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Sample records for 25-1 fractional factorial

  1. Optimization of minoxidil microemulsions using fractional factorial design approach.

    PubMed

    Jaipakdee, Napaphak; Limpongsa, Ekapol; Pongjanyakul, Thaned

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply fractional factorial and multi-response optimization designs using desirability function approach for developing topical microemulsions. Minoxidil (MX) was used as a model drug. Limonene was used as an oil phase. Based on solubility, Tween 20 and caprylocaproyl polyoxyl-8 glycerides were selected as surfactants, propylene glycol and ethanol were selected as co-solvent in aqueous phase. Experiments were performed according to a two-level fractional factorial design to evaluate the effects of independent variables: Tween 20 concentration in surfactant system (X1), surfactant concentration (X2), ethanol concentration in co-solvent system (X3), limonene concentration (X4) on MX solubility (Y1), permeation flux (Y2), lag time (Y3), deposition (Y4) of MX microemulsions. It was found that Y1 increased with increasing X3 and decreasing X2, X4; whereas Y2 increased with decreasing X1, X2 and increasing X3. While Y3 was not affected by these variables, Y4 increased with decreasing X1, X2. Three regression equations were obtained and calculated for predicted values of responses Y1, Y2 and Y4. The predicted values matched experimental values reasonably well with high determination coefficient. By using optimal desirability function, optimized microemulsion demonstrating the highest MX solubility, permeation flux and skin deposition was confirmed as low level of X1, X2 and X4 but high level of X3. PMID:25318551

  2. Using Bayesian variable selection to analyze regular resolution IV two-level fractional factorial designs

    DOE PAGES

    Chipman, Hugh A.; Hamada, Michael S.

    2016-06-02

    Regular two-level fractional factorial designs have complete aliasing in which the associated columns of multiple effects are identical. Here, we show how Bayesian variable selection can be used to analyze experiments that use such designs. In addition to sparsity and hierarchy, Bayesian variable selection naturally incorporates heredity . This prior information is used to identify the most likely combinations of active terms. We also demonstrate the method on simulated and real experiments.

  3. Effect of clay minerals and nanoparticles on chromium fractionation in soil contaminated with leather factory waste.

    PubMed

    Taghipour, Marzieh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-10-30

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of time, clay minerals and nanoparticles (NPs) on chromium (Cr) fractionation in a soil contaminated with leather factory waste (LFW). Soil was mixed with LFW, then, the contaminated soils were treated with clay minerals (bentonite and zeolite) and nanoparticles (MgO, TiO2 and ZnO) at 5% and 1%, respectively. The samples were incubated for 15-180 days at 25 °C and constant moisture. After incubation, Cr in control and treated soils was fractionated by the sequential extraction procedure. The distribution of various Cr fractions in control soil indicated that the greatest amounts of Cr were found in the residual fraction (RES) followed by the carbonate (CAR), organic matter (OM) and exchangeable (EXC) fractions. The addition of LFW in soils increased Cr concentration in all fractions. The higher proportion of EXC fraction in the soil treated with LFW indicates its higher potential of leaching and runoff transport. In all treated soils, the RES fraction was increased, while EXC and OM fractions were decreased during incubation. The results indicated that NPs are effective adsorbent for the removal of Cr ions from LFW treated soil, and they could be useful in reducing their environment risk.

  4. Effect of clay minerals and nanoparticles on chromium fractionation in soil contaminated with leather factory waste.

    PubMed

    Taghipour, Marzieh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-10-30

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of time, clay minerals and nanoparticles (NPs) on chromium (Cr) fractionation in a soil contaminated with leather factory waste (LFW). Soil was mixed with LFW, then, the contaminated soils were treated with clay minerals (bentonite and zeolite) and nanoparticles (MgO, TiO2 and ZnO) at 5% and 1%, respectively. The samples were incubated for 15-180 days at 25 °C and constant moisture. After incubation, Cr in control and treated soils was fractionated by the sequential extraction procedure. The distribution of various Cr fractions in control soil indicated that the greatest amounts of Cr were found in the residual fraction (RES) followed by the carbonate (CAR), organic matter (OM) and exchangeable (EXC) fractions. The addition of LFW in soils increased Cr concentration in all fractions. The higher proportion of EXC fraction in the soil treated with LFW indicates its higher potential of leaching and runoff transport. In all treated soils, the RES fraction was increased, while EXC and OM fractions were decreased during incubation. The results indicated that NPs are effective adsorbent for the removal of Cr ions from LFW treated soil, and they could be useful in reducing their environment risk. PMID:25956643

  5. Water and waste load allocation in rivers with emphasis on agricultural return flows: application of fractional factorial analysis.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Ali; Kerachian, Reza; Nikoo, Mohammad Reza; Soltani, Maryam; Estalaki, Siamak Malakpour

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a new methodology is developed to handle parameter and input uncertainties in water and waste load allocation (WWLA) in rivers by using factorial interval optimization and the Soil, Water, Atmosphere, and Plant (SWAP) simulation model. A fractional factorial analysis is utilized to provide detailed effects of uncertain parameters and their interaction on the optimization model outputs. The number of required optimizations in a fractional factorial analysis can be much less than a complete sensitivity analysis. The most important uncertain inputs and parameters can be also selected using a fractional factorial analysis. The uncertainty of the selected inputs and parameters should be incorporated real time water and waste load allocation. The proposed methodology utilizes the SWAP simulation model to estimate the quantity and quality of each agricultural return flow based on the allocated water quantity and quality. In order to control the pollution loads of agricultural dischargers, it is assumed that a part of their return flows can be diverted to evaporation ponds. Results of applying the methodology to the Dez River system in the southwestern part of Iran show its effectiveness and applicability for simultaneous water and waste load allocation in rivers. It is shown that in our case study, the number of required optimizations in the fractional factorial analysis can be reduced from 64 to 16. Analysis of the interactive effects of uncertainties indicates that in a low flow condition, the upstream water quality would have a significant effect on the total benefit of the system. PMID:24880723

  6. Exploring factors affecting measurements of the static coefficient of friction: An application of fractional factorial experiment design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkerts, Timothy J.

    2004-10-01

    The common undergraduate experiment for determining the static coefficient of friction between a wooden block and a horizontal tabletop often produces inconsistent results. We show how several factors influence the measured magnitude and consistency of the coefficient of friction. We utilize a fractional factorial experimental design, which is a method that has been specifically developed to effectively and efficiently uncover key factors that most strongly influence experimental results.

  7. Enhanced diesel fuel fraction from waste high-density polyethylene and heavy gas oil pyrolysis using factorial design methodology.

    PubMed

    Joppert, Ney; da Silva, Alexsandro Araujo; da Costa Marques, Mônica Regina

    2015-02-01

    Factorial Design Methodology (FDM) was developed to enhance diesel fuel fraction (C9-C23) from waste high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and Heavy Gas Oil (HGO) through co-pyrolysis. FDM was used for optimization of the following reaction parameters: temperature, catalyst and HDPE amounts. The HGO amount was constant (2.00 g) in all experiments. The model optimum conditions were determined to be temperature of 550 °C, HDPE = 0.20 g and no FCC catalyst. Under such conditions, 94% of pyrolytic oil was recovered, of which diesel fuel fraction was 93% (87% diesel fuel fraction yield), no residue was produced and 6% of noncondensable gaseous/volatile fraction was obtained. Seeking to reduce the cost due to high process temperatures, the impact of using higher catalyst content (25%) with a lower temperature (500 °C) was investigated. Under these conditions, 88% of pyrolytic oil was recovered (diesel fuel fraction yield was also 87%) as well as 12% of the noncondensable gaseous/volatile fraction. No waste was produced in these conditions, being an environmentally friendly approach for recycling the waste plastic. This paper demonstrated the usefulness of using FDM to predict and to optimize diesel fuel fraction yield with a great reduction in the number of experiments. PMID:25532672

  8. Enhanced diesel fuel fraction from waste high-density polyethylene and heavy gas oil pyrolysis using factorial design methodology.

    PubMed

    Joppert, Ney; da Silva, Alexsandro Araujo; da Costa Marques, Mônica Regina

    2015-02-01

    Factorial Design Methodology (FDM) was developed to enhance diesel fuel fraction (C9-C23) from waste high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and Heavy Gas Oil (HGO) through co-pyrolysis. FDM was used for optimization of the following reaction parameters: temperature, catalyst and HDPE amounts. The HGO amount was constant (2.00 g) in all experiments. The model optimum conditions were determined to be temperature of 550 °C, HDPE = 0.20 g and no FCC catalyst. Under such conditions, 94% of pyrolytic oil was recovered, of which diesel fuel fraction was 93% (87% diesel fuel fraction yield), no residue was produced and 6% of noncondensable gaseous/volatile fraction was obtained. Seeking to reduce the cost due to high process temperatures, the impact of using higher catalyst content (25%) with a lower temperature (500 °C) was investigated. Under these conditions, 88% of pyrolytic oil was recovered (diesel fuel fraction yield was also 87%) as well as 12% of the noncondensable gaseous/volatile fraction. No waste was produced in these conditions, being an environmentally friendly approach for recycling the waste plastic. This paper demonstrated the usefulness of using FDM to predict and to optimize diesel fuel fraction yield with a great reduction in the number of experiments.

  9. Evaluation of biomass production, carotenoid level and antioxidant capacity produced by Thermus filiformis Using fractional factorial design

    PubMed Central

    Mandelli, Fernanda; Yamashita, Fábio; Pereira, José L.; Mercadante, Adriana Z.

    2012-01-01

    A fractional factorial design 25–1 was used to evaluate the effect of temperature, pH, and concentrations of yeast extract, tryptone and Nitsch’s trace elements on the biomass, total carotenoids and protection against singlet oxygen by carotenoid extracts of the bacterium Thermus filiformis. In addition, the carotenoid composition was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography connected to a diode array and mass spectrometer detectors (HPLC-DAD-MS/MS). The production of biomass ranged from 0.113 to 0.658 g/L, the total carotenoid from 137.6 to 1,517.4 µg/g and the protection against singlet oxygen from 4.3 to 85.1 %. Results of the fractional factorial design showed that temperature had a negative effect on biomass production and a positive effect on carotenoid content and protection against singlet oxygen, besides, high levels of pH value, concentrations of yeast extract and tryptone had a positive effect on biomass production only at lower temperatures. The main carotenoids of T. filiformis were thermozeaxanthins. In the tested conditions, changes in the levels of the variables influenced the biomass, carotenoid production, and protection against singlet oxygen, although they did not influence the carotenoid profile. The results of this study provide a better understanding on the interactions among certain nutritional and cultivation conditions of a thermophile bacterium, Thermus filiformis, on biomass and carotenoid amounts, as well as on the antioxidant capacity. PMID:24031811

  10. Optimization of thiamethoxam adsorption parameters using multi-walled carbon nanotubes by means of fractional factorial design.

    PubMed

    Panić, Sanja; Rakić, Dušan; Guzsvány, Valéria; Kiss, Erne; Boskovic, Goran; Kónya, Zoltán; Kukovecz, Ákos

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate significant factors affecting the thiamethoxam adsorption efficiency using oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as adsorbents. Five factors (initial solution concentration of thiamethoxam in water, temperature, solution pH, MWCNTs weight and contact time) were investigated using 2V(5-1) fractional factorial design. The obtained linear model was statistically tested using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the analysis of residuals was used to investigate the model validity. It was observed that the factors and their second-order interactions affecting the thiamethoxam removal can be divided into three groups: very important, moderately important and insignificant ones. The initial solution concentration was found to be the most influencing parameter on thiamethoxam adsorption from water. Optimization of the factors levels was carried out by minimizing those parameters which are usually critical in real life: the temperature (energy), contact time (money) and weight of MWCNTs (potential health hazard), in order to maximize the adsorbed amount of the pollutant. The results of maximal adsorbed thiamethoxam amount in both real and optimized experiments indicate that among minimized parameters the adsorption time is one that makes the largest difference. The results of this study indicate that fractional factorial design is very useful tool for screening the higher number of parameters and reducing the number of adsorption experiments.

  11. An approach to optimize sample preparation for MALDI imaging MS of FFPE sections using fractional factorial design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Oetjen, Janina; Lachmund, Delf; Palmer, Andrew; Alexandrov, Theodore; Becker, Michael; Boskamp, Tobias; Maass, Peter

    2016-09-01

    A standardized workflow for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI imaging MS) is a prerequisite for the routine use of this promising technology in clinical applications. We present an approach to develop standard operating procedures for MALDI imaging MS sample preparation of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections based on a novel quantitative measure of dataset quality. To cover many parts of the complex workflow and simultaneously test several parameters, experiments were planned according to a fractional factorial design of experiments (DoE). The effect of ten different experiment parameters was investigated in two distinct DoE sets, each consisting of eight experiments. FFPE rat brain sections were used as standard material because of low biological variance. The mean peak intensity and a recently proposed spatial complexity measure were calculated for a list of 26 predefined peptides obtained by in silico digestion of five different proteins and served as quality criteria. A five-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied on the final scores to retrieve a ranking of experiment parameters with increasing impact on data variance. Graphical abstract MALDI imaging experiments were planned according to fractional factorial design of experiments for the parameters under study. Selected peptide images were evaluated by the chosen quality metric (structure and intensity for a given peak list), and the calculated values were used as an input for the ANOVA. The parameters with the highest impact on the quality were deduced and SOPs recommended. PMID:27485623

  12. Multi-factorial in vivo stable isotope fractionation: causes, correlations, consequences and applications.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hanns-Ludwig; Robins, Richard J; Werner, Roland A

    2015-01-01

    Many physical and chemical processes in living systems are accompanied by isotope fractionation on H, C, N, O and S. Although kinetic or thermodynamic isotope effects are always the basis, their in vivo manifestation is often modulated by secondary influences. These include metabolic branching events or metabolite channeling, metabolite pool sizes, reaction mechanisms, anatomical properties and compartmentation of plants and animals, and climatological or environmental conditions. In the present contribution, the fundamentals of isotope effects and their manifestation under in vivo conditions are outlined. The knowledge about and the understanding of these interferences provide a potent tool for the reconstruction of physiological events in plants and animals, their geographical origin, the history of bulk biomass and the biosynthesis of defined representatives. It allows the use of isotope characteristics of biomass for the elucidation of biochemical pathways and reaction mechanisms and for the reconstruction of climatic, physiological, ecological and environmental conditions during biosynthesis. Thus, it can be used for the origin and authenticity control of food, the study of ecosystems and animal physiology, the reconstruction of present and prehistoric nutrition chains and paleaoclimatological conditions. This is demonstrated by the outline of fundamental and application-orientated examples for all bio-elements. The aim of the review is to inform (advanced) students from various disciplines about the whole potential and the scope of stable isotope characteristics and fractionations and to provide them with a comprehensive introduction to the literature on fundamental aspects and applications.

  13. Background species effect on aqueous arsenic removal by nano zero-valent iron using fractional factorial design.

    PubMed

    Tanboonchuy, Visanu; Grisdanurak, Nurak; Liao, Chih-Hsiang

    2012-02-29

    This study describes the removal of arsenic species in groundwater by nano zero-valent iron process, including As(III) and As(V). Since the background species may inhibit or promote arsenic removal. The influence of several common ions such as phosphate (PO4(3-)), bicarbonate (HCO3-)), sulfate (SO4(2-)), calcium (Ca2+), chloride (Cl-), and humic acid (HA) were selected to evaluate their effects on arsenic removal. In particular, a 2(6-2) fractional factorial design (FFD) was employed to identify major or interacting factors, which affect arsenic removal in a significant way. As a result of FFD evaluation, PO4(3-) and HA play the role of inhibiting arsenic removal, while Ca2+ was observed to play the promoting one. As for HCO3- and Cl-, the former one inhibits As(III) removal, whereas the later one enhances its removal; on the other hand, As(V) removal was affected only slightly in the presence of HCO3- or Cl-. Hence, it was suggested that the arsenic removal by the nanoiron process can be improved through pretreatment of PO4(3-) and HA. In addition, for the groundwater with high hardness, the nanoiron process can be an advantageous option because of enhancing characteristics of Ca2+. PMID:22245511

  14. Fractional Factorial Design of MALDI-TOF-MS Sample Preparations for the Optimized Detection of Phospholipids and Acylglycerols.

    PubMed

    AlMasoud, Najla; Correa, Elon; Trivedi, Drupad K; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-06-21

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has successfully been used for the analysis of high molecular weight compounds, such as proteins and nucleic acids. By contrast, analysis of low molecular weight compounds with this technique has been less successful due to interference from matrix peaks which have a similar mass to the target analyte(s). Recently, a variety of modified matrices and matrix additives have been used to overcome these limitations. An increased interest in lipid analysis arose from the feasibility of correlating these components with many diseases, e.g. atherosclerosis and metabolic dysfunctions. Lipids have a wide range of chemical properties making their analysis difficult with traditional methods. MALDI-TOF-MS shows excellent potential for sensitive and rapid analysis of lipids, and therefore this study focuses on computational-analytical optimization of the analysis of five lipids (4 phospholipids and 1 acylglycerol) in complex mixtures using MALDI-TOF-MS with fractional factorial design (FFD) and Pareto optimality. Five different experimental factors were investigated using FFD which reduced the number of experiments performed by identifying 720 key experiments from a total of 8064 possible analyses. Factors investigated included the following: matrices, matrix preparations, matrix additives, additive concentrations, and deposition methods. This led to a significant reduction in time and cost of sample analysis with near optimal conditions. We discovered that the key factors used to produce high quality spectra were the matrix and use of appropriate matrix additives. PMID:27228355

  15. Custom fractional factorial designs to develop atorvastatin self-nanoemulsifying and nanosuspension delivery systems – enhancement of oral bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Hashem, Fahima M; Al-Sawahli, Majid M; Nasr, Mohamed; Ahmed, Osama AA

    2015-01-01

    Poor water solubility of a drug is a major challenge in drug delivery research and a main cause for limited bioavailability and pharmacokinetic parameters. This work aims to utilize custom fractional factorial design to assess the development of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) and solid nanosuspensions (NS) in order to enhance the oral delivery of atorvastatin (ATR). According to the design, 14 experimental runs of ATR SNEDDS were formulated utilizing the highly ATR solubilizing SNEDDS components: oleic acid, Tween 80, and propylene glycol. In addition, 12 runs of NS were formulated by the antisolvent precipitation–ultrasonication method. Optimized formulations of SNEDDS and solid NS, deduced from the design, were characterized. Optimized SNEDDS formula exhibited mean globule size of 73.5 nm, zeta potential magnitude of −24.1 mV, and 13.5 μs/cm of electrical conductivity. Optimized solid NS formula exhibited mean particle size of 260.3 nm, 7.4 mV of zeta potential, and 93.2% of yield percentage. Transmission electron microscopy showed SNEDDS droplets formula as discrete spheres. The solid NS morphology showed flaky nanoparticles with irregular shapes using scanning electron microscopy. The release behavior of the optimized SNEDDS formula showed 56.78% of cumulative ATR release after 10 minutes. Solid NS formula showed lower rate of release in the first 30 minutes. Bioavailability estimation in Wistar albino rats revealed an augmentation in ATR bioavailability, relative to ATR suspension and the commercial tablets, from optimized ATR SNEDDS and NS formulations by 193.81% and 155.31%, respectively. The findings of this work showed that the optimized nanocarriers enhance the oral delivery and pharmacokinetic profile of ATR. PMID:26150693

  16. The Use of a Fractional Factorial Design to Determine the Factors That Impact 1,3-Propanediol Production from Glycerol by Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Shivani; Trager, Jordan; Sitton, Oliver C; Mormile, Melanie R

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, biodiesel, a substitute for fossil fuels, has led to the excessive production of crude glycerol. The resulting crude glycerol can possess a high concentration of salts and an alkaline pH. Moreover, current crude glycerol purification methods are expensive, rendering this former commodity a waste product. However, Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, a haloalkaliphilic bacterium, possesses the metabolic capability to convert glycerol into 1,3-propanediol, a valuable commodity compound, without the need for salt dilution or adjusting pH when grown on this waste. Experiments were performed with different combinations of 24 medium components to determine their impact on the production of 1,3-propanediol by using a fractional factorial design. Tested medium components were selected based on data from the organism's genome. Analysis of HPLC data revealed enhanced production of 1,3-propanediol with additional glycerol, pH, vitamin B12, ammonium ions, sodium sulfide, cysteine, iron, and cobalt. However, other selected components; nitrate ions, phosphate ions, sulfate ions, sodium:potassium ratio, chloride, calcium, magnesium, silicon, manganese, zinc, borate, nickel, molybdenum, tungstate, copper and aluminum, did not enhance 1,3-propanediol production. The use of a fractional factorial design enabled the quick and efficient assessment of the impact of 24 different medium components on 1,3-propanediol production from glycerol from a haloalkaliphilic bacterium. PMID:27556494

  17. The Use of a Fractional Factorial Design to Determine the Factors That Impact 1,3-Propanediol Production from Glycerol by Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Shivani; Trager, Jordan; Sitton, Oliver C.; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, biodiesel, a substitute for fossil fuels, has led to the excessive production of crude glycerol. The resulting crude glycerol can possess a high concentration of salts and an alkaline pH. Moreover, current crude glycerol purification methods are expensive, rendering this former commodity a waste product. However, Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, a haloalkaliphilic bacterium, possesses the metabolic capability to convert glycerol into 1,3-propanediol, a valuable commodity compound, without the need for salt dilution or adjusting pH when grown on this waste. Experiments were performed with different combinations of 24 medium components to determine their impact on the production of 1,3-propanediol by using a fractional factorial design. Tested medium components were selected based on data from the organism’s genome. Analysis of HPLC data revealed enhanced production of 1,3-propanediol with additional glycerol, pH, vitamin B12, ammonium ions, sodium sulfide, cysteine, iron, and cobalt. However, other selected components; nitrate ions, phosphate ions, sulfate ions, sodium:potassium ratio, chloride, calcium, magnesium, silicon, manganese, zinc, borate, nickel, molybdenum, tungstate, copper and aluminum, did not enhance 1,3-propanediol production. The use of a fractional factorial design enabled the quick and efficient assessment of the impact of 24 different medium components on 1,3-propanediol production from glycerol from a haloalkaliphilic bacterium. PMID:27556494

  18. [Distribution characteristics of lead in different particle size fractions of surface soil of a lead-acid battery factory contaminated site].

    PubMed

    Yue, Xi; Sun, Ti-chang; Huang, Jin-lou

    2013-09-01

    In this research, six topsoil samples (0-20 cm) were collected in the heavy-metal lead contaminated soil of one lead battery factory in south-west China as research object, which were later divided into seven particle size fractions, and analyzed for the lead concentration as well as the correlation between the lead concentration and the organic matter content. The result showed that five soil samples were contaminated with lead with different pollution levels, and there were two different trends in the changes of lead concentration as of the change of soil particle size. The lead concentration of the three samples from sewage treatment workshop, the workshop A and the workshop B, showed a first declining and then ascending trend with the decreasing particle size. The lead concentration of the soil samples of the packing workshop and the former production workshop A showed a decreasing trend when the particle size decreased. The lead concentration and the organic matter content showed a positive linear correlation (R2 = 0.8232). Soil organic matter has the ability of lead enrichment, and the ability declines with the decreasing particle size. Soil texture may be an important factor for the interaction between soil organic matter and lead distribution.

  19. [Distribution characteristics of lead in different particle size fractions of surface soil of a lead-acid battery factory contaminated site].

    PubMed

    Yue, Xi; Sun, Ti-chang; Huang, Jin-lou

    2013-09-01

    In this research, six topsoil samples (0-20 cm) were collected in the heavy-metal lead contaminated soil of one lead battery factory in south-west China as research object, which were later divided into seven particle size fractions, and analyzed for the lead concentration as well as the correlation between the lead concentration and the organic matter content. The result showed that five soil samples were contaminated with lead with different pollution levels, and there were two different trends in the changes of lead concentration as of the change of soil particle size. The lead concentration of the three samples from sewage treatment workshop, the workshop A and the workshop B, showed a first declining and then ascending trend with the decreasing particle size. The lead concentration of the soil samples of the packing workshop and the former production workshop A showed a decreasing trend when the particle size decreased. The lead concentration and the organic matter content showed a positive linear correlation (R2 = 0.8232). Soil organic matter has the ability of lead enrichment, and the ability declines with the decreasing particle size. Soil texture may be an important factor for the interaction between soil organic matter and lead distribution. PMID:24289023

  20. Optimization of parameters for the quantitative surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of mephedrone using a fractional factorial design and a portable Raman spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Mabbott, Samuel; Correa, Elon; Cowcher, David P; Allwood, J William; Goodacre, Royston

    2013-01-15

    A new optimization strategy for the SERS detection of mephedrone using a portable Raman system has been developed. A fractional factorial design was employed, and the number of statistically significant experiments (288) was greatly reduced from the actual total number of experiments (1722), which minimized the workload while maintaining the statistical integrity of the results. A number of conditions were explored in relation to mephedrone SERS signal optimization including the type of nanoparticle, pH, and aggregating agents (salts). Through exercising this design, it was possible to derive the significance of each of the individual variables, and we discovered four optimized SERS protocols for which the reproducibility of the SERS signal and the limit of detection (LOD) of mephedrone were established. Using traditional nanoparticles with a combination of salts and pHs, it was shown that the relative standard deviations of mephedrone-specific Raman peaks were as low as 0.51%, and the LOD was estimated to be around 1.6 μg/mL (9.06 × 10(-6) M), a detection limit well beyond the scope of conventional Raman and extremely low for an analytical method optimized for quick and uncomplicated in-field use.

  1. Neutrino Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, Steve

    2010-06-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate O(1021) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source : a Neutrino Factory. This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for a Neutrino Factory.

  2. Slime Factory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Marilyn L.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity using slime, a colloid: it behaves like both a solid and liquid. Explains how slime can be produced from guar gum. An activity where students work in teams and become a slime factory is presented. (PR)

  3. Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate O(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This prepares the way for a Neutrino Factory (NF) in which high energy muons decay within the straight sections of a storage ring to produce a beam of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos. The NF concept was proposed in 1997 at a time when the discovery that the three known types of neutrino ({nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}) can change their flavor as they propagate through space (neutrino oscillations) was providing a first glimpse of physics beyond the Standard Model. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source: a Neutrino Factory. This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for a Neutrino Factory.

  4. Neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2015-07-15

    The Neutrino Factory is a facility that produces neutrino beams with a well-defined flavour content and energy spectrum from the decay of intense, high-energy, stored muon beams to establish CP violation in the neutrino sector. The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) is providing a Reference Design Report (RDR) for the facility. The present design is optimised for the recent measurements of θ{sub 13}. The accelerator facility will deliver 10{sup 21} muon decays per year from 10 GeV stored muon beams. The straight sections of the storage ring point to a 100 kton Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) at a distance of 2000-2500 km from the source. The accuracy in the value of δ{sub CP} that a Neutrino Factory can achieve and the δ{sub CP} coverage is unrivalled by other future facilities. Staging scenarios for the Neutrino Factory deliver facilities that can carry out physics at each stage. In the context of Fermilab, such a scenario would imply in the first stage the construction of a small storage ring, nuSTORM, to carry out neutrino cross-section and sterile neutrino measurements and to perform a programme of 6D muon cooling R&D. The second stage is the construction of a 5 GeV Neutrino Factory (nuMAX) pointing to the Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake and the final stage would use many of the components of this facility to construct a Muon Collider, initially as a 126 GeV CM Higgs Factory, which may be upgraded to a multi-TeV Muon Collider if required.

  5. 6 CFR 25.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 25.1 Section 25.1 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY REGULATIONS TO SUPPORT ANTI-TERRORISM BY FOSTERING EFFECTIVE TECHNOLOGIES § 25.1 Purpose. This part implements the Support Anti-terrorism by...

  6. 46 CFR 52.25-1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false General. 52.25-1 Section 52.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-1 General. Requirements for fired boilers of various sizes and uses are referenced in table 54.01-5(a)...

  7. 46 CFR 52.25-1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false General. 52.25-1 Section 52.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-1 General. Requirements for fired boilers of various sizes and uses are referenced in table 54.01-5(a)...

  8. 46 CFR 52.25-1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false General. 52.25-1 Section 52.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-1 General. Requirements for fired boilers of various sizes and uses are referenced in Table 54.01-5(a)...

  9. 46 CFR 52.25-1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General. 52.25-1 Section 52.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-1 General. Requirements for fired boilers of various sizes and uses are referenced in Table 54.01-5(a)...

  10. 46 CFR 52.25-1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General. 52.25-1 Section 52.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-1 General. Requirements for fired boilers of various sizes and uses are referenced in Table 54.01-5(a)...

  11. Plant Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Hideo

    Recently, much attention is paid on the plant factory, as it enable to grow plants stably under extraordinary climate condition such as high and/or low air temperature and less rain. Lots of questions such as decreasing investing cost, realizing stable plant production and developing new growing technique should be solved for making popular this growing system. However, I think that we can introduce a highly developed Japanese industrial now-how to plant factory system and can produce a business chance to the world market.

  12. Neutrino factory

    DOE PAGES

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; et al

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable ofmore » making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.« less

  13. Neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; Kuno, Y.; Benedetto, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoini, S.; Martini, M.; Wildner, E.; Prior, G.; Blondel, A.; Karadzhow, Y.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Jenner, L. J.; Kurup, A.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Zarrebini, A.; Poslimski, J.; Blackmore, V.; Cobb, J.; Tunnell, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bennett, J. R.J.; Brooks, S.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Edgecock, T. R.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; McFarland, A.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Booth, C.; Skoro, G.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Berg, J. S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Stratakis, D.; Souchlas, N.; Witte, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Makhov, N.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Strait, J.; Striganov, S.; Morfín, J. G.; Wands, R.; Snopok, P.; Bagacz, S. A.; Morozov, V.; Roblin, Y.; Cline, D.; Ding, X.; Bromberg, C.; Hart, T.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C. M.; Beard, K. B.; Cummings, M. A.C.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Roberts, T. J.; Yoshikawa, C. Y.; Graves, V. B.; McDonald, K. T.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  14. Neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; Kuno, Y.; Benedetto, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoini, S.; Martini, M.; Wildner, E.; Prior, G.; Blondel, A.; Karadzhow, Y.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Jenner, L. J.; Kurup, A.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Zarrebini, A.; Poslimski, J.; Blackmore, V.; Cobb, J.; Tunnell, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bennett, J. R. J.; Brooks, S.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Edgecock, T. R.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; McFarland, A.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Booth, C.; Skoro, G.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Berg, J. S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Stratakis, D.; Souchlas, N.; Witte, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Makhov, N.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Strait, J.; Striganov, S.; Morfín, J. G.; Wands, R.; Snopok, P.; Bagacz, S. A.; Morozov, V.; Roblin, Y.; Cline, D.; Ding, X.; Bromberg, C.; Hart, T.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C. M.; Beard, K. B.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Roberts, T. J.; Yoshikawa, C. Y.; Graves, V. B.; McDonald, K. T.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.

    2014-12-01

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that θ13>0 . The measured value of θ13 is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti)neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO ν Design Study consortium. EURO ν coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO ν baseline accelerator facility will provide 1 021 muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  15. A fractional-factorial probabilistic-possibilistic optimization framework for planning water resources management systems with multi-level parametric interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Huang, G H; Zhou, Y

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a multi-level factorial-vertex fuzzy-stochastic programming (MFFP) approach is developed for optimization of water resources systems under probabilistic and possibilistic uncertainties. MFFP is capable of tackling fuzzy parameters at various combinations of α-cut levels, reflecting distinct attitudes of decision makers towards fuzzy parameters in the fuzzy discretization process based on the α-cut concept. The potential interactions among fuzzy parameters can be explored through a multi-level factorial analysis. A water resources management problem with fuzzy and random features is used to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed methodology. The results indicate that useful solutions can be obtained for the optimal allocation of water resources under fuzziness and randomness. They can help decision makers to identify desired water allocation schemes with maximized total net benefits. A variety of decision alternatives can also be generated under different scenarios of water management policies. The findings from the factorial experiment reveal the interactions among design factors (fuzzy parameters) and their curvature effects on the total net benefit, which are helpful in uncovering the valuable information hidden beneath the parameter interactions affecting system performance. A comparison between MFFP and the vertex method is also conducted to demonstrate the merits of the proposed methodology.

  16. A fractional-factorial probabilistic-possibilistic optimization framework for planning water resources management systems with multi-level parametric interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Huang, G H; Zhou, Y

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a multi-level factorial-vertex fuzzy-stochastic programming (MFFP) approach is developed for optimization of water resources systems under probabilistic and possibilistic uncertainties. MFFP is capable of tackling fuzzy parameters at various combinations of α-cut levels, reflecting distinct attitudes of decision makers towards fuzzy parameters in the fuzzy discretization process based on the α-cut concept. The potential interactions among fuzzy parameters can be explored through a multi-level factorial analysis. A water resources management problem with fuzzy and random features is used to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed methodology. The results indicate that useful solutions can be obtained for the optimal allocation of water resources under fuzziness and randomness. They can help decision makers to identify desired water allocation schemes with maximized total net benefits. A variety of decision alternatives can also be generated under different scenarios of water management policies. The findings from the factorial experiment reveal the interactions among design factors (fuzzy parameters) and their curvature effects on the total net benefit, which are helpful in uncovering the valuable information hidden beneath the parameter interactions affecting system performance. A comparison between MFFP and the vertex method is also conducted to demonstrate the merits of the proposed methodology. PMID:26922500

  17. 46 CFR 62.25-1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false General. 62.25-1 Section 62.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements... unsafe condition. (b) Automation systems or subsystems that control or monitor more than one...

  18. 46 CFR 62.25-1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false General. 62.25-1 Section 62.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements... unsafe condition. (b) Automation systems or subsystems that control or monitor more than one...

  19. 46 CFR 62.25-1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General. 62.25-1 Section 62.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements... unsafe condition. (b) Automation systems or subsystems that control or monitor more than one...

  20. 46 CFR 62.25-1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false General. 62.25-1 Section 62.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements... unsafe condition. (b) Automation systems or subsystems that control or monitor more than one...

  1. 46 CFR 62.25-1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General. 62.25-1 Section 62.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements... unsafe condition. (b) Automation systems or subsystems that control or monitor more than one...

  2. 21 CFR 25.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 25.1 Section 25.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and the Public Health Service Act. This part also supplements...

  3. 21 CFR 25.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Purpose. 25.1 Section 25.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and the Public Health Service Act. This part also supplements...

  4. 21 CFR 25.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Purpose. 25.1 Section 25.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and the Public Health Service Act. This part also supplements...

  5. 21 CFR 25.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Purpose. 25.1 Section 25.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... amended, directs that, to the fullest extent possible, the policies, regulations, and public laws of the... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and the Public Health Service Act. This part also supplements...

  6. 21 CFR 25.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Purpose. 25.1 Section 25.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... amended, directs that, to the fullest extent possible, the policies, regulations, and public laws of the... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and the Public Health Service Act. This part also supplements...

  7. 46 CFR 113.25-1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Applicability. 113.25-1 Section 113.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM..., and similar vessels. (b) Section 113.25-25 applies to each manned ocean and coastwise barge of...

  8. 46 CFR 113.25-1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability. 113.25-1 Section 113.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM..., and similar vessels. (b) Section 113.25-25 applies to each manned ocean and coastwise barge of...

  9. 40 CFR 25.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Introduction. 25.1 Section 25.1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN PROGRAMS UNDER THE RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT §...

  10. 46 CFR 98.25-1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk § 98.25-1... ammonia on board as a cargo, cargo residue, or vapor and that is not regulated under part 154 of...

  11. 46 CFR 98.25-1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk § 98.25-1... ammonia on board as a cargo, cargo residue, or vapor and that is not regulated under part 154 of...

  12. 46 CFR 98.25-1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk § 98.25-1... ammonia on board as a cargo, cargo residue, or vapor and that is not regulated under part 154 of...

  13. 46 CFR 98.25-1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk § 98.25-1... ammonia on board as a cargo, cargo residue, or vapor and that is not regulated under part 154 of...

  14. 46 CFR 98.25-1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk § 98.25-1... ammonia on board as a cargo, cargo residue, or vapor and that is not regulated under part 154 of...

  15. 46 CFR 54.25-1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this..., Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-1 Scope. The carbon, alloy, and heat treated steels used...

  16. 46 CFR 54.25-1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this..., Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-1 Scope. The carbon, alloy, and heat treated steels used...

  17. 46 CFR 54.25-1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this..., Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-1 Scope. The carbon, alloy, and heat treated steels used...

  18. 46 CFR 54.25-1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this..., Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-1 Scope. The carbon, alloy, and heat treated steels used...

  19. 46 CFR 54.25-1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this..., Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-1 Scope. The carbon, alloy, and heat treated steels used...

  20. Fractional factorial approach combining 4 Escherichia coli strains, 3 culture media, 3 expression temperatures and 5 N-terminal fusion tags for screening the soluble expression of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Noguère, Christophe; Larsson, Anna M; Guyot, Jean-Christophe; Bignon, Christophe

    2012-08-01

    Producing recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli (E. coli) is generally performed using a trial and error approach with the different expression variables being tested independently from each other. As a consequence, variable interactions are lost which makes the trial and error approach quite time-consuming. In this paper, we report how switching from a trial and error to a fractional factorial approach allows testing in less than 2 weeks four expression variables (E. coli strains, culture media, expression temperatures and N-terminal fusion tags) in a single experiment. The method, called "Fusion-InFFact", was validated using four test proteins. In all cases, Fusion-InFFact allowed finding conditions for expressing high yields of soluble proteins. The method was originally set-up for high throughput structural genomics programs, but can be used in any recombinant protein expression project. PMID:22705765

  1. 40 CFR 25.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.1... in activities under the Clean Water Act (Pub. L. 95-217), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Pub. L. 94-580), and the Safe Drinking Water Act (Pub. L. 93-523). The applicability of......

  2. 40 CFR 25.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.1... in activities under the Clean Water Act (Pub. L. 95-217), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Pub. L. 94-580), and the Safe Drinking Water Act (Pub. L. 93-523). The applicability of......

