold disks, DEBRIS (Disk Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre) is an open time key project on Herschel which aims to conduct an unbiased statistical survey for debris disks around the nearest stars to unprecedented mass limits. The survey is driven by 100 and 160 micron observations and is flux-limited. The sample is drawn from a database of nearby stars (Phillips et al. in prep) of spectral types A0 through M7 and totals 446 primaries, 348 of which will be observed by the DEBRIS team and 98 of which are covered by another the DUNES (DUst disks around NEarby Stars) team. Each target will be observed to a 100 micron rms of 1.2 mJy, allowing the detection of disks with dust masses comparable that of our own Kuiper belt towar the nearest stars. The superior resolution of Herschel should provide resolved images of many of the closest disks, and even our most distant disks may be resolvable. I will discuss the current state of debris disk research and highlight the areas in which Herschel will make the biggest impacts: establishing the true incidence of debris disks; characterizing the debris disk population, resolving disks and modeling their structure for evidence of long period planets; and the placing of our own Solar System in context.

  15. Debris and meteoroid proportions deduced from impact crater residue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthoud, Lucinda; Mandeville, Jean-Claude; Durin, Christian; Borg, Janet

    1995-01-01

    This study is a further investigation of space-exposed samples recovered from the LDEF satellite and the Franco-Russian 'Aragatz' dust collection experiment on the Mir Space Station. Impact craters with diameters ranging from 1 to 900 micron were found on the retrieved samples. Elemental analysis of residues found in the impact craters was carried out using Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). The analyses show evidence of micrometeoroid and orbital debris origins for the impacts. The proportions of these two components vary according to particle size and experimental position with respect to the leading edge of the spacecraft. On the LDEF leading edge 17 percent of the impacts were apparently caused by micrometeoroids and 11 percent by debris; on the LDEF trailing edge 23 percent of the impacts are apparently caused by micrometeoroids and 4 percent consist of debris particles - mostly larger than 3 micron in diameter - in elliptical orbits around the Earth. For Mir, the analyses indicate that micrometeoroids form 23 percent of impacts and debris 9 percent. However, we note that 60-70 percent of the craters are unidentifiable, so the definitive proportions of natural v. man-made particles are yet to be determined. Experiments carried out using a light gas gun to accelerate glass spheres and fragments demonstrate the influence of particle shape on crater morphology. The experiments also show that it is more difficult to analyze the residues produced by an irregular fragment than those produced by a spherical projectile. If the particle is travelling above a certain velocity, it vaporizes upon impact and no residues are left. Simulation experiments carried out with an electrostatic accelerator indicate that this limit is about 14 km/s for Fe particles impacting Al targets. This chemical analysis cut-off may bias interpretations of the relative populations of meteoroid and orbital debris. Oblique impacts and multiple foil detectors provide a higher likelihood

  16. The fate of debris in the Pluto-Charon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smullen, Rachel A.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2017-04-01

    The Pluto-Charon system has come into sharper focus following the flyby of New Horizons. We use N-body simulations to probe the unique dynamical history of this binary dwarf planet system. We follow the evolution of the debris disc that might have formed during the Charon-forming giant impact. First, we note that in situ formation of the four circumbinary moons is extremely difficult if Charon undergoes eccentric tidal evolution. We track collisions of disc debris with Charon, estimating that hundreds to hundreds of thousands of visible craters might arise from 0.3-5 km radius bodies. New Horizons data suggesting a dearth of these small craters may place constraints on the disc properties. While tidal heating will erase some of the cratering history, both tidal and radiogenic heating may also make it possible to differentiate disc debris craters from Kuiper belt object craters. We also track the debris ejected from the Pluto-Charon system into the Solar system; while most of this debris is ultimately lost from the Solar system, a few tens of 10-30 km radius bodies could survive as a Pluto-Charon collisional family. Most are plutinos in the 3:2 resonance with Neptune, while a small number populate nearby resonances. We show that migration of the giant planets early in the Solar system's history would not destroy this collisional family. Finally, we suggest that identification of such a family would likely need to be based on composition as they show minimal clustering in relevant orbital parameters.

  17. Debris and meteoroid proportions deduced from impact crater residue analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Berthoud, L.; Mandeville, J.C.; Durin, C.; Borg, J. |

    1995-02-01

    This study is a further investigation of space-exposed samples recovered from the LDEF satellite and the Franco-Russian `Aragatz` dust collection experiment on the Mir Space Station. Impact craters with diameters ranging from 1 to 900 micron were found on the retrieved samples. Elemental analysis of residues found in the impact craters was carried out using Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). The analyses show evidence of micrometeoroid and orbital debris origins for the impacts. The proportions of these two components vary according to particle size and experimental position with respect to the leading edge of the spacecraft. On the LDEF leading edge 17 percent of the impacts were apparently caused by micrometeoroids and 11 percent by debris; on the LDEF trailing edge 23 percent of the impacts are apparently caused by micrometeoroids and 4 percent consist of debris particles - mostly larger than 3 micron in diameter - in elliptical orbits around the Earth. For Mir, the analyses indicate that micrometeoroids form 23 percent of impacts and debris 9 percent. However, the authors note that 60-70 percent of the craters are unidentifiable, so the definitive proportions of natural vs. man-made particles are yet to be determined. Experiments carried out using a light gas gun to accelerate glass spheres and fragments demonstrate the influence of particle shape on crater morphology. The experiments also show that it is more difficult to analyze the residues produced by an irregular fragment than those produced by a spherical projectile. If the particle is travelling above a certain velocity, it vaporizes upon impact and no residues are left. Simulation experiments carried out with an electrostatic accelerator indicate that this limit is about 14 km/s for Fe particles impacting Al targets. This chemical analysis cut-off may bias interpretations of the relative populations of meteoroid and orbital debris.

  18. Optical Observations of the Orbital Debris Environment at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Africano, John L.; Stansbery, Eugene G.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the LEO and MEO (low and middle earth orbit) optical orbital debris environments, especially in the important, but difficult to track one to ten centimeter size range, NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has built a zenith-staring Liquid Mirror Telescope (LMT) near Cloudcroft, NM. The mirror of the LMT consists of a three-meter diameter parabolic dish containing several gallons of mercury that is spun at a rate of ten revolutions per minute. A disadvantage of the LMT is its inability to point in any direction other than the zenith. However, this is not a major limitation for statistical sampling of the LEO and MEO orbital debris population. While the LMT is used for the characterization of the LEO and MEO orbital debris environments, its inability to point off zenith limits its utility for the GEO environment where objects are concentrated over the equator. To gain a better understanding of the GEO debris environment, NASA JSC has built a CCD Debris Telescope (CDT). The CDT is a 12.5-inch aperture Schmidt portable telescope with automated pointing capability. The CDT is presently co-located with the LMT. The CDT can see down to 17.1 magnitude in a 30 second exposure with a 1.5 degree field of view. This corresponds to a ten percent reflective, 0.8-meter diameter object at geosynchronous altitude. Both telescopes are used every clear night. We present results from 3 years of observations from the LMT and preliminary results from the CDT.

  19. An Optical Survey for Space Debris in Geosynchronous Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Abercromby, K.; Rodriguez, H.; Barker, E.

    2007-12-01

    The University of Michigan's Curtis-Schmidt telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory is dedicated to an optical survey for faint space debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) for NASA. In the public catalog in or near the GEO regime, there are over 250 active spacecraft, and more than 500 large inactive spacecraft and debris pieces. The purpose of the Schmidt GEO survey is to statistically estimate the debris population of objects too faint to be in the catalog. One result is that objects fainter than 15th R magnitude have a very different angular rate distribution than bright objects. One possibility for some of this difference is that an unknown fraction of the faint objects have a high area-to-mass (A/M) ratio, whose orbital eccentricity and inclination are changed by solar radiation pressure. Such behavior is predicted by theoretical models (Anselmo and Pardini 2005, Liou and Weaver 2005) and seen in European observations of GEO debris (Schildknecht, et al 2005). Our goal is to determine orbits for a complete sample of survey objects fainter than 15th R magnitude. However, the Schmidt survey observations only provide data for five minutes, which is not a long enough arc to fit a full six parameter orbit on GEO objects (mean period = 1436 min). Therefore in March, 2007, the Schmidt was used simultaneously with the CTIO 0.9-m. The Schmidt was constantly in survey mode, and as faint objects were detected, they were followed-up in real-time on the CTIO 0.9-m for orbit determination. Objects with full six parameter orbits show a range of eccentricities, inclination, and mean motion. We will discuss this result, as well as a summary of conclusions from the Schmidt GEO survey. This project is supported by grants to the University of Michigan from NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office.

  20. The Fate of Debris in the Pluto-Charon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smullen, Rachel A.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2017-01-01

    The Pluto-Charon system has come into sharper focus following the fly by of New Horizons. We use N-body simulations to probe the unique dynamical history of this binary dwarf planet system. We follow the evolution of the debris disc that might have formed during the Charon-forming giant impact. First, we note that in-situ formation of the four circumbinary moons is extremely difficult if Charon undergoes eccentric tidal evolution. We track collisions of disc debris with Charon, estimating that hundreds to hundreds of thousands of visible craters might arise from 0.3-5 km radius bodies. New Horizons data suggesting a dearth of these small craters may place constraints on the disc properties. While tidal heating will erase some of the cratering history, both tidal and radiogenic heating may also make it possible to differentiate disc debris craters from Kuiper belt object craters. We also track the debris ejected from the Pluto-Charon system into the Solar System; while most of this debris is ultimately lost from the Solar System, a few tens of 10-30 km radius bodies could survive as a Pluto-Charon collisional family. Most are plutinos in the 3:2 resonance with Neptune, while a small number populate nearby resonances. We show that migration of the giant planets early in the Solar System's history would not destroy this collisional family. Finally, we suggest that identification of such a family would likely need to be based on composition as they show minimal clustering in relevant orbital parameters.

  1. Primary dispersal of supraglacial debris and debris cover formation on alpine glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkbride, M. P.; Deline, P.

    2009-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are receiving increased attention due to the modulation of runoff by supraglacial covers, and to the lake outburst flood hazard at many covered glacier termini. Observed increases in debris cover extents cannot presently be explained in terms of glaciological influences. The supply of englacial debris to the supraglacial zone has previously been understood only in terms of local dispersal due to differential ablation between covered and uncovered ice, for example on medial moraines. Here, we introduce the term primary dispersal to describe the process of migration of the outcrops of angled debris septa across melting, thinning ablation zones. Understanding primary debris dispersal is an essential step to understanding how supraglacial debris cover is controlled by glaciological variables, and hence is sensitive to climatically-induced fluctuation. Three measures of a glacier's ability to evacuate supraglacial debris are outlined: (1) a concentration factor describing the focussing of englacial debris into specific supraglacial mass loads; (2) the rate of migration of a septum outcrop relative to the local ice surface; and (3) a downstream velocity differential between a septum outcrop and the ice surface. (1) and (2) are inversely related, while (3) increases downglacier to explain why slow-moving, thinning ice rapidly becomes debris covered. Data from Glacier d'Estelette (Italian Alps) illustrate primary dispersal processes at a site where debris cover is increasing in common with many other shrinking alpine glaciers. We develop a model of the potential for debris cover formation and growth in different glaciological environments. This explains why glaciers whose termini are obstructed often have steep debris septa feeding debris covers which vary slowly in response to mass balance change. In contrast, at glaciers with gently-dipping debris-bearing foliation, the debris cover extent is sensitive to glaciological change. These findings

  2. Debris Selection and Optimal Path Planning for Debris Removal on the SSO: Impulsive-Thrust Option

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olympio, J. T.; Frouvelle, N.

    2013-08-01

    The current paper deals with the mission design of a generic active space debris removal spacecraft. Considered debris are all on a sun-synchronous orbit. A perturbed Lambert's problem, modelling the transfer between two debris, is devised to take into account J2 perturbation, and to quickly evaluate mission scenarios. A robust approach, using techniques of global optimisation, is followed to find optimal debris sequence and mission strategy. Manoeuvres optimization is then performed to refine the selected trajectory scenarii.

  3. Space debris measurement program at Phillips Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dao, Phan D.; Mcnutt, Ross T.

    1992-01-01

    Ground-based optical sensing was identified as a technique for measuring space debris complementary to radar in the critical debris size range of 1 to 10 cm. The Phillips Laboratory is building a staring optical sensor for space debris measurement and considering search and track optical measurement at additional sites. The staring sensor is implemented in collaboration with Wright Laboratory using the 2.5 m telescope at Wright Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio. The search and track sensor is designed to detect and track orbital debris in tasked orbits. A progress report and a discussion of sensor performance and search and track strategies will be given.

  4. Space debris mitigation measures in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adimurthy, V.; Ganeshan, A. S.

    2006-02-01

    The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) recognizes the importance of the current space debris scenario, and the impact it has on the effective utilization of space technology for the improvement in the quality of life on the Earth. ISRO is committed to effective management of the threats due to space debris. Towards this commitment ISRO works on different aspects of space debris, including the debris mitigation measures. This paper highlights the activities and achievements in the implementation of the mitigation measures. ISRO successfully designed and developed a propellant venting system for implementation in the existing upper stage of India's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), which uses Earth-storable liquid propellants. GSLV also employs passivation of the Cryogenic Upper Stage at the end of its useful mission. ISRO's communication satellites in GSO are designed with adequate propellant margins for re-orbiting at the end of their useful life to a higher graveyard orbit. A typical successful operation in connection with INSAT-2C is described. ISRO developed its debris environmental models and software to predict the close approach of any of the debris to the functional satellites. The software are regularly used for the debris risk management of the orbiting spacecraft and launch vehicles. ISRO recognizes the role of international cooperation in the debris mitigation measures and actively contributes to the efforts of the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) and United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNCOPUOS).

  5. Pathways and Distribution of Marine Debris Around a Remote Caribbean Island, Little Cayman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, L.; Marsh, L.; O'Keefe, A.; Duran, J.; Wilcox, S. M.; James, R.; Cowan, E.

    2011-12-01

    Marine Debris is a major environmental concern that affects all levels of marine life. On remote beaches in the Caribbean, where human populations are minimal, marine debris is largely deposited by ocean currents. The ocean is estimated to be littered with over 6 million metric tons of trash per year with 90% coming from land sources, but little is known about the exact sources and pathways for the debris. In 2006, on Little Cayman Island, coastal debris was collected at two coastal areas where removal of debris had not occurred in at least 9 years and along 2000 meters squared. One site was located on the north side, while the other site was located on the south side of the island. Both sites were located in reef-protected coastal zones. These two sites were revisited in 2007, 2010, and 2011 to determine the volume, weight, and type of debris arriving annually and to assess the importance of different coastal processes in deposition. In 2011, eight turtle nesting beaches were added to the study and a total of 11,186 liters of debris was collected from 1600 meters of coastline. The island lies in a northeast southwest orientation. The south-side of the island is influenced largely by prevailing trade winds, currents and tropical storms, traveling across the Caribbean from the east. Currents, eddies, and Norwesters would presumably deposit debris on the north side of the island. Approximately five times the amount of debris is deposited on the south side of the island than on the north side of the island. From the total debris collected, 72.45% was plastic, 8.23% shoes, 6.37% ropes & nets , 5.13% glass, 4.37% styrofoam, and 3.44% contained other debris. The marine debris originated in 8 different countries, and it is estimated that there is collectively 223,721 liters (11,635 kg) covering the shores of the entire island. Remarkably, debris found on Little Cayman in 2011 was traced to the 2010 Haitian earthquake relief effort.

  6. 33 CFR 151.3000 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 151.3000 Section 151.3000... Definition of Marine Debris for the Purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act § 151.3000 Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

  7. 33 CFR 151.3000 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 151.3000 Section 151.3000... Definition of Marine Debris for the Purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act § 151.3000 Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

  8. 33 CFR 151.3000 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 151.3000 Section 151.3000... Definition of Marine Debris for the Purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act § 151.3000 Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention,...

  9. 33 CFR 151.3000 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 151.3000 Section 151.3000... Definition of Marine Debris for the Purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act § 151.3000 Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention,...

  10. A Sensitivity Study on the Effectiveness of Active Debris Removal in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J. C.; Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-01-01

    The near-Earth orbital debris population will continue to increase in the future due to ongoing space activities, on-orbit explosions, and accidental collisions among resident space objects. Commonly adopted mitigation measures, such as limiting postmission orbital lifetimes of satellites to less than 25 years, will slow down the population growth, but may be insufficient to stabilize the environment. The nature of the growth, in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region, is further demonstrated by a recent study where no future space launches were conducted in the environment projection simulations. The results indicate that, even with no new launches, the LEO debris population would remain relatively constant for only the next 50 years. Beyond that, the debris population would begin to increase noticeably, due to the production of collisional debris. Therefore, to better limit the growth of future debris population to protect the environment, remediation option, i.e., removing existing large and massive objects from orbit, needs to be considered. This paper does not intend to address the technical or economical issues for active debris removal. Rather, the objective is to provide a sensitivity study to quantify the effectiveness of various remediation options. A removal criterion based upon mass and collision probability is developed to rank objects at the beginning of each projection year. This study includes simulations with removal rates ranging from 2 to 20 objects per year, starting in the year 2020. The outcome of each simulation is analyzed, and compared with others. The summary of the study serves as a general guideline for future debris removal consideration.

  11. Columbia Debris - Congressman Dave Weldon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-20

    Congressman Dave Weldon (second from right) looks over the pieces of Columbia debris stored in the RLV Hangar. At right is Steve Altemus, Space Shuttle test director . Accompanying Weldon are (left toright) Greg Katnick, Grant Case, J.B. Kump and Center Director Roy Bridges. Workers will attempt to reconstruct the orbiter as part of the ongoing investigation of the accident that destroyed the Columbia and claimed the lives of seven astronauts as they returned to Earth after a 16-day research mission, STS-107.

  12. Improved Quantitative Debris Monitoring Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    voltage increase. A rate increase of the output was expected. The results were inconclusive because the oil contained 12 - r b a large amount of the 10...34ME%7A= - %ZT.ATQf This research was partially funded by the in-house 1 rdt )eri (lent research fund. 𔃻 CCSATI CODIES a S%.9jECT bE~,ohq. n~f...q.-bwrI This report describes the operation and performance evaluation results of a QDmi Mark TI prototype fine ferrous debris monitoring system

  13. The Fast Debris Evolution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Hugh G.; Swinerd, Graham; Newland, Rebecca; Saunders, Arrun

    The ‘Particles-in-a-box' (PIB) model introduced by Talent (1992) removed the need for computerintensive Monte Carlo simulation to predict the gross characteristics of an evolving debris environment. The PIB model was described using a differential equation that allows the stability of the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment to be tested by a straightforward analysis of the equation's coefficients. As part of an ongoing research effort to investigate more efficient approaches to evolutionary modelling and to develop a suite of educational tools, a new PIB model has been developed. The model, entitled Fast Debris Evolution (FaDE), employs a first-order differential equation to describe the rate at which new objects (˜ 10 cm) are added and removed from the environment. Whilst Talent (1992) based the collision theory for the PIB approach on collisions between gas particles and adopted specific values for the parameters of the model from a number of references, the form and coefficients of the FaDE model equations can be inferred from the outputs of future projections produced by high-fidelity models, such as the DAMAGE model. The FaDE model has been implemented as a client-side, web-based service using Javascript embedded within a HTML document. Due to the simple nature of the algorithm, FaDE can deliver the results of future projections immediately in a graphical format, with complete user-control over key simulation parameters. Historical and future projections for the ˜ 10 cm low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment under a variety of different scenarios are possible, including business as usual, no future launches, post-mission disposal and remediation. A selection of results is presented with comparisons with predictions made using the DAMAGE environment model. The results demonstrate that the FaDE model is able to capture comparable time-series of collisions and number of objects as predicted by DAMAGE in several scenarios. Further, and perhaps more importantly

  14. THE COLLISIONAL EVOLUTION OF DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Andras; Rieke, George H.; Balog, Zoltan E-mail: grieke@as.arizona.edu

    2013-05-01

    We explore the collisional decay of disk mass and infrared emission in debris disks. With models, we show that the rate of the decay varies throughout the evolution of the disks, increasing its rate up to a certain point, which is followed by a leveling off to a slower value. The total disk mass falls off {proportional_to}t {sup -0.35} at its fastest point (where t is time) for our reference model, while the dust mass and its proxy-the infrared excess emission-fades significantly faster ({proportional_to}t {sup -0.8}). These later level off to a decay rate of M{sub tot}(t){proportional_to}t {sup -0.08} and M{sub dust}(t) or L{sub ir}(t){proportional_to}t {sup -0.6}. This is slower than the {proportional_to}t {sup -1} decay given for all three system parameters by traditional analytic models. We also compile an extensive catalog of Spitzer and Herschel 24, 70, and 100 {mu}m observations. Assuming a log-normal distribution of initial disk masses, we generate model population decay curves for the fraction of stars harboring debris disks detected at 24 {mu}m. We also model the distribution of measured excesses at the far-IR wavelengths (70-100 {mu}m) at certain age regimes. We show general agreement at 24 {mu}m between the decay of our numerical collisional population synthesis model and observations up to a Gyr. We associate offsets above a Gyr to stochastic events in a few select systems. We cannot fit the decay in the far-infrared convincingly with grain strength properties appropriate for silicates, but those of water ice give fits more consistent with the observations (other relatively weak grain materials would presumably also be successful). The oldest disks have a higher incidence of large excesses than predicted by the model; again, a plausible explanation is very late phases of high dynamical activity around a small number of stars. Finally, we constrain the variables of our numerical model by comparing the evolutionary trends generated from the exploration

  15. Autogenic dynamics of debris-flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Wilco; de Haas, Tjalling; Braat, Lisanne; Kleinhans, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    Alluvial fans develop their semi-conical shape by cyclic avulsion of their geomorphologically active sector from a fixed fan apex. These cyclic avulsions have been attributed to both allogenic and autogenic forcings and processes. Autogenic dynamics have been extensively studied on fluvial fans through physical scale experiments, and are governed by cyclic alternations of aggradation by unconfined sheet flow, fanhead incision leading to channelized flow, channel backfilling and avulsion. On debris-flow fans, however, autogenic dynamics have not yet been directly observed. We experimentally created debris-flow fans under constant extrinsic forcings, and show that autogenic dynamics are a fundamental intrinsic process on debris-flow fans. We found that autogenic cycles on debris-flow fans are driven by sequences of backfilling, avulsion and channelization, similar to the cycles on fluvial fans. However, the processes that govern these sequences are unique for debris-flow fans, and differ fundamentally from the processes that govern autogenic dynamics on fluvial fans. We experimentally observed that backfilling commenced after the debris flows reached their maximum possible extent. The next debris flows then progressively became shorter, driven by feedbacks on fan morphology and flow-dynamics. The progressively decreasing debris-flow length caused in-channel sedimentation, which led to increasing channel overflow and wider debris flows. This reduced the impulse of the liquefied flow body to the flow front, which then further reduced flow velocity and runout length, and induced further in-channel sedimentation. This commenced a positive feedback wherein debris flows became increasingly short and wide, until the channel was completely filled and the apex cross-profile was plano-convex. At this point, there was no preferential transport direction by channelization, and the debris flows progressively avulsed towards the steepest, preferential, flow path. Simultaneously

  16. Sampling supraglacial debris thickness using terrestrial photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Lindsey; Mertes, Jordan

    2017-04-01

    The melt rate of debris-covered ice differs to that of clean ice primarily as a function of debris thickness. The spatial distribution of supraglacial debris thickness must therefore be known in order to understand how it is likely to impact glacier behaviour, and meltwater contribution to local hydrological resources and global sea level rise. However, practical means of determining debris cover thickness remain elusive. In this study we explore the utility of terrestrial photogrammetry to produce high resolution, scaled and texturized digital terrain models of debris cover exposures above ice cliffs as a means of quantifying and characterizing debris thickness. Two Nikon D5000 DSLRs with Tamron 100mm lenses were used to photograph a sample area of the Ngozumpa glacier in the Khumbu Himal of Nepal in April 2016. A Structure from Motion workflow using Agisoft Photoscan software was used to generate a surface models with <10cm resolution. A Trimble Geo7X differential GPS with Zephyr antenna, along with a local base station, was used to precisely measure marked ground control points to scale the photogrammetric surface model. Measurements of debris thickness along the exposed cliffline were made from this scaled model, assuming that the ice surface at the debris-ice boundary is horizontal, and these data are compared to 50 manual point measurements along the same clifftops. We conclude that sufficiently high resolution photogrammetry, with precise scaling information, provides a useful means to determine debris thickness at clifftop exposures. The resolution of the possible measurements depends on image resolution, the accuracy of the ground control points and the computational capacity to generate centimetre scale surface models. Application of such techniques to sufficiently high resolution imagery from UAV-borne cameras may offer a powerful means of determining debris thickness distribution patterns over debris covered glacier termini.

