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Sample records for 25-ft space simulator

  1. High energy solar beam testing in the JPL 25-ft space simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrell, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Modifications to the individual components in the solar simulation system to improve performance and reduce costs are described. The improvements include: an increase in lamp power from 20 KW to 30 KW; a family of solar beams from 8 to 18.5 feet in diameter at intensities related to beam size with a maximum intensity of 12 solar constants over a 9 ft. diameter; and up to 1.1 megawatts of simulated solar energy in the lamp array.

  2. A 7.6m /25-ft/ extreme environments simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argoud, M. J.; Harrell, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    Stainless steel cylindrical simulation chamber permits testing equipment under extreme cold, high partial vacuums, and intense solar radiation. Applications include heat balance and temperature distribution studies, investigations of subsystem interactions, tests of attitude control equipment and sensors, and acceptance tests of complete systems.

  3. Space robot simulator vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Alexander, H.

    1985-01-01

    A Space Robot Simulator Vehicle (SRSV) was constructed to model a free-flying robot capable of doing construction, manipulation and repair work in space. The SRSV is intended as a test bed for development of dynamic and static control methods for space robots. The vehicle is built around a two-foot-diameter air-cushion vehicle that carries batteries, power supplies, gas tanks, computer, reaction jets and radio equipment. It is fitted with one or two two-link manipulators, which may be of many possible designs, including flexible-link versions. Both the vehicle body and its first arm are nearly complete. Inverse dynamic control of the robot's manipulator has been successfully simulated using equations generated by the dynamic simulation package SDEXACT. In this mode, the position of the manipulator tip is controlled not by fixing the vehicle base through thruster operation, but by controlling the manipulator joint torques to achieve the desired tip motion, while allowing for the free motion of the vehicle base. One of the primary goals is to minimize use of the thrusters in favor of intelligent control of the manipulator. Ways to reduce the computational burden of control are described.

  4. Simulating Space Weather at Pluto

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a simulation of the space environment all the way out to Pluto in the months surrounding New Horizons’ July 2015 flyby. At the time, scientists at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Cente...

  5. Distributed Simulation for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crues, Edwin Z.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of simulation and modeling in preparation for the planned exploration initiatives. The Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (EMSD) Integrated Modeling and Simulation (IM&S) team strategy encompasses a wide spectrum of simulation and modeling policies and technologies. One prominent technology is distributed simulation. The DIstributed Simulation (DIS),a collaborative simulation project with international participation (US and Japan) is reviewed as an example of distributed simulation development. The Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES) is another example of distributed simulation that is described

  6. Ninth Conference on Space Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The papers presented in this conference provided an international dialogue and a meaningful exchange in the simulation of space environments as well as the evolution of these technological advances into other fields. The papers represent a significant contribution to the understanding of space simulation problems and the utilization of this knowledge. The topics of the papers include; spacecraft testing; facilities and test equipment; system and subsystem test; life sciences, medicine and space; physical environmental factors; chemical environmental factors; contamination; space physics; and thermal protection.

  7. Simulator of Space Communication Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clare, Loren; Jennings, Esther; Gao, Jay; Segui, John; Kwong, Winston

    2005-01-01

    Multimission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE) is a suite of software tools that simulates the behaviors of communication networks to be used in space exploration, and predict the performance of established and emerging space communication protocols and services. MACHETE consists of four general software systems: (1) a system for kinematic modeling of planetary and spacecraft motions; (2) a system for characterizing the engineering impact on the bandwidth and reliability of deep-space and in-situ communication links; (3) a system for generating traffic loads and modeling of protocol behaviors and state machines; and (4) a system of user-interface for performance metric visualizations. The kinematic-modeling system makes it possible to characterize space link connectivity effects, including occultations and signal losses arising from dynamic slant-range changes and antenna radiation patterns. The link-engineering system also accounts for antenna radiation patterns and other phenomena, including modulations, data rates, coding, noise, and multipath fading. The protocol system utilizes information from the kinematic-modeling and link-engineering systems to simulate operational scenarios of space missions and evaluate overall network performance. In addition, a Communications Effect Server (CES) interface for MACHETE has been developed to facilitate hybrid simulation of space communication networks with actual flight/ground software/hardware embedded in the overall system.

  8. The Seventeenth Space Simulation Conference. Terrestrial Test for Space Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences' Seventeenth Space Simulation Conference, 'Terrestrial Test for Space Success' provided participants with a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state of the art in space simulation, test technology, atomic oxygen, dynamics testing, contamination, and materials. The papers presented at this conference and the resulting discussions carried out the conference theme of 'terrestrial test for space success.'

  9. Flight simulator with spaced visuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, Richard D. (Inventor); Thurston, Marlin O. (Inventor); Olson, Karl W. (Inventor); Ventola, Ronald W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A flight simulator arrangement wherein a conventional, movable base flight trainer is combined with a visual cue display surface spaced a predetermined distance from an eye position within the trainer. Thus, three degrees of motive freedom (roll, pitch and crab) are provided for a visual proprioceptive, and vestibular cue system by the trainer while the remaining geometric visual cue image alterations are developed by a video system. A geometric approach to computing runway image eliminates a need to electronically compute trigonometric functions, while utilization of a line generator and designated vanishing point at the video system raster permits facile development of the images of the longitudinal edges of the runway.

  10. The evolution of space simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Arthur A.

    1992-01-01

    Thirty years have passed since the first large (more than 15 ft diameter) thermal vacuum space simulation chambers were built in this country. Many changes have been made since then, and the industry has learned a great deal as the designs have evolved in that time. I was fortunate to have been part of that beginning, and have participated in many of the changes that have occurred since. While talking with vacuum friends recently, I realized that many of the engineers working in the industry today may not be aware of the evolution of space simulation because they did not experience the changes that brought us today's technology. With that in mind, it seems to be appropriate to take a moment and review some of the events that were a big part of the past thirty years in the thermal vacuum business. Perhaps this review will help to understand a little of the 'why' as well as the 'how' of building and operating large thermal vacuum chambers.

  11. Performance of the Satellite Test Assistant Robot in JPL's Space Simulation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaffee, Douglas; Long, Mark; Johnson, Ken; Siebes, Georg

    1995-01-01

    An innovative new telerobotic inspection system called STAR (the Satellite Test Assistant Robot) has been developed to assist engineers as they test new spacecraft designs in simulated space environments. STAR operates inside the ultra-cold, high-vacuum, test chambers and provides engineers seated at a remote Operator Control Station (OCS) with high resolution video and infrared (IR) images of the flight articles under test. STAR was successfully proof tested in JPL's 25-ft (7.6-m) Space Simulation Chamber where temperatures ranged from +85 C to -190 C and vacuum levels reached 5.1 x 10(exp -6) torr. STAR's IR Camera was used to thermally map the entire interior of the chamber for the first time. STAR also made several unexpected and important discoveries about the thermal processes occurring within the chamber. Using a calibrated test fixture arrayed with ten sample spacecraft materials, the IR camera was shown to produce highly accurate surface temperature data. This paper outlines STAR's design and reports on significant results from the thermal vacuum chamber test.

  12. Eighteenth Space Simulation Conference: Space Mission Success Through Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences' Eighteenth Space Simulation Conference, 'Space Mission Success Through Testing' provided participants with a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state-of-the-art in space simulation, test technology, atomic oxygen, program/system testing, dynamics testing, contamination, and materials. The papers presented at this conference and the resulting discussions carried out the conference theme 'Space Mission Success Through Testing.'

  13. SpaceNet: Modeling and Simulating Space Logistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Gene; Jordan, Elizabeth; Shishko, Robert; de Weck, Olivier; Armar, Nii; Siddiqi, Afreen

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current state of the art in interplanetary supply chain modeling and discusses SpaceNet as one particular method and tool to address space logistics modeling and simulation challenges. Fundamental upgrades to the interplanetary supply chain framework such as process groups, nested elements, and cargo sharing, enabled SpaceNet to model an integrated set of missions as a campaign. The capabilities and uses of SpaceNet are demonstrated by a step-by-step modeling and simulation of a lunar campaign.

  14. Simulating Scenes In Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Multimission Interactive Picture Planner, MIP, computer program for scientifically accurate and fast, three-dimensional animation of scenes in deep space. Versatile, reasonably comprehensive, and portable, and runs on microcomputers. New techniques developed to perform rapidly calculations and transformations necessary to animate scenes in scientifically accurate three-dimensional space. Written in FORTRAN 77 code. Primarily designed to handle Voyager, Galileo, and Space Telescope. Adapted to handle other missions.

  15. Advanced Space Shuttle simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Smith, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A non-recursive model (based on von Karman spectra) for atmospheric turbulence along the flight path of the shuttle orbiter was developed. It provides for simulation of instantaneous vertical and horizontal gusts at the vehicle center-of-gravity, and also for simulation of instantaneous gusts gradients. Based on this model the time series for both gusts and gust gradients were generated and stored on a series of magnetic tapes, entitled Shuttle Simulation Turbulence Tapes (SSTT). The time series are designed to represent atmospheric turbulence from ground level to an altitude of 120,000 meters. A description of the turbulence generation procedure is provided. The results of validating the simulated turbulence are described. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. One-dimensional von Karman spectra are tabulated, while a discussion of the minimum frequency simulated is provided. The results of spectral and statistical analyses of the SSTT are presented.

  16. Simulating Avionics Upgrades to the Space Shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deger, Daniel; Hill, Kenneth; Braaten, Karsten E.

    2008-01-01

    Cockpit Avionics Prototyping Environment (CAPE) is a computer program that simulates the functions of proposed upgraded avionics for a space shuttle. In CAPE, pre-existing space-shuttle-simulation programs are merged with a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) display-development program, yielding a package of software that enables high-fi46 NASA Tech Briefs, September 2008 delity simulation while making it possible to rapidly change avionic displays and the underlying model algorithms. The pre-existing simulation programs are Shuttle Engineering Simulation, Shuttle Engineering Simulation II, Interactive Control and Docking Simulation, and Shuttle Mission Simulator playback. The COTS program Virtual Application Prototyping System (VAPS) not only enables the development of displays but also makes it possible to move data about, capture and process events, and connect to a simulation. VAPS also enables the user to write code in the C or C++ programming language and compile that code into the end-product simulation software. As many as ten different avionic-upgrade ideas can be incorporated in a single compilation and, thus, tested in a single simulation run. CAPE can be run in conjunction with any or all of four simulations, each representing a different phase of a space-shuttle flight.

  17. Space shuttle visual simulation system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A recommendation and a specification for the visual simulation system design for the space shuttle mission simulator are presented. A recommended visual system is described which most nearly meets the visual design requirements. The cost analysis of the recommended system covering design, development, manufacturing, and installation is reported. Four alternate systems are analyzed.

  18. GSFC Space Simulation Laboratory Contamination Philosophy: Efficient Space Simulation Chamber Cleaning Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Juan A.; Stitt, George F.; Roman, Felix R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper will provide a general overview of the molecular contamination philosophy of the Space Simulation Test Engineering Section and how the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) space simulation laboratory controls and maintains the cleanliness of all its facilities, thereby, minimizing down time between tests. It will also briefly cover the proper selection and safety precautions needed when using some chemical solvents for wiping, washing, or spraying thermal shrouds when molecular contaminants increase to unacceptable background levels.

  19. The Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crues, Edwin Z.; Chung, Victoria I.; Blum, Mike G.; Bowman, James D.

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES) Project, a research and development collaboration between NASA centers which focuses on the investigation and development of technologies, processes and integrated simulations related to the collaborative distributed simulation of complex space systems in support of NASA's Exploration Initiative. This paper describes the three major components of DSES: network infrastructure, software infrastructure and simulation development. In the network work area, DSES is developing a Distributed Simulation Network that will provide agency wide support for distributed simulation between all NASA centers. In the software work area, DSES is developing a collection of software models, tool and procedures that ease the burden of developing distributed simulations and provides a consistent interoperability infrastructure for agency wide participation in integrated simulation. Finally, for simulation development, DSES is developing an integrated end-to-end simulation capability to support NASA development of new exploration spacecraft and missions. This paper will present current status and plans for each of these work areas with specific examples of simulations that support NASA's exploration initiatives.

  20. Simulation study of dual-space microscopy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Darshan B; Zhelyeznyakov, Maksym V; Alanzi, Shaima A S; Grave de Peralta, Luis

    2016-09-10

    We explore the convergence of the dual-space microscopy (DSM) phase-recovery algorithm. DSM is an optical microscopy technique based on simultaneous observation of an object in the position and momentum spaces. We present one-dimensional (1D) simulations of this technique, demonstrating that the DSM technique is capable to resolve periodic and nonperiodic structures with a resolution well below the Rayleigh resolution limit. Using a simple and faster 1D version of the full 2D DSM algorithm, we simulated the DSM technique for thousands of different samples. Our results demonstrate that the DSM algorithm always converges rapidly to the correct optical disturbance. PMID:27661365

  1. Indian LSSC (Large Space Simulation Chamber) facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brar, A. S.; Prasadarao, V. S.; Gambhir, R. D.; Chandramouli, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Indian Space Agency has undertaken a major project to acquire in-house capability for thermal and vacuum testing of large satellites. This Large Space Simulation Chamber (LSSC) facility will be located in Bangalore and is to be operational in 1989. The facility is capable of providing 4 meter diameter solar simulation with provision to expand to 4.5 meter diameter at a later date. With such provisions as controlled variations of shroud temperatures and availability of infrared equipment as alternative sources of thermal radiation, this facility will be amongst the finest anywhere. The major design concept and major aspects of the LSSC facility are presented here.

  2. GALILEO Signal In Space Triple Carrier four Space Vehicle Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabacco, P.; Vernucci, A.; Cornacchini, C.; Richichi, F.; Botticchio, T.; Meta, F.

    2008-08-01

    The state of art of GALILEO Signal In Space specifications has been implemented by Space Engineering GALILEO Simulator. The design and quality test results of this Professional Instrument, aimed to support GALILEO receiver development, will be described in this Paper. The current version is compatible with SIS ICD vers. 12.0, but would allow easy migration to MBOC for L1 carrier, when this specification will be formalized by a new SIS ICD release. For what concern the E5 signal the Simulator is a truly Alt-BOC coherent generator allowing a 120MHz analog Bandwidth being generated digitally and not as two separate E5a and E5b analog signals. The current version of Space Engineering Signal In Space Simulator allow to generate up to four Satellites for all the three carriers L1, E5 and E6 simultaneously and it is a self contained unit, complete of AC power supplying adapter and fan cooling system, arranged in a single Compact-PCI (C-PCI)19" Rack.

  3. Space Simulation, 7th. [facilities and testing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Space simulation facilities and techniques are outlined that encompass thermal scale modeling, computerized simulations, reentry materials, spacecraft contamination, solar simulation, vacuum tests, and heat transfer studies.

  4. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation for Space Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Karl

    2000-01-01

    Current system simulations are mature, difficult to modify, and poorly documented. Probabilistic life prediction techniques for space applications are in their early application stage. Many parts of the full system, variable fidelity simulation, have been demonstrated individually or technology is available from aeronautical applications. A 20% reduction in time to design with improvements in performance and risk reduction is anticipated. GRC software development will proceed with similar development efforts in aeronautical simulations. Where appropriate, parallel efforts will be encouraged/tracked in high risk areas until success is assured.

  5. Space shuttle visual simulation system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The current and near-future state-of-the-art in visual simulation equipment technology is related to the requirements of the space shuttle visual system. Image source, image sensing, and displays are analyzed on a subsystem basis, and the principal conclusions are used in the formulation of a recommended baseline visual system. Perceptibility and visibility are also analyzed.

  6. Exploring Space Physics Concepts Using Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM), a Science and Technology Center (STC) funded by the National Science Foundation, has the goal of developing a suite of integrated physics based computer models of the space environment that can follow the evolution of a space weather event from the Sun to the Earth. In addition to the research goals, CISM is also committed to training the next generation of space weather professionals who are imbued with a system view of space weather. This view should include an understanding of both helio-spheric and geo-space phenomena. To this end, CISM offers a yearly Space Weather Summer School targeted to first year graduate students, although advanced undergraduates and space weather professionals have also attended. This summer school uses a number of innovative pedagogical techniques including devoting each afternoon to a computer lab exercise that use results from research quality simulations and visualization techniques, along with ground based and satellite data to explore concepts introduced during the morning lectures. These labs are suitable for use in wide variety educational settings from formal classroom instruction to outreach programs. The goal of this poster is to outline the goals and content of the lab materials so that instructors may evaluate their potential use in the classroom or other settings.

  7. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator- NB38 -Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a cooperative program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) to operate a long-lived space-based observatory. It was the flagship mission of NASA's Great Observatories program. The HST program began as an astronomical dream in the 1940s. During the 1970s and 1980s, the HST was finally designed and built becoming operational in the 1990s. The HST was deployed into a low-Earth orbit on April 25, 1990 from the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31). The design of the HST took into consideration its length of service and the necessity of repairs and equipment replacement by making the body modular. In doing so, subsequent shuttle missions could recover the HST, replace faulty or obsolete parts and be re-released. Pictured is MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) that served as the test center for shuttle astronauts training for Hubble related missions. Shown are astronauts Bruce McCandless and Sharnon Lucid being fitted for their space suits prior to entering the NBS to begin training on the space telescope axial scientific instrument changeout.

  8. Materials behavior under space simulation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrylov, R.; Eremenko, V.; Pokhyl, Y.

    The report contains review of researches carried out in SR&DB ILTPE NASU within last decade in the field of crygenic-vacuum and space material science, directed on an establishment of a nature of structural and functional materials physical properties changes under separated and combined laboratory simulating. Space factors influence. The aim of such researches is the definition of serviceability and durability of materials, used in space engineering, in extreme conditions influence of deep vacuum, electromagnetic radiation of the Sun, powerful flows of corpuscular radiation in radiation belts of the Earth, microgravitation, low temperatures, significant cyclic thermomechanical gradient stresses, magnetic fields, high dynamic loadings, vibrations and other factors. Each of the listed factors differently influences on changes of mechanical, optical, electrical, thermophysical, tribotechnical and other properties of materials, and their resulting joint influence is not additive. Generally real Space negatively influences on materials and designs elements of space vehicles, resulting to essential degradation of their operational characteristics. There are two approaches to decision of a problem of estimation and selection of materials, suitable to use in so specific conditions. The first consists in regular investigations of materials complex of physical&mechanical properties in conditions of separated and combined ground simulation of Space factors. The second assumes exhibiting of materials and designs elements in open Space conditions in real space flight with the subsequent investigation of their physical properties. These approaches are complementary, and in SR&DB ILTPE the works are carried out in these both directions. The description of the created laboratory -test base with specialized cryogenic, vacuum and simulating equipment for various types of researches in conditions of ground simulation of major outer Space factors is given. The report is represent the

  9. UCLA IGPP Space Plasma Simulation Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the past 10 years the UCLA IGPP Space Plasma Simulation Group has pursued its theoretical effort to develop a Mission Oriented Theory (MOT) for the International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program. This effort has been based on a combination of approaches: analytical theory, large scale kinetic (LSK) calculations, global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and self-consistent plasma kinetic (SCK) simulations. These models have been used to formulate a global interpretation of local measurements made by the ISTP spacecraft. The regions of applications of the MOT cover most of the magnetosphere: the solar wind, the low- and high-latitude magnetospheric boundary, the near-Earth and distant magnetotail, and the auroral region. Most recent investigations include: plasma processes in the electron foreshock, response of the magnetospheric cusp, particle entry in the magnetosphere, sources of observed distribution functions in the magnetotail, transport of oxygen ions, self-consistent evolution of the magnetotail, substorm studies, effects of explosive reconnection, and auroral acceleration simulations.

  10. Space shuttle main engine hardware simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vick, H. G.; Hampton, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    The Huntsville Simulation Laboratory (HSL) provides a simulation facility to test and verify the space shuttle main engine (SSME) avionics and software system using a maximum complement of flight type hardware. The HSL permits evaluations and analyses of the SSME avionics hardware, software, control system, and mathematical models. The laboratory has performed a wide spectrum of tests and verified operational procedures to ensure system component compatibility under all operating conditions. It is a test bed for integration of hardware/software/hydraulics. The HSL is and has been an invaluable tool in the design and development of the SSME.

  11. Remapping simulated halo catalogues in redshift space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, A. J.; Peacock, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss the extension to redshift space of a rescaling algorithm, designed to alter the effective cosmology of a pre-existing simulated particle distribution or catalogue of dark matter haloes. The rescaling approach was initially developed by Angulo & White and was adapted and applied to halo catalogues in real space in our previous work. This algorithm requires no information other than the initial and target cosmological parameters, and it contains no tuned parameters. It is shown here that the rescaling method also works well in redshift space, and that the rescaled simulations can reproduce the growth rate of cosmological density fluctuations appropriate for the target cosmology. Even when rescaling a grossly non-standard model with Λ = 0 and zero baryons, the redshift-space power spectrum of standard Λ cold dark matter can be reproduced to about 5 per cent error for k < 0.2 h Mpc-1. The ratio of quadrupole-to-monopole power spectra remains correct to the same tolerance up to k = 1 h Mpc-1, provided that the input halo catalogue contains measured internal velocity dispersions.

  12. Concurrent processing simulation of the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gluck, R.; Hale, A. L.; Sunkel, John W.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a new capability for the time-domain simulation of multibody dynamic systems and its application to the study of a large angle rotational maneuvers of the Space Station is described. The effort was divided into three sequential tasks, which required significant advancements of the state-of-the art to accomplish. These were: (1) the development of an explicit mathematical model via symbol manipulation of a flexible, multibody dynamic system; (2) the development of a methodology for balancing the computational load of an explicit mathematical model for concurrent processing; and (3) the implementation and successful simulation of the above on a prototype Custom Architectured Parallel Processing System (CAPPS) containing eight processors. The throughput rate achieved by the CAPPS operating at only 70 percent efficiency, was 3.9 times greater than that obtained sequentially by the IBM 3090 supercomputer simulating the same problem. More significantly, analysis of the results leads to the conclusion that the relative cost effectiveness of concurrent vs. sequential digital computation will grow substantially as the computational load is increased. This is a welcomed development in an era when very complex and cumbersome mathematical models of large space vehicles must be used as substitutes for full scale testing which has become impractical.

  13. The space transformation in the simulation of multidimensional random fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christakos, G.

    1987-01-01

    Space transformations are proposed as a mathematically meaningful and practically comprehensive approach to simulate multidimensional random fields. Within this context the turning bands method of simulation is reconsidered and improved in both the space and frequency domains. ?? 1987.

  14. Simulating Autonomous Telecommunication Networks for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segui, John S.; Jennings, Esther H.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, most interplanetary telecommunication systems require human intervention for command and control. However, considering the range from near Earth to deep space missions, combined with the increase in the number of nodes and advancements in processing capabilities, the benefits from communication autonomy will be immense. Likewise, greater mission science autonomy brings the need for unscheduled, unpredictable communication and network routing. While the terrestrial Internet protocols are highly developed their suitability for space exploration has been questioned. JPL has developed the Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE) tool to help characterize network designs and protocols. The results will allow future mission planners to better understand the trade offs of communication protocols. This paper discusses various issues with interplanetary network and simulation results of interplanetary networking protocols.

  15. The 11th Space Simulation Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Subject areas range from specialized issues dealing with the space and entry environments to the environmental testing of systems and complete spacecraft of present-day vintage. Various papers consider: the test and development of several key systems of the orbiter vehicle; integrated tests of complete satellites; new and unique test facilities developed to meet the demanding requirements of high fidelity simulation of test environments; and contamination species, including the instrumentation for detection and measurement of such. Special topics include improved thermal protection methodologies and approaches, sophisticated sensor developments, and other related testing and development areas.

  16. Space simulation test for thermal control materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardgrove, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Tests were run in TRW's Combined Environment Facility to examine the degradation of thermal control materials in a simulated space environment. Thermal control materials selected for the test were those presently being used on spacecraft or predicted to be used within the next few years. The geosynchronous orbit environment was selected as the most interesting. One of the goals was to match degradation of those materials with available flight data. Another aim was to determine if degradation can adequately be determined with accelerated or short term ground tests.

  17. Fifteenth Space Simulation Conference: Support the Highway to Space Through Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences Fifteenth Space Simulation Conference, Support the Highway to Space Through Testing, provided participants a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state-of-the-art in space simulation, test technology, thermal simulation and protection, contamination, and techniques of test measurements.

  18. Fourteenth Space Simulation Conference: Testing for a Permanent Presence in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences Fourteenth Space Simulation Conference, Testing for a Permanent Presence in Space, provided participants a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state-of-the-art in space simulation, test technology, thermal simulation, and protection, contamination, and techniques of test measurements.

  19. An HLA based design of space system simulation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinghua; Li, Yong; Liu, Jie

    2007-06-01

    Space system simulation is involved in many application fields, such as space remote sensing and space communication, etc. A simulation environment which can be shared by different space system simulation is needed. Two rules, called object template towing and hierarchical reusability, are proposed. Based on these two rules, the architecture, the network structure and the function structure of the simulation environment are designed. Then, the mechanism of utilizing data resources, inheriting object models and running simulation systems are also constructed. These mechanisms make the simulation objects defined in advance be easily inherited by different HLA federates, the fundamental simulation models be shared by different simulation systems. Therefore, the simulation environment is highly universal and reusable.

  20. Observation and simulation of AGW in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, Vyacheslav; Kholodov, Alexander; Andreeva, Elena; Nesterov, Ivan; Padokhin, Artem; Vorontsov, Artem

    2014-05-01

    Examples are presented of satellite observations and imaging of AGW and related phenomena in space travelling ionospheric disturbances (TID). The structure of AGW perturbations was reconstructed by satellite radio tomography (RT) based on the signals of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). The experiments use different GNSS, both low-orbiting (Russian Tsikada and American Transit) and high-orbiting (GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, Beidou). The examples of RT imaging of TIDs and AGWs from anthropogenic sources such as ground explosions, rocket launching, heating the ionosphere by high-power radio waves are presented. In the latter case, the corresponding AGWs and TIDs were generated in response to the modulation in the power of the heating wave. The natural AGW-like wave disturbances are frequently observed in the atmosphere and ionosphere in the form of variations in density and electron concentration. These phenomena are caused by the influence of the near-space environment, atmosphere, and surface phenomena including long-period vibrations of the Earth's surface, earthquakes, explosions, temperature heating, seisches, tsunami waves, etc. Examples of experimental RT reconstructions of wave disturbances associated with the earthquakes and tsunami waves are presented, and RT images of TIDs caused by the variations in the corpuscular ionization are demonstrated. The results of numerical modeling of AGW generation by some surface and volume sources are discussed. The milli-Hertz AGWs generated by these sources induce perturbations with a typical scale of a few hundred of kilometers at the heights of the middle atmosphere and ionosphere. The numerical modeling is based on the solution of equations of geophysical hydrodynamics. The results of the numerical simulations agree with the observations. The authors acknowledge the support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants 14-05-00855 and 13-05-01122), grant of the President of Russian Federation MK-2670

  1. Sixteenth Space Simulation Conference Confirming Spaceworthiness Into the Next Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The conference provided participants with a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state of the art in space simulation, test technology, thermal simulation and protection, contamination, and techniques of test measurements.

  2. Laser Scanning and Simulation at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kickbusch, Tracey E.

    2012-01-01

    We perform simulations of ground operations leading up launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA. We use Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to make sure operations are feasible, efficient, and safe.

  3. Macro Level Simulation Model Of Space Shuttle Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The contents include: 1) Space Shuttle Processing Simulation Model; 2) Knowledge Acquisition; 3) Simulation Input Analysis; 4) Model Applications in Current Shuttle Environment; and 5) Model Applications for Future Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV's). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  4. Deep Space Storm Shelter Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Kathryn; Phojanamongkolkij, Nipa; Cerro, Jeffrey; Simon, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Missions outside of Earth's magnetic field are impeded by the presence of radiation from galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. To overcome this issue, NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Radiation Works Storm Shelter (RadWorks) has been studying different radiation protective habitats to shield against the onset of solar particle event radiation. These habitats have the capability of protecting occupants by utilizing available materials such as food, water, brine, human waste, trash, and non-consumables to build short-term shelters. Protection comes from building a barrier with the materials that dampens the impact of the radiation on astronauts. The goal of this study is to develop a discrete event simulation, modeling a solar particle event and the building of a protective shelter. The main hallway location within a larger habitat similar to the International Space Station (ISS) is analyzed. The outputs from this model are: 1) the total area covered on the shelter by the different materials, 2) the amount of radiation the crew members receive, and 3) the amount of time for setting up the habitat during specific points in a mission given an event occurs.

  5. A Process for Comparing Dynamics of Distributed Space Systems Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cures, Edwin Z.; Jackson, Albert A.; Morris, Jeffery C.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a process that was developed for comparing the primary orbital dynamics behavior between space systems distributed simulations. This process is used to characterize and understand the fundamental fidelities and compatibilities of the modeling of orbital dynamics between spacecraft simulations. This is required for high-latency distributed simulations such as NASA s Integrated Mission Simulation and must be understood when reporting results from simulation executions. This paper presents 10 principal comparison tests along with their rationale and examples of the results. The Integrated Mission Simulation (IMSim) (formerly know as the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES)) is a NASA research and development project focusing on the technologies and processes that are related to the collaborative simulation of complex space systems involved in the exploration of our solar system. Currently, the NASA centers that are actively participating in the IMSim project are the Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), the Kennedy Space Center, the Langley Research Center and the Marshall Space Flight Center. In concept, each center participating in IMSim has its own set of simulation models and environment(s). These simulation tools are used to build the various simulation products that are used for scientific investigation, engineering analysis, system design, training, planning, operations and more. Working individually, these production simulations provide important data to various NASA projects.

  6. Simulation of random wind fluctuations. [space shuttle ascent control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlmutter, M.

    1974-01-01

    A technique was developed for the simulation of random wind fluctuations for use in computer studies of the space shuttle ascent control. The simulated wind fluctuations were generated using the techniques of control theory that have statistical characteristics similar to the characteristics obtained from wind data at Kennedy Space Center.

  7. Galactic cosmic ray simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Norbury, John W; Schimmerling, Walter; Slaba, Tony C; Azzam, Edouard I; Badavi, Francis F; Baiocco, Giorgio; Benton, Eric; Bindi, Veronica; Blakely, Eleanor A; Blattnig, Steve R; Boothman, David A; Borak, Thomas B; Britten, Richard A; Curtis, Stan; Dingfelder, Michael; Durante, Marco; Dynan, William S; Eisch, Amelia J; Robin Elgart, S; Goodhead, Dudley T; Guida, Peter M; Heilbronn, Lawrence H; Hellweg, Christine E; Huff, Janice L; Kronenberg, Amy; La Tessa, Chiara; Lowenstein, Derek I; Miller, Jack; Morita, Takashi; Narici, Livio; Nelson, Gregory A; Norman, Ryan B; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Patel, Zarana S; Reitz, Guenther; Rusek, Adam; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Scott-Carnell, Lisa A; Semones, Edward; Shay, Jerry W; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A; Sihver, Lembit; Simonsen, Lisa C; Story, Michael D; Turker, Mitchell S; Uchihori, Yukio; Williams, Jacqueline; Zeitlin, Cary J

    2016-02-01

    Most accelerator-based space radiation experiments have been performed with single ion beams at fixed energies. However, the space radiation environment consists of a wide variety of ion species with a continuous range of energies. Due to recent developments in beam switching technology implemented at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), it is now possible to rapidly switch ion species and energies, allowing for the possibility to more realistically simulate the actual radiation environment found in space. The present paper discusses a variety of issues related to implementation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulation at NSRL, especially for experiments in radiobiology. Advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to developing a GCR simulator are presented. In addition, issues common to both GCR simulation and single beam experiments are compared to issues unique to GCR simulation studies. A set of conclusions is presented as well as a discussion of the technical implementation of GCR simulation.

  8. Galactic cosmic ray simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Norbury, John W; Schimmerling, Walter; Slaba, Tony C; Azzam, Edouard I; Badavi, Francis F; Baiocco, Giorgio; Benton, Eric; Bindi, Veronica; Blakely, Eleanor A; Blattnig, Steve R; Boothman, David A; Borak, Thomas B; Britten, Richard A; Curtis, Stan; Dingfelder, Michael; Durante, Marco; Dynan, William S; Eisch, Amelia J; Robin Elgart, S; Goodhead, Dudley T; Guida, Peter M; Heilbronn, Lawrence H; Hellweg, Christine E; Huff, Janice L; Kronenberg, Amy; La Tessa, Chiara; Lowenstein, Derek I; Miller, Jack; Morita, Takashi; Narici, Livio; Nelson, Gregory A; Norman, Ryan B; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Patel, Zarana S; Reitz, Guenther; Rusek, Adam; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Scott-Carnell, Lisa A; Semones, Edward; Shay, Jerry W; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A; Sihver, Lembit; Simonsen, Lisa C; Story, Michael D; Turker, Mitchell S; Uchihori, Yukio; Williams, Jacqueline; Zeitlin, Cary J

    2016-02-01

    Most accelerator-based space radiation experiments have been performed with single ion beams at fixed energies. However, the space radiation environment consists of a wide variety of ion species with a continuous range of energies. Due to recent developments in beam switching technology implemented at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), it is now possible to rapidly switch ion species and energies, allowing for the possibility to more realistically simulate the actual radiation environment found in space. The present paper discusses a variety of issues related to implementation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulation at NSRL, especially for experiments in radiobiology. Advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to developing a GCR simulator are presented. In addition, issues common to both GCR simulation and single beam experiments are compared to issues unique to GCR simulation studies. A set of conclusions is presented as well as a discussion of the technical implementation of GCR simulation. PMID:26948012

  9. Galactic cosmic ray simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbury, John W.; Schimmerling, Walter; Slaba, Tony C.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Badavi, Francis F.; Baiocco, Giorgio; Benton, Eric; Bindi, Veronica; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Boothman, David A.; Borak, Thomas B.; Britten, Richard A.; Curtis, Stan; Dingfelder, Michael; Durante, Marco; Dynan, William S.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Robin Elgart, S.; Goodhead, Dudley T.; Guida, Peter M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Hellweg, Christine E.; Huff, Janice L.; Kronenberg, Amy; La Tessa, Chiara; Lowenstein, Derek I.; Miller, Jack; Morita, Takashi; Narici, Livio; Nelson, Gregory A.; Norman, Ryan B.; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Patel, Zarana S.; Reitz, Guenther; Rusek, Adam; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Scott-Carnell, Lisa A.; Semones, Edward; Shay, Jerry W.; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A.; Sihver, Lembit; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Story, Michael D.; Turker, Mitchell S.; Uchihori, Yukio; Williams, Jacqueline; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2016-02-01

    Most accelerator-based space radiation experiments have been performed with single ion beams at fixed energies. However, the space radiation environment consists of a wide variety of ion species with a continuous range of energies. Due to recent developments in beam switching technology implemented at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), it is now possible to rapidly switch ion species and energies, allowing for the possibility to more realistically simulate the actual radiation environment found in space. The present paper discusses a variety of issues related to implementation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulation at NSRL, especially for experiments in radiobiology. Advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to developing a GCR simulator are presented. In addition, issues common to both GCR simulation and single beam experiments are compared to issues unique to GCR simulation studies. A set of conclusions is presented as well as a discussion of the technical implementation of GCR simulation.

  10. On the simulation of space based manipulators with contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Michael W.; Dionise, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    An efficient method of simulating the motion of space based manipulators is presented. Since the manipulators will come into contact with different objects in their environment while carrying out different tasks, an important part of the simulation is the modeling of those contacts. An inverse dynamics controller is used to control a two armed manipulator whose task is to grasp an object floating in space. Simulation results are presented and an evaluation is made of the performance of the controller.

  11. An Overview of the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crues, Edwin Z.; Chung, Victoria I.; Blum, Michael G.; Bowman, James D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES) Project, a research and development collaboration between NASA centers which investigates technologies, and processes related to integrated, distributed simulation of complex space systems in support of NASA's Exploration Initiative. In particular, it describes the three major components of DSES: network infrastructure, software infrastructure and simulation development. With regard to network infrastructure, DSES is developing a Distributed Simulation Network for use by all NASA centers. With regard to software, DSES is developing software models, tools and procedures that streamline distributed simulation development and provide an interoperable infrastructure for agency-wide integrated simulation. Finally, with regard to simulation development, DSES is developing an integrated end-to-end simulation capability to support NASA development of new exploration spacecraft and missions. This paper presents the current status and plans for these three areas, including examples of specific simulations.

  12. Thirteenth Space Simulation Conference. The Payload: Testing for Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, J. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Information on the state of the art in space simulation, test technology, thermal simulation and protection, contamination, and test measurements and techniques are presented. Simulation of upper atmosphere oxygen was discussed. Problems and successes of retrieving and repairing orbiting spacecrafts by utilizing the shuttle are outlined.

  13. Modeling and simulation for space medicine operations: preliminary requirements considered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, D. L.; Billica, R. D.; McDonald, P. V.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Space Medicine program is now developing plans for more extensive use of high-fidelity medical simulation systems. The use of simulation is seen as means to more effectively use the limited time available for astronaut medical training. Training systems should be adaptable for use in a variety of training environments, including classrooms or laboratories, space vehicle mockups, analog environments, and in microgravity. Modeling and simulation can also provide the space medicine development program a mechanism for evaluation of other medical technologies under operationally realistic conditions. Systems and procedures need preflight verification with ground-based testing. Traditionally, component testing has been accomplished, but practical means for "human in the loop" verification of patient care systems have been lacking. Medical modeling and simulation technology offer potential means to accomplish such validation work. Initial considerations in the development of functional requirements and design standards for simulation systems for space medicine are discussed.

  14. Modeling and simulation for space medicine operations: preliminary requirements considered.

    PubMed

    Dawson, D L; Billica, R D; McDonald, P V

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Space Medicine program is now developing plans for more extensive use of high-fidelity medical simulation systems. The use of simulation is seen as means to more effectively use the limited time available for astronaut medical training. Training systems should be adaptable for use in a variety of training environments, including classrooms or laboratories, space vehicle mockups, analog environments, and in microgravity. Modeling and simulation can also provide the space medicine development program a mechanism for evaluation of other medical technologies under operationally realistic conditions. Systems and procedures need preflight verification with ground-based testing. Traditionally, component testing has been accomplished, but practical means for "human in the loop" verification of patient care systems have been lacking. Medical modeling and simulation technology offer potential means to accomplish such validation work. Initial considerations in the development of functional requirements and design standards for simulation systems for space medicine are discussed. PMID:11317721

  15. Secondary metabolism in simulated microgravity and space flight.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Liu, Zhiheng; Zhang, Lixin

    2011-11-01

    Space flight experiments have suggested that microgravity can affect cellular processes in microorganisms. To simulate the microgravity environment on earth, several models have been developed and applied to examine the effect of microgravity on secondary metabolism. In this paper, studies of effects of space flight on secondary metabolism are exemplified and reviewed along with the advantages and disadvantages of the current models used for simulating microgravity. This discussion is both significant and timely to researchers considering the use of simulated microgravity or space flight to explore effects of weightlessness on secondary metabolism. PMID:22180084

  16. Destination state screening of active spaces in spin dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzystyniak, M.; Edwards, Luke J.; Kuprov, Ilya

    2011-06-01

    We propose a novel avenue for state space reduction in time domain Liouville space spin dynamics simulations, using detectability as a selection criterion - only those states that evolve into or affect other detectable states are kept in the simulation. This basis reduction procedure (referred to as destination state screening) is formally exact and can be applied on top of the existing state space restriction techniques. As demonstrated below, in many cases this results in further reduction of matrix dimension, leading to considerable acceleration of many spin dynamics simulation types. Destination state screening is implemented in the latest version of the Spinach library (http://spindynamics.org).

  17. The Use of Microgravity Simulators for Space Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Richards, Stephanie E.; Wade, Randall I.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Fritsche, Ralph F.; Levine, Howard G.

    2016-01-01

    The spaceflight environment is known to influence biological processes ranging from stimulation of cellular metabolism to possible impacts on cellular damage repair, suppression of immune functions, and bone loss in astronauts. Microgravity is one of the most significant stress factors experienced by living organisms during spaceflight, and therefore, understanding cellular responses to altered gravity at the physiological and molecular level is critical for expanding our knowledge of life in space. Since opportunities to conduct experiments in space are scarce, various microgravity simulators and analogues have been widely used in space biology ground studies. Even though simulated microgravity conditions have produced some, but not all of the biological effects observed in the true microgravity environment, they provide test beds that are effective, affordable, and readily available to facilitate microgravity research. A Micro-g Simulator Center is being developed at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to offer a variety of microgravity simulators and platforms for Space Biology investigators. Assistance will be provided by both KSC and external experts in molecular biology, microgravity simulation, and engineering. Comparisons between the physical differences in microgravity simulators, examples of experiments using the simulators, and scientific questions regarding the use of microgravity simulators will be discussed.

  18. 20th Space Simulation Conference: The Changing Testing Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences and Technology's Twentieth Space Simulation Conference, "The Changing Testing Paradigm" provided participants with a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state-of-the-art in space simulation, test technology, atomic oxygen, program/system testing, dynamics testing, contamination, and materials. The papers presented at this conference and the resulting discussions carried out the conference theme "The Changing Testing Paradigm."

  19. Galactic Cosmic Ray Simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Rusek, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The external Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) spectrum is significantly modified when it passes through spacecraft shielding and astronauts. One approach for simulating the GCR space radiation environment is to attempt to reproduce the unmodified, external GCR spectrum at a ground based accelerator. A possibly better approach would use the modified, shielded tissue spectrum, to select accelerator beams impinging on biological targets. NASA plans for implementation of a GCR simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory will be discussed.

  20. 20th Space Simulation Conference: The Changing Testing Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences' Twentieth Space Simulation Conference, "The Changing Testing Paradigm" provided participants with a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state-of-the-art in space simulation, test technology, atomic oxygen, program/system testing, dynamics testing, contamination, and materials. The papers presented at this conference and the resulting discussions carried out the conference theme "The Changing Testing Paradigm."

  1. Space vehicle approach velocity judgments under simulated visual space conditions.

    PubMed

    Haines, R F

    1989-02-01

    There were 35 volunteers who responded when they first perceived an increase in apparent size of a collimated, two-dimensional perspective image of an Orbiter vehicle. The variables of interest included the presence (or absence) of a fixed reticle within the field of view (FOV), background starfield velocity, initial range to the vehicle and vehicle closure velocity. It was found that: 1) increasing vehicle approach velocity yielded a very small (but significant) effect of faster detection of vehicle movement, nevertheless, response variability was relatively large; 2) including the fixed reticle in the FOV produced significantly slower detection of vehicle radial movement, however this occurred only at the largest range and the magnitude of the effect was only about 15% of the one sigma value; and 3) increasing background star velocity during this judgment led to slower detection of vehicle movement. While statistically significant, this effect was small and occurred primarily at the largest range. A possible explanation for the last two findings is that other static and dynamic objects within the visual field may compete for available attention which otherwise would be available for judging image expansion; thus, the target's retinal image has to expand more than otherwise for its movement to be detected. This study also showed that the Proximity Operations Research Mockup at NASA/Ames can be used effectively to investigate a variety of visual judgment questions related to future space operations. These findings are discussed in relation to previous research and possible underlying mechanisms. PMID:2930426

  2. Space vehicle approach velocity judgments under simulated visual space conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    There were 35 volunteers who responded when they first perceived an increase in apparent size of a collimated, two-dimensional perspective image of an Orbiter vehicle. The variables of interest included the presence (or absence) of a fixed reticle within the field of view (FOV), background starfield velocity, initial range to the vehicle and vehicle closure velocity. It was found that: 1) increasing vehicle approach velocity yielded a very small (but significant) effect of faster detection of vehicle movement, nevertheless, response variability was relatively large; 2) including the fixed reticle in the FOV produced significantly slower detection of vehicle radial movement, however this occurred only at the largest range and the magnitude of the effect was only about 15% of the one sigma value; and 3) increasing background star velocity during this judgment led to slower detection of vehicle movement. While statistically significant, this effect was small and occurred primarily at the largest range. A possible explanation for the last two findings is that other static and dynamic objects within the visual field may compete for available attention which otherwise would be available for judging image expansion; thus, the target's retinal image has to expand more than otherwise for its movement to be detected. This study also showed that the Proximity Operations Research Mockup at NASA/Ames can be used effectively to investigate a variety of visual judgment questions related to future space operations. These findings are discussed in relation to previous research and possible underlying mechanisms.

  3. Simulated space environment tests on cadmium sulfide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, D. R.; Oman, H.

    1971-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide (Cu2s - CdS) solar cells were tested under simulated space environmental conditions. Some cells were thermally cycled with illumination from a Xenon-arc solar simulator. A cycle was one hour of illumination followed immediately with one-half hour of darkness. In the light, the cells reached an equilibrium temperature of 60 C (333 K) and in the dark the cell temperature dropped to -120 C (153 K). Other cells were constantly illuminated with a Xenon-arc solar simulator. The equilibrium temperature of these cells was 55 C (328 K). The black vacuum chamber walls were cooled with liquid nitrogen to simulate a space heat sink. Chamber pressure was maintained at 0.000001 torr or less. Almost all of the solar cells tested degraded in power when exposed to a simulated space environment of either thermal cycling or constant illumination. The cells tested the longest were exposed to 10.050 thermal cycles.

  4. GCR Simulator Development Status at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, T. C.; Norbury, J. W.; Blattnig, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    There are large uncertainties connected to the biological response for exposure to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) on long duration deep space missions. In order to reduce the uncertainties and gain understanding about the basic mechanisms through which space radiation initiates cancer and other endpoints, radiobiology experiments are performed with mono-energetic ions beams. Some of the accelerator facilities supporting such experiments have matured to a point where simulating the broad range of particles and energies characteristic of the GCR environment in a single experiment is feasible from a technology, usage, and cost perspective. In this work, several aspects of simulating the GCR environment at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) are discussed. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field, and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, a reference environment for the GCR simulator and suitable for deep space missions is identified and described in terms of fluence and integrated dosimetric quantities. Analysis results are given to justify the use of a single reference field over a range of shielding conditions and solar activities. Third, an approach for simulating the reference field at NSRL is presented. The approach directly considers the hydrogen and helium energy spectra, and the heavier ions are collectively represented by considering the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum. While many more aspects of the experimental setup need to be considered before final implementation of the GCR simulator, this preliminary study provides useful information that should aid the final design. Possible drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed and weighed

  5. A simulation facility for testing Space Station assembly procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajare, Ankur R.; Wick, Daniel T.; Shehad, Nagy M.

    1994-11-01

    NASA plans to construct the Space Station Freedom (SSF) in one of the most hazardous environments known to mankind - space. It is of the utmost importance that the procedures to assemble and operate the SSF in orbit are both safe and effective. This paper describes a facility designed to test the integration of the telerobotic systems and to test assembly procedures using a real-world robotic arm grappling space hardware in a simulated microgravity environment.

  6. A simulation facility for testing Space Station assembly procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajare, Ankur R.; Wick, Daniel T.; Shehad, Nagy M.

    1994-01-01

    NASA plans to construct the Space Station Freedom (SSF) in one of the most hazardous environments known to mankind - space. It is of the utmost importance that the procedures to assemble and operate the SSF in orbit are both safe and effective. This paper describes a facility designed to test the integration of the telerobotic systems and to test assembly procedures using a real-world robotic arm grappling space hardware in a simulated microgravity environment.

  7. Simulated space environmental effects on some experimental high performance polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.

    1993-01-01

    High performance polymers for potential space applications were evaluated under simulated space environmental conditions. Experimental resins from blends of acetylene terminated materials, poly(arylene ether)s and low color polyimides were exposed to high energy electron and ultraviolet radiation in an attempt to simulate space environmental effects. Thin films, neat resin moldings, and carbon fiber reinforced composites were exposed, and the effect on certain polymer properties were determined. Recent research involving the effects of various radiation exposures on the physical, optical, and mechanical properties of several experimental polymer systems is reviewed.

  8. Space logistics simulation: Launch-on-time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nii, Kendall M.

    1990-01-01

    During 1989-1990 the Center for Space Construction developed the Launch-On-Time (L-O-T) Model to help asses and improve the likelihood of successfully supporting space construction requiring multi-logistic delivery flights. The model chose a reference by which the L-O-T probability and improvements to L-O-T probability can be judged. The measure of improvement was chosen as the percent reduction in E(S(sub N)), the total expected amount of unscheduled 'hold' time. We have also previously developed an approach to determining the reduction in E(S(sub N)) by reducing some of the causes of unscheduled holds and increasing the speed at which the problems causing the holds may be 'fixed.' We provided a mathematical (binary linear programming) model for measuring the percent reduction in E(S(sub N)) given such improvements. In this presentation we shall exercise the model which was developed and draw some conclusions about the following: methods used, data available and needed, and make suggestions for areas of improvement in 'real world' application of the model.

  9. Manufacture of Cryoshroud Surfaces for Space Simulation Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Gary S.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental test chambers for space applications use internal shrouds to simulate temperature conditions encountered in space. Shroud temperatures may range from +150 C to -253 C (20 K), and internal surfaces are coated with special high emissivity/absorptivity paints. To obtain temperature uniformity over large areas, detailed thermal design is required for placement of tubing for gaseous or liquid nitrogen and helium and other exotic heat exchange fluids. The recent increase in space simulation activity related to the James Webb Space Telescope has led to the design of new cryogenic shrouds to meet critical needs in instrument package testing. This paper will review the design and manufacturing of shroud surfaces for several of these programs, including fabrication methods and the selection and application of paints for simulation chambers.

  10. Simulated Space Environmental Testing on Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Dennis A.; Fogdall, Larry B.; Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail; Connell, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An exploratory program has been conducted, to irradiate some mature commercial and some experimental polymer films with radiation simulating certain Earth orbits, and to obtain data about the response of each test film's reflective and tensile properties. Protocols to conduct optimized tests were considered and developed to a "prototype" level during this program. Fifteen polymer film specimens were arranged on a specially designed test fixture. The fixture featured controlled exposure areas, and protected the ends of the samples for later gripping in tensile tests. The fixture featured controlled exposure areas, and protected the ends of the samples for later gripping in tensile tests. The fixture containing the films was installed in a clean vacuum chamber where protons, electrons and solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation could simultaneously irradiate the specimens. Near realtime UV rates were used, whereas proton and electron rates were accelerated appreciably to simulate 5 years in orbit during a two month test. Periodically, the spectral reflectance of each film was measured in situ. After the end of the irradiation, final reflectance measurements were made in situ, and solar absorptance values were derived for each specimen. These samples were then measured in air for thermal emittance and for tensile strength. Most specimens withstood the irradiation intact, but with reduced reflectance (increased solar absorptance). Thermal emittance changed slightly in several materials, as did their tensile strength and elongation at break. Conclusions are drawn about the performance of the films. Simulated testing to an expected 5 year dose of electrons and protons consistent with those expected at L2 and 0.98 AU orbits and 100 equivalent solar hours exposure.

  11. A Simulation and Modeling Framework for Space Situational Awareness

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S

    2008-09-15

    This paper describes the development and initial demonstration of a new, integrated modeling and simulation framework, encompassing the space situational awareness enterprise, for quantitatively assessing the benefit of specific sensor systems, technologies and data analysis techniques. The framework is based on a flexible, scalable architecture to enable efficient, physics-based simulation of the current SSA enterprise, and to accommodate future advancements in SSA systems. In particular, the code is designed to take advantage of massively parallel computer systems available, for example, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The details of the modeling and simulation framework are described, including hydrodynamic models of satellite intercept and debris generation, orbital propagation algorithms, radar cross section calculations, optical brightness calculations, generic radar system models, generic optical system models, specific Space Surveillance Network models, object detection algorithms, orbit determination algorithms, and visualization tools. The use of this integrated simulation and modeling framework on a specific scenario involving space debris is demonstrated.

  12. Space Shuttle Plume Simulation Effect on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Technology for simulating plumes in wind tunnel tests was not adequate to provide the required confidence in test data where plume induced aerodynamic effects might be significant. A broad research program was undertaken to correct the deficiency. Four tasks within the program are reported. Three of these tasks involve conducting experiments, related to three different aspects of the plume simulation problem: (1) base pressures; (2) lateral jet pressures; and (3) plume parameters. The fourth task involves collecting all of the base pressure test data generated during the program. Base pressures were measured on a classic cone ogive cylinder body as affected by the coaxial, high temperature exhaust plumes of a variety of solid propellant rockets. Valid data were obtained at supersonic freestream conditions but not at transonic. Pressure data related to lateral (separation) jets at M infinity = 4.5, for multiple clustered nozzles canted to the freestream and operating at high dynamic pressure ratios. All program goals were met although the model hardware was found to be large relative to the wind tunnel size so that operation was limited for some nozzle configurations.

  13. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occurs during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological experiments on animals undergoing space flight is examined. The mouse model developed was an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to one used with rats. The study was divided into two parts. The first involved determination of which immunological parameters should be observed on animals flown during space flight or studied in the suspension model. The second involved suspending mice and determining which of those immunological parameters were altered by the suspension. Rats that were actually flown in Space Shuttle SL-3 were used to test the hypotheses.

  14. Classifying unresolved objects from simulated space data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalepka, R. F.; Hyde, P. D.

    1973-01-01

    A multispectral scanner data set gathered at a flight altitude of 10,000 ft. over an agricultural area was modified to simulate the spatial resolution of the spacecraft scanners. Signatures were obtained for several major crops and their proportions were estimated over a large area. For each crop, a map was generated to show its approximate proportion in each resolution element, and hence its distribution over the area of interest. A statistical criterion was developed to identify data points that may not represent a mixture of the specified crops. This allows for great reduction in the effect of unknown or alien objects on the estimated proportions. This criterion can be used to locate special features, such as roads or farm houses. Preliminary analysis indicates a high level of consistency between estimated proportions and available ground truth. Large concentrations of major crops show up especially well on the maps.

  15. Laboratory simulation of microdiamonds present in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, L.; Mennella, V.; Stephens, J. R.; Bussoletti, E.

    1994-04-01

    Among various carbonaceous grains which are expected to be present in space, submicron diamond particles have received particular attention recently. Laboratory analyses on fine-grained diamond residues extracted from primitive meteorites suggest that this component is one of the most abundant forms of circumstellar dust preserved in meteoritic samples. In addition, recent infrared spectroscopic observations seem to show a typical signature of diamonds in dense interstellar molecular clouds. Measurements on analog grains synthesized in the laboratory may provide experimental results useful to interpret both astronomical observations and laboratory data on meteoritic diamond residues. Following this line of attack to the problem of interstellar diamond characterization, in the present paper we report the results of systematic analyses performed on three soot samples which have been produced in the laboratory by means of detonation processes. As the explosion products contain a significant fraction of submicron diamond-like grains, we have analyzed the properties of the residues extracted from the soots by means of nitric and perchloic acid treatments. A variety of morphological, Raman and infrared laboratory analyses were performed. The results have been compared with data available in the literature for meteoritic samples to get new hints about the properties expected for diamond grains in the interstellar medium.

  16. Next Generation Simulation Framework for Robotic and Human Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Balaram, J.; Jain, Abhinandan; Kuo, Calvin; Lim, Christopher; Myint, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The Dartslab team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has a long history of developing physics-based simulations based on the Darts/Dshell simulation framework that have been used to simulate many planetary robotic missions, such as the Cassini spacecraft and the rovers that are currently driving on Mars. Recent collaboration efforts between the Dartslab team at JPL and the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) have led to significant enhancements to the Dartslab DSENDS (Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing) software framework. The new version of DSENDS is now being used for new planetary mission simulations at JPL. JSC is using DSENDS as the foundation for a suite of software known as COMPASS (Core Operations, Mission Planning, and Analysis Spacecraft Simulation) that is the basis for their new human space mission simulations and analysis. In this paper, we will describe the collaborative process with the JPL Dartslab and the JSC MOD team that resulted in the redesign and enhancement of the DSENDS software. We will outline the improvements in DSENDS that simplify creation of new high-fidelity robotic/spacecraft simulations. We will illustrate how DSENDS simulations are assembled and show results from several mission simulations.

  17. A Simulation Testbed for Airborne Merging and Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Michel; Manikonda, Vikram; Feinberg, Art; Lohr, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The key innovation in this effort is the development of a simulation testbed for airborne merging and spacing (AM&S). We focus on concepts related to airports with Super Dense Operations where new airport runway configurations (e.g. parallel runways), sequencing, merging, and spacing are some of the concepts considered. We focus on modeling and simulating a complementary airborne and ground system for AM&S to increase efficiency and capacity of these high density terminal areas. From a ground systems perspective, a scheduling decision support tool generates arrival sequences and spacing requirements that are fed to the AM&S system operating on the flight deck. We enhanced NASA's Airspace Concept Evaluation Systems (ACES) software to model and simulate AM&S concepts and algorithms.

  18. Survival rates of some terrestrial microorganisms under simulated space conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, J.; Oshima, T.; Koike, K. A.; Taguchi, H.; Tanaka, R.; Nishimura, K.; Miyaji, M.

    1992-10-01

    In connection with planetary quarantine, we have been studying the survival rates of nine species of terrestrial microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, yeasts, fungi, etc.) under simulated interstellar conditions. If common terrestrial microorganisms cannot survive in space even for short periods, we can greatly reduce expenditure for sterilizing space probes. The interstellar environment in the solar system has been simulated by low temperature, high vacuum (77 k, 4 × 10-6 torr), and protons irradiation from a Van de Graaff generator. After exposure to a barrage of protons corresponding to about 250 years of irradiation in solar space, Tobacco mosaic virus. Bacillus subtilis spores, Aspergillus niger spores, and Clostridium mangenoti spores showed survival rates of 82%, 45%, 28%, and 25%, respectively. Furthermore, pathogenic Candida albicans showed 7% survival after irradiation corresponding to about 60 years in space.

  19. Planetary and Space Simulation Facilities PSI at DLR for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbow, E.; Rettberg, P.; Panitz, C.; Reitz, G.

    2008-09-01

    Ground based experiments, conducted in the controlled planetary and space environment simulation facilities PSI at DLR, are used to investigate astrobiological questions and to complement the corresponding experiments in LEO, for example on free flying satellites or on space exposure platforms on the ISS. In-orbit exposure facilities can only accommodate a limited number of experiments for exposure to space parameters like high vacuum, intense radiation of galactic and solar origin and microgravity, sometimes also technically adapted to simulate extraterrestrial planetary conditions like those on Mars. Ground based experiments in carefully equipped and monitored simulation facilities allow the investigation of the effects of simulated single environmental parameters and selected combinations on a much wider variety of samples. In PSI at DLR, international science consortia performed astrobiological investigations and space experiment preparations, exposing organic compounds and a wide range of microorganisms, reaching from bacterial spores to complex microbial communities, lichens and even animals like tardigrades to simulated planetary or space environment parameters in pursuit of exobiological questions on the resistance to extreme environments and the origin and distribution of life. The Planetary and Space Simulation Facilities PSI of the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at DLR in Köln, Germany, providing high vacuum of controlled residual composition, ionizing radiation of a X-ray tube, polychromatic UV radiation in the range of 170-400 nm, VIS and IR or individual monochromatic UV wavelengths, and temperature regulation from -20°C to +80°C at the sample size individually or in selected combinations in 9 modular facilities of varying sizes are presented with selected experiments performed within.

  20. Radiation effects control: Eyes, skin. [space environment simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, D.; Smathers, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Adverse effects on the lens of the eye and the skin due to exposure to proton radiation during manned space flight were evaluated. Actual proton irradiation which might be encountered in space was simulated. Irradiation regimes included single acute exposures, daily fractionated exposures, and weekly fractionated exposures. Animals were exposed and then maintained and examined periodically until data sufficient to meet the objective were obtained. No significant skin effects were noted and no serious sight impairment was exhibited.

  1. Space Motion Sickness and Stress Training Simulator using Electrophysiological Biofeedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudeau, C.; Golding, J. F.; Thevot, F.; Lucas, Y.; Bobola, P.; Thouvenot, J.

    2005-06-01

    An important problem in manned spaceflight is the nausea that typically appears during the first 3 days and then disappears after 5 days. Methods of detecting changes in electrophysiological signals are being studied in order to reduce susceptibility to space motion sickness through biofeedback training, and for the early detection of nausea during EVA. A simulator would allow subjects to control their body functions and to use biofeedback to control space motion sickness and stress.

  2. Space telescope neutral buoyancy simulations: The first two years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, F. G.

