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Sample records for 252cf brachytherapy source

  1. Clinical brachytherapy with neutron emitting 252Cf sources and adherence to AAPM TG-43 dosimetry protocol.

    PubMed

    Rivard, M J; Wierzbicki, J G; Van den Heuvel, F; Martin, R C; McMahon, R R

    1999-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods, neutron dosimetry for 252Cf Applicator Tube (AT) type medical sources available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has for the first time been determined in terms of TG-43 formalism. This approach, as compared to previous "along-away" formalisms, demonstrates the relative angular independence of dose rate data, when the geometry factor has been removed. As the ORNL-made 252Cf AT type sources are considerably physically larger than most clinical sources used today, the radial dose function increases for radii less than 3.0 mm due to breakdown of the line source model. A comparison of the 252Cf neutron radial dose function with those for other medical sources revealed similarities with that from 137Cs. Differences with respect to previous 252Cf AT source neutron dosimetry data generally increased at increasing distances. This was attributed to differences in the various 252Cf AT source models and phantom compositions. The current status of 252Cf medical source fabrication and calibration procedures at ORNL is presented. PMID:9949403

  2. Graphite moderated (252)Cf source.

    PubMed

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Barros, Haydn; Greaves, Eduardo D; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2015-06-01

    The Thorium molten-salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid-fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a (252)Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the (252)Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. PMID:25770393

  3. Regeneration in cervix cancer after sup 252 Cf neutron brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.; Wierzbicki, J.; Feola, J.; Urano, M. )

    1990-07-01

    Regeneration of clonogens in human cervical cancer was assessed by the pathological evaluation of the hysterectomy specimen after intracavitary {sup 252}Cf neutron brachytherapy implants separated by varying time intervals followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. In this study, patients with bulky/barrel shaped Stage IB cervical cancers received {sup 252}Cf implants plus approximately 45 Gy of whole pelvis linear accelerator radiotherapy in approximately 25 fractions in 5 weeks followed by hysterectomy 4-6 weeks after radiotherapy. The specimens were studied grossly and microscopically for residual tumor. It was found that the fraction of positive specimens increased with elapsed time interval between implants. These findings support the hypothesis that there is repopulation of surviving clonogens with increased time interval between the implants. The observation also supports current concerns that rapid depopulation of tumor can lead to rapid repopulation, that is, rapid shrinkage of tumor can alter the physiological environment such that clonogens can rapidly regenerate.

  4. ANISOTROPY FACTORS FOR A 252Cf SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.; Bogard, James S

    2009-01-01

    A new 252Cf source has been procured for use at the Dosimetry Applications and Research (DOSAR) facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This source was encapsulated by the Californium Facility at ORNL, however, the encapsulation differs from previous designs designated as SR-Cf-100. The new encapsulation, designated SR-Cf-3000, has a similar cylindrical radius to the previous generation, but is 1.6 cm longer. Since the encapsulation geometries differ the amount of internal scattering of neutrons will also differ leading to changes in anisotropy factors between the two designs. Additionally, the different encapsulations will affect the absorbed dose and dose equivalent delivered per neutron emitted by the source since both the quantity and energy distribution of the emitted neutrons will vary with irradiation angle. This work presents the fluence anisotropy factors for the SR-Cf-3000 series encapsulation as well as absorbed dose and dose equivalent values calculated for various angles of irradiation. The fluence anisotropy factors vary from a maximum of 1.037 to a minimum of 0.641 for irradiation angles perpendicular and parallel to the source axis, respectively. Anisotropy in absorbed dose varied from a maximum of 1.033 to a minimum of 0.676 while anisotropy of dose equivalent varied from 1.035 to 0.657.

  5. Plaque Therapy and Scatter Dose Using {sup 252}Cf Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mark J. Rivard; Anita Mahajan

    2000-11-12

    As melanomas are radioresistant to conventional low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiations such as photons and electrons, {sup 252}Cf (high-LET due to neutrons) may offer more promising clinical results. Although {sup 252}Cf also emits photons and electrons, the majority of absorbed dose is imparted by the high-LET radiation. This study examines the impact of scattering material on the neutron dose distributions for {sup 252}Cf plaque therapy (used to treat surface lesions like melanoma). Neutrons were transported through a 10-cm-diam water phantom with a thickness of either 5 or 10 cm using the MCNP radiation transport code. The phantom was surrounded by vacuum; the {sup 252}Cf neutron energy spectrum was modeled as a Maxwellian distribution; and the source was a bare point positioned at 1.0, 0.5, or {epsilon} above or below the water/vacuum interface. These source positions were chosen to mimic the case where a plaque locates the source either above the skin's surface, e.g., 2{pi} scattering geometry, or if layers of tissue-equivalent bolus materials were placed atop the implant to provide radiation backscatter, 4{pi} geometry. Differences between the 2{pi} and 4{pi} geometries were maximized closest to the source and for source positions farthest from the water/vacuum interface. Therefore, the maximum radiation dose (closest to the {sup 252}Cf source) may be minimized by not including scattering material for plaque therapy. However, for nonrelativistic, elastic scattering for protons by neutrons, the proton range increases with neutron energy. This result was expected since the neutron energy spectrum degrades at increasing depth and the proportion of fast neutron dose to total dose is maximized closest to the source in the 2{pi} geometry. Future studies will examine this effect as a function of neutron energy, will consider synergy with the low-LET {sup 252}Cf dose component and include experimental measurements, and will assess this technique to possibly

  6. Intracavitary moderator balloon combined with 252Cf brachytherapy and boron neutron capture therapy, improving dosimetry in brain tumour and infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, S F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article proposes a combination of californium-252 (252Cf) brachytherapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and an intracavitary moderator balloon catheter applied to brain tumour and infiltrations. Methods: Dosimetric evaluations were performed on three protocol set-ups: 252Cf brachytherapy combined with BNCT (Cf-BNCT); Cf-BNCT with a balloon catheter filled with light water (LWB) and the same set-up with heavy water (HWB). Results: Cf-BNCT-HWB has presented dosimetric advantages to Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT in infiltrations at 2.0–5.0 cm from the balloon surface. However, Cf-BNCT-LWB has shown superior dosimetry up to 2.0 cm from the balloon surface. Conclusion: Cf-BNCT-HWB and Cf-BNCT-LWB protocols provide a selective dose distribution for brain tumour and infiltrations, mainly further from the 252Cf source, sparing the normal brain tissue. Advances in knowledge: Malignant brain tumours grow rapidly and often spread to adjacent brain tissues, leading to death. Improvements in brain radiation protocols have been continuously achieved; however, brain tumour recurrence is observed in most cases. Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT-HWB represent new modalities for selectively combating brain tumour infiltrations and metastasis. PMID:25927876

  7. Measurement of the 250Cf component in a 252Cf neutron source at KRISS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungho; Park, Hyeonseo; Choi, Kil-Oung

    2014-10-01

    Neutron emission rate measurements have been carried out at the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science using a manganese sulphate bath system for (252)Cf and (241)Am-Be sources since 2004. The relative measurement method was chosen in 2012, and the neutron emission rates agreed with those by the absolute measurement method within uncertainties. The neutron emission rate of an old (252)Cf source has been measured three times: in 2004, 2009 and 2012. The (250)Cf component was fitted to a double-exponential function of (252)Cf+(250)Cf, and the ratio of the (250)Cf component to the (252)Cf component was estimated to be 7.8 % in 2004 and 46.8 % in 2012. Underestimation of the neutron emission rates of old (252)Cf sources can be corrected if the neutron emission rate of the (250)Cf component is taken into account. PMID:24344350

  8. A new facility for non-destructive assay using a 252Cf source.

    PubMed

    Stevanato, L; Caldogno, M; Dima, R; Fabris, D; Hao, Xin; Lunardon, M; Moretto, S; Nebbia, G; Pesente, S; Pino, F; Sajo-Bohus, L; Viesti, G

    2013-03-01

    A new laboratory facility for non-destructive analysis (NDA) using a time-tagged (252)Cf source is presented. The system is designed to analyze samples having maximum size of about 20 × 25 cm(2), the material recognition being obtained by measuring simultaneously total and energy dependent transmission of neutrons and gamma rays. The equipment technical characteristics and performances of the NDA system are presented, exploring also limits due to the sample thickness. Some recent applications in the field of cultural heritage are presented. PMID:23276691

  9. [Radiation safety during work on the ANET-V therapeutic apparatus with 252Cf sources].

    PubMed

    Chekhonadskiĭ, V N; Drygin, V N; Vaĭnberg, M Sh; Komar, V Ia; Elisiutin, G P

    1985-03-01

    The Soviet ANET-W intracavitary neutron therapy apparatus is charged with 252Cf sources, the total mass of the radionuclide being 2100 micrograms. The radiation exposure of the staff has been studied and the results presented. Possible emergency situations have been analysed, methods of their prevention and liquidation worked out. Induced radioactivity in the patient's body has been estimated. Radiation dose levels for the medical staff are 10-15 times lower for the ANET-W apparatus than those for 252Cf sources administered by the manual series system but 10 times higher than those for the AGAT-W gamma-apparatus. The design, blocking system and emergency reset of the sources provide for safe work on the ANET-W apparatus. During liquidation of an emergency situation irradiation of the staff does not exceed 0.3 of the annual maximum tolerance dose. The level of induced activity in the patient's body is insignificant as in 10.5 min it does not exceed background values. PMID:3982256

  10. {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency analysis measurements with subcritical arrays of PWR fuel pins

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E.; Blakeman, E.D.; King, W.T.

    1996-08-01

    Experiments with fresh PWR fuel assemblies were performed to assess the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency analysis method for measuring the subcriticality of spent fuel. The measurements at the Babcox and Wilcox Critical Experiments Facility mocked up between 17x17 fuel pins (single assembly) and a full array of 4961 fuel pins (about 17 fuel assemblies) in borated water with a fixed B concentration. For the full array, the B content of the water was varied from 1511 at delayed criticality to 4303 ppM. Measurements were done for various source-detector-fuel pin configurations; they showed high sensitivity of frequency analysis parameters to B content and fissile mass. Parameters such as auto and cross power spectral densities can be calculated directly by a more general model of the Monte Carlo code (MCNP-DSP). Calculation-measurement comparisons are presented. This model permits the validation of neutron and gamma ray transport calculational methods with subcritical measurements using the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency analysis method.

  11. A feasibility study of [sup 252]Cf neutron brachytherapy, cisplatin + 5-FU chemo-adjuvant and accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Y.; Wierzbicki, J. Univ. of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY ); Bowen, M.G.; Van Nagell, J.R.; Gallion, H.H.; DePriest, P. )

    1994-06-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of [sup 252]Cf neutron brachytherapy combined with hyperaccelerated chemoradiotherapy for Stage III and IV cervical cancers. Eleven patients with advanced Stage IIIB-IVA cervical cancers were treated with [sup 252]Cf neutron brachytherapy in an up-front schedule followed by cisplatin (CDDP; 50 mg/m[sup 2]) chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated (1.2 Gy bid) radiotherapy given concurrently with intravenous infusion of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) (1000 mg/m[sup 2]/day [times] 4 days) in weeks 1 and 4 with conventional radiation (weeks 2, 3, 5, and 6). Total dose at a paracervical point A isodose surface was 80-85 Gy-eq by external and intracavitary therapy and 60 Gy at the pelvic sidewalls. Patients tolerated the protocol well. There was 91% compliance with the chemotherapy and full compliance with the [sup 252]Cf brachytherapy and the external beam radiotherapy. There were no problems with acute chemo or radiation toxicity. One patient developed a rectovaginal fistula (Grade 3-4 RTOG criteria) but no other patients developed significant late cystitis, proctitis or enteritis. There was complete response (CR) observed in all cases. With mean follow-up to 26 months, local control has been achieved with 90% actuarial 3-year survival with no evidence of disease (NED). [sup 252]Cf neutrons can be combined with cisplatin and 5-FU infusion chemotherapy plus hyperaccelerated chemoradiotherapy without unusual side effects or toxicity and with a high local response and tumor control rate. Further study of [sup 252]Cf neutron-chemoradiotherapy for advanced and bulky cervical cancer are indicated. The authors found chemotherapy was more effective with the improved local tumor control. 18 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Physics of the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Perez, R.B.; Mattingly, J.K.

    1997-02-01

    The {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method is a versatile measurements tool that has been applied to measurements for initial loading of reactors, quality assurance of reactor fuel elements, fuel processing facilities, fuel reprocessing facilities, fuel storage facilities, zero-power testing of reactors, verification of calculational methods, process monitoring, characterization of storage vaults, and nuclear weapons identification. This method`s broad range of application is due to the wide variety of time- and frequency domain signatures, each with unique properties, obtained from the measurement. The following parameters are obtained from this measurement: average detector count rates, detector multiplicities, detector autocorrelations, cross-correlation between detectors, detector autopower spectral densities, cross-power spectral densities between detectors, coherences, and ratios of spectral densities. All of these measured parameters can also be calculated using the MCNP-DSP Monte Carlo code. This paper presents a review of the time-domain signatures obtained from this measurement.

  13. A new facility for Non-Destructive Assay with a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanato, L.; Caldogno, M.; Hao Xin; Dima, R.; Fabris, D.; Nebbia, G.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pesente, S.; Viesti, G.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2010-08-04

    A new facility for non-destructive assay using a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf source is presented. The system is designed to analyze samples having maximum size of about 15x20 cm{sup 2}, the material recognition being obtained by measuring simultaneously transmission of neutrons and gamma rays.

  14. New source moderator geometry to improve performance of 252Cf and 241Am Be source-based PGNAA setups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, A. A.; Abdelmonem, M. S.; Al-Misned, Ghada; Al-Ghamdi, Hanan

    2006-06-01

    The gamma ray yield from a 252Cf and a 241Am-Be source-based Prompt Gamma Ray Activation Analysis (PGNAA) setup has been observed to increase with enclosing their neutrons sources in a high-density polyethylene moderator. The prompt gamma rays yield from both setups depends upon the moderator length and the source position in it. For both setups, the optimum moderator length is found to be 7 cm. The optimum position of the neutron source inside moderator of the 252Cf and the 241Am-Be source-based PGNAA setups was found to be at a distance of 0.5 and 0.75 cm from the moderator-end facing the sample, respectively. Due to enclosure of the source in the moderator, about three-fold increase has been observed in the yield of prompt gamma rays from a Portland cement sample of a 252Cf and a 241Am-Be source-based PGNAA setups.

  15. Measurements of gamma-ray dose from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Griffith, R.V.; Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1983-06-01

    The gamma-ray dose fraction from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source was determined by using three types of dosimetry systems. Measurements were carried out in air at a distance of 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere (50 cm from the source which is at the center of the sphere) to the geometrical center of each detector. The moderating sphere is 0.8-mm-thick stainless steel shell filled with D/sub 2/O and covered with 0.5 mm of cadmium. Measurements were also carried out with instruments and dosimeters positioned at the surface of a 40 cm x 40 cm x 15 cm plexiglass irradiation phantom whose front surface was also 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere. A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic ionization chambers and a TE proportional counter (TEPC) were used to measure tissue dose, from which the neutron dose equivalent was computed. The ratio of gamma-ray dose to the neutron dose equivalent was determined by using a relatively neutron-insensitive Geiger-Mueller (GM) counter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In addition, the event-size spectrum measured by the TEPC was also used to compute the gamma-ray dose fraction. The average value for the ratio of gamma-ray dose to neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.18 with an uncertainty of about +-18%.

  16. A New Facility For Non-Destructive Assay With A Time-Tagged {sup 252}Cf Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanato, L.; Caldogno, M.; Hao, Xin; Dima, R.; Fabris, D.; Nebbia, G.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pesente, S.; Viesti, G.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2011-06-01

    A new facility for Non-Destructive Assay based on a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission source is now in operation at the Padova University. The system is designed to analyze samples with dimensions on the order of 20x20 cm{sup 2}, the material recognition being obtained by measuring simultaneously transmission of neutrons and gamma rays as a function of energy.

  17. Replacing a 252Cf source with a neutron generator in a shuffler - a conceptual design performed with MCNPX

    SciTech Connect

    Schear, Melissa A; Tobin, Stephen J

    2009-01-01

    The {sup 252}Cf shuffler has been widely used in nuclear safeguards and radioactive waste management to assay fissile isotopes, such as {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu, present in a variety of samples, ranging from small cans of uranium waste to metal samples weighing several kilograms. Like other non-destructive assay instruments, the shuffler uses an interrogating neutron source to induce fissions in the sample. Although shufflers with {sup 252}Cf sources have been reliably used for several decades, replacing this isotopic source with a neutron generator presents some distinct advantages. Neutron generators can be run in a continuous or pulsed mode, and may be turned off, eliminating the need for shielding and a shuffling mechanism in the shuffler. There is also essentially no dose to personnel during installation, and no reliance on the availability of {sup 252}Cf. Despite these advantages, the more energetic neutrons emitted from the neutron generator (141 MeV for D-T generators) present some challenges for certain material types. For example when the enrichment of a uranium sample is unknown, the fission of {sup 238}U is generally undesirable. Since measuring uranium is one of the main uses of a shuffler, reducing the delayed neutron contribution from {sup 238}U is desirable. Hence, the shuffler hardware must be modified to accommodate a moderator configuration near the source to tailor the interrogating spectrum in a manner which promotes sub-threshold fissions (below 1 MeV) but avoids the over-moderation of the interrogating neutrons so as to avoid self-shielding. In this study, where there are many material and geometry combinations, the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code was used to model, design, and optimize the moderator configuration within the shuffler geometry. The code is then used to evaluate and compare the assay performances of both the modified shuffler and the current {sup 252}Cf shuffler designs for different test samples. The

  18. 252Cf-source-correlated transmission measurements for uranyl fluoride deposit in a 24-in-OD process pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckan, T.; Wyatt, M. S.; Mihalczo, J. T.; Valentine, T. E.; Mullens, J. A.; Hannon, T. F.

    1999-02-01

    Characterization of a hydrated uranyl fluoride (UO 2F 2· nH 2O) deposit in a 17 ft long, 24 in OD process pipe at the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant was successfully performed using 252Cf-source-correlated time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurements. These measurements of neutrons and gamma rays through the pipe from an external 252Cf fission source were used to measure the deposit profile and its distribution along the pipe, the hydration (or H/U), and the total uranium mass. The measurements were performed with a source in an ionization chamber on one side of the pipe and detectors on the other. Scanning the pipe vertically and horizontally produced a spatial and time-dependent radiograph of the deposit in which transmitted gamma rays and neutrons were separated in time. The cross-correlation function between the source and the detector was measured with the Nuclear Weapons Identification System. After correcting for pipe effects, the deposit thickness was determined from the transmitted neutrons and H/U from the gamma rays. Results were consistent with a later intrusive observation of the shape and the color of the deposit; i.e., the deposit was annular and was on the top of the pipe at some locations, demonstrating the usefulness of this method for deposit characterization.

  19. MCNP-DSP calculations of the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis measurements of highly enriched uranium metal cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents calculations of the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis measurements for subcritical highly enriched uranium metal cylinders using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-DSP. This code directly calculates the noise analysis data from the {sup 252}Cf- source-driven noise analysis method for both neutron and gamma ray detectors. Direct calculation of experimental observables by the Monte Carlo method allows for the benchmarking of the calculational model and the cross sections and for determining the bias in the calculation.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation optimisation of zinc sulphide based fast-neutron detector for radiography using a 252Cf source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkian, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    Neutron radiography is rapidly extending as one of the methods for non-destructive screening of materials. There are various parameters to be studied for optimising imaging screens and image quality for different fast-neutron radiography systems. Herein, a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation is employed to evaluate the response of a fast-neutron radiography system using a 252Cf neutron source. The neutron radiography system is comprised of a moderator as the neutron-to-proton converter with suspended silver-activated zinc sulphide (ZnS(Ag)) as the phosphor material. The neutron-induced protons deposit energy in the phosphor which consequently emits scintillation light. Further, radiographs are obtained by simulating the overall radiography system including source and sample. Two different standard samples are used to evaluate the quality of the radiographs.

  1. Feasibility of fissile mass assay of spent nuclear fuel using {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, J.K.; Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1996-10-01

    The feasibility was evaluated using MCNP-DSP, an analog Monte Carlo transport cod to simulate source-driven measurements. Models of an isolated Westinghouse 17x17 PWR fuel assembly in a 1500-ppM borated water storage pool were used. In the models, the fuel burnup profile was represented using seven axial burnup zones, each with isotopics estimated by the PDQ code. Four different fuel assemblies with average burnups from fresh to 32 GWd/MTU were modeled and analyzed. Analysis of the fuel assemblies was simulated by inducing fission in the fuel using a {sup 252}Cf source adjacent to the assembly and correlating source fissions with the response of a bank of {sup 3}He detectors adjacent to the assembly opposite the source. This analysis was performed at 7 different axial positions on each of the 4 assemblies, and the source-detector cross-spectrum signature was calculated for each of these 28 simulated measurements. The magnitude of the cross-spectrum signature follows a smooth upward trend with increasing fissile material ({sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu) content, and the signature is independent of the concentration of spontaneously fissioning isotopes (e.g., {sup 244}Cm) and ({alpha},n) sources. Furthermore, the cross-spectrum signature is highly sensitive to changes in fissile material content. This feasibility study indicated that the signature would increase {similar_to}100% in response to an increase of only 0.1 g/cm{sup 3} of fissile material.

  2. Bias in calculated k{sub eff} from subcritical measurements by the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E.

    1995-07-01

    The development of MCNP-DSP, which allows direct calculation of the measured time and frequency analysis parameters from subcritical measurements using the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method, permits the validation of calculational methods for criticality safety with in-plant subcritical measurements. In addition, a method of obtaining the bias in the calculations, which is essential to the criticality safety specialist, is illustrated using the results of measurements with 17.771-cm-diam, enriched (93.15), unreflected, and unmoderated uranium metal cylinders. For these uranium metal cylinders the bias obtained using MCNP-DSP and ENDF/B-V cross-section data increased with subcriticality. For a critical experiment [height (h) = 12.629 cm], it was {minus}0.0061 {+-} 0.0003. For a 10.16-cm-high cylinder (k {approx} 0.93), it was 0.0060 {+-} 0.0016, and for a subcritical cylinder (h = 8.13 cm, k {approx} 0.85), the bias was {minus}0.0137 {+-} 0.0037, more than a factor of 2 larger in magnitude. This method allows the nuclear criticality safety specialist to establish the bias in calculational methods for criticality safety from in-plant subcritical measurements by the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method.

  3. Results with the electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder for the {sup 252}Cf fission source project (Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade) at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Scott, R.; Zinkann, G. P.

    2010-02-15

    The construction of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is nearing completion. The facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Ci {sup 252}Cf source; thermalized and collected into a low-energy particle beam by a helium gas catcher. In order to reaccelerate these beams, an existing ATLAS electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source was redesigned to function as an ECR charge breeder. Thus far, the charge breeder has been tested with stable beams of rubidium and cesium achieving charge breeding efficiencies of 9.7% into {sup 85}Rb{sup 17+} and 2.9% into {sup 133}Cs{sup 20+}.

  4. Selective perturbation of in vivo linear energy transfer using high- Z vaginal applicators for Cf-252 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivard, M. J.; Evans, K. E.; Leal, L. C.; Kirk, B. L.

    2004-01-01

    Californium-252 ( 252Cf) brachytherapy sources emit both neutrons and photons, and have the potential to vastly improve the current standard-of-practice for brachytherapy. While hydrogenous materials readily attenuate the 252Cf fission energy neutrons, high- Z materials are utilized to attenuate the 252Cf gamma-rays. These differences in shielding materials may be exploited when treating with a vaginal applicator to possibly improve patient survival through perturbation of the in vivo linear energy transfer radiation.

  5. Fissible Deposit Characterization at the Former Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant by {sup 252}CF-Source-Driven Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hannon, T.F.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Uckan, T.; Valentine, T.E.; Wyatt, M.S.

    1998-05-01

    largest deposits with the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven transmission (CFSDT) technique, an active neutron interrogation method developed for use at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to identify nuclear weapons components in containers. The active CFSDT measurement technique uses CFSDT time-of-flight measurements of prompt neutrons and gamma rays from an externally introduced {sup 252}Cf source.

  6. Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Traub, Richard J.

    2010-03-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

  7. 1987 Neutron and gamma personnel dosimeter intercomparison study using a D/sub 2/O-moderated /sup 252/Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; West, L.E.; Sims, C.S.; Welty, T.J.

    1989-05-01

    The thirteenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study (i.e., PDIS 13) was conducted during April 1987 as a joint effort by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Dosimetry Applications Research Group and the Southwest Radiation Calibration Center at the University of Arkansas. A total of 48 organizations (34 from the US and 14 from abroad) participated in PDIS 13. Participants submitted a total of 1,113 neutron and gamma dosimeters for this mixed field study. The dosimeters were transferred by mail and were handled by experimental personnel at ORNL and the University of Arkansas. The type of neutron dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD-albedo (49%), direct interaction TLD (31%), CR-39 (17%), film (3%). The type of gamma dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: Li/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/, alone or in combination with CaSO/sub 4/, (69%), /sup 7/LiF (28%), natural LiF (3%). Radiation exposures in PDIS 13 were limited to 0.5 and 1.5 mSv from /sup 252/Cf moderated by 15-cm of D/sub 2/O. Traditional exposures using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) were not possible due to the fact that all reactors at ORNL, including the HPRR, were shutdown by order of the Department of Energy at the time the intercomparison was performed. Planned exposures using a /sup 238/PuBe source were negated by a faulty timing mechanism. Based on accuracy and precision, direct interaction TLD dosimeters exhibited the best performance in PDIS 13 neutron measurements. They were followed, in order of best performance, by CR-39, TLD albedo, and film. The Li/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/ type TLD dosimeters exhibited the best performance in PDIS 13 gamma measurements. They were followed by natural LiF, /sup 7/LiF, and film. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  8. Evaluation of plutonium oxidation using pulsed neutron measurements with {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1997-09-01

    The unrecognized oxidation of plutonium in {open_quotes}sealed{close_quotes} canisters poses a unique problem for both material control and accountability. A feasibility study was performed to address the use of randomly pulsed neutron measurements with {sup 252}Cf to determine if plutonium metal in a canister has oxidized without opening the container. The Monte Carlo code MCNP-DSP was used to determine if time-of-flight transmission measurements could be used to determine oxidation of plutonium in {open_quotes}sealed{close_quotes} cans. In the Monte Carlo models, a plutonium button in a can was positioned between a {sup 252}Cf source and a scintillation detector, and the time distribution of counts after {sup 252}Cf fission in the detector was calculated. The time distribution of counts after {sup 252}Cf fission differs between plutonium metal and plutonium oxide because resonances in oxygen will affect transmission of certain energy neutrons from {sup 252}Cf sources in ionization chambers. This method could be used to determine the presence of other materials that react with plutonium in {open_quotes}sealed{close_quotes} cans.

  9. Detailed dose distribution prediction of Cf-252 brachytherapy source with boron loading dose enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Mostacci, D; Molinari, V; Jehouani, A

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dose rate distribution and to determine the boron effect on dose rate distribution for (252)Cf brachytherapy source. This study was carried out using a Monte Carlo simulation. To validate the Monte Carlo computer code, the dosimetric parameters were determined following the updated TG-43 formalism and compared with current literature data. The validated computer code was then applied to evaluate the neutron and photon dose distribution and to illustrate the boron loading effect. PMID:19889549

  10. On the 252Cf primary and secondary gamma rays and epithermal neutron flux for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassoun, J.; Merzouki, A.; El Morabiti, A.; Jehouani, A.

    2007-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation has been used to calculate the different components of neutrons and secondary gamma rays originated by 252Cf fission and also the primary gamma rays emitted directly by the 252Cf source at the exit face of a compact system designed for the BNCT. The system consists of a 252Cf source and a moderator/reflector/filter assembly. To study the material properties and configuration possibilities, the MCNP code has been used. The moderator/reflector/filter arrangement is optimised to moderate neutrons to epithermal energy and, as far as possible, to get rid of fast and thermal neutrons and photons from the therapeutic beam. To reduce the total gamma contamination and to have a sufficiently high epithermal neutron flux we have used different photon filters of different thickness. Our analysis showed that the use of an appropriate filter leads to a gamma ray flux reduction without affecting the epithermal neutron beam quality at the exit face of the system.

  11. Reactor production of sup 252 Cf and transcurium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C.W.; Halperin, J.; Walker, R.L.; Bigelow, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Berkelium, californium, einsteinium, and fermium are currently produced in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and recovered in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). All the isotopes are used for research. In addition, {sup 252}Cf, {sup 253}Es, and {sup 255}Fm have been considered or are used for industrial or medical applications. ORNL is the sole producer of these transcurium isotopes in the western world. A wide range of actinide samples were irradiated in special test assemblies at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at Hanford, Washington. The purpose of the experiments was to evaluate the usefulness of the two-group flux model for transmutations in the special assemblies with an eventual goal of determining the feasibility of producing macro amounts of transcurium isotopes in the FFTF. Preliminary results from the production of {sup 254g}Es from {sup 252}Cf will be discussed. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  12. Observation of Light Shape Isomers in the Multi-Body Decay of 252Cf (sf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Kamanin, D. V.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Kondratyev, N. A.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Strekalovsky, O. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Mkaza, N.; Malaza, V.

    2015-11-01

    We observe an essential mass deficit in the total mass of the fission fragments detected in coincidence with Ti ions knocked out from the foil placed near a 252Cf source. This could be expected if the scattered fragment looks like a di-nuclear system breaking up due to inelastic scattering on the Ti nucleus. The mean flight time between the Cf source and the foil does not exceed 0.1 ns. This can be regarded as a lower limit for the life-time of the di-nuclear system (shape-isomer).

  13. Proton beam dosimetry using a TEPC with a 252Cf neutron calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Uk-Won; Park, Won-Kee; Lee, Jaejin; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Moon, Bongkon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-10-01

    A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) can measure the linear energy transfer (LET) of incident radiation and directly calculate the equivalent dose to humans in a complicated radiation field. For radiation monitoring, we developed and characterized a TEPC that can simulate a site diameter of 2 µm for micro-dosimetry. It was calibrated with a 252Cf neutron standard source at the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science. The channel to LET calibration factor of the TEPC is about 0.72 keV/ µm-channel. Also, we evaluated the possibility of usage the TEPC as a proton dosimeter.

  14. Remote afterloading for intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy with californium-252

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tačev, Tačo; Grigorov, Grigor; Papírek, Tomáš; Kolařík, Vladimír.

    2004-01-01

    The authors present their design concept of remote afterloading for 252Cf brachytherapy with respect to characteristic peculiarities of 252Cf and the current worldwide development of remote afterloading devices. The afterloading device has been designed as a stationary radiator comprising three mutually interconnected units: (1) a control and drive unit, consisting of a control computer and a motor-driven Bowden system carrying the 252Cf source; (2) a source housed in a watertight, concrete vessel, which is stored in a strong room situated well beneath the patient's bed and (3) an afterloading application module installed in the irradiation room. As 252Cf is a nuclide with low specific activity, it was necessary to produce two independent devices for high dose rate intracavitary treatment and for low dose rate intestinal treatment. The sources may be moved arbitrarily during the treatment with a position accuracy of 0.5-1.0 mm within a distance of 520 cm from the source storage position in the strong room to the application position. The technical concept of the present automatic afterloading device for neutron brachytherapy represents one possible option of a range of conceivable design variants, which, while minimizing the technical and economic requirements, provides operating personnel with optimum protection and work safety, thus extending the applicability of high-LET radiation-based treatment methods in clinical practice.

  15. Test and evaluation results of the /sup 252/Cf shuffler at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, T.W.

    1981-03-01

    The /sup 252/Cf Shuffler, a nondestructive assay instrument employing californium neutron source irradiation and delayed-neutron counting, was developed for measuring /sup 235/U content of scrap and waste items generated at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactor fuel fabrication facility. The scrap and waste items include high-purity uranium-aluminum alloy ingots as well as pieces of castings, saw and lathe chips from machining operations, low-purity items such as oxides of uranium or uranium intermixed with flux materials found in recovery operations, and materials not recoverable at SRP such as floor sweepings or residues from the uranium scrap recovery operation. The uranium contains about 60% /sup 235/U with the remaining isotopes being /sup 236/U, /sup 238/U, and /sup 234/U in descending order. The test and evaluation at SRP concluded that the accuracy, safety, reliability, and ease of use made the /sup 252/Cf Shuffler a suitable instrument for routine use in an industrial, production-oriented plant.

  16. A Monte Carlo simulation and setup optimization of output efficiency to PGNAA thermal neutron using 252Cf neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Zhao; Tuo, Xian-Guo

    2014-07-01

    We present the design and optimization of a prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) thermal neutron output setup based on Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5 computer code. In these simulations, the moderator materials, reflective materials, and structure of the PGNAA 252Cf neutrons of thermal neutron output setup are optimized. The simulation results reveal that the thin layer paraffin and the thick layer of heavy water moderating effect work best for the 252Cf neutron spectrum. Our new design shows a significantly improved performance of the thermal neutron flux and flux rate, that are increased by 3.02 times and 3.27 times, respectively, compared with the conventional neutron source design.

  17. PIXE, 252Cf-PDMS and radiochemistry applied for soil and vegetable analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias da Cunha, K.; Cazicava, J.; Coelho, M. J.; Barros Leite, C. V.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to identify the elements present in vegetables and soils using PIXE (particle induced X-rays emission) and 252Cf-PDMS (252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry) techniques in order to estimate the possible influence of soil and agricultural techniques in the metal absorption by the vegetables. In this work, metal concentrations were evaluated in soil and vegetable samples from several regions, where different agricultural techniques were employed. Si, Zr, Ce, Th, Sc and Pb identified in the soil samples were not biologically available. Ga, Ge, As and Br identified in the tubercles indicate that spray pesticide used on the vegetable leaves was absorbed by them. 232Th and 238U present in the soil were not absorbed by the vegetables. The airborne particles from anthropogenic sources (as CFn, VCn) were absorbed by the vegetables. Compounds from mineral sources present in soil as V+, VCO3, HPO4, Cr+, CrOH+, Mn+, FeH+, Fe(OH)n and in the bioorganic compounds as N+, Ca (CN)n+and CnH+ were identified in vegetables. The metal absorption by the vegetables is not dependent of the metal concentration in soil. Different tubercles cultivated in the same soil show similar metal absorption. The exogenous contributions such as the elements present in water irrigation, pesticides, fertilizers and airborne particles deposited on leaves can be absorbed by vegetables. The absorption by the roots depends on the chemical compound of the elements. The use of pesticide sprays and air pollution can cause more contamination in the vegetables than in soil. The use of this methodology allows the identification of possible sources of metals in soils and in vegetables and the metal speciation.

  18. Neutron emission in fission of 252Cf(sf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Fabry, I.

    2009-10-01

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics. The goal was to compare the results of this digital data acquisition and digital signal processing analysis to the results of the pioneering work of Budtz-Jo/rgensen and Knitter. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213 equivalent neutron detector in total about 10 neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution have been investigated using a 10 bit waveform digitizer. Neutron time- of- flight and pulse shape have been measured using analogue CAMAC modules, a 1 ns TDC and a pair of 12 bit charge-to-digital-converters. The fission fragment signals have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. The results are in very good agreement with literature. For the first time the dependence of the number of neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments does not drop at low TKE.

  19. Prompt Neutron Emission in 252CF Spontaneous Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2011-10-01

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics. The goal was to compare the results from digital data acquisition and digital signal processing analysis with results of the pioneering work of Budtz-Jørgensen and Knitter. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in total about 107 fission fragment-neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. The results are in very good agreement with literature. For the first time the dependence of the number of emitted neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations in the range of TKE from 140-220 MeV.

  20. Cluster ion emission from LiF induced by MeV Nq+ projectiles and 252Cf fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijazi, H.; Farenzena, L. S.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, Ph.; Grande, P. L.; da Silveira, E. F.

    2011-08-01

    Ion cluster desorption yields from LiF were measured at PUC-Rio with ≈0.1 MeV/u N q+ ( q = 2,4,5,6) ion beams by means of a time-of-fight (TOF) mass spectrometer. A 252Cf source mounted in the irradiation chamber allows immediate comparison of cluster emissions induced by ≈65 MeV fission fragments (FF). Emission of (LiF) n Li+ clusters are observed for both the N beams and the 252Cf fission fragments. The observed cluster size n varies from 1 to 6 for N q+ projectiles and from 1 to ≈40 for the 252Cf-FF. The size dependence of the Y( n) distributions suggests two cluster formation regimes: (i) recombination process in the outgoing gas phase after impact and (ii) emission of pre-formed clusters from the periphery of the impact site. The corresponding distribution of ejected negative cluster ions (LiF) n F- closely resembles that of the positive secondary (LiF) n Li+ ions. The desorption yields of positive ions scale as Y( n) ˜ q 5. A calculation with the CASP code shows that this corresponds to a cubic scaling ˜S{/e 3} with the electronic stopping power S e , as predicted by collective shock wave models for sputtering and models involving multiple excitons (Frenkel pair sputtering). We discuss possible interpretations of the functional dependence of the evolution of the cluster emission yield Y( n) with cluster size n, fitted by a number of statistical distributions.

  1. 252Cf fission-neutron spectrum using a simplified time-of-flight setup: An advanced teaching laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.; Febbraro, M.; Torres-Isea, R.; Ojaruega, M.; Baum, L.

    2013-02-01

    The removal of PuBe and AmBe neutron sources from many university teaching laboratories (due to heightened security issues) has often left a void in teaching various aspects of neutron physics. We have recently replaced such sources with sealed 252Cf oil-well logging sources (nominal 10-100 μCi), and developed several experiments using them as neutron sources. This includes a fission-neutron time-of-flight experiment using plastic scintillators, which utilizes the prompt γ rays emitted in 252Cf spontaneous fission as a fast timing start signal. The experiment can be performed with conventional nuclear instrumentation and a 1-D multi-channel pulse-height analyzer, available in most advanced teaching laboratories. Alternatively, a more sophisticated experiment using liquid scintillators and n/γ pulse-shape discrimination can be performed. Several other experiments using these neutron sources are also feasible. The experiments can introduce students to the problem of detecting the dark matter thought to dominate the universe and to the techniques used to detect contraband fissionable nuclear materials.

  2. A new type-B cask design for transporting {sub 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C.M.

    2000-07-01

    A project to design, certify, and build a new US Department of Energy (DOE) Type B container for transporting >5 mg of {sup 252}Cf is more than halfway to completion. This project was necessitated by the fact that the existing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Type B containers were designed and built many years ago and thus do not have the records and supporting data that current regulations require. Once the new cask is available, it will replace the existing Type B containers. The cask design is driven by the unique properties of {sup 252}Cf, which is a very intense spontaneous fission neutron source and necessitates a large amount of neutron shielding. The cask is designed to contain up to 60 mg of {sup 252}Cf in the form of californium oxide or californium oxysulfate, in pellet, wire, or sintered material forms that are sealed inside small special-form capsules. The new cask will be capable of all modes of transport (land, sea, and air). The ORNL team, composed of technical and purchasing personnel and using rigorous selection criteria, chose NAC, International (NAC), as the subcontractor for the project. In January 1997, NAC started work on developing the conceptual design and performing the analyses. The original design concept was for a tungsten alloy gamma shield surrounded by two concentric shells of NS-4-FR neutron shield material. A visit to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulators in November 1997 to present the conceptual design for their comments resulted in a design modification when the question of potential straight-line cracking in the NS-4-FR neutron shield material arose. NAC's modified design includes offset, wedgelike segments of the neutron shield material. The new geometry eliminates concerns about straight-line cracking but increases the weight of the packaging and makes the fabrication more complex. NAC has now completed the cask design and performed the analyses (shielding, structural, thermal, etc.) necessary to certify the

  3. AN INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON ON THE DETERMINATION OF 241Am, 244Cm AND 252Cf IN URINE.

    PubMed

    Gerstmann, Udo C; Taubner, Kerstin; Hartmann, Martina

    2016-09-01

    An intercomparison exercise on the determination of (241)Am, (244)Cm and (252)Cf in urine was performed. Since it was designed with regard to emergency preparedness, the detection limit for each nuclide was set to 0.1 Bq per 24-h urine sample. Most of the participating laboratories were established bioassay laboratories. However, some laboratories that routinely determine (241)Am only in environmental samples were also invited in order to explore their potential for emergency bioassay analysis. Another aspect of the intercomparison was to investigate the performance of all laboratories concerning the chemical yields of the (243)Am tracer in comparison with (244)Cm and (252)Cf. In summary, both types of laboratories showed good results. There was a negative bias for the results of (244)Cm and (252)Cf, which can be explained by slightly different radiochemical behaviours of americium, curium and californium and which is in agreement with results reported in the literature. PMID:26535001

  4. Gamma-ray multiplicity measurement of the spontaneous fission decay of 252Cf in a segmented HPGe/BGO detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D L; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Gibelin, J; Heffner, M D; Mintz, J; Norman, E B; Phair, L; Scielzo, N D; Sheets, S A; Snyderman, N J; Stoyer, M A; Wiedeking, M

    2008-04-23

    Coincident {gamma} rays from a {sup 252}Cf source were measured using an array of six segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) Clover detectors each enclosed by 16 bismuth-germanate (BGO) detectors. The detectors were arranged in a cubic pattern around a 1 {micro}Ci {sup 252}Cf source to cover a large solid angle for {gamma}-ray measurement with a reasonable reconstruction of the multiplicity. Neutron multiplicity was determined in certain cases by identifying the prompt {gamma} rays from individual fission fragment pairs. Multiplicity distributions from previous experiments and theoretical models were convolved with the response function of the array and compared to the present results. These results suggest a {gamma}-ray multiplicity spectrum broader than previous measurements and models, and provide no evidence of correlation with neutron multiplicity.

  5. Combination of HPLC and 252-Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry for identifying composition of ginseng tinctures.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Y N; Makhankov, V V; Uvarova, N L; Bondarenko, P V; Zubarev, R A; Knysh, A N

    1993-03-01

    The 252-Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry (252-Cf PDMS) determination or confirmation of the ginsenoside saponins has been proposed to investigate the composition of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) peaks of ginseng tinctures and galenic preparations. That ionization technique is well suitable for the analysis of natural mixtures of these saponins. The 252-Cf PD mass spectra of standard ginsenosides Rb1, Rb2, Rc, Re, Rg1, Rd, NG-R2, Z-R1 contain the peaks of two types of ions, namely, molecular adduct ions (MAI) and aglycone ions. By mass the latter may be referred to either protopanaxadiol or protopanaxatriol. The masses of MAI and aglycone ions are determined by the carbohydrate chains. The collected HPLC fractions of P ginseng tincture can be tested for content of ginsenosides. After studying two MAI peaks from the 252-Cf PD mass spectra of the basic ginsenosides, an example of distinction between two galenic preparations from different Panax has been shown. PMID:8352021

  6. A Monte Carlo comparison of PGNAA system performance using 252Cf neutrons, 2.8-MeV neutrons and 14-MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, A. A.

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to compare performance of a 252Cf neutron and a 14-MeV neutron-based prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system with that of the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Since the energy of neutron beam used in the KFUPM PGNAA system is very close to that produced by a DD neutron generator, performance comparison between a DD and a DT neutron generator-based PGNAA system is highly desired. For the sake of comparison, the calculations were carried out for the PGNAA system with geometry similar to the KFUPM PGNAA system. These calculations were required to determine improvement in performance of the KFUPM PGNAA system if its 2.8-MeV neutron source is replaced by a 252Cf neutron source or a 14-MeV neutron source. Results of the calculations revealed that the geometry of the 252Cf neutron and the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system are not significantly different but the geometry of the 14-MeV neutron-based system is significantly different from that of the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system. Accordingly, the prompt γ-ray yields from the 252Cf neutron and the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system is comparable but prompt γ-ray yields from 14-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system are about three times smaller than that from the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system. This study has shown that performance of the 252Cf neutron-based PGNAA system is comparable with that of the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system but the performance of the 14-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system is poorer than that of the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system.

  7. Dosimetric Characteristics for Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    DeWerd, Larry A.; Davis, Stephen D.

    2011-05-05

    Brachytherapy sources are characterized by the dosimetric parameters in a protocol such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43. The air-kerma strength is measured and traceable to a primary standard. Then the parameters such as dose-rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function are measured and related back to the primary standard. This is normally accomplished with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Since radial dose function and anisotropy function are relative parameters, some of the dosimetric corrections are negligible. For the dose-rate constant, parameters such as the energy dependence compared with a calibration beam such as {sup 60}Co need to be accounted for. A description of the primary standard measurements and TLD measurements will be discussed.

  8. Dosimetric Characteristics for Brachytherapy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWerd, Larry A.; Davis, Stephen D.

    2011-05-01

    Brachytherapy sources are characterized by the dosimetric parameters in a protocol such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43. The air-kerma strength is measured and traceable to a primary standard. Then the parameters such as dose-rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function are measured and related back to the primary standard. This is normally accomplished with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Since radial dose function and anisotropy function are relative parameters, some of the dosimetric corrections are negligible. For the dose-rate constant, parameters such as the energy dependence compared with a calibration beam such as 60Co need to be accounted for. A description of the primary standard measurements and TLD measurements will be discussed.

  9. Validation of IRDFF in 252Cf Standard and IRDF-2002 Reference Neutron Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Stanislav; Capote, Roberto; Greenwood, Lawrence; Griffin, Patrick; Kahler, Albert; Pronyaev, Vladimir; Trkov, Andrej; Zolotarev, Konstantin

    2016-02-01

    The results of validation of the latest release of International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File, IRDFF-1.03, in the standard 252Cf(s.f.) and reference 235U(nth,f) neutron benchmark fields are presented. The spectrum-averaged cross sections were shown to confirm IRDFF-1.03 in the 252Cf standard spontaneous fission spectrum; that was not the case for the current recommended spectra for 235U(nth,f). IRDFF was also validated in the spectra of the research reactor facilities ISNF, Sigma-Sigma and YAYOI, which are available in the IRDF-2002 collection. The ISNF facility was re-simulated to remove unphysical oscillations in the spectrum. IRDFF-1.03 was shown to reproduce reasonably well the spectrum-averaged data measured in these fields except for the case of YAYOI.

  10. 252Cf spectrum-averaged cross section for the 63Cu(n, p)63Ni reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, M.; Shibata, T.; Shibata, S.; Ohkubo, T.; Satoh, S.; Nogawa, N.

    1999-01-01

    The 63Ni produced by the 63Cu(n, p)63Ni reaction provides a unique measure to estimate the fast-neutron fluence of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki atomic bomb. In the similarity of the fission neutron spectrum of 252Cf to that of 235U, we have measured activation cross sections of the 63Cu(n, p)63Ni reaction averaged for the 252Cf fission spectrum.

  11. Evaluation of time-dose and fractionation for sup 252 Cf neutrons in preoperative bulky/barrel-cervix carcinoma radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.; Wierzbicki, J. )

    1990-12-01

    Time-dose fractionation factors (TDF) were calculated for 252Cf (Cf) neutron therapy versus 137Cs for intracavitary use in the preoperative treatment of bulky/barrel-shaped Stage IB cervix cancers. The endpoint assessed was gross and microscopic tumor eradication from the hysterectomy specimen. We reviewed the data obtained in clinical trials between 1976-1987 at the University of Kentucky Medical Center. Preoperative photon therapy was approximately 45 Gy of whole pelvis irradiation in 5 weeks for both 137Cs and Cf treated patients. 137Cs implant was done after pelvic irradiation x1 to a mean dose of 2104 +/- 36 cGy at point A at a dose rate of 50.5 cGy/h. There were 37.5% positive specimens. Using Cf intracavitary implants, dose varied from 109 to 459 neutron cGy in 1-2 sessions. Specimens were more frequently cleared of tumor (up to 100% at appropriate dose) and showed a dose-response relationship, both by nominal dose and by TDF adjusted analysis of dose, dose-rate, number of sessions, and overall time. Limited understanding of relative biological effectiveness, schedule, effect of implants, and dose rate all made it difficult to use TDF to study neutron effects. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated and showed that for Cf, RBE was a complex function of treatment variables. In the pilot clinical studies, a value of 6.0 had been assumed. The present findings of RBE for tumor destruction are larger than those assumed. Cf was effective for cervix tumor therapy and produced control without significant side effects due to the brachytherapy method used. The TDF model was of limited value in the present analysis and more information is still needed for RBE, dose-rate, and fractionation effects for Cf neutrons to develop a more sophisticated and relevant model.

  12. Investigation of the far asymmetric region in 252Cf(sf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    1997-02-01

    A twin Frisch-gridded ionization chamber has been used to measure the fission fragment mass, kinetic-energy and angular correlations for 252Cf(sf). In total 2.5 × 10 8 events were collected. The focus was in the far asymmetric mass region, where enhancements in the yield had been found earlier. It could be shown, that these findings are due to false events, coming from either close geometries not properly taking into account the angular-dependent energy loss in the sample and backing, from a too large angular cone selected in case of studies employing ionization chambers, or even from poor target qualities.

  13. Irradiation damage of APDs for CMS using neutrons from {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Musienko, Y.; Reucroft, S.; Ruuska, D.; Swain, J. Rusack, R.

    1998-11-01

    We report the results of exposing three APDs (avalanche photodiodes) from two manufacturers, EG&G and Hamamatsu, to a total fluence of 2{center_dot}10{sup 13}&hthinsp;neutrons/cm{sup 2} in a fast neutron field produced by {sup 252}Cf at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The effects of this type of radiation on many parameters such as QE (quantum efficiency), voltage coefficient of the gain, wavelength dependence of the gain, intrinsic dark current, and voltage dependent capacitance for these devices are shown and discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Irradiation damage of APDs for CMS using neutrons from [sup 252]Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Musienko, Y.; Reucroft, S.; Ruuska, D.; Swain, J. ) Rusack, R. )

    1998-11-01

    We report the results of exposing three APDs (avalanche photodiodes) from two manufacturers, EG G and Hamamatsu, to a total fluence of 2[center dot]10[sup 13] hthinsp;neutrons/cm[sup 2] in a fast neutron field produced by [sup 252]Cf at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The effects of this type of radiation on many parameters such as QE (quantum efficiency), voltage coefficient of the gain, wavelength dependence of the gain, intrinsic dark current, and voltage dependent capacitance for these devices are shown and discussed. [copyright] [ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.

  15. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35.406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all...

  16. Multi-modal fission in collinear ternary cluster decay of 252Cf(sf, fff)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Nasirov, A. K.; Tashkhodjaev, R. B.

    2015-06-01

    We discuss the multiple decay modes of collinear fission in 252Cf(sf, fff), with three fragments as suggested by the potential energy surface (PES). Fission as a statistical decay is governed by the phase space of the different decay channels, which are suggested in the PES-landscape. The population of the fission modes is determined by the minima in the PES at the scission points and on the internal potential barriers. The ternary collinear decay proceeds as a sequential process, in two steps. The originally observed ternary decay of 252Cf(sf) into three different masses (e.g. 132-140Sn, 52-48Ca, 68-72Ni), observed by the FOBOS group in the FLNR (Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions) of the JINR (Dubna) the collinear cluster tripartition (CCT), is one of the ternary fission modes. This kind of "true ternary fission" of heavy nuclei has often been predicted in theoretical works during the last decades. In the present note we discuss different ternary fission modes in the same system. The PES shows pronounced minima, which correspond to several modes of ternary fragmentations. These decays have very similar dynamical features as the previously observed CCT-decays. The data obtained in the experiments on CCT allow us to extract the yields for different decay modes using specific gates on the measured parameters, and to establish multiple modes of the ternary fission decay.

  17. True ternary fission of 252Cf(sf), the collinear decay into fragments of similar size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Nasirov, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    The ternary decay in 252Cf(sf, fff), with three cluster fragments of different masses (e.g.132Sn,52-48Ca,68-72Ni), has been observed by the FOBOS group in JINR. This work has established a new decay mode of heavy nuclei, the collinear cluster tripartition, (CCT). This "true ternary fission" of heavy nuclei has been predicted many times in theoretical works during the last decades. In the present report we discuss true ternary fission (FFF) into three nuclei of almost equal size (e.g. Z=98 → Zi = 32, 34, 32) and other fission modes in the same system. The possible fission channels for 252 Cf(sf) are predicted from potential-energy (PES) calculations. These PES's show pronounced minima for several ternary fragmentation decays, suggesting a variety of collinear ternary fission modes. The FFF-decays have very similar dynamical features as the previously observed collinear CCT-decays, the central fragment has very small kinetic energy. The data of the cited experiment allow the extraction of the yield for some FFF-decays, by using specific gates on the measured parameters.

  18. New Data on the Ternary Fission of {sup 252}Cf from the Gammasphere Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Akopian, G.M.; Daniel, A.V.; Fomichev, A.S.; Popeko, G.S.; Rodin, A.M.; Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Hamilton, J.H.; Ramayya, A.V.; Kormicki, J.; Hwang, J.K.; Fong, D.; Gore, P.; Cole, J.D.; Jandel, M.; Kliman, J.; Krupa, L.; Rasmussen, J.O.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Fallon, P.

    2004-10-01

    Ternary fission of {sup 252}Cf was studied at Gammasphere using eight {delta}E x E particle telescopes. Helium, beryllium, boron, and carbon light charged particles (LCPs) emitted with kinetic energy more than 9, 21, 26, and 32 MeV, respectively, were identified. The 3368-keV {gamma} transition from the first 2{sup +} excited state in {sup 10}Be was found and the population probability ratio N(2{sup +})/N(0{sup +}) = 0.160 {+-} 0.025 was estimated. No evidence was found for 3368-keV {gamma} rays emitted from a triple molecular state. For the first time, charge distributions are obtained for ternary fission fragments emitted with helium, beryllium, and carbon LCPs.

  19. Investigation of the prompt-neutron spectrum for spontaneously-fissioning /sup 252/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Poenitz, W.P.; Tamura, T.

    1982-01-01

    The prompt-fission-neutron spectrum of /sup 252/Cf was investigated. The spectrum was measured with Black Neutron Detectors which have a well known efficiency. Considerations of various issues in such measurements lead to an experiment in which a time-calibration pulser, a random pulser, the neutron detector time-of-flight spectrum, the pulse-shape-discriminator gamma time-of-flight spectrum, and the detector-response spectra were simultaneously recorded for the prompt-fission neutrons, transmission through carbon, and shadowbars in a total-cross-section-type measurement. Corrections and associated uncertainties were applied for a large variety of effects which may have been overlooked in many of the previously reported measurements. Preliminary results indicate deviations from a Maxwellian shape toward a Watt-spectrum shape. Agreement is good with the shape differences relative to a Maxwellian from the recent theoretical calculation by Madland and Nix, however, a lower average energy was found.

  20. Relative Yields of 149-153Pr in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldridge, Jonathan; Wang, Enhong; Hwang, J. K.; Hamilton, Joe; Ramayya, A. V.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Zhu, S. J.; Liu, S. H.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.

    2013-10-01

    The relative yields of the fission partners of 149-153Pr, resulting from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf, were studied. This study was done by means of γ - γ - γ , and γ - γ - γ - γ coincidence data taken in 2000 by the multi-HPGe, Compton-suppressed, gamma detector array, Gammasphere, at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The coincidence data were analyzed by double- and triple-gating on transitions in 149-153Pr and obtaining the intensities of the 93-101Y transitions. For 150 , 151 , 152 , 153Pr the 3n channel was found to be the strongest. The 149Pr, however, was found to peak at the 4n channel. These results were used to verify the assignments of the level schemes of 151 , 152 , 153Pr. The data are found to be in agreement with Wahl's independent yield tables.

  1. Application of 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry in dental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Lothar; Köhl, Peter; Jungclas, Hartmut; Duschner, Heins

    1993-07-01

    Topically applied fluorides introduced in dental hygiene products elevate the concentration levels of fluoride in oral fluids and thus also affect chemical reactions of enamel de- and remineralisation. The chemical reactions on the surface of tooth enamel still are a subject of controversy. Here 252Cf-plasma desorption mass spectrometry and argon ion etching are used to analyse the molecular structure of the upper layes of enamel. The mass spectrum of untreated enamel is characterised by a series of cluster ions containing phosphate. It is evident that under certain conditions the molecular structure of the surface enamel is completely transformed by treatment with fluorides. The result of the degradation and precipitation processes is reflected by a total replacement of the phosphate by fluoride in the measured cluster ion distribution. Stepwise etching of the upper layers by Ar+ ions reveals the transition from a nearly pure CaF2 structure to the unchanged composition of the enamel mineral.

  2. Figure of Merit for Chlorine Measurement in Reinforced Concrete Using {sup 252}Cf-Based Nondestructive Testing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Habeeb H. Saleh; Richard A. Livington

    2000-11-12

    The objective of this study is to design, fabricate, and evaluate a portable system for nondestructive determination of chloride concentration in reinforced portland cement concrete (PCC) structures. The need for such an instrument arises from the massive deterioration of the reinforced PCC, which has been used to construct a major part of the highway infrastructure. This deterioration of PCC is due to corrosion of the reinforcing steel, which is greatly promoted by the chloride ions. The sources of chloride include deicing salts, set accelerator, and seawater, either in the form of concrete-mixing water or as airborne droplets from ocean spray. The system consists of a high-purity germanium detector for gamma-ray detection and a portable {sup 252}Cf neutron source. Tradeoffs in the design of the neutron source include data quality, operational efficiency, and radiation safety. The number of photons detected in the germanium detector is directly proportional to the neutron source strength and the chloride nuclei concentration in the sample under testing. Therefore, assuming a uniform distribution of chloride, the figure of merit of the number of photons detected in the detector can be expressed as F = C/SN, where C = number of (6111) keV gamma rays detected per second, N = concentration of chloride nuclei, and S = neutron source strength (n/s). Under the assumption that the neutron source strength is fixed, the figure of merit in this case can have at least two uses. One is to optimize the thermalization efficiency of the neutron moderator. The second is to evaluate how effective the detector configuration is in detecting the gamma rays generated in the concrete. Using the figure-of-merit approach, it is possible to find an optimum size of moderator. This is important for a portable system. Other variables such as source/detector separation or detector gamma-ray shielding can also be evaluated.

  3. Prompt neutron multiplicity in correlation with fragments from spontaneous fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Vidali, M.

    2014-12-01

    The spontaneous fission of 252Cf serves as an excellent benchmark of prompt emission in fission since experimental data can be obtained without the need of an incident beam. With the purpose of providing experimental data on the prompt fission neutron properties in correlation with fission-fragment characteristics, an experiment on 252Cf(SF) has been performed. In addition, the experiment serves as a benchmark of setup and analysis procedures for measurements of fluctuations in the prompt-neutron properties as a function of incident neutron energy in fission of the major actinides 235U and 239Pu. The experiment employs a twin Frisch grid ionization chamber as fission-fragment detector while neutrons were counted by using a liquid scintillator placed along the symmetry axis of the ionization chamber. Average neutron multiplicity has been obtained as a function of fission-fragment mass and total kinetic energy (TKE). The average multiplicity as a function of mass agrees well with available data in the literature in the mass range from 80 to 170 u. The existence of additional sawtooth structures in the far asymmetric mass region could not be confirmed, although the statistical accuracy of the present experiment is as good as the previous study where such structures have been reported [Nucl. Phys. A 490, 307 (1988)., 10.1016/0375-9474(88)90508-8]. The available data in the literature on the TKE dependence of the multiplicity show strong deviations. Therefore, effort was focused on investigating experimental factors in low-efficiency neutron-counting experiments that may lead to faulty determination of this dependence. Taking these factors into account, a result that agrees well with data from high-efficiency neutron-counting experiments is obtained. The experimental arrangement allows determination of the angle between the detected neutron and the fission axis, which permits the neutron properties to be transformed into the fission-fragment rest frame. Fission neutron

  4. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432... § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the first medical use of a... licensee making its own measurements as required in paragraph (a) of this section, the licensee may...

  5. Phantom size in brachytherapy source dosimetric studies.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Calatayud, J; Granero, D; Ballester, F

    2004-07-01

    An important point to consider in a brachytherapy dosimetry study is the phantom size involved in calculations or experimental measurements. As pointed out by Williamson [Med. Phys. 18, 776-786 (1991)] this topic has a relevant influence on final dosimetric results. Presently, one-dimensional (1-D) algorithms and newly-developed 3-D correction algorithms are based on physics data that are obtained under full scatter conditions, i.e., assumed infinite phantom size. One can then assume that reference dose distributions in source dosimetry for photon brachytherapy should use an unbounded phantom size rather than phantom-like dimensions. Our aim in this paper is to study the effect of phantom size on brachytherapy for radionuclide 137Cs, 192Ir, 125I and 103Pd, mainly used for clinical purposes. Using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code, we can ascertain effects on derived dosimetry parameters and functions to establish a distance dependent difference due to the absence of full scatter conditions. We have found that for 137Cs and 192Ir, a spherical phantom with a 40 cm radius is the equivalent of an unbounded phantom up to a distance of 20 cm from the source, as this size ensures full scatter conditions at this distance. For 125I and 103Pd, the required radius for the spherical phantom in order to ensure full scatter conditions at 10 cm from the source is R = 15 cm. A simple expression based on fits of the dose distributions for various phantom sizes has been developed for 137Cs and 192Ir in order to compare the dose rate distributions published for different phantom sizes. Using these relations it is possible to obtain radial dose functions for unbounded medium from bounded phantom ones. PMID:15305460

  6. Prompt Fission Neutron Experiments on 235U(n,f) and 252Cf(SF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.

    For nuclear modeling and improved evaluation of nuclear data knowledge about fluctuations of the prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of incident neutron energy is requested for the major actinides 235U and 239Pu. Experimental investigations of the prompt fission neutron emission in resonance neutron induced fission on 235U are taking place at the GELINA facility of the IRMM. The experiment employs an array of neutron scintillation-detectors (SCINTIA) in conjunction with a newly designed 3D position sensitive twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber. A preparatory experiment on prompt fission neutron emission in 252Cf(SF) was undertaken to verify analysis procedures relevant for the implementation of the SCINTIA neutron detector array. The available literature data on the TKE dependence of the multiplicity show strong deviations. Therefore, effort was focused on investigating experimental factors in low efficiency neutron counting experiments that may lead to faulty determination of this dependence. Taking these factors into account a result that agree well with data from high efficiency neutron counting experiments is obtained.

  7. Kinetic energies of cluster fragments in ternary fission of 252 Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, K. R.; von Oertzen, W.; Balasubramaniam, M.

    2012-03-01

    The kinetic energy distribution and potential energies of fragments from the collinear cluster tripartition (CCT), the "true" ternary fission of 252Cf, have been calculated. It is assumed that the breakup of the nucleus into three fragments happens sequentially in two steps from a hyper-deformed shape. In the first step a first neck rupture occurs of the parent radioactive nucleus, forming two fragments (one of them is usually 132Sn) and, in the second step, one of the two fragments breaks into two other fragments, resulting finally in three fragments (the experiment is based on a binary coincidence where a missing mass is determined). We show the result for the principal combination of the three spherical fragments (semi-magic isotopes of Sn, Ca, Ni) observed recently experimentally. These isotopes are clusters with high Q -values, which produce the highest yields in the ternary fission bump. It is shown that the kinetic energies of the middle fragments have very low values, making their experimental detection quite difficult. This fact explains why the direct detection of true ternary fission with three fragments heavier than A > 40 has escaped experimental observation.

  8. Structures of the neutron-rich nuclei observed in fission of {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Ramayya, A. V.; Hamilton, J. H.; Goodin, C. J.; Brewer, N. T.; Hwang, J. K.; Luo, Y. X.; Liu, S. H.; Stone, N. J.; Daniel, A. V.; Zhu, S. J.