  17. Space debris, remarks on current legal issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrest, Armel

    2001-10-01

    A legal definition of space debris must take into consideration its consequences on the legal status of the object. For the purpose of mitigation of space debris at the time of the launch, any object launched in outer pace will turn sooner or later into a space debris. For liability purposes, a definition of a "space object " is more useful that the notion of "space debris". It must be sure that every space debris is considered as a space objet according to the liability convention. At the end and certainly a more difficult issue is the qualification of a space object as a space debris when it will be technically feasible to remove it. The question of the property of the debris or object should be important. States are responsible and liable for space debris. According to article VI and VII of the Outer Space Treaty, they must authorise and control any national space activity and make sure these activities will not be conducted against the law. In the case of an accident and excepting the use of nuclear power sources, the main problem lies on damage in outer space to other spacecraft. In that case, the victim must prove a fault. According with the lack of precise rules it should be difficult. It should be necessary to precise the law applicable to space debris. At the domestic level, rules must be taken to prevent space debris through an assessment of risk within the licensing process. At the international level, the principle of an obligation to mitigate debris should be clearly accepted. Some general rules should be useful to avoid breach of competition between commercial actors. The adoption of a clear and precise code of conduct should be of great help because it would determine the good launching States' behaviour and greatly helps the judge appreciating the proof of a fault in case of an accident.

  18. High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

    2009-10-30

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored

  19. Optical Observations of GEO Debris with Two Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Rodriguez, H.; Barker, E.

    2007-01-01

    For several years, the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST), the University of Michigan s 0.6/0.9-m Schmidt telescope on Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile has been used to survey the debris population at GEO in the visible regime. Magnitudes, positions, and angular rates are determined for GEO objects as they move across the telescope s field-of-view (FOV) during a 5-minute window. This short window of time is not long enough to determine a full six parameter orbit so usually a circular orbit is assumed. A longer arc of time is necessary to determine eccentricity and to look for changes in the orbit with time. MODEST can follow objects in real-time, but only at the price of stopping survey operations. A second telescope would allow for longer arcs of orbit to obtain the full six orbital parameters, as well as assess the changes over time. An additional benefit of having a second telescope is the capability of obtaining BVRI colors of the faint targets, aiding efforts to determine the material type of faint debris. For 14 nights in March 2007, two telescopes were used simultaneously to observe the GEO debris field. MODEST was used exclusively in survey mode. As objects were detected, they were handed off in near real-time to the Cerro Tololo 0.9-m telescope for follow-up observations. The goal was to determine orbits and colors for all objects fainter than R = 15th magnitude (corresponds to 1 meter in size assuming a 0.2 albedo) detected by MODEST. The hand-off process was completely functional during the final eight nights and follow-ups for objects from night-to-night were possible. The cutoff magnitude level of 15th was selected on the basis of an abrupt change in the observed angular rate distribution in the MODEST surveys. Objects brighter than 15th magnitude tend to lie on a well defined locus in the angular rate plane (and have orbits in the catalog), while fainter objects fill the plane almost uniformly. We need to determine full

  20. Assessment and prediction of debris-flow hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Gerald F.; ,

    1993-01-01

    Study of debris-flow geomorphology and initiation mechanism has led to better understanding of debris-flow processes. This paper reviews how this understanding is used in current techniques for assessment and prediction of debris-flow hazards.

  1. Space debris removal by ground-based lasers: main conclusions of the European project CLEANSPACE.

    PubMed

    Esmiller, Bruno; Jacquelard, Christophe; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Wnuk, Edwin

    2014-11-01

    Studies show that the number of debris in low Earth orbit is exponentially growing despite future debris release mitigation measures considered. Specifically, the already existing population of small and medium debris (between 1 cm and several dozens of cm) is today a concrete threat to operational satellites. A ground-based laser solution which can remove, at low expense and in a nondestructive way, hazardous debris around selected space assets appears as a highly promising answer. This solution is studied within the framework of the CLEANSPACE project which is part of the FP7 space program. The overall CLEANSPACE objective is: to propose an efficient and affordable global system architecture, to tackle safety regulation aspects, political implications and future collaborations, to develop affordable technological bricks, and to establish a roadmap for the development and the future implantation of a fully functional laser protection system. This paper will present the main conclusions of the CLEANSPACE project.

  2. Inventory and transport of plastic debris in the Laurentian Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Matthew J; Hittinger, Eric

    2017-02-15

    Plastic pollution in the world's oceans has received much attention, but there has been increasing concern about the high concentrations of plastic debris in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Using census data and methodologies used to study ocean debris we derive a first estimate of 9887 metric tonnes per year of plastic debris entering the Great Lakes. These estimates are translated into population-dependent particle inputs which are advected using currents from a hydrodynamic model to map the spatial distribution of plastic debris in the Great Lakes. Model results compare favorably with previously published sampling data. The samples are used to calibrate the model to derive surface microplastic mass estimates of 0.0211 metric tonnes in Lake Superior, 1.44 metric tonnes in Huron, and 4.41 metric tonnes in Erie. These results have many applications, including informing cleanup efforts, helping target pollution prevention, and understanding the inter-state or international flows of plastic pollution.

  3. A computational model for assessing high-velocity debris impact in space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergh, M.; Garcia, V.

    2017-07-01

    Man-made space debris is dominating the background meteorite environment with a growing debris population leading to increased collision risks for satellites, especially in the low Earth orbit and geostationary orbit protected environments. Here we present a computational model for estimating the effect of hypervelocity impact from debris particles on non-shielded propellant and pressurant tanks. Eulerian hydrocode simulation is utilised to model firstly penetration and shock wave formation in the propellant and secondly subsequent detonation wave propagation and interaction with the tank wall. Furthermore, reactive molecular dynamics is used to estimate the risk of detonation in a liquid hydrazine layer. We present simulations of a 3.5 mm aluminium spherical debris particle at a velocity of 14 km/s relative to a hydrazine tank. We find that the degree of damage is strongly dependent on tank temperature and hence on the satellite thermal configuration at its end of life.

  4. A computational model for assessing high-velocity debris impact in space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergh, M.; Garcia, V.

    2017-01-01

    Man-made space debris is dominating the background meteorite environment with a growing debris population leading to increased collision risks for satellites, especially in the low Earth orbit and geostationary orbit protected environments. Here we present a computational model for estimating the effect of hypervelocity impact from debris particles on non-shielded propellant and pressurant tanks. Eulerian hydrocode simulation is utilised to model firstly penetration and shock wave formation in the propellant and secondly subsequent detonation wave propagation and interaction with the tank wall. Furthermore, reactive molecular dynamics is used to estimate the risk of detonation in a liquid hydrazine layer. We present simulations of a 3.5 mm aluminium spherical debris particle at a velocity of 14 km/s relative to a hydrazine tank. We find that the degree of damage is strongly dependent on tank temperature and hence on the satellite thermal configuration at its end of life.

  5. Application of multi-agent coordination methods to the design of space debris mitigation tours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Jeffrey; Howell, Kathleen; Wilson, Roby

    2016-04-01

    The growth in the number of defunct and fragmented objects near to the Earth poses a growing hazard to launch operations as well as existing on-orbit assets. Numerous studies have demonstrated the positive impact of active debris mitigation campaigns upon the growth of debris populations, but comparatively fewer investigations incorporate specific mission scenarios. Furthermore, while many active mitigation methods have been proposed, certain classes of debris objects are amenable to mitigation campaigns employing chaser spacecraft with existing chemical and low-thrust propulsive technologies. This investigation incorporates an ant colony optimization routing algorithm and multi-agent coordination via auctions into a debris mitigation tour scheme suitable for preliminary mission design and analysis as well as spacecraft flight operations.

  6. Conjunction challenges of low-thrust geosynchronous debris removal maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul V.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2016-06-01

    The conjunction challenges of low-thrust engines for continuous thrust re-orbiting of geosynchronous (GEO) objects to super-synchronous disposal orbits are investigated, with applications to end-of-life mitigation and active debris removal (ADR) technologies. In particular, the low maneuverability of low-thrust systems renders collision avoidance a challenging task. This study investigates the number of conjunction events a low-thrust system could encounter with the current GEO debris population during a typical re-orbit to 300 km above the GEO ring. Sensitivities to thrust level and initial longitude and inclination are evaluated, and the impact of delaying the start time for a re-orbiting maneuver is assessed. Results demonstrate that the mean number of conjunctions increases hyperbolically as thrust level decreases, but timing the start of the maneuver appropriately can reduce the average conjunction rate when lower thrust levels are applied.

  7. Riding a Trail of Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the comet Encke riding along its pebbly trail of debris (long diagonal line) between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. This material actually encircles the solar system, following the path of Encke's orbit. Twin jets of material can also be seen shooting away from the comet in the short, fan-shaped emission, spreading horizontally from the comet.

    Encke, which orbits the Sun every 3.3 years, is well traveled. Having exhausted its supply of fine particles, it now leaves a long trail of larger more gravel-like debris, about one millimeter in size or greater. Every October, Earth passes through Encke's wake, resulting in the well-known Taurid meteor shower.

    This image was captured by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer when Encke was 2.6 times farther away than Earth is from the Sun. It is the best yet mid-infrared view of the comet at this great distance. The data are helping astronomers understand how rotating comets eject particles as they circle the Sun.

  8. Orbital Debris Observations with WFCAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bold, Matthew; Cross, Nick; Irwin, Mike; Kendrick, Richard; Kerr, Thomas; Lederer, Susan; Mann, Robert; Sutorius, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope has been operating for 35 years on the summit of Mauna Kea as a premier Infrared astronomical facility. In its 35th year the telescope has been turned over to a new operating group consisting of University of Arizona, University of Hawaii and the LM Advanced Technology Center. UKIRT will continue its astronomical mission with a portion of observing time dedicated to orbital debris and Near Earth Object detection and characterization. During the past 10 years the UKIRT Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) has been performing large area astronomical surveys in the J, H and K bands. The data for these surveys have been reduced by the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit in Cambridge, England and archived by the Wide Field Astronomy Unit in Edinburgh, Scotland. During January and February of 2014 the Wide Field CAMera (WFCAM) was used to scan through the geostationary satellite belt detecting operational satellites as well as nearby debris. Accurate photometric and astrometric parameters have been developed by CASU for each of the detections and all data has been archived by WFAU.

  9. Dynamical Processes in Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beust, H.

    2010-01-01

    Debris disks are dusty and/or gasous disk that are viewed in scattered light and thermal emission around stars around 107-108 yr. It is well known that the dust in these system is not primodial. It is short lived and must be continuously replenished by colliding planetesimals. Most of them appear distorted by the gravitational pertubations by inner planets or stellar companions. This is why these systems are viewed today as young planetary systems. Debris disks are collisional systems. Thanks to collisional cascade towards smaller size, the dust particles are transported outwards by radiation or stellar wind pressure. Below a given blow-off size they escape the system. This model explains the radial density profiles observed. The various asymmetries, clumps and other dynamical structures such as spiral arms are though to originate in gravitational perturbations by planets and/or companions. Planets usually create gaps in disks, but they also sculpt disks via their mean-motion resonances. Clumpy structures are often invoked as resulting from such an interaction. Stellar companions usually truncate the disk, sometimes confining them to thin annular structures. They also help creating spiral patterns, either tidally or by secular interaction. In this context, the situation is different whether the perturbing companions are bound or just passing stars. In any case, dynamical studies (often specific to each system) can greatly help constraining the configuration and the past history of these systems.

  10. Developing Insights into Debris Disk Composition from Dust Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Alycia

    Science Goals: To enable interpretation of visible to near-IR spectrophotometric imaging of debris disks, we propose realistic modeling of scattering of light by small aggregate dust grains and new laboratory measurements of meteoritic organic analogs. We will determine if disk colors, phase functions, and polarizations place unique constraints on the composition of debris dust. Ongoing collisions of planetesimals generate dust; therefore, the dust provides unique information on compositions of the parent bodies. These exosolar analogs of asteroids and comets bear clues to the history of a planetary system including migration and thermal processing. In the solar system, small bodies delivered volatiles to Earth, and they presumably play the same role for exoplanets. Because directly imaged debris disks are cold, they have no solid-state emission features. Grain scattering properties as a function of wavelength are our only tool to reveal their compositions. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging showed debris disks to be populated with small grains, a few tenths of a micron and larger. Radiation pressure and blasting by the interstellar medium sweep the dust away. New work from HST and ground-based adaptive optics systems reveal the color and polarization of the scattered light at wavelengths from visible to near-IR, with two dozen disks imaged at some subset of wavelengths. Far-IR and submm images from Herschel and ALMA show that the same disks also contain large, i.e. mm-sized, grains. Our goal is to develop dust calculations so that spectrophotometry of disks can determine dust compositions. Solar system interplanetary dust particles are fluffy aggregates, but most previous work on debris disk composition relied on Mie theory, i.e. assumed compact spherical grains. Mie calculations do not reproduce the observed colors and phase functions observed from debris disks. The few more complex calculations that exist do not explore the range of compositions and sizes

  11. Estimates of current debris from flux models

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Flux models that balance accuracy and simplicity are used to predict the growth of space debris to the present. Known and projected launch rates, decay models, and numerical integrations are used to predict distributions that closely resemble the current catalog-particularly in the regions containing most of the debris.

  12. STS-107 Columbia debris reconstruction team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-12

    Astronauts Lee Archambault and Joan Higginbotham look at a piece of Columbia debris placed on the grid in the RLV Hangar. The debris was shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La. As part of the ongoing investigation into the tragic accident, workers will attempt to reconstruct the orbiter inside the RLV.

  13. STS-107 Columbia debris reconstruction team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-12

    Shuttle Program Manager Ron Dittemore (leaning over) examines a piece of Columbia debris in the RLV Hangar. The debris was shipped from the collection point at Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La. As part of the ongoing investigation into the tragic accident that claimed Columbia and her crew of seven, workers will attempt to reconstruct the orbiter inside the RLV.

  14. STS-107 Columbia debris reconstruction team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-12

    The reconstruction team checks out the Columbia debris after it was offloaded at the RLV Hangar. The debris was shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La. As part of the ongoing investigation into the tragic accident, workers will attempt to reconstruct the orbiter inside the RLV.

  15. STS-107 Columbia debris reconstruction team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-12

    A worker examines a piece of the Columbia debris on the floor of the RLV Hangar. The debris was shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La. As part of the ongoing investigation into the tragic accident, workers will attempt to reconstruct the orbiter inside the RLV.

  16. STS-107 Columbia debris reconstruction team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-12

    Members of the reconstruction team check out the Columbia debris inside the RLV Hangar. The debris was shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La. As part of the ongoing investigation into the tragic accident, workers will attempt to reconstruct the orbiter inside the RLV.

  17. A high severity space hazard - Orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, G. K.; Disimile, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the orbital debris-meteoroid hazard that will be encountered by the Space Station Freedom. Recent reports on the orbital debris studies are discussed with special attention given to the procedures and techniques that can be used to minimize the impact damage, to avoid the collision, and to design shielding distribution so as to reduce the penetration damage.

  18. Interagency Report on Orbital Debris, 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This 1995 report updates the findings and recommendations of the 1989 report and reflects the authors' progress in understanding and managing the orbital debris environment. It provides an up-to-date portrait of their measurement, modeling, and mitigation efforts; and a set of recommendations outlining specific steps they should pursue, both domestically and internationally, to minimize the potential hazard posed by orbital debris.

  19. Reflectance Spectra of Space Debris in GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Vannanti, A.; Krag, H.; Erd, C.

    The space debris environment in the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) region is mostly investigated by means of optical surveys. Such surveys revealed a considerable amount of debris in the size range of 10 centimeter to one meter. Some of these debris exhibit particularly high area-to-mass ratios as derived from the evolution of their orbits. In order to understand the nature and eventually the origin of these objects, observations allowing to derive physical characteristics like size, shape and material are required. Information on the shape and the attitude motion of a debris piece may be obtained by photometric light curves. The most promising technique to investigate the surface material properties is reflectance spectroscopy. This paper discusses preliminary results obtained from spectrometric observations of space debris in GEO. The observations were acquired at the 1-meter ESA Space Debris Telescope (ESASDT) on Tenerife with a low-resolution spectrograph in the wavelength range of 450-960 nm. The target objects were space debris of different types with brightness as small as magnitude 15. Some simple-shaped, intact "calibration objects" with known surface materials like the MSG-2 satellites were also observed. The spectra show shape variations expected to be caused by the different physical properties of the objects. The determination of the possible materials is still in a preliminary phase. Limitations of the acquisition process of the spectra and the subsequent analysis are discussed. Future steps planned for a better characterization of the debris from the observed data are briefly outlined.

  20. Development of the Space Debris Sensor (SDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Joe; Liou, J. -C.; Anz-Meador, P.; Matney, M.; Christiansen, E.

    2017-01-01

    Debris Resistive/Acoustic Grid Orbital Navy-NASA Sensor (DRAGONS) is an impact sensor designed to detect and characterize collisions with small orbital debris: from 50 microns to greater than 1millimeter debris size detection; Characterizes debris size, speed, direction, and density. The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) is a flight demonstration of DRAGONS on the International Space Station: Approximately 1 square meter of detection area facing the ISS velocity vector; Minimum two year mission on Columbus External Payloads Facility (EPF); Minimal obstruction from ISS hardware; Development is nearing final checkout and integration with the ISS; Current launch schedule is SpaceX13, about September 2017, or SpaceX14, about Jan 2018.

  1. Debris flows: behavior and hazard assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Debris flows are water-laden masses of soil and fragmented rock that rush down mountainsides, funnel into stream channels, entrain objects in their paths, and form lobate deposits when they spill onto valley floors. Because they have volumetric sediment concentrations that exceed 40 percent, maximum speeds that surpass 10 m/s, and sizes that can range up to ~109 m3, debris flows can denude slopes, bury floodplains, and devastate people and property. Computational models can accurately represent the physics of debris-flow initiation, motion and deposition by simulating evolution of flow mass and momentum while accounting for interactions of debris' solid and fluid constituents. The use of physically based models for hazard forecasting can be limited by imprecise knowledge of initial and boundary conditions and material properties, however. Therefore, empirical methods continue to play an important role in debris-flow hazard assessment.

  2. Aquatic Debris Detection Using Embedded Camera Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Dianhong; Lu, Qian; Luo, Dapeng; Fang, Wu

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic debris monitoring is of great importance to human health, aquatic habitats and water transport. In this paper, we first introduce the prototype of an aquatic sensor node equipped with an embedded camera sensor. Based on this sensing platform, we propose a fast and accurate debris detection algorithm. Our method is specifically designed based on compressive sensing theory to give full consideration to the unique challenges in aquatic environments, such as waves, swaying reflections, and tight energy budget. To upload debris images, we use an efficient sparse recovery algorithm in which only a few linear measurements need to be transmitted for image reconstruction. Besides, we implement the host software and test the debris detection algorithm on realistically deployed aquatic sensor nodes. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach is reliable and feasible for debris detection using camera sensors in aquatic environments. PMID:25647741

  3. Development of the Space Debris Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, J.; Liou, J.-C.; Anz-Meador, P. D.; Corsaro, B.; Giovane, F.; Matney, M.; Christiansen, E.

    2017-01-01

    The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) is a NASA experiment scheduled to fly aboard the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2017. The SDS is the first flight demonstration of the Debris Resistive/Acoustic Grid Orbital NASA-Navy Sensor (DRAGONS) developed and matured by the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office. The DRAGONS concept combines several technologies to characterize the size, speed, direction, and density of small impacting objects. With a minimum two-year operational lifetime, SDS is anticipated to collect statistically significant information on orbital debris ranging from 50 micron to 500 micron in size. This paper describes the SDS features and how data from the ISS mission may be used to update debris environment models. Results of hypervelocity impact testing during the development of SDS and the potential for improvement on future sensors at higher altitudes will be reviewed.

  4. The debris-flow rheology myth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Models that employ a fixed rheology cannot yield accurate interpretations or predictions of debris-flow motion, because the evolving behavior of debris flows is too complex to be represented by any rheological equation that uniquely relates stress and strain rate. Field observations and experimental data indicate that debris behavior can vary from nearly rigid to highly fluid as a consequence of temporal and spatial variations in pore-fluid pressure and mixture agitation. Moreover, behavior can vary if debris composition changes as a result of grain-size segregation and gain or loss of solid and fluid constituents in transit. An alternative to fixed-rheology models is provided by a Coulomb mixture theory model, which can represent variable interactions of solid and fluid constituents in heterogeneous debris-flow surges with high-friction, coarse-grained heads and low-friction, liquefied tails. ?? 2003 Millpress.