  3. 40 CFR 25.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.1... in activities under the Clean Water Act (Pub. L. 95-217), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Pub. L. 94-580), and the Safe Drinking Water Act (Pub. L. 93-523). The applicability of......

  4. 40 CFR 25.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.1... in activities under the Clean Water Act (Pub. L. 95-217), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Pub. L. 94-580), and the Safe Drinking Water Act (Pub. L. 93-523). The applicability of......

  5. 4 CFR 25.1 - Applicability and governing laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applicability and governing laws. 25.1 Section 25.1... OFFICE BUILDING AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.1 Applicability and governing laws. These rules and regulations, and the laws of the United States and the District of Columbia, apply to the Government...

  6. 27 CFR 25.1 - Production and removal of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... beer. 25.1 Section 25.1 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.1 Production and removal of beer. The regulations in this part relate to beer and cereal beverages and cover the location, construction,...

  7. 27 CFR 25.1 - Production and removal of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... beer. 25.1 Section 25.1 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.1 Production and removal of beer. The regulations in this part relate to beer and cereal beverages and cover the location, construction,...

  8. 27 CFR 25.1 - Production and removal of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... beer. 25.1 Section 25.1 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.1 Production and removal of beer. The regulations in this part relate to beer and cereal beverages and cover the location, construction,...

  9. 27 CFR 25.1 - Production and removal of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... beer. 25.1 Section 25.1 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.1 Production and removal of beer. The regulations in this part relate to beer and cereal beverages and cover the location, construction,...

  10. 46 CFR 34.25-1 - Application-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application-T/ALL. 34.25-1 Section 34.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Water Spray Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.25-1 Application—T/ALL. (a) Where a water spray extinguishing system...

  11. 46 CFR 151.25-1 - Cargo tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo tank. 151.25-1 Section 151.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Environmental Control § 151.25-1 Cargo tank. When carrying certain commodities regulated by this subchapter, one...

  12. 27 CFR 25.1 - Production and removal of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... beer. 25.1 Section 25.1 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.1 Production and removal of beer. The regulations in this part relate to beer and cereal beverages and cover the location, construction,...

  13. 4 CFR 25.1 - Applicability and governing laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Applicability and governing laws. 25.1 Section 25.1... OFFICE BUILDING AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.1 Applicability and governing laws. These rules and regulations, and the laws of the United States and the District of Columbia, apply to the Government...

  14. 4 CFR 25.1 - Applicability and governing laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Applicability and governing laws. 25.1 Section 25.1... OFFICE BUILDING AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.1 Applicability and governing laws. These rules and regulations, and the laws of the United States and the District of Columbia, apply to the Government...

  15. 46 CFR 196.25-1 - Improper use prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Improper use prohibited. 196.25-1 Section 196.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS OPERATIONS Searchlights § 196.25-1 Improper use prohibited. (a) No person shall flash or cause to be flashed the rays of...

  16. 46 CFR 196.25-1 - Improper use prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Improper use prohibited. 196.25-1 Section 196.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS OPERATIONS Searchlights § 196.25-1 Improper use prohibited. (a) No person shall flash or cause to be flashed the rays of...

  17. 46 CFR 196.25-1 - Improper use prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Improper use prohibited. 196.25-1 Section 196.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS OPERATIONS Searchlights § 196.25-1 Improper use prohibited. (a) No person shall flash or cause to be flashed the rays of...

  18. 4 CFR 25.1 - Applicability and governing laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Applicability and governing laws. 25.1 Section 25.1 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE GENERAL PROCEDURES CONDUCT IN THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE BUILDING AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.1 Applicability and governing laws. These rules and...

  19. 4 CFR 25.1 - Applicability and governing laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Applicability and governing laws. 25.1 Section 25.1 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE GENERAL PROCEDURES CONDUCT IN THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE BUILDING AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.1 Applicability and governing laws. These rules and...

  20. 46 CFR 70.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 70.25-1 Section 70.25-1... General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 70.25-1 Electrical engineering details. All electrical engineering details and installations shall be designed and installed in accordance with subchapter...

  1. 46 CFR 90.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 90.25-1 Section 90.25-1... PROVISIONS General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 90.25-1 Electrical engineering details. (a) All electrical engineering details and installations shall be designed and installed in accordance...

  2. 46 CFR 70.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 70.25-1 Section 70.25-1... General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 70.25-1 Electrical engineering details. All electrical engineering details and installations shall be designed and installed in accordance with subchapter...

  3. 46 CFR 90.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 90.25-1 Section 90.25-1... PROVISIONS General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 90.25-1 Electrical engineering details. (a) All electrical engineering details and installations shall be designed and installed in accordance...

  4. 18 CFR 25.1 - Contents of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Contents of application. 25.1 Section 25.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... DETERMINATION PERMITTING RESTORATION TO ENTRY § 25.1 Contents of application. Any application for vacation of...

  5. 18 CFR 25.1 - Contents of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contents of application. 25.1 Section 25.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... DETERMINATION PERMITTING RESTORATION TO ENTRY § 25.1 Contents of application. Any application for vacation of...

  6. 18 CFR 25.1 - Contents of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Contents of application. 25.1 Section 25.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... DETERMINATION PERMITTING RESTORATION TO ENTRY § 25.1 Contents of application. Any application for vacation of...

  7. 18 CFR 25.1 - Contents of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Contents of application. 25.1 Section 25.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... DETERMINATION PERMITTING RESTORATION TO ENTRY § 25.1 Contents of application. Any application for vacation of...

  8. 18 CFR 25.1 - Contents of application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Contents of application. 25.1 Section 25.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... DETERMINATION PERMITTING RESTORATION TO ENTRY § 25.1 Contents of application. Any application for vacation of...

  9. 46 CFR 34.25-1 - Application-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application-T/ALL. 34.25-1 Section 34.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Water Spray Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.25-1 Application—T/ALL. (a) Where a water spray extinguishing system...

  10. 46 CFR 34.25-1 - Application-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application-T/ALL. 34.25-1 Section 34.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Water Spray Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.25-1 Application—T/ALL. (a) Where a water spray extinguishing system...

  11. 46 CFR 34.25-1 - Application-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application-T/ALL. 34.25-1 Section 34.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Water Spray Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.25-1 Application—T/ALL. (a) Where a water spray extinguishing system...

  12. 46 CFR 34.25-1 - Application-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application-T/ALL. 34.25-1 Section 34.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Water Spray Extinguishing Systems, Details § 34.25-1 Application—T/ALL. (a) Where a water spray extinguishing system...

  13. 46 CFR 90.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 90.25-1 Section 90.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 90.25-1 Electrical engineering details. (a)...

  14. 46 CFR 90.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 90.25-1 Section 90.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 90.25-1 Electrical engineering details. (a)...

  15. 46 CFR 90.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 90.25-1 Section 90.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 90.25-1 Electrical engineering details. (a)...

  16. 46 CFR 111.25-1 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General requirements. 111.25-1 Section 111.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motors § 111.25-1 General requirements. The requirements for generators contained in §...

  17. 46 CFR 70.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 70.25-1 Section 70.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 70.25-1 Electrical engineering details. All...

  18. 46 CFR 70.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 70.25-1 Section 70.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 70.25-1 Electrical engineering details. All...

  19. 46 CFR 111.25-1 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General requirements. 111.25-1 Section 111.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motors § 111.25-1 General requirements. The requirements for generators contained in §...

  20. 46 CFR 70.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 70.25-1 Section 70.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 70.25-1 Electrical engineering details. All...

  1. 46 CFR 111.25-1 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false General requirements. 111.25-1 Section 111.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motors § 111.25-1 General requirements. The requirements for generators contained in §...

  2. 46 CFR 111.25-1 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false General requirements. 111.25-1 Section 111.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motors § 111.25-1 General requirements. The requirements for generators contained in §...

  3. 46 CFR 111.25-1 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false General requirements. 111.25-1 Section 111.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motors § 111.25-1 General requirements. The requirements for generators contained in §...

  4. 46 CFR 151.25-1 - Cargo tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank. 151.25-1 Section 151.25-1 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Environmental Control § 151.25-1 Cargo tank. When carrying certain..., within the main cargo tank, and in some cases, in the space between the primary and secondary...

  5. Midlands Teaching Factory, LTD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midlands Technical Coll., Columbia, SC.

    In 1987, Midlands Technical College (MTC), in Columbia, South Carolina, initiated a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) project, the Midlands Teaching Factory, LTD, which integrated various college departments with the goal of manufacturing a high quality, saleable product. The faculty developed a teaching factory model which was designed to…

  6. Photon collider Higgs factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, V. I.

    2014-09-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson (and still nothing else) have triggered appearance of many proposals of Higgs factories for precision measurement of the Higgs properties. Among them there are several projects of photon colliders (PC) without e+e- in addition to PLC based on e+e- linear colliders ILC and CLIC. In this paper, following a brief discussion of Higgs factories physics program I give an overview of photon colliders based on linear colliders ILC and CLIC, and of the recently proposed photon-collider Higgs factories with no e+e- collision option based on recirculation linacs in ring tunnels.

  7. Manning the Unmanned Factory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebel, Karl-H.

    1989-01-01

    Suggests that total factory integration through computer networks, even when technically feasible, might be unwieldy, inefficient, and uneconomical because the human factor and accumulated know-how of the work force tend to be overlooked. (Author/JOW)

  8. e+ e- Factory Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Michael; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The impressive performance of current (KEKB) and recent (PEP-II) B-Factory colliders has increased interest in developing even higher luminosity B-factories. Two new designs are being developed (SuperKEKB and SuperB). Both designs plan to deliver a luminosity in the range of 1 x 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, nearly 100 times the present B-factory level. Achieving this high luminosity requires high-current beams and short bunch lengths and/or a new way of colliding the beams. The SuperB design employs a crabbed magnetic waist with a large crossing angle and the SuperKEKB design is looking at crab cavities with high-current beams and/or a travelling focus. I describe the designs being studied to achieve the high luminosity needed for the next generation of B-Factories.

  9. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  10. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  11. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  12. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  13. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  14. 7 CFR 25.1 - Applicability and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture (Secretary) (USDA). Provisions dealing with the nominations and designation of urban Empowerment... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applicability and scope. 25.1 Section 25.1 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture RURAL EMPOWERMENT ZONES AND ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES...

  15. 7 CFR 25.1 - Applicability and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agriculture (Secretary) (USDA). Provisions dealing with the nominations and designation of urban Empowerment... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Applicability and scope. 25.1 Section 25.1 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture RURAL EMPOWERMENT ZONES AND ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES...

  16. 7 CFR 25.1 - Applicability and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Agriculture (Secretary) (USDA). Provisions dealing with the nominations and designation of urban Empowerment... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Applicability and scope. 25.1 Section 25.1 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture RURAL EMPOWERMENT ZONES AND ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES...

  17. 46 CFR 188.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 188.25-1 Section 188.25... GENERAL PROVISIONS General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 188.25-1 Electrical engineering details. (a) The electrical engineering details shall be in accordance with subchapter J...

  18. 46 CFR 188.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 188.25-1 Section 188.25... GENERAL PROVISIONS General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 188.25-1 Electrical engineering details. (a) The electrical engineering details shall be in accordance with subchapter J...

  19. 46 CFR 188.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 188.25-1 Electrical engineering details. (a) The electrical engineering details shall be in accordance with subchapter J (Electrical... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 188.25-1 Section...

  20. 46 CFR 188.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 188.25-1 Electrical engineering details. (a) The electrical engineering details shall be in accordance with subchapter J (Electrical... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 188.25-1 Section...

  1. 46 CFR 188.25-1 - Electrical engineering details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS General Electrical Engineering Requirements § 188.25-1 Electrical engineering details. (a) The electrical engineering details shall be in accordance with subchapter J (Electrical... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electrical engineering details. 188.25-1 Section...

  2. Perspective view of threestory reinforced concrete factory. The factory is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of three-story reinforced concrete factory. The factory is painted pink with factory windows infilling the structural frame exposed on the exterior facade. On the east facade of the three-story factory is a two-story, seven bay addition that is painted the same tone as the larger factory. The last two bays of the two-story addition are newer. A brick base surrounds both the factory and the addition and runs the entire length of the building on Clay Ave. and Morrow St. (Duplicate Color view of HAER MI-334-1) - Ivan Doverspike Company, 1925 Clay Avenue, Detroit, MI

  3. Perspective view of threestory reinforced concrete factory. The factory is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of three-story reinforced concrete factory. The factory is painted pink with factory windows infilling the structural frame exposed on the exterior facade. On the east facade of the three-story factory is a two-story, seven bay addition that is painted the same tone as the larger factory. The last two bays of the two-story addition are newer. A brick base surrounds both the factory and the addition and runs the entire length of the building on Clay Ave. and Morrow St - Ivan Doverspike Company, 1925 Clay Avenue, Detroit, MI

  4. The Clone Factory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Have humans been cloned? Is it possible? Immediate interest is sparked when students are asked these questions. In response to their curiosity, the clone factory activity was developed to help them understand the process of cloning. In this activity, students reenact the cloning process, in a very simplified simulation. After completing the…

  5. The Invention Factory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speitel, Thomas W.; Scott, Neil G.; Gabrielli, Sandy D.

    2007-01-01

    The Invention Factory is a nontraditional youth-based, after-school program in Honolulu that teaches information technology and mechanics to teenagers through interactive, hands-on projects that improve human computer interaction for individuals with disabilities. One objective of the program is to stimulate interest in science and engineering…

  6. The Old Factory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Technology education is not just about things, systems, and processes. It can also be about history, people, technological change, and impacts on society. In this design challenge, one uses technology education principles and ideas to convert an old factory into a museum and learning center. The challenge with this historical resource is to think…

  7. Sequence Factorial and Its Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2012-01-01

    In this note, we introduce sequence factorial and use this to study generalized M-bonomial coefficients. For the sequence of natural numbers, the twin concepts of sequence factorial and generalized M-bonomial coefficients, respectively, extend the corresponding concepts of factorial of an integer and binomial coefficients. Some latent properties…

  8. The Super Flavor Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, A.J.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

    2007-01-26

    The main physics goals of a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} flavor factory are discussed, including the possibilities to perform detailed studies of the CKM mechanism of quark mixing, and constrain virtual Higgs and Non-Standard Model particle contributions to the dynamics of rare B{sub u,d,s} decays. The large samples of D mesons and {tau} leptons produced at a flavor factory will result in improved sensitivities on D mixing and lepton flavor violation searches, respectively. One can also test fundamental concepts such as lepton universality to much greater precision than existing constraints and improve the precision on tests of CPT from B meson decays. Recent developments in accelerator physics have demonstrated the feasibility to build an accelerator that can achieve luminosities of {Omicron}(10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}).

  9. SLAC B Factory computing

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, P.F.

    1992-02-01

    As part of the research and development program in preparation for a possible B Factory at SLAC, a group has been studying various aspects of HEP computing. In particular, the group is investigating the use of UNIX for all computing, from data acquisition, through analysis, and word processing. A summary of some of the results of this study will be given, along with some personal opinions on these topics.

  10. B-factories

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.D.

    1988-04-01

    We briefly review the physics of CP violation and the interest of studying this phenomenon in the B-meson system. The need for very large numbers of B-decays is shown, and a number of approaches for B-factories are compared. In particular, e/sup +/e/sup /minus// linear and circular colliders are discussed in some detail, with specific examples presented. 31 refs., 22 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. EMIR data factory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosich Minguell, Josefina; Barreto, M.; Castro, N.; Garzón, F.; Guerra, D.; Insausti, M.; López-Martín, L.; López, P.; Molgó, J.; Patrón, J.

    2014-07-01

    EMIR (Espectrógrafo Multiobjeto Infrarrojo) is a wide-field, near-infrared, multi-object spectrograph, with image capabilities, which will be located at the Nasmyth focus of GTC (Gran Telescopio Canarias). It will allow observers to obtain many intermediate resolution spectra simultaneously, in the nIR bands Z, J, H, K. A multi-slit mask unit will be used for target acquisition. This paper shows an overview of EMIR Data Factory System which main functionality is to receive raw images from DAS (Data Acquisition system), collect FITS header keywords, store images to database and propagate images to other GCS (GTC Control System) components to produce astronomical data. This system follows the standards defined by the telescope to permit the integration of this software on the GCS. The Data Factory System needs the DAS, the Sequencer, GUI and the Monitor Manager subsystems to operate. DAS generates images and sends them to the Data Factory. Sequencer and GUI (Graphical User Interface) provide information about instrument and observing program. The Monitor Manager supplies information about telescope and instrument state.

  12. 46 CFR 96.25-1 - When required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Radar § 96.25-1 When required. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for plotting radar readings must be provided on the bridge....

  13. 46 CFR 96.25-1 - When required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Radar § 96.25-1 When required. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for plotting radar readings must be provided on the bridge....

  14. 46 CFR 96.25-1 - When required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Radar § 96.25-1 When required. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for plotting radar readings must be provided on the bridge....

  15. 46 CFR 96.25-1 - When required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Radar § 96.25-1 When required. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for plotting radar readings must be provided on the bridge....

  16. 46 CFR 96.25-1 - When required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Radar § 96.25-1 When required. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for plotting radar readings must be provided on the bridge....

  17. 28 CFR 25.1 - Purpose and authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.1 Purpose and authority. The purpose of this subpart is to... Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) to be contacted by any licensed importer,...

  18. 29 CFR 25.1 - Purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Secretary of Labor RULES FOR THE NOMINATION OF ARBITRATORS UNDER SECTION 11 OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 10988 § 25.1 Purpose and scope. These procedures govern the nomination of arbitrators by the Secretary to perform the advisory functions specified under section 11 of Executive Order 10988. Any arbitrators so nominated...

  19. 28 CFR 25.1 - Purpose and authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.1 Purpose and authority. The purpose of this subpart is to... Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) to be contacted by any licensed importer,...

  20. 28 CFR 25.1 - Purpose and authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.1 Purpose and authority. The purpose of this subpart is to... Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) to be contacted by any licensed importer,...

  1. 28 CFR 25.1 - Purpose and authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.1 Purpose and authority. The purpose of this subpart is to... Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) to be contacted by any licensed importer,...

  2. 28 CFR 25.1 - Purpose and authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.1 Purpose and authority. The purpose of this subpart is to... Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) to be contacted by any licensed importer,...

  3. Hazardous factories: Nigerian evidence.

    PubMed

    Oloyede, Olajide

    2005-06-01

    The past 15 years have seen an increasing governmental and corporate concern for the environment worldwide. For governments, information about the environmental performance of the industrial sector is required to inform macro-level decisions about environmental targets such as those required to meet UN directives. However, in many African, Asian, and Latin American countries, researching and reporting company environmental performance is limited. This article serves as a contribution to filling the gap by presenting evidence of physical and chemical risk in Nigerian factories. One hundred and three factories with a total of 5,021 workers were studied. One hundred and twenty physical and chemical hazards were identified and the result shows a high number of workers exposed to such hazards. The study also reveals that workers' awareness level of chemical hazards was high. Yet the danger was perceived in behavioral terms, especially by manufacturing firms, which tend to see environmental investment in an increasingly global economy as detrimental to profitability. PMID:16022703

  4. Factory Cost Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bomber, Tom

    1996-12-17

    The Factory Cost Model (FCM) is an economic analysis tool intended to provide flat panel display (FPD) and other similar discrete component manufacturers with the ability to make first-order estimates of the cost of unit production. This software has several intended uses. Primary among these is the ability to provide first-order economic analysis for future factories. Consequently, the model requires a minimal level of input detail, and accomodates situations where actual production data are not available. This software is designed to be activity based such that most of the calculated direct costs are associated with the steps of a manufacturibg process. The FCM architecture has the ability to accomodate the analysis of existing manufacturing facilities. The FCM can provide assistance with strategic economic decisions surrounding production related matters. For instance, the program can project the effect on costs and resources of a new product''s introduction, or it can assess the potential cost reduction produced by step yield improvements in the manufacturing process.

  5. Factory Cost Model

    1996-12-17

    The Factory Cost Model (FCM) is an economic analysis tool intended to provide flat panel display (FPD) and other similar discrete component manufacturers with the ability to make first-order estimates of the cost of unit production. This software has several intended uses. Primary among these is the ability to provide first-order economic analysis for future factories. Consequently, the model requires a minimal level of input detail, and accomodates situations where actual production data are notmore » available. This software is designed to be activity based such that most of the calculated direct costs are associated with the steps of a manufacturibg process. The FCM architecture has the ability to accomodate the analysis of existing manufacturing facilities. The FCM can provide assistance with strategic economic decisions surrounding production related matters. For instance, the program can project the effect on costs and resources of a new product''s introduction, or it can assess the potential cost reduction produced by step yield improvements in the manufacturing process.« less

  6. Sequence factorial and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2012-06-01

    In this note, we introduce sequence factorial and use this to study generalized M-bonomial coefficients. For the sequence of natural numbers, the twin concepts of sequence factorial and generalized M-bonomial coefficients, respectively, extend the corresponding concepts of factorial of an integer and binomial coefficients. Some latent properties of generalized M-bonomial coefficients by which a vast majority of practical problems involving generalized M-bonomial coefficients can be solved are derived.

  7. A Classroom of Polymer Factories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Mary E.; Van Natta, Sandra

    1998-01-01

    Provides an activity in which students create small classroom factories and investigate several aspects of production including design, engineering, quality control, waste management, packaging, shipment, and communication. (DDR)

  8. The eldercare factory.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Noel; Sharkey, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Rapid advances in service robotics together with dramatic shifts in population demographics have led to the notion that technology may be the answer to our eldercare problems. Robots are being developed for feeding, washing, lifting, carrying and mobilising the elderly as well as monitoring their health. They are also being proposed as a substitute for companionship. While these technologies could accrue major benefits for society and empower the elderly, we must balance their use with the ethical costs. These include a potential reduction in human contact, increased feeling of objectification and loss of control, loss of privacy and personal freedom as well as deception and infantilisation. With appropriate guidelines in place before the introduction of robots en masse into the care system, robots could improve the lives of the elderly, reducing their dependence and creating more opportunities for social interaction. Without forethought, the elderly may find themselves in a barren world of machines, a world of automated care: a factory for the elderly.

  9. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  10. The nearby supernova factory

    SciTech Connect

    Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Aldering, G.; Lee, B.C.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Siegrist, J.; Wang, L.; Antilogus, P.; Astier, P.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Copin, Y.; Smadja, G.; Gangler, E.; Castera, A.; Adam, G.; Bacon, R.; Lemonnier, J.-P.; Pecontal, A.; Pecontal, E.; Kessler, R.

    2004-01-23

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an ambitious project to find and study in detail approximately 300 nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at redshifts 0.03 < z < 0.08. This program will provide an exceptional data set of well-studied SNe in the nearby smooth Hubble flow that can be used as calibration for the current and future programs designed to use SNe to measure the cosmological parameters. The first key ingredient for this program is a reliable supply of Hubble-flow SNe systematically discovered in unprecedented numbers using the same techniques as those used in distant SNe searches. In 2002, 35 SNe were found using our test-bed pipeline for automated SN search and discovery. The pipeline uses images from the asteroid search conducted by the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking group at JPL. Improvements in our subtraction techniques and analysis have allowed us to increase our effective SN discovery rate to {approx}12 SNe/month in 2003.

  11. AutoPyFactory: A Scalable Flexible Pilot Factory Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J.; Hover, J.; Love, P.; Stewart, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC is one of the largest users of grid computing infrastructure, which is a central part of the experiment's computing operations. Considerable efforts have been made to use grid technology in the most efficient and effective way, including the use of a pilot job based workload management framework. In this model the experiment submits ‘pilot’ jobs to sites without payload. When these jobs begin to run they contact a central service to pick-up a real payload to execute. The first generation of pilot factories were usually specific to a single Virtual Organization (VO), and were bound to the particular architecture of that VO's distributed processing. A second generation provides factories which are more flexible, not tied to any particular VO, and provide new and improved features such as monitoring, logging, profiling, etc. In this paper we describe this key part of the ATLAS pilot architecture, a second generation pilot factory, AutoPyFactory. AutoPyFactory has a modular design and is highly configurable. It is able to send different types of pilots to sites and exploit different submission mechanisms and queue characteristics. It is tightly integrated with the PanDA job submission framework, coupling pilot flow to the amount of work the site has to run. It gathers information from many sources in order to correctly configure itself for a site and its decision logic can easily be updated. Integrated into AutoPyFactory is a flexible system for delivering both generic and specific job wrappers which can perform many useful actions before starting to run end-user scientific applications, e.g., validation of the middleware, node profiling and diagnostics, and monitoring. AutoPyFactory also has a robust monitoring system that has been invaluable in establishing a reliable pilot factory service for ATLAS.

  12. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, Steve

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate O(1021) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  13. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  14. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  15. The Low Energy Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan; Geer, Steve; Ellis, Malcolm; Fernandez Martinez, Enrique; Li, Tracey; Pascoli, Silvia; Mena, Olga

    2010-03-30

    We show that a low energy neutrino factory with a baseline of 1300 km and muon energy of 4.5 GeV has an excellent physics reach. The results of our optimisation studies demonstrate that such a setup can have remarkable sensitivity to theta{sub 13} and delta for sin{sup 2}(2theta{sub 13})>10{sup -4}, and to the mass hierarchy for sin{sup 2}(2theta{sub 13})>10{sup -3}. We also illustrate the power of the unique combination of golden and platinum channels accessible to the low energy neutrino factory. We have considered both a 20 kton totally active scintillating detector and a 100 kton liquid argon detector as possible detector technologies, finding that a liquid argon detector with very good background rejection can produce sensitivity to theta{sub 13} and delta with that of the International Design Study neutrino factory.

  16. A plant factory for moth pheromone production.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bao-Jian; Hofvander, Per; Wang, Hong-Lei; Durrett, Timothy P; Stymne, Sten; Löfstedt, Christer

    2014-02-25

    Moths depend on pheromone communication for mate finding and synthetic pheromones are used for monitoring or disruption of pheromone communication in pest insects. Here we produce moth sex pheromone, using Nicotiana benthamiana as a plant factory, by transient expression of up to four genes coding for consecutive biosynthetic steps. We specifically produce multicomponent sex pheromones for two species. The fatty alcohol fractions from the genetically modified plants are acetylated to mimic the respective sex pheromones of the small ermine moths Yponomeuta evonymella and Y. padella. These mixtures are very efficient and specific for trapping of male moths, matching the activity of conventionally produced pheromones. Our long-term vision is to design tailor-made production of any moth pheromone component in genetically modified plants. Such semisynthetic preparation of sex pheromones is a novel and cost-effective way of producing moderate to large quantities of pheromones with high purity and a minimum of hazardous waste.

  17. A plant factory for moth pheromone production

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bao-Jian; Hofvander, Per; Wang, Hong-Lei; Durrett, Timothy P.; Stymne, Sten; Löfstedt, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Moths depend on pheromone communication for mate finding and synthetic pheromones are used for monitoring or disruption of pheromone communication in pest insects. Here we produce moth sex pheromone, using Nicotiana benthamiana as a plant factory, by transient expression of up to four genes coding for consecutive biosynthetic steps. We specifically produce multicomponent sex pheromones for two species. The fatty alcohol fractions from the genetically modified plants are acetylated to mimic the respective sex pheromones of the small ermine moths Yponomeuta evonymella and Y. padella. These mixtures are very efficient and specific for trapping of male moths, matching the activity of conventionally produced pheromones. Our long-term vision is to design tailor-made production of any moth pheromone component in genetically modified plants. Such semisynthetic preparation of sex pheromones is a novel and cost-effective way of producing moderate to large quantities of pheromones with high purity and a minimum of hazardous waste. PMID:24569486

  18. From Superbeams to Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan

    2010-03-30

    The Neutrino Factory, which produces an extremely intense source of flavor-tagged neutrinos from muon decays in a storage ring, arguably gives the best physics reach for CP violation, as well as virtually all parameters in the neutrino oscillation parameter space. I will briefly describe the physics capabilities of the baseline Neutrino Factory as compared to other possible future facilities (beta-beam and super-beam facilities), give an overview of the accelerator complex and describe in detail the current international R and D program.

  19. Charm Factories: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweber, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The next generation tau-charm factory, the third Beijing Electron Spectrometer (BESIII) at the new Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPCII), has begun data collection. I discuss the flavor physics reach of the BESIII charm program and conclude with a discussion on future proposed tau-charm facilities.

  20. Rural "Dropout Factories" Often Overshadowed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    In the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in the northwest corner of South Carolina, high schools' attempts to curb student dropouts may not match what many people picture when they hear talk of the nation's "dropout factories." Yet one-fifth of the 2,000 high schools nationwide categorized that way by researchers at Johns Hopkins University…

  1. Multiple Segment Factorial Vignette Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    2006-01-01

    The multiple segment factorial vignette design (MSFV) combines elements of experimental designs and probability sampling with the inductive, exploratory approach of qualitative research. MSFVs allow researchers to investigate topics that may be hard to study because of ethical or logistical concerns. Participants are presented with short stories…

  2. 46 CFR 110.25-1 - Plans and information required for new construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plans and information required for new construction. 110.25-1 Section 110.25-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Plan Submittal § 110.25-1 Plans and information required for new...

  3. From Neutrino Factory to Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Both Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories require a muon source capable of producing and capturing {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This paper reviews the similarities and differences between Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider accelerator complexes, the ongoing R&D needed for a Muon Collider that goes beyond Neutrino Factory R&D, and some thoughts about how a Neutrino Factory on the CERN site might eventually be upgraded to a Muon Collider.

  4. From Exam Factories to Communities of Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffield, Frank; Williamson, Bill

    2011-01-01

    The British current model of education has turned schools into exam factories and further education colleges and universities into skills factories for British industry. In their book, "From Exam Factories to Communities of Discovery: the Democratic Route," the authors offer an alternative way of thinking and talking about education, as well as…

  5. Sequence Factorial of "g"-Gonal Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2013-01-01

    The gamma function, which has the property to interpolate the factorial whenever the argument is an integer, is a special case (the case "g"?=?2) of the general term of the sequence factorial of "g"-gonal numbers. In relation to this special case, a formula for calculating the general term of the sequence factorial of any…

  6. Systems factorial technology with R.

    PubMed

    Houpt, Joseph W; Blaha, Leslie M; McIntire, John P; Havig, Paul R; Townsend, James T

    2014-06-01

    Systems factorial technology (SFT) comprises a set of powerful nonparametric models and measures, together with a theory-driven experiment methodology termed the double factorial paradigm (DFP), for assessing the cognitive information-processing mechanisms supporting the processing of multiple sources of information in a given task (Townsend and Nozawa, Journal of Mathematical Psychology 39:321-360, 1995). We provide an overview of the model-based measures of SFT, together with a tutorial on designing a DFP experiment to take advantage of all SFT measures in a single experiment. Illustrative examples are given to highlight the breadth of applicability of these techniques across psychology. We further introduce and demonstrate a new package for performing SFT analyses using R for statistical computing.

  7. Intelligent Robots for Factory Automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E. L.; Oh, S. J.

    1985-04-01

    Industrial robots are now proven technology in a variety of applications including welding, materials handling, spray painting, machine loading and assembly. However, to fully realize the potential of these universal manipulators , "intelligence" needs to be added to the industrial robot. This involves adding sensory capability and machine intelligence to the controls. The "intelligence" may be added externally or as integral components of the robot. These new "intelligent robots" promise to greatly enhance the versatility of the robot for factory applications. The purpose of this paper is to present a brief review of the techniques and applications of intelligent robots for factory automation and to suggest possible designs for the intelligent robot of the future.

  8. On KEK B-Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, H.

    2009-07-01

    There are two principles which the management of a research institute like KEK must respect when dealing with such big project as B-Factory. One is the scientific merit of the project and the other is the organizational consideration which includes financial, human, technical and historical elements. Ideally, the two principles are to be fully taken into account. But, in many cases, one or the other is only partially fulfilled due to unavoidable circumstances. The lack of flexibility to respond to all possible situations is more dangerous and may lead to a disaster as in the case of SSC. I will describe the process which lead to the successful construction, operation and physics presentations of KEK B-Factory following faithfully the official records.

  9. Apiary B Factory lattice design

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.H.R. ); Garren, A.A. )

    1991-04-01

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper will present the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent. 8 figs. 1 tab.

  10. Apiary B Factory Lattice Design

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.H.R.; Garren, A.A.

    1991-05-03

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper presents the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent.

  11. MUON STORAGE RINGS - NEUTRINO FACTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-05-30

    The concept of a muon storage ring based Neutrino Source (Neutrino Factory) has sparked considerable interest in the High Energy Physics community. Besides providing a first phase of a muon collider facility, it would generate more intense and well collimated neutrino beams than currently available. The BNL-AGS or some other proton driver would provide an intense proton beam that hits a target, produces pions that decay into muons. The muons must be cooled, accelerated and injected into a storage ring with a long straight section where they decay. The decays occurring in the straight sections of the ring would generate neutrino beams that could be directed to detectors located thousands of kilometers away, allowing studies of neutrino oscillations with precisions not currently accessible. For example, with the neutrino source at BNL, detectors at Soudan, Minnesota (1,715 km), and Gran Sasso, Italy (6,527 km) become very interesting possibilities. The feasibility of constructing and operating such a muon-storage-ring based Neutrino-Factory, including geotechnical questions related to building non-planar storage rings (e.g. at 8{degree} angle for BNL-Soudan, and 3{degree} angle for BNL-Gran Sasso) along with the design of the muon capture, cooling, acceleration, and storage ring for such a facility is being explored by the growing Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC). The authors present overview of Neutrino Factory concept based on a muon storage ring, its components, physics opportunities, possible upgrade to a full muon collider, latest simulations of front-end, and a new bowtie-muon storage ring design.

  12. Results from the B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, A.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

    2009-01-08

    These proceedings are based on lectures given at the Helmholtz International Summer School Heavy Quark Physics at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna, Russia, during August 2008. I review the current status of CP violation in B meson decays from the B factories. These results can be used, along with measurements of the sides of the Unitarity Triangle, to test the CKM mechanism. In addition I discuss experimental studies of B decays to final states with 'spin-one' particles.

  13. A Survey of Small Factories*

    PubMed Central

    Jefferys, Margot; Wood, C. H.

    1960-01-01

    This survey was undertaken by a group of doctors, nurses, and lecturers in the Department of Public Health of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine as part of the teaching programme for the Diploma in Public Health. Fifty small factories in an area of a metropolitan borough were invited to answer questions concerning their industrial processes, their labour force, their premises, their first-aid provision, and the visits they received from officials of local and central government. Forty-eight of these factories responded and observations were made by teams of three recording independently of each other in 45. A variety of industries was represented in these 48 firms, half of which employed less than 10 workers. The working environment, in respect of sanitary arrangements, cleanliness and tidiness, lighting on stairs and passage ways, was considered to be unsatisfactory in many firms. Some instances of inadequate safeguards of machines were seen. The accident rate was found to be rather less than the computed national rate for manufacturing industry in 1956. First-aid equipment and workers were also considered to be deficient in a number of instances. In case of accident and for the treatment of minor ailments most firms made use of a local casualty and out-patient department of a general hospital. This service was considered quite adequate. Many firms had not been visited by the Factory Inspector or his deputy during the previous year. Rather more had received visits from the local authority health inspectors. Many firms expressed confusion about the duties and functions of their various official visitors. The conclusions drawn from this limited enquiry were that the working conditions in small factories are often unsatisfactory; that in areas such as the one surveyed it is unrealistic to think in terms of development of an industrial health service similar to those operating in Slough and Harlow; and that the greatest impact on environmental

  14. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  15. Black holes as antimatter factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Dolgov, Alexander D.; Petrov, Alexey A.

    2009-09-01

    We consider accretion of matter onto a low mass black hole surrounded by ionized medium. We show that, because of the higher mobility of protons than electrons, the black hole would acquire positive electric charge. If the black hole's mass is about or below 1020 g, the electric field at the horizon can reach the critical value which leads to vacuum instability and electron-positron pair production by the Schwinger mechanism. Since the positrons are ejected by the emergent electric field, while electrons are back-captured, the black hole operates as an antimatter factory which effectively converts protons into positrons.

  16. Super B Factory at KEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, ByungGu

    2008-11-01

    A Super—KEKB factory, an asymmetric—energy e+e- lepton collider at KEK in Japan, has been proposed with the design peak luminosity of 8×1035 cm-2 s-1, which is about 50 times higher than that of the current operation of the KEKB collider. The physics goal of this project is mainly to measure extremely rare heavy flavor weak decays and CP violation phenomena, which are very sensitive on physics beyond the Standard Model. Hot physics topics and the status of experimental design are briefly described.

  17. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel M.

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  18. Super B Factory at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, Byung Gu

    2008-11-23

    A Super--KEKB factory, an asymmetric--energy e{sup +}e{sup -} lepton collider at KEK in Japan, has been proposed with the design peak luminosity of 8x10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is about 50 times higher than that of the current operation of the KEKB collider. The physics goal of this project is mainly to measure extremely rare heavy flavor weak decays and CP violation phenomena, which are very sensitive on physics beyond the Standard Model. Hot physics topics and the status of experimental design are briefly described.

  19. Naval Aircraft Factory (Curtiss) H-16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Naval Aircraft Factory (Curtiss) H-16: The Naval Aircraft Factory H-16 flying boat, seen here on a beaching dolly on the Langley seaplane ramp, was one of 150 built by the Naval Aircraft Factory in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Most H-16s built were made by Curtiss, so the type is more readily known under that name. The NACA performed hull pressure distribution tests at Langley during 1929.

  20. 33 CFR 67.25-1 - Class “B” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Class âBâ structures. 67.25-1... NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements § 67.25-1 Class “B” structures. Class “B” structures shall be the structures erected in an area where Class...

  1. 33 CFR 67.25-1 - Class “B” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Class âBâ structures. 67.25-1... NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements § 67.25-1 Class “B” structures. Class “B” structures shall be the structures erected in an area where Class...

  2. 33 CFR 67.25-1 - Class “B” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Class âBâ structures. 67.25-1... NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements § 67.25-1 Class “B” structures. Class “B” structures shall be the structures erected in an area where Class...