    2014-08-14

    Analysis of high statistics triple coincidence fission γ data from {sup 252}Cf at Gammasphere including angular correlations yielded well-expanded high-spin level schemes with more complete and reliable spin/parity assignments for {sup 82}Ge, {sup 118,120,122}Cd and {sup 114,115}Rh. Both the quasi-particle/hole couplings and quasi-rotational degrees of freedom are implied to play roles in these Cd isotopes. Evidence for triaxial shapes and octupole components in the Cd isotopes is presented. These Cd isotopes may have triaxial deformations. High-spin level schemes of {sup 114,115}Rh have been established for the first time. The existence of a relatively large signature splitting and an yrare band shows typical features of a triaxially deformed nucleus. Possible excited deformed rotational bands are observed, for the first time, in {sup 82}Ge. From the multipole mixing ratio measurement, the ground state configurations of {sup 109,111}Ru, as well as excited states in {sup 103,107}Mo and {sup 111}Ru were determined.

  9. Nuclear Structure Studies of Some Neutron Rich Nuclei Produced in 252Cf Spontaneous Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramayya, A. V.; Hamilton, J. H.; Hwang, J. K.

    2015-02-01

    High spin states of neutron-rich nuclei such as 133,134Te, 93Sr, 105Nb have been studied by measuring γ- γ- γ coincidences (cube), γ- γ- γ- γ coincidences (hypercube) and angular correlations from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf with the LBNL Gammasphere detector array. Four types of particle-hole bands built on the known 334.3 keV isomer in 133Te were identified. The level structure of 93Sr is interpreted, in part, as arising from the weak coupling of the 1d5/2 neutron hole to the yrast states of the 94Sr core. The g-factor of the 4+ state in 134Te was measured, for the first time, by using a new technique developed for measuring angular correlations with Gammasphere. A new level scheme of 105Nb was established. Three new collective bands were identified with a total of 14 new levels and 36 new γ transitions. In 117-122Cd, a shift to more slightly deformed structures was found where the excited levels do not fit the long held picture of one, two and three phonon bands.

  10. The Various Collinear Ternary Fission Decays in 252Cf(sf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Nasirov, A. K.; Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Kamanin, D. V.

    2015-06-01

    The collinear cluster decay in 252Cf(sf,fff), with three cluster fragments of different masses (e.g.132Sn,52-48Ca,68-72Ni), which has been observed by the FOBOS group in JINR, has established a new decay mode, the CCT (Collinear Cluster Tri-partition) of heavy nuclei. The same type of ternary fission decay has been observed in the reaction 235U(nth,fff). This collinear "true ternary fission" of heavy nuclei has been predicted many times in theoretical works during the last decades. In the present contribution we show that other ternary decay modes occur, in particular the symmetric ternary fission (FFF) into three fragments of almost equal size (e.g. Z=98→Zi = 32, 34, 32) in the same system. The different ternary fission channels are predicted with potential energy (PES) calculations for two mass parameters, M1(A1) and M3(A3). The deeper valleys point to the favored decay channels. An important aspect for the probability of the ternary decay modes are the internal barriers, which are presented here. The PES's show pronounced minima for several choices for favored ternary fragmentations. With these predictions, a variety of collinear ternary fission modes in the experimental data have been established.

  11. The sup 252 Cf(sf) neutron spectrum in the 5- to 20-MeV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, H.; Richter, D.; Seeliger, D. ); Fromm, W.D. ); Bottger, R.; Klein, H. )

    1990-11-01

    This paper reports on the {sup 252}Cf neutron spectrum measured at high energies with a miniature ionization chamber and two different NE-213 neutron detectors. The gamma-ray background and the main cosmic background caused by muons were suppressed by applying efficient pulse-shape discrimination. On the basis of two-dimensional spectroscopy of the neutron time-of-flight and scintillation pulse height, the sliding bias method is used to minimize experimental uncertainties. The experimental data, corrected for several systematic influences, confirm earlier results that show negative deviations from a reference Maxwellian distribution with a 1.42-MeV spectrum temperature for neutron energies above 6 MeV. Experimental results of this work are compared with various statistical model approaches to the {sup 252}Cf(sf) neutron spectrum.

  12. Pre-scission configuration of the tri-nuclear system at spontaneous ternary fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirov, A. K.; Tashkhodjaev, R. B.; von Oertzen, W.

    2016-05-01

    The potential energy surface for the pre-scission configurations of tri-nuclear systems formed in the spontaneous ternary fission of 252Cf is calculated. The fission channel 70Ni + 50Ca + 132Sn is chosen as one of the more probable channels of true ternary fission of 252Cf . A study of the collinear arrangement of the reaction products for true ternary fission is the aim of this work. The results are presented as a function of the relative distance R12 between the centres of mass of 70Ni and 132Sn and the distance from the centre of mass of 50Ca , which is perpendicular to R12. The results show that only for a particular range of the R12 values the collinear tripartion of the fissioning nucleus occurs.

  13. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy... Association of Physicists in Medicine that are made in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section. (c)...

  14. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy... Association of Physicists in Medicine that are made in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section. (c)...

  15. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy... Association of Physicists in Medicine that are made in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section. (c)...

  16. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy... Association of Physicists in Medicine that are made in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section. (c)...

  17. True ternary fission, the collinear cluster tripartition (CCT) of {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Oertzen, W. von; Pyatkov, Y. V.; Kamanin, D.

    2012-10-20

    In systematic work over the last decade (see Pyatkov et al. [12] and refs therein), the ternary fission decay of heavy nuclei, in {sup 235}U(n,fff) and {sup 252}Cf(sf) has been studied in a collinear geometry. The name used for this process is (CCT), with three fragments of similar size in a collinear decay, it is the true ternary fission. This decay has been observed in spontaneous fission as well as in a neutron induced reaction. The measurements are based on different experimental set-ups, with binary coincidences containing TOF and energy determinations. With two detector telescopes placed at 180 Degree-Sign , the measurements of masses and energies of each of the registered two fragments, give complete kinematic solutions. Thus the missing mass events in binary coincidences can be determined, these events are obtained by blocking one of the lighter fragments on a structure in front of the detectors. The relatively high yield of CCT (more than 10{sup -3} per binary fission) is explained. It is due to the favourable Q-values (more positive than for binary) and the large phase space of the ternary CCT-decay, dominated by three (magic) clusters: e.g. isotopes of Sn, Ca and Ni, {sup 132}Sn+{sup 50}Ca+{sup 70}Ni. It is shown that the collinear (prolate) geometry has the favoured potential energy relative to the oblate shapes. The ternary fission is considered to be a sequential process. With this assumption the kinetic energies of the fragments have been calculated by Vijay et al.. The third fragments have very low kinetic energies (below 20 MeV) and have thus escaped their detection in previous work on 'ternary fission', where in addition an oblate shape and a triangle for the momentum vectors have been assumed.

  18. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only brachytherapy sources...

  19. Detailed Study of the Angular Correlations in the Prompt Neutron Emission in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopatch, Yu.; Chietera, A.; Stuttgé, L.; Gönnenwein, F.; Mutterer, M.; Gagarski, A.; Guseva, I.; Chernysheva, E.; Dorvaux, O.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Hanappe, F.; Mezentseva, Z.; Telezhnikov, S.

    An experiment has been performed at IPHC Strasbourg, aimed at the detailed investigation of angular correlations in the neutron emission from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Fission fragments were measured by the angle-sensitive double ionization chamber CODIS while neutrons were detected by a set of 60 DEMON scintillator counters. The main aim of the experiment is the observation of the correlation between the fragment spins and neutron emission anisotropy. Preliminary results, based on the Monte-Carlo simulations, as well as the preliminary analysis of the experimental data are shown.

  20. A probe for neutron activation analysis in a drill hole using 252Cf, and a Ge(Li) detector cooled by a melting cryogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, A.B.; Moxham, R.M.; Senftle, F.E.; Baicker, J.A.

    1972-01-01

    A sonde has been built for high-resolution measurement of natural or neutron-induced gamma rays in boreholes. The sonde is 7.3 cm in diameter and about 2.2 m in length and weighs about 16 kg. The lithium-compensated germanium semiconductor detector is stabilized at -185 to -188??C for as much as ten hours by a cryostatic reservoir containing melting propane. During periods when the sonde is not in use the propane is kept frozen by a gravity-fed trickle of liquid nitrogen from a reservoir temporarily attached to the cryostat section. A 252Cf source, shielded from the detector, may be placed in the bottom section of the sonde for anlysis by measurement of neutron-activation or neutron-capture gamma rays. Stability of the cryostat with changing hydrostatic pressure, absence of vibration, lack of need for power to the cryostat during operation, and freedom of orientation make the method desirable for borehole, undersea, space, and some laboratory applications. ?? 1972.

  1. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Fulkerson, Regina K.; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR 192Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and 192Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose

  2. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, Regina K. Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally

  3. Angular Correlations Between Fragment Spin and Prompt Neutron Evaporation in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf: CORA-Demon Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhorova, E.; Goennenwein, F.; Kopatch, Yu.; Mutterer, M.; Hanappe, F.; Kinnard, V.; Stuttge, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2007-05-22

    A novel method to search for the anisotropic emission of prompt neutrons in the center-of-mass system of fission fragments is presented. The anisotropy is conjectured to be due to the large spins of fission fragments are known to carry. Triple neutron- neutron-fragment correlations in spontaneous fission of 252Cf were investigated in an exploratory experiment dubbed CORA-DEMON experiment. Fission fragments were intercepted in a double ionization chamber while neutrons were spotted in 2 two-dimensional cylindrical walls of Demon detectors with the target on the vertical cylinder axis. A new method of analysis of triple angular correlations between 2 neutrons and a fission fragment was applied. Preliminary results are reported.

  4. Angular Correlations Between Fragment Spin and Prompt Neutron Evaporation in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf: CORA-Demon Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorova, E.; Gönnenwein, F.; Kopatch, Yu.; Mutterer, M.; Hanappe, F.; Kinnard, V.; Stuttgé, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2007-05-01

    A novel method to search for the anisotropic emission of prompt neutrons in the center-of-mass system of fission fragments is presented. The anisotropy is conjectured to be due to the large spins of fission fragments are known to carry. Triple neutron- neutron-fragment correlations in spontaneous fission of 252Cf were investigated in an exploratory experiment dubbed CORA-DEMON experiment. Fission fragments were intercepted in a double ionization chamber while neutrons were spotted in 2 two-dimensional cylindrical walls of Demon detectors with the target on the vertical cylinder axis. A new method of analysis of triple angular correlations between 2 neutrons and a fission fragment was applied. Preliminary results are reported.

  5. Description of the /sup 252/Cf(sf) neutron spectrum in the framework of a generalized Madland-Nix model

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, H.; Seeliger, D.

    1986-08-01

    The Madland-Nix model (MNM) for the calculation of fission neutron spectra is modified considering the dependence on fragment mass number A. Further, an approximation of this generalized Madland-Nix model (GMNM) that takes into account the different center-of-mass system spectra for the light and heavy fragment groups is discussed. These new calculations are compared with two versions of the original MNM. In particular, the level density parameter, which was adjusted by fitting the calculated spectra to a Maxwellian distribution deduced from experimental data, becomes more reasonable in the framework of the GMNM. The results of the different model calculations are compared with experimental data on the /sup 252/Cf(sf) neutron spectrum in the 0.1- to 20-MeV energy range.

  6. Prompt fission γ-rays from the reactions 252Cf(SF) and 235U(nth, f) - new data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, S.; Belgya, T.; Billnert, R.; Bryś, T.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Kis, Z.; Martinez, T.; Oberstedt, A.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Vidali, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present new spectral data of prompt γ-ray emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. This work was performed in direct response to an OECD/NEA high priority data request. We discuss the impact of our new data on evaluated nuclear data tables not only for this nuclide, but also for 238U and 241Pu, which are always produced in a reactor. Furthermore, we will show results from our investigation of prompt γ-ray emission from the reaction 235 U(nth, f), measured in at the Centre for Energy Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, Hungary. Spectral data obtained with three different detectors are consistent and led to an uncertainty on total energy and multiplicity considerably smaller than requested by the OECD/NEA.

  7. Parameterization of brachytherapy source phase space file for Monte Carlo-based clinical brachytherapy dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Zou, W.; Chen, T.; Kim, L.; Khan, A.; Haffty, B.; Yue, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    A common approach to implementing the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of brachytherapy radiation dose deposition is to use a phase space file containing information on particles emitted from a brachytherapy source. However, the loading of the phase space file during the dose calculation consumes a large amount of computer random access memory, imposing a higher requirement for computer hardware. In this study, we propose a method to parameterize the information (e.g., particle location, direction and energy) stored in the phase space file by using several probability distributions. This method was implemented for dose calculations of a commercial Ir-192 high dose rate source. Dose calculation accuracy of the parameterized source was compared to the results observed using the full phase space file in a simple water phantom and in a clinical breast cancer case. The results showed the parameterized source at a size of 200 kB was as accurate as the phase space file represented source of 1.1 GB. By using the parameterized source representation, a compact Monte Carlo job can be designed, which allows an easy setup for parallel computing in brachytherapy planning.

  8. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy... Records § 35.2432 Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by § 35.432 for 3 years after...

  9. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. 35.490 Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.490 Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require an authorized user of...

  10. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. 35.490 Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.490 Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require an authorized user of...

  11. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. 35.490 Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.490 Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require an authorized user of...

  12. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. 35.490 Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.490 Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require an authorized user of...

  13. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. 35.490 Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.490 Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require an authorized user of...

  14. [Brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Itami, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Brachytherapy do require a minimal expansion of CTV to obtain PTV and it is called as ultimate high precision radiation therapy. In high-dose rate brachytherapy, applicators will be placed around or into the tumor and CT or MRI will be performed with the applicators in situ. With such image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) 3-dimensional treatment planning becomes possible and DVH of the tumor and organs at risk can be obtained. It is now even possible to make forward planning satisfying dose constraints. Traditional subjective evaluation of brachytherapy can be improved to the objective one by IGBT. Brachytherapy of the prostate cancer, cervical cancer, and breast cancer with IGBT technique was described. PMID:25596048

  15. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730 Section 892.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide...

  16. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730 Section 892.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide...

  17. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730 Section 892.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide...

  18. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730 Section 892.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide...

  19. Brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... smaller area in less time than conventional external beam radiation therapy. Brachytherapy is used to treat cancers ... to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) involves high-energy x-ray ...

  20. Californium versus cobalt brachytherapy combined with external-beam radiotherapy for IIB stage cervical cancer: long-term experience of a single institute

    PubMed Central

    Janulionis, Ernestas; Valuckas, Konstantinas Povilas; Samerdokiene, Vitalija; Atkocius, Vydmantas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper was to observe and compare long-term curative effects and complications of FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer patients (n = 232) treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) californium (252Cf) neutron or cobalt (60Co) photon intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Material and methods The EBRT dose to the small pelvis was 50 Gy in both groups. The brachytherapy component of 252Cf or 60Co was added in the 3rd week of EBRT, 5 fractions were performed once per week resulting in a total ICBT dose of 40 Gy/Gyeq (point A). Results Overall survival (OS) at 5, 10 and 15 years was 63.6%, 50.4% and 38.8% in the 252Cf group and 62.2%, 50.5%, 39.9%, in the 60Co group, respectively (p = 0.74). The percentage of tumour recurrence was statistically significantly lower in the 252Cf group with 7.4% versus 17.1% in the 60Co group (p = 0.02). Second primary cancers have developed similarly 9.1% and 8.1% cases for 252Cf and 60Co groups, respectively. Conclusions Our long-term retrospective study comparing 252Cf and 60Co isotopes with brachytherapy in combined treatment of FIGO IIB stage cervix carcinoma patients shows, that overall survival in the both groups are similar. However, the recurrence of tumour was significantly lower in the 252Cf group. The incidence of second primary cancers was similar in both groups. PMID:26622239

  1. Brachytherapy dosimetry parameters calculated for a new 103Pd source.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Mark J; Melhus, Christopher S; Kirk, Bernadette L

    2004-09-01

    A new brachytherapy source having 103Pd adsorbed onto silver beads has been designed. The dose distributions of this source have been characterized using version 5 of the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These results are presented in terms of the updated AAPM Task Group No. 43 (TG-43U1) formalism, dosimetry parameters, and recommended calculation methodology. PMID:15487726

  2. Theoretical and experimental analysis of ammonia ionic clusters produced by 252Cf fragment impact on an NH3 ice target.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lima, F A; Ponciano, C R; Chaer Nascimento, M A; da Silveira, E F

    2006-08-24

    Positive and negatively charged ammonia clusters produced by the impact of (252)Cf fission fragments (FF) on an NH(3) ice target have been examined theoretical and experimentally. The ammonia clusters generated by (252)Cf FF show an exponential dependence of the cluster population on its mass, and the desorption yields for the positive (NH(3))(n)NH(4)(+) clusters are 1 order of magnitude higher than those for the negative (NH(3))(n)NH(2)(-) clusters. The experimental population analysis of (NH(3))(n)NH(4)(+) (n = 0-18) and (NH(3))(n)NH(2)(-) (n = 0-8) cluster series show a special stability at n = 4 and 16 and n = 2, 4, and 6, respectively. DFT/B3LYP calculations of the (NH(3))(0)(-)(8)NH(4)(+) clusters show that the structures of the more stable conformers follow a clear pattern: each additional NH(3) group makes a new hydrogen bond with one of the hydrogen atoms of an NH(3) unit already bound to the NH(4)(+) core. For the (NH(3))(0)(-)(8)NH(2)(-) clusters, the DFT/B3LYP calculations show that, within the calculation error, the more stable conformers follow a clear pattern for n = 1-6: each additional NH(3) group makes a new hydrogen bond to the NH(2)(-) core. For n = 7 and 8, the additional NH(3) groups bind to other NH(3) groups, probably because of the saturation of the NH(2)(-) core. Similar results were obtained at the MP2 level of calculation. A stability analysis was performed using the commonly defined stability function E(n)(-)(1) + E(n)(+1) - 2E(n), where E is the total energy of the cluster, including the zero point correction energy (E = E(t) + ZPE). The trend on the relative stability of the clusters presents an excellent agreement with the distribution of experimental cluster abundances. Moreover, the stability analysis predicts that the (NH(3))(4)NH(4)(+) and the even negative clusters [(NH(3))(n)NH(2)(-), n = 2, 4, and 6] should be the most stable ones, in perfect agreement with the experimental results. PMID:16913675

  3. Optimized source selection for intracavitary low dose rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nurushev, T.; Kim, Jinkoo

    2005-05-01

    A procedure has been developed for automating optimal selection of sources from an available inventory for the low dose rate brachytherapy, as a replacement for the conventional trial-and-error approach. The method of optimized constrained ratios was applied for clinical source selection for intracavitary Cs-137 implants using Varian BRACHYVISION software as initial interface. However, this method can be easily extended to another system with isodose scaling and shaping capabilities. Our procedure provides optimal source selection results independent of the user experience and in a short amount of time. This method also generates statistics on frequently requested ideal source strengths aiding in ordering of clinically relevant sources.

  4. Benchmark Experiments of Thermal Neutron and Capture Gamma-Ray Distributions in Concrete Using {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Yoshihiro; Sugita, Takeshi; Hirose, Hideyuki; Suzaki, Takenori

    2005-10-15

    The distributions of thermal neutrons and capture gamma rays in ordinary concrete were investigated by using {sup 252}Cf. Two subjects are considered. One is the benchmark experiments for the thermal neutron and the capture gamma-ray distributions in ordinary concrete. The thermal neutron and the capture gamma-ray distributions were measured by using gold-foil activation detectors and thermoluminescence detectors. These were compared with the simulations by using the discrete ordinates code ANISN with two different group structure types of cross-section library of a new Japanese version, JENDL-3.3, showing reasonable agreement with both fine and rough structure groups of thermal neutron energy. The other is a comparison of the simulations with two different cross-section libraries, JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VI, for the deep penetration of neutrons in the concrete, showing close agreement in 0- to 100-cm-thick concrete. However, the differences in flux grow with an increase in concrete thickness, reaching up to approximately eight times near 4-m thickness.

  5. Cable attachment for a radioactive brachytherapy source capsule

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Ian G; Pierce, Larry A

    2006-07-18

    In cancer brachytherapy treatment, a small californium-252 neutron source capsule is attached to a guide cable using a modified crimping technique. The guide cable has a solid cylindrical end, and the attachment employs circumferential grooves micromachined in the solid cable end. The attachment was designed and tested, and hardware fabricated for use inside a radioactive hot cell. A welding step typically required in other cable attachments is avoided.

  6. Calibration of a Manganese Bath Relative to 252Cf Nu-Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, David M.; Yue, Andrew T.; Scott Dewey, M.

    2009-08-01

    A large manganese sulfate bath is employed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to calibrate isotopic neutron sources relative to the national standard neutron source NBS-I. In the past few years many low-emission Cf-252 neutron sources have been calibrated for testing of neutron detectors for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The low-emission DHS sources are about a factor of 100 lower in emission rate than NBS-I, so that background fluctuations become more significant in making accurate calibrations. To verify and improve the calibrations relative to NBS-I, a new calibration for sealed Cf-252 neutron sources has been made by measuring the fission rate of a bare Cf-252 deposit and inferring its neutron emission rate from Cf-252 nu-bar, the well-established neutron multiplicity of spontaneous fission in Cf-252. The fission rate of the bare deposit was measured by counting fission fragments in vacuum with a surface barrier detector behind an aperture and spacer, which provided a well-defined solid angle for detection. A thin polyimide film was placed just above the Cf deposit to prevent contamination of the detector by self-sputtering of the Cf material in vacuum. Tests with additional layers of polyimide were performed to observe any perturbation in the detection efficiency due to scattering or absorption of alpha particles or fission fragments in the polyimide film. The increase in the background count rate due to accumulation of Cf on the polyimide film was less than 0.02% of the fission fragment count rate from the sample, at the end of all runs. It is estimated that this increase in background would have been about 150 times higher without the polyimide film. The sealed Cf source NIST-DHSA was compared to the bare source by relative neutron counting in an assembly of polyethylene moderator and He-3 detectors. The calibration via Cf-252 nu-bar gave a result that was 1.7% higher than the previous calibration relative to NBS

  7. Effects Of The Inhomogeneity of Brachytherapy Sources In Cancer Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onumah, Nnenna

    2006-03-01

    Uniformity of radioactive sources is vital in delivering accurate doses in Brachytherapy. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) defines source uniformity as no more than a 20 % deviation from the average value of the dose along a transverse region. Brachytherapy induced cell damages occur at the microdosimetric levels, and as such, small deviations in dose delivered from different geometrical positions on the source can lead to huge deviations in proper treatment. A Geant4 simulation of a uniform source and a non-uniform source was simulated to check the validity of IAEA's proposed definition. A realistic source of non-uniformity, air bubbles of differing diameters (from 20 to 80 microns) were simulated and their uniformity checked against the model suggested by IAEA in two ways: (1) using the average obtained from the non-uniform source (2) using that obtained from the uniform source. Significant deviations of up to 50% were observed. These results validate the need for the scintillating fiber based detector currently in development within our research group.

  8. Dose rate constant and energy spectrum of interstitial brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2001-01-01

    In the past two years, several new manufacturers have begun to market low-energy interstitial brachytherapy seeds containing 125I and 103Pd. Parallel to this development, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has implemented a modification to the air-kerma strength (S(K)) standard for 125I seeds and has also established an S(K) standard for 103Pd seeds. These events have generated a considerable number of investigations on the determination of the dose rate constants (inverted V) of interstitial brachytherapy seeds. The aim of this work is to study the general properties underlying the determination of dose rate constant and to develop a simple method for a quick and accurate estimation of dose rate constant. As the dose rate constant of clinical seeds is defined at a fixed reference point, we postulated that dose rate constant may be calculated by treating the seed as an effective point source when the seed's source strength is specified in S(K) and its source characteristics are specified by the photon energy spectrum measured in air at the reference point. Using a semi-analytic approach, an analytic expression for dose rate constant was derived for point sources with known photon energy spectra. This approach enabled a systematic study of dose rate constant as a function of energy. Using the measured energy spectra, the calculated dose rate constant for 125I model 6711 and 6702 seeds and for 192Ir seed agreed with the AAPM recommended values within +/-1%. For the 103Pd model 200 seed, the agreement was 5% with a recently measured value (within the +/-7% experimental uncertainty) and was within 1% with the Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic expression for dose rate constant proposed here can be evaluated using a programmable calculator or a simple spreadsheet and it provides an efficient method for checking the measured dose rate constant for any interstitial brachytherapy seed once the energy spectrum of the seed is known. PMID:11213926

  9. Thermoluminescence dosimetry measurements of brachytherapy sources in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Tailor, Ramesh; Tolani, Naresh; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2008-09-15

    Radiation therapy dose measurements are customarily performed in liquid water. The characterization of brachytherapy sources is, however, generally based on measurements made with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs), for which contact with water may lead to erroneous readings. Consequently, most dosimetry parameters reported in the literature have been based on measurements in water-equivalent plastics, such as Solid Water. These previous reports employed a correction factor to transfer the dose measurements from a plastic phantom to liquid water. The correction factor most often was based on Monte Carlo calculations. The process of measuring in a water-equivalent plastic phantom whose exact composition may be different from published specifications, then correcting the results to a water medium leads to increased uncertainty in the results. A system has been designed to enable measurements with TLDs in liquid water. This system, which includes jigs to support water-tight capsules of lithium fluoride in configurations suitable for measuring several dosimetric parameters, was used to determine the correction factor from water-equivalent plastic to water. Measurements of several {sup 125}I and {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy sources in liquid water and in a Solid Water phantom demonstrated a correction factor of 1.039{+-}0.005 at 1 cm distance. These measurements are in good agreement with a published value of this correction factor for an {sup 125}I source.

  10. Dosimetric Study of a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Arzamendi, S.; Díaz-Perches, R.

    Carcinoma of the cervix is the most common malignancy - in terms of both incidence and mortality - in Mexican women. Low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy is normally prescribed for the treatment of this disease to the vast majority of patients attending public hospitals in our country. However, most treatment planning systems being used in these hospitals still rely on Sievert integral dose calculations. Moreover, experimental verification of dose distributions are hardly ever done. In this work we present a dosimetric characterisation of the Amersham CDCS-J 137Cs source, an LDR brachytherapy source commonly used in Mexican hospitals. To this end a Monte Carlo simulation was developed, that includes a realistic description of the internal structure of the source embedded in a scattering medium. The Monte Carlo results were compared to experimental measurements of dose distributions. A lucite phantom with the same geometric characteristics as the one used in the simulation was built. Dose measurements were performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters together with commercial RadioChromic dye film. A comparison between our Monte Carlo simulation, the experimental data, and results reported in the literature is presented.

  11. Monte Carlo dosimetry of a new 90Y brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Junxiang, Wu; Shihu, You; Jing, Huang; Fengxiang, Long; Chengkai, Wang; Zhangwen, Wu; Qing, Hou

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we attempted to obtain full dosimetric data for a new 90Y brachytherapy source developed by the College of Chemistry (Sichuan University) for use in high-dose-rate after-loading systems. Material and methods The dosimetric data for this new source were used as required by the dose calculation formalisms proposed by the AAPM Task Group 60 and Task Group 149. The active core length of the new 90Y source was increased to 4.7 mm compared to the value of 2.5 mm for the old 90Sr/90Y source. The Monte Carlo simulation toolkit Geant4 was used to calculate these parameters. The source was located in a 30-cm-radius theoretical sphere water phantom. Results The dosimetric data included the reference absorbed dose rate, the radial dose function in the range of 1.0 to 8.0 mm in the longitudinal axis, and the anisotropy function with a θ in the range of 0° to 90° at 5° intervals and an r in the range of 1.0 to 8.0 mm in 0.2-mm intervals. The reference absorbed dose rate for the new 90Y source was determined to be equal to 1.6608 ± 0.0008 cGy s–1 mCi–1, compared to the values of 0.9063 ± 0.0005 cGy s–1 mCi–1 that were calculated for the old 90Sr/90Y source. A polynomial function was also obtained for the radial dose function by curve fitting. Conclusions Dosimetric data are provided for the new 90Y brachytherapy source. These data are meant to be used commercially in after-loading system. PMID:26622247

  12. Evaluation of 101Rh as a brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Meigooni, Ali Soleimani

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recently a number of hypothetical sources have been proposed and evaluated for use in brachytherapy. In the present study, a hypothetical 101Rh source with mean photon energy of 121.5 keV and half-life of 3.3 years, has been evaluated as an alternative to the existing high-dose-rate (HDR) sources. Dosimetric characteristics of this source model have been determined following the recommendation of the Task Group 43 (TG-43) of the American Association of the Physicist in Medicine (AAPM), and the results are compared with the published data for 57Co source and Flexisource 192Ir sources with similar geometries. Material and methods MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used for simulation of the 101Rh hypothetical HDR source design. Geometric design of this hypothetical source was considered to be similar to that of Flexisource 192Ir source. Task group No. 43 dosimetric parameters, including air kerma strength per mCi, dose rate constant, radial dose function, and two dimensional (2D) anisotropy functions were calculated for the 101Rh source through simulations. Results Air kerma strength per activity and dose rate constant for the hypothetical 101Rh source were 1.09 ± 0.01 U/mCi and 1.18 ± 0.08 cGy/(h.U), respectively. At distances beyond 1.0 cm in phantom, radial dose function for the hypothetical 101Rh source is higher than that of 192Ir. It has also similar 2D anisotropy functions to the Flexisource 192Ir source. Conclusions 101Rh is proposed as an alternative to the existing HDR sources for use in brachytherapy. This source provides medium energy photons, relatively long half-life, higher dose rate constant and radial dose function, and similar 2D anisotropy function to the Flexisource 192Ir HDR source design. The longer half-life of the source reduces the frequency of the source exchange for the clinical environment. PMID:26034499

  13. On the Development of a Miniature Neutron Generator for the Brachytherapy Treatment of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, L.

    2009-03-10

    Brachytherapy refers to application of an irradiation source within a tumor. {sup 252}Cf needles used in brachytherapy have been successfully applied to treatment of some of the most virulent cancers but it is doubtful that it will be widely used because of difficulty in dealing with unwanted dose (source cannot be turned off) and in adhering to stringent NRC regulations that have been exacerbated in our post 911 environment. We have been working on the development of a miniature neutron generator with the reaction target placed at the end of a needle (tube) for brachytherapy applications. Orifice geometries are most amenable, e.g. rectum and cervix, but interstitial use is possible with microsurgery. This paper dicusses the results of a 30 watt DD neutron generator SBU project that demonstrates that sufficient hydrogen isotope current can be delivered down a small diameter needle required for a DT neutron treatment device, and, will summarize the progress of building a commercial device pursued by the All Russian Institute for Automatics (VNIIA) supported by the DOE's Industrial Proliferation Prevention Program (IPP). It is known that most of the fast neutron (FN) beam cancer treatment facilities have been closed down. It appears that the major limitation in the use of FN beams has been damage to healthy tissue, which is relatively insensitive to photons, but this problem is alleviated by brachytherapy. Moreover, recent clinical results indicate that fast neutrons in the boost mode are most highly effective in treating large, hypoxic, and rapidly repopulating diseases. It appears that early boost application of FN may halt angiogenesis (development and repair of tumor vascular system) and shrink the tumor resulting in lower hypoxia. The boost brachytherapy application of a small, low cost neutron generator holds promise of significant contribution to the treatment of cancer.

  14. On the Development of a Miniature Neutron Generator for the Brachytherapy Treatment of Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, L.

    2009-03-01

    Brachytherapy refers to application of an irradiation source within a tumor. 252Cf needles used in brachytherapy have been successfully applied to treatment of some of the most virulent cancers but it is doubtful that it will be widely used because of difficulty in dealing with unwanted dose (source cannot be turned off) and in adhering to stringent NRC regulations that have been exacerbated in our post 911 environment. We have been working on the development of a miniature neutron generator with the reaction target placed at the end of a needle (tube) for brachytherapy applications. Orifice geometries are most amenable, e.g. rectum and cervix, but interstitial use is possible with microsurgery. This paper dicusses the results of a 30 watt DD neutron generator SBU project that demonstrates that sufficient hydrogen isotope current can be delivered down a small diameter needle required for a DT neutron treatment device, and, will summarize the progress of building a commercial device pursued by the All Russian Institute for Automatics (VNIIA) supported by the DOE's Industrial Proliferation Prevention Program (IPP). It is known that most of the fast neutron (FN) beam cancer treatment facilities have been closed down. It appears that the major limitation in the use of FN beams has been damage to healthy tissue, which is relatively insensitive to photons, but this problem is alleviated by brachytherapy. Moreover, recent clinical results indicate that fast neutrons in the boost mode are most highly effective in treating large, hypoxic, and rapidly repopulating diseases. It appears that early boost application of FN may halt angiogenesis (development and repair of tumor vascular system) and shrink the tumor resulting in lower hypoxia. The boost brachytherapy application of a small, low cost neutron generator holds promise of significant contribution to the treatment of cancer.

  15. QUALIFICATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 252CF SHUFFLER FOR RECEIPT VERIFICATION MEASUREMENTS OF MIXED U-PU OXIDES STORED IN 9975 SHIPPING CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Dubose, F.

    2011-05-26

    To extend their ability to perform accountability and verification measurements of {sup 235}U in a U-Pu oxide matrix, the K-Area Material Storage facility commissioned the development and construction of a Passive/Active {sup 252}Cf Shuffler. A series of {sup 252}Cf, PuO{sub 2}, and U-Pu oxide standards, in addition to a single U{sub 3}O{sub 8} standard, were measured to characterize and calibrate the shuffler. Accompanying these measurements were simulations using MCNP5/MCNPX, aimed at isolating the neutron countrate contributions for each of the isotopes present. Two calibration methods for determining the {sup 235}U content in mixed UPu oxide were then developed, yielding comparable results. The first determines the {sup 235}U mass by estimating the {sup 239}Pu/{sup 235}U ratio-dependent contributions from the primary delayed neutron contributors. The second defines an average linear response based on the {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu mass contents. In each case, it was observed that self-shielding due to {sup 235}U mass has a large influence on the observed rates, requiring bounds on the applicable limits of each calibration method.

  16. Dosimetric effects of source-offset in intravascular brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Chibani, Omar; Li, X Allen

    2002-04-01

    In intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT), radioactive sources can be displaced (offset) laterally from the center of the lumen and/or longitudinally from the desired location due to the cardiac motion and/or the absence of a source-centering device. The purpose of this work is to study the dosimetric impact of such a source offset. Dose effects of both lateral and longitudinal source offsets with or without the presence of a calcified plaque or a metallic stent are calculated for the three most commonly used sources (32P, 90Sr/90Y, and 192Ir). The MCNP Monte Carlo code is used in the calculation. Static and random source offsets are considered. The major results include that (a) dose can be changed significantly (by a factor of up to 4) due to a static lateral source offset; (b) this dose variation is reduced if the lateral source offset is considered as random moving within the vessel (the dose at the 2 mm reference radial distance is increased by 5-15% for the three sources in the case of the 2D random offset studied); (c) the presence of a calcified plaque and/or a metallic stent worsens the dosimetric effects; (d) the longitudinal random source offset results in a reduction (15-18%) in the effective treatment length; (e) the dose effects of source offsets for the beta source are higher than those for the gamma source. The data presented in this paper may be used for IVBT treatment planning or for dosimetric analysis of treatment outcome. The dose change due to the source offset should be considered in dose prescription. The reduction of effective treatment length should be taken into account in selection of a proper source length to ensure an adequate coverage of the treatment target. PMID:11991124

  17. Dosimetry of the 198Au Source used in Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dauffy, L; Braby, L; Berner, B

    2004-05-18

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 report, AAPM TG-43, provides an analytical model and a dosimetry protocol for brachytherapy dose calculations, as well as documentation and results for some sealed sources. The radionuclide {sup 198}Au (T{sub 1/2} = 2.70 days, E{gamma} = 412 keV) has been used in the form of seeds for brachytherapy treatments including brain, eye, and prostate tumors. However, the TG-43 report has no data for {sup 198}Au seeds, and none have previously been obtained. For that reason, and because of the conversion of most treatment planning systems to TG-43 based methods, both Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP 4C) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are used in this work to determine these data. The geometric variation in dose is measured using an array of TLDs in a solid water phantom, and the seed activity is determined using both a well ion chamber and a High Purity Germanium detector (HPGe). The results for air kerma strength, S{sub k}, per unit apparent activity, are 2.06 (MCNP) and 2.09 (measured) U mCi{sup -1}. The former is identical to what was published in 1991 in the AAPM Task Group 32 report. The dose rate constant results, {Lambda}, are 1.12 (MCNP) and 1.10 (measured), cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. The radial dose function, g(r), anisotropy function, F(r,{theta}), and anisotropy factor, {psi}{sub an}(r), are given. The anisotropy constant values are 0.973 (MCNP) and 0.994 (measured) and are consistent with both source geometry and the emitted photon energy.

  18. A comparison study on various low energy sources in interstitial prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshabadi, Mahdi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Knaup, Courtney; Meigooni, Ali S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Low energy sources are routinely used in prostate brachytherapy. 125I is one of the most commonly used sources. Low energy 131Cs source was introduced recently as a brachytherapy source. The aim of this study is to compare dose distributions of 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs sources in interstitial brachytherapy of prostate. Material and methods ProstaSeed 125I brachytherapy source was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Additionally, two hypothetical sources of 103Pd and 131Cs were simulated with the same geometry as the ProstaSeed 125I source, while having their specific emitted gamma spectra. These brachytherapy sources were simulated with distribution of forty-eight seeds in a phantom including prostate. The prostate was considered as a sphere with radius of 1.5 cm. Absolute and relative dose rates were obtained in various distances from the source along the transverse and longitudinal axes inside and outside the tumor. Furthermore, isodose curves were plotted around the sources. Results Analyzing the initial dose profiles for various sources indicated that with the same time duration and air kerma strength, 131Cs delivers higher dose to tumor. However, relative dose rate inside the tumor is higher and outside the tumor is lower for the 103Pd source. Conclusions The higher initial absolute dose in cGy/(h.U) of 131Cs brachytherapy source is an advantage of this source over the others. The higher relative dose inside the tumor and lower relative dose outside the tumor for the 103Pd source are advantages of this later brachytherapy source. Based on the total dose the 125I source has advantage over the others due to its longer half-life. PMID:26985200

  19. Dosimetry of the 198Au source used in interstitial brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Dauffy, Lucile S; Braby, Leslie A; Berner, Barry M

    2005-06-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 reports, AAPM TG-43 and its update TG-43U1, provide an analytical model and a dosimetry protocol for brachytherapy dose calculations, as well as documentation and results for some sealed sources. The radionuclide 198Au (T(1/2)=2.70 days, Egamma=412 keV) has been used in the form of seeds for brachytherapy treatments including brain, eye, and prostate tumors. However, TG-43 reports have no data for 198Au seeds, and none have previously been obtained. For that reason, and because of the conversion of most treatment planning systems to TG-43 based methods, both Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP 4C2) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are used in this work to determine these data. The geometric variation in dose is measured using an array of TLDs in a solid water phantom, and the seed activity is determined using a high purity germanium detector (HPGe) and a well ionization chamber. The results for air kerma strength, Sk, per unit apparent activity, are 2.063 (MCNP) and 2.089 (measured) U mCi(-1), values close to those published in 1991 in the AAPM Task Group 32 report. The dose rate constant, lambda, is found equal to 1.115 (MCNP) and 1.095 (measured) cGy h(-1) U(-1). The radial dose function, g(r), anisotropy function, F(r, theta), and anisotropy factor, phi(an)(r), are also given. PMID:16013717

  20. Modeling a Hypothetical {sup 170}Tm Source for Brachytherapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Enger, Shirin A.; D'Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To perform absorbed dose calculations based on Monte Carlo simulations for a hypothetical {sup 170}Tm source and to investigate the influence of encapsulating material on the energy spectrum of the emitted electrons and photons. Methods: GEANT4 Monte Carlo code version 9.2 patch 2 was used to simulate the decay process of {sup 170}Tm and to calculate the absorbed dose distribution using the GEANT4 Penelope physics models. A hypothetical {sup 170}Tm source based on the Flexisource brachytherapy design with the active core set as a pure thulium cylinder (length 3.5 mm and diameter 0.6 mm) and different cylindrical source encapsulations (length 5 mm and thickness 0.125 mm) constructed of titanium, stainless-steel, gold, or platinum were simulated. The radial dose function for the line source approximation was calculated following the TG-43U1 formalism for the stainless-steel encapsulation. Results: For the titanium and stainless-steel encapsulation, 94% of the total bremsstrahlung is produced inside the core, 4.8 and 5.5% in titanium and stainless-steel capsules, respectively, and less than 1% in water. For the gold capsule, 85% is produced inside the core, 14.2% inside the gold capsule, and a negligible amount (<1%) in water. Platinum encapsulation resulted in bremsstrahlung effects similar to those with the gold encapsulation. The range of the beta particles decreases by 1.1 mm with the stainless-steel encapsulation compared to the bare source but the tissue will still receive dose from the beta particles several millimeters from the source capsule. The gold and platinum capsules not only absorb most of the electrons but also attenuate low energy photons. The mean energy of the photons escaping the core and the stainless-steel capsule is 113 keV while for the gold and platinum the mean energy is 160 keV and 165 keV, respectively. Conclusions: A {sup 170}Tm source is primarily a bremsstrahlung source, with the majority of bremsstrahlung photons being

  1. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    SciTech Connect

    Purwaningsih, Anik

    2014-09-30

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source.

  2. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwaningsih, Anik

    2014-09-01

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source.

  3. Source localisation and dose verification for a novel brachytherapy unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Marinos G.

    A recent development in the field of radiotherapy has been the introduction of the PRS Intrabeam system (Carl Zeiss Surgical GmbH, Oberkochen, Germany). This is essentially a portable, miniaturised, electron-driven photon generator that allows high intensity, soft-energy x-rays (50 kVp) to be delivered directly to the tumour site in a single fraction. The system has been used for the interstitial radiation treatment of both brain and breast tumours. At present, a standardised in-vivo dose verification technique is not available for the PRS treatments. The isotropical distribution of photons about the tip of the PRS probe inserted in the tissue can effectively be viewed as a point source of radiation buried in the body. This work has looked into ways of localising the PRS source utilising its own radiation field. Moreover, the response of monoenergetic sources, mimicking realistic brachytherapy sources, has also been investigated. The purpose of this project was to attempt to localise the source as well as derive important dosimetric information from the resulting image. A detection system comprised of a well-collimated Germanium detector (HPGe) has been devised in a rotate-translate Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) modality. The superior energy resolving ability of the detection system allowed for energy selective reconstruction to be carried out in the case of the monoenergetic source (241Am). Results showed that the monoenergetic source can be localised to within 1 mm and the continuous PRS x-ray source to within 3mm. For the PRS dose map derivation, Monte Carlo studies have been employed in order to extract information on the dosimetric aspect of the resulting image. The final goal of this work was therefore to formulate a direct mathematical relation (Transform Map) between the image created by the escaping photons and the dose map as predicted by the theoretical model. The formation therefore of the in-vivo PRS image could allow for a real-time monitoring

  4. Comparison of 60Co and 192Ir sources in HDR brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zwierzchowski, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares the isotopes 60Co and 192Ir as radiation sources for high-dose-rate (HDR) afterloading brachytherapy. The smaller size of 192Ir sources made it the preferred radionuclide for temporary brachytherapy treatments. Recently also 60Co sources have been made available with identical geometrical dimensions. This paper compares the characteristics of both nuclides in different fields of brachytherapy based on scientific literature. In an additional part of this paper reports from medical physicists of several radiation therapy institutes are discussed. The purpose of this work is to investigate the advantages or disadvantages of both radionuclides for HDR brachytherapy due to their physical differences. The motivation is to provide useful information to support decision-making procedures in the selection of equipment for brachytherapy treatment rooms. The results of this work show that no advantages or disadvantages exist for 60Co sources compared to 192Ir sources with regard to clinical aspects. Nevertheless, there are potential logistical advantages of 60Co sources due to its longer half-life (5.3 years vs. 74 days), making it an interesting alternative especially in developing countries. PMID:23346129

  5. 10 CFR 35.2067 - Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... must include the model number, and serial number if one has been assigned, of each source tested; the... of the semi-annual physical inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources required by § 35.67(g) for 3 years. The inventory records must contain the model number of each source, and...

  6. 10 CFR 35.2067 - Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... must include the model number, and serial number if one has been assigned, of each source tested; the... of the semi-annual physical inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources required by § 35.67(g) for 3 years. The inventory records must contain the model number of each source, and...

  7. 10 CFR 35.2067 - Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... must include the model number, and serial number if one has been assigned, of each source tested; the... of the semi-annual physical inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources required by § 35.67(g) for 3 years. The inventory records must contain the model number of each source, and...

  8. High dose rate sources in remote afterloading brachytherapy: Implications for intracavitary and interstitial treatment of carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Syzek, E.J.; Bogardus, C.R. Jr. )

    1990-11-01

    Remote afterloading brachytherapy provides effective cancer treatment with zero personnel radiation exposure compared to conventional low dose rate systems requiring inpatient use of iridium, radium, or cesium sources. Clinical use of high dose rate brachytherapy is broadened to encompass curative treatment of cervical, endometrial, endobronchial, head and neck, esophageal, rectal, and prostatic carcinomas as well as palliation of intra-abdominal metastasis intraoperatively. Complications encountered with high dose rate sources will be compared to those of low dose rate systems commonly used in conjunction with external beam irradiation. Radiobiological effectiveness and economic benefits will be addressed to provide support for use of remote afterloading using high dose rate brachytherapy in palliative and curative treatment of selected carcinoma. 36 refs.

  9. Correlations of neutron multiplicity and γ -ray multiplicity with fragment mass and total kinetic energy in spontaneous fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taofeng; Li, Guangwu; Zhu, Liping; Meng, Qinghua; Wang, Liming; Han, Hongyin; Zhang, Wenhui; Xia, Haihong; Hou, Long; Vogt, Ramona; Randrup, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of correlations of neutron multiplicity ν and γ -ray multiplicity Mγ in spontaneous fission of 252Cf on fragment mass A* and total kinetic energy (TKE) have been investigated by employing the ratio of Mγ/ν and the form of Mγ(ν ) . We show for the first time that Mγ and ν have a complex correlation for heavy fragment masses, while there is a positive dependence of Mγ for light fragment masses and for near-symmetric mass splits. The ratio Mγ/ν exhibits strong shell effects for neutron magic number N =50 and near doubly magic number shell closure at Z =50 and N =82 . The γ -ray multiplicity Mγ has a maximum for TKE=165 -170 MeV. Above 170 MeV Mγ(TKE) is approximately linear, while it deviates significantly from a linear dependence at lower TKE. The correlation between the average neutron and γ -ray multiplicities can be partly reproduced by model calculations.

  10. Establishment of air kerma reference standard for low dose rate Cs-137 brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunil Dutt; Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Chourasiya, G

    2011-01-01

    A guarded cylindrical graphite ionization chamber of nominal volume 1000 cm3 was designed and fabricated for use as a reference standard for low-dose rate 137Cs brachytherapy sources. The air kerma calibration coefficient (N(K)) of this ionization chamber was estimated analytically using Burlin's general cavity theory, as well as by the Monte Carlo simulation and validated experimentally using Amersham CDCS-J-type 137Cs reference source. In the analytical method, the N(K) was calculated for 662 keV gamma rays of 137Cs brachytherapy source. In the Monte Carlo method, the geometry of the measurement setup and physics-related input data of the 137Cs source and the surrounding material were simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle code. The photon energy fluence was used to arrive at the reference air kerma rate (RAKR) using mass energy absorption coefficient. The energy deposition rates were used to simulate the value of charge rate in the ionization chamber, and the N(K) was determined. The analytical and Monte Carlo values of N(K) of the cylindrical graphite ionization chamber for 137Cs brachytherapy source are in agreement within 1.07%. The deviation of analytical and Monte Carlo values from experimental values of N(K) is 0.36% and 0.72%, respectively. This agreement validates the analytical value, and establishes this chamber as a reference standard for RAKR or AKS measurement of 137Cs brachytherapy sources. PMID:22089009

  11. Effect of photon energy spectrum on dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Davenport, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim The aim of this study is to quantify the influence of the photon energy spectrum of brachytherapy sources on task group No. 43 (TG-43) dosimetric parameters. Background Different photon spectra are used for a specific radionuclide in Monte Carlo simulations of brachytherapy sources. Materials and methods MCNPX code was used to simulate 125I, 103Pd, 169Yb, and 192Ir brachytherapy sources. Air kerma strength per activity, dose rate constant, radial dose function, and two dimensional (2D) anisotropy functions were calculated and isodose curves were plotted for three different photon energy spectra. The references for photon energy spectra were: published papers, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). The data calculated by these photon energy spectra were compared. Results Dose rate constant values showed a maximum difference of 24.07% for 103Pd source with different photon energy spectra. Radial dose function values based on different spectra were relatively the same. 2D anisotropy function values showed minor differences in most of distances and angles. There was not any detectable difference between the isodose contours. Conclusions Dosimetric parameters obtained with different photon spectra were relatively the same, however it is suggested that more accurate and updated photon energy spectra be used in Monte Carlo simulations. This would allow for calculation of reliable dosimetric data for source modeling and calculation in brachytherapy treatment planning systems. PMID:27247558

  12. Perturbation of TG-43 parameters of the brachytherapy sources under insufficient scattering materials.

    PubMed

    Zehtabian, Mehdi; Sina, Sedigheh; Faghihi, Reza; Meigooni, Ali

    2013-01-01

    In the recommendations of Task Group #43 from American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM TG43), methods of brachytherapy source dosimetry are recommended, under full scattering conditions. However, in actual brachytherapy procedures, sources may not be surrounded by full scattering tissue in all directions. Clinical examples include high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of the breast or low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of ocular melanoma using eye plaque treatment with 125I and 103Pd. In this work, the impact of the missing tissue on the TG-43-recommended dosimetric parameters of different brachytherapy sources was investigated. The impact of missing tissue on the TG-43-recommended dosimetric parameters of 137Cs, 192Ir, and 103Pd brachytherapy sources was investigated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code. These evaluations were performed by placing the sources at different locations inside a 30 × 30 × 30 cm3 cubical water phantom and comparing the results with the values of the source located at the center of the phantom, which is in a full scattering condition. The differences between the thickness of the overlying tissues for different source positions and the thickness of the overlying tissue in full scattering condition is referred to as missing tissue. The results of these investigations indicate that values of the radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function vary as a function of the thickness of missing tissue, only in the direction of the missing tissue. These changes for radial dose function were up to 5%, 11%, and 8% for 137Cs, 192Ir, and 103Pd, respectively. No significant changes are observed for the values of the dose rate constants. In this project, we have demonstrated that the TG-43 dosimetric parameters may only change in the directions of the missing tissue. These results are more practical than the published data by different investigators in which a symmetric effect of the missing tissue on the dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy

  13. Clinical practice and quality assurance challenges in modern brachytherapy sources and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Butler, Wayne M; Merrick, Gregory S

    2008-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy has led to effective treatments through the establishment of broadly applicable dosimetric thresholds for maximizing survival with minimal morbidity. Proper implementation of recent dosimetric consensus statements and quality assurance procedures is necessary to maintain the established level of safety and efficacy. This review classifies issues as either "systematic" or "stochastic" in terms of their impact on large groups or individual patients, respectively. Systematic changes affecting large numbers of patients occur infrequently and include changes in source dosimetric parameters, prescribing practice, dose calculation formalism, and improvements in calculation algorithms. The physicist must be aware of how incipient changes accord with previous experience. Stochastic issues involve procedures that are applied to each patient individually. Although ample guidance for quality assurance of brachytherapy sources exists, some ambiguities remain. The latest American Association of Physicists in Medicine guidance clarifies what is meant by independent assay, changes source sampling recommendations, particularly for sources in sterile strands and sterile preassembled needles, and modifies action level thresholds. The changing environment of brachytherapy has not changed the fact that the prime responsibility for quality assurance in brachytherapy lies with the institutional medical physicist. PMID:18406914

  14. Differential dose contributions on total dose distribution of 125I brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Camgöz, B.; Yeğin, G.; Kumru, M.N.

    2010-01-01

    This work provides an improvement of the approach using Monte Carlo simulation for the Amersham Model 6711 125I brachytherapy seed source, which is well known by many theoretical and experimental studies. The source which has simple geometry was researched with respect to criteria of AAPM Tg-43 Report. The approach offered by this study involves determination of differential dose contributions that come from virtual partitions of a massive radioactive element of the studied source to a total dose at analytical calculation point. Some brachytherapy seeds contain multi-radioactive elements so the dose at any point is a total of separate doses from each element. It is momentous to know well the angular and radial dose distributions around the source that is located in cancerous tissue for clinical treatments. Interior geometry of a source is effective on dose characteristics of a distribution. Dose information of inner geometrical structure of a brachytherapy source cannot be acquired by experimental methods because of limits of physical material and geometry in the healthy tissue, so Monte Carlo simulation is a required approach of the study. EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation software was used. In the design of a simulation, the radioactive source was divided into 10 rings, partitioned but not separate from each other. All differential sources were simulated for dose calculation, and the shape of dose distribution was determined comparatively distribution of a single-complete source. In this work anisotropy function was examined also mathematically. PMID:24376927

  15. Dose characterization in the near-source region for two high dose rate brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruqing; Li, X Allen

    2002-08-01

    High dose rate (HDR) 192Ir sources are currently used in intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) for the peripheral arterial system. This poses a demand on evaluating accurate dose parameters in the near-source region for such sources. The purpose of this work is to calculate the dose parameters for the old VariSource HDR 192Ir source and the new microSelectron HDR 192Ir source, using Monte Carlo electron and photon transport simulation. The two-dimensional (2D) dose rate distributions and the air kerma strengths for the two HDR sources were calculated by EGSnrc and EGS4 Monte Carlo codes. Based on these data, the dose parameters proposed in the AAPM TG-60 protocol were derived. The dose rate constants obtained are 13.119+/-0.028 cGy h(-1) U(-1) for the old VariSource source, and 22.751+/-0.031 cGy h(-1) U(-1) for the new microSelectron source at the reference point (r0 = 2 mm, theta = pi/2). The 2D dose rate distributions, the radial dose functions, and the anisotropy functions presented for the two sources cover radial distances ranging from 0.5 to 10 mm. In the near-source region on the transverse plane, the dose effects of the charged particle nonequilibrium and the beta-particle dose contribution were studied. It is found that at radial distances ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm, these effects increase the calculated dose rates by up to 29% for the old VariSource source, and by up to 12% for the new microSelectron source, which, in turn, change values of the radial dose function and the anisotropy function. The present dose parameters, which account for the charged particle nonequilibrium and the beta particle contribution, may be used for accurate IVB dose calculation. PMID:12201413

  16. Study of encapsulated {sup 170}Tm sources for their potential use in brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, Facundo; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Venselaar, Jack L. M.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: High dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is currently performed with {sup 192}Ir sources, and {sup 60}Co has returned recently into clinical use as a source for this kind of cancer treatment. Both radionuclides have mean photon energies high enough to require specific shielded treatment rooms. In recent years, {sup 169}Yb has been explored as an alternative for HDR-brachytherapy implants. Although it has mean photon energy lower than {sup 192}Ir, it still requires extensive shielding to deliver treatment. An alternative radionuclide for brachytherapy is {sup 170}Tm (Z=69) because it has three physical properties adequate for clinical practice: (a) 128.6 day half-life, (b) high specific activity, and (c) mean photon energy of 66.39 keV. The main drawback of this radionuclide is the low photon yield (six photons per 100 electrons emitted). The purpose of this work is to study the dosimetric characteristics of this radionuclide for potential use in HDR-brachytherapy. Methods: The authors have assumed a theoretical {sup 170}Tm cylindrical source encapsulated with stainless steel and typical dimensions taken from the currently available HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources. The dose-rate distribution was calculated for this source using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code considering both photon and electron {sup 170}Tm spectra. The AAPM TG-43 U1 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters were derived. To study general properties of {sup 170}Tm encapsulated sources, spherical sources encapsulated with stainless steel and platinum were also studied. Moreover, the influence of small variations in the active core and capsule dimensions on the dosimetric characteristics was assessed. Treatment times required for a {sup 170}Tm source were compared to those for {sup 192}Ir and {sup 169}Yb for the same contained activity. Results: Due to the energetic beta spectrum and the large electron yield, the bremsstrahlung contribution to the dose was of the same order of magnitude as from the

  17. Effect of tissue composition on dose distribution in brachytherapy with various photon emitting sources

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Salahshour, Fateme; Haghparast, Abbas; Knaup, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to compare the dose in various soft tissues in brachytherapy with photon emitting sources. Material and methods 103Pd, 125I, 169Yb, 192Ir brachytherapy sources were simulated with MCNPX Monte Carlo code, and their dose rate constant and radial dose function were compared with the published data. A spherical phantom with 50 cm radius was simulated and the dose at various radial distances in adipose tissue, breast tissue, 4-component soft tissue, brain (grey/white matter), muscle (skeletal), lung tissue, blood (whole), 9-component soft tissue, and water were calculated. The absolute dose and relative dose difference with respect to 9-component soft tissue was obtained for various materials, sources, and distances. Results There was good agreement between the dosimetric parameters of the sources and the published data. Adipose tissue, breast tissue, 4-component soft tissue, and water showed the greatest difference in dose relative to the dose to the 9-component soft tissue. The other soft tissues showed lower dose differences. The dose difference was also higher for 103Pd source than for 125I, 169Yb, and 192Ir sources. Furthermore, greater distances from the source had higher relative dose differences and the effect can be justified due to the change in photon spectrum (softening or hardening) as photons traverse the phantom material. Conclusions The ignorance of soft tissue characteristics (density, composition, etc.) by treatment planning systems incorporates a significant error in dose delivery to the patient in brachytherapy with photon sources. The error depends on the type of soft tissue, brachytherapy source, as well as the distance from the source. PMID:24790623

  18. Determination of the tissue inhomogeneity correction in high dose rate Brachytherapy for Iridium-192 source

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Barlanka; Lakshminarayana, S.

    2012-01-01

    In Brachytherapy treatment planning, the effects of tissue heterogeneities are commonly neglected due to lack of accurate, general and fast three-dimensional (3D) dose-computational algorithms. In performing dose calculations, it is assumed that the tumor and surrounding tissues constitute a uniform, homogeneous medium equivalent to water. In the recent past, three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) based treatment planning for Brachytherapy applications has been popularly adopted. However, most of the current commercially available planning systems do not provide the heterogeneity corrections for Brachytherapy dosimetry. In the present study, we have measured and quantified the impact of inhomogeneity caused by different tissues with a 0.015 cc ion chamber. Measurements were carried out in wax phantom which was employed to measure the heterogeneity. Iridium-192 (192Ir) source from high dose rate (HDR) Brachytherapy machine was used as the radiation source. The reduction of dose due to tissue inhomogeneity was measured as the ratio of dose measured with different types of inhomogeneity (bone, spleen, liver, muscle and lung) to dose measured with homogeneous medium for different distances. It was observed that different tissues attenuate differently, with bone tissue showing maximum attenuation value and lung tissue resulting minimum value and rest of the tissues giving values lying in between those of bone and lung. It was also found that inhomogeneity at short distance is considerably more than that at larger distances. PMID:22363109

  19. Dosimetric characterization of a {sup 131}Cs brachytherapy source by thermoluminescence dosimetry in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Tailor, Ramesh; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Lampe, Stephanie; Bivens Warren, Whitney; Tolani, Naresh

    2008-12-15

    Dosimetry measurements of a {sup 131}Cs brachytherapy source have been performed in liquid water employing thermoluminescence dosimeters. A search of the literature reveals that this is the first time a complete set of dosimetric parameters for a brachytherapy ''seed'' source has been measured in liquid water. This method avoids the medium correction uncertainties introduced by the use of water-equivalent plastic phantoms. To assure confidence in the results, four different sources were employed for each parameter measured, and measurements were performed multiple times. The measured dosimetric parameters presented here are based on the AAPM Task Group 43 formalism. The dose-rate constant measured in liquid water was (1.063{+-}0.023) cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} and was based on the air-kerma strength standard for this source established by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Measured values for the 2D anisotropy function and the radial dose function are presented.

  20. Studies on the development of ¹⁶⁹Yb-brachytherapy seeds: New generation brachytherapy sources for the management of cancer.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sanjay Kumar; Kumar, Yogendra; Jagadeesan, K C; Nuwad, Jitendra; Bamankar, Y R; Dash, Ashutosh

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes development of (169)Yb-seeds by encapsulating 0.6-0.65 mm (ϕ) sized (169)Yb2O3 microspheres in titanium capsules. Microspheres synthesized by a sol-gel route were characterized by XRD, SEM/EDS and ICP-AES. Optimization of neutron irradiation was accomplished and (169)Yb-seeds up to 74 MBq of (169)Yb could be produced from natural Yb2O3 microspheres, which have the potential for use in prostate brachytherapy. A protocol to prepare (169)Yb-brachytherapy sources (2.96-3.7 TBq of (169)Yb) with the use of enriched targets was also formulated. PMID:25846454

  1. Tracking brachytherapy sources using emission imaging with one flat panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Song Haijun; Bowsher, James; Das, Shiva; Yin Fangfang

    2009-04-15

    This work proposes to use the radiation from brachytherapy sources to track their dwell positions in three-dimensional (3D) space. The prototype device uses a single flat panel detector and a BB tray. The BBs are arranged in a defined pattern. The shadow of the BBs on the flat panel is analyzed to derive the 3D coordinates of the illumination source, i.e., the dwell position of the brachytherapy source. A kilovoltage x-ray source located 3.3 m away was used to align the center BB with the center pixel on the flat panel detector. For a test plan of 11 dwell positions, with an Ir-192 high dose rate unit, one projection was taken for each dwell point, and locations of the BB shadows were manually identified on the projection images. The 3D coordinates for the 11 dwell positions were reconstructed based on two BBs. The distances between dwell points were compared with the expected values. The average difference was 0.07 cm with a standard deviation of 0.15 cm. With automated BB shadow recognition in the future, this technique possesses the potential of tracking the 3D trajectory and the dwell times of a brachytherapy source in real time, enabling real time source position verification.