  5. Spatial Density Evolution of Space Debris Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Canan; Pang, Baojun; Ding, Li

    2009-03-01

    It is known that the space debris provide great risks to the safety of on-orbit space vehicles, which makes it necessary to establish a model to evaluate their impact risks. In order to provide the scenario of the future space debris environment for space vehicle designers, this paper addresses a simplified mathematical model for the future evolution of space debris environment. While the spatial density is of more concern to engineers, this paper is devoted to study the evolution of the distribution of spatial density of space debris. Given the initial spatial density, this paper develops the algorithm to obtained the spatial density of space debris at any moment of future, by considering the orbital propagation and collisions.

  6. Development of the Space Debris Sensor (SDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, J.; Liou, J.-C.; Anz-Meador, P. D.; Corsaro, B.; Giovane, F.; Matney, M.; Christiansen, E.

    2017-01-01

    The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) is a NASA experiment scheduled to fly aboard the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2018. The SDS is the first flight demonstration of the Debris Resistive/Acoustic Grid Orbital NASA-Navy Sensor (DRAGONS) developed and matured at NASA Johnson Space Center's Orbital Debris Program Office. The DRAGONS concept combines several technologies to characterize the size, speed, direction, and density of small impacting objects. With a minimum two-year operational lifetime, SDS is anticipated to collect statistically significant information on orbital debris ranging from 50 microns to 500 microns in size. This paper describes the features of SDS and how data from the ISS mission may be used to update debris environment models. Results of hypervelocity impact testing during the development of SDS and the potential for improvement on future sensors at higher altitudes will be reviewed.

  7. Molecular Gas In Young Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, Attila

    2016-07-01

    Debris disks are generally thought to be the gas poor descendants of protoplanetary disks. While this characteristic may be true for most debris systems, recent surveys in rotational transitions of carbon monoxide led to a growing sample of debris disks where gas has been detected. The origin of gas in these disks is unclear yet. It may be secondary, i.e., similarly to dust grains it is continuously replenished via erosion of larger bodies. However, because of their youth, one cannot exclude that some disks may be hybrid in the sense that they retain their residual primordial gas, while the dust component may predominantly be second generation. The first observations of gaseous debris disks with ALMA provided examples of both types. This talk will review the currently known CO-rich debris disks with special emphasis on the origin of gas and on the commonly shared disk/host star properties.

  8. Geosynchronous Large Debris Reorbiter: Challenges and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Hanspeter; Moorer, Daniel F.

    2012-06-01

    An elegant solution is proposed to an old problem of how to remove expired or malfunctioning satellites from the geosynchronous belt. Previous "space-tug" concepts describe a scenario where one craft (the tug) docks with another (debris) and then boosts that object to a super-synchronous orbit. The most challenging aspect of these concepts is the very complex proximity operations to an aging, possibly rotating and, probably, non-cooperative satellite. Instead, the proposed method uses an elegant blend of electrostatic charge control and low-thrust propulsion to avoid any contact requirement. The Geosynchronous Large Debris Reorbiter (GLiDeR) uses active charge emission to raise its own absolute potential to 10's of kilovolts and, in addition, directs a stream of charged particles at the debris to increase its absolute potential. In a puller configuration the opposite polarity of the debris creates an attractive force between the GLiDeR and the debris. Pusher configurations are feasible as well. Next, fuel-efficient micro-thrusters are employed to gently move the reorbiter relative to the debris, and then accelerate the debris out of its geosynchronous slot and deposit it in a disposal orbit. Preliminary analysis shows that a 1000 kg debris object can be re-orbited over two-four months. During the reorbit phase the separation distance is held nominally fixed without physical contact, even if the debris is tumbling, by actively controlling the charge transfer between the reorbiter and the debris. Numerical simulations are presented illustrating the expected performance, taking into account also the solar radiation pressure.

  9. OT1_mthomp01_1: Confirming a sample of luminous debris disk candidates identified in the Herschel ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M.

    2010-07-01

    Debris disks are the remains of planetary system formation, tracing the existence of planetesimal-sized objects in orbit around main sequence stars. Current and planned surveys of debris disks (including the Herschel Key Projects DEBRIS and DUNES) are deep surveys aimed at characterising the typical population of disks and targeted at samples of a few hundred nearby objects. These deep narrow surveys are relatively insensitive to the rarities in the debris disk population, some of which may be luminous and/or massive disks that have undergone recent disruptive collisional events. We have recently shown that the primarily extragalactic Key Project, the Herschel-ATLAS, can be used as a wide and shallow survey of debris disks by combining its excellent optical coverage and statistical techniques more commonly employed to identify galaxies. The combination of Herschel-ATLAS, DEBRIS and DUNES thus forms a powerful nested tier of surveys that will be sensitive to disks across the spectrum from exosolar analogues to rare disks that cannot be inferred from local populations. In this proposal we seek time to image the three candidate disks that we discovered in the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Phase with PACS so that we may confirm them as true debris disks and model their SEDs to extract mass, temperature and fractional luminosity. We will confirm whether these disk candidates are in fact the most luminous disks yet detected.

  10. Erosion of steepland valleys by debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stock, J.D.; Dietrich, W.E.

    2006-01-01

    Episodic debris flows scour the rock beds of many steepland valleys. Along recent debris-flow runout paths in the western United States, we have observed evidence for bedrock lowering, primarily by the impact of large particles entrained in debris flows. This evidence may persist to the point at which debris-flow deposition occurs, commonly at slopes of less than ???0.03-0.10. We find that debris-flow-scoured valleys have a topographic signature that is fundamentally different from that predicted by bedrock river-incision models. Much of this difference results from the fact that local valley slope shows a tendency to decrease abruptly downstream of tributaries that contribute throughgoing debris flows. The degree of weathering of valley floor bedrock may also decrease abruptly downstream of such junctions. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesize that valley slope is adjusted to the long-term frequency of debris flows, and that valleys scoured by debris flows should not be modeled using conventional bedrock river-incision laws. We use field observations to justify one possible debris-flow incision model, whose lowering rate is proportional to the integral of solid inertial normal stresses from particle impacts along the flow and the number of upvalley debris-flow sources. The model predicts that increases in incision rate caused by increases in flow event frequency and length (as flows gain material) downvalley are balanced by rate reductions from reduced inertial normal stress at lower slopes, and stronger, less weathered bedrock. These adjustments lead to a spatially uniform lowering rate. Although the proposed expression leads to equilibrium long-profiles with the correct topographic signature, the crudeness with which the debris-flow dynamics are parameterized reveals that we are far from a validated debris-flow incision law. However, the vast extent of steepland valley networks above slopes of ???0.03-0.10 illustrates the need to understand debris

  11. The Technology of Modeling Debris Cloud Produced by Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhaoxia; Huang, Jie; Liang, Shichang; Zhou, Zhixuan; Ren, Leisheng; Liu, Sen

    2013-08-01

    Because of the large amount of debris in a debris cloud, it is hard to achieve a complete description of all the debris by a simple function. One workable approach is to use a group of complete distribution functions and MonteCarlo method to simplify the debris cloud simulation. Enough debris samples are produced by SPH simulation and debris identification program firstly. According to the distribution functions of debris mass, velocity and space angles determined by statistical analysis, the engineering model of debris cloud is set up. Combining the engineering model and MonteCarlo method, the fast simulation of debris cloud produced by an aluminum projectile impacting an aluminum plate is realized. An application example of the debris cloud engineering model to predict satellite damage caused by space debris impact is given at the end.

  12. Characterizing Secondary Debris Impact Ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, W. P.

    1999-01-01

    All spacecraft in low-Earth orbit are subject to high-speed impacts by meteoroids and orbital debris particles. These impacts can damage flight-critical systems which can in turn lead to catastrophic failure of the spacecraft. Therefore, the design of a spacecraft for an Earth-orbiting mission must take into account the possibility of such impacts and their effects on the spacecraft structure and on all of its exposed subsystem components. In addition to threatening the operation of the spacecraft itself, on-orbit impacts also generate a significant amount of ricochet particles. These high-speed particles can destroy critical external spacecraft subsystem and also increase the contamination of the orbital environment. This report presents a summary of the work performed towards the development of an empirical model that characterizes the secondary ejecta created by a high-speed impacta on a typical aerospace structural surface.

  13. Space debris studies in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Susumu; Yasaka, Tetsuo

    1993-08-01

    The Space Debris Study Group of the Japan Society for Aeronautical and Space Sciences was established in September 1990 and the Interim Report was published in January 1992. The group has five subgroups: Observation, Cause, Modeling, Protection, and Social Impact. It intends to promote an awareness for the problem and put together related researches, to define the urgently needed activity area by first describing the present situation in each engineering field and then summarizing on-going respective researches. It is expected that sound technological base line understandings to the problem are to be attained at various institutions. International cooperations are indispensable, and Japanese efforts should be focused on those which do not duplicate but are complementary to achievements in other countries. Some of the results obtained by the group are presented and several examples of individual researches are summarized.

  14. LDEF meteoroid and debris database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dardano, C. B.; See, Thomas H.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) database is maintained at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Houston, Texas, and consists of five data tables containing information about individual features, digitized images of selected features, and LDEF hardware (i.e., approximately 950 samples) archived at JSC. About 4000 penetrations (greater than 300 micron in diameter) and craters (greater than 500 micron in diameter) were identified and photodocumented during the disassembly of LDEF at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), while an additional 4500 or so have subsequently been characterized at JSC. The database also contains some data that have been submitted by various PI's, yet the amount of such data is extremely limited in its extent, and investigators are encouraged to submit any and all M&D-type data to JSC for inclusion within the M&D database. Digitized stereo-image pairs are available for approximately 4500 features through the database.

  15. In-situ Observations of Space Debris at ESA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drolshagen, G.

    Information on the small size (millimetre or smaller) space debris and meteoroid population in space can only be obtained by in-situ detectors or the analysis of retrieved hardware. Past, ongoing and planned ESA activities in this field are presented. In 1996 the GORID impact detector was launched into a geostationary orbit on-board the Russian Express-2 telecommunication satellite. This impact ionisation detector had a sensor surface of 0.1 m2. Until July 2002 when the spacecraft was shut down it recorded more than 3000 impacts in the micrometre size range. Inter alia, GORID measured numerous clusters of events, believed to result from debris clouds, and indicated that debris fluxes in GEO are larger than predicted by present models. Another in-situ detector, DEBIE-1, was launched in October 2001 and is operating on-board the small technology satellite PROBA in a low polar orbit. It has two sensors, each of 0.01m2 size, pointing in different directions. A second detector of this type, DEBIE-2 with 3 sensors, is ready for flight on the EuTEF carrier (external payload to ISS). The data from GORID and DEBIE-1 are stored on-line in EDID (European Detector Impact Database). Post-flight impact analyses of retrieved hardware provide detailed information on the encountered meteoroid and debris fluxes over a large range of sizes. ESA initiated several analyses in the past ((EURECA, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar arrays). The most recent impact analysis was performed for the HST solar arrays retrieved in March 2002. Measured crater sizes in solar cells ranged from about 1 micron to 7 mm. A total of 175 complete penetrations of the 0.7 mm thick arrays were observed. A chemical analysis of impact residues allowed the distinction between space debris and natural meteoroids. Space debris was found to dominate for sizes smaller than 10 microns and larger than about 1 mm. For intermediate sizes impacts are mainly from meteoroids. Results of the analysis and comparisons with

  16. Final Design for a Comprehensive Orbital Debris Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The rationale and specifics for the design of a comprehensive program for the control of orbital debris, as well as details of the various components of the overall plan, are described. The problem of orbital debris has been steadily worsening since the first successful launch in 1957. The hazards posed by orbital debris suggest the need for a progressive plan for the prevention of future debris, as well as the reduction of the current debris level. The proposed debris management plan includes debris removal systems and preventative techniques and policies. The debris removal is directed at improving the current debris environment. Because of the variance in sizes of debris, a single system cannot reasonably remove all kinds of debris. An active removal system, which deliberately retrieves targeted debris from known orbits, was determined to be effective in the disposal of debris tracked directly from earth. However, no effective system is currently available to remove the untrackable debris. The debris program is intended to protect the orbital environment from future abuses. This portion of the plan involves various environment from future abuses. This portion of the plan involves various methods and rules for future prevention of debris. The preventative techniques are protective methods that can be used in future design of payloads. The prevention policies are rules which should be employed to force the prevention of orbital debris.

  17. The New NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, P. H.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) has released its latest Orbital Debris Engineering Model, ORDEM 3.0. It supersedes ORDEM 2000, now referred to as ORDEM 2.0. This newer model encompasses the Earth satellite and debris flux environment from altitudes of low Earth orbit (LEO) through geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Debris sizes of 10 micron through larger than 1 m in non-GEO and 10 cm through larger than 1 m in GEO are available. The inclusive years are 2010 through 2035. The ORDEM model series has always been data driven. ORDEM 3.0 has the benefit of many more hours of data from existing sources and from new sources than past ORDEM versions. The object data range in size from 10 µm to larger than 1 m, and include in situ and remote measurements. The in situ data reveals material characteristics of small particles. Mass densities are grouped in ORDEM 3.0 in terms of 'high-density', represented by 7.9 g/cc, 'medium-density' represented by 2.8 g/cc and 'low-density' represented by 1.4 g/cc. Supporting models have also advanced significantly. The LEO-to-GEO ENvironment Debris model (LEGEND) includes an historical and a future projection component with yearly populations that include launched and maneuvered intact spacecraft and rocket bodies, mission related debris, and explosion and collision event fragments. LEGEND propagates objects with ephemerides and physical characteristics down to 1 mm in size. The full LEGEND yearly population acts as an a priori condition for a Bayesian statistical model. Specific populations are added from sodium potassium droplet releases, recent major accidental and deliberate collisions, and known anomalous debris events. This paper elaborates on the upgrades of this model over previous versions. Sample validation results with remote and in situ measurements are shown, and the consequences of including material density are discussed as it relates to heightened risks to crewed and robotic spacecraft

  18. Emergency assessment of post-fire debris-flow hazards for the 2013 Powerhouse fire, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staley, Dennis M.; Smoczyk, Gregory M.; Reeves, Ryan R.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire dramatically alters the hydrologic response of a watershed such that even modest rainstorms can produce dangerous flash floods and debris flows. Existing empirical models were used to predict the probability and magnitude of debris-flow occurrence in response to a 10-year recurrence interval rainstorm for the 2013 Powerhouse fire near Lancaster, California. Overall, the models predict a relatively low probability for debris-flow occurrence in response to the design storm. However, volumetric predictions suggest that debris flows that occur may entrain a significant volume of material, with 44 of the 73 basins identified as having potential debris-flow volumes between 10,000 and 100,000 cubic meters. These results suggest that even though the likelihood of debris flow is relatively low, the consequences of post-fire debris-flow initiation within the burn area may be significant for downstream populations, infrastructure, and wildlife and water resources. Given these findings, we recommend that residents, emergency managers, and public works departments pay close attention to weather forecasts and National-Weather-Service-issued Debris Flow and Flash Flood Outlooks, Watches, and Warnings and that residents adhere to any evacuation orders.

  19. Emergency assessment of post-fire debris-flow hazards for the 2013 Springs Fire, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staley, Dennis M.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfire can significantly alter the hydrologic response of a watershed to the extent that even modest rainstorms can produce dangerous flash floods and debris flows. In this report, empirical models are used to predict the probability and magnitude of debris-flow occurrence in response to a 10-year rainstorm for the 2013 Springs fire in Ventura County, California. Overall, the models predict a relatively high probability (60–80 percent) of debris flow for 9 of the 99 drainage basins in the burn area in response to a 10-year recurrence interval design storm. Predictions of debris-flow volume suggest that debris flows may entrain a significant volume of material, with 28 of the 99 basins identified as having potential debris-flow volumes greater than 10,000 cubic meters. These results of the relative combined hazard analysis suggest there is a moderate likelihood of significant debris-flow hazard within and downstream of the burn area for nearby populations, infrastructure, wildlife, and water resources. Given these findings, we recommend that residents, emergency managers, and public works departments pay close attention to weather forecasts and National Weather Service-issued Debris Flow and Flash Flood Outlooks, Watches, and Warnings, and that residents adhere to any evacuation orders.

  20. Fate of debris from the Borealis basin impact on Mars and from the formation of the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, Erik; Jackson, Alan P.; Gabriel, Travis; Minton, David A.; Hesselbrock, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Giant planet-forming collisions can inject significant amounts of debris into the inner solar system. Dynamically the fate of this debris is primarily to re-impact the target body and the other terrestrial planets, defining a post-giant-impact epoch. Giant impact debris leave signatures on the surfaces of terrestrial bodies, influencing and perhaps dominating their early cratering record, and for the largest giant impacts, to intensive surface evolution and even changes in bulk crustal material composition. We use high-resolution N-body simulations to study the fate of debris released by specific giant impacts suggested to have formed the Borealis basin on Mars, and compare it to the fate of debris released by giant impact scenarios for Earth's Moon. We consider how the velocity dependence of Earth-Moon accretion leads to differing velocity distributions of debris-impactors for Earth and Moon, and thus different crater distributions, and study how different assumptions on the size distribution of debris effects these results. We also investigate the influence of collisional grinding within the debris distribution, and the possibility of trapped populations.

  1. Orbital debris removal and meteoroid deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W.; Taylor, Charles R.; Smalley, Larry L.; Dickerson, Thomas

    1998-11-01

    Orbital debris in low-Earth orbit in the size range from 1 to 10 cm in diameter can be detected but not tracked reliably enough to be avoided by spacecraft. It can cause catastrophic damage even to a shielded spacecraft. With adaptive optics, a ground-based pulsed laser ablating the debris surface can produce enough propulsion in several hundred pulses to cause such debris to reenter the atmosphere. A single laser station could remove all of the 1 - 10 cm debris in three years or less. A technology demonstration of laser space propulsion is proposed which would pave the way for the implementation of such a debris removal system. The cost of the proposed demonstration is comparable with the estimated annual cost of spacecraft operations in the present orbital debris environment. Orbital debris is not the only space junk that is deleterious to the Earth's environment. Collisions with asteroids have caused major havoc to the Earth's biosphere many times in the ancient past. Since the possibility still exists for major impacts of asteroids with the Earth, it shown that it is possible to scale up the systems to prevent these catastrophic collisions providing sufficient early warning is available from new generation space telescopes plus deep space radar tracking.

  2. Nuclear-powered space debris sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, John D.; Leclaire, Rene J., Jr.; Howe, Steven D.; Burgin, Karen C.

    1989-01-01

    Future spacecraft design will be affected by collisions with man-made debris orbiting the earth. Most of this orbital space debris comes from spent rocket stages. It is projected that the source of future debris will be the result of fragmentation of large objects through hypervelocity collisions. Orbiting spacecraft will have to be protected from hypervelocity debris in orbit. The options are to armor the spacecraft, resulting in increased mass, or actively removing the debris from orbit. An active space debris sweeper is described which will utilize momentum transfer to the debris through laser-induced ablation to alter its orbital parameters to reduce orbital lifetime with eventual entry into the earth's atmosphere where it will burn. The paper describes the concept, estimates the amount of velocity change (Delta V) that can be imparted to an object through laser-induced ablation, and investigates the use of a neutral particle beam for the momentum transfer. The space sweeper concept could also be extended to provide a collision avoidance system for the space station and satellites, or could be used for collision protection during interplanetary travel.

  3. Development of Harpoon System for Capturing Space Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jame; Barraclough, Simon

    2013-08-01

    Active removal of large space debris has been identified as a key activity to control the growth in the debris population and to limit the risk to active satellites. Astrium is developing technologies to enable such a mission, including a harpoon capture system. The harpoon is simple, compact and lightweight. Since the capture is fast (typically <0.5s) it is relatively insensitive to the dynamic state of the target and orbital dynamics, simplifying the mission design. The harpoon system is designed to attach to the target whilst also minimising damage. The harpoon consists of a set of barbs to robustly hold the target, a crushable section to absorb excess impact energy, and a tether to connect to the chaser vehicle. The baseline firing system uses compressed gas, although a simpler one-shot system has also been designed. To understand how a harpoon could be applicable to active debris removal an on-ground prototype and test-rig has been developed for trials with real structural elements of satellites and rocket bodies. Testing has demonstrated the feasibility of the concept and this paper describes the results as well as the next steps. A number of design variants are also proposed which could simplify the system design of an ADR mission.