  3. 33 CFR 67.25-1 - Class “B” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class âBâ structures. 67.25-1 Section 67.25-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements §...

  4. The benefits and challenges of sharing glidein factory operations across nine time zones between OSG and CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfiligoi, I.; Dost, J. M.; Zvada, M.; Butenas, I.; Holzman, B.; Wuerthwein, F.; Kreuzer, P.; Teige, S. W.; Quick, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Flix, J.

    2012-12-01

    OSG has been operating for a few years at UCSD a glideinWMS factory for several scientific communities, including CMS analysis, HCC and GLOW. This setup worked fine, but it had become a single point of failure. OSG thus recently added another instance at Indiana University, serving the same user communities. Similarly, CMS has been operating a glidein factory dedicated to reprocessing activities at Fermilab, with similar results. Recently, CMS decided to host another glidein factory at CERN, to increase the availability of the system, both for analysis, MC and reprocessing jobs. Given the large overlap between this new factory and the three factories in the US, and given that CMS represents a significant fraction of glideins going through the OSG factories, CMS and OSG formed a common operations team that operates all of the above factories. The reasoning behind this arrangement is that most operational issues stem from Grid-related problems, and are very similar for all the factory instances. Solving a problem in one instance thus very often solves the problem for all of them. This paper presents the operational experience of how we address both the social and technical issues of running multiple instances of a glideinWMS factory with operations staff spanning multiple time zones on two continents.

  5. CDC-25.1 controls the rate of germline mitotic cell cycle by counteracting WEE-1.3 and by positively regulating CDK-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sunghee; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Shim, Yhong-Hee

    2012-04-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, cdc-25.1 loss-of-function mutants display a lack of germline proliferation. We found that the proliferation defect of cdc-25.1 mutants was suppressed by wee-1.3 RNAi. Further, among the seven cdk and seven cyclin homologs examined, cdk-1 and cyb-3 RNAi treatment caused the most severe germline proliferation defects in an rrf-1 mutant background, which were similar to those of the cdc-25.1 mutants. In addition, while RNAi of cyd-1 and cye-1 caused significant germline proliferation defects, RNAi of cdk-2 and cdk-4 did not. Compared with the number of germ nuclei in wee-1.3(RNAi) worms, the number in wee-1.3(RNAi);cdk-1(RNAi) and wee-1.3(RNAi);cyb-3(RNAi) worms further decreased to the level of cdk-1(RNAi) and cyb-3(RNAi) worms, respectively, indicating that cdk-1 and cyb-3 are epistatic and function downstream of cdc-25.1 and wee-1.3 in the control of the cell cycle. BrdU labeling of adult worms showed that, while 100% of the wild-type germ nuclei in the mitotic region incorporated BrdU when labeled for more than 12 h at 20°C, a small fraction of the cdc-25.1 mutant germ nuclei failed to incorporate BrdU even when labeled for 68 h. These results indicate that CDC-25.1 is required for maintaining proper rate of germline mitotic cell cycle. We propose that CDC-25.1 regulates the rate of germline mitotic cell cycle by counteracting WEE-1.3 and by positively controlling CDK-1, which forms a complex primarily with CYB-3, but also possibly with CYD-1 and CYE-1.

  6. Options for Production Staging for a Low Energy Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Berg J. S.

    2011-10-26

    A low energy neutrino factory (LENF) is defined, for the purpose of this report, to accelerate a muon beam to a total energy in the range of 10-14 GeV, and store it in a decay ring directing a resulting neutrino beam to a detector 2200-2300 km distant. The machine should be ultimately capable of producing 10{sup 21} decays toward that detector per year of 10{sup 7} s. We consider such a neutrino factory to be the accelerator defined in the Interim Design Report (IDR) of the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (IDS-NF), modified to remove the final stage of acceleration, possibly modifying the remaining acceleration stages to adjust the final energy, and replacing the decay ring with one designed for the lower energy and shorter baseline. We discuss modifications to that design which would reduce the cost of the machine at the price of a reduction in neutrino production, down to as low as 10{sup 20} decays per year. These modifications will not preclude eventually upgrading the machine to the full production of 10{sup 21} decays per year. The eventual cost of a machine which achieves the full production through a series of lower-production stages should not exceed the cost of a machine which is immediately capable of the full production by more than a small fraction of the cost difference between the full production machine and the lowest production stage.

  7. Douglas DT-2 (Naval Aircraft Factory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Douglas DT-2 (Naval Aircraft Factory): This example of the Douglas DT-2 torpedo plane, which flew as 'NACA 11,' was built in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by the Naval Aircraft Factory. Langley's NACA staff studied the take-off characteristics of a twin-float seaplane with this aircraft.

  8. A Tau-Charm Factory at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, K.K.

    1994-04-01

    It is proposed that a Tau Charm Factory represents a natural extension of CEBAF into higher energy domains. The exciting nature of the physics of charm quarks and tau leptons is briefly reviewed and it is suggested that the concept of a linac-ring collider as a Tau Charm Factory at CEBAF should be seriously studied.

  9. Factorial Validity of Student Ratings of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renaud, Robert D.; Murray, Harry G.

    2005-01-01

    This study tested the Systematic Distortion Hypothesis by examining the factorial validity of student ratings of university teaching. Factorial validity is defined as the degree to which covariance among judged traits resembles the actual or true covariation of observable behaviors underlying these traits. Although many studies have examined the…

  10. Charged Particle Optics in Circular Higgs Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai

    2015-02-26

    Similar to a super B-factory, a circular Higgs factory will require strong focusing systems near the interaction points and a low-emittance lattice in arcs to achieve a factory luminosity. At electron beam energy of 120 GeV, beamstrahlung effects during the collision pose an additional challenge to the collider design. In particular, a large momentum acceptance at 2 percent level is necessary to retain an adequate beam lifetime. This turns out to be the most challenging aspect in the design of circular Higgs factory. In this paper, an example will be provided to illustrate the beam dynamics in circular Higgs factory, emphasizing on the chromatic optics. Basic optical modules and advanced analysis will be presented. Most important, we will show that 2% momentum aperture is achievable

  11. Factorial invariance in multilevel confirmatory factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ehri

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a procedure to test factorial invariance in multilevel confirmatory factor analysis. When the group membership is at level 2, multilevel factorial invariance can be tested by a simple extension of the standard procedure. However level-1 group membership raises problems which cannot be appropriately handled by the standard procedure, because the dependency between members of different level-1 groups is not appropriately taken into account. The procedure presented in this article provides a solution to this problem. This paper also shows Muthén's maximum likelihood (MUML) estimation for testing multilevel factorial invariance across level-1 groups as a viable alternative to maximum likelihood estimation. Testing multilevel factorial invariance across level-2 groups and testing multilevel factorial invariance across level-1 groups are illustrated using empirical examples. SAS macro and Mplus syntax are provided.

  12. 1. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST (NORTHWEST CORNER OF EDIBLE FATS FACTORY) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST (NORTHWEST CORNER OF EDIBLE FATS FACTORY) - Wilson's Oil House, Lard Refinery, & Edible Fats Factory, Edible Fats Factory, 2801 Southwest Fifteenth Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

  13. 3. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST (NORTHEAST CORNER OF EDIBLE FATS FACTORY) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST (NORTHEAST CORNER OF EDIBLE FATS FACTORY) - Wilson's Oil House, Lard Refinery, & Edible Fats Factory, Edible Fats Factory, 2801 Southwest Fifteenth Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

  14. 4. SOUTHEAST CORNER OF EDIBLE FATS FACTORY (CONNECTING BUILDING ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SOUTHEAST CORNER OF EDIBLE FATS FACTORY (CONNECTING BUILDING ON THE LEFT) - Wilson's Oil House, Lard Refinery, & Edible Fats Factory, Edible Fats Factory, 2801 Southwest Fifteenth Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

  15. Neutrino factories: realization and physics potential

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; Zisman, M.S.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-12-01

    Neutrino Factories offer an exciting option for the long-term neutrino physics program. This new type of neutrino facility will provide beams with unique properties. Low systematic uncertainties at a Neutrino Factory, together with a unique and precisely known neutrino flavor content, will enable neutrino oscillation measurements to be made with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Over recent years, the resulting neutrino factory physics potential has been discussed extensively in the literature. In addition, over the last six years the R&D necessary to realize a Neutrino Factory has been progressing, and has developed into a significant international activity. It is expected that, within about five more years, the initial phase of this R&D program will be complete and, if the community chooses to build this new type of neutrino source within the following decade, neutrino factory technology will be ready for the final R&D phase prior to construction. In this paper (1) an overview is given of the technical ingredients needed for a Neutrino Factory, (2) beam properties are described, (3) the resulting neutrino oscillation physics potential is summarized, (4) a more detailed description is given for one representative Neutrino Factory design, and (5) the ongoing R&D program is summarized, and future plans briefly described.

  16. 6. FACTORY BUILDING, WITH FINISHED PRODUCT WAREHOUSE IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. FACTORY BUILDING, WITH FINISHED PRODUCT WAREHOUSE IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Maizewood Insulation Company Factory, 275 Salina Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  17. Verbal and Nonverbal Communication of Factory Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tway, Patricia

    1976-01-01

    Examines the verbal and nonverbal behavior patterns associated with two speech styles, one formal and the other informal, among factory workers. Available from: Mouton Publishers, Box 482, the Hague, Netherlands. (AM)

  18. HiPER Tritium factory elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, Didier

    2011-06-01

    HiPER will include a Tritium target factory. This presentation is an overview. We start from process ideas to go to first sketch passing through safety principles. We will follow the Tritium management process. We need first a gas factory producing the right gas mixture from hydrogen, Deuterium and Tritium storage. Then we could pass through the target factory. It is based on our LMJ single shot experiment and some new development like the injector. Then comes pellet burst and vapour recovery. The Tritium factory has to include the waste recovery, recycling process with gas purification before storage. At least, a nuclear plant is not a classical building. Tritium is also very special... All the design ideas have to be adapted. Many facilities are necessary, some with redundancy. We all have to well known these constraints. Tritium budget will be a major contributor for a material point of view as for a financial one.

  19. The Physics of the B Factories

    DOE PAGES

    Bevan, A. J.

    2014-11-19

    This work is on the Physics of the B Factories. Part A of this book contains a brief description of the SLAC and KEK B Factories as well as their detectors, BaBar and Belle, and data taking related issues. Part B discusses tools and methods used by the experiments in order to obtain results. The results themselves can be found in Part C.

  20. Riken RI Beam Factory, Harvest Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En'yo, H.

    2015-06-01

    At RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF), having all the experimental facilities in place, the uranium-beam intensity recorded 25pnA in 2014. With use of this powerful beam many experiments are begin performed by variety of researchers from all over the world, producing a lot of new data which were just a dream in several years ago. Recent status of RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) is presented with future prospects in science and an accelerator plan.

  1. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  2. A simple demonstration of zero factorial equals one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Munir; Mahmood, Ibtihal

    2016-08-01

    When asked, a number of students answer zero factorial to be zero as a continuation to the answer of one factorial to be one. Any instructor would then seek a justification of zero factorial to be one from computing nCn via the well- known combination formula. This article conveys a simple presentation of zero factorial to be one based on lower and upper bounds of n factorial. We have not seen this explanation covered in any algebra textbook.

  3. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and... engineering regulations in parts 50 to 63, inclusive, of Subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter. (2... part 52 of Subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter. All alterations, replacements or...

  4. 46 CFR 35.25-1 - Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer-T/ALL... Engine Department § 35.25-1 Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer—T/ALL. It shall be the duty of an engineer when assuming charge of the boilers to examine the same forthwith and thoroughly....

  5. 46 CFR 35.25-1 - Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer-T/ALL... Engine Department § 35.25-1 Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer—T/ALL. It shall be the duty of an engineer when assuming charge of the boilers to examine the same forthwith and thoroughly....

  6. 46 CFR 35.25-1 - Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer-T/ALL... Engine Department § 35.25-1 Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer—T/ALL. It shall be the duty of an engineer when assuming charge of the boilers to examine the same forthwith and thoroughly....

  7. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. 167... SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and... the following standards for boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances: (1)...

  8. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances. 167... SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and... the following standards for boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances: (1)...

  9. 46 CFR 35.25-1 - Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer-T/ALL... Engine Department § 35.25-1 Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer—T/ALL. It shall be the duty of an engineer when assuming charge of the boilers to examine the same forthwith and thoroughly....

  10. 46 CFR 35.25-1 - Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer-T/ALL... Engine Department § 35.25-1 Examination of boilers and machinery by engineer—T/ALL. It shall be the duty of an engineer when assuming charge of the boilers to examine the same forthwith and thoroughly....

  11. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and... engineering regulations in parts 50 to 63, inclusive, of Subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter. (2... part 52 of Subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter. All alterations, replacements or...

  12. 46 CFR 167.25-1 - Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and appurtenances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Marine Engineering § 167.25-1 Boilers, pressure vessels, piping and... engineering regulations in parts 50 to 63, inclusive, of Subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter. (2... part 52 of Subchapter F (Marine Engineering) of this chapter. All alterations, replacements or...

  13. Baby factories taint surrogacy in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Makinde, Olusesan Ayodeji; Makinde, Olufunmbi Olukemi; Olaleye, Olalekan; Brown, Brandon; Odimegwu, Clifford O

    2016-01-01

    The practice of reproductive medicine in Nigeria is facing new challenges with the proliferation of 'baby factories'. Baby factories are buildings, hospitals or orphanages that have been converted into places for young girls and women to give birth to children for sale on the black market, often to infertile couples, or into trafficking rings. This practice illegally provides outcomes (children) similar to surrogacy. While surrogacy has not been well accepted in this environment, the proliferation of baby factories further threatens its acceptance. The involvement of medical and allied health workers in the operation of baby factories raises ethical concerns. The lack of a properly defined legal framework and code of practice for surrogacy makes it difficult to prosecute baby factory owners, especially when they are health workers claiming to be providing services to clients. In this environment, surrogacy and other assisted reproductive techniques urgently require regulation in order to define when ethico-legal lines have been crossed in providing surrogacy or surrogacy-like services. PMID:26602942

  14. A Distribution-Free Multi-Factorial Profiler for Harvesting Information from High-Density Screenings

    PubMed Central

    Besseris, George J.

    2013-01-01

    Data screening is an indispensable phase in initiating the scientific discovery process. Fractional factorial designs offer quick and economical options for engineering highly-dense structured datasets. Maximum information content is harvested when a selected fractional factorial scheme is driven to saturation while data gathering is suppressed to no replication. A novel multi-factorial profiler is presented that allows screening of saturated-unreplicated designs by decomposing the examined response to its constituent contributions. Partial effects are sliced off systematically from the investigated response to form individual contrasts using simple robust measures. By isolating each time the disturbance attributed solely to a single controlling factor, the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney rank stochastics are employed to assign significance. We demonstrate that the proposed profiler possesses its own self-checking mechanism for detecting a potential influence due to fluctuations attributed to the remaining unexplainable error. Main benefits of the method are: 1) easy to grasp, 2) well-explained test-power properties, 3) distribution-free, 4) sparsity-free, 5) calibration-free, 6) simulation-free, 7) easy to implement, and 8) expanded usability to any type and size of multi-factorial screening designs. The method is elucidated with a benchmarked profiling effort for a water filtration process. PMID:24009744

  15. Ergonomic analysis jobs in recovered factories.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Gabriela; Zotta, Gastón

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of the deep economic crisis in Argentina on 2001, the recovery of companies through to the creation of the Cooperatives Working Self-Management or Factories Recovered by its workers was constituted as one of the ways in which the salaried disobeyed the increasing unemployment. When the companies turn into recovered factories they tend to leave of side practices that have been seen like imposed by the previous organization and not understanding them as a primary condition for the execution of his tasks. Safety and ergonomics are two disciplines that are no longer considered relevant to the daily work. Therefore this investigation aims to revalue, undergo semantic to give back to a place in every organization analyzed. This research developed a self-diagnostic tool for working conditions, and the environment, present in the recovered factories.

  16. The Physics of the B Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevan, A. J.; Golob, B.; Mannel, Th.; Prell, S.; Yabsley, B. D.; Aihara, H.; Anulli, F.; Arnaud, N.; Aushev, T.; Beneke, M.; Beringer, J.; Bianchi, F.; Bigi, I. I.; Bona, M.; Brambilla, N.; Brodzicka, J.; Chang, P.; Charles, M. J.; Cheng, C. H.; Cheng, H.-Y.; Chistov, R.; Colangelo, P.; Coleman, J. P.; Drutskoy, A.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Eidelman, S.; Eigen, G.; Eisner, A. M.; Faccini, R.; Flood, K. T.; Gambino, P.; Gaz, A.; Gradl, W.; Hayashii, H.; Higuchi, T.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Hurth, T.; Iijima, T.; Itoh, R.; Jackson, P. D.; Kass, R.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kou, E.; Križan, P.; Kronfeld, A.; Kumano, S.; Kwon, Y. J.; Latham, T. E.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lüth, V.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Meadows, B. T.; Mussa, R.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Ocariz, J.; Olsen, S. L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Palano, A.; Pich, A.; Playfer, S.; Poluektov, A.; Porter, F. C.; Robertson, S. H.; Roney, J. M.; Roodman, A.; Sakai, Y.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seidl, R.; Sekula, S. J.; Steinhauser, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Swanson, E. S.; Tackmann, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uehara, S.; Uno, S.; van de Water, R.; Vasseur, G.; Verkerke, W.; Waldi, R.; Wang, M. Z.; Wilson, F. F.; Zupan, J.; Zupanc, A.; Adachi, I.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bellis, M.; Ben-Haim, E.; Biassoni, P.; Cahn, R. N.; Cartaro, C.; Chauveau, J.; Chen, C.; Chiang, C. C.; Cowan, R.; Dalseno, J.; Davier, M.; Davies, C.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Echenard, B.; Epifanov, D.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Gary, J. W.; Godang, R.; Graham, M. T.; Hafner, A.; Hamilton, B.; Hartmann, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hearty, C.; Iwasaki, Y.; Khodjamirian, A.; Kusaka, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lazzaro, A.; Li, J.; Lindemann, D.; Long, O.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinelli, M.; Miyabayashi, K.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Muller, D. R.; Nakazawa, H.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Pacetti, S.; Palombo, F.; Pedlar, T. K.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pilloni, A.; Poireau, V.; Prothmann, K.; Pulliam, T.; Rama, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roudeau, P.; Schrenk, S.; Schroeder, T.; Schubert, K. R.; Shen, C. P.; Shwartz, B.; Soffer, A.; Solodov, E. P.; Somov, A.; Starič, M.; Stracka, S.; Telnov, A. V.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uglov, T.; Vinokurova, A.; Walsh, J. J.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Wormser, G.; Wright, D. H.; Ye, S.; Zhang, C. C.; Abachi, S.; Abashian, A.; Abe, K.; Abe, N.; Abe, R.; Abe, T.; Abrams, G. S.; Adam, I.; Adamczyk, K.; Adametz, A.; Adye, T.; Agarwal, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Ahn, B. S.; Ahn, H. S.; Aitchison, I. J. R.; Akai, K.; Akar, S.; Akatsu, M.; Akemoto, M.; Akhmetshin, R.; Akre, R.; Alam, M. S.; Albert, J. N.; Aleksan, R.; Alexander, J. P.; Alimonti, G.; Allen, M. T.; Allison, J.; Allmendinger, T.; Alsmiller, J. R. G.; Altenburg, D.; Alwyn, K. E.; An, Q.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, D.; Andreotti, M.; Andress, J. C.; Angelini, C.; Anipko, D.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Anthony, P. L.; Antillon, E. A.; Antonioli, E.; Aoki, K.; Arguin, J. F.; Arinstein, K.; Arisaka, K.; Asai, K.; Asai, M.; Asano, Y.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Asner, D. M.; Aso, T.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Aston, D.; Atmacan, H.; Aubert, B.; Aulchenko, V.; Ayad, R.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Azzolini, V.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Baak, M. A.; Back, J. J.; Bagnasco, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Bailey, D. S.; Bailey, S.; Bailly, P.; van Bakel, N.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Banas, E.; Band, H. R.; Banerjee, S.; Baracchini, E.; Barate, R.; Barberio, E.; Barbero, M.; Bard, D. J.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Barrett, M.; Bartel, W.; Bartelt, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batignani, G.; Battaglia, M.; Bauer, J. M.; Bay, A.; Beaulieu, M.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, T. W.; Becker, J.; Becla, J.; Bedny, I.; Behari, S.; Behera, P. K.; Behn, E.; Behr, L.; Beigbeder, C.; Beiline, D.; Bell, R.; Bellini, F.; Bellodi, G.; Belous, K.; Benayoun, M.; Benelli, G.; Benitez, J. F.; Benkebil, M.; Berger, N.; Bernabeu, J.; Bernard, D.; Bernet, R.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berryhill, J. W.; Bertsche, K.; Besson, P.; Best, D. S.; Bettarini, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhimji, W.; Bhuyan, B.; Biagini, M. E.; Biasini, M.; van Bibber, K.; Biesiada, J.; Bingham, I.; Bionta, R. M.; Bischofberger, M.; Bitenc, U.; Bizjak, I.; Blanc, F.; Blaylock, G.; Blinov, V. E.; Bloom, E.; Bloom, P. C.; Blount, N. L.; Blouw, J.; Bly, M.; Blyth, S.; Boeheim, C. T.; Bomben, M.; Bondar, A.; Bondioli, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Bonvicini, G.; Booke, M.; Booth, J.; Borean, C.; Borgland, A. W.; Borsato, E.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Botov, A. A.; Bougher, J.; Bouldin, K.; Bourgeois, P.; Boutigny, D.; Bowerman, D. A.; Boyarski, A. M.; Boyce, R. F.; Boyd, J. T.; Bozek, A.; Bozzi, C.; Bračko, M.; Brandenburg, G.; Brandt, T.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.; Breon, A. B.; Breton, D.; Brew, C.; Briand, H.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Brigljević, V.; Britton, D. I.; Brochard, F.; Broomer, B.; Brose, J.; Browder, T. E.; Brown, C. L.; Brown, C. M.; Brown, D. N.; Browne, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Brunet, S.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, C.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Bünger, C.; Bugg, W.; Bukin, A. D.; Bula, R.; Bulten, H.; Burchat, P. R.; Burgess, W.; Burke, J. P.; Button-Shafer, J.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Buzzo, A.; Cai, Y.; Calabrese, R.; Calcaterra, A.; Calderini, G.; Camanzi, B.; Campagna, E.; Campagnari, C.; Capra, R.; Carassiti, V.; Carpinelli, M.; Carroll, M.; Casarosa, G.; Casey, B. C. K.; Cason, N. M.; Castelli, G.; Cavallo, N.; Cavoto, G.; Cecchi, A.; Cenci, R.; Cerizza, G.; Cervelli, A.; Ceseracciu, A.; Chai, X.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Chang, M. C.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, D. S.; Chao, M.; Chao, Y.; Charles, E.; Chavez, C. A.; Cheaib, R.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, E.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J.-H.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P.; Chen, S.; Chen, W. T.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. Q.; Cheng, B.; Cheon, B. G.; Chevalier, N.; Chia, Y. M.; Chidzik, S.; Chilikin, K.; Chistiakova, M. V.; Cizeron, R.; Cho, I. 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A.; Krebs, J.; Kreisel, A.; Kreps, M.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Kroeger, R.; Kroeger, W.; Krokovny, P.; Kronenbitter, B.; Kroseberg, J.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kukartsev, G.; Kulasiri, R.; Kulikov, A.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kumita, T.; Kuniya, T.; Kunze, M.; Kuo, C. C.; Kuo, T.-L.; Kurashiro, H.; Kurihara, E.; Kurita, N.; Kuroki, Y.; Kurup, A.; Kutter, P. E.; Kuznetsova, N.; Kvasnička, P.; Kyberd, P.; Kyeong, S. H.; Lacker, H. M.; Lae, C. K.; Lamanna, E.; Lamsa, J.; Lanceri, L.; Landi, L.; Lang, M. I.; Lange, D. J.; Lange, J. S.; Langenegger, U.; Langer, M.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Laplace, S.; Latour, E.; Lau, Y. P.; Lavin, D. R.; Layter, J.; Lebbolo, H.; LeClerc, C.; Leddig, T.; Leder, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lee, C. L.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, M. C.; Lee, M. H.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Lee, S. E.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, Y. J.; Lees, J. P.; Legendre, M.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, R.; Leonardi, E.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lepeltier, V.; Leruste, Ph.; Lesiak, T.; Levi, M. E.; Levy, S. 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A.; Röhrken, M.; Roethel, W.; Rolquin, J.; Romanov, L.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Rong, G.; Ronga, F. J.; Roos, L.; Root, N.; Rosen, M.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rossi, A.; Rostomyan, A.; Rotondo, M.; Roussot, E.; Roy, J.; Rozanska, M.; Rozen, Y.; Rozen, Y.; Rubin, A. E.; Ruddick, W. O.; Ruland, A. M.; Rybicki, K.; Ryd, A.; Ryu, S.; Ryuko, J.; Sabik, S.; Sacco, R.; Saeed, M. A.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sagawa, H.; Sahoo, H.; Sahu, S.; Saigo, M.; Saito, T.; Saitoh, S.; Sakai, K.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakaue, H.; Saleem, M.; Salnikov, A. A.; Salvati, E.; Salvatore, F.; Samuel, A.; Sanders, D. A.; Sanders, P.; Sandilya, S.; Sandrelli, F.; Sands, W.; Sands, W. R.; Sanpei, M.; Santel, D.; Santelj, L.; Santoro, V.; Santroni, A.; Sanuki, T.; Sarangi, T. R.; Saremi, S.; Sarti, A.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satapathy, M.; Sato, Nobuhiko; Sato, Noriaki; Sato, Y.; Satoyama, N.; Satpathy, A.; Savinov, V.; Savvas, N.; Saxton, O. H.; Sayeed, K.; Schaffner, S. F.; Schalk, T.; Schenk, S.; Schieck, J. R.; Schietinger, T.; Schilling, C. J.; Schindler, R. H.; Schmid, S.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schmuecker, H.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schönmeier, P.; Schofield, K. C.; Schott, G.; Schröder, H.; Schram, M.; Schubert, J.; Schümann, J.; Schultz, J.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, M. H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarz, H.; Schwiening, J.; Schwierz, R.; Schwitters, R. F.; Sciacca, C.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, I. J.; Seeman, J.; Seiden, A.; Seitz, R.; Seki, T.; Sekiya, A. I.; Semenov, S.; Semmler, D.; Sen, S.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Serbo, V. V.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Serfass, B.; Serra, M.; Serrano, J.; Settai, Y.; Seuster, R.; Sevior, M. E.; Shakhova, K. V.; Shang, L.; Shapkin, M.; Sharma, V.; Shebalin, V.; Shelkov, V. G.; Shen, B. C.; Shen, D. Z.; Shen, Y. T.; Sherwood, D. J.; Shibata, T.; Shibata, T. A.; Shibuya, H.; Shidara, T.; Shimada, K.; Shimoyama, M.; Shinomiya, S.; Shiu, J. G.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Shpilinskaya, L. I.; Sibidanov, A.; Sicard, E.; Sidorov, A.; Sidorov, V.; Siegle, V.; Sigamani, M.; Simani, M. C.; Simard, M.; Simi, G.; Simon, F.; Simonetto, F.; Sinev, N. B.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sinha, R.; Sitt, S.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Sloane, R. J.; Smerkol, P.; Smith, A. J. S.; Smith, D.; Smith, D. S.; Smith, J. G.; Smol, A.; Snoek, H. L.; Snyder, A.; So, R. Y.; Sobie, R. J.; Soderstrom, E.; Soha, A.; Sohn, Y. S.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sokolov, A.; Solagna, P.; Solovieva, E.; Soni, N.; Sonnek, P.; Sordini, V.; Spaan, B.; Spanier, S. M.; Spencer, E.; Speziali, V.; Spitznagel, M.; Spradlin, P.; Staengle, H.; Stamen, R.; Stanek, M.; Stanič, S.; Stark, J.; Steder, M.; Steininger, H.; Steinke, M.; Stelzer, J.; Stevanato, E.; Stocchi, A.; Stock, R.; Stoeck, H.; Stoker, D. P.; Stroili, R.; Strom, D.; Strother, P.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stypula, J.; Su, D.; Suda, R.; Sugahara, R.; Sugi, A.; Sugimura, T.; Sugiyama, A.; Suitoh, S.; Sullivan, M. K.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Summers, D. J.; Sun, L.; Sun, S.; Sundermann, J. E.; Sung, H. F.; Susaki, Y.; Sutcliffe, P.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, J.; Suzuki, J. I.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Swain, J. E.; Swain, S. K.; T'Jampens, S.; Tabata, M.; Tackmann, K.; Tajima, H.; Tajima, O.; Takahashi, K.; Takahashi, S.; Takahashi, T.; Takasaki, F.; Takayama, T.; Takita, M.; Tamai, K.; Tamponi, U.; Tamura, N.; Tan, N.; Tan, P.; Tanabe, K.; Tanabe, T.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Taniguchi, N.; Taras, P.; Tasneem, N.; Tatishvili, G.; Tatomi, T.; Tawada, M.; Taylor, F.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, G. P.; Telnov, V. I.; Teodorescu, L.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Teramoto, Y.; Teytelman, D.; Thérin, G.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Thiessen, D.; Thomas, E. W.; Thompson, J. M.; Thorne, F.; Tian, X. C.; Tibbetts, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Tinslay, J. S.; Tiozzo, G.; Tisserand, V.; Tocut, V.; Toki, W. H.; Tomassini, E. W.; Tomoto, M.; Tomura, T.; Torassa, E.; Torrence, E.; Tosi, S.; Touramanis, C.; Toussaint, J. C.; Tovey, S. N.; Trapani, P. P.; Treadwell, E.; Triggiani, G.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trischuk, W.; Troost, D.; Trunov, A.; Tsai, K. L.; Tsai, Y. T.; Tsujita, Y.; Tsukada, K.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tuggle, J. M.; Tumanov, A.; Tung, Y. W.; Turnbull, L.; Turner, J.; Turri, M.; Uchida, K.; Uchida, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueki, M.; Ueno, K.; Ujiie, N.; Ulmer, K. A.; Unno, Y.; Urquijo, P.; Ushiroda, Y.; Usov, Y.; Usseglio, M.; Usuki, Y.; Uwer, U.; Va'vra, J.; Vahsen, S. E.; Vaitsas, G.; Valassi, A.; Vallazza, E.; Vallereau, A.; Vanhoefer, P.; van Hoek, W. C.; Van Hulse, C.; van Winkle, D.; Varner, G.; Varnes, E. W.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasileiadis, G.; Velikzhanin, Y. S.; Verderi, M.; Versillé, S.; Vervink, K.; Viaud, B.; Vidal, P. B.; Villa, S.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Vinograd, E. L.; Vitale, L.; Vitug, G. M.; Voß, C.; Voci, C.; Voena, C.; Volk, A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, A.; Vuagnin, G.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, A. P.; Wagner, D. L.; Wagner, G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wagner, S. R.; Wagoner, D. E.; Walker, D.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallom, D.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. G.; Wang, K.; Wang, L.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, P.; Wang, T. J.; Wang, W. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wappler, F. R.; Watanabe, M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, J. E.; Watson, N. K.; Watt, M.; Weatherall, J. H.; Weaver, M.; Weber, T.; Wedd, R.; Wei, J. T.; Weidemann, A. W.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wenzel, W. A.; West, C. A.; West, C. G.; West, T. J.; White, E.; White, R. M.; Wicht, J.; Widhalm, L.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wienands, U.; Wilden, L.; Wilder, M.; Williams, D. C.; Williams, G.; Williams, J. C.; Williams, K. M.; Williams, M. I.; Willocq, S. Y.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Winstrom, L. O.; Winter, M. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wittlin, J.; Wittmer, W.; Wixted, R.; Woch, A.; Wogsland, B. J.; Won, E.; Wong, Q. K.; Wray, B. C.; Wren, A. C.; Wright, D. M.; Wu, C. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Xella, S. M.; Xie, Q. L.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yéche, Ch.; Yamada, Y.; Yamaga, M.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaki, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, N.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamaoka, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yan, D. S.; Yan, Y.; Yanai, H.; Yanaka, S.; Yang, H.; Yang, R.; Yang, S.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yashchenko, S.; Yashima, J.; Yasin, Z.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, S. W.; Yeh, P.; Yi, J. I.; Yi, K.; Yi, M.; Yin, Z. W.; Ying, J.; Yocky, G.; Yokoyama, K.; Yokoyama, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Young, C. C.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, Z.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Yusa, Y.; Yushkov, A. N.; Yuta, H.; Zacek, V.; Zain, S. B.; Zallo, A.; Zambito, S.; Zander, D.; Zang, S. L.; Zanin, D.; Zaslavsky, B. G.; Zeng, Q. L.; Zghiche, A.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L. M.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zheng, Y.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhou, P.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. M.; Zhulanov, V.; Ziegler, T.; Ziegler, V.; Zioulas, G.; Zisman, M.; Zito, M.; Zürcher, D.; Zwahlen, N.; Zyukova, O.; Živko, T.; Žontar, D.

    2014-11-01

    This work is on the Physics of the B Factories. Part A of this book contains a brief description of the SLAC and KEK B Factories as well as their detectors, BaBar and Belle, and data taking related issues. Part B discusses tools and methods used by the experiments in order to obtain results. The results themselves can be found in Part C. Please note that version 3 on the archive is the auxiliary version of the Physics of the B Factories book. This uses the notation alpha, beta, gamma for the angles of the Unitarity Triangle. The nominal version uses the notation phi_1, phi_2 and phi_3. Please cite this work as Eur. Phys. J. C74 (2014) 3026.

  17. Design of experiments with multiple independent variables: a resource management perspective on complete and reduced factorial designs.

    PubMed

    Collins, Linda M; Dziak, John J; Li, Runze

    2009-09-01

    An investigator who plans to conduct an experiment with multiple independent variables must decide whether to use a complete or reduced factorial design. This article advocates a resource management perspective on making this decision, in which the investigator seeks a strategic balance between service to scientific objectives and economy. Considerations in making design decisions include whether research questions are framed as main effects or simple effects; whether and which effects are aliased (confounded) in a particular design; the number of experimental conditions that must be implemented in a particular design and the number of experimental subjects the design requires to maintain the desired level of statistical power; and the costs associated with implementing experimental conditions and obtaining experimental subjects. In this article 4 design options are compared: complete factorial, individual experiments, single factor, and fractional factorial. Complete and fractional factorial designs and single-factor designs are generally more economical than conducting individual experiments on each factor. Although relatively unfamiliar to behavioral scientists, fractional factorial designs merit serious consideration because of their economy and versatility.

  18. Radiative Penguin Decays at the B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Koneke, Karsten; /MIT, LNS

    2007-11-16

    In this article, I review the most recent results in radiative penguin decays from the B factories Belle and BABAR. Most notably, I will talk about the recent new observations in the decays B {yields} ({rho}/{omega}) {gamma}, a new analysis technique in b {yields} s{gamma}, and first measurements of radiative penguin decays in the B{sup 0}{sub s} meson system. Finally, I will summarize the current status and future prospects of radiative penguin B physics at the B factories.

  19. From super beams to neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    The Neutrino Factory, which produces an extremely intense source of flavor-tagged neutrinos from muon decays in a storage ring, arguably gives the best physics reach for CP violation, as well as virtually all parameters in the neutrino oscillation parameter space. I will briefly describe the physics capabilities of the baseline Neutrino Factory as compared to other possible future facilities ({beta}-beam and super-beam facilities), give an overview of the accelerator complex and describe in detail the current international R&D program.

  20. Data scanner and event builder for the SMVD of the KEK B-factory

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Manobu; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Ikeda, Mitsuo; Fujita, Youichi; Ozaki, Hitoshi . Physics Div.); Fukunaga, Chikara . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-02-01

    The authors are designing a readout system for a silicon microstrip vertex detector (SMVD) to be used in the KEK B-factory experiment. In order to obtain optimum numbers for the buffer size and the processing time they have constructed a simplified model using Verilog Hardware Description language (HDL). They estimated the live-time fractions of the SMVD readout system for various configurations.

  1. Making Connections: After the Factories Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Stuart A.; Bergman, Edward M.

    This analysis of employment patterns in the American South extends a 1985 report, "After the Factories: Changing Employment Patterns in the Rural South," which was based on the years between 1977-1982. The 1985 report included Texas, but this analysis includes only the 12 Southern Growth Policies Board (SGPB) member states. This new analysis…

  2. Speech Differences of Factory Worker Age Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tway, Patricia

    1975-01-01

    This article, which focuses on speech differences of age groups, is part of a larger study of occupational jargon, its characteristics and underlying features and the part it plays in reflecting the workers' knowledge of their jobs and their attitudes toward jobs in general. The project incorporated a case method of research in a china factory.…

  3. An Epiphany in a Toilet Factory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Catlin

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experiences of the universality of art making and artistic experience of being a dancer and teaching artist. She describes her performance at Kohler, a worldwide leader in plumbing products in Spartanburg, South Carolina, where she had an epiphany dancing in a toilet factory--a sudden, intuitive moment of…

  4. B-Factory Interaction Region Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, M.

    1997-05-01

    High luminosity B factories are generally high current (1-3 A) e^+e^- storage ring accelerators that operate at a center-of-mass energy equal to the mass of the Υ4S resonance (10.58 GeV). The high beam currents are achieved by storing a large number of bunches (several hundred to several thousand) into each beam. Two designs, the ones located at SLAC and KEK, also have asymmetric beam energies. This imparts a boost to the nearly stationary B mesons formed from the decay of the Υ4S and allows precision vertex tracking detectors to look for a difference between the decay profiles of the matter and anti-matter B mesons thereby observing a violation of CP. Bringing these stored beams into collision is one of the major challenges of any B factory design. In order to achieve high luminosity the beams must be tightly focused. This pushes the final focusing elements close enough to the interaction point to be inside the solenoidal field of the physics detector. In addition, beam related detector backgrounds from synchrotron radiation and scattered beam particles must be kept below an acceptable level. The major B factory designs at Cornell University, KEK, and SLAC have all addressed these problems in various ways that depend on specific accelerator design decisions. This presentation will describe the accelerator choices that affect the interaction region design of a B factory and discuss how the above designs address the challenges posed by a high luminosity B factory.