    1982-01-01

    Neutral Buoyancy simulations which were conducted to validate the crew systems interface as it relates to space telescope on-orbit maintenance and contingency operations is discussed. The initial concept validation tests using low fidelity mockups is described. The entire spectrum of proposed space telescope refurbishment and selected contingencies using upgraded mockups which reflect flight hardware are reported. Findings which may be applicable to future efforts of a similar nature are presented.

  3. Planetary and Space Simulation Facilities (PSI) at DLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, E.; Rettberg, P.; Kloss, M.; Reitz, G.; Horneck, G.

    2010-05-01

    The Planetary and Space Simulation facilities at DLR offer the possibility to expose biological and physical samples individually or integrated into space hardware to defined and controlled space conditions like ultra high vacuum, low temperature and extraterrestrial UV radiation. An x-ray facility stands for the simulation of the ionizing component at the disposal. All of the simulation facilities are required for the preparation of space experiments: - for testing of the newly developed space hardware - for investigating the effect of different space parameters on biological systems as a preparation for the flight experiment - for performing the 'Experiment Verification Tests' (EVT) for the specification of the test parameters - and 'Experiment Sequence Tests' (EST) by simulating sample assemblies, exposure to selected space parameters, and sample disassembly. To test the compatibility of the different biological and chemical systems and their adaptation to the opportunities and constraints of space conditions a profound ground support program has been developed among many others for the ESA facilities of the ongoing missions EXPOSE-R and EXPOSE-E on board of the International Space Station ISS . Several experiment verification tests EVTs and an experiment sequence test EST have been conducted in the carefully equipped and monitored planetary and space simulation facilities PSI of the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at DLR in Cologne, Germany. These ground based pre-flight studies allowed the investigation of a much wider variety of samples and the selection of the most promising organisms for the flight experiment. EXPOSE-E had been attached to the outer balcony of the European Columbus module of the ISS in February 2008 and stayed for 1,5 years in space; EXPOSE-R has been attached to the Russian Svezda module of the ISS in spring 2009 and mission duration will be approx. 1,5 years. The missions will give new insights into the survivability of terrestrial

  4. Galactic Cosmic Ray Simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Rusek, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The external Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) spectrum is significantly modified when it passes through spacecraft shielding and astronauts. One approach for simulating the GCR space radiation environment at ground based accelerators would use the modified spectrum, rather than the external spectrum, in the accelerator beams impinging on biological targets. Two recent workshops have studied such GCR simulation. The first workshop was held at NASA Langley Research Center in October 2014. The second workshop was held at the NASA Space Radiation Investigators' workshop in Galveston, Texas in January 2015. The results of these workshops will be discussed in this paper.

  5. Refurbishment of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Large Space Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrell, J.; Johnson, K.

    1993-01-01

    The JPL large space simulator has recently undergone a major refurbishment to restore and enhance its capabilities to provide high fidelity space simulation. The nearly completed refurbishment has included upgrading the vacuum pumping system by replacing old oil diffusion pumps with new cryogenic and turbomolecular pumps; modernizing the entire control system to utilize computerized, distributed control technology; replacing the Xenon arc lamp power supplies with new upgraded units; refinishing the primary collimating mirror; and replacing the existing integrating lens unit and the fused quartz penetration window.

  6. Controlled multibody dynamics simulation for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Wu, S. C.; Chang, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    Multibody dynamics discipline, and dynamic simulation in control structure interaction (CSI) design are discussed. The use, capabilities, and architecture of the Large Angle Transient Dynamics (LATDYN) code as a simulation tool are explained. A generic joint body with various types of hinge connections; finite element and element coordinate systems; results of a flexible beam spin-up on a plane; mini-mast deployment; space crane and robotic slewing manipulations; a potential CSI test article; and multibody benchmark experiments are also described.

  7. International Neutral Buoyancy Simulation of Space Station Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Lisa C.; Shields, Nicholas Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR) Neutral Buoyancy Simulation was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator facility during April and May 1992. The purpose of this simulation was to evaluate hardware design and operations for the ISPR and U.S. Lab system racks under simulated conditions of microgravity. The ISPR NBS was conducted by an international simulation team including representatives from Boeing, NASA, NASDA, and ESA. Hardware for the ISPR NBS was provided by Boeing, Alenia, ESA, and MSFC. NASDA and its contractors MEH and IHI provided experienced in-tank participants and technical observers who were present for the duration of the simulation. The ISPR NBS was the first Space Station simulation involving NASA, NASDA and ESA. In addition to bringing together technical representatives from around the world, the ISPR NBS included test subjects who are some of the most experienced U.S. and European astronauts. Eight general areas of investigation were addressed during the ISPR NBS, including: utility panel interfaces, rack tilt down, standoff access, wall access behind the rack, rack removal and installation, rack translation, multiple rack operations, and restraints and mobility aids. This paper focuses on aspects of simulation planning, conduct, and reporting that pertain to specifically to the international involvement of the activity.

  8. Space environment simulation at radiation test of nonmetallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briskman, B. A.; Klinshpont, E. R.; Tupikov, V. I.

    1999-05-01

    Russia [1] (B.A. Briskman, V.I. Toupikov, E.N. Lesnovsky, Proceedings of the Seventh International Symposium on Materials in Space Environment, Toulouse, France, 16-20 June 1997, ESA, SP-399, p. 537) has proposed new international standard for the testing of materials to simulated space radiation. The proposal was submitted to ISO (The International Organization for Standards) Technical Committee 20 (Aircraft and Space Vehicles), Subcommittee 14 (Space Systems and Operations) and was approved as Working Draft 15856 at the Los-Angeles meeting (1997). The second version of the draft was approved at the Beijing meeting (1998). The standard extends to space ionizing radiation: protons, electrons, solar ultraviolet, soft X-radiation, bremsstrahlung, that effect the polymeric materials of space engineering. The special feature of interaction of the space ionizing radiation with materials is the localization of the main part of absorbed energy in thin near-surface layers. Numerous problems appear in simulating the ionizing radiation impact, which require a solution for correct conduction of the on-ground tests.

  9. High Level Architecture Distributed Space System Simulation for Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization Simulation Smackdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zuqun

    2011-01-01

    Modeling and Simulation plays a very important role in mission design. It not only reduces design cost, but also prepares astronauts for their mission tasks. The SISO Smackdown is a simulation event that facilitates modeling and simulation in academia. The scenario of this year s Smackdown was to simulate a lunar base supply mission. The mission objective was to transfer Earth supply cargo to a lunar base supply depot and retrieve He-3 to take back to Earth. Federates for this scenario include the environment federate, Earth-Moon transfer vehicle, lunar shuttle, lunar rover, supply depot, mobile ISRU plant, exploratory hopper, and communication satellite. These federates were built by teams from all around the world, including teams from MIT, JSC, University of Alabama in Huntsville, University of Bordeaux from France, and University of Genoa from Italy. This paper focuses on the lunar shuttle federate, which was programmed by the USRP intern team from NASA JSC. The shuttle was responsible for provide transportation between lunar orbit and the lunar surface. The lunar shuttle federate was built using the NASA standard simulation package called Trick, and it was extended with HLA functions using TrickHLA. HLA functions of the lunar shuttle federate include sending and receiving interaction, publishing and subscribing attributes, and packing and unpacking fixed record data. The dynamics model of the lunar shuttle was modeled with three degrees of freedom, and the state propagation was obeying the law of two body dynamics. The descending trajectory of the lunar shuttle was designed by first defining a unique descending orbit in 2D space, and then defining a unique orbit in 3D space with the assumption of a non-rotating moon. Finally this assumption was taken away to define the initial position of the lunar shuttle so that it will start descending a second after it joins the execution. VPN software from SonicWall was used to connect federates with RTI during testing

  10. The development of a combined effects space simulation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, Carlos A.; Lilly, Taylor C.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.

    2012-11-27

    An overview of the development of a facility to study the combined effects of the space environment on spacecraft is presented. The characterization of a magnetic filter plasma source and a low energy electron flood source for the simulation of the low Earth orbit plasma environment is discussed. Plasma diagnostics show that the magnetic filter plasma source provides streaming ion energies of approximately 5eV and can supply the appropriate density for LEO simulation. Additionally the low energy flood gun is shown to provide the appropriate density for LEO simulation as a function of altitude and solar activity.

  11. Simulation test beds for the space station electrical power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, Gerald G.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center and its prime contractor are responsible for developing the electrical power system on the space station. The power system will be controlled by a network of distributed processors. Control software will be verified, validated, and tested in hardware and software test beds. Current plans for the software test bed involve using real time and nonreal time simulations of the power system. This paper will discuss the general simulation objectives and configurations, control architecture, interfaces between simulator and controls, types of tests, and facility configurations.

  12. Simulation test beds for the Space Station electrical power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, Gerald G.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center and its prime contractor are respnsible for developing the electrical power system on the Space Station. The power system will be controlled by a network of distributed processors. Control software will be verified, validated, and tested in hardware and software test beds. Current plans for the software test bed involve using real time and nonreal time simulations of the power system. This paper will discuss the general simulation objectives and configurations, control architecture, interfaces between simulator and controls, types of tests, and facility configurations.

  13. Simulation of Range Safety for the NASA Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabelo, Luis; Sepulveda, Jose; Compton, Jeppie; Turner, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a simulation environment that seamlessly combines a number of safety and environmental models for the launch phase of a NASA Space Shuttle mission. The components of this simulation environment represent the different systems that must interact in order to determine the Expectation of casualties (E(sub c)) resulting from the toxic effects of the gas dispersion that occurs after a disaster affecting a Space Shuttle within 120 seconds of lift-off. The utilization of the Space Shuttle reliability models, trajectory models, weather dissemination systems, population models, amount and type of toxicants, gas dispersion models, human response functions to toxicants, and a geographical information system are all integrated to create this environment. This simulation environment can help safety managers estimate the population at risk in order to plan evacuation, make sheltering decisions, determine the resources required to provide aid and comfort, and mitigate damages in case of a disaster. This simulation environment may also be modified and used for the landing phase of a space vehicle but will not be discussed in this paper.

  14. Simulation of the space station information system in Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, James R.

    1986-01-01

    The Flexible Ada Simulation Tool (FAST) is a discrete event simulation language which is written in Ada. FAST has been used to simulate a number of options for ground data distribution of Space Station payload data. The fact that Ada language is used for implementation has allowed a number of useful interactive features to be built into FAST and has facilitated quick enhancement of its capabilities to support new modeling requirements. General simulation concepts are discussed, and how these concepts are implemented in FAST. The FAST design is discussed, and it is pointed out how the used of the Ada language enabled the development of some significant advantages over classical FORTRAN based simulation languages. The advantages discussed are in the areas of efficiency, ease of debugging, and ease of integrating user code. The specific Ada language features which enable these advances are discussed.

  15. Simulation and test platform for free-space quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Jia, Jianjun; Wang, Jianyu

    2012-10-01

    We propose a simulation and test platform for free-space quantum communication. The platform is used to simulate the working condition of the satellite-to-ground quantum communication, test the technical parameters and performance of the quantum communication terminal. A collimator is used to simulate the far-field optical transmission between the satellite and the ground; A turntable is used to simulate the motion between the satellite and the ground; A voice coil motor fast steering mirror is used to simulate the vibration of the satellite. With this platform, we design experiments to test the quantum communication terminal we developed. Its acquisition, tracking and pointing (ATP) performance and the far-field distribution of the communication photons are tested, the test results are provided and analyzed.

  16. Simulation Results for Airborne Precision Spacing along Continuous Descent Arrivals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.; Baxley, Brian T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a fast-time simulation experiment and a high-fidelity simulator validation with merging streams of aircraft flying Continuous Descent Arrivals through generic airspace to a runway at Dallas-Ft Worth. Aircraft made small speed adjustments based on an airborne-based spacing algorithm, so as to arrive at the threshold exactly at the assigned time interval behind their Traffic-To-Follow. The 40 aircraft were initialized at different altitudes and speeds on one of four different routes, and then merged at different points and altitudes while flying Continuous Descent Arrivals. This merging and spacing using flight deck equipment and procedures to augment or implement Air Traffic Management directives is called Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing, an important subset of a larger Airborne Precision Spacing functionality. This research indicates that Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing initiated while at cruise altitude and well prior to the Terminal Radar Approach Control entry can significantly contribute to the delivery of aircraft at a specified interval to the runway threshold with a high degree of accuracy and at a reduced pilot workload. Furthermore, previously documented work has shown that using a Continuous Descent Arrival instead of a traditional step-down descent can save fuel, reduce noise, and reduce emissions. Research into Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing is a cooperative effort between government and industry partners.

  17. Extremophiles survival to simulated space conditions: an astrobiology model study.

    PubMed

    Mastascusa, V; Romano, I; Di Donato, P; Poli, A; Della Corte, V; Rotundi, A; Bussoletti, E; Quarto, M; Pugliese, M; Nicolaus, B

    2014-09-01

    In this work we investigated the ability of four extremophilic bacteria from Archaea and Bacteria domains to resist to space environment by exposing them to extreme conditions of temperature, UV radiation, desiccation coupled to low pressure generated in a Mars' conditions simulator. All the investigated extremophilic strains (namely Sulfolobus solfataricus, Haloterrigena hispanica, Thermotoga neapolitana and Geobacillus thermantarcticus) showed a good resistance to the simulation of the temperature variation in the space; on the other hand irradiation with UV at 254 nm affected only slightly the growth of H. hispanica, G. thermantarcticus and S. solfataricus; finally exposition to Mars simulated condition showed that H. hispanica and G. thermantarcticus were resistant to desiccation and low pressure.

  18. Extremophiles Survival to Simulated Space Conditions: An Astrobiology Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastascusa, V.; Romano, I.; Di Donato, P.; Poli, A.; Della Corte, V.; Rotundi, A.; Bussoletti, E.; Quarto, M.; Pugliese, M.; Nicolaus, B.

    2014-09-01

    In this work we investigated the ability of four extremophilic bacteria from Archaea and Bacteria domains to resist to space environment by exposing them to extreme conditions of temperature, UV radiation, desiccation coupled to low pressure generated in a Mars' conditions simulator. All the investigated extremophilic strains (namely Sulfolobus solfataricus, Haloterrigena hispanica, Thermotoga neapolitana and Geobacillus thermantarcticus) showed a good resistance to the simulation of the temperature variation in the space; on the other hand irradiation with UV at 254 nm affected only slightly the growth of H. hispanica, G. thermantarcticus and S. solfataricus; finally exposition to Mars simulated condition showed that H. hispanica and G. thermantarcticus were resistant to desiccation and low pressure.

  19. Computer simulation of cardiovascular changes during extended duration space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R. Srini; Charles, John B.; Leonard, Joel I.

    1990-01-01

    The application of mathematical modeling and computer simulation to the study of spaceflight cardiovascular changes is examined using a multicompartment representation model of the entire human cardiovascular system including its control elements. The model simulates the beat-to-beat dynamic responses of the cardiovascular system to orthostatic stresses. Simulation results pertaining to long-term space flight, the combined effect of +G(z) and blood volume loss, and the effect of anti-G suit inflation are discussed, including past results on the original version of the model which has been used in a number of analysis applications at NASA. New results pertain to analysis of cardiovascular changes in extended duration space flights and demonstrate the use of this model in evaluation of physiological factors that contribute to orthostatic intolerance following an exposure to weightlessness, in particular, blood volume loss and changes in the sensitivity of baroreceptors.

  20. Extremophiles survival to simulated space conditions: an astrobiology model study.

    PubMed

    Mastascusa, V; Romano, I; Di Donato, P; Poli, A; Della Corte, V; Rotundi, A; Bussoletti, E; Quarto, M; Pugliese, M; Nicolaus, B

    2014-09-01

    In this work we investigated the ability of four extremophilic bacteria from Archaea and Bacteria domains to resist to space environment by exposing them to extreme conditions of temperature, UV radiation, desiccation coupled to low pressure generated in a Mars' conditions simulator. All the investigated extremophilic strains (namely Sulfolobus solfataricus, Haloterrigena hispanica, Thermotoga neapolitana and Geobacillus thermantarcticus) showed a good resistance to the simulation of the temperature variation in the space; on the other hand irradiation with UV at 254 nm affected only slightly the growth of H. hispanica, G. thermantarcticus and S. solfataricus; finally exposition to Mars simulated condition showed that H. hispanica and G. thermantarcticus were resistant to desiccation and low pressure. PMID:25573749

  1. A Simulation Base Investigation of High Latency Space Systems Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zu Qun; Crues, Edwin Z.; Bielski, Paul; Moore, Michael

    2017-01-01

    NASA's human space program has developed considerable experience with near Earth space operations. Although NASA has experience with deep space robotic missions, NASA has little substantive experience with human deep space operations. Even in the Apollo program, the missions lasted only a few weeks and the communication latencies were on the order of seconds. Human missions beyond the relatively close confines of the Earth-Moon system will involve missions with durations measured in months and communications latencies measured in minutes. To minimize crew risk and to maximize mission success, NASA needs to develop a better understanding of the implications of these types of mission durations and communication latencies on vehicle design, mission design and flight controller interaction with the crew. To begin to address these needs, NASA performed a study using a physics-based subsystem simulation to investigate the interactions between spacecraft crew and a ground-based mission control center for vehicle subsystem operations across long communication delays. The simulation, built with a subsystem modeling tool developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center, models the life support system of a Mars transit vehicle. The simulation contains models of the cabin atmosphere and pressure control system, electrical power system, drinking and waste water systems, internal and external thermal control systems, and crew metabolic functions. The simulation has three interfaces: 1) a real-time crew interface that can be use to monitor and control the vehicle subsystems; 2) a mission control center interface with data transport delays up to 15 minutes each way; 3) a real-time simulation test conductor interface that can be use to insert subsystem malfunctions and observe the interactions between the crew, ground, and simulated vehicle. The study was conducted at the 21st NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) mission between July 18th and Aug 3rd of year 2016. The NEEMO

  2. Interplanetary Transit Simulations Using the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Arya, M.; Kundrot, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the space life sciences utility of the International Space Station (ISS) to simulate the outbound transit portion of missions to Mars and Near Earth Asteroids (NEA) to investigate biomedical and psychological aspects of such transits, to develop and test space operation procedures compatible with communication delays and outages, and to demonstrate and validate technologies and countermeasures. Two major categories of space life sciences activities can capitalize on ISS capabilities. The first includes studies that require ISS (or a comparable facility), typically for access to prolonged weightlessness. The second includes studies that do not strictly require ISS but can exploit it to maximize their scientific return more efficiently and productively than in ground-based simulations. For these studies, ISS offers a high fidelity analog for fundamental factors on future missions, such as crew composition, mission control personnel, operational tasks and workload, real-world risk, and isolation, and can mimic the effects of distance and limited accessibility. In addition to conducting Mars- and NEA-transit simulations on 6-month ISS increments, extending the current ISS increment duration from 6 months to 9 or even 12 months will provide opportunities for enhanced and focused research relevant to long duration Mars and NEA missions. Increasing the crew duration may pose little additional risk to crewmembers beyond that currently accepted on 6-month increments, but additional medical monitoring capabilities will be required beyond those currently used for ISS operations. Finally, while presenting major logistical challenges, such a simulation followed by a post-landing simulation of Mars exploration could provide quantitative evidence of capabilities in an actual mission. Thus, the use of ISS to simulate aspects of Mars and NEA missions seems practical. If it were to be implemented without major disruption of on-going ISS activities, then planning should

  3. AMOBA - ARINC 653 Simulator for Modular Based Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoal, E.; Rufino, J.; Schoofs, T.; Windsor, J.

    2008-08-01

    The ARINC 653 standard has taken a leading role within the aeronautical industry in the development of safety-critical systems based upon the Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) concept. The related cost savings in reduced integration, verification and validation effort has raised interest in the European space industry for developing a spacecraft IMA approach and for the definition of an ARINC 653-for-space software framework. As part of this process, it is necessary to establish an effective way to test and develop space applications without having access to the final IMA target platform. This paper describes the design and the architecture of a multi-platform and modular ARINC 653 simulator that emulates an execution environment for ARINC 653 space applications.

  4. Using Numerical Modeling to Simulate Space Capsule Ground Landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Ernie; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental work is being conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) to investigate ground landing capabilities of the Orion crew exploration vehicle (CEV). The Orion capsule is NASA s replacement for the Space Shuttle. The Orion capsule will service the International Space Station and be used for future space missions to the Moon and to Mars. To evaluate the feasibility of Orion ground landings, a series of capsule impact tests are being performed at the NASA Langley Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR). The experimental results derived at LandIR provide means to validate and calibrate nonlinear dynamic finite element models, which are also being developed during this study. Because of the high cost and time involvement intrinsic to full-scale testing, numerical simulations are favored over experimental work. Subsequent to a numerical model validated by actual test responses, impact simulations will be conducted to study multiple impact scenarios not practical to test. Twenty-one swing tests using the LandIR gantry were conducted during the June 07 through October 07 time period to evaluate the Orion s impact response. Results for two capsule initial pitch angles, 0deg and -15deg , along with their computer simulations using LS-DYNA are presented in this article. A soil-vehicle friction coefficient of 0.45 was determined by comparing the test stopping distance with computer simulations. In addition, soil modeling accuracy is presented by comparing vertical penetrometer impact tests with computer simulations for the soil model used during the swing tests.

  5. Psychosocial value of space simulation for extended spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Kanas, N

    1997-01-01

    There have been over 60 studies of Earth-bound activities that can be viewed as simulations of manned spaceflight. These analogs have involved Antarctic and Arctic expeditions, submarines and submersible simulators, land-based simulators, and hypodynamia environments. None of these analogs has accounted for all the variables related to extended spaceflight (e.g., microgravity, long-duration, heterogeneous crews), and some of the stimulation conditions have been found to be more representative of space conditions than others. A number of psychosocial factors have emerged from the simulation literature that correspond to important issues that have been reported from space. Psychological factors include sleep disorders, alterations in time sense, transcendent experiences, demographic issues, career motivation, homesickness, and increased perceptual sensitivities. Psychiatric factors include anxiety, depression, psychosis, psychosomatic symptoms, emotional reactions related to mission stage, asthenia, and postflight personality, and marital problems. Finally, interpersonal factors include tension resulting from crew heterogeneity, decreased cohesion over time, need for privacy, and issues involving leadership roles and lines of authority. Since future space missions will usually involve heterogeneous crews working on complicated objectives over long periods of time, these features require further study. Socio-cultural factors affecting confined crews (e.g., language and dialect, cultural differences, gender biases) should be explored in order to minimize tension and sustain performance. Career motivation also needs to be examined for the purpose of improving crew cohesion and preventing subgrouping, scapegoating, and territorial behavior. Periods of monotony and reduced activity should be addressed in order to maintain morale, provide meaningful use of leisure time, and prevent negative consequences of low stimulation, such as asthenia and crew member withdrawal

  6. Psychosocial value of space simulation for extended spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanas, N.

    1997-01-01

    There have been over 60 studies of Earth-bound activities that can be viewed as simulations of manned spaceflight. These analogs have involved Antarctic and Arctic expeditions, submarines and submersible simulators, land-based simulators, and hypodynamia environments. None of these analogs has accounted for all the variables related to extended spaceflight (e.g., microgravity, long-duration, heterogeneous crews), and some of the stimulation conditions have been found to be more representative of space conditions than others. A number of psychosocial factors have emerged from the simulation literature that correspond to important issues that have been reported from space. Psychological factors include sleep disorders, alterations in time sense, transcendent experiences, demographic issues, career motivation, homesickness, and increased perceptual sensitivities. Psychiatric factors include anxiety, depression, psychosis, psychosomatic symptoms, emotional reactions related to mission stage, asthenia, and postflight personality, and marital problems. Finally, interpersonal factors include tension resulting from crew heterogeneity, decreased cohesion over time, need for privacy, and issues involving leadership roles and lines of authority. Since future space missions will usually involve heterogeneous crews working on complicated objectives over long periods of time, these features require further study. Socio-cultural factors affecting confined crews (e.g., language and dialect, cultural differences, gender biases) should be explored in order to minimize tension and sustain performance. Career motivation also needs to be examined for the purpose of improving crew cohesion and preventing subgrouping, scapegoating, and territorial behavior. Periods of monotony and reduced activity should be addressed in order to maintain morale, provide meaningful use of leisure time, and prevent negative consequences of low stimulation, such as asthenia and crew member withdrawal

  7. Interplanetary Transit Simulations Using the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, J. B.; Arya, Maneesh

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that the International Space Station (ISS) be utilized to simulate the transit portion of long-duration missions to Mars and near-Earth asteroids (NEA). The ISS offers a unique environment for such simulations, providing researchers with a high-fidelity platform to study, enhance, and validate technologies and countermeasures for these long-duration missions. From a space life sciences perspective, two major categories of human research activities have been identified that will harness the various capabilities of the ISS during the proposed simulations. The first category includes studies that require the use of the ISS, typically because of the need for prolonged weightlessness. The ISS is currently the only available platform capable of providing researchers with access to a weightless environment over an extended duration. In addition, the ISS offers high fidelity for other fundamental space environmental factors, such as isolation, distance, and accessibility. The second category includes studies that do not require use of the ISS in the strictest sense, but can exploit its use to maximize their scientific return more efficiently and productively than in ground-based simulations. In addition to conducting Mars and NEA simulations on the ISS, increasing the current increment duration on the ISS from 6 months to a longer duration will provide opportunities for enhanced and focused research relevant to long-duration Mars and NEA missions. Although it is currently believed that increasing the ISS crew increment duration to 9 or even 12 months will pose little additional risk to crewmembers, additional medical monitoring capabilities may be required beyond those currently used for the ISS operations. The use of the ISS to simulate aspects of Mars and NEA missions seems practical, and it is recommended that planning begin soon, in close consultation with all international partners.

  8. Analysis of the Space Shuttle main engine simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deabreu-Garcia, J. Alex; Welch, John T.

    1993-01-01

    This is a final report on an analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Program, a digital simulator code written in Fortran. The research was undertaken in ultimate support of future design studies of a shuttle life-extending Intelligent Control System (ICS). These studies are to be conducted by NASA Lewis Space Research Center. The primary purpose of the analysis was to define the means to achieve a faster running simulation, and to determine if additional hardware would be necessary for speeding up simulations for the ICS project. In particular, the analysis was to consider the use of custom integrators based on the Matrix Stability Region Placement (MSRP) method. In addition to speed of execution, other qualities of the software were to be examined. Among these are the accuracy of computations, the useability of the simulation system, and the maintainability of the program and data files. Accuracy involves control of truncation error of the methods, and roundoff error induced by floating point operations. It also involves the requirement that the user be fully aware of the model that the simulator is implementing.

  9. Modem simulations for possible use in Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Stephen

    Two candidate modem structures for use in the Space Station Multiple-Access Communications System were simulated using a software simulation package to obtain symbol error-rate curves. These systems represent an evolutionary QPSK-through-8 PSK modulation format for the input data streams. It was found that the use of phase-staggered QPSK modems would give lower expected implementation loss than a modem based upon the polarity-Costas-loop method. However, the latter would represent a simpler hardware investment to realize the modem structure for both QPSK and 8 PSK.

  10. Modem simulations for possible use in Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    Two candidate modem structures for use in the Space Station Multiple-Access Communications System were simulated using a software simulation package to obtain symbol error-rate curves. These systems represent an evolutionary QPSK-through-8 PSK modulation format for the input data streams. It was found that the use of phase-staggered QPSK modems would give lower expected implementation loss than a modem based upon the polarity-Costas-loop method. However, the latter would represent a simpler hardware investment to realize the modem structure for both QPSK and 8 PSK.

  11. A Coordinated Initialization Process for the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crues, Edwin Z.; Phillips, Robert G.; Dexter, Dan; Hasan, David

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the federate initialization process for the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES) is described. The topics include: 1) Background: DSES; 2) Simulation requirements; 3) Nine Step Initialization; 4) Step 1: Create the Federation; 5) Step 2: Publish and Subscribe; 6) Step 3: Create Object Instances; 7) Step 4: Confirm All Federates Have Joined; 8) Step 5: Achieve initialize Synchronization Point; 9) Step 6: Update Object Instances With Initial Data; 10) Step 7: Wait for Object Reflections; 11) Step 8: Set Up Time Management; 12) Step 9: Achieve startup Synchronization Point; and 13) Conclusions

  12. Space Station gas-grain simulation facility - Application to exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, C. P.; Stoker, C. R.; Morris, J.; Conley, G.; Schwartz, D.

    1986-01-01

    The technical issues involved in performing experiments on the behavior and properties of aerosols in a microgravity environment provided by the Space Station are reviewed. The displacement of a particle resulting from g-jitter for ballistic, Knudsen, and Stokes flow regimes is examined in detail, and the radiation, acoustic, electrostatic, and electromagnetic mechanisms for the control of this motion are described. The simulation of organic haze production on Titan has been selected as an example experiment for detailed study. The purpose of this experiment was to simulate the photolysis of methane and the subsequent formation of the organic haze particles in the Titan upper atmosphere.

  13. RF systems in space. Volume 1: Space antennas frequency (SARF) simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, A. C.; Freeman, J. R.; Capp, J. D.

    1983-04-01

    The main objective of this effort was to develop a computer based analytical capability for simulating the RF performance of large space-based radar (SBR) systems. The model is capable of simulating corporate and space fed aperture. The model also can simulate multibeam feeds, cluster/point feeds, corporate feed and various aperture distributions. The simulation is capable of accepting Draper Labs structural data and antenna current data from Atlantic Research Corporation's (ARC) First Approximation Methods (FAM) and Higher Approximation Methods (HAM) models. In addition there is a routine to input various apertures surface distortions which causes the elements in the array to be displaced from the ideal location on a planar lattice. These were analyses looking at calibration/compensation techniques for large aperture space radars. Passive, space fed lens SBR designs were investigated. The survivability of an SBR system was analyzed. The design of ground based SBR validation experiments for large aperture SBR concepts were investigated. SBR designs were investigated for ground target detection.

  14. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator - NB32 - Large Space Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a cooperative program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) to operate a long-lived space-based observatory; it was the flagship mission of NASA's Great Observatories program. The HST program began as an astronomical dream in the 1940s. During the 1970s and 1980s, HST was finally designed and built; and it finally became operational in the 1990s. HST was deployed into a low-Earth orbit on April 25, 1990 from the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31). The design of the HST took into consideration its length of service and the necessity of repairs and equipment replacement by making the body modular. In doing so, subsequent shuttle missions could recover the HST, replace faulty or obsolete parts and be re-released. MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator served as the training facility for shuttle astronauts for Hubble related missions. Shown is astronaut Sharnon Lucid having her life support system being checked prior to entering the NBS to begin training on the space telescope axial scientific instrument changeout.

  15. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1985-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occur during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological flight experiments on animals was discussed. The mouse model is an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to the one used with rats. It is shown that this murine model yield similar results to the rat model of antiorthostatic suspension for simulating some aspects of weightlessness. It is also shown that mice suspended in this model have decreased interferon-alpha/beta production as compared to control, nonsuspended mice or to orthostatically suspended mice. It is suggested that the conditions occuring during space flight could possibly affect interferon production. The regulatory role of interferon in nonviral diseases is demonstrated including several bacterial and protozoan infections indicating the great significance of interferon in resistance to many types of infectious diseases.

  16. An Overview of Space Exploration Simulation (Basis of Confidence) Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Alleen; Hale, Joseph P.

    2006-01-01

    Models and simulations (M&S) are critical resources in the exploration of space. They support program management, systems engineering, integration, analysis, test, and operations by providing critical information that supports key analyses and decisions (technical, cost and schedule). Consequently, there is a clear need to establish a solid understanding of M&S strengths and weaknesses, and the bounds within which they can credibly support decision making. In this presentation we will describe how development of simulation capability documentation will be used to form a Basis of Confidence (Basis of Confidence) for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) M&S. The process by which BOC documentation is developed will be addressed, as well as the structure and critical concepts that are essential for establishing credibility of NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) legacy M&S. We will illustrate the significance of BOC documentation in supporting decision makers and Accreditation Authorities in M&S risk management.

  17. Computer simulation of space station computer steered high gain antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    The mathematical modeling and programming of a complete simulation program for a space station computer-steered high gain antenna are described. The program provides for reading input data cards, numerically integrating up to 50 first order differential equations, and monitoring up to 48 variables on printed output and on plots. The program system consists of a high gain antenna, an antenna gimbal control system, an on board computer, and the environment in which all are to operate.

  18. Space simulation testing of the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magette, E.; Smith, D.

    1984-01-01

    The Earth radiation budget components and dynamics and the interactions of this energy cycle, which influences our climate were investigated. The satellite package was subjected to space simulation testing. The size of the spacecraft dictated that the testing be conducted in the new BRUTUS Thermal Vacuum Facility. Computer aided control (CAC), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and residual gas analysis (RGA) monitoring are combined with rigid contamination control procedures to protect the flight hardware from anomalous and potentially destructive out of scope test environments.

  19. To Create Space on Earth: The Space Environment Simulation Laboratory and Project Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, Lori C.

    2003-01-01

    Few undertakings in the history of humanity can compare to the great technological achievement known as Project Apollo. Among those who witnessed Armstrong#s flickering television image were thousands of people who had directly contributed to this historic moment. Amongst those in this vast anonymous cadre were the personnel of the Space Environment Simulation Laboratory (SESL) at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) in Houston, Texas. SESL houses two large thermal-vacuum chambers with solar simulation capabilities. At a time when NASA engineers had a limited understanding of the effects of extremes of space on hardware and crews, SESL was designed to literally create the conditions of space on Earth. With interior dimensions of 90 feet in height and a 55-foot diameter, Chamber A dwarfed the Apollo command/service module (CSM) it was constructed to test. The chamber#s vacuum pumping capacity of 1 x 10(exp -6) torr can simulate an altitude greater than 130 miles above the Earth. A "lunar plane" capable of rotating a 150,000-pound test vehicle 180 deg replicates the revolution of a craft in space. To reproduce the temperature extremes of space, interior chamber walls cool to -280F as two banks of carbon arc modules simulate the unfiltered solar light/heat of the Sun. With capabilities similar to that of Chamber A, early Chamber B tests included the Gemini modular maneuvering unit, Apollo EVA mobility unit and the lunar module. Since Gemini astronaut Charles Bassett first ventured into the chamber in 1966, Chamber B has assisted astronauts in testing hardware and preparing them for work in the harsh extremes of space.

  20. High Performance Parallel Methods for Space Weather Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Paul (Technical Monitor); Gombosi, Tamas I.

    2003-01-01

    This is the final report of our NASA AISRP grant entitled 'High Performance Parallel Methods for Space Weather Simulations'. The main thrust of the proposal was to achieve significant progress towards new high-performance methods which would greatly accelerate global MHD simulations and eventually make it possible to develop first-principles based space weather simulations which run much faster than real time. We are pleased to report that with the help of this award we made major progress in this direction and developed the first parallel implicit global MHD code with adaptive mesh refinement. The main limitation of all earlier global space physics MHD codes was the explicit time stepping algorithm. Explicit time steps are limited by the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition, which essentially ensures that no information travels more than a cell size during a time step. This condition represents a non-linear penalty for highly resolved calculations, since finer grid resolution (and consequently smaller computational cells) not only results in more computational cells, but also in smaller time steps.

  1. A space systems perspective of graphics simulation integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R.; Gott, C.; Sabionski, G.; Bochsler, D.

    1987-01-01

    Creation of an interactive display environment can expose issues in system design and operation not apparent from nongraphics development approaches. Large amounts of information can be presented in a short period of time. Processes can be simulated and observed before committing resources. In addition, changes in the economics of computing have enabled broader graphics usage beyond traditional engineering and design into integrated telerobotics and Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications. The highly integrated nature of space operations often tend to rely upon visually intensive man-machine communication to ensure success. Graphics simulation activities at the Mission Planning and Analysis Division (MPAD) of NASA's Johnson Space Center are focusing on the evaluation of a wide variety of graphical analysis within the context of present and future space operations. Several telerobotics and AI applications studies utilizing graphical simulation are described. The presentation includes portions of videotape illustrating technology developments involving: (1) coordinated manned maneuvering unit and remote manipulator system operations, (2) a helmet mounted display system, and (3) an automated rendezous application utilizing expert system and voice input/output technology.

  2. Simulating Space Capsule Water Landing with Explicit Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2007-01-01

    A study of using an explicit nonlinear dynamic finite element code for simulating the water landing of a space capsule was performed. The finite element model contains Lagrangian shell elements for the space capsule and Eulerian solid elements for the water and air. An Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) solver and a penalty coupling method were used for predicting the fluid and structure interaction forces. The space capsule was first assumed to be rigid, so the numerical results could be correlated with closed form solutions. The water and air meshes were continuously refined until the solution was converged. The converged maximum deceleration predicted is bounded by the classical von Karman and Wagner solutions and is considered to be an adequate solution. The refined water and air meshes were then used in the models for simulating the water landing of a capsule model that has a flexible bottom. For small pitch angle cases, the maximum deceleration from the flexible capsule model was found to be significantly greater than the maximum deceleration obtained from the corresponding rigid model. For large pitch angle cases, the difference between the maximum deceleration of the flexible model and that of its corresponding rigid model is smaller. Test data of Apollo space capsules with a flexible heat shield qualitatively support the findings presented in this paper.

  3. Simulated space environmental effects on some experimental high performance polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Organic polymeric materials are currently being considered for long term use (more than 10 years) in structural (adhesives and composite matrices) and functional (films and coatings) applications on spacecraft. Although organic polymers have been utilized successfully in short term missions, the long term durability of these materials in space is of concern. As part of a NASA effort on high performance polymers for potential space applications, various experimental polymeric materials recently synthesized at NASA Langley Research Center were evaluated under simulated space environmental conditions. Experimental resins from blends of acetylene terminated materials, poly(arylene ether)s and low color polyimides were exposed to high energy electron and ultraviolet radiation in an attempt to simulate space environmental effects. Thin films, neat resin moldings and carbon fiber reinforced composites were exposed and the effect on certain polymer properties were determined. This paper reviews recent research involving the effects of various radiation exposures on the physical, optical and mechanical properties of several experimental polymer systems.

  4. Simulation of Space Shuttle neutron measurements with FLUKA.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, L; Carminati, F; Ferrari, A

    2001-06-01

    FLUKA is an integrated particle transport code that has enhanced multigroup low-energy neutron transport capability similar to the well-known MORSE transport code. Gammas are produced in groups but many important individual lines are specifically included, and subsequently transported by the main FLUKA routines which use a modified version of EGS4 for electromagnetic (EM) transport. Recoil protons are also transported by the primary FLUKA transport simulation. The neutron cross-section libraries employed within FLUKA were supplied by Giancarlo Panini (ENEA, Italy) based upon the most recent data from JEF-1, JEF-2.2, ENDF/B-VI, JENDL-3, etc. More than 60 different materials are included in the FLUKA databases with temperature ranges including down to cryogenic temperatures. This code has been used extensively to model the neutron environments near high-energy physics experiment shielding. A simulation of the Space Shuttle based upon a spherical aluminum equivalent shielding distribution has been performed with reasonable results. There are good prospects for extending this calculation to a more realistic 3-D geometrical representation of the Shuttle including an accurate representation of its composition, which is an essential ingredient for the improvement of the predictions. A proposed project to develop a combined analysis and simulation package based upon FLUKA and the analysis infrastructure provided by the ROOT software is under active consideration. The code to be developed for this project will be of direct application to the problem of simulating the neutron environment in space, including the albedo effects.

  5. Simulation of Space Shuttle neutron measurements with FLUKA.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, L; Carminati, F; Ferrari, A

    2001-06-01

    FLUKA is an integrated particle transport code that has enhanced multigroup low-energy neutron transport capability similar to the well-known MORSE transport code. Gammas are produced in groups but many important individual lines are specifically included, and subsequently transported by the main FLUKA routines which use a modified version of EGS4 for electromagnetic (EM) transport. Recoil protons are also transported by the primary FLUKA transport simulation. The neutron cross-section libraries employed within FLUKA were supplied by Giancarlo Panini (ENEA, Italy) based upon the most recent data from JEF-1, JEF-2.2, ENDF/B-VI, JENDL-3, etc. More than 60 different materials are included in the FLUKA databases with temperature ranges including down to cryogenic temperatures. This code has been used extensively to model the neutron environments near high-energy physics experiment shielding. A simulation of the Space Shuttle based upon a spherical aluminum equivalent shielding distribution has been performed with reasonable results. There are good prospects for extending this calculation to a more realistic 3-D geometrical representation of the Shuttle including an accurate representation of its composition, which is an essential ingredient for the improvement of the predictions. A proposed project to develop a combined analysis and simulation package based upon FLUKA and the analysis infrastructure provided by the ROOT software is under active consideration. The code to be developed for this project will be of direct application to the problem of simulating the neutron environment in space, including the albedo effects. PMID:11855415

  6. Dispersion analysis techniques within the space vehicle dynamics simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. S.; Kuhn, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The Space Vehicle Dynamics Simulation (SVDS) program was evaluated as a dispersion analysis tool. The Linear Error Analysis (LEA) post processor was examined in detail and simulation techniques relative to conducting a dispersion analysis using the SVDS were considered. The LEA processor is a tool for correlating trajectory dispersion data developed by simulating 3 sigma uncertainties as single error source cases. The processor combines trajectory and performance deviations by a root-sum-square (RSS process) and develops a covariance matrix for the deviations. Results are used in dispersion analyses for the baseline reference and orbiter flight test missions. As a part of this study, LEA results were verified as follows: (A) Hand calculating the RSS data and the elements of the covariance matrix for comparison with the LEA processor computed data. (B) Comparing results with previous error analyses. The LEA comparisons and verification are made at main engine cutoff (MECO).

  7. Space-based radar array system simulation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuman, H. K.; Pflug, D. R.; Thompson, L. D.

    1981-08-01

    The present status of the space-based radar phased array lens simulator is discussed. Huge arrays of thin wire radiating elements on either side of a ground screen are modeled by the simulator. Also modeled are amplitude and phase adjust modules connecting radiating elements between arrays, feedline to radiator mismatch, and lens warping. A successive approximation method is employed. The first approximation is based on a plane wave expansion (infinite array) moment method especially suited to large array analysis. the first approximation results then facilitate higher approximation computations that account for effects of nonuniform periodicities (lens edge, lens section interfaces, failed modules, etc.). The programming to date is discussed via flow diagrams. An improved theory is presented in a consolidated development. The use of the simulator is illustrated by computing active impedances and radiating element current distributions for infinite planar arrays of straight and 'swept back' dipoles (arms inclined with respect to the array plane) with feedline scattering taken into account.

  8. 25th Space Simulation Conference. Environmental Testing: The Earth-Space Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Topics covered include: Methods of Helium Injection and Removal for Heat Transfer Augmentation; The ESA Large Space Simulator Mechanical Ground Support Equipment for Spacecraft Testing; Temperature Stability and Control Requirements for Thermal Vacuum/Thermal Balance Testing of the Aquarius Radiometer; The Liquid Nitrogen System for Chamber A: A Change from Original Forced Flow Design to a Natural Flow (Thermo Siphon) System; Return to Mercury: A Comparison of Solar Simulation and Flight Data for the MESSENGER Spacecraft; Floating Pressure Conversion and Equipment Upgrades of Two 3.5kw, 20k, Helium Refrigerators; Affect of Air Leakage into a Thermal-Vacuum Chamber on Helium Refrigeration Heat Load; Special ISO Class 6 Cleanroom for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Project; A State-of-the-Art Contamination Effects Research and Test Facility Martian Dust Simulator; Cleanroom Design Practices and Their Influence on Particle Counts; Extra Terrestrial Environmental Chamber Design; Contamination Sources Effects Analysis (CSEA) - A Tool to Balance Cost/Schedule While Managing Facility Availability; SES and Acoustics at GSFC; HST Super Lightweight Interchangeable Carrier (SLIC) Static Test; Virtual Shaker Testing: Simulation Technology Improves Vibration Test Performance; Estimating Shock Spectra: Extensions beyond GEVS; Structural Dynamic Analysis of a Spacecraft Multi-DOF Shaker Table; Direct Field Acoustic Testing; Manufacture of Cryoshroud Surfaces for Space Simulation Chambers; The New LOTIS Test Facility; Thermal Vacuum Control Systems Options for Test Facilities; Extremely High Vacuum Chamber for Low Outgassing Processing at NASA Goddard; Precision Cleaning - Path to Premier; The New Anechoic Shielded Chambers Designed for Space and Commercial Applications at LIT; Extraction of Thermal Performance Values from Samples in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar; Thermal (Silicon Diode) Data Acquisition System; Aquarius's Instrument Science Data System (ISDS) Automated

  9. Simulation Studies on Harnessing of Artificial Ecosystems in Space Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyajima, Hiroyuki

    Space Colonies are an artificial habitation built in space, an idea first proposed by Gerard K. O'Neill in 1969. He suggested they be placed at Lagrange points which are points in space that balance out the gravitational attraction of the Earth and Moon. There are three types of space colonies proposed: Bernard, Cylinder, and Stanford Torus. The cylinder type, designed by Gerard K. O'Neill, is the most popular in concept at 6 km diameter and 30 km length, corresponding to about 845 cubic km, ten thousand people would potentially be able to reside these. The habitation area would be rotated to generate a quasi-gravitation by centrifugal force. It would be rotated at 0.55 rpm to generate a gravitation equivalent to that of the earth. In the space colony, there would be six areas axially, consisting of flooring and windows alternately. Mobile mirrors would be located outside the windows to reflect sun light toward the habitation areas and generate day, night, and seasons within the space colony. Thus an artificial ecosystem would be created allowing people live in much the same way as they do on the earth. According to my former research on micro ecosystems, it is very difficult to keep the environment balanced at all points due to the large volume of the habitation area and the thermal input of the mobile mirrors. It is predicted that there will be differences in the environment at each point of the cylinder due to the mirror angle. Although controlling the whole artificial ecosystem balance is important, local environment control at each point is also important for people to live and work comfortably. Therefore, it is needed to develop simulation models which can study the whole ecosystem as well as local environments at each point at the same time. This model has to be able to simulate dynamics of the whole system as well as the local environments. In this study, I have developed a new model to simulate the whole and local dynamics in a space colony by using a cell

  10. Robotic space simulation integration of vision algorithms into an orbital operations simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bochsler, Daniel C.

    1987-01-01

    In order to successfully plan and analyze future space activities, computer-based simulations of activities in low earth orbit will be required to model and integrate vision and robotic operations with vehicle dynamics and proximity operations procedures. The orbital operations simulation (OOS) is configured and enhanced as a testbed for robotic space operations. Vision integration algorithms are being developed in three areas: preprocessing, recognition, and attitude/attitude rates. The vision program (Rice University) was modified for use in the OOS. Systems integration testing is now in progress.

  11. Advanced manned space flight simulation and training: An investigation of simulation host computer system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montag, Bruce C.; Bishop, Alfred M.; Redfield, Joe B.

    1989-01-01

    The findings of a preliminary investigation by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in simulation host computer concepts is presented. It is designed to aid NASA in evaluating simulation technologies for use in spaceflight training. The focus of the investigation is on the next generation of space simulation systems that will be utilized in training personnel for Space Station Freedom operations. SwRI concludes that NASA should pursue a distributed simulation host computer system architecture for the Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) rather than a centralized mainframe based arrangement. A distributed system offers many advantages and is seen by SwRI as the only architecture that will allow NASA to achieve established functional goals and operational objectives over the life of the Space Station Freedom program. Several distributed, parallel computing systems are available today that offer real-time capabilities for time critical, man-in-the-loop simulation. These systems are flexible in terms of connectivity and configurability, and are easily scaled to meet increasing demands for more computing power.

  12. Aeroacoustic Simulations of Tandem Cylinders with Subcritical Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Neuhart, Dan H.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Tandem cylinders are being studied because they model a variety of component level interactions of landing gear. The present effort is directed at the case of two identical cylinders with their centroids separated in the streamwise direction by 1.435 diameters. Experiments in the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel and Quiet Flow Facility at NASA Langley Research Center have provided an extensive experimental database of the nearfield flow and radiated noise. The measurements were conducted at a Mach number of 0.1285 and Reynolds number of 1.66x10(exp 5) based on the cylinder diameter. A trip was used on the upstream cylinder to insure a fully turbulent flow separation and, hence, to simulate a major aspect of high Reynolds number flow. The parallel computational effort uses the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver CFL3D with a hybrid, zonal turbulence model that turns off the turbulence production term everywhere except in a narrow ring surrounding solid surfaces. The experiments exhibited an asymmetry in the surface pressure that was persistent despite attempts to eliminate it through small changes in the configuration. To model the asymmetry, the simulations were run with the cylinder configuration at a nonzero but small angle of attack. The computed results and experiments are in general agreement that vortex shedding for the spacing studied herein is weak relative to that observed at supercritical spacings. Although the shedding was subdued in the simulations, it was still more prominent than in the experiments. Overall, the simulation comparisons with measured near-field data and the radiated acoustics are reasonable, especially if one is concerned with capturing the trends relative to larger cylinder spacings. However, the flow details of the 1.435 diameter spacing have not been captured in full even though very fine grid computations have been performed. Some of the discrepancy may be associated with the simulation s inexact representation of the

  13. Time-dependent radiation dose simulations during interplanetary space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Li, Ju

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation is one of the main concerns in planning long-term interplanetary human space missions. There are two main types of hazardous radiation - Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). Their intensities and evolution depend on the solar activity. GCR activity is most enhanced during solar minimum, while the most intense SEPs usually occur during the solar maximum. SEPs are better shielded with thick shields, while GCR dose is less behind think shields. Time and thickness dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when radiation intensity and dose of SEP and GCR would be minimized. In this study we combine state-of-the-art space environment models with GEANT4 simulations to determine the optimal shielding, geometry of the spacecraft, and launch time with respect to the phase of the solar cycle. The radiation environment was described by the time-dependent GCR model, and the SEP spectra that were measured during the period from 1990 to 2010. We included gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and 27 fully ionized elements from hydrogen to nickel. We calculated the astronaut's radiation doses during interplanetary flights using the Monte-Carlo code that accounts for the primary and the secondary radiation. We also performed sensitivity simulations for the assumed spacecraft size and thickness to find an optimal shielding. In conclusion, we present the dependences of the radiation dose as a function of launch date from 1990 to 2010, for flight durations of up to 3 years.

  14. Space and Medical Applications of the Geant4 Simulation Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perl, Joseph

    2008-10-01

    Geant4 is a toolkit to simulate the passage of particles through matter. While Geant4 was developed for High Energy Physics (HEP), applications now include Nuclear, Medical and Space Physics. Medical applications have been increasing rapidly due to the overall growth of Monte Carlo in Medical Physics and the unique qualities of Geant4 as an all-particle code able to handle complex geometry, motion and fields with the flexibility of modern programming and an open free source code. Work has included characterizing beams and sources, treatment planning and imaging. The all-particle nature of Geant4 has made it popular for the newest modes of radiation treatment: Proton and Particle therapy. Geant4 has been used by ESA, NASA and JAXA to study radiation effects to spacecraft and personnel. The flexibility of Geant4 has enabled teams to incorporate it into their own applications (SPENVIS MULASSIS space environment from QinetiQ and ESA, RADSAFE simulation from Vanderbilt University and NASA). We provide an overview of applications and discuss how Geant4 has responded to specific challenges of moving from HEP to Medical and Space Physics, including recent work to extend Geant4's energy range to low dose radiobiology.

  15. Realistic simulation of the Space-borne Compton Polarimeter POLAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hualin

    2016-07-01

    POLAR is a compact wide field space-borne detector dedicated for precise measurements of the linear polarization of hard x-rays emitted by transient sources. Its energy range sensitivity is optimized for the detection of the prompt emission of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). POLAR is developed by an international collaboration of China, Switzerland and Poland. It is planned to be launched into space in 2016 onboard the Chinese space laboratory TG2. The energy range of POLAR spans between 50 keV and 500 keV. POLAR detects gamma rays with an array of 1600 plastic scintillator bars read out by 25 muti-anode PMTs (MAPMTs). Polarization measurements use Compton scattering process and are based on detection of energy depositions in the scintillator bars. Reconstruction of the polarization degree and polarization angle of GRBs requires comparison of experimental modulation curves with realistic simulations of the full instrument response. In this paper we present a method to model and parameterize the detector response including efficiency of the light collection, contributions from crosstalk and non-uniformity of MAPMTs as well as dependency on low energy detection thresholds and noise from readout electronics. The performance of POLAR for determination of polarization is predicted with such realistic simulations and carefully cross-checked with dedicated laboratory tests.

  16. Simulator evaluation of the final approach spacing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Erzberger, Heinz; Green, Steven M.

    1990-01-01

    The design and simulator evaluation of an automation tool for assisting terminal radar approach controllers in sequencing and spacing traffic onto the final approach course is described. The automation tool, referred to as the Final Approach Spacing Tool (FAST), displays speed and heading advisories for arrivals as well as sequencing information on the controller's radar display. The main functional elements of FAST are a scheduler that schedules and sequences the traffic, a 4-D trajectory synthesizer that generates the advisories, and a graphical interface that displays the information to the controller. FAST was implemented on a high performance workstation. It can be operated as a stand-alone in the Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) Facility or as an element of a system integrated with automation tools in the Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC). FAST was evaluated by experienced TRACON controllers in a real-time air traffic control simulation. Simulation results show that FAST significantly reduced controller workload and demonstrated a potential for an increase in landing rate.

  17. Modeling and Simulation for Multi-Missions Space Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Max

    2011-01-01

    Asteroids and Near-Earth Objects [NEOs] are of great interest for future space missions. The Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle [MMSEV] is being considered for future Near Earth Object missions and requires detailed planning and study of its Guidance, Navigation, and Control [GNC]. A possible mission of the MMSEV to a NEO would be to navigate the spacecraft to a stationary orbit with respect to the rotating asteroid and proceed to anchor into the surface of the asteroid with robotic arms. The Dynamics and Real-Time Simulation [DARTS] laboratory develops reusable models and simulations for the design and analysis of missions. In this paper, the development of guidance and anchoring models are presented together with their role in achieving mission objectives and relationships to other parts of the simulation. One important aspect of guidance is in developing methods to represent the evolution of kinematic frames related to the tasks to be achieved by the spacecraft and its robot arms. In this paper, we compare various types of mathematical interpolation methods for position and quaternion frames. Subsequent work will be on analyzing the spacecraft guidance system with different movements of the arms. With the analyzed data, the guidance system can be adjusted to minimize the errors in performing precision maneuvers.

  18. Simulated Space Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Exposure Testing for Polymer Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Pietromica, Anthony J.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Messer, Russell K.

    2002-01-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation of wavelengths between 115 and 200 nm produced by the sun in the space environment can cause degradation to polymer films producing changes in optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. These effects are particularly important for thin polymer films being considered for ultra-lightweight space structures, because, for most polymers, VUV radiation is absorbed in a thin surface layer. NASA Glenn Research Center has developed facilities and methods for long-term ground testing of polymer films to evaluate space environmental VUV radiation effects. VUV exposure can also be used as part of sequential simulated space environmental exposures to determine combined damaging effects. This paper will describe the effects of VUV on polymer films and the necessity for ground testing. Testing practices used at Glenn Research Center for VUV exposure testing will be described including characterization of the VUV radiation source used, calibration procedures traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and testing techniques for VUV exposure of polymer surfaces.

  19. Requirements for Simulating Space Radiation With Particle Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F.; Kim, M-H Y.

    2004-01-01

    Interplanetary space radiation consists of fully ionized nuclei of atomic elements with high energy for which only the few lowest energy ions can be stopped in shielding materials. The health risk from exposure to these ions and their secondary radiations generated in the materials of spacecraft and planetary surface enclosures is a major limiting factor in the management of space radiation risk. Accurate risk prediction depends on a knowledge of basic radiobiological mechanisms and how they are modified in the living tissues of a whole organism. To a large extent, this knowledge is not currently available. It is best developed at ground-based laboratories, using particle accelerator beams to simulate the components of space radiation. Different particles, in different energy regions, are required to study different biological effects, including beams of argon and iron nuclei in the energy range 600 to several thousand MeV/nucleon and carbon beams in the energy range of approximately 100 MeV/nucleon to approximately 1000 MeV/nucleon. Three facilities, one each in the United States, in Germany and in Japan, currently have the partial capability to satisfy these constraints. A facility has been proposed using the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster Synchrotron in the United States; in conjunction with other on-site accelerators, it will be able to provide the full range of heavy ion beams and energies required. International cooperation in the use of these facilities is essential to the development of a safe international space program.

  20. Space physics games and simulations for informal education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harold, J.; Dusenbery, P.

    2008-12-01

    We will demonstrate and discuss several game and simulation based plasma physics education products. Developed using NSF education supplements and the long running Space Weather Outreach Program at the Space Science Institute, these activities range from a "mini-golf" game that uses research grade particle pushing algorithms, to a "whack the Earth" coronal mass ejection activity. These games have their roots in "informal" education settings: as a result they assume a short interaction time by the visitor (as compared to traditional classroom experiences), and they cannot assume a particular level of prior knowledge. On the other hand, as web based activities they have a tremendous reach, and are easily available for any instructor interested in using them in classroom environments. Several of the activities have also been programmed to collect data on the visitors' interactions, giving us a window in to both visitor engagement and the degree to which the activities accomplish their learning goals. In addition to exploring these results, we will discuss the next stage in the Space Weather Outreach Program, where we will explore the ability of a series of short games to build the necessary prior knowledge base for acquiring a firm grasp on basic space physics concepts.

  1. Simulations of space charge in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-03-01

    The Fermilab Project X plan for future high intensity operation relies on the Main Injector as the engine for delivering protons in the 60-120 GeV energy range. Project X plans call for increasing the number of protons per Main Injector bunch from the current value of 1.0 x 10{sup 11} to 3.0 x 10{sup 11}. Space charge effects at the injection energy of 8 GeV have the potential to seriously disrupt operations. We report on ongoing simulation efforts with Synergia, MARYLIE/Impact, and IMPACT, which provide comprehensive capabilities for parallel, multi-physics modeling of beam dynamics in the Main Injector including 3D space-charge effects.

  2. Simulation Modeling and Performance Evaluation of Space Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Esther H.; Segui, John

    2006-01-01

    In space exploration missions, the coordinated use of spacecraft as communication relays increases the efficiency of the endeavors. To conduct trade-off studies of the performance and resource usage of different communication protocols and network designs, JPL designed a comprehensive extendable tool, the Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE). The design and development of MACHETE began in 2000 and is constantly evolving. Currently, MACHETE contains Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) protocol standards such as Proximity-1, Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS), Packet Telemetry/Telecommand, Space Communications Protocol Specification (SCPS), and the CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP). MACHETE uses the Aerospace Corporation s Satellite Orbital Analysis Program (SOAP) to generate the orbital geometry information and contact opportunities. Matlab scripts provide the link characteristics. At the core of MACHETE is a discrete event simulator, QualNet. Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) is an end-to-end architecture providing communication in and/or through highly stressed networking environments. Stressed networking environments include those with intermittent connectivity, large and/or variable delays, and high bit error rates. To provide its services, the DTN protocols reside at the application layer of the constituent internets, forming a store-and-forward overlay network. The key capabilities of the bundling protocols include custody-based reliability, ability to cope with intermittent connectivity, ability to take advantage of scheduled and opportunistic connectivity, and late binding of names to addresses. In this presentation, we report on the addition of MACHETE models needed to support DTN, namely: the Bundle Protocol (BP) model. To illustrate the use of MACHETE with the additional DTN model, we provide an example simulation to benchmark its performance. We demonstrate the use of the DTN protocol

  3. Simulation of MEMS for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mott, Brent; Kuhn, Jonathan; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing optical micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) components for potential application in Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) science instruments. In this work, we present an overview of the electro-mechanical simulation of three MEMS components for NGST, which include a reflective micro-mirror array and transmissive microshutter array for aperture control for a near infrared (NIR) multi-object spectrometer and a large aperture MEMS Fabry-Perot tunable filter for a NIR wide field camera. In all cases the device must operate at cryogenic temperatures with low power consumption and low, complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible, voltages. The goal of our simulation efforts is to adequately predict both the performance and the reliability of the devices during ground handling, launch, and operation to prevent failures late in the development process and during flight. This goal requires detailed modeling and validation of complex electro-thermal-mechanical interactions and very large non-linear deformations, often involving surface contact. Various parameters such as spatial dimensions and device response are often difficult to measure reliably at these small scales. In addition, these devices are fabricated from a wide variety of materials including surface micro-machined aluminum, reactive ion etched (RIE) silicon nitride, and deep reactive ion etched (DRIE) bulk single crystal silicon. The above broad set of conditions combine to be a formidable challenge for space flight qualification analysis. These simulations represent NASA/GSFC's first attempts at implementing a comprehensive strategy to address complex MEMS structures.