  4. A study of methods to estimate debris flow velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prochaska, A.B.; Santi, P.M.; Higgins, J.D.; Cannon, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    Debris flow velocities are commonly back-calculated from superelevation events which require subjective estimates of radii of curvature of bends in the debris flow channel or predicted using flow equations that require the selection of appropriate rheological models and material property inputs. This research investigated difficulties associated with the use of these conventional velocity estimation methods. Radii of curvature estimates were found to vary with the extent of the channel investigated and with the scale of the media used, and back-calculated velocities varied among different investigated locations along a channel. Distinct populations of Bingham properties were found to exist between those measured by laboratory tests and those back-calculated from field data; thus, laboratory-obtained values would not be representative of field-scale debris flow behavior. To avoid these difficulties with conventional methods, a new preliminary velocity estimation method is presented that statistically relates flow velocity to the channel slope and the flow depth. This method presents ranges of reasonable velocity predictions based on 30 previously measured velocities. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  5. POST Earthquake Debris Management - AN Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Raju

    Every year natural disasters, such as fires, floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, landslides, tsunami, and tornadoes, challenge various communities of the world. Earthquakes strike with varying degrees of severity and pose both short- and long-term challenges to public service providers. Earthquakes generate shock waves and displace the ground along fault lines. These seismic forces can bring down buildings and bridges in a localized area and damage buildings and other structures in a far wider area. Secondary damage from fires, explosions, and localized flooding from broken water pipes can increase the amount of debris. Earthquake debris includes building materials, personal property, and sediment from landslides. The management of this debris, as well as the waste generated during the reconstruction works, can place significant challenges on the national and local capacities. Debris removal is a major component of every post earthquake recovery operation. Much of the debris generated from earthquake is not hazardous. Soil, building material, and green waste, such as trees and shrubs, make up most of the volume of earthquake debris. These wastes not only create significant health problems and a very unpleasant living environment if not disposed of safely and appropriately, but also can subsequently impose economical burdens on the reconstruction phase. In practice, most of the debris may be either disposed of at landfill sites, reused as materials for construction or recycled into useful commodities Therefore, the debris clearance operation should focus on the geotechnical engineering approach as an important post earthquake issue to control the quality of the incoming flow of potential soil materials. In this paper, the importance of an emergency management perspective in this geotechnical approach that takes into account the different criteria related to the operation execution is proposed by highlighting the key issues concerning the handling of the construction

  6. POST Earthquake Debris Management — AN Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Raju

    Every year natural disasters, such as fires, floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, landslides, tsunami, and tornadoes, challenge various communities of the world. Earthquakes strike with varying degrees of severity and pose both short- and long-term challenges to public service providers. Earthquakes generate shock waves and displace the ground along fault lines. These seismic forces can bring down buildings and bridges in a localized area and damage buildings and other structures in a far wider area. Secondary damage from fires, explosions, and localized flooding from broken water pipes can increase the amount of debris. Earthquake debris includes building materials, personal property, and sediment from landslides. The management of this debris, as well as the waste generated during the reconstruction works, can place significant challenges on the national and local capacities. Debris removal is a major component of every post earthquake recovery operation. Much of the debris generated from earthquake is not hazardous. Soil, building material, and green waste, such as trees and shrubs, make up most of the volume of earthquake debris. These wastes not only create significant health problems and a very unpleasant living environment if not disposed of safely and appropriately, but also can subsequently impose economical burdens on the reconstruction phase. In practice, most of the debris may be either disposed of at landfill sites, reused as materials for construction or recycled into useful commodities Therefore, the debris clearance operation should focus on the geotechnical engineering approach as an important post earthquake issue to control the quality of the incoming flow of potential soil materials. In this paper, the importance of an emergency management perspective in this geotechnical approach that takes into account the different criteria related to the operation execution is proposed by highlighting the key issues concerning the handling of the construction

  7. Plastic debris in the Mediterranean Sea: Types, occurrence and distribution along Adriatic shorelines.

    PubMed

    Munari, Cristina; Scoponi, Marco; Mistri, Michele

    2017-09-01

    Small plastic debris in sediments from five beaches were investigated to evaluate their occurrence and abundance in the Northern Adriatic coast for the first time. Plastic debris extracted from sediments were counted, weighted and identified by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). A total of 1345 items of debris (13.491g) were recorded, with a mean density of 12.1 items kg(-1) d.w. and 0.12gkg(-1) d.w. Fragments were the most frequent type of small plastics debris detected. In terms of abundance, microplastics (<5mm) accounted for 61% of debris, showing their wide distribution on Adriatic coasts, even far-away from densely populated areas. The majority of the polymers found were polyolefins: there were greater quantities of polyethylene and polypropylene compared to other types of plastic. Primary microplastics accounted for only 5.6% of the total plastic debris. There were greater quantities of microplastics at sites subjected to stronger riverine runoff. The results will provide useful background information for further investigations to understand the sink and sources of this emergent and priority contaminant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Comparison of Damaging Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Fluxes in Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William; Matney, Mark; Moorhead, Althea V.; Vavrin, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Low Earth orbit is populated with a substantial amount of orbital debris, and it is usually assumed that the flux from these objects contributes to most of the hypervelocity particle risk to spacecraft in this region. The meteoroid flux is known to be dominant at very low altitudes (less than 300 km), where atmospheric drag rapidly removes debris, and at very high altitudes (beyond geostationary), where debris is practically non-existent. The vagueness of these boundaries and repeated questions from spacecraft projects have prompted this work, in which we compare the fluxes of meteoroids and orbital debris capable of producing a millimeter-deep crater in aluminum for circular orbits with altitudes ranging from the top of the atmosphere to 100,000 km. The outputs from the latest NASA debris and meteoroid models, ORDEM 3.0 and MEMR2, are combined with the modified Cour-Palais ballistic limit equation to make a realistic evaluation of the damage-capable particle fluxes, thereby establishing the relative contributions of hazardous debris and meteoroids throughout near-Earth space.

  9. A Comparison of Damaging Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Fluxes in Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William; Matney, Mark; Moorhead, Althea V.; Vavrin, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Low Earth orbit is populated with a substantial amount of orbital debris, and it is usually assumed that the flux from these objects contributes to most of the hypervelocity particle risk to spacecraft in this region. The meteoroid flux is known to be dominant at very low altitudes (<300 km), where atmospheric drag rapidly removes debris, and at very high altitudes beyond GEO (geostationary), where debris is practically non-existent. The vagueness of these boundaries has prompted this work, in which we compare the fluxes of meteoroids and orbital debris capable of penetrating a millimeter thick aluminum plate for circular orbits with altitudes ranging from the top of the atmosphere to 100,000 km. The outputs from the latest NASA debris and meteoroid models, ORDEM 3.0 and MEMR2, are combined with the modified Cour-Palais ballistic limit equation to make a realistic evaluation of the damage-capable particle fluxes, thereby establishing the relative contributions of hazardous debris and meteoroids in near Earth space.

  10. Current and Future Impact Risks from Small Debris to Operational Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Kessler, Don

    2011-01-01

    The collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 in 2009 signaled the potential onset of the collision cascade effect, commonly known as the "Kessler Syndrome", in the low Earth orbit (LEO) region. Recent numerical simulations have shown that the 10 cm and larger debris population in LEO will continue to increase even with a good implementation of the commonly-adopted mitigation measures. This increase is driven by collisions involving large and massive intacts, i.e., rocket bodies and spacecraft. Therefore, active debris removal (ADR) of large and massive intacts with high collision probabilities has been argued as a direct and effective means to remediate the environment in LEO. The major risk for operational satellites in the environment, however, comes from impacts with debris just above the threshold of the protection shields. In general, these are debris in the millimeter to centimeter size regime. Although impacts by these objects are insufficient to lead to catastrophic breakup of the entire vehicle, the damage is certainly severe enough to cause critical failure of the key instruments or the entire payload. The focus of this paper is to estimate the impact risks from 5 mm and 1 cm debris to active payloads in LEO (1) in the current environment and (2) in the future environment based on different projection scenarios, including ADR. The goal of the study is to quantify the benefits of ADR in reducing debris impact risks to operational satellites.

  11. Lessons Learned from Natural Space Debris in Heliocentric Orbit: An Analogue for Hazardous Debris in Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Wei, Hanying; Connors, Martin; Lai, Hairong; Delzanno, Gian Luca

    there is a spread of the IFE rate around the descending node, indicating that the co-orbiting materials have significant dispersion about the asteroid’s orbit. In summary, orbiting debris in orbits intersecting at high speeds can destroy itself quite efficiently, but with a long timescale. In deep space, this process is a step on the path between the asteroidal source population and the creation of solar system dust. This may be true for Earth-orbiting debris as well.

  12. Collector/Compactor for Waste or Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangialiardi, John K.

    1987-01-01

    Device collects and compacts debris by sweeping through volume with net. Consists of movable vane, fixed vane, and elastic net connected to both vanes. Movable vane is metal strip curved to follow general contour of container with clearance to prevent interference with other parts on inside wall of container. One end of movable vane mounted in bearing and other end connected to driveshaft equipped with handle. User rotates movable vane, net stretched and swept through container. Captures most of debris coarser than mesh as it moves, compressing debris as it arrives at fixed vane. Applications include cleaning swimming pools and tanks.

  13. Modelling of space debris and meteoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, J. C.; Alby, F.

    1997-05-01

    Since several years, CNES has undertaken studies in the field of debris and meteoroids since the knowledge of this environment is of prime importance for space activities and will be a growing concern in the future. In the frame of this study, the main available models concerning space debris and meteoroids have been analysed: origin, principle of modelization, limits and evolution as a function of time. A reference model has been choosen and evaluated through comparisons with available data, coming from in flight experiments such as LDEF, EURECA, MIR and HUBBLE. This work will lead in the future to improve the models, particularly for the small size debris.

  14. Space Shuttle crew compartment debris-contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Villarreal, Leopoldo J.

    1992-01-01

    Remedial actions undertaken to reduce debris during manned flights and ground turnaround operations at Kennedy Space Center and Palmdale are addressed. They include redesign of selected ground support equipment and Orbiter hardware to reduce particularization/debris generation; development of new detachable filters for air-cooled avionics boxes; application of tape-on screens to filter debris; and implementation of new Orbiter maintenance and turnaround procedures to clean filters and the crew compartment. Most of these steps were implemented before the return-to-flight of STS-26 in September 1988 which resulted in improved crew compartment habitability and less potential for equipment malfunction.

  15. Algorithms for the Computation of Debris Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Determining the risks from space debris involve a number of statistical calculations. These calculations inevitably involve assumptions about geometry - including the physical geometry of orbits and the geometry of non-spherical satellites. A number of tools have been developed in NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office to handle these calculations; many of which have never been published before. These include algorithms that are used in NASA's Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM 3.0, as well as other tools useful for computing orbital collision rates and ground casualty risks. This paper will present an introduction to these algorithms and the assumptions upon which they are based.

  16. Algorithms for the Computation of Debris Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    Determining the risks from space debris involve a number of statistical calculations. These calculations inevitably involve assumptions about geometry - including the physical geometry of orbits and the geometry of satellites. A number of tools have been developed in NASA’s Orbital Debris Program Office to handle these calculations; many of which have never been published before. These include algorithms that are used in NASA’s Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM 3.0, as well as other tools useful for computing orbital collision rates and ground casualty risks. This paper presents an introduction to these algorithms and the assumptions upon which they are based.

  17. Collector/Compactor for Waste or Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangialiardi, John K.

    1987-01-01

    Device collects and compacts debris by sweeping through volume with net. Consists of movable vane, fixed vane, and elastic net connected to both vanes. Movable vane is metal strip curved to follow general contour of container with clearance to prevent interference with other parts on inside wall of container. One end of movable vane mounted in bearing and other end connected to driveshaft equipped with handle. User rotates movable vane, net stretched and swept through container. Captures most of debris coarser than mesh as it moves, compressing debris as it arrives at fixed vane. Applications include cleaning swimming pools and tanks.

  18. Apparatus for controlling nuclear core debris

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear reactor apparatus for containing, cooling, and dispersing reactor debris assumed to flow from the core area in the unlikely event of an accident causing core meltdown. The apparatus includes a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced plates, having depressions to contain debris in controlled amounts, and a plurality of holes therein which provide natural circulation cooling and a path for debris to continue flowing downward to the plate beneath. The uppermost plates may also include generally vertical sections which form annular-like flow areas which assist the natural circulation cooling.

  19. Frequency and magnitude of debris flows on Cheekye River, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, M.; Friele, P.

    2010-01-01

    Natural hazard and risk assessments are predicated on a detailed understanding of the relationship between frequency and magnitude of the hazardous process under investigation. When information is sought from the deep past (i.e., several thousand years), continuous event records do not exist and the researcher has to rely on proxy data to develop the frequency-magnitude ( F- M) model. Such work is often prohibitively expensive and few well-researched examples for mass movement are available worldwide. The Cheekye fan is a desirable location for land development and has a depth and breadth of previous research unprecedented on any debris-flow fan in Canada. We pursued two principal strains of research to formulate a reliable F- M relationship. The first focuses on stratigraphic analyses combined with radiometric dating and dendrochronology to reconstruct a comprehensive picture of Holocene debris-flow activity. The second approach examines hydrological limitations of rock avalanche evolution into debris flows through either entrainment of saturated sediments or by failure of a landslide-generated dam and upstream impoundment. We thus hypothesize that debris flows from Cheekye River can be separated into two quasi-homogenous populations: those that are typically triggered by relatively small debris avalanches, slumps, or rock falls or simply by progressive bulking of in-stream erodible sediments; and those that are thought to result from transformation of rock avalanches. Our work suggests that debris flows exceeding some 3 million m 3 in volume are unlikely to reach the Cheekye fan as a result of limited water available to fully fluidize a rock avalanche. This analysis has also demonstrated that in order to arrive at reasonable estimates for the frequency and magnitude of debris flows on a complex alluvial fan significant multidisciplinary efforts are required. Without the significant precursor investigations and the additional efforts of this study, life and

  20. Active debris removal of multiple priority targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Vitali; Lüpken, A.; Flegel, S.; Gelhaus, J.; Möckel, M.; Kebschull, C.; Wiedemann, C.; Vörsmann, P.

    2013-05-01

    Today's space debris environment shows major concentrations of objects within distinct orbital regions for nearly all size regimes. The most critical region is found at orbital altitudes near 800 km with high declinations. Within this region many satellites are operated in so called sun-synchronous orbits (SSO). Among those, there are Earth observation, communication and weather satellites. Due to the orbital geometry in SSO, head-on encounters with relative velocities of about 15 km/s are most probable and would thus result in highly energetic collisions, which are often referred to as catastrophic collisions, leading to the complete fragmentation of the participating objects. So called feedback collisions can then be triggered by the newly generated fragments, thus leading to a further population increase in the affected orbital region. This effect is known as the Kessler syndrome.Current studies show that catastrophic collisions are not a major problem today, but will become the main process for debris generation within the SSO region in the near future, even without any further launches. In order to avoid this effect, objects with a major impact on collisional cascading have to be actively removed from the critical region after their end of life. Not having the capability to perform an end-of-life maneuver in order to transfer to a graveyard orbit or to de-orbit, many satellites and rocket bodies would have to be de-orbited within a dedicated mission. In such a mission, a service satellite would perform a de-orbit maneuver, after having docked to a specific target.In this paper, chemical and electric propulsion systems were analysed with the main focus on removing multiple targets within one single mission. The targets were chosen from a previously defined priority list in order to enhance the mission efficiency. Total mission time, ΔV and system mass were identified as key parameters to allow for an evaluation of the different concepts. It was shown that it

  1. Effects of Debris Flows on Stream Ecosystems of the Klamath Mountains, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cover, M. R.; Delafuente, J. A.; Resh, V. H.

    2006-12-01

    removal of riparian vegetation. Because debris flow frequency increases following road construction and timber harvest, the long-term biological effects of debris flows on stream ecosystems, including anadromous fish populations, needs to be considered in forest management decisions.

  2. Debris Examination Using Ballistic and Radar Integrated Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, Anthony; Schottel, Matthew; Lee, David; Scully, Robert; Hamilton, Joseph; Kent, Brian; Thomas, Christopher; Benson, Jonathan; Branch, Eric; Hardman, Paul; Stuble, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The Debris Examination Using Ballistic and Radar Integrated Software (DEBRIS) program was developed to provide rapid and accurate analysis of debris observed by the NASA Debris Radar (NDR). This software provides a greatly improved analysis capacity over earlier manual processes, allowing for up to four times as much data to be analyzed by one-quarter of the personnel required by earlier methods. There are two applications that comprise the DEBRIS system: the Automated Radar Debris Examination Tool (ARDENT) and the primary DEBRIS tool.

  3. Trends and drivers of marine debris on the Atlantic coast of the United States 1997-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ribic, C.A.; Sheavly, S.B.; Rugg, D.J.; Erdmann, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, we documented regional differences in amounts and long-term trends of marine debris along the US Atlantic coast. The Southeast Atlantic had low land-based and general-source debris loads as well as no increases despite a 19% increase in coastal population. The Northeast (8% population increase) also had low land-based and general-source debris loads and no increases. The Mid-Atlantic (10% population increase) fared the worst, with heavy land-based and general-source debris loads that increased over time. Ocean-based debris did not change in the Northeast where the fishery is relatively stable; it declined over the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast and was correlated with declining regional fisheries. Drivers, including human population, land use status, fishing activity, and oceanic current systems, had complex relationships with debris loads at local and regional scales. Management challenges remain undeniably large but solid information from long-term programs is one key to addressing this pressing pollution issue. ?? 2010.

  4. Debris in the deep: Using a 22-year video annotation database to survey marine litter in Monterey Canyon, central California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlining, Kyra; von Thun, Susan; Kuhnz, Linda; Schlining, Brian; Lundsten, Lonny; Jacobsen Stout, Nancy; Chaney, Lori; Connor, Judith

    2013-09-01

    Anthropogenic marine debris is an increasing concern because of its potential negative impacts on marine ecosystems. This is a global problem that will have lasting effects for many reasons, including: (1) the input of debris into marine environments is likely to continue (commensurate with population increase and globalization), (2) accumulation, and possibly retention, of debris will occur in specific areas due to hydrography and geomorphology, and (3) the most common types of debris observed to date will likely persist for centuries. Due to the technical challenges and prohibitive costs of conducting research in the deep sea, little is known about the abundance, types, sources, and impacts of human refuse on this vast habitat, and the extreme depths to which this debris is penetrating has only recently been exposed. We reviewed 1149 video records of marine debris from 22 years of remotely operated vehicle deployments in Monterey Bay, covering depths from 25 m to 3971 m. We characterize debris by type, examine patterns of distribution, and discuss potential sources and dispersal mechanisms. Debris was most abundant within Monterey Canyon where aggregation and downslope transport of debris from the continental shelf are enhanced by natural canyon dynamics. The majority of debris was plastic (33%) and metal (23%). The highest relative frequencies of plastic and metal observations occurred below 2000 m, indicating that previous studies may greatly underestimate the extent of anthropogenic marine debris on the seafloor due to limitations in observing deeper regions. Our findings provide evidence that submarine canyons function to collect debris and act as conduits for debris transport from coastal to deep-sea habitats.

  5. Protoplanetary and Debris Disk Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Wisniewski, John P.; Grady, Carol A.; McElwain, Michael W.; Hashimoto, Jun; Donaldson, Jessica; Debes, John H.; Malumuth, Eliot; Roberge, Aki; Weinberger, Alycia J.; SEEDS Team

    2016-01-01

    The types of planets that form around other stars are highly dependent on their natal disk conditions. Therefore, the composition, morphology, and distribution of material in protoplanetary and debris disks are important for planet formation. Here we present the results of studies of two disk systems: AB Aur and AU Mic.The circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star AB Aur has many interesting features, including spirals, asymmetries, and non-uniformities. However, comparatively little is known about the envelope surrounding the system. Recent work by Tang et al (2012) has suggested that the observed spiral armss may not in fact be in the disk, but instead are due to areas of increased density in the envelope and projection effects. Using Monte Carlo modeling, we find that it is unlikely that the envelope holds enough material to be responsible for such features and that it is more plausible that they form from disk material. Given the likelihood that gravitational perturbations from planets cause the observed spiral morphology, we use archival H band observations of AB Aur with a baseline of 5.5 years to determine the locations of possible planets.The AU Mic debris disk also has many interesting morphological features. Because its disk is edge on, the system is an ideal candidate for color studies using coronagraphic spectroscopy. Spectra of the system were taken by placing a HST/STIS long slit parallel to and overlapping the disk while blocking out the central star with an occulting fiducial bar. Color gradients may reveal the chemical processing that is occuring within the disk. In addition, it may trace the potential composition and architecture of any planetary bodies in the system because collisional break up of planetesimals produces the observed dust in the system. We present the resulting optical reflected spectra (5200 to 10,200 angstroms) from this procedure at several disk locations. We find that the disk is bluest at the innermost locations of the

  6. Debris-covered glaciers extend the lifespan of water supplies in the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardeux, Pierre; Glasser, Neil; Holt, Tom; Hubbard, Bryn

    2016-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers have a slower melting rate than clean-ice glaciers due to the insulating effect of their debris layer. In the European Alps, debris-covered glaciers have received little attention due to their small contribution to sea-level rise. However, glaciers provide water supplies for the five main watersheds draining the European Alps (Danube, Rhine, Rhone, Po and Adige, in order of size), an area inhabited by more than 145 million people (20% of Europe's population). It is unclear what volume of ice (and so quantity of potential meltwater) is affected by a debris layer, and what the effect of this layer is for water resources in the Alps. Combining the Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI) and online imagery services, we calculated that more than 40% of ice volume in the Alps is influenced by debris cover. In this presentation, we will show the different elements leading to this number, including our evaluation of the RGI, the volume calculation method and what percentage of ice is actually covered (0.6 to 99% of glacier surface area). Our analysis has allowed a comprehensive understanding of the debris-covered glaciers in each watershed by revealing their distribution (i.e. where they will extend water supply lifespan), and hypsometry and equilibrium line altitude (how sensitive they are to climate change). The prolonged lifespan of water supply is visible at the scale of an individual debris-covered glacier: comparing the evolution of Glacier Noir and Glacier Blanc (France) over the last 150 years indicates that Glacier Noir (debris covered) has retained 2.5 times more ice than Glacier Blanc (clean-ice) under the same climatic conditions. The number of debris-covered glaciers will increase as the >1°C rise in temperature in the European Alps since the start of the 20th Century increases the instability of rock faces and scree slopes. The evolution of these glaciers is therefore likely to have a major impact on human populations. This work shows that

  7. Debris ingestion by juvenile marine turtles: an underestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Santos, Robson Guimarães; Andrades, Ryan; Boldrini, Marcillo Altoé; Martins, Agnaldo Silva

    2015-04-15

    Marine turtles are an iconic group of endangered animals threatened by debris ingestion. However, key aspects related to debris ingestion are still poorly known, including its effects on mortality and the original use of the ingested debris. Therefore, we analysed the impact of debris ingestion in 265 green turtles (Chelonia mydas) over a large geographical area and different habitats along the Brazilian coast. We determined the death rate due to debris ingestion and quantified the amount of debris that is sufficient to cause the death of juvenile green turtles. Additionally, we investigated the original use of the ingested debris. We found that a surprisingly small amount of debris was sufficient to block the digestive tract and cause death. We suggested that debris ingestion has a high death potential that may be masked by other causes of death. An expressive part of the ingested debris come from disposable and short-lived products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of an Inductance In-Line Oil Debris Sensor and Magnetic Plug Oil Debris Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Tuck, Roger; Showalter, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research was to compare the performance of an inductance in-line oil debris sensor and magnetic plug oil debris sensor when detecting transmission component health in the same system under the same operating conditions. Both sensors were installed in series in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig during tests performed on 5 gear sets (pinion/gear) when different levels of damage occurred on the gear teeth. Results of this analysis found both the inductance in-line oil debris sensor and magnetic plug oil debris sensor have benefits and limitations when detecting gearbox component damage.

  9. Comparison of an Inductance In-Line Oil Debris Sensor and Magnetic Plug Oil Debris Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Tuck, Roger; Showalter, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research was to compare the performance of an inductance in-line oil debris sensor and magnetic plug oil debris sensor when detecting transmission component health in the same system under the same operating conditions. Both sensors were installed in series in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig during tests performed on 5 gear sets (pinion/gear) when different levels of damage occurred on the gear teeth. Results of this analysis found both the inductance in-line oil debris sensor and magnetic plug oil debris sensor have benefits and limitations when detecting gearbox component damage.