  2. Tracking brachytherapy sources using emission imaging with one flat panel detector.

    PubMed

    Song, Haijun; Bowsher, James; Das, Shiva; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2009-04-01

    This work proposes to use the radiation from brachytherapy sources to track their dwell positions in three-dimensional (3D) space. The prototype device uses a single flat panel detector and a BB tray. The BBs are arranged in a defined pattern. The shadow of the BBs on the flat panel is analyzed to derive the 3D coordinates of the illumination source, i.e., the dwell position of the brachytherapy source. A kilovoltage x-ray source located 3.3 m away was used to align the center BB with the center pixel on the flat panel detector. For a test plan of 11 dwell positions, with an Ir-192 high dose rate unit, one projection was taken for each dwell point, and locations of the BB shadows were manually identified on the projection images. The 3D coordinates for the 11 dwell positions were reconstructed based on two BBs. The distances between dwell points were compared with the expected values. The average difference was 0.07 cm with a standard deviation of 0.15 cm. With automated BB shadow recognition in the future, this technique possesses the potential of tracking the 3D trajectory and the dwell times of a brachytherapy source in real time, enabling real time source position verification. PMID:19472615

  3. Calibration of 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy source using different calibration procedures

    PubMed Central

    Bondel, Shwetha; Ravikumar, Manickham; Supe, Sanjay Sudhakar; Reddy, Buchuppudi Rekha

    2013-01-01

    Aim To calibrate Ir-192 high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy source using different calibration methods and to determine the accuracy and suitability of each method for routine calibrations. Background The source calibration is an essential part of the quality assurance programme for dosimetry of brachytherapy sources. The clinical use of brachytherapy source requires an independent measurement of the air kerma strength according to the recommendations of medical physics societies. Materials and methods The Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source from Gammamed plus machine (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was calibrated using three different procedures, one using the well-type ionization chamber, second by the in-air calibration method and third using solid water phantoms. The reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of the source was determined using Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Medizinische Physik (DGMP) recommendations. Results The RAKR determined using different calibration methods are in good agreement with the manufacturer stated value. The mean percentage variations of 0.21, −0.94, −0.62 and 0.58 in RAKR values with respect to the manufacturer quoted values were observed with the well-type chamber, in-air calibration, cylindrical phantom and slab phantom measurements, respectively. Conclusion Measurements with a well-type chamber are relatively simple to perform. For in-air measurements, the indigenously designed calibration jig provides an accurate positioning of the source and chamber with minimum scatter contribution. The slab phantom system has an advantage that no additional phantom and chamber are required other than those used for external beam therapy dosimetry. All the methods of calibration discussed in this study are effective to be used for routine calibration purposes. PMID:24944818

  4. Broad-beam transmission data for new brachytherapy sources, Tm-170 and Yb-169.

    PubMed

    Granero, Domingo; Pérez-Calatayud, José; Ballester, Facundo; Bos, Adrie J J; Venselaar, Jack

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics of the radionuclides (170)Tm and (169)Yb are highly interesting for their use as high dose-rate brachytherapy sources. The introduction of brachytherapy equipment containing these sources will lead to smaller required thicknesses of the materials used in radiation protection barriers compared with the use of conventional sources such as (192)Ir and (137)Cs. The purpose of this study is to determine the required thicknesses of protection material for the design of the protecting walls. Using the Monte Carlo method, transmission data were derived for broad-beam geometries through lead and concrete barriers, from which the first half value layer and tenth value layer are obtained. In addition, the dose reduction in a simulated patient was studied to determine whether transmission in the patient is a relevant factor in radiation protection calculations. PMID:16030058

  5. Developing A Directional High-Dose Rate (d-HDR) Brachytherapy Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heredia, Athena Yvonne

    Conventional sources used in brachytherapy provide nearly isotropic or radially symmetric dose distributions. Optimizations of dose distributions have been limited to varied dwell times at specified locations within a given treatment volume, or manipulations in source position for seed implantation techniques. In years past, intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) has been used to reduce the amount of radiation to surrounding sensitive structures in select intracavitary cases by adding space or partial shields. Previous work done by Lin et al., at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has shown potential improvements in conformality for brachytherapy treatments using a directionally shielded low dose rate (LDR) source for treatments in breast and prostate. Directional brachytherapy sources irradiate approximately half of the radial angles around the source, and adequately shield a quarter of the radial angles on the opposite side, with sharp gradient zones between the treated half and shielded quarter. With internally shielded sources, the radiation can be preferentially emitted in such a way as to reduce toxicities in surrounding critical organs. The objective of this work is to present findings obtained in the development of a new directional high dose rate (d-HDR) source. To this goal, 103Pd (Z = 46) is reintroduced as a potential radionuclide for use in HDR brachytherapy. 103Pd has a low average photon energy (21 keV) and relatively short half -life (17 days), which is why it has historically been used in low dose rate applications and implantation techniques. Pd-103 has a carrier-free specific activity of 75000 Ci/g. Using cyclotron produced 103Pd, near carrier-free specific activities can be achieved, providing suitability for high dose rate applications. The evolution of the d-HDR source using Monte Carlo simulations is presented, along with dosimetric parameters used to fully characterize the source. In addition, a discussion on how to obtain elemental

  6. Source position verification and dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy using an EPID

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. L.; Taylor, M. L.; McDermott, L. N.; Franich, R. D.; Haworth, A.; Millar, J. L.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate treatment delivery in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires correct source dwell positions and dwell times to be administered relative to each other and to the surrounding anatomy. Treatment delivery inaccuracies predominantly occur for two reasons: (i) anatomical movement or (ii) as a result of human errors that are usually related to incorrect implementation of the planned treatment. Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were originally developed for patient position verification in external beam radiotherapy and their application has been extended to provide dosimetric information. The authors have characterized the response of an EPID for use with an {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source to demonstrate its use as a verification device, providing both source position and dosimetric information.Methods: Characterization of the EPID response using an {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source included investigations of reproducibility, linearity with dose rate, photon energy dependence, and charge build-up effects associated with exposure time and image acquisition time. Source position resolution in three dimensions was determined. To illustrate treatment verification, a simple treatment plan was delivered to a phantom and the measured EPID dose distribution compared with the planned dose.Results: The mean absolute source position error in the plane parallel to the EPID, for dwells measured at 50, 100, and 150 mm source to detector distances (SDD), was determined to be 0.26 mm. The resolution of the z coordinate (perpendicular distance from detector plane) is SDD dependent with 95% confidence intervals of ±0.1, ±0.5, and ±2.0 mm at SDDs of 50, 100, and 150 mm, respectively. The response of the EPID is highly linear to dose rate. The EPID exhibits an over-response to low energy incident photons and this nonlinearity is incorporated into the dose calibration procedure. A distance (spectral) dependent dose rate calibration procedure has been

  7. New National Air-Kerma Standard for Low-Energy Electronic Brachytherapy Sources

    PubMed Central

    Seltzer, Stephen M; O’Brien, Michelle; Mitch, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    The new primary standard for low-energy electronic brachytherapy sources for the United States is described. These miniature x-ray tubes are inserted in catheters for interstitial radiation therapy and operate at tube potentials of up to about 50 kV. The standard is based on the realization of the air kerma produced by the x-ray beam at a reference distance in air of 50 cm. PMID:26601044

  8. Characterization of Low-Energy Photon-Emitting Brachytherapy Sources with Modified Strengths for Applications in Focal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Joshua L.

    Permanent implants of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are used to treat a variety of cancers. Individual source models must be separately characterized due to their unique geometry, materials, and radionuclides, which all influence their dose distributions. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are often used for dose measurements around low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources. TLDs are typically calibrated with higher energy sources such as 60Co, which requires a correction for the change in the response of the TLDs as a function of photon energy. These corrections have historically been based on TLD response to x ray bremsstrahlung spectra instead of to brachytherapy sources themselves. This work determined the TLD intrinsic energy dependence for 125I and 103Pd sources relative to 60Co, which allows for correction of TLD measurements of brachytherapy sources with factors specific to their energy spectra. Traditional brachytherapy sources contain mobile internal components and large amounts of high-Z material such as radio-opaque markers and titanium encapsulations. These all contribute to perturbations and uncertainties in the dose distribution around the source. The CivaString is a new elongated 103Pd brachytherapy source with a fixed internal geometry, polymer encapsulation, and lengths ranging from 1 to 6 cm, which offers advantages over traditional source designs. This work characterized the CivaString source and the results facilitated the formal approval of this source for use in clinical treatments. Additionally, the accuracy of a superposition technique for dose calculation around the sources with lengths >1 cm was verified. Advances in diagnostic techniques are paving the way for focal brachytherapy in which the dose is intentionally modulated throughout the target volume to focus on subvolumes that contain cancer cells. Brachytherapy sources with variable longitudinal strength (VLS) are a promising candidate for use in focal

  9. Verification of I-125 brachytherapy source strength for use in radioactive seed localization procedures.

    PubMed

    Metyko, John; Erwin, William; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2016-06-01

    A general-purpose nuclear medicine dose calibrator was assessed as a potential replacement for a dedicated air-communicating well-type ionization chamber (brachytherapy source strength verification instrument) for (125)I seed source strength verification for radioactive seed localization, where less stringent accuracy tolerances may be acceptable. The accuracy, precision and reproducibility of the dose calibrator were measured and compared to regulatory requirements. The results of this work indicate that a dose calibrator can be used for (125)I seed source strength verification for radioactive seed localization. PMID:27015651

  10. Evaluation of TG-43 recommended 2D-anisotropy function for elongated brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Awan, Shahid B; Meigooni, Ali S; Mokhberiosgouei, Ramin; Hussain, Manzoor

    2006-11-01

    The original and updated protocols recommended by Task Group 43 from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (i.e., TG-43 and TG-43U1, respectively), have been introduced to unify brachytherapy source dosimetry around the world. Both of these protocols are based on experiences with sources less than 1.0 cm in length. TG-43U1 recommends that for 103Pd sources, 2D anisotropy function F(r, theta), should be tabulated at a minimum for radial distances of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 5.0 cm. Anisotropy functions defined in these protocols are only valid when the point of calculation does not fall on the active length of the source. However, for elongated brachytherapy sources (active length >1 cm), some of the calculation points with r < 1/2 active length and small theta may fall on the source itself and there is no clear recommendation to handle this situation. In addition, the linear interpolation technique recommended by TG-43U1 is found to be valid for seed types of sources as the difference between F(r, theta) for two consecutive radii is <10%. However, in the present investigations it has been found that values of F(r, 5 degrees) for a 5 cm long RadioCoil 103Pd source at radial distances of 2.5, 3.0, and 4.0 cm were 2.95, 1.74, and 1.19, respectively, with differences up to about a factor of 3. Therefore, the validity of the linear interpolation technique for an elongated brachytherapy source with such a large variation in F(r, theta) needs to be investigated. In this project, application of the TG-43U1 formalism for dose calculation around an elongated RadioCoil 103Pd brachytherapy source has been investigated. In addition, the linear interpolation techniques as described in TG-43U1 for seed type sources have been evaluated for a 5.0 cm long RadioCoil 103Pd brachytherapy source. Application of a polynomial fit to F(r, theta) has also been investigated as an alternate approach to the linear interpolation technique. The results of these investigations

  11. Evaluation of TG-43 recommended 2D-anisotropy function for elongated brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Awan, Shahid B.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Mokhberiosgouei, Ramin; Hussain, Manzoor

    2006-11-15

    The original and updated protocols recommended by Task Group 43 from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (i.e., TG-43 and TG-43U1, respectively), have been introduced to unify brachytherapy source dosimetry around the world. Both of these protocols are based on experiences with sources less than 1.0 cm in length. TG-43U1 recommends that for {sup 103}Pd sources, 2D anisotropy function F(r,{theta}), should be tabulated at a minimum for radial distances of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 5.0 cm. Anisotropy functions defined in these protocols are only valid when the point of calculation does not fall on the active length of the source. However, for elongated brachytherapy sources (active length >1 cm), some of the calculation points with r<(1/2) active length and small {theta} may fall on the source itself and there is no clear recommendation to handle this situation. In addition, the linear interpolation technique recommended by TG-43U1 is found to be valid for seed types of sources as the difference between F(r,{theta}) for two consecutive radii is <10%. However, in the present investigations it has been found that values of F(r,5 deg. ) for a 5 cm long RadioCoil trade mark sign {sup 103}Pd source at radial distances of 2.5, 3.0, and 4.0 cm were 2.95, 1.74, and 1.19, respectively, with differences up to about a factor of 3. Therefore, the validity of the linear interpolation technique for an elongated brachytherapy source with such a large variation in F(r,{theta}) needs to be investigated. In this project, application of the TG-43U1 formalism for dose calculation around an elongated RadioCoil trade mark sign {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy source has been investigated. In addition, the linear interpolation techniques as described in TG-43U1 for seed type sources have been evaluated for a 5.0 cm long RadioCoil trade mark sign {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy source. Application of a polynomial fit to F(r,{theta}) has also been investigated as an alternate approach to the

  12. Spectroscopic output of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd low dose rate brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Usher-Moga, Jacqueline; Beach, Stephen M.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2009-01-15

    The spectroscopic output of low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources is dependent on the physical design and construction of the source. Characterization of the emitted photons from 12 {sup 125}I and 3 {sup 103}Pd LDR brachytherapy source models is presented. Photon spectra, both along the transverse bisector and at several polar angles, were measured in air with a high-purity reverse electrode germanium (REGe) detector. Measured spectra were corrected to in vacuo conditions via Monte Carlo and analytical methods. The tabulated and plotted spectroscopic data provide a more complete understanding of each source model's output characteristics than can be obtained with other measurement techniques. The variation in fluorescence yield of the {sup 125}I sources containing silver caused greater differences in the emitted spectra and average energies among these seed models than was observed for the {sup 103}Pd sources or the {sup 125}I sources that do not contain silver. Angular spectroscopic data further highlighted the effects of source construction unique to each model, as well as the asymmetric output of many seeds. These data demonstrate the need for the incorporation of such physically measured output characteristics in the Monte Carlo modeling process.

  13. Evaluation of brachytherapy lung implant dose distributions from photon-emitting sources due to tissue heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yun; Rivard, Mark J.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are used for permanent implantation to treat lung cancer. However, the current brachytherapy dose calculation formalism assumes a homogeneous water medium without considering the influence of radiation scatter or tissue heterogeneities. The purpose of this study was to determine the dosimetric effects of tissue heterogeneities for permanent lung brachytherapy. Methods: The MCNP5 v1.40 radiation transport code was used for Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Point sources with energies of 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 MeV were simulated to cover the range of pertinent brachytherapy energies and to glean dosimetric trends independent of specific radionuclide emissions. Source positions from postimplant CT scans of five patient implants were used for source coordinates, with dose normalized to 200 Gy at the center of each implant. With the presence of fibrosis (around the implant), cortical bone, lung, and healthy tissues, dose distributions and {sub PTV}DVH were calculated using the MCNP *FMESH4 tally and the NIST mass-energy absorption coefficients. This process was repeated upon replacing all tissues with water. For all photon energies, 10{sup 9} histories were simulated to achieve statistical errors (k = 1) typically of 1%. Results: The mean PTV doses calculated using tissue heterogeneities for all five patients changed (compared to dose to water) by only a few percent over the examined photon energy range, as did PTV dose at the implant center. The {sub PTV}V{sub 100} values were 81.2%, 90.0% (as normalized), 94.3%, 93.9%, 92.7%, and 92.2% for 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 MeV source photons, respectively. Relative to water, the maximum bone doses were higher by factors of 3.7, 5.1, 5.2, 2.4, 1.2, and 1.0 The maximum lung doses were about 0.98, 0.94, 0.91, 0.94, 0.97, and 0.99. Relative to water, the maximum healthy tissue doses at the mediastinal position were higher by factors of 9.8, 2.2, 1.3, 1.1, 1.1, and

  14. Source geometry factors for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, D. R.; Sander, T.; Nutbrown, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated 192Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR 192Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, ksg, is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR 192Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR 192Ir Flexisource ksg was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  15. The Application of Elliptic Cylindrical Phantom in Brachytherapy Dosimetric Study of HDR 192Ir Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Woo Sang; Park, Sung Ho; Jung, Sang Hoon; Choi, Wonsik; Do Ahn, Seung; Shin, Seong Soo

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the radial dose function of HDR 192Ir source based on Monte Carlo simulation using elliptic cylindrical phantom, similar to realistic shape of pelvis, in brachytherapy dosimetric study. The elliptic phantom size and shape was determined by analysis of dimensions of pelvis on CT images of 20 patients treated with brachytherapy for cervical cancer. The radial dose function obtained using the elliptic cylindrical water phantom was compared with radial dose functions for different spherical phantom sizes, including the Williamsion's data loaded into conventional planning system. The differences in the radial dose function for the different spherical water phantoms increase with radial distance, r, and the largest differences in the radial dose function appear for the smallest phantom size. The radial dose function of the elliptic cylindrical phantom significantly decreased with radial distance in the vertical direction due to different scatter condition in comparison with the Williamson's data. Considering doses to ICRU rectum and bladder points, doses to reference points can be underestimated up to 1-2% at the distance from 3 to 6 cm. The radial dose function in this study could be used as realistic data for calculating the brachytherapy dosimetry for cervical cancer.

  16. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... source accountability required by § 35.406 for 3 years. (b) For temporary implants, the record must... storage, and the name of the individual who returned them to storage. (c) For permanent implants, the... activity of sources not implanted, the date they were returned to storage, and the name of the...

  17. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... source accountability required by § 35.406 for 3 years. (b) For temporary implants, the record must... storage, and the name of the individual who returned them to storage. (c) For permanent implants, the... activity of sources not implanted, the date they were returned to storage, and the name of the...

  18. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... source accountability required by § 35.406 for 3 years. (b) For temporary implants, the record must... storage, and the name of the individual who returned them to storage. (c) For permanent implants, the... activity of sources not implanted, the date they were returned to storage, and the name of the...

  19. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... source accountability required by § 35.406 for 3 years. (b) For temporary implants, the record must... storage, and the name of the individual who returned them to storage. (c) For permanent implants, the... activity of sources not implanted, the date they were returned to storage, and the name of the...

  20. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... source accountability required by § 35.406 for 3 years. (b) For temporary implants, the record must... storage, and the name of the individual who returned them to storage. (c) For permanent implants, the... activity of sources not implanted, the date they were returned to storage, and the name of the...

  1. Novel tools for stepping source brachytherapy treatment planning: Enhanced geometrical optimization and interactive inverse planning

    SciTech Connect

    Dinkla, Anna M. Laarse, Rob van der; Koedooder, Kees; Petra Kok, H.; Wieringen, Niek van; Pieters, Bradley R.; Bel, Arjan

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Dose optimization for stepping source brachytherapy can nowadays be performed using automated inverse algorithms. Although much quicker than graphical optimization, an experienced treatment planner is required for both methods. With automated inverse algorithms, the procedure to achieve the desired dose distribution is often based on trial-and-error. Methods: A new approach for stepping source prostate brachytherapy treatment planning was developed as a quick and user-friendly alternative. This approach consists of the combined use of two novel tools: Enhanced geometrical optimization (EGO) and interactive inverse planning (IIP). EGO is an extended version of the common geometrical optimization method and is applied to create a dose distribution as homogeneous as possible. With the second tool, IIP, this dose distribution is tailored to a specific patient anatomy by interactively changing the highest and lowest dose on the contours. Results: The combined use of EGO–IIP was evaluated on 24 prostate cancer patients, by having an inexperienced user create treatment plans, compliant to clinical dose objectives. This user was able to create dose plans of 24 patients in an average time of 4.4 min/patient. An experienced treatment planner without extensive training in EGO–IIP also created 24 plans. The resulting dose-volume histogram parameters were comparable to the clinical plans and showed high conformance to clinical standards. Conclusions: Even for an inexperienced user, treatment planning with EGO–IIP for stepping source prostate brachytherapy is feasible as an alternative to current optimization algorithms, offering speed, simplicity for the user, and local control of the dose levels.

  2. Effect of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distributions from Cf-252 brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J

    2013-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method was used to determine the effect of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution from a Cf-252 brachytherapy source. Neutron and gamma-ray fluences, energy spectra and dose rate distributions were determined in both homogenous and inhomogeneous phantoms. Simulations were performed using the MCNP5 code. Obtained results were compared with experimentally measured values published in literature. Results showed a significant change in neutron dose rate distributions in presence of heterogeneities. However, their effect on gamma rays dose distribution is minimal. PMID:23069196

  3. Energy-based dosimetry of low-energy, photon-emitting brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malin, Martha J.

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) for low-energy, photon-emitting brachytherapy sources have advanced to the point where the algorithms may be used in clinical practice. Before these algorithms can be used, a methodology must be established to verify the accuracy of the source models used by the algorithms. Additionally, the source strength metric for these algorithms must be established. This work explored the feasibility of verifying the source models used by MBDCAs by measuring the differential photon fluence emitted from the encapsulation of the source. The measured fluence could be compared to that modeled by the algorithm to validate the source model. This work examined how the differential photon fluence varied with position and angle of emission from the source, and the resolution that these measurements would require for dose computations to be accurate to within 1.5%. Both the spatial and angular resolution requirements were determined. The techniques used to determine the resolution required for measurements of the differential photon fluence were applied to determine why dose-rate constants determined using a spectroscopic technique disagreed with those computed using Monte Carlo techniques. The discrepancy between the two techniques had been previously published, but the cause of the discrepancy was not known. This work determined the impact that some of the assumptions used by the spectroscopic technique had on the accuracy of the calculation. The assumption of isotropic emission was found to cause the largest discrepancy in the spectroscopic dose-rate constant. Finally, this work improved the instrumentation used to measure the rate at which energy leaves the encapsulation of a brachytherapy source. This quantity is called emitted power (EP), and is presented as a possible source strength metric for MBDCAs. A calorimeter that measured EP was designed and built. The theoretical framework that the calorimeter relied upon to measure EP

  4. TG-43 U1 based dosimetric characterization of model 67-6520 Cs-137 brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Meigooni, Ali S.; Wright, Clarissa; Koona, Rafiq A.; Awan, Shahid B.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy treatment has been a cornerstone for management of various cancer sites, particularly for the treatment of gynecological malignancies. In low dose rate brachytherapy treatments, {sup 137}Cs sources have been used for several decades. A new {sup 137}Cs source design has been introduced (model 67-6520, source B3-561) by Isotope Products Laboratories (IPL) for clinical application. The goal of the present work is to implement the TG-43 U1 protocol in the characterization of the aforementioned {sup 137}Cs source. Methods: The dosimetric characteristics of the IPL {sup 137}Cs source are measured using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Solid Water phantom material and calculated using Monte Carlo simulations with the GEANT4 code in Solid Water and liquid water. The dose rate constant, radial dose function, and two-dimensional anisotropy function of this source model were obtained following the TG-43 U1 recommendations. In addition, the primary and scatter dose separation (PSS) formalism that could be used in convolution/superposition methods to calculate dose distributions around brachytherapy sources in heterogeneous media was studied. Results: The measured and calculated dose rate constants of the IPL {sup 137}Cs source in Solid Water were found to be 0.930({+-}7.3%) and 0.928({+-}2.6%) cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}, respectively. The agreement between these two methods was within our experimental uncertainties. The Monte Carlo calculated value in liquid water of the dose rate constant was {Lambda}=0.948({+-}2.6%) cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. Similarly, the agreement between measured and calculated radial dose functions and the anisotropy functions was found to be within {+-}5%. In addition, the tabulated data that are required to characterize the source using the PSS formalism were derived. Conclusions: In this article the complete dosimetry of the newly designed {sup 137}Cs IPL source following the AAPM TG-43 U1 dosimetric protocol and the PSS

  5. Enhancement and validation of Geant4 Brachytherapy application on clinical HDR 192Ir source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababneh, Eshraq; Dababneh, Saed; Qatarneh, Sharif; Wadi-Ramahi, Shada

    2014-10-01

    The Geant4 Monte Carlo MC associated Brachytherapy example was adapted, enhanced and several analysis techniques have been developed. The simulation studies the isodose distribution of the total, primary and scattered doses around a Nucletron microSelectron 192Ir source. Different phantom materials were used (water, tissue and bone) and the calculation was conducted at various depths and planes. The work provides an early estimate of the required number of primary events to ultimately achieve a given uncertainty at a given distance, in the otherwise CPU and time consuming clinical MC calculation. The adaptation of the Geant4 toolkit and the enhancements introduced to the code are all validated including the comprehensive decay of the 192Ir source, the materials used to build the geometry, the geometry itself and the calculated scatter to primary dose ratio. The simulation quantitatively illustrates that the scattered dose in the bone medium is larger than its value in water and tissue. As the distance away from the source increases, scatter contribution to dose becomes more significant as the primary dose decreases. The developed code could be viewed as a platform that contains detailed dose calculation model for clinical application of HDR 192Ir in Brachytherapy.

  6. Thermoluminescent and Monte Carlo dosimetry of IR06-103Pd brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Saidi, Pooneh; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Hosseini, S Hamed; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    This work presents experimental dosimetry results for a new 103Pd brachytherapy seed, in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 recommendation that all new low-energy interstitial brachytherapy seeds should undergo one Monte Carlo (MC) and at least one experimental dosimetry characterization. Measurements were performed using TLD-GR200A circular chip dosimeters using standard methods employing thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Perspex phantom. The Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code, version 5 was used to evaluate the dose-rate distributions around this model 103Pd source in water and Perspex phantoms. The consensus value for dose-rate constant of the IR06-103Pd source was found equal to 0.690 cGy·h(-1)·U(-1). The anisotropy function, F(r, θ), and the radial dose function, g(L)(r), of the seed were measured in Perspex phantom and calculated in both Perspex and liquid water phantom. The measured values were also found in good agreement with corresponding MC calculations. PMID:22089014

  7. Experimental and Monte Carlo determination of the TG-43 dosimetric parameters for the model 9011 THINSeed brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R. M.; Davis, S. D.; Micka, J. A.; DeWerd, L. A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for a new, smaller diameter {sup 125}I brachytherapy source (THINSeed, model 9011) were determined using LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD-100) microcubes and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Two polymethyl methacrylate phantoms were machined to hold TLD-100 microcubes at specific locations for the experimental determination of the radial dose function, dose-rate constant, and anisotropy functions of the new source. The TG-43 parameters were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. For comparison, the model 6711 source was also investigated. Results: Experimental results for both models 9011 and 6711 sources showed good agreement with Monte Carlo values, as well as with previously published values. Conclusions: The TG-43 parameters for the new source model are similar to those of model 6711; however, they represent two separate sources and TG-43 parameters used in treatment planning must be source specific.

  8. Dosimetric characterizations of GZP6 60Co high dose rate brachytherapy sources: application of superimposition method

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Meigooni, Ali Soleimani

    2012-01-01

    Background Dosimetric characteristics of a high dose rate (HDR) GZP6 Co-60 brachytherapy source have been evaluated following American Association of Physicists in MedicineTask Group 43U1 (AAPM TG-43U1) recommendations for their clinical applications. Materials and methods MCNP-4C and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes were utilized to calculate dose rate constant, two dimensional (2D) dose distribution, radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function of the source. These parameters of this source are compared with the available data for Ralstron 60Co and microSelectron192Ir sources. Besides, a superimposition method was developed to extend the obtained results for the GZP6 source No. 3 to other GZP6 sources. Results The simulated value for dose rate constant for GZP6 source was 1.104±0.03 cGyh-1U-1. The graphical and tabulated radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function of this source are presented here. The results of these investigations show that the dosimetric parameters of GZP6 source are comparable to those for the Ralstron source. While dose rate constant for the two 60Co sources are similar to that for the microSelectron192Ir source, there are differences between radial dose function and anisotropy functions. Radial dose function of the 192Ir source is less steep than both 60Co source models. In addition, the 60Co sources are showing more isotropic dose distribution than the 192Ir source. Conclusions The superimposition method is applicable to produce dose distributions for other source arrangements from the dose distribution of a single source. The calculated dosimetric quantities of this new source can be introduced as input data to the GZP6 treatment planning system (TPS) and to validate the performance of the TPS. PMID:23077455

  9. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashouf, S.; Lechtman, E.; Lai, P.; Keller, B. M.; Karotki, A.; Beachey, D. J.; Pignol, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 × \\text{ICF} formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  10. Evaluation of high-energy brachytherapy source electronic disequilibrium and dose from emitted electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, Facundo; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Melhus, Christopher S.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The region of electronic disequilibrium near photon-emitting brachytherapy sources of high-energy radionuclides ({sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, and {sup 169}Yb) and contributions to total dose from emitted electrons were studied using the GEANT4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo codes. Methods: Hypothetical sources with active and capsule materials mimicking those of actual sources but with spherical shape were examined. Dose contributions due to source photons, x rays, and bremsstrahlung; source {beta}{sup -}, Auger electrons, and internal conversion electrons; and water collisional kerma were scored. To determine if conclusions obtained for electronic equilibrium conditions and electron dose contribution to total dose for the representative spherical sources could be applied to actual sources, the {sup 192}Ir mHDR-v2 source model (Nucletron B.V., Veenendaal, The Netherlands) was simulated for comparison to spherical source results and to published data. Results: Electronic equilibrium within 1% is reached for {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, and {sup 169}Yb at distances greater than 7, 3.5, 2, and 1 mm from the source center, respectively, in agreement with other published studies. At 1 mm from the source center, the electron contributions to total dose are 1.9% and 9.4% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, respectively. Electron emissions become important (i.e., >0.5%) within 3.3 mm of {sup 60}Co and 1.7 mm of {sup 192}Ir sources, yet are negligible over all distances for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 169}Yb. Electronic equilibrium conditions along the transversal source axis for the mHDR-v2 source are comparable to those of the spherical sources while electron dose to total dose contribution are quite different. Conclusions: Electronic equilibrium conditions obtained for spherical sources could be generalized to actual sources while electron contribution to total dose depends strongly on source dimensions, material composition, and electron spectra.

  11. EGSnrc Monte Carlo-aided dosimetric studies of the new BEBIG 60Co HDR brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Akramuzzaman, Mir Md.; Zakaria, Golam Abu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to obtain the dosimetric parameters of the new BEBIG 60Co brachytherapy source following by TG-43U1 recommendation with appropriate electron cutoff energy (0.521 MeV). Material and methods The new BEBIG 60Co brachytherapy source is used to calculate the TG-43U1 parameters. EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo simulation code has been used to calculate the radial dose functions and anisotropy functions. 2D dose rate table is obtained with Cartesian coordinate system for surrounding the source. Results The radial dose functions are calculated for the distance of 0.06 cm to 100 cm from the source center with different cutoff energies and compared. The anisotropy functions values are calculated with the range of 1° to 179°, and apart from 0.2 cm to 20 cm of radial distances. The along-away dose rate data are calculated for quality assurance purposes. The calculated values are compared with the consensus data set and previous published results. Conclusions The radial dose function values from 0.06 cm to 0.16 cm are low, and these values gradually increased up to 0.3 cm radial distance. The radial dose function values are compared with the values of consensus data set using EGSnrc code system, and it is in good agreement with the published data range. The data for < 0.1 cm is not available in consensus data set, and extrapolated value is included for 0 distances which is the same as the value of 0.1 cm. In this study, the obtained values are strictly fall-off to < 0.1 cm distances. Good agreement with the published data was observed, except the values less than 40° angle at 0.5 cm distance for anisotropy function values. PMID:24143150

  12. Dose distribution along the transverse axis of a new 125I source for interstitial brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Nath, R; Yue, N

    2000-11-01

    A new encapsulated source of 125I has been introduced for interstitial brachytherapy. This source, isoSTAR model 12501 (manufactured by Imagyn Corp.), consists of a welded titanium tube containing 125I as silver iodide uniformly coated on five silver beads. The dose rate constant and the radial dose function for this source were measured using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Solid Water phantom. The value of the dose rate constant is 0.95 cGy h(-1)U(-1) where the unit of air kerma strength is 1 U = 1 cGy h(-1)cm2. The air kerma strength was traceable to the year 2000 primary air kerma strength standard for the model 12501 source at the National Institute of Technology and Standards. The radial dose function for the source was very similar to that for the model 6711 source (manufactured by Nycomed Amersham) for radial distances up to 6 cm. However, the radial dose function is lower in value than that for the model 6702 source (manufactured by Nycomed Amersham) and the model MED3631-A/M Iogold source (manufactured by North American Scientific). PMID:11128306

  13. Experimental derivation of the fluence non-uniformity correction for air kerma near brachytherapy linear sources

    SciTech Connect

    Vianello, E. A.; Almeida, C. E. de

    2008-07-15

    In brachytherapy, one of the elements to take into account for measurements free in air is the non-uniformity of the photon fluence due to the beam divergence that causes a steep dose gradient near the source. The correction factors for this phenomenon have been usually evaluated by two available theories by Kondo and Randolph [Radiat. Res. 13, 37-60 (1960)] and Bielajew [Phys. Med. Biol. 35, 517-538 (1990)], both conceived for point sources. This work presents the experimental validation of the Monte Carlo calculations made by Rodriguez and deAlmeida [Phys. Med. Biol. 49, 1705-1709 (2004)] for the non-uniformity correction specifically for a Cs-137 linear source measured using a Farmer type ionization chamber. The experimental values agree very well with the Monte Carlo calculations and differ from the results predicted by both theoretical models widely used. This result confirms that for linear sources there are some important differences at short distances from the source and emphasizes that those theories should not be used for linear sources. The data provided in this study confirm the limitations of the mentioned theories when linear sources are used. Considering the difficulties and uncertainties associated with the experimental measurements, it is recommended to use the Monte Carlo data to assess the non-uniformity factors for linear sources in situations that require this knowledge.

  14. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Equivalent properties of single event burnout induced by different sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shi-Yu; Cao, Zhou; Da, Dao-An; Xue, Yu-Xiong

    2009-05-01

    The experimental results of single event burnout induced by heavy ions and 252Cf fission fragments in power MOSFET devices have been investigated. It is concluded that the characteristics of single event burnout induced by 252Cf fission fragments is consistent to that in heavy ions. The power MOSFET in the “turn-off" state is more susceptible to single event burnout than it is in the “turn-on" state. The thresholds of the drain-source voltage for single event burnout induced by 173 MeV bromine ions and 252Cf fission fragments are close to each other, and the burnout cross section is sensitive to variation of the drain-source voltage above the threshold of single event burnout. In addition, the current waveforms of single event burnouts induced by different sources are similar. Different power MOSFET devices may have different probabilities for the occurrence of single event burnout.

  15. Air kerma strength characterization of a GZP6 Cobalt-60 brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Taheri, Mojtaba; Layegh, Mohsen; Makhdoumi, Yasha; Meigooni, Ali Soleimani

    2010-01-01

    Background Task group number 40 (TG-40) of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) has recommended calibration of any brachytherapy source before its clinical use. GZP6 afterloading brachytherapy unit is a 60Co high dose rate (HDR) system recently being used in some of the Iranian radiotherapy centers. Aim In this study air kerma strength (AKS) of 60Co source number three of this unit was estimated by Monte Carlo simulation and in air measurements. Materials and methods Simulation was performed by employing the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo code. Self-absorption of the source core and its capsule were taken into account when calculating air kerma strength. In-air measurements were performed according to the multiple distance method; where a specially designed jig and a 0.6 cm3 Farmer type ionization chamber were used for the measurements. Monte Carlo simulation, in air measurement and GZP6 treatment planning results were compared for primary air kerma strength (as for November 8th 2005). Results Monte Carlo calculated and in air measured air kerma strength were respectively equal to 17240.01 μGym2 h−1 and 16991.83 μGym2 h−1. The value provided by the GZP6 treatment planning system (TPS) was “15355 μGym2 h−1”. Conclusion The calculated and measured AKS values are in good agreement. Calculated-TPS and measured-TPS AKS values are also in agreement within the uncertainties related to our calculation, measurements and those certified by the GZP6 manufacturer. Considering the uncertainties, the TPS value for AKS is validated by our calculations and measurements, however, it is incorporated with a large uncertainty. PMID:24376948

  16. Technical Note: EGSnrc-based dosimetric study of the BEBIG {sup 60}Co HDR brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Selvam, T. Palani; Bhola, Subhalaxmi

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to calculate two-dimensional (2D) dose rate distributions around the BEBIG (Eckert and Ziegler, BEBIG GmbH, Germany) models GK60M21 (old) and Co0.A86 (new) {sup 60}Co high dose rate brachytherapy sources in an unbounded liquid water phantom. The study includes calculation of absorbed dose to water-kerma ratio D/K around the BEBIG sources and a {sup 60}Co point source in water. A comparison is made with previously published data. Methods: The EGSnrcMP Monte Carlo code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose and water-kerma in water and air-kerma strength in vacuum. EGSnrcMP-based user codes such as EDKnrc, FLURZnrc, and DOSRZnrc are employed in the work. Results: The value of D/K reaches a maximum of 1.040{+-}0.002 for the {sup 60}Co point source (constant between 3.6 and 4.5 mm from the source) and 1.076{+-}0.002 for the BEBIG sources (constant between 2.6 and 3.2 mm along the transverse axis of the sources). Dose rate data for the new and old sources are comparable to published data for radial distances r>0.5 cm. Differences up to 9% are observed at points close to the source (r=0.25 cm). In addition for the new source, compared to previously published data, dose rate data are higher by 14% along the longitudinal axis where the source cable is connected. Dose rate differences on the longitudinal axis ({theta}=180 deg.) of this source are explained by varying the length of the simulated source cable. Conclusions: The 2D rectangular data set calculated in the present work could be considered for quality control on radiotherapy treatment planning systems.

  17. Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements of dosimetric parameters of the IRA-103Pd brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Raisali, Gholamreza; Hosseini, S Hamed; Shavar, Arzhang

    2008-04-01

    This article presents a brachytherapy source having 103Pd adsorbed onto a cylindrical silver rod that has been developed by the Agricultural, Medical, and Industrial Research School for permanent implant applications. Dosimetric characteristics (radial dose function, anisotropy function, and anisotropy factor) of this source were experimentally and theoretically determined in terms of the updated AAPM Task group 43 (TG-43U1) recommendations. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the dose rate constant. Measurements were performed using TLD-GR200A circular chip dosimeters using standard methods employing thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Perspex phantom. Precision machined bores in the phantom located the dosimeters and the source in a reproducible fixed geometry, providing for transverse-axis and angular dose profiles over a range of distances from 0.5 to 5 cm. The Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code, version 4C simulation techniques have been used to evaluate the dose-rate distributions around this model 103Pd source in water and Perspex phantoms. The Monte Carlo calculated dose rate constant of the IRA-103Pd source in water was found to be 0.678 cGy h(-1) U(-1) with an approximate uncertainty of +/-0.1%. The anisotropy function, F(r, theta), and the radial dose function, g(r), of the IRA- 103Pd source were also measured in a Perspex phantom and calculated in both Perspex and liquid water phantoms. PMID:18491522

  18. Air-kerma strength determination of a miniature x-ray source for brachytherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Stephen D.

    A miniature x-ray source has been developed by Xoft Inc. for high dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. The source is contained in a 5.4 mm diameter water-cooling catheter. The source voltage can be adjusted from 40 kV to 50 kV and the beam current is adjustable up to 300 muA. Electrons are accelerated toward a tungsten-coated anode to produce a lightly-filtered bremsstrahlung photon spectrum. The sources were initially used for early-stage breast cancer treatment using a balloon applicator. More recently, Xoft Inc. has developed vaginal and surface applicators. The miniature x-ray sources have been characterized using a modification of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 formalism normally used for radioactive brachytherapy sources. Primary measurements of air kerma were performed using free-air ionization chambers at the University of Wisconsin (UW) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The measurements at UW were used to calibrate a well-type ionization chamber for clinical verification of source strength. Accurate knowledge of the emitted photon spectrum was necessary to calculate the corrections required to determine air-kerma strength, defined in vacuo. Theoretical predictions of the photon spectrum were calculated using three separate Monte Carlo codes: MCNP5, EGSnrc, and PENELOPE. Each code used different implementations of the underlying radiological physics. Benchmark studies were performed to investigate these differences in detail. The most important variation among the codes was found to be the calculation of fluorescence photon production following electron-induced vacancies in the L shell of tungsten atoms. The low-energy tungsten L-shell fluorescence photons have little clinical significance at the treatment distance, but could have a large impact on air-kerma measurements. Calculated photon spectra were compared to spectra measured with high-purity germanium spectroscopy systems at both UW and

  19. Determination of air-kerma strength for the {sup 192}Ir GammaMedplus iX pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, A. D.; Pike, T. L.; Micka, J. A.; Fulkerson, R. K.; DeWerd, L. A.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy was originally proposed to combine the therapeutic advantages of high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Though uncommon in the United States, several facilities employ pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy in Europe and Canada. Currently, there is no air-kerma strength standard for PDR brachytherapy {sup 192}Ir sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Discrepancies in clinical measurements of the air-kerma strength of the PDR brachytherapy sources using HDR source-calibrated well chambers warrant further investigation.Methods: In this research, the air-kerma strength for an {sup 192}Ir PDR brachytherapy source was compared with the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory transfer standard well chambers, the seven-distance technique [B. E. Rasmussen et al., 'The air-kerma strength standard for 192Ir HDR sources,' Med. Phys. 38, 6721-6729 (2011)], and the manufacturer's stated value. Radiochromic film and Monte Carlo techniques were also employed for comparison to the results of the measurements.Results: While the measurements using the seven-distance technique were within + 0.44% from the manufacturer's determination, there was a + 3.10% difference between the transfer standard well chamber measurements and the manufacturer's stated value. Results showed that the PDR brachytherapy source has geometric and thus radiological qualities that exhibit behaviors similar to a point source model in contrast to a conventional line source model.Conclusions: The resulting effect of the pointlike characteristics of the PDR brachytherapy source likely account for the differences observed between well chamber and in-air measurements.

  20. Comparison Between High and Low Source Activity Seeds for I-125 Permanent Seed Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Masucci, Giuseppina Laura; Donath, David; Tetreault-Laflamme, Audrey; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Hervieux, Yannick; Larouche, Renee Xaviere; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Taussky, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To compare low (mean 0.44, SD {+-} 0.0163 mCi) with high source activity (0.61 {+-} 0.0178 mCi) in I{sup 125} permanent seed brachytherapy regarding seed loss, dosimetric outcome, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: The study included 199 patients with prostate cancer treated by permanent seed brachytherapy alone: the first 105 with seeds of lower activity (first cohort), the following 94 with higher seed activity (second cohort). The V100, V150, V200, and D90 were analyzed on the CT scan 30 days after implantation (CTD30). The V100, V150, and D2 of the rectum were also calculated on CTD30. Seed loss was determined 30 days after implantation. Urinary toxicity was measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Results: Lower seed activity was associated with lower V150 and V200 (p = 0.01 and p {<=} 0.001, respectively) on CTD30. More patients had a V100 <90% and D90 <140 Gy in the lower activity cohort (p = 0.098 for D90 and p = 0.029 for V100) on CTD30. There was no difference between cohorts in dose to the rectum (p = 0.325-0.516) or difference in patients' IPSS score from baseline (p = 0.0.117-0.618), although there was a trend toward more urinary toxicity at 4 and 8 months for high activity seeds. Seed loss as a percentage of implanted seeds was not different (p = 0.324). Conclusions: Higher seed activity (I{sup 125} {>=} 0.6 mCi) results in at least equal V100 and D90 on CTD30. However, dose inhomogeneity and a trend toward more urinary toxicity at 4 and 8 months after treatment may lead to a higher long-term urinary complications.

  1. Dosimetry of the {sup 198}Au source used in interstitial brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dauffy, Lucile S.; Braby, Leslie A.; Berner, Barry M.

    2005-06-15

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 reports, AAPM TG-43 and its update TG-43U1, provide an analytical model and a dosimetry protocol for brachytherapy dose calculations, as well as documentation and results for some sealed sources. The radionuclide {sup 198}Au (T{sub 1/2}=2.70 days, E{gamma}=412 keV) has been used in the form of seeds for brachytherapy treatments including brain, eye, and prostate tumors. However, TG-43 reports have no data for {sup 198}Au seeds, and none have previously been obtained. For that reason, and because of the conversion of most treatment planning systems to TG-43 based methods, both Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP 4C2) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are used in this work to determine these data. The geometric variation in dose is measured using an array of TLDs in a solid water phantom, and the seed activity is determined using a high purity germanium detector (HPGe) and a well ionization chamber. The results for air kerma strength, S{sub k}, per unit apparent activity, are 2.063 (MCNP) and 2.089 (measured) U mCi{sup -1}, values close to those published in 1991 in the AAPM Task Group 32 report. The dose rate constant, {lambda}, is found equal to 1.115 (MCNP) and 1.095 (measured) cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. The radial dose function, g(r), anisotropy function, F(r,{theta}), and anisotropy factor, {phi}{sub an}(r), are also given.

  2. Production, distribution and applications of californium-252 neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Martin, R C; Knauer, J B; Balo, P A

    2000-01-01

    The radioisotope 252Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-yr half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10(11) neutrons s(-1). Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, land mines and unexploded military ordinance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 yr of experience and by US Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells 252Cf to commercial reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed 252Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the US government and to universities for educational, research and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of 252Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations. PMID:11003521

  3. Dose errors in the near field of an HDR brachytherapy stepping source.

    PubMed

    Wong, T; Wallace, S; Fernando, W; Schumer, W; Quong, G

    1999-02-01

    The dose rate at point P at 0.25 cm in water from the transverse bisector of a straight catheter with an active stepping source (Nucletron microSelectron HDR source) with a dwell length of 2 cm was calculated using Monte Carlo code MCNP 4.A. The source step sizes were 1 cm and 0.25 cm. The Monte Carlo (MC) results were used for comparison with the results calculated with the Nucletron brachytherapy planning system (BPS) formalism, first with BPS variants and then with its respective MC calculated radial dose function and anisotropy function. The dose differences at point P calculated using the BPS formalism and variants are +15.4% and +3.1% for the source step size of 1 cm and 0.25 cm respectively. This reduction in dose difference is caused by the increased importance of errors in the anisotropy function with the smaller step size, which counter the errors in the radial dose function. Using the MC calculated radial dose function and anisotropy function with the BPS formalism. 1% dose calculation accuracy can be achieved, even in the near field, with negligible extra demand on computation time. PMID:10070787

  4. Effectiveness Evaluation of Skin Covers against Intravascular Brachytherapy Sources Using VARSKIN3 Code

    PubMed Central

    Baghani, H R; Nazempour, A R; Aghamiri, S M R; Hosseini Daghigh, S M; Mowlavi, A A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: The most common intravascular brachytherapy sources include 32P, 188Re, 106Rh and 90Sr/90Y. In this research, skin absorbed dose for different covering materials in dealing with these sources were evaluated and the best covering material for skin protection and reduction of absorbed dose by radiation staff was recognized and recommended. Method: Four materials including polyethylene, cotton and two different kinds of plastic were proposed as skin covers and skin absorbed dose at different depths for each kind of the materials was calculated separately using the VARSKIN3 code. Results: The results suggested that for all sources, skin absorbed dose was minimized when using polyethylene. Considering this material as skin cover, maximum and minimum doses at skin surface were related to 90Sr/90Y and 106Rh, respectively. Conclusion: polyethylene was found the most effective cover in reducing skin dose and protecting the skin. Furthermore, proper agreement between the results of VARSKIN3 and other experimental measurements indicated that VRASKIN3 is a powerful tool for skin dose calculations when working with beta emitter sources. Therefore, it can be utilized in dealing with the issue of radiation protection. PMID:25505758

  5. A Monte Carlo study on dose distribution evaluation of Flexisource 192Ir brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Majid; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Haghparast, Abbas; Zare, Naser; Ahmadi Moghaddas, Toktam

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to evaluate the dose distribution of the Flexisource 192Ir source. Background Dosimetric evaluation of brachytherapy sources is recommended by task group number 43 (TG. 43) of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Materials and methods MCNPX code was used to simulate Flexisource 192Ir source. Dose rate constant and radial dose function were obtained for water and soft tissue phantoms and compared with previous data on this source. Furthermore, dose rate along the transverse axis was obtained by simulation of the Flexisource and a point source and the obtained data were compared with those from Flexiplan treatment planning system (TPS). Results The values of dose rate constant obtained for water and soft tissue phantoms were equal to 1.108 and 1.106, respectively. The values of the radial dose function are listed in the form of tabulated data. The values of dose rate (cGy/s) obtained are shown in the form of tabulated data and figures. The maximum difference between TPS and Monte Carlo (MC) dose rate values was 11% in a water phantom at 6.0 cm from the source. Conclusion Based on dosimetric parameter comparisons with values previously published, the accuracy of our simulation of Flexisource 192Ir was verified. The results of dose rate constant and radial dose function in water and soft tissue phantoms were the same for Flexisource and point sources. For Flexisource 192Ir source, the results of TPS calculations in a water phantom were in agreement with the simulations within the calculation uncertainties. Furthermore, the results from the TPS calculation for Flexisource and MC calculation for a point source were practically equal within the calculation uncertainties. PMID:25949224

  6. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Santos, William S.; Gorski, Ronan; Perini, Ana P.; Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Orengo, Gilberto

    2014-11-01

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus.

  7. Monte Carlo modeling of 60Co HDR brachytherapy source in water and in different solid water phantom materials

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, S.; Selvam, T. Palani; Vishwakarma, R. S.; Chourasiya, G.

    2010-01-01

    The reference medium for brachytherapy dose measurements is water. Accuracy of dose measurements of brachytherapy sources is critically dependent on precise measurement of the source–detector distance. A solid phantom can be precisely machined and hence source–detector distances can be accurately determined. In the present study, four different solid phantom materials such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polystyrene, Solid Water, and RW1 are modeled using the Monte Carlo methods to investigate the influence of phantom material on dose rate distributions of the new model of BEBIG 60Co brachytherapy source. The calculated dose rate constant is 1.086 ± 0.06% cGy h−1 U−1 for water, PMMA, polystyrene, Solid Water, and RW1. The investigation suggests that the phantom materials RW1 and Solid Water represent water-equivalent up to 20 cm from the source. PMMA and polystyrene are water-equivalent up to 10 cm and 15 cm from the source, respectively, as the differences in the dose data obtained in these phantom materials are not significantly different from the corresponding data obtained in liquid water phantom. At a radial distance of 20 cm from the source, polystyrene overestimates the dose by 3% and PMMA underestimates it by about 8% when compared to the corresponding data obtained in water phantom. PMID:20177566

  8. Dosimetry revisited for the HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source model mHDR-v2

    SciTech Connect

    Granero, Domingo; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, the manufacturer of the HDR {sup 192}Ir mHDR-v2 brachytherapy source reported small design changes (referred to herein as mHDR-v2r) that are within the manufacturing tolerances but may alter the existing dosimetric data for this source. This study aimed to (1) check whether these changes affect the existing dosimetric data published for this source; (2) obtain new dosimetric data in close proximity to the source, including the contributions from {sup 192}Ir electrons and considering the absence of electronic equilibrium; and (3) obtain scatter dose components for collapsed cone treatment planning system implementation. Methods: Three different Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes were used: MCNP5, PENELOPE2008, and GEANT4. The source was centrally positioned in a 40 cm radius water phantom. Absorbed dose and collision kerma were obtained using 0.1 mm (0.5 mm) thick voxels to provide high-resolution dosimetry near (far from) the source. Dose-rate distributions obtained with the three MC codes were compared. Results: Simulations of mHDR-v2 and mHDR-v2r designs performed with three radiation transport codes showed agreement typically within 0.2% for r{>=}0.25 cm. Dosimetric contributions from source electrons were significant for r<0.25 cm. The dose-rate constant and radial dose function were similar to those from previous MC studies of the mHDR-v2 design. The 2D anisotropy function also coincided with that of the mHDR-v2 design for r{>=}0.25 cm. Detailed results of dose distributions and scatter components are presented for the modified source design. Conclusions: Comparison of these results to prior MC studies showed agreement typically within 0.5% for r{>=}0.25 cm. If dosimetric data for r<0.25 cm are not needed, dosimetric results from the prior MC studies will be adequate.

  9. Comparison of Axxent-Xoft, 192Ir and 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy sources for image-guided brachytherapy treatment planning for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Packianathan, S; He, R; Yang, C C

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the dosimetric differences and similarities between treatment plans generated with Axxent-Xoft electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft-EBS), 192Ir and 60Co for tandem and ovoids (T&O) applicators. Methods: In this retrospective study, we replanned 10 patients previously treated with 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Prescription was 7 Gy × 4 fractions to Point A. For each original plan, we created two additional plans with Xoft-EBS and 60Co. The dose to each organ at risk (OAR) was evaluated in terms of V35% and V50%, the percentage volume receiving 35% and 50% of the prescription dose, respectively, and D2cc, highest dose to a 2 cm3 volume of an OAR. Results: There was no difference between plans generated by 192Ir and 60Co, but the plans generated using Xoft-EBS showed a reduction of up to 50% in V35%, V50% and D2cc. The volumes of the 200% and 150% isodose lines, however, were 74% and 34% greater than the comparable volumes generated with the 192Ir source. Point B dose was on average only 16% of the Point A dose for plans generated with Xoft-EBS compared with 30% for plans generated with 192Ir or 60Co. Conclusion: The Xoft-EBS can potentially replace either 192Ir or 60Co in T&O treatments. Xoft-EBS offers either better sparing of the OARs compared with 192Ir or 60Co or at least similar sparing. Xoft-EBS-generated plans had higher doses within the target volume than 192Ir- or 60Co-generated ones. Advances in knowledge: This work presents newer knowledge in dosimetric comparison between Xoft-EBS, 192Ir or 60Co sources for T&O implants. PMID:25996576

  10. Monte Carlo and experimental dosimetric study of the mHDR-v2 brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Chandola, Rakesh M; Tiwari, Samit; Kowar, Manoj K; Choudhary, Vivek

    2010-01-01

    The conventional treatment planning system (TPS) gives analytical calculations with ± 15 to 20% dose, which may lead to over exposure of critical organs or under dose of target. It is to obtain dose distribution parameters of nucletron high dose rate (HDR) microselectron v2 (mHDR-v2) 192 Ir brachytherapy source by experiment and by calculated study using Monte Carlo (MC) EGSnrc code, and to find the similarity between them, and with any past study. To validate data, another MC GEANT4 study done in this work on the same source is also presented. Different software of the computer e.g. paint, excel, etc are employed for preparation of figures and graphs. The measured study of the source was done using an in-air ionization chamber, water phantom, and measurement set-up, while the calculated study was done by modeling the set up of the measured study by using the MC EGSnrc and GEANT4. Mean and probability are used in calculation of average values, and calculation of the uncertainties in result and discussion. The measured and calculated values of dose rate constant, radial dose function, and 2D anisotropy function were found to be in agreement with each other as well as with published data. The results of this study can be used as input to TPS. PMID:21358074

  11. Anode optimization for miniature electronic brachytherapy X-ray sources using Monte Carlo and computational fluid dynamic codes.

    PubMed

    Khajeh, Masoud; Safigholi, Habib

    2016-03-01

    A miniature X-ray source has been optimized for electronic brachytherapy. The cooling fluid for this device is water. Unlike the radionuclide brachytherapy sources, this source is able to operate at variable voltages and currents to match the dose with the tumor depth. First, Monte Carlo (MC) optimization was performed on the tungsten target-buffer thickness layers versus energy such that the minimum X-ray attenuation occurred. Second optimization was done on the selection of the anode shape based on the Monte Carlo in water TG-43U1 anisotropy function. This optimization was carried out to get the dose anisotropy functions closer to unity at any angle from 0° to 170°. Three anode shapes including cylindrical, spherical, and conical were considered. Moreover, by Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) code the optimal target-buffer shape and different nozzle shapes for electronic brachytherapy were evaluated. The characterization criteria of the CFD were the minimum temperature on the anode shape, cooling water, and pressure loss from inlet to outlet. The optimal anode was conical in shape with a conical nozzle. Finally, the TG-43U1 parameters of the optimal source were compared with the literature. PMID:26966563

  12. Anode optimization for miniature electronic brachytherapy X-ray sources using Monte Carlo and computational fluid dynamic codes

    PubMed Central

    Khajeh, Masoud; Safigholi, Habib

    2015-01-01

    A miniature X-ray source has been optimized for electronic brachytherapy. The cooling fluid for this device is water. Unlike the radionuclide brachytherapy sources, this source is able to operate at variable voltages and currents to match the dose with the tumor depth. First, Monte Carlo (MC) optimization was performed on the tungsten target-buffer thickness layers versus energy such that the minimum X-ray attenuation occurred. Second optimization was done on the selection of the anode shape based on the Monte Carlo in water TG-43U1 anisotropy function. This optimization was carried out to get the dose anisotropy functions closer to unity at any angle from 0° to 170°. Three anode shapes including cylindrical, spherical, and conical were considered. Moreover, by Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) code the optimal target-buffer shape and different nozzle shapes for electronic brachytherapy were evaluated. The characterization criteria of the CFD were the minimum temperature on the anode shape, cooling water, and pressure loss from inlet to outlet. The optimal anode was conical in shape with a conical nozzle. Finally, the TG-43U1 parameters of the optimal source were compared with the literature. PMID:26966563

  13. Energy Differential Response of Cancer Cells for Low Dose Irradiation:Impact of Monoenergetic Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gueye, Paul; Prilepskiy, Yuriy; Keppel, Cynthia; Britten, R

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate the energy differential response of cancer cells under identical dose exposure to asses the relevancy of mono-energetic sources for Brachytherapy treatments. Method and Materials: An electron energy spectrum impinging on lived breast cancer cell lines (MDA321) was obtained by placing a 19.65 {micro}Ci {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y radioactive source in front of a non-uniform magnetic field constructed from two 5.08 x 5.0 cm x 2.54 cm neodimium ion permanent dipole magnets with a 1 cm separation gap. The cell lines were placed on the exit pole face of the magnet and were subsequently irradiated with different electron energies ranging from about 0.75 MeV to 1.85 MeV. The energy distribution was accurately measured with a scintillating fiber detector system that provided a 0.5% agreement with ICRU and a 5% energy resolution. The dosimetry was performed using a series of data acquired with a {sup 9}Sr/{sup 90}Y 4.5 mCi SIA-6 eye applicator, 6-21 MeV fixed energies from a Varian 2100 EX linac, EBT Gafchromic and Kodak ERT2 films, and an ion chamber detector. The accuracy of the dose rate obtained at different locations along and away from the magnet inside the cell containers was within 10.7%. Results: The cell lines were irradiated with a 0.5-4 Gy dose range. The data indicate a very strong differential energy response for electrons around 1 MeV (more lethal) compare to those with lesser or greater energy and a survival rate of at most 10% at very low dose (0.5-2 Gy). Conclusion: Mono-energetic Brachytherapy sources may provide a new pathway for radio-therapy treatment optimizations following a dedicated study showing very unusual high lethality in a specific energy window for MDA321 breast cancer cells.

  14. On the physical, spectral, and dosimetric characteristics of a new {sup 125}I brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Pirchio, Rosana; Galiano, Eduardo; Saravi, Margarita; Banchik, David; Munoz, Carlos

    2007-07-15

    A new {sup 125}I source under the name Braquibac{sup TM} has been developed in Argentina for interstitial brachytherapy applications. The aim of this work is to study the new seed's design and to calculate its dosimetric parameters. Radiographic and destructive tests were carried out on inactive seeds to determine the physical characteristics of the source. Values of g(r), {lambda}, F(r,{theta}), and {phi}{sub an}(r), were obtained in water and air by simulation using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code according to the methodology recommended in TG-43 and updated in TG-43U1. The dose rate constant was determined to be 0.937{+-}0.004 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} (overall statistical uncertainty {+-}2.7%). S{sub k} per unity activity was calculated to be 0.671{+-}0.003 cGy cm{sup 2} h{sup -1} mCi{sup -1} by simulation of the seed in dry air using point detectors. Spectroscopic studies for both the new and the Amersham model 6711 seed were performed using an HPGe planar detector. The emission spectra of both seeds proved to be very similar. The anisotropy of the total photon intensity in air was measured in planes containing the seed's short and long axes using the HPGe detector. The minimum photon intensity for the new seed was 31.14{+-}3.10% of the transverse intensity.

  15. Overview on the dosimetric uncertainty analysis for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources, in the light of the AAPM Task Group No 138 and GEC-ESTRO report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWerd, Larry A.; Venselaar, Jack L. M.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Stump, Kurt E.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2012-10-01

    In 2011, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) published a report pertaining to uncertainties in brachytherapy single-source dosimetry preceding clinical use. The International Organization for Standardization's Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement and Technical Note 1297 by the National Institute of Standards and Technology are taken as reference standards for uncertainty formalism. Uncertainties involved in measurements or Monte Carlo methods to estimate brachytherapy dose distributions are provided with discussion of the components intrinsic to the overall dosimetric assessment. The uncertainty propagation from the primary calibration standard through transfer to the clinic for air-kerma strength is given with uncertainties in each of the brachytherapy dosimetry parameters of the AAPM TG-43 dose-calculation formalism. For low-energy and high-energy brachytherapy sources of low dose-rate and high dose-rate, a combined dosimetric uncertainty <5% (k = 1) is estimated, which is consistent with prior literature estimates. Recommendations are provided for clinical medical physicists, dosimetry investigators, and manufacturers of brachytherapy sources and treatment planning systems. These recommendations reflect the guidance of the AAPM and GEC-ESTRO for their members, and may also be used as guidance to manufacturers and regulatory agencies in developing good manufacturing practices for conventional brachytherapy sources used in routine clinical treatments.

  16. Improved source path localisation in ring applicators and the clinical impact for gynecological brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Humer, Irene; Kirisits, Christian; Berger, Daniel; Trnková, Petra; Pötter, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The path of subsequent dwell positions of an afterloader source being moved through a ring applicator for cervix cancer brachytherapy deviates from an ideal circle and the position of marker wires. This can lead to deviations of several millimetres between real and assumed dwell positions for treatment planning with simplified source path models. The aim of this study was to test video- and autoradiography-based methods for source path determination, and to study the influence of dwell position accuracy on dose-volume histogram (DVH)-parameters. Material and methods Videos of the exact motion of the source wire through three different (r = 26, 30, 34 mm) computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR) compatible plastic ring applicators were recorded. Observed dwell positions covering the whole length of each applicators channel were used to adjust the circular source path model. The agreement of the true source positions derived from video analysis with those of the corrected circular source path was verified using autoradiography. The impact of an accurate source path definition on dose planning was analysed by simulating clinically relevant uncertainties in 10 clinical treatment plans. Results Depending on the ring size, source path diameters had to be increased by 0.5-1.0 mm in order to achieve acceptable maximum differences between observed and corrected dwell positions (1.3-2.0 mm). Autoradiography analysis showed a positional accuracy within ± 3 mm (extended standard deviation k = 2). For shifts of ± 2.5 mm for even all dwell positions, the systematic and random variation of the D2cm3 for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid was within 3%, while the impact on DVH uncertainties was much smaller for clinical target volume (CTV)HR and gross tumour volume (GTV). Conclusions It is strongly advised to verify the real source path for ring applicators during acceptance testing in order to assure accurate source path definition and dose planning. Autoradiography can

  17. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The goal of this work is to compare D{sub m,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D{sub w,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether applying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Methods: Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D{sub w,m} over D{sub m,m} are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using {sup 103}Pd) and prostate (using {sup 125}I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D{sub 90} values are compared for D{sub w,m} and D{sub m,m}. Results: (1) Differences (D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m}-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m} is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D{sub 90(w

  18. Correction factors for source strength determination in HDR brachytherapy using the in-phantom method.

    PubMed

    Ubrich, Frank; Wulff, Jörg; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Zink, Klemens

    2014-05-01

    For the purpose of clinical source strength determination for HDR brachytherapy sources, the German society for Medical Physics (DGMP) recommends in their report 13 the usage of a solid state phantom (Krieger-phantom) with a thimble ionization chamber. In this work, the calibration chain for the determination of the reference air-kerma rate Ka,100 and reference dose rate to waterDw,1 by ionization chamber measurement in the Krieger-phantom was modeled via Monte Carlo simulations. These calculations were used to determine global correction factors k(tot), which allows a user to directly convert the reading of an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water, into the desired quantity Ka,100 or Dw,1. The factor k(tot) was determined for four available (192)Ir sources and one (60)Co source with three different thimble ionization chambers. Finally, ionization chamber measurements on three μSelectron V2 HDR sources within the Krieger-phantom were performed and Ka,100 was determined according to three different methods: 1) using a calibration factor in terms of absorbed dose to water with the global correction factor [Formula: see text] according DGMP 13 2) using a global correction factor calculated via Monte Carlo 3) using a direct reference air-kerma rate calibration factor determined by the national metrology institute PTB. The comparison of Monte Carlo based [Formula: see text] with those from DGMP 13 showed that the DGMP data were systematically smaller by about 2-2.5%. The experimentally determined [Formula: see text] , based on the direct Ka,100 calibration were also systematically smaller by about 1.5%. Despite of these systematical deviations, the agreement of the different methods was in almost all cases within the 1σ level of confidence of the interval of their respective uncertainties in a Gaussian distribution. The application of Monte Carlo based [Formula: see text] for the determination of Ka,100 for three μSelectron V2 sources

  19. Investigations into the Optimization of Multi-Source Strength Brachytherapy Treatment Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Henderson; S. Yoo; B.R. Thomadsen

    2002-09-30

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of multi-strength and multi-specie radioactive sources in permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In order to fulfill the requirement for an optimal dose distribution, the prescribed dose should be delivered to the target in a nearly uniform dose distribution while simultaneously sparing sensitive structures. The treatment plan should use a small number of needles and sources while satisfying the treatment requirements. The hypothesis for the use of multi-strength and/or multi-specie sources is that a better treatment plan using fewer sources and needles could be obtained than by treatment plans using single-strength sources could reduce the overall number of sources used for treatment. We employ a recently developed greedy algorithm based on the adjoint concept as the optimization search engine. The algorithm utilizes and ''adjoint ratio'', which provides a means of ranking source positions, as the pseudo-objective function. It ha s been shown that the greedy algorithm can solve the optimization problem efficiently and arrives at a clinically acceptable solution in less than 10 seconds. Our study was inclusive, that is there was no combination of sources that clearly stood out from the others and could therefore be considered the preferred set of sources for treatment planning. Source strengths of 0.2 mCi (low), 0.4 mCi (medium), and 0.6 mCi (high) of {sup 125}I in four different combinations were used for the multi-strength source study. The combination of high- and medium-strength sources achieved a more uniform target dose distribution due to few source implants whereas the combination of low-and medium-strength sources achieved better sparing of sensitive tissues including that of the single-strength 0.4 mCi base case. {sup 125}I at 0.4 mCi and {sup 192}Ir at 0.12 mCi and 0.25 mCi source strengths were used for the multi-specie source study. This study also proved inconclusive , Treatment plans using a

  20. Evaluation of a Proposed Biodegradable 188Re Source for Brachytherapy Application: A Review of Dosimetric Parameters.