  5. 4. OVERALL VIEW OF FACTORY COMPLEX, WITH DIGESTER HOUSE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. OVERALL VIEW OF FACTORY COMPLEX, WITH DIGESTER HOUSE IN LEFT FOREGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Maizewood Insulation Company Factory, 275 Salina Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  6. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF FACTORY COMPLEX, WITH BOILER HOUSE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF FACTORY COMPLEX, WITH BOILER HOUSE IN CENTER GROUND. VIEW TO NORTH. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Maizewood Insulation Company Factory, 275 Salina Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  7. 5. OVERALL VIEW OF FACTORY COMPLEX, WITH DIGESTER HOUSE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. OVERALL VIEW OF FACTORY COMPLEX, WITH DIGESTER HOUSE IN LEFT FOREGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Maizewood Insulation Company Factory, 275 Salina Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  8. 1. EAST AND NORTH FACADES OF NABISCO CARTON FACTORY, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EAST AND NORTH FACADES OF NABISCO CARTON FACTORY, LOOKING SOUTHWEST ALONG MARSEILLES POWER CANAL - National Biscuit Company, Marseilles Factory, Off Main Street on Marseilles Power Canal, Marseilles, La Salle County, IL

  9. Production of Tetraquark State Tcc at B-Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyima, Rashidin

    2013-12-01

    We study production of the tetraquark state Tcc via virtual photon at the B-factories in the QCD factorization framework. We predict the cross section of tetraquark state production in the leading order at the B-factories.

  10. CDC-25.1 stability is regulated by distinct domains to restrict cell division during embryogenesis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Hebeisen, Michaël; Roy, Richard

    2008-04-01

    Cdc25 phosphatases are key positive cell cycle regulators that coordinate cell divisions with growth and morphogenesis in many organisms. Intriguingly in C. elegans, two cdc-25.1(gf) mutations induce tissue-specific and temporally restricted hyperplasia in the embryonic intestinal lineage, despite stabilization of the mutant CDC-25.1 protein in every blastomere. We investigated the molecular basis underlying the CDC-25.1(gf) stabilization and its associated tissue-specific phenotype. We found that both mutations affect a canonical beta-TrCP phosphodegron motif, while the F-box protein LIN-23, the beta-TrCP orthologue, is required for the timely degradation of CDC-25.1. Accordingly, depletion of lin-23 in wild-type embryos stabilizes CDC-25.1 and triggers intestinal hyperplasia, which is, at least in part, cdc-25.1 dependent. lin-23(RNAi) causes embryonic lethality owing to cell fate transformations that convert blastomeres to an intestinal fate, sensitizing them to increased levels of CDC-25.1. Our characterization of a novel destabilizing cdc-25.1(lf) intragenic suppressor that acts independently of lin-23 indicates that additional cues impinge on different motifs of the CDC-25.1 phosphatase during early embryogenesis to control its stability and turnover, in order to ensure the timely divisions of intestinal cells and coordinate them with the formation of the developing gut.

  11. The Virtual Factory Teaching System (VFTS): Project Review and Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazlauskas, E. J.; Boyd, E. F., III; Dessouky, M. M.

    This paper presents a review of the Virtual Factory Teaching (VFTS) project, a Web-based, multimedia collaborative learning network. The system allows students, working alone or in teams, to build factories, forecast demand for products, plan production, establish release rules for new work into the factory, and set scheduling rules for…

  12. 3. SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATION OF IPA FACTORY; TWOSTORY SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATION OF IPA FACTORY; TWO-STORY SECTION WITH BRICK PARAPET BUILT WITH FACTORY EXPANSION CA. 1948. GABLE ROOF SECTION IS PART OF ORIGINAL 1892 FACTORY. TO THE RIGHT IS AN ABANDONED (COMMONWEALTH EDISON) ELECTRICAL SUBSTATION. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  13. 2. LOOKING NORTH ON COMMERCE ST. SHOWING HARMON MATTRESS FACTORY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. LOOKING NORTH ON COMMERCE ST. SHOWING HARMON MATTRESS FACTORY. BRIDGE CONNECTS HARMON MATTRESS FACTORY WITH HARMON WAREHOUSE (SEE PHOTO HABS WA-165-15). BUILDING IN LEFT FOREGROUND IS LINDSTROM-BERG CABINET FACTORY (SEE PHOTO HABS WA-165-36). - Union Depot Area Study, F. S. Harmon Mattress Company, 1953 South C Street, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  14. Testing Factorial Invariance in Multilevel Data: A Monte Carlo Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Eun Sook; Kwok, Oi-man; Yoon, Myeongsun

    2012-01-01

    Testing factorial invariance has recently gained more attention in different social science disciplines. Nevertheless, when examining factorial invariance, it is generally assumed that the observations are independent of each other, which might not be always true. In this study, we examined the impact of testing factorial invariance in multilevel…

  15. Nanotechnology, bionanotechnology and microbial cell factories

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is increasingly using both materials and nano-objects synthesized by living beings, most of them produced by microbial cells. Emerging technologies and highly integrative approaches (such as 'omics and systems biology), that have been largely proven successful for the production of proteins and secondary metabolites are now expected to become fully adapted for the improved biological production of nanostructured materials with tailored properties. The so far underestimated potential of microbial cell factories in nanotechnology and nanomedicine is expected to emerge, in the next years, in the context of novel needs envisaged in the nanoscience universe. This should prompt a careful revisiting of the microbial cell factories as the most versatile biological platforms to supply functional materials for nanotechnological applications. PMID:20602780

  16. Pion Production for Neutrino Factory-challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Florian; Couedic, Clément Le; Soler, F. J. P.

    2011-10-01

    One of the key issues in the design of a Neutrino Factory target station is the determination of the optimum kinetic energy of the proton beam due to the large uncertainties in simulations of protons impinging on nuclear targets. In this paper we have developed a procedure to correct GEANT4 simulations for the HARP data, and we have determined the yield of muons expected at the front-end of a Neutrino Factory as a function of target material (Be, C, Al, Ta and Pb) and energy (3-12 GeV).The maximum muon yield is found between 5 and 8 GeV for high Z targets and 3 GeV for low Z targets.

  17. Pion Production for Neutrino Factory-challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Breton, Florian; Le Couedic, Clement; Soler, F. J. P.

    2011-10-06

    One of the key issues in the design of a Neutrino Factory target station is the determination of the optimum kinetic energy of the proton beam due to the large uncertainties in simulations of protons impinging on nuclear targets. In this paper we have developed a procedure to correct GEANT4 simulations for the HARP data, and we have determined the yield of muons expected at the front-end of a Neutrino Factory as a function of target material (Be, C, Al, Ta and Pb) and energy (3-12 GeV).The maximum muon yield is found between 5 and 8 GeV for high Z targets and 3 GeV for low Z targets.

  18. China's factory floors: an industrial hygienist's view.

    PubMed

    Brown, Garrett D

    2003-01-01

    Determinants of workplace health and safety in China, including work organization, composition of the workforce, production regimens, lack of independent worker representation, and the status of government regulatory enforcement, are described and analyzed. The findings of reports of nongovernmental organizations and media articles are summarized. Key markers of working conditions in export-sector factories, i.e., accident and safety program compliance rates, chemical and noise exposures, and machine guarding issues, are analyzed. Four factors for improving workplace health and safety are proposed: 1) employer commitment and implementation of effective health and safety programs on a plant level; 2) Chinese government enforcement of regulations; 3) meaningful involvement of workers in plant health and safety programs; and 4) continued involvement of international professionals and "civil society" both to pressure multinational corporations and the Chinese government and to provide technical assistance and resources for building the capacity of employers, workers, and government agencies to improve factory working conditions in the world's fastest growing economy.

  19. On near detectors at a neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Jian; Winter, Walter

    2010-03-30

    The geometric effects of the beam in near detectors at a neutrino factory are discussed. The refined systematics treatment, including cross section errors, flux errors and background uncertainties, is compared with the IDS-NF one. Different near detector setups are included. We also probe their effects both at the measurements of standard neutrino oscillation parameters and constraints of the non-standard neutrino interaction.

  20. Muon front end for the neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C. T.; Stratakis, D.; Prior, G.; Gilardoni, S.; Neuffer, D.; Snopok, P.; Alekou, A.; Pasternak, J.

    2013-04-01

    In the neutrino factory, muons are produced by firing high-energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons and pass through a capture channel known as the muon front end, before acceleration to 12.6 GeV. The muon front end comprises a variable frequency rf system for longitudinal capture and an ionization cooling channel. In this paper we detail recent improvements in the design of the muon front end.

  1. Anaerobic digestion of cassava starch factory effluent.

    PubMed

    Manilal, V B; Narayanan, C S; Balagopalan, C

    1990-06-01

    Biomethanation of cassava starch factory effluent in a batch digester produced 130 l biogas/kg dry matter with an average melthane content of 59%. About 63% COD was removed during 60 days. In semicontinuous digesters, gas production was 3251/kg dry matter with a retention time of 33,3 days giving a COD reduction of 50%. Size of starter inoculum was important for good biogasification of the effluent.

  2. New Physics Results from the B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Sangro, Riccardo de

    2010-02-10

    We present a review of some recent experimental searches for new physics effects in precision flavour physics measurements performed at B factories. Recent results on selected leptonic, semi-leptonic and hadronic charm-less B decay channels studied by the BaBar and Belle collaborations will be presented and their implication within the framework of model extensions of the Standard Model will be discussed.

  3. Status of the Super B Factory Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Sangro, Riccardo de

    2010-08-05

    Two proposals have been presented for the construction of super high luminosity B factories, the SuperB in Italy and SuperKEKB in Japan. We review the physics case for the construction of such facilities in the LHC era and highlight several topics of hadronic physics that can benefit from the high luminosity they will integrate. The present status of the accelerator and detector work toward the Technical Design Reports is also presented.

  4. Dissecting the nascent human transcriptome by analysing the RNA content of transcription factories.

    PubMed

    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Cook, Peter R; Rippe, Karsten; Papantonis, Argyris

    2015-08-18

    While mapping total and poly-adenylated human transcriptomes has now become routine, characterizing nascent transcripts remains challenging, largely because nascent RNAs have such short half-lives. Here, we describe a simple, fast and cost-effective method to isolate RNA associated with transcription factories, the sites responsible for the majority of nuclear transcription. Following stimulation of human endothelial cells with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα, we isolate and analyse the RNA content of factories by sequencing. Comparison with total, poly(A)(+) and chromatin RNA fractions reveals that sequencing of purified factory RNA maps the complete nascent transcriptome; it is rich in intronic unprocessed transcript, as well as long intergenic non-coding (lincRNAs) and enhancer-associated RNAs (eRNAs), micro-RNA precursors and repeat-derived RNAs. Hence, we verify that transcription factories produce most nascent RNA and confer a regulatory role via their association with a set of specifically-retained non-coding transcripts.

  5. Neutrino factory optimization for nonstandard interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Joachim; Ota, Toshihiko; Winter, Walter

    2008-09-01

    We study the optimization of a neutrino factory with respect to nonstandard neutral current neutrino interactions, and compare the results to those obtained without nonstandard interactions. We discuss the muon energy, baselines, and oscillation channels as degrees of freedom. Our conclusions are based on both analytical calculations and on a full numerical simulation of the neutrino factory setup proposed by the international design study (IDS-NF). We consider all possible nonstandard parameters, and include their complex phases. We identify the impact of the different parameters on the golden, silver, and disappearance channels. We come to the conclusion that, even in the presence of nonstandard interactions, the performance of the neutrino factory hardly profits from a silver channel detector, unless the muon energy is significantly increased compared to the IDS-NF setup. Apart from the dispensable silver channel detector, we demonstrate that the IDS-NF setup is close to optimal even if nonstandard interactions are considered. We find that one very long baseline is a key component in the search for nonstandard interactions, in particular, for |{epsilon}{sub {mu}}{sub {tau}}{sup m}| and |{epsilon}{sub {tau}}{sub {tau}}{sup m}|.

  6. An asymmetric B factory based on PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    In this report we describe a design for a high-luminosity Asymmetric B Factory to be built in the PEP tunnel on the SLAC site. This proposal, a collaborative effort SLAC, LBL, and LLNL, is the culmination of more than two years of effort aimed at the design and construction of an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider capable of achieving a luminosity of L = 3 {times} 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The configuration adopted utilizes two storage rings, and electron ring operating at 9 GeV and a positron ring at 3.1 GeV, each with a circumference of 2200 m. The high-energy ring is an upgrade of the PEP storage ring at SLAC; all PEP magnets and most power supplies will be reused. The upgrade consists primarily of replacing the PEP vacuum chamber and RF system with newly designed versions optimized for the high-current environment of the B Factory. The low-energy ring will be newly constructed and will be situated atop the high-energy ring in the PEP tunnel. Utilities already installed in the PEP tunnel are largely sufficient to operate the two B Factory storage rings.

  7. In-Factory Learning - Qualification For The Factory Of The Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, Fabian; Mura, Katharina; Gorecky, Dominic

    2015-07-01

    The Industry 4.0 vision anticipates that internet technologies will find their way into future factories replacing traditional components by dynamic and intelligent cyber-physical systems (CPS) that combine the physical objects with their digital representation. Reducing the gap between the real and digital world makes the factory environment more flexible, more adaptive, but also more complex for the human workers. Future workers require interdisciplinary competencies from engineering, information technology, and computer science in order to understand and manage the diverse interrelations between physical objects and their digital counterpart. This paper proposes a mixed-reality based learning environment, which combines physical objects and visualisation of digital content via Augmented Reality. It uses reality-based interaction in order to make the dynamic interrelations between real and digital factory visible and tangible. We argue that our learning system does not work as a stand-alone solution, but should fit into existing academic and advanced training curricula.

  8. A mutation of cdc-25.1 causes defects in germ cells but not in somatic tissues in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Ah-Reum; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Strome, Susan; Shim, Yhong-Hee

    2009-07-31

    By screening C. elegans mutants for severe defects in germline proliferation, we isolated a new loss-of-function allele of cdc-25.1, bn115. bn115 and another previously identified loss-of-function allele nr2036 do not exhibit noticeable cell division defects in the somatic tissues but have reduced numbers of germ cells and are sterile, indicating that cdc-25.1 functions predominantly in the germ line during postembryonic development, and that cdc-25.1 activity is probably not required in somatic lineages during larval development. We analyzed cell division of germ cells and somatic tissues in bn115 homozygotes with germline-specific anti-PGL-1 immunofluorescence and GFP transgenes that express in intestinal cells, in distal tip cells, and in gonadal sheath cells, respectively. We also analyzed the expression pattern of cdc-25.1 with conventional and quantitative RT-PCR. In the presence of three other family members of cdc-25 in C. elegans defects are observed only in the germ line but not in the somatic tissues in cdc-25.1 single mutants, and cdc-25.1 is expressed predominantly, if not exclusively, in the germ line during postembryonic stages. Our findings indicate that the function of cdc-25.1 is unique in the germ line but likely redundant with other members in the soma.

  9. Diamond Growth in the Subduction Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, H.; Frost, D. J.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Leroy, C.; Estève, I.

    2014-12-01

    Natural diamonds are fabulous probes of the deep Earth Interior. They are the evidence of the deep storage of volatile elements, carbon at first, but also hydrogen and chlorine trapped as hydrous fluids in inclusions. The study of diamond growth processes in the lithosphere and mantle helps for our understanding of volatile elements cycling between deep reservoirs. We know now that inclusion-bearing diamonds similar to diamonds found in nature (i.e. polycrystalline, fibrous and coated diamonds) can grow in hydrous fluids or melts (Bureau et al., GCA 77, 202-214, 2012). Therefore, we propose that the best environment to promote such diamonds is the subduction factory, where highly hydrous fluids or melts are present. When oceanic plates are subducted in the lithosphere, they carry an oceanic crust soaked with seawater. While the slabs are traveling en route to the mantle, dehydration processes generate saline fluids highly concentrated in NaCl. In the present study we have experimentally shown that diamonds can grow from the saline fluids (up to 30 g/l NaCl in water) generated in subducted slabs. We have performed multi-anvil press experiments at 6-7 GPa and from 1300 to 1400°C during 6:00 hours to 30:00 hours. We observed large areas of new diamond grown in epitaxy on pure diamond seeds in salty hydrous carbonated melts, forming coated gems. The new rims are containing multi-component primary inclusions. Detailed characterizations of the diamonds and their inclusions have been performed and will be presented. These experimental results suggest that multi-component salty fluids of supercritical nature migrate with the slabs, down to the deep mantle. Such fluids may insure the first stage of the deep Earth's volatiles cycling (C, H, halogen elements) en route to the transition zone and the lower mantle. We suggest that the subduction factory may also be a diamond factory.

  10. Object classification at the Nearby Supernova Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S.; Aragon, C.; Romano, R.; Thomas, R. C.; Weaver, B. A.; Wong, D.

    2008-03-01

    We present the results of applying new object classification techniques to the supernova search of the Nearby Supernova Factory. In comparison to simple threshold cuts, more sophisticated methods such as boosted decision trees, random forests, and support vector machines provide dramatically better object discrimination: we reduced the number of non-supernova candidates by a factor of 10 while increasing our supernova identification efficiency. Methods such as these will be crucial for maintaining a reasonable false positive rate in the automated transient alert pipelines of upcoming large optical surveys.

  11. Object Classification at the Nearby Supernova Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Bailey, Stephen; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Romano, Raquel; Thomas, Rollin C.; Weaver, B. A.; Wong, D.

    2007-12-21

    We present the results of applying new object classification techniques to the supernova search of the Nearby Supernova Factory. In comparison to simple threshold cuts, more sophisticated methods such as boosted decision trees, random forests, and support vector machines provide dramatically better object discrimination: we reduced the number of nonsupernova candidates by a factor of 10 while increasing our supernova identification efficiency. Methods such as these will be crucial for maintaining a reasonable false positive rate in the automated transient alert pipelines of upcoming large optical surveys.

  12. Survey and Alignment of SLAC's B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Pietryka, Matthew J.; Gaydosh, Michael L.; /SLAC

    2011-09-08

    The survey and alignment of SLAC's B-factory injector and high energy ring will be complete in March 1997. Modern digital electronic surveying tools are contributing to new, efficient alignment procedures. A laser tracker was used to fiducialize almost 300 quadrupole magnets. Digital levels were used to pre-set base plate elevations. Theodolites with very accurate co-axial distance meters were used for everything from layout to 3D magnet positioning to network surveys, all in free stationing mode. A number of procedures and measurement results are outlined.

  13. The Personal Software Process: Downscaling the factory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Daniel M.

    1994-01-01

    It is argued that the next wave of software process improvement (SPI) activities will be based on a people-centered paradigm. The most promising such paradigm, Watts Humphrey's personal software process (PSP), is summarized and its advantages are listed. The concepts of the PSP are shown also to fit a down-scaled version of Basili's experience factory. The author's data and lessons learned while practicing the PSP are presented along with personal experience, observations, and advice from the perspective of a consultant and teacher for the personal software process.

  14. The Skateboard Factory: Curriculum by Design--Oasis Skateboard Factory Q&A with Craig Morrison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, George

    2012-01-01

    Since its opening three years ago, Oasis Skateboard Factory (OSF), founded by teacher Craig Morrison, has attracted considerable media exposure and received a Ken Spencer Award from the CEA for its innovative program. OSF is one of three programs offered by Oasis Alternative Secondary School, one of 22 alternative secondary schools of the Toronto…

  15. Parameters for a Super-Flavor-Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Cai, Y.; Ecklund, S.; Novokhatski, A.; Seryi, A.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Biagini, M.; Raimondi, P.; /Frascati

    2006-06-27

    A Super Flavor Factory, an asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider with a luminosity of order 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, can provide a sensitive probe of new physics in the flavor sector of the Standard Model. The success of the PEP-II and KEKB asymmetric colliders in producing unprecedented luminosity above 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} has taught us about the accelerator physics of asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider in a new parameter regime. Furthermore, the success of the SLAC Linear Collider and the subsequent work on the International Linear Collider allow a new Super-Flavor collider to also incorporate linear collider techniques. This note describes the parameters of an asymmetric Flavor-Factory collider at a luminosity of order 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} at the Y(4S) resonance and about 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} at the {tau} production threshold. Such a collider would produce an integrated luminosity of about 10,000 fb{sup -1} (10 ab{sup -1}) in a running year (10{sup 7} sec) at the Y(4S) resonance. In the following note only the parameters relative to the Y(4S) resonance will be shown, the ones relative to the lower energy operations are still under study.

  16. Quarkonium States at B-Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Robutti, Enrico; /INFN, Genoa

    2011-11-21

    An overview is given on recent progress in the study of quarkonium spectroscopy at the B-factories. In particular, an updated status report is presented of the long list of 'charmonium-like' resonances newly discovered, whose assignment as true charmonium states is in most cases at least controversial. Also, new measurements on the decay properties of bottomonium states above open-B production thresholds are shown. Much of the progress attained in recent years in the study of the quarkonium spectra is owed to the measurements performed at B-factories. The impressive amount of data recorded by the BABAR and Belle experiments has made it possible to study rare decay chains and to look for as yet undiscovered resonances in the charmonium and bottomonium mass regions. Results presented here are based on different subsamples of the full datasets recorded up to now by the two experiments, corresponding to integrated luminosities of about 430 fb{sup -1}(BABAR - final) and about 850 fb{sup -1}(Belle). Significant contributions also come from the analysis of the various data samples recorded by the CLEO detector.

  17. Particle identification at an asymmetric B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, P.; Eigen, G.; Hitlin, D.; Oddone, P.; Ratcliff, B.; Roe, N.; Va'vra, J.; Ypsilantis, T.

    1991-09-01

    Particle identification systems are an important component of any detector at a high-luminosity, asymmetric B Factory. In particular, excellent hadron identification is required to probe CP violation in B{sup 0} decays to CP eigenstates. The particle identification systems discussed below also provide help in separating leptons from hadrons at low momenta. We begin this chapter with a discussion of the physics motivation for providing particle identification, the inherent limitations due to interactions and decays in flight, and the requirements for hermiticity and angular coverage. A special feature of an asymmetric B Factory is the resulting asymmetry in the momentum distribution as a function of polar angle; this will also be quantified and discussed. In the next section the three primary candidates, time-of-flight (TOF), energy loss (dE/dx), and Cerenkov counters, both ring-imaging and threshold, will be briefly described and evaluated. Following this, one of the candidates, a long-drift Cerenkov ring-imaging device, is described in detail to provide a reference design. Design considerations for a fast RICH are then described. A detailed discussion of aerogel threshold counter designs and associated R D conclude the chapter. 56 refs., 64 figs., 13 tabs.

  18. Matrix fractional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the matrix representation of dynamical systems in the perspective of fractional calculus. Fractional elements and fractional systems are interpreted under the light of the classical Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole, and Havriliak-Negami heuristic models. Numerical simulations for an electrical circuit enlighten the results for matrix based models and high fractional orders. The conclusions clarify the distinction between fractional elements and fractional systems.

  19. Carbonate factories: A conundrum in sedimentary geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomar, L.; Hallock, P.

    2008-03-01

    by the end-Permian extinctions, excess photosynthesis by phytoplankton and microbial assemblages in surface waters, induced by moderately high CO 2 and temperature during the Early Mesozoic, supported proliferation of non-tissular metazoans (e.g., sponges) and heterotrophic bacteria at the sea floor. Metabolic activity by those microbes, especially sulfate reduction, resulted in abundant biologically-induced geochemical carbonate precipitation on and within the sea floor. For example, with the opening of Tethyan seaways during the Triassic, massive sponge/microbe boundstones (the benthic automicrite factory) formed steep, massive and thick progradational slopes and, locally, mud-mounds. As tectonic processes created shallow epicontinental seas, photosynthesis drove lime-mud precipitation in the illuminated zone of the water column. The resulting neritic lime-mud component of the shallow-water carbonate factory became predominant during the Jurassic, paralleling the increase in atmospheric pCO 2, while the decreasing importance of the benthic automicrite factory parallels the diversification of calcifying metazoans, phytoplankton and zooplankton. With atmospheric pCO 2 declining through the Cretaceous, the potential habitats for neritic lime-mud precipitation declined. At the same time, peak oceanic Ca 2+ concentrations promoted biotically-controlled calcification by the skeletal factory. With changes produced by extinctions and turnovers at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, adaptations to decreasing Ca 2+ and pCO 2, coupled with increasing global temperature gradients (i.e., high-latitude and deep-water cooling), and strategies that efficiently linked photosynthesis and calcification, promoted successive changes of the dominant skeletal factory through the Cenozoic: larger benthic foraminifers (protist-protist symbiosis) during the Paleogene, red algae during the Miocene and modern coral reefs (metazoan-protist symbiosis) since Late Miocene.

  20. Factorial analysis of trihalomethanes formation in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Champagne, Pascale; McLellan, P James

    2010-06-01

    Disinfection of drinking water reduces pathogenic infection, but may pose risks to human health through the formation of disinfection byproducts. The effects of different factors on the formation of trihalomethanes were investigated using a statistically designed experimental program, and a predictive model for trihalomethanes formation was developed. Synthetic water samples with different factor levels were produced, and trihalomethanes concentrations were measured. A replicated fractional factorial design with center points was performed, and significant factors were identified through statistical analysis. A second-order trihalomethanes formation model was developed from 92 experiments, and the statistical adequacy was assessed through appropriate diagnostics. This model was validated using additional data from the Drinking Water Surveillance Program database and was applied to the Smiths Falls water supply system in Ontario, Canada. The model predictions were correlated strongly to the measured trihalomethanes, with correlations of 0.95 and 0.91, respectively. The resulting model can assist in analyzing risk-cost tradeoffs in the design and operation of water supply systems.

  1. Integrating PCLIPS into ULowell's Lincoln Logs: Factory of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, Brenda J.; Miller, Mark D.; Krolak, Patrick; Barr, Stanley J.

    1990-01-01

    We are attempting to show how independent but cooperating expert systems, executing within a parallel production system (PCLIPS), can operate and control a completely automated, fault tolerant prototype of a factory of the future (The Lincoln Logs Factory of the Future). The factory consists of a CAD system for designing the Lincoln Log Houses, two workcells, and a materials handling system. A workcell consists of two robots, part feeders, and a frame mounted vision system.

  2. Asymptotic Normality Through Factorial Cumulants and Partition Identities

    PubMed Central

    Bobecka, Konstancja; Hitczenko, Paweł; López-Blázquez, Fernando; Rempała, Grzegorz; Wesołowski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    In the paper we develop an approach to asymptotic normality through factorial cumulants. Factorial cumulants arise in the same manner from factorial moments as do (ordinary) cumulants from (ordinary) moments. Another tool we exploit is a new identity for ‘moments’ of partitions of numbers. The general limiting result is then used to (re-)derive asymptotic normality for several models including classical discrete distributions, occupancy problems in some generalized allocation schemes and two models related to negative multinomial distribution. PMID:24591773

  3. The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.

    2008-02-21

    The International Design Study for a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS) established the physics case for a high-precision programme of long-baseline neutrino-oscillation measurements. The ISS also identified baseline specifications for the Neutrino Factory accelerator complex and the neutrino detector systems. This paper summarises the objectives of the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF). The IDS-NF will build on the work of the ISS to deliver a Reference Design Report for the Neutrino Factory by 2012/13 and an Interim Design Report by 2010/11.

  4. KEKB and PEP-II B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1997-01-01

    Two asymmetric B-Factories KEKB at KEK and PEP-II at SLAC are under construction, designed to study CP violation in the b-quark sector with a center of mass energy of 10.58 GeV. These two new accelerators are high luminosity two-ring two-energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders with one interaction point. There are many challenging accelerator physics and engineering issues associated with the high beam currents and high luminosities of these rings. The chosen solutions to these issues and the general parameters of the two rings are described in detail side-by-side. KEKB and PEP-II are well into the installation phase and are both scheduled to be completed in 1998. The particle physics programs are scheduled to start in 1999.

  5. Aplastic anemia in a petrochemical factory worker.

    PubMed Central

    Baak, Y M; Ahn, B Y; Chang, H S; Kim, J H; Kim, K A; Lim, Y

    1999-01-01

    A petrochemical worker with aplastic anemia was referred to our hospital. He worked in a petroleum resin-producing factory and had been exposed to low-level benzene while packaging the powder resin and pouring lime into a deactivation tank. According to the yearly environmental survey of the working area, the airborne benzene level was approximately 0.28 ppm. Exposure to benzene, a common chemical used widely in industry, may progressively lead to pancytopenia, aplastic anemia, and leukemia. The hematotoxicity of benzene is related to the amount and duration of exposure. Most risk predictions for benzene exposures have been based on rubber workers who were exposed to high concentrations. In the petroleum industry, the concentration of benzene is relatively low, and there are disputes over the toxicity of low-level benzene because of a lack of evidence. In this paper we report the case of aplastic anemia induced by low-level benzene exposure. Images Figure 1 PMID:10504154

  6. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  7. Fractional Factorial Experiment Designs to Minimize Configuration Changes in Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard; Cler, Daniel L.; Graham, Albert B.

    2002-01-01

    This paper serves as a tutorial to introduce the wind tunnel research community to configuration experiment designs that can satisfy resource constraints in a configuration study involving several variables, without arbitrarily eliminating any of them from the experiment initially. The special case of a configuration study featuring variables at two levels is examined in detail. This is the type of study in which each configuration variable has two natural states - 'on or off', 'deployed or not deployed', 'low or high', and so forth. The basic principles are illustrated by results obtained in configuration studies conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility and in the ViGYAN Low Speed Tunnel in Hampton, Virginia. The crucial role of interactions among configuration variables is highlighted with an illustration of difficulties that can be encountered when they are not properly taken into account.

  8. Tempered fractional calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  9. Tempered fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  10. Parametric study of a target factory for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sherohman, J.W.; Meier, W.R.

    1980-10-08

    An analysis of a target factory leading to the derivation of production rate equations has provided the basis for a parametric study. Rate equations describing the production of laser fusion targets have been developed for the purpose of identifying key parameters, attractive production techniques and cost scaling relationships for a commercial target factory.

  11. 13. INTERIOR VIEW OF THIRD FLOOR OF ORIGINAL FACTORY, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR VIEW OF THIRD FLOOR OF ORIGINAL FACTORY, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. THIS SECTION OF THE FACTORY WAS USED FOR STORAGE; TO THE LEFT IS AN ELECTRIC MOTOR SUSPENDED FROM A COLLAR BEAM. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  12. 11. INTERIOR VIEW OF THIRD FLOOR OF ORIGINAL FACTORY, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR VIEW OF THIRD FLOOR OF ORIGINAL FACTORY, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THIS SECTION OF THE FACTORY WAS USED FOR STORAGE; THE STAIRWAY LEADS DOWN TO THE SECOND FLOOR WHICH WAS THE LOCATION OF THE COMPANY OFFICE AND EMPLOYEE CHANGE ROOM. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  13. 12. INTERIOR VIEW OF THIRD FLOOR OF ORIGINAL FACTORY, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR VIEW OF THIRD FLOOR OF ORIGINAL FACTORY, LOOKING NORTHEAST. THIS SECTION OF THE FACTORY WAS USED FOR STORAGE; CENTRAL LINE SHAFTING EXTENDS ALONG THE CENTER ROW OF COLUMNS. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  14. 37. NORTH TO BINS ALONG NORTH WALL OF FACTORY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. NORTH TO BINS ALONG NORTH WALL OF FACTORY BUILDING WHICH REMAIN FILLED WITH NEW OLD STOCK AND USED PARTS FOR ELI WINDMILLS. THE ROPE AT THE LOWER FOREGROUND WAS USED IN ERECTING WINDMILLS AND TOWERS FOR CUSTOMERS. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  15. Muon Front-End for the Neutrino Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernow, R. C.

    2006-05-01

    The front end at a neutrino factory includes all the systems necessary for capturing the pion beam produced at the target and for preparing the transverse and longitudinal phase space of the resulting muon beam for subsequent acceleration to high energies. We compare front end configurations for a number of neutrino factory designs.

  16. 27 CFR 40.47 - Other businesses within factory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Other businesses within... AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Administrative Provisions § 40.47 Other businesses within factory. (a) General. The appropriate TTB officer may authorize such other businesses within the factory of...

  17. 27 CFR 40.47 - Other businesses within factory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Other businesses within... AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Administrative Provisions § 40.47 Other businesses within factory. (a) General. The appropriate TTB officer may authorize such other businesses within the factory of...

  18. Students Tackle Academics in Practical Context at Skateboard Factory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, George

    2012-01-01

    High school student Nick Robertson came to Oasis Skateboard Factory (OSF) from a suburban Toronto district. He was surfing the web when he spotted a reference to Oasis Skateboard Factory, an alternative program in the Toronto District School Board. He says his first reaction was "Skateboards in school? It didn't seem possible." He applied, was…

  19. Perspective view. Fivestory reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view. Five-story reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural frame on the exterior of the facade. Twelve bay facade facing onto Clay Avenue (north facade) has first floor openings bricked up. Mix of typical factory windows and glass block windows fill the majority of the openings on the rest of building - Russell Industrial Center, 1600 Clay Avenue, Detroit, MI

  20. Factorial Invariance in Multiple Populations: A Multiple Testing Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.; Millsap, Roger E.

    2013-01-01

    A multiple testing method for examining factorial invariance for latent constructs evaluated by multiple indicators in distinct populations is outlined. The procedure is based on the false discovery rate concept and multiple individual restriction tests and resolves general limitations of a popular factorial invariance testing approach. The…

  1. Factorial Invariance of a Pan-Hispanic Familism Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarreal, Ricardo; Blozis, Shelley A.; Widaman, Keith F.

    2005-01-01

    This article considers the validity and factorial invariance of an attitudinal measure of familism. Using a large, nationally representative sample of U.S. Hispanics, the validity and factorial invariance of the measure was tested across country of origin (United States, Mexico, and Latin America) and the language in which the survey was conducted…

  2. 1. Aerial photograph of the Quaker Oats Cereal Factory looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Aerial photograph of the Quaker Oats Cereal Factory looking east to west. Structures included in this complex situated on the east side of Broadway Street between Bowery Street and Mill Street range in date of original use from 1886 to 1940. - Quaker Oats Cereal Factory, Southeast corner of Broadway & Mill Streets, Akron, Summit County, OH

  3. 2. Aerial photograph of the Quaker Oats Cereal Factory looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Aerial photograph of the Quaker Oats Cereal Factory looking west to east. Structures included in this complex situated on the east side of Broadway Street between Bowery Street and Mill Street range in date of original use from 1886 to 1940. - Quaker Oats Cereal Factory, Southeast corner of Broadway & Mill Streets, Akron, Summit County, OH

  4. TEMPERED FRACTIONAL CALCULUS

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; SABZIKAR, FARZAD; CHEN, JINGHUA

    2014-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series. PMID:26085690

  5. The Experience Factory: Strategy and Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.; Caldiera, Gianluigi

    1995-01-01

    The quality movement, that has had in recent years a dramatic impact on all industrial sectors, has recently reached the system and software industry. Although some concepts of quality management, originally developed for other product types, can be applied to software, its specificity as a product which is developed and not produced requires a special approach. This paper introduces a quality paradigm specifically tailored on the problem of the systems and software industry. Reuse of products, processes and experiences originating from the system life cycle is seen today as a feasible solution to the problem of developing higher quality systems at a lower cost. In fact, quality improvement is very often achieved by defining and developing an appropriate set of strategic capabilities and core competencies to support them. A strategic capability is, in this context, a corporate goal defined by the business position of the organization and implemented by key business processes. Strategic capabilities are supported by core competencies, which are aggregate technologies tailored to the specific needs of the organization in performing the needed business processes. Core competencies are non-transitional, have a consistent evolution, and are typically fueled by multiple technologies. Their selection and development requires commitment, investment and leadership. The paradigm introduced in this paper for developing core competencies is the Quality Improvement Paradigm which consists of six steps: (1) Characterize the environment, (2) Set the goals, (3) Choose the process, (4) Execute the process, (5) Analyze the process data, and (6) Package experience. The process must be supported by a goal oriented approach to measurement and control, and an organizational infrastructure, called Experience Factory. The Experience Factory is a logical and physical organization distinct from the project organizations it supports. Its goal is development and support of core competencies

  6. Neutrino Factory Targets and the MICE Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Walaron, Kenneth Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The future of particle physics in the next 30 years must include detailed study of neutrinos. The first proof of physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics is evident in results from recent neutrino experiments which imply that neutrinos have mass and flavour mixing. The Neutrino Factory is the leading contender to measure precisely the neutrino mixing parameters to probe beyond the Standard Model physics. Significantly, one must look to measure the mixing angle θ13 and investigate the possibility of leptonic CP violation. If found this may provide a key insight into the origins of the matter/anti- matter asymmetry seen in the universe, through the mechanism of leptogenesis. The Neutrino Factory will be a large international multi-billion dollar experiment combining novel new accelerator and long-baseline detector technology. Arguably the most important and costly features of this facility are the proton driver and cooling channel. This thesis will present simulation work focused on determining the optimal proton driver energy to maximise pion production and also simulation of the transport of this pion °ux through some candidate transport lattices. Bench-marking of pion cross- sections calculated by MARS and GEANT4 codes to measured data from the HARP experiment is also presented. The cooling channel aims to reduce the phase-space volume of the decayed muon beam to a level that can be e±ciently injected into the accelerator system. The Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) hosted by the Rutherford Appleton laboratory, UK is a proof-of-principle experiment aimed at measuring ionisation cooling. The experiment will run parasitically to the ISIS accelerator and will produce muons from pion decay. The MICE beamline provides muon beams of variable emittance and momentum to the MICE experiment to enable measurement of cooling over a wide range of beam conditions. Simulation work in the design of this beamline is presented in this thesis as

  7. VLBA Reveals Dust-Enshrouded "Supernova Factory"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    Using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope, astronomers have discovered a newly-exploded star, or supernova, hidden deep in a dust-enshrouded "supernova factory" in a galaxy some 140 million light-years from Earth. "This supernova is likely to be part of a group of super star clusters that produce one such stellar explosion every two years," said James Ulvestad, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. "We're extremely excited by the tremendous insights into star formation and the early Universe that we may gain by observing this 'supernova factory,'" he added. Ulvestad worked with Susan Neff of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD, and Stacy Teng, a graduate student at the University of Maryland, on the project. The scientists presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Nashville, TN. "These super star clusters likely are forming in much the same way that globular clusters formed in the early Universe, and thus provide us with a unique opportunity to learn about how some of the first stars formed billions of years ago," Neff said. The cluster is in an object called Arp 299, a pair of colliding galaxies, where regions of vigorous star formation have been found in past observations. Since 1990, four other supernova explosions have been seen optically in Arp 299. Observations with the NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) earlier showed a region near the nucleus of one of the colliding galaxies which had all the earmarks of prolific star formation. The astronomers focused on this region, prosaically dubbed "Source A," with the VLBA and the NSF's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope in 2002, and found four objects in this dusty cloud that are likely young supernova remnants. When they observed the region again in February 2003, there was a new, fifth, object located only 7 light-years from one of the previously detected objects. More observations on April 30-May

  8. Agile manufacturing: The factory of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loibl, Joseph M.; Bossieux, Terry A.