  10. Target selection and comparison of mission design for space debris removal by DLR's advanced study group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pas, Niels; Lousada, Joao; Terhes, Claudia; Bernabeu, Marc; Bauer, Waldemar

    2014-09-01

    Space debris is a growing problem. Models show that the Kessler syndrome, the exponential growth of debris due to collisions, has become unavoidable unless an active debris removal program is initiated. The debris population in LEO with inclination between 60° and 95° is considered as the most critical zone. In order to stabilize the debris population in orbit, especially in LEO, 5 to 10 objects will need to be removed every year. The unique circumstances of such a mission could require that several objects are removed with a single launch. This will require a mission to rendezvous with a multitude of objects orbiting on different altitudes, inclinations and planes. Removal models have assumed that the top priority targets will be removed first. However this will lead to a suboptimal mission design and increase the ΔV-budget. Since there is a multitude of targets to choose from, the targets can be selected for an optimal mission design. In order to select a group of targets for a removal mission the orbital parameters and political constraints should also be taken into account. Within this paper a number of the target selection criteria are presented. The possible mission targets and their order of retrieval is dependent on the mission architecture. A comparison between several global mission architectures is given. Under consideration are 3 global missions of which a number of parameters are varied. The first mission launches multiple separate deorbit kits. The second launches a mother craft with deorbit kits. The third launches an orbital tug which pulls the debris in a lower orbit, after which a deorbit kit performs the final deorbit burn. A RoM mass and cost comparison is presented. The research described in this paper has been conducted as part of an active debris removal study by the Advanced Study Group (ASG). The ASG is an interdisciplinary student group working at the DLR, analyzing existing technologies and developing new ideas into preliminary

  11. A debris avalanche at Süphan stratovolcano (Turkey) and implications for hazard evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Yavuz; Akkaya, İsmail; Oyan, Vural; Güleç, Nilgün

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic debris avalanches result from catastrophic collapse of flanks of volcanic edifices. They are common events in the history of a volcano. In a few minutes, they can fill and change the surrounding landscape and cover extensive areas. The most tremendous Quaternary volcanoes of Turkey are situated at Eastern Anatolia. These dormant/active volcanoes represent significant threat to the surrounding populations. The reactivation and/or partly collapse of such a volcano in Eastern Anatolia can result catastrophic consequences due to the dearth of previous studies, hazard maps, emergency information programs. Süphan stratovolcano is one of the most important members of the Quaternary aged volcanic center in the region with its steep slopes and higher elevation reaches up to 4050m above sea level. It includes lava flows, lava domes, pyroclastic rocks, debris avalanche, maar related pyroclastic fall and flows. This study concerned with a debris avalanche which identified at the northern parts of the volcano. Süphan debris avalanche displays hummocky topography and appears to have traveled approximately 25-30 km away from the source at the northern parts of the volcano. The products of Süphan debris avalanche are characterized by two different facies, block and matrix and are overlain by younger deposits of the volcanism. There is no hazard assessment have been done so far about this volcano. There are lots of towns with a remarkable population present around the Süphan volcano. In this study we performed a series of debris avalanche flow simulations with a numerical code called VolcFlow to evaluate the possible future collapses and impact areas. Keywords: Süphan Stratovolcano, Eastern Anatolia, Debris avalanche, VolcFlow

  12. Spacelab J air filter debris analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obenhuber, Donald C.

    1993-01-01

    Filter debris from the Spacelab module SLJ of STS-49 was analyzed for microbial contamination. Debris for cabin and avionics filters was collected by Kennedy Space Center personnel on 1 Oct. 1992, approximately 5 days postflight. The concentration of microorganisms found was similar to previous Spacelab missions averaging 7.4E+4 CFU/mL for avionics filter debris and 4.5E+6 CFU/mL for the cabin filter debris. A similar diversity of bacterial types was found in the two filters. Of the 13 different bacterial types identified from the cabin and avionics samples, 6 were common to both filters. The overall analysis of these samples as compared to those of previous missions shows no significant differences.

  13. Managing Debris After a Natural Disaster

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hauling Hurricane-related debris to the curb in participating areas. Following these specific guidelines (PDF) will make for a speedier removal process. Check with your local government on what is available to you.

  14. Remote sensing and characterization of anomalous debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, R.; Beavers, W.; Lambour, R.; Gaposchkin, E. M.; Kansky, J.; Stansbery, E.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of orbital debris data shows a band of anomalously high debris concentration in the altitude range between 800 and 1000 km. Analysis indicates that the origin is the leaking coolant fluid from nuclear power sources that powered a now defunct Soviet space-based series of ocean surveillance satellites. A project carried out to detect, track and characterize a sample of the anomalous debris is reported. The nature of the size and shape of the sample set, and the possibility of inferring the composition of the droplets were assessed. The technique used to detect, track and characterize the sample set is described and the results of the characterization analysis are presented. It is concluded that the nature of the debris is consistent with leaked Na-K fluid, although this cannot be proved with the remote sensing techniques used.

  15. NASA-GSFC Orbital Debris Research Priorities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    While quite a lot is known about the orbital debris environment and how to limit its growth, more remains to be learned. The curent priorities for research and development, from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center perspective, will be discussed.

  16. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, Attila; Kóspál, Ágnes; Ábrahám, Péter; Juhász, Attila; Apai, Dániel; Csengeri, Timea; Grady, Carol; Henning, Thomas; Kiss, Csaba; Pascucci, Ilaria

    2013-07-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. So far only a very few debris disks with measurable gas component have been known. We carried out a survey with the APEX radio telescope to detect molecular gas at millimeter wavelengths in 28 infrared-luminous young debris disks, and discovered two new systems with substantial amount of CO. Motivated to understand the origin, physics, and evolutionary status of the gas in these systems we observed one of them, HD 21997, with ALMA and Herschel. Our results suggest that HD 21997 may be a hybrid system where secondary debris dust and residual primordial gas coexist. This poses a serious question to the current paradigm, since the age of the system (30 Myr) significantly exceeds model predictions for disk clearing and the ages of the oldest transitional disks.

  17. Sedimentology, Behavior, and Hazards of Debris Flows at Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, K.M.; Vallance, J.W.; Pringle, P.T.

    1995-01-01

    Mount Rainier is potentially the most dangerous volcano in the Cascade Range because of its great height, frequent earthquakes, active hydrothermal system, and extensive glacier mantle. Many debris flows and their distal phases have inundated areas far from the volcano during postglacial time. Two types of debris flows, cohesive and noncohesive, have radically different origins and behavior that relate empirically to clay content. The two types are the major subpopulations of debris flows at Mount Rainier. The behavior of cohesive flows is affected by the cohesion and adhesion of particles; noncohesive flows are dominated by particle collisions to the extent that particle cataclasis becomes common during near-boundary shear. Cohesive debris flows contain more than 3 to 5 percent of clay-size sediment. The composition of these flows changed little as they traveled more than 100 kilometers from Mount Rainier to inundate parts of the now-populated Puget Sound lowland. They originate as deep-seated failures of sectors of the volcanic edifice, and such failures are sufficiently frequent that they are the major destructional process of Mount Rainier's morphologic evolution. In several deposits of large cohesive flows, a lateral, megaclast-bearing facies (with a mounded or hummocky surface) contrasts with a more clay-rich facies in the center of valleys and downstream. Cohesive flows at Mount Rainier do not correlate strongly with volcanic activity and thus can recur without warning, possibly triggered by non-magmatic earthquakes or by changes in the hydrothermal system. Noncohesive debris flows contain less than 3 to 5 percent clay-size sediment. They form most commonly by bulking of sediment in water surges, but some originate directly or indirectly from shallow slope failures that do not penetrate the hydrothermally altered core of the volcano. In contrast with cohesive flows, most noncohesive flows transform both from and to other flow types and are, therefore, the

  18. Local orbital debris flux study in the geostationary ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul V.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2013-06-01

    A local orbital debris flux analysis is performed in the geostationary (GEO) ring to investigate how frequently near-miss events occur for each longitude slot in the GEO ring. The current resident space object (RSO) environment at GEO is evaluated, and publicly-available two-line element (TLE) data are utilized in tandem with a geostationary torus configuration to simulate near-miss events incurred by the trackable RSO population at GEO. Methodology for determining near-miss events with this formulation is introduced, and the results of the analysis for a one-year time frame are provided to illustrate the need for active GEO remediation.

  19. 33 CFR 151.3000 - Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Definition of marine debris for the purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act. 151.3000 Section 151.3000... Definition of Marine Debris for the Purposes of the Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act...

  20. Active Debris Removal - A Grand Engineering Challenge for the Twenty-First Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2010-01-01

    The collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 in 2009 underlined the potential of an ongoing collision cascade effect (the Kessler Syndrome ) in the near-Earth orbital debris environment. A 2006 NASA analysis of the instability of the debris population in the low Earth orbit (LEO, the region below 2000 km altitude) shows that the environment has reached a point where the debris population will continue to increase in the next 200 years, even without any future launches. The increase is driven by fragments generated via collisions among existing objects in LEO. In reality, the situation will be worse than this prediction because satellite launches will continue and unexpected major breakups may continue to occur. Mitigation measures commonly adopted by the international space community (such as the 25-year rule) will help, but will be insufficient to stop the population growth. To better preserve the near-Earth space environment for future generations, active debris removal (ADR) should be considered. The idea of active debris removal is not new. However, due to the monumental technical, resource, operational, legal, and political challenges associated with removing objects from orbit, it has not yet been widely considered feasible. The recent major breakup events and the environment modeling efforts have certainly reignited the interest in using active debris removal to remediate the environment. This trend is further highlighted by the National Space Policy of the United States of America, released by the White House in June 2010, where the President explicitly directs NASA and the Department of Defense to pursue research and development of technology and techniques, to mitigate and remove on-orbit debris, reduce hazards, and increase understanding of the current and future debris environment. A 2009 modeling study by the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has shown that, in order to maintain the LEO debris population at a constant level for the next 200 years

  1. Characterizing the Survey Strategy and Initial Orbit Determination Abilities of the NASA MCAT Telescope for Geosynchronous Orbital Debris Environmental Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frith, J.; Barker, E. S.; Cowardin, H.; Buckalew, B.; Matney, M.; Anz-Meador, P.; Lederer, S.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) recently commissioned the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) on Ascension Island with the primary goal of obtaining population statistics of the geosynchronous (GEO) orbital debris environment. To help facilitate this, studies have been conducted using MCAT's known and projected capabilities to estimate the accuracy and timeliness in which it can survey the GEO environment. A simulated GEO debris population is created and sampled at various cadences and run through the Constrained Admissible Region Multi Hypotheses Filter (CAR-MHF). The orbits computed from the results are then compared to the simulated data to assess MCAT's ability to determine accurately the orbits of debris at various sample rates. Additionally, estimates of the rate at which MCAT will be able produce a complete GEO survey are presented using collected weather data and the proposed observation data collection cadence. The specific methods and results are presented here.

  2. Analyzing costs of space debris mitigation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, C.; Krag, H.; Bendisch, J.; Sdunnus, H.

    The steadily increasing number of space objects poses a considerable hazard to all kinds of spacecraft. To reduce the risks to future space missions different debris mitigation measures and spacecraft protection techniques have been investigated during the last years. However, the economic efficiency has not been considered yet in this context. This economical background is not always clear to satellite operators and the space industry. Current studies have the objective to evaluate the mission costs due to space debris in a business as usual (no mitigation) scenario compared to the missions costs considering debris mitigation. The aim i an estimation of thes time until the investment in debris mitigation will lead to an effective reduction of mission costs. This paper presents the results of investigations on the key problems of cost estimation for spacecraft and the influence of debris mitigation and shielding on cost. The shielding of a satellite can be an effective method to protect the spacecraft against debris impact. Mitigation strategies like the reduction of orbital lifetime and de- or re-orbit of non-operational satellites are methods to control the space debris environment. These methods result in an increase of costs. In a first step the overall costs of different types of unmanned satellites are analyzed. The key problem is, that it is not possible to provide a simple cost model that can be applied to all types of satellites. Unmanned spacecraft differ very much in mission, complexity of design, payload and operational lifetime. It is important to classify relevant cost parameters and investigate their influence on the respective mission. The theory of empirical cost estimation and existing cost models are discussed. A selected cost model is simplified and generalized for an application on all operational satellites. In a next step the influence of space debris on cost is treated, if the implementation of mitigation strategies is considered.

  3. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1994-01-01

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  4. Deformation of debris-ice mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Peter L.

    2014-09-01

    Mixtures of rock debris and ice are common in high-latitude and high-altitude environments and are thought to be widespread elsewhere in our solar system. In the form of permafrost soils, glaciers, and rock glaciers, these debris-ice mixtures are often not static but slide and creep, generating many of the landforms and landscapes associated with the cryosphere. In this review, a broad range of field observations, theory, and experimental work relevant to the mechanical interactions between ice and rock debris are evaluated, with emphasis on the temperature and stress regimes common in terrestrial surface and near-surface environments. The first-order variables governing the deformation of debris-ice mixtures in these environments are debris concentration, particle size, temperature, solute concentration (salinity), and stress. A key observation from prior studies, consistent with expectations, is that debris-ice mixtures are usually more resistant to deformation at low temperatures than their pure end-member components. However, at temperatures closer to melting, the growth of unfrozen water films at ice-particle interfaces begins to reduce the strengthening effect and can even lead to profound weakening. Using existing quantitative relationships from theoretical and experimental work in permafrost engineering, ice mechanics, and glaciology combined with theory adapted from metallurgy and materials science, a simple constitutive framework is assembled that is capable of capturing most of the observed dynamics. This framework highlights the competition between the role of debris in impeding ice creep and the mitigating effects of unfrozen water at debris-ice interfaces.

  5. Hot Wax Sweeps Debris From Narrow Passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricklefs, Steven K.

    1990-01-01

    Safe and effective technique for removal of debris and contaminants from narrow passages involves entrainment of undesired material in thermoplastic casting material. Semisolid wax slightly below melting temperature pushed along passage by pressurized nitrogen to remove debris. Devised to clean out fuel passages in main combustion chamber of Space Shuttle main engine. Also applied to narrow, intricate passages in internal-combustion-engine blocks, carburetors, injection molds, and other complicated parts.

  6. Dimensional analysis of natural debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Gordon; Ouyang, Chaojun

    2015-04-01

    Debris flows occur when masses of poorly sorted sediment, agitated and saturated with water, surge down slopes in response to gravitational attraction. They are of great concern because they often cause catastrophic disasters due to the long run-out distance and large impact forc-es. Different from rock avalanches and sediment-laden water floods, both solid and fluid phases affected by multiple parameters can influence the motion of debris flows and govern their rheological properties. A dimensional analysis for a systematic study of the governing parameters is presented in this manuscript. Multiple dimensionless numbers with clear physical meanings are critically reviewed. Field data on natural debris flows are available here based on the fifty years' observation and measurement in the Jiangjia Gully, which is located in the Dongchuan City, Yunnan Province of China. The applications of field data with the dimensional analysis for studying natural debris flows are demonstrated. Specific values of dimensionless numbers (e.g., modified Savage Number, Reynolds number, Friction number) for classifying flowing regimes of natural debris flows on the large scales are obtained. Compared to previous physical model tests conducted mostly on small scales, this study shows that the contact friction between particles dominates in natural debris flows. In addition, the solid inertial stress due to particle collisions and the pore fluid viscous shear stress play key roles in governing the dynamic properties of debris flows and the total normal stress acting on the slope surfaces. The channel width as a confinement to the flows can affect the solids discharge per unit width significantly. Furthermore, a dimensionless number related to pore fluid pressure dissipation is found for distinguishing surge flows and continuous flows in field satisfactorily. It indicates that for surge debris flows, the high pore fluid pressures generated in granular body dissipate quite slowly and may

  7. DebriSat Hypervelocity Impact Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    public release; distribution unlimited.  Targets: Scaled Multishock Shield, DebrisLV, and DebriSat  500-600 g hollow aluminum and nylon projectile...solar cells), NBK7 glass, titanium, sapphire, T1000 fiber, M55J carbon fiber, PVE film (sheet, wire ), kevlar, HDPE, polyurethane plastic, mylar...impact project. The design (Fig. 7) used a hollow aluminum cylinder made of 7075-T651 aluminum with a nylon sleeve. During assembly the aluminum

  8. Catastrophic debris flows transformed from landslides in volcanic terrains : mobility, hazard assessment and mitigation strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Kevin M.; Macias, Jose Luis; Naranjo, Jose Antonio; Rodriguez, Sergio; McGeehin, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Communities in lowlands near volcanoes are vulnerable to significant volcanic flow hazards in addition to those associated directly with eruptions. The largest such risk is from debris flows beginning as volcanic landslides, with the potential to travel over 100 kilometers. Stratovolcanic edifices commonly are hydrothermal aquifers composed of unstable, altered rock forming steep slopes at high altitudes, and the terrain surrounding them is commonly mantled by readily mobilized, weathered airfall and ashflow deposits. We propose that volcano hazard assessments integrate the potential for unanticipated debris flows with, at active volcanoes, the greater but more predictable potential of magmatically triggered flows. This proposal reinforces the already powerful arguments for minimizing populations in potential flow pathways below both active and selected inactive volcanoes. It also addresses the potential for volcano flank collapse to occur with instability early in a magmatic episode, as well as the 'false-alarm problem'-the difficulty in evacuating the potential paths of these large mobile flows. Debris flows that transform from volcanic landslides, characterized by cohesive (muddy) deposits, create risk comparable to that of their syneruptive counterparts of snow and ice-melt origin, which yield noncohesive (granular) deposits, because: (1) Volcano collapses and the failures of airfall- and ashflow-mantled slopes commonly yield highly mobile debris flows as well as debris avalanches with limited runout potential. Runout potential of debris flows may increase several fold as their volumes enlarge beyond volcanoes through bulking (entrainment) of sediment. Through this mechanism, the runouts of even relatively small collapses at Cascade Range volcanoes, in the range of 0.1 to 0.2 cubic kilometers, can extend to populated lowlands. (2) Collapse is caused by a variety of triggers: tectonic and volcanic earthquakes, gravitational failure, hydrovolcanism, and

  9. Reflectance spectroscopy characterization of space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vananti, A.; Schildknecht, T.; Krag, H.

    2017-05-01

    When characterizing the space debris environment one important point is the identification of the physical properties of the space debris objects. Reflectance spectroscopy is a possible technique to study the surface material of these objects with observations from the ground. In this work the results collected from spectroscopy observations of space debris in orbit are presented. The observations were performed at the 1-m ESA Space Debris Telescope (ESASDT) in Tenerife equipped with a spectrograph in the 450-960 nm wavelength range. A preliminary classification using three different categories purely based on the shape and appearance of the spectra was proposed. Two debris objects with high AMR could be successfully associated with materials analyzed in the laboratory. The results show that the two debris objects are probably pieces of Kapton MLI with 'gold' and 'silver' coating, respectively. Color indices were extracted from the spectroscopic measurements. For high AMR objects the colors seem to be consistent with the proposed classification in three categories. The B-R and R-I laboratory measurements of 'gold' and 'silver' MLI taken from the literature are comparable with the obtained results.

  10. Gear Damage Detection Using Oil Debris Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to verify, when using an oil debris sensor, that accumulated mass predicts gear pitting damage and to identify a method to set threshold limits for damaged gears. Oil debris data was collected from 8 experiments with no damage and 8 with pitting damage in the NASA Glenn Spur Gear Fatigue Rig. Oil debris feature analysis was performed on this data. Video images of damage progression were also collected from 6 of the experiments with pitting damage. During each test, data from an oil debris sensor was monitored and recorded for the occurrence of pitting damage. The data measured from the oil debris sensor during experiments with damage and with no damage was used to identify membership functions to build a simple fuzzy logic model. Using fuzzy logic techniques and the oil debris data, threshold limits were defined that discriminate between stages of pitting wear. Results indicate accumulated mass combined with fuzzy logic analysis techniques is a good predictor of pitting damage on spur gears.

  11. HOT DEBRIS DUST AROUND HD 106797

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Hideaki; Onaka, Takashi; Yamashita, Takuya; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kataza, Hirokazu; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Hirao, Takanori; Enya, Keigo; Fukagawa, Misato; Marshall, Jonathan P.; White, Glenn J.

    2009-04-10

    Photometry of the A0 V main-sequence star HD 106797 with AKARI and Gemini/T-ReCS is used to detect excess emission over the expected stellar photospheric emission between 10 and 20 {mu}m, which is best attributed to hot circumstellar debris dust surrounding the star. The temperature of the debris dust is derived as T {sub d} {approx} 190 K by assuming that the excess emission is approximated by a single temperature blackbody. The derived temperature suggests that the inner radius of the debris disk is {approx}14 AU. The fractional luminosity of the debris disk is 1000 times brighter than that of our own zodiacal cloud. The existence of such a large amount of hot dust around HD 106797 cannot be accounted for by a simple model of the steady state evolution of a debris disk due to collisions, and it is likely that transient events play a significant role. Our data also show a narrow spectral feature between 11 and 12 {mu}m attributable to crystalline silicates, suggesting that dust heating has occurred during the formation and evolution of the debris disk of HD 106797.

  12. Conceptual design of an orbital debris collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonoghue, Peter (Editor); Brenton, Brian; Chambers, Ernest; Schwind, Thomas; Swanhart, Christopher; Williams, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The current Lower Earth Orbit (LEO) environment has become overly crowded with space debris. An evaluation of types of debris is presented in order to determine which debris poses the greatest threat to operation in space, and would therefore provide a feasible target for removal. A target meeting these functional requirements was found in the Cosmos C-1B Rocket Body. These launchers are spent space transporters which constitute a very grave risk of collision and fragmentation in LEO. The motion and physical characteristics of these rocket bodies have determined the most feasible method of removal. The proposed Orbital Debris Collector (ODC) device is designed to attach to the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV), which provides all propulsion, tracking, and power systems. The OMV/ODC combination, the Rocket Body Retrieval Vehicle (RBRV), will match orbits with the rocket body, use a spin table to match the rotational motion of the debris, capture it, despin it, and remove it from orbit by allowing it to fall into the Earth's atmosphere. A disposal analysis is presented to show how the debris will be deorbited into the Earth's atmosphere. The conceptual means of operation of a sample mission is described.

  13. Marine debris survey manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ribic, C.A.; Dixon, T.R.; Vining, I.; Duke, M.