    PubMed

    Khorshidi, Abdollah; Ahmadinejad, Marjan; Hamed Hosseini, S

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate dosimetric characteristics based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a proposed beta emitter bioglass 188Re seed for internal radiotherapy applications. The bioactive glass seed has been developed using the sol-gel technique. The simulations were performed for the seed using MC radiation transport code to investigate the dosimetric factors recommended by the AAPM Task Group 60 (TG-60). Dose distributions due to the beta and photon radiation were predicted at different radial distances surrounding the source. The dose rate in water at the reference point was calculated to be 7.43 ± 0.5 cGy/h/μCi. The dosimetric factors consisting of the reference point dose rate, D(r0,θ0), the radial dose function, g(r), the 2-dimensional anisotropy function, F(r,θ), the 1-dimensional anisotropy function, φan(r), and the R90 quantity were estimated and compared with several available beta-emitting sources. The element 188Re incorporated in bioactive glasses produced by the sol-gel technique provides a suitable solution for producing new materials for seed implants applied to brachytherapy applications in prostate and liver cancers treatment. Dose distribution of 188Re seed was greater isotropic than other commercially attainable encapsulated seeds, since it has no end weld to attenuate radiation. The beta radiation-emitting 188Re source provides high doses of local radiation to the tumor tissue and the short range of the beta particles limit damage to the adjacent normal tissue. PMID:26181543

  1. Evaluation of a Proposed Biodegradable 188Re Source for Brachytherapy Application

    PubMed Central

    Khorshidi, Abdollah; Ahmadinejad, Marjan; Hamed Hosseini, S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate dosimetric characteristics based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a proposed beta emitter bioglass 188Re seed for internal radiotherapy applications. The bioactive glass seed has been developed using the sol-gel technique. The simulations were performed for the seed using MC radiation transport code to investigate the dosimetric factors recommended by the AAPM Task Group 60 (TG-60). Dose distributions due to the beta and photon radiation were predicted at different radial distances surrounding the source. The dose rate in water at the reference point was calculated to be 7.43 ± 0.5 cGy/h/μCi. The dosimetric factors consisting of the reference point dose rate, D(r0,θ0), the radial dose function, g(r), the 2-dimensional anisotropy function, F(r,θ), the 1-dimensional anisotropy function, φan(r), and the R90 quantity were estimated and compared with several available beta-emitting sources. The element 188Re incorporated in bioactive glasses produced by the sol-gel technique provides a suitable solution for producing new materials for seed implants applied to brachytherapy applications in prostate and liver cancers treatment. Dose distribution of 188Re seed was greater isotropic than other commercially attainable encapsulated seeds, since it has no end weld to attenuate radiation. The beta radiation-emitting 188Re source provides high doses of local radiation to the tumor tissue and the short range of the beta particles limit damage to the adjacent normal tissue. PMID:26181543

  2. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tornero-López, Ana M.; Guirado, Damián; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Simancas, Fernando; Lallena, Antonio M.; Gazdic-Santic, Maja

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of {sup 125}I seeds.Methods: Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for {sup 125}I selectSeed{sup TM} brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level.Results: Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber.Conclusions: Variations of the altitude and

  3. Brachytherapy of recurrent malignant brain tumors with removable high-activity iodine-125 sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gutin, P.H.; Phillips, T.L.; Wara, W.M.; Leibel, S.A.; Hosobuchi, Y.; Levin, V.A.; Weaver, K.A.; Lamb, S.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-seven patients harboring recurrent malignant primary or metastatic brain tumors were treated by 40 implantations of high-activity iodine-125 (/sup 125/I) sources. All patients had been treated with irradiation and most had been treated with chemotherapeutic agents, primarily nitrosoureas. Implantations were performed using computerized tomography (CT)-directed stereotaxy; /sup 125/I sources were held in one or more afterloaded catheters that were removed after the desired dose (minimum tumor dose of 3000 to 12,000 rads) had been delivered. Patients were followed with sequential neurological examinations and CT scans. Results of 34 implantation procedures were evaluable: 18 produced documented tumor regression (response) for 4 to 13+ months; five, performed in deteriorating patients, resulted in disease stability for 4 to 12 months. The overall response rate was 68%. In 11 patients, implantation did not halt clinical deterioration. At exploratory craniotomy 5 to 12 months after implantation, focal radiation necrosis was documented in two patients whose tumor had responded initially and then progressed, and in three patients whose disease had progressed initially (four glioblastomas, one anaplastic astrocytoma); histologically identifiable tumor was documented in two of these patients. All improved after resection of the focal necrotic mass and are still alive 10, 15, 19, 24, and 25 months after the initial implantation procedure; only one patient has evidence of tumor regrowth. The median follow-up period after implantation for the malignant glioma (anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme) group is 9 months, with 48% of patients still surviving. While direct comparison with the results of chemotherapy is difficult, results obtained in this patient group with interstitial brachytherapy are probably superior to results obtained with chemotherapy.

  4. Estimation of distance error by fuzzy set theory required for strength determination of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sudhir; Datta, D.; Sharma, S. D.; Chourasiya, G.; Babu, D. A. R.; Sharma, D. N.

    2014-01-01

    Verification of the strength of high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of institutional quality assurance program. Either reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) or air-kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma-emitting brachytherapy sources. The use of Farmer-type cylindrical ionization chamber of sensitive volume 0.6 cm3 is one of the recommended methods for measuring RAKR of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources. While using the cylindrical chamber method, it is required to determine the positioning error of the ionization chamber with respect to the source which is called the distance error. An attempt has been made to apply the fuzzy set theory to estimate the subjective uncertainty associated with the distance error. A simplified approach of applying this fuzzy set theory has been proposed in the quantification of uncertainty associated with the distance error. In order to express the uncertainty in the framework of fuzzy sets, the uncertainty index was estimated and was found to be within 2.5%, which further indicates that the possibility of error in measuring such distance may be of this order. It is observed that the relative distance li estimated by analytical method and fuzzy set theoretic approach are consistent with each other. The crisp values of li estimated using analytical method lie within the bounds computed using fuzzy set theory. This indicates that li values estimated using analytical methods are within 2.5% uncertainty. This value of uncertainty in distance measurement should be incorporated in the uncertainty budget, while estimating the expanded uncertainty in HDR 192Ir source strength measurement. PMID:24872605

  5. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part II. High dose rate {sup 192}Ir sources

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, Regina K. Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper discussed the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources. Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the {sup 192}Ir sources were completed with several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose measurements of the surface dose distributions and characteristic depth dose curves were completed in-phantom. Results: Theoretical dose distributions and depth dose curves were generated for each applicator and agreed well with the measured values. A method of output verification was created that allows users to determine the applicator-specific dose to water at the treatment surface based on a

  6. Characterization of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources and kilovoltage x-ray beams using spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moga, Jacqueline D.

    Low-energy photon sources are used in therapeutic radiation oncology for brachytherapy with low dose-rate (LDR) sources and for superficial and orthovoltage therapy with kilovolt-age x-ray beams. Current dosimetry methods for these sources utilize energy-integrating devices, such as thermoluminescent dosimeters and ionization chambers. This thesis work investigates the dosimetry of LDR brachytherapy sources and kilovoltage x-ray beams using spectrometry, which preserves the energy-specific source output. Several LDR brachytherapy source models were measured with a reverse-electrode germanium (REGe) detector. The measured spectra were corrected for MCNP5-calculated detector response using a deconvolution algorithm (Beach, 2005). The peak areas determined from the corrected spectra were used to calculate the dose-rate constant (Chen and Nath, 2001) and the air-kerma strength. Dose-rate constant results agreed well with the published values (Rivard et al., 2004; Chen and Nath, 2007). Air-kerma strength results were systematically 2%--5% low compared to calibration values and primary air-kerma strength measurements. The spectrometry methods for LDR brachytherapy sources offer a promising alternative to existing experimental techniques, but further work is necessary to improve agreement with the current air-kerma strength standard methodology. Spectra of 20kVp---250kVp x-ray beams were measured with a low-energy germanium detector (LEGe). The LEGe spectrometry system was modeled in MCNP5 to calculate a detector response function. Backward stripping, which showed less variability than deconvolution, was used for correcting the measured x-ray spectra. The corrected experimental spectra were compared to spectra from: (1) Monte Carlo simulations of the full x-ray tube with EGSnrc, (2) the SpekCalc program (Poludniowski et al., 2009), and (3) the Gesellschaft fur Strahlen-und Umweltforschung mbH Munchen (GSF) Report 560. Agreement was best for the UW60-M through UW150-M

  7. Californium-252 Brachytherapy Combined With External-Beam Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer: Long-Term Treatment Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Xin; Qian Chengyuan; Qing Yi; Zhao Kewei; Yang Zhengzhou; Dai Nan; Zhong Zhaoyang; Tang Cheng; Li Zheng; Gu Xianqing; Zhou Qian; Feng Yan; Xiong Yanli; Shan Jinlu; Wang Dong

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To observe, by retrospective analysis, the curative effects and complications due to californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) neutron intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 1999 to December 2007, 696 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB to IIIB) were treated with {sup 252}Cf-ICBT in combination of EBRT. Of all, 31 patients were at Stage IB, 104 at IIA, 363 at IIB, 64 at IIIA, and 134 at IIIB. Californium-252 ICBT was delivered at 7-12 Gy per insertion per week, with a total dose of 29-45 Gy to reference point A in three to five insertions. The whole pelvic cavity was treated with 8-MV X-ray external irradiation at 2 Gy per fraction, four times per week. After 16-38 Gy of external irradiation, the center of the whole pelvic field was blocked with a 4-cm-wide lead shield, with a total external irradiation dose of 44-56 Gy. The total treatment course was 5 to 6 weeks. Results: Overall survival rate at 3 and 5 years for all patients was 76.0% and 64.9%, respectively. Disease-free 3- and 5-year survival rates of patients were 71.2% and 58.4%, respectively. Late complications included vaginal contracture and adhesion, radiation proctitis, radiation cystitis, and inflammatory bowel, which accounted for 5.8%, 7.1%, 6.2%, and 4.9%, respectively. Univariate analysis results showed significant correlation of stage, age, histopathologic grade, and lymph node status with overall survival. Cox multiple regression analysis showed that the independent variables were stage, histopathologic grade, tumor size, and lymphatic metastasis in all patients. Conclusion: Results of this series suggest that the combined use of {sup 252}Cf-ICBT with EBRT is an effective method for treatment of cervical cancer.

  8. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... MATERIAL General Technical Requirements § 35.67 Requirements for possession of sealed sources and... accordance with the requirements in parts 20 and 30 of this chapter; and (2) File a report within 5 days...

  9. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... MATERIAL General Technical Requirements § 35.67 Requirements for possession of sealed sources and... accordance with the requirements in parts 20 and 30 of this chapter; and (2) File a report within 5 days...

  10. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... MATERIAL General Technical Requirements § 35.67 Requirements for possession of sealed sources and... accordance with the requirements in parts 20 and 30 of this chapter; and (2) File a report within 5 days...

  11. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... MATERIAL General Technical Requirements § 35.67 Requirements for possession of sealed sources and... accordance with the requirements in parts 20 and 30 of this chapter; and (2) File a report within 5 days...

  12. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... MATERIAL General Technical Requirements § 35.67 Requirements for possession of sealed sources and... accordance with the requirements in parts 20 and 30 of this chapter; and (2) File a report within 5 days...

  13. Comparison of TG-43 and TG-186 in breast irradiation using a low energy electronic brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    White, Shane A.; Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The recently updated guidelines for dosimetry in brachytherapy in TG-186 have recommended the use of model-based dosimetry calculations as a replacement for TG-43. TG-186 highlights shortcomings in the water-based approach in TG-43, particularly for low energy brachytherapy sources. The Xoft Axxent is a low energy (<50 kV) brachytherapy system used in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Breast tissue is a heterogeneous tissue in terms of density and composition. Dosimetric calculations of seven APBI patients treated with Axxent were made using a model-based Monte Carlo platform for a number of tissue models and dose reporting methods and compared to TG-43 based plans. Methods: A model of the Axxent source, the S700, was created and validated against experimental data. CT scans of the patients were used to create realistic multi-tissue/heterogeneous models with breast tissue segmented using a published technique. Alternative water models were used to isolate the influence of tissue heterogeneity and backscatter on the dose distribution. Dose calculations were performed using Geant4 according to the original treatment parameters. The effect of the Axxent balloon applicator used in APBI which could not be modeled in the CT-based model, was modeled using a novel technique that utilizes CAD-based geometries. These techniques were validated experimentally. Results were calculated using two dose reporting methods, dose to water (D{sub w,m}) and dose to medium (D{sub m,m}), for the heterogeneous simulations. All results were compared against TG-43-based dose distributions and evaluated using dose ratio maps and DVH metrics. Changes in skin and PTV dose were highlighted. Results: All simulated heterogeneous models showed a reduced dose to the DVH metrics that is dependent on the method of dose reporting and patient geometry. Based on a prescription dose of 34 Gy, the average D{sub 90} to PTV was reduced by between ∼4% and ∼40%, depending on the

  14. Dosimetric characterization of surface applicators for use with high dose rate Iridium-192 and electronic brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulkerson, Regina Kennedy

    Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate 192Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Although use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. This thesis work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with high dose rate 192Ir and electronic brachytherapy sources. Air-kerma rate measurements were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose measurements of the surface dose distributions and characteristic depth dose curves were completed in-phantom and in-water. Theoretical dose distributions and depth dose curves were

  15. Unconventional neutron sources for oil well logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankle, C. M.; Dale, G. E.

    2013-09-01

    Americium-Beryllium (AmBe) radiological neutron sources have been widely used in the petroleum industry for well logging purposes. There is strong desire on the part of various governmental and regulatory bodies to find alternate sources due to the high activity and small size of AmBe sources. Other neutron sources are available, both radiological (252Cf) and electronic accelerator driven (D-D and D-T). All of these, however, have substantially different neutron energy spectra from AmBe and thus cause significantly different responses in well logging tools. We report on simulations performed using unconventional sources and techniques to attempt to better replicate the porosity and carbon/oxygen ratio responses a well logging tool would see from AmBe neutrons. The AmBe response of these two types of tools is compared to the response from 252Cf, D-D, D-T, filtered D-T, and T-T sources.

  16. Measurement of uranium and plutonium in solid waste by passive photon or neutron counting and isotopic neutron source interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, T.W.

    1980-03-01

    A summary of the status and applicability of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques for the measurement of uranium and plutonium in 55-gal barrels of solid waste is reported. The NDA techniques reviewed include passive gamma-ray and x-ray counting with scintillator, solid state, and proportional gas photon detectors, passive neutron counting, and active neutron interrogation with neutron and gamma-ray counting. The active neutron interrogation methods are limited to those employing isotopic neutron sources. Three generic neutron sources (alpha-n, photoneutron, and /sup 252/Cf) are considered. The neutron detectors reviewed for both prompt and delayed fission neutron detection with the above sources include thermal (/sup 3/He, /sup 10/BF/sub 3/) and recoil (/sup 4/He, CH/sub 4/) proportional gas detectors and liquid and plastic scintillator detectors. The instrument found to be best suited for low-level measurements (< 10 nCi/g) is the /sup 252/Cf Shuffler. The measurement technique consists of passive neutron counting followed by cyclic activation using a /sup 252/Cf source and delayed neutron counting with the source withdrawn. It is recommended that a waste assay station composed of a /sup 252/Cf Shuffler, a gamma-ray scanner, and a screening station be tested and evaluated at a nuclear waste site. 34 figures, 15 tables.

  17. Comparison of TG-43 dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources obtained by three different versions of MCNP codes.

    PubMed

    Zaker, Neda; Zehtabian, Mehdi; Sina, Sedigheh; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely used for calculation of the dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources. MCNP4C2, MCNP5, MCNPX, EGS4, EGSnrc, PTRAN, and GEANT4 are among the most commonly used codes in this field. Each of these codes utilizes a cross-sectional library for the purpose of simulating different elements and materials with complex chemical compositions. The accuracies of the final outcomes of these simulations are very sensitive to the accuracies of the cross-sectional libraries. Several investigators have shown that inaccuracies of some of the cross section files have led to errors in 125I and 103Pd parameters. The purpose of this study is to compare the dosimetric parameters of sample brachytherapy sources, calculated with three different versions of the MCNP code - MCNP4C, MCNP5, and MCNPX. In these simulations for each source type, the source and phantom geometries, as well as the number of the photons, were kept identical, thus eliminating the possible uncertainties. The results of these investigations indicate that for low-energy sources such as 125I and 103Pd there are discrepancies in gL(r) values. Discrepancies up to 21.7% and 28% are observed between MCNP4C and other codes at a distance of 6 cm for 103Pd and 10 cm for 125I from the source, respectively. However, for higher energy sources, the discrepancies in gL(r) values are less than 1.1% for 192Ir and less than 1.2% for 137Cs between the three codes. PMID:27074460

  18. Monte Carlo calculated TG-60 dosimetry parameters for the {beta}{sup -} emitter {sup 153}Sm brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Taghdiri, Fatemeh; Hamed Hosseini, S.; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The formalism recommended by Task Group 60 (TG-60) of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is applicable for {beta} sources. Radioactive biocompatible and biodegradable {sup 153}Sm glass seed without encapsulation is a {beta}{sup -} emitter radionuclide with a short half-life and delivers a high dose rate to the tumor in the millimeter range. This study presents the results of Monte Carlo calculations of the dosimetric parameters for the {sup 153}Sm brachytherapy source. Methods: Version 5 of the (MCNP) Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to calculate two-dimensional dose distributions around the source. The dosimetric parameters of AAPM TG-60 recommendations including the reference dose rate, the radial dose function, the anisotropy function, and the one-dimensional anisotropy function were obtained. Results: The dose rate value at the reference point was estimated to be 9.21{+-}0.6 cGy h{sup -1} {mu}Ci{sup -1}. Due to the low energy beta emitted from {sup 153}Sm sources, the dose fall-off profile is sharper than the other beta emitter sources. The calculated dosimetric parameters in this study are compared to several beta and photon emitting seeds. Conclusions: The results show the advantage of the {sup 153}Sm source in comparison with the other sources because of the rapid dose fall-off of beta ray and high dose rate at the short distances of the seed. The results would be helpful in the development of the radioactive implants using {sup 153}Sm seeds for the brachytherapy treatment.

  19. Dosimetric prerequisites for routine clinical use of photon emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 kev

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zuofeng; Das, Rupak K.; De Werd, Larry A.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Rivard, Mark J.; Sloboda, Ronald S.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2007-01-15

    This paper presents the recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) on the dosimetric parameters to be characterized, and dosimetric studies to be performed to obtain them, for brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV that are intended for routine clinical use. In addition, this document makes recommendations on procedures to be used to maintain vendor source strength calibration accuracy. These recommendations reflect the guidance of the AAPM and the ESTRO for its members, and may also be used as guidance to vendors and regulatory agencies in developing good manufacturing practices for sources used in routine clinical treatments.

  20. A comparison of the relative biological effectiveness of low energy electronic brachytherapy sources in breast tissue: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Shane A.; Reniers, Brigitte; de Jong, Evelyn E. C.; Rusch, Thomas; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Electronic brachytherapy sources use low energy photons to treat the tumor bed during or after breast-conserving surgery. The relative biological effectiveness of two electronic brachytherapy sources was explored to determine if spectral differences due to source design influenced radiation quality and if radiation quality decreased with distance in the breast. The RBE was calculated through the number of DNA double strand breaks (RBEDSB) using the Monte Carlo damage simulator (MCDS) in combination with other Monte Carlo electron/photon spectrum calculations. 50kVp photons from the Intrabeam (Carl Zeiss Surgical) and Axxent (Xoft) through 40-mm spherical applicators were simulated to account for applicator and tissue attenuation in a variety of breast tissue compositions. 40kVp Axxent photons were also simulated. Secondary electrons (known to be responsible for most DNA damage) spectra at different distance were inputted into MCDS to calculate the RBEDSB. All RBEDSB used a cobalt-60 reference. RBEDSB data was combined with corresponding average photon spectrum energy for the Axxent and applied to model-based average photon energy distributions to produce an RBEDSB map of an accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) patient. Both Axxent and Intrabeam 50kVp spectra were shown to have a comparable RBEDSB of between 1.4 and 1.6 at all distances in spite of progressive beam hardening. The Axxent 40kVp also demonstrated a similar RBEDSB at distances. Most RBEDSB variability was dependent on the tissue type as was seen in rib (RBEDSB  ≈  1.4), gland (≈1.55), adipose (≈1.59), skin (≈1.52) and lung (≈1.50). RBEDSB variability between both sources was within 2%. A correlation was shown between RBEDSB and average photon energy and used to produce an RBEDSB map of a dose distribution in an APBI patient dataset. Radiation quality is very similar between electronic brachytherapy sources studied. No significant reductions in RBEDSB were observed with

  1. New 125I brachytherapy source IsoSeed I25.S17plus: Monte Carlo dosimetry simulation and comparison to sources of similar design

    PubMed Central

    Pantelis, Evaggelos; Anagnostopoulos, Giorgos; Baltas, Dimos

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relative dose rate distribution around the new 125I brachytherapy source IsoSeed I25.S17plus and report results in a form suitable for clinical use. Results for the new source are also compared to corresponding results for other commercially available 125I sources of similar design. Material and methods Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the MCNP5 v.1.6 general purpose code. The model of the new source was prepared from information provided by the manufacturer and verified by imaging a sample of ten non-radioactive sources. Corresponding simulations were also performed for the 6711 125I brachytherapy source, using updated geometric information presented recently in the literature. The uncertainty of the dose distribution around the new source, as well as the dosimetric quantities derived from it according to the Task Group 43 formalism, were determined from the standard error of the mean of simulations for a sample of fifty source models. These source models were prepared by randomly selecting values of geometric parameters from uniform distributions defined by manufacturer stated tolerances. Results and Conclusions Results are presented in the form of the quantities defined in the update of the Task Group 43 report, as well as a relative dose rate table in Cartesian coordinates. The dose rate distribution of the new source is comparable to that of sources of similar design (IsoSeed I25.S17, Oncoseed 6711, SelectSeed 130.002, Advantage IAI-125A, I-Seed AgX100, Thinseed 9011). Noticeable differences were observed only for the IsoSeed I25.S06 and Best 2301 sources. PMID:24474975

  2. Absolute depth-dose-rate measurements for an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source in water using MOSFET detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zilio, Valery Olivier; Joneja, Om Parkash; Popowski, Youri; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Chawla, Rakesh

    2006-06-15

    Reported MOSFET measurements concern mostly external radiotherapy and in vivo dosimetry. In this paper, we apply the technique for absolute dosimetry in the context of HDR brachytherapy using an {sup 192}Ir source. Measured radial dose rate distributions in water for different planes perpendicular to the source axis are presented and special attention is paid to the calibration of the R and K type detectors, and to the determination of appropriate correction factors for the sensitivity variation with the increase of the threshold voltage and the energy dependence. The experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulated dose rate distributions. The experimental results show a good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations: the discrepancy between experimental and Monte Carlo results being within 5% for 82% of the points and within 10% for 95% of the points. Moreover, all points except two are found to lie within the experimental uncertainties, confirming thereby the quality of the results obtained.

  3. Dosimetric comparison of four new design {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources: Optimal design using silver and copper rod cores

    SciTech Connect

    Hosseini, S. Hamed; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Ataeinia, Vahideh

    2009-07-15

    Four new brachytherapy sources, IRA1-{sup 103}Pd, IRA2-{sup 103}Pd, IRA3-{sup 103}Pd, and IRA4-{sup 103}Pd, have been developed at Agricultural, Medical, and Industrial Research School and are designed for permanent implant application. With the goal of determining an optimal design for a {sup 103}Pd source, this article compares the dosimetric properties of these sources with reference to the authors' earlier IRA-{sup 103}Pd source. The four new sources differ in end cap configuration and thickness and in the core material, silver or copper, that carries the adsorbed {sup 103}Pd. Dosimetric data derived from the authors' Monte Carlo simulation results are reported in accordance with the updated AAPM Task Group No. 43 report (TG-43U1). For each source, the authors obtained detailed results for the dose rate constant {Lambda}, the radial dose function g(r), the anisotropy function F(r,{theta}), and the anisotropy factor {phi}{sub an}(r). In this study, the optimal source IRA3-{sup 103}Pd provides the most isotropic dose distribution in water with the dose rate constant of 0.678({+-}0.1%) cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. The IRA3-{sup 103}Pd design has a silver rod core combined with thin-wall, concave end caps. Finally, the authors compared the results for their optimal source with published results for those of other source manufacturers.

  4. High-resolution gel dosimetry of a HDR brachytherapy source using normoxic polymer gel dosimeters: Preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, C.; McLucas, C.; Pedrazzini, G.; Baldock, C.

    2006-09-01

    Polymer gel dosimetry has been shown to be an effective tool in the analysis of radiotherapy treatments in cancer therapy, being used to map the dose distribution around an irradiation pattern of a polymer gel dosimeter. Combined with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), polymer gel dosimetry can be an effective dosimetry tool to map dose distributions with high spatial resolution (˜100 μm). Previously polyacrylamide polymer gel dosimetry required a strict hypoxic environment to protect the gel from oxygen infiltration as oxygen inhibits the polymerization reaction used to correlate to absorbed dose. However, with the advent of normoxic polymer gels, a strict hypoxic environment is not required. Normoxic polymer gel dosimeters can be manufactured under normal atmospheric conditions. This study assessed the use of a MAGIC normoxic polymer gel dosimeter to accurately map the dose distribution of a single-line irradiation and a point source irradiation from a brachytherapy radiation source administered through a nylon catheter inserted into the gel dosimeter. The phantoms were irradiated to a dose of 10 Gy at 2 mm from the source center and imaged using high-resolution MRI with an in-plane pixel size of 0.1055 mm/pixel. Good agreement was found between the dose points predicted by the computer treatment-planning system and the measured normalized dose profiles in the gel dosimeter. The use of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters with high-resolution MRI evaluation shows promise as an effective tool in applications requiring accurate dose distributions in high resolution, such as intravascular brachytherapy.

  5. An analytic approach to the dosimetry of a new BEBIG 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Bhola, Subhalaxmi; Selvam, T. Palani; Sridhar, Sahoo; Vishwakarma, Ramkrishna S.

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple analytic tool for calculating the dose rate distribution in water for a new BEBIG high-dose-rate (HDR) 60Co brachytherapy source. In the analytic tool, we consider the active source as a point located at the geometric center of the 60Co material. The influence of the activity distribution in the active volume of the source is taken into account separately by use of the line source-based geometric function. The exponential attenuation of primary 60Co photons by the source materials (60Co and stainless-steel) is included in the model. The model utilizes the point-source-based function, f(r) that represents the combined effect of the exponential attenuation and scattered photons in water. We derived this function by using the published radial dose function for a point 60Co source in an unbounded water medium of radius 50 cm. The attenuation coefficients for 60Co and the stainless-steel encapsulation materials are deduced as best-fit parameters that minimize the different PMID:22973079

  6. Physics-aspects of dose accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: source dosimetry, treatment planning, equipment performance and in vivo verification techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, David; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a review of recent publications on the physics-aspects of dosimetric accuracy in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The discussion of accuracy is primarily concerned with uncertainties, but methods to improve dose conformation to the prescribed intended dose distribution are also noted. The main aim of the paper is to review current practical techniques and methods employed for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry. This includes work on the determination of dose rate fields around brachytherapy sources, the capability of treatment planning systems, the performance of treatment units and methods to verify dose delivery. This work highlights the determinants of accuracy in HDR dosimetry and treatment delivery and presents a selection of papers, focusing on articles from the last five years, to reflect active areas of research and development. Apart from Monte Carlo modelling of source dosimetry, there is no clear consensus on the optimum techniques to be used to assure dosimetric accuracy through all the processes involved in HDR brachytherapy treatment. With the exception of the ESTRO mailed dosimetry service, there is little dosimetric audit activity reported in the literature, when compared with external beam radiotherapy verification. PMID:23349649

  7. Evaluation of Wall Correction Factor of INER's Air-Kerma Primary Standard Chamber and Dose Variation by Source Displacement for HDR 192Ir Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. H.; Wang, J. N.; Huang, T. T.; Su, S. H.; Chang, B. J.; Su, C. H.; Hsu, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the 192Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA) and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK) for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR 192Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity. PMID:24222907

  8. Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements of dosimetric parameters of the IRA-{sup 103}Pd brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Raisali, Gholamreza; Hosseini, S. Hamed; Shavar, Arzhang

    2008-04-15

    This article presents a brachytherapy source having {sup 103}Pd adsorbed onto a cylindrical silver rod that has been developed by the Agricultural, Medical, and Industrial Research School for permanent implant applications. Dosimetric characteristics (radial dose function, anisotropy function, and anisotropy factor) of this source were experimentally and theoretically determined in terms of the updated AAPM Task group 43 (TG-43U1) recommendations. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the dose rate constant. Measurements were performed using TLD-GR200A circular chip dosimeters using standard methods employing thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Perspex phantom. Precision machined bores in the phantom located the dosimeters and the source in a reproducible fixed geometry, providing for transverse-axis and angular dose profiles over a range of distances from 0.5 to 5 cm. The Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code, version 4C simulation techniques have been used to evaluate the dose-rate distributions around this model {sup 103}Pd source in water and Perspex phantoms. The Monte Carlo calculated dose rate constant of the IRA-{sup 103}Pd source in water was found to be 0.678 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} with an approximate uncertainty of {+-}0.1%. The anisotropy function, F(r,{theta}), and the radial dose function, g(r), of the IRA-{sup 103}Pd source were also measured in a Perspex phantom and calculated in both Perspex and liquid water phantoms.

  9. Experimental measurements and Monte Carlo calculations of dosimetric parameters of the IRA1-103Pd brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Hosseini, S Hamed; Raisali, Gholamreza

    2008-10-01

    This work presents a brachytherapy source having (103)Pd adsorbed onto a cylindrical silver rod that has been developed by Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School for permanent implant applications. Dosimetric characteristics (dose-rate constant, radial dose function, anisotropy function and anisotropy factor) of this source were experimentally and theoretically determined in terms of the updated AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43U1) recommendations. Measurements were performed using TLD-GR200A circular chip dosimeters using standard methods employing thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Perspex phantom. Precision machined bores in the phantom located dosimeters and source in a reproducible fixed geometry providing for transverse-axis and angular dose profiles over a range of distances from 0.5 to 5 cm. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code, version 4C was used to evaluate the dose-rate distributions around this model (103)Pd source in water and Perspex phantoms. The Monte Carlo calculated dose-rate constant of the IRA1-(103)Pd source in water was found equal to Lambda=0.669 cGy/h/U with approximate uncertainties of +/-0.1%. The anisotropy function, F(r, theta), and the radial dose function, g(L)(r), of the IRA1-(103)Pd source were also measured in Perspex phantom and calculated in both Perspex and liquid water phantom. PMID:18387806

  10. Limitations of current dosimetry for intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation with high dose rate iridium-192 and electronic brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffi, Julie A.

    Intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a method of treating early stage breast cancer using a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy source positioned within the lumpectomy cavity. An expandable applicator stretches the surrounding tissue into a roughly spherical or elliptical shape and the dose is prescribed to 1 cm beyond the edge of the cavity. Currently, dosimetry for these treatments is most often performed using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism. The TG-43 dose-rate equation determines the dose delivered to a homogeneous water medium by scaling the measured source strength with standardized parameters that describe the radial and angular features of the dose distribution. Since TG-43 parameters for each source model are measured or calculated in a homogeneous water medium, the dosimetric effects of the patient's dimensions and composition are not accounted for. Therefore, the accuracy of TG-43 calculations for intracavitary APBI is limited by the presence of inhomogeneities in and around the target volume. Specifically, the breast is smaller than the phantoms used to determine TG-43 parameters and is surrounded by air, ribs, and lung tissue. Also, the composition of the breast tissue itself can affect the dose distribution. This dissertation is focused on investigating the limitations of TG-43 dosimetry for intracavitary APBI for two HDR brachytherapy sources: the VariSource TM VS2000 192Ir source and the AxxentRTM miniature x-ray source. The dose for various conditions was determined using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. Accurate measurements and calculations were achieved through the implementation of new measurement and simulation techniques and a novel breast phantom was developed to enable anthropomorphic phantom measurements. Measured and calculated doses for phantom and patient geometries were compared with TG-43 calculated doses to

  11. Impact of the vaginal applicator and dummy pellets on the dosimetry parameters of Cs-137 brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Sina, Sedigheh; Faghihi, Reza; Meigooni, Ali S; Mehdizadeh, Simin; Mosleh Shirazi, M Amin; Zehtabian, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, dose rate distribution around a spherical 137Cs pellet source, from a low-dose-rate (LDR) Selectron remote afterloading system used in gynecological brachytherapy, has been determined using experimental and Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using MCNP4C code, for a single pellet source in water medium and Plexiglas, and measurements were performed in Plexiglas phantom material using LiF TLD chips. Absolute dose rate distribution and the dosimetric parameters, such as dose rate constant, radial dose functions, and anisotropy functions, were obtained for a single pellet source. In order to investigate the effect of the applicator and surrounding pellets on dosimetric parameters of the source, the simulations were repeated for six different arrangements with a single active source and five non-active pellets inside central metallic tubing of a vaginal cylindrical applicator. In commercial treatment planning systems (TPS), the attenuation effects of the applicator and inactive spacers on total dose are neglected. The results indicate that this effect could lead to overestimation of the calculated F(r,θ), by up to 7% along the longitudinal axis of the applicator, especially beyond the applicator tip. According to the results obtained in this study, in a real situation in treatment of patients using cylindrical vaginal applicator and using several active pellets, there will be a large discrepancy between the result of superposition and Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:21844861

  12. Near-field dosimetry of {sup 125}I sources for interstitial brachytherapy implants measured using thermoluminescent sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, Kazuro; Yue, Ning J.; Nath, Ravinder

    2004-12-01

    The dosimetric characteristics were measured for two types of {sup 125}I low-energy photon-emitting sources by using a wide and highly sensitive thermoluminescent (TL) sheet film, which was developed for two-dimensional dose distribution measurements. The TL film is made of Teflon homogeneously mixed with small powders of thermoluminescence (BaSO{sub 4}:Eu doped). Various dosimetric parameters (i.e., radial dose function, 2D and 1D anisotropy functions) of model 6711 and 6702 {sup 125}I sources were obtained at various distances from the source surfaces to 15 mm. These parameters obtained with TL sheet were compared with the data recommended in the updated AAPM TG-43 report. The radial dose functions measured with TL sheet are in agreement with those established data of model 6711 {sup 125}I seed and model 6702 {sup 125}I seed at most of the distances within 5% and 7%, respectively. All the measured anisotropy functions showed symmetry about the longitudinal source axis. The anisotropy of dose distributions was clearly present in the immediate vicinity of the source edges. The measured 2D anisotropy function values at 1 cm are in reasonably good agreement with the recommended values. The differences at two points in the 1D anisotropy functions measured with TL sheet and the established data at 1 cm from source center were 0.7% and 1.9% for model 6711 and 6702 {sup 125}I sources, respectively; the differences at 0.5 cm were 1.5% and 1.7% for model 6711 and 6702 {sup 125}I sources, respectively. The relative dosimetric characteristics in the vicinity of actual interstitial brachytherapy sources containing {sup 125}I have been experimentally determined by using the TL sheet as a 2D dosimeter.

  13. Dosimetric audit in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-01-01

    Dosimetric audit is required for the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy and to aid optimization of treatment. The reassurance that treatment is being delivered in line with accepted standards, that delivered doses are as prescribed and that quality improvement is enabled is as essential for brachytherapy as it is for the more commonly audited external beam radiotherapy. Dose measurement in brachytherapy is challenging owing to steep dose gradients and small scales, especially in the context of an audit. Several different approaches have been taken for audit measurement to date: thimble and well-type ionization chambers, thermoluminescent detectors, optically stimulated luminescence detectors, radiochromic film and alanine. In this work, we review all of the dosimetric brachytherapy audits that have been conducted in recent years, look at current audits in progress and propose required directions for brachytherapy dosimetric audit in the future. The concern over accurate source strength measurement may be essentially resolved with modern equipment and calibration methods, but brachytherapy is a rapidly developing field and dosimetric audit must keep pace. PMID:24807068

  14. A dosimetric uncertainty analysis for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources: Report of AAPM Task Group No. 138 and GEC-ESTRO

    PubMed Central

    DeWerd, Larry A.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Mitch, Michael G.; Rivard, Mark J.; Stump, Kurt E.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Venselaar, Jack L. M.

    2011-01-01

    This report addresses uncertainties pertaining to brachytherapy single-source dosimetry preceding clinical use. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Technical Note 1297 are taken as reference standards for uncertainty formalism. Uncertainties in using detectors to measure or utilizing Monte Carlo methods to estimate brachytherapy dose distributions are provided with discussion of the components intrinsic to the overall dosimetric assessment. Uncertainties provided are based on published observations and cited when available. The uncertainty propagation from the primary calibration standard through transfer to the clinic for air-kerma strength is covered first. Uncertainties in each of the brachytherapy dosimetry parameters of the TG-43 formalism are then explored, ending with transfer to the clinic and recommended approaches. Dosimetric uncertainties during treatment delivery are considered briefly but are not included in the detailed analysis. For low- and high-energy brachytherapy sources of low dose rate and high dose rate, a combined dosimetric uncertainty <5% (k=1) is estimated, which is consistent with prior literature estimates. Recommendations are provided for clinical medical physicists, dosimetry investigators, and source and treatment planning system manufacturers. These recommendations include the use of the GUM and NIST reports, a requirement of constancy of manufacturer source design, dosimetry investigator guidelines, provision of the lowest uncertainty for patient treatment dosimetry, and the establishment of an action level based on dosimetric uncertainty. These recommendations reflect the guidance of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie–European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) for their members and may also be used

  15. A dosimetric uncertainty analysis for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources: Report of AAPM Task Group No. 138 and GEC-ESTRO

    SciTech Connect

    DeWerd, Larry A.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Mitch, Michael G.; Rivard, Mark J.; Stump, Kurt E.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Venselaar, Jack L. M.

    2011-02-15

    This report addresses uncertainties pertaining to brachytherapy single-source dosimetry preceding clinical use. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Technical Note 1297 are taken as reference standards for uncertainty formalism. Uncertainties in using detectors to measure or utilizing Monte Carlo methods to estimate brachytherapy dose distributions are provided with discussion of the components intrinsic to the overall dosimetric assessment. Uncertainties provided are based on published observations and cited when available. The uncertainty propagation from the primary calibration standard through transfer to the clinic for air-kerma strength is covered first. Uncertainties in each of the brachytherapy dosimetry parameters of the TG-43 formalism are then explored, ending with transfer to the clinic and recommended approaches. Dosimetric uncertainties during treatment delivery are considered briefly but are not included in the detailed analysis. For low- and high-energy brachytherapy sources of low dose rate and high dose rate, a combined dosimetric uncertainty <5% (k=1) is estimated, which is consistent with prior literature estimates. Recommendations are provided for clinical medical physicists, dosimetry investigators, and source and treatment planning system manufacturers. These recommendations include the use of the GUM and NIST reports, a requirement of constancy of manufacturer source design, dosimetry investigator guidelines, provision of the lowest uncertainty for patient treatment dosimetry, and the establishment of an action level based on dosimetric uncertainty. These recommendations reflect the guidance of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) for their members and may also be used as

  16. A dosimetric uncertainty analysis for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources: report of AAPM Task Group No. 138 and GEC-ESTRO.

    PubMed

    DeWerd, Larry A; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Meigooni, Ali S; Mitch, Michael G; Rivard, Mark J; Stump, Kurt E; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Venselaar, Jack L M

    2011-02-01

    This report addresses uncertainties pertaining to brachytherapy single-source dosimetry preceding clinical use. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Technical Note 1297 are taken as reference standards for uncertainty formalism. Uncertainties in using detectors to measure or utilizing Monte Carlo methods to estimate brachytherapy dose distributions are provided with discussion of the components intrinsic to the overall dosimetric assessment. Uncertainties provided are based on published observations and cited when available. The uncertainty propagation from the primary calibration standard through transfer to the clinic for air-kerma strength is covered first. Uncertainties in each of the brachytherapy dosimetry parameters of the TG-43 formalism are then explored, ending with transfer to the clinic and recommended approaches. Dosimetric uncertainties during treatment delivery are considered briefly but are not included in the detailed analysis. For low- and high-energy brachytherapy sources of low dose rate and high dose rate, a combined dosimetric uncertainty <5% (k=1) is estimated, which is consistent with prior literature estimates. Recommendations are provided for clinical medical physicists, dosimetry investigators, and source and treatment planning system manufacturers. These recommendations include the use of the GUM and NIST reports, a requirement of constancy of manufacturer source design, dosimetry investigator guidelines, provision of the lowest uncertainty for patient treatment dosimetry, and the establishment of an action level based on dosimetric uncertainty. These recommendations reflect the guidance of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) for their members and may also be used as

  17. Determination of surface dose rate of indigenous (32)P patch brachytherapy source by experimental and Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D; Saxena, Sanjay Kumar; Bakshi, A K; Dash, Ashutosh; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2015-09-01

    Isotope production and Application Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Center developed (32)P patch sources for treatment of superficial tumors. Surface dose rate of a newly developed (32)P patch source of nominal diameter 25 mm was measured experimentally using standard extrapolation ionization chamber and Gafchromic EBT film. Monte Carlo model of the (32)P patch source along with the extrapolation chamber was also developed to estimate the surface dose rates from these sources. The surface dose rates to tissue (cGy/min) measured using extrapolation chamber and radiochromic films are 82.03±4.18 (k=2) and 79.13±2.53 (k=2) respectively. The two values of the surface dose rates measured using the two independent experimental methods are in good agreement to each other within a variation of 3.5%. The surface dose rate to tissue (cGy/min) estimated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code works out to be 77.78±1.16 (k=2). The maximum deviation between the surface dose rates to tissue obtained by Monte Carlo and the extrapolation chamber method is 5.2% whereas the difference between the surface dose rates obtained by radiochromic film measurement and the Monte Carlo simulation is 1.7%. The three values of the surface dose rates of the (32)P patch source obtained by three independent methods are in good agreement to one another within the uncertainties associated with their measurements and calculation. This work has demonstrated that MCNP based electron transport simulations are accurate enough for determining the dosimetry parameters of the indigenously developed (32)P patch sources for contact brachytherapy applications. PMID:26086681

  18. Absorbed dose simulations in near-surface regions using high dose rate Iridium-192 sources applied for brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, E. S.; Zeituni, C. A.; Sakuraba, R. K.; Gonçalves, V. D.; Cruz, J. C.; Júnior, D. K.; Souza, C. D.; Rostelato, M. E. C. M.

    2014-02-01

    Brachytherapy treatment with Iridium-192 high dose rate (HDR) sources is widely used for various tumours and it could be developed in many anatomic regions. Iridium-192 sources are inserted inside or close to the region that will be treated. Usually, the treatment is performed in prostate, gynaecological, lung, breast and oral cavity regions for a better clinical dose coverage compared with other techniques, such as, high energy photons and Cobalt-60 machines. This work will evaluate absorbed dose distributions in near-surface regions around Ir-192 HDR sources. Near-surface dose measurements are a complex task, due to the contribution of beta particles in the near-surface regions. These dose distributions should be useful for non-tumour treatments, such as keloids, and other non-intracavitary technique. For the absorbed dose distribution simulations the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE with the general code penEasy was used. Ir-192 source geometry and a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) tube, for beta particles shield were modelled to yield the percentage depth dose (PDD) on a cubic water phantom. Absorbed dose simulations were realized at the central axis to yield the Ir-192 dose fall-off along central axis. The results showed that more than 99.2% of the absorbed doses (relative to the surface) are deposited in 5 cm depth but with slower rate at higher distances. Near-surface treatments with Ir-192 HDR sources yields achievable measurements and with proper clinical technique and accessories should apply as an alternative for treatment of lesions where only beta sources were used.

  19. WE-A-17A-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Development of a Calorimeter for the Measurement of the Power Emitted From LDR Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, M; Palmer, B; DeWerd, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Model-based dose calculation algorithms for brachytherapy sources are designed to compute dose per particle or dose per unit energy leaving the encapsulation of a brachytherapy source. As such, the power leaving the encapsulation of a source, called emitted power (EP), would be a natural source strength metric for these new algorithms. However, no instrument is currently capable of an absolute measurement of EP. A calorimeter operating with a liquid helium thermal sink was designed and constructed to measure the EP of low-dose rate (LDR) I-125 and Pd-103 brachytherapy sources. Methods: Calorimeter design was optimized through thermal and Monte Carlo (MC) modeling. Thermal modeling showed that specific thermal conditions would be necessary for accurate calorimeter measurements. These conditions were experimentally verified. The EP of two LDR I-125 source models was measured. An air-kermastrength (AKS)-to-EP conversion coefficient was determined through MC simulations and applied to well-type ionization chamber measurements of AKS to enable comparison with EP measurements. Results: MCdetermined EP per unit AKS conversion coefficients were source model dependent and are on the order of 0.1 μW/U. The signal-to-noise ratio was a function of source strength, and was 294 for a 0.5 μW source. Measurements were repeatable to within 3.6% for a 0.5 μW source. Initial EP measurements were made with two I-125 source models, a 5.7 U Oncura 6711 and a 2.9 U Best Medical 2301. Model 2301 results agreed with the MC-converted AKS value to within the measurement uncertainty of 4.3% at k=1. The Model 6711 results were systematically high and are under investigation. Conclusion: A calorimeter was designed to provide an absolute measurement of the EP for LDR brachytherapy sources and preliminary EP measurements have been made. This new calorimeter design shows promise of providing a more fundamentally useful source strength standard.

  20. Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: Report of the AAPM and ESTRO

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Das, Rupak K.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Ouhib, Zoubir; Rivard, Mark J.; Sloboda, Ron S.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) on dose calculations for high-energy (average energy higher than 50 keV) photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are presented, including the physical characteristics of specific {sup 192}Ir, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 60}Co source models. Methods: This report has been prepared by the High Energy Brachytherapy Source Dosimetry (HEBD) Working Group. This report includes considerations in the application of the TG-43U1 formalism to high-energy photon-emitting sources with particular attention to phantom size effects, interpolation accuracy dependence on dose calculation grid size, and dosimetry parameter dependence on source active length. Results: Consensus datasets for commercially available high-energy photon sources are provided, along with recommended methods for evaluating these datasets. Recommendations on dosimetry characterization methods, mainly using experimental procedures and Monte Carlo, are established and discussed. Also included are methodological recommendations on detector choice, detector energy response characterization and phantom materials, and measurement specification methodology. Uncertainty analyses are discussed and recommendations for high-energy sources without consensus datasets are given. Conclusions: Recommended consensus datasets for high-energy sources have been derived for sources that were commercially available as of January 2010. Data are presented according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism, with modified interpolation and extrapolation techniques of the AAPM TG-43U1S1 report for the 2D anisotropy function and radial dose function.

  1. Production, Distribution, and Applications of Californium-252 Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Balo, P.A.; Knauer, J.B.; Martin, R.C.

    1999-10-03

    The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10{sup 11} neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6- year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10 neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL). DOE sells {sup 252}Cf to commercial

  2. Dosimetric characteristics, air-kerma strength calibration and verification of Monte Carlo simulation for a new ytterbium-169 brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, H.; Williamson, J.F.; Li, Zuofeng; Mishra, V.; Meigooni, A.S. )

    1994-03-01

    Ytterbium-169 ([sup 169]Yb) is a promising new isotope for brachytherapy with a half life of 32 days and an average photon energy of 93 KeV. It has an Ir-192-equivalent dose distribution in water but a much smaller half-value layer in lead (0.2 mm), affording improved radiation protection and customized shielding of dose-limiting anatomic structures. The goals of this study are to: (a) experimentally validate Monte Carlo photon transport dose-rate calculations for this energy range, (b) to develop a secondary air-kerma strength standard for [sup 169]Yb, and (c) to present essential treatment planning data including the transverse-axis dose-rate distribution and dose correction factors for a number of local shielding materials. Several interstitial [sup 169]Yb sources (type 6) and an experimental high dose-rate source were made available for this study. Monte Carlo photon-transport (MCPT) simulations, based upon validated geometric models of source structure, were used to calculate dose rates in water. To verify MCPT predictions, the transverse-axis dose distribution in homogeneous water medium was measured using a silicon-diode detector. For use in designing shielded applicators, heterogeneity correction factors (HCF) arising from small cylindrical heterogeneities of lead, aluminum, titanium, steel and air were measured in a water medium. Finally, to provide a sound experimental basis for comparing experimental and theoretical dose-rate distributions, the air-kerma strength of the sources was measured using a calibrated ion chamber. To eliminate the influence of measurement artifacts on the comparison of theory and measurement, simulated detector readings were compared directly to measured diode readings. The final data are presented in the format endorsed by the Interstitial Collaborative Working Group. 33 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Cluster pattern analysis of energy deposition sites for the brachytherapy sources 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Bäckström, Gloria; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2014-09-01

    Analysing the pattern of energy depositions may help elucidate differences in the severity of radiation-induced DNA strand breakage for different radiation qualities. It is often claimed that energy deposition (ED) sites from photon radiation form a uniform random pattern, but there is indication of differences in RBE values among different photon sources used in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to analyse the spatial patterns of EDs from 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs sources commonly used in brachytherapy and a 60Co source as a reference radiation. The results suggest that there is both a non-uniform and a uniform random component to the frequency distribution of distances to the nearest neighbour ED. The closest neighbouring EDs show high spatial correlation for all investigated radiation qualities, whilst the uniform random component dominates for neighbours with longer distances for the three higher mean photon energy sources (192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co). The two lower energy photon emitters (103Pd and 125I) present a very small uniform random component. The ratio of frequencies of clusters with respect to 60Co differs up to 15% for the lower energy sources and less than 2% for the higher energy sources when the maximum distance between each pair of EDs is 2 nm. At distances relevant to DNA damage, cluster patterns can be differentiated between the lower and higher energy sources. This may be part of the explanation to the reported difference in RBE values with initial DSB yields as an endpoint for these brachytherapy sources.

  4. EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo dosimetry of CSA1 and CSA2 {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy source models

    SciTech Connect

    Selvam, T. Palani; Sahoo, S.; Vishwakarma, R. S.

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: AAPM TG-56 recommends the use of a specific dosimetric dataset for each brachytherapy source model. In this study, a full dosimetric dataset for indigenously developed {sup 137}Cs source models, namely, the CSA1 and CSA2, in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism is presented. The study includes calculation of dose-to-kerma ratio D/K in water around these sources including stainless steel encapsulated {sup 137}Cs sources such as RTR, 3M, and selectron/LDR {sup 137}Cs. Methods: The Monte Carlo-based EGSnrcMP code system is employed for modeling the sources in vacuum and in water. Calculations of air-kerma strength, S{sub K} for the investigated sources and collision kerma in water along the transverse axis of the RTR source are based on the FLURZnrc code. Simulations of water-kerma and dose in water for the CSA1, CSA2, RTR, 3M, and selectron/LDR {sup 137}Cs sources are carried out using the DOSRZnrc code. In DOSRZnrc calculations, water-kerma and dose are scored in a cylindrical water phantom having dimensions of 80 cm diameterx80 cm height. Results: The calculated dose-rate constants for the CSA1 and CSA2 sources are 0.945(1) and 1.023(1) cGy/(h U), respectively. The calculated value of S{sub K} per unit source activity, S{sub K}/A for the CSA1 and CSA2 sources is 7.393(7)x10{sup -8} cGy cm{sup 2}/(h Bq). The EGSnrcMP-based collision kerma rates for the RTR source along the transverse axis (0.25-10 cm) agree with the corresponding GEANT4-based published values within 0.5%. Anisotropy profiles of the CSA1 and CSA2 sources are significantly different from those of other sources. For the selectron/LDR single pellet {sup 137}Cs spherical source (modeled as a cylindrical pellet with dimensions similar to the seed selectron), the values of D/K at 1 and 1.25 mm from the capsule are 1.023(1) and 1.029(1), respectively. The value of D/K at 1 mm from the CSA1, CSA2, RTR, and 3M {sup 137}Cs source capsules (all sources have an external radius of 1.5 mm) is 1

  5. On source models for (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy dosimetry using model based algorithms.

    PubMed

    Pantelis, Evaggelos; Zourari, Kyveli; Zoros, Emmanouil; Lahanas, Vasileios; Karaiskos, Pantelis; Papagiannis, Panagiotis

    2016-06-01

    A source model is a prerequisite of all model based dose calculation algorithms. Besides direct simulation, the use of pre-calculated phase space files (phsp source models) and parameterized phsp source models has been proposed for Monte Carlo (MC) to promote efficiency and ease of implementation in obtaining photon energy, position and direction. In this work, a phsp file for a generic (192)Ir source design (Ballester et al 2015) is obtained from MC simulation. This is used to configure a parameterized phsp source model comprising appropriate probability density functions (PDFs) and a sampling procedure. According to phsp data analysis 15.6% of the generated photons are absorbed within the source, and 90.4% of the emergent photons are primary. The PDFs for sampling photon energy and direction relative to the source long axis, depend on the position of photon emergence. Photons emerge mainly from the cylindrical source surface with a constant probability over  ±0.1 cm from the center of the 0.35 cm long source core, and only 1.7% and 0.2% emerge from the source tip and drive wire, respectively. Based on these findings, an analytical parameterized source model is prepared for the calculation of the PDFs from data of source geometry and materials, without the need for a phsp file. The PDFs from the analytical parameterized source model are in close agreement with those employed in the parameterized phsp source model. This agreement prompted the proposal of a purely analytical source model based on isotropic emission of photons generated homogeneously within the source core with energy sampled from the (192)Ir spectrum, and the assignment of a weight according to attenuation within the source. Comparison of single source dosimetry data obtained from detailed MC simulation and the proposed analytical source model show agreement better than 2% except for points lying close to the source longitudinal axis. PMID:27191179

  6. On source models for 192Ir HDR brachytherapy dosimetry using model based algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelis, Evaggelos; Zourari, Kyveli; Zoros, Emmanouil; Lahanas, Vasileios; Karaiskos, Pantelis; Papagiannis, Panagiotis

    2016-06-01

    A source model is a prerequisite of all model based dose calculation algorithms. Besides direct simulation, the use of pre-calculated phase space files (phsp source models) and parameterized phsp source models has been proposed for Monte Carlo (MC) to promote efficiency and ease of implementation in obtaining photon energy, position and direction. In this work, a phsp file for a generic 192Ir source design (Ballester et al 2015) is obtained from MC simulation. This is used to configure a parameterized phsp source model comprising appropriate probability density functions (PDFs) and a sampling procedure. According to phsp data analysis 15.6% of the generated photons are absorbed within the source, and 90.4% of the emergent photons are primary. The PDFs for sampling photon energy and direction relative to the source long axis, depend on the position of photon emergence. Photons emerge mainly from the cylindrical source surface with a constant probability over  ±0.1 cm from the center of the 0.35 cm long source core, and only 1.7% and 0.2% emerge from the source tip and drive wire, respectively. Based on these findings, an analytical parameterized source model is prepared for the calculation of the PDFs from data of source geometry and materials, without the need for a phsp file. The PDFs from the analytical parameterized source model are in close agreement with those employed in the parameterized phsp source model. This agreement prompted the proposal of a purely analytical source model based on isotropic emission of photons generated homogeneously within the source core with energy sampled from the 192Ir spectrum, and the assignment of a weight according to attenuation within the source. Comparison of single source dosimetry data obtained from detailed MC simulation and the proposed analytical source model show agreement better than 2% except for points lying close to the source longitudinal axis.

  7. A dual-plane co-RASOR technique for accurate and rapid tracking and position verification of an Ir-192 source for single fraction HDR brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, Hendrik; Moerland, Marinus A.; van Vulpen, Marco; Seevinck, Peter R.; Bakker, Chris J. G.

    2013-11-01

    Effective high-dose-rate (HDR) treatment requires accurate and independent treatment verification to ensure that the treatment proceeds as prescribed, in particular if a high dose is given, as in single fraction therapy. Contrary to CT imaging and fluoroscopy, MR imaging provides high soft tissue contrast. Conventional MR techniques, however, do not offer the temporal resolution in combination with the 3D spatial resolution required for accurate brachytherapy source localization. We have developed an MR imaging method (center-out RAdial Sampling with Off-Resonance (co-RASOR)) that generates high positive contrast in the geometrical center of field perturbing objects, such as HDR brachytherapy sources. co-RASOR generates high positive contrast in the geometric center of an Ir-192 source by applying a frequency offset to center-out encoded data. To obtain high spatial accuracy in 3D with adequate temporal resolution, two orthogonal center-out encoded 2D images are applied instead of a full 3D acquisition. Its accuracy in 3D is demonstrated by 3D MRI and CT. The 2D images show high positive contrast in the geometric center of non-radioactive Ir-192 sources, with signal intensities up to 160% of the average signal intensity in the surrounding medium. The accuracy with which the center of the Ir-192 source is located by the dual-plane MRI acquisition corresponds closely to the accuracy obtained by 3D MRI and CT imaging. The positive contrast is shown to be obtained in homogeneous and in heterogeneous tissue. The dual-plane MRI technique allows the brachytherapy source to be tracked in 3D with millimeter accuracy with a temporal resolution of approximately 4 s.

  8. SU-E-T-284: Revisiting Reference Dosimetry for the Model S700 Axxent 50 KV{sub p} Electronic Brachytherapy Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hiatt, JR; Rivard, MJ

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source by Xoft was characterized in 2006 by Rivard et al. The source design was modified in 2006 to include a plastic centering insert at the source tip to more accurately position the anode. The objectives of the current study were to establish an accurate Monte Carlo source model for simulation purposes, to dosimetrically characterize the new source and obtain its TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters, and to determine dose differences between the source with and without the centering insert. Methods: Design information from dissected sources and vendor-supplied CAD drawings were used to devise the source model for radiation transport simulations of dose distributions in a water phantom. Collision kerma was estimated as a function of radial distance, r, and polar angle, θ, for determination of reference TG-43 dosimetry parameters. Simulations were run for 10{sup 10} histories, resulting in statistical uncertainties on the transverse plane of 0.03% at r=1 cm and 0.08% at r=10 cm. Results: The dose rate distribution the transverse plane did not change beyond 2% between the 2006 model and the current study. While differences exceeding 15% were observed near the source distal tip, these diminished to within 2% for r>1.5 cm. Differences exceeding a factor of two were observed near θ=150° and in contact with the source, but diminished to within 20% at r=10 cm. Conclusions: Changes in source design influenced the overall dose rate and distribution by more than 2% over a third of the available solid angle external from the source. For clinical applications using balloons or applicators with tissue located within 5 cm from the source, dose differences exceeding 2% were observed only for θ>110°. This study carefully examined the current source geometry and presents a modern reference TG-43 dosimetry dataset for the model S700 source.

  9. Stem effect of a Ce3+ doped SiO2 optical dosimeter irradiated with a 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, Mauro; Tenconi, Chiara; Guilizzoni, Roberta; Borroni, Marta; Cavatorta, Claudia; Cerrotta, Annamaria; Fallai, Carlo; Gambarini, Grazia; Vedda, Anna; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2014-11-01

    Fiber-optic-coupled scintillation dosimeters are characterized by their small active volume if compared to other existing systems. However, they potentially show a greater stem effect, especially in external beam radiotherapy where the Cerenkov effect is not negligible. In brachytherapy, due to the lower energies and the shorter high dose range of the employed sources, the impact of the stem effect to the detector accuracy might be low. In this work, the stem effect of a Ce3+ doped SiO2 scintillation detector coupled to a SiO2 optical fiber was studied for high dose rate brachytherapy applications. Measurements were performed in a water phantom at changing source-detector mutual positions. The same irradiations were performed with a passive optical fiber, which doesn't have the dosimeter at its end. The relative contribution of the passive fiber with respect to the uncorrected readings of the detector in each one of the investigated source dwell positions was evaluated. Furthermore, the dosimeter was calibrated both neglecting and correcting its response for the passive fiber readings. The obtained absolute dose measurements were then compared to the dose calculations resulting from the treatment planning system. Dosimeter uncertainties with and without taking into account the passive fiber readings were generally below 2.8% and 4.3%, respectively. However, a particular exception results when the source is positioned near to the optical fiber, where the detector underestimates the dose (-8%) or at source-detector longitudinal distances higher than 3 cm. The obtained results show that the proposed dosimeter might be adopted in high dose rate prostate brachytherapy with satisfactory accuracy, without the need for any stem effect correction. However, accuracy further improves by subtraction of the noise signal produced by the passive optical fiber.

  10. A novel ytterbium-169 brachytherapy source and delivery system for use in conjunction with minimally invasive wedge resection of early-stage lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Kara Lynne; DiPetrillo, Thomas A.; Munro, John J.; Wazer, David E.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To describe a novel source–delivery system for intraoperative brachytherapy in patients with early-stage lung cancer that is readily adaptable to a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach and can be precisely delivered to achieve optimal dose distribution. METHODS AND MATERIALS Radioactive ytterbium-169 (169Yb) was sealed within a titanium tube 0.28 mm in diameter and then capped and resealed by titanium wires laser welded to the tube to serve as the legs of a tissue-fastening system. Dose simulations were performed using Monte Carlo computer code (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM) to mimic the geometric and elemental compositions of the source, fastening apparatus, and surroundings. RESULTS Five test source capsules were subjected to a tensile load to failure. Failure in each capsule occurred in the wire of the fastener leg; there were no weld failures. Monte Carlo simulations and subsequent dose measurement showed the perturbation by the source legs in the deployed (bent over) position to be small (4–5%) for 169Yb and much less than that for iodine-125 (32%). CONCLUSION We have developed a 169Yb brachytherapy source–delivery system that can be used in conjunction with commercially available surgical stapling instruments, facilitates the precise placement of brachytherapy sources relative to the surgical margin, assures the seeds remain fixed in their precise position for the duration of the treatment, overcomes the technical difficulties of manipulating the seeds through the narrow surgical incision associated with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, and reduces the radiation dose to the clinicians. PMID:20705525

  11. Determination of the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources relative to {sup 60}Co

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J. L. Micka, J. A.; Culberson, W. S.; DeWerd, L. A.; Rasmussen, B. E.; Davis, S. D.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the intrinsic energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources relative to {sup 60}Co. Methods: LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs were irradiated with low-energy brachytherapy sources and with a {sup 60}Co teletherapy source. The brachytherapy sources measured were the Best 2301 {sup 125}I seed, the OncoSeed 6711 {sup 125}I seed, and the Best 2335 {sup 103}Pd seed. The TLD light output per measured air-kerma strength was determined for the brachytherapy source irradiations, and the TLD light output per air kerma was determined for the {sup 60}Co irradiations. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to calculate the dose-to-TLD rate per air-kerma strength for the brachytherapy source irradiations and the dose to TLD per air kerma for the {sup 60}Co irradiations. The measured and MC-calculated results for all irradiations were used to determine the TLD intrinsic energy dependence for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd relative to {sup 60}Co. Results: The relative TLD intrinsic energy dependences (relative to {sup 60}Co) and associated uncertainties (k = 1) were determined to be 0.883 ± 1.3%, 0.870 ± 1.4%, and 0.871 ± 1.5% for the Best 2301 seed, OncoSeed 6711 seed, and Best 2335 seed, respectively. Conclusions: The intrinsic energy dependence of TLD-100 is dependent on photon energy, exhibiting changes of 13%–15% for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources relative to {sup 60}Co. TLD measurements of absolute dose around {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources should explicitly account for the relative TLD intrinsic energy dependence in order to improve dosimetric accuracy.