  4. Surgery in space. Phase I: Basic surgical principles in a simulated space environment.

    PubMed

    Satava, R M

    1988-06-01

    The venturing forth of man into space confronts the surgeon with a new weightless environment with which he will inevitably have to contend. In this study operative procedures were performed on 20 rats in a simulated space environment with use of neutral buoyancy in order to identify those factors that could actually or potentially affect operative technique. There are three general areas of difference from normal conditions in simulated microgravity: physical adaptation to gravity deprivation tissue behavior, including bleeding; and the conduct of surgery. Without gravity, the tactile "feel" of objects is changed ("heavy" and "light" are meaningless terms) and proprioception is confused so that there is past pointing and overreaching of movements. Tissue planes tend to separate, and organs float and bob in the operative field, which makes clamping, cutting, and suturing different. Bleeding is a major consideration; surface tension tends to keep venous blood oozing along surfaces, whereas pulsatile arterial blood forms droplets, streamers, and clouds, depending on the force of the bleeding. These factors and others interfere with surgical technique in a number of ways: dispersion of blood obscures the surgeon's vision, sutures become entangled, organs are not stabilized, and instruments float into the operative field. The limitations of comparing neutral buoyancy to the true zero gravity of space are addressed. There is a definite need for further investigation for development of new surgical techniques in preparation for experimental and clinical surgery in space.

  5. Space Station gas-grain simulation facility - Microgravity particle research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, Glenn C.; Fogleman, Guy; Huntington, Judith L.

    1988-01-01

    The proposed Space Station gas-grain simulation facility (GGSF) and the possibilities for research in the facility are discussed. The physics of particles in microgravity is reviewed. The proposed design of the GGSF is illustrated and examined. Examples of experiments which have been suggested for the GGSF are presented, including the formation of organic haze particles in Titan's atmosphere, organic compound synthesis on surfaces of growing particles, fractal particles, planetary ring particle dynamics, aggregation of fine geological particulates in planetary atmospheres, and dipolar grain coagulation and orientation.

  6. Human habitat positioning system for NASA's space flight environmental simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.; Keas, P.

    1998-01-01

    Artificial gravity by centrifugation offers an effective countermeasure to the physiologic deconditioning of chronic exposure to microgravity; however, the system requirements of rotational velocity, radius of rotation, and resultant centrifugal acceleration require thorough investigation to ascertain the ideal human-use centrifuge configuration. NASA's Space Flight Environmental Simulator (SFES), a 16-meter (52-foot) diameter, animal-use centrifuge, was recently modified to accommodate human occupancy. This paper describes the SFES Human Habitat Positioning System, the mechanism that facilitates radius of rotation variability and alignment of the centrifuge occupants with the artificial gravity vector.

  7. Estimating crop acreage from space-simulated multispectral scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalepka, R. F.; Hyde, P. D.

    1973-01-01

    The need for multispectral data processing methods to permit the estimation of proportions of objects and materials appearing within the instantaneous field of view of a scanning system is discussed. An algorithm developed for proportion estimation is described as well as other supporting processing techniques. Application of this algorithm to space-simulated multispectral scanner data is discussed and some results presented and compared. Results indicate that, for this data set, the true proportions of the various crops contained within this data set are with one exception more closely in agreement with the proportions determined by the proportion estimation algorithm than with the proportions determined by conventional classfication algorithm.

  8. Space simulation experiments on reaction control system thruster plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A space simulation procedure was developed for studying rocket plume contamination effects using a 5-pound bipropellant reaction control system thruster. Vacuum chamber pressures of 3 x 10 to the minus 5 torr (70 miles altitude) were achieved with the thruster firing in pulse trains consisting of eight pulses (50 msec on, 100 msec off, and seven minutes between pulse trains). The final vacuum was achieved by cooling all vacuum chamber surfaces to liquid helium temperature and by introducing a continuous argon leak of 48 std. cc/sec into the test chamber. An effort was made to simulate propellant system flow dynamics corresponding to actual spacecraft mission use. Fast time response liquid flow rate measurements showed that large variations occurred in the ratio of oxidizer to fuel flow for pulse-on times up to 120 msec. These variations could lead to poor combustion efficiency and the production of contamination.

  9. Prevention of decompression sickness during a simulated space docking mission.

    PubMed

    Cooke, J P; Bollinger, R R; Richardson, B

    1975-07-01

    This study has shown that repetitive exchanges between the American Apollo space vehicle atmosphere of 100% oxygen at 5 psia (258 torr) and the Russian Soyuz spacecraft atmosphere of 30% oxygen-70% nitrogen at 10 psia (523 torr), as simulated in altitude chambers, will not likely result in any form of decompression sickness. This conclusion is based upon the absence of any form of bends in seven crewmen who participated in 11 tests distributed over three 24-h periods. During each period, three transfers from the 5 to the 10 psia environments were performed by simulating passage through a docking module which served as an airlock where astronauts and cosmonauts first adapted to each other's cabin gases and pressures before transfer. Biochemical tests, subjective fatigue scores, and the complete absence of any form of pain were also indicative that decompression sickness should not be expected if this spacecraft transfer schedule is followed.

  10. Coalescent simulation in continuous space: algorithms for large neighbourhood size.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, J; Etheridge, A M; Barton, N H

    2014-08-01

    Many species have an essentially continuous distribution in space, in which there are no natural divisions between randomly mating subpopulations. Yet, the standard approach to modelling these populations is to impose an arbitrary grid of demes, adjusting deme sizes and migration rates in an attempt to capture the important features of the population. Such indirect methods are required because of the failure of the classical models of isolation by distance, which have been shown to have major technical flaws. A recently introduced model of extinction and recolonisation in two dimensions solves these technical problems, and provides a rigorous technical foundation for the study of populations evolving in a spatial continuum. The coalescent process for this model is simply stated, but direct simulation is very inefficient for large neighbourhood sizes. We present efficient and exact algorithms to simulate this coalescent process for arbitrary sample sizes and numbers of loci, and analyse these algorithms in detail. PMID:24910324

  11. Processing of Lunar Soil Simulant for Space Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, Subhayu; Ray, Chandra S.; Reddy, Ramana

    2005-01-01

    NASA's long-term vision for space exploration includes developing human habitats and conducting scientific investigations on planetary bodies, especially on Moon and Mars. To reduce the level of up-mass processing and utilization of planetary in-situ resources is recognized as an important element of this vision. Within this scope and context, we have undertaken a general effort aimed primarily at extracting and refining metals, developing glass, glass-ceramic, or traditional ceramic type materials using lunar soil simulants. In this paper we will present preliminary results on our effort on carbothermal reduction of oxides for elemental extraction and zone refining for obtaining high purity metals. In additions we will demonstrate the possibility of developing glasses from lunar soil simulant for fixing nuclear waste from potential nuclear power generators on planetary bodies. Compositional analysis, x-ray diffraction patterns and differential thermal analysis of processed samples will be presented.

  12. Development of a Space Radiation Monte Carlo Computer Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsky, Lawrence S.

    1997-01-01

    The ultimate purpose of this effort is to undertake the development of a computer simulation of the radiation environment encountered in spacecraft which is based upon the Monte Carlo technique. The current plan is to adapt and modify a Monte Carlo calculation code known as FLUKA, which is presently used in high energy and heavy ion physics, to simulate the radiation environment present in spacecraft during missions. The initial effort would be directed towards modeling the MIR and Space Shuttle environments, but the long range goal is to develop a program for the accurate prediction of the radiation environment likely to be encountered on future planned endeavors such as the Space Station, a Lunar Return Mission, or a Mars Mission. The longer the mission, especially those which will not have the shielding protection of the earth's magnetic field, the more critical the radiation threat will be. The ultimate goal of this research is to produce a code that will be useful to mission planners and engineers who need to have detailed projections of radiation exposures at specified locations within the spacecraft and for either specific times during the mission or integrated over the entire mission. In concert with the development of the simulation, it is desired to integrate it with a state-of-the-art interactive 3-D graphics-capable analysis package known as ROOT, to allow easy investigation and visualization of the results. The efforts reported on here include the initial development of the program and the demonstration of the efficacy of the technique through a model simulation of the MIR environment. This information was used to write a proposal to obtain follow-on permanent funding for this project.

  13. Launching a Dream. A Teachers Guide to a Simulated Space Shuttle Mission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. Lewis Research Center.

    This publication is about imagination, teamwork, creativity, and a host of other ingredients required to carry out a dream. It is about going into space--going into space as part of a simulated space shuttle mission. The publication highlights two simulated shuttle missions cosponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)…

  14. Structuring and sampling complex conformation space: Weighted ensemble dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gong, Linchen; Zhou, Xin

    2009-08-01

    Based on multiple simulation trajectories, which started from dispersively selected initial conformations, the weighted ensemble dynamics method is designed to robustly and systematically explore the hierarchical structure of complex conformational space through the spectral analysis of the variance-covariance matrix of trajectory-mapped vectors. The nondegenerate ground state of the matrix directly predicts the ergodicity of simulation data. The ground state could be adopted as statistical weights of trajectories to correctly reconstruct the equilibrium properties, even though each trajectory only explores part of the conformational space. Otherwise, the degree of degeneracy simply gives the number of metastable states of the system under the time scale of individual trajectory. Manipulation on the eigenvectors leads to the classification of trajectories into nontransition ones within the states and transition ones between them. The transition states may also be predicted without a priori knowledge of the system. We demonstrate the application of the general method both to the system with a one-dimensional glassy potential and with the one of alanine dipeptide in explicit solvent.

  15. Structuring and sampling complex conformation space: Weighted ensemble dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Linchen; Zhou, Xin

    2009-08-01

    Based on multiple simulation trajectories, which started from dispersively selected initial conformations, the weighted ensemble dynamics method is designed to robustly and systematically explore the hierarchical structure of complex conformational space through the spectral analysis of the variance-covariance matrix of trajectory-mapped vectors. The nondegenerate ground state of the matrix directly predicts the ergodicity of simulation data. The ground state could be adopted as statistical weights of trajectories to correctly reconstruct the equilibrium properties, even though each trajectory only explores part of the conformational space. Otherwise, the degree of degeneracy simply gives the number of metastable states of the system under the time scale of individual trajectory. Manipulation on the eigenvectors leads to the classification of trajectories into nontransition ones within the states and transition ones between them. The transition states may also be predicted without a priori knowledge of the system. We demonstrate the application of the general method both to the system with a one-dimensional glassy potential and with the one of alanine dipeptide in explicit solvent.

  16. Space Station gas-grain simulation facility: application to exobiology.

    PubMed

    McKay, C P; Stoker, C R; Morris, J; Conley, G; Schwartz, D

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station provides an environment in which the forces required to suspend particles during an experiment can be reduced by as much as six orders of magnitude. This reduction in levitation force enables us to perform many new experiments in a variety of disciplines. We have grouped these experiments into two categories: 1) those involving an individual particle or the interaction between a few particles and 2) those involving clouds in particles. We consider only particle experiments at this stage because cloud experiments suffer from electrostatic interactions and levitation-forced coalescence therefore requiring considerably more space, mass and crew interaction. The displacement of a particle resulting from g-jitter for ballistic, Knudsen and Stokes flow regimes is considered in detail and the radiation, acoustic, electrostatic and electromagnetic levitation mechanisms to control this motion are reviewed. We have selected the simulation of organic haze production ion Titan as an example experiment for detailed study. The objective of this experiment is to simulate the photolysis of methane and the subsequent formation of the organic haze particles in the upper atmosphere of Titan.

  17. An FPGA computing demo core for space charge simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Huang, Yifei; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    In accelerator physics, space charge simulation requires large amount of computing power. In a particle system, each calculation requires time/resource consuming operations such as multiplications, divisions, and square roots. Because of the flexibility of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), we implemented this task with efficient use of the available computing resources and completely eliminated non-calculating operations that are indispensable in regular micro-processors (e.g. instruction fetch, instruction decoding, etc.). We designed and tested a 16-bit demo core for computing Coulomb's force in an Altera Cyclone II FPGA device. To save resources, the inverse square-root cube operation in our design is computed using a memory look-up table addressed with nine to ten most significant non-zero bits. At 200 MHz internal clock, our demo core reaches a throughput of 200 M pairs/s/core, faster than a typical 2 GHz micro-processor by about a factor of 10. Temperature and power consumption of FPGAs were also lower than those of micro-processors. Fast and convenient, FPGAs can serve as alternatives to time-consuming micro-processors for space charge simulation.

  18. Unified Simulation and Analysis Framework for Deep Space Navigation Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzalone, Evan; Chuang, Jason; Olsen, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    As the technology that enables advanced deep space autonomous navigation continues to develop and the requirements for such capability continues to grow, there is a clear need for a modular expandable simulation framework. This tool's purpose is to address multiple measurement and information sources in order to capture system capability. This is needed to analyze the capability of competing navigation systems as well as to develop system requirements, in order to determine its effect on the sizing of the integrated vehicle. The development for such a framework is built upon Model-Based Systems Engineering techniques to capture the architecture of the navigation system and possible state measurements and observations to feed into the simulation implementation structure. These models also allow a common environment for the capture of an increasingly complex operational architecture, involving multiple spacecraft, ground stations, and communication networks. In order to address these architectural developments, a framework of agent-based modules is implemented to capture the independent operations of individual spacecraft as well as the network interactions amongst spacecraft. This paper describes the development of this framework, and the modeling processes used to capture a deep space navigation system. Additionally, a sample implementation describing a concept of network-based navigation utilizing digitally transmitted data packets is described in detail. This developed package shows the capability of the modeling framework, including its modularity, analysis capabilities, and its unification back to the overall system requirements and definition.

  19. Simulator Evaluation of Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2001-01-01

    The Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) concept is designed to support independent parallel approach operations to runways spaced as close as 2500 ft. This report describes the AILS operational concept and the results of a ground-based flight simulation experiment of one implementation of this concept. The focus of this simulation experiment was to evaluate pilot performance, pilot acceptability, and minimum miss-distances for the rare situation in which all aircraft oil one approach intrudes into the path of an aircraft oil the other approach. Results from this study showed that the design-goal mean miss-distance of 1200 ft to potential collision situations was surpassed with an actual mean miss-distance of 2236 ft. Pilot reaction times to the alerting system, which was an operational concern, averaged 1.11 sec, well below the design-goal reaction time 2.0 sec.These quantitative results and pilot subjective data showed that the AILS concept is reasonable from an operational standpoint.

  20. Space Debris Attitude Simulation - IOTA (In-Orbit Tumbling Analysis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzler, R.; Schildknecht, T.; Lips, T.; Fritsche, B.; Silha, J.; Krag, H.

    Today, there is little knowledge on the attitude state of decommissioned intact objects in Earth orbit. Observational means have advanced in the past years, but are still limited with respect to an accurate estimate of motion vector orientations and magnitude. Especially for the preparation of Active Debris Removal (ADR) missions as planned by ESA's Clean Space initiative or contingency scenarios for ESA spacecraft like ENVISAT, such knowledge is needed. The In-Orbit Tumbling Analysis tool (IOTA) is a prototype software, currently in development within the framework of ESA's “Debris Attitude Motion Measurements and Modelling” project (ESA Contract No. 40000112447), which is led by the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB). The project goal is to achieve a good understanding of the attitude evolution and the considerable internal and external effects which occur. To characterize the attitude state of selected targets in LEO and GTO, multiple observation methods are combined. Optical observations are carried out by AIUB, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is performed by the Space Research Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IWF) and radar measurements and signal level determination are provided by the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR). Developed by Hyperschall Technologie Göttingen GmbH (HTG), IOTA will be a highly modular software tool to perform short- (days), medium- (months) and long-term (years) propagation of the orbit and attitude motion (six degrees-of-freedom) of spacecraft in Earth orbit. The simulation takes into account all relevant acting forces and torques, including aerodynamic drag, solar radiation pressure, gravitational influences of Earth, Sun and Moon, eddy current damping, impulse and momentum transfer from space debris or micro meteoroid impact, as well as the optional definition of particular spacecraft specific influences like tank sloshing, reaction wheel behaviour

  1. Simulation and control for telerobots in space medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidegger, Tamás; Kovács, Levente; Precup, Radu-Emil; Benyó, Balázs; Benyó, Zoltán; Preitl, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    Human space exploration is continuously advancing despite the current financial difficulties, and the new missions are targeting the Moon and the Mars with more effective human-robot collaborative systems. The continuous development of robotic technology should lead to the advancement of automated technology, including space medicine. Telesurgery has already proved its effectiveness through various telemedicine procedures on Earth, and it has the potential to provide medical assistance in space as well. Aeronautical agencies have already conducted numerous experiments and developed various setups to push the boundaries of teleoperation under extreme conditions. Different control schemes have been proposed and tested to facilitate and enhance telepresence and to ensure transparency, sufficient bandwidth and latency-tolerance. This paper focuses on the modeling of a generic telesurgery setup, supported by a cascade control approach. The minimalistic models were tested with linear and PID-fuzzy control options to provide a simple, universal and scalable solution for the challenges of telesurgery over large distances. In our simulations, the control structures were capable of providing good dynamic performance indices and robustness with respect to the gain in the human operator model. This is a promising result towards the support of future teleoperational missions.

  2. Virtual Reality Simulation of the International Space Welding Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a set of breakthrough technologies that allow a human being to enter and fully experience a 3-dimensional, computer simulated environment. A true virtual reality experience meets three criteria: (1) It involves 3-dimensional computer graphics; (2) It includes real-time feedback and response to user actions; and (3) It must provide a sense of immersion. Good examples of a virtual reality simulator are the flight simulators used by all branches of the military to train pilots for combat in high performance jet fighters. The fidelity of such simulators is extremely high -- but so is the price tag, typically millions of dollars. Virtual reality teaching and training methods are manifestly effective, and we have therefore implemented a VR trainer for the International Space Welding Experiment. My role in the development of the ISWE trainer consisted of the following: (1) created texture-mapped models of the ISWE's rotating sample drum, technology block, tool stowage assembly, sliding foot restraint, and control panel; (2) developed C code for control panel button selection and rotation of the sample drum; (3) In collaboration with Tim Clark (Antares Virtual Reality Systems), developed a serial interface box for the PC and the SGI Indigo so that external control devices, similar to ones actually used on the ISWE, could be used to control virtual objects in the ISWE simulation; (4) In collaboration with Peter Wang (SFFP) and Mark Blasingame (Boeing), established the interference characteristics of the VIM 1000 head-mounted-display and tested software filters to correct the problem; (5) In collaboration with Peter Wang and Mark Blasingame, established software and procedures for interfacing the VPL DataGlove and the Polhemus 6DOF position sensors to the SGI Indigo serial ports. The majority of the ISWE modeling effort was conducted on a PC-based VR Workstation, described below.

  3. Numerical simulation of space debris impacts on the Whipple shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, M.; Toda, S.; Kibe, S.

    1997-06-01

    The authors carried out three series of experimental tests of the first bumper perforation and main wall cratering processes directly caused by three types of projectiles with about 2, 4 and 7 km s -1 impact velocities but comparable initial kinetic energies, by using three different accelerators (one-stage powder gun, two-stage light-gas gun and rail gun), for the purpose of investigating space debris hypervelocity impacts onto single-walled Whipple bumper shields [1]. In the present study, after reviewing the numerical simulation method of hydrocode for both Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions, a number of parametric numerical simulation analyses using multiple material Eulerian methods were performed in order to optimize the material properties of bumper and main wall materials through comparison with experimental results of single target impacts by the projectiles. In particular, the material data on the dynamic fracture phenomena are discussed in detail in the first part. Then a couple of numerical calculations using the interactive Lagrangian rezoning method to simulate the overall impact process against the single walled Whipple shield were performed and compared with the corresponding experimental results. Both results indicated fairly good agreement with each other. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the present method is helpful and efficient in understanding the impact phenomena and fracture mechanism in the space debris hypervelocity impact problem. Finally the multiple material Eulerian method was applied to the same problems modeled by the interactive Lagrangian rezoning method used previously, because the former is much easier to use for almost all users, although it is more diffusive and unclear of material boundaries than the latter. Those two kinds of numerical results also indicated fairly good agreements with each other.

  4. A Data Management System for International Space Station Simulation Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Bradley J.; DelMundo, Rommel; Elcott, Sharif; McIntosh, Dawn; Niehaus, Brian; Papasin, Richard; Mah, Robert W.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Groups associated with the design, operational, and training aspects of the International Space Station make extensive use of modeling and simulation tools. Users of these tools often need to access and manipulate large quantities of data associated with the station, ranging from design documents to wiring diagrams. Retrieving and manipulating this data directly within the simulation and modeling environment can provide substantial benefit to users. An approach for providing these kinds of data management services, including a database schema and class structure, is presented. Implementation details are also provided as a data management system is integrated into the Intelligent Virtual Station, a modeling and simulation tool developed by the NASA Ames Smart Systems Research Laboratory. One use of the Intelligent Virtual Station is generating station-related training procedures in a virtual environment, The data management component allows users to quickly and easily retrieve information related to objects on the station, enhancing their ability to generate accurate procedures. Users can associate new information with objects and have that information stored in a database.

  5. Stationkeeping Monte Carlo Simulation for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dichmann, Donald J.; Alberding, Cassandra M.; Yu, Wayne H.

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is scheduled to launch in 2018 into a Libration Point Orbit (LPO) around the Sun-Earth/Moon (SEM) L2 point, with a planned mission lifetime of 10.5 years after a six-month transfer to the mission orbit. This paper discusses our approach to Stationkeeping (SK) maneuver planning to determine an adequate SK delta-V budget. The SK maneuver planning for JWST is made challenging by two factors: JWST has a large Sunshield, and JWST will be repointed regularly producing significant changes in Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). To accurately model SRP we employ the Solar Pressure and Drag (SPAD) tool, which uses ray tracing to accurately compute SRP force as a function of attitude. As an additional challenge, the future JWST observation schedule will not be known at the time of SK maneuver planning. Thus there will be significant variation in SRP between SK maneuvers, and the future variation in SRP is unknown. We have enhanced an earlier SK simulation to create a Monte Carlo simulation that incorporates random draws for uncertainties that affect the budget, including random draws of the observation schedule. Each SK maneuver is planned to optimize delta-V magnitude, subject to constraints on spacecraft pointing. We report the results of the Monte Carlo simulations and discuss possible improvements during flight operations to reduce the SK delta-V budget.

  6. Distributed interactive communication in simulated space-dwelling groups.

    PubMed

    Brady, Joseph V; Hienz, Robert D; Hursh, Steven R; Ragusa, Leonard C; Rouse, Charles O; Gasior, Eric D

    2004-03-01

    This report describes the development and preliminary application of an experimental test bed for modeling human behavior in the context of a computer generated environment to analyze the effects of variations in communication modalities, incentives and stressful conditions. In addition to detailing the methodological development of a simulated task environment that provides for electronic monitoring and recording of individual and group behavior, the initial substantive findings from an experimental analysis of distributed interactive communication in simulated space dwelling groups are described. Crews of three members each (male and female) participated in simulated "planetary missions" based upon a synthetic scenario task that required identification, collection, and analysis of geologic specimens with a range of grade values. The results of these preliminary studies showed clearly that cooperative and productive interactions were maintained between individually isolated and distributed individuals communicating and problem-solving effectively in a computer-generated "planetary" environment over extended time intervals without benefit of one another's physical presence. Studies on communication channel constraints confirmed the functional interchangeability between available modalities with the highest degree of interchangeability occurring between Audio and Text modes of communication. The effects of task-related incentives were determined by the conditions under which they were available with Positive Incentives effectively attenuating decrements in performance under stressful time pressure. PMID:14983895

  7. Contact dynamics simulations for robotic servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiegao; Mukherji, Raja; Ficocelli, Mariano; Ogilvie, Andrew; Rice, Craig

    2006-05-01

    This paper addresses contact dynamics simulations for a Hubble Robotic Servicing mission. First, the modeling of the robotic system is introduced. The simulation models of the robotic system include: flexible body dynamics, control system models and geometric models of the contacting bodies. These models are incorporated into MDA's simulation facility, the multibody dynamics simulator "Space Station Portable Operations Training Simulator (SPOTS)". Three contact dynamics simulation examples of the robotic servicing operations are presented: (1) capture of the Hubble Space Telescope, (2) berthing the Hubble Space Telescope to the Hubble Robotic Vehicle and (3) inserting the Wide Field Camera into the Hubble Space Telescope.

  8. High versus low crewmember autonomy in space simulation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanas, Nick; Saylor, Stephanie; Harris, Matthew; Neylan, Thomas; Boyd, Jennifer; Weiss, Daniel S.; Baskin, Pamela; Cook, Colleen; Marmar, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Given the long distances involved and the kinds of activities planned, crewmembers participating in long-duration exploratory space missions such as an expedition to Mars will have more autonomy than in previous space missions. In order to study the impact of high versus low crew autonomy on crewmembers and the crew-mission control interaction, we conducted a series of pilot studies involving three space simulation settings: NEEMO missions, the Haughton-Mars Project, and the pilot phase of the Mars 500 Program. As in our previous on-orbit studies on the Mir and International Space Station, crew and mission control subjects working in missions involving these three settings completed a weekly study questionnaire that assessed mood and interpersonal interactions using the Profile of Mood States, the Group Environment Scale, and the Work Environment Scale. The Mars 500 pilot study also directly assessed individual and group autonomy. In these studies, high autonomy periods were those where crewmembers planned much of their work schedule, whereas low autonomy periods were those where mission control personnel developed the schedule, much as happens now during actual space flight conditions. Our results suggested that high work autonomy was well-received by the crews, mission goals were accomplished, and there were no adverse effects. During high autonomy periods, crewmember mood was generally reported as being better and creativity was higher, but mission control personnel reported some confusion about their work role. The crewmember group environment in the Mars 500 pilot study was dependent on the nationality mix. Despite scoring lower in work pressure overall, the four Russian crewmembers reported a greater rise in work pressure from low to high autonomy than the two Europeans. In contrast, the European crewmembers reported a greater rise in dysphoric mood in going from low to high autonomy, whereas the Russians' emotional state remained the same or slightly

  9. Development of a Matheatical Dynamic Simulation Model for the New Motion Simulator Used for the Large Space Simulator at ESTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messing, Rene

    2012-07-01

    To simulate environmental space conditions for space- craft qualification testing the European Space Agency ESA uses a Large Space Simulator (LSS) in its Test Centre in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. In the LSS a motion system is used, to provide the orientation of an up to five tons heavy spacecraft with respect to an artificial solar beam. The existing motion simulation will be replaced by a new motion system. The new motion system shall be able to orient a spacecraft, defined by its elevation and azimuth angle and provide an eclipse simulation (continuous spinning) around the spacecraft rotation axis. The development of the new motion system has been contracted to APCO Technologies in Switzerland. In addition to the design development done by the con- tractor the Engineering section of the ESTEC Test Centre is in parallel developing a mathematical model simulating the dynamic behaviour of the system. The model shall to serve, during the preliminary design, to verify the selection of the drive units and define the specimen trajectory speed and acceleration profiles. In the further design phase it shall verify the dynamic response, at the spacecraft mounting interface of the unloaded system, against the requirements. In the future it shall predict the dynamic responses of the implemented system for different spacecraft being mounted and operated onto the system. The paper shall give a brief description of the investment history and design developments of the new motion system for the LSS and then give a brief description the different developments steps which are foreseen and which have been already implemented in the mathematical simulation model.

  10. Space simulation experiments on reaction control system thruster plumes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A space simulation procedure was developed for studying rocket plume contamination effects using a 5-lb bipropellant reaction control system thrustor. Vacuum chamber pressures of 0.00003 torr (70 miles altitude) were achieved with the thrustor firing in pulse trains consisting of eight pulses - 50 msec on, 100 msec off, and seven minutes between pulse trains. The final vacuum was achieved by cooling all vacuum chamber surfaces to liquid-helium temperature and by introducing a continuous argon leak of 48 std. cc/sec into the test chamber. Fast time response liquid flow rate measurements showed that large variations occurred in the ratio of oxidizer to fuel flow for pulse-on times up to 120 msec. These variations could lead to poor combustion efficiency and the production of contamination.

  11. Software system for simulation IPDA lidar sensing from space platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, G. G.; Sukhanov, A. Ya.

    2014-11-01

    High measurement sensitivity of troposphere CO2 and CH4 is expected from using of integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar, where the strong lidar echoes on two wavelengths from cloud tops or the Earth's take place. We consider a software system for the radiation transport simulation in the atmosphere by Monte-Carlo method that applied in the greenhouse gas (CH4 and CO2) sensing space-based IPDA-lidar. This software is used to evaluate the accuracy of measurement of the green house gas concentration. The paper investigates the impact of multiple scattering in presence of clouds. So multiple scattering can influence on signal power, but differential absorption method eliminates this drawback.

  12. Simulation capability for dynamics of rotating counterweight space stations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, F.; Zetkov, G.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis and computer program were prepared to realistically simulate the dynamic behavior of a class of space stations consisting of two end bodies separated by a connecting structure. The shape and mass distribution of the flexible end bodies are arbitrary; the connecting structure is flexible but massless and is capable of deployment and retraction. Fluid flowing in a piping system and rigid moving masses, representing a cargo elevator or crew members, have been modeled. Connecting structure characteristics, control systems, and externally applied loads are modeled in easily replaced subroutines. Subroutines currently available include a telescopic beam-type connecting structure as well as attitude, deployment, spin, and wobble control. In addition, a unique mass balance control system was developed to sense and balance mass shifts due to the motion of a cargo elevator. The mass of the cargo may vary through a large range. Numerical results are discussed for various types of runs.

  13. TID Simulation of Advanced CMOS Devices for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    This paper focuses on Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects caused by accumulation of charges at silicon dioxide, substrate/silicon dioxide interface, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) for scaled CMOS bulk devices as well as at Buried Oxide (BOX) layer in devices based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology to be operated in space radiation environment. The radiation induced leakage current and corresponding density/concentration electrons in leakage current path was presented/depicted for 180nm, 130nm and 65nm NMOS, PMOS transistors based on CMOS bulk as well as SOI process technologies on-board LEO and GEO satellites. On the basis of simulation results, the TID robustness analysis for advanced deep sub-micron technologies was accomplished up to 500 Krad. The correlation between the impact of technology scaling and magnitude of leakage current with corresponding total dose was established utilizing Visual TCAD Genius program.

  14. Analysis of the Thermo-Elastic Response of Space Reflectors to Simulated Space Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegri, G.; Ivagnes, M. M.; Marchetti, M.; Poscente, F.

    2002-01-01

    The evaluation of space environment effects on materials and structures is a key matter to develop a proper design of long duration missions: since a large part of satellites operating in the earth orbital environment are employed for telecommunications, the development of space antennas and reflectors featured by high dimensional stability versus space environment interactions represents a major challenge for designers. The structural layout of state of the art space antennas and reflectors is very complex, since several different sensible elements and materials are employed: particular care must be placed in evaluating the actual geometrical configuration of the reflectors operating in the space environment, since very limited distortions of the designed layout can produce severe effects on the quality of the signal both received and transmitted, especially for antennas operating at high frequencies. The effects of thermal loads due to direct sunlight exposition and to earth and moon albedo can be easily taken into account employing the standard methods of structural analysis: on the other hand the thermal cycling and the exposition to the vacuum environment produce a long term damage accumulation which affects the whole structure. The typical effects of the just mentioned exposition are the outgassing of polymeric materials and the contamination of the exposed surface, which can affect sensibly the thermo-mechanical properties of the materials themselves and, therefore, the structural global response. The main aim of the present paper is to evaluate the synergistic effects of thermal cycling and of the exposition to high vacuum environment on an innovative antenna developed by Alenia Spazio S.p.a.: to this purpose, both an experimental and numerical research activity has been developed. A complete prototype of the antenna has been exposed to the space environment simulated by the SAS facility: this latter is constituted by an high vacuum chamber, equipped by

  15. Thermal System Upgrade of the Space Environment Simulation Test Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Ashok B.

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the refurbishing and upgrade of the thermal system for the existing thermal vacuum test facility, the Space Environment Simulator, at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The chamber is the largest such facility at the center. This upgrade is the third phase of the long range upgrade of the chamber that has been underway for last few years. The first phase dealt with its vacuum system, the second phase involved the GHe subsystem. The paper describes the considerations of design philosophy options for the thermal system; approaches taken and methodology applied, in the evaluation of the remaining "life" in the chamber shrouds and related equipment by conducting special tests and studies; feasibility and extent of automation, using computer interfaces and Programmable Logic Controllers in the control system and finally, matching the old components to the new ones into an integrated, highly reliable and cost effective thermal system for the facility. This is a multi-year project just started and the paper deals mainly with the plans and approaches to implement the project successfully within schedule and costs.

  16. Imaging Simulations for DESTINY, the Dark Energy Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, T. R.; DESTINY Science Team

    2004-12-01

    We describe a mission concept for a 1.8-meter near-infrared (NIR) grism-mode space telescope optimized to return richly sampled Hubble diagrams of Type Ia and Type II supernovae (SNe) over the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1.7 for determining cosmological distances, measuring the expansion rate of the Universe as a function of time, and characterizing the nature of dark energy. The central concept for our proposed Dark Energy Space Telescope (DESTINY) is an all-grism NIR survey camera. SNe will be discovered by repeated imaging of an area located at the north ecliptic pole. Grism spectra with resolving power l/Dl = R * 100 will provide broad-band spectrophotometry, redshifts, SNe classification, as well as valuable time-resolved diagnostic data for understanding the SN explosion physics. Our approach features only a single mode of operation, a single detector technology, and a single instrument. Although grism spectroscopy is slow compared to SN detection in any single broad-band filter for photometry, or to conventional slit spectra for spectral diagnostics, the multiplex advantage of observing a large field-of-view over a full octave in wavelength simultaneously makes this approach highly competitive. In this poster we present exposure simulations to demonstrate the efficiency of the DESTINY approach.

  17. CFD simulation of boundary effects on closely spaced jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Ishita; Adams, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In coastal areas characterized by shallow water depth, industrial effluents are often diluted using multiple closely spaced jets. Examples of such effluents include brine from desalination plants, treated wastewater from sewage treatment plants and heated water from thermal power plants. These jets are arranged in various orientations, such as unidirectional diffusers and rosette groups, to maximize mixing with ambient water. Due to effects of dynamic pressure, the jets interact with each other leading to mixing characteristics which are quite different from those of individual jets. The effect of mutual interaction is exaggerated under confinement, when a large number of closely spaced jets discharge into shallow depth. Dilution through an outfall, consisting of multiple jets, depends on various outfall and ambient parameters. Here we observe the effects of shoreline proximity, in relation to diffuser length and water depth, on the performance of unidirectional diffusers discharging to quiescent water. For diffusers located closer to shore, less dilution is observed due to the limited availability of ambient water for dilution. We report on the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and compare the results with experimental observations.

  18. Mutagenesis of Bacillus subtilis spores exposed to simulated space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munakata, N.; Natsume, T.; Takahashi, K.; Hieda, K.; Panitz, C.; Horneck, G.

    Bacterial spores can endure in a variety of extreme earthly environments. However, some conditions encountered during the space flight could be detrimental to DNA in the spore, delimiting the possibility of transpermia. We investigate the genetic consequences of the exposure to space environments in a series of preflight simulation project of EXPOSE. Using Bacillus subtilis spores of repair-proficient HA101 and repair-deficient TKJ6312 strains, the mutations conferring resistance to rifampicin were detected, isolated and sequenced. Most of the mutations were located in a N-terminal region of the rpoB gene encoding RNA polymerase beta-subunit. Among several potentially mutagenic factors, high vacuum, UV radiation, heat, and accelerated heavy ions induced mutations with varying efficiencies. A majority of mutations induced by vacuum exposure carried a tandem double-base change (CA to TT) at a unique sequence context of TCAGC. Results indicate that the vacuum and high temperature may act synergistically for the induction of mutations.

  19. An Orion/Ares I Launch and Ascent Simulation: One Segment of the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Victoria I.; Crues, Edwin Z.; Blum, Mike G.; Alofs, Cathy; Busto, Juan

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the architecture and implementation of a distributed launch and ascent simulation of NASA's Orion spacecraft and Ares I launch vehicle. This simulation is one segment of the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES) Project. The DSES project is a research and development collaboration between NASA centers which investigates technologies and processes for distributed simulation of complex space systems in support of NASA's Exploration Initiative. DSES is developing an integrated end-to-end simulation capability to support NASA development and deployment of new exploration spacecraft and missions. This paper describes the first in a collection of simulation capabilities that DSES will support.

  20. A simulation program for the analysis of on-orbit Space Station maintenance and logistics operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlong, Kelly L.; Dejulio, Edmund T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis approach adopted by NASA's Space Station Maintenance Planning and Analysis (MPA) Study and focuses on the development and use of a simulation program called Simulation of Manned Space System Logistics Support (SIMSYLS) for modeling the Space Station operations environment. The basic assumptions and groundrules used in the development of SIMSYLS are presented, including its capabilities, limitations and samples of analyses performed. Finally, a proposed simulation outgrowth entitled Space Applications System Simulation (SASS) is described. SIMSYLS will constitute the foundation for SASS which will provide a full system operational RAM analysis tool for Space Station and its logistics support environment.

  1. Simulating atmospheric free-space optical propagation: rainfall attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achour, Maha

    2002-04-01

    With recent advances and interest in Free-Space Optics (FSO) for commercial deployments, more attention has been placed on FSO weather effects and the availability of global weather databases. The Meteorological Visual Range (Visibility) is considered one of the main weather parameters necessary to estimate FSO attenuation due to haze, fog and low clouds. Proper understanding of visibility measurements conducted throughout the years is essential. Unfortunately, such information is missing from most of the databases, leaving FSO players no choice but to use the standard visibility equation based on 2% contrast and other assumptions on the source luminance and its background. Another challenge is that visibility is measured using the visual wavelength of 550 nm. Extrapolating the measured attenuations to longer infrared wavelengths is not trivial and involves extensive experimentations. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by spherical droplets of different sizes is considered to simulate FSO scattering effects. This paper serves as an introduction to a series of publications regarding simulation of FSO atmospheric propagation. This first part focuses on attenuation due to rainfall. Additional weather parameters, such as rainfall rate, temperature and relative humidity are considered to effectively build the rain model. Comparison with already published experimental measurement is performed to validate the model. The scattering cross section due to rain is derived from the density of different raindrop sizes and the raindrops fall velocity is derived from the overall rainfall rate. Absorption due the presence of water vapor is computed using the temperature and relative humidity measurements.

  2. Processing of Lunar Soil Simulant for Space Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, Subhayu; Ray, C. S.; Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's long-term vision for space exploration includes developing human habitats and conducting scientific investigations on planetary bodies, especially on Moon and Mars. Processing and utilization of planetary in-situ resources is recognized as an important element of this vision since it can minimize the level of up-mass that will have to be transported from earth to the planetary bodies. Within this scope and context, we have undertaken a general effort aimed primarily at extracting and refining metals, developing glass, glass-ceramic, or traditional ceramic type materials using lunar soil simulants. In this paper we will present preliminary results on our effort on simultaneous carbothermal reduction of oxides for elemental extraction and zone refining for obtaining high purity metals. In additions we will demonstrate the possibility of developing glass fibers as reinforcement agents for planetary habitat construction, glasses for fixing nuclear waste from potential nuclear power generators, and glasses for magnetic applications. The paper will also include initial thermal characterization of the glasses produced from lunar simulant. Compositional analysis of processed samples will be presented.

  3. Thermally Induced Vibrations of the Hubble Space Telescope's Solar Array 3 in a Test Simulated Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Early, Derrick A.; Haile, William B.; Turczyn, Mark T.; Griffin, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) conducted a disturbance verification test on a flight Solar Array 3 (SA3) for the Hubble Space Telescope using the ESA Large Space Simulator (LSS) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. The LSS cyclically illuminated the SA3 to simulate orbital temperature changes in a vacuum environment. Data acquisition systems measured signals from force transducers and accelerometers resulting from thermally induced vibrations of the SAI The LSS with its seismic mass boundary provided an excellent background environment for this test. This paper discusses the analysis performed on the measured transient SA3 responses and provides a summary of the results.

  4. Biological UV dosimeters in simulated space irradiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontó, G.; Bérces, A.; Fekete, A.; Kovács, G.; Lammer, H.

    For the measurement of the harmful biological effect of solar UV radiation bacteriophage T7 and polycrystalline uracil dosimeters were used. For terrestrial dosimetric purposes bacteriophage T7 has been applied in solution, while uracil in the form of thin layers. For space irradiation dosimetry the uracil, phage T7-DNA and bacteriophage T7 thin layer samples were prepared in vacuum tightly closed sandwich forms covered either by calciumfluoride or quartz windows. The experimental conditions tested correspond to the conditions planned in the EXPOSE facility: the samples were surrounded by nitrogen atmosphere at various humidities, their vacuum stability was tested in the vacuum chamber of the Institute of Space Research,, Graz. All kinds of the thin film samples have been stored in an atmosphere containing Nitrogen and Hidrogen, in quality control no change in the structure of them has been found. To attenuate the high extraterrestrial irradiance neutral filters of 0.5 and 1.0 optical densities have been tested. Irradiation of the samples has been performed with various UV sources: solar simulator, low pressure Mercury lamp, Deuterium lamp. Dose-effect functions have been determined using for the evaluation spectrophotometry in the characteristic UV range, HPLC of photoproducts, PCR of two different primer sequences of phage T7-DNA. Photoproduct formation kinetics was followed by the saturation level of uracil thin layer. Attenuation ability of the neutral filters was controlled with low pressure Mercury lamp by the exposure necessary for saturation of uracil dosimeters. A three and tenfold increase in the exposure was found respectively, while the influence of spectral composition of the irradiation source was tested using Deuterium lamp supplied with Ca F2 and quartz filters respectively. A doubling of the irradiance was necessary for the saturation of uracil with quartz filter.

  5. Simulations of Ground and Space-Based Oxygen Atom Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, T. K.; Cline, J. A.; Braunstein, M.

    2002-01-01

    obtained from separate measurements. These computations use basic engineering models for the gas-gas and gas-surface scattering and focus on the influence of multi-collision effects. These simulations characterize many important quantities of interest including the actual flux of atoms that reach the surface, the energy distribution of this flux, as well as the direction of the velocity of the flux that strikes the surface. These quantities are important in characterizing the conditions which give rise to measured surface erosion. The calculations also yield time- snapshots of the pulse as it impacts and flows around the surface. These snapshots reveal the local environment of gas near the surface for the duration of the pulse. We are also able to compute the flux of molecules that travel downstream and reach the spectrometer, and we characterize their velocity distribution. The number of atoms that reach the spectrometer can in fact be influenced by the presence of the surface due to gas-gas collisions from atoms scattered h m the surface, and it will generally be less than that with the surface absent. This amounts to an overall normalization factor in computing erosion yields. We discuss these quantities and their relationship to the gas-surf$ce interaction parameters. We have also performed similar calculations corresponding to conditions (number densities, temperatures, and velocities) of low-earth orbit. The steady-state nature and lower overall flux of the actual space environment give rise to differences in the nature of the gas-impacts on the surface from those of the ground-based measurements using a pulsed source.

  6. System simulation of a multicell thermionic space power reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Arx, Alan Vincent

    For many years, thermionic power has been considered for space application. The prominent feature of the power conversion system is that there are no moving parts. Although designs have been developed by various organizations, no comprehensive system models are known to exist which can simulate transient behavior of a multicell design nor is there a method to directly couple these models to other codes that can calculate variations in reactivity. Thus, a procedure has been developed to couple the performance calculations of a space nuclear reactor thermal/hydraulics code with a neutron diffusion code to analyze temperature feedback. Thermionic power is based on the thermionic emissions principle where free electrons in a conductor have sufficient energy to escape the surface. Kinetic energy is given to the electrons by heating the conductor. Specifically, a 48 kWe thermionic power converter system model has been developed and used to model startup and other transients. Less than 10% of the fuel heat is converted to electricity, and the rest is rejected to space via a heat pipe radiator. An electromagnetic pump circulates the liquid metal coolant. First, a startup transient model was developed which showed stable operation through ignition of the Thermionic Fuel Elements (TFEs) and thawing of the radiator heat pipes. Also, the model's capability was expanded to include two-phase heat transfer to model boiling using coupled mass and thermal energy conservation equations. The next step incorporated effects of reactivity feedback---showing that various mechanisms will prevent power and temperature run-up for a flow reduction scenario where the reactor control systems fail to respond. In particular, the Doppler effect was shown to counter a positive worth due to partial core voiding although steps must be taken to preclude film boiling in that high superheats will result in TFE failures. Finally, analysis of the core grid spacer location suggests it should be located at

  7. LISP based simulation generators for modeling complex space processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Fan T.; Schroer, Bernard J.; Dwan, Wen-Shing

    1987-01-01

    The development of a simulation assistant for modeling discrete event processes is presented. Included are an overview of the system, a description of the simulation generators, and a sample process generated using the simulation assistant.

  8. Promoting A-Priori Interoperability of HLA-Based Simulations in the Space Domain: The SISO Space Reference FOM Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Bjorn; Garro, Alfredo; Falcone, Alberto; Crues, Edwin Z.; Dexter, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Distributed and Real-Time Simulation plays a key-role in the Space domain being exploited for missions and systems analysis and engineering as well as for crew training and operational support. One of the most popular standards is the 1516-2010 IEEE Standard for Modeling and Simulation (M&S) High Level Architecture (HLA). HLA supports the implementation of distributed simulations (called Federations) in which a set of simulation entities (called Federates) can interact using a Run-Time Infrastructure (RTI). In a given Federation, a Federate can publish and/or subscribes objects and interactions on the RTI only in accordance with their structures as defined in a FOM (Federation Object Model). Currently, the Space domain is characterized by a set of incompatible FOMs that, although meet the specific needs of different organizations and projects, increases the long-term cost for interoperability. In this context, the availability of a reference FOM for the Space domain will enable the development of interoperable HLA-based simulators for related joint projects and collaborations among worldwide organizations involved in the Space domain (e.g. NASA, ESA, Roscosmos, and JAXA). The paper presents a first set of results achieved by a SISO standardization effort that aims at providing a Space Reference FOM for international collaboration on Space systems simulations.

  9. Evaluation of the effects of solar radiation on glass. [space environment simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Harada, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The degradation of glass used on space structures due to electromagnetic and particulate radiation in a space environment was evaluated. The space environment was defined and a simulated space exposure apparatus was constructed. Four optical materials were exposed to simulated solar and particulate radiation in a space environment. Sapphire and fused silica experienced little change in transmittance, while optical crown glass and ultra low expansion glass darkened appreciably. Specimen selection and preparation, exposure conditions, and the effect of simulated exposure are discussed. A selective bibliography of the effect of radiation on glass is included.

  10. Studies of beam plasma interactions in a space simulation chamber using prototype Space Shuttle instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.; Raitt, W. J.; Denig, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    In March, 1981, electron beam experiments were conducted in a large space simulation chamber using equipment destined to be flown aboard NASA's Office of Space Science-1 pallet (OSS-1). Two major flight experiments were involved. They include the Vehicle Charging and Potential (VCAP) experiment and the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP). Apparatus connected with VCAP included a Fast Pulse Electron Gun (FPEG), and a Charge and Current Probe (CCP). A preliminary view is provided of the results obtained when the electron emissions were held steady over relatively long periods of time such that steady state conditions could be obtained with respect to the electron beam interaction with the neutral gases and plasma of the vacuum chamber. Of particular interest was the plasma instability feature known as the Beam Plasma Discharge. For the present experiments the FPEG was used in a dc mode with a range of currents of 2 to 80 mA at a beam energy of 970 eV. Attention is given to the emissions of VLF and HF noise associated with the dc beam.

  11. Osteoblasts subjected to spaceflight and simulated space shuttle launch conditions.

    PubMed

    Kacena, Melissa A; Todd, Paul; Landis, William J

    2003-01-01

    To understand further the effects of spaceflight on osteoblast-enriched cultures, normal chicken calvarial osteoblasts were flown aboard shuttle flight STS-77, and the total number of attached cells was determined. Spaceflight and control cultures were chemically fixed 3 h and 3 d after launch. These fixed cultures were processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM analysis showed that with just 3 d of exposure to spaceflight, coverslip cultures contained 300 +/- 100 cells/mm2, whereas 1G control samples contained a confluent monolayer of cells (2400 +/- 200 cells/mm2). Although the cultures flown in space experienced a drastic decline in cell number in just 3 d, without further experimentation it was impossible to determine whether the decline was a result of microgravity, the harsh launch environment, or some combination of these factors. Therefore, this research attempted to address the effect of launch by subjecting osteoblasts to conditions simulating shuttle launch accelerations, noise, and vibrations. No differences, compared with controls, were seen in the number of total or viable cells after exposure to these various launch conditions. Taken together, these data indicate that the magnitude of gravitational loading (3G maximum) and vibration (7.83G rms maximum) resulting from launch does not adversely affect osteoblasts in terms of total or viable cell number immediately, but launch conditions, or the microgravity environment itself, may start a cascade of events that over several d contributes to cell loss.

  12. Simulated Space Environment Effects on Tether Materials with Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria M.; Watts, Ed

    2005-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) erodes most organic materials. and ultraviolet radiation embrittles polymers. A previous study indicated untreated polymers such as ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) are severely degraded when exposed to AO. This test series was performed to determine the effect of AO and UV on the mechanical integrity of tether materials that were treated with AO-protective coatings. Three coating systems were evaluated for their ability to protect the underlying material from AO erosion. The first coating system is the Photosil surface modification process which incorporates silicon-containing functional groups into the top micron of an organic material. The Photosil process has had favorable results with polyurethane- and epoxy-based thermal control coatings . The second coating system is metallization, in this case nickel. The third coating system is silsesquioxane. The Marshall Space Flight Center Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility (AOBF) was used to simulate low Earth orbit AO of 5 eV energy. In addition, some tether samples were exposed to ultraviolet radiation then evaluated for any changes in mechanical strength. Tether missions, such as a momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether, may benefit from this research.

  13. Simulated lightning test shuttle .03 scale model. [(space shuttle orbiter)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lightning Attach Point tests were conducted for the space shuttle launch configuration (Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters). A series of 250 long spark tests (15 to 20 foot sparks) determined that the orbiter may be struck on the nose, windshield brow, tail and wingtips during launch but not on the main engine nozzles which have been shown to be vulnerable to lightning damage. The orbiter main engine and SRB exhaust plumes were simulated electrically with physical models coated with graded resistance paints. The tests showed that the exhaust plumes from the SRB provide additional protection for the main engine nozzles. However, the tests showed that the Orbiter Thermal Protection System (TPS), which has also been shown to be vulnerable to lightning damage, may be struck during launch. Therefore further work is indicated in the areas of swept stroke studies on the model and on TPS panels. Further attach point testing is also indicated on the free-flying orbiter. Photographs of the test setup are shown.

  14. Coupled test facilities for optimal space simulation test campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcé, J. L.; Meurat, A.

    1997-01-01

    One of the main issues for spacecraft test staff is to minimise number and type of interfaces to be developed for on ground tests. Actually, the goal is double: first this should reduce cost of test campaigns, but also their duration through an optimum use of standard equipment's. In order to suit this increasing customer need, INTESPACE has optimised its test centre by the use of redundant and complementary test facilities, and by the definition of standard interface and test data format.(as the wellknown DynaWorks ® common data format provided by INTESPACE to customers involved in any kind of test. Ref. 1). The other example presented in this paper is dealing with space simulation test campaigns which can be performed at INTESPACE in two large test facilities: SIMLES and SIMMER These chambers are presented in the first part of this paper through their main performances and characteristics. The technical similarities of both are emphasised, pointing out a real redundancy even during test run. A classical test campaign is then presented, with consecutive tests performed in SIMLES and SIMMER, taking profit from common interface. The gain of test campaign duration is there pointed out through optimised interphases between both facilities, compared to an obsolete type of test campaign with two tests in series on completely different test facilities.

  15. Behavior of stem cells under outer-space microgravity and ground-based microgravity simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui; Li, Liang; Chen, Jianling; Wang, Jinfu

    2015-06-01

    With rapid development of space engineering, research on life sciences in space is being conducted extensively, especially cellular and molecular studies on space medicine. Stem cells, undifferentiated cells that can differentiate into specialized cells, are considered a key resource for regenerative medicine. Research on stem cells under conditions of microgravity during a space flight or a ground-based simulation has generated several excellent findings. To help readers understand the effects of outer space and ground-based simulation conditions on stem cells, we reviewed recent studies on the effects of microgravity (as an obvious environmental factor in space) on morphology, proliferation, migration, and differentiation of stem cells.

  16. Optical Properties of Thermal Control Coatings After Weathering, Simulated Ascent Heating, and Simulated Space Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Tuan, George C.; Westheimer, David T.; Peters, Wanda C.; Kauder, Lonny R.

    2008-01-01

    Spacecraft radiators reject heat to their surroundings and coatings play an important role in this heat rejection. The coatings provide the combined optical properties of low solar absorptance and high infrared emittance. The coatings are applied to the radiator panel in a number of ways, including conventional spraying, plasma spraying, or as an applique. Not designed for a terrestrial weathering environment, the durability of spacecraft paints, coatings, and appliques upon exposure to weathering and subsequent exposure to ascent heating, solar wind, and ultraviolet radiation was studied. In addition to traditional aluminum panels, new isocyanate ester composite panels were exposed for a total of 90 days at the Atmospheric Exposure Site of Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) Beach Corrosion Facility for the purpose of identifying their durability to weathering. Selected panel coupons were subsequently exposed to simulated ascent heating, solar wind, and vacuum ultraviolet (UV) radiation to identify the effect of a simulated space environment on as-weathered surfaces. Optical properties and adhesion testing were used to document the durability of the paints, coatings, and appliques.

  17. Simulated space flight testing of commercial terrestrial silicon cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P. M.; Miyahira, T. F.

    1982-01-01

    Low cost silicon solar cells manufactured for the terrestrial market are examined for possible space flight use. The results of preliminary space environmental testing are reported and discussed. In addition, a number of possible obstacles to the use of these cells is examined. It is concluded that the terrestrial industry could provide an extremely low cost and reliable cell for space use.

  18. Efficient conformational space exploration in ab initio protein folding simulation.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ahammed; Ahmed, Nasif; Pappu, Subrata Dey; Shatabda, Swakkhar; Ullah, A Z M Dayem; Rahman, M Sohel

    2015-08-01

    Ab initio protein folding simulation largely depends on knowledge-based energy functions that are derived from known protein structures using statistical methods. These knowledge-based energy functions provide us with a good approximation of real protein energetics. However, these energy functions are not very informative for search algorithms and fail to distinguish the types of amino acid interactions that contribute largely to the energy function from those that do not. As a result, search algorithms frequently get trapped into the local minima. On the other hand, the hydrophobic-polar (HP) model considers hydrophobic interactions only. The simplified nature of HP energy function makes it limited only to a low-resolution model. In this paper, we present a strategy to derive a non-uniform scaled version of the real 20×20 pairwise energy function. The non-uniform scaling helps tackle the difficulty faced by a real energy function, whereas the integration of 20×20 pairwise information overcomes the limitations faced by the HP energy function. Here, we have applied a derived energy function with a genetic algorithm on discrete lattices. On a standard set of benchmark protein sequences, our approach significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art methods for similar models. Our approach has been able to explore regions of the conformational space which all the previous methods have failed to explore. Effectiveness of the derived energy function is presented by showing qualitative differences and similarities of the sampled structures to the native structures. Number of objective function evaluation in a single run of the algorithm is used as a comparison metric to demonstrate efficiency.

  19. Efficient conformational space exploration in ab initio protein folding simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Ahammed; Ahmed, Nasif; Pappu, Subrata Dey; Shatabda, Swakkhar; Ullah, A. Z. M. Dayem; Rahman, M. Sohel

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio protein folding simulation largely depends on knowledge-based energy functions that are derived from known protein structures using statistical methods. These knowledge-based energy functions provide us with a good approximation of real protein energetics. However, these energy functions are not very informative for search algorithms and fail to distinguish the types of amino acid interactions that contribute largely to the energy function from those that do not. As a result, search algorithms frequently get trapped into the local minima. On the other hand, the hydrophobic–polar (HP) model considers hydrophobic interactions only. The simplified nature of HP energy function makes it limited only to a low-resolution model. In this paper, we present a strategy to derive a non-uniform scaled version of the real 20×20 pairwise energy function. The non-uniform scaling helps tackle the difficulty faced by a real energy function, whereas the integration of 20×20 pairwise information overcomes the limitations faced by the HP energy function. Here, we have applied a derived energy function with a genetic algorithm on discrete lattices. On a standard set of benchmark protein sequences, our approach significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art methods for similar models. Our approach has been able to explore regions of the conformational space which all the previous methods have failed to explore. Effectiveness of the derived energy function is presented by showing qualitative differences and similarities of the sampled structures to the native structures. Number of objective function evaluation in a single run of the algorithm is used as a comparison metric to demonstrate efficiency. PMID:26361554

  20. Desert Cyanobacteria under simulated space and Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billi, D.; Ghelardini, P.; Onofri, S.; Cockell, C. S.; Rabbow, E.; Horneck, G.

    2008-09-01

    The environment in space and on planets such as Mars, can be lethal to living organisms and high levels of tolerance to desiccation, cold and radiation are needed for survival: rock-inhabiting cyanobacteria belonging to the genus Chroococcidiopsis can fulfil these requirements [1]. These cyanobacteria constantly appear in the most extreme and dry habitats on Earth, including the McMurdo Dry Valleys (Antarctica) and the Atacama Desert (Chile), which are considered the closest terrestrial analogs of two Mars environmental extremes: cold and aridity. In their natural environment, these cyanobacteria occupy the last refuges for life inside porous rocks or at the stone-soil interfaces, where they survive in a dry, dormant state for prolonged periods. How desert strains of Chroococcidiopsis can dry without dying is only partially understood, even though experimental evidences support the existence of an interplay between mechanisms to avoid (or limit) DNA damage and repair it: i) desert strains of Chroococcidiopsis mend genome fragmentation induced by ionizing radiation [2]; ii) desiccation-survivors protect their genome from complete fragmentation; iii) in the dry state they show a survival to an unattenuated Martian UV flux greater than that of Bacillus subtilis spores [3], and even though they die following atmospheric entry after having orbited the Earth for 16 days [4], they survive to simulated shock pressures up to 10 GPa [5]. Recently additional experiments were carried out at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) of Cologne (Germany) in order to identify suitable biomarkers to investigate the survival of Chroococcidiopsis cells present in lichen-dominated communities, in view of their direct and long term space exposition on the International Space Station (ISS) in the framework of the LIchens and Fungi Experiments (LIFE, EXPOSEEuTEF, ESA). Multilayers of dried cells of strains CCMEE 134 (Beacon Valley, Antarctica), and CCMEE 123 (costal desert, Chile ), shielded by

  1. Space Station communications and tracking systems modeling and RF link simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Chit-Sang; Chie, Chak M.; Lindsey, William C.

    1986-07-01

    In this final report, the effort spent on Space Station Communications and Tracking System Modeling and RF Link Simulation is described in detail. The effort is mainly divided into three parts: frequency division multiple access (FDMA) system simulation modeling and software implementation; a study on design and evaluation of a functional computerized RF link simulation/analysis system for Space Station; and a study on design and evaluation of simulation system architecture. This report documents the results of these studies. In addition, a separate User's Manual on Space Communications Simulation System (SCSS) (Version 1) documents the software developed for the Space Station FDMA communications system simulation. The final report, SCSS user's manual, and the software located in the NASA JSC system analysis division's VAX 750 computer together serve as the deliverables from LinCom for this project effort.

  2. Space Station communications and tracking systems modeling and RF link simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Chit-Sang; Chie, Chak M.; Lindsey, William C.

    1986-01-01

    In this final report, the effort spent on Space Station Communications and Tracking System Modeling and RF Link Simulation is described in detail. The effort is mainly divided into three parts: frequency division multiple access (FDMA) system simulation modeling and software implementation; a study on design and evaluation of a functional computerized RF link simulation/analysis system for Space Station; and a study on design and evaluation of simulation system architecture. This report documents the results of these studies. In addition, a separate User's Manual on Space Communications Simulation System (SCSS) (Version 1) documents the software developed for the Space Station FDMA communications system simulation. The final report, SCSS user's manual, and the software located in the NASA JSC system analysis division's VAX 750 computer together serve as the deliverables from LinCom for this project effort.