    1991-10-01

    Over the last several years, concern has increased about the amount of man-made materials lost or discarded at sea and the potential impacts to the environment. The scope of the problem depends on the amounts and types of debris. One problem is making a regional comparison of debris is the lack of a standard methodology. The objective of this manual is to discuss designs and methodologies for assessment studies of marine debris. This manual has been written for managers, researchers, and others who are just entering this area of study and who seek guidance in designing marine debris surveys. Active researchers will be able to use this manual along with applicable references herein as a source for design improvement. To this end, the authors have reviewed and synthesized survey techniques that have been used in the past for assessing marine debris, such as sighting surveys, beach surveys, and trawl surveys, and have considered new methods (e.g., aerial photography). All techniques have been put into a general survey planning framework to assist in developing different marine debris surveys.

  14. LDEF meteoroid and debris database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dardano, C. B.; See, Thomas H.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) database is maintained at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Houston, Texas, and consists of five data tables containing information about individual features, digitized images of selected features, and LDEF hardware (i.e., approximately 950 samples) archived at JSC. About 4000 penetrations (greater than 300 micron in diameter) and craters (greater than 500 micron in diameter) were identified and photo-documented during the disassembly of LDEF at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), while an additional 4500 or so have subsequently been characterized at JSC. The database also contains some data that have been submitted by various PI's, yet the amount of such data is extremely limited in its extent, and investigators are encouraged to submit any and all M&D-type data to JSC for inclusion within the M&D database. Digitized stereo-image pairs are available for approximately 4500 features through the database.

  15. Micrometeoroids and debris on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandeville, Jean-Claude

    1993-01-01

    Two experiments within the French Cooperative Payload (FRECOPA) and devoted to the detection of cosmic dust were flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). A variety of sensors and collecting devices have made possible the study of impact processes on dedicated sensors and on materials of technological interest. Examination of hypervelocity impact features on these experiments gives valuable information on the size distribution and nature of interplanetary dust particles in low-Earth orbit (LEO), within the 0.5-300 micrometer size range. However no crater smaller than 1.5 microns has been observed, thus suggesting a cut-off in the near Earth particle distribution. Chemical investigation of craters by EDX clearly shows evidence of elements (Na, Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Fe) consistent with cosmic origin. However, remnants of orbital debris have been found in a few craters; this can be the result of particles in eccentric orbits about the Earth and of the 8 deg offset in the orientation of LDEF. Crater size distribution is compared with results from other dust experiments flown on LDEF and with current models. Possible origin and orbital evolution of micrometeoroids is discussed. Use of thin foil detectors for the chemical study of particle remnants looks promising for future experiments.

  16. Postdetonation nuclear debris for attribution.

    PubMed

    Fahey, A J; Zeissler, C J; Newbury, D E; Davis, J; Lindstrom, R M

    2010-11-23

    On the morning of July 16, 1945, the first atomic bomb was exploded in New Mexico on the White Sands Proving Ground. The device was a plutonium implosion device similar to the device that destroyed Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9 of that same year. Recently, with the enactment of US public law 111-140, the "Nuclear Forensics and Attribution Act," scientists in the government and academia have been able, in earnest, to consider what type of forensic-style information may be obtained after a nuclear detonation. To conduct a robust attribution process for an exploded device placed by a nonstate actor, forensic analysis must yield information about not only the nuclear material in the device but about other materials that went into its construction. We have performed an investigation of glassed ground debris from the first nuclear test showing correlations among multiple analytical techniques. Surprisingly, there is strong evidence, obtainable only through microanalysis, that secondary materials used in the device can be identified and positively associated with the nuclear material.

  17. Postdetonation nuclear debris for attribution

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, A. J.; Zeissler, C. J.; Newbury, D. E.; Davis, J.; Lindstrom, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    On the morning of July 16, 1945, the first atomic bomb was exploded in New Mexico on the White Sands Proving Ground. The device was a plutonium implosion device similar to the device that destroyed Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9 of that same year. Recently, with the enactment of US public law 111-140, the “Nuclear Forensics and Attribution Act,” scientists in the government and academia have been able, in earnest, to consider what type of forensic-style information may be obtained after a nuclear detonation. To conduct a robust attribution process for an exploded device placed by a nonstate actor, forensic analysis must yield information about not only the nuclear material in the device but about other materials that went into its construction. We have performed an investigation of glassed ground debris from the first nuclear test showing correlations among multiple analytical techniques. Surprisingly, there is strong evidence, obtainable only through microanalysis, that secondary materials used in the device can be identified and positively associated with the nuclear material. PMID:21059943

  18. Active Debris Removal Using Modified Launch Vehicle Upper Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, S. Ali; Emanuelli, Matteo; Raval, Siddharth; Turconi, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    During the past few years, several research programs have assessed the current state and future evolution of space debris in the Low Earth Orbit region. These studies indicate that space debris density could reach a critical level such that there will be a continuous increase in the number of debris objects, primarily driven by debris-debris collision activity known as the Kessler effect. These studies also highlight the urgency for active debris removal.An Active Debris Removal System (ADRS) is capable of approaching the debris object through a close-range rendezvous, stabilizing its attitude, establishing physical contact, and finally de-orbiting the debris object. The de-orbiting phase could be powered by propulsion systems such as chemical rockets or electrodynamic tether (EDT) systems.The aim of this project is to model and evaluate a debris removal mission in which an adapted rocket upper stage, equipped with an electrodynamic tether (EDT) system, is employed for de-orbiting a debris object. This ADRS package is installed initially as part of a launch vehicle on a normal satellite deployment mission, and a far-approach manoeuvre will be required to align the ADRS' orbit with that of the target debris. We begin by selecting a suitable target debris and launch vehicle, and then proceed with modelling the entire debris removal mission from launch to de-orbiting of the target debris object using Analytical Graphic Inc.'s Systems Tool Kit (STK).

  19. Global analysis of anthropogenic debris ingestion by sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Schuyler, Qamar; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Wilcox, Chris; Townsend, Kathy

    2014-02-01

    Ingestion of marine debris can have lethal and sublethal effects on sea turtles and other wildlife. Although researchers have reported on ingestion of anthropogenic debris by marine turtles and implied incidences of debris ingestion have increased over time, there has not been a global synthesis of the phenomenon since 1985. Thus, we analyzed 37 studies published from 1985 to 2012 that report on data collected from before 1900 through 2011. Specifically, we investigated whether ingestion prevalence has changed over time, what types of debris are most commonly ingested, the geographic distribution of debris ingestion by marine turtles relative to global debris distribution, and which species and life-history stages are most likely to ingest debris. The probability of green (Chelonia mydas) and leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) ingesting debris increased significantly over time, and plastic was the most commonly ingested debris. Turtles in nearly all regions studied ingest debris, but the probability of ingestion was not related to modeled debris densities. Furthermore, smaller, oceanic-stage turtles were more likely to ingest debris than coastal foragers, whereas carnivorous species were less likely to ingest debris than herbivores or gelatinovores. Our results indicate oceanic leatherback turtles and green turtles are at the greatest risk of both lethal and sublethal effects from ingested marine debris. To reduce this risk, anthropogenic debris must be managed at a global level.

  20. A globally complete map of supraglacial debris cover and a new toolkit for debris cover research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herreid, Sam; Pellicciotti, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    A growing canon of literature is focused on resolving the processes and implications of debris cover on glaciers. However, this work is often confined to a handful of glaciers that were likely selected based on criteria optimizing their suitability to test a specific hypothesis or logistical ease. The role of debris cover in a glacier system is likely to not go overlooked in forthcoming research, yet the magnitude of this role at a global scale has not yet been fully described. Here, we present a map of debris cover for all glacierized regions on Earth including the Greenland Ice Sheet using 30 m Landsat data. This dataset will begin to open a wider context to the high quality, localized findings from the debris-covered glacier research community and help inform large-scale modeling efforts. A global map of debris cover also facilitates analysis attempting to isolate first order geomorphological and climate controls of supraglacial debris production. Furthering the objective of expanding the inclusion of debris cover in forthcoming research, we also present an under development suite of open-source, Python based tools. Requiring minimal and often freely available input data, we have automated the mapping of: i) debris cover, ii) ice cliffs, iii) debris cover evolution over the Landsat era and iv) glacier flow instabilities from altered debris structures. At the present time, debris extent is the only globally complete quantity but with the expanding repository of high quality global datasets and further tool development minimizing manual tasks and computational cost, we foresee all of these tools being applied globally in the near future.

  1. On fixed-area plot sampling for downed coarse woody debris

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey H. Gove; Paul C. Van Deusen

    2011-01-01

    The use of fixed-area plots for sampling down coarse woody debris is reviewed. A set of clearly defined protocols for two previously described methods is established and a new method, which we call the 'sausage' method, is developed. All methods (protocols) are shown to be unbiased for volume estimation, but not necessarily for estimation of population...

  2. The Near-Earth Orbital Debris Problem and the Challenges for Environment Remediation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2012-01-01

    The near-Earth space environment has been gradually polluted with orbital debris (OD) since the beginning of space activities 55 years ago. Although this problem has been known to the research community for decades, the public was, in general, unaware of the issue until the anti-satellite test conducted by China in 2007 and the collision between Cosmos 2251 and the operational Iridium 33 in 2009. The latter also underlined the potential of an ongoing collision cascade effect (the "Kessler Syndrome") in the low Earth orbit (LEO, the region below 2000 km altitude). Recent modeling results have indicated that mitigation measures commonly adopted by the international space community will be insufficient to stabilize the LEO debris population. To better limit the OD population increase, more aggressive actions must be considered. There are three options for OD environment remediation-removal of large/massive intact objects to address the root cause of the OD population growth problem, removal of 5-mm-to-1 cm debris to mitigate the main mission-ending threats for the majority of operational spacecraft, and prevention of major debris-generating collisions as a temporary means to slow down the OD population increase. The technology, engineering, and cost challenges to carry out any of these three options are monumental. It will require innovative ideas, game-changing technologies, and major collaborations at the international level to address the OD problem and preserve the near-Earth environment for future generations.

  3. Estimating the carbon in coarse woody debris with perpendicular distance sampling. Chapter 6

    Treesearch

    Harry T. Valentine; Jeffrey H. Gove; Mark J. Ducey; Timothy G. Gregoire; Michael S. Williams

    2008-01-01

    Perpendicular distance sampling (PDS) is a design for sampling the population of pieces of coarse woody debris (logs) in a forested tract. In application, logs are selected at sample points with probability proportional to volume. Consequently, aggregate log volume per unit land area can be estimated from tallies of logs at sample points. In this chapter we provide...

  4. Common factors drive disease and coarse woody debris dynamics in forests impacted by sudden oak death

    Treesearch

    Richard C. Cobb; Maggie N. Chan; Ross K. Meentemeyer; David M. Rizzo

    2011-01-01

    Disease ecology has made important steps in describing how epidemiological processes control the impact of pathogens on populations and communities but fewer field or theoretical studies address disease effects at the ecosystem level. We demonstrate that the same epidemiological mechanisms drive disease intensity and coarse woody debris (CWD) dynamics...

  5. Laser system for space debris cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenchik, A. M.; Erlandson, A. C.; Liedahl, D.

    2012-07-01

    Starting with intensity requirements for producing efficient ablation thrust, then applying orbital mechanics and taking beam transport into account, we have determined the laser pulse energy and the number of pulses required for removing orbital debris. Our calculations show that a ground-based, diode-pumped, gas-cooled multi-slab laser, that uses only modest extensions of existing technology, would be capable of removing most small debris from low-earth orbit, when used with a 3-m-diameter beam director. Such a laser would also be capable of moving large debris into orbits that avoid high-value satellites and of even removing large debris from orbit, by illuminating the debris over several encounters. The laser design we propose uses diode-pumped, Nd:glass, gas-cooled amplifiers with 25-cm square apertures. When operating at the laser fundamental wavelength of 1054 nm, each beamline would produce ˜ 8kJ/4ns pulses at 15 Hz. Two such beamlines, combined using established polarization-combining methods, would be sufficient for orbital debris cleaning. Alternatively, when operating at the second harmonic of 527 nm, each beamline would produce ˜ 7 kJ/4 ns pulses. Due to reduced beam divergence and a smaller beam diameter at the debris, a single harmonically-converted beamline can be useful. We estimate that the first-of-a-kind beamline could be deployed within 4-5 years of project start at a cost of 100-150M. Later beamlines would require less development and engineering costs and would have substantially lower overall cost.

  6. Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM) v.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark; Krisko, Paula; Xu, Yu-Lin; Horstman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    A model of the manmade orbital debris environment is required by spacecraft designers, mission planners, and others in order to understand and mitigate the effects of the environment on their spacecraft or systems. A manmade environment is dynamic, and can be altered significantly by intent (e.g., the Chinese anti-satellite weapon test of January 2007) or accident (e.g., the collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 spacecraft in February 2009). Engineering models are used to portray the manmade debris environment in Earth orbit. The availability of new sensor and in situ data, the re-analysis of older data, and the development of new analytical and statistical techniques has enabled the construction of this more comprehensive and sophisticated model. The primary output of this model is the flux [#debris/area/time] as a function of debris size and year. ORDEM may be operated in spacecraft mode or telescope mode. In the former case, an analyst defines an orbit for a spacecraft and "flies" the spacecraft through the orbital debris environment. In the latter case, an analyst defines a ground-based sensor (telescope or radar) in terms of latitude, azimuth, and elevation, and the model provides the number of orbital debris traversing the sensor's field of view. An upgraded graphical user interface (GUI) is integrated with the software. This upgraded GUI uses project-oriented organization and provides the user with graphical representations of numerous output data products. These range from the conventional flux as a function of debris size for chosen analysis orbits (or views), for example, to the more complex color-contoured two-dimensional (2D) directional flux diagrams in local spacecraft elevation and azimuth.

  7. Debris analysis workstation: from concept to reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, David B.; Maethner, Scott R.; Shubert, Ann J.; Yates, Ken W.

    1995-06-01

    Determining the hazards from debris generating events is a design and safety consideration for a number of space systems, both currently operating and planned. To meet these and other requirements, the US Air Force Phillips Laboratory Space Debris Research Program is developing a simulation platform called the Debris Analysis Workstation (DAW) which provides an analysis capability for assessing a wide variety of debris studies. DAW integrates several component debris analysis models and data visualization tools into a single analysis platform that meets the needs for DoD space debris analysis, and is both user friendly and modular. This allows for studies to be performed expeditiously by analysts that are not debris experts. DAW has gone from concept to reality with the recent deliveries of Versions 0.1 to 0.4 to a number of customers. The current version of DAW incorporates a spacecraft break-up model, drag inclusive propagator, a collision dispersion model, a graphical user interface, and data visualization routines, which together provide capabilities to conduct missile intercept range safety analyses. Work is progressing to add new capabilities with the incorporation of additional models and improved designs. The existing tools are in their initial integrated form, but the 'glue' that will ultimately bring them together into an integrated, user-friendly system, is an object oriented language layer that is scheduled to be added in 1995. Other candidate component models that are under consideration for incorporation include additional orbital propagators, error estimation routines, dispersion models, and other breakup models. At present, DAW resides on a SUN workstation, although future versions could be tailored for other platforms, depending on the need.

  8. Loopy, Floppy and Fragmented: Debris Characteristics Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, J.; Burgess, H. K.

    2016-02-01

    Marine debris is a world-wide problem threatening the health and safety of marine organisms, ecosystems, and humans. Recent and ongoing research shows that risk of harm is not associated with identity, but rather with a set of specific character states, where the character state space intersection is defined by the organism of interest. For example, intersections of material, color, rigidity and size predict the likelihood of an object being ingested: plastic, clear-white, floppy objects <100cm pose higher risks to sea turtles whereas yellow-red, rigid objects <10cm pose higher risks to albatrosses. A character state space approach allows prioritization of prevention and removal of marine debris informed by risk assessments for species of interest by comparing species ranges with spatio-temporal hotspots of all debris with characteristics known to be associated with increased risk of harm, regardless of identity. With this in mind, the Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST) developed and tested a 20 character data collection approach to quantifying the diversity and abundance of marine debris found on beaches. Development resulted in meta-analysis of the literature and expert opinion eliciting harmful character state space. Testing included data collection on inter-rater reliability and accuracy, where the latter included 75 participants quantifying marine debris characteristics on monthly surveys of 30 beaches along the Washington and Oregon coastlines over the past year. Pilot work indicates that characters must be simply and operationally defined, states must be listed, and examples must be provided for color states. Complex characters (e.g., windage, shape) are not replicable across multiple data collectors. Although data collection takes longer than other marine debris surveys for a given amount of debris and area surveyed, volunteer rapidity and accuracy improved within 3-5 surveys. Initial feedback indicated that volunteers were willing to

  9. Overview of the space debris environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshishnek, M. J.

    1995-03-01

    There is a component of the space environment that is man-made pollution, termed 'space debris' it exists at all inclinations and, primarily, at altitudes of roughly 350 km to 2000 km. The size of this debris ranges from several meters to a fraction of a micrometer in diameter, and the particle distribution follows an inverse power law, with the smaller size component far exceeding that of the larger. Debris is composed primarily of alumina from solid rocket motor exhausts, aluminum from spacecraft structures, and zinc and titanium oxides from thermal control coatings. The accepted model of the space debris environment is that of Kessler et al., a complex model that predicts the number of particles that will impact a surface as a function of altitude, inclination, solar cycle, and particle diameter, as well as their collision velocities. Recent data from LDEF has demonstrated both the accuracy and shortcomings of the Kessler model. Measured debris impactor fluxes are in good agreement with the model for ram surfaces. However, predictions of the model for other surfaces of a spacecraft are less accurate, most notably for the wake or trailing side. While the Kessler model is appropriate for long-term, average flux predictions, spatial-temporal impact fluxes measured on LDEF dramatically illustrated the presence of strong debris clouds that do not dissipate quickly in space and will encounter an orbiting spacecraft cyclically and repeatedly over its lifetime. LDEF data has also indicated the presence of debris in elliptical orbits, a fact not predicted by the Kessler model. This fact is responsible for the discrepancy between measured impact fluxes and predictions on trailing edge surfaces.

  10. Debris-flow hazards on tributary junction fans, Chitral, Hindu Kush Range, northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. Asif; Haneef, M.; Khan, Anwar S.; Tahirkheli, Tazeem

    2013-01-01

    The Chitral district of northern Pakistan lies in the eastern Hindu Kush Range. The population in this high-relief mountainous terrain is restricted to tributary-junction fans in the Chitral valley. Proximity to steep valley slopes renders these fans prone to hydrogeomorphic hazards, including landslides, floods and debris flows. This paper focuses on debris-flow hazards on tributary-junction fans in Chitral. Using field observations, satellite-image analyses and a preliminary morphometry, the tributary-junction fans in the Chitral valley are classified into (1) discrete and (2) composite. The discrete fans are modern-day active landforms and include debris cones associated with ephemeral gullies, debris fans associated with ephemeral channels and alluvial fans formed by perennial streams. The composite fans are a collage of sediment deposits of widely different ages and formed by diverse alluvial-fan forming processes. These include fans formed predominantly during MIS-2/Holocene interglacial stages superimposed by modern-day alluvial and debris fans. Composite fans are turned into relict fans when entrenched by modern-day perennial streams. These deeply incised channels discharge their sediment load directly into the trunk river without significant spread on fan surface. In comparison, when associated with ephemeral streams, active debris fans develop directly at composite-fan surfaces. Major settlements in Chitral are located on composite fans, as they provide large tracts of leveled land with easy accesses to water from the tributary streams. These fan surfaces are relatively more stable, especially when they are entrenched by perennial streams (e.g., Chitral, Ayun, and Reshun). When associated with ephemeral streams (e.g., Snowghar) or a combination of ephemeral and perennial streams (e.g., Drosh), these fans are subject to frequent debris-flow hazards. Fans associated with ephemeral streams are prone to high-frequency (˜10 years return period) debris

  11. Mixed debris treatment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.C.; Porter, C.L.; Wallace, M.T.

    1993-10-01

    August 18, 1992 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the final revised treatment standards for hazardous debris, including mixed debris. (1) Whereas previous standards had been concentration based, the revised standards are performance based. Debris must be treated prior to land disposal, using specific technologies from one or more of the following families of debris treatment technologies: Extraction, destruction, or immobilization. Seventeen specific technologies with generic application are discussed in the final rule. The existing capabilities and types of debris at the INEL were scrubbed against the debris rule to determine an overall treatment strategy. Seven types of debris were identified: combustible, porous, non-porous, inherently hazardous, HEPA filters, asbestos contaminated, and reactive metals contaminated debris. With the exception of debris contaminated with reactive metals treatment can be achieved utilizing existing facilities coupled with minor modifications.

  12. Linking social drivers of marine debris with actual marine debris on beaches.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Chris; Grage, Anna; Campbell, Marnie L

    2012-08-01

    The drivers (social) and pressures (physical) of marine debris have typically been examined separately. We redress this by using social and beach surveys at nine Tasmanian beaches, across three coastlines and within three categories of urbanisation, to examine whether people acknowledge that their actions contribute to the issue of marine debris, and whether these social drivers are reflected in the amount of marine debris detected on beaches. A large proportion (75%) of survey participants do not litter at beaches; with age, gender, income and residency influencing littering behaviour. Thus, participants recognise that littering at beaches is a problem. This social trend was reflected in the small amounts of debris that were detected. Furthermore, the amount of debris was not statistically influenced by the degree of beach urbanisation, the coastline sampled, or the proximity to beach access points. By linking social and physical aspects of this issue, management outcomes can be improved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Emergency assessment of post-fire debris-flow hazards for the 2013 Mountain fire, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staley, Dennis M.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Smoczyk, Greg M.; Reeves, Ryan R.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire dramatically alters the hydrologic response of a watershed such that even modest rainstorms can produce dangerous flash floods and debris flows. We use empirical models to predict the probability and magnitude of debris flow occurrence in response to a 10-year rainstorm for the 2013 Mountain fire near Palm Springs, California. Overall, the models predict a relatively high probability (60–100 percent) of debris flow for six of the drainage basins in the burn area in response to a 10-year recurrence interval design storm. Volumetric predictions suggest that debris flows that occur may entrain a significant volume of material, with 8 of the 14 basins identified as having potential debris-flow volumes greater than 100,000 cubic meters. These results suggest there is a high likelihood of significant debris-flow hazard within and downstream of the burn area for nearby populations, infrastructure, and wildlife and water resources. Given these findings, we recommend that residents, emergency managers, and public works departments pay close attention to weather forecasts and National Weather Service–issued Debris Flow and Flash Flood Outlooks, Watches and Warnings and that residents adhere to any evacuation orders.

