Science.gov

Sample records for 252cf neutron sources

  1. Measurement of the 250Cf component in a 252Cf neutron source at KRISS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungho; Park, Hyeonseo; Choi, Kil-Oung

    2014-10-01

    Neutron emission rate measurements have been carried out at the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science using a manganese sulphate bath system for (252)Cf and (241)Am-Be sources since 2004. The relative measurement method was chosen in 2012, and the neutron emission rates agreed with those by the absolute measurement method within uncertainties. The neutron emission rate of an old (252)Cf source has been measured three times: in 2004, 2009 and 2012. The (250)Cf component was fitted to a double-exponential function of (252)Cf+(250)Cf, and the ratio of the (250)Cf component to the (252)Cf component was estimated to be 7.8 % in 2004 and 46.8 % in 2012. Underestimation of the neutron emission rates of old (252)Cf sources can be corrected if the neutron emission rate of the (250)Cf component is taken into account. PMID:24344350

  2. Clinical brachytherapy with neutron emitting 252Cf sources and adherence to AAPM TG-43 dosimetry protocol.

    PubMed

    Rivard, M J; Wierzbicki, J G; Van den Heuvel, F; Martin, R C; McMahon, R R

    1999-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods, neutron dosimetry for 252Cf Applicator Tube (AT) type medical sources available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has for the first time been determined in terms of TG-43 formalism. This approach, as compared to previous "along-away" formalisms, demonstrates the relative angular independence of dose rate data, when the geometry factor has been removed. As the ORNL-made 252Cf AT type sources are considerably physically larger than most clinical sources used today, the radial dose function increases for radii less than 3.0 mm due to breakdown of the line source model. A comparison of the 252Cf neutron radial dose function with those for other medical sources revealed similarities with that from 137Cs. Differences with respect to previous 252Cf AT source neutron dosimetry data generally increased at increasing distances. This was attributed to differences in the various 252Cf AT source models and phantom compositions. The current status of 252Cf medical source fabrication and calibration procedures at ORNL is presented. PMID:9949403

  3. Graphite moderated (252)Cf source.

    PubMed

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Barros, Haydn; Greaves, Eduardo D; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2015-06-01

    The Thorium molten-salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid-fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a (252)Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the (252)Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. PMID:25770393

  4. Replacing a 252Cf source with a neutron generator in a shuffler - a conceptual design performed with MCNPX

    SciTech Connect

    Schear, Melissa A; Tobin, Stephen J

    2009-01-01

    The {sup 252}Cf shuffler has been widely used in nuclear safeguards and radioactive waste management to assay fissile isotopes, such as {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu, present in a variety of samples, ranging from small cans of uranium waste to metal samples weighing several kilograms. Like other non-destructive assay instruments, the shuffler uses an interrogating neutron source to induce fissions in the sample. Although shufflers with {sup 252}Cf sources have been reliably used for several decades, replacing this isotopic source with a neutron generator presents some distinct advantages. Neutron generators can be run in a continuous or pulsed mode, and may be turned off, eliminating the need for shielding and a shuffling mechanism in the shuffler. There is also essentially no dose to personnel during installation, and no reliance on the availability of {sup 252}Cf. Despite these advantages, the more energetic neutrons emitted from the neutron generator (141 MeV for D-T generators) present some challenges for certain material types. For example when the enrichment of a uranium sample is unknown, the fission of {sup 238}U is generally undesirable. Since measuring uranium is one of the main uses of a shuffler, reducing the delayed neutron contribution from {sup 238}U is desirable. Hence, the shuffler hardware must be modified to accommodate a moderator configuration near the source to tailor the interrogating spectrum in a manner which promotes sub-threshold fissions (below 1 MeV) but avoids the over-moderation of the interrogating neutrons so as to avoid self-shielding. In this study, where there are many material and geometry combinations, the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code was used to model, design, and optimize the moderator configuration within the shuffler geometry. The code is then used to evaluate and compare the assay performances of both the modified shuffler and the current {sup 252}Cf shuffler designs for different test samples. The

  5. Monte Carlo simulation optimisation of zinc sulphide based fast-neutron detector for radiography using a 252Cf source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkian, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    Neutron radiography is rapidly extending as one of the methods for non-destructive screening of materials. There are various parameters to be studied for optimising imaging screens and image quality for different fast-neutron radiography systems. Herein, a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation is employed to evaluate the response of a fast-neutron radiography system using a 252Cf neutron source. The neutron radiography system is comprised of a moderator as the neutron-to-proton converter with suspended silver-activated zinc sulphide (ZnS(Ag)) as the phosphor material. The neutron-induced protons deposit energy in the phosphor which consequently emits scintillation light. Further, radiographs are obtained by simulating the overall radiography system including source and sample. Two different standard samples are used to evaluate the quality of the radiographs.

  6. ANISOTROPY FACTORS FOR A 252Cf SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.; Bogard, James S

    2009-01-01

    A new 252Cf source has been procured for use at the Dosimetry Applications and Research (DOSAR) facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This source was encapsulated by the Californium Facility at ORNL, however, the encapsulation differs from previous designs designated as SR-Cf-100. The new encapsulation, designated SR-Cf-3000, has a similar cylindrical radius to the previous generation, but is 1.6 cm longer. Since the encapsulation geometries differ the amount of internal scattering of neutrons will also differ leading to changes in anisotropy factors between the two designs. Additionally, the different encapsulations will affect the absorbed dose and dose equivalent delivered per neutron emitted by the source since both the quantity and energy distribution of the emitted neutrons will vary with irradiation angle. This work presents the fluence anisotropy factors for the SR-Cf-3000 series encapsulation as well as absorbed dose and dose equivalent values calculated for various angles of irradiation. The fluence anisotropy factors vary from a maximum of 1.037 to a minimum of 0.641 for irradiation angles perpendicular and parallel to the source axis, respectively. Anisotropy in absorbed dose varied from a maximum of 1.033 to a minimum of 0.676 while anisotropy of dose equivalent varied from 1.035 to 0.657.

  7. Plaque Therapy and Scatter Dose Using {sup 252}Cf Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mark J. Rivard; Anita Mahajan

    2000-11-12

    As melanomas are radioresistant to conventional low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiations such as photons and electrons, {sup 252}Cf (high-LET due to neutrons) may offer more promising clinical results. Although {sup 252}Cf also emits photons and electrons, the majority of absorbed dose is imparted by the high-LET radiation. This study examines the impact of scattering material on the neutron dose distributions for {sup 252}Cf plaque therapy (used to treat surface lesions like melanoma). Neutrons were transported through a 10-cm-diam water phantom with a thickness of either 5 or 10 cm using the MCNP radiation transport code. The phantom was surrounded by vacuum; the {sup 252}Cf neutron energy spectrum was modeled as a Maxwellian distribution; and the source was a bare point positioned at 1.0, 0.5, or {epsilon} above or below the water/vacuum interface. These source positions were chosen to mimic the case where a plaque locates the source either above the skin's surface, e.g., 2{pi} scattering geometry, or if layers of tissue-equivalent bolus materials were placed atop the implant to provide radiation backscatter, 4{pi} geometry. Differences between the 2{pi} and 4{pi} geometries were maximized closest to the source and for source positions farthest from the water/vacuum interface. Therefore, the maximum radiation dose (closest to the {sup 252}Cf source) may be minimized by not including scattering material for plaque therapy. However, for nonrelativistic, elastic scattering for protons by neutrons, the proton range increases with neutron energy. This result was expected since the neutron energy spectrum degrades at increasing depth and the proportion of fast neutron dose to total dose is maximized closest to the source in the 2{pi} geometry. Future studies will examine this effect as a function of neutron energy, will consider synergy with the low-LET {sup 252}Cf dose component and include experimental measurements, and will assess this technique to possibly

  8. Evaluation of plutonium oxidation using pulsed neutron measurements with {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1997-09-01

    The unrecognized oxidation of plutonium in {open_quotes}sealed{close_quotes} canisters poses a unique problem for both material control and accountability. A feasibility study was performed to address the use of randomly pulsed neutron measurements with {sup 252}Cf to determine if plutonium metal in a canister has oxidized without opening the container. The Monte Carlo code MCNP-DSP was used to determine if time-of-flight transmission measurements could be used to determine oxidation of plutonium in {open_quotes}sealed{close_quotes} cans. In the Monte Carlo models, a plutonium button in a can was positioned between a {sup 252}Cf source and a scintillation detector, and the time distribution of counts after {sup 252}Cf fission in the detector was calculated. The time distribution of counts after {sup 252}Cf fission differs between plutonium metal and plutonium oxide because resonances in oxygen will affect transmission of certain energy neutrons from {sup 252}Cf sources in ionization chambers. This method could be used to determine the presence of other materials that react with plutonium in {open_quotes}sealed{close_quotes} cans.

  9. Regeneration in cervix cancer after sup 252 Cf neutron brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.; Wierzbicki, J.; Feola, J.; Urano, M. )

    1990-07-01

    Regeneration of clonogens in human cervical cancer was assessed by the pathological evaluation of the hysterectomy specimen after intracavitary {sup 252}Cf neutron brachytherapy implants separated by varying time intervals followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. In this study, patients with bulky/barrel shaped Stage IB cervical cancers received {sup 252}Cf implants plus approximately 45 Gy of whole pelvis linear accelerator radiotherapy in approximately 25 fractions in 5 weeks followed by hysterectomy 4-6 weeks after radiotherapy. The specimens were studied grossly and microscopically for residual tumor. It was found that the fraction of positive specimens increased with elapsed time interval between implants. These findings support the hypothesis that there is repopulation of surviving clonogens with increased time interval between the implants. The observation also supports current concerns that rapid depopulation of tumor can lead to rapid repopulation, that is, rapid shrinkage of tumor can alter the physiological environment such that clonogens can rapidly regenerate.

  10. Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Traub, Richard J.

    2010-03-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

  11. On the 252Cf primary and secondary gamma rays and epithermal neutron flux for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassoun, J.; Merzouki, A.; El Morabiti, A.; Jehouani, A.

    2007-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation has been used to calculate the different components of neutrons and secondary gamma rays originated by 252Cf fission and also the primary gamma rays emitted directly by the 252Cf source at the exit face of a compact system designed for the BNCT. The system consists of a 252Cf source and a moderator/reflector/filter assembly. To study the material properties and configuration possibilities, the MCNP code has been used. The moderator/reflector/filter arrangement is optimised to moderate neutrons to epithermal energy and, as far as possible, to get rid of fast and thermal neutrons and photons from the therapeutic beam. To reduce the total gamma contamination and to have a sufficiently high epithermal neutron flux we have used different photon filters of different thickness. Our analysis showed that the use of an appropriate filter leads to a gamma ray flux reduction without affecting the epithermal neutron beam quality at the exit face of the system.