  3. The role of simulation in space operations training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocasio, Frank; Atkins, Dana

    The expanding use of computer simulation to train aerospace personnel is reviewed emphasizing the increasing complexity of responsibilities in the operations segment. The inefficiency of on-the-job training is discussed, and the simulation technologies employed by the USAF Combat Crew Training Squadron are described. The Mission Control Complex-Kernel is employed to simulate an operational Satellite Control Squadron (SCS) and a downscaled SCS. A system for telemetry simulation is incorporated into the launch and early-orbit segments of the training, and the training emphasizes time-critical actions, schedule adherence, and the interaction with external organizations. Hands-on training is required to supplement the simulator training which cannot be used to simulate anomalies in satellites and ground systems. The use of a centralized simulator as an instructional tool facilitates and expedites the transition of the student to operational levels.

  4. Isotope heat source simulator for testing of space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Smith, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    A reliable isotope heat source simulator was designed for use in a Brayton power system. This simulator is composed of an electrically heated tungsten wire which is wound around a boron nitride core and enclosed in a graphite jacket. Simulator testing was performed at the expected operating temperature of the Brayton power system. Endurance testing for 5012 hours was followed by cycling the simulator temperature. The integrity of this simulator was maintained throughout testing. Alumina beads served as a diffusion barrier to prevent interaction between the tungsten heater and boron nitride core. The simulator was designed to maintain a surface temperature of 1311 to 1366 K (1900 to 2000 F) with a power input of approximately 400 watts. The design concept and the materials used in the simulator make possible man different geometries. This flexibility increases its potential use.

  5. Simulation of Terminal-Area Flight Management System Arrivals with Airborne Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Lee, Paul U.; Mercer, Joey S.; Palmer, Everett A.; Prevot, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A simulation evaluated the feasibility and potential benefits of using decision support tools to support time-based airborne spacing and merging for aircraft arriving in the terminal area on charted Flight Management System (FMS) routes. Sixteen trials were conducted in each treatment combination of a 2X2 repeated-measures design. In trials 'with ground tools' air traffic controller participants managed traffic using sequencing and spacing tools. In trials 'with air tools' approximately seventy-five percent of aircraft assigned to the primary landing runway were equipped for airborne spacing, including flight simulators flown by commercial pilots. The results indicate that airborne spacing improves spacing accuracy and is feasible for FMS operations and mixed spacing equipage. Controllers and pilots can manage spacing clearances that contain two call signs without difficulty. For best effect, both decision support tools and spacing guidance should exhibit consistently predictable performance, and merging traffic flows should be well coordinated.

  6. Microbiological assay of the Marshall Space Flight Center neutral buoyancy simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyerle, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    A neutral buoyancy simulator tank system is described in terms of microbiological and medical safety for astronauts. The system was designed to simulate a gravity-free state for evaluation of orbital operations in a microorganism-free environment. Methods for the identification and elimination of specific microorganisms are dealt with as measures for a pure system of space environment simulation.

  7. Numerical simulations of space processing - The reality, the myth, and the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chait, A.

    1991-01-01

    The present capabilities offered by the combination of advanced special and general purpose numerical codes and supercomputers are discussed. Emphasis is placed on unique demands placed by the space environment on the computation of realistic space experiments and recommendations for improving the scientific return on the space investment. It is concluded that numerical simulations can provide timely and relevant answers which can guide and improve future space experiments.

  8. Unified Approach to Modeling and Simulation of Space Communication Networks and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barritt, Brian; Bhasin, Kul; Eddy, Wesley; Matthews, Seth

    2010-01-01

    Network simulator software tools are often used to model the behaviors and interactions of applications, protocols, packets, and data links in terrestrial communication networks. Other software tools that model the physics, orbital dynamics, and RF characteristics of space systems have matured to allow for rapid, detailed analysis of space communication links. However, the absence of a unified toolset that integrates the two modeling approaches has encumbered the systems engineers tasked with the design, architecture, and analysis of complex space communication networks and systems. This paper presents the unified approach and describes the motivation, challenges, and our solution - the customization of the network simulator to integrate with astronautical analysis software tools for high-fidelity end-to-end simulation. Keywords space; communication; systems; networking; simulation; modeling; QualNet; STK; integration; space networks

  9. 360 View: Habitat Simulates Deep Space Mission For Astronauts

    NASA Video Gallery

    Johnson Space Center in Houston brings crews to an asteroid without ever leaving the building. HERA – the Human Exploration Research Analog – is one of several analogs used by the Human Research Pr...

  10. Observing system simulation experiments at NASA. Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Kalnay, E.; Baker, W. E.; Susskind, J.; Reuter, D.; Halem, M.

    1985-01-01

    A series of realistic simulation studies is being conducted as a cooperative effort between the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), the National Meteorological Center (NMC), and the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA), to provide a quantitative assessment of the potential impact of future observing systems on large scale numerical weather prediction. A special objective is to avoid the unrealistic character of earlier simulation studies. Following a brief review of previous simulation studies and real data impact tests, the methodology for the current simulation system will be described. Results from an assessment of the realism of the simulation system and of the potential impact of advanced observing systems on numerical weather prediction and preliminary results utilizing this system will be presented at the conference.

  11. Assessment of satellite collision hazards by simulated sampling in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chobotov, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    The origin and distribution of the tracked population of objects and implications for future missions were examined. The distribution of the tracked population of objects as a function of altitude and orbital inclination are studied. Representative encounter parameters such as the number, relative velocity, and miss distance are determined for circular mission orbits and are used to classify regions of space according to the degree of collision hazard presented. Implications for space shuttle and geosynchronous orbits are examined.

  12. Requirements for Modeling and Simulation for Space Medicine Operations: Preliminary Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, David L.; Billica, Roger D.; Logan, James; McDonald, P. Vernon

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Space Medicine program is now developing plans for more extensive use of high-fidelity medical Simulation systems. The use of simulation is seen as means to more effectively use the limited time available for astronaut medical training. Training systems should be adaptable for use in a variety of training environments, including classrooms or laboratories, space vehicle mockups, analog environments, and in microgravity. Modeling and simulation can also provide the space medicine development program a mechanism for evaluation of other medical technologies under operationally realistic conditions. Systems and procedures need preflight verification with ground-based testing. Traditionally, component testing has been accomplished, but practical means for "human in the loop" verification of patient care systems have been lacking. Medical modeling and simulation technology offer potential means to accomplish such validation work. Initial considerations in the development of functional requirements and design standards for simulation systems for space medicine are discussed.

  13. Space-based radar representation in the advanced warfighting simulation (AWARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phend, Andrew E.; Buckley, Kathryn; Elliott, Steven R.; Stanley, Page B.; Shea, Peter M.; Rutland, Jimmie A.

    2004-09-01

    Space and orbiting systems impact multiple battlefield operating systems (BOS). Space support to current operations is a perfect example of how the United States fights. Satellite-aided munitions, communications, navigation and weather systems combine to achieve military objectives in a relatively short amount of time. Through representation of space capabilities within models and simulations, the military will have the ability to train and educate officers and soldiers to fight from the high ground of space or to conduct analysis and determine the requirements or utility of transformed forces empowered with advanced space-based capabilities. The Army Vice Chief of Staff acknowledged deficiencies in space modeling and simulation during the September 2001 Space Force Management Analsyis Review (FORMAL) and directed that a multi-disciplinary team be established to recommend a service-wide roadmap to address shortcomings. A Focus Area Collaborative Team (FACT), led by the U.S. Army Space & Missile Defense Command with participation across the Army, confirmed the weaknesses in scope, consistency, correctness, completeness, availability, and usability of space model and simulation (M&S) for Army applications. The FACT addressed the need to develop a roadmap to remedy Space M&S deficiencies using a highly parallelized process and schedule designed to support a recommendation during the Sep 02 meeting of the Army Model and Simulation Executive Council (AMSEC).

  14. High-performing simulations of the space radiation environment for the International Space Station and Apollo Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Matthew Lawrence

    The space radiation environment is a significant challenge to future manned and unmanned space travels. Future missions will rely more on accurate simulations of radiation transport in space through spacecraft to predict astronaut dose and energy deposition within spacecraft electronics. The International Space Station provides long-term measurements of the radiation environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO); however, only the Apollo missions provided dosimetry data beyond LEO. Thus dosimetry analysis for deep space missions is poorly supported with currently available data, and there is a need to develop dosimetry-predicting models for extended deep space missions. GEANT4, a Monte Carlo Method, provides a powerful toolkit in C++ for simulation of radiation transport in arbitrary media, thus including the spacecraft and space travels. The newest version of GEANT4 supports multithreading and MPI, resulting in faster distributive processing of simulations in high-performance computing clusters. This thesis introduces a new application based on GEANT4 that greatly reduces computational time using Kingspeak and Ember computational clusters at the Center for High Performance Computing (CHPC) to simulate radiation transport through full spacecraft geometry, reducing simulation time to hours instead of weeks without post simulation processing. Additionally, this thesis introduces a new set of detectors besides the historically used International Commission of Radiation Units (ICRU) spheres for calculating dose distribution, including a Thermoluminescent Detector (TLD), Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), and human phantom combined with a series of new primitive scorers in GEANT4 to calculate dose equivalence based on the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) standards. The developed models in this thesis predict dose depositions in the International Space Station and during the Apollo missions showing good agreement with experimental measurements

  15. Space Station Simulation Computer System (SCS) study for NASA/MSFC. Concept document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) planning efforts have identified a need for a payload training simulator system to serve as both a training facility and as a demonstrator to validate operational concepts. The envisioned MSFC Payload Training Complex (PTC) required to meet this need will train the Space Station Payload of experiments that will be onboard the Space Station Freedom. The simulation will support the Payload Training Complex at MSFC. The purpose of this SCS Study is to investigate issues related to the SCS, alternative requirements, simulator approaches, and state-of-the-art technologies to develop candidate concepts and designs.

  16. Issues in visual support to real-time space system simulation solved in the Systems Engineering Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, Vincent K.

    1989-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Simulator has addressed the major issues in providing visual data to its real-time man-in-the-loop simulations. Out-the-window views and CCTV views are provided by three scene systems to give the astronauts their real-world views. To expand the window coverage for the Space Station Freedom workstation a rotating optics system is used to provide the widest field of view possible. To provide video signals to as many viewpoints as possible, windows and CCTVs, with a limited amount of hardware, a video distribution system has been developed to time-share the video channels among viewpoints at the selection of the simulation users. These solutions have provided the visual simulation facility for real-time man-in-the-loop simulations for the NASA space program.

  17. International Collaboration for Galactic Cosmic Ray Simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Rusek, Adam; Durante, Marco; Reitz, Guenther

    2015-01-01

    An international collaboration on Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) simulation is being formed to make recommendations on how to best simulate the GCR spectrum at ground based accelerators. The external GCR spectrum is significantly modified when it passes through spacecraft shielding and astronauts. One approach for simulating the GCR space radiation environment at ground based accelerators would use the modified spectrum, rather than the external spectrum, in the accelerator beams impinging on biological targets. Two recent workshops have studied such GCR simulation. The first workshop was held at NASA Langley Research Center in October 2014. The second workshop was held at the NASA Space Radiation Investigators' workshop in Galveston, Texas in January 2015. The anticipated outcome of these and other studies may be a report or journal article, written by an international collaboration, making accelerator beam recommendations for GCR simulation. This poster describes the status of GCR simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory and encourages others to join the collaboration.

  18. Accelerated simulation study of space charge effects in quadrupole ion traps using GPU techniques.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xingchuang; Xu, Wei; Fang, Xiang; Deng, Yulin; Ouyang, Zheng

    2012-10-01

    Space charge effects play important roles in the performance of various types of mass analyzers. Simulation of space charge effects is often limited by the computation capability. In this study, we evaluate the method of using graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate ion trajectory simulation. Simulation using GPU has been compared with multi-core central processing unit (CPU), and an acceleration of about 390 times have been obtained using a single computer for simulation of up to 10(5) ions in quadrupole ion traps. Characteristics of trapped ions can be investigated at detailed levels within a reasonable simulation time. Space charge effects on the trapping capacities of linear and 3D ion traps, ion cloud shapes, ion motion frequency shift, mass spectrum peak coalescence effects between two ion clouds of close m/z are studied with the ion trajectory simulation using GPU.

  19. Applications of formal simulation languages in the control and monitoring subsystems of Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacovara, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    The notions, benefits, and drawbacks of numeric simulation are introduced. Two formal simulation languages, Simpscript and Modsim are introduced. The capabilities of each are discussed briefly, and then the two programs are compared. The use of simulation in the process of design engineering for the Control and Monitoring System (CMS) for Space Station Freedom is discussed. The application of the formal simulation language to the CMS design is presented, and recommendations are made as to their use.

  20. Improved Space Charge Modeling for Simulation and Design of Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Robert H. Jackson, Thuc Bui, John Verboncoeur

    2010-04-19

    Photoinjectors in advanced high-energy accelerators reduce beam energy spreads and enhance undulator photon fluxes. Photoinjector design is difficult because of the substantial differences in time and spatial scales. This Phase I program explored an innovative technique, the local Taylor polynomial (LTP) formulation, for improving finite difference analysis of photoinjectors. This included improved weighting techniques, systematic formula for high order interpolation and electric field computation, and improved handling of space charge. The Phase I program demonstrated that the approach was powerful, accurate, and efficient. It handles space charge gradients better than currently available technology.

  1. Integrated Clinical Training for Space Flight Using a High-Fidelity Patient Simulator in a Simulated Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Victor; Doerr, Harold K.; Polk, J. D.; Schmid, Josef; Parazynksi, Scott; Kelly, Scott

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of telemedicine in a simulated microgravity environment using a patient simulator. For decades, telemedicine techniques have been used in terrestrial environments by many cohorts with varied clinical experience. The success of these techniques has been recently expanded to include microgravity environments aboard the International Space Station (ISS). In order to investigate how an astronaut crew medical officer will execute medical tasks in a microgravity environment, while being remotely guided by a flight surgeon, the Medical Operation Support Team (MOST) used the simulated microgravity environment provided aboard DC-9 aircraft teams of crew medical officers, and remote flight surgeons performed several tasks on a patient simulator.

  2. Wake Encounter Analysis for a Closely Spaced Parallel Runway Paired Approach Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckissick,Burnell T.; Rico-Cusi, Fernando J.; Murdoch, Jennifer; Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Stough, Harry P, III; O'Connor, Cornelius J.; Syed, Hazari I.

    2009-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of simultaneous approaches performed by two transport category aircraft from the final approach fix to a pair of closely spaced parallel runways was conducted to explore the aft boundary of the safe zone in which separation assurance and wake avoidance are provided. The simulation included variations in runway centerline separation, initial longitudinal spacing of the aircraft, crosswind speed, and aircraft speed during the approach. The data from the simulation showed that the majority of the wake encounters occurred near or over the runway and the aft boundaries of the safe zones were identified for all simulation conditions.

  3. Postnatal development under conditions of simulated weightlessness and space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, K.

    1998-01-01

    The adaptability of the developing nervous system to environmental influences and the mechanisms underlying this plasticity has recently become a subject of interest in space neuroscience. Ground studies on neonatal rats using the tail suspension model of weightlessness have shown that the force of gravity clearly influences the events underlying the postnatal development of motor function. These effects depend on the age of the animal, duration of the perturbation and the motor function studied. A nine-day flight study has shown that a dam and neonates can develop under conditions of space flight. The motor function of the flight animals after landing was consistent with that seen in the tail suspension studies, being marked by limb joint extension. However, there were expected differences due to: (1) the unloading of the vestibular system in flight, which did not occur in the ground-based experiments; (2) differences between flight and suspension durations; and (3) the inability to evaluate motor function during the flight. The next step is to conduct experiments in space with the flexibility and rigor that is now limited to ground studies: an opportunity offered by the International Space Station. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. Geant4 electromagnetic physics updates for space radiation effects simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantchenko, Anton; Nieminen, Petteri; Incerti, Sebastien; Santin, Giovanni; Ivantchenko, Vladimir; Grichine, Vladimir; Allison, John; Karamitos, Mathiew

    The Geant4 toolkit is used in many applications including space science studies. The new Geant4 version 10.0 released in December 2013 includes a major revision of the toolkit and offers multi-threaded mode for event level parallelism. At the same time, Geant4 electromagnetic and hadronic physics sub-libraries have been significantly updated. In order to validate the new and updated models Geant4 verification tests and benchmarks were extended. Part of these developments was sponsored by the European Space Agency in the context of research aimed at modelling radiation biological end effects. In this work, we present an overview of results of several benchmarks for electromagnetic physics models relevant to space science. For electromagnetic physics, recently Compton scattering, photoelectric effect, and Rayleigh scattering models have been improved and extended down to lower energies. Models of ionization and fluctuations have also been improved; special micro-dosimetry models for Silicon and liquid water were introduced; the main multiple scattering model was consolidated; and the atomic de-excitation module has been made available to all models. As a result, Geant4 predictions for space radiation effects obtained with different Physics Lists are in better agreement with the benchmark data than previous Geant4 versions. Here we present results of electromagnetic tests and models comparison in the energy interval 10 eV - 10 MeV.

  5. A SLAM II simulation model for analyzing space station mission processing requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Space station mission processing is modeled via the SLAM 2 simulation language on an IBM 4381 mainframe and an IBM PC microcomputer with 620K RAM, two double-sided disk drives and an 8087 coprocessor chip. Using a time phased mission (payload) schedule and parameters associated with the mission, orbiter (space shuttle) and ground facility databases, estimates for ground facility utilization are computed. Simulation output associated with the science and applications database is used to assess alternative mission schedules.

  6. The General-Use Nodal Network Solver (GUNNS) Modeling Package for Space Vehicle Flow System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Jason; Moore, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The General-Use Nodal Network Solver (GUNNS) is a modeling software package that combines nodal analysis and the hydraulic-electric analogy to simulate fluid, electrical, and thermal flow systems. GUNNS is developed by L-3 Communications under the TS21 (Training Systems for the 21st Century) project for NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), primarily for use in space vehicle training simulators at JSC. It has sufficient compactness and fidelity to model the fluid, electrical, and thermal aspects of space vehicles in real-time simulations running on commodity workstations, for vehicle crew and flight controller training. It has a reusable and flexible component and system design, and a Graphical User Interface (GUI), providing capability for rapid GUI-based simulator development, ease of maintenance, and associated cost savings. GUNNS is optimized for NASA's Trick simulation environment, but can be run independently of Trick.

  7. Star/horizon simulator used to test space guidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, W. C.

    1967-01-01

    Star/horizon simulator is used for alignment and optical plus photoelectric tests of the sextant for the Apollo guidance and navigation system optical unit assembly. The unit is basically a refractive collimator with a two inch objective lens system and a twenty-four inch focal length.

  8. Simulation of Trajectories for High Specific Impulse Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polsgrove, Tara; Adams, Robert B.; Brady, Hugh J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Difficulties in approximating flight times and deliverable masses for continuous thrust propulsion systems have complicated comparison and evaluation of proposed propulsion concepts. These continuous thrust propulsion systems are of interest to many groups, not the least of which are the electric propulsion and fusion communities. Several charts plotting the results of well-known trajectory simulation codes were developed and are contained in this paper. These charts illustrate the dependence of time of flight and payload ratio on jet power, initial mass, specific impulse and specific power. These charts are intended to be a tool by which people in the propulsion community can explore the possibilities of their propulsion system concepts. Trajectories were simulated using the tools VARITOP and IPOST. VARITOP is a well known trajectory optimization code that involves numerical integration based on calculus of variations. IPOST has several methods of trajectory simulation; the one used in this paper is Cowell's method for full integration of the equations of motion. The analytical method derived in the companion paper was also used to simulate the trajectory. The accuracy of this method is discussed in the paper.

  9. Language Simulations: The Blending Space for Writing and Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalik, Doina L.; Kovalik, Ludovic M.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a language simulation involving six distinct phases: an in-class quick response, a card game, individual research, a classroom debate, a debriefing session, and an argumentative essay. An analysis of student artifacts--quick-response writings and final essays, respectively, both addressing the definition of liberty in a…

  10. The role of simulation prior to manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Prior to manufacturing in space, it is useful to conduct analog experiments where possible so that problems that are apt to be encountered may be identified and planning toward their solution considered. An example is presented involving containerless casting in a near zero gravitational field using paraffin wax as the material cast surrounded by a heated fluid immiscible with the wax that renders it neutrally buoyant.

  11. Discontinuity detection in multivariate space for stochastic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, Rick Gelb, Anne Saxena, Rishu Xiu Dongbin

    2009-04-20

    Edge detection has traditionally been associated with detecting physical space jump discontinuities in one dimension, e.g. seismic signals, and two dimensions, e.g. digital images. Hence most of the research on edge detection algorithms is restricted to these contexts. High dimension edge detection can be of significant importance, however. For instance, stochastic variants of classical differential equations not only have variables in space/time dimensions, but additional dimensions are often introduced to the problem by the nature of the random inputs. The stochastic solutions to such problems sometimes contain discontinuities in the corresponding random space and a prior knowledge of jump locations can be very helpful in increasing the accuracy of the final solution. Traditional edge detection methods typically require uniform grid point distribution. They also often involve the computation of gradients and/or Laplacians, which can become very complicated to compute as the number of dimensions increases. The polynomial annihilation edge detection method, on the other hand, is more flexible in terms of its geometric specifications and is furthermore relatively easy to apply. This paper discusses the numerical implementation of the polynomial annihilation edge detection method to high dimensional functions that arise when solving stochastic partial differential equations.

  12. Discontinuity Detection in Multivariate Space for Stochastic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, Richard K; Gelb, Anne; Saxena, Rishu; Xiu, Dongbin

    2009-01-01

    Edge detection has traditionally been associated with detecting physical space jump discontinuities in one dimension, e.g. seismic signals, and two dimensions, e.g. digital images. Hence most of the research on edge detection algorithms is restricted to these contexts. High dimension edge detection can be of significant importance, however. For instance, stochastic variants of classical differential equations not only have variables in space/time dimensions, but additional dimensions are often introduced to the problem by the nature of the random inputs. The stochastic solutions to such problems sometimes contain discontinuities in the corresponding random space and a prior knowledge of jump locations can be very helpful in increasing the accuracy of the final solution. Traditional edge detection methods typically require uniform grid point distribution. They also often involve the computation of gradients and/or Laplacians, which can become very complicated to compute as the number of dimensions increases. The polynomial annihilation edge detection method, on the other hand, is more flexible in terms of its geometric specifications and is furthermore relatively easy to apply. This paper discusses the numerical implementation of the polynomial annihilation edge detection method to high dimensional functions that arise when solving stochastic partial differential equations.

  13. Navigating the Problem Space: The Medium of Simulation Games in the Teaching of History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Jeremiah

    2012-01-01

    Simulation games can play a critical role in enabling students to navigate the problem spaces of the past while simultaneously critiquing the models designers offer to represent those problem spaces. There is much to be gained through their use. This includes rich opportunities for students to engage the past as independent historians; to consider…

  14. A prototype for simulation of the space-to-ground assembly/contingency system of Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deacetis, Louis A.

    1992-01-01

    This project was a continuation of work started during the Summer of 1991 when techniques and methods were investigated for simulating equipment components of the Communications and Tracking System on Space Station Freedom (SSF). The current work involved developing a design for simulation of the entire Assembly/Contingency Subsystem (ACS), which includes the Baseband Signal Processor, standard TDRSS Transponder and the RF Group antenna assembly. A design prototype of the ACS was developed. Methods to achieving 'high fidelity' real-time simulations of the ACS components on IBM-PC compatible computers were considered. The intention is to have separate component simulations running on separate personal computers (PC's), with the capability of substituting actual equipment units for those being simulated when such equipment becomes available for testing. To this end, a scheme for communication between the various simulated ACS components was developed using the serial ports of the PC's hosting the simulations. In addition, control and monitoring of ACS equipment on SSF will be via a MIL-STD 1553B bus. The proposed simulation includes actual 1553B hardware as part of the test bed.

  15. Distributed communication and psychosocial performance in simulated space dwelling groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienz, R. D.; Brady, J. V.; Hursh, S. R.; Ragusa, L. C.; Rouse, C. O.; Gasior, E. D.

    2005-05-01

    The present report describes the development and application of a distributed interactive multi-person simulation in a computer-generated planetary environment as an experimental test bed for modeling the human performance effects of variations in the types of communication modes available, and in the types of stress and incentive conditions underlying the completion of mission goals. The results demonstrated a high degree of interchangeability between communication modes (audio, text) when one mode was not available. Additionally, the addition of time pressure stress to complete tasks resulted in a reduction in performance effectiveness, and these performance reductions were ameliorated via the introduction of positive incentives contingent upon improved performances. The results obtained confirmed that cooperative and productive psychosocial interactions can be maintained between individually isolated and dispersed members of simulated spaceflight crews communicating and problem-solving effectively over extended time intervals without the benefit of one another's physical presence.

  16. Distributed communication and psychosocial performance in simulated space dwelling groups.

    PubMed

    Hienz, R D; Brady, J V; Hursh, S R; Ragusa, L C; Rouse, C O; Gasior, E D

    2005-01-01

    The present report describes the development and application of a distributed interactive multi-person simulation in a computer-generated planetary environment as an experimental test bed for modeling the human performance effects of variations in the types of communication modes available, and in the types of stress and incentive conditions underlying the completion of mission goals. The results demonstrated a high degree of interchangeability between communication modes(audio, text) when one mode was not available. Additionally, the addition of time pressure stress to complete tasks resulted in a reduction in performance effectiveness, and these performance reductions were ameliorated via the introduction of positive incentives contingent upon improved performances. The results obtained confirmed that cooperative and productive psychosocial interactions can be maintained between individually isolated and dispersed members of simulated spaceflight crews communicating and problem-solving effectively over extended time intervals without the benefit of one another's physical presence. PMID:15835052

  17. Simulation of space charge effects and transition crossing in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, P.; MacLachlan, J.

    1987-03-01

    The longitudinal phase space program ESME, modified for space charge and wall impedance effects, has been used to simulate transition crossing in the Fermilab Booster. The simulations yield results in reasonable quantitative agreement with measured parameters. They further indicate that a transition jump scheme currently under construction will significantly reduce emittance growth, while attempts to alter machine impedance are less obviously beneficial. In addition to presenting results, this paper points out a serious difficulty, related to statistical fluctuations, in the space charge calculation. False indications of emittance growth can appear if care is not taken to minimize this problem.

  18. Behavior of ionic conducting IPN actuators in simulated space conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannir, Adelyne; Plesse, Cédric; Nguyen, Giao T. M.; Laurent, Elisabeth; Cadiergues, Laurent; Vidal, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    The presentation focuses on the performances of flexible all-polymer electroactive actuators under space-hazardous environmental factors in laboratory conditions. These bending actuators are based on high molecular weight nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR), poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) derivative and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxithiophene) (PEDOT). The electroactive PEDOT is embedded within the PEO/NBR membrane which is subsequently swollen with an ionic liquid as electrolyte. Actuators have been submitted to thermal cycling test between -25 to 60°C under vacuum (2.4 10-8 mbar) and to ionizing Gamma radiations at a level of 210 rad/h during 100 h. Actuators have been characterized before and after space environmental condition ageing. In particular, the viscoelasticity properties and mechanical resistance of the materials have been determined by dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile tests. The evolution of the actuation properties as the strain and the output force have been characterized as well. The long-term vacuuming, the freezing temperature and the Gamma radiations do not affect significantly the thermomechanical properties of conducting IPNs actuators. Only a slight decrease on actuation performances has been observed.

  19. Some real-time simulation applications to Space Shuttle approach and landing design and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, H. G., III; Stegall, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    In the present discussion of the roles played by real time, man-in-the-loop engineering simulation in the development of NASA Space Shuttle approaches and landings, attention is given to the function of the simulator as a design and verification tool. Aspects of the problem posed by Shuttle landings, and the difficulties involved in this problem's quantification, are noted. Recent results of control system studies for pitch axis control, using fixed- and motion-base simulators, are discussed.

  20. Simulation study of interactions of Space Shuttle-generated electron beams with ambient plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin S.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained through the support of NASA Grant NAGW-1936. The objective of this report is to conduct large scale simulations of electron beams injected into space. The topics covered include the following: (1) simulation of radial expansion of an injected electron beam; (2) simulations of the active injections of electron beams; (3) parameter study of electron beam injection into an ionospheric plasma; and (4) magnetosheath-ionospheric plasma interactions in the cusp.

  1. Simulation verification techniques study: Simulation performance validation techniques document. [for the space shuttle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, L. M.; Reddell, J. P.; Schoonmaker, P. B.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques and support software for the efficient performance of simulation validation are discussed. Overall validation software structure, the performance of validation at various levels of simulation integration, guidelines for check case formulation, methods for real time acquisition and formatting of data from an all up operational simulator, and methods and criteria for comparison and evaluation of simulation data are included. Vehicle subsystems modules, module integration, special test requirements, and reference data formats are also described.

  2. A TREETOPS simulation of the Hubble Space Telescope-High Gain Antenna interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharkey, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Virtually any project dealing with the control of a Large Space Structure (LSS) will involve some level of verification by digital computer simulation. While the Hubble Space Telescope might not normally be included in a discussion of LSS, it is presented to highlight a recently developed simulation and analysis program named TREETOPS. TREETOPS provides digital simulation, linearization, and control system interaction of flexible, multibody spacecraft which admit to a point-connected tree topology. The HST application of TREETOPS is intended to familiarize the LSS community with TREETOPS by presenting a user perspective of its key features.

  3. Improving traffic noise simulations using space syntax: preliminary results from two roadway systems.

    PubMed

    M Dzhambov, Angel; D Dimitrova, Donka; H Turnovska, Tanya

    2014-09-01

    Noise pollution is one of the four major pollutions in the world. In order to implement adequate strategies for noise control, assessment of traffic-generated noise is essential in city planning and management. The aim of this study was to determine whether space syntax could improve the predictive power of noise simulation. This paper reports a record linkage study which combined a documentary method with space syntax analysis. It analyses data about traffic flow as well as field-measured and computer-simulated traffic noise in two Bulgarian agglomerations. Our findings suggest that space syntax might have a potential in predicting traffic noise exposure by improving models for noise simulations using specialised software or actual traffic counts. The scientific attention might need to be directed towards space syntax in order to study its further application in current models and algorithms for noise prediction. PMID:25222575

  4. A low Earth orbit molecular beam space simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    A brief synopsis of the low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite environment is presented including neutral and ionic species. Two ground based atomic and molecular beam instruments are described which are capable of simulating the interaction of spacecraft surfaces with the LEO environment and detecting the results of these interactions. The first detects mass spectrometrically low level fluxes of reactively and nonreactively surface scattered species as a function of scattering angle and velocity while the second ultrahigh velocity (UHV) molecular beam, laser induced fluorescence apparatus is capable of measuring chemiluminescence produced by either gas phase or gas-surface interactions. A number of proposed experiments are described.

  5. Space-flight simulations of calcium metabolism using a mathematical model of calcium regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a series of simulation studies of calcium matabolic changes which have been recorded during human exposure to bed rest and space flight are presented. Space flight and bed rest data demonstrate losses of total body calcium during exposure to hypogravic environments. These losses are evidenced by higher than normal rates of urine calcium excretion and by negative calcium balances. In addition, intestinal absorption rates and bone mineral content are assumed to decrease. The bed rest and space flight simulations were executed on a mathematical model of the calcium metabolic system. The purpose of the simulations is to theoretically test hypotheses and predict system responses which are occurring during given experimental stresses. In this case, hypogravity occurs through the comparison of simulation and experimental data and through the analysis of model structure and system responses. The model reliably simulates the responses of selected bed rest and space flight parameters. When experimental data are available, the simulated skeletal responses and regulatory factors involved in the responses agree with space flight data collected on rodents. In addition, areas within the model that need improvement are identified.

  6. SPACE CHARGE SIMULATION METHODS INCORPORATED IN SOME MULTI - PARTICLE TRACKING CODES AND THEIR RESULTS COMPARISON.

    SciTech Connect

    BEEBE - WANG,J.; LUCCIO,A.U.; D IMPERIO,N.; MACHIDA,S.

    2002-06-03

    Space charge in high intensity beams is an important issue in accelerator physics. Due to the complicity of the problems, the most effective way of investigating its effect is by computer simulations. In the resent years, many space charge simulation methods have been developed and incorporated in various 2D or 3D multi-particle-tracking codes. It has becoming necessary to benchmark these methods against each other, and against experimental results. As a part of global effort, we present our initial comparison of the space charge methods incorporated in simulation codes ORBIT++, ORBIT and SIMPSONS. In this paper, the methods included in these codes are overviewed. The simulation results are presented and compared. Finally, from this study, the advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed.

  7. Electrical behaviour of a silicone elastomer under simulated space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggero, A.; Dantras, E.; Paulmier, T.; Tonon, C.; Balcon, N.; Rejsek-Riba, V.; Dagras, S.; Payan, D.

    2015-04-01

    The electrical behavior of a space-used silicone elastomer was characterized using surface potential decay and dynamic dielectric spectroscopy techniques. In both cases, the dielectric manifestation of the glass transition (dipole orientation) and a charge transport phenomenon were observed. An unexpected linear increase of the surface potential with temperature was observed around Tg in thermally-stimulated potential decay experiments, due to molecular mobility limiting dipolar orientation in one hand, and 3D thermal expansion reducing the materials capacitance in the other hand. At higher temperatures, the charge transport process, believed to be thermally activated electron hopping with an activation energy of about 0.4 eV, was studied with and without the silica and iron oxide fillers present in the commercial material. These fillers were found to play a preponderant role in the low-frequency electrical conductivity of this silicone elastomer, probably through a Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars relaxation phenomenon.

  8. Developing a space network interface simulator: The NTS approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrzak, Gary E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the approach used to redevelop the Network Control Center (NCC) Test System (NTS), a hardware and software facility designed to make testing of the NCC Data System (NCCDS) software efficient, effective, and as rigorous as possible prior to operational use. The NTS transmits and receives network message traffic in real-time. Data transfer rates and message content are strictly controlled and are identical to that of the operational systems. NTS minimizes the need for costly and time-consuming testing with the actual external entities (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) and the White Sands Ground Terminal). Discussed are activities associated with the development of the NTS, lessons learned throughout the project's lifecycle, and resulting productivity and quality increases.

  9. A General Simulator Using State Estimation for a Space Tug Navigation System. [computerized simulation, orbital position estimation and flight mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1975-01-01

    A general simulation program is presented (GSP) involving nonlinear state estimation for space vehicle flight navigation systems. A complete explanation of the iterative guidance mode guidance law, derivation of the dynamics, coordinate frames, and state estimation routines are given so as to fully clarify the assumptions and approximations involved so that simulation results can be placed in their proper perspective. A complete set of computer acronyms and their definitions as well as explanations of the subroutines used in the GSP simulator are included. To facilitate input/output, a complete set of compatable numbers, with units, are included to aid in data development. Format specifications, output data phrase meanings and purposes, and computer card data input are clearly spelled out. A large number of simulation and analytical studies were used to determine the validity of the simulator itself as well as various data runs.

  10. Using Virtual Simulations in the Design of 21st Century Space Science Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, Sonya L.; Alves, Jeffery R.

    1996-01-01

    Space Technology has been rapidly increasing in the past decade. This can be attributed to the future construction of the International Space Station (ISS). New innovations must constantly be engineered to make ISS the safest, quality, research facility in space. Since space science must often be gathered by crew members, more attention must be geared to the human's safety and comfort. Virtual simulations are now being used to design environments that crew members can live in for long periods of time without harmful effects to their bodies. This paper gives a few examples of the ergonomic design problems that arise on manned space flights, and design solutions that follow NASA's strategic commitment to customer satisfaction. The conclusions show that virtual simulations are a great asset to 21st century design.

  11. Study of ceramic products and processing techniques in space. [using computerized simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markworth, A. J.; Oldfield, W.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of the solidification kinetics of beta alumina in a zero-gravity environment was carried out, using computer-simulation techniques, in order to assess the feasibility of producing high-quality single crystals of this material in space. The two coupled transport processes included were movement of the solid-liquid interface and diffusion of sodium atoms in the melt. Results of the simulation indicate that appreciable crystal-growth rates can be attained in space. Considerations were also made of the advantages offered by high-quality single crystals of beta alumina for use as a solid electrolyte; these clearly indicate that space-grown materials are superior in many respects to analogous terrestrially-grown crystals. Likewise, economic considerations, based on the rapidly expanding technological applications for beta alumina and related fast ionic conductors, reveal that the many superior qualities of space-grown material justify the added expense and experimental detail associated with space processing.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of interparticle spacing and many-body effect in gold supracrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, X P; Ni, Y; He, L H

    2016-04-01

    Interparticle spacing in supracrystals is a crucial parameter for photoelectric applications as it dominates the transport rates between neighboring nanoparticles (NPs). Based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate interparticle spacing in alkylthiol-stabilized gold supracrystals as a function of the NP size, ligand length and external pressure. The repulsive many-body interactions in the supracrystals are also quantified by comparing the interparticle spacing with that between two individual NPs at equilibrium. Our results are consistent with available experiments, and are expected to help precise control of interparticle spacing in supracrystal devices.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of interparticle spacing and many-body effect in gold supracrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, X P; Ni, Y; He, L H

    2016-04-01

    Interparticle spacing in supracrystals is a crucial parameter for photoelectric applications as it dominates the transport rates between neighboring nanoparticles (NPs). Based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate interparticle spacing in alkylthiol-stabilized gold supracrystals as a function of the NP size, ligand length and external pressure. The repulsive many-body interactions in the supracrystals are also quantified by comparing the interparticle spacing with that between two individual NPs at equilibrium. Our results are consistent with available experiments, and are expected to help precise control of interparticle spacing in supracrystal devices. PMID:26909856

  14. Effect of simulated space radiation on selected optical materials.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoletta, C. A.; Eubanks, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of simulated Nimbus spacecraft orbital (1100 km, circular, and polar) radiation on wide-band-pass glass filters, narrow-bandpass thin-film interference filters, and several fused silicas was determined by transmittance measurements over the 200-3400-nm wavelength region. No changes were observed in the filters, which were shielded with fused silica during irradiation, after exposure to a 1-yr equivalent orbital dose of electrons, nor were changes observed in the fused silicas after the same electron exposure plus a 1-yr equivalent dose of protons. Exposure to a 1/2-yr equivalent dose of solar uv radiation, however, caused a significant degradation in the transmittance of two uv-transmitting interference filters but had no effect on two colored glass filters that transmitted in the visible and near-ir regions. As a result of the uv exposure, the fused silicas exhibited losses of several percent over the 200-300-nm wavelength region.

  15. Phase space structures in gyrokinetic simulations of fusion plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghendrih, Philippe; Norscini, Claudia; Cartier-Michaud, Thomas; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Abiteboul, Jérémie; Dong, Yue; Garbet, Xavier; Gürcan, Ozgür; Hennequin, Pascale; Grandgirard, Virginie; Latu, Guillaume; Morel, Pierre; Sarazin, Yanick; Storelli, Alexandre; Vermare, Laure

    2014-10-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations of fusion plasmas give extensive information in 5D on turbulence and transport. This paper highlights a few of these challenging physics in global, flux driven simulations using experimental inputs from Tore Supra shot TS45511. The electrostatic gyrokinetic code GYSELA is used for these simulations. The 3D structure of avalanches indicates that these structures propagate radially at localised toroidal angles and then expand along the field line at sound speed to form the filaments. Analysing the poloidal mode structure of the potential fluctuations (at a given toroidal location), one finds that the low modes m = 0 and m = 1 exhibit a global structure; the magnitude of the m = 0 mode is much larger than that of the m = 1 mode. The shear layers of the corrugation structures are thus found to be dominated by the m = 0 contribution, that are comparable to that of the zonal flows. This global mode seems to localise the m = 2 mode but has little effect on the localisation of the higher mode numbers. However when analysing the pulsation of the latter modes one finds that all modes exhibit a similar phase velocity, comparable to the local zonal flow velocity. The consequent dispersion like relation between the modes pulsation and the mode numbers provides a means to measure the zonal flow. Temperature fluctuations and the turbulent heat flux are localised between the corrugation structures. Temperature fluctuations are found to exhibit two scales, small fluctuations that are localised by the corrugation shear layers, and appear to bounce back and forth radially, and large fluctuations, also readily observed on the flux, which are associated to the disruption of the corrugations. The radial ballistic velocity of both avalanche events if of the order of 0.5ρ∗c0 where ρ∗ = ρ0/a, a being the tokamak minor radius and ρ0 being the characteristic Larmor radius, ρ0 = c0/Ω0. c0 is the reference ion thermal velocity and Ω0 = qiB0/mi the reference

  16. Interfacing Space Communications and Navigation Network Simulation with Distributed System Integration Laboratories (DSIL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Esther H.; Nguyen, Sam P.; Wang, Shin-Ywan; Woo, Simon S.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's planned Lunar missions will involve multiple NASA centers where each participating center has a specific role and specialization. In this vision, the Constellation program (CxP)'s Distributed System Integration Laboratories (DSIL) architecture consist of multiple System Integration Labs (SILs), with simulators, emulators, testlabs and control centers interacting with each other over a broadband network to perform test and verification for mission scenarios. To support the end-to-end simulation and emulation effort of NASA' exploration initiatives, different NASA centers are interconnected to participate in distributed simulations. Currently, DSIL has interconnections among the following NASA centers: Johnson Space Center (JSC), Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Through interconnections and interactions among different NASA centers, critical resources and data can be shared, while independent simulations can be performed simultaneously at different NASA locations, to effectively utilize the simulation and emulation capabilities at each center. Furthermore, the development of DSIL can maximally leverage the existing project simulation and testing plans. In this work, we describe the specific role and development activities at JPL for Space Communications and Navigation Network (SCaN) simulator using the Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE) tool to simulate communications effects among mission assets. Using MACHETE, different space network configurations among spacecrafts and ground systems of various parameter sets can be simulated. Data that is necessary for tracking, navigation, and guidance of spacecrafts such as Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), and Lunar Relay Satellite (LRS) and orbit calculation data are disseminated to different NASA centers and updated periodically using the High Level Architecture (HLA). In

  17. Peculiar velocities in redshift space: formalism, N-body simulations and perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Teppei; Seljak, Uroš; Vlah, Zvonimir; Desjacques, Vincent E-mail: useljak@berkeley.edu E-mail: Vincent.Desjacques@unige.ch

    2014-05-01

    Direct measurements of peculiar velocities of galaxies and clusters of galaxies can in principle provide explicit information on the three dimensional mass distribution, but this information is modulated by the fact that velocity field is sampled at galaxy positions, and is thus probing galaxy momentum. We derive expressions for the cross power spectrum between the density and momentum field and the auto spectrum of the momentum field in redshift space, by extending the distribution function method to these statistics. The resulting momentum cross and auto power spectra in redshift space are expressed as infinite sums over velocity moment correlators in real space, as is the case for the density power spectrum in redshift space. We compute each correlator using Eulerian perturbation theory (PT) and halo biasing model and compare the resulting redshift-space velocity statistics to those measured from N-body simulations for both dark matter and halos. We find that in redshift space linear theory predictions for the density-momentum cross power spectrum as well as for the momentum auto spectrum fail to predict the N-body results at very large scales. On the other hand, our nonlinear PT prediction for these velocity statistics, together with real-space power spectrum for dark matter from simulations, improves the accuracy for both dark matter and halos. We also present the same analysis in configuration space, computing the redshift-space pairwise mean infall velocities and velocity correlation function and compare to nonlinear PT.

  18. Space simulation techniques and facilities for SAX STM test campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giordano, Pietro; Raimondo, Giacomo; Messidoro, Piero

    1994-01-01

    SAX is a satellite for X-Ray astronomy. It is a major element of the overall basic Science Program of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and is being developed with the contribution of the Netherlands Agency for Aerospace Programs (NIVR). The scientific objectives of SAX are to carry out systematic and comprehensive observations of celestial X-Ray sources over the 0.1 - 300 KeV energy range with special emphasis on spectral and timing measurements. The satellite will also monitor the X-Ray sky to investigate long-term source variability and to permit localization and study of X-Ray transients. Alenia Spazio is developing the satellite that is intended for launch in the second half of 1995 in a low, near-equatorial Earth orbit. At system level a Structural Thermal Model (STM) has been conceived to verify the environmental requirements by validating the mechanical and thermal analytical models and qualifying satellite structure and thermal control. In particular, the following tests have been carried out in Alenia Spazio, CEA/CESTA and ESTEC facilities: Modal Survey, Centrifuge, Acoustic, Sinusoidal/Random Vibration and Thermal Balance. The paper, after a short introduction of the SAX satellite, summarizes the environmental qualification program performed on the SAX STM. It presents test objectives, methodologies and relevant test configurations. Peculiar aspects of the test campaign are highlighted. Problems encountered and solutions adopted in performing the tests are described as well. Furthermore, test results are presented and assessed.

  19. Space simulation techniques and facilities for SAX STM test campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Pietro; Raimondo, Giacomo; Messidoro, Piero

    1994-11-01

    SAX is a satellite for X-Ray astronomy. It is a major element of the overall basic Science Program of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and is being developed with the contribution of the Netherlands Agency for Aerospace Programs (NIVR). The scientific objectives of SAX are to carry out systematic and comprehensive observations of celestial X-Ray sources over the 0.1 - 300 KeV energy range with special emphasis on spectral and timing measurements. The satellite will also monitor the X-Ray sky to investigate long-term source variability and to permit localization and study of X-Ray transients. Alenia Spazio is developing the satellite that is intended for launch in the second half of 1995 in a low, near-equatorial Earth orbit. At system level a Structural Thermal Model (STM) has been conceived to verify the environmental requirements by validating the mechanical and thermal analytical models and qualifying satellite structure and thermal control. In particular, the following tests have been carried out in Alenia Spazio, CEA/CESTA and ESTEC facilities: Modal Survey, Centrifuge, Acoustic, Sinusoidal/Random Vibration and Thermal Balance. The paper, after a short introduction of the SAX satellite, summarizes the environmental qualification program performed on the SAX STM. It presents test objectives, methodologies and relevant test configurations. Peculiar aspects of the test campaign are highlighted. Problems encountered and solutions adopted in performing the tests are described as well. Furthermore, test results are presented and assessed.

  20. Using Jupyter Notebooks for Interactive Space Science Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Albrecht

    2016-04-01

    Jupyter Notebooks can be used as an effective means to communicate scientific ideas through Web-based visualisations and, at the same time, give a user more than a pre-defined set of options to manipulate the visualisations. To some degree, even computations can be done without too much knowledge of the underlying data structures and infrastructure to discover novel aspects of the data or tailor view to users' needs. Here, we show how to combine Jupyter Notebooks with other open-source tools to provide rich and interactive views on space data, especially the visualisation of spacecraft operations. Topics covered are orbit visualisation, spacecraft orientation, instrument timelines as well as performance analysis of mission segments. Technically, also the re-use and integration of existing components will be shown, both on the code level as well on the visualisation level so that the effort which was put into the development of new components could be reduced. Another important aspect is the bridging of the gap between operational data and the scientific exploitation of the payload data, for which also a way forward will be shown. A lesson learned from the implementation and use of a prototype is the synergy between the team who provisions the notebooks and the consumers, who both share access to the same code base, if not resources; this often simplifies communication and deployment.

  1. A simulation model for probabilistic analysis of Space Shuttle abort modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hage, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    A simulation model which was developed to provide a probabilistic analysis tool to study the various space transportation system abort mode situations is presented. The simulation model is based on Monte Carlo simulation of an event-tree diagram which accounts for events during the space transportation system's ascent and its abort modes. The simulation model considers just the propulsion elements of the shuttle system (i.e., external tank, main engines, and solid boosters). The model was developed to provide a better understanding of the probability of occurrence and successful completion of abort modes during the vehicle's ascent. The results of the simulation runs discussed are for demonstration purposes only, they are not official NASA probability estimates.

  2. The PLATO Simulator: modelling of high-precision high-cadence space-based imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos-Arenal, P.; Zima, W.; De Ridder, J.; Aerts, C.; Huygen, R.; Samadi, R.; Green, J.; Piotto, G.; Salmon, S.; Catala, C.; Rauer, H.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Many aspects of the design trade-off of a space-based instrument and its performance can best be tackled through simulations of the expected observations. The complex interplay of various noise sources in the course of the observations make such simulations an indispensable part of the assessment and design study of any space-based mission. Aims: We present a formalism to model and simulate photometric time series of CCD images by including models of the CCD and its electronics, the telescope optics, the stellar field, the jitter movements of the spacecraft, and all of the important natural noise sources. Methods: This formalism has been implemented in a versatile end-to-end simulation software tool, specifically designed for the PLATO (Planetary Transists and Oscillations of Stars) space mission to be operated from L2, but easily adaptable to similar types of missions. We call this tool Plato Simulator. Results: We provide a detailed description of several noise sources and discuss their properties in connection with the optical design, the allowable level of jitter, the quantum efficiency of the detectors, etc. The expected overall noise budget of generated light curves is computed, as a function of the stellar magnitude, for different sets of input parameters describing the instrument properties. The simulator is offered to the scientific community for future use. Software package available at the Plato Simulator web site (http://https://fys.kuleuven.be/ster/Software/PlatoSimulator/).

  3. Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Network Simulation Tool Development and Its Use Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Esther; Borgen, Richard; Nguyen, Sam; Segui, John; Stoenescu, Tudor; Wang, Shin-Ywan; Woo, Simon; Barritt, Brian; Chevalier, Christine; Eddy, Wesley

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we focus on the development of a simulation tool to assist in analysis of current and future (proposed) network architectures for NASA. Specifically, the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Network is being architected as an integrated set of new assets and a federation of upgraded legacy systems. The SCaN architecture for the initial missions for returning humans to the moon and beyond will include the Space Network (SN) and the Near-Earth Network (NEN). In addition to SCaN, the initial mission scenario involves a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), the International Space Station (ISS) and NASA Integrated Services Network (NISN). We call the tool being developed the SCaN Network Integration and Engineering (SCaN NI&E) Simulator. The intended uses of such a simulator are: (1) to characterize performance of particular protocols and configurations in mission planning phases; (2) to optimize system configurations by testing a larger parameter space than may be feasible in either production networks or an emulated environment; (3) to test solutions in order to find issues/risks before committing more significant resources needed to produce real hardware or flight software systems. We describe two use cases of the tool: (1) standalone simulation of CEV to ISS baseline scenario to determine network performance, (2) participation in Distributed Simulation Integration Laboratory (DSIL) tests to perform function testing and verify interface and interoperability of geographically dispersed simulations/emulations.

  4. Dispersion analysis and linear error analysis capabilities of the space vehicle dynamics simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. S.; Kuhn, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    Previous error analyses conducted by the Guidance and Dynamics Branch of NASA have used the Guidance Analysis Program (GAP) as the trajectory simulation tool. Plans are made to conduct all future error analyses using the Space Vehicle Dynamics Simulation (SVDS) program. A study was conducted to compare the inertial measurement unit (IMU) error simulations of the two programs. Results of the GAP/SVDS comparison are presented and problem areas encountered while attempting to simulate IMU errors, vehicle performance uncertainties and environmental uncertainties using SVDS are defined. An evaluation of the SVDS linear error analysis capability is also included.

  5. Numerical simulations of aerodynamic contribution of flows about a space-plane-type configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsushima, Kisa; Takanashi, Susume; Fujii, Kozo; Obayashi, Shigeru

    1987-01-01

    The slightly supersonic viscous flow about the space-plane under development at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) in Japan was simulated numerically using the LU-ADI algorithm. The wind-tunnel testing for the same plane also was conducted with the computations in parallel. The main purpose of the simulation is to capture the phenomena which have a great deal of influence to the aerodynamic force and efficiency but is difficult to capture by experiments. It includes more accurate representation of vortical flows with high angles of attack of an aircraft. The space-plane shape geometry simulated is the simplified model of the real space-plane, which is a combination of a flat and slender body and a double-delta type wing. The comparison between experimental results and numerical ones will be done in the near future. It could be said that numerical results show the qualitatively reliable phenomena.

  6. Space Station Simulation Computer System (SCS) study for NASA/MSFC. Phased development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) planning efforts have identified a need for a payload training simulator system to serve as both a training facility and as a demonstrator to validate operational concepts. The envisioned MSFC Payload Training Complex (PTC) required to meet this need will train the Space Station payload scientists, station scientists and ground controllers to operate the wide variety of experiments that will be onboard the Space Station Freedom. The Simulation Computer System (SCS) is made up of computer hardware, software, and workstations that will support the Payload Training Complex at MSFC. The purpose of this SCS Study is to investigate issues related to the SCS, alternative requirements, simulator approaches, and state-of-the-art technologies to develop candidate concepts and designs.

  7. Space Station Simulation Computer System (SCS) study for NASA/MSFC. Operations concept report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) planning efforts have identified a need for a payload training simulator system to serve as both a training facility and as a demonstrator to validate operational concepts. The envisioned MSFC Payload Training Complex (PTC) required to meet this need will train the Space Station payload scientists, station scientists, and ground controllers to operate the wide variety of experiments that will be onboard the Space Station Freedom. The Simulation Computer System (SCS) is made up of computer hardware, software, and workstations that will support the Payload Training Complex at MSFC. The purpose of this SCS Study is to investigate issues related to the SCS, alternative requirements, simulator approaches, and state-of-the-art technologies to develop candidate concepts and designs.

  8. Space Station Simulation Computer System (SCS) study for NASA/MSFC. Volume 1: Baseline architecture report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) planning efforts have identified a need for a payload training simulator system to serve as both a training facility and as a demonstrator to validate operational concepts. The envisioned MSFC Payload Training Complex (PTC) required to meet this need will train the Space Station payload scientists, station scientists, and ground controllers to operate the wide variety of experiments that will be onboard the Space Station Freedom. The Simulation Computer System (SCS) is made up of the computer hardware, software, and workstations that will support the Payload Training Complex at MSFC. The purpose of this SCS Study is to investigate issues related to the SCS, alternative requirements, simulator approaches, and state-of-the-art technologies to develop candidate concepts and designs.

  9. Simulated response of top-hat electrostatic analysers - importance of phase-space resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Rossana; Bruno, Roberto; D'Amicis, Raffaella; Federica Marcucci, Maria; Servidio, Sergio; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    We use a numerical code able to reproduce the angular/energy response of a typical electrostatic analyzer of top-hat type starting from velocity distribution functions (VDFs) generated by numerical imulations.The simulations are based on the Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) numerical algorithm which integrates the Vlasov equation for the ion distribution function in multi-dimensional geometry in phase space, while the electrons are treated as a fluid. Virtual satellites launched through the simulation box measure the particle VDFs. Such VDFs are interpolated into a spacecraft reference frame and moved from the simulation Cartesian grid to energy-angular coordinates to mimic the response of a real electrostatic sensor in the solar wind and in the magnetosheath for different conditions. We discuss the results of this study with respect to the importance of phase-space resolution for a space plasma experiment meant to investigate kinetic plasma regime.

  10. STS-41 Mission Specialist (MS) Akers in EMU prepares for JSC WETF simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-41 Mission Specialist (MS) Thomas D. Akers, suited in an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and wearing a communications carrier assembly (CCA), prepares for an extravehicular activity (EVA) contingency simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Akers will be lowered into the WETF's 25 ft deep pool for the underwater simulation.

  11. Development of a simulation environment to test space missions COTS technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraf, S.; Knoll, A.; Melanson, P.; Tafazoli, M.

    2002-07-01

    The Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Software and Ground Segment Section (SGS) has the mandate to develop innovative emerging software and on-board satellite and ground segment computer technologies. To that end, there is an ongoing development of a simulation environment to test COTS (Commercial-Of-The-Shelf) technologies. There are severe cost constraints in all aspects of many space missions due to the limited return on investment and scarce commercialization opportunities that come with many science missions. There is an opportunity to explore the innovative implementation of COTS technologies to reduce the mission cost and maximize performance available from COTS components. However, using COTS technologies in the space environment has ist constraints and therefore designing a spacecraft mission has to involve some new techniques that allow implementation of these components and minimize the risk of failure. The goal of our project is to develop a simulation environment, itself using COTS components, and then to allow the seamless integration of various components to test spacecraft mission concepts. For example, one of the aspects of using COTS processors in space is to protect them from the radiation environment. The current state of the simulation tests an innovative software EDAC (Error Detection and Correction) package and a redundant processor configuration to investigate protection against the effects of radiation and other failures on a generic mission. It also includes the capability to test formation-flying concepts that have the potential to revolutionize cost reduction efforts for space missions and to enable new space applications. This paper describes the simulation environment in detail and illustrates some of the technologies being tested for possible future space missions. The paper concludes with a look at the future development of the simulation environment and possible benefits of its use as well as the lessons learned to date.

  12. Hypervelocity impact facility for simulating the effects of space debris over a wide range of conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. F.; Best, S.; Chaloupka, T.

    1991-01-01

    An impact facility for simulating space debris effects is described. The facility capability is described in terms of drive geometry, energetics, and armature loading. The facility is used to study impact phenomena on Space Station Freedom's solar array structure, other structural materials from the Station, and a means of duplicating the damage characteristic of the Long Duration Exposure Facility. Preliminary results of these experiments are described in terms of the mass/velocity distribution incident on selected samples, crater dynamics, and sample geometry.

  13. Mathematical modeling and simulation of the space shuttle imaging radar antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. W.; Melick, K. E.; Coffey, E. L., III

    1978-01-01

    Simulations of space shuttle synthetic aperture radar antennas under the influence of space environmental conditions were carried out at L, C, and X-band. Mathematical difficulties in modeling large, non-planar array antennas are discussed, and an approximate modeling technique is presented. Results for several antenna error conditions are illustrated in far-field profile patterns, earth surface footprint contours, and summary graphs.

  14. 26th Space Simulation Conference Proceedings. Environmental Testing: The Path Forward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    Topics covered include: A Multifunctional Space Environment Simulation Facility for Accelerated Spacecraft Materials Testing; Exposure of Spacecraft Surface Coatings in a Simulated GEO Radiation Environment; Gravity-Offloading System for Large-Displacement Ground Testing of Spacecraft Mechanisms; Microscopic Shutters Controlled by cRIO in Sounding Rocket; Application of a Physics-Based Stabilization Criterion to Flight System Thermal Testing; Upgrade of a Thermal Vacuum Chamber for 20 Kelvin Operations; A New Approach to Improve the Uniformity of Solar Simulator; A Perfect Space Simulation Storm; A Planetary Environmental Simulator/Test Facility; Collimation Mirror Segment Refurbishment inside ESA s Large Space; Space Simulation of the CBERS 3 and 4 Satellite Thermal Model in the New Brazilian 6x8m Thermal Vacuum Chamber; The Certification of Environmental Chambers for Testing Flight Hardware; Space Systems Environmental Test Facility Database (SSETFD), Website Development Status; Wallops Flight Facility: Current and Future Test Capabilities for Suborbital and Orbital Projects; Force Limited Vibration Testing of JWST NIRSpec Instrument Using Strain Gages; Investigation of Acoustic Field Uniformity in Direct Field Acoustic Testing; Recent Developments in Direct Field Acoustic Testing; Assembly, Integration and Test Centre in Malaysia: Integration between Building Construction Works and Equipment Installation; Complex Ground Support Equipment for Satellite Thermal Vacuum Test; Effect of Charging Electron Exposure on 1064nm Transmission through Bare Sapphire Optics and SiO2 over HfO2 AR-Coated Sapphire Optics; Environmental Testing Activities and Capabilities for Turkish Space Industry; Integrated Circuit Reliability Simulation in Space Environments; Micrometeoroid Impacts and Optical Scatter in Space Environment; Overcoming Unintended Consequences of Ambient Pressure Thermal Cycling Environmental Tests; Performance and Functionality Improvements to Next Generation

  15. A Coordinated Initialization Process for the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert; Dexter, Dan; Hasan, David; Crues, Edwin Z.

    2007-01-01

    This document describes the federate initialization process that was developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center with the HIIA Transfer Vehicle Flight Controller Trainer (HTV FCT) simulations and refined in the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES). These simulations use the High Level Architecture (HLA) IEEE 1516 to provide the communication and coordination between the distributed parts of the simulation. The purpose of the paper is to describe a generic initialization sequence that can be used to create a federate that can: 1. Properly initialize all HLA objects, object instances, interactions, and time management 2. Check for the presence of all federates 3. Coordinate startup with other federates 4. Robustly initialize and share initial object instance data with other federates.