  12. {sup 103}Pd strings: Monte Carlo assessment of a new approach to brachytherapy source design

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Reed, Joshua L.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: A new type of{sup 103}Pd source (CivaString and CivaThin by CivaTech Oncology, Inc.) is examined. The source contains {sup 103}Pd and Au radio-opaque marker(s), all contained within low-Z{sub eff} organic polymers that permit source flexibility. The CivaString source is available in lengths L of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 mm, and referred to in the current study as CS10–CS60, respectively. A thinner design, CivaThin, has sources designated as CT10–CT60, respectively. The CivaString and CivaThin sources are 0.85 and 0.60 mm in diameter, respectively. The source design is novel and offers an opportunity to examine its interesting dosimetric properties in comparison to conventional {sup 103}Pd seeds. Methods: The MCNP5 radiation transport code was used to estimate air-kerma rate and dose rate distributions with polar and cylindrical coordinate systems. Doses in water and prostate tissue phantoms were compared to determine differences between the TG-43 formalism and realistic clinical circumstances. The influence of Ti encapsulation and 2.7 keV photons was examined. The accuracy of superposition of dose distributions from shorter sources to create longer source dose distributions was also assessed. Results: The normalized air-kerma rate was not highly dependent onL or the polar angle θ, with results being nearly identical between the CivaString and CivaThin sources for common L. The air-kerma strength was also weakly dependent on L. The uncertainty analysis established a standard uncertainty of 1.3% for the dose-rate constant Λ, where the largest contributors were μ{sub en}/ρ and μ/ρ. The Λ values decreased with increasing L, which was largely explained by differences in solid angle. The radial dose function did not substantially vary among the CivaString and CivaThin sources for r ≥ 1 cm. However, behavior for r < 1 cm indicated that the Au marker(s) shielded radiation for the sources having L = 10, 30, and 50 mm. The 2D anisotropy function

  13. Numerical calculation of relative dose rates from spherical 106Ru beta sources used in ophthalmic brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paiva, Eduardo

    Concave beta sources of 106Ru/106Rh are used in radiotherapy to treat ophthalmic tumors. However, a problem that arises is the difficult determination of absorbed dose distributions around such sources mainly because of the small range of the electrons and the steep dose gradients. In this sense, numerical methods have been developed to calculate the dose distributions around the beta applicators. In this work a simple code in Fortran language is developed to estimate the dose rates along the central axis of 106Ru/106Rh curved plaques by numerical integration of the beta point source function and results are compared with other calculated data.

  14. Influence of photon energy spectra from brachytherapy sources on Monte Carlo simulations of kerma and dose rates in water and air

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: For a given radionuclide, there are several photon spectrum choices available to dosimetry investigators for simulating the radiation emissions from brachytherapy sources. This study examines the dosimetric influence of selecting the spectra for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd on the final estimations of kerma and dose. Methods: For {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd, the authors considered from two to five published spectra. Spherical sources approximating common brachytherapy sources were assessed. Kerma and dose results from GEANT4, MCNP5, and PENELOPE-2008 were compared for water and air. The dosimetric influence of {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd spectral choice was determined. Results: For the spectra considered, there were no statistically significant differences between kerma or dose results based on Monte Carlo code choice when using the same spectrum. Water-kerma differences of about 2%, 2%, and 0.7% were observed due to spectrum choice for {sup 192}Ir, {sup 125}I, and {sup 103}Pd, respectively (independent of radial distance), when accounting for photon yield per Bq. Similar differences were observed for air-kerma rate. However, their ratio (as used in the dose-rate constant) did not significantly change when the various photon spectra were selected because the differences compensated each other when dividing dose rate by air-kerma strength. Conclusions: Given the standardization of radionuclide data available from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) and the rigorous infrastructure for performing and maintaining the data set evaluations, NNDC spectra are suggested for brachytherapy simulations in medical physics applications.

  15. The theoretical basis and clinical methodology for stereotactic interstitial brain tumor irradiation using iododeoxyuridine as a radiation sensitizer and samarium-145 as a brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, J.H.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Kanellitsas, C.; Clendenon, N.R. ); Laster, B.H.; Fairchild, R.G. )

    1989-01-01

    High grade astrocytomas have proven resistant to all conventional therapy. A technique to produce radiation enhancement during interstitial brain tumor irradiation by using a radiation sensitizer (IdUrd) and by stimulation of Auger electron cascades through absorption of low energy photons in iodine (Photon activation) is described. Clinical studies using IdUrd, {sup 192}Ir as a brachytherapy source, and external radiation have produced promising results. Substituting samarium-145 for {sup 192}Ir in this protocol is expected to produce enhanced results. 15 refs.

  16. A photon spectrometric dose-rate constant determination for the Advantage Pd-103 brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Bongiorni, Paul; Nath, Ravinder

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Although several dosimetric characterizations using Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) have been reported for the new Advantage Pd-103 source (IsoAid, LLC, Port Richey, FL), no AAPM consensus value has been established for the dosimetric parameters of the source. The aim of this work was to perform an additional dose-rate constant ({Lambda}) determination using a recently established photon spectrometry technique (PST) that is independent of the published TLD and Monte Carlo techniques. Methods: Three Model IAPD-103A Advantage Pd-103 sources were used in this study. The relative photon energy spectrum emitted by each source along the transverse axis was measured using a high-resolution germanium spectrometer designed for low-energy photons. For each source, the dose-rate constant was determined from its emitted energy spectrum. The PST-determined dose-rate constant ({sub PST}{Lambda}) was then compared to those determined by TLD ({sub TLD}{Lambda}) and Monte Carlo ({sub MC}{Lambda}) techniques. A likely consensus {Lambda} value was estimated as the arithmetic mean of the average {Lambda} values determined by each of three different techniques. Results: The average {sub PST}{Lambda} value for the three Advantage sources was found to be (0.676{+-}0.026) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}. Intersource variation in {sub PST}{Lambda} was less than 0.01%. The {sub PST}{Lambda} was within 2% of the reported {sub MC}{Lambda} values determined by PTRAN, EGSnrc, and MCNP5 codes. It was 3.4% lower than the reported {sub TLD}{Lambda}. A likely consensus {Lambda} value was estimated to be (0.688{+-}0.026) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}, similar to the AAPM consensus values recommended currently for the Theragenics (Buford, GA) Model 200 (0.686{+-}0.033) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}, the NASI (Chatsworth, CA) Model MED3633 (0.688{+-}0.033) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}, and the Best Medical (Springfield, VA) Model 2335 (0.685{+-}0.033) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1} {sup 103}Pd

  17. Monte Carlo-based dose calculation for 32P patch source for superficial brachytherapy applications

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Sridhar; Palani, Selvam T.; Saxena, S. K.; Babu, D. A. R.; Dash, A.

    2015-01-01

    Skin cancer treatment involving 32P source is an easy, less expensive method of treatment limited to small and superficial lesions of approximately 1 mm deep. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has indigenously developed 32P nafion-based patch source (1 cm × 1 cm) for treating skin cancer. For this source, the values of dose per unit activity at different depths including dose profiles in water are calculated using the EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code system. For an initial activity of 1 Bq distributed in 1 cm2 surface area of the source, the calculated central axis depth dose values are 3.62 × 10-10 GyBq-1 and 8.41 × 10-11 GyBq-1at 0.0125 and 1 mm depths in water, respectively. Hence, the treatment time calculated for delivering therapeutic dose of 30 Gy at 1 mm depth along the central axis of the source involving 37 MBq activity is about 2.7 hrs. PMID:26150682

  18. A systematic evaluation of the dose-rate constant determined by photon spectrometry for twenty-one different models of low energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe (Jay); Nath, Ravinder

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To perform a systematic comparison of the dose-rate constant (Λ) determined by the photon spectrometry technique (PST) with the consensus value (CONΛ) recommended by the American Association of Physicist in Medicine (AAPM) for twenty-one low energy photon-emitting interstitial brachytherapy sources. Method and Materials A total of 63 interstitial brachytherapy sources (21 different models with 3 sources per model) containing either 125I (14 models), 103Pd (6 models), or 131Cs (one model) were included in this study. A photon spectrometry technique (Med. Phys. 34, 1412-1430, 2007) was used to determine the dose-rate constant (PSTΛ) for each source model. Source-dependent variations in PSTΛ were analyzed systematically against the spectral characteristics of the emitted photons and the consensus values recommended by the AAPM brachytherapy subcommittee. Results The values of PSTΛ for the encapsulated sources of 103Pd, 125I, and 131Cs varied from 0.661 cGyh-1U-1 to 0.678 cGyh-1U-1, 0.959 cGyh-1U-1 to 1.024 cGyh-1U-1, and 1.066 cGyh-1U-1 to 1.073 cGyh-1U-1, respectively. The relative variation in PSTΛ among the six 103Pd source models, caused by variations in photon attenuation and in spatial distributions of radioactivity among the source models, was less than 3%. Greater variations in PSTΛ were observed among the fourteen 125I source models; the maximum relative difference was over 6%. These variations were caused primarily by the presence of silver in some 125I source models and, to a lesser degree, by the variations in photon attenuation and in spatial distribution of radioactivity among the source models. The presence of silver generates additional fluorescent x-rays with lower photon energies which caused the PSTΛ value to vary from 0.959 cGyh-1U-1 to 1.019 cGyh-1U-1 depending on the amount of silver used by a given source model. For those 125I sources that contain no silver, their PSTΛ was less variable and had values within 1% of 1.024 cGyh-1U

  19. Impact of the differential fluence distribution of brachytherapy sources on the spectroscopic dose-rate constant

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, Martha J.; Bartol, Laura J.; DeWerd, Larry A. E-mail: ladewerd@wisc.edu

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate why dose-rate constants for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds computed using the spectroscopic technique, Λ{sub spec}, differ from those computed with standard Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. A potential cause of these discrepancies is the spectroscopic technique’s use of approximations of the true fluence distribution leaving the source, φ{sub full}. In particular, the fluence distribution used in the spectroscopic technique, φ{sub spec}, approximates the spatial, angular, and energy distributions of φ{sub full}. This work quantified the extent to which each of these approximations affects the accuracy of Λ{sub spec}. Additionally, this study investigated how the simplified water-only model used in the spectroscopic technique impacts the accuracy of Λ{sub spec}. Methods: Dose-rate constants as described in the AAPM TG-43U1 report, Λ{sub full}, were computed with MC simulations using the full source geometry for each of 14 different {sup 125}I and 6 different {sup 103}Pd source models. In addition, the spectrum emitted along the perpendicular bisector of each source was simulated in vacuum using the full source model and used to compute Λ{sub spec}. Λ{sub spec} was compared to Λ{sub full} to verify the discrepancy reported by Rodriguez and Rogers. Using MC simulations, a phase space of the fluence leaving the encapsulation of each full source model was created. The spatial and angular distributions of φ{sub full} were extracted from the phase spaces and were qualitatively compared to those used by φ{sub spec}. Additionally, each phase space was modified to reflect one of the approximated distributions (spatial, angular, or energy) used by φ{sub spec}. The dose-rate constant resulting from using approximated distribution i, Λ{sub approx,i}, was computed using the modified phase space and compared to Λ{sub full}. For each source, this process was repeated for each approximation in order to determine which approximations used in

  20. Dosimetric characterization of the GammaClip™{sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer postwedge resection

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, Blake; Munro, John J. III; Medich, David C.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: A novel {sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source, the GammaClip™, was developed by Source Production and Equipment Co. (New Orleans, LA) which is designed similar to a surgical staple while delivering therapeutic radiation. In this report, the brachytherapy source was characterized in terms of “Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: Report of the AAPM and ESTRO” by Perez-Calatayud et al. [Med. Phys. 39, 2904–2929 (2012)] using the updated AAPM Task Group Report No. 43 formalism.Methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle 5, version 1.6 in water and air, the in-air photon spectrum filtered to remove photon energies below 10 keV in accordance with TG-43U1 recommendations and previously reviewed {sup 169}Yb energy cutoff levels [D. C. Medich, M. A. Tries, and J. M. Munro, “Monte Carlo characterization of an Ytterbium-169 high dose rate brachytherapy source with analysis of statistical uncertainty,” Med. Phys. 33, 163–172 (2006)]. TG-43U1 dosimetric data, including S{sub K}, D-dot (r,θ), Λ, g{sub L}(r), F(r, θ), φ{sub an}(r), and φ{sub an} were calculated along with their statistical uncertainties. Since the source is not axially symmetric, an additional set of calculations were performed to assess the resulting axial anisotropy.Results: The brachytherapy source's dose rate constant was calculated to be (1.22 ± 0.03) cGy h{sup −1} U{sup −1}. The uncertainty in the dose to water calculations, D-dot (r,θ), was determined to be 2.5%, dominated by the uncertainties in the cross sections. The anisotropy constant, φ{sub an}, was calculated to be 0.960 ± 0.011 and was obtained by integrating the anisotropy factor between 1 and 10 cm using a weighting factor proportional to r{sup −2}. The radial dose function was calculated at distances between 0.5 and 12 cm, with a maximum value of 1.20 at 5.15 ± 0.03 cm. Radial dose

  1. Dosimetric characterization of the GammaClip™ 169Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer postwedge resection

    PubMed Central

    Currier, Blake; Munro, John J.; Medich, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A novel 169Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source, the GammaClip™, was developed by Source Production & Equipment Co. (New Orleans, LA) which is designed similar to a surgical staple while delivering therapeutic radiation. In this report, the brachytherapy source was characterized in terms of “Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: Report of the AAPM and ESTRO” by Perez-Calatayud [Med. Phys. 39, 2904–2929 (2012)]10.1118/1.3703892 using the updated AAPM Task Group Report No. 43 formalism. Methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle 5, version 1.6 in water and air, the in-air photon spectrum filtered to remove photon energies below 10 keV in accordance with TG-43U1 recommendations and previously reviewed 169Yb energy cutoff levels [D. C. Medich, M. A. Tries, and J. M. Munro, “Monte Carlo characterization of an Ytterbium-169 high dose rate brachytherapy source with analysis of statistical uncertainty,” Med. Phys. 33, 163–172 (2006)]10.1118/1.2147767. TG-43U1 dosimetric data, including SK, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\dot D(r,\\theta)\\end{document}D˙(r,θ), Λ, gL(r), F(r, θ), ϕan(r), and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\bar \\phi _{an}\\end{document}ϕ¯an were calculated along with their statistical uncertainties. Since the source is not axially symmetric, an additional set of calculations were performed to assess the resulting axial anisotropy. Results: The brachytherapy source's dose rate constant was calculated to

  2. Response of the alanine/ESR dosimeter to radiation from an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, M.; Hackel, T.; Zink, K.; von Voigts-Rhetz, P.; Selbach, H.-J.

    2015-01-01

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to radiation from an Ir-192 source with respect to the absorbed dose to water, relative to Co-60 radiation, was determined experimentally as well as by Monte Carlo simulations. The experimental and Monte Carlo results for the response agree well within the limits of uncertainty. The relative response decreases with an increasing distance between the measurement volume and the source from approximately 98% at a 1 cm distance to 96% at 5 cm. The present data are more accurate, but agree well with data published by Schaeken et al (2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6625-34). The decrease of the relative response with an increasing distance that had already been observed by these authors is confirmed. In the appendix, the properties of the alanine dosimeter with respect to volume and sensitivity corrections are investigated. The inhomogeneous distribution of the detection probability that was taken into account for the analysis was determined experimentally.

  3. Dosimetric impact of source-positioning uncertainty in high-dose-rate balloon brachytherapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dosimetric impact of source-positioning uncertainty in high-dose-rate (HDR) balloon brachytherapy of breast cancer. Material and methods For 49 HDR balloon patients, each dwell position of catheter(s) was manually shifted distally (+) and proximally (–) with a magnitude from 1 to 4 mm. Total 392 plans were retrospectively generated and compared to corresponding clinical plans using 7 dosimetric parameters: dose (D95) to 95% of planning target volume for evaluation (PTV_EVAL), and volume covered by 100% and 90% of the prescribed dose (PD) (V100 and V90); skin and rib maximum point dose (Dmax); normal breast tissue volume receiving 150% and 200% of PD (V150 and V200). Results PTV_EVAL dosimetry deteriorated with larger average/maximum reduction (from ± 1 mm to ± 4 mm) for larger source position uncertainty (p value < 0.0001): from 1.0%/2.5%, 3.3%/5.9%, 6.3%/10.0% to 9.8%/14.5% for D95; from 1.0%/2.6%, 3.1%/5.7%, 5.8%/8.9% to 8.7%/12.3% for V100; from 0.2%/1.5%, 1.0%/4.0%, 2.7%/6.8% to 5.1%/10.3% for V90. ≥ ± 3 mm shift reduced average D95 to < 95% and average V100 to < 90%. While skin and rib Dmax change was case-specific, its absolute change (∣Δ(Value)∣) showed that larger shift and high dose group had larger variation compared to smaller and lower dose group (p value < 0.0001), respectively. Normal breast tissue V150 variation was case-specific and small. Average ∣Δ(V150)∣ was 0.2 cc for the largest shift (± 4 mm) with maximum < 1.7 cc. V200 was increased with higher elevation for larger shift: from 6.4 cc/9.8 cc, 7.0 cc/10.1 cc, 8.0 cc/11.3 cc to 9.2 cc/ 13.0 cc. Conclusions The tolerance of ± 2 mm recommended by AAPM TG 56 is clinically acceptable in most clinical cases. However, special attention should be paid to a case where both skin and rib are located proximally to balloon, and the orientation of balloon catheter(s) is vertical to these critical structures. In this case, sufficient dosimetric planning margins are

  4. Source test of the prototype neutron detector for the large-acceptance multipurpose spectrometer at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Mulilo, Benard; Hong, Byungsik

    2013-05-01

    A neutron detector array will be essential for the study of the nuclear symmetry energy in the large-acceptance multipurpose spectrometer (LAMPS) at the planned rare-isotope beam facility RAON in Korea. We have built the prototype neutron detector for LAMPS and examined its performance by using radiation sources. For data taking, we tested the voltage-threshold discriminator (VTD) and the constant-fraction discriminator (CFD) modules for the pulse process. The intrinsic time resolution of the prototype detector is estimated to be 723 ps for VTD and 488 ps for CFD. The fission neutrons and gammas emitted from 252Cf can be clearly separated in the time distribution. We reconstruct the energy spectrum of the spontaneous fission neutrons from 252Cf, which can be described well by using the empirical Watt spectrum.

  5. Dose distribution in water for monoenergetic photon point sources in the energy range of interest in brachytherapy: Monte Carlo simulations with PENELOPE and GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almansa, Julio F.; Guerrero, Rafael; Al-Dweri, Feras M. O.; Anguiano, Marta; Lallena, Antonio M.

    2007-05-01

    Monte Carlo calculations using the codes PENELOPE and GEANT4 have been performed to characterize the dosimetric properties of monoenergetic photon point sources in water. The dose rate in water has been calculated for energies of interest in brachytherapy, ranging between 10 keV and 2 MeV. A comparison of the results obtained using the two codes with the available data calculated with other Monte Carlo codes is carried out. A χ2-like statistical test is proposed for these comparisons. PENELOPE and GEANT4 show a reasonable agreement for all energies analyzed and distances to the source larger than 1 cm. Significant differences are found at distances from the source up to 1 cm. A similar situation occurs between PENELOPE and EGS4.

  6. An absorbed dose to water standard for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources based on water calorimetry: numerical and experimental proof-of-principle.

    PubMed

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Stewart, Kristin; Seuntjens, Jan

    2007-12-01

    Water calorimetry is an established technique for absorbed dose to water measurements in external beams. In this paper, the feasibility of direct absorbed dose measurements for high dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 (192Ir) sources using water calorimetry is established. Feasibility is determined primarily by a balance between the need to obtain sufficient signal to perform a reproducible measurement, the effect of heat loss on the measured signal, and the positioning uncertainty affecting the source-detector distance. The heat conduction pattern generated in water by the Nucletron microSelectron-HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source was simulated using COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS software. Source heating due to radiation self-absorption was calculated using EGSnrcMP. A heat-loss correction k(c) was calculated as the ratio of the temperature rise under ideal conditions to temperature rise under realistic conditions. The calorimeter setup used a parallel-plate calorimeter vessel of 79 mm diameter and 1.12 mm thick front and rear glass windows located 24 mm apart. Absorbed dose was measured with two sources with nominal air kerma strengths of 38 000 and 21 000 U, at source-detector separations ranging from 24.7 to 27.6 mm and irradiation times of 36.0 to 80.0 s. The preliminary measured dose rate per unit air kerma strength of (0.502 +/- 0.007) microGy/(s U) compares well with the TG-43 derived 0.505 microGy/(s U). This work shows that combined dose uncertainties of significantly less than 5% can be achieved with only modest modifications of current water calorimetry techniques and instruments. This work forms the basis of a potential future absolute dose to water standard for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy. PMID:18196821

  7. An absorbed dose to water standard for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources based on water calorimetry: Numerical and experimental proof-of-principle

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Stewart, Kristin; Seuntjens, Jan

    2007-12-15

    Water calorimetry is an established technique for absorbed dose to water measurements in external beams. In this paper, the feasibility of direct absorbed dose measurements for high dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir) sources using water calorimetry is established. Feasibility is determined primarily by a balance between the need to obtain sufficient signal to perform a reproducible measurement, the effect of heat loss on the measured signal, and the positioning uncertainty affecting the source-detector distance. The heat conduction pattern generated in water by the Nucletron microSelectron-HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source was simulated using COMSOL MULTIPHYSICSTM software. Source heating due to radiation self-absorption was calculated using EGSnrcMP. A heat-loss correction k{sub c} was calculated as the ratio of the temperature rise under ideal conditions to temperature rise under realistic conditions. The calorimeter setup used a parallel-plate calorimeter vessel of 79 mm diameter and 1.12 mm thick front and rear glass windows located 24 mm apart. Absorbed dose was measured with two sources with nominal air kerma strengths of 38 000 and 21 000 U, at source-detector separations ranging from 24.7 to 27.6 mm and irradiation times of 36.0 to 80.0 s. The preliminary measured dose rate per unit air kerma strength of (0.502{+-}0.007) {mu}Gy/(s U) compares well with the TG-43 derived 0.505 {mu}Gy/(s U). This work shows that combined dose uncertainties of significantly less than 5% can be achieved with only modest modifications of current water calorimetry techniques and instruments. This work forms the basis of a potential future absolute dose to water standard for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy.

  8. Comparison of 3D dose distributions for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry and treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Senkesen, Oznur; Tezcanli, Evrim; Buyuksarac, Bora; Ozbay, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Radiation fluence changes caused by the dosimeter itself and poor spatial resolution may lead to lack of 3-dimensional (3D) information depending on the features of the dosimeter and quality assurance of dose distributions for high-dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 ((192)Ir) brachytherapy sources is challenging and experimental dosimetry methods used for brachytherapy sources are limited. In this study, we investigated 3D dose distributions of (192)Ir brachytherapy sources for irradiation with single and multiple dwell positions using a normoxic gel dosimeter and compared them with treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. For dose calibration purposes, 100-mL gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses and then scanned in an magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit. Gel phantoms prepared in 2 spherical glasses were irradiated with (192)Ir for the calculated dwell positions, and MR scans of the phantoms were obtained. The images were analyzed with MATLAB software. Dose distributions and profiles derived with 1-mm resolution were compared with TPS calculations. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. The x-, y-, and z-axes were defined as the sagittal, coronal, and axial planes, respectively, the sagittal and axial planes were defined parallel to the long axis of the source while the coronal plane was defined horizontally to the long axis of the source. The differences between measured and calculated profile widths of 3-cm source length and point source for 70%, 50%, and 30% isodose lines were evaluated at 3 dose levels using 18 profiles of comparison. The calculations for 3-cm source length revealed a difference of > 3mm in 1 coordinate at 50% profile width on the sagittal plane and 3 coordinates at 70% profile width and 2 coordinates at 50% and 30% profile widths on the axial plane. Calculations on the coronal plane for 3-cm source length showed > 3-mm difference in 1 coordinate at

  9. Comparison of 3D dose distributions for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry and treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Senkesen, Oznur; Tezcanli, Evrim; Buyuksarac, Bora; Ozbay, Ismail

    2014-10-01

    Radiation fluence changes caused by the dosimeter itself and poor spatial resolution may lead to lack of 3-dimensional (3D) information depending on the features of the dosimeter and quality assurance of dose distributions for high–dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir) brachytherapy sources is challenging and experimental dosimetry methods used for brachytherapy sources are limited. In this study, we investigated 3D dose distributions of {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources for irradiation with single and multiple dwell positions using a normoxic gel dosimeter and compared them with treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. For dose calibration purposes, 100-mL gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses and then scanned in an magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit. Gel phantoms prepared in 2 spherical glasses were irradiated with {sup 192}Ir for the calculated dwell positions, and MR scans of the phantoms were obtained. The images were analyzed with MATLAB software. Dose distributions and profiles derived with 1-mm resolution were compared with TPS calculations. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. The x-, y-, and z-axes were defined as the sagittal, coronal, and axial planes, respectively, the sagittal and axial planes were defined parallel to the long axis of the source while the coronal plane was defined horizontally to the long axis of the source. The differences between measured and calculated profile widths of 3-cm source length and point source for 70%, 50%, and 30% isodose lines were evaluated at 3 dose levels using 18 profiles of comparison. The calculations for 3-cm source length revealed a difference of > 3 mm in 1 coordinate at 50% profile width on the sagittal plane and 3 coordinates at 70% profile width and 2 coordinates at 50% and 30% profile widths on the axial plane. Calculations on the coronal plane for 3-cm source length showed > 3-mm difference in 1

  10. Application of a pelvic phantom in brachytherapy dosimetry for high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir source based on Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Woo Sang; Choi, Wonsik; Shin, Seong Soo; Jung, Jinhong

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we evaluate how the radial dose function is influenced by the source position as well as the phantom size and shape. A pelvic water phantom similar to the pelvic shape of a human body was designed by averaging dimensions obtained from computed tomography (CT) images of patients treated with brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Furthermore, for the study of the effects of source position on the dose distribution, the position of the source in the water phantom was determined by using the center of mass of the gross target volume (GTV) in the CT images. To obtain the dosimetric parameter of a high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir source, we performed Monte Carlo simulations by using the Monte Carlo n-particle extended code (MCNPX). The radial dose functions obtained using the pelvic water phantom were compared with those of spherical phantom with different sizes, including the Monte Carlo (MC) results of Williamson and Li. Differences between the radial dose functions from this study and the data in the literature increased with the radial distances. The largest differences appeared for spherical phantom with the smallest size. In contrast to the published MC results, the radial dose function of the pelvic water phantom significantly decreased with radial distance in the vertical direction because full scattering was not possible. When the source was located in posterior position 2 cm from the center in the pelvic water phantom, the differences between the radial dose functions rapidly decreased with the radial distance in the lower vertical direction. If the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements bladder and rectum points are considered, doses to these reference points could be underestimated by up to 1%-2% at a distance of 3 to 6 cm. Our simulation results provide a valid clinical reference data and can used to improve the accuracy of the doses delivered during brachytherapy applied to patients with cervical cancer.

  11. Using LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs to estimate the absorbed dose to water in liquid water around an {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, P. Avilés Aubineau-Lanièce, I.; Lourenço, V.; Vermesse, D.; Cutarella, D.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The absorbed dose to water is the fundamental reference quantity for brachytherapy treatment planning systems and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) have been recognized as the most validated detectors for measurement of such a dosimetric descriptor. The detector response in a wide energy spectrum as that of an{sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source as well as the specific measurement medium which surrounds the TLD need to be accounted for when estimating the absorbed dose. This paper develops a methodology based on highly sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs to directly estimate the absorbed dose to water in liquid water around a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source. Methods: Different experimental designs in liquid water and air were constructed to study the response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs when irradiated in several standard photon beams of the LNE-LNHB (French national metrology laboratory for ionizing radiation). Measurement strategies and Monte Carlo techniques were developed to calibrate the LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors in the energy interval characteristic of that found when TLDs are immersed in water around an{sup 192}Ir source. Finally, an experimental system was designed to irradiate TLDs at different angles between 1 and 11 cm away from an {sup 192}Ir source in liquid water. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to correct measured results to provide estimates of the absorbed dose to water in water around the {sup 192}Ir source. Results: The dose response dependence of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs with the linear energy transfer of secondary electrons followed the same variations as those of published results. The calibration strategy which used TLDs in air exposed to a standard N-250 ISO x-ray beam and TLDs in water irradiated with a standard{sup 137}Cs beam provided an estimated mean uncertainty of 2.8% (k = 1) in the TLD calibration coefficient for irradiations by the {sup 192}Ir source in water. The 3D TLD measurements performed in liquid water were obtained with a

  12. Dosimetric characterization of model Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131 brachytherapy source in water phantoms and human tissues with MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianhua; Zhang Hualin

    2008-04-15

    A recently developed alternative brachytherapy seed, Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131, has begun to be used in clinical practice. The dosimetric characteristics of this source in various media, particularly in human tissues, have not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to calculate the dosimetric parameters for the Cs-1 Rev2 cesium-131 seed following the recommendations of the AAPM TG-43U1 report [Rivard et al., Med. Phys. 31, 633-674 (2004)] for new sources in brachytherapy applications. Dose rate constants, radial dose functions, and anisotropy functions of the source in water, Virtual Water, and relevant human soft tissues were calculated using MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulations following the TG-43U1 formalism. The results yielded dose rate constants of 1.048, 1.024, 1.041, and 1.044 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} in water, Virtual Water, muscle, and prostate tissue, respectively. The conversion factor for this new source between water and Virtual Water was 1.02, between muscle and water was 1.006, and between prostate and water was 1.004. The authors' calculation of anisotropy functions in a Virtual Water phantom agreed closely with Murphy's measurements [Murphy et al., Med. Phys. 31, 1529-1538 (2004)]. Our calculations of the radial dose function in water and Virtual Water have good agreement with those in previous experimental and Monte Carlo studies. The TG-43U1 parameters for clinical applications in water, muscle, and prostate tissue are presented in this work.

  13. Approaches to calculating AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for 137Cs, 125I, 192Ir, 103Pd, and 169Yb sources.

    PubMed

    Melhus, Christopher S; Rivard, Mark J

    2006-06-01

    Underlying characteristics in brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for medical radionuclides 137Cs, 125I, 192Ir, 103Pd, and 169Yb were examined using Monte Carlo methods. Sources were modeled as unencapsulated point or line sources in liquid water to negate variations due to materials and construction. Importance of phantom size, mode of radiation transport physics--i.e., photon transport only or coupled photon:electron transport, phantom material, volume averaging, and Monte Carlo tally type were studied. For noninfinite media, g(r) was found to degrade as r approached R, the phantom radius. MCNP5 results were in agreement with those published using GEANT4. Brachytherapy dosimetry parameters calculated using coupled photon:electron radiation transport simulations did not differ significantly from those using photon transport only. Dose distributions from low-energy photon-emitting radionuclides 125I and 103Pd were sensitive to phantom material by upto a factor of 1.4 and 2.0, respectively, between tissue-equivalent materials and water at r =9 cm. In comparison, high-energy photons from 137Cs, 192Ir, and 169Yb demonstrated +/- 5% differences in dose distributions between water and tissue substitutes at r=20 cm. Similarly, volume-averaging effects were found to be more significant for low-energy radionuclides. When modeling line sources with L < or = 0.5 cm, the two-dimensional anisotropy function was largely within +/- 0.5% of unity for 137Cs, 125I, and 192Ir. However, an energy and geometry effect was noted for 103Pd and 169Yb, with Pd-103F(0.5,0 degrees)=l.05 and yb-169F(0.5,0 degrees)=0.98 for L=0.5 cm. Simulations of monoenergetic photons for L=0.5 cm produced energy-dependent variations in F(r, theta) having a maximum value at 10 keV, minimum at 50 keV, and approximately 1.0 for higher-energy photons up to 750 keV. Both the F6 cell heating and *F4 track-length estimators were employed to determine brachytherapy dosimetry parameters. F6 was found to be necessary

  14. Approaches to calculating AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 125}I, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 169}Yb sources

    SciTech Connect

    Melhus, Christopher S.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2006-06-15

    Underlying characteristics in brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for medical radionuclides {sup 137}Cs, {sup 125}I, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 169}Yb were examined using Monte Carlo methods. Sources were modeled as unencapsulated point or line sources in liquid water to negate variations due to materials and construction. Importance of phantom size, mode of radiation transport physics--i.e., photon transport only or coupled photon:electron transport, phantom material, volume averaging, and Monte Carlo tally type were studied. For noninfinite media, g(r) was found to degrade as r approached R, the phantom radius. MCNP5 results were in agreement with those published using GEANT4. Brachytherapy dosimetry parameters calculated using coupled photon:electron radiation transport simulations did not differ significantly from those using photon transport only. Dose distributions from low-energy photon-emitting radionuclides {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd were sensitive to phantom material by upto a factor of 1.4 and 2.0, respectively, between tissue-equivalent materials and water at r=9 cm. In comparison, high-energy photons from {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, and {sup 169}Yb demonstrated {+-}5% differences in dose distributions between water and tissue substitutes at r=20 cm. Similarly, volume-averaging effects were found to be more significant for low-energy radionuclides. When modeling line sources with L{<=}0.5 cm, the two-dimensional anisotropy function was largely within {+-}0.5% of unity for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 125}I, and {sup 192}Ir. However, an energy and geometry effect was noted for {sup 103}Pd and {sup 169}Yb, with {sub Pd-103}F(0.5,0 deg.)=1.05 and {sub Yb-169}F(0.5,0 deg.)=0.98 for L=0.5 cm. Simulations of monoenergetic photons for L=0.5 cm produced energy-dependent variations in F(r,{theta}) having a maximum value at 10 keV, minimum at 50 keV, and {approx}1.0 for higher-energy photons up to 750 keV. Both the F6 cell heating and track-length estimators were

  15. A review of californium-252 neutron brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.; van Nagell, J.R.; Yoneda, J.; Donaldson, E.S.; Gallion, H.H.; Powell, D.; Kryscio, R.J. )

    1991-09-15

    Since 1976 a clinical trial has been conducted to test the feasibility, the potential, and to develop methods for using the neutron-emitting radioactive isotope, californium-252 (Cf-252), for the treatment of cervical cancer. A total of 218 patients were treated in the initial study period from 1976 until 1983. The trials initially treated advanced cervical cancer patients using different doses and schedules; they were extended to include unfavorable presentations of Stages 1 and 2 because of favorable results in the initial trials. The authors began to treat patients with Stage IB bulky or barrel-shaped tumors and the majority were treated with both radiation and hysterectomy. Actuarial survival was determined for Stage IB disease and was 87% at 5 years and 82% at 10 years. For those tested with preoperative radiation it was 92% at 5 and 87% at 10 years. For Stage 2, it was 62% 5 years and 61% at 10. Survival 5 years after combined radiation and surgical therapy for Stage 2 disease was 68%. For Stage 3, it was 33% at 5 years and 25% at 10. However, 5-year survival using the early neutron implant was 46% versus approximately 19% for delayed Cf-252 or cesium 137. Different schedules and sequences of neutrons and photons greatly altered outcome. Neutron treatment before external photon therapy was better for all stages of disease. Only about 5% of all patients developed complications after neutron therapy. No hematologic or mesenchymal second tumors were observed. Neutron brachytherapy was found to be very effective for producing rapid response and greatly improved local control of bulky, barrel, or advanced cervical cancers. The clinical trial identified and evolved schedules, doses, doses per session, and developed methods different from standard photon therapy but highly effective for local control and cure of cervical cancers of all stages.

  16. Measurement of absorbed dose to water around an electronic brachytherapy source. Comparison of two dosimetry systems: lithium formate EPR dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolfsson, Emelie; White, Shane; Landry, Guillaume; Lund, Eva; Gustafsson, Håkan; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2015-05-01

    Interest in high dose rate (HDR) electronic brachytherapy operating at 50 kV is increasing. For quality assurance it is important to identify dosimetry systems that can measure the absorbed doses in absolute terms which is difficult in this energy region. In this work a comparison is made between two dosimetry systems, EPR lithium formate dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film. Both types of dosimeters were irradiated simultaneously in a PMMA phantom using the Axxent EBS. Absorbed dose to water was determined at distances of 10 mm, 30 mm and 50 mm from the EBS. Results were traceable to different primary standards as regards to absorbed dose to water (EPR) and air kerma (EBT2). Monte Carlo simulations were used in absolute terms as a third estimate of absorbed dose to water. Agreement within the estimated expanded (k = 2) uncertainties (5% (EPR), 7% (EBT2)) was found between the results at 30 mm and 50 mm from the x-ray source. The same result was obtained in 4 repetitions of irradiation, indicating high precision in the measurements with both systems. At all distances, agreement between EPR and Monte Carlo simulations was shown as was also the case for the film measurements at 30mm and 50mm. At 10mm the geometry for the film measurements caused too large uncertainty in measured values depending on the exact position (within sub-mm distances) of the EBS and the 10 mm film results were exculded from comparison. This work has demonstrated good performance of the lithium formate EPR dosimetry system in accordance with earlier experiments at higher photon energies (192Ir HDR brachytherapy). It was also highlighted that there might be issues regarding the energy dependence and intrinsic efficiency of the EBT2 film that need to be considered for measurements using low energy sources.

  17. The dosimetric feasibility of gold nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy (GNRT) via brachytherapy using low-energy gamma-/x-ray sources

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang Hyun; Jones, Bernard L; Krishnan, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    The preferential accumulation of gold nanoparticles within tumors and the increased photoelectric absorption due to the high atomic number of gold cooperatively account for the possibility of significant tumor dose enhancement during gold nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy (GNRT). Among the many conceivable ways to implement GNRT clinically, a brachytherapy approach using low-energy gamma-/x-ray sources (i.e. Eavg < 100 keV) appears to be highly feasible and promising, because it may easily fulfill some of the technical and clinical requirements for GNRT. Therefore, the current study investigated the dosimetric feasibility of implementing GNRT using the following sources: 125I, 50 kVp and 169Yb. Specifically, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations were performed to determine the macroscopic dose enhancement factors (MDEF), defined as the ratio of the average dose in the tumor region with and without the presence of gold nanoparticles during the irradiation of the tumor, and the photo/Auger electron spectra within a tumor loaded with gold nanoparticles. The current study suggests that a significant tumor dose enhancement (e.g. >40%) could be achievable using 125I, 50 kVp and 169Yb sources and gold nanoparticles. When calculated at 1.0 cm from the center of the source within a tumor loaded with 18 mg Au g−1, macroscopic dose enhancement was 116, 92 and 108% for 125I, 50 kVp and 169Yb, respectively. For a tumor loaded with 7 mg Au g−1, it was 68, 57 and 44% at 1 cm from the center of the source for 125I, 50 kVp and 169Yb, respectively. The estimated MDEF values for 169Yb were remarkably larger than those for 192Ir, on average by up to about 70 and 30%, for 18 mg Au and 7 mg Au cases, respectively. The current MC study also shows a remarkable change in the photoelectron fluence and spectrum (e.g. more than two orders of magnitude) and a significant production (e.g. comparable to the number of photoelectrons) of the Auger electrons within the tumor region due to the

  18. Brachytherapy in pelvic malignancies: a review for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Vicens, Rafael A; Rodriguez, Joshua; Sheplan, Lawrence; Mayo, Cody; Mayo, Lauren; Jensen, Corey

    2015-10-01

    Brachytherapy, also known as sealed source or internal radiation therapy, involves placement of a radioactive source immediately adjacent to or within tumor, thus enabling delivery of a localized high dose of radiation. Compared with external beam radiation which must first pass through non-target tissues, brachytherapy results in less radiation dose to normal tissues. In the past decade, brachytherapy use has markedly increased, thus radiologists are encountering brachytherapy devices and their associated post-treatment changes to increasing degree. This review will present a variety of brachytherapy devices that radiologists may encounter during diagnostic pelvic imaging with a focus on prostate and gynecologic malignancies. The reader will become familiar with the function, correct position, and potential complications of brachytherapy devices in an effort to improve diagnostic reporting and communication with clinicians. PMID:25820802

  19. Clinical implementation of a new electronic brachytherapy system for skin brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ballester-Sánchez, Rosa; Celada-Álvarez, Francisco Javier; Candela-Juan, Cristian; García-Martínez, Teresa; Llavador-Ros, Margarita; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Barker, Christopher A.; Ballesta, Antonio; Tormo-Micó, Alejandro; Rodríguez, Silvia; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Although surgery is usually the first-line treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancers, radiotherapy (RT) may be indicated in selected cases. Radiation therapy as primary therapy can result in excellent control rates, cosmetics, and quality of life. Brachytherapy is a radiation treatment modality that offers the most conformal option to patients. A new modality for skin brachytherapy is electronic brachytherapy. This involves the placement of a high dose rate X-ray source directly in a skin applicator close to the skin surface, and therefore combines the benefits of brachytherapy with those of low energy X-ray radiotherapy. The Esteya electronic brachytherapy system is specifically designed for skin surface brachytherapy procedures. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the clinical implementation of the new Esteya electronic brachytherapy system, which may provide guidance for users of this system. The information covered includes patient selection, treatment planning (depth evaluation and margin determination), patient marking, and setup. The justification for the hypofractionated regimen is described and compared with others protocols in the literature. Quality assurance (QA) aspects including daily testing are also included. We emphasize that these are guidelines, and clinical judgment and experience must always prevail in the care of patients, as with any medical treatment. We conclude that clinical implementation of the Esteya brachytherapy system is simple for patients and providers, and should allow for precise and safe treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancers. PMID:25834587

  20. SU-E-T-102: Determination of Dose Distributions and Water-Equivalence of MAGIC-F Polymer Gel for 60Co and 192Ir Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Quevedo, A; Nicolucci, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f polymer gel for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir clinical brachytherapy sources, through dose distributions simulated with PENELOPE Monte Carlo code. Methods: The real geometry of {sup 60} (BEBIG, modelo Co0.A86) and {sup 192}192Ir (Varian, model GammaMed Plus) clinical brachytherapy sources were modelled on PENELOPE Monte Carlo simulation code. The most probable emission lines of photons were used for both sources: 17 emission lines for {sup 192}Ir and 12 lines for {sup 60}. The dose distributions were obtained in a cubic water or gel homogeneous phantom (30 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}), with the source positioned in the middle of the phantom. In all cases the number of simulation showers remained constant at 10{sup 9} particles. A specific material for gel was constructed in PENELOPE using weight fraction components of MAGIC-f: wH = 0,1062, wC = 0,0751, wN = 0,0139, wO = 0,8021, wS = 2,58×10{sup −6} e wCu = 5,08 × 10{sup −6}. The voxel size in the dose distributions was 0.6 mm. Dose distribution maps on the longitudinal and radial direction through the centre of the source were used to analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f. Results: For the {sup 60} source, the maximum diferences in relative doses obtained in the gel and water were 0,65% and 1,90%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. For {sup 192}Ir, the maximum difereces in relative doses were 0,30% and 1,05%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. The materials equivalence can also be verified through the effective atomic number and density of each material: Zef-MAGIC-f = 7,07 e .MAGIC-f = 1,060 g/cm{sup 3} and Zef-water = 7,22. Conclusion: The results showed that MAGIC-f is water equivalent, consequently being suitable to simulate soft tissue, for Cobalt and Iridium energies. Hence, gel can be used as a dosimeter in clinical applications. Further investigation to its use in a clinical protocol is needed.

  1. Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements of the TG-43U1-recommended dosimetric parameters of 125I (Model IR-Seed2) brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, Sahar; Nedaie, Hasan Ali; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Pourbeigi, Hossein; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Zehtabian, Mehdi; Hasani, Mohsen; Meigooni, Ali S

    2016-01-01

    A new design of 125I (Model IR-Seed2) brachytherapy source has been manufactured recently at the Applied Radiation Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute in Iran. The source consists of six resin beads (0.5 mm diameter) that are sealed in a cylindrical titanium capsule of 0.7 mm internal and 0.8 mm external diameters. This work aims to evaluate the dosimetric parameters of the newly designed 125I source using experimental measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Dosimetric characteristics (dose rate constant, radial dose function, and 2D and 1D anisotropy functions) of the IR-Seed2 were determined using experimental measurements and MC simulations following the recommendations by the Task Group 43 (TG-43U1) report of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). MC simulations were performed using the MCNP5 code in water and Plexiglas, and experimental measurements were carried out using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-GR207A) in Plexiglas phantoms. The measured dose to water in Plexiglas data were used for verification of the accuracy of the source and phantom geometry in the Monte Carlo simulations. The final MC simulated data to water in water were recommended for clinical applications. The MC calculated dose rate constant (Λ) of the IR-Seed2 125I seed in water was found to be 0.992 ± 0.025 cGy h-1U-1. Additionally, its radial dose function by line and point source approximations, gL(r) and gp(r), calculated for distances from 0.1 cm to 7 cm. The values of gL(r) at radial distances from 0.5 cm to 5 cm were measured in a Plexiglas phantom to be between 1.212 and 0.413. The calculated and measured of values for 2D anisotropy function, F(r, θ), were obtained for the radial distances ranging from 1.5 cm to 5 cm and angular range of 0°-90° in a Plexiglas phantom. Also, the 2D anisotropy function was calculated in water for the clinical application. The results of these investigations show that the uncertainty of

  2. A revised dosimetric characterization of the model S700 electronic brachytherapy source containing an anode-centering plastic insert and other components not included in the 2006 model

    SciTech Connect

    Hiatt, Jessica R.; Davis, Stephen D.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source by Xoft, Inc., was characterized by Rivard et al. in 2006. Since then, the source design was modified to include a new insert at the source tip. Current study objectives were to establish an accurate source model for simulation purposes, dosimetrically characterize the new source and obtain its TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters, and determine dose differences between the original simulation model and the current model S700 source design. Methods: Design information from measurements of dissected model S700 sources and from vendor-supplied CAD drawings was used to aid establishment of an updated Monte Carlo source model, which included the complex-shaped plastic source-centering insert intended to promote water flow for cooling the source anode. These data were used to create a model for subsequent radiation transport simulations in a water phantom. Compared to the 2006 simulation geometry, the influence of volume averaging close to the source was substantially reduced. A track-length estimator was used to evaluate collision kerma as a function of radial distance and polar angle for determination of TG-43 dosimetry parameters. Results for the 50 kV source were determined every 0.1 cm from 0.3 to 15 cm and every 1° from 0° to 180°. Photon spectra in water with 0.1 keV resolution were also obtained from 0.5 to 15 cm and polar angles from 0° to 165°. Simulations were run for 10{sup 10} histories, resulting in statistical uncertainties on the transverse plane of 0.04% at r = 1 cm and 0.06% at r = 5 cm. Results: The dose-rate distribution ratio for the model S700 source as compared to the 2006 model exceeded unity by more than 5% for roughly one quarter of the solid angle surrounding the source, i.e., θ ≥ 120°. The radial dose function diminished in a similar manner as for an {sup 125}I seed, with values of 1.434, 0.636, 0.283, and 0.0975 at 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 cm, respectively. The radial dose

  3. SU-C-16A-01: In Vivo Source Position Verification in High Dose Rate (HDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Flat Panel Imager: Initial Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Franich, R; Smith, R; Millar, J; Haworth, A; Taylor, M; McDermott, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We report our initial clinical experience with a novel position-sensitive source-tracking system based on a flat panel imager. The system has been trialled with 4 prostate HDR brachytherapy patients (8 treatment fractions) in this initial study. Methods: The flat panel imaging system was mounted under a customised carbon fibre couch top assembly (Figure 1). Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate of each patient at the time of catheter placement. X-ray dwell position markers were inserted into three catheters and a radiograph acquired to locate the implant relative to the imaging device. During treatment, as the HDR source dwells were delivered, images were acquired and processed to determine the position of the source in the patient. Source positions measured by the imaging device were compared to the treatment plan for verification of treatment delivery. Results: Measured dwell positions provided verification of relative dwell spacing within and between catheters, in the coronal plane. Measurements were typically within 2.0mm (0.2mm – 3.3mm, s.d. 0.8mm) of the planned positions over 60 dwells (Figure 2). Discrimination between larger dwell intervals and catheter differentiation were clear. This confirms important delivery attributes such as correct transfer tube connection, source step size, relative catheter positions and therefore overall correct plan selection and delivery. The fiducial markers, visible on the radiograph, provided verification of treatment delivery to the correct anatomical location. The absolute position of the dwells was determined by comparing the measured dwell positions with the x-ray markers from the radiograph, validating the programmed treatment indexer length. The total impact on procedure time was less than 5 minutes. Conclusion: The novel, noninvasive HDR brachytherapy treatment verification system was used clinically with minor impact on workflow. The system allows verification of correct treatment

  4. Dosimetric comparison between the microSelectron HDR 192Ir v2 source and the BEBIG 60Co source for HDR brachytherapy using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo transport code

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. Anwarul; Akramuzzaman, M. M.; Zakaria, G. A.

    2012-01-01

    Manufacturing of miniaturized high activity 192Ir sources have been made a market preference in modern brachytherapy. The smaller dimensions of the sources are flexible for smaller diameter of the applicators and it is also suitable for interstitial implants. Presently, miniaturized 60Co HDR sources have been made available with identical dimensions to those of 192Ir sources. 60Co sources have an advantage of longer half life while comparing with 192Ir source. High dose rate brachytherapy sources with longer half life are logically pragmatic solution for developing country in economic point of view. This study is aimed to compare the TG-43U1 dosimetric parameters for new BEBIG 60Co HDR and new microSelectron 192Ir HDR sources. Dosimetric parameters are calculated using EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo simulation code accordance with the AAPM TG-43 formalism for microSlectron HDR 192Ir v2 and new BEBIG 60Co HDR sources. Air-kerma strength per unit source activity, calculated in dry air are 9.698×10-8 ± 0.55% U Bq-1 and 3.039×10-7 ± 0.41% U Bq-1 for the above mentioned two sources, respectively. The calculated dose rate constants per unit air-kerma strength in water medium are 1.116±0.12% cGy h-1U-1 and 1.097±0.12% cGy h-1U-1, respectively, for the two sources. The values of radial dose function for distances up to 1 cm and more than 22 cm for BEBIG 60Co HDR source are higher than that of other source. The anisotropic values are sharply increased to the longitudinal sides of the BEBIG 60Co source and the rise is comparatively sharper than that of the other source. Tissue dependence of the absorbed dose has been investigated with vacuum phantom for breast, compact bone, blood, lung, thyroid, soft tissue, testis, and muscle. No significant variation is noted at 5 cm of radial distance in this regard while comparing the two sources except for lung tissues. The true dose rates are calculated with considering photon as well as electron transport using appropriate cut

  5. Modified Fletcher's 3-channel brachytherapy system with vaginal line source loading versus uterine tandem and vaginal cylinder system in Stage IIIA cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Low, JSH; Ng, KB

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The uterine tandem with open-ended vaginal cylinder is the most commonly used brachytherapy system for Federation Internationale de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique (FIGO) Stage IIIA cervix cancer at the National Cancer Centre, Singapore. Without the 3-channel ovoid system, the dose to the parametrium is often compromised. In this study, a vaginal cylinder that could potentially be incorporated with the 3-channel system was developed, hence addressing the problem of treating both the vaginal disease extension and the parametrium. Methods and materials A hollow cylinder of 3 cm in diameter was incorporated with the Fletcher's 3-channel tandem and ovoid system. Treatment plans were generated with the single tandem line source with a vaginal cylinder applicator and the modified Fletcher's system using the Abacus version 3 brachytherapy treatment planning software. A nominal dose of 5 Gy was prescribed to point H for both plans. The perpendicular distance of the 5 Gy isodose line from the uterine tandem plane at the centre of the ovoid and the vaginal cylinder plane 1 cm below the os guard were then compared. Results The 5 Gy isodose line was 1.7 cm from the uterine tandem source at the location lateral through the centre of the ovoids on the plan with the uterine tandem and vaginal cylinder system as compared to a distance of 3.3 cm using the modified 3-channel Fletcher system. The 5 Gy isodose line was 2 cm lateral to the central source at the vaginal cylinder plane 1 cm below the os guard on the uterine tandem and vaginal cylinder system as compared to a distance of 2.5 cm on the Modified-Fletcher system. This corresponds to an increase of 1.6 cm and 0.5 cm depth of treated parametrium on the uterine tandem plane and vaginal cylinder plane respectively with the modified Fletcher's applicator as compared with the single line source cylinder system. Conclusion As compared with the single uterine tandem and open-ended vaginal cylinder system, an addition of 1.6 cm

  6. Image guided Brachytherapy: The paradigm of Gynecologic and Partial Breast HDR Brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantopoulos, S.; Kantemiris, I.; Konidari, A.; Zaverdinos, P.

    2015-09-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy uses high strength radioactive sources and temporary interstitial implants to conform the dose to target and minimize the treatment time. The advances of imaging technology enable accurate reconstruction of the implant and exact delineation of high-risk CTV and the surrounding critical structures. Furthermore, with sophisticated treatment planning systems, applicator devices and stepping source afterloaders, brachytherapy evolved to a more precise, safe and individualized treatment. At the Radiation Oncology Department of Metropolitan Hospital Athens, MRI guided HDR gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with brachytherapy are performed routinely. Contouring and treatment planning are based on the recommendations of the GEC - ESTRO Working group. The task of this presentation is to reveal the advantages of 3D image guided brachytherapy over 2D brachytherapy. Thus, two patients treated at our department (one GYN and one APBI) will be presented. The advantage of having adequate dose coverage of the high risk CTV and simultaneous low doses to the OARs when using 3D image- based brachytherapy will be presented. The treatment techniques, equipment issues, as well as implantation, imaging and treatment planning procedures will be described. Quality assurance checks will be treated separately.

  7. Verification and source-position error analysis of film reconstruction techniques used in the brachytherapy planning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Liyun; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Chui, Chen-Shou; Du, Yi-Chun; Chen Tainsong

    2009-09-15

    A method was presented that employs standard linac QA tools to verify the accuracy of film reconstruction algorithms used in the brachytherapy planning system. Verification of reconstruction techniques is important as suggested in the ESTRO booklet 8: ''The institution should verify the full process of any reconstruction technique employed clinically.'' Error modeling was also performed to analyze seed-position errors. The ''isocentric beam checker'' device was used in this work. It has a two-dimensional array of steel balls embedded on its surface. The checker was placed on the simulator couch with its center ball coincident with the simulator isocenter, and one axis of its cross marks parallel to the axis of gantry rotation. The gantry of the simulator was rotated to make the checker behave like a three-dimensional array of balls. Three algorithms used in the ABACUS treatment planning system: orthogonal film, 2-films-with-variable-angle, and 3-films-with-variable-angle were tested. After exposing and digitizing the films, the position of each steel ball on the checker was reconstructed and compared to its true position, which can be accurately calculated. The results showed that the error is dependent on the object-isocenter distance, but not the magnification of the object. The averaged errors were less than 1 mm within the tolerance level defined by Roueet al. [''The EQUAL-ESTRO audit on geometric reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy,'' Radiother. Oncol. 78, 78-83 (2006)]. However, according to the error modeling, the theoretical error would be greater than 2 mm if the objects were located more than 20 cm away from the isocenter with a 0.5 deg. reading error of the gantry and collimator angles. Thus, in addition to carefully performing the QA of the gantry and collimator angle indicators, it is suggested that the patient, together with the applicators or seeds inside, should be placed close to the isocenter as much as possible. This method could be used

  8. A generic high-dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, Facundo; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Granero, Domingo; Haworth, Annette; Mourtada, Firas; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Rivard, Mark J.; Siebert, Frank-André; Sloboda, Ron S.; and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic {sup 192}Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra{sup ®} Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS{sup TM}]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201){sup 3} voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by

  9. Silver fluorescent x-ray yield and its influence on the dose rate constant for nine low-energy brachytherapy source models

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Ravinder; Chen, Zhe Jay

    2007-10-15

    The physical characteristics of the photons emitted by a low-energy brachytherapy source are strongly dependent on the source's construction. Aside from absorption and scattering caused by the internal structures and the source encapsulation, the photoelectric interactions occurred in certain type of source-construction materials can generate additional energetic characteristic x rays with energies different from those emitted by the bare radionuclide. As a result, the same radionuclide encapsulated in different source models can result in dose rate constants and other dosimetric parameters that are strikingly different from each other. The aim of this work was to perform a systematic study on the yield of silver fluorescent x rays produced in nine {sup 125}I sources that are known to contain silver and its impact on the dose-rate constant. Using a high-resolution germanium spectrometer, the relative {sup 125}I spectra emitted by the nine sources on its bisector were measured and found to be similar to each other (the maximum variation in the {sup 125}I-K{sub {beta}} relative intensity was less than 4%). On the other hand, the measured silver fluorescent x-ray spectra exhibited much greater variations from model to model; the maximum change in the measured Ag-K{sub {alpha}} relative intensity was over 95%. This larger variation in the measured silver fluorescent x-ray yield was caused by (1) the different amount of silver that was directly exposed to the {sup 125}I radionuclide in different source models and (2) the stronger influence of the source's internal geometry on the silver fluorescent x rays. Because the addition of silver fluorescent x rays can significantly alter the photon characteristics emitted by the radioactive sources, a precise knowledge on the silver fluorescent x-ray yield is needed in theoretical calculations of the sources' intrinsic dosimetric properties. This study concludes that the differences in silver fluorescent yield are the primary

  10. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 03: Current status of the NRC primary standard for {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mainegra-Hing, E; Downton, Brad

    2014-08-15

    The Canadian primary standard for {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy sources has been recently revised in a more accurate manner allowing for more realistic uncertainty estimation. Air-kerma strength S{sub k} is derived from measurements of the source's output using a graphite-walled spherical ionization chamber (2S) at several distances. Traceability to NRC primary standards for the {sup 192}Ir calibration coefficient N{sub k} is insured by estimating it as the inverse arithmetic mean of the inverse of the calibration coefficients for a {sup 137}Cs beam and the medium energy x-ray beam quality N250, both of which are traceable to NRC primary standards. The multiple-distance method is combined with a non-linear least squares fit to determine St, while at the same time removing the effects of room scatter and position offset. The previously used shadow-cone method for directly measuring the room scatter is found to be inadequate due to the increased scatter contribution from the lead cone itself, especially at short source-detector distances. Rather than including the reported 1% difference in source strength for {sup 192}Ir HDR sources of different construction into the total uncertainty, users are cautioned that the calibration coefficient provided by NRC is only valid for a microSelectron V2 model. A comprehensive uncertainty budged shows that the total one sigma uncertainty of the standard is actually 0.6% rather than the previously assumed 1.2%. NRC measured S{sub k} agrees within 0.03% of the manufacturer's value.