  12. Neutron emission in fission of 252Cf(sf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Fabry, I.

    2009-10-01

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics. The goal was to compare the results of this digital data acquisition and digital signal processing analysis to the results of the pioneering work of Budtz-Jo/rgensen and Knitter. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213 equivalent neutron detector in total about 10 neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution have been investigated using a 10 bit waveform digitizer. Neutron time- of- flight and pulse shape have been measured using analogue CAMAC modules, a 1 ns TDC and a pair of 12 bit charge-to-digital-converters. The fission fragment signals have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. The results are in very good agreement with literature. For the first time the dependence of the number of neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments does not drop at low TKE.

  13. Prompt Neutron Emission in 252CF Spontaneous Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2011-10-01

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics. The goal was to compare the results from digital data acquisition and digital signal processing analysis with results of the pioneering work of Budtz-Jørgensen and Knitter. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in total about 107 fission fragment-neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. The results are in very good agreement with literature. For the first time the dependence of the number of emitted neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations in the range of TKE from 140-220 MeV.

  14. 1987 Neutron and gamma personnel dosimeter intercomparison study using a D/sub 2/O-moderated /sup 252/Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; West, L.E.; Sims, C.S.; Welty, T.J.

    1989-05-01

    The thirteenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study (i.e., PDIS 13) was conducted during April 1987 as a joint effort by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Dosimetry Applications Research Group and the Southwest Radiation Calibration Center at the University of Arkansas. A total of 48 organizations (34 from the US and 14 from abroad) participated in PDIS 13. Participants submitted a total of 1,113 neutron and gamma dosimeters for this mixed field study. The dosimeters were transferred by mail and were handled by experimental personnel at ORNL and the University of Arkansas. The type of neutron dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD-albedo (49%), direct interaction TLD (31%), CR-39 (17%), film (3%). The type of gamma dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: Li/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/, alone or in combination with CaSO/sub 4/, (69%), /sup 7/LiF (28%), natural LiF (3%). Radiation exposures in PDIS 13 were limited to 0.5 and 1.5 mSv from /sup 252/Cf moderated by 15-cm of D/sub 2/O. Traditional exposures using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) were not possible due to the fact that all reactors at ORNL, including the HPRR, were shutdown by order of the Department of Energy at the time the intercomparison was performed. Planned exposures using a /sup 238/PuBe source were negated by a faulty timing mechanism. Based on accuracy and precision, direct interaction TLD dosimeters exhibited the best performance in PDIS 13 neutron measurements. They were followed, in order of best performance, by CR-39, TLD albedo, and film. The Li/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/ type TLD dosimeters exhibited the best performance in PDIS 13 gamma measurements. They were followed by natural LiF, /sup 7/LiF, and film. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. A Monte Carlo simulation and setup optimization of output efficiency to PGNAA thermal neutron using 252Cf neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Zhao; Tuo, Xian-Guo

    2014-07-01

    We present the design and optimization of a prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) thermal neutron output setup based on Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5 computer code. In these simulations, the moderator materials, reflective materials, and structure of the PGNAA 252Cf neutrons of thermal neutron output setup are optimized. The simulation results reveal that the thin layer paraffin and the thick layer of heavy water moderating effect work best for the 252Cf neutron spectrum. Our new design shows a significantly improved performance of the thermal neutron flux and flux rate, that are increased by 3.02 times and 3.27 times, respectively, compared with the conventional neutron source design.

  16. Proton beam dosimetry using a TEPC with a 252Cf neutron calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Uk-Won; Park, Won-Kee; Lee, Jaejin; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Moon, Bongkon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-10-01

    A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) can measure the linear energy transfer (LET) of incident radiation and directly calculate the equivalent dose to humans in a complicated radiation field. For radiation monitoring, we developed and characterized a TEPC that can simulate a site diameter of 2 µm for micro-dosimetry. It was calibrated with a 252Cf neutron standard source at the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science. The channel to LET calibration factor of the TEPC is about 0.72 keV/ µm-channel. Also, we evaluated the possibility of usage the TEPC as a proton dosimeter.

  17. A new facility for Non-Destructive Assay with a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanato, L.; Caldogno, M.; Hao Xin; Dima, R.; Fabris, D.; Nebbia, G.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pesente, S.; Viesti, G.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2010-08-04

    A new facility for non-destructive assay using a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf source is presented. The system is designed to analyze samples having maximum size of about 15x20 cm{sup 2}, the material recognition being obtained by measuring simultaneously transmission of neutrons and gamma rays.

  18. A new facility for non-destructive assay using a 252Cf source.

    PubMed

    Stevanato, L; Caldogno, M; Dima, R; Fabris, D; Hao, Xin; Lunardon, M; Moretto, S; Nebbia, G; Pesente, S; Pino, F; Sajo-Bohus, L; Viesti, G

    2013-03-01

    A new laboratory facility for non-destructive analysis (NDA) using a time-tagged (252)Cf source is presented. The system is designed to analyze samples having maximum size of about 20 × 25 cm(2), the material recognition being obtained by measuring simultaneously total and energy dependent transmission of neutrons and gamma rays. The equipment technical characteristics and performances of the NDA system are presented, exploring also limits due to the sample thickness. Some recent applications in the field of cultural heritage are presented. PMID:23276691

  19. [Radiation safety during work on the ANET-V therapeutic apparatus with 252Cf sources].

    PubMed

    Chekhonadskiĭ, V N; Drygin, V N; Vaĭnberg, M Sh; Komar, V Ia; Elisiutin, G P

    1985-03-01

    The Soviet ANET-W intracavitary neutron therapy apparatus is charged with 252Cf sources, the total mass of the radionuclide being 2100 micrograms. The radiation exposure of the staff has been studied and the results presented. Possible emergency situations have been analysed, methods of their prevention and liquidation worked out. Induced radioactivity in the patient's body has been estimated. Radiation dose levels for the medical staff are 10-15 times lower for the ANET-W apparatus than those for 252Cf sources administered by the manual series system but 10 times higher than those for the AGAT-W gamma-apparatus. The design, blocking system and emergency reset of the sources provide for safe work on the ANET-W apparatus. During liquidation of an emergency situation irradiation of the staff does not exceed 0.3 of the annual maximum tolerance dose. The level of induced activity in the patient's body is insignificant as in 10.5 min it does not exceed background values. PMID:3982256

  20. {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency analysis measurements with subcritical arrays of PWR fuel pins

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E.; Blakeman, E.D.; King, W.T.

    1996-08-01

    Experiments with fresh PWR fuel assemblies were performed to assess the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency analysis method for measuring the subcriticality of spent fuel. The measurements at the Babcox and Wilcox Critical Experiments Facility mocked up between 17x17 fuel pins (single assembly) and a full array of 4961 fuel pins (about 17 fuel assemblies) in borated water with a fixed B concentration. For the full array, the B content of the water was varied from 1511 at delayed criticality to 4303 ppM. Measurements were done for various source-detector-fuel pin configurations; they showed high sensitivity of frequency analysis parameters to B content and fissile mass. Parameters such as auto and cross power spectral densities can be calculated directly by a more general model of the Monte Carlo code (MCNP-DSP). Calculation-measurement comparisons are presented. This model permits the validation of neutron and gamma ray transport calculational methods with subcritical measurements using the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency analysis method.

  1. New source moderator geometry to improve performance of 252Cf and 241Am Be source-based PGNAA setups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, A. A.; Abdelmonem, M. S.; Al-Misned, Ghada; Al-Ghamdi, Hanan

    2006-06-01

    The gamma ray yield from a 252Cf and a 241Am-Be source-based Prompt Gamma Ray Activation Analysis (PGNAA) setup has been observed to increase with enclosing their neutrons sources in a high-density polyethylene moderator. The prompt gamma rays yield from both setups depends upon the moderator length and the source position in it. For both setups, the optimum moderator length is found to be 7 cm. The optimum position of the neutron source inside moderator of the 252Cf and the 241Am-Be source-based PGNAA setups was found to be at a distance of 0.5 and 0.75 cm from the moderator-end facing the sample, respectively. Due to enclosure of the source in the moderator, about three-fold increase has been observed in the yield of prompt gamma rays from a Portland cement sample of a 252Cf and a 241Am-Be source-based PGNAA setups.

  2. A New Facility For Non-Destructive Assay With A Time-Tagged {sup 252}Cf Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanato, L.; Caldogno, M.; Hao, Xin; Dima, R.; Fabris, D.; Nebbia, G.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pesente, S.; Viesti, G.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2011-06-01

    A new facility for Non-Destructive Assay based on a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission source is now in operation at the Padova University. The system is designed to analyze samples with dimensions on the order of 20x20 cm{sup 2}, the material recognition being obtained by measuring simultaneously transmission of neutrons and gamma rays as a function of energy.

  3. A Monte Carlo comparison of PGNAA system performance using 252Cf neutrons, 2.8-MeV neutrons and 14-MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, A. A.

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to compare performance of a 252Cf neutron and a 14-MeV neutron-based prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system with that of the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Since the energy of neutron beam used in the KFUPM PGNAA system is very close to that produced by a DD neutron generator, performance comparison between a DD and a DT neutron generator-based PGNAA system is highly desired. For the sake of comparison, the calculations were carried out for the PGNAA system with geometry similar to the KFUPM PGNAA system. These calculations were required to determine improvement in performance of the KFUPM PGNAA system if its 2.8-MeV neutron source is replaced by a 252Cf neutron source or a 14-MeV neutron source. Results of the calculations revealed that the geometry of the 252Cf neutron and the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system are not significantly different but the geometry of the 14-MeV neutron-based system is significantly different from that of the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system. Accordingly, the prompt γ-ray yields from the 252Cf neutron and the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system is comparable but prompt γ-ray yields from 14-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system are about three times smaller than that from the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system. This study has shown that performance of the 252Cf neutron-based PGNAA system is comparable with that of the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system but the performance of the 14-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system is poorer than that of the 2.8-MeV neutron-based PGNAA system.