  16. An IBM PC-based math model for space station solar array simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    This report discusses and documents the design, development, and verification of a microcomputer-based solar cell math model for simulating the Space Station's solar array Initial Operational Capability (IOC) reference configuration. The array model is developed utilizing a linear solar cell dc math model requiring only five input parameters: short circuit current, open circuit voltage, maximum power voltage, maximum power current, and orbit inclination. The accuracy of this model is investigated using actual solar array on orbit electrical data derived from the Solar Array Flight Experiment/Dynamic Augmentation Experiment (SAFE/DAE), conducted during the STS-41D mission. This simulator provides real-time simulated performance data during the steady state portion of the Space Station orbit (i.e., array fully exposed to sunlight). Eclipse to sunlight transients and shadowing effects are not included in the analysis, but are discussed briefly. Integrating the Solar Array Simulator (SAS) into the Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) subsystem is also discussed.

  17. Designing a Distributed Space Systems Simulation in Accordance with the Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization (SISO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowen, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Simulations are essential for engineering design. These virtual realities provide characteristic data to scientists and engineers in order to understand the details and complications of the desired mission. A standard development simulation package known as Trick is used in developing a source code to model a component (federate in HLA terms). The runtime executive is integrated into an HLA based distributed simulation. TrickHLA is used to extend a Trick simulation for a federation execution, develop a source code for communication between federates, as well as foster data input and output. The project incorporates international cooperation along with team collaboration. Interactions among federates occur throughout the simulation, thereby relying on simulation interoperability. Communication through the semester went on between participants to figure out how to create this data exchange. The NASA intern team is designing a Lunar Rover federate and a Lunar Shuttle federate. The Lunar Rover federate supports transportation across the lunar surface and is essential for fostering interactions with other federates on the lunar surface (Lunar Shuttle, Lunar Base Supply Depot and Mobile ISRU Plant) as well as transporting materials to the desired locations. The Lunar Shuttle federate transports materials to and from lunar orbit. Materials that it takes to the supply depot include fuel and cargo necessary to continue moon-base operations. This project analyzes modeling and simulation technologies as well as simulation interoperability. Each team from participating universities will work on and engineer their own federate(s) to participate in the SISO Spring 2011 Workshop SIW Smackdown in Boston, Massachusetts. This paper will focus on the Lunar Rover federate.

  18. Concept verification of three dimensional free motion simulator for space robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Osamu; Nakaya, Teruomi; Pokines, Brett

    1994-01-01

    In the development of automatic assembling technologies for space structures, it is an indispensable matter to investigate and simulate the movements of robot satellites concerned with mission operation. The movement investigation and simulation on the ground will be effectively realized by a free motion simulator. Various types of ground systems for simulating free motion have been proposed and utilized. Some of these methods are a neutral buoyancy system, an air or magnetic suspension system, a passive suspension balance system, and a free flying aircraft or drop tower system. In addition, systems can be simulated by computers using an analytical model. Each free motion simulation method has limitations and well known problems, specifically, disturbance by water viscosity, limited number of degrees-of-freedom, complex dynamics induced by the attachment of the simulation system, short experiment time, and the lack of high speed super-computer simulation systems, respectively. The basic idea presented here is to realize 3-dimensional free motion. This is achieved by combining a spherical air bearing, a cylindrical air bearing, and a flat air bearing. A conventional air bearing system has difficulty realizing free vertical motion suspension. The idea of free vertical suspension is that a cylindrical air bearing and counter balance weight realize vertical free motion. This paper presents a design concept, configuration, and basic performance characteristics of an innovative free motion simulator. A prototype simulator verifies the feasibility of 3-dimensional free motion simulation.

  19. The simulated hospital environment: a qualitative study applying space industry techniques.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Constance J; Binder, Brenda K; Lyon, Karen C; Montgomery, Diane; Koci, Anne; Foster, William A

    2015-01-01

    Patterned after the integrated simulation approach utilized in the space industry, we report results of an innovative simulation in nursing, a 96-hour continuous simulated hospital environment. Training objectives for our study emphasized the integrative and critical thinking skills needed by new graduate nurses. The purpose of this study was to determine the process for development and the experience of participating in a simulated hospital environment. We sought to (a) translate space industry-integrated simulation techniques into development of a simulated hospital environment and (b) determine the experience of participating in an integrated simulation experience among undergraduate (UG) and graduate nursing students and nursing faculty. We used a qualitative mixed-methods design. Data were collected from participant focus groups, debriefing sessions, research team field notes, and electronic health record documentation. The sample, 72 student focus group participants, consisted of 12 baccalaureate-level soon-to-graduate students and 60 graduate nurse practitioner students as patient actors and providers. Important themes emerged from the project. We were able to design a simulated hospital environment that was true to life. Notably, student knowledge-practice gap was a major theme of the study, consistent with studies of employer concerns of new graduate nurses.

  20. The simulated hospital environment: a qualitative study applying space industry techniques.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Constance J; Binder, Brenda K; Lyon, Karen C; Montgomery, Diane; Koci, Anne; Foster, William A

    2015-01-01

    Patterned after the integrated simulation approach utilized in the space industry, we report results of an innovative simulation in nursing, a 96-hour continuous simulated hospital environment. Training objectives for our study emphasized the integrative and critical thinking skills needed by new graduate nurses. The purpose of this study was to determine the process for development and the experience of participating in a simulated hospital environment. We sought to (a) translate space industry-integrated simulation techniques into development of a simulated hospital environment and (b) determine the experience of participating in an integrated simulation experience among undergraduate (UG) and graduate nursing students and nursing faculty. We used a qualitative mixed-methods design. Data were collected from participant focus groups, debriefing sessions, research team field notes, and electronic health record documentation. The sample, 72 student focus group participants, consisted of 12 baccalaureate-level soon-to-graduate students and 60 graduate nurse practitioner students as patient actors and providers. Important themes emerged from the project. We were able to design a simulated hospital environment that was true to life. Notably, student knowledge-practice gap was a major theme of the study, consistent with studies of employer concerns of new graduate nurses. PMID:25601242

  1. Apu/hydraulic/actuator Subsystem Computer Simulation. Space Shuttle Engineering and Operation Support, Engineering Systems Analysis. [for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Major developments are examined which have taken place to date in the analysis of the power and energy demands on the APU/Hydraulic/Actuator Subsystem for space shuttle during the entry-to-touchdown (not including rollout) flight regime. These developments are given in the form of two subroutines which were written for use with the Space Shuttle Functional Simulator. The first subroutine calculates the power and energy demand on each of the three hydraulic systems due to control surface (inboard/outboard elevons, rudder, speedbrake, and body flap) activity. The second subroutine incorporates the R. I. priority rate limiting logic which limits control surface deflection rates as a function of the number of failed hydraulic. Typical results of this analysis are included, and listings of the subroutines are presented in appendicies.

  2. Object oriented Simulation of Maintenance and Operations for Space Systems (OSMOSSYS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doran, Linda; Nguyen, Vien; Nguyen, Judy; Blumentritt, Will

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the NASA/JSC Research Technology Opportunity Program (RTOP) activity to assess the supportability of space systems throughout their life cycles. Supportability analyses for space systems present unique attributes and problems. The OSMOSSYS (Object oriented Simulation of Maintenance and Operations for Space Systems) was developed using object-oriented design concepts to provide NASA an analysis tool which addresses the question `Will a proposed space facility be able to successfully perform the missions for which it is designed?' This model integrates the complete configuration of the system including the reliability and maintainability characteristics of each component, the logistics support, and the mission operations of the facility to assess the success rate of the planned mission(s). Two parallel design processes are being utilized; developing core modules utilizing C++, and incorporating as much code and ideas as possible from existing NASA models. The space station was used as a test case to demonstrate the applicability of the model.

  3. Characterization of a lower-body exoskeleton for simulation of space-suited locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Christopher E.; Newman, Dava J.

    2008-02-01

    In a previous analysis of suited and unsuited locomotion energetics, we found evidence that space suits act as springs during running. Video images from the lunar surface suggest that knee torques create, in large part, this spring effect. We hypothesized that a lower-body exoskeleton, properly constructed, could be used to simulate the knee torques of a range of space suits. Here we report characterization of a lower-body exoskeleton. Equivalent spring stiffness of each exoskeleton leg varies as a function of exoskeleton knee angle and load, and the exoskeleton joint-torque relationship closely matches the current NASA space suit, or Extravehicular Mobility Unit, knee torques in form and magnitude. We have built an exoskeleton with two physical non-linear springs, which achieve space-suit like joint-torques. Therefore space-suit legs act as springs, with this effect most pronounced when locomotion requires large changes in knee flexion such as during running.

  4. Longevity of Paramecium Cell Clone under Microgravity in Space: Hypergravity Experiment as a Ground Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Y.; Mogami, Y.; Baba, S. A.

    We proposed a space experiment aboard International Space Station to explore the effects of the stay under microgravity on the longevity of Paramecium cell clone (Mogami et al., 1999, Adv. Space Res., 23/12, 2087-2090). Former space experiments in CYTOS and Space Lab D-1 demonstrated that Paramecium proliferated faster in space. In combination with the fact that aging process in Paramecium is largely related to the fission age, the results of the proliferation experiment in space may predict that the longevity of Paramecium decreases when measured by clock time. As a ground simulation of the space experiment, we made an experiment to assess the aging process under hypergravity, which is known to reduce the proliferation rate. As a result, the length of autogamy immaturity increased when measured by clock time, whereas it remained unchanged by fission age (Kato et al., 2003, Zool. Sci., 1373-1380). It is therefore expected that autogamy immaturity in the measure of the clock time would be shortened under microgravity. Since the length of clonal life span of Paramecium is related to the length of autogamy immaturity, the result of hypergravity experiment may support the prediction above; i.e. a decrease in the clonal longevity of Paramecium under microgravity in space.

  5. High temperature antenna development for space shuttle, volume 2. [space environment simulation effects on antenna radiation patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    An S-band antenna system and a group of off-the-shelf aircraft antenna were exposed to temperatures simulating shuttle orbital cold soak and entry heating. Radiation pattern and impedance measurements before and after exposure to the thermal environments were used to evaluate the electrical performance. The results of the electrical and thermal testing are given. Test data showed minor changes in electrical performance and established the capability of these antenna to withstand both the low temperatures of space flight and the high temperatures of entry.

  6. NASA Virtual Glovebox (VBX): Emerging Simulation Technology for Space Station Experiment Design, Development, Training and Troubleshooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey D.; Twombly, I. Alexander; Maese, A. Christopher; Cagle, Yvonne; Boyle, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The International Space Station demonstrates the greatest capabilities of human ingenuity, international cooperation and technology development. The complexity of this space structure is unprecedented; and training astronaut crews to maintain all its systems, as well as perform a multitude of research experiments, requires the most advanced training tools and techniques. Computer simulation and virtual environments are currently used by astronauts to train for robotic arm manipulations and extravehicular activities; but now, with the latest computer technologies and recent successes in areas of medical simulation, the capability exists to train astronauts for more hands-on research tasks using immersive virtual environments. We have developed a new technology, the Virtual Glovebox (VGX), for simulation of experimental tasks that astronauts will perform aboard the Space Station. The VGX may also be used by crew support teams for design of experiments, testing equipment integration capability and optimizing the procedures astronauts will use. This is done through the 3D, desk-top sized, reach-in virtual environment that can simulate the microgravity environment in space. Additional features of the VGX allow for networking multiple users over the internet and operation of tele-robotic devices through an intuitive user interface. Although the system was developed for astronaut training and assisting support crews, Earth-bound applications, many emphasizing homeland security, have also been identified. Examples include training experts to handle hazardous biological and/or chemical agents in a safe simulation, operation of tele-robotic systems for assessing and diffusing threats such as bombs, and providing remote medical assistance to field personnel through a collaborative virtual environment. Thus, the emerging VGX simulation technology, while developed for space- based applications, can serve a dual use facilitating homeland security here on Earth.

  7. Being an "Agent Provocateur": Utilising Online Spaces for Teacher Professional Development in Virtual Simulation Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deNoyelles, Aimee; Raider-Roth, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    This article details the results of an action research study which investigated how teachers used online learning community spaces to develop and support their teaching and learning of the Jewish Court of All Time (JCAT), a web-mediated, character-playing, simulation game that engages participants with social, historical and cultural curricula.…

  8. Applying simulation model to uniform field space charge distribution measurements by the PEA method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Salama, M.M.A.

    1996-12-31

    Signals measured under uniform fields by the Pulsed Electroacoustic (PEA) method have been processed by the deconvolution procedure to obtain space charge distributions since 1988. To simplify data processing, a direct method has been proposed recently in which the deconvolution is eliminated. However, the surface charge cannot be represented well by the method because the surface charge has a bandwidth being from zero to infinity. The bandwidth of the charge distribution must be much narrower than the bandwidths of the PEA system transfer function in order to apply the direct method properly. When surface charges can not be distinguished from space charge distributions, the accuracy and the resolution of the obtained space charge distributions decrease. To overcome this difficulty a simulation model is therefore proposed. This paper shows their attempts to apply the simulation model to obtain space charge distributions under plane-plane electrode configurations. Due to the page limitation for the paper, the charge distribution originated by the simulation model is compared to that obtained by the direct method with a set of simulated signals.

  9. Preparation, control, and use of standard operating procedures in a space simulation laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parish, R. P., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The degree of success in the operation of a space simulation laboratory is a direct function of the role of its standard operating procedures. Their proper use in a thermal vacuum test effects a wellrun test program. Preparation and procedure control are discussed.

  10. Computer-Based Space Shuttle Simulation Teaches Children about the Sciences and Themselves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Barbara J.

    The space shuttle simulation, Totally Enclosed Modular Environment (TEME), was developed as a means for students to study group dynamics and how people adapt to their environment. This paper highlights features of this project. Topics reviewed include: (1) its historical development (tracing its origins as a year-long ecology course to current…

  11. Better Space Construction Decisions by Instructional Program Simulation Utilizing the Generalized Academic Simulation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apker, Wesley

    This school district utilized the generalized academic simulation programs (GASP) to assist in making decisions regarding the kinds of facilities that should be constructed at Pilchuck Senior High School. Modular scheduling was one of the basic educational parameters used in determining the number and type of facilities needed. The objectives of…

  12. Complex System for Ground-Based and Accelerated Simulation of Six Extremal Space Factors (KIFK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraimov, V. V.; Kolybaev, L. K.; Verkhovtseva, E. T.; Nekludov, I. M.; Rybalko, V. F.; Borts, B. V.

    This work was aimed at 1. Development and construction of a complex SF simulator for simultaneous and accelerated simulation of six SF (unparalleled in the GUS and ESA countries): artificial Sun radiation (200..2500 nm) + VUV radiation (5..200 nm) + proton (p+) and electron (e-) radiation (50..200 keV) + vacuum (10-6 Torr) + thermocycling (4.2..400 K). 2.Development of new physical techniques of accelerated laboratory simulation of the basic space factors adequate to natural factors influencing materials, components, units and scale models of spacecraft. In our opinion, this work solves a number of topical problems of ground-based simulation of space factors. 1.Simultaneous impact of six SF on spacecraft materials and models. 2.Simulation of the complete electromagnetic solar radiation (including VUV) spectrum in the wavelength range 5..2500 nm. 3.Accelerated simulation of the electron and proton flows of the Earth's radiation belts (the energy 50..200 keV, intensity 1012 particle/cm2s), i.e. with the acceleration coefficient 500..1000. 4.Accelerated simulation of the VUV component of the Sun's spectrum with the maximum intensity 3000 erg/cm2s) (i.e., the acceleration coefficient 300) 5.Simultaneous thermocycling of test objects in a wide range of temperatures 4.2..400 K in the vacuum of 10-6 Torr.

  13. Simulation of the Effect of Realistic Space Vehicle Environments on Binary Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; Poirier, D. R.; Heinrich, J. C.; Sung, P. K.; Felicelli, S. D.; Phelps, Lisa (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Simulations that assess the effect of space vehicle acceleration environments on the solidification of Pb-Sb alloys are reported. Space microgravity missions are designed to provide a near zero-g acceleration environment for various types of scientific experiments. Realistically. these space missions cannot provide a perfect environment. Vibrations caused by crew activity, on-board experiments, support systems stems (pumps, fans, etc.), periodic orbital maneuvers, and water dumps can all cause perturbations to the microgravity environment. In addition, the drag on the space vehicle is a source of acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the impact of these vibration-perturbations and the steady-state drag acceleration on the experiments. These predictions can be used to design mission timelines. so that the experiment is run during times that the impact of the acceleration environment is acceptable for the experiment of interest. The simulations reported herein were conducted using a finite element model that includes mass, species, momentum, and energy conservation. This model predicts the existence of "channels" within the processing mushy zone and subsequently "freckles" within the fully processed solid, which are the effects of thermosolutal convection. It is necessary to mitigate thermosolutal convection during space experiments of metal alloys, in order to study and characterize diffusion-controlled transport phenomena (microsegregation) that are normally coupled with macrosegregation. The model allows simulation of steady-state and transient acceleration values ranging from no acceleration (0 g). to microgravity conditions (10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3) g), to terrestrial gravity conditions (1 g). The transient acceleration environments simulated were from the STS-89 SpaceHAB mission and from the STS-94 SpaceLAB mission. with on-orbit accelerometer data during different mission periods used as inputs for the simulation model. Periods of crew exercise

  14. The study on the image quality of varied line spacing plane grating by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shouqiang; Zhang, Weiping; Liu, Lei; Yang, Qingyi

    2014-11-01

    Varied line spacing plane gratings have the features of self-focusing , aberration-reduced and easy manufacturing ,which are widely applied in synchrotron radiation, plasma physics and space astronomy, and other fields. In the study of diffracting imaging , the optical path function is expanded into maclaurin series, aberrations are expressed by the coefficient of series, most of the aberration coefficients are similar and the category is more, can't directly reflects image quality in whole. The paper will study on diffraction imaging of the varied line spacing plane gratings by using computer simulation technology, for a method judging the image quality visibly. In this paper, light beam from some object points on the same object plane are analyzed and simulated by ray trace method , the evaluation function is set up, which can fully scale the image quality. In addition, based on the evaluation function, the best image plane is found by search algorithm .

  15. A Laboratory Simulation of Solar Wind Space Weathering for Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrove, Kelsey; Smith, C. W.; Campins, H.; Britt, D.

    2009-12-01

    A significant, yet unanswered, question in the area of Near-Earth-Asteroid research is the effect solar wind has on the surface characteristics of these bodies. It would benefit the scientific community to better understand space weathering as it is important for all remote sensing studies of asteroid surfaces (Clark et al. 2002). We propose to replicate the electron component of our sun's solar wind on samples of ordinary chondrite meteorites using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Simulating the flux of charged particles (electrons) an asteroid at one astronomical unit (1 AU) would receive, we will use a range of time-scales and characterize any effects because rates of space weathering, at this time, are poorly understood. To characterize any changes in optical properties, and chemical or mineralogical structure, the meteorite samples will be tested spectrally and optically before and after the solar wind space weathering simulation.

  16. Multiple-body simulation with emphasis on integrated Space Shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Ing-Tsau

    1993-01-01

    The program to obtain intergrid communications - Pegasus - was enhanced to make better use of computing resources. Periodic block tridiagonal and penta-diagonal diagonal routines in OVERFLOW were modified to use a better algorithm to speed up the calculation for grids with periodic boundary conditions. Several programs were added to collar grid tools and a user friendly shell script was developed to help users generate collar grids. User interface for HYPGEN was modified to cope with the changes in HYPGEN. ET/SRB attach hardware grids were added to the computational model for the space shuttle and is currently incorporated into the refined shuttle model jointly developed at Johnson Space Center and Ames Research Center. Flow simulation for the integrated space shuttle vehicle at flight Reynolds number was carried out and compared with flight data as well as the earlier simulation for wind tunnel Reynolds number.

  17. CFD Simulation of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle with Booster Separation Motor and Reaction Control Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gea, L. M.; Vicker, D.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate a very complicated flow field encountered during the space shuttle ascent. The flow field features nozzle plumes from booster separation motor (BSM) and reaction control system (RCS) jets with a supersonic incoming cross flow at speed of Mach 4. The overset Navier-Stokes code OVERFLOW, was used to simulate the flow field surrounding the entire space shuttle launch vehicle (SSLV) with high geometric fidelity. The variable gamma option was chosen due to the high temperature nature of nozzle flows and different plume species. CFD predicted Mach contours are in good agreement with the schlieren photos from wind tunnel test. Flow fields are discussed in detail and the results are used to support the debris analysis for the space shuttle Return To Flight (RTF) task.

  18. Instrumentation for Ground-Based Testing in Simulated Space and Planetary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiman, Jacob; Horodetsky, Sergey; Issoupov, Vitali

    This paper is an overview of instrumentation developed and created by ITL Inc. for simulated testing and performance evaluation of spacecraft materials, structures, mechanisms, assemblies and components in different space and planetary environments. The LEO Space Environment Simulator allows simulation of the synergistic effect of ultra-high vacuum conditions, 5 eV neutral atomic oxygen beams, Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) and Near-Ultraviolet (NUV) radiation, and temperature conditions. The simulated space environmental conditions can be controlled in-situ using a quadruple mass-spectrometer, Time-of-Flight technique, as well as Quartz Crystal Microbalance sensors. The new NUV System is capable of delivering an NUV power intensity of up to 10 Equivalent Suns. The design of the system uses horizontal orientation of the 5 kW Mercury lamp, focusing of NUV radiation is achieved due to a parabolic reflector. To address the Lunar/Martian surface environments, the Planetary Environmental Simulator/Test Facility has been developed and built to allow for physical evaluation of the effects of the Lunar/Martian dust environments in conjunction with other factors (ultra-high vacuum or planetary atmospheric conditions, VUV/NUV radiation, thermal cycling, and darkness). The ASTM E 595/ASTM E 1559 Outgassing Test Facility provides the means for the outgassing test of materials with the objective to select materials with low outgassing properties for spacecraft use and allows to determine the following outgassing parameters: Total Mass Loss, Collected Volatile Condensable Materials, and Water Vapor Regained.

  19. LABORATORY TESTING TO SIMULATE VAPOR SPACE CORROSION IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Gray, J.

    2013-08-30

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 70 years at the Hanford nuclear facility. Vapor space corrosion of the tank walls has emerged as an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of these tanks. The interaction between corrosive and inhibitor species in condensates/supernates on the tank wall above the liquid level, and their interaction with vapor phase constituents as the liquid evaporates from the tank wall influences the formation of corrosion products and the corrosion of the carbon steel. An effort is underway to gain an understanding of the mechanism of vapor space corrosion. Localized corrosion, in the form of pitting, is of particular interest in the vapor space. CPP testing was utilized to determine the susceptibility of the steel in a simulated vapor space environment. The tests also investigated the impact of ammonia gas in the vapor space area on the corrosion of the steel. Vapor space coupon tests were also performed to investigate the evolution of the corrosion products during longer term exposures. These tests were also conducted at vapor space ammonia levels of 50 and 550 ppm NH{sub 3} (0.005, and 0.055 vol.%) in air. Ammonia was shown to mitigate vapor space corrosion.

  20. General purpose simulation system of the data management system for Space Shuttle mission 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bengtson, N. M.; Mellichamp, J. M.; Smith, O. C.

    1976-01-01

    A simulation program for the flow of data through the Data Management System of Spacelab and Space Shuttle was presented. The science, engineering, command and guidance, navigation and control data were included. The programming language used was General Purpose Simulation System V (OS). The science and engineering data flow was modeled from its origin at the experiments and subsystems to transmission from Space Shuttle. Command data flow was modeled from the point of reception onboard and from the CDMS Control Panel to the experiments and subsystems. The GN&C data flow model handled data between the General Purpose Computer and the experiments and subsystems. Mission 18 was the particular flight chosen for simulation. The general structure of the program is presented, followed by a user's manual. Input data required to make runs are discussed followed by identification of the output statistics. The appendices contain a detailed model configuration, program listing and results.

  1. Simulations of the MATROSHKA experiment at the international space station using PHITS.

    PubMed

    Sihver, L; Sato, T; Puchalska, M; Reitz, G

    2010-08-01

    Concerns about the biological effects of space radiation are increasing rapidly due to the perspective of long-duration manned missions, both in relation to the International Space Station (ISS) and to manned interplanetary missions to Moon and Mars in the future. As a preparation for these long-duration space missions, it is important to ensure an excellent capability to evaluate the impact of space radiation on human health, in order to secure the safety of the astronauts/cosmonauts and minimize their risks. It is therefore necessary to measure the radiation load on the personnel both inside and outside the space vehicles and certify that organ- and tissue-equivalent doses can be simulated as accurate as possible. In this paper, simulations are presented using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS) (Iwase et al. in J Nucl Sci Tech 39(11):1142-1151, 2002) of long-term dose measurements performed with the European Space Agency-supported MATROSHKA (MTR) experiment (Reitz and Berger in Radiat Prot Dosim 120:442-445, 2006). MATROSHKA is an anthropomorphic phantom containing over 6,000 radiation detectors, mimicking a human head and torso. The MTR experiment, led by the German Aerospace Center (DLR), was launched in January 2004 and has measured the absorbed doses from space radiation both inside and outside the ISS. Comparisons of simulations with measurements outside the ISS are presented. The results indicate that PHITS is a suitable tool for estimation of doses received from cosmic radiation and for study of the shielding of spacecraft against cosmic radiation. PMID:20496176

  2. Simulations of the MATROSHKA experiment at the international space station using PHITS.

    PubMed

    Sihver, L; Sato, T; Puchalska, M; Reitz, G

    2010-08-01

    Concerns about the biological effects of space radiation are increasing rapidly due to the perspective of long-duration manned missions, both in relation to the International Space Station (ISS) and to manned interplanetary missions to Moon and Mars in the future. As a preparation for these long-duration space missions, it is important to ensure an excellent capability to evaluate the impact of space radiation on human health, in order to secure the safety of the astronauts/cosmonauts and minimize their risks. It is therefore necessary to measure the radiation load on the personnel both inside and outside the space vehicles and certify that organ- and tissue-equivalent doses can be simulated as accurate as possible. In this paper, simulations are presented using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS) (Iwase et al. in J Nucl Sci Tech 39(11):1142-1151, 2002) of long-term dose measurements performed with the European Space Agency-supported MATROSHKA (MTR) experiment (Reitz and Berger in Radiat Prot Dosim 120:442-445, 2006). MATROSHKA is an anthropomorphic phantom containing over 6,000 radiation detectors, mimicking a human head and torso. The MTR experiment, led by the German Aerospace Center (DLR), was launched in January 2004 and has measured the absorbed doses from space radiation both inside and outside the ISS. Comparisons of simulations with measurements outside the ISS are presented. The results indicate that PHITS is a suitable tool for estimation of doses received from cosmic radiation and for study of the shielding of spacecraft against cosmic radiation.

  3. Sun-, Earth- and Moon-integrated simulation ray tracing for observation from space using ASAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breault, Robert P.; Kim, Sug-Whan; Yang, Seul-Ki; Ryu, Dongok

    2014-09-01

    The Space Optics Laboratory at Yonsei University, Korea, in cooperation with Breault Research Organization (BRO) in Tucson, Arizona, have invested significant research and development efforts into creating large scale ray tracing techniques for simulating "reflected" light from the earth with an artificial satellite. This presentation describes a complex model that combines the sun, the earth and an orbiting optical instrument combined into a real scale nonsequential ray tracing computation using BRO's Advanced Systems Analysis Program, ASAP®. The Sun is simulated as a spherically emitting light source of 695,500 km in diameter. The earth also is simulated as a sphere with its characteristics defined as target objects to be observed and defined with appropriate optical properties. They include the atmosphere, land and ocean elements, each having distinctive optical properties expressed by single or combined characteristics of refraction, reflection and scattering. The current embodiment has an atmospheric model consisting of 33 optical layers, a land model with 6 different albedos and the ocean simulated with sun glint characteristics. A space-based optical instrument, with an actual opto-mechanical prescription, is defined in an orbit of several hundreds to thousands of miles in altitude above the earth's surface. The model allows for almost simultaneous evaluations of the imaging and radiometric performances of the instrument. Several real-life application results are reported suggesting that this simulation approach not only provides valuable information that can greatly improve the space optical instrument performance but also provides a simulation tool for scientists to evaluate all phases of a space mission.

  4. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator: MSFC-Langley joint test of large space structures component assembly:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA and MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  5. Nonlinear biasing and redshift-space distortions in Lagrangian resummation theory and N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masanori; Matsubara, Takahiko

    2011-08-01

    Understanding a behavior of galaxy biasing is crucial for future galaxy redshift surveys. One aim is to measure the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) within the precision of a few percent level. Using 30 large cosmological N-body simulations for a standard ΛCDM cosmology, we study the halo biasing over a wide redshift range. We compare the simulation results with theoretical predictions proposed by Matsubara [T. Matsubara, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 78, 083519 (2008).10.1103/PhysRevD.78.083519] which naturally incorporate the halo bias and redshift-space distortions into their formalism of perturbation theory with a resummation technique via the Lagrangian picture. The power spectrum and correlation function of halos obtained from Lagrangian resummation theory (LRT) well agree with N-body simulation results on scales of BAOs. Especially nonlinear effects on the baryon acoustic peak of the halo correlation function are accurately explained both in real and redshift space. We find that nonlinearity and scale dependence of bias are fairly well reproduced by 1-loop LRT up to k=0.35hMpc-1 (z=2 and 3) within a few percent level in real space and up to k=0.1hMpc-1 (z=2) and 0.15hMpc-1 (z=3) in redshift space. Thus, the LRT is very powerful for accurately extracting cosmological information in upcoming high redshift BAO surveys.

  6. An expert system for simulating electric loads aboard Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukich, George; Dolce, James L.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station Freedom will provide an infrastructure for space experimentation. This environment will feature regulated access to any resources required by an experiment. Automated systems are being developed to manage the electric power so that researchers can have the flexibility to modify their experiment plan for contingencies or for new opportunities. To define these flexible power management characteristics for Space Station Freedom, a simulation is required that captures the dynamic nature of space experimentation; namely, an investigator is allowed to restructure his experiment and to modify its execution. This changes the energy demands for the investigator's range of options. An expert system competent in the domain of cryogenic fluid management experimentation, was developed. It will be used to help design and test automated power scheduling software for Freedom's electric power system. The expert system allows experiment planning and experiment simulation. The former evaluates experimental alternatives and offers advice on the details of the experiment's design. The latter provides a real-time simulation of the experiment replete with appropriate resource consumption.

  7. An expert system for simulating electric loads aboard Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukich, George; Dolce, James L.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station Freedom will provide an infrastructure for space experimentation. This environment will feature regulated access to any resources required by an experiment. Automated systems are being developed to manage the electric power so that researchers can have the flexibility to modify their experiment plan for contingencies or for new opportunities. To define these flexible power management characteristics for Space Station Freedom, a simulation is required that captures the dynamic nature of space experimentation; namely, an investigator is allowed to restructure his experiment and to modify its execution. This changes the energy demands for the investigator's range of options. An expert system competent in the domain of cryogenic fluid management experimentation was developed. It will be used to help design and test automated power scheduling software for Freedom's electric power system. The expert system allows experiment planning and experiment simulation. The former evaluates experimental alternatives and offers advice on the details of the experiment's design. The latter provides a real-time simulation of the experiment replete with appropriate resource consumption.

  8. Space station Simulation Computer System (SCS) study for NASA/MSFC. Volume 1: Overview and summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA's Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) planning efforts have identified a need for a payload training simulator system to serve as both a training facility and as a demonstrator to validate operational concepts. The envisioned Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Payload Training Complex (PTC) required to meet this need will train the space station payload scientists, station scientists, and ground controllers to operate the wide variety of experiments that will be onboard the Space Station Freedom. The Simulation Computer System (SCS) is the computer hardware, software, and workstations that will support the Payload Training Complex at MSFC. The purpose of this SCS study is to investigate issues related to the SCS, alternative requirements, simulator approaches, and state-of-the-art technologies to develop candidate concepts and designs. This study was performed August 1988 to October 1989. Thus, the results are based on the SSFP August 1989 baseline, i.e., pre-Langley configuration/budget review (C/BR) baseline. Some terms, e.g., combined trainer, are being redefined. An overview of the study activities and a summary of study results are given here.

  9. Proximity Operations for Space Situational Awareness Spacecraft Rendezvous and Maneuvering using Numerical Simulations and Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, T.; Langster, T.; Carrico, J.; Alfano, S.; Loucks, M.; Vallado, D.

    The authors present several spacecraft rendezvous and close proximity maneuvering techniques modeled with a high-precision numerical integrator using full force models and closed loop control with a Fuzzy Logic intelligent controller to command the engines. The authors document and compare the maneuvers, fuel use, and other parameters. This paper presents an innovative application of an existing capability to design, simulate and analyze proximity maneuvers; already in use for operational satellites performing other maneuvers. The system has been extended to demonstrate the capability to develop closed loop control laws to maneuver spacecraft in close proximity to another, including stand-off, docking, lunar landing and other operations applicable to space situational awareness, space based surveillance, and operational satellite modeling. The fully integrated end-to-end trajectory ephemerides are available from the authors in electronic ASCII text by request. The benefits of this system include: A realistic physics-based simulation for the development and validation of control laws A collaborative engineering environment for the design, development and tuning of spacecraft law parameters, sizing actuators (i.e., rocket engines), and sensor suite selection. An accurate simulation and visualization to communicate the complexity, criticality, and risk of spacecraft operations. A precise mathematical environment for research and development of future spacecraft maneuvering engineering tasks, operational planning and forensic analysis. A closed loop, knowledge-based control example for proximity operations. This proximity operations modeling and simulation environment will provide a valuable adjunct to programs in military space control, space situational awareness and civil space exploration engineering and decision making processes.

  10. Simulations of the observation of clouds and aerosols with the Experimental Lidar in Space Equipment system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Voelger, P; Sugimoto, N

    2000-06-20

    We carried out a simulation study for the observation of clouds and aerosols with the Japanese Experimental Lidar in Space Equipment (ELISE), which is a two-wavelength backscatter lidar with three detection channels. The National Space Development Agency of Japan plans to launch the ELISE on the Mission Demonstrate Satellite 2 (MDS-2). In the simulations, the lidar return signals for the ELISE are calculated for an artificial, two-dimensional atmospheric model including different types of clouds and aerosols. The signal detection processes are simulated realistically by inclusion of various sources of noise. The lidar signals that are generated are then used as input for simulations of data analysis with inversion algorithms to investigate retrieval of the optical properties of clouds and aerosols. The results demonstrate that the ELISE can provide global data on the structures and optical properties of clouds and aerosols. We also conducted an analysis of the effects of cloud inhomogeneity on retrievals from averaged lidar profiles. We show that the effects are significant for space lidar observations of optically thick broken clouds.

  11. Standard Lunar Regolith Simulants for Space Resource Utilization Technologies Development: Effects of Materials Choices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Carpenter, Paul K.

    2006-01-01

    As NASA turns its exploration ambitions towards the Moon once again, the research and development of new technologies for lunar operations face the challenge of meeting the milestones of a fastpace schedule, reminiscent of the 1960's Apollo program. While the lunar samples returned by the Apollo and Luna missions have revealed much about the Moon, these priceless materials exist in too scarce quantities to be used for technology development and testing. The need for mineral materials chosen to simulate the characteristics of lunar regoliths is a pressing issue that is being addressed today through the collaboration of scientists, engineers and NASA program managers. The issue of reproducing the properties of lunar regolith for research and technology development purposes was addressed by the recently held 2005 Workshop on Lunar Regolith Simulant Materials at Marshall Space Flight Center. The recommendation of the workshop of establishing standard simulant materials to be used in lunar technology development and testing will be discussed here with an emphasis on space resource utilization. The variety of techniques and the complexity of functional interfaces make these simulant choices critical in space resource utilization.

  12. Nineteenth Space Simulation Conference Cost Effective Testing for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    The Nineteenth Space Simulation Conference was hosted by the Institute of Environmental Sciences (IES) and was supported by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). These proceedings attest to the scope of the conference; papers were presented on topics as diverse as shuttle payload contamination effects, simulating Martian environment for testing, to state-of-the-art 6-axis hydraulic shaker testing system. A good cross section of the international aerospace community took advantage of the opportunity to get together, to share their experiences, and to participate in the technical sessions. The two invited keynote speakers were Lieutenant General Malcolm O'Neill (USA, Ret.), past Director of BMDO, and Mr. Thomas Coughlin, Space Programs Manager at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Their most informative and thought provoking talks were on cost effective testing approaches in Defense Department programs for the 21st Century and what part testing plays in the faster, better, cheaper approach for the NEAR and APL programs, respectively. The preceding tutorial and the tour of the Garber Facility of the Air and Space Museum rounded out a comprehensive conference contributing to the knowledge base vital to cost effective testing for successful missions into the 21st Century.

  13. Monte Carlo simulations for the space radiation superconducting shield project (SR2S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuolo, M.; Giraudo, M.; Musenich, R.; Calvelli, V.; Ambroglini, F.; Burger, W. J.; Battiston, R.

    2016-02-01

    Astronauts on deep-space long-duration missions will be exposed for long time to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE). The exposure to space radiation could lead to both acute and late effects in the crew members and well defined countermeasures do not exist nowadays. The simplest solution given by optimized passive shielding is not able to reduce the dose deposited by GCRs below the actual dose limits, therefore other solutions, such as active shielding employing superconducting magnetic fields, are under study. In the framework of the EU FP7 SR2S Project - Space Radiation Superconducting Shield - a toroidal magnetic system based on MgB2 superconductors has been analyzed through detailed Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 interface GRAS. Spacecraft and magnets were modeled together with a simplified mechanical structure supporting the coils. Radiation transport through magnetic fields and materials was simulated for a deep-space mission scenario, considering for the first time the effect of secondary particles produced in the passage of space radiation through the active shielding and spacecraft structures. When modeling the structures supporting the active shielding systems and the habitat, the radiation protection efficiency of the magnetic field is severely decreasing compared to the one reported in previous studies, when only the magnetic field was modeled around the crew. This is due to the large production of secondary radiation taking place in the material surrounding the habitat.

  14. Monte Carlo simulations for the space radiation superconducting shield project (SR2S).

    PubMed

    Vuolo, M; Giraudo, M; Musenich, R; Calvelli, V; Ambroglini, F; Burger, W J; Battiston, R

    2016-02-01

    Astronauts on deep-space long-duration missions will be exposed for long time to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE). The exposure to space radiation could lead to both acute and late effects in the crew members and well defined countermeasures do not exist nowadays. The simplest solution given by optimized passive shielding is not able to reduce the dose deposited by GCRs below the actual dose limits, therefore other solutions, such as active shielding employing superconducting magnetic fields, are under study. In the framework of the EU FP7 SR2S Project - Space Radiation Superconducting Shield--a toroidal magnetic system based on MgB2 superconductors has been analyzed through detailed Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 interface GRAS. Spacecraft and magnets were modeled together with a simplified mechanical structure supporting the coils. Radiation transport through magnetic fields and materials was simulated for a deep-space mission scenario, considering for the first time the effect of secondary particles produced in the passage of space radiation through the active shielding and spacecraft structures. When modeling the structures supporting the active shielding systems and the habitat, the radiation protection efficiency of the magnetic field is severely decreasing compared to the one reported in previous studies, when only the magnetic field was modeled around the crew. This is due to the large production of secondary radiation taking place in the material surrounding the habitat.

  15. Monte Carlo simulations for the space radiation superconducting shield project (SR2S).

    PubMed

    Vuolo, M; Giraudo, M; Musenich, R; Calvelli, V; Ambroglini, F; Burger, W J; Battiston, R

    2016-02-01

    Astronauts on deep-space long-duration missions will be exposed for long time to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE). The exposure to space radiation could lead to both acute and late effects in the crew members and well defined countermeasures do not exist nowadays. The simplest solution given by optimized passive shielding is not able to reduce the dose deposited by GCRs below the actual dose limits, therefore other solutions, such as active shielding employing superconducting magnetic fields, are under study. In the framework of the EU FP7 SR2S Project - Space Radiation Superconducting Shield--a toroidal magnetic system based on MgB2 superconductors has been analyzed through detailed Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 interface GRAS. Spacecraft and magnets were modeled together with a simplified mechanical structure supporting the coils. Radiation transport through magnetic fields and materials was simulated for a deep-space mission scenario, considering for the first time the effect of secondary particles produced in the passage of space radiation through the active shielding and spacecraft structures. When modeling the structures supporting the active shielding systems and the habitat, the radiation protection efficiency of the magnetic field is severely decreasing compared to the one reported in previous studies, when only the magnetic field was modeled around the crew. This is due to the large production of secondary radiation taking place in the material surrounding the habitat. PMID:26948010

  16. A Strategy for Autogeneration of Space Shuttle Ground Processing Simulation Models for Project Makespan Estimations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Michael G.; Wyrick, Roberta; O'Neill, Dale E.

    2005-01-01

    Space Shuttle Processing is a complicated and highly variable project. The planning and scheduling problem, categorized as a Resource Constrained - Stochastic Project Scheduling Problem (RC-SPSP), has a great deal of variability in the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) process flow from one flight to the next. Simulation Modeling is a useful tool in estimation of the makespan of the overall process. However, simulation requires a model to be developed, which itself is a labor and time consuming effort. With such a dynamic process, often the model would potentially be out of synchronization with the actual process, limiting the applicability of the simulation answers in solving the actual estimation problem. Integration of TEAMS model enabling software with our existing schedule program software is the basis of our solution. This paper explains the approach used to develop an auto-generated simulation model from planning and schedule efforts and available data.

  17. Numerical methods for the simulation of complex multi-body flows with applications for the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.

    1992-01-01

    The following papers are presented: (1) numerical methods for the simulation of complex multi-body flows with applications for the Integrated Space Shuttle vehicle; (2) a generalized scheme for 3-D hyperbolic grid generation; (3) collar grids for intersecting geometric components within the Chimera overlapped grid scheme; and (4) application of the Chimera overlapped grid scheme to simulation of Space Shuttle ascent flows.

  18. Development of a space radiation Monte Carlo computer simulation based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, L S; Wilson, T L; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Carminati, F; Brun, R

    2001-01-01

    This NASA funded project is proceeding to develop a Monte Carlo-based computer simulation of the radiation environment in space. With actual funding only initially in place at the end of May 2000, the study is still in the early stage of development. The general tasks have been identified and personnel have been selected. The code to be assembled will be based upon two major existing software packages. The radiation transport simulation will be accomplished by updating the FLUKA Monte Carlo program, and the user interface will employ the ROOT software being developed at CERN. The end-product will be a Monte Carlo-based code which will complement the existing analytic codes such as BRYNTRN/HZETRN presently used by NASA to evaluate the effects of radiation shielding in space. The planned code will possess the ability to evaluate the radiation environment for spacecraft and habitats in Earth orbit, in interplanetary space, on the lunar surface, or on a planetary surface such as Mars. Furthermore, it will be useful in the design and analysis of experiments such as ACCESS (Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for Space Station), which is an Office of Space Science payload currently under evaluation for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS). FLUKA will be significantly improved and tailored for use in simulating space radiation in four ways. First, the additional physics not presently within the code that is necessary to simulate the problems of interest, namely the heavy ion inelastic processes, will be incorporated. Second, the internal geometry package will be replaced with one that will substantially increase the calculation speed as well as simplify the data input task. Third, default incident flux packages that include all of the different space radiation sources of interest will be included. Finally, the user interface and internal data structure will be melded together with ROOT, the object-oriented data analysis infrastructure system. Beyond

  19. Simulation of Cascaded Longitudinal-Space-Charge Amplifier at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (Fast) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cascaded Longitudinal Space Charge Amplifiers (LSCA) have been proposed as a mechanism to generate density modulation over a board spectral range. The scheme has been recently demonstrated in the optical regime and has confirmed the production of broadband optical radiation. In this paper we investigate, via numerical simulations, the performance of a cascaded LSCA beamline at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility to produce broadband ultraviolet radiation. Our studies are carried out using elegant with included tree-based grid-less space charge algorithm.

  20. Experimental Trapped-ion Quantum Simulation of the Kibble-Zurek dynamics in momentum space.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jin-Ming; Huang, Yun-Feng; Wang, Zhao; Cao, Dong-Yang; Wang, Jian; Lv, Wei-Min; Luo, Le; Del Campo, Adolfo; Han, Yong-Jian; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-01-01

    The Kibble-Zurek mechanism is the paradigm to account for the nonadiabatic dynamics of a system across a continuous phase transition. Its study in the quantum regime is hindered by the requisite of ground state cooling. We report the experimental quantum simulation of critical dynamics in the transverse-field Ising model by a set of Landau-Zener crossings in pseudo-momentum space, that can be probed with high accuracy using a single trapped ion. We test the Kibble-Zurek mechanism in the quantum regime in the momentum space and find the measured scaling of excitations is in accordance with the theoretical prediction. PMID:27633087

  1. Development of a space radiation Monte Carlo computer simulation based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, L S; Wilson, T L; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Carminati, F; Brun, R

    2001-01-01

    This NASA funded project is proceeding to develop a Monte Carlo-based computer simulation of the radiation environment in space. With actual funding only initially in place at the end of May 2000, the study is still in the early stage of development. The general tasks have been identified and personnel have been selected. The code to be assembled will be based upon two major existing software packages. The radiation transport simulation will be accomplished by updating the FLUKA Monte Carlo program, and the user interface will employ the ROOT software being developed at CERN. The end-product will be a Monte Carlo-based code which will complement the existing analytic codes such as BRYNTRN/HZETRN presently used by NASA to evaluate the effects of radiation shielding in space. The planned code will possess the ability to evaluate the radiation environment for spacecraft and habitats in Earth orbit, in interplanetary space, on the lunar surface, or on a planetary surface such as Mars. Furthermore, it will be useful in the design and analysis of experiments such as ACCESS (Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for Space Station), which is an Office of Space Science payload currently under evaluation for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS). FLUKA will be significantly improved and tailored for use in simulating space radiation in four ways. First, the additional physics not presently within the code that is necessary to simulate the problems of interest, namely the heavy ion inelastic processes, will be incorporated. Second, the internal geometry package will be replaced with one that will substantially increase the calculation speed as well as simplify the data input task. Third, default incident flux packages that include all of the different space radiation sources of interest will be included. Finally, the user interface and internal data structure will be melded together with ROOT, the object-oriented data analysis infrastructure system. Beyond

  2. Experimental Trapped-ion Quantum Simulation of the Kibble-Zurek dynamics in momentum space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jin-Ming; Huang, Yun-Feng; Wang, Zhao; Cao, Dong-Yang; Wang, Jian; Lv, Wei-Min; Luo, Le; Del Campo, Adolfo; Han, Yong-Jian; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-09-01

    The Kibble-Zurek mechanism is the paradigm to account for the nonadiabatic dynamics of a system across a continuous phase transition. Its study in the quantum regime is hindered by the requisite of ground state cooling. We report the experimental quantum simulation of critical dynamics in the transverse-field Ising model by a set of Landau-Zener crossings in pseudo-momentum space, that can be probed with high accuracy using a single trapped ion. We test the Kibble-Zurek mechanism in the quantum regime in the momentum space and find the measured scaling of excitations is in accordance with the theoretical prediction.

  3. A generic multi-flex-body dynamics, controls simulation tool for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Ken W.; Lee, John F.; Singh, Ramen P.; Schubele, Buddy

    1991-01-01

    An order (n) multiflex body Space Station simulation tool is introduced. The flex multibody modeling is generic enough to model all phases of Space Station from build up through to Assembly Complete configuration and beyond. Multibody subsystems such as the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) undergoing a prescribed translation and rotation are also allowed. The software includes aerodynamic, gravity gradient, and magnetic field models. User defined controllers can be discrete or continuous. Extensive preprocessing of 'body by body' NASTRAN flex data is built in. A significant aspect, too, is the integrated controls design capability which includes model reduction and analytic linearization.

  4. Experimental Trapped-ion Quantum Simulation of the Kibble-Zurek dynamics in momentum space

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jin-Ming; Huang, Yun-Feng; Wang, Zhao; Cao, Dong-Yang; Wang, Jian; Lv, Wei-Min; Luo, Le; del Campo, Adolfo; Han, Yong-Jian; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-01-01

    The Kibble-Zurek mechanism is the paradigm to account for the nonadiabatic dynamics of a system across a continuous phase transition. Its study in the quantum regime is hindered by the requisite of ground state cooling. We report the experimental quantum simulation of critical dynamics in the transverse-field Ising model by a set of Landau-Zener crossings in pseudo-momentum space, that can be probed with high accuracy using a single trapped ion. We test the Kibble-Zurek mechanism in the quantum regime in the momentum space and find the measured scaling of excitations is in accordance with the theoretical prediction. PMID:27633087

  5. Modeling extreme "Carrington-type" space weather events using three-dimensional global MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Glocer, Alex

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing concern over possible severe societal consequences related to adverse space weather impacts on man-made technological infrastructure. In the last two decades, significant progress has been made toward the first-principles modeling of space weather events, and three-dimensional (3-D) global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models have been at the forefront of this transition, thereby playing a critical role in advancing our understanding of space weather. However, the modeling of extreme space weather events is still a major challenge even for the modern global MHD models. In this study, we introduce a specially adapted University of Michigan 3-D global MHD model for simulating extreme space weather events with a Dst footprint comparable to the Carrington superstorm of September 1859 based on the estimate by Tsurutani et. al. (2003). Results are presented for a simulation run with "very extreme" constructed/idealized solar wind boundary conditions driving the magnetosphere. In particular, we describe the reaction of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system and the associated induced geoelectric field on the ground to such extreme driving conditions. The model setup is further tested using input data for an observed space weather event of Halloween storm October 2003 to verify the MHD model consistence and to draw additional guidance for future work. This extreme space weather MHD model setup is designed specifically for practical application to the modeling of extreme geomagnetically induced electric fields, which can drive large currents in ground-based conductor systems such as power transmission grids. Therefore, our ultimate goal is to explore the level of geoelectric fields that can be induced from an assumed storm of the reported magnitude, i.e., Dst˜=-1600 nT.

  6. Application of Parallel Discrete Event Simulation to the Space Surveillance Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferson, D.; Leek, J.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we describe how and why we chose parallel discrete event simulation (PDES) as the paradigm for modeling the Space Surveillance Network (SSN) in our modeling framework, TESSA (Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness). DES is a simulation paradigm appropriate for systems dominated by discontinuous state changes at times that must be calculated dynamically. It is used primarily for complex man-made systems like telecommunications, vehicular traffic, computer networks, economic models etc., although it is also useful for natural systems that are not described by equations, such as particle systems, population dynamics, epidemics, and combat models. It is much less well known than simple time-stepped simulation methods, but has the great advantage of being time scale independent, so that one can freely mix processes that operate at time scales over many orders of magnitude with no runtime performance penalty. In simulating the SSN we model in some detail: (a) the orbital dynamics of up to 105 objects, (b) their reflective properties, (c) the ground- and space-based sensor systems in the SSN, (d) the recognition of orbiting objects and determination of their orbits, (e) the cueing and scheduling of sensor observations, (f) the 3-d structure of satellites, and (g) the generation of collision debris. TESSA is thus a mixed continuous-discrete model. But because many different types of discrete objects are involved with such a wide variation in time scale (milliseconds for collisions, hours for orbital periods) it is suitably described using discrete events. The PDES paradigm is surprising and unusual. In any instantaneous runtime snapshot some parts my be far ahead in simulation time while others lag behind, yet the required causal relationships are always maintained and synchronized correctly, exactly as if the simulation were executed sequentially. The TESSA simulator is custom-built, conservatively synchronized, and designed to scale to

  7. Time-Space Decoupled Explicit Method for Fast Numerical Simulation of Tsunami Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Anxin; Xiao, Shengchao; Li, Hui

    2015-02-01

    This study presents a novel explicit numerical scheme for simulating tsunami propagation using the exact solution of the wave equations. The objective of this study is to develop a fast and stable numerical scheme by decoupling the wave equation in both the time and space domains. First, the finite difference scheme of the shallow-water equations for tsunami simulation are briefly introduced. The time-space decoupled explicit method based on the exact solution of the wave equation is given for the simulation of tsunami propagation without including frequency dispersive effects. Then, to consider wave dispersion, the second-order accurate numerical scheme to solve the shallow-water equations, which mimics the physical frequency dispersion with numerical dispersion, is derived. Lastly, the computation efficiency and the accuracy of the two types of numerical schemes are investigated by the 2004 Indonesia tsunami and the solution of the Boussinesq equation for a tsunami with Gaussian hump over both uniform and varying water depths. The simulation results indicate that the proposed numerical scheme can achieve a fast and stable tsunami propagation simulation while maintaining computation accuracy.

  8. Simulation of Foam Impact Effects on Components of the Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System. Chapter 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.; Park, Young-Keun

    2004-01-01

    A series of three dimensional simulations has been performed to investigate analytically the effect of insulating foam impacts on ceramic tile and reinforced carbon-carbon components of the Space Shuttle thermal protection system. The simulations employed a hybrid particle-finite element method and a parallel code developed for use in spacecraft design applications. The conclusions suggested by the numerical study are in general consistent with experiment. The results emphasize the need for additional material testing work on the dynamic mechanical response of thermal protection system materials, and additional impact experiments for use in validating computational models of impact effects.

  9. Atmospheric compensation in free space optical communication with simulated annealing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaokun; Cao, Jingtai; Zhao, Xiaohui; Liu, Wei

    2015-03-01

    As we know that the conventional adaptive optics (AO) systems can compensate atmospheric turbulence in free space optical (FSO) communication system. Since in strong scintillation conditions, wave-front measurements based on phase-conjugation principle are undesired. A novel global optimization simulated annealing (SA) algorithm is proposed in this paper to compensate wave-front aberration. With global optimization characteristics, SA algorithm is better than stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) and other algorithms that already exist. Related simulations are conducted and the results show that the SA algorithm can significantly improve performance in FSO communication system and is better than SPGD algorithm with the increase of coupling efficiency.

  10. A computer program for engineering simulations of space reactor system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, D.

    1992-07-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion systems are envisioned as a fast and efficient form of transportation for the exploration of space. Several nuclear reactor concepts have been proposed. This document discusses SAFSIM (System Analysis Flow SIMulator) which is an engineering computer program that allows the fluid mechanic, heat transfer, and reactor dynamic simulation of the entire propulsion system. SAFSIM currently contains three basic physics modules: (1) fluid mechanics, (2) heat transfer, and (3) reactor dynamics. All three modules are coupled to allow the prediction of system performance. The analyst can employ any or all of the physics modules as the problem dictates.

  11. Simulation of space radiation effects on polyimide film materials for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogdall, L. B.; Cannaday, S. S.

    1977-01-01

    Space environment effects on candidate materials for the solar sail film are determined. Polymers, including metallized polyimides that might be suitable solar radiation receivers, were exposed to combined proton and solar electromagnetic radiation. Each test sample was weighted, to simulate the tension on the polymer when it is stretched into near-planar shape while receiving solar radiation. Exposure rates up to 16 times that expected in Earth orbit were employed, to simulate near-sun solar sailing conditions. Sample appearance, elongation, and shrinkage were monitored, noted, and documented in situ. Thermosetting polyimides showed less degradation or visual change in appearance than thermoplastics.

  12. Simulation Evaluation of Controller-Managed Spacing Tools under Realistic Operational Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Hunt, Sarah M.; Prevot, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Controller-Managed Spacing (CMS) tools have been developed to aid air traffic controllers in managing high volumes of arriving aircraft according to a schedule while enabling them to fly efficient descent profiles. The CMS tools are undergoing refinement in preparation for field demonstration as part of NASA's Air Traffic Management (ATM) Technology Demonstration-1 (ATD-1). System-level ATD-1 simulations have been conducted to quantify expected efficiency and capacity gains under realistic operational conditions. This paper presents simulation results with a focus on CMS-tool human factors. The results suggest experienced controllers new to the tools find them acceptable and can use them effectively in ATD-1 operations.

  13. Free-space optical channel simulator for weak-turbulence conditions.

    PubMed

    Bykhovsky, Dima

    2015-11-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication may be severely influenced by the inevitable turbulence effect that results in channel gain fluctuations and fading. The objective of this paper is to provide a simple and effective simulator of the weak-turbulence FSO channel that emulates the influence of the temporal covariance effect. Specifically, the proposed model is based on lognormal distributed samples with a corresponding correlation time. The simulator is based on the solution of the first-order stochastic differential equation (SDE). The results of the provided SDE analysis reveal its efficacy for turbulent channel modeling.

  14. Development of the reentry flight dynamics simulator for evaluation of space shuttle orbiter entry systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowell, L. F.; Powell, R. W.; Stone, H. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A nonlinear, six degree of freedom, digital computer simulation of a vehicle which has constant mass properties and whose attitudes are controlled by both aerodynamic surfaces and reaction control system thrusters was developed. A rotating, oblate Earth model was used to describe the gravitational forces which affect long duration Earth entry trajectories. The program is executed in a nonreal time mode or connected to a simulation cockpit to conduct piloted and autopilot studies. The program guidance and control software used by the space shuttle orbiter for its descent from approximately 121.9 km to touchdown on the runway.

  15. Multi-scale simulations of space problems with iPIC3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Bettarini, Lapo; Markidis, Stefano

    The implicit Particle-in-Cell method for the computer simulation of space plasma, and its im-plementation in a three-dimensional parallel code, called iPIC3D, are presented. The implicit integration in time of the Vlasov-Maxwell system removes the numerical stability constraints and enables kinetic plasma simulations at magnetohydrodynamics scales. Simulations of mag-netic reconnection in plasma are presented to show the effectiveness of the algorithm. In particular we will show a number of simulations done for large scale 3D systems using the physical mass ratio for Hydrogen. Most notably one simulation treats kinetically a box of tens of Earth radii in each direction and was conducted using about 16000 processors of the Pleiades NASA computer. The work is conducted in collaboration with the MMS-IDS theory team from University of Colorado (M. Goldman, D. Newman and L. Andersson). Reference: Stefano Markidis, Giovanni Lapenta, Rizwan-uddin Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, Available online 17 October 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matcom.2009.08.038

  16. Resistance of Antarctic black fungi and cryptoendolithic communities to simulated space and Martian conditions.

    PubMed

    Onofri, S; Barreca, D; Selbmann, L; Isola, D; Rabbow, E; Horneck, G; de Vera, J P P; Hatton, J; Zucconi, L

    2008-01-01

    Dried colonies of the Antarctic rock-inhabiting meristematic fungi Cryomyces antarcticus CCFEE 515, CCFEE 534 and C. minteri CCFEE 5187, as well as fragments of rocks colonized by the Antarctic cryptoendolithic community, were exposed to a set of ground-based experiment verification tests (EVTs) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR, Köln, Germany). These were carried out to test the tolerance of these organisms in view of their possible exposure to space conditions outside of the International Space Station (ISS). Tests included single or combined simulated space and Martian conditions. Responses were analysed both by cultural and microscopic methods. Thereby, colony formation capacities were measured and the cellular viability was assessed using live/dead dyes FUN 1 and SYTOX Green. The results clearly suggest a general good resistance of all the samples investigated. C. minteri CCFEE 5187, C. antarcticus CCFEE 515 and colonized rocks were selected as suitable candidates to withstand space flight and long-term permanence in space on the ISS in the framework of the LIchens and Fungi Experiments (LIFE programme, European Space Agency).