  11. Characteristics of miniature electronic brachytherapy x-ray sources based on TG-43U1 formalism using Monte Carlo simulation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Safigholi, Habib; Faghihi, Reza; Jashni, Somaye Karimi; Meigooni, Ali S.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study is to determine a method for Monte Carlo (MC) characterization of the miniature electronic brachytherapy x-ray sources (MEBXS) and to set dosimetric parameters according to TG-43U1 formalism. TG-43U1 parameters were used to get optimal designs of MEBXS. Parameters that affect the dose distribution such as anode shapes, target thickness, target angles, and electron beam source characteristics were evaluated. Optimized MEBXS designs were obtained and used to determine radial dose functions and 2D anisotropy functions in the electron energy range of 25-80 keV. Methods: Tungsten anode material was considered in two different geometries, hemispherical and conical-hemisphere. These configurations were analyzed by the 4C MC code with several different optimization techniques. The first optimization compared target thickness layers versus electron energy. These optimized thicknesses were compared with published results by Ihsan et al.[Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 264, 371-377 (2007)]. The second optimization evaluated electron source characteristics by changing the cathode shapes and electron energies. Electron sources studied included; (1) point sources, (2) uniform cylinders, and (3) nonuniform cylindrical shell geometries. The third optimization was used to assess the apex angle of the conical-hemisphere target. The goal of these optimizations was to produce 2D-dose anisotropy functions closer to unity. An overall optimized MEBXS was developed from this analysis. The results obtained from this model were compared to known characteristics of HDR {sup 125}I, LDR {sup 103}Pd, and Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy source (XAEBS) [Med. Phys. 33, 4020-4032 (2006)]. Results: The optimized anode thicknesses as a function of electron energy is fitted by the linear equation Y ({mu}m) = 0.0459X (keV)-0.7342. The optimized electron source geometry is obtained for a disk-shaped parallel beam (uniform cylinder) with 0.9 mm radius. The TG-43

  12. SU-F-19A-05: Experimental and Monte Carlo Characterization of the 1 Cm CivaString 103Pd Brachytherapy Source

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J; Micka, J; Culberson, W; DeWerd, L; Rivard, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the in-air azimuthal anisotropy and in-water dose distribution for the 1 cm length of the CivaString {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy source through measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) dosimetry parameters were also determined for this source. Methods: The in-air azimuthal anisotropy of the source was measured with a NaI scintillation detector and simulated with the MCNP5 radiation transport code. Measured and simulated results were normalized to their respective mean values and compared. The TG-43 dose-rate constant, line-source radial dose function, and 2D anisotropy function for this source were determined from LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements and MC simulations. The impact of {sup 103}Pd well-loading variability on the in-water dose distribution was investigated using MC simulations by comparing the dose distribution for a source model with four wells of equal strength to that for a source model with strengths increased by 1% for two of the four wells. Results: NaI scintillation detector measurements and MC simulations of the in-air azimuthal anisotropy showed that ≥95% of the normalized data were within 1.2% of the mean value. TLD measurements and MC simulations of the TG-43 dose-rate constant, line-source radial dose function, and 2D anisotropy function agreed to within the experimental TLD uncertainties (k=2). MC simulations showed that a 1% variability in {sup 103}Pd well-loading resulted in changes of <0.1%, <0.1%, and <0.3% in the TG-43 dose-rate constant, radial dose distribution, and polar dose distribution, respectively. Conclusion: The CivaString source has a high degree of azimuthal symmetry as indicated by the NaI scintillation detector measurements and MC simulations of the in-air azimuthal anisotropy. TG-43 dosimetry parameters for this source were determined from TLD measurements and MC simulations. {sup 103}Pd well

  13. Comparison of organ doses for patients undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the breast with HDR 192Ir or electronic sources using Monte Carlo simulations in a heterogeneous human phantom1

    PubMed Central

    Mille, Matthew M.; Xu, X. George; Rivard, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation via interstitial balloon brachytherapy is a fast and effective treatment method for certain early stage breast cancers. The radiation can be delivered using a conventional high-dose rate (HDR) 192Ir gamma-emitting source or a novel electronic brachytherapy (eBx) source which uses lower energy x rays that do not penetrate as far within the patient. A previous study [A. Dickler, M. C. Kirk, N. Seif, K. Griem, K. Dowlatshahi, D. Francescatti, and R. A. Abrams, “A dosimetric comparison of MammoSite high-dose-rate brachytherapy and Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy,” Brachytherapy 6, 164–168 (2007)] showed that the target dose is similar for HDR 192Ir and eBx. This study compares these sources based on the dose received by healthy organs and tissues away from the treatment site. Methods: A virtual patient with left breast cancer was represented by a whole-body, tissue-heterogeneous female voxel phantom. Monte Carlo methods were used to calculate the dose to healthy organs in a virtual patient undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the left breast with HDR 192Ir or eBx sources. The dose-volume histograms for a few organs which received large doses were also calculated. Additional simulations were performed with all tissues in the phantom defined as water to study the effect of tissue inhomogeneities. Results: For both HDR 192Ir and eBx, the largest mean organ doses were received by the ribs, thymus gland, left lung, heart, and sternum which were close to the brachytherapy source in the left breast. eBx yielded mean healthy organ doses that were more than a factor of ∼1.4 smaller than for HDR 192Ir for all organs considered, except for the three closest ribs. Excluding these ribs, the average and median dose-reduction factors were ∼28 and ∼11, respectively. The volume distribution of doses in nearby soft tissue organs that were outside the PTV were also improved with eBx. However, the maximum dose to the closest

  14. Comparison of organ doses for patients undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the breast with HDR {sup 192}Ir or electronic sources using Monte Carlo simulations in a heterogeneous human phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Mille, Matthew M.; Xu, X. George; Rivard, Mark J.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation via interstitial balloon brachytherapy is a fast and effective treatment method for certain early stage breast cancers. The radiation can be delivered using a conventional high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir gamma-emitting source or a novel electronic brachytherapy (eBx) source which uses lower energy x rays that do not penetrate as far within the patient. A previous study [A. Dickler, M. C. Kirk, N. Seif, K. Griem, K. Dowlatshahi, D. Francescatti, and R. A. Abrams, ''A dosimetric comparison of MammoSite high-dose-rate brachytherapy and Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy,'' Brachytherapy 6, 164-168 (2007)] showed that the target dose is similar for HDR {sup 192}Ir and eBx. This study compares these sources based on the dose received by healthy organs and tissues away from the treatment site. Methods: A virtual patient with left breast cancer was represented by a whole-body, tissue-heterogeneous female voxel phantom. Monte Carlo methods were used to calculate the dose to healthy organs in a virtual patient undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the left breast with HDR {sup 192}Ir or eBx sources. The dose-volume histograms for a few organs which received large doses were also calculated. Additional simulations were performed with all tissues in the phantom defined as water to study the effect of tissue inhomogeneities. Results: For both HDR {sup 192}Ir and eBx, the largest mean organ doses were received by the ribs, thymus gland, left lung, heart, and sternum which were close to the brachytherapy source in the left breast. eBx yielded mean healthy organ doses that were more than a factor of {approx}1.4 smaller than for HDR {sup 192}Ir for all organs considered, except for the three closest ribs. Excluding these ribs, the average and median dose-reduction factors were {approx}28 and {approx}11, respectively. The volume distribution of doses in nearby soft tissue organs that were outside the PTV were also improved with e

  15. Optimization of deterministic transport parameters for the calculation of the dose distribution around a high dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Kent A; Price, Michael J; Horton, John L; Wareing, Todd A; Mourtada, Firas

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this work was to calculate the dose distribution around a high dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy source using a multi-group discrete ordinates code and then to compare the results with a Monte Carlo calculated dose distribution. The unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete ordinates code Attila version 6.1.1 was used to calculate the photon kerma rate distribution in water around the Nucletron microSelectron mHDRv2 source. MCNPX 2.5.c was used to compute the Monte Carlo water photon kerma rate distribution. Two hundred million histories were simulated, resulting in standard errors of the mean of less than 3% overall. The number of energy groups, S(n) (angular order), P(n) (scattering order), and mesh elements were varied in addition to the method of analytic ray tracing to assess their effects on the deterministic solution. Water photon kerma rate matrices were exported from both codes into an in-house data analysis software. This software quantified the percent dose difference distribution, the number of points within +/- 3% and +/- 5%, and the mean percent difference between the two codes. The data demonstrated that a 5 energy-group cross-section set calculated results to within 0.5% of a 15 group cross-section set. S12 was sufficient to resolve the solution in angle. P2 expansion of the scattering cross-section was necessary to compute accurate distributions. A computational mesh with 55 064 tetrahedral elements in a 30 cm diameter phantom resolved the solution spatially. An efficiency factor of 110 with the above parameters was realized in comparison to MC methods. The Attila code provided an accurate and efficient solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for the mHDRv2 source. PMID:18649459

  16. Optimization of deterministic transport parameters for the calculation of the dose distribution around a high dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Gifford, Kent A.; Price, Michael J.; Horton, John L. Jr.; Wareing, Todd A.; Mourtada, Firas

    2008-06-15

    The goal of this work was to calculate the dose distribution around a high dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source using a multi-group discrete ordinates code and then to compare the results with a Monte Carlo calculated dose distribution. The unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete ordinates code Attila version 6.1.1 was used to calculate the photon kerma rate distribution in water around the Nucletron microSelectron mHDRv2 source. MCNPX 2.5.c was used to compute the Monte Carlo water photon kerma rate distribution. Two hundred million histories were simulated, resulting in standard errors of the mean of less than 3% overall. The number of energy groups, S{sub n} (angular order), P{sub n} (scattering order), and mesh elements were varied in addition to the method of analytic ray tracing to assess their effects on the deterministic solution. Water photon kerma rate matrices were exported from both codes into an in-house data analysis software. This software quantified the percent dose difference distribution, the number of points within {+-}3% and {+-}5%, and the mean percent difference between the two codes. The data demonstrated that a 5 energy-group cross-section set calculated results to within 0.5% of a 15 group cross-section set. S{sub 12} was sufficient to resolve the solution in angle. P{sub 2} expansion of the scattering cross-section was necessary to compute accurate distributions. A computational mesh with 55 064 tetrahedral elements in a 30 cm diameter phantom resolved the solution spatially. An efficiency factor of 110 with the above parameters was realized in comparison to MC methods. The Attila code provided an accurate and efficient solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for the mHDRv2 source.

  17. Gadolinium-153 as a brachytherapy isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enger, Shirin A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to present the fundamental dosimetric characteristics of a hypothetical 153Gd brachytherapy source using the AAPM TG-43U1 dose-calculation formalism. Gadolinium-153 is an intermediate-energy isotope that emits 40-100 keV photons with a half-life of 242 days. The rationale for considering 153Gd as a brachytherapy source is for its potential of patient specific shielding and to enable reduced personnel shielding requirements relative to 192Ir, and as an isotope for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT). A hypothetical 153Gd brachytherapy source with an active core of 0.84 mm diameter, 10 mm length and specific activity of 5.55 TBq of 153Gd per gram of Gd was simulated with Geant4. The encapsulation material was stainless steel with a thickness of 0.08 mm. The radial dose function, anisotropy function and photon spectrum in water were calculated for the 153Gd source. The simulated 153Gd source had an activity of 242 GBq and a dose rate in water 1 cm off axis of 13.12 Gy h-1, indicating that it would be suitable as a low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The beta particles emitted have low enough energies to be absorbed in the source encapsulation. Gadolinium-153 has an increasing radial dose function due to multiple scatter of low-energy photons. Scattered photon dose takes over with distance from the source and contributes to the majority of the absorbed dose. The anisotropy function of the 153Gd source decreases at low polar angles, as a result of the long active core. The source is less anisotropic at polar angles away from the longitudinal axes. The anisotropy function increases with increasing distance. The 153Gd source considered would be suitable as an intermediate-energy low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The source could provide a means for I-RSBT delivery and enable brachytherapy treatments with patient specific shielding and reduced personnel shielding requirements relative to

  18. Gadolinium-153 as a brachytherapy isotope.

    PubMed

    Enger, Shirin A; Fisher, Darrell R; Flynn, Ryan T

    2013-02-21

    The purpose of this work was to present the fundamental dosimetric characteristics of a hypothetical (153)Gd brachytherapy source using the AAPM TG-43U1 dose-calculation formalism. Gadolinium-153 is an intermediate-energy isotope that emits 40-100 keV photons with a half-life of 242 days. The rationale for considering (153)Gd as a brachytherapy source is for its potential of patient specific shielding and to enable reduced personnel shielding requirements relative to (192)Ir, and as an isotope for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT). A hypothetical (153)Gd brachytherapy source with an active core of 0.84 mm diameter, 10 mm length and specific activity of 5.55 TBq of (153)Gd per gram of Gd was simulated with Geant4. The encapsulation material was stainless steel with a thickness of 0.08 mm. The radial dose function, anisotropy function and photon spectrum in water were calculated for the (153)Gd source. The simulated (153)Gd source had an activity of 242 GBq and a dose rate in water 1 cm off axis of 13.12 Gy h(-1), indicating that it would be suitable as a low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The beta particles emitted have low enough energies to be absorbed in the source encapsulation. Gadolinium-153 has an increasing radial dose function due to multiple scatter of low-energy photons. Scattered photon dose takes over with distance from the source and contributes to the majority of the absorbed dose. The anisotropy function of the (153)Gd source decreases at low polar angles, as a result of the long active core. The source is less anisotropic at polar angles away from the longitudinal axes. The anisotropy function increases with increasing distance. The (153)Gd source considered would be suitable as an intermediate-energy low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The source could provide a means for I-RSBT delivery and enable brachytherapy treatments with patient specific shielding and reduced personnel

  19. Post-stenting Intravascular Brachytherapy Trials on Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits Using 32P Liquid Sources: Implications for Prevention of In-Stent Restenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, Krzysztof; Walichiewicz, Piotr; Petelenz, Barbara; Jachec, Wojciech; Jochem, Jerzy; Tomasik, Andrzej; Bilski, Pawel; Snietura, Miroslaw; Wodniecki, Jan

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: Liquid sources of radiation delivered in angioplasty balloons may be a convenient self-centering device used for prevention of in-stent restenosis. To test the effectiveness of this method an intravascular brachytherapy study was performed using 32P liquid sources in an animal model. Methods: The radial dose distribution around angioplasty balloons filled with solutions of Na2H32PO4 was calibrated by thermoluminescence dosimetry. The animal experiments were performed in rabbits with induced hypercholesterolemia. The balloons containing 32P were introduced into iliac arteries immediately after stent implantation. Estimated 7-49 Gy doses required 30-100 minirradiations. Radiation effects were evaluated by comparing the thickness of various components of the artery wall. Results:Doses of 7, 12, 16 or 49 Gy on the internal artery surface required 30-100 min of irradiation. The dose of 49 Gy at 'zero' distance corresponding to 16 Gy at 1.0 mm from the balloon surface reduced hypertrophy in every layer of the arterial wall: in the intima the cross-sectional areas were 0.13 versus 0.91 mm2, in the media were 0.5 versus 0.46 mm2 and in the adventitia were 0.04 versus 0.3 mm2 (p <0.05). A dose of 7 Gyat the balloon surface produced adverse irradiation effects: the intimal area of the artery was 2.087 versus 0.857 mm2, the medial area was 0.59 versus 0.282 mm2 and the adventitial area was 0.033 versus 0.209 mm2 in treated and control arteries, respectively.Conclusion: Application of a 49 Gy irradiation dose to the internal arterial surface effectively prevented in-stentrestenosis.

  20. Evaluation of neutron sources for ISAGE-in-situ-NAA for a future lunar mission.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Breitkreutz, H; Burfeindt, J; Bernhardt, H-G; Trieloff, M; Hopp, J; Jessberger, E K; Schwarz, W H; Hofmann, P; Hiesinger, H

    2011-11-01

    For a future Moon landing, a concept for an in-situ NAA involving age determination using the (40)Ar-(39)Ar method is developed. A neutron source (252)Cf is chosen for sample irradiation on the Moon. A special sample-in-source irradiation geometry is designed to provide a homogeneous distribution of neutron flux at the irradiation position. Using reflector, the neutron flux is likely to increase by almost 200%. Sample age of 1Ga could be determined. Elemental analysis using INAA is discussed. PMID:21680192

  1. Dosimetry of indigenously developed (192)Ir high-dose rate brachytherapy source: An EGSnrc Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sridhar; Selvam, T Palani; Sharma, S D; Das, Trupti; Dey, A C; Patil, B N; Sastri, K V S

    2016-01-01

    Clinical application using high-dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir sources in remote afterloading technique is a well-established treatment method. In this direction, Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, jointly indigenously developed a remote afterloading machine and (192)Ir HDR source. The two-dimensional (2D) dose distribution and dosimetric parameters of the BRIT (192)Ir HDR source are generated using EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system in a 40 cm dia × 40 cm height cylindrical water phantom. The values of air-kerma strength and dose rate constant for BRIT (192)Ir HDR source are 9.894 × 10(-8) ± 0.06% UBq(-1) and 1.112 ± 0.11% cGyh(-1)U(-1), respectively. The values of radial dose function (gL(r)) of this source compare well with the corresponding values of BEBIG, Flexisource, and GammaMed 12i source models. This is because of identical active lengths of the sources (3.5 mm) and the comparable phantom dimensions. A comparison of gL(r) values of BRIT source with microSelectron-v1 show differences about 2% at r = 6 cm and up to 13% at r = 12 cm, which is due to differences in phantom dimensions involved in the calculations. The anisotropy function of BRIT (192)Ir HDR source is comparable with the corresponding values of microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR source. PMID:27217623

  2. Dosimetry of indigenously developed 192Ir high-dose rate brachytherapy source: An EGSnrc Monte Carlo study

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Sridhar; Selvam, T. Palani; Sharma, S. D.; Das, Trupti; Dey, A. C.; Patil, B. N.; Sastri, K.V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical application using high-dose rate (HDR) 192Ir sources in remote afterloading technique is a well-established treatment method. In this direction, Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, jointly indigenously developed a remote afterloading machine and 192Ir HDR source. The two-dimensional (2D) dose distribution and dosimetric parameters of the BRIT 192Ir HDR source are generated using EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system in a 40 cm dia × 40 cm height cylindrical water phantom. The values of air-kerma strength and dose rate constant for BRIT 192Ir HDR source are 9.894 × 10−8 ± 0.06% UBq−1 and 1.112 ± 0.11% cGyh−1U−1, respectively. The values of radial dose function (gL(r)) of this source compare well with the corresponding values of BEBIG, Flexisource, and GammaMed 12i source models. This is because of identical active lengths of the sources (3.5 mm) and the comparable phantom dimensions. A comparison of gL(r) values of BRIT source with microSelectron-v1 show differences about 2% at r = 6 cm and up to 13% at r = 12 cm, which is due to differences in phantom dimensions involved in the calculations. The anisotropy function of BRIT 192Ir HDR source is comparable with the corresponding values of microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR source. PMID:27217623

  3. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  4. Dosimetry characterization of 32P intravascular brachytherapy source wires using Monte Carlo codes PENELOPE and GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Torres, Javier; Buades, Manuel J; Almansa, Julio F; Guerrero, Rafael; Lallena, Antonio M

    2004-02-01

    Monte Carlo calculations using the codes PENELOPE and GEANT4 have been performed to characterize the dosimetric parameters of the new 20 mm long catheter-based 32P beta source manufactured by the Guidant Corporation. The dose distribution along the transverse axis and the two-dimensional dose rate table have been calculated. Also, the dose rate at the reference point, the radial dose function, and the anisotropy function were evaluated according to the adapted TG-60 formalism for cylindrical sources. PENELOPE and GEANT4 codes were first verified against previous results corresponding to the old 27 mm Guidant 32P beta source. The dose rate at the reference point for the unsheathed 27 mm source in water was calculated to be 0.215 +/- 0.001 cGy s(-1) mCi(-1), for PENELOPE, and 0.2312 +/- 0.0008 cGy s(-1) mCi(-1), for GEANT4. For the unsheathed 20 mm source, these values were 0.2908 +/- 0.0009 cGy s(-1) mCi(-1) and 0.311 0.001 cGy s(-1) mCi(-1), respectively. Also, a comparison with the limited data available on this new source is shown. We found non-negligible differences between the results obtained with PENELOPE and GEANT4. PMID:15000615

  5. Evaluation of a lithium formate EPR dosimetry system for dose measurements around {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Antonovic, Laura; Gustafsson, Haakan; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2009-06-15

    A dosimetry system using lithium formate monohydrate (HCO{sub 2}Li{center_dot}H{sub 2}O) as detector material and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for readout has been used to measure absorbed dose distributions around clinical {sup 192}Ir sources. Cylindrical tablets with diameter of 4.5 mm, height of 4.8 mm, and density of 1.26 g/cm{sup 3} were manufactured. Homogeneity test and calibration of the dosimeters were performed in a 6 MV photon beam. {sup 192}Ir irradiations were performed in a PMMA phantom using two different source models, the GammaMed Plus HDR and the microSelectron PDR-v1 model. Measured absorbed doses to water in the PMMA phantom were converted to the corresponding absorbed doses to water in water phantoms of dimensions used by the treatment planning systems (TPSs) using correction factors explicitly derived for this experiment. Experimentally determined absorbed doses agreed with the absorbed doses to water calculated by the TPS to within {+-}2.9%. Relative standard uncertainties in the experimentally determined absorbed doses were estimated to be within the range of 1.7%-1.3% depending on the radial distance from the source, the type of source (HDR or PDR), and the particular absorbed doses used. This work shows that a lithium formate dosimetry system is well suited for measurements of absorbed dose to water around clinical HDR and PDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Being less energy dependent than the commonly used thermoluminescent lithium fluoride (LiF) dosimeters, lithium formate monohydrate dosimeters are well suited to measure absorbed doses in situations where the energy dependence cannot easily be accounted for such as in multiple-source irradiations to verify treatment plans. Their wide dynamic range and linear dose response over the dose interval of 0.2-1000 Gy make them suitable for measurements on sources of the strengths used in clinical applications. The dosimeter size needs, however, to be reduced for application to

  6. Implementation of the Fissile Mass Flow Monitor Source Verification and Confirmation

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, Taner; March-Leuba, Jose A; Powell, Danny H; Nelson, Dennis; Radev, Radoslav

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the verification procedure for neutron sources installed in U.S. Department of Energy equipment used to measure fissile material flow. The Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) equipment determines the {sup 235}U fissile mass flow of UF{sub 6} gas streams by using {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for fission activation of the UF{sub 6} gas and by measuring the fission products in the flow. The {sup 252}Cf sources in each FMFM are typically replaced every 2 to 3 years due to their relatively short half-life ({approx} 2.65 years). During installation of the new FMFM sources, the source identity and neutronic characteristics provided by the manufacturer are verified with the following equipment: (1) a remote-control video television (RCTV) camera monitoring system is used to confirm the source identity, and (2) a neutron detection system (NDS) is used for source-strength confirmation. Use of the RCTV and NDS permits remote monitoring of the source replacement process and eliminates unnecessary radiation exposure. The RCTV, NDS, and the confirmation process are described in detail in this report.

  7. [Brachytherapy for oesophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Wong, S; Hennequin, C; Quero, L

    2013-04-01

    The main indication of oesophageal brachytherapy is palliative: it can improve dysphagia in patients with a tumor not suitable for surgery or chemoradiotherapy. A randomized clinical trial showed that survival without dysphagia and quality of life was improved by endoluminal brachytherapy in comparison to self-expansible metallic stents. It also increases the duration of palliation after laser deobstruction. Its role as a curative treatment of locally advanced tumors is still discussed: in combination with external beam radiotherapy, it seems that brachytherapy increased the rate of severe toxicity (haemorrhages, fistula, stenosis). In superficial lesions, brachytherapy with or without external beam radiotherapy seems logical but large prospective studies are missing in this setting. PMID:23603254

  8. Moderator design studies for a new neutron reference source based on the D-T fusion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Piper, Roman K.; Rathbone, Bruce A.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The radioactive isotope Californium-252 (252Cf) is relied upon internationally as a neutron calibration source for ionizing radiation dosimetry because of its high specific activity. The source may be placed within a heavy-water (D2O) moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum representative of neutron fields common to commercial nuclear power plant environments, among others. Due to termination of the U.S. Department of Energy loan/lease program in 2012, the expense of obtaining 252Cf sources has undergone a significant increase, rendering high output sources largely unattainable. On the other hand, the use of neutron generators in research and industry applications has increased dramatically in recent years. Neutron generators based on deuteriumtritium (D-T) fusion reaction provide high neutron fluence rates and, therefore, could possibly be used as a replacement for 252Cf. To be viable, the 14 MeV D-T output spectrum must be significantly moderated to approximate common workplace environments. This paper presents the results of an effort to select appropriate moderating materials and design a configuration to reshape the primary neutron field toward a spectrum approaching that from a nuclear power plant workplace. A series of Monte-Carlo (MCNP) simulations of single layer high- and low-Z materials are used to identify initial candidate moderators. Candidates are refined through a similar series of simulations involving combinations of 2-5 different materials. The simulated energy distribution using these candidate moderators are rated in comparison to a target spectrum. Other properties, such as fluence preservation and/or enhancement, prompt gamma production and other characteristics are also considered.

  9. A system for nonradiographic source localization and real-time planning of intraoperative high dose rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Anderson, L L

    1997-12-01

    We have developed a system for source localization and real-time planning of interstitial volume implants for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) using high dose rate remote afterloading techniques. Source localization is realized by using an electromagnetic tracking device, which consists of a transmitter coil, a receiver coil, and a signal processing unit, to generate the coordinates and orientation of the receiver. A drawback of the device is its sensitivity to adjacent metallic objects. Localization accuracy was evaluated in an operating room environment, where the metallic objects closest to the receiver are surgical retractors (that, incidentally, preclude radiographic localization). For achievable separation distances, we found an rms error of 0.7 mm in determining the distance between points 2 cm apart, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of the method. The receiver is mounted on a plastic block from which projects a long stylet and the transmitter is located at about 50 cm from the receiver. The stylet is inserted sequentially into source catheters to obtain the location and orientation data that serve as input to treatment planning software. The planning program optimizes source dwell time to make calculated dose conform to the dose prescribed on an ellipsoidal surface to an extent consistent with a certain level of dose uniformity inside the target volume. A least squares method is used that involves minimizing the objective function by a matrix method (nonnegative least squares). We have demonstrated that dwell time optimization can be performed in a short time and that the approach is adequate for the IORT application. PMID:9434985

  10. Patient release criteria for low dose rate brachytherapy implants.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Dale E; Sheetz, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    A lack of consensus regarding a model governing the release of patients following sealed source brachytherapy has led to a set of patient release policies that vary from institution to institution. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued regulatory guidance on patient release in NUREG 1556, Volume 9, Rev. 2, Appendix U, which allows calculation of release limits following implant brachytherapy. While the formalism presented in NUREG is meaningful for the calculation of release limits in the context of relatively high energy gamma emitters, it does not estimate accurately the effective dose equivalent for the common low dose rate brachytherapy sources Cs, I, and Pd. NUREG 1556 states that patient release may be based on patient-specific calculations as long as the calculation is documented. This work is intended to provide a format for patient-specific calculations to be used for the consideration of patients' release following the implantation of certain low dose rate brachytherapy isotopes. PMID:23439145

  11. 1989 neutron and gamma personnel dosimetry intercomparison study using RADCAL (Radiation Calibration Laboratory) sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H.; Patterson, G.R. ); Murakami, H. . Dept. of Health Physics); Liu, J.C. )

    1990-10-01

    The fourteenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study (i.e., PDIS 14) was conducted during May 1-5, 1989. A total of 48 organizations (33 from the US and 15 from abroad) participated in PDIS 14. Participants submitted by mail a total of 1,302 neutron and gamma dosimeters for this mixed field study. The type of neutron dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD-albedo (40%), direct interaction TLD (22%), track (20%), film (7%), combination (7%), and bubble detectors (4%). The type of gamma dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD (84%) and film (16%). Radiation sources used in the six PDIS 14 exposures included {sup 252}Cf moderated by 15-cm D{sub 2}O, {sup 252}Cf moderated by 15-cm polyethylene (gamma-enhanced with {sup 137}Cs), and {sup 238}PuBe. Neutron dose equivalents ranged from 0.44--2.63 mSv and gamma doses ranged from 0. 01-1.85 mSv. One {sup 252}Cf(D{sub 2}O) exposure was performed at a 60{degree} angle of incidence (most performance tests are at perpendicular incidence). The average neutron dosimeter response for this exposure was 70% of that at normal incidence. The average gamma dosimeter response was 96% of that at normal incidence. A total of 70% of individual reported neutron dosimeter measurements were within {plus minus}50% of reference values. If the 0.01 mSv data are omitted, approximately 90% of the individual reported gamma measurements were within {plus minus}50% of reference values. 33 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  12. The dosimetry of brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M

    2003-12-31

    There is emerging evidence that brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) is technique-related and may be minimized by careful attention to source placement. Herein, we review the relationship between radiation doses to the prostate gland/surrounding structures and the development of brachytherapy-induced ED. The permanent prostate brachytherapy literature was reviewed using MEDLINE searches to ensure completeness. Although the site-specific structure associated with brachytherapy-induced ED remains unknown, there is an increasing body of data implicating the proximal penis. With day 0 CT-based dosimetry, the dose to 50% (D{sub 50}) and 25% (D{sub 25}) of the bulb of the penis should be maintained below 40% and 60% mPD, respectively, while the crura D{sub 50} should be maintained below 28% mPD to maximize post-brachytherapy potency. To date, there is no data to suggest that either radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles or choice of isotope is associated with brachytherapy-induced ED, while conflicting data has been reported regarding radiation dose to the prostate and the use of supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Although the etiology of brachytherapy-induced ED is likely multifactorial, the available data supports the proximal penis as an important site-specific structure. Refinements in implant technique, including preplanning and intraoperative seed placement, will result in lower radiation doses to the proximal penis with potential improvement in potency preservation.

  13. SU-E-T-548: Modeling of Breast IORT Using the Xoft 50 KV Brachytherapy Source and 316L Steel Rigid Shield

    SciTech Connect

    Burnside, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Xoft provides a set of 316L Stainless Steel Rigid Shields to be used with their 50 kV X-ray source for Breast IORT treatments. Modeling the different shield sizes in MCNP provides information to help make clinical decisions for selecting the appropriate shield size. Methods: The Xoft Axxent 50 kV Electronic Brachytherapy System has several applications in radiation therapy, one of which is treating cancer of the breast intraoperatively by placing the miniaturized X-ray tube inside an applicator balloon that is expanded to fill the lumpectomy bed immediately following tumor removal. The ribs, lung, and muscular chest wall are all regions at risk to receive undesired dose during the treatment. A Xoft 316L Stainless Steel Rigid Shield can be placed between the intracostal muscles of the chest wall and the remaining breast tissue near the balloon to attenuate the beam and protect these organs. These shields are provided in 5 different sizes, and the effects on dose to the surrounding tissues vary with shield size. MCNP was used to model this environment and tally dose rate to certain regions of interest. Results: The average rib dose rate calculated using 0cm (i.e., no shield), 3cm, and 5cm diameter shields were 26.89, 15.43, and 8.91 Gy/hr respectively. The maximum dose rates within the rib reached 94.74 Gy/hr, 53.56 Gy/hr, and 31.44 Gy/hr for the 0cm, 3cm, and 5cm cases respectively. The shadowing effect caused by the steel shields was seen in the 3-D meshes and line profiles. Conclusion: This model predicts a higher dose rate to the underlying rib region with the 3cm shield compared to the 5cm shield; it may be useful to select the largest possible diameter when choosing a shield size for a particular IORT patient. The ability to attenuate the beam to reduce rib dose was also confirmed. Research sponsored by Xoft Inc, a subsidiary of iCAD.

  14. Determination of the optimum-size californium-252 neutron source for borehole capture gamma-ray analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Macy, R.J.; Mikesell, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The fast- and thermal-neutron fluence rates from a 3.7 ??g 252Cf neutron source in a simulated borehole have been measured as a function of the source-to-detector distance using air, water, coal, iron ore-concrete mix, and dry sand as borehole media. Gamma-ray intensity measurements were made for specific spectral lines at low and high energies for the same range of source-to-detector distances in the iron ore-concrete mix and in coal. Integral gamma-ray counts across the entire spectrum were also made at each source-to-detector distance. From these data, the specific neutron-damage rate, and the critical count-rate criteria, we show that in an iron ore-concrete mix (low hydrogen concentration), 252Cf neutron sources of 2-40 ??g are suitable. The source size required for optimum gamma-ray sensitivity depends on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium such as coal, similar measurements were made. The results show that sources from 2 to 20 ??g are suitable to obtain the highest gamma-ray sensitivity, again depending on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium, significant improvement in sensitivity can be achieved by using faster electronics; in iron ore, it cannot. ?? 1979 North-Holland Publishing Co.

  15. SU-E-T-46: Application of a Twin-Detector Method for the Determination of the Mean Photon Energy Em at Points of Measurement in a Water Phantom Surrounding a GammaMed HDR 192Ir Brachytherapy Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chofor, N; Poppe, B; Nebah, F; Harder, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In a brachytherapy photon field in water the fluence-averaged mean photon energy Em at the point of measurement correlates with the radiation quality correction factor kQ of a non water-equivalent detector. To support the experimental assessment of Em, we show that the normalized signal ratio NSR of a pair of radiation detectors, an unshielded silicon diode and a diamond detector can serve to measure quantity Em in a water phantom at a Ir-192 unit. Methods: Photon fluence spectra were computed in EGSnrc based on a detailed model of the GammaMed source. Factor kQ was calculated as the ratio of the detector's spectrum-weighted responses under calibration conditions at a 60Co unit and under brachytherapy conditions at various radial distances from the source. The NSR was investigated for a pair of a p-type unshielded silicon diode 60012 and a synthetic single crystal diamond detector 60019 (both PTW Freiburg). Each detector was positioned according to its effective point of measurement, with its axis facing the source. Lateral signal profiles were scanned under complete scatter conditions, and the NSR was determined as the quotient of the signal ratio under application conditions x and that at position r-ref = 1 cm. Results: The radiation quality correction factor kQ shows a close correlation with the mean photon energy Em. The NSR of the diode/diamond pair changes by a factor of two from 0–18 cm from the source, while Em drops from 350 to 150 keV. Theoretical and measured NSR profiles agree by ± 2 % for points within 5 cm from the source. Conclusion: In the presence of the close correlation between radiation quality correction factor kQ and photon mean energy Em, the NSR provides a practical means of assessing Em under clinical conditions. Precise detector positioning is the major challenge.

  16. Directional interstitial brachytherapy from simulation to application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liyong

    Organs at risk (OAR) are sometimes adjacent to or embedded in or overlap with the clinical target volume (CTV) to be treated. The purpose of this PhD study is to develop directionally low energy gamma-emitting interstitial brachytherapy sources. These sources can be applied between OAR to selectively reduce hot spots in the OARs and normal tissues. The reduction of dose over undesired regions can expand patient eligibility or reduce toxicities for the treatment by conventional interstitial brachytherapy. This study covers the development of a directional source from design optimization to construction of the first prototype source. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to simulate the radiation transport for the designs of directional sources. We have made a special construction kit to assemble radioactive and gold-shield components precisely into D-shaped titanium containers of the first directional source. Directional sources have a similar dose distribution as conventional sources on the treated side but greatly reduced dose on the shielded side, with a sharp dose gradient between them. A three-dimensional dose deposition kernel for the 125I directional source has been calculated. Treatment plans can use both directional and conventional 125I sources at the same source strength for low-dose-rate (LDR) implants to optimize the dose distributions. For prostate tumors, directional 125I LDR brachytherapy can potentially reduce genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities and improve potency preservation for low risk patients. The combination of better dose distribution of directional implants and better therapeutic ratio between tumor response and late reactions enables a novel temporary LDR treatment, as opposed to permanent or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the intermediate risk T2b and high risk T2c tumors. Supplemental external-beam treatments can be shortened with a better brachytherapy boost for T3 tumors. In conclusion, we have successfully finished the

  17. Canadian prostate brachytherapy in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Mira; Crook, Juanita; Morris, W. James; Morton, Gerard; Pickles, Tom; Usmani, Nawaid; Vigneault, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy can be used as a monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk patients or in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a form of dose escalation for selected intermediate- and high-risk patients. Prostate brachytherapy with either permanent implants (low dose rate [LDR]) or temporary implants (high dose rate [HDR]) is emerging as the most effective radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Several large Canadian brachytherapy programs were established in the mid- to late-1990s. Prostate brachytherapy is offered in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. We anticipate the need for brachytherapy services in Canada will significantly increase in the near future. In this review, we summarize brachytherapy programs across Canada, contemporary eligibility criteria for the procedure, toxicity and prostate-specific antigen recurrence free survival (PRFS), as published from Canadian institutions for both LDR and HDR brachytherapy. PMID:23671495

  18. [Safety in brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Marcié, S; Marinello, G; Peiffert, D; Lartigau, É

    2013-04-01

    No technique can now be used without previously considering the safety of patients, staff and public and risk management. This is the case for brachytherapy. The various aspects of brachytherapy are discussed for both the patient and the staff. For all, the risks must be minimized while achieving a treatment of quality. It is therefore necessary to establish a list as comprehensive as possible regardless of the type of brachytherapy (low, high, pulsed dose-rate). Then, their importance must be assessed with the help of their criticality. Radiation protection of personnel and public must take into account the many existing regulation texts. Four axes have been defined for the risk management for patients: organization, preparation, planning and implementation of treatment. For each axis, a review of risks is presented, as well as administrative, technical and medical dispositions for staff and the public. PMID:23465784

  19. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  20. Investigation and optimisation of mobile NaI(Tl) and 3He-based neutron detectors for finding point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Jonas M. C.; Finck, Robert R.; Rääf, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Neutron radiation produces high-energy gamma radiation through (n,γ) reactions in matter. This can be used to detect neutron sources indirectly using gamma spectrometers. The sensitivity of a gamma spectrometer to neutrons can be amplified by surrounding it with polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The hydrogen in the PVC acts as a moderator and the chlorine emits prompt gammas when a neutron is captured. A 4.7-l 3He-based mobile neutron detector was compared to a 4-l NaI(Tl)-detector covered with PVC using this principle. Methods were also developed to optimise the measurement parameters of the systems. The detector systems were compared with regard to their ability to find 241AmBe, 252Cf and 238Pu-13C neutron sources. Results from stationary measurements were used to calculate optimal integration times as well as minimum detectable neutron emission rates. It was found that the 3He-based detector was more sensitive to 252Cf sources whereas the NaI(Tl) detector was more sensitive to 241AmBe and 238Pu-13C sources. The results also indicated that the sensitivity of the detectors to sources at known distances could theoretically be improved by 60% by changing from fixed integration times to list mode in mobile surveys.

  1. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part II: Monte Carlo and experimental verification of a multiple source dwell position plan employing a shielded applicator

    SciTech Connect

    Petrokokkinos, L.; Zourari, K.; Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Karaiskos, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.; Georgiou, E.; Papagiannis, P.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the dosimetric validation of a deterministic radiation transport based treatment planning system (BRACHYVISION v. 8.8, referred to as TPS in the following) for multiple {sup 192}Ir source dwell position brachytherapy applications employing a shielded applicator in homogeneous water geometries. Methods: TPS calculations for an irradiation plan employing seven VS2000 {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) source dwell positions and a partially shielded applicator (GM11004380) were compared to corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results, as well as experimental results obtained using the VIP polymer gel-magnetic resonance imaging three-dimensional dosimetry method with a custom made phantom. Results: TPS and MC dose distributions were found in agreement which is mainly within {+-}2%. Considerable differences between TPS and MC results (greater than 2%) were observed at points in the penumbra of the shields (i.e., close to the edges of the ''shielded'' segment of the geometries). These differences were experimentally verified and therefore attributed to the TPS. Apart from these regions, experimental and TPS dose distributions were found in agreement within 2 mm distance to agreement and 5% dose difference criteria. As shown in this work, these results mark a significant improvement relative to dosimetry algorithms that disregard the presence of the shielded applicator since the use of the latter leads to dosimetry errors on the order of 20%-30% at the edge of the ''unshielded'' segment of the geometry and even 2%-6% at points corresponding to the potential location of the target volume in clinical applications using the applicator (points in the unshielded segment at short distances from the applicator). Conclusions: Results of this work attest the capability of the TPS to accurately account for the scatter conditions and the increased attenuation involved in HDR brachytherapy applications employing multiple source dwell positions and

  2. Air kerma and absorbed dose standards for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in primary standards for the calibration of brachytherapy sources, with an emphasis on the currently most common photon-emitting radionuclides. The introduction discusses the need for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy in general. The following section focuses on the three main quantities, i.e. reference air kerma rate, air kerma strength and absorbed dose rate to water, which are currently used for the specification of brachytherapy photon sources and which can be realized with primary standards from first principles. An overview of different air kerma and absorbed dose standards, which have been independently developed by various national metrology institutes over the past two decades, is given in the next two sections. Other dosimetry techniques for brachytherapy will also be discussed. The review closes with an outlook on a possible transition from air kerma to absorbed dose to water-based calibrations for brachytherapy sources in the future. PMID:24814696

  3. Restenosis: Intracoronary Brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Drachman, Douglas E.; Simon, Daniel I.

    2002-04-01

    Though interventional strategies have revolutionized the management of patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease, in-stent restenosis has emerged as the single most important limitation of long-term success following percutaneous coronary intervention. Once present, in-stent restenosis is extraordinarily difficult to treat, with conventional revascularization techniques failing in 50% to 80% of patients. Intracoronary radiation, or brachytherapy, targets cellular proliferation within the culprit neointima. Clinical trials have demonstrated that brachytherapy is a highly effective treatment for in-stent restenosis, reducing angiographic restenosis by 50% to 60% and the need for target vessel revascularization by 40% to 50%. The benefits of intracoronary brachytherapy may be particularly pronounced in certain patient subgroups (eg, those with diabetes, long lesions, or lesions in saphenous vein bypass grafts), but comes at the cost of an increased rate of late stent thrombosis and the need for extended antiplatelet therapy. The role of brachytherapy in the arsenal of the interventional cardiologist will continue to evolve, particularly in light of the unprecedented recent advances with the use of drug-eluting stents for restenosis prevention. PMID:11858773

  4. Fission-neutrons source with fast neutron-emission timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.

    2016-05-01

    A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The time is provided by registering the fission fragments in a layer of a thin scintillation film with a signal rise time of 1 ns. The scintillation light output is measured by two silicon photomultipliers with rise time of 0.5 ns. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements using it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  5. Magnetite nanoparticles for nonradionuclide brachytherapy1

    PubMed Central

    Safronov, Victor; Sozontov, Evgeny; Polikarpov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles possess several properties that can make them useful for targeted delivery of radiation to tumors for the purpose of brachytherapy. Such particles are biodegradable and magnetic and can emit secondary radiation when irradiated by an external source. In this work, the dose distribution around a magnetite particle of 10 nm diameter being irradiated by monochromatic X-rays with energies in the range 4–60 keV is calculated. PMID:26089761

  6. Imaging method for monitoring delivery of high dose rate brachytherapy

    DOEpatents

    Weisenberger, Andrew G; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2012-10-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring both the balloon/cavity and the radioactive source in brachytherapy treatment utilizing using at least one pair of miniature gamma cameras to acquire separate images of: 1) the radioactive source as it is moved in the tumor volume during brachytherapy; and 2) a relatively low intensity radiation source produced by either an injected radiopharmaceutical rendering cancerous tissue visible or from a radioactive solution filling a balloon surgically implanted into the cavity formed by the surgical resection of a tumor.

  7. The evolution of brachytherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Venselaar, Jack L. M.; Beaulieu, Luc

    2009-06-15

    Brachytherapy is a mature treatment modality that has benefited from technological advances. Treatment planning has advanced from simple lookup tables to complex, computer-based dose-calculation algorithms. The current approach is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism with recent advances in acquiring single-source dose distributions. However, this formalism has clinically relevant limitations for calculating patient dose. Dose-calculation algorithms are being developed based on Monte Carlo methods, collapsed cone, and solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation. In addition to improved dose-calculation tools, planning systems and brachytherapy treatment planning will account for material heterogeneities, scatter conditions, radiobiology, and image guidance. The AAPM, ESTRO, and other professional societies are working to coordinate clinical integration of these advancements. This Vision 20/20 article provides insight into these endeavors.

  8. Radiochromic dye film studies for brachytherapy applications.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Dávalos, A; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M; Díaz-Perches, R; Arzamendi-Pérez, S

    2002-01-01

    Commercial radiochromic dye films have been used in recent years to quantify absorbed dose in several medical applications. In this study we present the characterisation of the GafChromic MD-55-2 dye film, a double sensitive layer film suitable for photon irradiation in brachytherapy applications. Dose measurements were carried out with a low dose rate 137Cs brachytherapy source, which produces very steep dose gradients in its vicinity, and therefore requires the capability of producing high spatial resolution isodose curves. Quantification of the dose rate in water per unit air kerma strength was obtained using a high-resolution transmission commercial scanner (Agfa DuoScan T1200 with the capability of digitising up to 600 x 1200 pixels per inch using 36 bits per pixel, together with optical density measurements. The Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements compared well in the 0-50 Gy dose interval used in this study. PMID:12382798

  9. Ruthenium-106 brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Brachytherapy is the most common method for treating uveal melanoma, and currently the ruthenium-106 (Ru-106) and iodine-125 (I-125) applicators are the most frequently used. Ru-106 applicators were introduced by Prof. Peter Lommatzsch in the 1960s, and since then have been used widely by many ocular oncologists, mainly in Europe. The Ru-106 isotope is a beta ray (electron) emitter, and as such it has a limited depth of penetration. This is the reason why many experts use Ru-106 applicators for tumors with a maximal thickness of up to 7.0 mm, although others use it successfully for thicker tumors. The Ru-106 applicators are manufactured commercially and have a half-life of about 1 year. Ru-106 brachytherapy for uveal melanoma provides excellent local control rates and eye preservation with a relatively low recurrence rate. The main advantage of Ru-106 over other isotopes is the better preservation of vision in the treated eye, and less damage to the healthy parts of the eye due to its limited range of radiation. This can also be achieved by positioning the Ru-106 plaque eccentrically, away from the macula and optic nerve head. Ru-106 brachytherapy can be used in combination with other methods of treatment of uveal melanoma, such as local resection or transpupillary thermotherapy, and is sporadically combined with other isotopes, such as gamma-emitting cobalt-60 and I-125. PMID:22042011

  10. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wallner, K; Smathers, S; Sutlief, S; Corman, J; Ellis, W

    2000-06-20

    Our aim was to document the technical and clinical course of prostate brachytherapy patients with radiographic evidence of median lobe hyperplasia (MLH). Eight patients with MLH were identified during our routine brachytherapy practice, representing 9% of the 87 brachytherapy patients treated during a 6-month period. No effort was made to avoid brachytherapy in patients noted to have MLH on diagnostic work-up. Cystoscopic evaluation was not routinely performed. Postimplant axial computed tomographic (CT) images of the prostate were obtained at 0.5 cm intervals. Preimplant urinary obstructive symptoms were quantified by the criteria of the American Urologic Association (AUA). Each patient was contacted during the writing of this report to update postimplant morbidity information. There was no apparent association between the degree of MLH and preimplant prostate volume or AUA score. Intraoperatively, we were able to visualize MLH by transrectal ultrasound and did not notice any particular difficulty placing sources in the MLH tissue or migration of sources out of the tissue. The prescription isodose covered from 81% to 99% of the postimplant CT-defined target volume, achieving adequate dose to the median lobe tissue in all patients. Two of the eight patients developed acute, postimplant urinary retention. The first patient required intermittent self-catheterization for 3 months and then resumed spontaneous urination. MLH does not appear to be a strong contraindication to prostate brachytherapy, and prophylactic resection of hypertrophic tissue in such patients is probably not warranted. Int. J. Cancer (Radiat. Oncol. Invest.) 90, 152-156 (2000). PMID:10900427

  11. SU-D-19A-05: The Dosimetric Impact of Using Xoft Axxent® Electronic Brachytherapy Source TG-43 Dosimetry Parameters for Treatment with the Xoft 30 Mm Diameter Vaginal Applicator

    SciTech Connect

    Simiele, S; Micka, J; Culberson, W; DeWerd, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A full TG-43 dosimetric characterization has not been performed for the Xoft Axxent ® electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft, a subsidiary of iCAD, San Jose, CA) within the Xoft 30 mm diameter vaginal applicator. Currently, dose calculations are performed using the bare-source TG-43 parameters and do not account for the presence of the applicator. This work focuses on determining the difference between the bare-source and sourcein- applicator TG-43 parameters. Both the radial dose function (RDF) and polar anisotropy function (PAF) were computationally determined for the source-in-applicator and bare-source models to determine the impact of using the bare-source dosimetry data. Methods: MCNP5 was used to model the source and the Xoft 30 mm diameter vaginal applicator. All simulations were performed using 0.84p and 0.03e cross section libraries. All models were developed based on specifications provided by Xoft. The applicator is made of a proprietary polymer material and simulations were performed using the most conservative chemical composition. An F6 collision-kerma tally was used to determine the RDF and PAF values in water at various dwell positions. The RDF values were normalized to 2.0 cm from the source to accommodate the applicator radius. Source-in-applicator results were compared with bare-source results from this work as well as published baresource results. Results: For a 0 mm source pullback distance, the updated bare-source model and source-in-applicator RDF values differ by 2% at 3 cm and 4% at 5 cm. The largest PAF disagreements were observed at the distal end of the source and applicator with up to 17% disagreement at 2 cm and 8% at 8 cm. The bare-source model had RDF values within 2.6% of the published TG-43 data and PAF results within 7.2% at 2 cm. Conclusion: Results indicate that notable differences exist between the bare-source and source-in-applicator TG-43 simulated parameters. Xoft Inc. provided partial funding for this work.

  12. The impact of activating source dwell positions outside the CTV on the dose to treated normal tissue volumes in TRUS guided 3D conformal interstitial HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thunberg, Per; Johansson, Bengt; Persliden, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Dose coverage is crucial for successful treatment in mono-brachytherapy. Since few and very high dose fractions are used, there is an important balance between dwell positioning outside the clinical target volume (CTV) and possible damage on adjacent normal tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of having dwell positions close to the CTV surface, while maintaining an acceptable dose distribution, and to investigate the robustness in terms of known geometrical uncertainties of the implant. Material and methods This study included 37 patients who had received brachytherapy for prostate cancer as a monotherapy with the following schedules: 2 × 14 Gy or 3 × 11 Gy, each fraction separated by two weeks. The source dwell positions were activated 5 mm outside CTV. New optimizations were simulated for dwell positions at 3, 2, 1, and 0 mm. Inverse and graphical optimization were applied according to the relative dose constraints: V100 CTV ≥ 97%, Dmax, urethra ≤ 110%, and D10 rectal mucosa ≤ 65%. The V100, normal tissue outside CTV was used to evaluate dose variations caused by different dwell positions. Prostate geometries and dose distributions for the different dwell positions outside the CTV were used to investigate the impact on the CTV dose distribution due to geometrical uncertainties. Results Both V100, CTV, and V100, normal tissue decreased, 98.6% to 92.2%, and 17 cm3 to 9.0 cm3, for dwell activation from 5 mm to 0 mm. The evaluation of both simulated longitudinal geometrical uncertainties and different source dwell activations implied that V100, CTV ranged from 98.6% to 86.3%. Conclusions It is possible to reduce the V100, normal tissue by decreasing the source dwell positions outside the CTV from 5 to 3 mm, while maintaining dose constraints. In combination with the estimated geometrical uncertainties, however, the source dwell positions need to be 5 mm from the surface in order to maintain a robust implant. PMID:25337130

  13. Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Song, Qi; Liu, Yunlong; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-06-01

    In this treatment planning study, the potential benefits of a rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) technique based on a partially-shielded electronic brachytherapy source were assessed for treating cervical cancer. Conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), intracavitary plus supplementary interstitial (IS+ICBT), and RSBT treatment plans for azimuthal emission angles of 180° (RSBT-180) and 45° (RSBT-45) were generated for five patients. For each patient, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) (α/β = 10 Gy) was escalated until bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon tolerance EQD2 values were reached. External beam radiotherapy dose (1.8 Gy × 25) was accounted for, and brachytherapy was assumed to have been delivered in 5 fractions. IS+ICBT provided a greater HR-CTV D90 (minimum EQD2 to the hottest 90%) than ICBT. D90 was greater for RSBT-45 than IS+ICBT for all five patients, and greater for RSBT-180 than IS+ICBT for two patients. When the RSBT-45/180 plan with the lowest HR-CTV D90 that was greater than the D90 the ICBT or IS+ICBT plan was selected, the average (range) of D90 increases for RSBT over ICBT and IS+ICBT were 16.2 (6.3-27.2)and 8.5 (0.03-20.16) Gy, respectively. The average (range) treatment time increase per fraction of RSBT was 34.56 (3.68-70.41) min over ICBT and 34.59 (3.57-70.13) min over IS+ICBT. RSBT can increase D90 over ICBT and IS+ICBT without compromising organ-at-risk sparing. The D90 and treatment time improvements from RSBT depend on the patient and shield emission angle.

  14. Salvage Brachytherapy for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer following Primary Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, John M.; Wilson, William A.; Bole, Raevti; Chen, Li; Meigooni, Ali S.; Rowland, Randall G.; Clair, William H. St.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we evaluated our experience with salvage brachytherapy after discovery of biochemical recurrence after a prior brachytherapy procedure. Methods and Materials. From 2001 through 2012 twenty-one patients treated by brachytherapy within University of Kentucky or from outside centers developed biochemical failure and had no evidence of metastases. Computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated; patients who had an underseeded portion of their prostate were considered for reimplantation. Results. The majority of the patients in this study (61.9%) were low risk and median presalvage PSA was 3.49 (range 17.41–1.68). Mean follow-up was 61 months. At last follow-up after reseeding, 11/21 (52.4%) were free of biochemical recurrence. There was a trend towards decreased freedom from biochemical recurrence in low risk patients (p = 0.12). International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) increased at 3-month follow-up visits but decreased and were equivalent to baseline scores at 18 months. Conclusions. Salvage brachytherapy after primary brachytherapy is possible; however, in our experience the side-effect profile after the second brachytherapy procedure was higher than after the first brachytherapy procedure. In this cohort of patients we demonstrate that approximately 50% oncologic control, low risk patients appear to have better outcomes than others. PMID:27092279

  15. SU-E-T-223: Investigation of the Accuracy of Two-Dimensional Dose Distributions Measurement From High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Ir-192 Source Using Multiple-Diode-Array Detector (MapCheck2)

    SciTech Connect

    Taguenang, J; De La Fuente, T Herman; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric accuracy of multiple-diode-array detector (Mapcheck2) for high-dose-rate brachytherapy Ir-192 source. The two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 were validated with EBT2 Gafchromic film measurement and AAPM task-group- 43 (TG-43) modeling. Methods: 2D-dose distributions from Ir-192 source were measured with MapCheck2 and EBT2-films. MapCheck2 response was corrected for effects: directional dependence, diode and phantom heterogeneity. Optical density growth of the film was controlled by synchronized scanning of the film exposed to Ir-192 and calibration films exposed to 6 MV linac beams. Similarly, MapCheck2 response was calibrated to dose using 6 MV beams. An empirical model was developed for the dose distributions measured with Mapcheck2 that considered directional, diode and phantom heterogeneity corrections. The dose deposited in solid-state-detectors was modeled using a cavity theory model for the diode. This model was then validated with measurements using EBT2-films and calculations with TG-43. Results: The response of MapCheck2 has been corrected for different effects including: (a) directional dependence of 0–20% over angular range 0o–90o, (b) phantom heterogeneity (3%) and (c) diode heterogeneity (9%). The corrected dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 agreed well with the measured dose distributions from EBT2-film and with calculations using TG-43 within 5% over a wide range of dose levels and rates. The advantages of MapCheck2 include less noisy, linear and stable response compared with film. The response of MapCheck2 exposed to 192Ir-source showed no energy dependence similar to its response to MV energy beam. Detection spatial-resolution of individual diodes was 0.8×0.8 mm2, however, 2DMapCheck2 resolution is limited by distance between diodes (7.07 mm). Conclusion: The dose distribution measured with MapCheck2 agreed well within 5% with that measured using EBT2-films; and

  16. Sealed source and device design safety testing: Technical report on the findings of task 4 -- Investigation of failed Nitinol brachytherapy wire. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Benac, D.J.; Burghard, H.C.

    1996-03-01

    This report covers an investigation of the nature and cause of failure in Nitinol brachytherapy sourcewires. The investigation was initiated after two clinical incidents in which sourcewires failed during or immediately after a treatment. The investigation determined that the two clinical Nitinol sourcewires failed in a brittle manner, which is atypical for Nitinol. There were no material anomalies or subcritical flaws to explain the brittle failures. The bend tests also demonstrated that neither moist environment, radiation, nor low-temperature structural transformation was a likely root cause of the failures. However, degradation of the PTFE was consistently evident, and those sourcewires shipped or stored with PTFE sleeves consistently failed in laboratory bend tests. On the basis of the results of this study, it was concluded that the root cause of the in-service failures of the sourcewires was environmentally induced embrittlement due to the breakdown of the PTFE protective sleeves in the presence of the high-radiation field and subsequent reaction or interaction of the breakdown products with the Nitinol alloy.

  17. A capture-gated neutron spectrometer for characterization of neutron sources and their shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Philip; Peräjärvi, Kari; Ristkari, Samu; Siiskonen, Teemu; Toivonen, Harri

    2014-07-01

    A portable capture-gated neutron spectrometer was designed and built. The spectrometer consists of a boron-loaded scintillator. Data acquisition is performed in list-mode. 252Cf and AmBe sources and various neutron and gamma shields were used to characterize the response of the device. It is shown that both the unfolded capture-gated neutron spectrum and the singles spectrum up to 5 MeV should be utilized. Source identification is then possible and important information is revealed regarding the surroundings of the source. The detector's discrimination of neutrons from photons is relatively good; specifically, one out of 105 photons is misclassified as a neutron and, more importantly, this misclassification rate can be calculated precisely for different measurement environments and can be taken into account in setting alarm limits for neutron detection. The source and source shield identification capabilities of the detector make it an interesting asset for security applications.

  18. Dosimetric characteristics of a new unit for electronic skin brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Chan, Jan-Pieter; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Brachytherapy with radioactive high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir source is applied to small skin cancer lesions, using surface applicators, i.e. Leipzig or Valencia type. New developments in the field of radiotherapy for skin cancer include electronic brachytherapy. This technique involves the placement of an HDR X-ray source close to the skin, therefore combining the benefits of brachytherapy with the reduced shielding requirements and targeted energy of low energy X-rays. Recently, the Esteya® Electronic Brachytherapy System (Esteya EBS, Elekta AB-Nucletron, Stockholm, Sweden) has been developed specifically for HDR brachytherapy treatment of surface lesions. The system provides radionuclide free HDR brachytherapy by means of a small 69.5 kV X-ray source. The purpose of this study is to obtain the dosimetric characterization required for clinical implementation, providing the detailed methodology to perform the commissioning. Material and methods Flatness, symmetry and penumbra, percentage of depth dose (PDD), kV stability, HVL, output, spectrum, linearity, and leakage have been evaluated for a set of applicators (from 10 mm to 30 mm in diameter). Results Flatness and symmetry resulted better than 5% with around 1 mm of penumbra. The depth dose gradient is about 7%/mm. A kV value of 68.4 ± 1.0 kV (k = 1) was obtained, in good agreement with manufacturer data (69.5 kV). HVL was 1.85 mm Al. Dose rate for a typical 6 Gy to 7 Gy prescription resulted about 3.3 Gy/min and the leakage value was < 100 µGy/min. Conclusions The new Esteya® Electronic Brachytherapy System presents excellent flatness and penumbra as with the Valencia applicator case, combined with an improved PDD, allowing treatment of lesions of up to a depth of 5 mm in combination with reduced treatment duration. The Esteya unit allows HDR brachytherapy superficial treatment within a minimally shielded environment due its low energy. PMID:24790622

  19. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dadkhah, Hossein; Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T.; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  20. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited).

    PubMed

    Vondrasek, R; Levand, A; Pardo, R; Savard, G; Scott, R

    2012-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi (252)Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci (252)Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 10(6) ions∕s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for (23)Na(8+), 15.6% for (84)Kr(17+), and 13.7% for (85)Rb(19+) with typical breeding times of 10 ms∕charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for (143)Cs(27+) and 14.7% for (143)Ba(27+). The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of (143)Ba(27+) accelerated to 6.1 MeV∕u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities. PMID:22380254

  1. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2012-02-15

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi {sup 252}Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci {sup 252}Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 10{sup 6} ions/s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for {sup 23}Na{sup 8+}, 15.6% for {sup 84}Kr{sup 17+}, and 13.7% for {sup 85}Rb{sup 19+} with typical breeding times of 10 ms/charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for {sup 143}Cs{sup 27+} and 14.7% for {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+}. The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+} accelerated to 6.1 MeV/u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities.

  2. Integral-transport-based deterministic brachytherapy dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi

    2003-01-01

    We developed a transport-equation-based deterministic algorithm for computing three-dimensional brachytherapy dose distributions. The deterministic algorithm has been based on the integral transport equation. The algorithm provided us with the capability of computing dose distributions for multiple isotropic point and/or volumetric sources in a homogenous/heterogeneous medium. The algorithm results have been benchmarked against the results from the literature and MCNP results for isotropic point sources and volumetric sources.

  3. In vivo TLD dose measurements in catheter-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Adlienė, Diana; Jakštas, Karolis; Urbonavičius, Benas Gabrielis

    2015-07-01

    Routine in vivo dosimetry is well established in external beam radiotherapy; however, it is restricted mainly to detection of gross errors in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy due to complicated measurements in the field of steep dose gradients in the vicinity of radioactive source and high uncertainties. The results of in vivo dose measurements using TLD 100 mini rods and TLD 'pin worms' in catheter-based HDR brachytherapy are provided in this paper alongside with their comparison with corresponding dose values obtained using calculation algorithm of the treatment planning system. Possibility to perform independent verification of treatment delivery in HDR brachytherapy using TLDs is discussed. PMID:25809111

  4. Determination of absorbed dose in water at the reference point D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}) for an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source using a Fricke system

    SciTech Connect

    Austerlitz, C.; Mota, H. C.; Sempau, J.; Benhabib, S. M.; Campos, D.; Allison, R.; Almeida, C. E. de; Zhu, D.; Sibata, C. H.

    2008-12-15

    method towards calibration of brachytherapy radiation sources in terms of D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}) and audit HDR source calibrations.

  5. Detection of buried explosives using portable neutron sources with nanosecond timing.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A V; Evsenin, A V; Gorshkov, I Yu; Osetrov, O I; Vakhtin, D N

    2004-07-01

    Significant reduction of time needed to identify hidden explosives and other hazardous materials by the "neutron in, gamma out" method has been achieved by introducing timed (nanosecond) neutron sources-the so-called nanosecond neutron analysis technique. Prototype mobile device for explosives' detection based on a timed (nanosecond) isotopic (252)Cf neutron source has been created. The prototype is capable of identifying 400 g of hidden explosives in 10 min. Tests have been also made with a prototype device using timed (nanosecond) neutron source based on a portable D-T neutron generator with built-in segmented detector of accompanying alpha-particles. The presently achieved intensity of the neutron generator is 5x10(7)n/s into 4pi, with over 10(6) of these neutrons being correlated with alpha-particles detected by the built-in alpha-particle detector. Results of measurements with an anti-personnel landmine imitator are presented. PMID:15145438

  6. Verification of Oncentra brachytherapy planning using independent calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safian, N. A. M.; Abdullah, N. H.; Abdullah, R.; Chiang, C. S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the verification technique of treatment plan quality assurance for brachytherapy. It is aimed to verify the point doses in 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy between Oncentra Masterplan brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent calculation software at a region of rectum, bladder and prescription points for both pair ovoids and full catheter set ups. The Oncentra TPS output text files were automatically loaded into the verification programme that has been developed based on spreadsheets. The output consists of source coordinates, desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell time of a patient plan. The source strength and reference dates were entered into the programme and then dose point calculations were independently performed. The programme shows its results in a comparison of its calculated point doses with the corresponding Oncentra TPS outcome. From the total of 40 clinical cases that consisted of two fractions for 20 patients, the results that were given in term of percentage difference, it shows an agreement between TPS and independent calculation are in the range of 2%. This programme only takes a few minutes to be used is preferably recommended to be implemented as the verification technique in clinical brachytherapy dosimetry.

  7. Development of a multi-electrode extrapolation chamber as a prototype of a primary standard for the realization of the unit of the absorbed dose to water for beta brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambynek, M.

    2002-10-01

    The prototype of a primary standard has been developed, built and tested, which enables the realization of the unit of the absorbed dose to water for beta brachytherapy sources. In the course of the development of the prototype, the recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 60 (TG60) and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Medizinische Physik (DGMP) Arbeitskreis 18 (AK18) were taken into account. The prototype is based on a new multi-electrode extrapolation chamber (MEC) which meets, in particular, the requirements on high spatial resolution and small uncertainty. The central part of the MEC is a segmented collecting electrode which was manufactured in the clean room center of PTB by means of electron beam lithography on a wafer. A precise displacement device consisting of three piezoelectric macrotranslators has been incorporated to move the wafer collecting electrode against the entrance window. For adjustment of the wafer collecting electrode parallel to the entrance foil, an electro-mechanical adjustment system based on a capacitance bridge circuit has been developed. The MEC allows a three-dimensional dose distribution to be measured with high spatial resolution, without having to fall back on an additional relative dosimetry system. All components of the MEC were separately investigated for suitability. The extrapolation chamber measurements on a plane beta source proved the suitability of the MEC as a primary standard. With sizes of collector electrodes as small as 1 mm×1 mm, calibrations were performed with a relative combined standard uncertainty of 3.8%. The reproducibility of the MEC amounted to 1.5%, with k=1.

  8. Preparation of (103)Pd brachytherapy seeds by electroless plating of (103)Pd onto carbon bars.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Yong; Gao, Hui-Bo; Deng, Xue-Song; Zhou, Leng; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Han, Lian-Ge; Jin, Xiao-Hai; Cui, Hai-Ping

    2015-09-01

    A method for preparing (103)Pd brachytherapy seeds is reported. The key of the method was to deposit (103)Pd onto carbon bars by electroless plating so as to prepare source cores. After each carbon bar with (103)Pd was sealed in a titanium capsule, the (103)Pd seeds were fabricated. This paper provides valuable experiences and data for the preparation of (103)Pd brachytherapy seeds. PMID:26092353

  9. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  10. SU-E-T-270: Quality Control of Source Strength and Indexer Length in HDR Brachytherapy Using Sun Nuclear Mapcheck2

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this work was to evaluate Sun Nuclear MapCheck2 capability for quantitative determination of both HDR source strength and position. Predictive power of Mapcheck2 dose matrix, originated by a microSelectron-v2 source from 22mm distance, was investigated. Methods: A Mick MultiDoc phantom with the 1400mm indexer length mark aligned over MapCheck2 central detector plus two additional 5cm plastic slabs were used as a composite phantom. Dose readings were transformed by applying published source anisotropy corrections and experimentally established radial dose and relative sensitivity factors. Angular dependence was not considered. Only readings from diodes located 2cm around the central detector were evaluated. The reproducibility of a fit between transformed dose readings and the ratio of virtual source strength and the square of source-detector distance was investigated. Four parameters were considered in the model: virtual source strength, lateral, longitudinal and vertical source positions. Final source strength calibration factor was calculated from the ratio of reference measurements and results from the fit. Results: Original lateral and longitudinal source position estimations had systematic errors of 0.39mm and 0.75mm. After subtracting these errors, both source positions were predicted with a standard deviation of 0.15mm. Results for vertical positions were reproducible with a standard deviation of 0.05mm. The difference between calculated and reference source strengths from 34 independent measurement setups had a standard deviation of 0.3%. The coefficient of determination for the linear regression between known indexer lengths and results from the fit in the range 1400mm ± 5mm was 0.985. Conclusions: ource strength can be estimated with MapCheck2 at appropriate accuracy levels for quality control. Verification of indexer length with present implementation is more accurate than visual alternatives. Results can be improved by designing a

  11. Improving photoacoustic imaging contrast of brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Leo; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu; Tang, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy for treating prostate cancer where the radiation sources are seeds inserted into the prostate. Accurate localization of seeds during prostate brachytherapy is essential to the success of intraoperative treatment planning. The current standard modality used in intraoperative seeds localization is transrectal ultrasound. Transrectal ultrasound, however, suffers in image quality due to several factors such speckle, shadowing, and off-axis seed orientation. Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic phenomenon, is an emerging imaging modality. The contrast generating mechanism in photoacoustic imaging is optical absorption that is fundamentally different from conventional B-mode ultrasound which depicts changes in acoustic impedance. A photoacoustic imaging system is developed using a commercial ultrasound system. To improve imaging contrast and depth penetration, absorption enhancing coating is applied to the seeds. In comparison to bare seeds, approximately 18.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio as well as a doubling of imaging depth are achieved. Our results demonstrate that the coating of the seeds can further improve the discernibility of the seeds.