  4. Intracavitary moderator balloon combined with 252Cf brachytherapy and boron neutron capture therapy, improving dosimetry in brain tumour and infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, S F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article proposes a combination of californium-252 (252Cf) brachytherapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and an intracavitary moderator balloon catheter applied to brain tumour and infiltrations. Methods: Dosimetric evaluations were performed on three protocol set-ups: 252Cf brachytherapy combined with BNCT (Cf-BNCT); Cf-BNCT with a balloon catheter filled with light water (LWB) and the same set-up with heavy water (HWB). Results: Cf-BNCT-HWB has presented dosimetric advantages to Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT in infiltrations at 2.0–5.0 cm from the balloon surface. However, Cf-BNCT-LWB has shown superior dosimetry up to 2.0 cm from the balloon surface. Conclusion: Cf-BNCT-HWB and Cf-BNCT-LWB protocols provide a selective dose distribution for brain tumour and infiltrations, mainly further from the 252Cf source, sparing the normal brain tissue. Advances in knowledge: Malignant brain tumours grow rapidly and often spread to adjacent brain tissues, leading to death. Improvements in brain radiation protocols have been continuously achieved; however, brain tumour recurrence is observed in most cases. Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT-HWB represent new modalities for selectively combating brain tumour infiltrations and metastasis. PMID:25927876

  5. Validation of IRDFF in 252Cf Standard and IRDF-2002 Reference Neutron Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Stanislav; Capote, Roberto; Greenwood, Lawrence; Griffin, Patrick; Kahler, Albert; Pronyaev, Vladimir; Trkov, Andrej; Zolotarev, Konstantin

    2016-02-01

    The results of validation of the latest release of International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File, IRDFF-1.03, in the standard 252Cf(s.f.) and reference 235U(nth,f) neutron benchmark fields are presented. The spectrum-averaged cross sections were shown to confirm IRDFF-1.03 in the 252Cf standard spontaneous fission spectrum; that was not the case for the current recommended spectra for 235U(nth,f). IRDFF was also validated in the spectra of the research reactor facilities ISNF, Sigma-Sigma and YAYOI, which are available in the IRDF-2002 collection. The ISNF facility was re-simulated to remove unphysical oscillations in the spectrum. IRDFF-1.03 was shown to reproduce reasonably well the spectrum-averaged data measured in these fields except for the case of YAYOI.

  6. 252Cf fission-neutron spectrum using a simplified time-of-flight setup: An advanced teaching laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.; Febbraro, M.; Torres-Isea, R.; Ojaruega, M.; Baum, L.

    2013-02-01

    The removal of PuBe and AmBe neutron sources from many university teaching laboratories (due to heightened security issues) has often left a void in teaching various aspects of neutron physics. We have recently replaced such sources with sealed 252Cf oil-well logging sources (nominal 10-100 μCi), and developed several experiments using them as neutron sources. This includes a fission-neutron time-of-flight experiment using plastic scintillators, which utilizes the prompt γ rays emitted in 252Cf spontaneous fission as a fast timing start signal. The experiment can be performed with conventional nuclear instrumentation and a 1-D multi-channel pulse-height analyzer, available in most advanced teaching laboratories. Alternatively, a more sophisticated experiment using liquid scintillators and n/γ pulse-shape discrimination can be performed. Several other experiments using these neutron sources are also feasible. The experiments can introduce students to the problem of detecting the dark matter thought to dominate the universe and to the techniques used to detect contraband fissionable nuclear materials.

  7. Measurements of gamma-ray dose from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Griffith, R.V.; Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1983-06-01

    The gamma-ray dose fraction from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source was determined by using three types of dosimetry systems. Measurements were carried out in air at a distance of 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere (50 cm from the source which is at the center of the sphere) to the geometrical center of each detector. The moderating sphere is 0.8-mm-thick stainless steel shell filled with D/sub 2/O and covered with 0.5 mm of cadmium. Measurements were also carried out with instruments and dosimeters positioned at the surface of a 40 cm x 40 cm x 15 cm plexiglass irradiation phantom whose front surface was also 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere. A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic ionization chambers and a TE proportional counter (TEPC) were used to measure tissue dose, from which the neutron dose equivalent was computed. The ratio of gamma-ray dose to the neutron dose equivalent was determined by using a relatively neutron-insensitive Geiger-Mueller (GM) counter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In addition, the event-size spectrum measured by the TEPC was also used to compute the gamma-ray dose fraction. The average value for the ratio of gamma-ray dose to neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.18 with an uncertainty of about +-18%.

  8. Irradiation damage of APDs for CMS using neutrons from {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Musienko, Y.; Reucroft, S.; Ruuska, D.; Swain, J. Rusack, R.

    1998-11-01

    We report the results of exposing three APDs (avalanche photodiodes) from two manufacturers, EG&G and Hamamatsu, to a total fluence of 2{center_dot}10{sup 13}&hthinsp;neutrons/cm{sup 2} in a fast neutron field produced by {sup 252}Cf at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The effects of this type of radiation on many parameters such as QE (quantum efficiency), voltage coefficient of the gain, wavelength dependence of the gain, intrinsic dark current, and voltage dependent capacitance for these devices are shown and discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Irradiation damage of APDs for CMS using neutrons from [sup 252]Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Musienko, Y.; Reucroft, S.; Ruuska, D.; Swain, J. ) Rusack, R. )

    1998-11-01

    We report the results of exposing three APDs (avalanche photodiodes) from two manufacturers, EG G and Hamamatsu, to a total fluence of 2[center dot]10[sup 13] hthinsp;neutrons/cm[sup 2] in a fast neutron field produced by [sup 252]Cf at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The effects of this type of radiation on many parameters such as QE (quantum efficiency), voltage coefficient of the gain, wavelength dependence of the gain, intrinsic dark current, and voltage dependent capacitance for these devices are shown and discussed. [copyright] [ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.

  10. MCNP-DSP calculations of the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis measurements of highly enriched uranium metal cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents calculations of the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis measurements for subcritical highly enriched uranium metal cylinders using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-DSP. This code directly calculates the noise analysis data from the {sup 252}Cf- source-driven noise analysis method for both neutron and gamma ray detectors. Direct calculation of experimental observables by the Monte Carlo method allows for the benchmarking of the calculational model and the cross sections and for determining the bias in the calculation.

  11. 252Cf-source-correlated transmission measurements for uranyl fluoride deposit in a 24-in-OD process pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckan, T.; Wyatt, M. S.; Mihalczo, J. T.; Valentine, T. E.; Mullens, J. A.; Hannon, T. F.

    1999-02-01

    Characterization of a hydrated uranyl fluoride (UO 2F 2· nH 2O) deposit in a 17 ft long, 24 in OD process pipe at the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant was successfully performed using 252Cf-source-correlated time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurements. These measurements of neutrons and gamma rays through the pipe from an external 252Cf fission source were used to measure the deposit profile and its distribution along the pipe, the hydration (or H/U), and the total uranium mass. The measurements were performed with a source in an ionization chamber on one side of the pipe and detectors on the other. Scanning the pipe vertically and horizontally produced a spatial and time-dependent radiograph of the deposit in which transmitted gamma rays and neutrons were separated in time. The cross-correlation function between the source and the detector was measured with the Nuclear Weapons Identification System. After correcting for pipe effects, the deposit thickness was determined from the transmitted neutrons and H/U from the gamma rays. Results were consistent with a later intrusive observation of the shape and the color of the deposit; i.e., the deposit was annular and was on the top of the pipe at some locations, demonstrating the usefulness of this method for deposit characterization.

  12. Investigation of the prompt-neutron spectrum for spontaneously-fissioning /sup 252/Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Poenitz, W.P.; Tamura, T.

    1982-01-01

    The prompt-fission-neutron spectrum of /sup 252/Cf was investigated. The spectrum was measured with Black Neutron Detectors which have a well known efficiency. Considerations of various issues in such measurements lead to an experiment in which a time-calibration pulser, a random pulser, the neutron detector time-of-flight spectrum, the pulse-shape-discriminator gamma time-of-flight spectrum, and the detector-response spectra were simultaneously recorded for the prompt-fission neutrons, transmission through carbon, and shadowbars in a total-cross-section-type measurement. Corrections and associated uncertainties were applied for a large variety of effects which may have been overlooked in many of the previously reported measurements. Preliminary results indicate deviations from a Maxwellian shape toward a Watt-spectrum shape. Agreement is good with the shape differences relative to a Maxwellian from the recent theoretical calculation by Madland and Nix, however, a lower average energy was found.

  13. Prompt Fission Neutron Experiments on 235U(n,f) and 252Cf(SF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.

    For nuclear modeling and improved evaluation of nuclear data knowledge about fluctuations of the prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of incident neutron energy is requested for the major actinides 235U and 239Pu. Experimental investigations of the prompt fission neutron emission in resonance neutron induced fission on 235U are taking place at the GELINA facility of the IRMM. The experiment employs an array of neutron scintillation-detectors (SCINTIA) in conjunction with a newly designed 3D position sensitive twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber. A preparatory experiment on prompt fission neutron emission in 252Cf(SF) was undertaken to verify analysis procedures relevant for the implementation of the SCINTIA neutron detector array. The available literature data on the TKE dependence of the multiplicity show strong deviations. Therefore, effort was focused on investigating experimental factors in low efficiency neutron counting experiments that may lead to faulty determination of this dependence. Taking these factors into account a result that agree well with data from high efficiency neutron counting experiments is obtained.

  14. Prompt neutron multiplicity in correlation with fragments from spontaneous fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Vidali, M.

    2014-12-01

    The spontaneous fission of 252Cf serves as an excellent benchmark of prompt emission in fission since experimental data can be obtained without the need of an incident beam. With the purpose of providing experimental data on the prompt fission neutron properties in correlation with fission-fragment characteristics, an experiment on 252Cf(SF) has been performed. In addition, the experiment serves as a benchmark of setup and analysis procedures for measurements of fluctuations in the prompt-neutron properties as a function of incident neutron energy in fission of the major actinides 235U and 239Pu. The experiment employs a twin Frisch grid ionization chamber as fission-fragment detector while neutrons were counted by using a liquid scintillator placed along the symmetry axis of the ionization chamber. Average neutron multiplicity has been obtained as a function of fission-fragment mass and total kinetic energy (TKE). The average multiplicity as a function of mass agrees well with available data in the literature in the mass range from 80 to 170 u. The existence of additional sawtooth structures in the far asymmetric mass region could not be confirmed, although the statistical accuracy of the present experiment is as good as the previous study where such structures have been reported [Nucl. Phys. A 490, 307 (1988)., 10.1016/0375-9474(88)90508-8]. The available data in the literature on the TKE dependence of the multiplicity show strong deviations. Therefore, effort was focused on investigating experimental factors in low-efficiency neutron-counting experiments that may lead to faulty determination of this dependence. Taking these factors into account, a result that agrees well with data from high-efficiency neutron-counting experiments is obtained. The experimental arrangement allows determination of the angle between the detected neutron and the fission axis, which permits the neutron properties to be transformed into the fission-fragment rest frame. Fission neutron

  15. The sup 252 Cf(sf) neutron spectrum in the 5- to 20-MeV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, H.; Richter, D.; Seeliger, D. ); Fromm, W.D. ); Bottger, R.; Klein, H. )

    1990-11-01

    This paper reports on the {sup 252}Cf neutron spectrum measured at high energies with a miniature ionization chamber and two different NE-213 neutron detectors. The gamma-ray background and the main cosmic background caused by muons were suppressed by applying efficient pulse-shape discrimination. On the basis of two-dimensional spectroscopy of the neutron time-of-flight and scintillation pulse height, the sliding bias method is used to minimize experimental uncertainties. The experimental data, corrected for several systematic influences, confirm earlier results that show negative deviations from a reference Maxwellian distribution with a 1.42-MeV spectrum temperature for neutron energies above 6 MeV. Experimental results of this work are compared with various statistical model approaches to the {sup 252}Cf(sf) neutron spectrum.