  14. Debris mitigation techniques for petawatt-class lasers in high debris environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Jens; Rambo, Patrick; Kimmel, Mark; Geissel, Matthias; Robertson, Grafton; Ramsey, Marc; Headley, Daniel; Atherton, Briggs

    2010-04-01

    This paper addresses debris mitigation techniques for two different kinds of debris sources that are found in the high-energy density community. The first debris source stems from the laser-target interaction and this debris can be mitigated by avoiding a direct line of sight to the debris source (e.g. by using a sacrificial fold mirror) or by inserting a thin debris shield. Several thin film debris shields have been investigated and nitrocellulose was found to be the best suited. The second debris source originates from an external high-energy density driver or experiment. In our specific case, this is the Z accelerator, a Z-pinch machine that generates 2 MJ of x rays at 300 TW. The center section of the Z accelerator is an extremely violent environment which requires the development of novel debris mitigation approaches for backlighting with petawatt lasers. Two such approaches are presented in this paper. First, a self-closing focusing cone. In our facility, the focused beam on target is fully enclosed inside a solid focusing cone. In the first debris mitigation scenario, the last part of the cone has a “flapper” that should seal the cone when the pressure wave from the Z-pinch explosion hits it. In the second scenario, an enclosed target assembly is used, with the last part of the focusing cone connected to a “target can” which houses the laser target. The laser produced x rays for backlighting escape through a 3 mm diameter hole that is protected by an x-ray filter stack. Both techniques are discussed in detail and have been successfully tested on the Z accelerator.

  15. A Search for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Lederer, Susan M.; Barker, Edwin S.; Cowardin, Heather; Abercromby, Kira J.; ilha, Jiri

    2011-01-01

    Existing optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) have been conducted with meter class telescopes, which have detection limits in the range of 18th-19th magnitude. We report on a new search for optically faint debris at GEO using the 6.5-m Magellan 1 telescope Walter Baade at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to go as faint as possible and characterize the brightness distribution of debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude, corresponding to a size smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. We wish to compare the inferred size distribution for GEO debris with that for LEO debris. We describe results obtained during 9.4 hours of observing time during 25-27 March 2011. We used the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a mosaic of 8 CCDs, and a field of view of 30 arc-minutes in diameter. This is the widest field of view of any instrument on either Magellan telescope. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r filter. The limiting magnitude for 5 second exposures is estimated to be fainter than 22. With this small field of view and the limited observing time, our objective was to search for optically faint objects from the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris (SSN # 25001 and 33519) with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for objects on similar orbits but with a spread in mean anomaly. To detect bright objects over a wider field of view (1.6x1.6 degrees), we observed the same field centers at the same time through a similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will describe our experiences using Magellan, a telescope never used previously for orbital debris research, and our initial results.

  16. Debris Flow Models With Vertical Redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcelwaine, J. N.; Kowalski, J.

    2011-12-01

    The destructive power of debris flows is enormous and hence there is a need for quantitative models that can accurately describe their behavior and predict their flow paths, heights, velocities and corresponding impact pressures. The dynamics of a debris flows is effected by the pore pressure, which can be measured in experiments and in the field, but existing theories to not model this well. We introduce a new class of shallow debris flow models that includes an equation for the vertical distribution of material and show how this gives predictions of the pore pressure and can effect flow mobility. Debris flows exhibit different flow forms depending on water and solid concentration, particle size distribution and the topography of the flow path. The complex interplay between the fluid and solids of a whole range of different grain sizes leads to physical phenomena such as the development of a front with large boulders, lateral levee formation and, due to a varying fraction of particles being in suspension, an effective basal fluid pressure that can exceed the pure fluids hydrostatic pressure. Large scale debris flow data of the Illgraben torrent, Switzerland, show that a varying basal fluid pressure is characteristic for the snout of debris flows with a granular front and significantly affects basal shear stresses. A comprehensive mathematical debris flow model that explains all the observed phenomena will be extremely complicated; if it is achievable at all. However, promising approaches exist that successfully describe some of the effects in simple situations. Yet the observed basal fluid pressure data in granular front flows is not explained satisfactorily up to this point. One reason for this is that any change of the effective basal fluid pressure is associated with an internal redistribution of the solids above, and hence is caused by relative motion between the phases within the flowing body. However, this inter-component slip is usually neglected in the

  17. A Search For Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitzer, P.; Lederer, S.; Barker, E.; Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Silha, J.; Burkhardt, A.

    2011-09-01

    Existing optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) have been conducted with meter class telescopes, which have detection limits in the range of 18th-19th magnitude. We report on a new search for optically faint debris at GEO using the 6.5-m Magellan telescope ‘Walter Baade’ at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to go as faint as possible and characterize the brightness distribution of debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude, corresponding to a size smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. We wish to compare the inferred size distribution for GEO debris with that for LEO debris. We describe preliminary results obtained during 9.4 hours of observing time during 25-27 March 2011. We used the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a mosaic of 8 CCDs, and a field of view of 30 arc-minutes in diameter. This is the widest field of view of any instrument on either Magellan telescope. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r’ filter. The limiting magnitude for 5 second exposures is measured to be fainter tan R = 21. With this small field of view and the limited observing time, our objective was to search for optically faint objects from the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris (SSN # 25001 and 33519) with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for objects on similar orbits but with a spread in mean anomaly. To detect bright objects over a wider field of view (1.6x1.6 degrees), we observed the same field centers at the same time through a similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will describe our experiences using Magellan, a telescope never used previously for orbital debris research, and our initial results.

  18. New Results from Topographic Studies of Martian Debris Aprons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Robinson, M. S.

    2004-12-01

    Lobate debris aprons in the mid- to high latitudes for Mars' northern and southern hemispheres have been interpreted as ice-related features [e.g. 1, 2, 3]. Using MOLA topographic profiles perpendicular to apron flow fronts, we surveyed 45 debris aprons in the 35-55° Nøª latitude range of both the northern and hemispheres, specifically Mareotis, Protonilus, and Deuteronilus Mensae and Acheron Fossae, Argyre and eastern Hellas Basin. The profiles of these aprons were compared with predictions from idealized simple plastic and viscous power law models for ice-rock mixtures. All aprons studied exhibit convex profiles that closely match or follow the overall trend of a simple plastic model. This result is consistent with previous interpretations [1, 2, 3, 4] that debris aprons are ice-rich mixtures with rheologies similar to stagnant ice sheets and furthermore requires high ice concentration (>40 percent by volume) in apron deposits. About 60 percent of the surveyed debris apron population deviates from the idealized simple plastic model profile, which may be due to locally reduced ice content, with ice content likely being the primary control on apron topography. Although post-emplacement modification due to near-surface ice sublimation may play a secondary role in defining the overall shape of aprons, it causes conspicuous surface textures. Degradation by ice sublimation results in pitted and ridge-and-furrow surface textures revealed by high resolution MOC images. Such textures may indicate decreased near-surface ice stability since the formation of the aprons, consistent with a recently proposed interglacial period after their emplacement [5]. Despite their elevation difference, northern and southern hemisphere debris aprons have essentially identical profile shape and exhibit similar surface texture and surface age. These similarities suggest two groups of aprons share same origin and degradation processes and their most recent reactivation likely occurred

  19. Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A. M.; Barty, C. P. J.; Beach, R. J.; Erlandson, A. C.; Caird, J. A.

    2010-10-08

    The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called 'LIFE' laser system. Because a single 'LIFE' beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

  20. Debris-flow mobilization from landslides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; Reid, M.E.; LaHusen, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    Field observations, laboratory experiments, and theoretical analyses indicate that landslides mobilize to form debris flows by three processes: (a) widespread Coulomb failure within a sloping soil, rock, or sediment mass, (b) partial or complete liquefaction of the mass by high pore-fluid pressures, and (c) conversion of landslide translational energy to internal vibrational energy (i.e. granular temperature). These processes can operate independently, but in many circumstances they appear to operate simultaneously and synergistically. Early work on debris-flow mobilization described a similar interplay of processes but relied on mechanical models in which debris behavior was assumed to be fixed and governed by a Bingham or Bagnold rheology. In contrast, this review emphasizes models in which debris behavior evolves in response to changing pore pressures and granular temperatures. One-dimensional infinite-slope models provide insight by quantifying how pore pressures and granular temperatures can influence the transition from Coulomb failure to liquefaction. Analyses of multidimensional experiments reveal complications ignored in one-dimensional models and demonstrate that debris-flow mobilization may occur by at least two distinct modes in the field.

  1. Orbital debris minimization and mitigation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, Joseph P., Jr.; Anz-Meador, Phillip D.; Reynolds, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Man's activity in space has generated significant amounts of debris that remain in orbit for periods of sufficient duration to become a hazard to future space activities. Upper stages and spacecraft that have ended their functional life are the largest objects. In the past, additional debris has been generated by inadvertent explosions of upper stages and spacecraft, by intentional explosions for military reasons, and possibly by a few breakups resulting from collisions. In the future, debris can be generated by collisions among spacecraft as the number of orbital objects continues to grow at rates greater than natural forces remove them from orbit. There are design and operations practices that can minimize the inadvertent generation of debris. There are other design and operations options for removing objects from space at the end of their useful service so they are not available as a source for the generation of future debris. Those studies are the primary concern of this paper. The most economic removal of objects is achieved when those objects have the capability to execute the necessary maneuvers with their own systems and resources. The most costly option is to have some other system remove the spacecraft after it has become a derelict. Numerous options are being studied to develop systems and techniques that can remove spacecraft from useful orbits at the end of their useful life and do so for the least mass penalty and economic cost.

  2. Debris dynamics under evection and inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, T.; Santos, M. T.; Celestino, C. C.; Winter, O. C.; Neto, E. V.; Cordeiro, R. R.

    The human activity in exploring the space has generated undesirable artificial debris Unfortunately the number of them is increasing so fast that a tremendous problem is arising The natural and artificial debris are distributed in a very large range of altitude and according to the semi major axis of the orbit the particle may survive for very long time For low altitude less than 200 km the life time of the particles is mostly dominated by the atmospheric drag while for more distant debris different disturbing forces should be considered and the dynamics is slight more complicated Although the maximum concentration of the debris is not at high altitude the problem at high altitudes is important since the mitigation mechanism to clean these regions is very slow Usually Poynting Robertson P-R effect and similar other forces are not efficient to remove rapidly the particles at high altitudes in opposition to human activities which are always feeding more rapidly almost any region of the space Therefore since the debris survive for very long time it is important to increase our theoretical knowledge on the dynamics of these regions In this work we show the existence of some important resonances which may give significant variations in the inclination and eccentricity of the particle In the case of the Earth they occur at about 10128 5 km and 12309 8 km and are related to a commensurability involving the mean longitude of the sun and

  3. Orbital debris minimization and mitigation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, Joseph P., Jr.; Anz-Meador, Phillip D.; Reynolds, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Man's activity in space has generated significant amounts of debris that remain in orbit for periods of sufficient duration to become a hazard to future space activities. Upper stages and spacecraft that have ended their functional life are the largest objects. In the past, additional debris has been generated by inadvertent explosions of upper stages and spacecraft, by intentional explosions for military reasons, and possibly by a few breakups resulting from collisions. In the future, debris can be generated by collisions among spacecraft as the number of orbital objects continues to grow at rates greater than natural forces remove them from orbit. There are design and operations practices that can minimize the inadvertent generation of debris. There are other design and operations options for removing objects from space at the end of their useful service so they are not available as a source for the generation of future debris. Those studies are the primary concern of this paper. The most economic removal of objects is achieved when those objects have the capability to execute the necessary maneuvers with their own systems and resources. The most costly option is to have some other system remove the spacecraft after it has become a derelict. Numerous options are being studied to develop systems and techniques that can remove spacecraft from useful orbits at the end of their useful life and do so for the least mass penalty and economic cost.

  4. Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenchik, A. M.; Barty, C. P. J.; Beach, R. J.; Erlandson, A. C.; Caird, J. A.

    2010-10-01

    The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called "LIFE" laser system. Because a single "LIFE" beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

  5. ESA Technologies for Space Debris Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wormnes, K.; Le Letty, R.; Summerer, L.; Schonenborg, R.; Dubois-Matra, O.; Luraschi, E.; Cropp, A.; Krag, H.; Delaval, J.

    2013-08-01

    Space debris is an existing and growing problem for space operations. Studies show that for a continued use of LEO, 5 - 10 large and strategically chosen debris need to be removed every year. The European Space Agency (ESA) is actively pursuing technologies and systems for space debris removal under its Clean Space initiative. This overview paper describes the activities that are currently ongoing at ESA and that have already been completed. Additionally it outlines the plan for the near future. The technologies under study fall in two main categories corresponding to whether a pushing or a pulling manoeuvre is required for the de-orbitation. ESA is studying the option of using a tethered capture system for controlled de-orbitation through pulling where the capture is performed using throw-nets or alternatively a harpoon. The Agency is also studying rigid capture systems with a particular emphasis on tentacles (potentially combined with a robotic arm). Here the de-orbitation is achieved through a push-manoeuvre. Additionally, a number of activities will be discussed that are ongoing to develop supporting technologies for these scenarios, or to develop systems for de-orbiting debris that can be allowed to re-enter in an uncontrolled manner. The short term goal and main driver for the current technology developments is to achieve sufficient TRL on required technologies to support a potential de-orbitation mission to remove a large and strategically chosen piece of debris.

  6. Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A M; Barty, C P; Beach, R J; Erlandson, A C; Caird, J A

    2010-02-05

    The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called 'LIFE' laser system. Because a single 'LIFE' beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

  7. Characteristics of marine debris that entangle Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) in southern Australia.

    PubMed

    Lawson, T J; Wilcox, Chris; Johns, Karen; Dann, P; Hardesty, Britta Denise

    2015-09-15

    Marine debris is a global issue that can have devastating impacts on marine mammals. To understand the types of materials that result in entanglement and thus the potential impact of entangling items on marine wildlife, we analysed data collected from items in which Australian fur seals had been entangled in southern Victoria, Australia over a 15year period. From 1997 to 2012, 138 entangling items were removed from seals. The majority of these entanglements were plastic twine or rope, and seals were entangled in green items more than in any other colour. In general, younger seals were more likely to be entangled than adults. Understanding the effects of marine debris entanglement on the Australian fur seal population can lead to more effective management of the sources of debris and the wildlife that interact with it. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Pathologies of the digestive system caused by marine debris in Chelonia mydas.

    PubMed

    Jerdy, Hassan; Werneck, Max Rondon; da Silva, Maria Aparecida; Ribeiro, Rachel Bittencourt; Bianchi, Mariah; Shimoda, Eduardo; de Carvalho, Eulógio Carlos Queiróz

    2017-03-15

    The growth of human population and deficient pollution control measures pose significant challenge to the environment. Despite conservation efforts, all sea turtle species are at some risk of extinction. The present study investigated the effect of marine debris on the gastrointestinal tract of green turtles in southeastern Brazil. Of the 777 animals evaluated, 290 showed marine debris in one segment of the gastrointestinal tract. The presence of these materials in the gastrointestinal tract may be harmful, independent of the segment involved, and increases the risk of impaction. Marine debris has become a significant hazard to Chelonia mydas in the region surveyed, causing perforation, rupture, or fecal impaction that, when not treated, is potentially fatal, exposing the intestine to bacterial infection.

  9. Entanglement of Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) in marine debris: identifying causes and finding solutions.

    PubMed

    Raum-Suryan, Kimberly L; Jemison, Lauri A; Pitcher, Kenneth W

    2009-10-01

    Entanglement in marine debris is a contributing factor in Steller sea lion (SSL; Eumetopias jubatus) injury and mortality. We quantified SSL entanglement by debris type, sex and age class, entanglement incidence, and estimated population level effects. Surveys of SSL haul-outs were conducted from 2000-2007 in Southeast Alaska and northern British Columbia. We recorded 386 individuals of all age classes as being either entangled in marine debris or having ingested fishing gear. Packing bands were the most common neck entangling material (54%), followed by rubber bands (30%), net (7%), rope (7%), and monofilament line (2%). Ingested fishing gear included salmon fishery flashers (lures: 80%), longline gear (12%), hook and line (4%), spinners/spoons (2%), and bait hooks (2%). Entanglement incidence was 0.26% (SD=0.0064, n=69 sites). "Lose the Loop!" Simple procedures such as cutting entangling loops of synthetic material and eliminating the use of packing bands can prevent entanglements.

  10. What Children Tell Us about Their Parents: From Visible Dust to Invisible Planetesimals in Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Sebastian; Krivov, A. V.; Loehne, T.; Mutschke, H.

    2008-09-01

    Various small body families in the solar system, together with dust they produce through mutual collisions and cometary activity, exemplify a non-planetary component of a planetary system, usually referred to as a "debris disk". Debris disks have been found to be a common phenomenon for main-sequence stars and, similar to the solar system, are believed to comprise planetesimal populations that have accreted at early epochs and survived possible planet formation. However, in contrast to the solar system, observations of extrasolar debris disks only show their dusty portion, whereas the dust-producing planetesimals remain invisible. We show how collisional models of debris disks can be used to "climb up" the ladder of the collisional cascade, from dust towards parent bodies, representing the main mass reservoir of the disks. Applying our approach to five sun-like stars known to harbor dust, we find that the observed excess emission in far-IR to sub-mm is compatible with debris disks collisionally sustained by "large Kuiper belts" of 0.2-50 earth masses (in the bodies up to 100 km in size) with radii of 100-200 AU, larger than thought before. This research has been funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), projects Kr 2164/5-1 and Mu 1164/6-1, by the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD), project D/0707543, and by the International Space Science Institute (Bern).

  11. Debris generation from Mechanical degradation of MLI and thermo-control coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duzellier, Sophie; Drolshagen, Gerhard; Pons, Claude; Rey, Romain; Gordo, Paulo; Horstmann, Andre

    2016-07-01

    Space environment is a harsh environment for exposed materials. Amongst all environmental constraints, ionizing radiation in GEO (particles, UV), atomic oxygen in LEO and temperature variation through synergy mechanisms may lead to serious damage and loss of performance of surface materials (thermo-optical or mechanical properties). Optical and radar observations from the ground as well as analysis of retrieved hardware have shown an abundance of space debris objects that seem to result from the degradation of outer spacecraft surfaces. Recent surveys of the GEO and GTO region have found many objects with high area-to-mass ratio (HAMR debris, see T. Childknecht et al. 2003, 2004, 2005) indicating that they must consist of relatively thin material, like foils. This paper explores the cause, amount and characteristics of space debris objects resulting from spacecraft surface degradation in order to improve space debris population models and support the selection of materials in the context of debris mitigation measures. 20-year GEO dose profile along with thermal cycling has been applied to a set of MLI assemblies and painting samples. The material degradation was monitored through in and ex situ characterizations (visual observation, mechanical and thermo-optical). No self-flaking was observed for paintings nor for MLIs. However, paint surfaces became very brittle, whereas reclosable fasteners of MLIs and Mylar inner foils were strongly damaged as well. Potential scenarios for delamination of MLI foils could be defined.

  12. Operational Impact of Improved Space Tracking on Collision Avoidance in the Future LEO Space Debris Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibert, D.; Borgeson, D.; Peterson, G.; Jenkin, A.; Sorge, M.

    2010-09-01

    Even if global space policy successfully curtails on orbit explosions and ASAT demonstrations, studies indicate that the number of debris objects in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) will continue to grow solely from debris on debris collisions and debris generated from new launches. This study examines the threat posed by this growing space debris population over the next 30 years and how improvements in our space tracking capabilities can reduce the number of Collision Avoidance (COLA) maneuvers required keep the risk of operational satellite loss within tolerable limits. Particular focus is given to satellites operated by the Department of Defense (DoD) and Intelligence Community (IC) in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The following debris field and space tracking performance parameters were varied parametrically in the experiment to study the impact on the number of collision avoidance maneuvers required: - Debris Field Density (by year 2009, 2019, 2029, and 2039) - Quality of Track Update (starting 1 sigma error ellipsoid) - Future Propagator Accuracy (error ellipsoid growth rates - Special Perturbations in 3 axes) - Track Update Rate for Debris (stochastic) - Track Update Rate for Payloads (stochastic) Baseline values matching present day tracking performance for quality of track update, propagator accuracy, and track update rate were derived by analyzing updates to the unclassified Satellite Catalog (SatCat). Track update rates varied significantly for active payloads and debris and as such we used different models for the track update rates for military payloads and debris. The analysis was conducted using the System Effectiveness Analysis Simulation (SEAS) an agent based model developed by the United States Air Force Space Command’s Space and Missile Systems Center to evaluate the military utility of space systems. The future debris field was modeled by The Aerospace Corporation using a tool chain which models the growth of the 10cm+ debris field using high fidelity

  13. A Numerical Approach to Estimate the Ballistic Coefficient of Space Debris from TLE Orbital Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narkeliunas, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is full of space debris, which consist of spent rocket stages, old satellites and fragments from explosions and collisions. As of 2009, more than 21,000 orbital debris larger than 10 cm are known to exist], and while it is hard to track anything smaller than that, the estimated population of particles between 1 and 10 cm in diameter is approximately 500,000, whereas small as 1 cm exceeds 100 million. These objects orbit Earth with huge kinetic energies speeds usually exceed 7 kms. The shape of their orbit varies from almost circular to highly elliptical and covers all LEO, a region in space between 160 and 2,000 km above sea level. Unfortunately, LEO is also the place where most of our active satellites are situated, as well as, International Space Station (ISS) and Hubble Space Telescope, whose orbits are around 400 and 550 km above sea level, respectively.This poses a real threat as debris can collide with satellites and deal substantial damage or even destroy them.Collisions between two or more debris create clouds of smaller debris, which are harder to track and increase overall object density and collision probability. At some point, the debris density couldthen reach a critical value, which would start a chain reaction and the number of space debris would grow exponentially. This phenomenon was first described by Kessler in 1978 and he concluded that it would lead to creation of debris belt, which would vastly complicate satellite operations in LEO. The debris density is already relatively high, as seen from several necessary debris avoidance maneuvers done by Shuttle, before it was discontinued, and ISS. But not all satellites have a propulsion system to avoid collision, hence different methods need to be applied. One of the proposed collision avoidance concepts is called LightForce and it suggests using photon pressure to induce small orbital corrections to deflect debris from colliding. This method is very efficient as seen from

  14. Space debris and related legal issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafferranderie, G.

    2001-10-01

    "We are now witnessing an extraordinary event, the first of the 21st century, the MIR space station's plunge to Earth, producing of course impressive fireworks, but also a massive amount of debris." The first launchings created the first space debris. Space debris is the immediate, logical consequence of the exploration and use of outer space (around the Earth) involving manmade objects. This situation will persist, making launching, exploration and use increasingly difficult and risky - unless we turn to the type of rocket dreamt up by Hergé for Tintin's trips to the Moon. Worldwide concern has been expressed in particular in the Vienna Space Millennium Declaration adopted at the Unispace Conference in Vienna in July 1999, with the contributions of the Space Law Workshop organised by the International Institute of Space Law (session eight).