    1994-01-01

    The factory of the future will require an operating methodology which effectively utilizes all of the elements of product design, manufacturing and delivery. The process must respond rapidly to changes in product demand, product mix, design changes or changes in the raw materials. To achieve agility in a manufacturing operation, the design and development of the manufacturing processes must focus on customer satisfaction. Achieving greatest results requires that the manufacturing process be considered from product concept through sales. This provides the best opportunity to build a quality product for the customer at a reasonable rate. The primary elements of a manufacturing system include people, equipment, materials, methods and the environment. The most significant and most agile element in any process is the human resource. Only with a highly trained, knowledgeable work force can the proper methods be applied to efficiently process materials with machinery which is predictable, reliable and flexible. This paper discusses the affect of each element on the development of agile manufacturing systems.

  9. Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

    2001-12-19

    Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

  10. Lidar/DIAL detection of bomb factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorani, Luca; Puiu, Adriana; Rosa, Olga; Palucci, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    One of the aims of the project BONAS (BOmb factory detection by Networks of Advanced Sensors) is to develop a lidar/DIAL (differential absorption lidar) to detect precursors employed in the manufacturing of improvised explosive devices (IEDs). At first, a spectroscopic study has been carried out: the infrared (IR) gas phase spectrum of acetone, one of the more important IED precursors, has been procured from available databases and checked with cell measurements. Then, the feasibility of a lidar/DIAL for the detection of acetone vapors has been shown in laboratory, simulating the experimental conditions of a field campaign. Eventually, having in mind measurements in a real scenario, an interferent study has been performed, looking for all known compounds that share with acetone IR absorption in the spectral band selected for its detection. Possible interfering species were investigated, simulating both urban and industrial atmospheres and limits of acetone detection in both environments were identified. This study confirmed that a lidar/DIAL can detect low concentration of acetone at considerable distances.

  11. Factory daughters, the family, and nuptiality in Java.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D L

    1990-01-01

    The commercialization of agriculture, increasing landlessness, and an expanding labor class in rural areas of Java are all the result of industrialization. This work discusses the effect of female employment on marriage patterns of women working in rural factories. The central point is that employment has not only increased the financial autonomy of these women, but also increased the level of control they have over the choice of marriage partners. The data set used for analysis consisted of the observations of all factory workers and all non-factory females age 15-24 located in an agricultural village. The observations were make over a 15 month period between 1981-83. A follow up visit was made in 1986 and the following conclusions were then made: 1) the village study gave detailed data, but the data set was not large enough, thus a follow up study that encompasses more people is called for; 2) young rural female factory workers are more likely to chose their marriage partners than those engaged in traditional village labor. Of those that married and worked in factories, their fertility rate was significantly lower, compared to non-factory workers. Factory workers also had different family structures, because they spent less time living in extended families because of a larger income for the couple. This study indicates that increased economic control results in increased life decision control. This changed the daughter's economic relationship with her family and gives her more control in marriage decisions.

  12. Factorial Experiments: Efficient Tools for Evaluation of Intervention Components

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Linda M.; Dziak, John J.; Kugler, Kari C.; Trail, Jessica B.

    2014-01-01

    Background An understanding of the individual and combined effects of a set of intervention components is important for moving the science of preventive medicine interventions forward. This understanding can often be achieved in an efficient and economical way via a factorial experiment, in which two or more independent variables are manipulated. The factorial experiment is a complement to the randomized controlled trial (RCT); the two designs address different research questions. Purpose This article offers an introduction to factorial experiments aimed at investigators trained primarily in the RCT. Method The factorial experiment is compared and contrasted with other experimental designs used commonly in intervention science to highlight where each is most efficient and appropriate. Results Several points are made: factorial experiments make very efficient use of experimental subjects when the data are properly analyzed; a factorial experiment can have excellent statistical power even if it has relatively few subjects per experimental condition; and when conducting research to select components for inclusion in a multicomponent intervention, interactions should be studied rather than avoided. Conclusions Investigators in preventive medicine and related areas should begin considering factorial experiments alongside other approaches. Experimental designs should be chosen from a resource management perspective, which states that the best experimental design is the one that provides the greatest scientific benefit without exceeding available resources. PMID:25092122

  13. 46 CFR 30.25-1 - Cargoes carried in vessels certificated under the rules of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... part 153, or, as an alternative in the case of category C oil-like NLS, under 33 CFR part 151... CFR part 151. Table 30.25-1—List of Flammable and Combustible Bulk Liquid Cargoes Cargo name IMOAnnex... vessel, see 46 CFR 153.900(c). —A NLS category in brackets indicates that the product is...

  14. Laser-cooled radioactive francium factory at CYRIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, T.; Sato, T.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A factory of laser-cooled francium (Fr) atoms is being developed to search for the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron. The factory has achieved the production of Fr ions of 9 × 105 particles/s and transport with a transmission efficiency of 2%. In pilot experiments, the magneto-optical trapping of rubidium (Rb) has been performed using a new ion-to-atom converter. To achieve the Fr trap, the development and design of each of the factory's components are in progress.

  15. Energy conservation through recycling of factory asphalt roofing waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, P.B.; Powers, T.J. . Manville Technical Center); Hardy, J.; Maloof, R.; Patenaude, C.; Zilfi, J. )

    1989-12-31

    Prior DOE laboratory research showed that it was possible to recover the energy resource represented in factory shingle waste. This waste could be processed and recycled into the asphalt composition used to make new shingles. This bench-scale research concluded that factory experiments were all that were needed to provide a basis for commercial implementation. The project reported here completed that full scale research. Factory fiber glass shingle waste was processed to a form suitable for recycling. The processed waste was then mixed into the asphalt used to make new shingles. Process parameters and shingle quality were measured to provide a basis for commercial implementation.

  16. The Experiment Factory: Standardizing Behavioral Experiments.

    PubMed

    Sochat, Vanessa V; Eisenberg, Ian W; Enkavi, A Zeynep; Li, Jamie; Bissett, Patrick G; Poldrack, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    The administration of behavioral and experimental paradigms for psychology research is hindered by lack of a coordinated effort to develop and deploy standardized paradigms. While several frameworks (Mason and Suri, 2011; McDonnell et al., 2012; de Leeuw, 2015; Lange et al., 2015) have provided infrastructure and methods for individual research groups to develop paradigms, missing is a coordinated effort to develop paradigms linked with a system to easily deploy them. This disorganization leads to redundancy in development, divergent implementations of conceptually identical tasks, disorganized and error-prone code lacking documentation, and difficulty in replication. The ongoing reproducibility crisis in psychology and neuroscience research (Baker, 2015; Open Science Collaboration, 2015) highlights the urgency of this challenge: reproducible research in behavioral psychology is conditional on deployment of equivalent experiments. A large, accessible repository of experiments for researchers to develop collaboratively is most efficiently accomplished through an open source framework. Here we present the Experiment Factory, an open source framework for the development and deployment of web-based experiments. The modular infrastructure includes experiments, virtual machines for local or cloud deployment, and an application to drive these components and provide developers with functions and tools for further extension. We release this infrastructure with a deployment (http://www.expfactory.org) that researchers are currently using to run a set of over 80 standardized web-based experiments on Amazon Mechanical Turk. By providing open source tools for both deployment and development, this novel infrastructure holds promise to bring reproducibility to the administration of experiments, and accelerate scientific progress by providing a shared community resource of psychological paradigms.

  17. Overview of the nearby supernova factory

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, Greg; Adam, Gilles; Antilogus, Pierre; Astier, Pierre; Bacon, Roland; Bongard, S.; Bonnaud, C.; Copin, Yannick; Hardin, D.; Howell, D. Andy; Lemmonnier, Jean-Pierre; Levy, J.-M.; Loken, S.; Nugent, Peter; Pain, Reynald; Pecontal, Arlette; Pecontal, Emmanuel; Perlmutter, Saul; Quimby, Robert; Schahmaneche, Kyan; Smadja, Gerard; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael

    2002-07-29

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an international experiment designed to lay the foundation for the next generation of cosmology experiments (such as CFHTLS, wP, SNAP and LSST) which will measure the expansion history of the Universe using Type Ia supernovae. The SNfactory will discover and obtain frequent lightcurve spectrophotometry covering 3200-10000 {angstrom} for roughly 300 Type Ia supernovae at the low-redshift end of the smooth Hubble flow. The quantity, quality, breadth of galactic environments, and homogeneous nature of the SNfactory dataset will make it the premier source of calibration for the Type Ia supernova width-brightness relation and the intrinsic supernova colors used for K-correction and correction for extinction by host-galaxy dust. This dataset will also allow an extensive investigation of additional parameters which possibly influence the quality of Type Ia supernovae as cosmological probes. The SNfactory search capabilities and follow-up instrumentation include wide-field CCD imagers on two 1.2-m telescopes (via collaboration with the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking team at JPL and the QUEST team at Yale), and a two-channel integral-field-unit optical spectrograph/imager being fabricated for the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. In addition to ground-based follow-up, UV spectra for a subsample of these supernovae will be obtained with HST. The pipeline to obtain, transfer via wireless and standard internet, and automatically process the search images is in operation. Software and hardware development is now underway to enable the execution of follow-up spectroscopy of supernova candidates at the Hawaii 2.2-m telescope via automated remote control of the telescope and the IFU spectrograph/imager.

  18. The Experiment Factory: Standardizing Behavioral Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sochat, Vanessa V.; Eisenberg, Ian W.; Enkavi, A. Zeynep; Li, Jamie; Bissett, Patrick G.; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    The administration of behavioral and experimental paradigms for psychology research is hindered by lack of a coordinated effort to develop and deploy standardized paradigms. While several frameworks (Mason and Suri, 2011; McDonnell et al., 2012; de Leeuw, 2015; Lange et al., 2015) have provided infrastructure and methods for individual research groups to develop paradigms, missing is a coordinated effort to develop paradigms linked with a system to easily deploy them. This disorganization leads to redundancy in development, divergent implementations of conceptually identical tasks, disorganized and error-prone code lacking documentation, and difficulty in replication. The ongoing reproducibility crisis in psychology and neuroscience research (Baker, 2015; Open Science Collaboration, 2015) highlights the urgency of this challenge: reproducible research in behavioral psychology is conditional on deployment of equivalent experiments. A large, accessible repository of experiments for researchers to develop collaboratively is most efficiently accomplished through an open source framework. Here we present the Experiment Factory, an open source framework for the development and deployment of web-based experiments. The modular infrastructure includes experiments, virtual machines for local or cloud deployment, and an application to drive these components and provide developers with functions and tools for further extension. We release this infrastructure with a deployment (http://www.expfactory.org) that researchers are currently using to run a set of over 80 standardized web-based experiments on Amazon Mechanical Turk. By providing open source tools for both deployment and development, this novel infrastructure holds promise to bring reproducibility to the administration of experiments, and accelerate scientific progress by providing a shared community resource of psychological paradigms. PMID:27199843

  19. The Experiment Factory: Standardizing Behavioral Experiments.

    PubMed

    Sochat, Vanessa V; Eisenberg, Ian W; Enkavi, A Zeynep; Li, Jamie; Bissett, Patrick G; Poldrack, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    The administration of behavioral and experimental paradigms for psychology research is hindered by lack of a coordinated effort to develop and deploy standardized paradigms. While several frameworks (Mason and Suri, 2011; McDonnell et al., 2012; de Leeuw, 2015; Lange et al., 2015) have provided infrastructure and methods for individual research groups to develop paradigms, missing is a coordinated effort to develop paradigms linked with a system to easily deploy them. This disorganization leads to redundancy in development, divergent implementations of conceptually identical tasks, disorganized and error-prone code lacking documentation, and difficulty in replication. The ongoing reproducibility crisis in psychology and neuroscience research (Baker, 2015; Open Science Collaboration, 2015) highlights the urgency of this challenge: reproducible research in behavioral psychology is conditional on deployment of equivalent experiments. A large, accessible repository of experiments for researchers to develop collaboratively is most efficiently accomplished through an open source framework. Here we present the Experiment Factory, an open source framework for the development and deployment of web-based experiments. The modular infrastructure includes experiments, virtual machines for local or cloud deployment, and an application to drive these components and provide developers with functions and tools for further extension. We release this infrastructure with a deployment (http://www.expfactory.org) that researchers are currently using to run a set of over 80 standardized web-based experiments on Amazon Mechanical Turk. By providing open source tools for both deployment and development, this novel infrastructure holds promise to bring reproducibility to the administration of experiments, and accelerate scientific progress by providing a shared community resource of psychological paradigms. PMID:27199843

  20. Make your company a talent factory.

    PubMed

    Ready, Douglas A; Conger, Jay A

    2007-06-01

    Despite the great sums of money companies dedicate to talent management systems, many still struggle to fill key positions - limiting their potential for growth in the process. Virtually all the human resource executives in the authors' 2005 survey of 40 companies around the world said that their pipeline of high-potential employees was insufficient to fill strategic management roles. The survey revealed two primary reasons for this. First, the formal procedures for identifying and developing next-generation leaders have fallen out of sync with what companies need to grow or expand into new markets. To save money, for example, some firms have eliminated positions that would expose high-potential employees to a broad range of problems, thus sacrificing future development opportunities that would far outweigh any initial savings from the job cuts. Second, HR executives often have trouble keeping top leaders' attention on talent issues, despite those leaders' vigorous assertions that obtaining and keeping the best people is a major priority. If passion for that objective doesn't start at the top and infuse the culture, say the authors, talent management can easily deteriorate into the management of bureaucratic routines. Yet there are companies that can face the future with confidence. These firms don't just manage talent, they build talent factories. The authors describe the experiences of two such corporations - consumer products icon Procter & Gamble and financial services giant HSBC Group -that figured out how to develop and retain key employees and fill positions quickly to meet evolving business needs. Though each company approached talent management from a different direction, they both maintained a twin focus on functionality (rigorous talent processes that support strategic and cultural objectives) and vitality (management's emotional commitment, which is reflected in daily actions).

  1. Make your company a talent factory.

    PubMed

    Ready, Douglas A; Conger, Jay A

    2007-06-01

    Despite the great sums of money companies dedicate to talent management systems, many still struggle to fill key positions - limiting their potential for growth in the process. Virtually all the human resource executives in the authors' 2005 survey of 40 companies around the world said that their pipeline of high-potential employees was insufficient to fill strategic management roles. The survey revealed two primary reasons for this. First, the formal procedures for identifying and developing next-generation leaders have fallen out of sync with what companies need to grow or expand into new markets. To save money, for example, some firms have eliminated positions that would expose high-potential employees to a broad range of problems, thus sacrificing future development opportunities that would far outweigh any initial savings from the job cuts. Second, HR executives often have trouble keeping top leaders' attention on talent issues, despite those leaders' vigorous assertions that obtaining and keeping the best people is a major priority. If passion for that objective doesn't start at the top and infuse the culture, say the authors, talent management can easily deteriorate into the management of bureaucratic routines. Yet there are companies that can face the future with confidence. These firms don't just manage talent, they build talent factories. The authors describe the experiences of two such corporations - consumer products icon Procter & Gamble and financial services giant HSBC Group -that figured out how to develop and retain key employees and fill positions quickly to meet evolving business needs. Though each company approached talent management from a different direction, they both maintained a twin focus on functionality (rigorous talent processes that support strategic and cultural objectives) and vitality (management's emotional commitment, which is reflected in daily actions). PMID:17580649

  2. Factorial kriging analysis applied to geological data from petroleum exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Jaquet, O.

    1989-10-01

    A regionalized variable, thickness of the reservoir layer, from a gas field is decomposed by factorial kriging analysis. Maps of the obtained components may be associated with depositional environments that are favorable for petroleum exploration.

  3. Three-dimensional structure of Rubella virus factories

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Juan; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Tzeng, Wen-Ping; Frey, Teryl K.; Fernandez, Jose J.; Risco, Cristina

    2010-09-30

    Viral factories are complex structures in the infected cell where viruses compartmentalize their life cycle. Rubella virus (RUBV) assembles factories by recruitment of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), mitochondria and Golgi around modified lysosomes known as cytopathic vacuoles or CPVs. These organelles contain active replication complexes that transfer replicated RNA to assembly sites in Golgi membranes. We have studied the structure of RUBV factory in three dimensions by electron tomography and freeze-fracture. CPVs contain stacked membranes, rigid sheets, small vesicles and large vacuoles. These membranes are interconnected and in communication with the endocytic pathway since they incorporate endocytosed BSA-gold. RER and CPVs are coupled through protein bridges and closely apposed membranes. Golgi vesicles attach to the CPVs but no tight contacts with mitochondria were detected. Immunogold labelling confirmed that the mitochondrial protein p32 is an abundant component around and inside CPVs where it could play important roles in factory activities.

  4. 2. EAST ELEVATION OF IPA FACTORY; TWOSTORY SECTION BUILT IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAST ELEVATION OF IPA FACTORY; TWO-STORY SECTION BUILT IN 1892 AND PARTIALLY DESTROYED PARAPET SECTION BUILT CA. 1948. BRICK CHIMNEY ALSO BUILT CA. 1948. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  5. Reliability and Factorial Validity of the Student Development Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Lorraine Morlock; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Student Development Inventory and its seven subscales were administered to 163 college students to determine its reliability and factorial validity. Results suggested that it is a reliable and convenient attitudinal inventory. (Sample items are included.) (Author/GDC)

  6. Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Guidman, K.K.; Strait, J.B.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Optimization of pion and muon production/collection for neutrino factories and muon colliders is described along with recent developments of the MARS15 code event generators and effects influencing the choice of the optimal beam energy.

  7. RIKEN Radio Isotope Beam Factory: Japanese Flagship for Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En'yo, Hideto

    2015-11-01

    Recent activities at the RIKEN Radio Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) are reported together with its history and future prospects. RIBF is the Japanese flagship for nuclear science, and at this moment is the world flagship machine.

  8. 19. 1925 Main Factory building, interior, view of second floor's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. 1925 Main Factory building, interior, view of second floor's permutit room, view looking east showing water treatment tanks - North Star Woolen Mill, 109 Portland Avenue South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  9. 1. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT PARTIAL EAST ELEVATION OF FACTORY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT PARTIAL EAST ELEVATION OF FACTORY, SHOWING FORMER OHIO & ERIE CANAL PRISM IN FOREGROUND THAT WAS USED AS WATER RESERVOIR (500,000 GALLON) - Jaite Paper Mill, 1200 West Highland Road, Sagamore Hills, Summit County, OH

  10. Application of fiber laser for a Higgs factory

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.

    2014-06-04

    This paper proposes a medium size(~6km) circular Higgs factory based on a photon collider. The recent breakthrough in fiber laser technology by means of a coherent amplifier network makes such a collider feasible and probably also affordable.

  11. 12. SOUTH INSIDE FACTORY ALONG EAST WALL TO PARTS STORAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. SOUTH INSIDE FACTORY ALONG EAST WALL TO PARTS STORAGE SHELVES AND BINS OUTSIDE PARTITION WALL OF OFFICE. THE SOUTH PARTITION WALL IN THIS AREA IS FITTED WITH SHELVES COVERED WITH BOXES CONTAINING MANUSCRIPT COMPANY RECORDS. THE BENCH IN THE RIGHT FOREGROUND WAS USED FOR ATTACHING WROUGHT IRON CONNECTIONS TO THE ENDS OF WOODEN SUCKER RODS; THE WOODEN RODS WERE STORED ON THE RACKS ALONG THE EAST WALL OF THIS AREA. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  12. Expert Meeting Report: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Mullens, M.; Tompos, E.; Kessler, B.; Rath, P.

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about the Building America expert meeting on advanced envelope research for factory built housing, hosted by the ARIES Collaborative on October 11, 2011, in Phoenix, Arizona. The goals of this meeting were to provide a comprehensive solution to the use of three previously selected advanced alternatives for factory-built wall construction, assess each option focusing on major issues relating to viability and commercial potential, and determine additional steps are required to reach this potential.

  13. Expert Meeting Report: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Mullens, M.; Tompos, E.; Kessler, B.; Rath, P.

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about the expert meeting on advanced envelope research for factory built housing, hosted by the ARIES Collaborative on October 11, 2011, in Phoenix, Arizona. The goals of this meeting were to provide a comprehensive solution to the use of three previously selected advanced alternatives for factory-built wall construction, assess each option focusing on major issues relating to viability and commercial potential, and determine additional steps are required to reach this potential.

  14. 9. NORTHEAST FROM SOUTH ENTRANCE ACROSS RECEIVING AREA OF FACTORY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. NORTHEAST FROM SOUTH ENTRANCE ACROSS RECEIVING AREA OF FACTORY PAST THE GLASS-ENCLOSED OFFICE TOWARD SHOP AREA. BESIDE THE VERTICAL POST ROOF SUPPORT IN THE LEFT FOREGROUND IS A SCALE AND DRAFTING TABLE. BESIDE THE OFFICE WALL ON THE RIGHT IS A SMALL SHOP REPAIR BENCH, WHILE ABOVE THE OFFICE WINDOWS ARE BOXES OF COMPANY MANUSCRIPT BUSINESS RECORDS. THE WELDED METAL PIPE RACK IS A MODERN INTRUSION. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  15. The role of specialized transcription factories in chromosome pairing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Cook, Peter R

    2008-11-01

    Homologous chromosomes can pair in somatic and germ line cells, and many mechanisms have been proposed to explain how they do so. One popular class of models involves base-pairing between DNA strands catalyzed by recombination proteins, but pairing still occurs in mutants lacking the relevant functional proteins. We discuss an alternative based on two observations: transcription occurs in factories that specialize in transcribing specific gene sub-sets, and chromosomes only pair when transcribed. Each chromosome in the haploid set has a unique array of transcription units strung along its length; we suggest each is organized into clouds of loops tethered to specialized factories. Only homologs share similar strings of clouds and factories. Pairing begins when a promoter on one chromosome initiates in the homologous and specialized factory organized mainly by its homologous partner. This transiently ties the two homologs together, to increase the chances that adjacent promoters initiate in their homologous factories and that the two homologs will be zipped together. Then, interactions between promoters and RNA polymerases in the factories mediate pairing.

  16. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  17. Black hole as a wormhole factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Won; Park, Mu-In

    2015-12-01

    There have been lots of debates about the final fate of an evaporating black hole and the singularity hidden by an event horizon in quantum gravity. However, on general grounds, one may argue that a black hole stops radiation at the Planck mass (ħc / G) 1 / 2 ∼10-5 g, where the radiated energy is comparable to the black hole's mass. And also, it has been argued that there would be a wormhole-like structure, known as "spacetime foam", due to large fluctuations below the Planck length (ħG /c3) 1 / 2 ∼10-33 cm. In this paper, as an explicit example, we consider an exact classical solution which represents nicely those two properties in a recently proposed quantum gravity model based on different scaling dimensions between space and time coordinates. The solution, called "Black Wormhole", consists of two different states, depending on its mass parameter M and an IR parameter ω: For the black hole state (with ωM2 > 1 / 2), a non-traversable wormhole occupies the interior region of the black hole around the singularity at the origin, whereas for the wormhole state (with ωM2 < 1 / 2), the interior wormhole is exposed to an outside observer as the black hole horizon is disappearing from evaporation. The black hole state becomes thermodynamically stable as it approaches the merging point where the interior wormhole throat and the black hole horizon merges, and the Hawking temperature vanishes at the exact merge point (with ωM2 = 1 / 2). This solution suggests the "Generalized Cosmic Censorship" by the existence of a wormhole-like structure which protects the naked singularity even after the black hole evaporation. One could understand the would-be wormhole inside the black hole horizon as the result of microscopic wormholes created by "negative" energy quanta which have entered the black hole horizon in Hawking radiation process; the quantum black hole could be a wormhole factory! It is found that this speculative picture may be consistent with the recent " ER

  18. The Subduction Factory of Hydrocarbon Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleschev, K. A.

    2003-04-01

    THE SUBDUCTION FACTORY OF HYDROCARBON FORMATION K. A. Kleschev VNIGNI, Moscow, Russia balanyuk@sio.rssi.ru In the zones of collision of continental lithospheric plates, the subducting plates drive down great amounts of sediments formed at the former passive margins. This sedimentary layer, enclosed between two plates, contains significant quantities of hydrocarbons and occurs under the effect of strong shear deformations and special thermodynamic conditions. As the mass of the sediments passing through this zone is rather great, there are favorable conditions for occurrence of numerous hydrocarbon fields of industrial importance, including fields giants. Combined consideration of geodynamic and fluidodynamic aspects in a model of lithospheric plates collision enables to understand the influence of P T conditions and shear deformations on the mechanism of hydrocarbon generation and to look after their migration in the lithosphere up to the formation of deposits. Such model would allow one not only to describe and to explain these processes, but also to predict some features essential for the search and exploration of hydrocarbon fields in these regions and their classification. Enormous volumes of sediments accumulated over continental slopes and shelves are involved into the subduction zones in the course of overthrusting of island arcs onto continental margins. The weight of the overthrusting island arc substantially accelerates the subsiding of the continental margin. Crustal ground waters and hydrocarbons, capable to migration, begin to be squeezed out from the sedimentary material delivered to the waveguide zone under the island arc. The waters from the waveguide zone and the thermal water, released through dehydration of sediments and rocks of the former ocean crust and supplied from the deeper parts of the subduction zone, favor this process. Although the major portion of hydrocarbons is discharged and lost still in the body of the island arc itself

  19. 46 CFR 30.25-1 - Cargoes carried in vessels certificated under the rules of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... category C oil-like NLS, under 33 CFR part 151. Requirements for category D NLS cargoes and mixtures of non-NLS cargoes with category D NLS cargoes are in 33 CFR part 151. Table 30.25-1—List of Flammable and... vessel, see 46 CFR 153.900(c). —A NLS category in brackets indicates that the product is...

  20. 46 CFR 30.25-1 - Cargoes carried in vessels certificated under the rules of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... category C oil-like NLS, under 33 CFR part 151. Requirements for category D NLS cargoes and mixtures of non-NLS cargoes with category D NLS cargoes are in 33 CFR part 151. Table 30.25-1—List of Flammable and... vessel, see 46 CFR 153.900(c). —A NLS category in brackets indicates that the product is...

  1. 46 CFR 30.25-1 - Cargoes carried in vessels certificated under the rules of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... category C oil-like NLS, under 33 CFR part 151. Requirements for category D NLS cargoes and mixtures of non-NLS cargoes with category D NLS cargoes are in 33 CFR part 151. Table 30.25-1—List of Flammable and... vessel, see 46 CFR 153.900(c). —A NLS category in brackets indicates that the product is...

  2. 46 CFR 30.25-1 - Cargoes carried in vessels certificated under the rules of this subchapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... category C oil-like NLS, under 33 CFR part 151. Requirements for category D NLS cargoes and mixtures of non-NLS cargoes with category D NLS cargoes are in 33 CFR part 151. Table 30.25-1—List of Flammable and... vessel, see 46 CFR 153.900(c). —A NLS category in brackets indicates that the product is...

  3. A simple model for factory distribution: Historical effect in an industry city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Takashi; Sato, Kazunori; Morita, Satoru; Maeda, Yasunobu; Yoshimura, Jin; Tainaka, Kei-ichi

    2016-02-01

    The construction and discontinuance processes of factories are complicated problems in sociology. We focus on the spatial and temporal changes of factories at Hamamatsu city in Japan. Real data indicate that the clumping degree of factories decreases as the density of factory increases. To represent the spatial and temporal changes of factories, we apply "contact process" which is one of cellular automata. This model roughly explains the dynamics of factory distribution. We also find "historical effect" in spatial distribution. Namely, the recent factories have been dispersed due to the past distribution during the period of economic bubble. This effect may be related to heavy shock in Japanese stock market.

  4. An Appetite for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  5. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  6. The Future of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usiskin, Zalman P.

    2007-01-01

    In the 1970s, the movement to the metric system (which has still not completely occurred in the United States) and the advent of hand-held calculators led some to speculate that decimal representation of numbers would render fractions obsolete. This provocative proposition stimulated Zalman Usiskin to write "The Future of Fractions" in 1979. He…

  7. Microbially induced and microbially catalysed precipitation: two different carbonate factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The landmark paper by Schlager (2003) has revealed three types of benthic carbonate production referred to as "carbonate factories", operative at different locations at different times in Earth history. The tropical or T-factory comprises the classical platforms and fringing reefs and is dominated by carbonate precipitation by autotrophic calcifying metazoans ("biotically controlled" precipitation). The cool or C-factory is also biotically controlled but via heterotrophic, calcifying metazoans in cold and deep waters at the continental margins. A further type is the mud-mound or M-factory, where carbonate precipitation is supported by microorganisms but not controlled by a specific enzymatic pathway ("biotically induced" precipitation). How exactly the microbes influence precipitation is still poorly understood. Based on recent experimental and field studies, the microbial influence on modern mud mound and microbialite growth includes two fundamentally different processes: (1) Metabolic activity of microbes may increase the saturation state with respect to a particular mineral phase, thereby indirectly driving the precipitation of the mineral phase: microbially induced precipitation. (2) In a situation, where a solution is already supersaturated but precipitation of the mineral is inhibited by a kinetic barrier, microbes may act as a catalyser, i.e. they lower the kinetic barrier: microbially catalysed precipitation. Such a catalytic effect can occur e.g. via secreted polymeric substances or specific chemical groups on the cell surface, at which the minerals nucleate or which facilitate mechanistically the bonding of new ions to the mineral surface. Based on these latest developments in microbialite formation, I propose to extend the scheme of benthic carbonate factories of Schlager et al. (2003) by introducing an additional branch distinguishing microbially induced from microbially catalysed precipitation. Although both mechanisms could be operative in a M-factory

  8. Operating a production pilot factory serving several scientific domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfiligoi, I.; Würthwein, F.; Andrews, W.; Dost, J. M.; MacNeill, I.; McCrea, A.; Sheripon, E.; Murphy, C. W.

    2011-12-01

    Pilot infrastructures are becoming prominent players in the Grid environment. One of the major advantages is represented by the reduced effort required by the user communities (also known as Virtual Organizations or VOs) due to the outsourcing of the Grid interfacing services, i.e. the pilot factory, to Grid experts. One such pilot factory, based on the glideinWMS pilot infrastructure, is being operated by the Open Science Grid at University of California San Diego (UCSD). This pilot factory is serving multiple VOs from several scientific domains. Currently the three major clients are the analysis operations of the HEP experiment CMS, the community VO HCC, which serves mostly math, biology and computer science users, and the structural biology VO NEBioGrid. The UCSD glidein factory allows the served VOs to use Grid resources distributed over 150 sites in North and South America, in Europe, and in Asia. This paper presents the steps taken to create a production quality pilot factory, together with the challenges encountered along the road.

  9. Kinetic models in industrial biotechnology - Improving cell factory performance.

    PubMed

    Almquist, Joachim; Cvijovic, Marija; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Nielsen, Jens; Jirstrand, Mats

    2014-07-01

    An increasing number of industrial bioprocesses capitalize on living cells by using them as cell factories that convert sugars into chemicals. These processes range from the production of bulk chemicals in yeasts and bacteria to the synthesis of therapeutic proteins in mammalian cell lines. One of the tools in the continuous search for improved performance of such production systems is the development and application of mathematical models. To be of value for industrial biotechnology, mathematical models should be able to assist in the rational design of cell factory properties or in the production processes in which they are utilized. Kinetic models are particularly suitable towards this end because they are capable of representing the complex biochemistry of cells in a more complete way compared to most other types of models. They can, at least in principle, be used to in detail understand, predict, and evaluate the effects of adding, removing, or modifying molecular components of a cell factory and for supporting the design of the bioreactor or fermentation process. However, several challenges still remain before kinetic modeling will reach the degree of maturity required for routine application in industry. Here we review the current status of kinetic cell factory modeling. Emphasis is on modeling methodology concepts, including model network structure, kinetic rate expressions, parameter estimation, optimization methods, identifiability analysis, model reduction, and model validation, but several applications of kinetic models for the improvement of cell factories are also discussed.

  10. Site environmental assessment to an old paint factory in China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fucheng; Yan, Jichang; Wang, Yuehong; Chen, Dawei

    2008-04-01

    High ethyl-benzene and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) were found in the soil samples and groundwater samples during a site environmental assessment for an old paint factory in the city Changchun, Jilin province of China. The target old paint plant had been in operation for near 30 years by manufacturing resin and house paint. Driving force for this study was to identify potential environmental contamination existing in this paint factory which is located next to a new resident area under construction. The assessment result would be used as baseline environmental data input for remediation plan when the factory site will be changed into potential resident area in near future. The analytical data from the soil samples from different area of the factory which had high exposure to operation showed that solid waster storage area was contaminated with high heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Zn) and waster paint storage areas were contaminated with ethyl-benzene, xylene and C9-C30 aromatic hydrocarbon solvent. The analytical data from the groundwater samples from different area of the factory showed that resin plant area and waster paint storage areas were contaminated with high concentration of naphthalene, ethyl-benzene and xylene which exceed the reference standard. Remediation action is recommended.

  11. Recent Searches for Exotic Physics at the BaBar/PEP-II B-factory

    SciTech Connect

    Sekula, Stephen Jacob; /Ohio State U.

    2008-10-22

    I present three recent results from searches for exotic physics at the BABAR/PEP-II B-factory. These results span many of the samples produced at the B-factory, including B mesons, {tau} leptons, and {Upsilon}(3S) mesons. We have searched for CPT-violation in B{sup 0} mixing and find no significant deviation from the no-violation hypothesis. We have also searched for lepton-flavor-violating decays of the {tau} using {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup -} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and their charge conjugates. We find no evidence for these processes and set upper limits on their branching fractions. Finally, we have searched for a low-mass Higgs boson in the decay {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}, where the Higgs decays invisibly. We find no evidence for such a decay and set upper limits across a range of possible Higgs masses.

  12. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  13. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  14. Characterization of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Gas Turbine Hybrid System Based on a Factorial Design of Experiments Using Hardware Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, Bernardo; Banta, Larry E; Tucker, David

    2012-10-01

    A full factorial experimental design and a replicated fractional factorial design were carried out using the Hybrid Performance (HyPer) project facility installed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), U.S. Department of Energy to simulate gasifer/fuel cell/turbine hybrid power systems. The HyPer facility uses hardware in the loop (HIL) technology that couples a modified recuperated gas turbine cycle with hardware driven by a solid oxide fuel cell model. A 34 full factorial design (FFD) was selected to study the effects of four factors: cold-air, hot-air, bleed-air bypass valves, and the electric load on different parameters such as cathode and turbine inlet temperatures, pressure and mass flow. The results obtained, compared with former results where the experiments were made using one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT), show that no strong interactions between the factors are present in the different parameters of the system. This work also presents a fractional factorial design (ffd) 34-2 in order to analyze replication of the experiments. In addition, a new envelope is described based on the results of the design of experiments (DoE), compared with OFAT experiments, and analyzed in an off-design integrated fuel cell/gas turbine framework. This paper describes the methodology, strategy, and results of these experiments that bring new knowledge concerning the operating state space for this kind of power generation system.

  15. Status of the International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Kenneth

    2010-03-30

    The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) has been established by the Neutrino Factory community to deliver the Reference Design Report (RDR) for the facility by 2012. The baseline design for the facility, developed from that defined in the International Scoping Study of a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS), will provide 10{sup 21} muon decays per year from 25 GeV stored muon beams. The facility will serve two neutrino detectors; one situated at source-detector distance of between 3000-5000 km, the second at 7000-8000 km. The baseline design for the facility will be described and the status of the IDS-NF effort will be summarised.

  16. Prevalence of Acute Symptoms among Workers in Printing Factories

    PubMed Central

    Decharat, Somsiri

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To identify socioeconomic situation factors and behavioral factors associated with the prevalence of acute symptoms among 150 printing workers in 16 printing factories in Southern Thailand. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted by interviewing 150 printing workers in 16 printing factories in Southern Thailand. Results. Acute symptoms comprised dizziness, drowsiness, eye irritation, light-headedness, rhinitis, shortness of breath, cough, chest tightness, nausea/vomiting, exacerbation of asthma, allergic skin reaction, and visual disorder. The prevalence of symptoms was consistently higher among workers in the printing process than among other workers. Smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol were not associated with an increased prevalence of acute symptoms among these printing-factory workers. Conclusion. The significant associations were found between personal protective equipment and personal hygiene and prevalence of acute symptoms in printing workers. PMID:25386365

  17. On the Physics Case of a Super Flavour Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Browder, T.; Ciuchini, M.; Gershon, T.; Hazumi, M.; Hurth, T.; Okada, Y.; Stocchi, A.; /Hawaii U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Warwick U. /KEK, Tsukuba /CERN /SLAC /Tsukuba, Graduate U. Adv. Studies /Orsay, LAL /Orsay

    2007-11-07

    We summarize the physics case of a high-luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} flavor factory collecting an integrated luminosity of 50 - 75 ab{sup -1}. Many New Physics sensitive measurements involving B and D mesons and {tau} leptons, unique to a Super Flavor Factory, can be performed with excellent sensitivity to new particles with masses up to {approx} 100 (or even {approx} 1000) TeV. Flavor- and CP-violating couplings of new particles that may be discovered at the LHC can be measured in most scenarios, even in unfavorable cases assuming minimal flavor violation. Together with the LHC, a Super Flavor Factory, following either the SuperKEKB or the SuperB proposal, could be soon starting the project of reconstructing the New Physics Lagrangian.