  16. Nuclear Structure Studies of Some Neutron Rich Nuclei Produced in 252Cf Spontaneous Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramayya, A. V.; Hamilton, J. H.; Hwang, J. K.

    2015-02-01

    High spin states of neutron-rich nuclei such as 133,134Te, 93Sr, 105Nb have been studied by measuring γ- γ- γ coincidences (cube), γ- γ- γ- γ coincidences (hypercube) and angular correlations from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf with the LBNL Gammasphere detector array. Four types of particle-hole bands built on the known 334.3 keV isomer in 133Te were identified. The level structure of 93Sr is interpreted, in part, as arising from the weak coupling of the 1d5/2 neutron hole to the yrast states of the 94Sr core. The g-factor of the 4+ state in 134Te was measured, for the first time, by using a new technique developed for measuring angular correlations with Gammasphere. A new level scheme of 105Nb was established. Three new collective bands were identified with a total of 14 new levels and 36 new γ transitions. In 117-122Cd, a shift to more slightly deformed structures was found where the excited levels do not fit the long held picture of one, two and three phonon bands.

  17. Physics of the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Perez, R.B.; Mattingly, J.K.

    1997-02-01

    The {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method is a versatile measurements tool that has been applied to measurements for initial loading of reactors, quality assurance of reactor fuel elements, fuel processing facilities, fuel reprocessing facilities, fuel storage facilities, zero-power testing of reactors, verification of calculational methods, process monitoring, characterization of storage vaults, and nuclear weapons identification. This method`s broad range of application is due to the wide variety of time- and frequency domain signatures, each with unique properties, obtained from the measurement. The following parameters are obtained from this measurement: average detector count rates, detector multiplicities, detector autocorrelations, cross-correlation between detectors, detector autopower spectral densities, cross-power spectral densities between detectors, coherences, and ratios of spectral densities. All of these measured parameters can also be calculated using the MCNP-DSP Monte Carlo code. This paper presents a review of the time-domain signatures obtained from this measurement.

  18. Detailed Study of the Angular Correlations in the Prompt Neutron Emission in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopatch, Yu.; Chietera, A.; Stuttgé, L.; Gönnenwein, F.; Mutterer, M.; Gagarski, A.; Guseva, I.; Chernysheva, E.; Dorvaux, O.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Hanappe, F.; Mezentseva, Z.; Telezhnikov, S.

    An experiment has been performed at IPHC Strasbourg, aimed at the detailed investigation of angular correlations in the neutron emission from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Fission fragments were measured by the angle-sensitive double ionization chamber CODIS while neutrons were detected by a set of 60 DEMON scintillator counters. The main aim of the experiment is the observation of the correlation between the fragment spins and neutron emission anisotropy. Preliminary results, based on the Monte-Carlo simulations, as well as the preliminary analysis of the experimental data are shown.

  19. Angular Correlations Between Fragment Spin and Prompt Neutron Evaporation in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf: CORA-Demon Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhorova, E.; Goennenwein, F.; Kopatch, Yu.; Mutterer, M.; Hanappe, F.; Kinnard, V.; Stuttge, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2007-05-22

    A novel method to search for the anisotropic emission of prompt neutrons in the center-of-mass system of fission fragments is presented. The anisotropy is conjectured to be due to the large spins of fission fragments are known to carry. Triple neutron- neutron-fragment correlations in spontaneous fission of 252Cf were investigated in an exploratory experiment dubbed CORA-DEMON experiment. Fission fragments were intercepted in a double ionization chamber while neutrons were spotted in 2 two-dimensional cylindrical walls of Demon detectors with the target on the vertical cylinder axis. A new method of analysis of triple angular correlations between 2 neutrons and a fission fragment was applied. Preliminary results are reported.

  20. Angular Correlations Between Fragment Spin and Prompt Neutron Evaporation in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf: CORA-Demon Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorova, E.; Gönnenwein, F.; Kopatch, Yu.; Mutterer, M.; Hanappe, F.; Kinnard, V.; Stuttgé, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2007-05-01

    A novel method to search for the anisotropic emission of prompt neutrons in the center-of-mass system of fission fragments is presented. The anisotropy is conjectured to be due to the large spins of fission fragments are known to carry. Triple neutron- neutron-fragment correlations in spontaneous fission of 252Cf were investigated in an exploratory experiment dubbed CORA-DEMON experiment. Fission fragments were intercepted in a double ionization chamber while neutrons were spotted in 2 two-dimensional cylindrical walls of Demon detectors with the target on the vertical cylinder axis. A new method of analysis of triple angular correlations between 2 neutrons and a fission fragment was applied. Preliminary results are reported.

  1. Description of the /sup 252/Cf(sf) neutron spectrum in the framework of a generalized Madland-Nix model

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, H.; Seeliger, D.

    1986-08-01

    The Madland-Nix model (MNM) for the calculation of fission neutron spectra is modified considering the dependence on fragment mass number A. Further, an approximation of this generalized Madland-Nix model (GMNM) that takes into account the different center-of-mass system spectra for the light and heavy fragment groups is discussed. These new calculations are compared with two versions of the original MNM. In particular, the level density parameter, which was adjusted by fitting the calculated spectra to a Maxwellian distribution deduced from experimental data, becomes more reasonable in the framework of the GMNM. The results of the different model calculations are compared with experimental data on the /sup 252/Cf(sf) neutron spectrum in the 0.1- to 20-MeV energy range.

  2. Structures of the neutron-rich nuclei observed in fission of {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Ramayya, A. V.; Hamilton, J. H.; Goodin, C. J.; Brewer, N. T.; Hwang, J. K.; Luo, Y. X.; Liu, S. H.; Stone, N. J.; Daniel, A. V.; Zhu, S. J.

    2014-08-14

    Analysis of high statistics triple coincidence fission γ data from {sup 252}Cf at Gammasphere including angular correlations yielded well-expanded high-spin level schemes with more complete and reliable spin/parity assignments for {sup 82}Ge, {sup 118,120,122}Cd and {sup 114,115}Rh. Both the quasi-particle/hole couplings and quasi-rotational degrees of freedom are implied to play roles in these Cd isotopes. Evidence for triaxial shapes and octupole components in the Cd isotopes is presented. These Cd isotopes may have triaxial deformations. High-spin level schemes of {sup 114,115}Rh have been established for the first time. The existence of a relatively large signature splitting and an yrare band shows typical features of a triaxially deformed nucleus. Possible excited deformed rotational bands are observed, for the first time, in {sup 82}Ge. From the multipole mixing ratio measurement, the ground state configurations of {sup 109,111}Ru, as well as excited states in {sup 103,107}Mo and {sup 111}Ru were determined.

  3. Benchmark Experiments of Thermal Neutron and Capture Gamma-Ray Distributions in Concrete Using {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Yoshihiro; Sugita, Takeshi; Hirose, Hideyuki; Suzaki, Takenori

    2005-10-15

    The distributions of thermal neutrons and capture gamma rays in ordinary concrete were investigated by using {sup 252}Cf. Two subjects are considered. One is the benchmark experiments for the thermal neutron and the capture gamma-ray distributions in ordinary concrete. The thermal neutron and the capture gamma-ray distributions were measured by using gold-foil activation detectors and thermoluminescence detectors. These were compared with the simulations by using the discrete ordinates code ANISN with two different group structure types of cross-section library of a new Japanese version, JENDL-3.3, showing reasonable agreement with both fine and rough structure groups of thermal neutron energy. The other is a comparison of the simulations with two different cross-section libraries, JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VI, for the deep penetration of neutrons in the concrete, showing close agreement in 0- to 100-cm-thick concrete. However, the differences in flux grow with an increase in concrete thickness, reaching up to approximately eight times near 4-m thickness.

  4. A feasibility study of [sup 252]Cf neutron brachytherapy, cisplatin + 5-FU chemo-adjuvant and accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Y.; Wierzbicki, J. Univ. of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY ); Bowen, M.G.; Van Nagell, J.R.; Gallion, H.H.; DePriest, P. )

    1994-06-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of [sup 252]Cf neutron brachytherapy combined with hyperaccelerated chemoradiotherapy for Stage III and IV cervical cancers. Eleven patients with advanced Stage IIIB-IVA cervical cancers were treated with [sup 252]Cf neutron brachytherapy in an up-front schedule followed by cisplatin (CDDP; 50 mg/m[sup 2]) chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated (1.2 Gy bid) radiotherapy given concurrently with intravenous infusion of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) (1000 mg/m[sup 2]/day [times] 4 days) in weeks 1 and 4 with conventional radiation (weeks 2, 3, 5, and 6). Total dose at a paracervical point A isodose surface was 80-85 Gy-eq by external and intracavitary therapy and 60 Gy at the pelvic sidewalls. Patients tolerated the protocol well. There was 91% compliance with the chemotherapy and full compliance with the [sup 252]Cf brachytherapy and the external beam radiotherapy. There were no problems with acute chemo or radiation toxicity. One patient developed a rectovaginal fistula (Grade 3-4 RTOG criteria) but no other patients developed significant late cystitis, proctitis or enteritis. There was complete response (CR) observed in all cases. With mean follow-up to 26 months, local control has been achieved with 90% actuarial 3-year survival with no evidence of disease (NED). [sup 252]Cf neutrons can be combined with cisplatin and 5-FU infusion chemotherapy plus hyperaccelerated chemoradiotherapy without unusual side effects or toxicity and with a high local response and tumor control rate. Further study of [sup 252]Cf neutron-chemoradiotherapy for advanced and bulky cervical cancer are indicated. The authors found chemotherapy was more effective with the improved local tumor control. 18 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Prompt Neutron Emission from Fragments in Spontaneous Fission of 244, 248Cm and 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. S.; Dushin, V. N.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Jakovlev, V. A.; Kalinin, V. A.; Laptev, A. B.; Petrov, B. F.; Shcherbakov, O. A.

    2005-11-01

    Neutrons emitted in fission were measured separately for each complementary fragment in correlation with fission fragment energies. Two high efficient Gd-loaded liquid scintillator tanks were used for neutron registration. Fission fragment energies were measured using a twin Frisch gridded ionization chamber with a pin-hole collimator. The neutron multiplicity distributions were obtained for each value of the fission fragment mass and energy and corrected for neutron registration efficiency, background and pile-up. The dependencies of these distributions on fragment mass and energy for different energy and mass bins, as well as the mass and energy distribution of the fission fragments are presented and discussed.