  15. THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND HR 8799

    SciTech Connect

    Su, K. Y. L.; Rieke, G. H.; Smith, P. S.; Misselt, K. A.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Bryden, G.; Moro-Martin, A.; Williams, J. P.

    2009-11-01

    We have obtained a full suite of Spitzer observations to characterize the debris disk around HR 8799 and to explore how its properties are related to the recently discovered set of three massive planets orbiting the star. We distinguish three components to the debris system: (1) warm dust (T approx 150 K) orbiting within the innermost planet; (2) a broad zone of cold dust (T approx 45 K) with a sharp inner edge orbiting just outside the outermost planet and presumably sculpted by it; and (3) a dramatic halo of small grains originating in the cold dust component. The high level of dynamical activity implied by this halo may arise due to enhanced gravitational stirring by the massive planets. The relatively young age of HR 8799 places it in an important early stage of development and may provide some help in understanding the interaction of planets and planetary debris, an important process in the evolution of our own solar system.

  16. Dust and Debris Tolerant Retractable Cover Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Mark E. (Inventor); Dokos, Adam G. (Inventor); Townsend, III, Ivan I. (Inventor); Carlson, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Bastin, Gary L. (Inventor); Murtland, Kevin A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A debris exclusion and removal apparatus for connectors which have retractable cover configurations which include internal wafers that clean the connectors prior to mating. XXXX connectors. More particularly, embodiments relate to dust tolerant connectors. Some embodiments also relate to an intelligent connector system capable of detecting damage to or faults within a conductor and then rerouting the energy to a non-damaged spare conductor. Discussion Connectors of the present invention may be used to transfer electrical current, fluid, and gas in a wide variety of environments containing dust and other debris, wherein that debris may present substantial challenges. For example, lunar/Martian dust intrusion and/or accumulation in connectors used to transfer oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, etc., may lead to larger system failures as well as loss of life in extraterrestrial human exploration endeavors. Additionally, embodiments of the present invention may also be suitable for use where connectors must resist water intrusion, such as terrestrial deep water operations.

  17. Autonomous space processor for orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar; Campbell, David; Marine, Micky; Saad, Mohamad; Bertles, Daniel; Nichols, Dave

    1990-01-01

    Advanced designs are being continued to develop the ultimate goal of a GETAWAY special to demonstrate economical removal of orbital debris utilizing local resources in orbit. The fundamental technical feasibility was demonstrated in 1988 through theoretical calculations, quantitative computer animation, a solar focal point cutter, a robotic arm design and a subcase model. Last year improvements were made to the solar cutter and the robotic arm. Also performed last year was a mission analysis which showed the feasibility of retrieve at least four large (greater than 1500 kg) pieces of debris. Advances made during this reporting period are the incorporation of digital control with the existing placement arm, the development of a new robotic manipulator arm, and the study of debris spin attenuation. These advances are discussed.

  18. Autonomous space processor for orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This work continues to develop advanced designs toward the ultimate goal of a Get Away Special to demonstrate economical removal of orbital debris using local resources in orbit. The fundamental technical feasibility was demonstrated in 1988 through theoretical calculations, quantitative computer animation, a solar focal point cutter, a robotic arm design, and a subscale model. Last year improvements were made to the solar cutter and the robotic arm. Also performed last year was a mission analysis that showed the feasibility of retrieving at least four large (greater than 1500-kg) pieces of debris. Advances made during this reporting period are the incorporation of digital control with the existing placement arm, the development of a new robotic manipulator arm, and the study of debris spin attenuation. These advances are discussed here.

  19. Parametric analysis: SOC meteoroid and debris protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The meteoroid and man made space debris environments of an Earth orbital manned space operations center are discussed. Protective shielding thickness and design configurations for providing given levels of no penetration probability were also calculated. Meteoroid/debris protection consists of a radiator/shield thickness, which is actually an outer skin, separated from the pressure wall, thickness by a distance. An ideal shield thickness, will, upon impact with a particle, cause both the particle and shield to vaporize, allowing a minimum amount of debris to impact the pressure wall itself. A shield which is too thick will crater on the outside, and release small particles of shield from the inside causing damage to the pressure wall. Inversely, if the shield is too thin, it will afford no protection, and the backup must provide all necessary protection. It was concluded that a double wall concept is most effective.

  20. VISCOPLASTIC FLUID MODEL FOR DEBRIS FLOW ROUTING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes how a generalized viscoplastic fluid model, which was developed based on non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, can be successfully applied to routing a debris flow down a channel. The one-dimensional dynamic equations developed for unsteady clear-water flow can be used for debris flow routing if the flow parameters, such as the momentum (or energy) correction factor and the resistance coefficient, can be accurately evaluated. The writer's generalized viscoplastic fluid model can be used to express such flow parameters in terms of the rheological parameters for debris flow in wide channels. A preliminary analysis of the theoretical solutions reveals the importance of the flow behavior index and the so-called modified Froude number for uniformly progressive flow in snout profile modeling.

  1. Amplification of postwildfire peak flow by debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, J. W.; McGuire, L. A.; Rengers, F. K.; Smith, J. B.; Staley, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    In burned steeplands, the peak depth and discharge of postwildfire runoff can substantially increase from the addition of debris. Yet methods to estimate the increase over water flow are lacking. We quantified the potential amplification of peak stage and discharge using video observations of postwildfire runoff, compiled data on postwildfire peak flow (Qp), and a physically based model. Comparison of flood and debris flow data with similar distributions in drainage area (A) and rainfall intensity (I) showed that the median runoff coefficient (C = Qp/AI) of debris flows is 50 times greater than that of floods. The striking increase in Qp can be explained using a fully predictive model that describes the additional flow resistance caused by the emergence of coarse-grained surge fronts. The model provides estimates of the amplification of peak depth, discharge, and shear stress needed for assessing postwildfire hazards and constraining models of bedrock incision.

  2. Amplification of postwildfire peak flow by debris

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kean, Jason W.; Mcguire, Luke; Rengers, Francis; Smith, Joel B.; Staley, Dennis M.

    2016-01-01

    In burned steeplands, the peak depth and discharge of postwildfire runoff can substantially increase from the addition of debris. Yet methods to estimate the increase over water flow are lacking. We quantified the potential amplification of peak stage and discharge using video observations of postwildfire runoff, compiled data on postwildfire peak flow (Qp), and a physically based model. Comparison of flood and debris flow data with similar distributions in drainage area (A) and rainfall intensity (I) showed that the median runoff coefficient (C = Qp/AI) of debris flows is 50 times greater than that of floods. The striking increase in Qp can be explained using a fully predictive model that describes the additional flow resistance caused by the emergence of coarse-grained surge fronts. The model provides estimates of the amplification of peak depth, discharge, and shear stress needed for assessing postwildfire hazards and constraining models of bedrock incision.

  3. Improving the Near-Earth Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris Environment Definition with LADC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Giovane, F.; Corsaro, R.; Stansbery, E.

    2006-01-01

    The Large Area Debris Collector (LADC) is a 10 m(sup 2) aerogel and acoustic sensor system designed to characterize and collect submillimeter micrometeoroids and orbital debris on the International Space Station (ISS). The project is led by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) with major collaboration by the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office at Johnson Space Center. The U.S. Department of Defense Space Test Program (STP) is responsible for the integration, deployment, and retrieval of the system. The deployment is scheduled for August 2007 with an orbital collection period of one to two years. The combined area time product of LADC will provide a much needed orbital debris population update in the size regime that is important to the safety community - 100 mm and larger. Another key element for LADC is the source identification of the collected samples. Impact features such as track length and track volume can be used to estimate the impact speed and direction of any selected residual embedded in aerogel. Acoustic sensors can provide impact timing and impact location information. The combined dynamical signatures make it possible to reconstruct the orbits of some of the collected samples and lead to their source identification. Compositional analysis on the residuals can also separate debris from meteoroids and provide additional population breakdown for orbital debris (e.g., Al, paint, steel, Al2O3). To maximize the science return and minimize potential contamination from other ISS modules, a careful selection of the location and orientation of LADC on the ISS is needed. Key issues and engineering constraints encountered during mission preparation, and the expected science return based on the mission configuration, are summarized in this paper.

  4. Improving the Near-Earth Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris Environment Definition with LADC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Giovane, F.; Corsaro, R.; Stansbery, E.

    2006-01-01

    The Large Area Debris Collector (LADC) is a 10 m(sup 2) aerogel and acoustic sensor system designed to characterize and collect submillimeter micrometeoroids and orbital debris on the International Space Station (ISS). The project is led by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) with major collaboration by the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office at Johnson Space Center. The U.S. Department of Defense Space Test Program (STP) is responsible for the integration, deployment, and retrieval of the system. The deployment is scheduled for August 2007 with an orbital collection period of one to two years. The combined area time product of LADC will provide a much needed orbital debris population update in the size regime that is important to the safety community - 100 mm and larger. Another key element for LADC is the source identification of the collected samples. Impact features such as track length and track volume can be used to estimate the impact speed and direction of any selected residual embedded in aerogel. Acoustic sensors can provide impact timing and impact location information. The combined dynamical signatures make it possible to reconstruct the orbits of some of the collected samples and lead to their source identification. Compositional analysis on the residuals can also separate debris from meteoroids and provide additional population breakdown for orbital debris (e.g., Al, paint, steel, Al2O3). To maximize the science return and minimize potential contamination from other ISS modules, a careful selection of the location and orientation of LADC on the ISS is needed. Key issues and engineering constraints encountered during mission preparation, and the expected science return based on the mission configuration, are summarized in this paper.

  5. Debris flow hazards mitigation--Mechanics, prediction, and assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.; Major, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Debris-Flow Hazards Mitigation: Mechanics, Prediction, and Assessment held in Chengdu, China, September 10-13, 2007. The papers cover a wide range of topics on debris-flow science and engineering, including the factors triggering debris flows, geomorphic effects, mechanics of debris flows (e.g., rheology, fluvial mechanisms, erosion and deposition processes), numerical modeling, various debris-flow experiments, landslide-induced debris flows, assessment of debris-flow hazards and risk, field observations and measurements, monitoring and alert systems, structural and non-structural countermeasures against debris-flow hazards and case studies. The papers reflect the latest devel-opments and advances in debris-flow research. Several studies discuss the development and appli-cation of Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) technologies in debris-flow hazard/risk assessment. Timely topics presented in a few papers also include the development of new or innovative techniques for debris-flow monitoring and alert systems, especially an infra-sound acoustic sensor for detecting debris flows. Many case studies illustrate a wide variety of debris-flow hazards and related phenomena as well as their hazardous effects on human activities and settlements.

  6. The Debris Disk Explorer: A Balloon-Borne Coronagraph for Observing Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Lewis C. Jr; Bryden, Geoffrey; Traub, Wesley; Unwin, Stephen; Trauger, John; Krist, John; Aldrich, Jack; Brugarolas, Paul; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Wyatt, Mark; Stuchlik, David; Lanzi, James

    2013-01-01

    The Debris Disk Explorer (DDX) is a proposed balloon-borne investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. DDX will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of tens of disks. These measurements will enable us to place the Solar System in context. By imaging debris disks around nearby stars, DDX will reveal the presence of perturbing planets via their influence on disk structure, and explore the physics and history of debris disks by characterizing the size and composition of disk dust. The DDX instrument is a 0.75-m diameter off-axis telescope and a coronagraph carried by a stratospheric balloon. DDX will take high-resolution, multi-wavelength images of the debris disks around tens of nearby stars. Two flights are planned; an overnight test flight within the United States followed by a month-long science flight launched from New Zealand. The long flight will fully explore the set of known debris disks accessible only to DDX. It will achieve a raw contrast of 10(exp -7), with a processed contrast of 10(exp -8). A technology benefit of DDX is that operation in the near-space environment will raise the Technology Readiness Level of internal coronagraphs, deformable mirrors, and wavefront sensing and control, all potentially needed for a future space-based telescope for high-contrast exoplanet imaging.

  7. Effect of perturbations on debris-to-debris orbital transfers: A quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kartik; Hekma, Enne; Agrawal, Abhishek; Topputo, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the applicability of the Lambert solver (Izzo, 2014) for preliminary design of Multi-Target Active Debris Removal missions. Firstly, we computed ≈25 million debris-to-debris transfers using the Lambert solver for selected sets of debris objects in Low Earth Orbit, Geostationary Transfer Orbit, and Geosynchronous Orbit. Subsequently, we propagated the departure states of the Lambert transfers below selected ΔV cut-offs using the SGP4/SDP4 propagator (Vallado et al., 2006). We recorded the arrival position and velocity error vectors incurred by neglecting perturbations and analyzed the results for each orbital regime. Our results indicate that perturbations can play a significant role in determining the feasibility of debris-to-debris transfers. By using the Lambert solver and neglecting perturbations, the errors in the arrival position and velocity for individual legs can be large. The largest errors were obtained for transfers between debris objects in Sun-Synchronous Orbit (O (100) km error in magnitude of position vector and O (0.1) km/s error in magnitude of velocity vector). Hence, solely employing the Lambert solver to rank transfer legs could lead to incorrect choices for sequencing of multi-target trajectories. This is particularly relevant for transfers in Low Earth Orbit, where the effects of perturbations are the strongest.

  8. Active Debris Removal mission design in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Th.; Pérot, E.; Desjean, M.-Ch.; Bitetti, L.

    2013-03-01

    Active Debris Removal (ADR) aims at removing large sized intact objects ― defunct satellites, rocket upper-stages ― from space crowded regions. Why? Because they constitute the main source of the long-term debris environment deterioration caused by possible future collisions with fragments and worse still with other intact but uncontrolled objects. In order to limit the growth of the orbital debris population in the future (referred to as the Kessler syndrome), it is now highly recommended to carry out such ADR missions, together with the mitigation measures already adopted by national agencies (such as postmission disposal). At the French Space Agency, CNES, and in the frame of advanced studies, the design of such an ADR mission in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is under evaluation. A two-step preliminary approach has been envisaged. First, a reconnaissance mission based on a small demonstrator (˜500 kg) rendezvousing with several targets (observation and in-flight qualification testing). Secondly, an ADR mission based on a larger vehicle (inherited from the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) concept) being able to capture and deorbit several preselected targets by attaching a propulsive kit to these targets. This paper presents a flight dynamics level tradeoff analysis between different vehicle and mission concepts as well as target disposal options. The delta-velocity, times, and masses required to transfer, rendezvous with targets and deorbit are assessed for some propelled systems and propellant less options. Total mass budgets are then derived for two end-to-end study cases corresponding to the reconnaissance and ADR missions mentioned above.

  9. Development of in-situ Space Debris Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Waldemar; Romberg, O.; Wiedemann, C.; Drolshagen, G.; Vörsmann, P.

    2014-11-01

    Due to high relative velocities, collisions of spacecraft in orbit with Space Debris (SD) or Micrometeoroids (MM) can lead to payload degradation, anomalies as well as failures in spacecraft operation, or even loss of mission. Flux models and impact risk assessment tools, such as MASTER (Meteoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference) or ORDEM (Orbital Debris Engineering Model), and ESABASE2 or BUMPER II are used to analyse mission risk associated with these hazards. Validation of flux models is based on measured data. Currently, as most of the SD and MM objects are too small (millimeter down to micron sized) for ground-based observations (e.g. radar, optical), the only available data for model validation is based upon retrieved hardware investigations e.g. Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), Hubble Space Telescope (HST), European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA). Since existing data sets are insufficient, further in-situ experimental investigation of the SD and MM populations are required. This paper provides an overview and assessment of existing and planned SD and MM impact detectors. The detection area of the described detectors is too small to adequately provide the missing data sets. Therefore an innovative detection concept is proposed that utilises existing spacecraft components for detection purposes. In general, solar panels of a spacecraft provide a large area that can be utilised for in-situ impact detection. By using this method on several spacecraft in different orbits the detection area can be increased significantly and allow the detection of SD and MM objects with diameters as low as 100 μm. The design of the detector is based on damage equations from HST and EURECA solar panels. An extensive investigation of those panels was performed by ESA and is summarized within this paper. Furthermore, an estimate of the expected sensitivity of the patented detector concept as well as examples for its implementation into large and small

  10. Discrete Element Modelling of Floating Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffey, Samantha; Liang, Qiuhua; Parkin, Geoff; Large, Andy; Rouainia, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Flash flooding is characterised by high velocity flows which impact vulnerable catchments with little warning time and as such, result in complex flow dynamics which are difficult to replicate through modelling. The impacts of flash flooding can be made yet more severe by the transport of both natural and anthropogenic debris, ranging from tree trunks to vehicles, wheelie bins and even storage containers, the effects of which have been clearly evident during recent UK flooding. This cargo of debris can have wide reaching effects and result in actual flood impacts which diverge from those predicted. A build-up of debris may lead to partial channel blockage and potential flow rerouting through urban centres. Build-up at bridges and river structures also leads to increased hydraulic loading which may result in damage and possible structural failure. Predicting the impacts of debris transport; however, is difficult as conventional hydrodynamic modelling schemes do not intrinsically include floating debris within their calculations. Subsequently a new tool has been developed using an emerging approach, which incorporates debris transport through the coupling of two existing modelling techniques. A 1D hydrodynamic modelling scheme has here been coupled with a 2D discrete element scheme to form a new modelling tool which predicts the motion and flow-interaction of floating debris. Hydraulic forces arising from flow around the object are applied to instigate its motion. Likewise, an equivalent opposing force is applied to fluid cells, enabling backwater effects to be simulated. Shock capturing capabilities make the tool applicable to predicting the complex flow dynamics associated with flash flooding. The modelling scheme has been applied to experimental case studies where cylindrical wooden dowels are transported by a dam-break wave. These case studies enable validation of the tool's shock capturing capabilities and the coupling technique applied between the two numerical

  11. Giant Exoplanet and Debris Disk (Artist's Concept)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-10-11

    This artist's rendering shows a giant exoplanet causing small bodies to collide in a disk of dust. A study in The Astronomical Journal finds that giant exoplanets with long-period orbits are more likely to be found around young stars that have a disk of dust and debris than those without disks. The study focused on planets more than five times the mass of Jupiter. The astronomers are conducting the largest survey to date of stars with dusty debris disks, and finding the best evidence yet that giant planets are responsible for keeping that material in check. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22082

  12. Density Estimations in Laboratory Debris Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz de Oliveira, Gustavo; Kulisch, Helmut; Malcherek, Andreas; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2016-04-01

    Bulk density and its variation is an important physical quantity to estimate the solid-liquid fractions in two-phase debris flows. Here we present mass and flow depth measurements for experiments performed in a large-scale laboratory set up. Once the mixture is released and it moves down the inclined channel, measurements allow us to determine the bulk density evolution throughout the debris flow. Flow depths are determined by ultrasonic pulse reflection, and the mass is measured with a total normal force sensor. The data were obtained at 50 Hz. The initial two phase material was composed of 350 kg debris with water content of 40%. A very fine pebble with mean particle diameter of 3 mm, particle density of 2760 kg/m³ and bulk density of 1400 kg/m³ in dry condition was chosen as the solid material. Measurements reveal that the debris bulk density remains high from the head to the middle of the debris body whereas it drops substantially at the tail. This indicates lower water content at the tail, compared to the head and the middle portion of the debris body. This means that the solid and fluid fractions are varying strongly in a non-linear manner along the flow path, and from the head to the tail of the debris mass. Importantly, this spatial-temporal density variation plays a crucial role in determining the impact forces associated with the dynamics of the flow. Our setup allows for investigating different two phase material compositions, including large fluid fractions, with high resolutions. The considered experimental set up may enable us to transfer the observed phenomena to natural large-scale events. Furthermore, the measurement data allows evaluating results of numerical two-phase mass flow simulations. These experiments are parts of the project avaflow.org that intends to develop a GIS-based open source computational tool to describe wide spectrum of rapid geophysical mass flows, including avalanches and real two-phase debris flows down complex natural

  13. Possible Fengyun-1C debris fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golebiewska, J.; Nowak, M.; Muszyński, A.; Wnuk, E.

    2017-05-01

    A fall of small objects took place on 27th April 2012 in Wargowo village near Oborniki, about 25 km NW from Poznań (Poland). There was only one eye-witness of the fall, who found two separate pieces (ca. 2.7 cm and ca. 2 cm), with several small additional fragments. After microscopic observations and chemical analysis a meteoritic origin of these objects was excluded. They are identified as space debris, therefore man-made. The most probable source of the observed fall was space debris 35127 Fengyun 1C DEB, created during destruction of the Chinese weather satellite Fengyun-1C (FY-1C).

  14. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  15. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, R.B.

    1996-05-21

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  16. DebriSat Pre Preshot Laboratory Analyses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-27

    panels consisting of fiberglass (E-glass, #1,2,4,5), stainless steel mesh (#3) and Kevlar (#6,7). In contrast to the DebriSat and Debris-LV impact...shield supplied by NASA which consisted of seven bumper panels consisting of fiberglass (E-glass, #1,2,4,5), stainless steel mesh (#3) and Kevlar (#6,7...stainless steel bumper though it also contains significant amounts Al and Si. The Al and Si contents are about equal in early arriving Fe-Cr-Ni while

  17. Patterns In Debris Disks: No Planets Required?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Debris disks like those around Fomalhaut and Beta Pictoris show striking dust patterns often attributed to hidden exoplanets. These patterns have been crucial for constraining the masses and orbits of these planets. But adding a bit of gas to our models of debris disks--too little gas to detect--seems to alter this interpretation. Small amounts of gas lead to new dynamical instabilities that may mimic the narrow eccentric rings and other structures planets would create in a gas-free disk. Can we still use dust patterns to find hidden exoplanets?

  18. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Martin P. [Trafford, PA; Tilbrook, Roger W. [Monroeville, PA; Heylmun, Neal F. [Pittsburgh, PA

    1977-07-19

    Apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed.

  19. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1977-07-19

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures.

  20. Electrometallurgical treatment of TMI-2 fuel debris

    SciTech Connect

    Karell, E.J.; Gourishankar, K.V.; Johnson, G.K.

    1997-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed an electrometallurgical treatment process suitable for conditioning DOE oxide spent fuel for long-term storage or disposal. The process consists of an initial oxide reduction step that converts the actinide oxides to a metallic form, followed by an electrochemical separation of uranium from the other fuel constituents. The final product of the process is a uniform set of stable waste forms suitable for long-term storage or disposal. The suitability of the process for treating core debris from the Three Mile Island-2 (TMI-2) reactor is being evaluated. This paper reviews the results of preliminary experimental work performed using simulated TMI-2 fuel debris.