  17. Resistance of Antarctic black fungi and cryptoendolithic communities to simulated space and Martian conditions

    PubMed Central

    Onofri, S.; Barreca, D.; Selbmann, L.; Isola, D.; Rabbow, E.; Horneck, G.; de Vera, J.P.P.; Hatton, J.; Zucconi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Dried colonies of the Antarctic rock-inhabiting meristematic fungi Cryomyces antarcticus CCFEE 515, CCFEE 534 and C. minteri CCFEE 5187, as well as fragments of rocks colonized by the Antarctic cryptoendolithic community, were exposed to a set of ground-based experiment verification tests (EVTs) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR, Köln, Germany). These were carried out to test the tolerance of these organisms in view of their possible exposure to space conditions outside of the International Space Station (ISS). Tests included single or combined simulated space and Martian conditions. Responses were analysed both by cultural and microscopic methods. Thereby, colony formation capacities were measured and the cellular viability was assessed using live/dead dyes FUN 1 and SYTOX Green. The results clearly suggest a general good resistance of all the samples investigated. C. minteri CCFEE 5187, C. antarcticus CCFEE 515 and colonized rocks were selected as suitable candidates to withstand space flight and long-term permanence in space on the ISS in the framework of the LIchens and Fungi Experiments (LIFE programme, European Space Agency). PMID:19287532

  18. Alterations in calcium homeostasis and bone during actual and simulated space flight.

    PubMed

    Wronski, T J; Morey, E R

    1983-01-01

    The weightlessness experienced in space produces alterations in calcium homeostasis. Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab astronauts exhibited a negative calcium balance due primarily to hypercalciuria. In addition, the bone mineral density of the calcaneus declined by approximately 4% in Skylab crew members after 84 d of orbital flight. The negative calcium balance and loss of calcaneal bone mineral in normal adults subjected to prolonged bed rest was comparable to that observed in space. The pathogenesis of bone loss during space flight and bed rest is not well understood due to the lack of histomorphometric data. It is also uncertain whether osteoporotic changes in astronauts are corrected postflight. The observed bone loss would be reversible and of no long-term consequence if the only abnormality was an increased remodeling rate. However, altered bone cell activity would probably result in irreversible bone loss with the premature development of senile osteoporosis many years after space flight. The main skeletal defect in growing rats placed in orbit aboard Soviet Cosmos biosatellites appears to be diminished bone formation. Bone resorption was not elevated during weightlessness. Although cortical bone returned to normal postflight, the decline in trabecular bone mass was somewhat persistent. These studies established that the modeling of a growing skeleton was altered in a weightless environment, but do not necessarily imply that a remodeling imbalance occurs in adults during space flight. However, various forms of simulated space flight inhibited bone formation during both skeletal modeling and the remodeling of adult bone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6645871

  19. PATH: a lumped-element beam-transport simulation program with space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    PATH is a group of computer programs for simulating charged-particle beam-transport systems. It was developed for evaluating the effects of some aberrations without a time-consuming integration of trajectories through the system. The beam-transport portion of PATH is derived from the well-known program, DECAY TURTLE. PATH contains all features available in DECAY TURTLE (including the input format) plus additional features such as a more flexible random-ray generator, longitudinal phase space, some additional beamline elements, and space-charge routines. One of the programs also provides a simulation of an Alvarez linear accelerator. The programs, originally written for a CDC 7600 computer system, also are available on a VAX-VMS system. All of the programs are interactive with input prompting for ease of use.

  20. Simulation and research on security enhancement policies of space network protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hengtai; Hong, Zhiguo; Zhu, Dengke; Zheng, Gang

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, the state of the art of network protocols and security problems of space networks are firstly introduced. Then, it analyzes some security protocols that can be applicable to satellite networks. To validate the effect of security protocols in space networks, we use Stochastic Petri Nets (SPN) to model the communication process of Border Gateway Protocol - Satellite version (BGP-S). Furthermore, by comparison and analysis, the effect of three security protocols on average time delay is also analyzed from the SPN model with Stochastic Petri Net Package (SPNP) 6.0. What's more, the policies on choosing security shemes are discussed. Finally, a NS-2-based simulation for BGP-S is implemented and with the addition of security data flow test is made by comparison and analysis. Simulation results are basically in accordance with the numerical results of the SPN model.

  1. Thermal Simulator Development: Non-Nuclear Testing of Space Fission Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power system. At the NASA MSFC Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF), highly designed electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel to test space fission power and propulsion systems. To allow early utilization, nuclear system designs must be relatively simple, easy to fabricate, and easy to test using non-nuclear heaters to closely mimic heat from fission. In this test strategy, highly designed electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel, allowing one to develop a significant understanding of individual components and integrated system operation without the cost, time and safety concerns associated with nuclear testing.

  2. Sensor-scheduling simulation of disparate sensors for Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, T.; Clarkson, I.

    2011-09-01

    The art and science of space situational awareness (SSA) has been practised and developed from the time of Sputnik. However, recent developments, such as the accelerating pace of satellite launch, the proliferation of launch capable agencies, both commercial and sovereign, and recent well-publicised collisions involving man-made space objects, has further magnified the importance of timely and accurate SSA. The United States Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM) operates the Space Surveillance Network (SSN), a global network of sensors tasked with maintaining SSA. The rapidly increasing number of resident space objects will require commensurate improvements in the SSN. Sensors are scarce resources that must be scheduled judiciously to obtain measurements of maximum utility. Improvements in sensor scheduling and fusion, can serve to reduce the number of additional sensors that may be required. Recently, Hill et al. [1] have proposed and developed a simulation environment named TASMAN (Tasking Autonomous Sensors in a Multiple Application Network) to enable testing of alternative scheduling strategies within a simulated multi-sensor, multi-target environment. TASMAN simulates a high-fidelity, hardware-in-the-loop system by running multiple machines with different roles in parallel. At present, TASMAN is limited to simulations involving electro-optic sensors. Its high fidelity is at once a feature and a limitation, since supercomputing is required to run simulations of appreciable scale. In this paper, we describe an alternative, modular and scalable SSA simulation system that can extend the work of Hill et al with reduced complexity, albeit also with reduced fidelity. The tool has been developed in MATLAB and therefore can be run on a very wide range of computing platforms. It can also make use of MATLAB’s parallel processing capabilities to obtain considerable speed-up. The speed and flexibility so obtained can be used to quickly test scheduling algorithms even with a

  3. Quantum simulations in phase-space: from quantum optics to ultra-cold physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Peter D.; Chaturvedi, Subhash

    2016-07-01

    As a contribution to the international year of light, we give a brief history of quantum optics in phase-space, with new directions including quantum simulations of multipartite Bell violations, opto-mechanics, ultra-cold atomic systems, matter-wave Bell violations, coherent transport and quantum fluctuations in the early Universe. We mostly focus on exact methods using the positive-P representation, and semiclassical truncated Wigner approximations.

  4. Simulation study of beam-beam effects in ion beams with large space charge tuneshift

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.

    2012-05-20

    During low-energy operations with gold-gold collisions at 3.85 GeV beam energy, significant beam lifetime reductions have been observed due to the beam-beam interaction in the presence of large space charge tuneshifts. These beam-beam tuneshift parameters were about an order of magnitude smaller than during regular high energy operations. To get a better understanding of this effect, simulations have been performed. Recent results are presented.

  5. Computer graphics testbed to simulate and test vision systems for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, John B.

    1991-01-01

    Artificial intelligence concepts are applied to robotics. Artificial neural networks, expert systems and laser imaging techniques for autonomous space robots are being studied. A computer graphics laser range finder simulator developed by Wu has been used by Weiland and Norwood to study use of artificial neural networks for path planning and obstacle avoidance. Interest is expressed in applications of CLIPS, NETS, and Fuzzy Control. These applications are applied to robot navigation.

  6. Portable Simulator for On-Board International Space Station Emergency Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolt, Kathy; Root, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The crew on-board the International Space Station (ISS) have to be prepared for any possible emergency. The emergencies of most concern are a fire, depressurization or a toxic atmosphere. The crew members train on the ground before launch but also need to practice their emergency response skills while they are on orbit for 6 months. On-Board Training (OBT) events for emergency response proficiency used to require the crew and ground teams to use paper "scripts" that showed the path through the emergency procedures. This was not very realistic since the participants could read ahead and never deviate from this scripted path. The new OBT emergency simulator allows the crew to view dynamic information on an iPad only when it would become available during an event. The simulator interface allows the crew member to indicate hatch closures, don and doff masks, read pressures, and sample smoke or atmosphere levels. As the crew executes their actions using the on-board simulator, the ground teams are able to monitor those actions via ground display data flowing through the ISS Ku Band communication system which syncs the on-board simulator software with a ground simulator which is accessible in all the control centers. The OBT Working Group (OBT WG), led by the Chief Training Office (CTO) at Johnson Space center is a Multilateral working group with partners in Russia, Japan, Germany and U.S.A. The OBTWG worked together to create a simulator based on these principles: (a) Create a dynamic simulation that gives real-time data feedback; (b) Maintain real-time interface between Mission Control Centers and crew during OBTs; (c) Provide flexibility for decision making during drill execution; (d) Materially reduce Instructor and Flight Control Team man-hour costs involved with developing, updating, and maintaining emergency OBT cases/scenarios; and (e) Introduce an element of surprise to emergency scenarios so the team can't tell the outcome of the case by reading ahead in a

  7. On the simulation of tether-nets for space debris capture with Vortex Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Eleonora M.; Sharf, Inna; Misra, Arun K.; Teichmann, Marek

    2016-06-01

    Tether-nets are one of the more promising methods for the active removal of space debris. The aim of this paper is to study the dynamics of this type of systems in space, which is still not well-known and the simulation of which has multiple outstanding issues. In particular, the focus is on the deployment and capture phases of a net-based active debris removal mission, and on the effect of including the bending stiffness of the net threads on the dynamical characteristics of the net and on the computational efficiency. Lumped-parameter modeling of the net in Vortex Dynamics, without bending stiffness representation, is introduced first and validated then, against results obtained with an equivalent model in Matlab, using numerical simulations of the deployment phase. A model able to reproduce the bending stiffness of the net in Vortex Dynamics is proposed, and the outcome of a net deployment simulation is compared to the results of simulation without bending stiffness. A simulation of net-based capture of a derelict spacecraft is analyzed from the point of view of evaluating the effect of modeling the bending stiffness. From comparison of simulations with and without bending stiffness representation, it is found that bending stiffness has a significant influence both on the simulation results and on the computation time. When bending stiffness is included, the net is more resistant to the changes in its shape caused both by the motion of the corner masses (during deployment) and by the contact with the debris (during capture).

  8. A Space-Time Adaptive Method for Simulating Complex Cardiac Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, E. M.; Greenside, H. S.; Henriquez, C. S.

    2000-03-01

    A new space-time adaptive mesh refinement algorithm (AMRA) is presented and analyzed which, by automatically adding and deleting local patches of higher-resolution Cartesian meshes, can simulate quantitatively accurate models of cardiac electrical dynamics efficiently in large domains. We find in two space dimensions that the AMRA is able to achieve a factor of 5 speedup and a factor of 5 reduction in memory while achieving the same accuracy compared to a code based on a uniform space-time mesh at the highest resolution of the AMRA method. We summarize applications of the code to the Luo-Rudy 1 cardiac model in large two- and three-dimensional domains and discuss the implications of our results for understanding the initiation of arrhythmias.

  9. Shortcomings in ground testing, environment simulations, and performance predictions for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Brucker, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the issues involved in radiation testing of devices and subsystems to obtain the data that are required to predict the performance and survivability of satellite systems for extended missions in space. The problems associated with space environmental simulations, or the lack thereof, in experiments intended to produce information to describe the degradation and behavior of parts and systems are discussed. Several types of radiation effects in semiconductor components are presented, as for example: ionization dose effects, heavy ion and proton induced Single Event Upsets (SEUs), and Single Event Transient Upsets (SETUs). Examples and illustrations of data relating to these ground testing issues are provided. The primary objective of this presentation is to alert the reader to the shortcomings, pitfalls, variabilities, and uncertainties in acquiring information to logically design electronic subsystems for use in satellites or space stations with long mission lifetimes, and to point out the weaknesses and deficiencies in the methods and procedures by which that information is obtained.

  10. Real-time graphics for the Space Station Freedom cupola, developed in the Systems Engineering Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Red, Michael T.; Hess, Philip W.

    1989-01-01

    Among the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center's responsibilities for Space Station Freedom is the cupola. Attached to the resource node, the cupola is a windowed structure that will serve as the space station's secondary control center. From the cupola, operations involving the mobile service center and orbital maneuvering vehicle will be conducted. The Systems Engineering Simulator (SES), located in building 16, activated a real-time man-in-the-loop cupola simulator in November 1987. The SES cupola is an engineering tool with the flexibility to evolve in both hardware and software as the final cupola design matures. Two workstations are simulated with closed-circuit television monitors, rotational and translational hand controllers, programmable display pushbuttons, and graphics display with trackball and keyboard. The displays and controls of the SES cupola are driven by a Silicon Graphics Integrated Raster Imaging System (IRIS) 4D/70 GT computer. Through the use of an interactive display builder program, SES, cupola display pages consisting of two dimensional and three dimensional graphics are constructed. These display pages interact with the SES via the IRIS real-time graphics interface. The focus is on the real-time graphics interface applications software developed on the IRIS.

  11. Velocity-space resolution, entropy production, and upwind dissipation in Eulerian gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Waltz, R.E.

    2006-03-15

    Equations which describe the evolution of volume-averaged gyrokinetic entropy are derived and added to GYRO [J. Candy and R.E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], a Eulerian gyrokinetic turbulence simulation code. In particular, the creation of entropy through spatial upwind dissipation (there is zero velocity-space dissipation in GYRO) and the reduction of entropy via the production of fluctuations are monitored in detail. This new diagnostic has yielded several key confirmations of the validity of the GYRO simulations. First, fluctuations balance dissipation in the ensemble-averaged sense, thus demonstrating that turbulent GYRO simulations achieve a true statistical steady state. Second, at the standard spatial grid size, neither entropy nor energy flux is significantly changed by a 16-fold increase (from 32 to 512 grid points per cell) in the number of grid points in the two-dimensional velocity space. Third, the measured flux is invariant to an eightfold increase in the upwind dissipation coefficients. A notable conclusion is that the lack of change in entropy with grid refinement refutes the familiar but incorrect notion that Eulerian gyrokinetic codes miss important velocity-space structure. The issues of density and energy conservation and their relation to negligible second-order effects such as the parallel nonlinearity are also discussed.

  12. Thermal design and simulation of an attitude-varied space camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenjie; Yang, Wengang; Feng, Liangjie; Li, XuYang; Wang, Yinghao; Fan, Xuewu; Wen, Desheng

    2015-10-01

    An attitude-varied space camera changes attitude continually when it is working, its attitude changes with large angle in short time leads to the significant change of heat flux; Moreover, the complicated inner heat sources, other payloads and the satellite platform will also bring thermal coupling effects to the space camera. According to a space camera which is located on a two dimensional rotating platform, detailed thermal design is accomplished by means of thermal isolation, thermal transmission and temperature compensation, etc. Then the ultimate simulation cases of both high temperature and low temperature are chosen considering the obscuration of the satellite platform and other payloads, and also the heat flux analysis of light entrance and radiator surface of the camera. NEVEDA and SindaG are used to establish the simulation model of the camera and the analysis is carried out. The results indicate that, under both passive and active thermal control, the temperature of optical components is 20+/-1°C,both their radial and axial temperature gradient are less than 0.3°C, while the temperature of the main structural components is 20+/-2°C, and the temperature fluctuation of the focal plane assemblies is 3.0-9.5°C The simulation shows that the thermal control system can meet the need of the mission, and the thermal design is efficient and reasonable.

  13. Simulation of Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS) for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, J. L.; Barclay, R. B.; Dutta, S. B.; Freund, M. M.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Moseley, S. H.

    2000-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing optical micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) components for potential application in Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) science instruments. In this work, we present an overview of the electro-mechanical simulation of three MEMS components for NGST, which include a reflective micro-mirror array and transmissive microshutter array for aperture control for a near infrared (NIR) multi-object spectrometer and a large aperture MEMS Fabry-Perot tunable filter for a NIR wide field camera. In all cases the device must operate at cryogenic temperatures with low power consumption and low, CMOS compatible, voltages. The goal of our simulation efforts is to adaquately predict both the performance and the reliability of the devices during ground handling, launch, and operation to prevent failures late in the development process and during flight. This goal requires detailed modeling and validation of complex electro-thermal-mechanical interactions and very large non-linear deformations, often involving surface contact. Various parameters such as spatial dimensions and device response are often difficult to measure reliably at these small scales. In addition, these devices are fabricated from a wide variety of materials including surface micro-machined aluminum, reactive ion etched (RIE) silicon nitride, and deep reactive ion etched (DRIE) bulk single crystal silicon. The above broad set of conditions combine to be a formidable challenge for space flight qualification analysis. These simulations represent NASA/GSFC's first attempts at implementing a comprehensive strategy to address complex MEMS structures.

  14. The performance of field scientists undertaking observations of early life fossils while in simulated space suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, D.; Rask, J. C.; George, S. C.; de Leon, P.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Blank, J.; Slocombe, J.; Silburn, K.; Steele, H.; Gargarno, M.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulated Apollo Extravehicular Activity's (EVA) at the 3.45 Ga Australian 'Pilbara Dawn of life' (Western Australia) trail with field and non-field scientists using the University of North Dakota's NDX-1 pressurizable space suit to overview the effectiveness of scientist astronauts employing their field observation skills while looking for stromatolite fossil evidence. Off-world scientist astronauts will be faced with space suit limitations in vision, human sense perception, mobility, dexterity, the space suit fit, time limitations, and the psychological fear of death from accidents, causing physical fatigue reducing field science performance. Finding evidence of visible biosignatures for past life such as stromatolite fossils, on Mars, is a very significant discovery. Our preliminary overview trials showed that when in simulated EVAs, 25% stromatolite fossil evidence is missed with more incorrect identifications compared to ground truth surveys but providing quality characterization descriptions becomes less affected by simulated EVA limitations as the science importance of the features increases. Field scientists focused more on capturing high value characterization detail from the rock features whereas non-field scientists focused more on finding many features. We identified technologies and training to improve off-world field science performance. The data collected is also useful for NASA's "EVA performance and crew health" research program requirements but further work will be required to confirm the conclusions.

  15. Improving Tribological Properties of Multialkylated Cyclopentanes under Simulated Space Environment: Two Feasible Approaches.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Liping; Li, Wen; Wan, Shanhong

    2015-07-01

    Space mechanisms require multialkylated cyclopentanes (MACs) more lubricious, more reliable, more durable, and better adaptive to harsh space environments. In this study, two kinds of additives were added into MACs for improving the tribological properties under simulated space environments: (a) solid nanoparticles (tungsten disulfide (WS2), tungsten trioxide (WO3), lanthanum oxide (La2O3), and lanthanum trifluoride (LaF3)) for steel/steel contacts; (b) liquid additives like zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) and molybdenum dialkyldithiocarbamate (MoDTC) for steel/steel and steel/diamond-like carbon (DLC) contacts. The results show that, under harsh simulated space environments, addition of the solid nanoparticles into MACs allows the wear to be reduced by up to one order magnitude, while liquid additives simultaneously reduce friction and wear by 80% and 93%, respectively. Friction mechanisms were proposed according to surface/interface analysis techniques, such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS). The role of solid nanoparticles in reducing friction and wear mainly depends on their surface enhancement effect, and the liquid additives are attributed to the formation of tribochemical reaction film derived from ZDDP and MoDTC on the sliding surfaces. PMID:26067481

  16. The Study of Simulated Space Radiation Environment Effect on Conductive Properties of ITO Thermal Control Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei-Quan, Feng; Chun-Qing, Zhao; Zi-Cai, Shen; Yi-Gang, Ding; Fan, Zhang; Yu-Ming, Liu; Hui-Qi, Zheng; Xue, Zhao

    In order to prevent detrimental effects of ESD caused by differential surface charging of spacecraft under space environments, an ITO transparent conductive coating is often deposited on the thermal control materials outside spacecraft. Since the ITO coating is exposed in space environment, the environment effects on electrical property of ITO coatings concern designers of spacecraft deeply. This paper introduces ground tests to simulate space radiation environmental effects on conductive property of ITO coating. Samples are made of ITO/OSR, ITO/Kapton/Al and ITO/FEP/Ag thermal control coatings. Simulated space radiation environment conditions are NUV of 500ESH, 40 keV electron of 2 × 1016 е/cm2, 40 keV proton of 2.5 × 1015 p/cm2. Conductive property is surface resistivity measured in-situ in vacuum. Test results proved that the surface resistivity for all ITO coatings have a sudden decrease in the beginning of environment test. The reasons for it may be the oxygen vacancies caused by vacuum and decayed RIC caused by radiation. Degradation in conductive properties caused by irradiation were found. ITO/FEP/Ag exhibits more degradation than other two kinds. The conductive property of ITO/kapton/Al is stable for vacuum irradiation. The analysis of SEM and XPS found more crackers and less Sn and In concentration after irradiation which may be the reason for conductive property degradation.

  17. Accelerated multiscale space-time finite element simulation and application to high cycle fatigue life prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Wen, Lihua; Naboulsi, Sam; Eason, Thomas; Vasudevan, Vijay K.; Qian, Dong

    2016-08-01

    A multiscale space-time finite element method based on time-discontinuous Galerkin and enrichment approach is presented in this work with a focus on improving the computational efficiencies for high cycle fatigue simulations. While the robustness of the TDG-based space-time method has been extensively demonstrated, a critical barrier for the extensive application is the large computational cost due to the additional temporal dimension and enrichment that are introduced. The present implementation focuses on two aspects: firstly, a preconditioned iterative solver is developed along with techniques for optimizing the matrix storage and operations. Secondly, parallel algorithms based on multi-core graphics processing unit are established to accelerate the progressive damage model implementation. It is shown that the computing time and memory from the accelerated space-time implementation scale with the number of degree of freedom N through ˜ O(N^{1.6}) and ˜ O(N), respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the accelerated space-time FEM simulation through benchmark problems.

  18. Improving Tribological Properties of Multialkylated Cyclopentanes under Simulated Space Environment: Two Feasible Approaches.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Liping; Li, Wen; Wan, Shanhong

    2015-07-01

    Space mechanisms require multialkylated cyclopentanes (MACs) more lubricious, more reliable, more durable, and better adaptive to harsh space environments. In this study, two kinds of additives were added into MACs for improving the tribological properties under simulated space environments: (a) solid nanoparticles (tungsten disulfide (WS2), tungsten trioxide (WO3), lanthanum oxide (La2O3), and lanthanum trifluoride (LaF3)) for steel/steel contacts; (b) liquid additives like zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) and molybdenum dialkyldithiocarbamate (MoDTC) for steel/steel and steel/diamond-like carbon (DLC) contacts. The results show that, under harsh simulated space environments, addition of the solid nanoparticles into MACs allows the wear to be reduced by up to one order magnitude, while liquid additives simultaneously reduce friction and wear by 80% and 93%, respectively. Friction mechanisms were proposed according to surface/interface analysis techniques, such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS). The role of solid nanoparticles in reducing friction and wear mainly depends on their surface enhancement effect, and the liquid additives are attributed to the formation of tribochemical reaction film derived from ZDDP and MoDTC on the sliding surfaces.

  19. Implementation of an open-scenario, long-term space debris simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupl, J.; Nelson, B.; Faber, N.; Perez, A.; Carlino, R.; Yang, F.; Henze, C.; Karacalioglu, A.; O'Toole, C.; Swenson, J.

    This paper provides a status update on the implementation of a flexible, long-term space debris simulation approach. The motivation is to build a tool that can assess the long-term impact of various options for debris-remediation, including the LightForce space debris collision avoidance scheme. State-of-the-art simulation approaches that assess the long-term development of the debris environment use either completely statistical approaches, or they rely on large time steps in the order of several (5-15) days if they simulate the positions of single objects over time. They cannot be easily adapted to investigate the impact of specific collision avoidance schemes or de-orbit schemes, because the efficiency of a collision avoidance maneuver can depend on various input parameters, including ground station positions, space object parameters and orbital parameters of the conjunctions and take place in much smaller timeframes than 5-15 days. For example, LightForce only changes the orbit of a certain object (aiming to reduce the probability of collision), but it does not remove entire objects or groups of objects. In the same sense, it is also not straightforward to compare specific de-orbit methods in regard to potential collision risks during a de-orbit maneuver. To gain flexibility in assessing interactions with objects, we implement a simulation that includes every tracked space object in LEO, propagates all objects with high precision, and advances with variable-sized time-steps as small as one second. It allows the assessment of the (potential) impact of changes to any object. The final goal is to employ a Monte Carlo approach to assess the debris evolution during the simulation time-frame of 100 years and to compare a baseline scenario to debris remediation scenarios or other scenarios of interest. To populate the initial simulation, we use the entire space-track object catalog in LEO. We then use a high precision propagator to propagate all objects over the

  20. Time-Accurate Unsteady Pressure Loads Simulated for the Space Launch System at Wind Tunnel Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Kleb, William L.; Glass, Christopher E.; Streett, Craig L.; Schuster, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A transonic flow field about a Space Launch System (SLS) configuration was simulated with the Fully Unstructured Three-Dimensional (FUN3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code at wind tunnel conditions. Unsteady, time-accurate computations were performed using second-order Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES) for up to 1.5 physical seconds. The surface pressure time history was collected at 619 locations, 169 of which matched locations on a 2.5 percent wind tunnel model that was tested in the 11 ft. x 11 ft. test section of the NASA Ames Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between computation and experiment showed that the peak surface pressure RMS level occurs behind the forward attach hardware, and good agreement for frequency and power was obtained in this region. Computational domain, grid resolution, and time step sensitivity studies were performed. These included an investigation of pseudo-time sub-iteration convergence. Using these sensitivity studies and experimental data comparisons, a set of best practices to date have been established for FUN3D simulations for SLS launch vehicle analysis. To the author's knowledge, this is the first time DDES has been used in a systematic approach and establish simulation time needed, to analyze unsteady pressure loads on a space launch vehicle such as the NASA SLS.

  1. Launching a dream: A teachers guide to a simulated space shuttle mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Two simulated shuttle missions cosponsored by the NASA Lewis Research Center and Cleveland, Ohio, area schools are highlighted in this manual for teachers. A simulated space shuttle mission is an opportunity for students of all ages to plan, train for, and conduct a shuttle mission. Some students are selected to be astronauts, flight planners, and flight controllers. Other students build and test the experiments that the astronauts will conduct. Some set up mission control, while others design the mission patch. Students also serve as security officers or carry out public relations activities. For the simulated shuttle mission, school buses or recreation vehicles are converted to represent shuttle orbiters. All aspects of a shuttle mission are included. During preflight activities the shuttle is prepared, and experiments and a flight plan are made ready for launch day. The flight itself includes lifting off, conducting experiments on orbit, and rendezvousing with the crew from the sister school. After landing back at the home school, the student astronauts are debriefed and hold press conferences. The astronauts celebrate their successful missions with their fellow students at school and with the community at an evening postflight recognition program. To date, approximately 6,000 students have been involved in simulated shuttle missions with the Lewis Research Center. A list of participating schools, along with the names of their space shuttles, is included. Educations outcomes and other positive effects for the students are described.

  2. Development of a Simulation Capability for the Space Station Active Rack Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Terry L.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    To realize quality microgravity science on the International Space Station, many microgravity facilities will utilize the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS). Simulation capabilities for ARIS will be needed to predict the microgravity environment. This paper discusses the development of a simulation model for use in predicting the performance of the ARIS in attenuating disturbances with frequency content between 0.01 Hz and 10 Hz. The derivation of the model utilizes an energy-based approach. The complete simulation includes the dynamic model of the ISPR integrated with the model for the ARIS controller so that the entire closed-loop system is simulated. Preliminary performance predictions are made for the ARIS in attenuating both off-board disturbances as well as disturbances from hardware mounted onboard the microgravity facility. These predictions suggest that the ARIS does eliminate resonant behavior detrimental to microgravity experimentation. A limited comparison is made between the simulation predictions of ARIS attenuation of off-board disturbances and results from the ARIS flight test. These comparisons show promise, but further tuning of the simulation is needed.

  3. Numerical simulations of the electrodynamic interactions between the Tethered-Satellite-System and space plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vashi, Bharat I.

    1992-01-01

    The first Tethered-Satellite-System (TSS-1), scheduled for a flight in late 1992, is expected to provide relevant information related to the concept of generating an emf in a 20-km-long (or longer) conducting wire. This paper presents numerical simulations of the electrodynamic interactions between the TSS system and space plasma, using a 2D and 3D models of the system. The 2D case code simulates the motion of a long cylinder past a plasma, which is composed of electrons and H(+) ions. The system is solved by allowing the plasma to flow past the cylinder with an imposed magnetic field. The more complex 3D case is considered to study the dynamics in great detail. Results of 2D simulation show that the interaction of a satellite with plasma flowing perpendicularly to the magnetic field results in an enhancement in the current collection.

  4. Information content of simulated space photographs as a function of various levels of image resolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, D. T.; Thaman, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    The results of research are reported on the information content in simulated space photographs derivable as a function of various levels of image resolution. Whenever certain resource features could not be consistently identified on simulated low-resolution imagery, attempts were made to define the required level of image resolution that would allow a skilled interpreter to discriminate one feature from another. The results of this research, conducted within a chaparral-hardwood-grassland environment in California, indicate that simulated ERTS data contain sufficient information to allow an interpreter to discriminate between woody vegetation, grassland, and water bodies. However, if more detailed information is desired, the imagery must have a ground resolution of at least 50 ft, showing shape, size, texture, and shadow characteristics within each vegetation type. Spaceborne data, therefore, often will have to be supplemented by higher resolution aircraft imagery, depending on the types of resource information being sought.

  5. Simulation of Latex Film Formation Using a Cell Model in Real Space: Vertical Drying.

    PubMed

    Gromer, A; Nassar, M; Thalmann, F; Hébraud, P; Holl, Y

    2015-10-13

    This paper presents a simulation tool applied to latex film formation by drying, a hybrid between a classical numerical resolution method using finite differences and cellular automata, and making use of object-oriented programming. It consists of dividing real space into cells and applying local physical laws to simulate the exchange of matter between neighboring cells. In a first step, the simulation was applied to the simple case of vertical drying of a latex containing only one population of monodisperse particles and water. Our results show how the distribution of latex particles evolves through the different drying stages due to a combination of diffusion, convection, and particle deformation. While repulsive interactions between the particles tend to favor homogeneous distributions in the first drying stage, concentration gradients that develop in opposite ways can be observed depending on the drying regime. The distributions, calculated in various cases, reproduce and extend several theoretical results and are in qualitative agreement with some experimental findings. PMID:26378376

  6. Impact of simulated microgravity on human bone stem cells: New hints for space medicine.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Maier, Jeanette A M; Castiglioni, Sara

    2016-04-22

    Bone loss is a well known early event in astronauts and represents one of the major obstacle to space exploration. While an imbalance between osteoblast and osteoclast activity has been described, less is known about the behavior of bone mesenchymal stem cells in microgravity. We simulated microgravity using the Random Positioning Machine and found that mesenchymal stem cells respond to gravitational unloading by upregulating HSP60, HSP70, cyclooxygenase 2 and superoxyde dismutase 2. Such an adaptive response might be involved in inducing the overexpression of some osteogenic transcripts, even though the threshold to induce the formation of bone crystal is not achieved. Indeed, only the addition of an osteogenic cocktail activates the full differentiation process both in simulated microgravity and under static 1G-conditions. We conclude that simulated microgravity alone reprograms bone mesenchymal stem cells towards an osteogenic phenotype which results in complete differentiation only after exposure to a specific stimulus. PMID:27005819

  7. Impact of simulated microgravity on human bone stem cells: New hints for space medicine.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Maier, Jeanette A M; Castiglioni, Sara

    2016-04-22

    Bone loss is a well known early event in astronauts and represents one of the major obstacle to space exploration. While an imbalance between osteoblast and osteoclast activity has been described, less is known about the behavior of bone mesenchymal stem cells in microgravity. We simulated microgravity using the Random Positioning Machine and found that mesenchymal stem cells respond to gravitational unloading by upregulating HSP60, HSP70, cyclooxygenase 2 and superoxyde dismutase 2. Such an adaptive response might be involved in inducing the overexpression of some osteogenic transcripts, even though the threshold to induce the formation of bone crystal is not achieved. Indeed, only the addition of an osteogenic cocktail activates the full differentiation process both in simulated microgravity and under static 1G-conditions. We conclude that simulated microgravity alone reprograms bone mesenchymal stem cells towards an osteogenic phenotype which results in complete differentiation only after exposure to a specific stimulus.

  8. Simulation experiments of the effect of space environment on bacteriophage and DNA thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, A.; Rontó, G.; Hegedûs, M.; Módos, K.; Bérces, A.; Kovács, G.; Lammer, H.

    PUR experiment (phage and uracil response) is part of the ROSE consortium selected for the first mission on the ISS and its main goal to examine and quantify the effect of specific space parameters such as VUV, UV radiation, dehydration effects, non-oxidative environments etc. related to space vacuum conditions on nucleic acid models. An improved method for the preparation of DNA thin films (NaDNA and LiDNA) was elaborated and the homogeneity of the films were controlled by spectroscopy and phase contrast microscopy. The complete recovery of the amount of DNA from the thin film was found after dissolution. Electrophoresis of the dissolved DNA indicated an intact DNA structure, while successful PCR amplification an intact function of the molecule, so they are likely candidates for the flight on the EXPOSE facility. A new method for preparation of bacteriophage T7 thin layer has been developed, the quality was controlled by spectroscopy and microscopy. After dissolution almost 90% of the viability of the phage particles remained, and the intactness of DNA structure was checked by PCR. DNA and phage thin films were produced in sandwich form as well, and stored in an atmosphere containing a mixture of N2 and H2 , by quality control of the samples no change has been found. They were tested under simulated space conditions at IWF space simulation facility in Graz. DNA thin films and bacteriophage T7 thin layers at different r.h. values have been irradiated in sandwich form in normal atmospheric conditions by using a low pressure Mercury lamp and high power (300W) Deuterium lamp containing short wavelength ( < 240 nm) UVC components simulating theextraterrestrial solar radiation. Characteristic change in the absorption spectrum and the decrease of the amount of PCR products have been detected indicating the photodamage of isolated and intraphage DNA.

  9. Implementation of an Open-Scenario, Long-Term Space Debris Simulation Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Bron; Yang Yang, Fan; Carlino, Roberto; Dono Perez, Andres; Faber, Nicolas; Henze, Chris; Karacalioglu, Arif Goktug; O'Toole, Conor; Swenson, Jason; Stupl, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a status update on the implementation of a flexible, long-term space debris simulation approach. The motivation is to build a tool that can assess the long-term impact of various options for debris-remediation, including the LightForce space debris collision avoidance concept that diverts objects using photon pressure [9]. State-of-the-art simulation approaches that assess the long-term development of the debris environment use either completely statistical approaches, or they rely on large time steps on the order of several days if they simulate the positions of single objects over time. They cannot be easily adapted to investigate the impact of specific collision avoidance schemes or de-orbit schemes, because the efficiency of a collision avoidance maneuver can depend on various input parameters, including ground station positions and orbital and physical parameters of the objects involved in close encounters (conjunctions). Furthermore, maneuvers take place on timescales much smaller than days. For example, LightForce only changes the orbit of a certain object (aiming to reduce the probability of collision), but it does not remove entire objects or groups of objects. In the same sense, it is also not straightforward to compare specific de-orbit methods in regard to potential collision risks during a de-orbit maneuver. To gain flexibility in assessing interactions with objects, we implement a simulation that includes every tracked space object in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and propagates all objects with high precision and variable time-steps as small as one second. It allows the assessment of the (potential) impact of physical or orbital changes to any object. The final goal is to employ a Monte Carlo approach to assess the debris evolution during the simulation time-frame of 100 years and to compare a baseline scenario to debris remediation scenarios or other scenarios of interest. To populate the initial simulation, we use the entire space

  10. RENEW v3.2 user's manual, maintenance estimation simulation for Space Station Freedom Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bream, Bruce L.

    1993-01-01

    RENEW is a maintenance event estimation simulation program developed in support of the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP). This simulation uses reliability and maintainability (R&M) and logistics data to estimate both average and time dependent maintenance demands. The simulation uses Monte Carlo techniques to generate failure and repair times as a function of the R&M and logistics parameters. The estimates are generated for a single type of orbital replacement unit (ORU). The simulation has been in use by the SSFP Work Package 4 prime contractor, Rocketdyne, since January 1991. The RENEW simulation gives closer estimates of performance since it uses a time dependent approach and depicts more factors affecting ORU failure and repair than steady state average calculations. RENEW gives both average and time dependent demand values. Graphs of failures over the mission period and yearly failure occurrences are generated. The averages demand rate for the ORU over the mission period is also calculated. While RENEW displays the results in graphs, the results are also available in a data file for further use by spreadsheets or other programs. The process of using RENEW starts with keyboard entry of the R&M and operational data. Once entered, the data may be saved in a data file for later retrieval. The parameters may be viewed and changed after entry using RENEW. The simulation program runs the number of Monte Carlo simulations requested by the operator. Plots and tables of the results can be viewed on the screen or sent to a printer. The results of the simulation are saved along with the input data. Help screens are provided with each menu and data entry screen.

  11. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator: MSFC-Langley joint test of large space structures component assembly:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. Another facet of the space station would be electrical cornectors which would be used for powering tools the astronauts would need for construction, maintenance and repairs. Shown is an astronaut training during an underwater electrical connector test in the NBS.

  12. Simulation of space charge compensation in a multibeamlet negative ion beam.

    PubMed

    Sartori, E; Maceina, T J; Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    Ion beam space charge compensation occurs by cumulating in the beam potential well charges having opposite polarity, usually generated by collisional processes. In this paper we investigate the case of a H(-) ion beam drift, in a bi-dimensional approximation of the NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization phase 1) negative ion source. H(-) beam ion transport and plasma formation are studied via particle-in-cell simulations. Differential cross sections are sampled to determine the velocity distribution of secondary particles generated by ionization of the residual gas (electrons and slow H2 (+) ions) or by stripping of the beam ions (electrons, H, and H(+)). The simulations include three beamlets of a horizontal section, so that multibeamlet space charge and secondary particle diffusion between separate generation regions are considered, and include a repeller grid biased at various potentials. Results show that after the beam space charge is effectively screened by the secondary plasma in about 3 μs (in agreement with theoretical expectations), a plasma grows across the beamlets with a characteristic time three times longer, and a slight overcompensation of the electric potential is verified as expected in the case of negative ions. PMID:26932089

  13. Credibility Assessment of Deterministic Computational Models and Simulations for Space Biomedical Research and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulugeta, Lealem; Walton, Marlei; Nelson, Emily; Myers, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Human missions beyond low earth orbit to destinations, such as to Mars and asteroids will expose astronauts to novel operational conditions that may pose health risks that are currently not well understood and perhaps unanticipated. In addition, there are limited clinical and research data to inform development and implementation of health risk countermeasures for these missions. Consequently, NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working to develop and implement computational models and simulations (M&S) to help predict and assess spaceflight health and performance risks, and enhance countermeasure development. In order to effectively accomplish these goals, the DAP evaluates its models and simulations via a rigorous verification, validation and credibility assessment process to ensure that the computational tools are sufficiently reliable to both inform research intended to mitigate potential risk as well as guide countermeasure development. In doing so, DAP works closely with end-users, such as space life science researchers, to establish appropriate M&S credibility thresholds. We will present and demonstrate the process the DAP uses to vet computational M&S for space biomedical analysis using real M&S examples. We will also provide recommendations on how the larger space biomedical community can employ these concepts to enhance the credibility of their M&S codes.

  14. Simulating longitudinal phase space in the SLC, from the damping rings to the final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.

    1990-09-01

    At high currents the longitudinal phase space of the SLC beam is not simply described by gaussian distributions in both position and energy. The distorted ring beam, the curvature of the compressor rf, the limited energy aperture of the RTL, the wakefields in the linac, and the momentum compaction in the arc all contribute to some extent to a distortion of longitudinal phase space. In this paper we present simulation results that describe the phase space of the SLC beam, from the damping rings to the final focus area, and that include all these distorting effects. From bunch length measurements in the SLC it was discovered that the damping ring beam is lengthened and is clearly not gaussian. One author describes a potential well calculation for the ring bunch shape that agrees remarkably well with the measurements. These calculated shapes are the starting point for the simulations described in this paper. These initial distributions are propagated through the RTL, then the linac, and then the arcs. We will address questions of the bunch shape, beam tilt, beam loss, and tail population at the end of the RTL. Following this we discuss the energy spectrum at the end of the linac and the bunch shape when the beam reaches the final focus. Finally, in Appendix A we describe a method of measuring the bunch shape and the induced voltage in the SLC linac. 22 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Space station Simulation Computer System (SCS) study for NASA/MSFC. Volume 6: Study issues report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Simulation Computer System (SCS) is the computer hardware, software, and workstations that will support the Payload Training Complex (PTC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The PTC will train the space station payload specialists and mission specialists to operate the wide variety of experiments that will be on-board the Freedom Space Station. This simulation Computer System (SCS) study issues report summarizes the analysis and study done as task 1-identify and analyze the CSC study issues- of the SCS study contract.This work was performed over the first three months of the SCS study which began in August of 1988. First issues were identified from all sources. These included the NASA SOW, the TRW proposal, and working groups which focused the experience of NASA and the contractor team performing the study-TRW, Essex, and Grumman. The final list is organized into training related issues, and SCS associated development issues. To begin the analysis of the issues, a list of all the functions for which the SCS could be used was created, i.e., when the computer is turned on, what will it be doing. Analysis was continued by creating an operational functions matrix of SCS users vs. SCS functions to insure all the functions considered were valid, and to aid in identification of users as the analysis progressed. The functions will form the basis for the requirements, which are currently being developed under task 3 of the SCS study.

  16. Analysis of Waves in Space Plasma (WISP) near field simulation and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richie, James E.

    1992-01-01

    The WISP payload scheduler for a 1995 space transportation system (shuttle flight) will include a large power transmitter on board at a wide range of frequencies. The levels of electromagnetic interference/electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) must be addressed to insure the safety of the shuttle crew. This report is concerned with the simulation and experimental verification of EMI/EMC for the WISP payload in the shuttle cargo bay. The simulations have been carried out using the method of moments for both thin wires and patches to stimulate closed solids. Data obtained from simulation is compared with experimental results. An investigation of the accuracy of the modeling approach is also included. The report begins with a description of the WISP experiment. A description of the model used to simulate the cargo bay follows. The results of the simulation are compared to experimental data on the input impedance of the WISP antenna with the cargo bay present. A discussion of the methods used to verify the accuracy of the model is shown to illustrate appropriate methods for obtaining this information. Finally, suggestions for future work are provided.

  17. Time Accurate Unsteady Pressure Loads Simulated for the Space Launch System at a Wind Tunnel Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Kleb, Bil; Streett, Craig L; Glass, Christopher E.; Schuster, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Using the Fully Unstructured Three-Dimensional (FUN3D) computational fluid dynamics code, an unsteady, time-accurate flow field about a Space Launch System configuration was simulated at a transonic wind tunnel condition (Mach = 0.9). Delayed detached eddy simulation combined with Reynolds Averaged Naiver-Stokes and a Spallart-Almaras turbulence model were employed for the simulation. Second order accurate time evolution scheme was used to simulate the flow field, with a minimum of 0.2 seconds of simulated time to as much as 1.4 seconds. Data was collected at 480 pressure taps at locations, 139 of which matched a 3% wind tunnel model, tested in the Transonic Dynamic Tunnel (TDT) facility at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons between computation and experiment showed agreement within 5% in terms of location for peak RMS levels, and 20% for frequency and magnitude of power spectral densities. Grid resolution and time step sensitivity studies were performed to identify methods for improved accuracy comparisons to wind tunnel data. With limited computational resources, accurate trends for reduced vibratory loads on the vehicle were observed. Exploratory methods such as determining minimized computed errors based on CFL number and sub-iterations, as well as evaluating frequency content of the unsteady pressures and evaluation of oscillatory shock structures were used in this study to enhance computational efficiency and solution accuracy. These techniques enabled development of a set of best practices, for the evaluation of future flight vehicle designs in terms of vibratory loads.

  18. The effect of simulated microgravity on bacteria from the Mir space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul W.; Leff, Laura

    2004-01-01

    The effects of simulated microgravity on two bacterial isolates, Sphingobacterium thalpophilium and Ralstonia pickettii (formerly Burkholderia pickettii), originally recovered from water systems aboard the Mir space station were examined. These bacteria were inoculated into water, high and low concentrations of nutrient broth and subjected to simulated microgravity conditions. S. thalpophilium (which was motile and had flagella) showed no significant differences between simulated microgravity and the normal gravity control regardless of the method of enumeration and medium. In contrast, for R. pickettii (that was non-motile and lacked flagella), there were significantly higher numbers in high nutrient broth under simulated microgravity compared to normal gravity. Conversely, when R. pikkettii was inoculated into water (i.e., starvation conditions) significantly lower numbers were found under simulated microgravity compared to normal gravity. Responses to microgravity depended on the strain used (e.g., the motile strain exhibited no response to microgravity, while the non-motile strain did), the method of enumeration, and the nutrient concentration of the medium. Under oligotrophic conditions, non-motile cells may remain in geostationary orbit and deplete nutrients in their vicinity, while in high nutrient medium, resources surrounding the cell may be sufficient so that high growth is observed until nutrients becoming limiting.

  19. Modelling and simulation of Space Station Freedom berthing dynamics and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Paul A.; Garrison, James L., Jr.; Montgomery, Raymond C.; Wu, Shih-Chin; Stockwell, Alan E.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1994-01-01

    A large-angle, flexible, multibody, dynamic modeling capability has been developed to help validate numerical simulations of the dynamic motion and control forces which occur during berthing of Space Station Freedom to the Shuttle Orbiter in the early assembly flights. This paper outlines the dynamics and control of the station, the attached Shuttle Remote Manipulator System, and the orbiter. The simulation tool developed for the analysis is described and the results of two simulations are presented. The first is a simulated maneuver from a gravity-gradient attitude to a torque equilibrium attitude using the station reaction control jets. The second simulation is the berthing of the station to the orbiter with the station control moment gyros actively maintaining an estimated torque equilibrium attitude. The influence of the elastic dynamic behavior of the station and of the Remote Manipulator System on the attitude control of the station/orbiter system during each maneuver was investigated. The flexibility of the station and the arm were found to have only a minor influence on the attitude control of the system during the maneuvers.

  20. Modelling and simulation of Space Station Freedom berthing dynamics and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Paul A.; Garrison, James L., Jr.; Montgomery, Raymond C.; Wu, Shih-Chin; Stockwell, Alan E.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1994-08-01

    A large-angle, flexible, multibody, dynamic modeling capability has been developed to help validate numerical simulations of the dynamic motion and control forces which occur during berthing of Space Station Freedom to the Shuttle Orbiter in the early assembly flights. This paper outlines the dynamics and control of the station, the attached Shuttle Remote Manipulator System, and the orbiter. The simulation tool developed for the analysis is described and the results of two simulations are presented. The first is a simulated maneuver from a gravity-gradient attitude to a torque equilibrium attitude using the station reaction control jets. The second simulation is the berthing of the station to the orbiter with the station control moment gyros actively maintaining an estimated torque equilibrium attitude. The influence of the elastic dynamic behavior of the station and of the Remote Manipulator System on the attitude control of the station/orbiter system during each maneuver was investigated. The flexibility of the station and the arm were found to have only a minor influence on the attitude control of the system during the maneuvers.

  1. Virtual Observatories for Space Physics Observations and Simulations: New Routes to Efficient Access and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Aaron

    2005-01-01

    New tools for data access and visualization promise to make the analysis of space plasma data both more efficient and more powerful, especially for answering questions about the global structure and dynamics of the Sun-Earth system. We will show how new existing tools (particularly the Virtual Space Physics Observatory-VSPO-and the Visual System for Browsing, Analysis and Retrieval of Data-ViSBARD; look for the acronyms in Google) already provide rapid access to such information as spacecraft orbits, browse plots, and detailed data, as well as visualizations that can quickly unite our view of multispacecraft observations. We will show movies illustrating multispacecraft observations of the solar wind and magnetosphere during a magnetic storm, and of simulations of 3 0-spacecraft observations derived from MHD simulations of the magnetosphere sampled along likely trajectories of the spacecraft for the MagCon mission. An important issue remaining to be solved is how best to integrate simulation data and services into the Virtual Observatory environment, and this talk will hopefully stimulate further discussion along these lines.

  2. [Mathematical simulation support to the dosimetric monitoring on the Russian segment of the International Space Station].

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, V G

    2014-01-01

    To ensure radiation safety of cosmonauts, it is necessary not only to predict, but also to reconstruct absorbed dose dynamics with the knowledge of how long cosmonauts stay in specific space vehicle compartments with different shielding properties and lacking equipment for dosimetric monitoring. In this situation, calculating is one and only way to make a correct estimate of radiation exposure of cosmonaut's organism as a whole (tissue-average dose) and of separate systems and organs. The paper addresses the issues of mathematical simulation of epy radiation environment of standard dosimetric instruments in the Russian segments of the International Space Station (ISS RS). Results of comparing the simulation and experimental data for the complement of dosimeters including ionization chamber-based radiometer R-16, DB8 dosimeters composed of semiconductor detectors, and Pille dosimeters composed of thermoluminescent detectors evidence that the current methods of simulation in support of the ISS RS radiation monitoring provide a sufficiently good agreement between the calculated and experimental data. PMID:25163341

  3. Reservoir Modeling by Data Integration via Intermediate Spaces and Artificial Intelligence Tools in MPS Simulation Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, Rouhollah; Khamehchi, Ehsan

    2013-12-15

    Conditioning stochastic simulations are very important in many geostatistical applications that call for the introduction of nonlinear and multiple-point data in reservoir modeling. Here, a new methodology is proposed for the incorporation of different data types into multiple-point statistics (MPS) simulation frameworks. Unlike the previous techniques that call for an approximate forward model (filter) for integration of secondary data into geologically constructed models, the proposed approach develops an intermediate space where all the primary and secondary data are easily mapped onto. Definition of the intermediate space, as may be achieved via application of artificial intelligence tools like neural networks and fuzzy inference systems, eliminates the need for using filters as in previous techniques. The applicability of the proposed approach in conditioning MPS simulations to static and geologic data is verified by modeling a real example of discrete fracture networks using conventional well-log data. The training patterns are well reproduced in the realizations, while the model is also consistent with the map of secondary data.

  4. A new approach for data acquisition at the JPL space simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Terry C.

    1992-01-01

    In 1990, a personal computer based data acquisition system was put into service for the Space Simulators and Environmental Test Laboratory at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. The new system replaced an outdated minicomputer system which had been in use since 1980. This new data acquisition system was designed and built by JPL for the specific task of acquiring thermal test data in support of space simulation and thermal vacuum testing at JPL. The data acquisition system was designed using powerful personal computers and local-area-network (LAN) technology. Reliability, expandability, and maintainability were some of the most important criteria in the design of the data system and in the selection of hardware and software components. The data acquisition system is used to record both test chamber operational data and thermal data from the unit under test. Tests are conducted in numerous small thermal vacuum chambers and in the large solar simulator and range in size from individual components using only 2 or 3 thermocouples to entire planetary spacecraft requiring in excess of 1200 channels of test data. The system supports several of these tests running concurrently. The previous data system is described along with reasons for its replacement, the types of data acquired, the new data system, and the benefits obtained from the new system including information on tests performed to date.

  5. Graphical programming and the use of simulation for space-based manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, Debra S.; Reynolds, James C.

    1989-01-01

    Robotic manipulators are difficult to program even without the special requirements of a zero-gravity environment. While attention should be paid to investigating the usefulness of industrial application programming methods to space manipulators, new methods with potential application to both environments need to be invented. These methods should allow various levels of autonomy and human-in-the-loop interaction and simple, rapid switching among them. For all methods simulation must be integrated to provide reliability and safety. Graphical programming of manipulators is a candidate for an effective robot programming method despite current limitations in input devices and displays. A research project in task-level robot programming has built an innovative interface to a state-of-the-art commercial simulation and robot programming platform. The prototype demonstrates simple augmented methods for graphical programming and simulation which may be of particular interest to those concerned with Space Station applications; its development has also raised important issues for the development of more sophisticated robot programming tools. Both aspects of the project are discussed.

  6. [Mathematical simulation support to the dosimetric monitoring on the Russian segment of the International Space Station].

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, V G

    2014-01-01

    To ensure radiation safety of cosmonauts, it is necessary not only to predict, but also to reconstruct absorbed dose dynamics with the knowledge of how long cosmonauts stay in specific space vehicle compartments with different shielding properties and lacking equipment for dosimetric monitoring. In this situation, calculating is one and only way to make a correct estimate of radiation exposure of cosmonaut's organism as a whole (tissue-average dose) and of separate systems and organs. The paper addresses the issues of mathematical simulation of epy radiation environment of standard dosimetric instruments in the Russian segments of the International Space Station (ISS RS). Results of comparing the simulation and experimental data for the complement of dosimeters including ionization chamber-based radiometer R-16, DB8 dosimeters composed of semiconductor detectors, and Pille dosimeters composed of thermoluminescent detectors evidence that the current methods of simulation in support of the ISS RS radiation monitoring provide a sufficiently good agreement between the calculated and experimental data.

  7. Two-Dimensional Distribution of Volatiles in the Lunar Regolith from Space Weathering Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, Dana M.; Lawrence, David J.; Bussey, D. Benjamin J.; Vondrak, Richard R.; Elphic, Richard C.; Gladstone, G. Randall

    2012-01-01

    We present simulations of space weathering effects on ice deposits in regions of permanent shadow on the Moon. These Monte Carlo simulations follow the effects of space weathering processes on the distribution of the volatiles over time. The model output constrains the coherence of volatile deposits with depth, lateral separation, and time. The results suggest that ice sheets become broken and buried with time. As impacts begin to puncture an initially coherent surficial ice sheet, small areas with a deficit of ice compared to surrounding areas are formed first. As time progresses, holes become prevalent and the anomalous regions are local enhancements of ice concentration in a volume. The 3-D distribution is also heterogeneous because the ice is buried to varying depths in different locations. Analysis of the coherence of ice on 10 cm scales predicts that putative ice sheets in anomalous radar craters are < 100 Myr old. Surface frost becomes homogenized within 20 Myr. The simulations show the data from the LCROSS impact and surrounding region are consistent with the ice deposit in Cabeus being >1000 Myr old. For future in situ analysis of cold trap volatiles, a horizontal range of 10 m is sufficient to acquire surface-based measurements of heterogeneously distributed ice. These results also support previous analyses that Mercury's cold traps are young.

  8. Revisiting Numerical Errors in Direct and Large Eddy Simulations of Turbulence: Physical and Spectral Spaces Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedioun, Ivan; Lardjane, Nicolas; Gökalp, Iskender

    2001-12-01

    Some recent studies on the effects of truncation and aliasing errors on the large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows via the concept of modified wave number are revisited. It is shown that all the results obtained for nonlinear partial differential equations projected and advanced in time in spectral space are not straightforwardly applicable to physical space calculations due to the nonequivalence by Fourier transform of spectral aliasing errors and numerical errors on a set of grid points in physical space. The consequences of spectral static aliasing errors on a set of grid points are analyzed in one dimension of space for quadratic products and their derivatives. The dynamical process that results through time stepping is illustrated on the Burgers equation. A method based on midpoint interpolation is proposed to remove in physical space the static grid point errors involved in divergence forms. It is compared to the sharp filtering technique on finer grids suggested by previous authors. Global performances resulting from combination of static aliasing errors and truncation errors are then discussed for all classical forms of the convective terms in Navier-Stokes equations. Some analytical results previously obtained on the relative magnitude of subgrid scale terms and numerical errors are confirmed with 3D realistic random fields. The physical space dynamical behavior and the stability of typical associations of numerical schemes and forms of nonlinear terms are finally evaluated on the LES of self-decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence. It is shown that the convective form (if conservative properties are not strictly required) associated with highly resolving compact finite difference schemes provides the best compromise, which is nearly equivalent to dealiased pseudo-spectral calculations.

  9. Numerical simulation on a nanosecond-pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in near space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Xueke; Shao, Tao; Nie, Wansheng; Yan, Ping

    2012-04-01

    Lift-enhancement-drag-reduction technology is strongly required by near-space vehicles with low Reynolds number. It is known that a flow control method by a surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma can play an important role in this field. In order to obtain the discharge characteristics and evaluate the flow control effect of a SDBD actuator, the nanosecond-pulse discharge and induced flow field by the SDBD plasma are simulated at various altitudes using discharge-aerodynamics models. The results show that the ignition voltage decreases with altitude and it is very easy to discharge in near space. Compared with a SDBD at ground level, the plasma is produced on both sides of the exposed electrode and distributes more uniformly in near space. Although the body force generated by the SDBD actuator is less effective in inducing a jet with nanosecond-pulse excitation than that with alternating voltage excitation, the induced jet by body force is with longer extent, thicker profile and higher velocity in near space than at ground level. The plasma bulk heating should be taken into account for nanosecond-pulse excitation. The Joule heating of electrons is the main source of plasma bulk heating which acts as a micro-explosion and mainly induces pressure perturbation. The discharge at ground level is like a ‘point explosion’, but a ‘region explosion’ in near space, which indicates a diffuse distribution of energy, should be responsible for the fact that the effect of bulk heating is reduced in near space.

  10. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Simulation Testbed II: design of a three-lens anastigmat telescope simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet, Élodie; Levecq, Olivier; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Perrin, Marshall D.; Soummer, Rémi

    2014-08-01

    The JamesWebb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop experiment designed to reproduce the main aspects of wavefront sensing and control (WFS and C) for JWST. To replicate the key optical physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) design at optical wavelengths we have developed a three-lens anastigmat optical system. This design uses custom lenses (plano-convex, plano-concave, and bi-convex) with fourth-order aspheric terms on powered surfaces to deliver the equivalent image quality and sampling of JWST NIRCam at the WFS and C wavelength (633 nm, versus JWST's 2.12 μm). For active control, in addition to the segmented primary mirror simulator, JOST reproduces the secondary mirror alignment modes with five degrees of freedom. We present the testbed requirements and its optical and optomechanical design. We study the linearity of the main aberration modes (focus, astigmatism, coma) both as a function of field point and level of misalignments of the secondary mirror. We find that the linearity with the transmissive design is similar to what is observed with a traditional TMA design, and will allow us to develop a linear-control alignment strategy based on the multi-field methods planned for JWST.

  11. Optical Analysis of Transparent Polymeric Material Exposed to Simulated Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Finckenor, Miria M.

    1999-01-01

    Transparent polymeric materials are being designed and utilized as solar concentrating lenses for spacecraft power and propulsion systems. These polymeric lenses concentrate solar energy onto energy conversion devices such as solar cells and thermal energy systems. The conversion efficiency is directly related to the transmissivity of the polymeric lens. The Environmental Effects Group of the Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials, Processes, and Manufacturing Department exposed a variety of materials to a simulated space environment and evaluated them for an, change in optical transmission. These materials include Lexan(TM), polyethylene terephthalate (PET). several formulations of Tefzel(TM). and Teflon(TM), and silicone DC 93-500. Samples were exposed to a minimum of 1000 Equivalent Sun Hours (ESH) of near-UV radiation (250 - 400 nm wavelength). Data will be presented on materials exposed to charged particle radiation equivalent to a five-year dose in geosynchronous orbit. These exposures were performed in MSFC's Combined Environmental Effects Test Chamber, a unique facility with the capability to expose materials simultaneously or sequentially to protons, low-energy electrons, high-energy electrons, near UV radiation and vacuum UV radiation.Prolonged exposure to the space environment will decrease the polymer film's transmission and thus reduce the conversion efficiency. A method was developed to normalize the transmission loss and thus rank the materials according to their tolerance to space environmental exposure. Spectral results and the material ranking according to transmission loss are presented.

  12. Page mode reading with simulated scotomas: a modest effect of interline spacing on reading speed.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Jean-Baptiste; Scherlen, Anne-Catherine; Anne-Catherine, Scherlen; Castet, Eric; Eric, Castet

    2007-12-01

    Crowding is thought to be one potent limiting factor of reading in peripheral vision. While several studies investigated how crowding between horizontally adjacent letters or words can influence eccentric reading, little attention has been paid to the influence of vertically adjacent lines of text. The goal of this study was to examine the dependence of page mode reading performance (speed and accuracy) on interline spacing. A gaze-contingent visual display was used to simulate a visual central scotoma while normally sighted observers read meaningful French sentences following MNREAD principles. The sensitivity of this new material to low-level factors was confirmed by showing strong effects of perceptual learning, print size and scotoma size on reading performance. In contrast, reading speed was only slightly modulated by interline spacing even for the largest range tested: a 26% gain for a 178% increase in spacing. This modest effect sharply contrasts with the dramatic influence of vertical word spacing found in a recent RSVP study. This discrepancy suggests either that vertical crowding is minimized when reading meaningful sentences, or that the interaction between crowding and other factors such as attention and/or visuo-motor control is dependent on the paradigm used to assess reading speed (page vs. RSVP mode).

  13. Simulation of Space Charge Dynamic in Polyethylene Under DC Continuous Electrical Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhari, Hamed; Rogti, Fatiha

    2016-10-01

    The space charge dynamic plays a very important role in the aging and breakdown of polymeric insulation materials under high voltage. This is due to the intensification of the local electric field and the attendant chemical-mechanical effects in the vicinity around the trapped charge. In this paper, we have investigated the space charge dynamic in low-density polyethylene under high direct-current voltage, which is evaluated by experimental conditions. The evaluation is on the basis of simulation using a bipolar charge transport model consisting of charge injection, transports, trapping, detrapping, and recombination phenomena. The theoretical formulation of the physical problem is based on the Poisson, the continuity, and the transport equations. Numerical results provide temporal and local distributions of the electric field, the space charge density for the different kinds of charges (net charge density, mobile and trapped of electron density, mobile hole density), conduction and displacement current densities, and the external current. The result shows the appearance of the negative packet-like space charge with a large amount of the bulk under the dc electric field of 100 kV/mm, and the induced distortion of the electric field is largely near to the anode, about 39% higher than the initial electric field applied.