  12. A comparison of the dose distributions between the brachytherapy 125I source models, STM1251 and Oncoseed 6711, in a geometry lacking radiation equilibrium scatter conditions.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Kamo, Ken-ichi; Tateoka, Kunihiko; Asanuma, Osamu; Sato, Kaori; Takeda, Hiromitsu; Sakata, Koh-ichi; Takada, Jun

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the uncertainty in the dose distribution for the (125)I source STM1251, as measured with a radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter and calculated using the Monte Carlo code EGS5 in geometry that included the source structure reported by Kirov et al. This was performed at a range of positions in and on a water phantom 18 cm in diameter and 16 cm in length. Some dosimetry positions were so close to the surface that the backscatter margin was insufficient for photons. Consequently, the combined standard uncertainty (CSU) at the coverage factor k of 1 was 11.0-11.2% for the measurement and 1.8-3.6% for the calculation. The calculation successfully reproduced the measured dose distribution within 13%, with CSU at k ≤ 1.6 (P > 0.3). Dose distributions were then compared with those for the (125)I source Oncoseed 6711. Our results supported the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 Updated Protocol (TG43U1) formalism, in which STM1251 dose distributions were more penetrating than those of Oncoseed 6711. This trend was also observed in the region near the phantom surface lacking the equilibrium radiation scatter conditions. In this region, the difference between the TG43U1 formalism and the measurement and calculation performed in the present study was not significant (P > 0.3) for either of the source models. Selection of the source model based on the treatment plans according to the TG43U1 formalism will be practical. PMID:25618137

  13. Source storage and transfer cask: Users Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Eccleston, G.W.; Speir, L.G.; Garcia, D.C.

    1985-04-01

    The storage and shield cask for the dual californium source is designed to shield and transport up to 3.7 mg (2 Ci) of /sup 252/Cf. the cask meets Department of Transportation (DOT) license requirements for Type A materials (DOT-7A). The cask is designed to transfer sources to and from the Flourinel and Fuel Storage (FAST) facility delayed-neutron interrogator. Californium sources placed in the cask must be encapsulated in the SR-CF-100 package and attached to Teleflex cables. The cask contains two source locations. Each location contains a gear box that allows a Teleflex cable to be remotely moved by a hand crank into and out of the cask. This transfer procedure permits sources to be easily removed and inserted into the delayed-neutron interrogator and reduces personnel radiation exposure during transfer. The radiation dose rate with the maximum allowable quantity of californium (3.7 mg) in the cask is 30 mR/h at the surface and less than 2 mR/h 1 m from the cask surface. This manual contains information about the cask, californium sources, describes the method to ship the cask, and how to insert and remove sources from the cask. 28 figs.

  14. Brachytherapy dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, L. M.; Castro, I. F. C.; Peralta, L.; Abreu, M. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2015-07-01

    In-vivo and in-situ measurement of the radiation dose administered during brachytherapy faces several technical challenges, requiring a very compact, tissue-equivalent, linear and highly sensitive dosimeter, particularly in low-dose rate brachytherapy procedures, which use radioactive seeds with low energy and low dose deposition rate. In this work we present a scintillating optical fiber dosimeter composed of a flexible sensitive probe and a dedicated electronic readout system based on silicon photomultiplier photodetection, capable of operating both in pulse and current modes. The performance of the scintillating fiber optic dosimeter was evaluated in low energy regimes, using an X-ray tube operating at voltages of 40-50 kV and currents below 1 mA, to assess minimum dose response of the scintillating fiber. The dosimeter shows a linear response with dose and is capable of detecting mGy dose variations like an ionization chamber. Besides fulfilling all the requirements for a dosimeter in brachytherapy, the high sensitivity of this device makes it a suitable candidate for application in low-dose rate brachytherapy. According to Peralta and Rego [1], the BCF-10 and BCF-60 scintillating optical fibers used in dosimetry exhibit high variations in their sensitivity for photon beams in the 25-100 kVp energy range. Energy linearity for energies below 50 keV needs to be further investigated, using monochromatic X-ray photons.

  15. A Novel Device for Intravaginal Electronic Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Frank Fuchs, Holger; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Steil, Volker; Ziglio, Francesco; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Postoperative intravaginal brachytherapy for endometrial carcinoma is usually performed with {sup 192}Ir high-dose rate (HDR) afterloading. A potential alternative is treatment with a broadband 50kV X-ray point source, the advantage being its low energy and the consequential steep dose gradient. The aim of this study was to create and evaluate a homogeneous cylindrical energy deposition around a newly designed vaginal applicator. Methods and Materials: To create constant isodose layers along the cylindrical plastic vaginal applicator, the source (INTRABEAM system) was moved in steps of 17-19.5 mm outward from the tip of the applicator. Irradiation for a predetermined time was performed at each position. The axial shift was established by a stepping mechanism that was mounted on a table support. The total dose/dose distribution was determined using film dosimetry (Gafchromic EBT) in a 'solid water' phantom. The films were evaluated with Mathematica 5.2 and OmniPro-I'mRT 1.6. The results (dose D0/D5/D10 in 0/5/10 mm tissue depth) were compared with an {sup 192}Ir HDR afterloading plan for multiple sampling points around the applicator. Results: Three different dose distributions with lengths of 3.9-7.3 cm were created. The irradiation time based on the delivery of 5/7 Gy to a 5 mm tissue depth was 19/26 min to 27/38 min. D0/D5/D10 was 150%/100%/67% for electronic brachytherapy and 140%/100%/74% for the afterloading technique. The deviation for repeated measurements in the phantom was <7%. Conclusions: It is possible to create a homogeneous cylindrical dose distribution, similar to {sup 192}Ir HDR afterloading, through the superimposition of multiple spherical dose distributions by stepping a kilovolt point source.

  16. Analusis by 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry of Bordetella pertussis endotoxin after nitrous deamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deprun, C.; Karibian, D.; Caroff, M.

    1993-07-01

    Endotoxic lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are the major components of Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane. Like many amphipathic molecules, they pose problems of heterogeneity, purity, solubility, and aggregation. Nevertheless, PDMS has recently have been applied to unmodified endotoxins composed of LPS having uip to five sugar units in their saccharide chain. The B. Pertussis LPSs, most of which have a dodecasaccharide domain, ahve been analysed by classical methods and the masses of the separate lipid and saccharide domains determined after rupture of the bond linking them. However, the acid treatment employed for these and most chemical analyses can also modify structures in the vicinity of the bond. In order to investigate this biologically-important region, the endotoxin was treated to nitrous deamination, which shortens the saccharide chain to five sugars, but preserves the acid-labile region of the LPS. The PDM spectrum of this derivative, which required new conditions for its desorption, confirmed the structure analysis and demonstrated the presence of at least four molecular species.

  17. Prompt Neutron Emission from Fragments in Spontaneous Fission of 244, 248Cm and 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. S.; Dushin, V. N.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Jakovlev, V. A.; Kalinin, V. A.; Laptev, A. B.; Petrov, B. F.; Shcherbakov, O. A.

    2005-11-01

    Neutrons emitted in fission were measured separately for each complementary fragment in correlation with fission fragment energies. Two high efficient Gd-loaded liquid scintillator tanks were used for neutron registration. Fission fragment energies were measured using a twin Frisch gridded ionization chamber with a pin-hole collimator. The neutron multiplicity distributions were obtained for each value of the fission fragment mass and energy and corrected for neutron registration efficiency, background and pile-up. The dependencies of these distributions on fragment mass and energy for different energy and mass bins, as well as the mass and energy distribution of the fission fragments are presented and discussed.

  18. Using matrix summation method for three dimensional dose calculation in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zibandeh-Gorji, Mahmoud; Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Mohammadi, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study is to calculate radiation dose around a brachytherapy source in a water phantom for different seed locations or rotation the sources by the matrix summation method. Background Monte Carlo based codes like MCNP are widely used for performing radiation transport calculations and dose evaluation in brachytherapy. But for complicated situations, like using more than one source, moving or rotating the source, the routine Monte Carlo method for dose calculation needs a long time running. Materials and methods The MCNPX code has been used to calculate radiation dose around a 192Ir brachytherapy source and saved in a 3D matrix. Then, we used this matrix to evaluate the absorbed dose in any point due to some sources or a source which shifted or rotated in some places by the matrix summation method. Results Three dimensional (3D) dose results and isodose curves were presented for 192Ir source in a water cube phantom shifted for 10 steps and rotated for 45 and 90° based on the matrix summation method. Also, we applied this method for some arrays of sources. Conclusion The matrix summation method can be used for 3D dose calculations for any brachytherapy source which has moved or rotated. This simple method is very fast compared to routine Monte Carlo based methods. In addition, it can be applied for dose optimization study. PMID:24377009

  19. Image-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargo, John A; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide; definitive radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy is the accepted standard of care for patients with node positive or locally advanced tumors > 4 cm. Brachytherapy is an important part of definitive radiotherapy shown to improve overall survival. While results for two-dimensional X-ray based brachytherapy have been good in terms of local control especially for early stage disease, unexplained toxicities and treatment failures remain. Improvements in brachytherapy planning have more recently paved the way for three-dimensional image-based brachytherapy with volumetric optimization which increases tumor control, reduces toxicity, and helps predict outcomes. Advantages of image-based brachytherapy include: improved tumor coverage (especially for large volume disease), decreased dose to critical organs (especially for small cervix), confirmation of applicator placement, and accounting for sigmoid colon dose. A number of modalities for image-based brachytherapy have emerged including: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), CT-MRI hybrid, and ultrasound with respective benefits and outcomes data. For practical application of image-based brachytherapy the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Working Group and American Brachytherapy Society working group guideline serve as invaluable tools, additionally here-in we outline our institutional clinical integration of these guidelines. While the body of literature supporting image-based brachytherapy continues to evolve a number of uncertainties and challenges remain including: applicator reconstruction, increasing resource/cost demands, mobile four-dimensional targets and organs-at-risk, and accurate contouring of “grey zones” to avoid marginal miss. Ongoing studies, including the prospective EMBRACE (an international study of MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced

  20. Development and Evaluation of Rhenium-188-labeled Radioactive Stents for Restenosis Therapy and Development of Strategies for Radiolabeling Brachytherapy Sources with Palladium-103 CRADA FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F. F.

    1998-06-01

    This project involved collaboration between InnerDyne, Inc., and radiopharmaceutical research programs at ORNL and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which explored new strategies for the development and animal testing of radioactive rhenium-188-labeled implantable stent sources for the treatment of coronary restenosis after angioplasty and the development of chemical species radiolabeled with the palladium-103 radioisotope for the treatment of cancer. Rhenium-l 88 was made available for these studies from radioactive decay of tungsten-188 produced in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Stent activation and coating technology was developed and provided by InnerDyne, Inc., and stent radiolabeling technology and animal studies were conducted by InnerDyne staff in conjunction with investigators at BNL. Collaborative studies in animals were supported at sites by InnerDyne, Inc. New chemical methods for attaching the palladium-103 radioisotope to bifunctional chelate technologies were developed by investigators at ORNL.

  1. Development and Evaluation of Rhenium-188-labeled Radioactive Stents for Restenosis Therapy and Development of Strategies for Radiolabeling Brachytherapy Sources with Palladium-103

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F.

    2001-04-27

    This project involved collaboration between InnerDyne, Inc., and radiopharmaceutical research programs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which explored new strategies for the development and animal testing of radioactive rhenium-188-labeled implantable stent sources for the treatment of coronary restenosis after angioplasty and the development of chemical species radiolabeled with the palladium-103 radioisotope for the treatment of cancer. Rhenium-188 was made available for these studies from radioactive decay of tungsten-188 produced in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Stent activation and coating technology was developed and provided by InnerDyne, Inc., and stent radiolabeling technology and animal studies were conducted by InnerDyne staff in conjunction with investigators at BNL. Collaborative studies in animals were supported at sites by InnerDyne, Inc. New chemical methods for attaching the palladium-103 radioisotope to bifunctional chelate technologies were developed by investigators at ORNL.

  2. Dosimetric impact of an {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source cable length modeled using a grid-based Boltzmann transport equation solver

    SciTech Connect

    Mikell, Justin K.; Mourtada, Firas

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose distributions of an {sup 192}Ir source (model VS2000) in homogeneous water geometry calculated using a deterministic grid-based Boltzmann transport equation solver (GBBS) in the commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (BRACHYVISION-ACUROS v8.8). Methods: Using percent dose differences (%{Delta}D), the GBBS (BV-ACUROS) was compared to the (1) published TG-43 data, (2) MCNPX Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the {sup 192}Ir source centered in a 15 cm radius water sphere, and (3) TG-43 output from the TPS using vendor supplied (BV-TG43-vendor) and user extended (BV-TG43-extended) 2D anisotropy functions F(r,{theta}). BV-ACUROS assumes 1 mm of NiTi cable, while the TPS TG-43 algorithm uses data based on a 15 cm cable. MC models of various cable lengths were simulated. Results: The MC simulations resulted in >20% dose deviations along the cable for 1, 2, and 3 mm cable lengths relative to 15 cm. BV-ACUROS comparisons with BV-TG43-vendor and BV-TG43-extended yielded magnitude of differences, consistent with those seen in MC simulations. However, differences >20% extended further ({theta}{<=}10 deg.) when using the vendor supplied anisotropy function F{sub ven}(r,{theta}). These differences were also seen in comparisons of F(r,{theta}) derived from the TPS output. Conclusions: The results suggest that %{Delta}D near the cable region is larger than previously estimated. The spatial distribution of the dose deviation is highly dependent on the reference TG-43 data used to compare to GBBS. The differences observed, while important to realize, should not have an impact on clinical dosimetry in homogeneous water.

  3. Treatment planning of a skin-sparing conical breast brachytherapy applicator using conventional brachytherapy software

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yun; Melhus, Christopher S.; Sioshansi, Shirin; Rivard, Mark J.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: AccuBoost is a noninvasive image-guided technique for the delivery of partial breast irradiation to the tumor bed and currently serves as an alternate to conventional electron beam boost. To irradiate the target volume while providing dose sparing to the skin, the round applicator design was augmented through the addition of an internally truncated conical shield and the reduction of the source to skin distance. Methods: Brachytherapy dose distributions for two types of conical applicators were simulated and estimated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods for radiation transport and a conventional treatment planning system (TPS). MC-derived and TPS-generated dose volume histograms (DVHs) and dose distribution data were compared for both the conical and round applicators for benchmarking purposes. Results: Agreement using the gamma-index test was {>=}99.95% for distance to agreement and dose accuracy criteria of 2 mm and 2%, respectively. After observing good agreement, TPS DVHs and dose distributions for the conical and round applicators were obtained and compared. Brachytherapy dose distributions generated using Pinnacle{sup 3} for ten CT data sets showed that the parallel-opposed beams of the conical applicators provided similar PTV coverage to the round applicators and reduced the maximum dose to skin, chest wall, and lung by up to 27%, 42%, and 43%, respectively. Conclusions: Brachytherapy dose distributions for the conical applicators have been generated using MC methods and entered into the Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS via the Tufts technique. Treatment planning metrics for the conical AccuBoost applicators were significantly improved in comparison to those for conventional electron beam breast boost.

  4. An overview of interstitial brachytherapy and hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, B.B.; Harney, J.

    1989-11-01

    Interstitial thermoradiotherapy, an experimental cancer treatment that combines interstitial radiation implants (brachytherapy) and interstitial hyperthermia, is in the early stages of investigation. In accordance with the procedure used in a current national trial protocol, a 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered after catheters are placed into the tumor area while the patient is under general anesthesia. This is immediately followed by loading of radioactive Iridium-192 seeds into the catheters for a defined period of time. Once the prescribed radiation dose is delivered, the radioactive sources are removed and a second, 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered. Clinical trials with hyperthermia in combination with radiation have increased in recent years. Nurses caring for these patients need to become more knowledgeable about this investigational therapy. This paper provides an overview of the biologic rationale for this therapy, as well as a description of the delivery method and clinical application. Specific related nursing interventions are defined in a nursing protocol.23 references.

  5. Harmony search optimization for HDR prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, Aditya

    In high dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, multiple catheters are inserted interstitially into the target volume. The process of treating the prostate involves calculating and determining the best dose distribution to the target and organs-at-risk by means of optimizing the time that the radioactive source dwells at specified positions within the catheters. It is the goal of this work to investigate the use of a new optimization algorithm, known as Harmony Search, in order to optimize dwell times for HDR prostate brachytherapy. The new algorithm was tested on 9 different patients and also compared with the genetic algorithm. Simulations were performed to determine the optimal value of the Harmony Search parameters. Finally, multithreading of the simulation was examined to determine potential benefits. First, a simulation environment was created using the Python programming language and the wxPython graphical interface toolkit, which was necessary to run repeated optimizations. DICOM RT data from Varian BrachyVision was parsed and used to obtain patient anatomy and HDR catheter information. Once the structures were indexed, the volume of each structure was determined and compared to the original volume calculated in BrachyVision for validation. Dose was calculated using the AAPM TG-43 point source model of the GammaMed 192Ir HDR source and was validated against Varian BrachyVision. A DVH-based objective function was created and used for the optimization simulation. Harmony Search and the genetic algorithm were implemented as optimization algorithms for the simulation and were compared against each other. The optimal values for Harmony Search parameters (Harmony Memory Size [HMS], Harmony Memory Considering Rate [HMCR], and Pitch Adjusting Rate [PAR]) were also determined. Lastly, the simulation was modified to use multiple threads of execution in order to achieve faster computational times. Experimental results show that the volume calculation that was

  6. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M.; Dadkhah, Hossein; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  7. [Basic principles and results of brachytherapy in gynecological oncology].

    PubMed

    Kanaev, S V; Turkevich, V G; Baranov, S B; Savel'eva, V V

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental basics of contact radiation therapy (brachytherapy) for gynecological cancer are presented. During brachytherapy the principles of conformal radiotherapy should be implemented, the aim of which is to sum the maximum possible dose of radiation to the tumor and decrease the dose load in adjacent organs and tissues, which allows reducing the frequency of radiation damage at treatment of primary tumors. It is really feasible only on modern technological level, thanks to precision topometry preparation, optimal computer dosimetrical and radiobiological planning of each session and radiotherapy in general. Successful local and long-term results of the contact radiation therapy for cancer of cervix and endometrium are due to optimal anatomical and topometrical ratio of the tumor localization, radioactive sources, and also physical and radiobiological laws of distribution and effects of ionizing radiation, the dose load accounting rules. PMID:25552060

  8. Brachytherapy Application with in situ Dose-painting Administered via Gold-nanoparticle Eluters

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Neeharika; Cifter, Gizem; Sajo, Erno; Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas; Nguyen, Paul; Cormack, Robert A; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies show promise that administering gold nanoparticles (GNP) to tumor cells during brachytherapy could significantly enhance radiation damage to the tumor. A proposed new strategy for sustained administration of the GNP in prostate tumors is to load them into routinely used brachytherapy spacers for customizable in-situ release after implantation. This in silico study investigates the intra-tumor biodistribution and corresponding dose enhancement over time due to GNP released from such GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS). Method and Materials An experimentally determined intra-tumoral diffusion coefficient (D) for 10 nm nanoparticles was employed to estimate D for other sizes using the Stoke-Einstein equation. GNP concentration profiles, obtained using D, were then employed to calculate the corresponding dose enhancement factor (DEF) for each tumor voxel using dose-painting by numbers approach, for times relevant to the considered brachytherapy sources' lifetimes. The investigation is carried out as a function of GNP size for clinically applicable low dose rate brachytherapy sources: I-125, Pd-103, Cs-131. Results Results showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels/sub-volumes during brachytherapy can be customized by varying the sizes of GNP released or eluted from the GBS. For example, using 7 mg/g GNP concentration, significant DEF (> 20%) could be achieved 5 mm from a GBS after 5, 12, 25, 46, 72, 120, and 195 days, respectively, for GNPs sizes of 2 nm, 5 nm, 10 nm, 20 nm, 30 nm 50 nm, and 80 nm when treating with I-125. Conclusions Analyses show that using Cs-131 provides the highest dose enhancement to tumor voxels. However, given its relatively longer half-life, I-125 presents the most flexibility for customizing the dose enhancement as a function of GNP size. The findings provide a useful reference for further work towards potential development of a new brachytherapy application with in-situ dose-painting administered via gold

  9. A quality management program in intravascular brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Chakri, Abderrahim; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2002-12-01

    While simple, intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) presents a considerable potential for harm to the patient. The medical physicist maintains the responsibility to minimize the likelihood of operational problems or dosimetric errors. The principals for safe operation remain the same as with any radiotherapy treatment: to deliver the correct dose, to the correct location, safety. To develop an effective and comprehensive quality management (QM) program for IVB, a physicist should utilize proven risk assessment techniques rather than simply thinking of things to check, and follow guidances such as ISO9001:2000. The proposed QM program includes the following: Procedures designed to assure the safety of the patient. Identification of the patient; tests of the integrity and patency for the delivery catheter, operation of the source train, and patency of the catheter in the treatment position; a check for recovery preparations; and verification of source recovery. Procedures to assure positional accuracy of the treatment: Verification of the positioning the catheter in the artery and of the sources in the catheter. Procedures to assure dosimetry accuracy: Acceptance testing of the device, including verification of the source strength and uniformity, and of the treatment duration tables; verification of the treatment prescription and duration for each patient; and control measures that minimize the likelihood of errors removing the source at the correct time. PMID:12512720

  10. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-30

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm{sup 3}. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm{sup 3}. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  11. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aronowitz, Jesse N.

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  12. Testicular shielding in penile brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Arpita; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Ghadi, Yogesh; Murthy, Vedang; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penile cancer, although rare, is one of the common genitourinary cancers in India affecting mostly aged uncircumcised males. For patients presenting with small superficial lesions < 3 cm restricted to glans, surgery, radical external radiation or brachytherapy may be offered, the latter being preferred as it allows organ and function preservation. In patients receiving brachytherapy, testicular morbidity is not commonly addressed. With an aim to minimize and document the doses to testis after adequate shielding during radical interstitial brachytherapy for penile cancers, we undertook this study in 2 patients undergoing brachytherapy and forms the basis of this report. Material and methods Two patients with early stage penile cancer limited to the glans were treated with radical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using interstitial implant. A total of 7-8 tubes were implanted in two planes, parallel to the penile shaft. A total dose of 44-48 Gy (55-60 Gy EQD2 doses with α/β = 10) was delivered in 11-12 fractions of 4 Gy each delivered twice daily. Lead sheets adding to 11 mm (4-5 half value layer) were interposed between the penile shaft and scrotum. The testicular dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each patient, dosimetry was done for 3 fractions and mean calculated. Results The cumulative testicular dose to left and right testis was 31.68 cGy and 42.79 cGy for patient A, and 21.96 cGy and 23.28 cGy for patient B. For the same patients, the mean cumulative dose measured at the posterior aspect of penile shaft was 722.15 cGy and 807.72 cGy, amounting to 16.4% and 16.8% of the prescribed dose. Hence, the application of lead shield 11 mm thick reduced testicular dose from 722-808 cGy to 21.96-42.57 cGy, an “absolute reduction” of 95.99 ± 1.5%. Conclusions With the use of a simple lead shield as described, we were able to effectively reduce testicular dose from “spermicidal” range to “oligospermic” range with possible

  13. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Quentin E. Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Enger, Shirin A.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq{sup 153}Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D{sub 98%}), I-RSBT reduced urethral D{sub 0.1cc} below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq {sup 153}Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed{sup 153}Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29

  14. Long-Term Results of an RTOG Phase II Trial (00-19) of External-Beam Radiation Therapy Combined With Permanent Source Brachytherapy for Intermediate-Risk Clinically Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Yan, Yan; Lee, W. Robert; Gillin, Michael; Firat, Selim; Baikadi, Madhava; Crook, Juanita; Kuettel, Michael; Morton, Gerald; Sandler, Howard

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: External-beam radiation therapy combined with low-doserate permanent brachytherapy are commonly used to treat men with localized prostate cancer. This Phase II trial was performed to document late gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity as well as biochemical control for this treatment in a multi-institutional cooperative group setting. This report defines the long-term results of this trial. Methods and Materials: All eligible patients received external-beam radiation (45 Gy in 25 fractions) followed 2-6 weeks later by a permanent iodine 125 implant of 108 Gy. Late toxicity was defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. Biochemical control was defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus definition and the ASTRO Phoenix definition. Results: One hundred thirty-eight patients were enrolled from 20 institutions, and 131 were eligible. Median follow-up (living patients) was 8.2 years (range, 2.7-9.3 years). The 8-year estimate of late grade >3 genitourinary and/or gastrointestinal toxicity was 15%. The most common grade >3 toxicities were urinary frequency, dysuria, and proctitis. There were two grade 4 toxicities, both bladder necrosis, and no grade 5 toxicities. In addition, 42% of patients complained of grade 3 impotence (no erections) at 8 years. The 8-year estimate of biochemical failure was 18% and 21% by the Phoenix and ASTRO consensus definitions, respectively. Conclusion: Biochemical control for this treatment seems durable with 8 years of follow-up and is similar to high-dose external beam radiation alone or brachytherapy alone. Late toxicity in this multi-institutional trial is higher than reports from similar cohorts of patients treated with high-dose external-beam radiation alone or permanent low-doserate brachytherapy alone, perhaps suggesting further attention to strategies that limit doses to

  15. A portable measurement system for subcriticality measurements by the CF-source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Ragan, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    A portable system has been assembled that is capable of measuring the subcriticality of fissile materials using the /sup 252/CF-source-driven neutron noise analysis method. The measurement system consists of a parallel-plate ionization chamber containing /sup 252/CF, two /sup 3/He proportional counters with their associated electronics, and a small computer containing anti-aliasing filters and A/D convertors. The system Fourier analyzes the digitized data and forms the appropriate auto and cross-power spectral densities. These spectra are used to form a ratio of spectral densities, G/sub 12/G/sub 13//G/sub 11/G/sub 23/, where 1 refers to the ionization chamber, and 2 and 3 refer to the /sup 3/He counters, from which subcriticality can be determined. The chamber and detectors are located appropriately near the fissile material. The system is capable of sampling signals at rates of up to 80 kHz and processing these data at rates of 2 kHz to form the appropriate spectra. The presently configured system is a two-channel system, hence the measurement of G/sub 12/, G/sub 13/, and G/sub 23/ must be done sequentially before the ratio of spectral densities is obtained. Future improvements of the system will allow simultaneous measurement of all spectra and will further reduce size, thereby enhancing portability. This measurement system can provide reliable, cost effective, and convenient determination of the subcriticality of a wide variety of fissile materials and moderators.

  16. Technical Note: Contrast solution density and cross section errors in inhomogeneity-corrected dose calculation for breast balloon brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Leonard H.; Zhang Miao; Howell, Roger W.; Yue, Ning J.; Khan, Atif J.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Recent recommendations by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 186 emphasize the importance of understanding material properties and their effect on inhomogeneity-corrected dose calculation for brachytherapy. Radiographic contrast is normally injected into breast brachytherapy balloons. In this study, the authors independently estimate properties of contrast solution that were expected to be incorrectly specified in a commercial brachytherapy dose calculation algorithm. Methods: The mass density and atomic weight fractions of a clinical formulation of radiographic contrast solution were determined using manufacturers' data. The mass density was verified through measurement and compared with the density obtained by the treatment planning system's CT calibration. The atomic weight fractions were used to determine the photon interaction cross section of the contrast solution for a commercial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy source and compared with that of muscle. Results: The density of contrast solution was 10% less than that obtained from the CT calibration. The cross section of the contrast solution for the HDR source was 1.2% greater than that of muscle. Both errors could be addressed by overriding the density of the contrast solution in the treatment planning system. Conclusions: The authors estimate the error in mass density and cross section parameters used by a commercial brachytherapy dose calculation algorithm for radiographic contrast used in a clinical breast brachytherapy practice. This approach is adaptable to other clinics seeking to evaluate dose calculation errors and determine appropriate density override values if desired.

  17. Dose rate in brachytherapy using after-loading machine: pulsed or high-dose rate?

    PubMed

    Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; Peiffert, D

    2014-10-01

    Since February 2014, it is no longer possible to use low-dose rate 192 iridium wires due to the end of industrial production of IRF1 and IRF2 sources. The Brachytherapy Group of the French society of radiation oncology (GC-SFRO) has recommended switching from iridium wires to after-loading machines. Two types of after-loading machines are currently available, based on the dose rate used: pulsed-dose rate or high-dose rate. In this article, we propose a comparative analysis between pulsed-dose rate and high-dose rate brachytherapy, based on biological, technological, organizational and financial considerations. PMID:25195117

  18. Dynamic modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) and intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) for the treatment of rectal and breast carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Matthew Julian

    The ultimate goal of any treatment of cancer is to maximize the likelihood of killing the tumor while minimizing the chance of damaging healthy tissues. One of the most effective ways to accomplish this is through radiation therapy, which must be able to target the tumor volume with a high accuracy while minimizing the dose delivered to healthy tissues. A successful method of accomplishing this is brachytherapy which works by placing the radiation source in very close proximity to the tumor. However, most current applications of brachytherapy rely mostly on the geometric manipulation of isotropic sources, which limits the ability to specifically target the tumor. The purpose of this work is to introduce several types of shielded brachytherapy applicators which are capable of targeting tumors with much greater accuracy than existing technologies. These applicators rely on the modulation of the dose profile through a high-density tungsten alloy shields to create anisotropic dose distributions. Two classes of applicators have been developed in this work. The first relies on the active motion of the shield, to aim a highly directional radiation profile. This allows for very precise control of the dose distribution for treatment, achieving unparalleled dose coverage to the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. This technique has been given the moniker of Dynamic Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT). The second class of applicators, designed to reduce treatment complexity uses static applicators. These applicators retain the use of the tungsten shield, but the shield is motionless during treatment. By intelligently designing the shield, significant improvements over current methods have been demonstrated. Although these static applicators fail to match the dosimetric quality of DMBT applicators the simplified setup and treatment procedure gives them significant appeal. The focus of this work has been to optimize these shield designs, specifically for the treatment of rectal and

  19. Preliminary experience on the implementation of computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 source in University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamalludin, Z.; Min, U. N.; Ishak, W. Z. Wan; Malik, R. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our preliminary work of the computed tomography (CT) image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) implementation on cervical cancer patients. We developed a protocol in which patients undergo two Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examinations; a) prior to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and b) prior to intra-cavitary brachytherapy for tumour identification and delineation during IGBT planning and dosimetry. For each fraction, patients were simulated using CT simulator and images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The HR-CTV, IR-CTV, bladder and rectum were delineated on CT-based contouring for cervical cancer. Plans were optimised to achieve HR-CTV and IR-CTV dose (D90) of total EQD2 80Gy and 60Gy respectively, while limiting the minimum dose to the most irradiated 2cm3 volume (D2cc) of bladder and rectum to total EQD2 90Gy and 75Gy respectively. Data from seven insertions were analysed by comparing the volume-based with traditional point- based doses. Based on our data, there were differences between volume and point doses of HR- CTV, bladder and rectum organs. As the number of patients having the CT-based IGBT increases from day to day in our centre, it is expected that the treatment and dosimetry accuracy will be improved with the implementation.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: initiating a program

    PubMed Central

    Prisciandaro, Joann I.; Soliman, Abraam; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has increased, and there is growing evidence to suggest that improvements in accuracy of target delineation in MRI-guided brachytherapy may improve clinical outcomes in cervical cancer. To implement a high quality image guided brachytherapy program, a multidisciplinary team is required with appropriate expertise as well as an adequate patient load to ensure a sustainable program. It is imperative to know that the most important source of uncertainty in the treatment process is related to target delineation and therefore, the necessity of training and expertise as well as quality assurance should be emphasized. A short review of concepts and techniques that have been developed for implementation and/or improvement of workflow of a MRI-guided brachytherapy program are provided in this document, so that institutions can use and optimize some of them based on their resources to minimize their procedure times. PMID:26622249

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: initiating a program.

    PubMed

    Owrangi, Amir M; Prisciandaro, Joann I; Soliman, Abraam; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y

    2015-10-01

    Over the past decade, the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has increased, and there is growing evidence to suggest that improvements in accuracy of target delineation in MRI-guided brachytherapy may improve clinical outcomes in cervical cancer. To implement a high quality image guided brachytherapy program, a multidisciplinary team is required with appropriate expertise as well as an adequate patient load to ensure a sustainable program. It is imperative to know that the most important source of uncertainty in the treatment process is related to target delineation and therefore, the necessity of training and expertise as well as quality assurance should be emphasized. A short review of concepts and techniques that have been developed for implementation and/or improvement of workflow of a MRI-guided brachytherapy program are provided in this document, so that institutions can use and optimize some of them based on their resources to minimize their procedure times. PMID:26622249

  2. [Endobronchial brachytherapy: state of the art in 2013].

    PubMed

    Derhem, N; Sabila, H; Mornex, F

    2013-04-01

    Endobronchial brachytherapy is an invasive technique, which allows localizing radioactive sources at the tumour contact. Therefore, high doses are administered to tumour while healthy tissues can be spared. Initially dedicated to a palliative setting, improvements helped reaching 60 to 88% symptoms alleviation and 30 to 100% of endoscopic macroscopic response. New diagnostic techniques and early diagnosis extended the indications to a curative intent: endoluminal primitive tumour, post radiation endobronchial recurrence, inoperable patients. CT-based dosimetry is a keypoint to optimize treatment quality and to minimize potential side effects, making this treatment a safe and efficient technique for specific indications. PMID:23465785

  3. Brachytherapy next generation: robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacsó, Alex Cristian; Pisla, Doina; Kacsó, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    In a field dominated by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), both the therapeutic and technical possibilities of brachytherapy (BT) are underrated, shadowed by protons and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Decreasing expertise and indications, as well as increasing lack of specific BT training for radiation therapy (RT) residents led to the real need of shortening its learning curve and making it more popular. Developing robotic BT devices can be a way to mitigate the above issues. There are many teams working at custom-made robotic BT platforms to perfect and overcome the limitations of the existing systems. This paper provides a picture of the current state-of-the-art in robotic assisted BT, as it also conveys the author's solution to the problem, a parallel robot that uses CT-guidance. PMID:26816510

  4. Brachytherapy next generation: robotic systems

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacsó, Alex Cristian; Pisla, Doina

    2015-01-01

    In a field dominated by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), both the therapeutic and technical possibilities of brachytherapy (BT) are underrated, shadowed by protons and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Decreasing expertise and indications, as well as increasing lack of specific BT training for radiation therapy (RT) residents led to the real need of shortening its learning curve and making it more popular. Developing robotic BT devices can be a way to mitigate the above issues. There are many teams working at custom-made robotic BT platforms to perfect and overcome the limitations of the existing systems. This paper provides a picture of the current state-of-the-art in robotic assisted BT, as it also conveys the author's solution to the problem, a parallel robot that uses CT-guidance. PMID:26816510

  5. Patient-Specific Monte Carlo-Based Dose-Kernel Approach for Inverse Planning in Afterloading Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amours, Michel; Pouliot, Jean; Dagnault, Anne; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy planning software relies on the Task Group report 43 dosimetry formalism. This formalism, based on a water approximation, neglects various heterogeneous materials present during treatment. Various studies have suggested that these heterogeneities should be taken into account to improve the treatment quality. The present study sought to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry within an inverse planning algorithm to improve the dose conformity and increase the treatment quality. Methods and Materials: The method was based on precalculated dose kernels in full patient geometries, representing the dose distribution of a brachytherapy source at a single dwell position using MC simulations and the Geant4 toolkit. These dose kernels are used by the inverse planning by simulated annealing tool to produce a fast MC-based plan. A test was performed for an interstitial brachytherapy breast treatment using two different high-dose-rate brachytherapy sources: the microSelectron iridium-192 source and the electronic brachytherapy source Axxent operating at 50 kVp. Results: A research version of the inverse planning by simulated annealing algorithm was combined with MC to provide a method to fully account for the heterogeneities in dose optimization, using the MC method. The effect of the water approximation was found to depend on photon energy, with greater dose attenuation for the lower energies of the Axxent source compared with iridium-192. For the latter, an underdosage of 5.1% for the dose received by 90% of the clinical target volume was found. Conclusion: A new method to optimize afterloading brachytherapy plans that uses MC dosimetric information was developed. Including computed tomography-based information in MC dosimetry in the inverse planning process was shown to take into account the full range of scatter and heterogeneity conditions. This led to significant dose differences compared with the Task Group report

  6. A Monte Carlo dosimetry study using Henschke applicator for cervical brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pei-Chieh; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Lee, Chung-Chi; Wu, Ching-Jung; Tung, Chuan-Jong

    2010-07-01

    In recent years the Henschke applicator has been widely used for gynecologic patients treated by brachytherapy in Taiwan. However, the commercial brachytherapy planning system did not properly evaluate the dose perturbation caused by the Henschke applicator. Since the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology advised that the effect of source shielding should be incorporated into the brachytherapy planning system, it required calculation and comparison of the dose distribution around the applicator. This study used the Monte Carlo MCNP code to simulate the dose distribution in a water phantom that contained the Henschke applicator with one tandem and two ovoids. Three dwell positions of a high dose rate 192Ir source were simulated by including and excluding the applicator. The mesh tally option of the MCNP was applied to facilitate the calculation of a large number of tallies in the phantom. The voxel size effect and the charge particle equilibrium were studied by comparing the results calculated with different tally options. The calculated results showed that the brachytherapy planning system overestimated the rectal dose and that the shielding material in the applicator contributed more than 40% to the rectal dose.

  7. Methodology for commissioning a brachytherapy treatment planning system in the era of 3D planning.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Claire

    2010-12-01

    To describe the steps undertaken to commission a 3D high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS). Emphasis was placed on validating previously published recommendations, in addition to checking 3D parameters such as treatment optimization and dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Commissioning was performed of the brachytherapy module of the Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system (version 3.2). Commissioning test results were compared to an independent external beam TPS (Varian Eclipse v 8.6) and the previously commissioned Nucletron Plato (v 14.3.7) brachytherapy treatment planning system, with point doses also independently verified using the brachytherapy module in RadCalc (v 6.0) independent point dose calculation software. Tests were divided into eight categories: (i) Image import accuracy, (ii) Reconstruction accuracy, (iii) Source configuration data check, (iv) Dose calculation accuracy, (v) Treatment optimization validation, (vi) DVH reproducibility, (vii) Treatment export check and (viii) Printout consistency. Point dose agreement between Oncentra, Plato and RadCalc was better than 5% with source data and dose calculation protocols following the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) guidelines. Testing of image accuracy (import and reconstruction), along with validation of automated treatment optimization and DVH analysis generated a more comprehensive set of testing procedures than previously listed in published recommendations. PMID:21053116

  8. {sup 106}Ruthenium Brachytherapy for Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzeid, Hana; Moeckli, Raphael; Gaillard, Marie-Claire; Beck-Popovic, Maja; Pica, Alessia; Zografos, Leonidas; Balmer, Aubin; Pampallona, Sandro; Munier, Francis L.

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of {sup 106}Ru plaque brachytherapy for the treatment of retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed a retrospective, noncomparative case series of 39 children with retinoblastoma treated with {sup 106}Ru plaques at the Jules-Gonin Eye Hospital between October 1992 and July 2006, with 12 months of follow-up. Results: A total of 63 tumors were treated with {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy in 41 eyes. The median patient age was 27 months. {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy was the first-line treatment for 3 tumors (4.8%), second-line treatment for 13 (20.6%), and salvage treatment for 47 tumors (74.6%) resistant to other treatment modalities. Overall tumor control was achieved in 73% at 1 year. Tumor recurrence at 12 months was observed in 2 (12.5%) of 16 tumors for which {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy was used as the first- or second-line treatment and in 15 (31.9%) of 47 tumors for which {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy was used as salvage treatment. Eye retention was achieved in 76% of cases (31 of 41 eyes). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no statistically significant risk factors for tumor recurrence. Radiation complications included retinal detachment in 7 (17.1%), proliferative retinopathy in 1 (2.4%), and subcapsular cataract in 4 (9.7%) of 41 eyes. Conclusion: {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy is an effective treatment for retinoblastoma, with few secondary complications. Local vitreous seeding can be successfully treated with {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy.

  9. Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Guo Mengye; Mitra, Nandita; Metz, James M.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the role of brachytherapy in the treatment of cholangiocarcinomas in a relatively large group of patients. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database, a total of 193 patients with cholangiocarcinoma treated with brachytherapy were identified for the period 1988-2003. The primary analysis compared patients treated with brachytherapy (with or without external-beam radiation) with those who did not receive radiation. To try to account for confounding variables, propensity score and sensitivity analyses were used. Results: There was a significant difference between patients who received radiation (n = 193) and those who did not (n = 6859) with regard to surgery (p < 0.0001), race (p < 0.0001), stage (p < 0.0001), and year of diagnosis (p <0.0001). Median survival for patients treated with brachytherapy was 11 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 9-13 months), compared with 4 months for patients who received no radiation (p < 0.0001). On multivariable analysis (hazard ratio [95% CI]) brachytherapy (0.79 [0.66-0.95]), surgery (0.50 [0.46-0.53]), year of diagnosis (1998-2003: 0.66 [0.60-0.73]; 1993-1997: (0.96 [0.89-1.03; NS], baseline 1988-1992), and extrahepatic disease (0.84 [0.79-0.89]) were associated with better overall survival. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the largest dataset reported for the treatment of cholangiocarcinomas with brachytherapy. The results of this retrospective analysis suggest that brachytherapy may improve overall survival. However, because of the limitations of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database, these results should be interpreted cautiously, and future prospective studies are needed.

  10. Apparatus and method for high dose rate brachytherapy radiation treatment

    DOEpatents

    Macey, Daniel J.; Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Smith, Mark Frederick; Kross, Brian James

    2005-01-25

    A method and apparatus for the in vivo location and tracking of a radioactive seed source during and after brachytherapy treatment. The method comprises obtaining multiple views of the seed source in a living organism using: 1) a single PSPMT detector that is exposed through a multiplicity of pinholes thereby obtaining a plurality of images from a single angle; 2) a single PSPMT detector that may obtain an image through a single pinhole or a plurality of pinholes from a plurality of angles through movement of the detector; or 3) a plurality of PSPMT detectors that obtain a plurality of views from different angles simultaneously or virtually simultaneously. The plurality of images obtained from these various techniques, through angular displacement of the various acquired images, provide the information required to generate the three dimensional images needed to define the location of the radioactive seed source within the body of the living organism.

  11. Comparison of dose calculation methods for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Finger, Paul T.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Mourtada, Firas; Napolitano, Mary E.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Thomson, Rowan M.; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric differences among several clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) and Monte Carlo (MC) codes for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors using {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd plaques, and to evaluate the impact on the prescription dose of the adoption of MC codes and certain versions of a TPS (Plaque Simulator with optional modules). Methods: Three clinical brachytherapy TPS capable of intraocular brachytherapy treatment planning and two MC codes were compared. The TPS investigated were Pinnacle v8.0dp1, BrachyVision v8.1, and Plaque Simulator v5.3.9, all of which use the AAPM TG-43 formalism in water. The Plaque Simulator software can also handle some correction factors from MC simulations. The MC codes used are MCNP5 v1.40 and BrachyDose/EGSnrc. Using these TPS and MC codes, three types of calculations were performed: homogeneous medium with point sources (for the TPS only, using the 1D TG-43 dose calculation formalism); homogeneous medium with line sources (TPS with 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes); and plaque heterogeneity-corrected line sources (Plaque Simulator with modified 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes). Comparisons were made of doses calculated at points-of-interest on the plaque central-axis and at off-axis points of clinical interest within a standardized model of the right eye. Results: For the homogeneous water medium case, agreement was within {approx}2% for the point- and line-source models when comparing between TPS and between TPS and MC codes, respectively. For the heterogeneous medium case, dose differences (as calculated using the MC codes and Plaque Simulator) differ by up to 37% on the central-axis in comparison to the homogeneous water calculations. A prescription dose of 85 Gy at 5 mm depth based on calculations in a homogeneous medium delivers 76 Gy and 67 Gy for specific {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources, respectively, when accounting for COMS-plaque heterogeneities. For off

  12. Comparison of dose calculation methods for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Mark J.; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Finger, Paul T.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Mourtada, Firas; Napolitano, Mary E.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Thomson, Rowan M.; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric differences among several clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) and Monte Carlo (MC) codes for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors using 125I or 103Pd plaques, and to evaluate the impact on the prescription dose of the adoption of MC codes and certain versions of a TPS (Plaque Simulator with optional modules). Methods: Three clinical brachytherapy TPS capable of intraocular brachytherapy treatment planning and two MC codes were compared. The TPS investigated were Pinnacle v8.0dp1, BrachyVision v8.1, and Plaque Simulator v5.3.9, all of which use the AAPM TG-43 formalism in water. The Plaque Simulator software can also handle some correction factors from MC simulations. The MC codes used are MCNP5 v1.40 and BrachyDose∕EGSnrc. Using these TPS and MC codes, three types of calculations were performed: homogeneous medium with point sources (for the TPS only, using the 1D TG-43 dose calculation formalism); homogeneous medium with line sources (TPS with 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes); and plaque heterogeneity-corrected line sources (Plaque Simulator with modified 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes). Comparisons were made of doses calculated at points-of-interest on the plaque central-axis and at off-axis points of clinical interest within a standardized model of the right eye. Results: For the homogeneous water medium case, agreement was within ∼2% for the point- and line-source models when comparing between TPS and between TPS and MC codes, respectively. For the heterogeneous medium case, dose differences (as calculated using the MC codes and Plaque Simulator) differ by up to 37% on the central-axis in comparison to the homogeneous water calculations. A prescription dose of 85 Gy at 5 mm depth based on calculations in a homogeneous medium delivers 76 Gy and 67 Gy for specific 125I and 103Pd sources, respectively, when accounting for COMS-plaque heterogeneities. For off-axis points

  13. Brachytherapy Application With In Situ Dose Painting Administered by Gold Nanoparticle Eluters

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Neeharika; Cifter, Gizem; Sajo, Erno; Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas; Nguyen, Paul L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Recent studies show promise that administering gold nanoparticles (GNP) to tumor cells during brachytherapy could significantly enhance radiation damage to the tumor. A new strategy proposed for sustained administration of the GNP in prostate tumors is to load them into routinely used brachytherapy spacers for customizable in situ release after implantation. This in silico study investigated the intratumor biodistribution and corresponding dose enhancement over time due to GNP released from such GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS). Method and Materials: An experimentally determined intratumoral diffusion coefficient (D) for 10-nm nanoparticles was used to estimate D for other sizes by using the Stokes-Einstein equation. GNP concentration profiles, obtained using D, were then used to calculate the corresponding dose enhancement factor (DEF) for each tumor voxel, using dose painting-by-numbers approach, for times relevant to the considered brachytherapy sources' lifetimes. The investigation was carried out as a function of GNP size for the clinically applicable low-dose-rate brachytherapy sources iodine-125 (I-125), palladium-103 (Pd-103), and cesium-131 (Cs-131). Results: Results showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels and subvolumes during brachytherapy can be customized by varying the size of GNP released or eluted from the GBS. For example, using a concentration of 7 mg/g GNP, significant DEF (>20%) could be achieved 5 mm from a GBS after 5, 12, 25, 46, 72, 120, and 195 days, respectively, for GNP sizes of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 nm and for 80 nm when treating with I-125. Conclusions: Analyses showed that using Cs-131 provides the highest dose enhancement to tumor voxels. However, given its relatively longer half-life, I-125 presents the most flexibility for customizing the dose enhancement as a function of GNP size. These findings provide a useful reference for further work toward development of potential new brachytherapy application with

  14. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Byrne, T.E.; Miller, L.F.

    1997-04-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with {sup 252}Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of {sup 252}Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a {sup 252}Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded {sup 252}Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy.

  15. AB012. Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yong; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the security and effect of brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods Forty five patients with Tl–T2 prostate cancer were treated with real-time transperineal ultrasound-guide 125I seeds prostate implantation. Results The median operation time was 90 min, the median number of I seeds used was 56. The follow up time was 12–48 months, the cases of PSA <1 µg/L were 29, PSA 1–2 µg/L were 11 and PSA ≥2 µg/L were 5. Conclusions Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer is safe and effective.

  16. Overview: Five decades of brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, F.

    1986-01-01

    Brachytherapy started in 1930. Ra-226 was the radioisotope for cancer therapy at that time and much has been learned about its properties since then. One of the major findings at that time was output. When the author started, there was no T factor. People did not know how many R units were produced by 1.0 mg of radium filtered by 0.5 mm of platinum at 1.0 cm. So one was in a bit of chaos from that point of view. Eventually, that was settled in the 1930's. It was very exciting to find out that, although the national laboratories of the U.S., England, France and Germany had had values of this T factor varying from about five to seven (when they're only supposed to have less than 1% error); the value was really 8.3 and it was quite a landmark. This led to an improved knowledge of dose and effects. Developments over the next five decades are discussed in detail.

  17. SU-E-T-366: Clinical Implementation of MR-Guided Vaginal Cylinder Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Owrangi, A; Jolly, S; Balter, J; Cao, Y; Young, L; Zhu, T; Prisciandaro, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of MR-based vaginal brachytherapy source localization using an in-house MR-visible marker versus the alignment of an applicator model to MR images. Methods: Three consecutive patients undergoing vaginal HDR brachytherapy with a plastic cylinder were scanned with both CT and MRI (including T1- and T2- weighted images). An MR-visible source localization marker, consisting of a sealed thin catheter filled with either water (for T2 contrast) or Gd-doped water (for T1 contrast), was assembled shortly before scanning. Clinically, the applicator channel was digitized on CT with an x-ray marker. To evaluate the efficacy of MR-based applicator reconstruction, each MR image volume was aligned locally to the CT images based on the region containing the cylinder. Applicator digitization was performed on the MR images using (1) the MR visible marker and (2) alignment of an applicator surface model from Varian's Brachytherapy Planning software to the MRI images. Resulting source positions were compared with the original CT digitization. Results: Although the source path was visualized by the MR marker, the applicator tip proved difficult to identify due to challenges in achieving a watertight seal. This resulted in observed displacements of the catheter tip, at times >1cm. Deviations between the central source positions identified via aligning the applicator surface model to MR and using the xray marker on CT ranged from 0.07 – 0.19 cm and 0.07 – 0.20 cm on T1- weighted and T2-weighted images, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the current study, aligning the applicator model to MRI provides a practical, current approach to perform MR-based brachytherapy planning. Further study is needed to produce catheters with reliably and reproducibly identifiable tips. Attempts are being made to improve catheter seals, as well as to increase the viscosity of the contrast material to decrease fluid mobility inside the catheter.

  18. SU-E-T-447: Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT) Treatment of Cervical Cancer - First Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D; Johnson, M; Thompson, J; Ahmad, S; Chan, L; Hausen, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the first trial patient in which an electronic brachytherapy (EBT) x-ray source is utilized for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: During patient treatment, a miniaturized x-ray source was used in combination with a customized titanium tandem and ovoid applicator set. The semi-specialized source was modeled with formalisms outlined by AAMP Task Group 43. Multiple models were used to compensate for variable attenuation conditions as a function of source positions. Varian Brachyvision treatment planning software was utilized on CT data sets for dose calculations prior to treatment delivery. The dose was prescribed to “point A” as defined by American Brachytherapy society. Additional treatments plans were created from those clinically utilized in patient care and were recalculated for an existing Ir-192 source model. Dose volume histograms (DVH) and point dose calculations were compared between the modalities for the clinical condition present in patients treated with EBT. Results: Clinical treatment times, though longer than those typically experienced by Ir-192 users, were manageable. Instantaneous dose rates at personal positions within the treatment vault were lower than those measured during intra operative radiation therapy and breast EBT treatments. Due to lower average photon energy in EBT, dose gradients within the treatment plans were as expected steeper than those observed in Ir-192 based brachytherapy. DVH comparisons between Ir-192 and EBT treatments showed an expected decrease in the integral dose to normal tissues of interest for EBT. In comparing plans created for EBT delivery with those calculated for Ir-192, average dose values for EBT were more than 4%, 11%, and 9% lower at predefined bladder, rectum and “point B” positions, respectively. Conclusion: For the first time, we have demonstrated that the utilizing electronic brachytherapy system for tandem and ovoid based treatment of cancer of the cervix is feasible, and

  19. Dose-reducing effect of Lipowitz metal-embedded spacers in interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the mobile tongue.

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Hirokawa, Y; Tamamoto, M; Kashiwado, K; Akagi, Y; Kashimoto, K; Wada, T

    1994-06-01

    Dose-reducing effects of spacers with and without a Lipowitz metal plate for the purpose of decreasing osteoradionecrosis after interstitial brachytherapy for tongue cancers were examined experimentally and clinically. The thicker the sample or spacer and the thicker the metal plate, the greater was the dose reduction achieved. A more marked dose reduction was achieved with iridium than with radium because of lower gamma ray energy of iridium. Iridium has been used widely as a radioactive source for interstitial brachytherapy. It was concluded therefore that a metal plate should be used as a shield into the spacer in interstitial brachytherapy both to reduce the radiation dose to surrounding normal tissues and to help prevent osteoradionecrosis. PMID:8065721

  20. Development of a thin scintillation films fission-fragment detector and a novel neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Daum, J. K.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Roman, A. R.; Springs, R. K.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-08-01

    Investigation of prompt fission and neutron-capture Υ rays from fissile actinide samples at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) requires use of a fission-fragment detector to provide a trigger or a veto signal. A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillations were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U(n,f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described. A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the same type of scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements with it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  1. Energy spectra of the pneumatically positioned neutron sources at LLNL's Hazards control standards and calibration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thorngate, J.H.

    1987-06-15

    The Hazards Control Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory maintains a Standards and Calibration Laboratory that includes three neutron sources (two /sup 252/Cf and one /sup 238/PuBe that can be positioned pneumatically for irradiations. Ten moderators exist to modify the neutron energy spectra produced by these sources. The thicknesses and materials of these moderators are: 25-cm water; 5-, 10-, 15-, and 25-cm heavy water; 20-cm aluminum; and 2-, 5-, 10-, and 15-cm polyethylene. We used a multisphere spectrometer to measure the neutron spectra at 2 m from both the PuBe source and the smaller Cf source, with the sources bare, and in all of the moderators. These data were reduced in 25 energy groups ranging from 0.25 eV to 16 MeV. Except for the 15-m polyethylene moderator, we also made measurements using a liquid-scintillator fast-neutron spectrometer. These data were reduced in 0.1-MeV increments from 0.5 to 12.5 MeV. Spectra from the measurements and from independent calculations are presented in tabular and graphic form. Dosimetric values, calculated from both the measured and calculated spectra, are also presented.

  2. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  3. Monte Carlo calculated doses to treatment volumes and organs at risk for permanent implant lung brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Furutani, K. M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2013-10-01

    Iodine-125 (125I) and Caesium-131 (131Cs) brachytherapy have been used with sublobar resection to treat stage I non-small cell lung cancer and other radionuclides, 169Yb and 103Pd, are considered for these treatments. This work investigates the dosimetry of permanent implant lung brachytherapy for a range of source energies and various implant sites in the lung. Monte Carlo calculated doses are calculated in a patient CT-derived computational phantom using the EGsnrc user-code BrachyDose. Calculations are performed for 103Pd, 125I, 131Cs seeds and 50 and 100 keV point sources for 17 implant positions. Doses to treatment volumes, ipsilateral lung, aorta, and heart are determined and compared to those determined using the TG-43 approach. Considerable variation with source energy and differences between model-based and TG-43 doses are found for both treatment volumes and organs. Doses to the heart and aorta generally increase with increasing source energy. TG-43 underestimates the dose to the heart and aorta for all implants except those nearest to these organs where the dose is overestimated. Results suggest that model-based dose calculations are crucial for selecting prescription doses, comparing clinical endpoints, and studying radiobiological effects for permanent implant lung brachytherapy.

  4. Beta dosimetry with microMOSFETs for endovascular brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drud, Eva; Todorovic, Manuel; Schönborn, Thies; Schmidt, Rainer

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if microMOSFETs are suitable for the dosimetry and quality assurance of beta sources. The microMOSFET dosimeters have been tested for their angular dependence in a 6 MeV electron beam. The dose rate dependence was measured with an iridium-192 afterloading source. By varying the source-to-surface distance (SSD) in a 12 MeV electron beam the dose rate dependence in an electron beam was also investigated. To measure a depth dose curve the dose rate at 2, 5, 8 and 12 mm distance from the beta source train axis was determined with the OPTIDOS and the microMOSFET detector. A comparison between the two detector types shows that the microMOSFET is suitable for quality assurance of beta sources for endovascular brachytherapy (EVBT). The homogeneity of the source is checked by measurements at five points (for the 60 mm source at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mm) along the source train. The microMOSFET was then used to evaluate the influence of a common stent type (single layer stainless steel) on the dose distribution in water. The stent led to a dose inhomogeneity of ±8.5%. Additionally the percentage depth dose curves with and without a stent were compared. The depth dose curves show good agreement which means that the stent does not change the beta spectrum significantly.

  5. Early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Wagner; Nag; Young; Bahnson

    2000-12-15

    Introduction: Transperineal prostate brachytherapy is gaining popularity as a treatment for clinically localized carcinoma of the prostate. Very little prospective data exists addressing the issue of complications associated with this procedure. We present an analysis of the early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: Forty-six consecutive patients who underwent Palladium-103 (Pd-103) seed placement for clinically localized prostate carcinoma were evaluated prospectively for any morbidity associated with the procedure. Twenty-three patients completed an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire preoperatively, at their first postoperative visit, and at their second postoperative visit. The total IPSS, each of the seven individual components, and the "bother" score were evaluated separately for each visit, and statistical significance was determined. Results: Urinary retention occurred in 7/46 patients (15%). Of these, 5 were able to void spontaneously after catheter removal. One patient is maintained with a suprapubic tube, and one patient is currently on continuous intermittent catheterization. Baseline IPSS was 7.1 and this went to 20.0 at the first postoperative visit (p<0.001). By the second postoperative visit, the IPSS was 8.0. Conclusions: In our experience, prostate brachytherapy for localized carcinoma of the prostate is associated with a 15% catheterization rate and a significant increase in the IPSS (7.1 to 20.0). This increase in the IPSS seems to be self-limited. Patients need to be educated on these issues prior to prostate brachytherapy. PMID:11113369

  6. Dose reduction in LDR brachytherapy by implanted prostate gold fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Lutgens, Ludy; Murrer, Lars; Afsharpour, Hossein; Haas-Kock, Danielle de; Visser, Peter; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of gold fiducial markers (FM) implanted prior to external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seed implants performed in the context of combined therapy was investigated. Methods: A virtual water phantom was designed containing a single FM. Single and multi source scenarios were investigated by performing Monte Carlo dose calculations, along with the influence of varying orientation and distance of the FM with respect to the sources. Three prostate cancer patients treated with LDR brachytherapy for a recurrence following external beam radiotherapy with implanted FM were studied as surrogate cases to combined therapy. FM and brachytherapy seeds were identified on post implant CT scans and Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed with and without FM. The dosimetric impact of the FM was evaluated by quantifying the amplitude of dose shadows and the volume of cold spots. D{sub 90} was reported based on the post implant CT prostate contour. Results: Large shadows are observed in the single source-FM scenarios. As expected from geometric considerations, the shadows are dependent on source-FM distance and orientation. Large dose reductions are observed at the distal side of FM, while at the proximal side a dose enhancement is observed. In multisource scenarios, the importance of shadows appears mitigated, although FM at the periphery of the seed distribution caused underdosage (brachytherapy seed implant dose distributions. Therefore, reduced tumor control could be expected from FM implanted in tumors, although

  7. [In-phantom dosimetric measurements as quality control for brachytherapy: System check and constancy check].

    PubMed

    Kollefrath, Michael; Bruggmoser, Gregor; Nanko, Norbert; Gainey, Mark

    2015-06-01

    In brachytherapy dosimetric measurements are difficult due to the inherent dose-inhomogenieties. Typically in routine clincal practice only the nominal dose rate is determined for computer controlled afterloading systems. The region of interest lies close to the source when measuring the spatial dose distribution. In this region small errors in the postioning of the detector, and its finite size, lead to large measurement uncertainties that exacerbate the routine dosimetric control of the system in the clinic. The size of the measurement chamber, its energy dependence, and the directional dependence of the measurement apparatus are the factors which have a significant influence on dosimetry. Although ionisation chambers are relatively large, they are employed since similar chambers are commonly found on clincal brachytherapy units. The dose is determined using DIN 6800 [11] since DIN 6809-2 [12], which deals with dosimetry in brachytherapy, is antiquated and is currently in the process of revision. Further information regarding dosimetry for brachytherapy can be found in textbooks [1] and [2]. The measurements for this work were performed with a HDR (High-Dose-Rate) (192)Ir source, type mHDR V2, and a Microselectron Afterloader V2 both from Nucletron/Elekta. In this work two dosimetric procedures are presented which, despite the aforemention difficulties, should assist in performing checks of the proper operation of the system. The first is a system check that measures the dose distribution along a line and is to be performed when first bringing the afterloader into operation, or after significant changes to the system. The other is a dosimetric constancy check, which with little effort can be performed monhtly or weekly. It simultaneously verifies the positioning of the source at two positions, the functionality of the system clock and the automatic re-calculation of the source activity. PMID:25791738

  8. Large-angle ionization chambers for brachytherapy air-kerma-strength measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culberson, Wesley S.