  6. Evaluation of time-dose and fractionation for sup 252 Cf neutrons in preoperative bulky/barrel-cervix carcinoma radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.; Wierzbicki, J. )

    1990-12-01

    Time-dose fractionation factors (TDF) were calculated for 252Cf (Cf) neutron therapy versus 137Cs for intracavitary use in the preoperative treatment of bulky/barrel-shaped Stage IB cervix cancers. The endpoint assessed was gross and microscopic tumor eradication from the hysterectomy specimen. We reviewed the data obtained in clinical trials between 1976-1987 at the University of Kentucky Medical Center. Preoperative photon therapy was approximately 45 Gy of whole pelvis irradiation in 5 weeks for both 137Cs and Cf treated patients. 137Cs implant was done after pelvic irradiation x1 to a mean dose of 2104 +/- 36 cGy at point A at a dose rate of 50.5 cGy/h. There were 37.5% positive specimens. Using Cf intracavitary implants, dose varied from 109 to 459 neutron cGy in 1-2 sessions. Specimens were more frequently cleared of tumor (up to 100% at appropriate dose) and showed a dose-response relationship, both by nominal dose and by TDF adjusted analysis of dose, dose-rate, number of sessions, and overall time. Limited understanding of relative biological effectiveness, schedule, effect of implants, and dose rate all made it difficult to use TDF to study neutron effects. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated and showed that for Cf, RBE was a complex function of treatment variables. In the pilot clinical studies, a value of 6.0 had been assumed. The present findings of RBE for tumor destruction are larger than those assumed. Cf was effective for cervix tumor therapy and produced control without significant side effects due to the brachytherapy method used. The TDF model was of limited value in the present analysis and more information is still needed for RBE, dose-rate, and fractionation effects for Cf neutrons to develop a more sophisticated and relevant model.

  7. A probe for neutron activation analysis in a drill hole using 252Cf, and a Ge(Li) detector cooled by a melting cryogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, A.B.; Moxham, R.M.; Senftle, F.E.; Baicker, J.A.

    1972-01-01

    A sonde has been built for high-resolution measurement of natural or neutron-induced gamma rays in boreholes. The sonde is 7.3 cm in diameter and about 2.2 m in length and weighs about 16 kg. The lithium-compensated germanium semiconductor detector is stabilized at -185 to -188??C for as much as ten hours by a cryostatic reservoir containing melting propane. During periods when the sonde is not in use the propane is kept frozen by a gravity-fed trickle of liquid nitrogen from a reservoir temporarily attached to the cryostat section. A 252Cf source, shielded from the detector, may be placed in the bottom section of the sonde for anlysis by measurement of neutron-activation or neutron-capture gamma rays. Stability of the cryostat with changing hydrostatic pressure, absence of vibration, lack of need for power to the cryostat during operation, and freedom of orientation make the method desirable for borehole, undersea, space, and some laboratory applications. ?? 1972.

  8. Feasibility of fissile mass assay of spent nuclear fuel using {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, J.K.; Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1996-10-01

    The feasibility was evaluated using MCNP-DSP, an analog Monte Carlo transport cod to simulate source-driven measurements. Models of an isolated Westinghouse 17x17 PWR fuel assembly in a 1500-ppM borated water storage pool were used. In the models, the fuel burnup profile was represented using seven axial burnup zones, each with isotopics estimated by the PDQ code. Four different fuel assemblies with average burnups from fresh to 32 GWd/MTU were modeled and analyzed. Analysis of the fuel assemblies was simulated by inducing fission in the fuel using a {sup 252}Cf source adjacent to the assembly and correlating source fissions with the response of a bank of {sup 3}He detectors adjacent to the assembly opposite the source. This analysis was performed at 7 different axial positions on each of the 4 assemblies, and the source-detector cross-spectrum signature was calculated for each of these 28 simulated measurements. The magnitude of the cross-spectrum signature follows a smooth upward trend with increasing fissile material ({sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu) content, and the signature is independent of the concentration of spontaneously fissioning isotopes (e.g., {sup 244}Cm) and ({alpha},n) sources. Furthermore, the cross-spectrum signature is highly sensitive to changes in fissile material content. This feasibility study indicated that the signature would increase {similar_to}100% in response to an increase of only 0.1 g/cm{sup 3} of fissile material.

  9. Fissible Deposit Characterization at the Former Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant by {sup 252}CF-Source-Driven Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hannon, T.F.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Uckan, T.; Valentine, T.E.; Wyatt, M.S.

    1998-05-01

    largest deposits with the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven transmission (CFSDT) technique, an active neutron interrogation method developed for use at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to identify nuclear weapons components in containers. The active CFSDT measurement technique uses CFSDT time-of-flight measurements of prompt neutrons and gamma rays from an externally introduced {sup 252}Cf source.

  10. Bias in calculated k{sub eff} from subcritical measurements by the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E.

    1995-07-01

    The development of MCNP-DSP, which allows direct calculation of the measured time and frequency analysis parameters from subcritical measurements using the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method, permits the validation of calculational methods for criticality safety with in-plant subcritical measurements. In addition, a method of obtaining the bias in the calculations, which is essential to the criticality safety specialist, is illustrated using the results of measurements with 17.771-cm-diam, enriched (93.15), unreflected, and unmoderated uranium metal cylinders. For these uranium metal cylinders the bias obtained using MCNP-DSP and ENDF/B-V cross-section data increased with subcriticality. For a critical experiment [height (h) = 12.629 cm], it was {minus}0.0061 {+-} 0.0003. For a 10.16-cm-high cylinder (k {approx} 0.93), it was 0.0060 {+-} 0.0016, and for a subcritical cylinder (h = 8.13 cm, k {approx} 0.85), the bias was {minus}0.0137 {+-} 0.0037, more than a factor of 2 larger in magnitude. This method allows the nuclear criticality safety specialist to establish the bias in calculational methods for criticality safety from in-plant subcritical measurements by the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method.

  11. Correlations of neutron multiplicity and γ -ray multiplicity with fragment mass and total kinetic energy in spontaneous fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taofeng; Li, Guangwu; Zhu, Liping; Meng, Qinghua; Wang, Liming; Han, Hongyin; Zhang, Wenhui; Xia, Haihong; Hou, Long; Vogt, Ramona; Randrup, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of correlations of neutron multiplicity ν and γ -ray multiplicity Mγ in spontaneous fission of 252Cf on fragment mass A* and total kinetic energy (TKE) have been investigated by employing the ratio of Mγ/ν and the form of Mγ(ν ) . We show for the first time that Mγ and ν have a complex correlation for heavy fragment masses, while there is a positive dependence of Mγ for light fragment masses and for near-symmetric mass splits. The ratio Mγ/ν exhibits strong shell effects for neutron magic number N =50 and near doubly magic number shell closure at Z =50 and N =82 . The γ -ray multiplicity Mγ has a maximum for TKE=165 -170 MeV. Above 170 MeV Mγ(TKE) is approximately linear, while it deviates significantly from a linear dependence at lower TKE. The correlation between the average neutron and γ -ray multiplicities can be partly reproduced by model calculations.

  12. Results with the electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder for the {sup 252}Cf fission source project (Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade) at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Scott, R.; Zinkann, G. P.

    2010-02-15

    The construction of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is nearing completion. The facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Ci {sup 252}Cf source; thermalized and collected into a low-energy particle beam by a helium gas catcher. In order to reaccelerate these beams, an existing ATLAS electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source was redesigned to function as an ECR charge breeder. Thus far, the charge breeder has been tested with stable beams of rubidium and cesium achieving charge breeding efficiencies of 9.7% into {sup 85}Rb{sup 17+} and 2.9% into {sup 133}Cs{sup 20+}.

  13. Distribution of Prompt Neutron Emission Probability for Fission Fragments in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf and 244,248Cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. S.; Dushin, V. N.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Jakovlev, V. A.; Kalinin, V. A.; Laptev, A. B.; Petrov, B. F.; Shcherbakov, O. A.

    2005-05-01

    Neutrons emitted in fission events were measured separately for each complementary fragment in correlation with fission fragment energies. Two high-efficiency Gd-loaded liquid scintillator tanks were used for neutron registration. Fission fragment energies were measured using a twin Frisch gridded ionization chamber with a pinhole collimator. The neutron multiplicity distributions were obtained for each value of the fission fragment mass and energy and corrected for neutron registration efficiency, background, and pile-up. The dependency of these distributions on fragment mass and energy for different energy and mass bins as well as mass and energy distribution of fission fragments are presented and discussed.

  14. Test and evaluation results of the /sup 252/Cf shuffler at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, T.W.

    1981-03-01

    The /sup 252/Cf Shuffler, a nondestructive assay instrument employing californium neutron source irradiation and delayed-neutron counting, was developed for measuring /sup 235/U content of scrap and waste items generated at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactor fuel fabrication facility. The scrap and waste items include high-purity uranium-aluminum alloy ingots as well as pieces of castings, saw and lathe chips from machining operations, low-purity items such as oxides of uranium or uranium intermixed with flux materials found in recovery operations, and materials not recoverable at SRP such as floor sweepings or residues from the uranium scrap recovery operation. The uranium contains about 60% /sup 235/U with the remaining isotopes being /sup 236/U, /sup 238/U, and /sup 234/U in descending order. The test and evaluation at SRP concluded that the accuracy, safety, reliability, and ease of use made the /sup 252/Cf Shuffler a suitable instrument for routine use in an industrial, production-oriented plant.

  15. 252Cf spectrum-averaged cross section for the 63Cu(n, p)63Ni reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, M.; Shibata, T.; Shibata, S.; Ohkubo, T.; Satoh, S.; Nogawa, N.

    1999-01-01

    The 63Ni produced by the 63Cu(n, p)63Ni reaction provides a unique measure to estimate the fast-neutron fluence of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki atomic bomb. In the similarity of the fission neutron spectrum of 252Cf to that of 235U, we have measured activation cross sections of the 63Cu(n, p)63Ni reaction averaged for the 252Cf fission spectrum.

  16. Production, distribution and applications of californium-252 neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Martin, R C; Knauer, J B; Balo, P A

    2000-01-01

    The radioisotope 252Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-yr half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10(11) neutrons s(-1). Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, land mines and unexploded military ordinance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 yr of experience and by US Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells 252Cf to commercial reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed 252Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the US government and to universities for educational, research and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of 252Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations. PMID:11003521

  17. Gamma-ray multiplicity measurement of the spontaneous fission decay of 252Cf in a segmented HPGe/BGO detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D L; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Gibelin, J; Heffner, M D; Mintz, J; Norman, E B; Phair, L; Scielzo, N D; Sheets, S A; Snyderman, N J; Stoyer, M A; Wiedeking, M

    2008-04-23

    Coincident {gamma} rays from a {sup 252}Cf source were measured using an array of six segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) Clover detectors each enclosed by 16 bismuth-germanate (BGO) detectors. The detectors were arranged in a cubic pattern around a 1 {micro}Ci {sup 252}Cf source to cover a large solid angle for {gamma}-ray measurement with a reasonable reconstruction of the multiplicity. Neutron multiplicity was determined in certain cases by identifying the prompt {gamma} rays from individual fission fragment pairs. Multiplicity distributions from previous experiments and theoretical models were convolved with the response function of the array and compared to the present results. These results suggest a {gamma}-ray multiplicity spectrum broader than previous measurements and models, and provide no evidence of correlation with neutron multiplicity.