  18. Gearing up to the factory of the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The features of factories and manufacturing techniques and tools of the near future are discussed. The spur to incorporate new technologies on the factory floor will originate in management, who must guide the interfacing of computer-enhanced equipment with traditional manpower, materials and machines. Electronic control with responsiveness and flexibility will be the key concept in an integrated approach to processing materials. Microprocessor controlled laser and fluid cutters add accuracy to cutting operations. Unattended operation will become feasible when automated inspection is added to a work station through developments in robot vision. Optimum shop management will be achieved through AI programming of parts manufacturing, optimized work flows, and cost accounting. The automation enhancements will allow designers to affect directly parts being produced on the factory floor.

  19. Analysis of Interpersonal Communication Processes in Digital Factory Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Jens; Baum, Heiko; Laue, Martin; Müller, Egon

    The paper outlines the scope of influence of digital factory on the interpersonal communication process and the exemplary description of them. On the basis of a brief description about the theoretical basic concepts of the digital factory occurs the illustration of communicative features in digital factory. Practical coherences of interpersonal communication from a human oriented view were analyzed in Volkswagen AG in Wolfsburg in a pilot project. A modeling method was developed within the process analysis. This method makes it possible to visualize interpersonal communication and its human oriented attribute in a technically focused workflow. Due to the results of a developed inquiry about communication analysis and process models of modeling methods it was possible to build the processes in a suitable way for humans and to obtain a positive implication on the communication processes.

  20. Longitudinal Beam Stability in the SUPER B-FACTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati

    2009-07-06

    We give an overview of wake fields and impedances in a proposed Super B project, which is based on extremely low emittance beams colliding at a large angle with a crab waist transformation. Understanding the effects that wake fields have on the beam is critical for a successful machine operation. We use our combined experience from the operation of the SLAC B-factory and DA{Phi}NE {Phi}-factory to eliminate strong HOM sources and minimize the chamber impedance in the Super B design. Based on a detailed study of the wake fields in this design we have developed a quasi-Green's function for the entire ring that is used to study bunch lengthening and beam stability. In particular, we check the stability threshold using numerical solutions of the Fokker-Plank equation. We also make a comparison of numerical simulations with the bunch lengthening data in the B- factory.

  1. Running medical image analysis on GridFactory desktop grid.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Frederik; Niinimaki, Marko; Zhou, Xin; Rosendahl, Peter; Müller, Henning; Waananen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    At the Geneva University Hospitals work is in progress to establish a computing facility for medical image analysis, potentially using several hundreds of desktop computers. Typically, hospitals do not have a computer infrastructure dedicated to research, nor can the data leave the hospital network for the reasons of privacy. For this purpose, a novel batch system called GridFactory has been tested along-side with the well-known batch system Condor. GridFactory's main benefits, compared to other batch systems, lie in its virtualization support and firewall friendliness. The tests involved running visual feature extraction from 50,000 anonymized medical images on a small local grid of 20 desktop computers. A comparisons with a Condor based batch system in the same computers is then presented. The performance of GridFactory is found satisfactory. PMID:19593040

  2. Quality of life among Thai workers in textile dyeing factories.

    PubMed

    Kittipichai, Wirin; Arsa, Rattanaporn; Jirapongsuwan, Ann; Singhakant, Chatchawal

    2014-11-30

    The purpose of a cross-sectional study was to investigate factors influencing the quality of life among Thai workers in textile dyeing factories. Samples included 205 Thai workers from five textile dyeing factories located in the suburban area of Bangkok in Thailand. Data were collected with a self-administered questionnaire. Scales of the questionnaire had reliability coefficients ranging from 0.70-0.91. The results revealed that the overall quality of life among workers was most likely between good and moderate levels, and the percentage-mean score was 74.77. The seven factors associated with the overall quality of life were co-worker relationships, safety at work in the dimension of accident prevention, job characteristics, supervisory relationships, welfares, marital status, and physical environment. Furthermore, co-worker relationships, accident prevention, and marital status were three considerable predictors accounted for 23% of the variance in the overall quality of life among workers in textile dyeing factories.

  3. Initial Configuration of Acceleration for the IDS-NF Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J.S.

    2011-10-01

    The IDS-NF neutrino factory acceleration system must accelerate the muon beam coming out of cooling to a total energy of 25 GeV. The parameters of the beam being accelerated are given in Table 1. While a certain fraction of the beam will be lost early in acceleration, losses of the beam that falls within the acceptance (see Table 1) should be dominated by decay losses (as opposed to dynamic losses or losses on apertures). Decay losses will be kept small, and the cost of the machine will be reduced to the extent possible, consistent with the above requirements. There is a tradeoff between machine cost and the amount of decay losses, and a reasonable compromise will be made between them. Both muon signs will be accelerated simultaneously.

  4. NEUTRINO FACTORY AND BETA BEAM EXPERIMENTS AND DEVELOPMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    ALBRIGHT, C.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.; GALLARDO, J.; KAHN, S.; KIRK, H.; ET AL.

    2004-09-21

    The long-term prospects for fully exploring three-flavor mixing in the neutrino sector depend upon an ongoing and increased investment in the appropriate accelerator R&D. Two new concepts have been proposed that would revolutionize neutrino experiments, namely the Neutrino Factory and the Beta Beam facility. These new facilities would dramatically improve our ability to test the three-flavor mixing framework, measure CP violation in the lepton sector, and perhaps determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, and, if necessary, probe extremely small values of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. The stunning sensitivity that could be achieved with a Neutrino Factory is described, together with our present understanding of the corresponding sensitivity that might be achieved with a Beta Beam facility. In the Beta Beam case, additional study is required to better understand the optimum Beta Beam energy, and the achievable sensitivity. Neither a Neutrino Factory nor a Beta Beam facility could be built without significant R&D. An impressive Neutrino Factory R&D effort has been ongoing in the U.S. and elsewhere over the last few years and significant progress has been made towards optimizing the design, developing and testing the required accelerator components, and significantly reducing the cost. The recent progress is described here. There has been no corresponding activity in the U.S. on Beta Beam facility design and, given the very limited resources, there is little prospect of starting a significant U.S. Beta Beam R&D effort in the near future. However, the Beta Beam concept is interesting, and progress on its development in Europe should be followed. The Neutrino Factory R&D program has reached a critical stage in which support is required for two crucial international experiments and a third-generation international design study. If this support is forthcoming, a Neutrino Factory could be added to the Neutrino Community's road map in about a decade.

  5. 40. NORTH ACROSS WOODWORKING AREA IN NORTHWESTERN QUADRANT OF FACTORY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. NORTH ACROSS WOODWORKING AREA IN NORTHWESTERN QUADRANT OF FACTORY ACROSS STACKED LUMBER ON SAWHORSES TOWARD CIRCA 1900 THICKNESS PLANER, SHOP-MADE BELT GUARD, AND BELOW THE SKYLIGHT OVERHEAD LINE SHAFT, BELTS, AND PULLEYS. BEYOND THE LUMBER ON A WHEELED WORK STATION ARE CIRCA 1900 ROLLS FOR BENDING PROPER CURVATURE IN STEEL WINDMILL BLADES AND CIRCA 1900 BEADING MACHINE FOR FORMING CREASES IN THE EDGES OF SHEET METAL PARTS SUCH AS WHEEL BLADES. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  6. n-Hexane polyneuropathy in a ball-manufacturing factory

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.C.; Shih, T.S.; Cheng, S.Y.; Chen, S.S.; Tchen, P.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Five overt and two occult cases of n-hexane polyneuropathy occurred in a ball-manufacturing factory in Taiwan. The severity of polyneuropathy was directly related to the index of n-hexane exposure that occurred during the processes of cement coating and nylon fiber winding in a poorly ventilated room. The n-hexane concentrations over eight hours of personal sampling of the air of the cement coating and nylon fiber winding areas were 109 ppm and 86 ppm, respectively. After installation of a new factory ventilation system, these seven patients recovered completely, and there were no new cases in the two-year follow-up.

  7. R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2011-03-20

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in R&D towards a neutrino factory and muon collider. The U.S. Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) has been formed recently to expedite the R&D efforts. This paper will review the U.S. MAP R&D programs for a neutrino factory and muon collider. Muon ionization cooling research is the key element of the program. The first muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment, MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment), is under construction now at RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) in the UK. The current status of MICE will be described.

  8. Jean Piaget: Images of a life and his factory.

    PubMed

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2012-08-01

    In this article, I use a new book about Jean Piaget to introduce a new historical method: examining "psychological factories." I also discuss some of the ways that "Great Men" are presented in the literature, as well as opportunities for new projects if one approaches the history of the discipline differently and examines the conditions that made that greatness possible. To that end, the article includes many details about Piaget that have never before been discussed in English. Attention is drawn, in particular, to Piaget's collaborators: the hundreds of workers at his factory in Geneva, many of whom were women. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Linear collider approach to a B anti B factory

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1987-06-01

    In this paper we consider the basic design expression and principal design constraints for a linear collider suitable for a B anti-B factory: Energy approx. =10 GeV, luminosity 10/sup 33/-10/sup 34/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/, energy resolution approx. =10/sup -2/. The design of room temperature linear colliders for a B factory is discussed. In such colliders, the rf energy stored in the linac structure is thrown away after each linac pulse. Linear colliders using superconducting rf cavities are considered. Some brief conclusions are presented.

  10. Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration R and D Program

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    2000-07-01

    The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) comprises some 140 scientists and engineers located at U.S. National Laboratories and Universities, and at a number of non-U.S. research institutions. In the past year, the MC R and D program has shifted its focus mainly toward the design issues related to the development of a Neutrino Factory based on a muon storage ring. In this paper the status of the various R and D activities is described, and future plans are outlined.

  11. Five practices of efficient factories applied to dental education.

    PubMed

    Nalliah, Romesh P

    2015-05-01

    Efficient factories, such as dental school clinics (DSC), are trying to improve the quality of their product by reducing inefficiencies, error rates, and wastage. Dental education is an expensive business for the student and the institution. Dental materials and equipment are costly, and students are novice providers who work slowly and inefficiently compared to an experienced dentist; this is not a good business model. The objective of this article was to present and apply five practices of efficient factories that could be applied to the DSC setting. I propose that this will lead to improved educational outcomes and improved patient outcomes in DSC. PMID:25891379

  12. Jean Piaget: Images of a life and his factory.

    PubMed

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2012-08-01

    In this article, I use a new book about Jean Piaget to introduce a new historical method: examining "psychological factories." I also discuss some of the ways that "Great Men" are presented in the literature, as well as opportunities for new projects if one approaches the history of the discipline differently and examines the conditions that made that greatness possible. To that end, the article includes many details about Piaget that have never before been discussed in English. Attention is drawn, in particular, to Piaget's collaborators: the hundreds of workers at his factory in Geneva, many of whom were women. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23397918

  13. A factory concept for processing and manufacturing with lunar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driggers, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    A conceptual design for an orbital factory sized to process 1.5 million metric tons per year of raw lunar fines into 0.3 million metric tons of manufacturing materials is presented. A conservative approach involving application of present earth-based technology leads to a design devoid of new inventions. Earth based counterparts to the factory machinery were used to generate subsystem masses and lumped parameters for volume and mass estimates. The results are considered to be conservative since technologies more advanced than those assumed are presently available in many areas. Some attributes of potential space processing technologies applied to material refinement and component manufacture are discussed.

  14. A cost-Effective Design for a Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J.S.; Bogacz, S.A.; Caspi, S.; Cobb, J.; Fernow, R.C.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Neuffer, D.; Palmer, R.; Paul, K.; Witte, H.; Zisman, M.

    2006-06-01

    There have been active efforts in the U.S., Europe, and Japan on the design of a Neutrino Factory. This type of facility produces intense beams of neutrinos from the decay of muons in a high energy storage ring. In the U.S., a second detailed Feasibility Study (FS2) for a Neutrino Factory was completed in 2001. Since that report was published, new ideas in bunching, cooling and acceleration of muon beams have been developed. We have incorporated these ideas into a new facility design, which we designate as Study 2B (ST2B), that should lead to significant cost savings over the FS2 design.

  15. Cost-effective design for a neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Bogacz

    2006-01-01

    There have been active efforts in the U.S., Europe, and Japan on the design of a neutrino factory. This type of facility produces intense beams of neutrinos from the decay of muons in a high-energy storage ring. In the U.S., a second detailed feasibility study (FS2) for a neutrino factory was completed in 2001. Since that report was published, new ideas in bunching, cooling, and acceleration of muon beams have been developed. We have incorporated these ideas into a new facility design, which we designate as study 2B (ST2B), that should lead to significant cost savings over the FS2 design.

  16. Stable Chlorine Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Z.

    2006-12-01

    Chlorine isotope partitioning between different phases is not well understood. Pore fluids can have δ37Cl values as low as -8‰, with neoform sediments having strongly positive values. Most strikingly, volcanic gases have δ37Cl values that cover a range in excess of 14‰ (Barnes et al., this meeting). The large range is difficult to explain in terms of equilibrium fractionation, which, although calculated to be very large for Cl in different oxidation states, should be less than 2‰ between chloride species (Schauble et al., 2003, GCA). To address the discrepancy between Nature and theory, we have measured Cl isotope fractionation for selected equilibrium and disequilibrium experiments in order to identify mechanisms that might lead to large fractionations. 1) NaCl (s,l) NaCl (v): NaCl was sealed in an evacuated silica tube and heated at one end, causing vaporization and reprecipitation of NaCl (v) at the cool end of the tube. The fractionation is 0.2‰ at 700°C (halite-vapor) and 0.7‰ at 800°C (liquid-vapor), respectively. The larger fractionation at higher temperature may be related to equilibrium fractionation between liquid and gas vs. `stripping' of the solid in the lower T experiments. 2) Sodalite NaCl(l): Nepheline and excess NaCl were sealed in a Pt crucible at 825°C for 48 hrs producing sodalite. The measured newly-formed sodalite-NaCl fractionation is -0.2‰. 3) Volatilization of HCl: Dry inert gas was bubbled through HCl solutions and the vapor was collected in a downstream water trap. There was no fractionation for 12.4M HCl (HCl fuming) vapor at 25°C. For a 1 M boiling HCl solution, the HCl-vapor fractionation was ~9‰. The difference is probably related to the degree of dissociation in the acid, with HCl dissolved in water for the highly acidic solutions, and dissociated H3O+ and Cl- for lower concentrations. The HCl volatilization experiments are in contrast to earlier vapor-liquid experiments in NaCl-H2O system, where fractionation was

  17. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  18. NAMER: A FORTRAN 4 program for use in optimizing designs of two-level factorial experiments given partial prior information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidik, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Under certain specified conditions, the Bayes procedure for designing two-level fractional factorial experiments is that which maximizes the expected utility over all possible choices of parameter-estimator matchings, physical-design variable matchings, defining parameter groups, and sequences of telescoping groups. NAMER computes the utility of all possible matchings of physical variables to design variables and parameters to estimators for a specified choice of defining parameter group or groups. The matching yielding the maximum expected utility is indicated, and detailed information is provided about the optimal matchings and utilities. Complete documentation is given; and an example illustrates input, output, and usage.

  19. Chromatographic methods of fractionation.

    PubMed

    Friesen, A D

    1987-01-01

    Chromatography's functional versatility, separation efficiency, gentle non-denaturing separating process and ease of automation and scale-up make it attractive for industrial scale protein purification. The Winnipeg Rh Institute's new Plasma Fractionation facility is an example of the use of chromatography for the large scale purification of plasma protein fractions. The fractionation facility has a capacity to process 800 litres of plasma per batch into blood clotting factor VIII and IX, albumin and intravenous immune serum globulin (i.v. ISG). Albumin and i.v. ISG are purified using ion exchange columns of DEAE-Sepharose (230 litre size), DEAE-Biogel (150 litre size) and CM-Sepharose (150 litre size). The chromatographic process is automated using a Modicon 584 Programmable Logic Controller to regulate valves, pumps and sensors which control plasma flow during fractionation. The stainless steel tanks and piping are automatically cleaned-in-place. The high degree of automation and cleaning provides efficient operation and sanitary processing. Chromatographic methods (DEAE-Sepharose and metal chelation) are also being used at the pilot scale to purify the human blood products superoxide dismutase and hemoglobin from outdated red blood cells. Characterization of the protein fractions produced by chromatography has shown them to be of equal or higher quality than fractions produced by other techniques.

  20. Impact of carrier recombination on fill factor for large area heterojunction crystalline silicon solar cell with 25.1% efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Daisuke; Hernández, José Luis; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    We have achieved a certified 25.1% conversion efficiency in a large area (151.9 cm2) heterojunction (HJ) crystalline Si (c-Si) solar cell with amorphous Si (a-Si) passivation layer. This efficiency is a world record in a both-side-contacted c-Si solar cell. Our high efficiency HJ c-Si solar cells are investigated from the standpoint of the effective minority carrier lifetime (τe), and the impact of τe on fill factor (FF) is discussed. The τe measurements of our high efficiency HJ c-Si solar cells reveal that τe at an injection level corresponding to an operation point of maximum power is dominated by the carrier recombination at the a-Si/c-Si interface. By optimization of the process conditions, the carrier recombination at the a-Si/c-Si interface is reduced, which leads to an improvement of the FF by an absolute value of 2.7%, and a conversion efficiency of 25.1% has been achieved. These results indicate that the reduction of carrier recombination centers at the a-Si/c-Si interface should be one of the most crucial issues for further improvement of FF even in the HJ c-Si solar cells with efficiency over 25%.

  1. soil organic matter fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osat, Maryam; Heidari, Ahmad

    2010-05-01

    Carbon is essential for plant growth, due to its effects on other soil properties like aggregation. Knowledge of dynamics of organic matter in different locations in the soil matrix can provide valuable information which affects carbon sequestration and soil the other soil properties. Extraction of soil organic matter (SOM) fractions has been a long standing approach to elucidating the roles of soil organic matter in soil processes. Several kind fractionation methods are used and all provide information on soil organic matter function. Physical fractionation capture the effects on SOM dynamics of the spatial arrangement of primary and secondary organomineral particles in soil while chemical fractionation can not consider the spatial arrangement but their organic fractions are suitable for advanced chemical characterization. Three method of physical separation of soil have been used, sieving, sedimentation and densitometry. The distribution of organic matter within physical fractions of the soil can be assessed by sieving. Sieving separates soil particles based strictly on size. The study area is located on north central Iran, between 35° 41'- 36° 01' N and 50° 42'- 51° 14' E. Mean annual precipitation about 243.8 mm and mean annual air temperature is about 14.95 °C. The soil moisture and temperature regime vary between aridic-thermic in lower altitudes to xeric-mesic in upper altitudes. More than 36 surface soil samples (0-20 cm) were collected according to land-use map units. After preliminary analyzing of samples 10 samples were selected for further analyses in five size fractions and three different time intervals in September, January and April 2008. Fractionation carried out by dry sieving in five classes, 1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm, 270 μm-0.5mm, 53-270 μm and <53 μm. Organic matter and C/N ratio were determined for all fractions at different time intervals. Chemical fractionation of organic matter also carried out according to Tan (2003), also Mineralogical

  2. Fractional Noether Theorem Based on Extended Exponentially Fractional Integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Zi-Xuan; Zhang, Yi

    2013-10-01

    Based on the new type of fractional integral definition, namely extended exponentially fractional integral introduced by EI-Nabulsi, we study the fractional Noether symmetries and conserved quantities for both holonomic system and nonholonomic system. First, the fractional variational problem under the sense of extended exponentially fractional integral is established, the fractional d'Alembert-Lagrange principle is deduced, then the fractional Euler-Lagrange equations of holonomic system and the fractional Routh equations of nonholonomic system are given; secondly, the invariance of fractional Hamilton action under infinitesimal transformations of group is also discussed, the corresponding definitions and criteria of fractional Noether symmetric transformations and quasi-symmetric transformations are established; finally, the fractional Noether theorems for both holonomic system and nonholonomic system are explored. What's more, the relationship between the fractional Noether symmetry and conserved quantity are revealed.

  3. Cognitive Processes and Linguistic Forms of Factory Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tway, Patricia

    This paper examines language in a factory setting and focuses on: (1) identical terms which workers use in different contexts, (2) terms that are discarded or changed, (3) different terms that express opposite units in a conceptual category but are labels for identical objects, and (4) terms which represent finer discriminations within conceptual…

  4. West Virginia's Byrd Institute: Teaching Factory for New Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casto, James E.

    1993-01-01

    The Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing Systems at Marshall University (Huntington, West Virginia) is part of a nationwide network of teaching factories where manufacturers can learn new, more competitive production technologies. The institute has helped several local manufacturing companies develop computer programs to…

  5. Mobile Monitoring and Embedded Control System for Factory Environment

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Kuang-Yow; Hsiao, Sung-Jung; Sung, Wen-Tsai

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a real-time method to carry out the monitoring of factory zone temperatures, humidity and air quality using smart phones. At the same time, the system detects possible flames, and analyzes and monitors electrical load. The monitoring also includes detecting the vibrations of operating machinery in the factory area. The research proposes using ZigBee and Wi-Fi protocol intelligent monitoring system integration within the entire plant framework. The sensors on the factory site deliver messages and real-time sensing data to an integrated embedded systems via the ZigBee protocol. The integrated embedded system is built by the open-source 32-bit ARM (Advanced RISC Machine) core Arduino Due module, where the network control codes are built in for the ARM chipset integrated controller. The intelligent integrated controller is able to instantly provide numerical analysis results according to the received data from the ZigBee sensors. The Android APP and web-based platform are used to show measurement results. The built-up system will transfer these results to a specified cloud device using the TCP/IP protocol. Finally, the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach is used to analyze the power loads in the factory zones. Moreover, Near Field Communication (NFC) technology is used to carry out the actual electricity load experiments using smart phones. PMID:24351642

  6. 7. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. AT CENTER IS A DEEP-BRAWN, HEAVY PRESS MANUFACTURED BY E. W. BLISS CO., BROOKLYN, NEW YORK. PRESS #3-1/2-C PATENTED BY E. W. BLISS CO., 1893. MANUFACTURER'S PLATE INDICATES PRESS DATES FROM 1922. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  7. 14. INTERIOR VIEW OF THIRD FLOOR OF FACTORY ADDITION, NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR VIEW OF THIRD FLOOR OF FACTORY ADDITION, NORTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING. AT THE CENTER IS THE BUFFING MACHINE, MANUFACTURED BY THE ACME CO. OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN. IT WAS HERE THAT ALUMINUM WARES WERE BROUGHT FOR FINAL GRINDING AND BUFFING. THE HOSES REMOVED DUST AND DEBRIS. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  8. 8. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. AT CENTER IS THE SAME PRESS AS SHOWN ABOVE (IL-25-7). TO LEFT IS PART OF THE OVERHEAD BELT GUARD. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  9. 10. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, LOOKING SOUTH. AT CENTER IS A SHALLOW-DRAWN PRESS (#3-1/2) MANUFACTURED BY E. W. BLISS OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  10. Parameters of a Super-B-Factory Design

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.; Cai, Y.; Ecklund, S.; Fox, J.D.; Heifets, S.A.; Li, N.; McIntosh, P.A.; Novokhatski, A.; Sullivan, M.K.; Teytelman, D.; Wienands, U.; Biagini, M.E.; /Frascati

    2006-03-03

    Parameters are being studied for a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at the Upsilon 4S that would deliver a luminosity in the range of 7 to 10 x 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/s. Particle physics studies dictate that a much higher luminosity collider than the present B-Factory accelerators will be needed to answer future new key physics questions. The success of the present B-Factories, PEP-II and KEKB, in producing unprecedented luminosity with very short commissioning times has taught us about the accelerator physics of asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders in a new parameter regime. Such a collider could produce an integrated luminosity of 10,000 fb{sup -1} (10 ab{sup -1}) in a running year. A Super-B-Factory [1-8] with 30 to 50 times the performance of the present PEP-II accelerator would incorporate a higher frequency RF system, lower impedance vacuum chambers, higher power synchrotron radiation absorbers, and stronger bunch-by-bunch feedback systems. The present injector based on the SLAC linac needs no improvements and is ready for the Super-B-Factory.

  11. Development in the Learning Factory: Training Human Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Harry; Delbridge, Rick

    2001-01-01

    A study of human resource practices in 18 automobile factories in the United States and Britain showed that manufacturing innovations are placing greater demands on line managers and workers. Training is being refocused to develop their interpersonal, team, and leadership skills. However, lack of time and suitable training facilities are barriers.…

  12. Replicating systems concepts: Self-replicating lunar factory and demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Automation of lunar mining and manufacturing facility maintenance and repair is addressed. Designing the factory as an automated, multiproduct, remotely controlled, reprogrammable Lunar Manufacturing Facility capable of constructing duplicates of itself which would themselves be capable of further replication is proposed.

  13. Factory Acceptance Test Procedure Westinghouse 100 ton Hydraulic Trailer

    SciTech Connect

    Aftanas, B.L.

    1994-11-16

    This Factory Acceptance Test Procedure (FAT) is for the Westinghouse 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer. The trailer will be used for the removal of the 101-SY pump. This procedure includes: safety check and safety procedures; pre-operation check out; startup; leveling trailer; functional/proofload test; proofload testing; and rolling load test.

  14. Perspective view. Threestory steel and brick building with factory windows ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view. Three-story steel and brick building with factory windows punctuating facades. East and west facades have tall brick piers capped with evenly spaced stone capitals. North facade (facing Milwaukee Ave. E.) has parapet element decorated with stone accent lines and large flagpole. Piers on north facade have raised stone base - New Center Stamping, 950 East Milwaukee Avenue, Detroit, MI

  15. 46 CFR 162.050-13 - Factory production and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Factory production and inspection. 162.050-13 Section 162.050-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Pollution Prevention Equipment §...

  16. Evaluation of Eight "Infinity Factory" Programs. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Francis A.; And Others

    "Infinity Factory" is a television series which presents mathematics in a common-sense way to help children understand the usefulness of mathematics in their own lives. The 52-programs in the series are for children ages 8 through 11, especially black and Latino children. While covering decimal systems, measurement, estimation, mapping and…

  17. PROTON BEAM REQUIREMENTS FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2009-12-11

    Both a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider place stringent demands on the proton beam used to generate the desired beam of muons. Here we discuss the advantages and challenges of muon accelerators and the rationale behind the requirements on proton beam energy, intensity, bunch length, and repetition rate. Example proton driver configurations that have been considered in recent years are also briefly indicated.

  18. Bioretention Systems: Partial Factorial Designs for Nitrate Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in nutrient loadings are monitored by introducing captured stormwater runoff into eight outdoor rain gardens at EPA’s Urban Water Research Facility in Edison, New Jersey scaled for residential and urban landscapes. The partial factorial design includes non-vegetated meso...

  19. No Child Left Behind: Factory Models and Business Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Andrew P.

    2006-01-01

    Because No Child Left Behind (NCLB) is not based on educational research or research-based theory, it offers no new innovations nor does anything to improve the fundamental quality of education. NCLB is built on a rigid, outdated factory model in which students step onto a thirteen-year conveyor belt in kindergarten and progress slowly forward,…

  20. Error Rates of Multiple F Tests in Factorial ANOVA Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halderson, Judith S.; Glasnapp, Douglas R.

    The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate empirically the effect of multiple hypothesis testing on error rates in factorial ANOVA designs under a variety of controlled conditions. The per comparison, per experiment, and experimentwise error rates were investigated for three hypothesis testing procedures. The specific conditions…

  1. Search for Light New Physics at B Factories

    DOE PAGES

    Echenard, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Many extensions of the Standard Model include the possibility of light new particles, such as light Higgs bosons or dark matter candidates. These scenarios can be probed using the large datasets collected by B factories, complementing measurements performed at the LHC. This paper summarizes recent searches for light new physics conducted by the BABAR and Belle experiments.

  2. Child Protection Decision Making: A Factorial Analysis Using Case Vignettes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Jacqueline; Schmidt, Glen

    2012-01-01

    This study explored decision making by child protection social workers in the province of British Columbia, Canada. A factorial survey method was used in which case vignettes were constructed by randomly assigning a number of key characteristics associated with decision making in child protection. Child protection social workers (n = 118) assessed…

  3. Factorial Design: An Eight Factor Experiment Using Paper Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozma, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present the analysis of the multi-factor experiment (factorial design) conducted in EG490, Junior Design at Loyola College in Maryland. The discussion of this paper concludes the experimental analysis and ties the individual class papers together.

  4. From Exam Factories to Communities of Discovery: The Democratic Route

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffield, Frank; Williamson, Bill

    2011-01-01

    "From Exam Factories to Communities of Discovery" passionately calls for educators to challenge the dominant market-led model of education and instead build a more democratic one, better able to face threats such as environmental damage; intensified global competition; corrosive social inequalities in and between nations in the world; and the need…

  5. The Use of Factorial Forecasting to Predict Public Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Policies that call for members of the public to change their behavior fail if people don't change; predictions of whether the requisite changes will take place are needed prior to implementation. I propose to solve the prediction problem with Factorial Forecasting, a version of functional measurement methodology that employs group designs. Aspects…

  6. Factorial study of rain garden design for nitrogen removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Nitrate (〖NO〗_3^--N ) removal studies in bioretention systems showed great variability in removal rates and in some cases 〖NO〗_3^--N was exported. A 3-way factorial design (2 x 2 x 4) was devised for eight outdoor un-vegetated rain gardens to evaluate the effects of ...

  7. 76. Hayman Krupp and Company Building (Justin Boot Factory), 222 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. Hayman Krupp and Company Building (Justin Boot Factory), 222 South Santa Fe St., south and facade facades, building on northeast corner of Santa Fe and West Overland - South El Paso Street Historic District, South El Paso, South Oregon & South Santa Fe Streets, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  8. Training Factory Workers: Three Case Studies. Contractor Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschhorn, Larry D.

    Case studies examined the context and impact of training in three factories: a bakery, a circuit assembly plant, and a plant that produces microchips. Cookie-Foods, Inc. used Statistical Process Control (SPC) and a course on problem solving to increase the operators' productivity. Impact of the SPC program was limited, because workers who…

  9. Factorial Validity of the Fennema-Sherman Mathematics Attitudes Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Marcia R.; And Others

    The factorial validity of four of the nine Fennema-Sherman Mathematics Attitudes Scales (FSMASs) was examined for use in measuring fifth graders' interaction with a subject. The following four scales were assessed: (1) the Confidence in Learning Mathematics Scale; (2) the Attitude Toward Success in Mathematics Scale (ATSMS); (3) the Mathematics…

  10. A factorial assessment of the sensitivity of the BATS land-surface parameterization scheme. [BATS (Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme)

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson-Sellers, A. )

    1993-02-01

    Land-surface schemes developed for incorporation into global climate models include parameterizations that are not yet fully validated and depend upon the specification of a large (20-50) number of ecological and soil parameters, the values of which are not yet well known. There are two methods of investigating the sensitivity of a land-surface scheme to prescribed values: simple one-at-a-time changes or factorial experiments. Factorial experiments offer information about interactions between parameters and are thus a more powerful tool. Here the results of a suite of factorial experiments are reported. These are designed (i) to illustrate the usefulness of this methodology and (ii) to identify factors important to the performance of complex land-surface schemes. The Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) is used and its sensitivity is considered (a) to prescribed ecological and soil parameters and (b) to atmospheric forcing used in the off-line tests undertaken. Results indicate that the most important atmospheric forcings are mean monthly temperature and the interaction between mean monthly temperature and total monthly precipitation, although fractional cloudiness and other parameters are also important. The most important ecological parameters are vegetation roughness length, soil porosity, and a factor describing the sensitivity of the stomatal resistance of vegetation to the amount of photosynthetically active solar radiation and, to a lesser extent, soil and vegetation albedos. Two-factor interactions including vegetation roughness length are more important than many of the 23 specified single factors. The results of factorial sensitivity experiments such as these could form the basis for intercomparison of land-surface parameterization schemes and for field experiments and satellite-based observation programs aimed at improving evaluation of important parameters.

  11. Genetic variants on 15q25.1, smoking, and lung cancer: an assessment of mediation and interaction.

    PubMed

    VanderWeele, Tyler J; Asomaning, Kofi; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Han, Younghun; Spitz, Margaret R; Shete, Sanjay; Wu, Xifeng; Gaborieau, Valerie; Wang, Ying; McLaughlin, John; Hung, Rayjean J; Brennan, Paul; Amos, Christopher I; Christiani, David C; Lin, Xihong

    2012-05-15

    Genome-wide association studies have identified variants on chromosome 15q25.1 that increase the risks of both lung cancer and nicotine dependence and associated smoking behavior. However, there remains debate as to whether the association with lung cancer is direct or is mediated by pathways related to smoking behavior. Here, the authors apply a novel method for mediation analysis, allowing for gene-environment interaction, to a lung cancer case-control study (1992-2004) conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital using 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs8034191 and rs1051730, on 15q25.1. The results are validated using data from 3 other lung cancer studies. Tests for additive interaction (P = 2 × 10(-10) and P = 1 × 10(-9)) and multiplicative interaction (P = 0.01 and P = 0.01) were significant. Pooled analyses yielded a direct-effect odds ratio of 1.26 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19, 1.33; P = 2 × 10(-15)) for rs8034191 and an indirect-effect odds ratio of 1.01 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.01; P = 0.09); the proportion of increased risk mediated by smoking was 3.2%. For rs1051730, direct- and indirect-effect odds ratios were 1.26 (95% CI: 1.19, 1.33; P = 1 × 10(-15)) and 1.00 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.01; P = 0.22), respectively, with a proportion mediated of 2.3%. Adjustment for measurement error in smoking behavior allowing up to 75% measurement error increased the proportions mediated to 12.5% and 9.2%, respectively. These analyses indicate that the association of the variants with lung cancer operates primarily through other pathways.

  12. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents results of experiments conducted to measure release fractions during certain tank retrieval processes. The tests were performed in a 1/4 scale model of a waste storage tank. The retrieval processes simulated were: (1) Discharging liquid or slurry from the mouth of a vertically oriented two-in. Schedule 40 pipe. The discharging material was in free-fall from the mouth of the pipe near the top of the tank into a liquid or slurry pool at the bottom of the tank. (2) The jet from a 9/16-in.-diameter nozzle transferring liquid or slurry waste from one side of the tank to the other. The discharging liquid was aimed at the opposite side of the tank from the nozzle and either impacted the tank wall or fell into a liquid or slurry pool in the bottom of the tank. (3) A high pressure fan jet of liquid striking a steel plate or simulated waste from a stand-off distance of a few inches. For each process, a water-soluble fluorescent dye was added to the liquid fraction as a tracer. Kaolin clay was used to represent the solids. The tank was covered and there was no forced ventilation in the tank during the tests. Six air samples were collected during each test. The air samples were collected at fixed positions in the tank. The air sample filters were dried and weighed to determine the solids collection. The fluorescent dye was then leached from each filter and quantified with a fluorometer to determine the collection of liquid. Samples of the slurry and liquid simulants were also collected to determine the quantities of simulant used in each test. To calculate the release fraction, the quantity collected on each air sample was adjusted for the fraction of the tank volume sampled and divided by the quantity of material exposed in the simulation. The method was not as sensitive for the solids content as it was for the liquid content, but in those instances where a solids release fraction was determined, it was in relatively good agreement with that of the

  13. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    DOE PAGES

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifoldmore » singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.« less

  14. Understanding Fraction Multiplication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezuk, Nadine S.; Armstrong, Barbara E.

    1992-01-01

    Presents five activities to help students construct meaning for multiplying fractions through real-world problem contexts, physical or pictorial models, the recognition of patterns, and the use of calculators. In the context of a garden plot, worksheets examine various aspects of parts of plots, patterns in plots, and a maximization problem.…

  15. Fractions through Fruit Salad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Lisa

    1987-01-01

    The mathematics concept of fractions was taught to a group of learning disabled, dyslexic, and multiply handicapped students (15-20 years old) by preparing a fruit salad. Enthusiastic student participation and enhanced knowledge illustrated the effectiveness of employing several sensory modes in learning activities. (CB)

  16. Field-Flow Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Karin D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique for separating samples that range over 15 orders of magnitude in molecular weight. Discusses theory, apparatus, and sample preparation techniques. Lists several types of field-flow fractionation (FFF) and their uses: sedimentation FFF, thermal FFF, flow FFF, electrical FFF, and steric FFF. (ML)

  17. Avoidance of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Kathleen; Kerslake, Daphne

    The Concepts in Secondary Mathematics and Science (CSMS) and Strategies and Errors in Secondary Mathematics (SESM) research projects based at Chelsa College, England, have shown the marked reluctance of secondary school students to use fractions when solving mathematical problems, even though they have been taught the topic for a number of years.…

  18. Sweet Work with Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinogradova, Natalya; Blaine, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Almost everyone loves chocolate. However, the same cannot be said about fractions, which are loved by markedly fewer. Middle school students tend to view them with wary respect, but little affection. The authors attempt to sweeten the subject by describing a type of game involving division of chocolate bars. The activity they describe provides a…

  19. Videodisc Instruction in Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnine, Douglas; And Others

    1987-01-01

    How laser videodisc technology can be used to improve mathematics instruction is described, with note of the development of a videodisc curriculum on mastering fractions. Relevant research is reviewed, as well as how teachers can use the technology. The instructional design is described, and field-testing and revision reported. (MNS)

  20. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-01

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in high-degree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  1. From gene to structure: The protein factory of the NBICS Centre of Kurchatov Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Boyko, K. M.; Lipkin, A. V.; Popov, V. O. Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2013-05-15

    The Protein Factory was established at the Centre for Nano, Bio, Info, Cognitive, and Social Sciences and Technologies (NBICS Centre) of the National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute' in 2010. The Protein Factory, together with the Centre for Synchrotron Radiation and Nanotechnology, promote research on structural biology. This paper presents the technology platforms developed at the Protein Factory and the facilities available for researchers. The main projects currently being performed at the Protein Factory are briefly described.