  14. Computer graphics testbed to simulate and test vision systems for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, John B.; Wu, Chris K.; Lin, Y. H.

    1991-01-01

    A system was developed for displaying computer graphics images of space objects and the use of the system was demonstrated as a testbed for evaluating vision systems for space applications. In order to evaluate vision systems, it is desirable to be able to control all factors involved in creating the images used for processing by the vision system. Considerable time and expense is involved in building accurate physical models of space objects. Also, precise location of the model relative to the viewer and accurate location of the light source require additional effort. As part of this project, graphics models of space objects such as the Solarmax satellite are created that the user can control the light direction and the relative position of the object and the viewer. The work is also aimed at providing control of hue, shading, noise and shadows for use in demonstrating and testing imaging processing techniques. The simulated camera data can provide XYZ coordinates, pitch, yaw, and roll for the models. A physical model is also being used to provide comparison of camera images with the graphics images.

  15. Physical design and Monte Carlo simulations of a space radiation detector onboard the SJ-10 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya-Qing; Wang, Huan-Yu; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Peng, Wen-Xi; Fan, Rui-Rui; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Gao, Ming; Zhang, Yun-Long; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Yang, Jia-Wei; Wang, Jin-Zhou; Zhang, Fei; Dong, Yi-Fan; Guo, Dong-Ya; Zhou, Da-Wei

    2015-01-01

    A radiation gene box (RGB) onboard the SJ-10 satellite is a device carrying mice and drosophila cells to determine the biological effects of space radiation environment. The shielded fluxes of different radioactive sources were calculated and the linear energy transfers of γ-rays, electrons, protons and α-particles in the tissue were acquired using A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic. Then, a conceptual model of a space radiation instrument employing three semiconductor sub-detectors for deriving the charged and uncharged radiation environment of the RGB was designed. The energy depositions in the three sub-detectors were classified into 15 channels (bins) in an algorithm derived from the Monte Carlo method. The physical feasibility of the conceptual instrument was also verified by Monte Carlo simulations.

  16. Contamination Control Assessment of the World's Largest Space Environment Simulation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Aaron; Henry, Michael W.; Grisnik, Stanley P.; Sinclair, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    The Space Power Facility s thermal vacuum test chamber is the largest chamber in the world capable of providing an environment for space simulation. To improve performance and meet stringent requirements of a wide customer base, significant modifications were made to the vacuum chamber. These include major changes to the vacuum system and numerous enhancements to the chamber s unique polar crane, with a goal of providing high cleanliness levels. The significance of these changes and modifications are discussed in this paper. In addition, the composition and arrangement of the pumping system and its impact on molecular back-streaming are discussed in detail. Molecular contamination measurements obtained with a TQCM and witness wafers during two recent integrated system tests of the chamber are presented and discussed. Finally, a concluding remarks section is presented.

  17. Development of High-Resolution UV-VIS Diagnostics for Space Plasma Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Andrew; Batishchev, Oleg

    2012-10-01

    Non-invasive far-UV-VIS plasma emission allows remote diagnostics of plasma, which is particularly important for space application. Accurate vacuum tank space plasma simulations require monochromators with high spectral resolution (better than 0.01A) to capture important details of atomic and ionic lines, such as Ly-alpha, etc. We are building a new system based on the previous work [1], and will discuss the development of a spectrometry system that combines a single-pass vacuum far-UV-NIR spectrometer and a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon. [4pt] [1] O. Batishchev and J.L. Cambier, Experimental Study of the Mini-Helicon Thruster, Air Force Research Laboratory Report, AFRL-RZ-ED-TR-2009-0020, 2009.

  18. Preliminary Observing System Simulation Experiments for Doppler Wind Lidars Deployed on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, E.; Jacob, J.; Rosenberg, R.; Jusem, J. C.; Emmitt, G. D.; Wood, S.; Greco, L. P.; Riishojgaard, L. P.; Masutani, M.; Ma, Z.; Tucker, S.; Atlas, R.; Bucci, L.; Hardesty, M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Software Systems Support Office (SSSO) is participating in a multi-agency study of the impact of assimilating Doppler wind lidar observations on numerical weather prediction. Funded by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office, SSSO has worked with Simpson Weather Associates to produce time series of synthetic lidar observations mimicking the OAWL and WISSCR lidar instruments deployed on the International Space Station. In addition, SSSO has worked to assimilate a portion of these observations those drawn from the NASA fvGCM Nature Run into the NASA GEOS-DAS global weather prediction system in a series of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). These OSSEs will complement parallel OSSEs prepared by the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation and by NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. In this talk, we will describe our procedure and provide available OSSE results.

  19. The simulation of radiation effects to astronauts due to solar energetic particles in deep space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Bao

    2012-02-01

    The exposure to interplanetary radiation poses a serious health risk to astronauts, especially for long-term missions. Protecting the astronauts from these particles has been the key issue to the manned space mission. High-energy space particles can penetrate the protective layer of a spacecraft, and probably cause deleterious effects to the astronauts. To estimate the size of these effects, a credible simulation of radioprotection is required. Using the Geant4 software toolkit, we have modeled the interaction processes and predicted the total energy deposit in a phantom (astronaut) as well as the similar information associated with secondary effects, due to Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) at ∼1 AU caused by the large SEPs events in October 1989 and August 1972. In addition, we compared the characteristics of the energy deposit due to SEPs and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and explained the differences between them by physical mechanism analysis.

  20. Space station Simulation Computer System (SCS) study for NASA/MSFC. Volume 2: Concept document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Simulation Computer System (SCS) concept document describes and establishes requirements for the functional performance of the SCS system, including interface, logistic, and qualification requirements. The SCS is the computational communications and display segment of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Payload Training Complex (PTC). The PTC is the MSFC facility that will train onboard and ground operations personnel to operate the payloads and experiments on board the international Space Station Freedom. The requirements to be satisfied by the system implementation are identified here. The SCS concept document defines the requirements to be satisfied through the implementation of the system capability. The information provides the operational basis for defining the requirements to be allocated to the system components and enables the system organization to assess whether or not the completed system complies with the requirements of the system.

  1. From diffusion pumps to cryopumps: The conversion of GSFC's space environment simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cary, Ron

    1992-01-01

    The SES (Space Environmental Simulator), largest of the Thermal Vacuum Facilities at The Goddard Space Flight Center, recently was converted from an oil diffusion pumped chamber to a Cryopumped chamber. This modification was driven by requirements of flight projects. The basic requirement was to retain or enhance the operational parameters of the chamber such as pumping speed, ultimate vacuum, pump down time, and thermal system performance. To accomplish this task, seventeen diffusion pumps were removed and replaced with eight 1.2 meter (48 inch) diameter cryopumps and one 0.5 meter (20 inch) turbomolecular pump. The conversion was accomplished with a combination of subcontracting and in-house efforts to maximize the efficiency of implementation.

  2. Space-time conditional disaggregation of precipitation at high resolution via simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bárdossy, András.; Pegram, Geoffrey G. S.

    2016-02-01

    Daily rainfall data are more plentiful and reliable than pluviometer data and are the best data set to start data-repair from, worldwide. Clusters of pluviometers (a term used herein for instruments recording at subdaily intervals) record wet and dry periods in close synchrony and larger and smaller catches tend to be recorded in similar groups, but they have many gaps that require infilling. We present a method of disaggregating daily rainfall to subdaily intervals, contemporaneously infilling gaps in the pluviometers. Then the observed data, together with the infilled and disaggregated values, are interpolated over the intervening space. To achieve this disaggregation, we used a Gaussian copula-based model with time-dependent marginal distributions and censored values representing the dry periods. In addition, we generated stochastically meaningful ensembles of missing or disaggregated values, while constraining each realization to the observed daily total where relevant. This applies to the gaps filled in the pluviometers as well as the disaggregation of the daily totals. Using the disaggregated and infilled subdaily ensembles, we then conditionally spatially simulated historical rainfall in the space between the gauges and pluviometers. The mean of these stochastic realizations was compared to interpolated fields using two other procedures: Rescaled Ordinary Kriging and Rescaled Nearest Neighbors, and found our method to be superior. Where there are daily data, the daily sum constrains the simulation. In the intervening space, in a chosen daily subinterval, there will be an ensemble of values simulated from the observations. We present the results of measurements and validation of the applications to an unusually large amount of data (not just a few convenient samples), and are confident that the methodology is sound and applicable in a variety of geographies.

  3. Signature mutations from B. subtilis spores exposed to radiations and simulated space environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munakata, , Nobuo; Natsume, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Teruaki; Hieda, Kotaro; Panitz, Corinna; Horneck, Gerda

    Rifampicin-resistant mutants were collected from the spores of three B. subtilis strains, HA101 (HA, repair proficient), TKJ6312 (US, UV-repair defective) and TKJ6412 (RF, recombination deficient) grown after exposure to various radiations and simulated space environments. All of 563 mutations analyzed carried sequence changes in the N-terminal region of the rpoB gene cod-ing for the subunit β of RNA polymerase II and belonged to 56 alleles. (1) Most of spontaneous mutants from the three strains belonged to 13 single-base substitution (SBS) alleles, exceptions (<2%) being one 3 bp insertion and one tandem double substitution (TDS). (2) About 6 % and 16 % of the mutations from the HA and RF spores, respectively, exposed to ionizing radiations were complex mutations including multiple-base substitutions, insertions and deletions. Several TDS and non-tandem double substitutions (NTDS), and 3, 6, 9 and one 30 bp deletions seem to provide signatures of the exposure to ionizing radiations. (3) Except one TDS from US and one NTDS from HA spores, UV or solar exposure seemed not to leave unique footprints. (4) In space simulation experiments, the only conditions involving high vacuum consistently increased the mutation frequency, and exhibited high occurrences (>50%) of TDS. In HA spores, the al-lele r201 (CA to TT at 1460) was the most frequent, while in US spores, another allele r210 (TC to AA at 1404) was the most frequent. In conclusion, some of the conditions encountered in space environments, such as space vacuum and ionizing radiations, could produce unique mutational signatures in the rpoB gene of B. subtilis spores.

  4. Comparison of Orion Vision Navigation Sensor Performance from STS-134 and the Space Operations Simulation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, John A.; Patangan, Mogi; Hinkel, Heather; Chevray, Keiko; Brazzel, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is a new spacecraft being designed by NASA and Lockheed Martin for future crewed exploration missions. The Vision Navigation Sensor is a Flash LIDAR that will be the primary relative navigation sensor for this vehicle. To obtain a better understanding of this sensor's performance, the Orion relative navigation team has performed both flight tests and ground tests. This paper summarizes and compares the performance results from the STS-134 flight test, called the Sensor Test for Orion RelNav Risk Mitigation (STORRM) Development Test Objective, and the ground tests at the Space Operations Simulation Center.

  5. Evaluation of radioisotope tracer and activation analysis techniques for contamination monitoring in space environment simulation chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smathers, J. B.; Kuykendall, W. E., Jr.; Wright, R. E., Jr.; Marshall, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Radioisotope measurement techniques and neutron activation analysis are evaluated for use in identifying and locating contamination sources in space environment simulation chambers. The alpha range method allows the determination of total contaminant concentration in vapor state and condensate state. A Cf-252 neutron activation analysis system for detecting oils and greases tagged with stable elements is described. While neutron activation analysis of tagged contaminants offers specificity, an on-site system is extremely costly to implement and provides only marginal detection sensitivity under even the most favorable conditions.

  6. Space simulation ultimate pressure lowered two decades by removal of diffusion pump oil contaminants during operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buggele, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    The complex problem why large space simulation chambers do not realize the true ultimate vacuum was investigated. Some contaminating factors affecting diffusion pump performance have been identified and some advances in vacuum/distillation/fractionation technology have been achieved which resulted in a two decade or more lower ultimate pressure. Data are presented to show the overall or individual contaminating effect of commonly used phthalate ester plasticizers of 390 to 530 molecular weight on diffusion pump performance. Methods for removing contaminants from diffusion pump silicone oil during operation and reclaiming contaminated oil by high vacuum molecular distillation are described.

  7. OVERFLOW Simulations of Space Shuttle Orbiter Reentry Based on As-Built Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Edward C.; Vicker, Darby J.; Campbell, Charles H.; Wilson, Brad; Pavek, Mike; Berger, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiters Discovery and Endeavor have been digitally scanned to obtain outer mold line surfaces. Using these scans, the existing overset computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grid system will be modified by projecting the grid points to the scanned geometry. Simulations will be performed using the OVERFLOW solver and the results compared to previous OVERFLOW results on the theoretical geometry and the aerodynamic databook. The "bent airframe" term will be compared between the aerodynamic databook and the computations over a range of reentry conditions.

  8. MEMS Functional Validation Using the Configuration Space Approach to Simulation and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.; Sacks, E.

    1999-03-09

    We have developed an interactive computer-aided design program that supports mechanical design of devices fabricated in surface micro-machining processes. The program automates kinematic analysis via a novel configuration space computation code, performs real-time simulation, and supports functional parametric design. Designers can visualize system function under a range of operating conditions, can find and correct design flaws, and can optimize performance. We used the program to detect and correct a design flaw in a micro-mechanical indexing mechanism fabricated at Sandia with the SUMMiT process.

  9. Source altitude for experiments to simulate space-to-earth laser propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O.

    1973-01-01

    The bias in scintillation measurements caused by the proximity of a spherical-wave source to the turbulence region of the atmosphere is predicted, and the laser-source altitude required for meaningful experiments simulating space-to-earth laser propagation is estimated. It is concluded that the source should be located at two or more times the maximum altitude of the tropopause to ensure that all measurements are not biased by more than 25%. Thus the vehicle used for experiments of this type should be capable of reaching a minimum altitude of 32 km.

  10. A space simulation test chamber development for the investigation of radiometric properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enlow, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and preliminary utilization of a thermal vacuum space simulation facility are discussed. The facility was required to perform studies on the thermal radiation properties of materials. A test chamber was designed to provide high pumping speed, low pressure, a low photon level radiation background (via high emissivity, coated, finned cryopanels), internal heat sources for rapid warmup, and rotary and linear motion of the irradiated materials specimen. The radiation detection system consists of two wideband infrared photoconductive detectors, their cryogenic coolers, a cryogenic-cooled blackbody source, and a cryogenic-cooled optical radiation modulator.

  11. A three body dynamic simulation of a seated tractor rocket escape system for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ondler, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    In the tractor-rocket seated-extraction candidate system for Space Shuttle Orbiter crew escape, the crewmember is pulled from his seat and away from the Orbiter via an elastic pendant, using a system of rails to guide the extraction trajectory through an opening on the window frame for flight deck crew and through the side hatch for the middeck crew. A three-body simulation has been developed to model the flight-mechanics aspects of the concept, where the three bodies are the astronaut (six DOF), the tractor rocket (six DOF), and the Shuttle Orbiter (three DOF); attention is given to crewmembers' clearance of the Orbiter structure and engine plumes.

  12. Simulation and optimization of a coherent detection and tracking receiver for free-space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schex, Anton; Zanner, Stefan

    1996-04-01

    The simulation and optimization of a high sensitive coherent detection and tracking receiver for free-space laser communications is described. The data and the spatial tracking error signals are obtained with the same set of photodetectors, hereby avoiding systematic losses. Simulation models for the tracking tilt mirror transfer function, the diffraction limited data and tracking receiver gain functions and the performance of the digital signal processing algorithms are derived. The optimization of the telescope's Fresnel-number and of the local laser's Gaussian beamwidth for the photodetectors used in our laboratory system is described. The intermediate frequency current and signal-to-noise ratio of the data signal are compared with theoretical limits.

  13. Degradation of learned skills. Effectiveness of practice methods on simulated space flight skill retention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitterley, T. E.; Berge, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Manual flight control and emergency procedure task skill degradation was evaluated after time intervals of from 1 to 6 months. The tasks were associated with a simulated launch through the orbit insertion flight phase of a space vehicle. The results showed that acceptable flight control performance was retained for 2 months, rapidly deteriorating thereafter by a factor of 1.7 to 3.1 depending on the performance measure used. Procedural task performance showed unacceptable degradation after only 1 month, and exceeded an order of magnitude after 4 months. The effectiveness of static rehearsal (checklists and briefings) and dynamic warmup (simulator practice) retraining methods were compared for the two tasks. Static rehearsal effectively countered procedural skill degradation, while some combination of dynamic warmup appeared necessary for flight control skill retention. It was apparent that these differences between methods were not solely a function of task type or retraining method, but were a function of the performance measures used for each task.

  14. An integrative approach to space-flight physiology using systems analysis and mathematical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.; White, R. J.; Rummel, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    An approach was developed to aid in the integration of many of the biomedical findings of space flight, using systems analysis. The mathematical tools used in accomplishing this task include an automated data base, a biostatistical and data analysis system, and a wide variety of mathematical simulation models of physiological systems. A keystone of this effort was the evaluation of physiological hypotheses using the simulation models and the prediction of the consequences of these hypotheses on many physiological quantities, some of which were not amenable to direct measurement. This approach led to improvements in the model, refinements of the hypotheses, a tentative integrated hypothesis for adaptation to weightlessness, and specific recommendations for new flight experiments.

  15. Transient analysis and startup simulation of a thermionic space nuclear reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Xue, Huimin; Paramonov, D. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    The thermionic transient analysis model is used to simulate the startup of the TOPAZ-2 space nuclear power system in orbit. The simulated startup procedures are assumed for the purpose of demonstrating the capabilities of the model and may not represent an accurate account of the actual startup procedures of the TOPAZ-2 system. The temperature reactivity feedback effects of the moderator, UO[sub 2] fuel, electrodes, coolant, and other components in the core are calculated, and their effects on the thermal and criticality conditions of the reactor are investigated. Also, estimates of the time constants of the temperature reactivity feedback for the UO[sub 2] fuel and the ZrH moderator during startup, as well as of the total temperature reactivity feedback as a function of the reactor steady-state thermal power, are obtained.

  16. Start-up simulation of a thermionic space nuclear reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Xue, H.; Paramonov, D. )

    1993-01-15

    The Thermionic Transient Analysis Model (TITAM) is used in this paper to simulate the start-up of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear power system in orbit. The start-up procedures simulated herein are assumed for the purpose of demonstrating the capabilities of the model and may not represent an accurate account of the actual start-up procedures of the TOPAZ-II system. The temperature reactivity feedback effects of the moderator, UO[sub 2] fuel, electrodes, coolant, and other components in the core are calculated and their effects on the thermal and criticality conditions of the reactor are investigated. Also, estimates of the time constants of the temperature reactivity feedback for the UO[sub 2] fuel and the ZrH moderator during start-up, as well as of the total temperature reactivity feedback as a function of the reactor steady-state thermal power, are obtained.

  17. ICESat-2 Simulations and Analysis using Sigma Space MPL Measurements over Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, A. C.; Barbieri, K.; Markus, T.; Neumann, T.; Sirota, M.; Field, C.; Zwally, H. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Sigma Space Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL), a 100 channel photon counting instrument, collected data over the Jacobshavn glacier and fjord and adjacent ice sheet regions in July 2009. Sigma Space preprocessed the data to geolocate it and remove instrument-induced anomalies and the majority of the atmospheric noise, delivering a “signal only” data set containing the x, y, z locations of photons received from the surface. This presentation explains the procedure we used to produce simulated ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) returns from this data and analyze the projected ATLAS instrument performance over these Greenland regions. ATLAS data sets were simulated by sub sampling the MPL data and then adding realistic ICESat-2 background noise. The current ATLAS instrument design includes 9-beams, grouped in three sets of three beams spanning ~6 km in total width. The ICESat-2 project and Science Definition Team defined a number of design cases, which specify the environmental conditions under which we expect ICESat-2 to collect useful data. These design cases were used to predict the performance of the ATLAS instrument. We used the output of these design cases to define the mean number of signal and background photoelectrons in our simulations to define the locations and number of signal and noise photons per shot. We present a preliminary algorithm from which the ground elevation can be calculated from the simulated data sets and calculate the precision of the retrieved elevations by comparing to elevations calculated from the full rate MPL data. An analysis of the precision and characteristics of the cross track slope knowledge at both the 6km and 100m level and how precisely it will allow us to calculate elevation changes using repeat cycles is also presented.

  18. Tetrahedral-Mesh Simulation of Turbulent Flows with the Space-Time Conservative Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Venkatachari, Balaji; Cheng, Gary C.

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows are predominantly carried out using structured, hexahedral meshes despite decades of development in unstructured mesh methods. Tetrahedral meshes offer ease of mesh generation around complex geometries and the potential of an orientation free grid that would provide un-biased small-scale dissipation and more accurate intermediate scale solutions. However, due to the lack of consistent multi-dimensional numerical formulations in conventional schemes for triangular and tetrahedral meshes at the cell interfaces, numerical issues exist when flow discontinuities or stagnation regions are present. The space-time conservative conservation element solution element (CESE) method - due to its Riemann-solver-free shock capturing capabilities, non-dissipative baseline schemes, and flux conservation in time as well as space - has the potential to more accurately simulate turbulent flows using unstructured tetrahedral meshes. To pave the way towards accurate simulation of shock/turbulent boundary-layer interaction, a series of wave and shock interaction benchmark problems that increase in complexity, are computed in this paper with triangular/tetrahedral meshes. Preliminary computations for the normal shock/turbulence interactions are carried out with a relatively coarse mesh, by direct numerical simulations standards, in order to assess other effects such as boundary conditions and the necessity of a buffer domain. The results indicate that qualitative agreement with previous studies can be obtained for flows where, strong shocks co-exist along with unsteady waves that display a broad range of scales, with a relatively compact computational domain and less stringent requirements for grid clustering near the shock. With the space-time conservation properties, stable solutions without any spurious wave reflections can be obtained without a need for buffer domains near the outflow/farfield boundaries. Computational results for the

  19. Simulations of phase space distributions of storm time proton ring current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Lyons, Larry R.; Schulz, Michael

    1994-01-01

    We use results of guiding-center simulations of ion transport to map phase space densities of the stormtime proton ring current. We model a storm as a sequence of substorm-associated enhancements in the convection electric field. Our pre-storm phase space distribution is an analytical solution to a steady-state transport model in which quiet-time radial diffusion balances charge exchange. This pre-storm phase space spectra at L approximately 2 to 4 reproduce many of the features found in observed quiet-time spectra. Using results from simulations of ion transport during model storms having main phases of 3, 6, and 12 hr, we map phase space distributions from the pre-storm distribution in accordance with Liouville's theorem. We find stormtime enhancements in the phase space densities at energies E approximately 30-160 keV for L approximately 2.5 to 4. These enhancements agree well with the observed stormtime ring current. For storms with shorter main phases (approximately 3 hr), the enhancements are caused mainly by the trapping of ions injected from open night side trajectories, and diffusive transport of higher-energy (greater than or approximately 160 keV) ions contributes little to the stormtime ring current. However, the stormtime ring current is augmented also by the diffusive transport of higher-energy ions (E greater than or approximately 160 keV) durinng stroms having longer main phases (greater than or approximately 6 hr). In order to account for the increase in Dst associated with the formation of the stormtime ring current, we estimate the enhancement in particle-energy content that results from stormtime ion transport in the equatorial magnetosphere. We find that transport alone cannot account for the entire increase in absolute value of Dst typical of a major storm. However, we can account for the entire increase in absolute value of Dst by realistically increasing the stormtime outer boundary value of the phase space density relative to the quiet

  20. The effects of simulated space environmental parameters on six commercially available composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.; Sykes, George F., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of simulated space environmental parameters on microdamage induced by the environment in a series of commercially available graphite-fiber-reinforced composite materials were determined. Composites with both thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems were studied. Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) exposures were simulated by thermal cycling; geosynchronous-orbit (GEO) exposures were simulated by electron irradiation plus thermal cycling. The thermal cycling temperature range was -250 F to either 200 F or 150 F. The upper limits of the thermal cycles were different to ensure that an individual composite material was not cycled above its glass transition temperature. Material response was characterized through assessment of the induced microcracking and its influence on mechanical property changes at both room temperature and -250 F. Microdamage was induced in both thermoset and thermoplastic advanced composite materials exposed to the simulated LEO environment. However, a 350 F cure single-phase toughened epoxy composite was not damaged during exposure to the LEO environment. The simuated GEO environment produced microdamage in all materials tested.

  1. A space time-ensemble parallel nudged elastic band algorithm for molecular kinetics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Aiichiro

    2008-02-01

    A scalable parallel algorithm has been designed to study long-time dynamics of many-atom systems based on the nudged elastic band method, which performs mutually constrained molecular dynamics simulations for a sequence of atomic configurations (or states) to obtain a minimum energy path between initial and final local minimum-energy states. A directionally heated nudged elastic band method is introduced to search for thermally activated events without the knowledge of final states, which is then applied to an ensemble of bands in a path ensemble method for long-time simulation in the framework of the transition state theory. The resulting molecular kinetics (MK) simulation method is parallelized with a space-time-ensemble parallel nudged elastic band (STEP-NEB) algorithm, which employs spatial decomposition within each state, while temporal parallelism across the states within each band and band-ensemble parallelism are implemented using a hierarchy of communicator constructs in the Message Passing Interface library. The STEP-NEB algorithm exhibits good scalability with respect to spatial, temporal and ensemble decompositions on massively parallel computers. The MK simulation method is used to study low strain-rate deformation of amorphous silica.

  2. Simulated Space Radiation and Weightlessness: Vascular-Bone Coupling Mechanisms to Preserve Skeletal Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Delp, M. D.; Castillo, A. B.; Globus, R. K.

    2012-01-01

    Weightlessness causes a cephalad fluid shift and reduction in mechanical stimulation, adversely affecting both cortical and trabecular bone tissue in astronauts. In rodent models of weightlessness, the onset of bone loss correlates with reduced skeletal perfusion, reduced and rarified vasculature and lessened vasodilation, which resembles blood-bone symbiotic events that can occur with fracture repair and aging. These are especially serious risks for long term, exploration class missions when astronauts will face the challenge of increased exposure to space radiation and abrupt transitions between different gravity environments upon arrival and return. Previously, we found using the mouse hindlimb unloading model and exposure to heavy ion radiation, both disuse and irradiation cause an acute bone loss that was associated with a reduced capacity to produce bone-forming osteoblasts from the bone marrow. Together, these findings led us to hypothesize that exposure to space radiation exacerbates weightlessness-induced bone loss and impairs recovery upon return, and that treatment with anti-oxidants may mitigate these effects. The specific aims of this recently awarded grant are to: AIM 1 Determine the functional and structural consequences of prolonged weightlessness and space radiation (simulated spaceflight) for bone and skeletal vasculature in the context of bone cell function and oxidative stress. AIM 2 Determine the extent to which an anti-oxidant protects against weightlessness and space radiation-induced bone loss and vascular dysfunction. AIM 3 Determine how space radiation influences later skeletal and vasculature recovery from prolonged weightlessness and the potential of anti-oxidants to preserve adaptive remodeling.

  3. Vapor Space Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Gray, J. R.; Garcia-Diaz, B. L.; Murphy, T. H.; Hicks, K. R.

    2014-01-30

    As part of an integrated program to better understand corrosion in the high level waste tanks, Hanford has been investigating corrosion at the liquid/air interface (LAI) and at higher areas in the tank vapor space. This current research evaluated localized corrosion in the vapor space over Hanford double shell tank simulants to assess the impact of ammonia and new minimum nitrite concentration limits, which are part of the broader corrosion chemistry limits. The findings from this study showed that the presence of ammonia gas (550 ppm) in the vapor space is sufficient to reduce corrosion over the short-term (i.e. four months) for a Hanford waste chemistry (SY102 High Nitrate). These findings are in agreement with previous studies at both Hanford and SRS which showed ammonia gas in the vapor space to be inhibitive. The presence of ammonia in electrochemical test solution, however, was insufficient to inhibit against pitting corrosion. The effect of the ammonia appears to be a function of the waste chemistry and may have more significant effects in waste with low nitrite concentrations. Since high levels of ammonia were found beneficial in previous studies, additional testing is recommended to assess the necessary minimum concentration for protection of carbon steel. The new minimum R value of 0.15 was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion in the vapor space. The pitting that occurred, however, did not progress over the four-month test. Pits appeared to stop growing, which would indicate that pitting might not progress through wall.

  4. Simulation of physiological systems in order to evaluate and predict the human condition in a space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verigo, V. V.

    1979-01-01

    Simulation models were used to study theoretical problems of space biology and medicine. The reaction and adaptation of the main physiological systems to the complex effects of space flight were investigated. Mathematical models were discussed in terms of their significance in the selection of the structure and design of biological life support systems.

  5. Extended Phase-Space Methods for Enhanced Sampling in Molecular Simulations: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fujisaki, Hiroshi; Moritsugu, Kei; Matsunaga, Yasuhiro; Morishita, Tetsuya; Maragliano, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulations are a powerful approach to study biomolecular conformational changes or protein–ligand, protein–protein, and protein–DNA/RNA interactions. Straightforward applications, however, are often hampered by incomplete sampling, since in a typical simulated trajectory the system will spend most of its time trapped by high energy barriers in restricted regions of the configuration space. Over the years, several techniques have been designed to overcome this problem and enhance space sampling. Here, we review a class of methods that rely on the idea of extending the set of dynamical variables of the system by adding extra ones associated to functions describing the process under study. In particular, we illustrate the Temperature Accelerated Molecular Dynamics (TAMD), Logarithmic Mean Force Dynamics (LogMFD), and Multiscale Enhanced Sampling (MSES) algorithms. We also discuss combinations with techniques for searching reaction paths. We show the advantages presented by this approach and how it allows to quickly sample important regions of the free-energy landscape via automatic exploration. PMID:26389113

  6. James Webb Space Telescope optical simulation testbed III: first experimental results with linear-control alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egron, Sylvain; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Leboulleux, Lucie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Élodie; Perrin, Marshall D.; Ygouf, Marie; Michau, Vincent; Bonnefois, Aurélie; Fusco, Thierry; Escolle, Clément; Ferrari, Marc; Hugot, Emmanuel; Soummer, Rémi

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop experiment designed to study wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science and Operations Center. The design of JOST reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) using three custom aspheric lenses. It provides similar quality image as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at 633 nm. An Iris AO segmented mirror stands for the segmented primary mirror of JWST. Actuators allow us to control (1) the 18 segments of the segmented mirror in piston, tip, tilt and (2) the second lens, which stands for the secondary mirror, in tip, tilt and x, y, z positions. We present the full linear control alignment infrastructure developed for JOST, with an emphasis on multi-field wavefront sensing and control. Our implementation of the Wavefront Sensing (WFS) algorithms using phase diversity is experimentally tested. The wavefront control (WFC) algorithms, which rely on a linear model for optical aberrations induced by small misalignments of the three lenses, are tested and validated on simulations.

  7. Simulation of reusable cislunar space transportation systems with special consideration of chemical propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ress, R.

    1983-01-01

    The design of a multicomponent space transportation system to support such missions as nuclear-waste disposal, GEO solar-power-satellite construction, and lunar mining or manufacturing is investigated by means of computer simulations involving reusable chemically propelled spacecraft. The simulation comprises mission, spacecraft, facilities, management, production, and cost models and is based on currently available technologies and current costs. The main requirements for the system are supply of a lunar station and transport of 100 Gg/yr or more from earth or moon to GEO, with a system life of about 60 yr; and it is found that they are best met by a two-stage 9.5 Gg ballistic launcher, three types of shuttle vehicles, and space stations in GEO and lunar orbit to provide the shuttles with H2 and O2, respectively. Up to 730 launches and 1000 shuttle flights (on each route) per year at costs of $30-50/kg for earth-Leo, $100-150/kg for earth GEO, anad $40-60/kg for moon-GEO predicted.

  8. Performance assessment in a flight simulator test—Validation of a space psychology methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, B.; Salnitski, Vyacheslav; Soll, Henning; Rauch, Melina; Goeters, Klaus-Martin; Maschke, Peter; Stelling, Dirk; Eißfeldt, Hinnerk

    2007-02-01

    The objective assessment of operator performance in hand controlled docking of a spacecraft on a space station has 30 years of tradition and is well established. In the last years the performance assessment was successfully combined with a psycho-physiological approach for the objective assessment of the levels of physiological arousal and psychological load. These methods are based on statistical reference data. For the enhancement of the statistical power of the evaluation methods, both were actually implemented into a comparable terrestrial task: the flight simulator test of DLR in the selection procedure for ab initio pilot applicants for civil airlines. In the first evaluation study 134 male subjects were analysed. Subjects underwent a flight simulator test including three tasks, which were evaluated by instructors applying well-established and standardised rating scales. The principles of the performance algorithms of the docking training were adapted for the automated flight performance assessment. They are presented here. The increased human errors under instrument flight conditions without visual feedback required a manoeuvre recognition algorithm before calculating the deviation of the flown track from the given task elements. Each manoeuvre had to be evaluated independently of former failures. The expert rated performance showed a highly significant correlation with the automatically calculated performance for each of the three tasks: r=.883, r=.874, r=.872, respectively. An automated algorithm successfully assessed the flight performance. This new method will possibly provide a wide range of other future applications in aviation and space psychology.

  9. Space structure capturing and assembling by experimental free-floating robot satellite (EFFORTS) simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.

    1993-09-01

    In order to study and validate practical availability of control schemes for in-orbit operational free-floating robots, a research group at the Tokyo Institute of Technology has developed the Experimental Free-FlOating RoboT Satellite (EFFORTS-I and II) simulators, which enable to examine 2-dimensional pseudo-micro gravity motion dynamics by air lift system. The robot model comprising a satellite base body and articulated manipulator arms with grippers and wrist force sensors, makes horizontal motion without mechanical disturbances or external forces. This paper presents the control methods and experimental results for spacecraft/manipulator control paying attention to the reaction dynamics, and assembly and deployment operation of space structures. The paper focuses the discussion of (1) hardware design of EFFORTS simulators, (2) dynamic modeling and a basic control concept for space free-floating manipulators, (3) satellite attitude control coordinating with manipulator dynamics, (4) practical force control for dexterous manipulation, and (5) experimental results on above topics.

  10. Facility and Methods Developed for Simulated Space Vacuum Ultraviolet Exposure Testing of Polymer Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Pietromica, Anthony J.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Messer, Russell K.

    2002-01-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation of wavelengths between 115 and 200 nm produced by the Sun in the space environment can degrade polymer films, producing changes in their optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. These effects are particularly important for thin polymer films being considered for ultralightweight space structures, because, for most polymers, VUV radiation is absorbed in a thin surface layer. The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed facilities and methods for long-term ground testing of polymer films to evaluate space environmental VUV radiation effects. VUV exposure can also be used as part of combined or sequential simulated space environmental exposures to determine combined damaging effects with other aspects of the space environment, which include solar ultraviolet radiation, solar flare x-rays, electron and proton radiation, atomic oxygen (for low-Earth-orbit missions), and temperature effects. Because the wavelength sensitivity of VUV damage is not well known for most materials, Glenn's VUV facility uses a broad-spectrum deuterium lamp with a magnesium fluoride window that provides output between 115 and 200 nm. Deuterium lamps of this type were characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and through measurements at Glenn. Spectral irradiance measurements show that from approximately 115 to 160 nm, deuterium lamp irradiance can be many times that of air mass zero solar irradiance, and as wavelength increases above approximately 160 nm, deuterium lamp irradiance decreases in comparison to the Sun. The facility is a cryopumped vacuum chamber that achieves a system pressure of approximately 5310(exp -6) torr. It contains four individual VUV-exposure compartments in vacuum, separated by water-cooled copper walls to minimize VUV radiation and any sample contamination cross interactions between compartments. Each VUV-exposure compartment contains a VUV deuterium lamp, a motor-controlled sample stage coupled with a

  11. Space station Simulation Computer System (SCS) study for NASA/MSFC. Volume 5: Study analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Simulation Computer System (SCS) is the computer hardware, software, and workstations that will support the Payload Training Complex (PTC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The PTC will train the space station payload scientists, station scientists, and ground controllers to operate the wide variety of experiments that will be on-board the Freedom Space Station. The further analysis performed on the SCS study as part of task 2-Perform Studies and Parametric Analysis-of the SCS study contract is summarized. These analyses were performed to resolve open issues remaining after the completion of task 1, and the publishing of the SCS study issues report. The results of these studies provide inputs into SCS task 3-Develop and present SCS requirements, and SCS task 4-develop SCS conceptual designs. The purpose of these studies is to resolve the issues into usable requirements given the best available information at the time of the study. A list of all the SCS study issues is given.

  12. Evaluation of reformulated thermal control coatings in a simulated space environment. Part 1: YB-71

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerbus, Clifford A.; Carlin, Patrick S.

    1994-01-01

    The Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center and Wright Laboratory Materials Directorate (WL/ML) have sponsored and effort to effort to reformulate and qualify Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute (IITRI) spacecraft thermal control coatings. S13G/LO-1, Z93, and YB-71 coatings were reformulated because the potassium silicate binder, Sylvania PS-7, used in the coatings is no longer manufactured. Coatings utilizing the binder's replacement candidate, Kasil 2130, manufactured by The Philadelphia Quartz (PQ) Corporation, Baltimore, Maryland, and undergoing testing at the Materials Directorate's Space Combined Effects Primary Test and Research Equipment (SCEPTRE) Facility operated by the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI). The simulated space environment consists of combined ultraviolet (UV) and electron exposure with in site specimen reflectance measurements. A brief description of the effort at IITRI, results and discussion from testing the reformulated YB-71 coating in SCEPTRE, and plans for further testing of reformulated Z93 and S13G/LO-1 are presented.

  13. The Value of Biomedical Simulation Environments to Future Human Space Flight Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry G.; Skytland, Nicholas G.; Platts, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    With the ambitious goals to send manned missions to asteroids and onto Mars, substantial work will be required to ensure the well being of the men and women who will undertake these difficult missions. Unlike current International Space Station or Shuttle missions, astronauts will be required to endure long-term exposure to higher levels of radiation, isolation and reduced gravity. These new operation conditions will pose health risks that are currently not well understood and perhaps unanticipated. Therefore, it is essential to develop and apply advanced tools to predict, assess and mitigate potential hazards to astronaut health. NASA s Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working to develop and apply computational models of physiologic response to space flight operation conditions over various time periods and environmental circumstances. The collective application and integration of well vetted models assessing the physiology, biomechanics and anatomy is referred to as the Digital Astronaut. The Digital Astronaut simulation environment will serve as a practical working tool for use by NASA in operational activities such as the prediction of biomedical risks and functional capabilities of astronauts. In additional to space flight operation conditions, DAP s work has direct applicability to terrestrial biomedical research by providing virtual environments for hypothesis testing, experiment design, and to reduce animal/human testing. A practical application of the DA to assess pre and post flight responses to exercise is illustrated and the difficulty in matching true physiological responses is discussed.

  14. Detection of Macromolecules in Desert Cyanobacteria Mixed with a Lunar Mineral Analogue After Space Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baqué, Mickael; Verseux, Cyprien; Rabbow, Elke; de Vera, Jean-Pierre Paul; Billi, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    In the context of future exposure missions in Low Earth Orbit and possibly on the Moon, two desert strains of the cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, strains CCMEE 029 and 057, mixed or not with a lunar mineral analogue, were exposed to fractionated fluencies of UVC and polychromatic UV (200-400 nm) and to space vacuum. These experiments were carried out within the framework of the BIOMEX (BIOlogy and Mars EXperiment) project, which aims at broadening our knowledge of mineral-microorganism interaction and the stability/degradation of their macromolecules when exposed to space and simulated Martian conditions. The presence of mineral analogues provided a protective effect, preserving survivability and integrity of DNA and photosynthetic pigments, as revealed by testing colony-forming abilities, performing PCR-based assays and using confocal laser scanning microscopy. In particular, DNA and pigments were still detectable after 500 kJ/m2 of polychromatic UV and space vacuum (10-4 Pa), corresponding to conditions expected during one-year exposure in Low Earth Orbit on board the EXPOSE-R2 platform in the presence of 0.1 % Neutral Density (ND) filter. After exposure to high UV fluencies (800 MJ/m2) in the presence of minerals, however, altered fluorescence emission spectrum of the photosynthetic pigments were detected, whereas DNA was still amplified by PCR. The present paper considers the implications of such findings for the detection of biosignatures in extraterrestrial conditions and for putative future lunar missions.

  15. Detection of macromolecules in desert cyanobacteria mixed with a lunar mineral analogue after space simulations.

    PubMed

    Baqué, Mickael; Verseux, Cyprien; Rabbow, Elke; de Vera, Jean-Pierre Paul; Billi, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    In the context of future exposure missions in Low Earth Orbit and possibly on the Moon, two desert strains of the cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, strains CCMEE 029 and 057, mixed or not with a lunar mineral analogue, were exposed to fractionated fluencies of UVC and polychromatic UV (200-400 nm) and to space vacuum. These experiments were carried out within the framework of the BIOMEX (BIOlogy and Mars EXperiment) project, which aims at broadening our knowledge of mineral-microorganism interaction and the stability/degradation of their macromolecules when exposed to space and simulated Martian conditions. The presence of mineral analogues provided a protective effect, preserving survivability and integrity of DNA and photosynthetic pigments, as revealed by testing colony-forming abilities, performing PCR-based assays and using confocal laser scanning microscopy. In particular, DNA and pigments were still detectable after 500 kJ/m(2) of polychromatic UV and space vacuum (10(-4) Pa), corresponding to conditions expected during one-year exposure in Low Earth Orbit on board the EXPOSE-R2 platform in the presence of 0.1 % Neutral Density (ND) filter. After exposure to high UV fluencies (800 MJ/m(2)) in the presence of minerals, however, altered fluorescence emission spectrum of the photosynthetic pigments were detected, whereas DNA was still amplified by PCR. The present paper considers the implications of such findings for the detection of biosignatures in extraterrestrial conditions and for putative future lunar missions.

  16. Modeling and simulations of three-dimensional laser imaging based on space-variant structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jie; Hao, Qun; Peng, Yuxin; Cheng, Yang; Mu, Jiaxing; Wang, Peng; Yu, Haoyong

    2016-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) laser imaging system based on time of flight is proposed, based on the human retina structure. The system obtains 3D images with space-variant resolution, and we further establish mathematical models of the system and carried out simulative comparison between space-variant structure (SVS) and space-invariant structure (SIS). The system based on SVS produces significant improvements over traditional system based on SIS in the following aspects: (1) The system based on SVS uses less pixels than that based on SIS under the same field of view (FOV) and resolution. Therefore, this property is more suitable for uses in situations that require high speed and large volume data processing. (2) The system based on SVS has higher efficiency of utilization of photodiode array than that based on SIS. (3) 3D image based on SVS has the properties of rotation and scaling invariance. (4) The system based on SVS has higher echo power in outside ring of large photodiode array, which is more effective in detecting targets with low reflectance.

  17. Adaptive space warping to enhance passive haptics in an arthroscopy surgical simulator.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Jonas; Tuchschmid, Stefan; Harders, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Passive haptics, also known as tactile augmentation, denotes the use of a physical counterpart to a virtual environment to provide tactile feedback. Employing passive haptics can result in more realistic touch sensations than those from active force feedback, especially for rigid contacts. However, changes in the virtual environment would necessitate modifications of the physical counterparts. In recent work space warping has been proposed as one solution to overcome this limitation. In this technique virtual space is distorted such that a variety of virtual models can be mapped onto one single physical object. In this paper, we propose as an extension adaptive space warping; we show how this technique can be employed in a mixed-reality surgical training simulator in order to map different virtual patients onto one physical anatomical model. We developed methods to warp different organ geometries onto one physical mock-up, to handle different mechanical behaviors of the virtual patients, and to allow interactive modifications of the virtual structures, while the physical counterparts remain unchanged. Various practical examples underline the wide applicability of our approach. To the best of our knowledge this is the first practical usage of such a technique in the specific context of interactive medical training.

  18. Space station Simulation Computer System (SCS) study for NASA/MSFC. Volume 4: Conceptual design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Simulation Computer System (SCS) is the computer hardware, software, and workstations that will support the Payload Training Complex (PTC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The PTC will train the space station payload scientists, station scientists, and ground controllers to operate the wide variety of experiments that will be onboard the Space Station Freedom. In the first step of this task, a methodology was developed to ensure that all relevant design dimensions were addressed, and that all feasible designs could be considered. The development effort yielded the following method for generating and comparing designs in task 4: (1) Extract SCS system requirements (functions) from the system specification; (2) Develop design evaluation criteria; (3) Identify system architectural dimensions relevant to SCS system designs; (4) Develop conceptual designs based on the system requirements and architectural dimensions identified in step 1 and step 3 above; (5) Evaluate the designs with respect to the design evaluation criteria developed in step 2 above. The results of the method detailed in the above 5 steps are discussed. The results of the task 4 work provide the set of designs which two or three candidate designs are to be selected by MSFC as input to task 5-refine SCS conceptual designs. The designs selected for refinement will be developed to a lower level of detail, and further analyses will be done to begin to determine the size and speed of the components required to implement these designs.

  19. Low Earth orbital atomic oxygen environmental simulation facility for space materials evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stidham, Curtis R.; Banks, Bruce A.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Dever, Joyce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Bruckner, Eric J.

    1993-01-01

    Simulation of low Earth orbit atomic oxygen for accelerated exposure in ground-based facilities is necessary for the durability evaluation of space power system component materials for Space Station Freedom (SSF) and future missions. A facility developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations's (NASA) Lewis Research Center provides accelerated rates of exposure to a directed or scattered oxygen beam, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, and offers in-situ optical characterization. The facility utilizes an electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source to generate a low energy oxygen beam. Total hemispherical spectral reflectance of samples can be measured in situ over the wavelength range of 250 to 2500 nm. Deuterium lamps provide VUV radiation intensity levels in the 115 to 200 nm range of three to five equivalent suns. Retarding potential analyses show distributed ion energies below 30 electron volts (eV) for the operating conditions most suited for high flux, low energy testing. Peak ion energies are below the sputter threshold energy (approximately 30 eV) of the protective coatings on polymers that are evaluated in the facility, thus allowing long duration exposure without sputter erosion. Neutral species are expected to be at thermal energies of approximately .04 eV to .1 eV. The maximum effective flux level based on polyimide Kapton mass loss is 4.4 x 10 exp 6 atoms/((sq. cm)*s), thus providing a highly accelerated testing capability.

  20. Adaptive space warping to enhance passive haptics in an arthroscopy surgical simulator.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Jonas; Tuchschmid, Stefan; Harders, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Passive haptics, also known as tactile augmentation, denotes the use of a physical counterpart to a virtual environment to provide tactile feedback. Employing passive haptics can result in more realistic touch sensations than those from active force feedback, especially for rigid contacts. However, changes in the virtual environment would necessitate modifications of the physical counterparts. In recent work space warping has been proposed as one solution to overcome this limitation. In this technique virtual space is distorted such that a variety of virtual models can be mapped onto one single physical object. In this paper, we propose as an extension adaptive space warping; we show how this technique can be employed in a mixed-reality surgical training simulator in order to map different virtual patients onto one physical anatomical model. We developed methods to warp different organ geometries onto one physical mock-up, to handle different mechanical behaviors of the virtual patients, and to allow interactive modifications of the virtual structures, while the physical counterparts remain unchanged. Various practical examples underline the wide applicability of our approach. To the best of our knowledge this is the first practical usage of such a technique in the specific context of interactive medical training. PMID:23428447

  1. PIC Simulations of the Effect of Velocity Space Instabilities on Electron Viscosity and Thermal Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    In low-collisionality plasmas, velocity-space instabilities are a key mechanism providing an effective collisionality for the plasma. We use particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to study the interplay between electron- and ion-scale velocity-space instabilities and their effect on electron pressure anisotropy, viscous heating, and thermal conduction. The adiabatic invariance of the magnetic moment in low-collisionality plasmas leads to pressure anisotropy, {{Δ }}{p}j\\equiv {p}\\perp ,j-{p}\\parallel ,j\\gt 0, if the magnetic field {\\boldsymbol{B}} is amplified ({p}\\perp ,j and {p}\\parallel ,j denote the pressure of species j (electron, ion) perpendicular and parallel to {\\boldsymbol{B}}). If the resulting anisotropy is large enough, it can in turn trigger small-scale plasma instabilities. Our PIC simulations explore the nonlinear regime of the mirror, IC, and electron whistler instabilities, through continuous amplification of the magnetic field | {\\boldsymbol{B}}| by an imposed shear in the plasma. In the regime 1≲ {β }j≲ 20 ({β }j\\equiv 8π {p}j/| {\\boldsymbol{B}}{| }2), the saturated electron pressure anisotropy, {{Δ }}{p}{{e}}/{p}\\parallel ,{{e}}, is determined mainly by the (electron-lengthscale) whistler marginal stability condition, with a modest factor of ˜1.5-2 decrease due to the trapping of electrons into ion-lengthscale mirrors. We explicitly calculate the mean free path of the electrons and ions along the mean magnetic field and provide a simple physical prescription for the mean free path and thermal conductivity in low-collisionality β j ≳ 1 plasmas. Our results imply that velocity-space instabilities likely decrease the thermal conductivity of plasma in the outer parts of massive, hot, galaxy clusters. We also discuss the implications of our results for electron heating and thermal conduction in low-collisionality accretion flows onto black holes, including Sgr A* in the Galactic Center.

  2. Free space optical communication flight mission: simulations and experimental results on ground level demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata Calvo, Ramon; Ferrero, Valter; Camatel, Stefano; Catalano, Valeria; Bonino, Luciana; Toselli, Italo

    2009-05-01

    In the context of the increasing demand in high-speed data link for scientific, planetary exploration and earth observation missions, the Italian Space Agency (ASI), involving Thales Alenia Space as prime, the Polytechnic of Turin and other Italian partners, is developing a program for feasibility demonstration of optical communication system with the goal of a prototype flight mission in the next future. We have designed and analyzed a ground level bidirectional Free Space Optical Communication (FSOC) Breadboard at 2.5Gbit/s working at 1550nm as an emulator of slant path link. The breadboard is full-working and we tested it back-toback, at 500m and 2.3km during one month. The distances were chosen in order to get an equivalent slant path cumulative turbulence in a ground level link. The measurements campaign was done during the day and the night time and under several weather conditions, from sunny, rainy or windy. So we could work under very different turbulence conditions from weak to strong turbulence. We measured the scintillation both, on-axis and off-axis by introducing known misalignments at the terminals, transmission losses at both path lengths and BER at both receivers. We present simulations results considering slant and ground level links, where we took into account the atmospheric effects; scintillation, beam spread, beam wander and fade probability, and comparing them with the ground level experimental results, we find a good agreement between them. Finally we discuss the results obtained in the experimentation and in the flight mission simulations in order to apply our experimental results in the next project phases.

  3. Toward multi-scale simulation of reconnection phenomena in space plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den, M.; Horiuchi, R.; Usami, S.; Tanaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ohtani, H.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is considered to play an important role in space phenomena such as substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. It is well known that magnetic reconnection is controlled by microscopic kinetic mechanism. Frozen-in condition is broken due to particle kinetic effects and collisionless reconnection is triggered when current sheet is compressed as thin as ion kinetic scales under the influence of external driving flow. On the other hand configuration of the magnetic field leading to formation of diffusion region is determined in macroscopic scale and topological change after reconnection is also expressed in macroscopic scale. Thus magnetic reconnection is typical multi-scale phenomenon and microscopic and macroscopic physics are strongly coupled. Recently Horiuchi et al. developed an effective resistivity model based on particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results obtained in study of collisionless driven reconnection and applied to a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. They showed reproduction of global behavior in substrom such as dipolarization and flux rope formation by global three dimensional MHD simulation. Usami et al. developed multi-hierarchy simulation model, in which macroscopic and microscopic physics are solved self-consistently and simultaneously. Based on the domain decomposition method, this model consists of three parts: a MHD algorithm for macroscopic global dynamics, a PIC algorithm for microscopic kinetic physics, and an interface algorithm to interlock macro and micro hierarchies. They verified the interface algorithm by simulation of plasma injection flow. In their latest work, this model was applied to collisionless reconnection in an open system and magnetic reconnection was successfully found. In this paper, we describe our approach to clarify multi-scale phenomena and report the current status. Our recent study about extension of the MHD domain to global system is presented. We

  4. GNSS reflectometry aboard the International Space Station: phase-altimetry simulation to detect ocean topography anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmling, Maximilian; Leister, Vera; Saynisch, Jan; Zus, Florian; Wickert, Jens

    2016-04-01

    An ocean altimetry experiment using Earth reflected GNSS signals has been proposed to the European Space Agency (ESA). It is part of the GNSS Reflectometry Radio Occultation Scatterometry (GEROS) mission that is planned aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Altimetric simulations are presented that examine the detection of ocean topography anomalies assuming GNSS phase delay observations. Such delay measurements are well established for positioning and are possible due to a sufficient synchronization of GNSS receiver and transmitter. For altimetric purpose delays of Earth reflected GNSS signals can be observed similar to radar altimeter signals. The advantage of GNSS is the synchronized separation of transmitter and receiver that allow a significantly increased number of observation per receiver due to more than 70 GNSS transmitters currently in orbit. The altimetric concept has already been applied successfully to flight data recorded over the Mediterranean Sea. The presented altimetric simulation considers anomalies in the Agulhas current region which are obtained from the Region Ocean Model System (ROMS). Suitable reflection events in an elevation range between 3° and 30° last about 10min with ground track's length >3000km. Typical along-track footprints (1s signal integration time) have a length of about 5km. The reflection's Fresnel zone limits the footprint of coherent observations to a major axis extention between 1 to 6km dependent on the elevation. The altimetric performance depends on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reflection. Simulation results show that precision is better than 10cm for SNR of 30dB. Whereas, it is worse than 0.5m if SNR goes down to 10dB. Precision, in general, improves towards higher elevation angles. Critical biases are introduced by atmospheric and ionospheric refraction. Corresponding correction strategies are still under investigation.

  5. Internal Flow Simulation of Enhanced Performance Solid Rocket Booster for the Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An enhanced performance solid rocket booster concept for the space shuttle system has been proposed. The concept booster will have strong commonality with the existing, proven, reliable four-segment Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM) with individual component design (nozzle, insulator, etc.) optimized for a five-segment configuration. Increased performance is desirable to further enhance safety/reliability and/or increase payload capability. Performance increase will be achieved by adding a fifth propellant segment to the current four-segment booster and opening the throat to accommodate the increased mass flow while maintaining current pressure levels. One development concept under consideration is the static test of a "standard" RSRM with a fifth propellant segment inserted and appropriate minimum motor modifications. Feasibility studies are being conducted to assess the potential for any significant departure in component performance/loading from the well-characterized RSRM. An area of concern is the aft motor (submerged nozzle inlet, aft dome, etc.) where the altered internal flow resulting from the performance enhancing features (25% increase in mass flow rate, higher Mach numbers, modified subsonic nozzle contour) may result in increased component erosion and char. To assess this issue and to define the minimum design changes required to successfully static test a fifth segment RSRM engineering test motor, internal flow studies have been initiated. Internal aero-thermal environments were quantified in terms of conventional convective heating and discrete phase alumina particle impact/concentration and accretion calculations via Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two sets of comparative CFD simulations of the RSRM and the five-segment (IBM) concept motor were conducted with CFD commercial code FLUENT. The first simulation involved a two-dimensional axi-symmetric model of the full motor, initial grain RSRM. The second set of analyses

  6. High Fidelity Simulations of Plume Impingement to the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkin, Forrest E., III; Marichalar, Jeremiah; Stewart, Benedicte D.

    2012-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, the United States now depends on recently developed commercial spacecraft to supply the International Space Station (ISS) with cargo. These new vehicles supplement ones from international partners including the Russian Progress, the European Autonomous Transfer Vehicle (ATV), and the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). Furthermore, to carry crew to the ISS and supplement the capability currently provided exclusively by the Russian Soyuz, new designs and a refinement to a cargo vehicle design are in work. Many of these designs include features such as nozzle scarfing or simultaneous firing of multiple thrusters resulting in complex plumes. This results in a wide variety of complex plumes impinging upon the ISS. Therefore, to ensure safe "proximity operations" near the ISS, the need for accurate and efficient high fidelity simulation of plume impingement to the ISS is as high as ever. A capability combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) techniques has been developed to properly model the large density variations encountered as the plume expands from the high pressure in the combustion chamber to the near vacuum conditions at the orbiting altitude of the ISS. Details of the computational tools employed by this method, including recent software enhancements and the best practices needed to achieve accurate simulations, are discussed. Several recent examples of the application of this high fidelity capability are presented. These examples highlight many of the real world, complex features of plume impingement that occur when "visiting vehicles" operate in the vicinity of the ISS.

  7. Simulating the Effect of Space Vehicle Environments on Directional Solidification of a Binary Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, D. G.; Heinrich, J. C.; Poirier, D. R.

    2003-01-01

    Space microgravity missions are designed to provide a microgravity environment for scientific experiments, but these missions cannot provide a perfect environment, due to vibrations caused by crew activity, on-board experiments, support systems (pumps, fans, etc.), periodic orbital maneuvers, and water dumps. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the impact of these vibrations on space experiments, prior to performing them. Simulations were conducted to study the effect of the vibrations on the directional solidification of a dendritic alloy. Finite element ca!cu!attie?ls were dme with a simd2titcr based on a continuum model of dendritic solidification, using the Fractional Step Method (FSM). The FSM splits the solution of the momentum equation into two steps: the viscous intermediate step, which does not enforce continuity; and the inviscid projection step, which calculates the pressure and enforces continuity. The FSM provides significant computational benefits for predicting flows in a directionally solidified alloy, compared to other methods presently employed, because of the efficiency gains in the uncoupled solution of velocity and pressure. finite differences, arises when the interdendritic liquid reaches the eutectic temperature and concentration. When a node reaches eutectic temperature, it is assumed that the solidification of the eutectic liquid continues at constant temperature until all the eutectic is solidified. With this approach, solidification is not achieved continuously across an element; rather, the element is not considered solidified until the eutectic isotherm overtakes the top nodes. For microgravity simulations, where the convection is driven by shrinkage, it introduces large variations in the fluid velocity. When the eutectic isotherm reaches a node, all the eutectic must be solidified in a short period, causing an abrupt increase in velocity. To overcome this difficulty, we employed a scheme to numerically predict a more accurate value

  8. Status of the Space Radiation Monte Carlos Simulation Based on FLUKA and ROOT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, Victor; Carminati, Federico; Empl, Anton; Ferrari, Alfredo; Pinsky, Lawrence; Sala, Paola; Wilson, Thomas L.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA-funded project reported on at the first IWSSRR in Arona to develop a Monte-Carlo simulation program for use in simulating the space radiation environment based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes is well into its second year of development, and considerable progress has been made. The general tasks required to achieve the final goals include the addition of heavy-ion interactions into the FLUKA code and the provision of a ROOT-based interface to FLUKA. The most significant progress to date includes the incorporation of the DPMJET event generator code within FLUKA to handle heavy-ion interactions for incident projectile energies greater than 3GeV/A. The ongoing effort intends to extend the treatment of these interactions down to 10 MeV, and at present two alternative approaches are being explored. The ROOT interface is being pursued in conjunction with the CERN LHC ALICE software team through an adaptation of their existing AliROOT software. As a check on the validity of the code, a simulation of the recent data taken by the ATIC experiment is underway.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope six-battery nickel-cadmium mission simulation test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Lorna G.; Bush, John R., Jr.; Lanier, John R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A simulation test of the six-battery nickel-cadmium mission to determine battery life and electrical power system (EPS) performance characteristics for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) program, is described. The basic HST power system requirements are to provide power generation, energy storage, and EPS control and distribution for 2.5 years with the nickel-cadmium (NiCd) batteries at an end of life solar array of 2 years. Mission simulation life testing begain in April of 1986, and the batteries have completed their 2.5 year mission requirement. Conditions as close as practical to the actual predicted mission profiles were used. These included solar array degradation, load variations, beta angle changes, temperature changes (with excursions to 10 C), battery reconditioning, safemode simulations, and off-normal roll activities. Discounting system cycling interruptions caused by hardware, software, human error, and periodic updates and revisions, the HST EPS breadboard hardware operated continuously for 30 months and demonstrated the power system's ability to meet the HST requirement.

  10. Simulation of fluid flow in a U-shape self-siphon and its working space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhayati, Hidayat, W.; Novitrian, Viridi, S.; Zen, F. P.