  18. Unconventional neutron sources for oil well logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankle, C. M.; Dale, G. E.

    2013-09-01

    Americium-Beryllium (AmBe) radiological neutron sources have been widely used in the petroleum industry for well logging purposes. There is strong desire on the part of various governmental and regulatory bodies to find alternate sources due to the high activity and small size of AmBe sources. Other neutron sources are available, both radiological (252Cf) and electronic accelerator driven (D-D and D-T). All of these, however, have substantially different neutron energy spectra from AmBe and thus cause significantly different responses in well logging tools. We report on simulations performed using unconventional sources and techniques to attempt to better replicate the porosity and carbon/oxygen ratio responses a well logging tool would see from AmBe neutrons. The AmBe response of these two types of tools is compared to the response from 252Cf, D-D, D-T, filtered D-T, and T-T sources.

  19. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Byrne, T.E.; Miller, L.F.

    1997-04-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with {sup 252}Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of {sup 252}Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a {sup 252}Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded {sup 252}Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy.

  20. Measurement of uranium and plutonium in solid waste by passive photon or neutron counting and isotopic neutron source interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, T.W.

    1980-03-01

    A summary of the status and applicability of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques for the measurement of uranium and plutonium in 55-gal barrels of solid waste is reported. The NDA techniques reviewed include passive gamma-ray and x-ray counting with scintillator, solid state, and proportional gas photon detectors, passive neutron counting, and active neutron interrogation with neutron and gamma-ray counting. The active neutron interrogation methods are limited to those employing isotopic neutron sources. Three generic neutron sources (alpha-n, photoneutron, and /sup 252/Cf) are considered. The neutron detectors reviewed for both prompt and delayed fission neutron detection with the above sources include thermal (/sup 3/He, /sup 10/BF/sub 3/) and recoil (/sup 4/He, CH/sub 4/) proportional gas detectors and liquid and plastic scintillator detectors. The instrument found to be best suited for low-level measurements (< 10 nCi/g) is the /sup 252/Cf Shuffler. The measurement technique consists of passive neutron counting followed by cyclic activation using a /sup 252/Cf source and delayed neutron counting with the source withdrawn. It is recommended that a waste assay station composed of a /sup 252/Cf Shuffler, a gamma-ray scanner, and a screening station be tested and evaluated at a nuclear waste site. 34 figures, 15 tables.

  1. A new type-B cask design for transporting {sub 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C.M.

    2000-07-01

    A project to design, certify, and build a new US Department of Energy (DOE) Type B container for transporting >5 mg of {sup 252}Cf is more than halfway to completion. This project was necessitated by the fact that the existing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Type B containers were designed and built many years ago and thus do not have the records and supporting data that current regulations require. Once the new cask is available, it will replace the existing Type B containers. The cask design is driven by the unique properties of {sup 252}Cf, which is a very intense spontaneous fission neutron source and necessitates a large amount of neutron shielding. The cask is designed to contain up to 60 mg of {sup 252}Cf in the form of californium oxide or californium oxysulfate, in pellet, wire, or sintered material forms that are sealed inside small special-form capsules. The new cask will be capable of all modes of transport (land, sea, and air). The ORNL team, composed of technical and purchasing personnel and using rigorous selection criteria, chose NAC, International (NAC), as the subcontractor for the project. In January 1997, NAC started work on developing the conceptual design and performing the analyses. The original design concept was for a tungsten alloy gamma shield surrounded by two concentric shells of NS-4-FR neutron shield material. A visit to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulators in November 1997 to present the conceptual design for their comments resulted in a design modification when the question of potential straight-line cracking in the NS-4-FR neutron shield material arose. NAC's modified design includes offset, wedgelike segments of the neutron shield material. The new geometry eliminates concerns about straight-line cracking but increases the weight of the packaging and makes the fabrication more complex. NAC has now completed the cask design and performed the analyses (shielding, structural, thermal, etc.) necessary to certify the

  2. Production, Distribution, and Applications of Californium-252 Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Balo, P.A.; Knauer, J.B.; Martin, R.C.

    1999-10-03

    The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10{sup 11} neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6- year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10 neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL). DOE sells {sup 252}Cf to commercial

  3. Reactor production of sup 252 Cf and transcurium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C.W.; Halperin, J.; Walker, R.L.; Bigelow, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Berkelium, californium, einsteinium, and fermium are currently produced in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and recovered in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). All the isotopes are used for research. In addition, {sup 252}Cf, {sup 253}Es, and {sup 255}Fm have been considered or are used for industrial or medical applications. ORNL is the sole producer of these transcurium isotopes in the western world. A wide range of actinide samples were irradiated in special test assemblies at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at Hanford, Washington. The purpose of the experiments was to evaluate the usefulness of the two-group flux model for transmutations in the special assemblies with an eventual goal of determining the feasibility of producing macro amounts of transcurium isotopes in the FFTF. Preliminary results from the production of {sup 254g}Es from {sup 252}Cf will be discussed. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  4. Observation of Light Shape Isomers in the Multi-Body Decay of 252Cf (sf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Kamanin, D. V.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Kondratyev, N. A.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Strekalovsky, O. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Mkaza, N.; Malaza, V.

    2015-11-01

    We observe an essential mass deficit in the total mass of the fission fragments detected in coincidence with Ti ions knocked out from the foil placed near a 252Cf source. This could be expected if the scattered fragment looks like a di-nuclear system breaking up due to inelastic scattering on the Ti nucleus. The mean flight time between the Cf source and the foil does not exceed 0.1 ns. This can be regarded as a lower limit for the life-time of the di-nuclear system (shape-isomer).

  5. Figure of Merit for Chlorine Measurement in Reinforced Concrete Using {sup 252}Cf-Based Nondestructive Testing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Habeeb H. Saleh; Richard A. Livington

    2000-11-12

    The objective of this study is to design, fabricate, and evaluate a portable system for nondestructive determination of chloride concentration in reinforced portland cement concrete (PCC) structures. The need for such an instrument arises from the massive deterioration of the reinforced PCC, which has been used to construct a major part of the highway infrastructure. This deterioration of PCC is due to corrosion of the reinforcing steel, which is greatly promoted by the chloride ions. The sources of chloride include deicing salts, set accelerator, and seawater, either in the form of concrete-mixing water or as airborne droplets from ocean spray. The system consists of a high-purity germanium detector for gamma-ray detection and a portable {sup 252}Cf neutron source. Tradeoffs in the design of the neutron source include data quality, operational efficiency, and radiation safety. The number of photons detected in the germanium detector is directly proportional to the neutron source strength and the chloride nuclei concentration in the sample under testing. Therefore, assuming a uniform distribution of chloride, the figure of merit of the number of photons detected in the detector can be expressed as F = C/SN, where C = number of (6111) keV gamma rays detected per second, N = concentration of chloride nuclei, and S = neutron source strength (n/s). Under the assumption that the neutron source strength is fixed, the figure of merit in this case can have at least two uses. One is to optimize the thermalization efficiency of the neutron moderator. The second is to evaluate how effective the detector configuration is in detecting the gamma rays generated in the concrete. Using the figure-of-merit approach, it is possible to find an optimum size of moderator. This is important for a portable system. Other variables such as source/detector separation or detector gamma-ray shielding can also be evaluated.

  6. Relative biological effectiveness of fission neutrons for producing micronuclei in the root-tip cells of onion seedlings after irradiation as dry seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyi; Endo, Satoru; Ishikawa, Masayori; Ikeda, Hideo; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2002-12-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of mixed neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted at a 252Cf source at the Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, compared with 60Co gamma-ray radiation was determined. The tissue-absorbed dose contribution of the accompanying gamma radiation was about 35.7% to the total tissue-absorbed dose from the 252Cf mixed radiation. The 252Cf mixed radiation and 60Co gamma rays produced approximate linear changes in the frequency of micronuclei induced in root-tip cells of Allium cepa L. onion seedlings after irradiation as dry dormant seeds with varying absorbed doses in onion seeds. Therefore, the RBE for radiation-induced micronuclei was calculated as the ratio of the slopes for the 252Cf mixed radiation and the 60Co gamma rays. The deduced RBE value of 252Cf mixed radiation to 60Co gamma rays to induce micronuclei in dry dormant onion seed cells was about 90.5 +/- 3.6 (+/- 1sigma); the RBE of neutrons from the 252Cf mixed radiation was about 150 +/- 6 (+/- 1sigma). Furthermore, the sensitivity ratio of the induction rate of micronuclei in dry dormant seeds to that in seedlings by neutrons from 252Cf mixed radiation was significantly different from that by 60Co gamma rays. From these results, we concluded that the repair efficiency of DNA damage induced by neutrons may be different from that by gamma rays. PMID:12674204

  7. Fission-neutrons source with fast neutron-emission timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.

    2016-05-01

    A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The time is provided by registering the fission fragments in a layer of a thin scintillation film with a signal rise time of 1 ns. The scintillation light output is measured by two silicon photomultipliers with rise time of 0.5 ns. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements using it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  8. Source test of the prototype neutron detector for the large-acceptance multipurpose spectrometer at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Mulilo, Benard; Hong, Byungsik

    2013-05-01

    A neutron detector array will be essential for the study of the nuclear symmetry energy in the large-acceptance multipurpose spectrometer (LAMPS) at the planned rare-isotope beam facility RAON in Korea. We have built the prototype neutron detector for LAMPS and examined its performance by using radiation sources. For data taking, we tested the voltage-threshold discriminator (VTD) and the constant-fraction discriminator (CFD) modules for the pulse process. The intrinsic time resolution of the prototype detector is estimated to be 723 ps for VTD and 488 ps for CFD. The fission neutrons and gammas emitted from 252Cf can be clearly separated in the time distribution. We reconstruct the energy spectrum of the spontaneous fission neutrons from 252Cf, which can be described well by using the empirical Watt spectrum.

  9. PIXE, 252Cf-PDMS and radiochemistry applied for soil and vegetable analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias da Cunha, K.; Cazicava, J.; Coelho, M. J.; Barros Leite, C. V.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to identify the elements present in vegetables and soils using PIXE (particle induced X-rays emission) and 252Cf-PDMS (252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry) techniques in order to estimate the possible influence of soil and agricultural techniques in the metal absorption by the vegetables. In this work, metal concentrations were evaluated in soil and vegetable samples from several regions, where different agricultural techniques were employed. Si, Zr, Ce, Th, Sc and Pb identified in the soil samples were not biologically available. Ga, Ge, As and Br identified in the tubercles indicate that spray pesticide used on the vegetable leaves was absorbed by them. 232Th and 238U present in the soil were not absorbed by the vegetables. The airborne particles from anthropogenic sources (as CFn, VCn) were absorbed by the vegetables. Compounds from mineral sources present in soil as V+, VCO3, HPO4, Cr+, CrOH+, Mn+, FeH+, Fe(OH)n and in the bioorganic compounds as N+, Ca (CN)n+and CnH+ were identified in vegetables. The metal absorption by the vegetables is not dependent of the metal concentration in soil. Different tubercles cultivated in the same soil show similar metal absorption. The exogenous contributions such as the elements present in water irrigation, pesticides, fertilizers and airborne particles deposited on leaves can be absorbed by vegetables. The absorption by the roots depends on the chemical compound of the elements. The use of pesticide sprays and air pollution can cause more contamination in the vegetables than in soil. The use of this methodology allows the identification of possible sources of metals in soils and in vegetables and the metal speciation.