  2. Factorial Structure of the New Ecological Paradigm Scale in Two French Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleury-Bahi, Ghozlane; Marcouyeux, Aurore; Renard, Elise; Roussiau, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The principal objective of this research is to test the factorial structure of the New Ecological Paradigm scale on a population of men and women residing in France. The tested model is a second-order factorial model. This factorial structure is evaluated on two separate samples to test the stability of the solution (a first sample of 253…

  3. Evolutionary algorithm for the neutrino factory front end design

    SciTech Connect

    Poklonskiy, Alexey A.; Neuffer, David; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The Neutrino Factory is an important tool in the long-term neutrino physics program. Substantial effort is put internationally into designing this facility in order to achieve desired performance within the allotted budget. This accelerator is a secondary beam machine: neutrinos are produced by means of the decay of muons. Muons, in turn, are produced by the decay of pions, produced by hitting the target by a beam of accelerated protons suitable for acceleration. Due to the physics of this process, extra conditioning of the pion beam coming from the target is needed in order to effectively perform subsequent acceleration. The subsystem of the Neutrino Factory that performs this conditioning is called Front End, its main performance characteristic is the number of the produced muons.

  4. Optimal Staging of Acceleration and Cooling in a Neutrino Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.

    2005-12-01

    Schemes to produce intense sources of high-energy muons, Neutrino Factories, beta beams, and colliders, require collection, rf capture, and transport of particle beams with unprecedented emittances, both longitudinally and transversely. These large initial emittances must be reduced or cooled both in size and in energy spread before the muons can be efficiently accelerated to multi-GeV energies. The acceleration stage becomes critical in formulating and optimizing muon beams; individual stages are strongly interlinked and not independent as is the case in most conventional acceleration systems. Most importantly, the degree of cooling, or cooling channel, depends on the choice of acceleration. This work discusses two basic, but different approaches to a Neutrino Factory and how the optimal strategy depends on beam parameters and method of acceleration.

  5. SEARCH FOR NEW PHYSICS AT A SUPER-B FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWDER,T.E.; SONI,A.

    2004-01-05

    The importance of a Super-B Factory in the search for New Physics, in particular, due to CP-od phase(s) from physics beyond the Standard Model is surveyed. The first point to emphasize is that we know now how to directly measure all three angles of the unitarity triangle very cleanly, i. e. without theoretical assumptions with irreducible theory error {le} 1%; however this requires much more luminosity than is currently available at B-factories. Direct searches via penguin-dominated hadronic modes as well as radiative, pair-leptonic and semi-leptonic decays are also discussed. Null tests of the SM are stressed as these will play a crucial role especially if the effects of BSM phase(s) on B-physics are small.

  6. Smoking Intensity among Male Factory Workers in Kunming, China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, K-W; Tsoh, JY; Cui, W; Li, X; Kohrman, M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated the intensity of cigarette consumption and its correlates among male factory workers in China, who has benefitted little from recent public health efforts to reduce smoking rates. Methods Data was collected from men working in factories of Kunming city, Yunnan, China, who are current daily smokers (N = 490). A multinomial logistic regression was conducted to examine the factors in association with smoking intensity in light, moderate, and heavy level. Results Light smoking correlated with social smoking, smoking the first cigarette later in the day, self-reported health condition, and quit intention. Heavy smoking was associated with purchase of lower priced cigarettes, difficulty refraining from smoking, and pre-hypertensive blood pressure. Conclusion Analyses of the ways specific demographic groups consume cigarettes in smoking prevalent regions can help guide tobacco-control strategies. Findings support that the selection of tobacco-control strategies may take smoking intensity and its correlates of the targeted population into consideration. PMID:23572373

  7. Systems analysis and futuristic designs of advanced biofuel factory concepts.

    SciTech Connect

    Chianelli, Russ; Leathers, James; Thoma, Steven George; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. is addicted to petroleum--a dependency that periodically shocks the economy, compromises national security, and adversely affects the environment. If liquid fuels remain the main energy source for U.S. transportation for the foreseeable future, the system solution is the production of new liquid fuels that can directly displace diesel and gasoline. This study focuses on advanced concepts for biofuel factory production, describing three design concepts: biopetroleum, biodiesel, and higher alcohols. A general schematic is illustrated for each concept with technical description and analysis for each factory design. Looking beyond current biofuel pursuits by industry, this study explores unconventional feedstocks (e.g., extremophiles), out-of-favor reaction processes (e.g., radiation-induced catalytic cracking), and production of new fuel sources traditionally deemed undesirable (e.g., fusel oils). These concepts lay the foundation and path for future basic science and applied engineering to displace petroleum as a transportation energy source for good.

  8. The Operator Guide: An Ambient Persuasive Interface in the Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschtscherjakov, Alexander; Reitberger, Wolfgang; Pöhr, Florian; Tscheligi, Manfred

    In this paper we introduce the context of a semiconductor factory as a promising area for the application of innovative interaction approaches. In order to increase efficiency ambient persuasive interfaces, which influence the operators' behaviour to perform in an optimized way, could constitute a potential strategy. We present insights gained from qualitative studies conducted in a specific semiconductor factory and provide a description of typical work processes and already deployed interfaces in this context. These findings informed the design of a prototype of an ambient persuasive interface within this realm - the "Operator Guide". Its overall aim is to improve work efficiency, while still maintaining a minimal error rate. We provide a detailed description of the Operator Guide along with an outlook of the next steps within a user-centered design approach.

  9. On-line separators for the Dubna Superheavy Element Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popeko, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    The main goal of creation of a Superheavy Element Factory at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) is to sufficiently improve the efficiency of studies on heavy and superheavy nuclei. The factory will be based on a high-current DC-280 cyclotron. The use of beams with the intensity up to 6 ×1013 s-1 (10 pμA) requires effective separators providing high suppression of unwanted reaction products. Following the analysis of the kinematic characteristics of several hundreds of reactions, a conclusion was drawn that it is necessary to construct three separators optimized for specific tasks: a universal gas-filled separator for synthesis and study of the properties of heavy isotopes, a velocity filter for spectroscopic investigations, and a pre-separator for further chemical separation and precise mass measurements.

  10. R&D Toward Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2003-06-24

    R&D aimed at the production, acceleration, and storage of intense muon beams is under way in the U.S., in Europe, and in Japan. Considerable progress has been made in the past few years toward the design of a ''Neutrino Factory'' in which a beam of 20-50 GeV mu- or mu+ is stored. Decay neutrinos from the beam illuminate a detector located roughly 3000 km from the ring. Here, we briefly describe the ingredients of a Neutrino Factory and then discuss the current R&D program and its results. A key concept in the design is ''ionization cooling,'' a process whereby the muon emittance is reduced by repeated interactions with an absorber material followed by reacceleration with high-gradient rf cavities. Plans to test this concept in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) are well along and are described briefly.

  11. R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2009-04-29

    There is considerable interest in the use of muon beams to create either an intense source of decay neutrinos aimed at a detector located 3000-7500 km away (a Neutrino Factory), or a Muon Collider that produces high-luminosity collisions at the energy frontier. R&D aimed at producing these facilities has been under way for more than 10 years. This paper will review experimental results from MuCool, MERIT, and MICE and indicate the extent to which they will provide proof-of-principle demonstrations of the key technologies required for a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. Progress in constructing components for the MICE experiment will also be described.

  12. An Introduction to Continued Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Charles G.

    Provided is an introduction to the properties of continued fractions for the intellectually curious high school student. Among the topics included are (1) Expansion of Rational Numbers into Simple Continued Fractions, (2) Convergents, (3) Continued Fractions and Linear Diophantine Equations of the Type am + bn = c, (4) Continued Fractions and…

  13. 6. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT OF CA. 1948 FACTORY ADDITION, WITH REINFORCED CONCRETE FRAME AND FLOOR OF REINFORCED CONCRETE TEE-BEAMS, LOOKING NORTH. AT LEFT IS DEEP DRAW, HEAVY PRESS MANUFACTURED BY E. W. BLISS CO., BROOKLYN, NEW YORK. PRESS #3-1/2 B, PATENTED BY E. W. BLISS CO., 1893. MANUFACTURERS PLATE INDICATES PRESS DATES FROM 1920. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  14. Feedback implementation options and issues for B factory accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Briggs, D.; Eisen, N.; Hindi, H.; Hosseini, W.; Oxoby, G.; Linscott, I.; Coiro, O.; Ghigo, A.; Serio, M.; Lambertson, G.; Voelker, F.

    1992-09-01

    The proposed B factory accelerator facilities will require active feedback systems to control multibunch instabilities. These feedback systems must operate in machines with thousands of circulating bunches and with short (2--4 ns) interbunch intervals. The functional requirements for transverse (betatron) and longitudinal (synchrotron) feedback systems are presented. Several possible implementation options are discussed and system requirements developed. Conceptual designs are presented for the PEP II transverse and longitudinal feedback systems.

  15. A first generation factory for typing DNA polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.L.; Klug, D.; David, D.

    1994-09-01

    Although linkage mapping of fully penetrant, single-gene disorders can readily be accomplished using {open_quotes}manual{close_quotes} polymorphism genotyping methods, mapping of genes responsible for genetically more complex disorders such as asthma and schizophrenia will likely require more highly automated approaches. Routine clinical application of linkage analysis will also require reliable automated methods. To meet these needs we have initiated a first generation factory for analysis of short tandem repeat polymorphisms. The factory includes an eight-pronged pipetting robot for efficient PCR setup, amplification within high density microtiter plates, and a scanning fluorescence detection system for automatic sizing of amplification products. Initial throughput for the factory will be several hundred thousand genotypes per year. The heart of the factory is a new scanning fluorescence detection system for gel electrophoresis. The system employs an argon laser for excitation and has the capability of simultaneously detecting four different fluorescent dyes. The detector scans across the bottom of short, wide denaturing polyacrylamide gels which routinely contain 144 lanes. Emitted fluorescent light is collected with a high numerical aperture microscope objective and transmitted through a fiber optic cable, dichroic mirrors and band pass filters to a series of photomultiplier tubes. Amplified output from the photomultiplier tubes is digitized and fed into computers for further analysis. Software has been written for viewing the gel images, for lane finding and for allele identification. Rhodamine-labeled {lambda} DNA standard fragments ranging in size from 70 to 300 bases are utilized for lane identification and allele sizing. Each gel run takes 3 hours, and each gel can be loaded at least three times. Multiple markers can be amplified simultaneously and detected without prior concentration.

  16. A VERY FAST RAMPING MUON SYNCHROTRON FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    SUMMERS,D.J.BERG,J.S.PALMER,R.B.GARREN,A.A.

    2003-05-12

    A 4600 Hz fast ramping synchrotron is studied as an economical way of accelerating muons from 4 to 20 GeV/c for a neutrino factory. Eddy current losses are minimized by the low machine duty cycle plus thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations and thin copper wires. Combined function magnets with high gradients alternating within single magnets form the lattice. Muon survival is 83%.

  17. Physics of a high-luminosity Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.E.

    1992-10-01

    This paper highlights the physics capabilities of a Tau-Charm Factory; i.e., high luminosity ({approximately}10{sup 33}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider operating in the center-of-mass energy range of 3-5 GeV, with a high-precision, general-purpose detector. Recent developments in {tau} and charm physics are emphasized.

  18. Algal omics: unlocking bioproduct diversity in algae cell factories.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Michael T; Pienkos, Philip T

    2015-03-01

    Rapid advances in "omic" technologies are helping to unlock the full potential of microalgae as multi-use feedstocks, with utility in an array of industrial biotechnology, biofuel, and biomedical applications. In turn, algae are emerging as highly attractive candidates for development as microbial cell factories. In this review, we examine the wide array of potential algal bioproducts, with a focus upon the role of omic technologies in driving bioproduct discovery and optimization in microalgal systems.

  19. ISIS as a Proton Driver for a Neutrino Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, Christopher R.

    2004-10-01

    The paper describes plans to develop the ISIS accelerators into a high intensity, multi-megawatt, proton driver for a range of fixed-target studies. Possibilities include use in a Neutrino Factory and an advanced spallation neutron source. A phased upgrade would allow intermediate accelerator R&D on pressing problems such as nanosecond proton bunch compression, the pion target and the muon capture channel. A possible bunch compression experiment using the existing ISIS synchrotron is also outlined.

  20. Wilson Prize Lecture: The Novosibirsk Tau/Charm Factory Project: prospect/status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrinsky, Alexander

    2002-04-01

    For a long time at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, we develop step-by-step our electron-electron and electron-positron colliders. Now, the VEPP-4M collider (total energy up to 11 GeV), with a special emphasis on Two-Photon hadron physics, is in operation. The new VEPP-2000 collider, as direct extension of our VEPP-2M collider (which finished its very productive life in 2000) to the energy up to 2 GeV total, should start its commissioning phase in 2002. But our main goal in the field (for quite a few years already) is development and construction of Tau/Charm Factory (VEPP-5 collider). There are 3 main modes of operation foreseen: Maximal luminosity - up to 1 \\cdot 10^34 cm-2 sec-1. For reaching of this ambitious goal we intend to use ``round beam'' approach. The approach will be used and studied at VEPP-2000. Longitudinally polarized collisions (proposed and proved theoretically in Novosibirsk still in 1969) with luminosity 1 \\cdot 10^33 cm-2 sec-1. High monochromaticity option (down to few 10 of keV). Now the new injector complex, which would produce intense low emittance bunches of positrons and electrons (for VEPP-5, VEPP-4M and VEPP-2000 efficient operation) is nearing completion. Fraction of the VEPP-5 tunnel is constructed. We hope, when the VEPP-5 collider would become closer to completion, to attract international collaborators to use unique features of our Tau/Charm Factory.

  1. Testing fractional action cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchigolev, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests, which gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  2. [Fractionated P-bilirubins].

    PubMed

    Schou, C S; Mortensen, H

    1989-08-14

    A diazo-based dry film technique for the estimation of different bilirubins in plasma is now available. This procedure separates bilirubins from icteric sera into three separate fractions: bilirubin (unconjugated), bilirubin-glucuronides (mono + diglucuronide) and bilirubin-albumin. In newborns with prolonged jaundice classification of hyperbilirubinemia is of importance for choice of treatment. While binding of bilirubin and bilirubin-glucuronides to albumin is non covalent, reversible, bilirubin-albumin appears to be firmly associated with albumin by covalent bonds. This causes delayed clearance of this bilirubin fraction from plasma as the half-life of albumin is approximately 18 days. Hence the substance concentration of bilirubin-albumin will decrease at a slower rate than will bilirubin and bilirubin-glucuronide, despite hepatobiliary recovery. Bilirubin-albumin may therefore prove of value in the differentiation between different clinical entities with hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:2773134

  3. Infinite Factorial Unbounded-State Hidden Markov Model.

    PubMed

    Valera, Isabel; Ruiz, Francisco J R; Perez-Cruz, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    There are many scenarios in artificial intelligence, signal processing or medicine, in which a temporal sequence consists of several unknown overlapping independent causes, and we are interested in accurately recovering those canonical causes. Factorial hidden Markov models (FHMMs) present the versatility to provide a good fit to these scenarios. However, in some scenarios, the number of causes or the number of states of the FHMM cannot be known or limited a priori. In this paper, we propose an infinite factorial unbounded-state hidden Markov model (IFUHMM), in which the number of parallel hidden Markovmodels (HMMs) and states in each HMM are potentially unbounded. We rely on a Bayesian nonparametric (BNP) prior over integer-valued matrices, in which the columns represent the Markov chains, the rows the time indexes, and the integers the state for each chain and time instant. First, we extend the existent infinite factorial binary-state HMM to allow for any number of states. Then, we modify this model to allow for an unbounded number of states and derive an MCMC-based inference algorithm that properly deals with the trade-off between the unbounded number of states and chains. We illustrate the performance of our proposed models in the power disaggregation problem. PMID:26571511

  4. Data Processing Factory for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoughton, Christopher; Adelman, Jennifer; Annis, James T.; Hendry, John; Inkmann, John; Jester, Sebastian; Kent, Steven M.; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Lee, Brian; Lin, Huan; Peoples, John, Jr.; Sparks, Robert; Tucker, Douglas; Vanden Berk, Dan; Yanny, Brian; Yocum, Dan

    2002-12-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data handling presents two challenges: large data volume and timely production of spectroscopic plates from imaging data. A data processing factory, using technologies both old and new, handles this flow. Distribution to end users is via disk farms, to serve corrected images and calibrated spectra, and a database, to efficiently process catalog queries. For distribution of modest amounts of data from Apache Point Observatory to Fermilab, scripts use rsync to update files, while larger data transfers are accomplished by shipping magnetic tapes commercially. All data processing pipelines are wrapped in scripts to address consecutive phases: preparation, submission, checking, and quality control. We constructed the factory by chaining these pipelines together while using an operational database to hold processed imaging catalogs. The science database catalogs all imaging and spectroscopic object, with pointers to the various external files associated with them. Diverse computing systems address particular processing phases. UNIX computers handle tape reading and writing, as well as calibration steps that require access to a large amount of data with relatively modest computational demands. Commodity CPUs process steps that require access to a limited amount of data with more demanding computations requirements. Disk servers optimized for cost per Gbyte serve terabytes of processed data, while servers optimized for disk read speed run SQLServer software to process queries on the catalogs. This factory produced data for the SDSS Early Data Release in June 2001, and it is currently producing Data Release One, scheduled for January 2003.

  5. A Low energy neutrino factory for large theta(13)

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; Mena, Olga; Pascoli, Silvia; /Durham U., IPPP

    2007-01-01

    If the value of {theta}{sub 13} is within the reach of the upcoming generation of long-baseline experiments, T2K and NOvA, they show that a low-energy neutrino factory, with peak energy in the few GeV range, would provide a sensitive tool to explore CP-violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy. They consider baselines with typical length 1000-1500 km. The unique performance of the low energy neutrino factory is due to the rich neutrino oscillation pattern at energies between 1 and 4 GeV at baselines {Omicron}(1000) km. They perform both a semi-analytical study of the sensitivities and a numerical analysis to explore how well this setup can measure {theta}{sub 13}, CP-violation, and determine the type of mass hierarchy and the {theta}{sub 23} quadrant. A low energy neutrino factory provides a powerful tool to resolve ambiguities and make precise parameter determinations, for both large and fairly small values of the mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13}.

  6. Quality of Life Among Thai Workers in Textile Dyeing Factories

    PubMed Central

    Kittipichai, Wirin; Arsa, Rattanaporn; Jirapongsuwan, Ann; Singhakant, Chatchawal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of a cross-sectional study was to investigate factors influencing the quality of life among Thai workers in textile dyeing factories. Samples included 205 Thai workers from five textile dyeing factories located in the suburban area of Bangkok in Thailand. Data were collected with a self-administered questionnaire. Scales of the questionnaire had reliability coefficients ranging from 0.70–0.91. The results revealed that the overall quality of life among workers was most likely between good and moderate levels, and the percentage-mean score was 74.77. The seven factors associated with the overall quality of life were co-worker relationships, safety at work in the dimension of accident prevention, job characteristics, supervisory relationships, welfares, marital status, and physical environment. Furthermore, co-worker relationships, accident prevention, and marital status were three considerable predictors accounted for 23% of the variance in the overall quality of life among workers in textile dyeing factories. PMID:25948458

  7. Pulmonary functions in plastic factory workers: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Farah; Singh, Pawan; Chandra, Prakash; Gupta, Keshav; Vaney, Neelam

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to long term air pollution in the work environment may result in decreased lung functions and various other health problems. A significant occupational hazard to lung functions is experienced by plastic factory workers. The present study is planned to assess the pulmonary functions of workers in the plastic factory where recycling of pastic material was done. These workers were constantly exposed to fumes of various chemicals throughout the day. Thirty one workers of plastic factory were assessed for their pulmonary functions. Parameters were compared with 31 age and sex matched controls not exposed to the same environment. The pulmonary function tests were done using Sibelmed Datospir 120 B portable spirometer. A significant decrease in most of the flow rates (MEF 25%, MEF 50%, MEF 75% and FEF 25-75%) and most of the lung volumes and capacities (FVC, FEV1, VC, TV, ERV, MVV) were observed in the workers. Smoking and duration of exposure were not affecting the lung functions as the non smokers also showed a similar decrement in pulmonary functions. Similarly the workers working for less than 5 years also had decrement in pulmonary functions indicating that their lungs are being affected even if they have worked for one year. Exposure to the organic dust in the work environment should be controlled by adequate engineering measures, complemented by effective personal respiratory protection. PMID:22315811

  8. New Dry Fractionation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Cooper, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes new fractionation methods that are used to create dust that is respirable for testing the effects of inhalation of lunar dust in preparation for future manned lunar exploration. Because lunar dust is a very limited commodity, a method that does not result in loss of the material had to be developed. The dust separation system that is described incorporates some traditional methods, while preventing the dust from being contaminated or changed in reactivity properties while also limiting losses.

  9. Fractional Galilean symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseiny, Ali; Rouhani, Shahin

    2016-09-01

    We generalize the differential representation of the operators of the Galilean algebras to include fractional derivatives. As a result a whole new class of scale invariant Galilean algebras are obtained. The first member of this class has dynamical index z = 2 similar to the Schrödinger algebra. The second member of the class has dynamical index z = 3 / 2, which happens to be the dynamical index Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation.

  10. Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia (SPG45) with mental retardation maps to 10q24.3-q25.1.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Umut; Koroglu, Cigdem; Kocasoy Orhan, Elif; Ugur, Sibel Aylin; Tolun, Aslihan

    2009-10-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are characterized by progressive spasticity in the lower limbs. They are clinically heterogeneous, and pure forms as well as complicated forms with other accompanying clinical findings are known. HSPs are also genetically heterogeneous. We performed clinical and genetic studies in a consanguineous family with five affected members. A genome scan using 405 microsatellite markers for eight members of the family identified candidate gene loci, and subsequent fine mapping in 16 members identified the gene locus responsible for the HSP. The clinical manifestations were very early onset spastic paraplegia (SPG) accompanied by mental retardation and ocular signs. The gene locus was identified as the interval 102.05-106.64 Mbp on chromosome 10. Gene MRPL43 was analyzed in the patients. No mutation but high levels of mRNA were detected. We have mapped a novel autosomal recessive complicated form of HSP (SPG45) to a 4.6-Mbp region at 10q24.3-q25.1 with multipoint logarithm of odds scores >4.5.

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies variation at 6q25.1 associated with survival in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David C.; Weinhold, Niels; Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Chen, Bowang; Kaiser, Martin; Begum, Dil B.; Hillengass, Jens; Bertsch, Uta; Gregory, Walter A.; Cairns, David; Jackson, Graham H.; Försti, Asta; Nickel, Jolanta; Hoffmann, Per; Nöethen, Markus M.; Stephens, Owen W.; Barlogie, Bart; Davis, Faith E.; Hemminki, Kari; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Houlston, Richard S.; Morgan, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    Survival following a diagnosis of multiple myeloma (MM) varies between patients and some of these differences may be a consequence of inherited genetic variation. In this study, to identify genetic markers associated with MM overall survival (MM-OS), we conduct a meta-analysis of four patient series of European ancestry, totalling 3,256 patients with 1,200 MM-associated deaths. Each series is genotyped for ∼600,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms across the genome; genotypes for six million common variants are imputed using 1000 Genomes Project and UK10K as the reference. The association between genotype and OS is assessed by Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for age, sex, International staging system and treatment. We identify a locus at 6q25.1 marked by rs12374648 associated with MM-OS (hazard ratio=1.34, 95% confidence interval=1.22–1.48, P=4.69 × 10–9). Our findings have potential clinical implications since they demonstrate that inherited genotypes can provide prognostic information in addition to conventional tumor acquired prognostic factors. PMID:26743840

  12. Model Fractional Chern Insulators.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Jörg; Liu, Zhao; Bergholtz, Emil J

    2016-05-27

    We devise local lattice models whose ground states are model fractional Chern insulators-Abelian and non-Abelian topologically ordered states characterized by exact ground state degeneracies at any finite size and infinite entanglement gaps. Most saliently, we construct exact parent Hamiltonians for two distinct families of bosonic lattice generalizations of the Z_{k} parafermion quantum Hall states: (i) color-entangled fractional Chern insulators at band filling fractions ν=k/(C+1) and (ii) nematic states at ν=k/2, where C is the Chern number of the lowest band. In spite of a fluctuating Berry curvature, our construction is partially frustration free: the ground states reside entirely within the lowest band and exactly minimize a local (k+1) body repulsion term by term. In addition to providing the first known models hosting intriguing states such as higher Chern number generalizations of the Fibonacci anyon quantum Hall states, the remarkable stability and finite-size properties make our models particularly well suited for the study of novel phenomena involving, e.g., twist defects and proximity induced superconductivity, as well as being a guide for designing experiments.

  13. Model Fractional Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, Jörg; Liu, Zhao; Bergholtz, Emil J.

    2016-05-01

    We devise local lattice models whose ground states are model fractional Chern insulators—Abelian and non-Abelian topologically ordered states characterized by exact ground state degeneracies at any finite size and infinite entanglement gaps. Most saliently, we construct exact parent Hamiltonians for two distinct families of bosonic lattice generalizations of the Zk parafermion quantum Hall states: (i) color-entangled fractional Chern insulators at band filling fractions ν =k /(C +1 ) and (ii) nematic states at ν =k /2 , where C is the Chern number of the lowest band. In spite of a fluctuating Berry curvature, our construction is partially frustration free: the ground states reside entirely within the lowest band and exactly minimize a local (k +1 ) body repulsion term by term. In addition to providing the first known models hosting intriguing states such as higher Chern number generalizations of the Fibonacci anyon quantum Hall states, the remarkable stability and finite-size properties make our models particularly well suited for the study of novel phenomena involving, e.g., twist defects and proximity induced superconductivity, as well as being a guide for designing experiments.

  14. Model Fractional Chern Insulators.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Jörg; Liu, Zhao; Bergholtz, Emil J

    2016-05-27

    We devise local lattice models whose ground states are model fractional Chern insulators-Abelian and non-Abelian topologically ordered states characterized by exact ground state degeneracies at any finite size and infinite entanglement gaps. Most saliently, we construct exact parent Hamiltonians for two distinct families of bosonic lattice generalizations of the Z_{k} parafermion quantum Hall states: (i) color-entangled fractional Chern insulators at band filling fractions ν=k/(C+1) and (ii) nematic states at ν=k/2, where C is the Chern number of the lowest band. In spite of a fluctuating Berry curvature, our construction is partially frustration free: the ground states reside entirely within the lowest band and exactly minimize a local (k+1) body repulsion term by term. In addition to providing the first known models hosting intriguing states such as higher Chern number generalizations of the Fibonacci anyon quantum Hall states, the remarkable stability and finite-size properties make our models particularly well suited for the study of novel phenomena involving, e.g., twist defects and proximity induced superconductivity, as well as being a guide for designing experiments. PMID:27284668

  15. Total fume and metal concentrations during welding in selected factories in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Balkhyour, Mansour Ahmed; Goknil, Mohammad Khalid

    2010-07-01

    Welding is a major industrial process used for joining metals. Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a serious occupational health problem all over the world. The degree of risk to welder's health from fumes depends on composition, concentration, and the length of exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate workers' welding fume exposure levels in some industries in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. In each factory, the air in the breathing zone within 0.5 m from welders was sampled during 8-hour shifts. Total particulates, manganese, copper, and molybdenum concentrations of welding fumes were determined. Mean values of eight-hour average particulate concentrations measured during welding at the welders breathing zone were 6.3 mg/m(3) (Factory 1), 5.3 mg/m(3) (Factory 2), 11.3 mg/m(3) (Factory 3), 6.8 mg/m(3) (Factory 4), 4.7 mg/m(3) (Factory 5), and 3.0 mg/m(3) (Factory 6). Mean values of airborne manganese, copper, and molybdenum levels measured during welding were in the range of 0.010 mg/m(3)-0.477 mg/m(3), 0.001 mg/m(3)-0.080 mg/m(3) and 0.001 mg/m(3)-0.058 mg/m(3) respectively. Mean values of calculated equivalent exposure values were: 1.50 (Factory 1), 1.56 (Factory 2), 5.14 (Factory 3), 2.21 (Factory 4), 2.89 (Factory 5), and 1.20 (Factory 6). The welders in factories 1, 2, 3, and 4 were exposed to welding fume concentration above the SASO limit value, which may increase the risk of respiratory health problems. PMID:20717553

  16. Total Fume and Metal Concentrations during Welding in Selected Factories in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Balkhyour, Mansour Ahmed; Goknil, Mohammad Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Welding is a major industrial process used for joining metals. Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a serious occupational health problem all over the world. The degree of risk to welder’s health from fumes depends on composition, concentration, and the length of exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate workers’ welding fume exposure levels in some industries in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. In each factory, the air in the breathing zone within 0.5 m from welders was sampled during 8-hour shifts. Total particulates, manganese, copper, and molybdenum concentrations of welding fumes were determined. Mean values of eight-hour average particulate concentrations measured during welding at the welders breathing zone were 6.3 mg/m3 (Factory 1), 5.3 mg/m3 (Factory 2), 11.3 mg/m3 (Factory 3), 6.8 mg/m3 (Factory 4), 4.7 mg/m3 (Factory 5), and 3.0 mg/m3 (Factory 6). Mean values of airborne manganese, copper, and molybdenum levels measured during welding were in the range of 0.010 mg/m3–0.477 mg/m3, 0.001 mg/m3–0.080 mg/m3 and 0.001 mg/m3–0.058 mg/m3 respectively. Mean values of calculated equivalent exposure values were: 1.50 (Factory 1), 1.56 (Factory 2), 5.14 (Factory 3), 2.21 (Factory 4), 2.89 (Factory 5), and 1.20 (Factory 6). The welders in factories 1, 2, 3, and 4 were exposed to welding fume concentration above the SASO limit value, which may increase the risk of respiratory health problems. PMID:20717553

  17. Total fume and metal concentrations during welding in selected factories in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Balkhyour, Mansour Ahmed; Goknil, Mohammad Khalid

    2010-07-01

    Welding is a major industrial process used for joining metals. Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a serious occupational health problem all over the world. The degree of risk to welder's health from fumes depends on composition, concentration, and the length of exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate workers' welding fume exposure levels in some industries in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. In each factory, the air in the breathing zone within 0.5 m from welders was sampled during 8-hour shifts. Total particulates, manganese, copper, and molybdenum concentrations of welding fumes were determined. Mean values of eight-hour average particulate concentrations measured during welding at the welders breathing zone were 6.3 mg/m(3) (Factory 1), 5.3 mg/m(3) (Factory 2), 11.3 mg/m(3) (Factory 3), 6.8 mg/m(3) (Factory 4), 4.7 mg/m(3) (Factory 5), and 3.0 mg/m(3) (Factory 6). Mean values of airborne manganese, copper, and molybdenum levels measured during welding were in the range of 0.010 mg/m(3)-0.477 mg/m(3), 0.001 mg/m(3)-0.080 mg/m(3) and 0.001 mg/m(3)-0.058 mg/m(3) respectively. Mean values of calculated equivalent exposure values were: 1.50 (Factory 1), 1.56 (Factory 2), 5.14 (Factory 3), 2.21 (Factory 4), 2.89 (Factory 5), and 1.20 (Factory 6). The welders in factories 1, 2, 3, and 4 were exposed to welding fume concentration above the SASO limit value, which may increase the risk of respiratory health problems.

  18. A Measurement of the Exclusive Branching Fraction for B → π K at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Aspinwall, Marie Louise

    2002-02-01

    This thesis presents an exclusive measurement of the branching fraction B for the rare charmless hadronic B decays to πK final states. A sample of 22.57±0.36 million BB pairs was collected with the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's PEP-II B Factory, during the Run 1 data taking period (1999-2000).

  19. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  20. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  1. Human cytomegalovirus microRNA miR-US25-1-5p inhibits viral replication by targeting multiple cellular genes during infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shujuan; Qi, Ying; He, Rong; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Ma, Yanping; Guo, Xin; Shao, Yaozhong; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in regulating various cellular processes in plants, animals, and viruses. This mechanism is also utilized by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in the process of infection and pathogenesis. The HCMV-encoded miRNA, hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p, was highly expressed during lytic and latent infections, and was found to inhibit viral replication. Identification of functional target genes of this microRNA is important in that it will enable a better understanding of the function of hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p during HCMV infection. In the present study, 35 putative cellular transcript targets of hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p were identified. Down-regulation of the targets YWHAE, UBB, NPM1, and HSP90AA1 by hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p was validated by luciferase reporter assay and Western blot analysis. In addition, we showed that hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p could inhibit viral replication by interacting with these targets, the existence of which may impact virus replication directly or indirectly.

  2. [Risk assessment and countermeasure of BTEX in pesticide factory].

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Wang, Tie-Yu; Du, Li-Yu; Tan, Bing; Zhu, Zhao-Yun; Lu, Yong-Long

    2013-07-01

    BTEX are important environmental pollutants, harmful to human through respiratory inhalation, digestive tract and skin contact, and also have teratogenic, mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. BTEX were detected in multi-media to identify their distributions and assess their human health risk in a pesticide factory in Hebei province. Purge and trap GC-MS, adsorption/thermal desorption GC chromatography and the health risk assessment model were applied, and corresponding management measures were proposed. The results showed that BTEX existed in soil, dust, air, groundwater and wastewater. The concentration of BTEX in dust of the production area was 7.33 mg x kg(-1), in particular the concentration of toluene was 5.64 mg x kg(-1), exceeding the Canadian industrial land standard. Building three scenarios for working more than 10 years, 20 years and 30 years, the total non-carcinogens index was 4.19 x10(-3), 8.25 x 10(-3) and 1.22 x 10(-2), respectively, all lower than 1; the carcinogens index of benzene was 1.70 x 10(-7), 3.34 x 10(-7) and 4.92 x 10(-7), respectively, all lower than 10(-6). It indicated that there was no significant non-carcinogens and carcinogens hazard to workers inside the factory, but they might be exposed to more health risks if their work experience increase. Finally, recommendations for improving the environmental quality and personnel security in the factory were proposed based on the research results. PMID:24028020

  3. [Risk assessment and countermeasure of BTEX in pesticide factory].

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Wang, Tie-Yu; Du, Li-Yu; Tan, Bing; Zhu, Zhao-Yun; Lu, Yong-Long

    2013-07-01

    BTEX are important environmental pollutants, harmful to human through respiratory inhalation, digestive tract and skin contact, and also have teratogenic, mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. BTEX were detected in multi-media to identify their distributions and assess their human health risk in a pesticide factory in Hebei province. Purge and trap GC-MS, adsorption/thermal desorption GC chromatography and the health risk assessment model were applied, and corresponding management measures were proposed. The results showed that BTEX existed in soil, dust, air, groundwater and wastewater. The concentration of BTEX in dust of the production area was 7.33 mg x kg(-1), in particular the concentration of toluene was 5.64 mg x kg(-1), exceeding the Canadian industrial land standard. Building three scenarios for working more than 10 years, 20 years and 30 years, the total non-carcinogens index was 4.19 x10(-3), 8.25 x 10(-3) and 1.22 x 10(-2), respectively, all lower than 1; the carcinogens index of benzene was 1.70 x 10(-7), 3.34 x 10(-7) and 4.92 x 10(-7), respectively, all lower than 10(-6). It indicated that there was no significant non-carcinogens and carcinogens hazard to workers inside the factory, but they might be exposed to more health risks if their work experience increase. Finally, recommendations for improving the environmental quality and personnel security in the factory were proposed based on the research results.

  4. Roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodal gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peijiang; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Huang, Lifang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2015-06-01

    Some gene regulatory systems can exhibit bimodal distributions of mRNA or protein although the deterministic counterparts are monostable. This noise-induced bimodality is an interesting phenomenon and has important biological implications, but it is unclear how different sources of expression noise (each source creates so-called factorial noise that is defined as a component of the total noise) contribute separately to this stochastic bimodality. Here we consider a minimal model of gene regulation, which is monostable in the deterministic case. Although simple, this system contains factorial noise of two main kinds: promoter noise due to switching between gene states and transcriptional (or translational) noise due to synthesis and degradation of mRNA (or protein). To better trace the roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodality, we also analyze two limit models, continuous and adiabatic approximations, apart from the exact model. We show that in the case of slow gene switching, the continuous model where only promoter noise is considered can exhibit bimodality; in the case of fast switching, the adiabatic model where only transcriptional or translational noise is considered can also exhibit bimodality but the exact model cannot; and in other cases, both promoter noise and transcriptional or translational noise can cooperatively induce bimodality. Since slow gene switching and large protein copy numbers are characteristics of eukaryotic cells, whereas fast gene switching and small protein copy numbers are characteristics of prokaryotic cells, we infer that eukaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced mainly by promoter noise, whereas prokaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced primarily by transcriptional or translational noise.

  5. What is a fractional derivative?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortigueira, Manuel D.; Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    This paper discusses the concepts underlying the formulation of operators capable of being interpreted as fractional derivatives or fractional integrals. Two criteria for required by a fractional operator are formulated. The Grünwald-Letnikov, Riemann-Liouville and Caputo fractional derivatives and the Riesz potential are accessed in the light of the proposed criteria. A Leibniz rule is also obtained for the Riesz potential.

  6. Positive fractional linear electrical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczorek, Tadeusz

    2013-10-01

    The positive fractional linear systems and electrical circuits are addressed. New classes of fractional asymptotically stable and unstable electrical circuits are introduced. The Caputo and Riemann-Liouville definitions of fractional derivatives are used to analysis of the positive electrical circuits composed of resistors, capacitors, coils and voltage (current) sources. The positive fractional electrical and specially unstable different types electrical circuits are analyzed. Some open problems are formulated.