    There has been a significant increase in the use of low-energy photon-emitting radionuclides in the past decade to treat cancer with a special form of radiation therapy called brachytherapy. For treating prostate cancer, brachytherapy sources are approximately the size of a grain of rice and are normally radioactive 125I or 103Pd sources encapsulated in titanium or plastic. Although these sources have proven effective in the treatment of cancer, the clinical dosimetry is difficult due to the unique varieties available and their typically. A large-angle free-air chamber at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) called the Wide-Angle Free-Air Chamber (WAFAC) is the current standard for measuring the strength of low-energy photon-emitting radionuclides for brachytherapy. This chamber has served the clinical medical physics community well and is a significant improvement over previous standards. However, it has some shortcomings. This thesis describes the development of a new large-angle ionization chamber at the University of Wisconsin called the Variable-Aperture Free-Air Chamber (VAFAC) to measure brachytherapy sources with extended capabilities. This chamber is constructed to explore characteristics in the calibration of brachytherapy seeds by quantifying potential variations caused by anisotropy and the change in response with integration angle. In addition, the characterization of yet another large-angle free-air chamber called the Grossvolumen Extrapolationskammer (GROVEX) in the German national standards institute Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is also presented. The objective of this thesis is to present improved measurement techniques with free-air ionization chambers that will improve the accuracy of the dose delivered to patients. First, it will be shown that the UW VAFAC is capable of measuring conventional 125I or 103Pd seeds as well as longer sources, coiled sources, and miniature x-ray tubes. Additionally, the VAFAC

  9. Ocular brachytherapy dosimetry for 103Pd and 125I in the presence of gold nanoparticles: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Somayeh; Vaez-Zadeh, Mehdi; Vahidian, Mohammad; Marghchouei, Mahdieh; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present Monte Carlo study is to evaluate the variation of energy deposition in healthy tissues in the human eye which is irradiated by brachytherapy sources in comparison with the resultant dose increase in the gold nanoparticle (GNP)-loaded choroidal melanoma. The effects of these nanoparticles on normal tissues are compared between 103Pd and 125I as two ophthalmic brachytherapy sources. Dose distribution in the tumor and healthy tissues has been taken into account for both brachytherapy sources. Also, in certain points of the eye, the ratio of the absorbed dose by the normal tissue in the presence of GNPs to the absorbed dose by the same point in the absence of GNPs has been calculated. In addition, differences of the absorbed dose in the tumor observed in the comparison of simple water phantom and actual simulated human eye in presence of GNPs are also a matter of interest that have been considered in the present work. The difference between the eye globe and the water phantom is more obvious for 125I than that of the 103Pd when the ophthalmic dosimetry is done in the presence of GNPs. Whenever these nanoparticles are utilized in enhancing the absorbed dose by the tumor, the use of 125I brachytherapy source will greatly amplify the amount of dose enhancement factor (DEF) in the tumor site without inflicting much dam-age to healthy organs, when compared to the 103Pd source. For instance, in the concentration of 30 mg GNPs, the difference amongst the calculated DEF for 125I between these phantoms is 5.3%, while it is 2.45% for 103Pd. Furthermore, in Monte Carlo studies of eye brachytherapy, more precise definition of the eye phantom instead of a water phantom will become increasingly important when we use 125I as opposed to 103Pd. PMID:27167265

  10. Electronic brachytherapy--current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Eaton, D J

    2015-05-01

    In the past decade, electronic brachytherapy (EB) has emerged as an attractive modality for the treatment of skin lesions and intraoperative partial breast irradiation, as well as finding wider applications in intracavitary and interstitial sites. These miniature X-ray sources, which operate at low kilovoltage energies (<100 kV), have reduced shielding requirements and inherent portability, therefore can be used outside the traditional realms of the radiotherapy department. However, steep dose gradients and increased sensitivity to inhomogeneities challenge accurate dosimetry. Secondly, ease of use does not mitigate the need for close involvement by medical physics experts and consultant oncologists. Finally, further studies are needed to relate the more heterogeneous dose distributions to clinical outcomes. With these provisos, the practical convenience of EB strongly suggests that it will become an established option for selected patients, not only in radiotherapy departments but also in a range of operating theatres and clinics around the world. PMID:25748070

  11. Poster — Thur Eve — 40: Automated Quality Assurance for Remote-Afterloading High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Anthony; Ravi, Ananth

    2014-08-15

    High dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading brachytherapy involves sending a small, high-activity radioactive source attached to a cable to different positions within a hollow applicator implanted in the patient. It is critical that the source position within the applicator and the dwell time of the source are accurate. Daily quality assurance (QA) tests of the positional and dwell time accuracy are essential to ensure that the accuracy of the remote afterloader is not compromised prior to patient treatment. Our centre has developed an automated, video-based QA system for HDR brachytherapy that is dramatically superior to existing diode or film QA solutions in terms of cost, objectivity, positional accuracy, with additional functionalities such as being able to determine source dwell time and transit time of the source. In our system, a video is taken of the brachytherapy source as it is sent out through a position check ruler, with the source visible through a clear window. Using a proprietary image analysis algorithm, the source position is determined with respect to time as it moves to different positions along the check ruler. The total material cost of the video-based system was under $20, consisting of a commercial webcam and adjustable stand. The accuracy of the position measurement is ±0.2 mm, and the time resolution is 30 msec. Additionally, our system is capable of robustly verifying the source transit time and velocity (a test required by the AAPM and CPQR recommendations), which is currently difficult to perform accurately.

  12. Spectroscopic characterization of a novel electronic brachytherapy system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derek; Poon, Emily; Bazalova, Magdalena; Reniers, Brigitte; Evans, Michael; Rusch, Thomas; Verhaegen, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The Axxent developed by Xoft Inc. is a novel electronic brachytherapy system capable of generating x-rays up to 50 keV. These low energy photon-emitting sources merit attention not only because of their ability to vary the dosimetric properties of the radiation, but also because of the radiobiological effects of low energy x-rays. The objective of this study is to characterize the x-ray source and to model it using the Geant4 Monte Carlo code. Spectral and attenuation curve measurements are performed at various peak voltages and angles and the source is characterized in terms of spectrum and half-value layers (HVLs). Also, the effects of source variation and source aging are quantified. Bremsstrahlung splitting, phase-space scoring and particle-tagging features are implemented in the Geant4 code, which is bench-marked against BEAMnrc simulations. HVLs from spectral measurements, attenuation curve measurements and Geant4 simulations mostly agree within uncertainty. However, there are discrepancies between measurements and simulations for photons emitted on the source transverse plane (90 degrees). PMID:18182687

  13. Improved charge breeding efficiency of light ions with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Kutsaev, Sergey; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.

    2012-11-15

    The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade is a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). The facility utilizes a {sup 252}Cf fission source coupled with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to provide radioactive beam species for the ATLAS experimental program. The californium fission fragment distribution provides nuclei in the mid-mass range which are difficult to extract from production targets using the isotope separation on line technique and are not well populated by low-energy fission of uranium. To date the charge breeding program has focused on optimizing these mid-mass beams, achieving high charge breeding efficiencies of both gaseous and solid species including 14.7% for the radioactive species {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+}. In an effort to better understand the charge breeding mechanism, we have recently focused on the low-mass species sodium and potassium which up to present have been difficult to charge breed efficiently. Unprecedented charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for {sup 23}Na{sup 7+} and 17.9% for {sup 39}K{sup 10+} were obtained injecting stable Na{sup +} and K{sup +} beams from a surface ionization source.

  14. Improved charge breeding efficiency of light ions with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Vondrasek, R; Delahaye, P; Kutsaev, Sergey; Maunoury, L

    2012-11-01

    The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade is a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). The facility utilizes a (252)Cf fission source coupled with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to provide radioactive beam species for the ATLAS experimental program. The californium fission fragment distribution provides nuclei in the mid-mass range which are difficult to extract from production targets using the isotope separation on line technique and are not well populated by low-energy fission of uranium. To date the charge breeding program has focused on optimizing these mid-mass beams, achieving high charge breeding efficiencies of both gaseous and solid species including 14.7% for the radioactive species (143)Ba(27+). In an effort to better understand the charge breeding mechanism, we have recently focused on the low-mass species sodium and potassium which up to present have been difficult to charge breed efficiently. Unprecedented charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for (23)Na(7+) and 17.9% for (39)K(10+) were obtained injecting stable Na(+) and K(+) beams from a surface ionization source. PMID:23206054

  15. Distribution of Prompt Neutron Emission Probability for Fission Fragments in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf and 244,248Cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. S.; Dushin, V. N.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Jakovlev, V. A.; Kalinin, V. A.; Laptev, A. B.; Petrov, B. F.; Shcherbakov, O. A.

    2005-05-01

    Neutrons emitted in fission events were measured separately for each complementary fragment in correlation with fission fragment energies. Two high-efficiency Gd-loaded liquid scintillator tanks were used for neutron registration. Fission fragment energies were measured using a twin Frisch gridded ionization chamber with a pinhole collimator. The neutron multiplicity distributions were obtained for each value of the fission fragment mass and energy and corrected for neutron registration efficiency, background, and pile-up. The dependency of these distributions on fragment mass and energy for different energy and mass bins as well as mass and energy distribution of fission fragments are presented and discussed.

  16. BrachyGuide: a brachytherapy-dedicated DICOM RT viewer and interface to Monte Carlo simulation software.

    PubMed

    Pantelis, Evaggelos; Peppa, Vassiliki; Lahanas, Vasileios; Pappas, Eleftherios; Papagiannis, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    This work presents BrachyGuide, a brachytherapy-dedicated software tool for the automatic preparation of input files for Monte Carlo simulation from treatment plans exported in DICOM RT format, and results of calculations performed for its benchmarking. Three plans were prepared using two computational models, the image series of a water sphere and a multicatheter breast brachytherapy patient, for each of two commercially available treatment planning systems: BrachyVision and Oncentra Brachy. One plan involved a single source dwell position of an 192Ir HDR source (VS2000 or mHDR-v2) at the center of the water sphere using the TG43 algorithm, and the other two corresponded to the TG43 and advanced dose calculation algorithm for the multicatheter breast brachytherapy patient. Monte Carlo input files were prepared using BrachyGuide and simulations were performed with MCNP v.6.1. For the TG43 patient plans, the Monte Carlo computational model was manually edited in the prepared input files to resemble TG43 dosimetry assumptions. Hence all DICOM RT dose exports were equivalent to corresponding simulation results and their comparison was used for benchmarking the use of BrachyGuide. Monte Carlo simulation results and corresponding DICOM RT dose exports agree within type A uncertainties in the majority of points in the computational models. Treatment planning system, algorithm, and source specific differences greater than type A uncertainties were also observed, but these were explained by treatment planning system-related issues and other sources of type B uncertainty. These differences have to be taken into account in commissioning procedures of brachytherapy dosimetry algorithms. BrachyGuide is accurate and effective for use in the preparation of commissioning tests for new brachytherapy dosimetry algorithms as a user-oriented commissioning tool and the expedition of retrospective patient cohort studies of dosimetry planning. PMID:25679171

  17. Verification of the plan dosimetry for high dose rate brachytherapy using metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Huang Shaomin; Lu Jie; Lerch, Michael; Cutajar, Dean; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2007-06-15

    The feasibility of a recently designed metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimetry system for dose verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning was investigated. MOSFET detectors were calibrated with a 0.6 cm{sup 3} NE-2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber in water. Key characteristics of the MOSFET detectors, such as the energy dependence, that will affect phantom measurements with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources were measured. The MOSFET detector was then applied to verify the dosimetric accuracy of HDR brachytherapy treatments in a custom-made water phantom. Three MOSFET detectors were calibrated independently, with the calibration factors ranging from 0.187 to 0.215 cGy/mV. A distance dependent energy response was observed, significant within 2 cm from the source. The new MOSFET detector has a good reproducibility (<3%), small angular effect (<2%), and good dose linearity (R{sup 2}=1). It was observed that the MOSFET detectors had a linear response to dose until the threshold voltage reached approximately 24 V for {sup 192}Ir source measurements. Further comparison of phantom measurements using MOSFET detectors with dose calculations by a commercial treatment planning system for computed tomography-based brachytherapy treatment plans showed that the mean relative deviation was 2.2{+-}0.2% for dose points 1 cm away from the source and 2.0{+-}0.1% for dose points located 2 cm away. The percentage deviations between the measured doses and the planned doses were below 5% for all the measurements. The MOSFET detector, with its advantages of small physical size and ease of use, is a reliable tool for quality assurance of HDR brachytherapy. The phantom verification method described here is universal and can be applied to other HDR brachytherapy treatments.

  18. Plastic optical fibre sensor for in-vivo radiation monitoring during brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulfe, P.; Sullivan, F. J.; Lewis, E.; O'Keeffe, S.

    2015-09-01

    An optical fibre sensor is presented for applications in real-time in-vivo monitoring of the radiation dose a cancer patient receives during seed implantation in Brachytherapy. The sensor is based on radioluminescence whereby radiation sensitive scintillation material is embedded in the core of a 1mm plastic optical fibre. Three scintillation materials are investigated: thallium-doped caesium iodide (CsI:Tl), terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd2O2S:Tb) and europium-doped lanthanum oxysulphide (La2O2S:Eu). Terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulphide was identified as being the most suitable scintillator and further testing demonstrates its measureable response to different activities of Iodine-125, the radio-active source commonly used in Brachytherapy for treating prostate cancer.

  19. Improved dosimetry techniques for intravascular brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Varun

    Coronary artery disease leads to the accumulation of atheromatous plaque leading to coronary stenosis. Coronary intervention techniques such as balloon angioplasty and atherectomy are used to address coronary stenosis and establish a stable lumen thus enhancing blood flow to the myocardium. Restenosis or re-blockage of the arteries is a major limitation of the above mentioned interventional techniques. Neointimal hyperplasia or proliferation of cells in response to the vascular injury as a result of coronary intervention is considered to be one of the major causes of restenosis. Recent studies indicated that irradiation of the coronary lesion site, with radiation doses ranging from 15 to 30 Gy, leads to diminishing neointimal hyperplasia with subsequent reduction in restenosis. The radiation dose is given by catheter-based radiation delivery systems using beta-emitters 90Sr/90Y, 32P and gamma-emitting 192Ir among others. However the dose schema used for dose prescription for these sources are relatively simplistic, and are based on calculations using uniform homogenous water or tissue media and simple cylinder geometry. Stenotic coronary vessels are invariably lined with atheromatous plaque of heterogeneous composition, the radiation dose distribution obtained from such dosimetry data can cause significant variations in the actual dose received by a given patient. Such discrepancies in dose calculation can introduce relatively large uncertainties in the limits of dose window for effective and safe application of intravascular brachytherapy, and consequently in the clinical evaluation of the efficacy of this modality. In this research study we investigated the effect of different geometrical and material heterogeneities, including residual plaque, catheter non-centering, lesion eccentricity and cardiac motion on the radiation dose delivered at the lesion site. Correction factors including dose perturbation factors and dose variation factors have been calculated

  20. Review of clinical brachytherapy uncertainties: Analysis guidelines of GEC-ESTRO and the AAPM☆

    PubMed Central

    Kirisits, Christian; Rivard, Mark J.; Baltas, Dimos; Ballester, Facundo; De Brabandere, Marisol; van der Laarse, Rob; Niatsetski, Yury; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Tanderup, Kari; Venselaar, Jack L.M.; Siebert, Frank-André

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose A substantial reduction of uncertainties in clinical brachytherapy should result in improved outcome in terms of increased local control and reduced side effects. Types of uncertainties have to be identified, grouped, and quantified. Methods A detailed literature review was performed to identify uncertainty components and their relative importance to the combined overall uncertainty. Results Very few components (e.g., source strength and afterloader timer) are independent of clinical disease site and location of administered dose. While the influence of medium on dose calculation can be substantial for low energy sources or non-deeply seated implants, the influence of medium is of minor importance for high-energy sources in the pelvic region. The level of uncertainties due to target, organ, applicator, and/or source movement in relation to the geometry assumed for treatment planning is highly dependent on fractionation and the level of image guided adaptive treatment. Most studies to date report the results in a manner that allows no direct reproduction and further comparison with other studies. Often, no distinction is made between variations, uncertainties, and errors or mistakes. The literature review facilitated the drafting of recommendations for uniform uncertainty reporting in clinical BT, which are also provided. The recommended comprehensive uncertainty investigations are key to obtain a general impression of uncertainties, and may help to identify elements of the brachytherapy treatment process that need improvement in terms of diminishing their dosimetric uncertainties. It is recommended to present data on the analyzed parameters (distance shifts, volume changes, source or applicator position, etc.), and also their influence on absorbed dose for clinically-relevant dose parameters (e.g., target parameters such as D90 or OAR doses). Publications on brachytherapy should include a statement of total dose uncertainty for the entire

  1. Modern head and neck brachytherapy: from radium towards intensity modulated interventional brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) is a modern development of classical interventional radiation therapy (brachytherapy), which allows the application of a high radiation dose sparing severe adverse events, thereby further improving the treatment outcome. Classical indications in head and neck (H&N) cancers are the face, the oral cavity, the naso- and oropharynx, the paranasal sinuses including base of skull, incomplete resections on important structures, and palliation. The application type can be curative, adjuvant or perioperative, as a boost to external beam radiation as well as without external beam radiation and with palliative intention. Due to the frequently used perioperative application method (intraoperative implantation of inactive applicators and postoperative performance of radiation), close interdisciplinary cooperation between surgical specialists (ENT-, dento-maxillary-facial-, neuro- and orbital surgeons), as well interventional radiotherapy (brachytherapy) experts are obligatory. Published results encourage the integration of IMBT into H&N therapy, thereby improving the prognosis and quality of life of patients. PMID:25834586

  2. Erectile Function Durability Following Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Kurko, Brian S.; Anderson, Richard; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term changes in erectile function following prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 226 patients with prostate cancer and preimplant erectile function assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function-6 (IIEF-6) who underwent brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003. Median follow-up was 6.4 years. Pre- and postbrachytherapy potency was defined as IIEF-6 >= 13 without pharmacologic or mechanical support. The relationship among clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters and erectile function was examined. Results: The 7-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 55.6% with median postimplant IIEF of 22 in potent patients. Potent patients were statistically younger (p = 0.014), had a higher preimplant IIEF (p < 0.001), were less likely to be diabetic (p = 0.002), and were more likely to report nocturnal erections (p = 0.008). Potency preservation in men with baseline IIEF scores of 29-30, 24-28, 18-23, and 13-17 were 75.5% vs. 73.6%, 51.7% vs. 44.8%, 48.0% vs. 40.0%, and 23.5% vs. 23.5% in 2004 vs. 2008. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, preimplant IIEF, hypertension, diabetes, prostate size, and brachytherapy dose to proximal penis strongly predicted for potency preservation. Impact of proximal penile dose was most pronounced for men with IIEF of 18-23 and aged 60-69. A significant minority of men who developed postimplant impotence ultimately regained erectile function. Conclusion: Potency preservation and median IIEF scores following brachytherapy are durable. Thoughtful dose sparing of proximal penile structures and early penile rehabilitation may further improve these results.

  3. Brachytherapy needle deflection evaluation and correction

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Gang; Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2005-04-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, an 18-gauge needle is used to implant radioactive seeds. This thin needle can be deflected from the preplanned trajectory in the prostate, potentially resulting in a suboptimum dose pattern and at times requiring repeated needle insertion to achieve optimal dosimetry. In this paper, we report on the evaluation of brachytherapy needle deflection and bending in test phantoms and two approaches to overcome the problem. First we tested the relationship between needle deflection and insertion depth as well as whether needle bending occurred. Targeting accuracy was tested by inserting a brachytherapy needle to target 16 points in chicken tissue phantoms. By implanting dummy seeds into chicken tissue phantoms under 3D ultrasound guidance, the overall accuracy of seed implantation was determined. We evaluated methods to overcome brachytherapy needle deflection with three different insertion methods: constant orientation, constant rotation, and orientation reversal at half of the insertion depth. Our results showed that needle deflection is linear with needle insertion depth, and that no noticeable bending occurs with needle insertion into the tissue and agar phantoms. A 3D principal component analysis was performed to obtain the population distribution of needle tip and seed position relative to the target positions. Our results showed that with the constant orientation insertion method, the mean needle targeting error was 2.8 mm and the mean seed implantation error was 2.9 mm. Using the constant rotation and orientation reversal at half insertion depth methods, the deflection error was reduced. The mean needle targeting errors were 0.8 and 1.2 mm for the constant rotation and orientation reversal methods, respectively, and the seed implantation errors were 0.9 and 1.5 mm for constant rotation insertion and orientation reversal methods, respectively.

  4. Myths and fallacies in permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Wayne M.; Merrick, Gregory S

    2003-09-30

    Because there are competing modalities to treat early-stage prostate cancer, the constraints or deficiencies of one modality may be erroneously applied to others. Some valid concerns arising from surgery and external beam therapy, which have been falsely transferred to brachytherapy, are constraints based on patient age, clinical and pathological parameters, patient weight, and size of prostate. Although the constraints have a valid basis in one modality, knowledge of the origin and mechanism of the constraint has provided a means to circumvent or overcome it in brachytherapy. Failures as measured by biochemical no-evidence of disease (bNED) survival may be attributed to extracapsular disease extension. Such extension often expresses itself in surrogate parameters such as a high percentage of positive biopsies, perineural invasion, or the dominant pattern in Gleason score histology. Failures due to such factors may be prevented by implanting with consistent extracapsular dosimetric margins. Some presumed limitations on prostate brachytherapy originated from data on patients implanted in the first few years the procedure was being developed. Most of the urinary morbidity and a significant part of the decrease in sexual function observed may be avoided by controlling the dosimetry along the prostatic and membranous urethra and at the penile bulb.

  5. Optimized geometry for bulk coal PGNAA with external moderation of the source neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C.; Salgado, J.; Carvalho, F. G.

    1995-10-01

    A simulation study of a PGNAA system for the analysis of coal with a 252Cf neutron source has been carried out using the MCNP code to investigate the effect on the system response of variable thickness, density and composition of the sample when the source is placed at the center of a moderating sphere of polyethylene. Results for different radii of the moderating sphere are reported. The results show that the geometry of the measuring arrangement can be chosen so that the γ count rate/wt % of an arbitrary element (including hydrogen) is independent both of the hydrogen content of the coal, ωH, expressed as a mass fraction, and of the bulk density, d, or volume hydrogen content of the sample νH, at least in the range of ωH-values commonly found in bituminous coals. The system response, defined as the magnitude of the output signal/wt % of an arbitrary element in the coal composition is then independent of composition and bulk density of the coal sample.

  6. Assessment of neutron dosemeters around standard sources and nuclear fissile objects.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, N; Tournier, B; Groetz, J E; Piot, J; Riebler, E; Crovisier, P; Chambaudet, A; Cabanné, N

    2002-01-01

    In order to evaluate the neutron doses around nuclear fissile objects, a comparative study has been made on several neutron dosemeters: bubble dosemeters, etched-track detectors (CR-39) and 3He-filled proportional counters used as dose-rate meters. The measurements were made on the ambient and the personal dose equivalents H*(10) and Hp(10). Results showed that several bubble dosemeters should have been used due to a low reproducibility in the measurements. A strong correlation with the neutron energy was also found, with about a 30% underestimation of Hp(10) for neutrons from the PuBe source, and about a 9% overestimation for neutrons from the 252Cf source. Measurements of the nuclear fissile objects were made using the CR-39 and the dose-rate meters. The CR-39 led to an underestimation of 30% with respect to the neutron dose-rate meter measurements. In addition, the MCNP calculation code was used in the different configurations. PMID:12382734

  7. Reliability of Monte Carlo simulations in modeling neutron yields from a shielded fission source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArthur, Matthew S.; Rees, Lawrence B.; Czirr, J. Bart

    2016-08-01

    Using the combination of a neutron-sensitive 6Li glass scintillator detector with a neutron-insensitive 7Li glass scintillator detector, we are able to make an accurate measurement of the capture rate of fission neutrons on 6Li. We used this detector with a 252Cf neutron source to measure the effects of both non-borated polyethylene and 5% borated polyethylene shielding on detection rates over a range of shielding thicknesses. Both of these measurements were compared with MCNP calculations to determine how well the calculations reproduced the measurements. When the source is highly shielded, the number of interactions experienced by each neutron prior to arriving at the detector is large, so it is important to compare Monte Carlo modeling with actual experimental measurements. MCNP reproduces the data fairly well, but it does generally underestimate detector efficiency both with and without polyethylene shielding. For non-borated polyethylene it underestimates the measured value by an average of 8%. This increases to an average of 11% for borated polyethylene.

  8. Ultrasound use in gynecologic brachytherapy: Time to focus the beam.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, Sylvia; Schneider, Michal; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Bernshaw, David; Narayan, Kailash

    2015-01-01

    There is wide disparity in the practice of brachytherapy for cervical cancer around the world. Although select well-resourced centers advocate use of MRI for all insertions, planar X-ray imaging remains the most commonly used imaging modality to assess intracavitary implants, particularly where the burden of cervical cancer is high. Incorporating soft tissue imaging into brachytherapy programs has been shown to improve the technical accuracy of implants, which in turn has led to improved local control and decreased toxicity. These improvements have a positive effect on the quality of life of patients undergoing brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Finding an accessible soft tissue imaging modality is essential to enable these improvements to be available to all patients. A modality that has good soft tissue imaging capabilities, is widely available, portable, and economical, is needed. Ultrasound fulfils these requirements and offers the potential of soft tissue image guidance to a much wider brachytherapy community. Although use of ultrasound is the standard of care in brachytherapy for prostate cancer, it only seems to have limited uptake in gynecologic brachytherapy. This article reviews the role of ultrasound in gynecologic brachytherapy and highlights the potential applications for use in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. PMID:25620161

  9. Penile brachytherapy: Results for 49 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita M. . E-mail: juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Jezioranski, John; Grimard, Laval; Esche, Bernd; Pond, G.

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: To report results for 49 men with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis treated with primary penile interstitial brachytherapy at one of two institutions: the Ottawa Regional Cancer Center, Ottawa, and the Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Methods and Materials: From September 1989 to September 2003, 49 men (mean age, 58 years; range, 22-93 years) had brachytherapy for penile SCC. Fifty-one percent of tumors were T1, 33% T2, and 8% T3; 4% were in situ and 4% Tx. Grade was well differentiated in 31%, moderate in 45%, and poor in 2%; grade was unspecified for 20%. One tumor was verrucous. All tumors in Toronto had pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy (n = 23), whereas those in Ottawa had either Iridium wire (n 22) or seeds (n = 4). Four patients had a single plane implant with a plastic tube technique, and all others had a volume implant with predrilled acrylic templates and two or three parallel planes of needles (median, six needles). Mean needle spacing was 13.5 mm (range, 10-18 mm), mean dose rate was 65 cGy/h (range, 33-160 cGy/h), and mean duration was 98.8 h (range, 36-188 h). Dose rates for PDR brachytherapy were 50-61.2 cGy/h, with no correction in total dose, which was 60 Gy in all cases. Results: Median follow-up was 33.4 months (range, 4-140 months). At 5 years, actuarial overall survival was 78.3% and cause-specific survival 90.0%. Four men died of penile cancer, and 6 died of other causes with no evidence of recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate for never having experienced any type of failure at 5 years was 64.4% and for local failure was 85.3%. All 5 patients with local failure were successfully salvaged by surgery; 2 other men required penectomy for necrosis. The soft tissue necrosis rate was 16% and the urethral stenosis rate 12%. Of 8 men with regional failure, 5 were salvaged by lymph node dissection with or without external radiation. All 4 men with distant failure died of disease. Of 49 men, 42 had an intact

  10. Exploring {sup 57}Co as a new isotope for brachytherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Enger, Shirin A.; Lundqvist, Hans; D'Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The characteristics of the radionuclide {sup 57}Co make it interesting for use as a brachytherapy source. {sup 57}Co combines a possible high specific activity with the emission of relatively low-energy photons and a half-life (272 days) suitable for regular source exchanges in an afterloader. {sup 57}Co decays by electron capture to the stable {sup 57}Fe with emission of 136 and 122 keV photons. Methods: A hypothetical {sup 57}Co source based on the Flexisource brachytherapy encapsulation with the active core set as a pure cobalt cylinder (length 3.5 mm and diameter 0.6 mm) covered with a cylindrical stainless-steel capsule (length 5 mm and thickness 0.125 mm) was simulated using Geant4 Monte Carlo (MC) code version 9.4. The radial dose function, g(r), and anisotropy function F(r,{theta}), for the line source approximation were calculated following the TG-43U1 formalism. The results were compared to well-known {sup 192}Ir and {sup 125}I radionuclides, representing the higher and the lower energy end of brachytherapy, respectively. Results: The mean energy of photons in water, after passing through the core and the encapsulation material was 123 keV. This hypothetical {sup 57}Co source has an increasing g(r) due to multiple scatter of low-energy photons, which results in a more uniform dose distribution than {sup 192}Ir. Conclusions: {sup 57}Co has many advantages compared to {sup 192}Ir due to its low-energy gamma emissions without any electron contamination. {sup 57}Co has an increasing g(r) that results in a more uniform dose distribution than {sup 192}Ir due to its multiple scattered photons. The anisotropy of the {sup 57}Co source is comparable to that of {sup 192}Ir. Furthermore, {sup 57}Co has lower shielding requirements than {sup 192}Ir.

  11. Influence of trace elements in human tissue in low-energy photon brachytherapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Shane A.; Landry, Guillaume; van Gils, Francis; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the dosimetric impact of trace elements in human tissues for low-energy photon sources used in brachytherapy. Monte Carlo dose calculations were used to investigate the dosimetric effect of trace elements present in normal or cancerous human tissues. The effect of individual traces (atomic number Z = 11-30) was studied in soft tissue irradiated by low-energy brachytherapy sources. Three other tissue types (prostate, adipose and mammary gland) were also simulated with varying trace concentrations to quantify the contribution of each trace to the dose distribution. The dose differences between cancerous and healthy prostate tissues were calculated in single- and multi-source geometries. The presence of traces in a tissue produces a difference in the dose distribution that is dependent on Z and the concentration of the trace. Low-Z traces (Na) have a negligible effect (<0.3%) in all tissues, while higher Z (K) had a larger effect (>3%). There is a potentially significant difference in the dose distribution between cancerous and healthy prostate tissues (4%) and even larger if compared to the trace-free composition (15%) in both single- and multi-sourced geometries. Trace elements have a non-negligible (up to 8% in prostate D90) effect on the dose in tissues irradiated with low-energy photon sources. This study underlines the need for further investigation into accurate determination of the trace composition of tissues associated with low-energy brachytherapy. Alternatively, trace elements could be incorporated as a source of uncertainty in dose calculations. This work was part of an invited presentation at the ‘International Workshop on Recent Advances in Monte Carlo Techniques for Radiation Therapy’, held in Montreal, June 8-10, 2011.

  12. BrachyView, a novel in-body imaging system for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Experimental evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Alnaghy, S.; Cutajar, D.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Franklin, D. R.; Bucci, J.; Carrara, M.; Zaider, M.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: This paper presents initial experimental results from a prototype of high dose rate (HDR) BrachyView, a novel in-body source tracking system for HDR brachytherapy based on a multipinhole tungsten collimator and a high resolution pixellated silicon detector array. The probe and its associated position estimation algorithms are validated and a comprehensive evaluation of the accuracy of its position estimation capabilities is presented. Methods: The HDR brachytherapy source is moved through a sequence of positions in a prostate phantom, for various displacements in x, y, and z. For each position, multiple image acquisitions are performed, and source positions are reconstructed. Error estimates in each dimension are calculated at each source position and combined to calculate overall positioning errors. Gafchromic film is used to validate the accuracy of source placement within the phantom. Results: More than 90% of evaluated source positions were estimated with an error of less than one millimeter, with the worst-case error being 1.3 mm. Experimental results were in close agreement with previously published Monte Carlo simulation results. Conclusions: The prototype of HDR BrachyView demonstrates a satisfactory level of accuracy in its source position estimation, and additional improvements are achievable with further refinement of HDR BrachyView’s image processing algorithms.

  13. SU-E-T-564: Multi-Helix Rotating Shield Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dadkhah, H; Wu, X; Flynn, R; Kim, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel and practical brachytherapy technique, called multi-helix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT enables RSBT delivery using only translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. H-RSBT overcomes the challenges associated with previously proposed RSBT approaches based on a serial (S-RSBT) step-and-shoot delivery technique, which required independent translational and rotational motion. Methods: A Fletcher-type applicator, compatible with the combination of a Xoft Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy source and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten shield, is proposed. The wall of the applicator contains six evenly-spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the shield as a function of depth. The shield contains three protruding keys and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients representative of a wide range of high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. The number of beamlets used in the treatment planning process was nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. For all the treatment plans the EQD2 of the HR-CTV was escalated until the EQD{sub 2cc} tolerance of either the bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon was reached. Results: Treatment times for H-RSBT tended to be shorter than for S-RSBT, with changes of −38.47% to 1.12% with an average of −8.34%. The HR-CTV D{sub 90} changed by −8.81% to 2.08% with an average of −2.46%. Conclusion: H-RSBT is a mechanically feasible technique in the curved applicators needed for cervical cancer brachytherapy. S-RSBT and H-RSBT dose distributions were clinically equivalent for all patients

  14. Optical fibre luminescence sensor for real-time LDR brachytherapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulfe, P.; Sullivan, F. J.; O'Keeffe, S.

    2016-05-01

    An optical fibre sensor for monitoring low dose radiation is presented. The sensor is based on a scintillation material embedded within the optical fibre core, which emits visible light when exposed to low level ionising radiation. The incident level of ionising radiation can be determined by analysing the optical emission. An optical fibre sensor is presented, based on radioluminescence whereby radiation sensitive scintillation material, terbium doped gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd2O2S:Tb), is embedded in a cavity of 250μm of a 500μm plastic optical fibre. The sensor is designed for in-vivo monitoring of the radiation dose during radio-active seed implantation for brachytherapy, in prostate cancer treatment, providing oncologists with real-time information of the radiation dose to the target area and/or nearby critical structures. The radiation from the brachytherapy seeds causes emission of visible light from the scintillation material through the process of radioluminescence, which penetrates the fibre, propagating along the optical fibre for remote detection using a multi-pixel photon counter. The sensor demonstrates a high sensitivity to Iodine-125, the radioactive source most commonly used in brachytherapy for treating prostate cancer.

  15. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  16. Current Brachytherapy Quality Assurance Guidance: Does It Meet the Challenges of Emerging Image-Guided Technologies?

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2008-05-01

    In the past decade, brachytherapy has shifted from the traditional surgical paradigm to more modern three-dimensional image-based planning and delivery approaches. The role of intraoperative and multimodality image-based planning is growing. Published American Association of Physicists in Medicine, American College of Radiology, European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and International Atomic Energy Agency quality assurance (QA) guidelines largely emphasize the QA of planning and delivery devices rather than processes. These protocols have been designed to verify compliance with major performance specifications and are not risk based. With some exceptions, complete and clinically practical guidance exists for sources, QA instrumentation, non-image-based planning systems, applicators, remote afterloading systems, dosimetry, and calibration. Updated guidance is needed for intraoperative imaging systems and image-based planning systems. For non-image-based brachytherapy, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group reports 56 and 59 provide reasonable guidance on procedure-specific process flow and QA. However, improved guidance is needed even for established procedures such as ultrasound-guided prostate implants. Adaptive replanning in brachytherapy faces unsolved problems similar to that of image-guided adaptive external beam radiotherapy.

  17. Does the Entire Uterus Need to be Treated in Cancer of the Cervix? Role of Adaptive Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Anker, Christopher J.; Cachoeira, Charles V.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Rankin, Jim M.S.; Gaffney, David K.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control and toxicity by use of a method of adaptive cervical brachytherapy (ACB). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2008, we identified 65 cervical cancer patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) Stage IB1-IVA disease who received definitive external beam radiation therapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy with tandem and ovoid applicators. As tumors regressed, 45 of 65 patients had the tandem source retracted from the uterine fundus at successive brachytherapy insertions, thus decreasing the number of {sup 192}Ir dwell positions. Tests of trend and Fisher's exact test were used to identify the effect of ACB on disease control and toxicity. Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed to evaluate disease control and late complications. Results: The median follow-up was 24.5 months. Of the patients, 92% received chemotherapy. The 3-year overall survival, 3-year disease-free survival, 3-year distant metastasis-free survival, and local control rates were 67%, 76%, 79%, and 97%, respectively. There was only 1 isolated local failure, and there were no local failures beyond 1 year. Distant failure was involved in 93% of recurrences. No significant trend was identified regarding the extent of retraction of the tandem source start position with either failure or toxicity. Acute and actuarial 3-year late Grade 3 toxicity or greater occurred in 24.6% and 17% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: ACB determined by clinical response yielded excellent local control rates. These data indicate that ACB may be useful in decreasing late toxicities from high-dose rate brachytherapy. With the advent of three-dimensional image-guided brachytherapy, additional methods to adapt treatment technique to changes in tumor volume warrant investigation.

  18. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D Printed, gynecologic 192-Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    PubMed

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment.  PMID:25679174

  19. Use of water-equivalent plastic scintillator for intravascular brachytherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Geso, M; Robinson, N; Schumer, W; Williams, K

    2004-03-01

    Beta irradiation has recently been investigated as a possible technique for the prevention of restenosis in intravascular brachytherapy after balloon dilatation or stent implantation. Present methods of beta radiation dosimetry are primarily conducted using radiochromic film. These film dosimeters exhibit limited sensitivity and their characteristics differ from those of tissue, therefore the dose measurement readings require correction factors to be applied. In this work a novel, mini-size (2 mm diameter by 5 mm long) dosimeter element fabricated from Organic Plastic Scintillator (OPS) material was employed. Scintillation photon detection is accomplished using a precision photodiode and innovative signal amplification and processing techniques, rather than traditional photomultiplier tube methods. A significant improvement in signal to noise ratio, dynamic range and stability is achieved using this set-up. In addition, use of the non-saturating organic plastic scintillator material as the detector enables the dosimeter to measure beta radiation at very close distances to the source. In this work the plastic scintillators have been used to measure beta radiation dose at distances of less than 1 mm from an Sr-90 cardiovascular brachytherapy source having an activity of about 2.1 GBq beta radiation levels for both depth-distance and longitudinal profile of the source pellet chain, both in air and in liquid water, are measured using this system. The data obtained is compared with results from Monte Carlo simulation technique (MCNP 4B). Plastic scintillator dosimeter elements, when used in conjunction with photodiode detectors may prove to be useful dosimeters for cardiovascular brachytherapy beta sources, or other applications where precise near-source field dosimetry is required. The system described is particularly useful where measurement of actual dose rate in real time, a high level of stability and repeatability, portability, and immediate access to results are

  20. Three-Dimensional Imaging in Gynecologic Brachytherapy: A Survey of the American Brachytherapy Society

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Erickson, Beth A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to three-dimensional (3D) imaging for gynecologic brachytherapy among American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) members. Methods and Materials: Registered physician members of the ABS received a 19-item survey by e-mail in August 2007. This report excludes physicians not performing brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Results: Of the 256 surveys sent, we report results for 133 respondents who perform one or more implantations per year for locally advanced cervical cancer. Ultrasound aids 56% of physicians with applicator insertion. After insertion, 70% of physicians routinely obtain a computed tomography (CT) scan. The majority (55%) use CT rather than X-ray films (43%) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 2%) for dose specification to the cervix. However, 76% prescribe to Point A alone instead of using a 3D-derived tumor volume (14%), both Point A and tumor volume (7%), or mg/h (3%). Those using 3D imaging routinely contour the bladder and rectum (94%), sigmoid (45%), small bowel (38%), and/or urethra (8%) and calculate normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis parameters including the D2cc (49%), D1cc (36%), D0.1cc (19%), and/or D5cc (19%). Respondents most commonly modify the treatment plan based on International Commission on Radiation Units bladder and/or rectal point dose values (53%) compared with DVH values (45%) or both (2%). Conclusions: More ABS physician members use CT postimplantation imaging than plain films for visualizing the gynecologic brachytherapy apparatus. However, the majority prescribe to Point A rather than using 3D image based dosimetry. Use of 3D image-based treatment planning for gynecologic brachytherapy has the potential for significant growth in the United States.

  1. A survey of quality control practices for high dose rate (HDR) and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Bidmead, Margaret; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A survey of quality control (QC) currently undertaken in UK radiotherapy centres for high dose rate (HDR) and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy has been conducted. The purpose was to benchmark current accepted practice of tests, frequencies and tolerances to assure acceptable HDR/PDR equipment performance. It is 20 years since a similar survey was conducted in the UK and the current review is timed to coincide with a revision of the IPEM Report 81 guidelines for quality control in radiotherapy. Material and methods All radiotherapy centres in the UK were invited by email to complete a comprehensive questionnaire on their current brachytherapy QC practice, including: equipment type, patient workload, source calibration method, level of image guidance for planning, prescribing practices, QC tests, method used, staff involved, test frequencies, and acceptable tolerance limits. Results Survey data was acquired between June and August 2012. Of the 64 centres invited, 47 (73%) responded, with 31 centres having brachytherapy equipment (3 PDR) and fully completing the survey, 13 reporting no HDR/PDR brachytherapy, and 3 intending to commence HDR brachytherapy in the near future. All centres had comprehensive QC schedules in place and there was general agreement on key test frequencies and tolerances. Greatest discord was whether source strength for treatment planning should be derived from measurement, as at 58% of centres, or from the certified value, at 42%. IPEM Report 81 continues to be the most frequently cited source of QC guidance, followed by ESTRO Booklet No. 8. Conclusions A comprehensive survey of QC practices for HDR/PDR brachytherapy in UK has been conducted. This is a useful reference to which centres may benchmark their own practice. However, individuals should take a risk-assessment based approach, employing full knowledge of local equipment, clinical procedures and available test equipment in order to determine individual QC needs. PMID:23378853

  2. Error Analysis of non-TLD HDR Brachytherapy Dosimetric Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoush, Ahmad

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group Report43 (AAPM-TG43) and its updated version TG-43U1 rely on the LiF TLD detector to determine the experimental absolute dose rate for brachytherapy. The recommended uncertainty estimates associated with TLD experimental dosimetry include 5% for statistical errors (Type A) and 7% for systematic errors (Type B). TG-43U1 protocol does not include recommendation for other experimental dosimetric techniques to calculate the absolute dose for brachytherapy. This research used two independent experimental methods and Monte Carlo simulations to investigate and analyze uncertainties and errors associated with absolute dosimetry of HDR brachytherapy for a Tandem applicator. An A16 MicroChamber* and one dose MOSFET detectors† were selected to meet the TG-43U1 recommendations for experimental dosimetry. Statistical and systematic uncertainty analyses associated with each experimental technique were analyzed quantitatively using MCNPX 2.6‡ to evaluate source positional error, Tandem positional error, the source spectrum, phantom size effect, reproducibility, temperature and pressure effects, volume averaging, stem and wall effects, and Tandem effect. Absolute dose calculations for clinical use are based on Treatment Planning System (TPS) with no corrections for the above uncertainties. Absolute dose and uncertainties along the transverse plane were predicted for the A16 microchamber. The generated overall uncertainties are 22%, 17%, 15%, 15%, 16%, 17%, and 19% at 1cm, 2cm, 3cm, 4cm, and 5cm, respectively. Predicting the dose beyond 5cm is complicated due to low signal-to-noise ratio, cable effect, and stem effect for the A16 microchamber. Since dose beyond 5cm adds no clinical information, it has been ignored in this study. The absolute dose was predicted for the MOSFET detector from 1cm to 7cm along the transverse plane. The generated overall uncertainties are 23%, 11%, 8%, 7%, 7%, 9%, and 8% at 1cm, 2cm, 3cm

  3. Recent developments and best practice in brachytherapy treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy has evolved over many decades, but more recently, there have been significant changes in the way that brachytherapy is used for different treatment sites. This has been due to the development of new, technologically advanced computer planning systems and treatment delivery techniques. Modern, three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities have been incorporated into treatment planning methods, allowing full 3D dose distributions to be computed. Treatment techniques involving online planning have emerged, allowing dose distributions to be calculated and updated in real time based on the actual clinical situation. In the case of early stage breast cancer treatment, for example, electronic brachytherapy treatment techniques are being used in which the radiation dose is delivered during the same procedure as the surgery. There have also been significant advances in treatment applicator design, which allow the use of modern 3D imaging techniques for planning, and manufacturers have begun to implement new dose calculation algorithms that will correct for applicator shielding and tissue inhomogeneities. This article aims to review the recent developments and best practice in brachytherapy techniques and treatments. It will look at how imaging developments have been incorporated into current brachytherapy treatment and how these developments have played an integral role in the modern brachytherapy era. The planning requirements for different treatments sites are reviewed as well as the future developments of brachytherapy in radiobiology and treatment planning dose calculation. PMID:24734939

  4. A Novel MRI Marker for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J. Stafford, R. Jason; Bankson, James A.; Li Chun; Swanson, David A.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Martirosyan, Karen S.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the optimal imaging modality for the prostate and surrounding critical organ structures. However, on MRI, the titanium radioactive seeds used for brachytherapy appear as black holes (negative contrast) and cannot be accurately localized. We sought to develop an encapsulated contrast agent marker (ECAM) with high-signal intensity on MRI to permit accurate localization of radioactive seeds with MRI during and after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We investigated several agents with paramagnetic and superparamagnetic properties. The agents were injected into titanium, acrylic, and glass seeds, which were linked together in various combinations and imaged with MRI. The agent with the greatest T1-weighted signal was tested further in a canine prostate and agarose phantom. Studies were performed on a 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner. Results: The cobalt-chloride complex contrast (C4) agent with stoichiometry (CoCl{sub 2}){sub 0.8}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NO{sub 2}){sub 0.2} had the greatest T1-weighted signal (positive contrast) with a relaxivity ratio >1 (r{sub 2}/r{sub 1} = 1.21 {+-} 0.29). Acrylic-titanium and glass-titanium seed strands were clearly visualized with the encapsulated contrast agent marker. Conclusion: We have developed a novel ECAM that permits positive identification of the radioactive seeds used for prostate brachytherapy on MRI. Preclinical in vitro phantom studies and in vivo canine studies are needed to further optimize MRI sequencing techniques to facilitate MRI-based dosimetry.

  5. Prevention of high-dose-rate brachytherapy accidents. ICRP Publication 97.

    PubMed

    Valentin, J

    2005-01-01

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy is a rapidly growing technique (HDR) that has been replacing low-dose-rate (LDR) procedures over the last few years in both industrialised and developing countries. It is estimated that about 500,000 procedures (administration of treatment) are performed by HDR units annually. LDR equipment has been discontinued by many manufacturers over the last few years, leaving HDR brachytherapy as the major alternative. HDR brachytherapy techniques deliver a very high dose, of the order of 1.6-5.0 Gy/min, so mistakes can lead to under- or overdosage with the potential for clinical adverse effects. More than 500 HDR accidents (including one death) have been reported along the entire chain of procedures from source packing to delivery of dose. Human error has been the prime cause of radiation events. In the present report, the International Commission on Radiological Protection concludes that many accidents could have been prevented if staff had had functional monitoring equipment and paid attention to the results. Since iridium has relatively short half-life, the HDR sources need to be replaced approximately every 4 months. Over 10,000 HDR sources are transported annually, with the resultant potential for accidents; therefore, appropriate procedures and regulations must be observed. A number of specific recommendations on procedures and equipment are given in this report. The need for an emergency plan and for practising emergency procedures is stressed. The possibility of loss or theft of sources must be kept in mind. A collaborating team of specifically trained personnel following quality assurance (QA) procedures is necessary to prevent accidents. Maintenance is indispensable component of QA; external audits of procedures re-enforce good and safe practice, and identify potential causes of accidents. QA should include peer review of cases. Accidents and incidents should be reported and the lessons learned should be shared with other users to

  6. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations

  7. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: report of Task Group 192.

    PubMed

    Podder, Tarun K; Beaulieu, Luc; Caldwell, Barrett; Cormack, Robert A; Crass, Jostin B; Dicker, Adam P; Fenster, Aaron; Fichtinger, Gabor; Meltsner, Michael A; Moerland, Marinus A; Nath, Ravinder; Rivard, Mark J; Salcudean, Tim; Song, Danny Y; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Yu, Yan

    2014-10-01

    mimic the real operating procedure as closely as possible. Additional recommendations on robotic brachytherapy systems include display of the operational state; capability of manual override; documented policies for independent check and data verification; intuitive interface displaying the implantation plan and visualization of needle positions and seed locations relative to the target anatomy; needle insertion in a sequential order; robot-clinician and robot-patient interactions robustness, reliability, and safety while delivering the correct dose at the correct site for the correct patient; avoidance of excessive force on radioactive sources; delivery confirmation of the required number or position of seeds; incorporation of a collision avoidance system; system cleaning, decontamination, and sterilization procedures. These recommendations are applicable to end users and manufacturers of robotic brachytherapy systems. PMID:25281939

  8. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: Report of Task Group 192

    SciTech Connect

    Podder, Tarun K.; Beaulieu, Luc; Caldwell, Barrett; Cormack, Robert A.; Crass, Jostin B.; Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan; Fenster, Aaron; Fichtinger, Gabor; Meltsner, Michael A.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Nath, Ravinder; Rivard, Mark J.; Salcudean, Tim; Song, Danny Y.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.

    2014-10-15

    should mimic the real operating procedure as closely as possible. Additional recommendations on robotic brachytherapy systems include display of the operational state; capability of manual override; documented policies for independent check and data verification; intuitive interface displaying the implantation plan and visualization of needle positions and seed locations relative to the target anatomy; needle insertion in a sequential order; robot–clinician and robot–patient interactions robustness, reliability, and safety while delivering the correct dose at the correct site for the correct patient; avoidance of excessive force on radioactive sources; delivery confirmation of the required number or position of seeds; incorporation of a collision avoidance system; system cleaning, decontamination, and sterilization procedures. These recommendations are applicable to end users and manufacturers of robotic brachytherapy systems.

  9. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Robyn; Kamrava, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer. PMID:24920937

  10. Definition and Application of Proton Source Efficiency in Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seltborg, Per; Wallenius, Jan; Tucek, Kamil; Gudowski, Waclaw

    2003-11-15

    In order to study the beam power amplification of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), a new parameter, the proton source efficiency {psi}* is introduced. {psi}* represents the average importance of the external proton source, relative to the average importance of the eigenmode production, and is closely related to the neutron source efficiency [varphi]*, which is frequently used in the ADS field. [varphi]* is commonly used in the physics of subcritical systems driven by any external source (spallation source, (d,d), (d,t), {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fissions, etc.). On the contrary, {psi}* has been defined in this paper exclusively for ADS studies where the system is driven by a spallation source. The main advantage with using {psi}* instead of [varphi]* for ADS is that the way of defining the external source is unique and that it is proportional to the core power divided by the proton beam power, independent of the neutron source distribution.Numerical simulations have been performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX in order to study {psi}* as a function of different design parameters. It was found that, in order to maximize {psi}* and therefore minimize the proton current needs, a target radius as small as possible should be chosen. For target radii smaller than {approx}30 cm, lead-bismuth is a better choice of coolant material than sodium, regarding the proton source efficiency, while for larger target radii the two materials are equally good. The optimal axial proton beam impact was found to be located {approx}20 cm above the core center. Varying the proton energy, {psi}*/E{sub p} was found to have a maximum for proton energies between 1200 and 1400 MeV. Increasing the americium content in the fuel decreases {psi}* considerably, in particular when the target radius is large.

  11. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in inoperable endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Petsuksiri, J; Chansilpa, Y; Hoskin, P J

    2014-01-01

    Inoperable endometrial cancer may be treated with curative aim using radical radiotherapy alone. The radiation techniques are external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) alone, EBRT plus brachytherapy and brachytherapy alone. Recently, high-dose-rate brachytherapy has been used instead of low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Image-guided brachytherapy enables sufficient coverage of tumour and reduction of dose to the organs at risk, thus increasing the therapeutic ratio of treatment. Local control rates with three-dimensional brachytherapy appear better than with conventional techniques (about 90–100% and 70–90%, respectively). PMID:24807067

  12. Relative biological effectiveness of fission neutrons for producing micronuclei in the root-tip cells of onion seedlings after irradiation as dry seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyi; Endo, Satoru; Ishikawa, Masayori; Ikeda, Hideo; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2002-12-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of mixed neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted at a 252Cf source at the Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, compared with 60Co gamma-ray radiation was determined. The tissue-absorbed dose contribution of the accompanying gamma radiation was about 35.7% to the total tissue-absorbed dose from the 252Cf mixed radiation. The 252Cf mixed radiation and 60Co gamma rays produced approximate linear changes in the frequency of micronuclei induced in root-tip cells of Allium cepa L. onion seedlings after irradiation as dry dormant seeds with varying absorbed doses in onion seeds. Therefore, the RBE for radiation-induced micronuclei was calculated as the ratio of the slopes for the 252Cf mixed radiation and the 60Co gamma rays. The deduced RBE value of 252Cf mixed radiation to 60Co gamma rays to induce micronuclei in dry dormant onion seed cells was about 90.5 +/- 3.6 (+/- 1sigma); the RBE of neutrons from the 252Cf mixed radiation was about 150 +/- 6 (+/- 1sigma). Furthermore, the sensitivity ratio of the induction rate of micronuclei in dry dormant seeds to that in seedlings by neutrons from 252Cf mixed radiation was significantly different from that by 60Co gamma rays. From these results, we concluded that the repair efficiency of DNA damage induced by neutrons may be different from that by gamma rays. PMID:12674204

  13. Brachytherapy structural shielding calculations using Monte Carlo generated, monoenergetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Zourari, K.; Peppa, V.; Papagiannis, P.; Ballester, Facundo; Siebert, Frank-André

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide a method for calculating the transmission of any broad photon beam with a known energy spectrum in the range of 20–1090 keV, through concrete and lead, based on the superposition of corresponding monoenergetic data obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: MCNP5 was used to calculate broad photon beam transmission data through varying thickness of lead and concrete, for monoenergetic point sources of energy in the range pertinent to brachytherapy (20–1090 keV, in 10 keV intervals). The three parameter empirical model introduced byArcher et al. [“Diagnostic x-ray shielding design based on an empirical model of photon attenuation,” Health Phys. 44, 507–517 (1983)] was used to describe the transmission curve for each of the 216 energy-material combinations. These three parameters, and hence the transmission curve, for any polyenergetic spectrum can then be obtained by superposition along the lines of Kharrati et al. [“Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities,” Med. Phys. 34, 1398–1404 (2007)]. A simple program, incorporating a graphical user interface, was developed to facilitate the superposition of monoenergetic data, the graphical and tabular display of broad photon beam transmission curves, and the calculation of material thickness required for a given transmission from these curves. Results: Polyenergetic broad photon beam transmission curves of this work, calculated from the superposition of monoenergetic data, are compared to corresponding results in the literature. A good agreement is observed with results in the literature obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for the photon spectra emitted from bare point sources of various radionuclides. Differences are observed with corresponding results in the literature for x-ray spectra at various tube potentials, mainly due to the different broad beam conditions or x-ray spectra assumed. Conclusions

  14. Water equivalent phantom materials for (192)Ir brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-21

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with (192)Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading (192)Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm.The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm.As suggested

  15. Water equivalent phantom materials for 192Ir brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-01

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with 192Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm. The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm. As suggested by

  16. Rapid emission angle selection for rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Yang Wenjun; Wu Xiaodong

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: The authors present a rapid emission angle selection (REAS) method that enables the efficient selection of the azimuthal shield angle for rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). The REAS method produces a Pareto curve from which a potential RSBT user can select a treatment plan that balances the tradeoff between delivery time and tumor dose conformity. Methods: Two cervical cancer patients were considered as test cases for the REAS method. The RSBT source considered was a Xoft Axxent{sup TM} electronic brachytherapy source, partially shielded with 0.5 mm of tungsten, which traveled inside a tandem intrauterine applicator. Three anchor RSBT plans were generated for each case using dose-volume optimization, with azimuthal shield emission angles of 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 270 Degree-Sign . The REAS method converts the anchor plans to treatment plans for all possible emission angles by combining neighboring beamlets to form beamlets for larger emission angles. Treatment plans based on exhaustive dose-volume optimization (ERVO) and exhaustive surface optimization (ERSO) were also generated for both cases. Uniform dwell-time scaling was applied to all plans such that that high-risk clinical target volume D{sub 90} was maximized without violating the D{sub 2cc} tolerances of the rectum, bladder, and sigmoid colon. Results: By choosing three azimuthal emission angles out of 32 potential angles, the REAS method performs about 10 times faster than the ERVO method. By setting D{sub 90} to 85-100 Gy{sub 10}, the delivery times used by REAS generated plans are 21.0% and 19.5% less than exhaustive surface optimized plans used by the two clinical cases. By setting the delivery time budget to 5-25 and 10-30 min/fx, respectively, for two the cases, the D{sub 90} contributions for REAS are improved by 5.8% and 5.1% compared to the ERSO plans. The ranges used in this comparison were selected in order to keep both D{sub 90} and the delivery time within acceptable

  17. Absolute determination of the neutron source yield using melamine as a neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciechanowski, M.; Bolewski, A., Jr.; Kreft, A.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to absolute determination of the neutron source yield is presented. It bases on the application of melamine (C3H6N6) to neutron detection combined with Monte Carlo simulations of neutron transport. Melamine has the ability to detect neutrons via 14N(n, p)14C reaction and subsequent determination of 14C content. A cross section for this reaction is relatively high for thermal neutrons (1.827 b) and much lower for fast neutrons. A concentration of 14C nuclei created in the irradiated sample of melamine can be reliably measured with the aid of the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The mass of melamine sufficient for this analysis is only 10 mg. Neutron detection is supported by Monte Carlo simulations of neutron transport carried out with the use of MCNP-4C code. These simulations are aimed at computing the probability of 14C creation in the melamine sample per the source neutron. The result of AMS measurements together with results of MCNP calculations enable us to determine the number of neutrons emitted from the source during the irradiation of melamine. The proposed method was applied for determining the neutron emission from a commercial 252Cf neutron source which was independently calibrated. The measured neutron emission agreed with the certified one within uncertainty limits. The relative expanded uncertainty (k=2) of the absolute neutron source yield determination was estimated at 2.6%. Apart from calibration of radionuclide neutron sources the proposed procedure could facilitate absolute yield measurements for more complex sources. Potential applications of this methodology as it is further developed include diagnostics of inertial confinement fusion and plasma-focus experiments, calibration of neutron measurement systems at tokamaks and accelerator-based neutron sources as well as characterization of neutron fields generated in large particle detectors during collisions of hadron beams.

  18. Adjuvant brachytherapy in the treatment of soft-tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Crownover, R L; Marks, K E

    1999-06-01

    For many patients with STS, administering adjuvant radiation treatments in the form of interstitial brachytherapy provides an excellent alternative to a protracted course of EBRT. Ideal patients are those with intermediate- or high-grade tumors amenable to en bloc resection. Attractive features of this approach include an untainted pathologic specimen, expeditious completion of treatment, reduction in wound complications, and improved functional outcome. Brachytherapy can permit definitive reirradiation by tightly localizing the high dose radiation exposure. It is also useful in patients who are known to have or be at high risk of metastatic disease, for whom the rapid completion of local treatment allows systemic therapy to begin quickly. Introduction of HDR techniques has shifted the delivery of brachytherapy from inpatient solitary confinement to an outpatient setting. Early reports using HDR brachytherapy for treatment of adult and pediatric STS are quite encouraging. The clinical equivalence between hyperfractionated HDR schedules and traditional LDR techniques is gaining acceptance. PMID:10432432

  19. Brachytherapy in India – a long road ahead

    PubMed Central

    Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy can play a very important role in the definitive cure by radiation therapy in India. However, except for in a handful of centres, the majority of hospitals use it only for intracavitary treatment. The most probable reasons for such are the lack of logistical resources in terms of trained personal and supporting staff, rather than lack of radiotherapy machines and equipment. In this article, the authors look into the various aspects of brachytherapy in India: from its beginning to present days. The authors point out the resources available, shortcomings, and some possible solutions to make use of brachytherapy more popular and effective. Apart from presenting a picture of the present scenario, the article pays attention to the positive signs of brachytherapy becoming more popular in the near future. PMID:25337139

  20. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harkenrider, Matthew M. Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R.; Small, William

    2015-07-15

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy.

  1. The Adjoint Method for The Optimization of Brachytherapy and Radiotherapy Patient Treatment Planning Procedures Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    D.L. Henderson; S. Yoo; M. Kowalok; T.R. Mackie; B.R. Thomadsen

    2001-10-30

    The goal of this project is to investigate the use of the adjoint method, commonly used in the reactor physics community, for the optimization of radiation therapy patient treatment plans. Two different types of radiation therapy are being examined, interstitial brachytherapy and radiotherapy. In brachytherapy radioactive sources are surgically implanted within the diseased organ such as the prostate to treat the cancerous tissue. With radiotherapy, the x-ray source is usually located at a distance of about 1-metere from the patient and focused on the treatment area. For brachytherapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal placement of the radioactive sources, which delivers the prescribed dose to the disease tissue while simultaneously sparing (reducing) the dose to sensitive tissue and organs. For external beam radiation therapy the optimization phase of the treatment plan consists of determining the optimal direction and intensity of beam, which provides complete coverage of the tumor region with the prescribed dose while simultaneously avoiding sensitive tissue areas. For both therapy methods, the optimal treatment plan is one in which the diseased tissue has been treated with the prescribed dose and dose to the sensitive tissue and organs has been kept to a minimum.

  2. High versus Low-Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Sonali S.; Tergas, Ana I.; Deutsch, Israel; Burke, William M.; Hou, June Y.; Ananth, Cande V.; Huang, Yongmei; Neugut, Alfred I.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Wright, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of cervical cancer. While small trials have shown comparable survival outcomes between high (HDR) and low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, little data is available in the US. We examined the utilization of HDR brachytherapy and analyzed the impact of type of brachytherapy on survival for cervical cancer. Methods Women with stage IB2–IVA cervical cancer treated with primary (external beam and brachytherapy) radiotherapy between 2003–2011 and recorded in the National Cancer Database (NCDB) were analyzed. Generalized linear mixed models and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to examine predictors of HDR brachytherapy use and the association between HDR use and survival. Results A total of 10,564 women including 2681 (25.4%) who received LDR and 7883 (74.6%) that received HDR were identified. Use of HDR increased from 50.2% in 2003 to 83.9% in 2011 (P<0.0001). In a multivariable model, year of diagnosis was the strongest predictor of use of HDR. While patients in the Northeast were more likely to receive HDR therapy, there were no other clinical or socioeconomic characteristics associated with receipt of HDR. In a multivariable Cox model, survival was similar between the HDR and LDR groups (HR=0.93; 95% 0.83–1.03). Similar findings were noted in analyses stratified by stage and histology. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated no difference in survival based on type of brachytherapy for stage IIB (P=0.68), IIIB (P=0.17), or IVA (P=0.16) tumors. Conclusions The use of HDR therapy has increased rapidly. Overall survival is similar for LDR and HDR brachytherapy. PMID:25575481

  3. The evolution of computerized treatment planning for brachytherapy: American contributions

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To outline the evolution of computerized brachytherapy treatment planning in the United States through a review of technological developments and clinical practice refinements. Material and methods A literature review was performed and interviews were conducted with six participants in the development of computerized treatment planning for brachytherapy. Results Computerized brachytherapy treatment planning software was initially developed in the Physics Departments of New York's Memorial Hospital (by Nelson, Meurk and Balter), and Houston's M. D. Anderson Hospital (by Stovall and Shalek). These public-domain programs could be used by institutions with adequate computational resources; other clinics had access to them via Memorial's and Anderson's teletype-based computational services. Commercial brachytherapy treatment planning programs designed to run on smaller computers (Prowess, ROCS, MMS), were developed in the late 1980s and early 1990s. These systems brought interactive dosimetry into the clinic and surgical theatre. Conclusions Brachytherapy treatment planning has evolved from systems of rigid implant rules to individualized pre- and intra-operative treatment plans, and post-operative dosimetric assessments. Brachytherapy dose distributions were initially calculated on public domain programs on large regionally located computers. With the progression of computer miniaturization and increase in processor speeds, proprietary software was commercially developed for microcomputers that offered increased functionality and integration with clinical practice. PMID:25097560

  4. Quantifying IOHDR brachytherapy underdosage resulting from an incomplete scatter environment

    SciTech Connect

    Raina, Sanjay; Avadhani, Jaiteerth S.; Oh, Moonseong; Malhotra, Harish K.; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Kuettel, Michael R.; Podgorsak, Matthew B. . E-mail: matthew.podgorsak@roswellpark.org

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Most brachytherapy planning systems are based on a dose calculation algorithm that assumes an infinite scatter environment surrounding the target volume and applicator. Dosimetric errors from this assumption are negligi