  10. A capture-gated neutron spectrometer for characterization of neutron sources and their shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Philip; Peräjärvi, Kari; Ristkari, Samu; Siiskonen, Teemu; Toivonen, Harri

    2014-07-01

    A portable capture-gated neutron spectrometer was designed and built. The spectrometer consists of a boron-loaded scintillator. Data acquisition is performed in list-mode. 252Cf and AmBe sources and various neutron and gamma shields were used to characterize the response of the device. It is shown that both the unfolded capture-gated neutron spectrum and the singles spectrum up to 5 MeV should be utilized. Source identification is then possible and important information is revealed regarding the surroundings of the source. The detector's discrimination of neutrons from photons is relatively good; specifically, one out of 105 photons is misclassified as a neutron and, more importantly, this misclassification rate can be calculated precisely for different measurement environments and can be taken into account in setting alarm limits for neutron detection. The source and source shield identification capabilities of the detector make it an interesting asset for security applications.

  11. Evaluation of neutron sources for ISAGE-in-situ-NAA for a future lunar mission.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Breitkreutz, H; Burfeindt, J; Bernhardt, H-G; Trieloff, M; Hopp, J; Jessberger, E K; Schwarz, W H; Hofmann, P; Hiesinger, H

    2011-11-01

    For a future Moon landing, a concept for an in-situ NAA involving age determination using the (40)Ar-(39)Ar method is developed. A neutron source (252)Cf is chosen for sample irradiation on the Moon. A special sample-in-source irradiation geometry is designed to provide a homogeneous distribution of neutron flux at the irradiation position. Using reflector, the neutron flux is likely to increase by almost 200%. Sample age of 1Ga could be determined. Elemental analysis using INAA is discussed. PMID:21680192

  12. Cluster ion emission from LiF induced by MeV Nq+ projectiles and 252Cf fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijazi, H.; Farenzena, L. S.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, Ph.; Grande, P. L.; da Silveira, E. F.

    2011-08-01

    Ion cluster desorption yields from LiF were measured at PUC-Rio with ≈0.1 MeV/u N q+ ( q = 2,4,5,6) ion beams by means of a time-of-fight (TOF) mass spectrometer. A 252Cf source mounted in the irradiation chamber allows immediate comparison of cluster emissions induced by ≈65 MeV fission fragments (FF). Emission of (LiF) n Li+ clusters are observed for both the N beams and the 252Cf fission fragments. The observed cluster size n varies from 1 to 6 for N q+ projectiles and from 1 to ≈40 for the 252Cf-FF. The size dependence of the Y( n) distributions suggests two cluster formation regimes: (i) recombination process in the outgoing gas phase after impact and (ii) emission of pre-formed clusters from the periphery of the impact site. The corresponding distribution of ejected negative cluster ions (LiF) n F- closely resembles that of the positive secondary (LiF) n Li+ ions. The desorption yields of positive ions scale as Y( n) ˜ q 5. A calculation with the CASP code shows that this corresponds to a cubic scaling ˜S{/e 3} with the electronic stopping power S e , as predicted by collective shock wave models for sputtering and models involving multiple excitons (Frenkel pair sputtering). We discuss possible interpretations of the functional dependence of the evolution of the cluster emission yield Y( n) with cluster size n, fitted by a number of statistical distributions.

  13. NSDUAZ unfolding package for neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with Bonner spheres.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Ortiz-Rodríguez, J M; Martínez-Blanco, M R

    2012-12-01

    NSDUAZ (Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry from the Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas) is a user friendly neutron unfolding package for Bonner sphere spectrometer with (6)LiI(Eu) developed under LabView(®) environment. Unfolding is carried out using a recursive iterative procedure with the SPUNIT algorithm, where the starting spectrum is obtained from a library initial guess spectra to start the iterations. The NSDUAZ performance was evaluated using (252)Cf, (252)Cf/D(2)O, (241)AmBe neutron sources and the neutrons outside the radial beam port of a TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor running to 10 W. PMID:22578610

  14. AN INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON ON THE DETERMINATION OF 241Am, 244Cm AND 252Cf IN URINE.

    PubMed

    Gerstmann, Udo C; Taubner, Kerstin; Hartmann, Martina

    2016-09-01

    An intercomparison exercise on the determination of (241)Am, (244)Cm and (252)Cf in urine was performed. Since it was designed with regard to emergency preparedness, the detection limit for each nuclide was set to 0.1 Bq per 24-h urine sample. Most of the participating laboratories were established bioassay laboratories. However, some laboratories that routinely determine (241)Am only in environmental samples were also invited in order to explore their potential for emergency bioassay analysis. Another aspect of the intercomparison was to investigate the performance of all laboratories concerning the chemical yields of the (243)Am tracer in comparison with (244)Cm and (252)Cf. In summary, both types of laboratories showed good results. There was a negative bias for the results of (244)Cm and (252)Cf, which can be explained by slightly different radiochemical behaviours of americium, curium and californium and which is in agreement with results reported in the literature. PMID:26535001

  15. Detection of buried explosives using portable neutron sources with nanosecond timing.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A V; Evsenin, A V; Gorshkov, I Yu; Osetrov, O I; Vakhtin, D N

    2004-07-01

    Significant reduction of time needed to identify hidden explosives and other hazardous materials by the "neutron in, gamma out" method has been achieved by introducing timed (nanosecond) neutron sources-the so-called nanosecond neutron analysis technique. Prototype mobile device for explosives' detection based on a timed (nanosecond) isotopic (252)Cf neutron source has been created. The prototype is capable of identifying 400 g of hidden explosives in 10 min. Tests have been also made with a prototype device using timed (nanosecond) neutron source based on a portable D-T neutron generator with built-in segmented detector of accompanying alpha-particles. The presently achieved intensity of the neutron generator is 5x10(7)n/s into 4pi, with over 10(6) of these neutrons being correlated with alpha-particles detected by the built-in alpha-particle detector. Results of measurements with an anti-personnel landmine imitator are presented. PMID:15145438

  16. True ternary fission, the collinear cluster tripartition (CCT) of {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Oertzen, W. von; Pyatkov, Y. V.; Kamanin, D.

    2012-10-20

    In systematic work over the last decade (see Pyatkov et al. [12] and refs therein), the ternary fission decay of heavy nuclei, in {sup 235}U(n,fff) and {sup 252}Cf(sf) has been studied in a collinear geometry. The name used for this process is (CCT), with three fragments of similar size in a collinear decay, it is the true ternary fission. This decay has been observed in spontaneous fission as well as in a neutron induced reaction. The measurements are based on different experimental set-ups, with binary coincidences containing TOF and energy determinations. With two detector telescopes placed at 180 Degree-Sign , the measurements of masses and energies of each of the registered two fragments, give complete kinematic solutions. Thus the missing mass events in binary coincidences can be determined, these events are obtained by blocking one of the lighter fragments on a structure in front of the detectors. The relatively high yield of CCT (more than 10{sup -3} per binary fission) is explained. It is due to the favourable Q-values (more positive than for binary) and the large phase space of the ternary CCT-decay, dominated by three (magic) clusters: e.g. isotopes of Sn, Ca and Ni, {sup 132}Sn+{sup 50}Ca+{sup 70}Ni. It is shown that the collinear (prolate) geometry has the favoured potential energy relative to the oblate shapes. The ternary fission is considered to be a sequential process. With this assumption the kinetic energies of the fragments have been calculated by Vijay et al.. The third fragments have very low kinetic energies (below 20 MeV) and have thus escaped their detection in previous work on 'ternary fission', where in addition an oblate shape and a triangle for the momentum vectors have been assumed.

  17. Combination of HPLC and 252-Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry for identifying composition of ginseng tinctures.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Y N; Makhankov, V V; Uvarova, N L; Bondarenko, P V; Zubarev, R A; Knysh, A N

    1993-03-01

    The 252-Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry (252-Cf PDMS) determination or confirmation of the ginsenoside saponins has been proposed to investigate the composition of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) peaks of ginseng tinctures and galenic preparations. That ionization technique is well suitable for the analysis of natural mixtures of these saponins. The 252-Cf PD mass spectra of standard ginsenosides Rb1, Rb2, Rc, Re, Rg1, Rd, NG-R2, Z-R1 contain the peaks of two types of ions, namely, molecular adduct ions (MAI) and aglycone ions. By mass the latter may be referred to either protopanaxadiol or protopanaxatriol. The masses of MAI and aglycone ions are determined by the carbohydrate chains. The collected HPLC fractions of P ginseng tincture can be tested for content of ginsenosides. After studying two MAI peaks from the 252-Cf PD mass spectra of the basic ginsenosides, an example of distinction between two galenic preparations from different Panax has been shown. PMID:8352021

  18. 1989 neutron and gamma personnel dosimetry intercomparison study using RADCAL (Radiation Calibration Laboratory) sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H.; Patterson, G.R. ); Murakami, H. . Dept. of Health Physics); Liu, J.C. )

    1990-10-01

    The fourteenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study (i.e., PDIS 14) was conducted during May 1-5, 1989. A total of 48 organizations (33 from the US and 15 from abroad) participated in PDIS 14. Participants submitted by mail a total of 1,302 neutron and gamma dosimeters for this mixed field study. The type of neutron dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD-albedo (40%), direct interaction TLD (22%), track (20%), film (7%), combination (7%), and bubble detectors (4%). The type of gamma dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD (84%) and film (16%). Radiation sources used in the six PDIS 14 exposures included {sup 252}Cf moderated by 15-cm D{sub 2}O, {sup 252}Cf moderated by 15-cm polyethylene (gamma-enhanced with {sup 137}Cs), and {sup 238}PuBe. Neutron dose equivalents ranged from 0.44--2.63 mSv and gamma doses ranged from 0. 01-1.85 mSv. One {sup 252}Cf(D{sub 2}O) exposure was performed at a 60{degree} angle of incidence (most performance tests are at perpendicular incidence). The average neutron dosimeter response for this exposure was 70% of that at normal incidence. The average gamma dosimeter response was 96% of that at normal incidence. A total of 70% of individual reported neutron dosimeter measurements were within {plus minus}50% of reference values. If the 0.01 mSv data are omitted, approximately 90% of the individual reported gamma measurements were within {plus minus}50% of reference values. 33 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  19. Investigation and optimisation of mobile NaI(Tl) and 3He-based neutron detectors for finding point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Jonas M. C.; Finck, Robert R.; Rääf, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Neutron radiation produces high-energy gamma radiation through (n,γ) reactions in matter. This can be used to detect neutron sources indirectly using gamma spectrometers. The sensitivity of a gamma spectrometer to neutrons can be amplified by surrounding it with polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The hydrogen in the PVC acts as a moderator and the chlorine emits prompt gammas when a neutron is captured. A 4.7-l 3He-based mobile neutron detector was compared to a 4-l NaI(Tl)-detector covered with PVC using this principle. Methods were also developed to optimise the measurement parameters of the systems. The detector systems were compared with regard to their ability to find 241AmBe, 252Cf and 238Pu-13C neutron sources. Results from stationary measurements were used to calculate optimal integration times as well as minimum detectable neutron emission rates. It was found that the 3He-based detector was more sensitive to 252Cf sources whereas the NaI(Tl) detector was more sensitive to 241AmBe and 238Pu-13C sources. The results also indicated that the sensitivity of the detectors to sources at known distances could theoretically be improved by 60% by changing from fixed integration times to list mode in mobile surveys.