  7. Experimental observation of fractional echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karras, G.; Hertz, E.; Billard, F.; Lavorel, B.; Siour, G.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Faucher, O.; Gershnabel, Erez; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2016-09-01

    We report the observation of fractional echoes in a double-pulse excited nonlinear system. Unlike standard echoes, which appear periodically at delays which are integer multiples of the delay between the two exciting pulses, the fractional echoes appear at rational fractions of this delay. We discuss the mechanism leading to this phenomenon, and provide experimental demonstration of fractional echoes by measuring third harmonic generation in a thermal gas of CO2 molecules excited by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses.

  8. MUON EDM EXPERIMENT USING STAGE II OF THE NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    FERNOW,R.C.; GALLARDO,J.C.; MORSE,W.M.; SEMERTZIDIS,Y.K.

    2002-07-01

    During the second stage of a future neutrino factory unprecedented numbers of bunched muons will become available. The cooled medium-energy muon beam could be used for a high sensitivity search for an electric dipole moment (EDM) of the muon with a sensitivity better than 10{sup -24}e {center_dot} cm. This will make the sensitivity of the EDM experiment to non-standard physics competitive and in many models more sensitive than the present limits on edms of the electron and nucleons. The experimental design exploits the strong motional electric field sensed by relativistic particles in a magnetic storage ring.

  9. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment: MICE and Neutrino Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freemire, Ben

    2010-03-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an accelerator and particle physics experiment aimed at demonstrating the technique of ionization cooling on a beam of muons. Ionization cooling is the process by which muons are sent through an absorbing material, thereby losing energy and decreasing their normalized emittance. The muons are then reaccelerated in the appropriate direction with radio frequency (RF) cavities. This produces an overall reduction in transverse emittance of the muon beam. Ionization cooling could be a key technique in the design of a high intensity Neutrino Factory.

  10. R&D Topics for Neutrino Factory Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, J. Scott

    2008-02-01

    The muons in a neutrino factory must be accelerated from the energy of the capture, phase rotation, and cooling systems (around 120 MeV kinetic energy) to the energy of the storage ring (around 25 GeV). This is done with a sequence of accelerators of different types: a linac, one or more recirculating linear accelerators, and finally one or more fixed field alternating gradient accelerators (FFAGs). I discuss the R&D that is needed to arrive at a complete system which we can have confidence will accelerate the beam and for which we can obtain a cost estimate.

  11. Engineering microbial factories for synthesis of value-added products

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Shao, Zengyi; Zhao, Huimin

    2011-01-01

    Microorganisms have become an increasingly important platform for the production of drugs, chemicals, and biofuels from renewable resources. Advances in protein engineering, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology enable redesigning microbial cellular networks and fine-tuning physiological capabilities, thus generating industrially viable strains for the production of natural and unnatural value-added compounds. In this review, we describe the recent progress on engineering microbial factories for synthesis of valued-added products including alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, biofuels, and chemicals. Related topics on lignocellulose degradation, sugar utilization, and microbial tolerance improvement will also be discussed. PMID:21526386

  12. Palomar Transient Factory Discovery of 5 New Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenko, S. B.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Matheson, T.; Nugent, P. E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Bloom, J. S.; Quimby, R M.

    2010-09-01

    We report the discovery and spectroscopic classification of 5 new supernovae from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf). The supernovae were discovered and classified by Oarical, an autonomous software framework of the PTF collaboration, based on observations made with the Palomar 48-inch Oschin Schmidt telescope. Spectroscopy was undertaken with the R-C spectrograph mounted at the Cassegrain focus of the Mayall 4-m telescope at Kitt Peak Observatory on UT 2010 September 8 by Cenko, Kulkarni, and Matheson.

  13. The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) begins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.

    2013-02-01

    S. R. Kulkarni on behalf of the "intermediate Palomar Transient Factory" (iPTF) announces the start of this project. iPTF is a partnership led by the California Institute of Technology, US and includes the Infrared Processing & Astronomical Center, US; Los Alamos National Laboratory, US; University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, US; Oskar-Klein Center of the University of Stockholm, Sweden; Weizmann Institute of Sciences, Israel; University System of Taiwan, Taiwan; the Institute for Physics & Mathematics of the Universe, Japan; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, US and the University of California, Berkeley.

  14. Interaction region considerations for a B-factory

    SciTech Connect

    DeStaebler, H.

    1990-07-01

    The goal of the project is to observe CP violation in the {bar B}B system. This machine is supposed to be a factory for high energy physics, not an R D project for accelerator physics. There are a number of interrelated design issues arising from the different desires of the detector and the machine, some of which are listed in this paper. A number of background and beampipe issues are mentioned. The emphasis is on calculations. Any satisfactory design will combine measurements on existing machines with calculations pertaining to the measurement conditions as well as to the proposed machine. 57 refs.

  15. A database for operation logging of the KEK photon factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Cheol On

    1990-08-01

    A prototype database for operation logging of the KEK Photon Factory storage ring has been constructed and tested. This paper describes the basic design of the operation logging system and its performance. Front-end control computers gather various data concerning the operation of the storage ring, and transfer them to a large general-purpose computer through a token-ring network. We have adopted a relational database system so as to save large amounts of data under daily operation. An interactive software tool was developed to retrieve data and to make graphic representations easily.

  16. Distributed Sensing and Control Architecture for Automotive Factory Automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ningxu; Brennan, Robert W.

    In this paper we propose an architecture for distributed intelligent sensing and control (DISC) for automotive factory automation. The architecture is based on a platform-based design approach that breaks the sensing and control problem into increasingly higher levels of abstraction from physical hardware to intelligent sensing and control. The focus of this paper is on the middleware layer that serves as an interface between an upper, agent-based control level and the wireless sensor network. This layer takes advantage the IEC 61499 model for distributed process measurement and control, and in particular, exploits its distributed, modular structure and its close match to wireless sensor systems.

  17. THE ROLE OF QUANTUM MECHANICS IN NEUTRINO FACTORIES.

    SciTech Connect

    GALLARDO,J.C.; SESSLER,A.M.; WURTELE,J.

    2000-12-06

    A compilation is made of the various ways in which quantum phenomena enter into the design and operation of a neutrino factory. They include production of pions, decay of pions into muons, ionization energy loss of muons in material, scattering and energy straggling of muons in material, polarization of muons, and the decay of muons into neutrinos, and the radiation effect of neutrinos. For each process formulas are presented which cover the basic mechanism. A discussion is presented of the areas of uncertainty and of the experiments, underway and proposed, which will reduce the uncertainty to an acceptable level.

  18. Charmonium Spectroscopy (X,Y,Z) at the B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Kreps, Michal; /Karlsruhe U.

    2012-04-03

    Since 2003 several states in the charmonium mass region were discovered. While in the conventional c{bar c} spectrum some states are missing, the number of states observed up to now is larger than empty spaces in the c{bar c} spectrum. This, together with other difficulties to explain observed states as a c{bar c} mesons triggered discussions on a possible exotic interpretations. In this proceedings we present current experimental status from B-factories of the so called X, Y and Z states.

  19. Charmonium physics at a tau-charm factory

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T. |

    1993-11-01

    Since its discovery in 1974 the charmonium system has served hadron physics as an important arena for the investigation of many aspects of QCD and hadron spectroscopy. In this summary the author briefly reviews some of these and discusses several of the important outstanding issues in hadron spectroscopy and their relation to the spectrum and couplings of resonances in the charmonium system. The topics discussed are charmonium spectroscopy, electromagnetic couplings ({gamma}, {gamma}{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}), strong decays and unusual states (charm molecules and charmonium hybrids), and in each case the author notes areas in which experiments at a tau-charm factory could make valuable contributions.

  20. Measurement of the branching fraction and polarization for the decay B--->D*0K*-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Shen, B C; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Biasini, M; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Pioppi, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-04-01

    We present a study of the decay B--->D(*0)K(*-) based on a sample of 86 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BBmacr; decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We measure the branching fraction B(B--->D(*0)K(*-))=(8.3+/-1.1(stat)+/-1.0(syst)) x 10(-4), and the fraction of longitudinal polarization in this decay to be Gamma(L)/Gamma=0.86+/-0.06(stat)+/-0.03(syst).

  1. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    SciTech Connect

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; Gunzburger, Max Donald; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  2. Fractionation of Subcellular Organelles.

    PubMed

    Graham, John M

    2015-01-01

    This unit provides both a theoretical and a practical background to all the techniques associated with the application of differential and density gradient centrifugation for the analysis of subcellular membranes. The density gradient information focuses on the use of the modern gradient solute iodixanol, chosen for its ease of use, versatility, and compatibility with biological particles. Its use in both pre-formed discontinuous and continuous gradients and in self-generated gradients is discussed. Considerable emphasis is given to selection of the appropriate centrifuge rotors and tubes and their influence on the methods used for creation, fractionation, and analysis of density gradients. Without proper consideration of these critical ancillary procedures, the resolving power of the gradient can be easily compromised. PMID:26621372

  3. Fractionation of Subcellular Organelles.

    PubMed

    Graham, John M

    2015-12-01

    This unit provides both a theoretical and a practical background to all the techniques associated with the application of differential and density gradient centrifugation for the analysis of subcellular membranes. The density gradient information focuses on the use of the modern gradient solute iodixanol, chosen for its ease of use, versatility, and compatibility with biological particles. Its use in both pre-formed discontinuous and continuous gradients and in self-generated gradients is discussed. Considerable emphasis is given to selection of the appropriate centrifuge rotors and tubes and their influence on the methods used for creation, fractionation, and analysis of density gradients. Without proper consideration of these critical ancillary procedures, the resolving power of the gradient can be easily compromised.

  4. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  5. DKIST enclosure modeling and verification during factory assembly and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrakoetxea, Ibon; McBride, William; Marshall, Heather K.; Murga, Gaizka

    2014-08-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST) is unique as, apart from protecting the telescope and its instrumentation from the weather, it holds the entrance aperture stop and is required to position it with millimeter-level accuracy. The compliance of the Enclosure design with the requirements, as of Final Design Review in January 2012, was supported by mathematical models and other analyses which included structural and mechanical analyses (FEA), control models, ventilation analysis (CFD), thermal models, reliability analysis, etc. During the Enclosure Factory Assembly and Testing the compliance with the requirements has been verified using the real hardware and the models created during the design phase have been revisited. The tests performed during shutter mechanism subsystem (crawler test stand) functional and endurance testing (completed summer 2013) and two comprehensive system-level factory acceptance testing campaigns (FAT#1 in December 2013 and FAT#2 in March 2014) included functional and performance tests on all mechanisms, off-normal mode tests, mechanism wobble tests, creation of the Enclosure pointing map, control system tests, and vibration tests. The comparison of the assumptions used during the design phase with the properties measured during the test campaign provides an interesting reference for future projects.

  6. Staging acceleration and cooling in a Neutrino Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.

    2006-03-01

    All schemes to produce intense sources of high-energy muons—Neutrino factories, beta beams, Colliders—require collection, RF capture, and transport of particle beams with unprecedented emittances, both longitudinally and transversely. These large initial emittances must be reduced or "cooled" both in size and in energy spread before the muons can be efficiently accelerated to multi-GeV energies. The acceleration stage becomes critical in formulating and optimizing muon beams; individual stages are strongly interlinked and not independent as is the case in most conventional acceleration systems. Most importantly, the degree of cooling, or cooling channel, depends on the choice of acceleration. In the current US baseline scenario, the cooling required for acceleration is about a factor of 10 in transverse emittance per plane. Longitudinal cooling is also required. In the proposed Japanese scenario, using an alternative acceleration scheme, no cooling is presumed. This work discusses two basic, but different approaches to a Neutrino Factory and how the optimal strategy depends on beam parameters and method of acceleration.

  7. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  8. An artificial reality environment for remote factory control and monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosta, Charles Paul; Krolak, Patrick D.

    1993-01-01

    Work has begun on the merger of two well known systems, VEOS (HITLab) and CLIPS (NASA). In the recent past, the University of Massachusetts Lowell developed a parallel version of NASA CLIPS, called P-CLIPS. This modification allows users to create smaller expert systems which are able to communicate with each other to jointly solve problems. With the merger of a VEOS message system, PCLIPS-V can now act as a group of entities working within VEOS. To display the 3D virtual world we have been using a graphics package called HOOPS, from Ithaca Software. The artificial reality environment we have set up contains actors and objects as found in our Lincoln Logs Factory of the Future project. The environment allows us to view and control the objects within the virtual world. All communication between the separate CLIPS expert systems is done through VEOS. A graphical renderer generates camera views on X-Windows devices; Head Mounted Devices are not required. This allows more people to make use of this technology. We are experimenting with different types of virtual vehicles to give the user a sense that he or she is actually moving around inside the factory looking ahead through windows and virtual monitors.

  9. EUVL reticle factory model and reticle cost analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Shelden, G.; Troccolo, P.

    1996-05-22

    The key issues in reticle manufacturing are cost and delivery time, both of which are dependent upon the yield of the process line. To estimate the cost and delivery time for EUVL reticles in commercial manufacturing, we have developed the first model for an EUV reticle factory which includes all the tools required for a presumed EUVL reticle fabrication process. This model includes the building, support tools and sufficient ``in-line`` process tools for the manufacture of (more than) 2500 reticles per year. Industry specifications for the tool performance are used to determine the number of tools required per process step and the average number of reticles fabricated per year. Building and capital equipment depreciation costs, tool installation costs, tool maintenance costs, labor, clean room costs, process times and process yields are estimated and used to calculate the yearly operating cost of the reticle factory and the average reticle fabrication cost. We estimate the sales price of an EUV reticle to be $60K for non-critical levels and $120K for ``leading-edge.`` The average reticle fabrication time is calculated for three different process-line yields.

  10. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  11. Factorial Design to Optimize Biosurfactant Production by Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Gizele Cardoso; Fonseca Amaral, Priscilla Filomena; Nele, Marcio; Zarur Coelho, Maria Alice

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve biosurfactant production by Yarrowia lipolytica IMUFRJ 50682, a factorial design was carried out. A 24 full factorial design was used to investigate the effects of nitrogen sources (urea, ammonium sulfate, yeast extract, and peptone) on maximum variation of surface tension (ΔST) and emulsification index (EI). The best results (67.7% of EI and 20.9 mN m−1 of ΔST) were obtained in a medium composed of 10 g 1−1 of ammonium sulfate and 0.5 g 1−1 of yeast extract. Then, the effects of carbon sources (glycerol, hexadecane, olive oil, and glucose) were evaluated. The most favorable medium for biosurfactant production was composed of both glucose (4% w/v) and glycerol (2% w/v), which provided an EI of 81.3% and a ΔST of 19.5 mN m−1. The experimental design optimization enhanced ΔEI by 110.7% and ΔST by 108.1% in relation to the standard process. PMID:20368788

  12. Neutrino factory and muon collider collaboration R and D activities

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.; Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaborat

    2001-03-22

    The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) comprises about 140 U.S. and non-U.S. accelerator and particle physicists. The MC is carrying out an R and D program aimed at validating the critical design concepts required for the construction of such machines. We are committed to encouraging international cooperation and coordination of the R and D effort. Main activities of the MC include a Targetry program, a MUCOOL program, a component development program, and a theory and simulation effort. Moreover, the MC has participated in several feasibility studies for a complete Neutrino Factory facility, with the aim of identifying any additional R and D activities needed to prepare a Zeroth-order Design Report (ZDR) in about two years and a Conceptual Design report (CDR) about two years thereafter. In this paper, the R and D goals in each area will be indicated, and the present status and future plans of the R and D program will be described.

  13. A Market-Based Approach to Multi-factory Scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vytelingum, Perukrishnen; Rogers, Alex; MacBeth, Douglas K.; Dutta, Partha; Stranjak, Armin; Jennings, Nicholas R.

    In this paper, we report on the design of a novel market-based approach for decentralised scheduling across multiple factories. Specifically, because of the limitations of scheduling in a centralised manner - which requires a center to have complete and perfect information for optimality and the truthful revelation of potentially commercially private preferences to that center - we advocate an informationally decentralised approach that is both agile and dynamic. In particular, this work adopts a market-based approach for decentralised scheduling by considering the different stakeholders representing different factories as self-interested, profit-motivated economic agents that trade resources for the scheduling of jobs. The overall schedule of these jobs is then an emergent behaviour of the strategic interaction of these trading agents bidding for resources in a market based on limited information and their own preferences. Using a simple (zero-intelligence) bidding strategy, we empirically demonstrate that our market-based approach achieves a lower bound efficiency of 84%. This represents a trade-off between a reasonable level of efficiency (compared to a centralised approach) and the desirable benefits of a decentralised solution.

  14. Status of neutrino factory and muon collider R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    2001-06-17

    A significant worldwide R and D effort is presently directed toward solving the technical challenges of producing, cooling, accelerating, storing, and eventually colliding beams of muons. Its primary thrust is toward issues critical to a Neutrino Factory, for which R and D efforts are under way in the U.S., via the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC); in Europe, centered at CERN; and in Japan, at KEK. Under study and experimental development are production targets handling intense proton beams (1-4 MW), phase rotation systems to reduce beam energy spread, cooling channels to reduce transverse beam emittance for the acceleration system, and storage rings where muon decays in a long straight section provide a neutrino beam for a long-baseline (3000 km) experiment. Critical experimental activities include development of very high gradient normal conducting RF (NCRF) and superconducting RF (SCRF) cavities, high-power liquid-hydrogen absorbers, and high-field superconducting solenoids. Components and instrumentation that tolerate the intense decay products of the muon beam are being developed for testing. For a high-luminosity collider, muons must be cooled longitudinally as well as transversely, requiring an emittance exchange scheme. In addition to the experimental R and D effort, sophisticated theoretical and simulation tools are needed for the design. Here, the goals, present status, and future R and D plans in these areas will be described.

  15. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters.

  16. A Factorial Analysis Study on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Fiber Pressed Oil Palm Frond for Bioethanol Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, F. S.; Yussof, H. W.; Zahari, M. A. K. M.; Illias, R. M.; Rahman, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    Different technologies have been developed to for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to suitable fermentation substrates for bioethanol production. The enzymatic conversion of cellulose seems to be the most promising technology as it is highly specific and does not produce substantial amounts of unwanted byproducts. The effects of agitation speed, enzyme loading, temperature, pH and reaction time on the conversion of glucose from fiber pressed oil palm frond (FPOPF) for bioethanol production were screened by statistical analysis using response surface methodology (RSM). A half fraction two-level factorial analysis with five factors was selected for the experimental design to determine the best enzymatic conditions that produce maximum amount of glucose. FPOPF was pre-treated with alkaline prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. The enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using a commercial enzyme Cellic CTec2. From this study, the highest yield of glucose concentration was 9.736 g/L at 72 hours reaction time at 35 °C, pH 5.6, and 1.5% (w/v) of enzyme loading. The model obtained was significant with p-value <0.0001. It is suggested that this model had a maximum point which is likely to be the optimum point and possible for the optimization process.

  17. Application of factorial designs for optimization of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase production from Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumoniae AS-22.

    PubMed

    Gawande, B N; Patkar, A Y

    1999-07-20

    Production of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumoniae AS-22 was optimized in shake flasks using a statistical experimental design approach. Effect of various components in the basal medium, like carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and mineral sources as well as initial pH and temperature, were tested on enzyme production. The optimum concentrations of the selected media components were determined using statistical experimental designs. Two level fractional factorial designs in five variables, namely, dextrin, peptone, yeast extract, ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphate, and magnesium sulphate concentrations were constructed. The optimum medium composition thus found consisted of 49.3 g/L dextrin, 20.6 g/L peptone, 18.3 g/L yeast extract, 6.7 g/L ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphate, and 0.5 g/L magnesium sulphate. The maximum CGTase activity obtained was 21.4 U/mL in 28 h of incubation. The cell growth and CGTase production profiles were studied with the optimized medium in shake flasks and in 1-L fermenters. It was observed that the enzyme production was growth associated both in shake flask and in fermenter, although it was slower in shake flask. The maximum CGTase activity obtained in the fermenter was 32.5 U/mL in 16 h. The optimized medium resulted in about 9-fold increase in the enzyme activity as compared to that obtained in the basal medium in shake flask as well as in fermenter. PMID:10397852

  18. Fish as major carbonate mud producers and missing components of the tropical carbonate factory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Chris T.; Salter, Michael A.; Harborne, Alastair R.; Crowley, Stephen F.; Jelks, Howard L.; Wilson, Rod W.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonate mud is a major constituent of recent marine carbonate sediments and of ancient limestones, which contain unique records of changes in ocean chemistry and climate shifts in the geological past. However, the origin of carbonate mud is controversial and often problematic to resolve. Here we show that tropical marine fish produce and excrete various forms of precipitated (nonskeletal) calcium carbonate from their guts ("low" and "high" Mg-calcite and aragonite), but that very fine-grained (mostly 4 mole % MgCO3) are their dominant excretory product. Crystallites from fish are morphologically diverse and species-specific, but all are unique relative to previously known biogenic and abiotic sources of carbonate within open marine systems. Using site specific fish biomass and carbonate excretion rate data we estimate that fish produce ~6.1 x 106 kg CaCO3/year across the Bahamian archipelago, all as mud-grade (the <63 μm fraction) carbonate and thus as a potential sediment constituent. Estimated contributions from fish to total carbonate mud production average ~14% overall, and exceed 70% in specific habitats. Critically, we also document the widespread presence of these distinctive fish-derived carbonates in the finest sediment fractions from all habitat types in the Bahamas, demonstrating that these carbonates have direct relevance to contemporary carbonate sediment budgets. Fish thus represent a hitherto unrecognized but significant source of fine-grained carbonate sediment, the discovery of which has direct application to the conceptual ideas of how marine carbonate factories function both today and in the past.

  19. Fish as major carbonate mud producers and missing components of the tropical carbonate factory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, C.T.; Salter, M.A.; Harborne, A.R.; Crowley, S.F.; Jelks, H.L.; Wilson, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonate mud is a major constituent of recent marine carbonate sediments and of ancient limestones, which contain unique records of changes in ocean chemistry and climate shifts in the geological past. However, the origin of carbonate mud is controversial and often problematic to resolve. Here we show that tropical marine fish produce and excrete various forms of precipitated (nonskeletal) calcium carbonate from their guts ("low" and "high" Mg-calcite and aragonite), but that very fine-grained (mostly <2 ??m) high Mg-calcite crystallites (i.e., >4 mole % MgCO3) are their dominant excretory product. Crystallites from fish are morphologically diverse and species-specific, but all are unique relative to previously known biogenic and abiotic sources of carbonate within open marine systems. Using site specific fish biomass and carbonate excretion rate data we estimate that fish produce ???6.1 ?? 106 kg CaCO3/year across the Bahamian archipelago, all as mud-grade (the <63 ??m fraction) carbonate and thus as a potential sediment constituent. Estimated contributions from fish to total carbonate mud production average ???14% overall, and exceed 70% in specific habitats. Critically, we also document the widespread presence of these distinctive fish-derived carbonates in the finest sediment fractions from all habitat types in the Bahamas, demonstrating that these carbonates have direct relevance to contemporary carbonate sediment budgets. Fish thus represent a hitherto unrecognized but significant source of fine-grained carbonate sediment, the discovery of which has direct application to the conceptual ideas of how marine carbonate factories function both today and in the past.

  20. Fish as major carbonate mud producers and missing components of the tropical carbonate factory.

    PubMed

    Perry, Chris T; Salter, Michael A; Harborne, Alastair R; Crowley, Stephen F; Jelks, Howard L; Wilson, Rod W

    2011-03-01

    Carbonate mud is a major constituent of recent marine carbonate sediments and of ancient limestones, which contain unique records of changes in ocean chemistry and climate shifts in the geological past. However, the origin of carbonate mud is controversial and often problematic to resolve. Here we show that tropical marine fish produce and excrete various forms of precipitated (nonskeletal) calcium carbonate from their guts ("low" and "high" Mg-calcite and aragonite), but that very fine-grained (mostly < 2 μm) high Mg-calcite crystallites (i.e., > 4 mole % MgCO(3)) are their dominant excretory product. Crystallites from fish are morphologically diverse and species-specific, but all are unique relative to previously known biogenic and abiotic sources of carbonate within open marine systems. Using site specific fish biomass and carbonate excretion rate data we estimate that fish produce ∼6.1 × 10(6) kg CaCO(3)/year across the Bahamian archipelago, all as mud-grade (the < 63 μm fraction) carbonate and thus as a potential sediment constituent. Estimated contributions from fish to total carbonate mud production average ∼14% overall, and exceed 70% in specific habitats. Critically, we also document the widespread presence of these distinctive fish-derived carbonates in the finest sediment fractions from all habitat types in the Bahamas, demonstrating that these carbonates have direct relevance to contemporary carbonate sediment budgets. Fish thus represent a hitherto unrecognized but significant source of fine-grained carbonate sediment, the discovery of which has direct application to the conceptual ideas of how marine carbonate factories function both today and in the past.

  1. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  2. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Balram, Ajit C; Wurstbauer, U; Wójs, A; Pinczuk, A; Jain, J K

    2015-01-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region. PMID:26608906

  3. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-01-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region. PMID:26608906

  4. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Balram, Ajit C; Wurstbauer, U; Wójs, A; Pinczuk, A; Jain, J K

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  5. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  6. Exploring metal detoxification and accumulation potential during vermicomposting of Tea factory coal ash: sequential extraction and fluorescence probe analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Linee; Pratihar, Sanjay; Dasgupta, Suman; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Mudoi, Pronab; Bora, Jayanta; Bhattacharya, Satya Sundar; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Metal contamination from coal ashes (CAs) is widely recognized as a significant environmental concern. To learn more about metal detoxification and accumulation potential of earthworm species, metal-rich tea factory coal ashes (TFCA) were fed to Eisenia fetida and Lampito mauritii by employing a fluorescent tag detection method. Fascinatingly, on feeding fluorescence probed Zn and Cd along with cow dung to Eisenia fetida, the detection of the gut-proteins with a molecular mass higher than 100 kDa was a distinct evidence of metal binding. Significant increases were observed in the content of humified organic C [humic acid (HAC) and fulvic acid C (FAC)] and degree of humification during vermicomposting. Concurrently, considerably large amount of toxic metals (Cr, Cd, Pb, and Zn) was transformed from exchangeable to recalcitrant (organic matter and mineral bound) fractions. Moreover, total metal concentrations were reduced with high removal efficiency upon vermicomposting. PMID:27456167

  7. Exploring metal detoxification and accumulation potential during vermicomposting of Tea factory coal ash: sequential extraction and fluorescence probe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Linee; Pratihar, Sanjay; Dasgupta, Suman; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Mudoi, Pronab; Bora, Jayanta; Bhattacharya, Satya Sundar; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Metal contamination from coal ashes (CAs) is widely recognized as a significant environmental concern. To learn more about metal detoxification and accumulation potential of earthworm species, metal-rich tea factory coal ashes (TFCA) were fed to Eisenia fetida and Lampito mauritii by employing a fluorescent tag detection method. Fascinatingly, on feeding fluorescence probed Zn and Cd along with cow dung to Eisenia fetida, the detection of the gut-proteins with a molecular mass higher than 100 kDa was a distinct evidence of metal binding. Significant increases were observed in the content of humified organic C [humic acid (HAC) and fulvic acid C (FAC)] and degree of humification during vermicomposting. Concurrently, considerably large amount of toxic metals (Cr, Cd, Pb, and Zn) was transformed from exchangeable to recalcitrant (organic matter and mineral bound) fractions. Moreover, total metal concentrations were reduced with high removal efficiency upon vermicomposting.

  8. Exploring metal detoxification and accumulation potential during vermicomposting of Tea factory coal ash: sequential extraction and fluorescence probe analysis.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Linee; Pratihar, Sanjay; Dasgupta, Suman; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Mudoi, Pronab; Bora, Jayanta; Bhattacharya, Satya Sundar; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Metal contamination from coal ashes (CAs) is widely recognized as a significant environmental concern. To learn more about metal detoxification and accumulation potential of earthworm species, metal-rich tea factory coal ashes (TFCA) were fed to Eisenia fetida and Lampito mauritii by employing a fluorescent tag detection method. Fascinatingly, on feeding fluorescence probed Zn and Cd along with cow dung to Eisenia fetida, the detection of the gut-proteins with a molecular mass higher than 100 kDa was a distinct evidence of metal binding. Significant increases were observed in the content of humified organic C [humic acid (HAC) and fulvic acid C (FAC)] and degree of humification during vermicomposting. Concurrently, considerably large amount of toxic metals (Cr, Cd, Pb, and Zn) was transformed from exchangeable to recalcitrant (organic matter and mineral bound) fractions. Moreover, total metal concentrations were reduced with high removal efficiency upon vermicomposting. PMID:27456167

  9. Fractional telegrapher's equation from fractional persistent random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoliver, Jaume

    2016-05-01

    We generalize the telegrapher's equation to allow for anomalous transport. We derive the space-time fractional telegrapher's equation using the formalism of the persistent random walk in continuous time. We also obtain the characteristic function of the space-time fractional process and study some particular cases and asymptotic approximations. Similarly to the ordinary telegrapher's equation, the time-fractional equation also presents distinct behaviors for different time scales. Specifically, transitions between different subdiffusive regimes or from superdiffusion to subdiffusion are shown by the fractional equation as time progresses.

  10. Fractional telegrapher's equation from fractional persistent random walks.

    PubMed

    Masoliver, Jaume

    2016-05-01

    We generalize the telegrapher's equation to allow for anomalous transport. We derive the space-time fractional telegrapher's equation using the formalism of the persistent random walk in continuous time. We also obtain the characteristic function of the space-time fractional process and study some particular cases and asymptotic approximations. Similarly to the ordinary telegrapher's equation, the time-fractional equation also presents distinct behaviors for different time scales. Specifically, transitions between different subdiffusive regimes or from superdiffusion to subdiffusion are shown by the fractional equation as time progresses. PMID:27300830

  11. Method development for VOST Fractionator

    SciTech Connect

    St. Germain Wickham, M.E.; Cummins, S.B.; Radolovich, G. )

    1994-01-01

    A VOST Fractionator was designed and tested to fractionate an original VOST sample into two samples: one large and one small sample. The device allows for quantitation of high levels of compounds in the small fraction and trace levels in the large fraction. Several preliminary validation samples were prepared, split, and analyzed to test the feasibility of the VOST Fractionator. These validation samples contained 40,000 ng of three terpene compounds and 100 ng of 42 other volatile target analytes. Analyte recoveries ranged from 70 to 130 percent, except for five water-soluble compounds. Recovery for the terpene compounds was 110 to 118 percent. Precision for triplicate spiked samples was less than 30 percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) for most compounds. Results indicate that the VOST Fractionator accurately splits the sample and allows quantitation of extremely high levels of compounds without sacrificing sensitivity for trace compounds. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Suppressors of the cdc-25.1(gf)-associated intestinal hyperplasia reveal important maternal roles for prp-8 and a subset of splicing factors in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hebeisen, Michaël; Drysdale, John; Roy, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The maternal contribution of gene products enables embryos to initiate their developmental program in the absence of zygotic gene expression. In Caenorhabditis elegans, maternal CDC-25.1 levels are tightly regulated to promote early cell divisions, while stabilization of this phosphatase by gain-of-function mutations gives rise to intestinal-specific hyperplasia. To identify regulators of CDC-25.1 levels and/or function, we performed a modifier screen of the cdc-25.1(gf)-dependent hyperplasia. One of the isolated suppressor mutants possesses a donor splice site mutation in prp-8, a key splicing factor of the U5-specific snRNP. prp-8(rr40) produces aberrant prp-8 splice variants that generate C-terminal truncations at the expense of wild-type prp-8. Levels of maternal transcripts are reduced, including cdc-25.1, while zygotic transcripts appear unperturbed, suggesting a germ-line-specific role for this splicing factor in regulating the splicing, and consequently, the steady-state levels of maternal transcripts. Using a novel feeding RNAi strategy we found that only a subset of splicing factors suppress cdc-25.1(gf), suggesting that they too may play specific roles in germ-line spliceosome function. In humans, mutations in the corresponding hPrp8 C-terminal domain result in retinitis pigmentosa, a retinal-specific disorder. Intriguingly, despite affecting the general splicing apparatus, both human and C. elegans show tissue-specific defects resulting from mutations in this key splicing component. Our findings suggest that in addition to its important regulatory function in the C. elegans germ line, prp-8(rr40) may provide further insight into the etiology of this splicing-associated human disorder. PMID:18945809

  13. Nonbiological fractionation of iron isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Roe, J. E.; Barling, J.; Nealson, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory experiments demonstrate that iron isotopes can be chemically fractionated in the absence of biology. Isotopic variations comparable to those seen during microbially mediated reduction of ferrihydrite are observed. Fractionation may occur in aqueous solution during equilibration between inorganic iron complexes. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of iron isotope fractionation and suggest that nonbiological processes may contribute to iron isotope variations observed in sediments.

  14. [Implementation rate of periodic health checkup at manufacturing factories in Kawasaki].

    PubMed

    Tobe, T; Nakamura, K; Takano, T

    1992-03-01

    A questionnaire survey on periodic health checkup was conducted on 4,432 manufacturing factories in Kawasaki and the following results were obtained. 1) Implementation rate of periodic health checkup was 100% in factories with 100 workers or more. In smaller factories employing less than 100 workers, the implementation rate decreased with decrease in their total work force. The rate was 47.5% and 37.7% in factories with 9-4 and 3-1 workers, respectively. 2) The proportion of workers less than 30 years of age decreased and that of 60 or more years of age increased with decreasing size of the total work force. Distribution of both age groups was 12.6% and 12.9%, respectively in factories with less than 10 workers. The proportion of female workers increased from about 10% in factories with 300 workers or more to 26.8% in factories with less than 10 workers. 3) In large factories with 500 workers or more periodic health checkups were implemented mostly at their own or related medical facilities and in factories with 499-10 workers, almost 50% were implemented in independent health service facilities. In factories with less than 10 workers periodic health checkup were implemented mainly at health centers (33.1%) and at hospitals or clinics (26.9%). 4) The main reasons why small factories could not implement periodic health checkup were: (1) they could not afford the time for the implementation (50.0%) and (2) ignorance of the law of mandatory periodic health checkup for workers (23.6%).

  15. Wake Fields in the Super B Factory Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, Stephen; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The geometry of storage ring collider interaction regions present an impedance to beam fields resulting in the generation of additional electromagnetic fields (higher order modes or wake fields) which affect the beam energy and trajectory. These affects are computed for the Super B interaction region by evaluating longitudinal loss factors and averaged transverse kicks for short range wake fields. Results indicate at least a factor of 2 lower wake field power generation in comparison with the interaction region geometry of the PEP-II B-factory collider. Wake field reduction is a consderation in the Super B design. Transverse kicks are consistent with an attractive potential from the crotch nearest the beam trajectory. The longitudinal loss factor scales as the -2.5 power of the bunch length. A factor of 60 loss factor reduction is possible with crotch geometry based on an intersecting tubes model.

  16. Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory: Realtime Image Subtraction Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Nugent, Peter E.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2016-11-01

    A fast-turnaround pipeline for realtime data reduction plays an essential role in discovering and permitting follow-up observations to young supernovae and fast-evolving transients in modern time-domain surveys. In this paper, we present the realtime image subtraction pipeline in the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory. By using high-performance computing, efficient databases, and machine-learning algorithms, this pipeline manages to reliably deliver transient candidates within 10 minutes of images being taken. Our experience in using high-performance computing resources to process big data in astronomy serves as a trailblazer to dealing with data from large-scale time-domain facilities in the near future.

  17. Accelerator R&D toward Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, V.

    2010-12-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. Such a collider can offer superb energy resolution, smaller size, and potentially cost and power consumption compared to multi-TeV e + e - linear colliders. This article briefly reviews the motivation, design and status of accelerator R&D for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory.

  18. Formulation of wax oxybenzone microparticles using a factorial approach.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Y A; Darwish, I A; Boraei, N A; El-Khordagui, L K

    2010-01-01

    Oxybenzone wax microparticles (MPs) were prepared by the hydrophobic congealable disperse phase method. The formulation of oxybenzone-loaded MPs was optimized using a 2⁴ experimental design. Factorial analysis indicated that the main MP characteristics were influenced by initial drug loading, emulsification speed, emulsifier concentration and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance. MPs were spherical with 50.5–88.1 μm size range, 17.8–38.9 drug content in mg/100 mg MPs and 33.1–87.2% oxybenzone release in 1 h. A wide range of sunscreen delivery systems suitable for different formulation purposes were generated which may contribute to the advanced formulation of sunscreen products with improved performance. PMID:20681744

  19. Actual curriculum development practices instrument: Testing for factorial validity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foi, Liew Yon; Bakar, Kamariah Abu; Hamzah, Mohd Sahandri Gani; Alwi, Nor Hayati

    2014-09-01

    The Actual Curriculum Development Practices Instrument (ACDP-I) was developed and the factorial validity of the ACDP-I was tested (n = 107) using exploratory factor analysis procedures in the earlier work of [1]. Despite the ACDP-I appears to be content and construct valid instrument with very high internal reliability qualities for using in Malaysia, the accumulated evidences are still needed to provide a sound scientific basis for the proposed score interpretations. Therefore, the present study addresses this concern by utilising the confirmatory factor analysis to further confirm the theoretical structure of the variable Actual Curriculum Development Practices (ACDP) and enrich the psychometrical properties of ACDP-I. Results of this study have practical implication to both researchers and educators whose concerns focus on teachers' classroom practices and the instrument development and validation process.

  20. Interaction Region Upgrades of e+ e- B-Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.; /SLAC

    2008-02-22

    Both the PEP-II and KEKB B-Factories have plans to upgrade their Interaction Regions (IRs) in order to improve luminosity performance. Last summer PEP-II added cooling to the IR beam pipe in order to increase beam currents thereby raising the luminosity. In addition, PEP-II is working on a design that modifies the permanent magnets near the Interaction Point (IP) for an even higher luminosity increase. KEKB is also planning an improvement to their IR that will decrease the detector beam pipe radius. In addition, KEK has a design to increase the luminosity of KEKB to 1 x 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} which includes changes to the IR. PEP-II is also investigating the feasibility of a 1 x 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} luminosity design. I summarize these various upgrades and concentrate on issues common to the different designs.