    2014-03-01

    Observation of occurrence of fluid flow in a U-shape self-siphon has been conducted experimentally and in simulation. Water is chosen as the fluid. In experiment, three kinds of pipe inner diameter d (4, 6, and 8 mm) have been used to find its influence to the flow occurrence. The U-shape self-siphon has three different segments, where length of the first segment plays important role for the flow occurrence. The segment has length L + h, which stands for length above and below water surface in water container, respectively. In simulation, head (interface between water and air in the siphon) equation of motion is solved numerically using Euler method. Working spaces of L against h for several d have been produced from simulation and experiment, and they show a good agreement to each other. It can be observed that the relation between L and minimum h for flow to occur becomes more linear for larger inner diameter d.

  11. Mission Simulation of Space Lidar Measurements for Seasonal and Regional CO2 Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, Stephan; Collatz, G. J.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Sun, X.; Weaver, C. J.

    2010-01-01

    Results of mission simulation studies are presented for a laser-based atmospheric [82 sounder. The simulations are based on real-time carbon cycle process modeling and data analysis. The mission concept corresponds to the Active Sensing of [82 over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey of Earth Science and Applications from Space. One prerequisite for meaningful quantitative sensor evaluation is realistic CO2 process modeling across a wide range of scales, i.e., does the model have representative spatial and temporal gradients? Examples of model comparison with data will be shown. Another requirement is a relatively complete description of the atmospheric and surface state, which we have obtained from meteorological data assimilation and satellite measurements from MODIS and [ALIPS0. We use radiative transfer model calculations, an instrument model with representative errors ' and a simple retrieval approach to complete the cycle from "nature" run to "pseudo-data" CO2, Several mission and instrument configuration options are examined/ and the sensitivity to key design variables is shown. We use the simulation framework to demonstrate that within reasonable technological assumptions for the system performance, relatively high measurement precision can be obtained, but errors depend strongly on environmental conditions as well as instrument specifications. Examples are also shown of how the resulting pseudo - measurements might be used to address key carbon cycle science questions.

  12. The Aouda.X space suit simulator and its applications to astrobiology.

    PubMed

    Groemer, Gernot E; Hauth, Stefan; Luger, Ulrich; Bickert, Klaus; Sattler, Birgit; Hauth, Eva; Föger, Daniel; Schildhammer, Daniel; Agerer, Christian; Ragonig, Christoph; Sams, Sebastian; Kaineder, Felix; Knoflach, Martin

    2012-02-01

    We have developed the space suit simulator Aouda.X, which is capable of reproducing the physical and sensory limitations a flight-worthy suit would have on Mars. Based upon a Hard-Upper-Torso design, it has an advanced human-machine interface and a sensory network connected to an On-Board Data Handling system to increase the situational awareness in the field. Although the suit simulator is not pressurized, the physical forces that lead to a reduced working envelope and physical performance are reproduced with a calibrated exoskeleton. This allows us to simulate various pressure regimes from 0.3-1 bar. Aouda.X has been tested in several laboratory and field settings, including sterile sampling at 2800 m altitude inside a glacial ice cave and a cryochamber at -110°C, and subsurface tests in connection with geophysical instrumentation relevant to astrobiology, including ground-penetrating radar, geoacoustics, and drilling. The communication subsystem allows for a direct interaction with remote science teams via telemetry from a mission control center. Aouda.X as such is a versatile experimental platform for studying Mars exploration activities in a high-fidelity Mars analog environment with a focus on astrobiology and operations research that has been optimized to reduce the amount of biological cross contamination. We report on the performance envelope of the Aouda.X system and its operational limitations.

  13. Particle-In-Cell Simulation on the Characteristics of a Receiving Antenna in Space Plasma Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2008-12-31

    We applied the electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell simulation to the analysis of receiving antenna characteristics in space plasma environment. In the analysis, we set up external waves in a simulation region and receive them with a numerical antenna model placed in the simulation region. Using this method, we evaluated the effective length of electric field antennas used for plasma wave investigations conducted by scientific spacecraft. We particularly focused on the effective length of an electric field instrument called MEFISTO for a future mission to Mercury: BepiColombo. We first confirmed that the effective length of the MEFISTO-type antenna is basically longer than that of a simple dipole antenna for both electrostatic and electromagnetic plasma waves. By applying the principle of a voltmeter, the effective length of the MEFISTO-type antenna is predicted to become identical to the separation between two sensor-conductor's midpoints. However, the numerical result revealed that the actual effective length becomes shorter than the prediction, which is caused by the shorting-out effect due to the presence of a center boom conductor between the two sensor conductors. Since the above effect is difficult to treat theoretically, the present numerical method is a powerful tool for further quantitative evaluation of the antenna characteristics.

  14. Particle-In-Cell Simulation on the Characteristics of a Receiving Antenna in Space Plasma Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2008-12-01

    We applied the electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell simulation to the analysis of receiving antenna characteristics in space plasma environment. In the analysis, we set up external waves in a simulation region and receive them with a numerical antenna model placed in the simulation region. Using this method, we evaluated the effective length of electric field antennas used for plasma wave investigations conducted by scientific spacecraft. We particularly focused on the effective length of an electric field instrument called MEFISTO for a future mission to Mercury: BepiColombo. We first confirmed that the effective length of the MEFISTO-type antenna is basically longer than that of a simple dipole antenna for both electrostatic and electromagnetic plasma waves. By applying the principle of a voltmeter, the effective length of the MEFISTO-type antenna is predicted to become identical to the separation between two sensor-conductor's midpoints. However, the numerical result revealed that the actual effective length becomes shorter than the prediction, which is caused by the shorting-out effect due to the presence of a center boom conductor between the two sensor conductors. Since the above effect is difficult to treat theoretically, the present numerical method is a powerful tool for further quantitative evaluation of the antenna characteristics.

  15. Alterations in calcium homeostasis and bone during actual and simulated space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wronski, T. J.; Morey, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Skeletal alteration in experimental animals induced by actual and simulated spaceflight are discussed, noting that the main factor contributing to bone loss in growing rats placed in orbit aboard Soviet Cosmos biosatellites appears to be diminished bone formation. Mechanical unloading is seen as the most obvious cause of bone loss in a state of weightlessness. Reference is made to a study by Roberts et al. (1981), which showed that osteoblast differentiation in the periodontal ligament of the maxilla was suppressed in rats flown in space. Since the maxilla lacks a weight-bearing function, this finding indicates that the skeletal alterations associated with orbital flight may be systemic rather than confined to weight-bearing bones. In addition, the skeletal response to simulated weightlessness may also be systemic (wronski and Morey, 1982). In suspended rats, the hindlimbs lost all weight-bearing functions, while the forelimbs maintained contact with the floor of the hypokinetic model. On this basis, it was to be expected that there would be different responses at the two skeletal sites if the observed abnormalities were due to mechanical unloading alone. The changes induced by simulated weightlessness in the proximal tibia and humerus, however, were generally comparable. This evidence for systemic skeletal responses has drawn attention to endocrine factors.

  16. The Aouda.X space suit simulator and its applications to astrobiology.

    PubMed

    Groemer, Gernot E; Hauth, Stefan; Luger, Ulrich; Bickert, Klaus; Sattler, Birgit; Hauth, Eva; Föger, Daniel; Schildhammer, Daniel; Agerer, Christian; Ragonig, Christoph; Sams, Sebastian; Kaineder, Felix; Knoflach, Martin

    2012-02-01

    We have developed the space suit simulator Aouda.X, which is capable of reproducing the physical and sensory limitations a flight-worthy suit would have on Mars. Based upon a Hard-Upper-Torso design, it has an advanced human-machine interface and a sensory network connected to an On-Board Data Handling system to increase the situational awareness in the field. Although the suit simulator is not pressurized, the physical forces that lead to a reduced working envelope and physical performance are reproduced with a calibrated exoskeleton. This allows us to simulate various pressure regimes from 0.3-1 bar. Aouda.X has been tested in several laboratory and field settings, including sterile sampling at 2800 m altitude inside a glacial ice cave and a cryochamber at -110°C, and subsurface tests in connection with geophysical instrumentation relevant to astrobiology, including ground-penetrating radar, geoacoustics, and drilling. The communication subsystem allows for a direct interaction with remote science teams via telemetry from a mission control center. Aouda.X as such is a versatile experimental platform for studying Mars exploration activities in a high-fidelity Mars analog environment with a focus on astrobiology and operations research that has been optimized to reduce the amount of biological cross contamination. We report on the performance envelope of the Aouda.X system and its operational limitations. PMID:22300413

  17. Biological space experiments for the simulation of Martian conditions: UV radiation and Martian soil analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, P.; Rabbow, E.; Panitz, C.; Horneck, G.

    2004-01-01

    The survivability of resistant terrestrial microbes, bacterial spores of Bacillus subtilis, was investigated in the BIOPAN facility of the European Space Agency onboard of Russian Earth-orbiting FOTON satellites (BIOPAN I -III missions). The spores were exposed to different subsets of the extreme environmental parameters in space (vacuum, extraterrestrial solar UV, shielding by protecting materials like artificial meteorites). The results of the three space experiments confirmed the deleterious effects of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation which, in contrast to the UV radiation reaching the surface of the Earth, also contains the very energy-rich, short wavelength UVB and UVC radiation. Thin layers of clay, rock or meteorite material were shown to be only successful in UV-shielding, if they are in direct contact with the spores. On Mars the UV radiation climate is similar to that of the early Earth before the development of a protective ozone layer in the atmosphere by the appearance of the first aerobic photosynthetic bacteria. The interference of Martian soil components and the intense and nearly unfiltered Martian solar UV radiation with spores of B. subtilis will be tested with a new BIOPAN experiment, MARSTOX. Different types of Mars soil analogues will be used to determine on one hand their potential toxicity alone or in combination with solar UV (phototoxicity) and on the other hand their UV protection capability. Two sets of samples will be placed under different cut-off filters used to simulate the UV radiation climate of Mars and Earth. After exposure in space the survival of and mutation induction in the spores will be analyzed at the DLR, together with parallel samples from the corresponding ground control experiment performed in the laboratory. This experiment will provide new insights into the principal limits of life and its adaptation to environmental extremes on Earth or other planets which and will also have implications for the potential for the

  18. Biological space experiments for the simulation of Martian conditions: UV radiation and Martian soil analogues.

    PubMed

    Rettberg, P; Rabbow, E; Panitz, C; Horneck, G

    2004-01-01

    The survivability of resistant terrestrial microbes, bacterial spores of Bacillus subtilis, was investigated in the BIOPAN facility of the European Space Agency onboard of Russian Earth-orbiting FOTON satellites (BIOPAN I -III missions). The spores were exposed to different subsets of the extreme environmental parameters in space (vacuum, extraterrestrial solar UV, shielding by protecting materials like artificial meteorites). The results of the three space experiments confirmed the deleterious effects of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation which, in contrast to the UV radiation reaching the surface of the Earth, also contains the very energy-rich, short wavelength UVB and UVC radiation. Thin layers of clay, rock or meteorite material were shown to be only successful in UV-shielding, if they are in direct contact with the spores. On Mars the UV radiation climate is similar to that of the early Earth before the development of a protective ozone layer in the atmosphere by the appearance of the first aerobic photosynthetic bacteria. The interference of Martian soil components and the intense and nearly unfiltered Martian solar UV radiation with spores of B. subtilis will be tested with a new BIOPAN experiment, MARSTOX. Different types of Mars soil analogues will be used to determine on one hand their potential toxicity alone or in combination with solar UV (phototoxicity) and on the other hand their UV protection capability. Two sets of samples will be placed under different cut-off filters used to simulate the UV radiation climate of Mars and Earth. After exposure in space the survival of and mutation induction in the spores will be analyzed at the DLR, together with parallel samples from the corresponding ground control experiment performed in the laboratory. This experiment will provide new insights into the principal limits of life and its adaptation to environmental extremes on Earth or other planets which and will also have implications for the potential for the

  19. Dynamic Modelling of Aquifer Level Using Space-Time Kriging and Sequential Gaussian Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.; Hristopulos, Dionisis T.

    2016-04-01

    Geostatistical models are widely used in water resources management projects to represent and predict the spatial variability of aquifer levels. In addition, they can be applied as surrogate to numerical hydrological models if the hydrogeological data needed to calibrate the latter are not available. For space-time data, spatiotemporal geostatistical approaches can model the aquifer level variability by incorporating complex space-time correlations. A major advantage of such models is that they can improve the reliability of predictions compared to purely spatial or temporal models in areas with limited spatial and temporal data availability. The identification and incorporation of a spatiotemporal trend model can further increase the accuracy of groundwater level predictions. Our goal is to derive a geostatistical model of dynamic aquifer level changes in a sparsely gauged basin on the island of Crete (Greece). The available data consist of bi-annual (dry and wet hydrological period) groundwater level measurements at 11 monitoring locations for the time period 1981 to 2010. We identify a spatiotemporal trend function that follows the overall drop of the aquifer level over the study period. The correlation of the residuals is modeled using a non-separable space-time variogram function based on the Spartan covariance family. The space-time Residual Kriging (STRK) method is then applied to combine the estimated trend and the residuals into dynamic predictions of groundwater level. Sequential Gaussian Simulation is also employed to determine the uncertainty of the spatiotemporal model (trend and covariance) parameters. This stochastic modelling approach produces multiple realizations, ranks the prediction results on the basis of specified criteria, and captures the range of the uncertainty. The model projections recommend that in 2032 a part of the basin will be under serious threat as the aquifer level will approximate the sea level boundary.

  20. Numerical simulation of free evolution in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using low-order correlations in Liouville space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Butler, Mark C.; Emsley, Lyndon

    2010-12-01

    The design of simulations of free evolution in dipolar-coupled nuclear-spin systems using low-order correlations in Liouville space (LCL) is discussed, and a computational scheme relying on the Suzuki-Trotter algorithm and involving minimal memory requirements is described. The unusual nature of the approximation introduced by Liouville-space reduction in a spinning solid is highlighted by considering the accuracy of LCL simulations at different spinning frequencies, the quasiequilibria achieved by spin systems in LCL simulations, and the growth of high-order coherences in the exact dynamics. In particular, it is shown that accurate LCL simulations of proton spin diffusion occur in a regime where the reduced space excludes the coherences that make the dominant contribution to Vert σ Vert ^2, the norm-squared of the density matrix.

  1. In-Vessel Composting of Simulated Long-Term Missions Space-Related Solid Wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Carias, Abner A.; Sager, John; Krumins, Valdis; Strayer, Richard; Hummerick, Mary; Roberts, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    Reduction and stabilization of solid wastes generated during space missions is a major concern for the Advanced Life Support - Resource Recovery program at the NASA, Kennedy Space Center. Solid wastes provide substrates for pathogen proliferation, produce strong odor, and increase storage requirements during space missions. A five periods experiment was conducted to evaluate the Space Operation Bioconverter (SOB), an in vessel composting system, as a biological processing technology to reduce and stabilize simulated long-term missions space related solid-wastes (SRSW). For all periods, SRSW were sorted into components with fast (FBD) and slow (SBD) biodegradability. Uneaten food and plastic were used as a major FBD and SBD components, respectively. Compost temperature (C), CO2 production (%), mass reduction (%), and final pH were utilized as criteria to determine compost quality. In period 1, SOB was loaded with a 55% FBD: 45% SBD mixture and was allowed to compost for 7 days. An eleven day second composting period was conducted loading the SOB with 45% pre-composted SRSW and 55% FBD. Period 3 and 4 evaluated the use of styrofoam as a bulking agent and the substitution of regular by degradable plastic on the composting characteristics of SRSW, respectively. The use of ceramic as a bulking agent and the relationship between initial FBD mass and heat production was investigated in period 5. Composting SRSW resulted in an acidic fermentation with a minor increase in compost temperature, low CO2 production, and slightly mass reduction. Addition of styrofoam as a bulking agent and substitution of regular by biodegradable plastic improved the composting characteristics of SRSW, as evidenced by higher pH, CO2 production, compost temperature and mass reduction. Ceramic as a bulking agent and increase the initial FBD mass (4.4 kg) did not improve the composting process. In summary, the SOB is a potential biological technology for reduction and stabilization of mission space

  2. Optical Analysis of Transparent Polymeric Material Exposed to Simulated Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Finckenor, Miria M.

    2000-01-01

    Many innovations in spacecraft power and propulsion have been recently tested at NASA, particularly in non-chemical propulsion. One improvement in solar array technology is solar concentration using thin polymer film Fresnel lenses. Weight and cost savings were proven with the Solar Concentrator Arrays with Refractive Linear Element Technology (SCARLET)-II array on NASA's Deep Space I spacecraft. The Fresnel lens concentrates solar energy onto high-efficiency solar cells, decreasing the area of solar cells needed for power. Continued efficiency of this power system relies on the thin film's durability in the space environment and maintaining transmission in the 300 - 1000 nm bandwidth. Various polymeric materials have been tested for use in solar concentrators, including Lexan(TM), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), several formulations of Tefzel(Tm) and Teflon(TM), and DC 93-500, the material selected for SCARLET-II. Also tested were several innovative materials including Langley Research Center's CPI and CP2 polymers and atomic oxygen- resistant polymers developed by Triton Systems, Inc. The Environmental Effects Group of the Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials, Processes, and Manufacturing Department exposed these materials to simulated space environment and evaluated them for any change in optical transmission. Samples were exposed to a minimum of 1000 equivalent Sun hours of near-UV radiation (250 - 400 nm wavelength). Materials that appeared robust after near-UV exposure were then exposed to charged particle radiation equivalent to a five-year dose in geosynchronous orbit. These exposures were performed in MSFC's Combined Environmental Effects Test Chamber, a unique facility with the capability to expose materials simultaneously or sequentially to protons, low-energy electrons, high-energy electrons, near UV radiation and vacuum UV radiation. Reflectance measurements can be made on the samples in vacuum. Prolonged exposure to the space environment will

  3. Tracking colloid transport in porous media using discrete flow fields and sensitivity of simulated colloid deposition to space discretization.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhelong; Zhang, Dongxiao; Li, Xiqing

    2010-02-15

    Advances in pore structure characterization and lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations of flow fields in pore spaces are making mechanistic simulations of colloid transport in real porous media a realistic goal. The primary challenge to reach this goal may be the computational demand of LB flow simulations in discretized porous medium domains at an assemblage scale. In this work, flow fields in simple cubic and dense packing systems were simulated at different discretization resolutions using the LB method. The simulated flow fields were incorporated into to a three-dimensional particle tracking model to simulate colloid transport in the two systems. The simulated colloid deposition tended to become asymptotic at a critical discretization resolution (voxel-grain size ratio = 0.01) at groundwater flow regimes for colloids down to submicrometer level under favorable conditions and down to around 1 microm under unfavorable conditions. The average simulated fluid velocities near grain surfaces were extracted to explain the sensitivities of simulated depositions to space discretization under both conditions. At the critical discretization resolution, current computation capacity would allow flow simulations and particle tracking in assemblage porous medium domains. In addition, particle tracking simulations revealed that colloids may be retained in flow vortices under conditions both favorable and unfavorable for deposition. Colloid retention in flow vortices has been proposed only very recently. Here we provide a mechanistic confirmation to this novel retention process. PMID:20088544

  4. Wave optics simulation of spatially partially coherent beams: Applications to free space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xifeng

    One of the main drawbacks that prevent the extensive application of free space laser communications is the atmospheric turbulence through which the beam must propagate. For the past four decades, much attention has been devoted to finding different methods to overcome this difficulty. A partially coherent beam (PCB) has been recognized as an effective approach to improve the performance of an atmospheric link. It has been examined carefully with most analyses considering the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam. However, practical PCBs may not follow GSM theory and are better examined through some numerical simulation approach such as a wave optics simulation. Consequently, an approach for modeling the spatially PCB in wave optics simulation is presented here. The approach involves the application of a sequence of random phase screens to an initial beam field and the summation of the intensity results after propagation. The relationship between the screen parameters and the spatial coherence function for the beam is developed and the approach is verified by comparing results with analytic formulations for a Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam. A variety of simulation studies were performed for this dissertation. The propagation through turbulence of a coherent beam and a particular version of a PCB, a pseudo-partially coherent beam (PPCB), is analyzed. The beam is created with a sequence of several Gaussian random phase screens for each atmospheric realization. The average intensity profiles, the scintillation index and aperture averaging factor for a horizontal propagation scenario are examined. Comparisons between these results and their corresponding analytic results for the well-known GSM beam are also made. Cumulative probability density functions for the received irradiance are initially investigated. Following the general simulation investigations, a performance metric is proposed as a general measure for optimizing the transverse coherence length of a partial

  5. Measurement and Simulation of Space Charge Effects in a Multi-Beam Electron Bunch from an RF Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.M.; Piot, P.; Power, J.G.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.; /Argonne

    2009-05-01

    We report on a new experimental study of the space charge effect in a space-charge-dominated multi-beam electron bunch. A 5 MeV electron bunch, consisting of a variable number of beamlets separated transversely, was generated in a photoinjector and propagated in a drift space. The collective interaction of these beamlets was studied for different experimental conditions. The experiment allowed the exploration of space charge effects and its comparison with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Our observations also suggest the possible use of a multibeam configuration to tailor the transverse distribution of an electron beam.

  6. Numerical simulations of galaxy formation: Angular momentum distribution and phase space structure of galactic halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sanjib

    Within the past decade, the L CDM model has emerged as a standard paradigm of structure formation. While it has been very successful in explaining the structure of the Universe on large scales, on smaller (galactic) scales problems have surfaced. In this thesis, we investigate several of these problems in more detail. The thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 1, we give a brief introduction about structure formation in the universe and discuss some of the problems being faced by the current CDM paradigm of galaxy formation. In Chapter 2, we analyze the angular momentum properties of virialized halos obtained from hydrodynamical simulations. We describe an analytical function that can be used to describe a wide variety of angular momentum distributions (AMDs), with just one parameter a. About 90-95% of halos turn out to have a < 1.3, while exponential disks in cosmological halos would require 1.3 < a < 1.6. This implies that a typical halo in simulations has an excess of low angular momentum material as compared to that of observed exponential disks, a result which is consistent with the findings of earlier works. In Chapter 3, we perform controlled numerical experiments of merging galactic halos in order to shed light on the results obtained in cosmological simulations. We explore the properties of shape parameter a of AMDs and the spin ratio l Gas /l DM in merger remnants and also their dependence on orbital parameters. We find that the shape parameter a is typically close to 1 for a wide range of orbital parameters, less than what is needed to form an exponential disk. The last chapter of the thesis (Chapter 4) is devoted to the analysis of phase space structure of dark matter halos. We first present a method to numerically estimate the densities of discretely sampled data based on a binary space partitioning tree. We implement an entropy-based node splitting criterion that results in a significant improvement in the estimation of densities compared to

  7. Simulation investigation of multipactor in metal components for space application with an improved secondary emission model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Cui, Wan-Zhao; Wang, Hong-Guang

    2015-05-01

    Effects of the secondary electron emission (SEE) phenomenon of metal surface on the multipactor analysis of microwave components are investigated numerically and experimentally in this paper. Both the secondary electron yield (SEY) and the emitted energy spectrum measurements are performed on silver plated samples for accurate description of the SEE phenomenon. A phenomenological probabilistic model based on SEE physics is utilized and fitted accurately to the measured SEY and emitted energy spectrum of the conditioned surface material of microwave components. Specially, the phenomenological probabilistic model is extended to the low primary energy end lower than 20 eV mathematically, since no accurate measurement data can be obtained. Embedding the phenomenological probabilistic model into the Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (EM-PIC) method, the electronic resonant multipacting in microwave components can be tracked and hence the multipactor threshold can be predicted. The threshold prediction error of the transformer and the coaxial filter is 0.12 dB and 1.5 dB, respectively. Simulation results demonstrate that the discharge threshold is strongly dependent on the SEYs and its energy spectrum in the low energy end (lower than 50 eV). Multipacting simulation results agree quite well with experiments in practical components, while the phenomenological probabilistic model fit both the SEY and the emission energy spectrum better than the traditionally used model and distribution. The EM-PIC simulation method with the phenomenological probabilistic model for the surface collision simulation has been demonstrated for predicting the multipactor threshold in metal components for space application.

  8. Simulation investigation of multipactor in metal components for space application with an improved secondary emission model

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yun E-mail: cuiwanzhao@126.com; Cui, Wan-Zhao E-mail: cuiwanzhao@126.com; Wang, Hong-Guang

    2015-05-15

    Effects of the secondary electron emission (SEE) phenomenon of metal surface on the multipactor analysis of microwave components are investigated numerically and experimentally in this paper. Both the secondary electron yield (SEY) and the emitted energy spectrum measurements are performed on silver plated samples for accurate description of the SEE phenomenon. A phenomenological probabilistic model based on SEE physics is utilized and fitted accurately to the measured SEY and emitted energy spectrum of the conditioned surface material of microwave components. Specially, the phenomenological probabilistic model is extended to the low primary energy end lower than 20 eV mathematically, since no accurate measurement data can be obtained. Embedding the phenomenological probabilistic model into the Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (EM-PIC) method, the electronic resonant multipacting in microwave components can be tracked and hence the multipactor threshold can be predicted. The threshold prediction error of the transformer and the coaxial filter is 0.12 dB and 1.5 dB, respectively. Simulation results demonstrate that the discharge threshold is strongly dependent on the SEYs and its energy spectrum in the low energy end (lower than 50 eV). Multipacting simulation results agree quite well with experiments in practical components, while the phenomenological probabilistic model fit both the SEY and the emission energy spectrum better than the traditionally used model and distribution. The EM-PIC simulation method with the phenomenological probabilistic model for the surface collision simulation has been demonstrated for predicting the multipactor threshold in metal components for space application.

  9. RENEW - MAINTENANCE ESTIMATION SIMULATION MODEL FOR SPACE STATION FREEDOM PROGRAM, VERSION 3.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bream, B. L.

    1994-01-01

    RENEW is a maintenance event estimation simulation program developed in support of the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) Work Package 4 at NASA Lewis Research Center. This simulation uses reliability and maintainability (R&M) data as well as logistics data to estimate both average and time dependent maintenance demands. RENEW uses Monte Carlo techniques to generate failure and repair times as a function of the R&M and logistics parameters. The estimates are generated for a single type of orbital replacement unit (ORU). The RENEW simulation gives closer estimates of performance than steady-state average calculations since it uses a time dependent approach and depicts more factors affecting ORU failure and repair. RENEW gives both average and time dependent demand values, and generates graphs of both failures over the mission period and yearly failure occurrences. The average demand rate for the ORU over the mission period is also calculated. While RENEW displays the results in graphs, the results are also available in data tables. The process of using RENEW starts with keyboard entry of the R&M and operational data. Once entered, the data may be saved in a data file for later retrieval, and the parameters may be viewed and changed. The simulation program runs the number of Monte Carlo simulations requested by the operator. Plots and tables of the results can be viewed on the screen or sent to a printer. The results of the simulation are saved along with the input data. Help screens are provided with each menu and data entry screen. RENEW is written in BASIC and assembly language for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. Microsoft's QuickBasic Professional Development System and Crescent Software's QuickPak Professional are required to compile the source code. A CGA or VGA monitor is required. A sample executable is provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette

  10. Ion irradiation of carbonaceous chondrites as a simulation of space weathering on C-complex asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, C.; Brunetto, R.; Barucci, M. A.; Bachelet, C.; Baklouti, D.; Bourçois, J.; Dartois, E.; Duprat, J.; Duret, P.; Engrand, C.; Godard, M.; Ledu, D.; Mivumbi, O.; Fornasier, S.

    2015-10-01

    We are investigating the effects of space weathering on primitive asteroids using ion irradiation on their meteoritic analogs. To do so, we exposed several carbonaceous chondrites (CV Allende, COs Lancé and Frontier Mountain 95002, CM Mighei, CI Alais, and ungrouped Tagish Lake) to 40 keV He+ ions as a simulation of solar wind irradiation using fluences up to 6.1016 ions/cm2 (implantation platform IRMA at CSNSM Orsay). As a test for our new experimental setup, we also studied samples of olivine and diopside. We confirm the reddening and darkening trends on S-type objects, but carbonaceous chondrites present a continuum of behaviors after ion irradiation as a function of the initial albedo and carbon content: from red to blue and from dark to bright.

  11. Investigations of a simulated geomagnetic field experienced by the International Space Station on attentional performance.

    PubMed

    Del Seppia, Cristina; Mezzasalma, Lorena; Messerotti, Mauro; Cordelli, Alessandro; Ghione, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that the exposure to an abnormal magnetic field simulating the one encountered by the International Space Station (ISS) orbiting around the Earth may enhance autonomic response to emotional stimuli. Here we report the results of the second part of that study which tested whether this field also affects cognitive functions. Twenty-four volunteers participated in the study, 12 exposed to the natural geomagnetic field and 12 to the magnetic field encountered by ISS. The test protocol consisted of a set of eight tests chosen from a computerized test battery for the assessment of attentional performance. The duration of exposure was 90 min. No effect of exposure to ISS magnetic field was observed on attentional performance.

  12. Simulation of Aluminum Micro-mirrors for Space Applications at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, J. L.; Dutta, S. B.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Mott, D. B.

    2000-01-01

    Closed form and finite element models are developed to predict the device response of aluminum electrostatic torsion micro-mirrors fabricated on silicon substrate for space applications at operating temperatures of 30K. Initially, closed form expressions for electrostatic pressure arid mechanical restoring torque are used to predict the pull-in and release voltages at room temperature. Subsequently, a detailed mechanical finite element model is developed to predict stresses and vertical beam deflection induced by the electrostatic and thermal loads. An incremental and iterative solution method is used in conjunction with the nonlinear finite element model and closed form electrostatic equations to solve. the coupled electro-thermo-mechanical problem. The simulation results are compared with experimental measurements at room temperature of fabricated micro-mirror devices.

  13. Deployment analysis of large space antenna using flexible multibody dynamics simulation^1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsugi, Jin; Ando, Kazuhide; Senbokuya, Yumi; Meguro, Akira

    2000-07-01

    Flexible multibody dynamics is applied to the deployment analysis of a large space antenna composed of a reflective mesh, a cable network and a deployable truss structure. It is clarified that the tension of some of the cables increase when the reflector is stowed. The largest deployment force is observed slightly before the completion of the deployment. A proper allocation of both translational and rotational springs can provide an efficient deployment force. A deployment experiment on a 4.8 m aperture reflector model verifies the computational results. It is concluded that a flexible multibody dynamics simulation is an indispensable design tool for reducing the weight and ensuring the secure deployment of low-cost mesh reflectors.

  14. Micromechanics analysis of space simulated thermal deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Space simulated thermally induced deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites were investigated with a micromechanics analysis. The investigation focused on two primary areas. First, available explicit expressions for predicting the effective coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) for a composite were compared with each other, and with a finite element (FE) analysis, developed specifically for this study. Analytical comparisons were made for a wide range of fiber/matrix systems, and predicted values were compared with experimental data. The second area of investigation focused on the determination of thermally induced stress fields in the individual constituents. Stresses predicted from the FE analysis were compared to those predicted from a closed-form solution to the composite cylinder (CC) model, for two carbon fiber/epoxy composites. A global-local formulation, combining laminated plate theory and FE analysis, was used to determine the stresses in multidirectional laminates. Thermally induced damage initiation predictions were also made.

  15. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas.more » At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.« less

  16. Current status of MCNP6 as a simulation tool useful for space and accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan G; Bull, Jeffrey S; Hughes, H. Grady; Prael, Richard E; Sierk, Arnold J

    2012-07-20

    For the past several years, a major effort has been undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop the transport code MCNP6, the latest LANL Monte-Carlo transport code representing a merger and improvement of MCNP5 and MCNPX. We emphasize a description of the latest developments of MCNP6 at higher energies to improve its reliability in calculating rare-isotope production, high-energy cumulative particle production, and a gamut of reactions important for space-radiation shielding, cosmic-ray propagation, and accelerator applications. We present several examples of validation and verification of MCNP6 compared to a wide variety of intermediate- and high-energy experimental data on reactions induced by photons, mesons, nucleons, and nuclei at energies from tens of MeV to about 1 TeV/nucleon, and compare to results from other modern simulation tools.

  17. A large high vacuum, high pumping speed space simulation chamber for electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisnik, Stanley P.; Parkes, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Testing high power electric propulsion devices poses unique requirements on space simulation facilities. Very high pumping speeds are required to maintain high vacuum levels while handling large volumes of exhaust products. These pumping speeds are significantly higher than those available in most existing vacuum facilities. There is also a requirement for relatively large vacuum chamber dimensions to minimize facility wall/thruster plume interactions and to accommodate far field plume diagnostic measurements. A 4.57 m (15 ft) diameter by 19.2 m (63 ft) long vacuum chamber at NASA Lewis Research Center is described. The chamber utilizes oil diffusion pumps in combination with cryopanels to achieve high vacuum pumping speeds at high vacuum levels. The facility is computer controlled for all phases of operation from start-up, through testing, to shutdown. The computer control system increases the utilization of the facility and reduces the manpower requirements needed for facility operations.

  18. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas. At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.

  19. Architecture and performance of the space-based Far-Infrared Interferometer Instrument Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanola-Parramon, R.; Fenech, D. M.; Savini, G.

    2016-04-01

    FIRI (Far Infra-Red Interferometer) is a spatial and spectral space interferometer with an operating wavelength range of 25-400 μm and sub-arcsecond angular resolution. It is based on the combination of stellar interferometry and Fourier transform spectroscopy to perform spectroscopy at high angular resolution in the far-infrared. The resulting technique is referred to as double Fourier spatio-spectral interferometry. With increased spatial and spectral resolution come a number of interesting science cases such as the formation and evolution of AGN and the characterization of gas, ice and dust in discs undergoing planetary formation, among others. To study the feasibility of a FIRI system, the Far-Infrared Interferometer Instrument Simulator (FIInS) has been developed. With FIInS, once a set of modelled scientific data is available, one can compare an input sky map with the synthesized one after data reduction algorithms have been applied.

  20. Modeling fuzzy state space of reheater system for simulation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munirah, W. M. Wan; Ahmad, T.; Ashaari, A.; Abdullah, M. Adib

    2014-07-01

    Reheater is one of the important heat exchange components in a high capacity power plant of a boiler system. The aim of this study is to improve heat transfer of a reheater system. The method is to maximize steam production and at the same time, keeping variables within constraints. Fuzzy arithmetic is a powerful tool used to solve engineering problems with uncertain parameters. Therefore, in order to determine heat transfer efficiency, the state space of reheater is simulated using fuzzy arithmetic by taking into account the uncertainties in the reheater system. The uncertain model parameters and the model inputs are represented by fuzzy numbers with their shape derived from quasi-Gaussian function. Finally, this paper discusses how the mathematical model can be manipulated in order to produce maximum heat transfer with least loss of energy. Furthermore, the improvement of the reheater efficiency and the quantification of the heat supplied parameters are presented in this paper.

  1. Analysis of space reactor system components: Investigation through simulation and non-nuclear testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    The use of fission energy in space power and propulsion systems offers considerable advantages over chemical propulsion. Fission provides over six orders of magnitude higher energy density, which translates to higher vehicle specific impulse and lower specific mass. These characteristics enable ambitious space exploration missions. The natural space radiation environment provides an external source of protons and high energy, high Z particles that can result in the production of secondary neutrons through interactions in reactor structures. Applying the approximate proton source in geosynchronous orbit during a solar particle event, investigation using MCNPX 2.5.b for proton transport through the SAFE-400 heat pipe cooled reactor indicates an incoming secondary neutron current of (1.16 +/- 0.03) x 107 n/s at the core-reflector interface. This neutron current may affect reactor operation during low power maneuvers (e.g., start-up) and may provide a sufficient reactor start-up source. It is important that a reactor control system be designed to automatically adjust to changes in reactor power levels, maintaining nominal operation without user intervention. A robust, autonomous control system is developed and analyzed for application during reactor start-up, accounting for fluctuations in the radiation environment that result from changes in vehicle location or to temporal variations in the radiation field. Development of a nuclear reactor for space applications requires a significant amount of testing prior to deployment of a flight unit. High confidence in fission system performance can be obtained through relatively inexpensive non-nuclear tests performed in relevant environments, with the heat from nuclear fission simulated using electric resistance heaters. A series of non-nuclear experiments was performed to characterize various aspects of reactor operation. This work includes measurement of reactor core deformation due to material thermal expansion and

  2. Visualizing Space Weather: The Planeterrella Auroral Simulator as a Heliophysics Public Outreach Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masongsong, E. V.; Lilensten, J.; Booth, M. J.; Suri, G.; Heflinger, T. G.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA THEMIS and ARTEMIS satellite missions study "space weather," which describes the solar wind influence on Earth's protective magnetic shield, the magnetosphere. Space weather is important to study and predict because it can damage critical GPS and communications satellites, harm space travelers, and even disable our global electrical grid. The Planeterrella is an innovative heliophysics outreach demonstration, expanding public awareness of space weather by visualizing the sun-Earth connection up close and in-person. Using a glass vacuum chamber, two magnetized spheres and a 1kV power supply, the device can simulate plasma configurations of the solar corona, solar wind, Van Allen radiation belts, and auroral ovals, all of which are observable only by satellites. This "aurora in a bottle" is a modernized version of the original Terrella built by Kristian Birkeland in the 1890s to show that the aurora are electrical in nature. Adapted from plans by Lilensten et al. at CNRS-IPAG, the UCLA Planeterrella was completed in Nov. 2013, the second device of its kind in the U.S., and the centerpiece of the THEMIS/ARTEMIS mobile public outreach exhibit. In combination with captivating posters, 3D magnetic field models, dazzling aurora videos and magnetosphere animations, the Planeterrella has already introduced over 1200 people to the electrical link between our sun and the planets. Most visitors had seen solar flare images in the news, however the Planeterrella experience enhanced their appreciation of the dynamic solar wind and its effects on Earth's invisible magnetic field. Most importantly, visitors young and old realized that magnets are not just cool toys or only for powering hybrid car motors and MRIs, they are a fundamental aspect of ongoing life on Earth and are key to the formation and evolution of planets, moons, and stars, extending far beyond our galaxy to other planetary systems throughout the universe. Novel visualizations such as the Planeterrella can

  3. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of Alloys in a Simulated Space Shuttle Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; Kolody, M. R.; Vinje, R. D.; Whitten, M. C.; Li, D.

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion studies began at NASA/Kennedy Space Center in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term protective coatings for the atmospheric protection of carbon steel. An outdoor exposure facility on the beach near the launch pad was established for this purpose at that time. The site has provided over 35 years of technical information on the evaluation of the long-term corrosion performance of many materials and coatings as well as on maintenance procedures. Results from these evaluations have helped NASA find new materials and processes that increase the safety and reliability of our flight hardware, launch structures, and ground support equipment. The launch environment at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is extremely corrosive due to the combination of ocean salt spray, heat, humidity, and sunlight. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acidic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. Over the years, many materials have been evaluated for their corrosion performance under conditions similar to those found at the launch pads. These studies have typically included atmospheric exposure and evaluation with conventional electrochemical methods such as open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, polarization techniques, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The atmosphere at the Space Shuttle launch site is aggressive to most metals and causes severe pitting in many of the common stainless steel alloys such as type 304L stainless steel (304L SS). A study was undertaken to find a more corrosion resistant material to replace the existing 304L SS tubing. This paper presents the results from atmospheric exposure as well as electrochemical measurements on the corrosion resistance of AL-6XN (UNS N08367) and 254-SMO (UNS S32154). Type 304L SS (UNS S30403) was used as a control. Conditions at the Space Shuttle launch pad were

  4. Lichens as a Model-System for Symbiotic Organisms under Simulated Extreme Space Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, J.; Horneck, G.; Rettberg, P.; Ott, S.

    As a consequence of the symbiotic state of lichens both the bionts are able to colonize habitats where the separate bionts would not be able to survive. The symbiosis of lichens reflects a high degree of complexity and plasticity. The combination of the different bionts enables these organisms to colonize most extreme habitats worldwide from the Arctic and Alpine zones to the Antarctic. Besides the already well investigated microorganisms lichens are good model -systems to examine adaptation strategies to most extreme environments. Because of the symbiotic nature of the lichens a 3-component -system can be used for investigations: the mycobiont (fungi), the photobiont (algae) and the lichen itself. Our investigations are based on such a system related to simulated extreme conditions. The influence of different doses of UV A, B, C (>200nm) on the vitality of fungal (mycobiont) fruiting bodys and their spores and the germination process has been investigated. The spores are cultivated on a variety of different substrates, especially on a Martian Regolith Simulant JSC - 1-A g a r- Extract for testing the influence of the UV radiation related to the dependency of different soil-substrate-extracts. The influence of vacuum conditions has been investigated. The aim of this research is to test the reaction of a symbiotic organism complex and its respective bionts to highly extreme space conditions looking forward to a possibly survival strategy of lichenized associations in space; probably supporting the theory of Panspermia. For the interpretation of results especially refering to the vitality potential of the photobionts in damaged and healthy lichens the method of modern confocal lasermicroscopy (CLSM) - a novel method in lichenology is presented.

  5. International Space Station Internal Thermal Control System Lab Module Simulator Build-Up and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Paul; Miller, Lee; Ibarra, Tom

    2003-01-01

    As part of the Sustaining Engineering program for the International Space Station (ISS), a ground simulator of the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) in the Lab Module was designed and built at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). To support prediction and troubleshooting, this facility is operationally and functionally similar to the flight system and flight-like components were used when available. Flight software algorithms, implemented using the LabVIEW(Registered Trademark) programming language, were used for monitoring performance and controlling operation. Validation testing of the low temperature loop was completed prior to activation of the Lab module in 2001. Assembly of the moderate temperature loop was completed in 2002 and validated in 2003. The facility has been used to address flight issues with the ITCS, successfully demonstrating the ability to add silver biocide and to adjust the pH of the coolant. Upon validation of the entire facility, it will be capable not only of checking procedures, but also of evaluating payload timelining, operational modifications, physical modifications, and other aspects affecting the thermal control system.

  6. Arc Testing of a Mockup Cable in a Simulated Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    A mockup cable was irradiated with electrons of 25-100 keV energy in a vacuum chamber. The m'ockup cable consisted of insulated wires on a kapton substrate, overlaid with a metallized teonex shield. Voltages induced on the wires and shield by the electron beam during irradiation were monitored, and voltage changes were used, along with video, to detect arcs due to the charge built-up in the cable. The cable was also cooled with liquid nitrogen to very low temperatures, to simulate cables kept in the dark for long periods of time. Arcing was common at fluences typical of long space missions. Occasionally an arc would occur some time after the electron beam was turned off. The conductivity of the wires and shield was monitored as a function of temperature, and behaved as expected, with lower conductivities at lower temperatures. Arcs from the wires and shield to ground and from the wires to the shield were measured. Sympathetic arcs were also seen, wherein an arc from the shield to ground or from the wires to ground was followed in a short period of time by another arc of a different type. Implications of these results for real cables on long space missions will be discussed, and recommendations given for arc mitigation.

  7. Degenerative Tissue Responses to Space-like Radiation Doses in a Rodent Model of Simulated Microgravity.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Parimal; Akel, Nisreen; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Gaddy, Dana; Griffin, Robert J; Yadlapalli, Jai Shankar K; Dobretsov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    This study examines acute and degenerative tissue responses to space-like radiation doses in a rodent model of simulated microgravity. We have studied four groups of rats, control (CON), irradiated (IR), irradiated and hindlimb suspended (IR-HLS), and suspended (HLS) that were maintained for two weeks. IR and IR+HLS groups were exposed to five sessions of X-ray irradiation (1.2 Gy each, at 3-4 days intervals). Body weights, soleus muscle weights, and hindlimb bone mineral density (BMD) were measured. Results show that compared to CON animals, IR, HLS, and IR+HLS group reduced the body weight gain significantly. IR-associated growth retardation appeared to be closely linked to acute and transient post-IR 'anorexia' (a decrease in food intake). HLS but not IR induced major changes in the musculoskeletal system, consisting in decreases in soleus muscle mass and bone mineral density of distal femur and proximal tibia. Additional dosimetric studies showed that the effect of IR on weight is detectable at 0.3 Gy X-ray doses, while no threshold dose for the IR-produced decrease in food intake could be observed. This study suggests that space flight-associated anorexia and musculoskeletal degenerative changes may be driven by different, radiation- and microgravity-associated (respectively) mechanisms. PMID:27098627

  8. Applications of Modeling and Simulation for Flight Hardware Processing at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    The Boeing Design Visualization Group (DVG) is responsible for the creation of highly-detailed representations of both on-site facilities and flight hardware using computer-aided design (CAD) software, with a focus on the ground support equipment (GSE) used to process and prepare the hardware for space. Throughout my ten weeks at this center, I have had the opportunity to work on several projects: the modification of the Multi-Payload Processing Facility (MPPF) High Bay, weekly mapping of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) floor layout, kinematics applications for the Orion Command Module (CM) hatches, and the design modification of the Ares I Upper Stage hatch for maintenance purposes. The main goal of each of these projects was to generate an authentic simulation or representation using DELMIA V5 software. This allowed for evaluation of facility layouts, support equipment placement, and greater process understanding once it was used to demonstrate future processes to customers and other partners. As such, I have had the opportunity to contribute to a skilled team working on diverse projects with a central goal of providing essential planning resources for future center operations.

  9. Influence of simulated space environment on the performance of optical solar reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bingsen; Qiu, Jiawen; Wang, Bin; Chang, Tianhai

    1990-08-01

    The inf1ere of simulated space environment on the prcpert ies of the satel 1 i te temperature-control coat ing --- Optical Sol ar Ref1etor (OSR) is discussed. I kinds of CSR sample are tested in the simu1at1 space environment . The simulat ion i tens include vacuum US? irradi at on, electron and proton i rradiat ion . The surface charge/discharge test is carried out tcx . After the ecron, proton and UV accelerat ive irradiat ion of total dosage equivalent to 7 years at the south or north pale of geosyixthrcrx,us satellite, the solar aI:sorptaire increases from 0 .068 to 0 . 078 for cczxkt ive C , and from 0 . 066 to 0 . 085 for ncn-oonduct ive OSR; the normal ni ttance decreases from 0 .83 to 0.72 for conditive OSR, and from 0.82 to 0.76 for non-conductive OSR. Also, it is shown from the charge/discharge test that the surface charge potential is only I5--40 V for conduct ive CSR, and about 1 --1 0 Ky for non-conduct ive CSR.

  10. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Simulation Testbed I: overview and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Soummer, Rémi; Choquet, Élodie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Levecq, Olivier; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Ygouf, Marie; Leboulleux, Lucie; Egron, Sylvain; Anderson, Rachel; Long, Chris; Elliott, Erin; Hartig, George; Pueyo, Laurent; van der Marel, Roeland; Mountain, Matt

    2014-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop workbench to study aspects of wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing optomechanical testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope, TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science & Operations Center. We have developed an optical design that reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat using three aspheric lenses; it provides similar image quality as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at HeNe wavelength. A segmented deformable mirror stands in for the segmented primary mirror and allows control of the 18 segments in piston, tip, and tilt, while the secondary can be controlled in tip, tilt and x, y, z position. This will be sufficient to model many commissioning activities, to investigate field dependence and multiple field point sensing & control, to evaluate alternate sensing algorithms, and develop contingency plans. Testbed data will also be usable for cross-checking of the WFS&C Software Subsystem, and for staff training and development during JWST's five- to ten-year mission.

  11. Simulation and Control Lab Development for Power and Energy Management for NASA Manned Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Anne M.; Beach, Raymond F.; Soeder, James F.; McNelis, Nancy B.; May, Ryan; Dever, Timothy P.; Trase, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The development of distributed hierarchical and agent-based control systems will allow for reliable autonomous energy management and power distribution for on-orbit missions. Power is one of the most critical systems on board a space vehicle, requiring quick response time when a fault or emergency is identified. As NASAs missions with human presence extend beyond low earth orbit autonomous control of vehicle power systems will be necessary and will need to reliably function for long periods of time. In the design of autonomous electrical power control systems there is a need to dynamically simulate and verify the EPS controller functionality prior to use on-orbit. This paper presents the work at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio where the development of a controls laboratory is being completed that will be utilized to demonstrate advanced prototype EPS controllers for space, aeronautical and terrestrial applications. The control laboratory hardware, software and application of an autonomous controller for demonstration with the ISS electrical power system is the subject of this paper.

  12. Large eddy simulation study of spanwise spacing effects on secondary flows in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliakbarimiyanmahaleh, Mohammad; Anderson, William

    2015-11-01

    The structure of turbulent flow over a complex topography composed of streamwise-aligned rows of cones with varying spanwise spacing, s is studied with large-eddy simulation (LES). Similar to the experimental study of Vanderwel and Ganapathisubramani, 2015: J. Fluid Mech., we investigate the relationship between secondary flow and s, for 0 . 25 <= s / δ <= 5 . For cases with s / δ > 2 , domain-scale rollers freely exist. These had previously been called ``turbulent secondary flows'' (Willingham et al., 2014: Phys. Fluids; Barros and Christensen, 2014: J. Fluid Mech.; Anderson et al., 2015: J. Fluid Mech.), but closer inspection of the statistics indicates these are a turbulent tertiary flow: they only remain ``anchored'' to the conical roughness elements for s / δ > 2 . For s / δ < 2 , turbulent tertiary flows are prevented from occupying the domain by virtue of proximity to adjacent, counter-rotating tertiary flows. Turbulent secondary flows are associated with the conical roughness elements. These turbulent secondary flows emanate from individual conical topographic elements and set the roughness sublayer depth. The turbulent secondary flows remain intact for large and small spacing. For s / δ < 1 , a mean tertiary flow is not present. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Sci. Research, Young Inv. Program (PM: Dr. R. Ponnoppan and Ms. E. Montomery) under Grant # FA9550-14-1-0394. Computational resources were provided by the Texas Adv. Comp. Center at the Univ. of Texas.

  13. The ESA Large Space Simulator Mechanical Ground Support Equipment for Spacecraft Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagelschuer, Dirk; Messing, Rene; Westera, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Environmental test facilities are not suitable in any case to comply with special or complex test requirements without modifications. Dedicated upgrades of the test facility and their subsystems with respect to the test requirements and specifications are often necessary. The Flight Model of the Planck Space Telescope was tested in the Large Space Simulator (LSS) of the ESTEC Test Centre. Main goals of the test were the verification of the deformation of the Telescope during thermal vacuum conditions at different temperature levels and the validation of the Thermal Model. The deformations of the telescope have been traced by two Videogrammetry canisters. In order to provide different view positions with respect to the PLANCK Telescope it was necessary to rotate the specimen by +/- 180deg. In addition very stringent requirements for the low temperature level of the thermal environment has lead to a comprehensive test set-up which was divided in four main elements: Dedicated support structure for the Videogrammetry canisters providing several DoF for adjustment. Structure to support three Infrared panels around the specimen. MLI curtain to cover the LSS 8m auxiliary chamber opening. System providing LN2 supply for the rotating PLANCK telescope cold panel. The design, manufacturing and integration of the necessary mechanical ground support to install for instance the canisters and to ensure the 180 rotation of the telescope under cold and high vacuum conditions was an extensive and important part of the entire test program. This paper will concentrate on the design issues, the implementation and verification of the MGSE provided for the Planck Space Telescope FM Videogrammetry Test in the LSS and the troubleshooting caused by a failure during the first rotation under cold conditions.

  14. Degradation of thermal control materials under a simulated radiative space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. K.; Sridhara, N.

    2012-11-01

    A spacecraft with a passive thermal control system utilizes various thermal control materials to maintain temperatures within safe operating limits. Materials used for spacecraft applications are exposed to harsh space environments such as ultraviolet (UV) and particle (electron, proton) irradiation and atomic oxygen (AO), undergo physical damage and thermal degradation, which must be considered for spacecraft thermal design optimization and cost effectiveness. This paper describes the effect of synergistic radiation on some of the important thermal control materials to verify the assumptions of beginning-of-life (BOL) and end-of-life (EOL) properties. Studies on the degradation in the optical properties (solar absorptance and infrared emittance) of some important thermal control materials exposed to simulated radiative geostationary space environment are discussed. The current studies are purely related to the influence of radiation on the degradation of the materials; other environmental aspects (e.g., thermal cycling) are not discussed. The thermal control materials investigated herein include different kind of second-surface mirrors, white anodizing, white paints, black paints, multilayer insulation materials, varnish coated aluminized polyimide, germanium coated polyimide, polyether ether ketone (PEEK) and poly tetra fluoro ethylene (PTFE). For this purpose, a test in the constant vacuum was performed reproducing a three year radiative space environment exposure, including ultraviolet and charged particle effects on North/South panels of a geostationary three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Reflectance spectra were measured in situ in the solar range (250-2500 nm) and the corresponding solar absorptance values were calculated. The test methodology and the degradations of the materials are discussed. The most important degradations among the low solar absorptance materials were found in the white paints whereas the rigid optical solar reflectors remained quite

  15. Detection of macromolecules in desert cyanobacteria mixed with a lunar mineral analogue after space simulations.

    PubMed

    Baqué, Mickael; Verseux, Cyprien; Rabbow, Elke; de Vera, Jean-Pierre Paul; Billi, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    In the context of future exposure missions in Low Earth Orbit and possibly on the Moon, two desert strains of the cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, strains CCMEE 029 and 057, mixed or not with a lunar mineral analogue, were exposed to fractionated fluencies of UVC and polychromatic UV (200-400 nm) and to space vacuum. These experiments were carried out within the framework of the BIOMEX (BIOlogy and Mars EXperiment) project, which aims at broadening our knowledge of mineral-microorganism interaction and the stability/degradation of their macromolecules when exposed to space and simulated Martian conditions. The presence of mineral analogues provided a protective effect, preserving survivability and integrity of DNA and photosynthetic pigments, as revealed by testing colony-forming abilities, performing PCR-based assays and using confocal laser scanning microscopy. In particular, DNA and pigments were still detectable after 500 kJ/m(2) of polychromatic UV and space vacuum (10(-4) Pa), corresponding to conditions expected during one-year exposure in Low Earth Orbit on board the EXPOSE-R2 platform in the presence of 0.1 % Neutral Density (ND) filter. After exposure to high UV fluencies (800 MJ/m(2)) in the presence of minerals, however, altered fluorescence emission spectrum of the photosynthetic pigments were detected, whereas DNA was still amplified by PCR. The present paper considers the implications of such findings for the detection of biosignatures in extraterrestrial conditions and for putative future lunar missions. PMID:25351683

  16. The potential of the lichen symbiosis to cope with the extreme conditions of outer space II: germination capacity of lichen ascospores in response to simulated space conditions.

    PubMed

    de Vera, J-P; Horneck, G; Rettberg, P; Ott, S

    2004-01-01

    Complementary to the already well-studied microorganisms, lichens, symbiotic organisms of the mycobiont (fungi) and the photobiont (algae), were used as "model systems" in which to examine the ecological potential to resist to extreme environments of outer space. Ascospores (sexual propagules of the mycobiont) of the lichens Fulgensia bracteata, Xanthoria elegans and Xanthoria parietina were exposed to selected space-simulating conditions (up to 16 h of space vacuum at 10(-3) Pa and UV radiation at 160 nm < or = lambda < or = 400 nm), while embedded in the lichen fruiting bodies. After exposure, the ascospores were discharged and their viability was tested as germination capacity on different culture media including those containing Mars regolith simulant. It was found that (i) the germination rate on media containing Mars regolith simulant was as high as on other mineral-containing media, (ii) if enclosed in the ascocarps, the ascospores survived the vacuum exposure, the UV-irradiation as well as the combined treatment of vacuum and UV to a high degree. In general, 50 % or more viable spores were recovered, with ascospores of X. elegans showing the highest survival. It is suggested that ascospores inside the ascocarps are well protected by the anatomical structure, the gelatinous layer and the pigments (parietin and carotene) against the space parameters tested.

  17. GMC COLLISIONS AS TRIGGERS OF STAR FORMATION. I. PARAMETER SPACE EXPLORATION WITH 2D SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Benjamin; Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Bruderer, Simon

    2015-09-20

    We utilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to develop a numerical model for giant molecular cloud (GMC)–GMC collisions between nearly magnetically critical clouds. The goal is to determine if, and under what circumstances, cloud collisions can cause pre-existing magnetically subcritical clumps to become supercritical and undergo gravitational collapse. We first develop and implement new photodissociation region based heating and cooling functions that span the atomic to molecular transition, creating a multiphase ISM and allowing modeling of non-equilibrium temperature structures. Then in 2D and with ideal MHD, we explore a wide parameter space of magnetic field strength, magnetic field geometry, collision velocity, and impact parameter and compare isolated versus colliding clouds. We find factors of ∼2–3 increase in mean clump density from typical collisions, with strong dependence on collision velocity and magnetic field strength, but ultimately limited by flux-freezing in 2D geometries. For geometries enabling flow along magnetic field lines, greater degrees of collapse are seen. We discuss observational diagnostics of cloud collisions, focussing on {sup 13}CO(J = 2–1), {sup 13}CO(J = 3–2), and {sup 12}CO(J = 8–7) integrated intensity maps and spectra, which we synthesize from our simulation outputs. We find that the ratio of J = 8–7 to lower-J emission is a powerful diagnostic probe of GMC collisions.

  18. Quantitative orientation preference and susceptibility to space motion sickness simulated in a virtual reality environment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Chao, Jian-Gang; Chen, Xue-Wen; Wang, Jin-Kun; Tan, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Orientation preference should appear when variable weightings of spatial orientation cues are used between individuals. It is possible that astronauts' orientation preferences could be a potential predictor for susceptibility to space motion sickness (SMS). The present study was conducted to confirm this relationship on Earth by quantifying orientation preferences and simulating SMS in a virtual reality environment. Two tests were carried out. The first was to quantitatively determine one's orientation preference. Thirty-two participants' vision and body cue preferences were determined by measuring perceptual up (PU) orientations. The ratio of vision and body vector (ROVB) was used as the indicator of one's orientation preference. The second test was to visually induce motion sickness symptoms that represent similar sensory conflicts as SMS using a virtual reality environment. Relationships between ROVB values and motion sickness scores were analyzed, which revealed cubic functions by using optimal fits. According to ROVB level, participants were divided into three groups - body group, vision group, and confusion group - and the factor of gender was further considered as a covariate in the analysis. Consistent differences in motion sickness scores were observed between the three groups. Thus, orientation preference had a significant relationship with susceptibility to simulated SMS symptoms. This knowledge could assist with astronaut selection and might be a useful countermeasure when developing new preflight trainings.

  19. Method for simulating free space optical data links for personnel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateti, Kiron; Clarke, Brandon R.; Seals, Ean J.; Petty, Gregory J.; Tran, Hoang Q.; Boykin, Courtney L.; Nicholson, Gail M.; Borneman, Joshua D.

    2013-05-01

    Free Space Optical (FSO) wireless data links are attractive alternatives to RF communications. This technology could enable vision around corners or barriers, and allow covert, secure, and wireless distribution of scope images to other squad helmet mounted displays (HMDs), with minimal additional hardware to the current equipment. A major design challenge for FSO links in personnel applications is ensuring line of sight (LoS) between transmitter and receiver. This work captures warfighter helmet and gun movement using video motion tracking in a typical application for FSO data links. A method to simulate transmitter and receiver on the warfighter helmet and gun scope and analyze LoS and FOV is presented. This method allows optimization of FSO data link placement and provides requirements for future FSO technology. The initial results suggest that to meet 100% of the threshold requirements, the vertical FOV of a receiver must be 80° and the horizontal FOV must be 60° and oriented 10° in pitch and -7.5° in yaw. Simulating a FSO link with horizontal and vertical FOV of 60° shows expected performance using a visual method from a helmet mounted camera. Additionally, the FOV of the transmitter and receiver can be visualized with arbitrary FOV, position, and orientation.

  20. Simulation analyses of space use: Home range estimates, variability, and sample size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekoff, M.; Mech, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Simulations of space use by animals were run to determine the relationship among home range area estimates, variability, and sample size {number of locations}. As sample size increased, home range size increased asymptotically, whereas variability decreased among mean home range area estimates generated by multiple simulations for the same sample size. Our results suggest that field workers should ascertain between 100 and 200 locations in order to estimate reliably home range area. In some cases, this suggested guideline is higher than values found in the few published studies in which the relationship between home range area and number of locations is addressed. Sampling differences for small species occupying relatively small home ranges indicate that fewer locations may be sufficient to allow for a reliable estimate of home range. Intraspecffic variability in social status (group member, loner, resident, transient), age, sex, reproductive condition, and food resources also have to be considered, as do season, habitat, and differences in sampling and analytical methods. Comparative data still are needed.