  20. Moderator design studies for a new neutron reference source based on the D-T fusion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Piper, Roman K.; Rathbone, Bruce A.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The radioactive isotope Californium-252 (252Cf) is relied upon internationally as a neutron calibration source for ionizing radiation dosimetry because of its high specific activity. The source may be placed within a heavy-water (D2O) moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum representative of neutron fields common to commercial nuclear power plant environments, among others. Due to termination of the U.S. Department of Energy loan/lease program in 2012, the expense of obtaining 252Cf sources has undergone a significant increase, rendering high output sources largely unattainable. On the other hand, the use of neutron generators in research and industry applications has increased dramatically in recent years. Neutron generators based on deuteriumtritium (D-T) fusion reaction provide high neutron fluence rates and, therefore, could possibly be used as a replacement for 252Cf. To be viable, the 14 MeV D-T output spectrum must be significantly moderated to approximate common workplace environments. This paper presents the results of an effort to select appropriate moderating materials and design a configuration to reshape the primary neutron field toward a spectrum approaching that from a nuclear power plant workplace. A series of Monte-Carlo (MCNP) simulations of single layer high- and low-Z materials are used to identify initial candidate moderators. Candidates are refined through a similar series of simulations involving combinations of 2-5 different materials. The simulated energy distribution using these candidate moderators are rated in comparison to a target spectrum. Other properties, such as fluence preservation and/or enhancement, prompt gamma production and other characteristics are also considered.

  1. Absolute determination of the neutron source yield using melamine as a neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciechanowski, M.; Bolewski, A., Jr.; Kreft, A.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to absolute determination of the neutron source yield is presented. It bases on the application of melamine (C3H6N6) to neutron detection combined with Monte Carlo simulations of neutron transport. Melamine has the ability to detect neutrons via 14N(n, p)14C reaction and subsequent determination of 14C content. A cross section for this reaction is relatively high for thermal neutrons (1.827 b) and much lower for fast neutrons. A concentration of 14C nuclei created in the irradiated sample of melamine can be reliably measured with the aid of the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The mass of melamine sufficient for this analysis is only 10 mg. Neutron detection is supported by Monte Carlo simulations of neutron transport carried out with the use of MCNP-4C code. These simulations are aimed at computing the probability of 14C creation in the melamine sample per the source neutron. The result of AMS measurements together with results of MCNP calculations enable us to determine the number of neutrons emitted from the source during the irradiation of melamine. The proposed method was applied for determining the neutron emission from a commercial 252Cf neutron source which was independently calibrated. The measured neutron emission agreed with the certified one within uncertainty limits. The relative expanded uncertainty (k=2) of the absolute neutron source yield determination was estimated at 2.6%. Apart from calibration of radionuclide neutron sources the proposed procedure could facilitate absolute yield measurements for more complex sources. Potential applications of this methodology as it is further developed include diagnostics of inertial confinement fusion and plasma-focus experiments, calibration of neutron measurement systems at tokamaks and accelerator-based neutron sources as well as characterization of neutron fields generated in large particle detectors during collisions of hadron beams.

  2. Neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  3. QUALIFICATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 252CF SHUFFLER FOR RECEIPT VERIFICATION MEASUREMENTS OF MIXED U-PU OXIDES STORED IN 9975 SHIPPING CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Dubose, F.

    2011-05-26

    To extend their ability to perform accountability and verification measurements of {sup 235}U in a U-Pu oxide matrix, the K-Area Material Storage facility commissioned the development and construction of a Passive/Active {sup 252}Cf Shuffler. A series of {sup 252}Cf, PuO{sub 2}, and U-Pu oxide standards, in addition to a single U{sub 3}O{sub 8} standard, were measured to characterize and calibrate the shuffler. Accompanying these measurements were simulations using MCNP5/MCNPX, aimed at isolating the neutron countrate contributions for each of the isotopes present. Two calibration methods for determining the {sup 235}U content in mixed UPu oxide were then developed, yielding comparable results. The first determines the {sup 235}U mass by estimating the {sup 239}Pu/{sup 235}U ratio-dependent contributions from the primary delayed neutron contributors. The second defines an average linear response based on the {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu mass contents. In each case, it was observed that self-shielding due to {sup 235}U mass has a large influence on the observed rates, requiring bounds on the applicable limits of each calibration method.

  4. Determination of the optimum-size californium-252 neutron source for borehole capture gamma-ray analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Macy, R.J.; Mikesell, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The fast- and thermal-neutron fluence rates from a 3.7 ??g 252Cf neutron source in a simulated borehole have been measured as a function of the source-to-detector distance using air, water, coal, iron ore-concrete mix, and dry sand as borehole media. Gamma-ray intensity measurements were made for specific spectral lines at low and high energies for the same range of source-to-detector distances in the iron ore-concrete mix and in coal. Integral gamma-ray counts across the entire spectrum were also made at each source-to-detector distance. From these data, the specific neutron-damage rate, and the critical count-rate criteria, we show that in an iron ore-concrete mix (low hydrogen concentration), 252Cf neutron sources of 2-40 ??g are suitable. The source size required for optimum gamma-ray sensitivity depends on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium such as coal, similar measurements were made. The results show that sources from 2 to 20 ??g are suitable to obtain the highest gamma-ray sensitivity, again depending on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium, significant improvement in sensitivity can be achieved by using faster electronics; in iron ore, it cannot. ?? 1979 North-Holland Publishing Co.

  5. NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

    1963-01-15

    A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

  6. Investigation of the far asymmetric region in 252Cf(sf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    1997-02-01

    A twin Frisch-gridded ionization chamber has been used to measure the fission fragment mass, kinetic-energy and angular correlations for 252Cf(sf). In total 2.5 × 10 8 events were collected. The focus was in the far asymmetric mass region, where enhancements in the yield had been found earlier. It could be shown, that these findings are due to false events, coming from either close geometries not properly taking into account the angular-dependent energy loss in the sample and backing, from a too large angular cone selected in case of studies employing ionization chambers, or even from poor target qualities.

  7. Multi-modal fission in collinear ternary cluster decay of 252Cf(sf, fff)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Nasirov, A. K.; Tashkhodjaev, R. B.

    2015-06-01

    We discuss the multiple decay modes of collinear fission in 252Cf(sf, fff), with three fragments as suggested by the potential energy surface (PES). Fission as a statistical decay is governed by the phase space of the different decay channels, which are suggested in the PES-landscape. The population of the fission modes is determined by the minima in the PES at the scission points and on the internal potential barriers. The ternary collinear decay proceeds as a sequential process, in two steps. The originally observed ternary decay of 252Cf(sf) into three different masses (e.g. 132-140Sn, 52-48Ca, 68-72Ni), observed by the FOBOS group in the FLNR (Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions) of the JINR (Dubna) the collinear cluster tripartition (CCT), is one of the ternary fission modes. This kind of "true ternary fission" of heavy nuclei has often been predicted in theoretical works during the last decades. In the present note we discuss different ternary fission modes in the same system. The PES shows pronounced minima, which correspond to several modes of ternary fragmentations. These decays have very similar dynamical features as the previously observed CCT-decays. The data obtained in the experiments on CCT allow us to extract the yields for different decay modes using specific gates on the measured parameters, and to establish multiple modes of the ternary fission decay.

  8. True ternary fission of 252Cf(sf), the collinear decay into fragments of similar size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Nasirov, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    The ternary decay in 252Cf(sf, fff), with three cluster fragments of different masses (e.g.132Sn,52-48Ca,68-72Ni), has been observed by the FOBOS group in JINR. This work has established a new decay mode of heavy nuclei, the collinear cluster tripartition, (CCT). This "true ternary fission" of heavy nuclei has been predicted many times in theoretical works during the last decades. In the present report we discuss true ternary fission (FFF) into three nuclei of almost equal size (e.g. Z=98 → Zi = 32, 34, 32) and other fission modes in the same system. The possible fission channels for 252 Cf(sf) are predicted from potential-energy (PES) calculations. These PES's show pronounced minima for several ternary fragmentation decays, suggesting a variety of collinear ternary fission modes. The FFF-decays have very similar dynamical features as the previously observed collinear CCT-decays, the central fragment has very small kinetic energy. The data of the cited experiment allow the extraction of the yield for some FFF-decays, by using specific gates on the measured parameters.

  9. Spatial and spectral characteristics of a compact system neutron beam designed for BNCT facility.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Chkillou, B; Jehouani, A

    2009-04-01

    The development of suitable neutron sources and neutron beam is critical to the success of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). In this work a compact system designed for BNCT is presented. The system consists of (252)Cf fission neutron source and a moderator/reflector/filter/shield assembly. The moderator/reflector/filter arrangement has been optimized to maximize the epithermal neutron component which is useful for BNCT treatment of deep seated tumors with the suitably low level of beam contamination. The MCMP5 code has been used to calculate the different components of neutrons, secondary gamma rays originating from (252)Cf source and the primary gamma rays emitted directly by this source at the exit face of the compact system. The fluence rate distributions of such particles were also computed along the central axis of a human head phantom. PMID:19168369

  10. Neutron activation analysis at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Smith, E.H.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Marsh, D.L.; Zhao, L.

    1997-12-01

    The Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science has been established to provide {sup 252}Cf-based neutron irradiation services and research capabilities including neutron activation analysis (NAA). A major advantage of the CUF is its accessibility and controlled experimental conditions compared with those of a reactor environment The CUF maintains the world`s largest inventory of compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources. Neutron source intensities of {le} 10{sup 11} neutrons/s are available for irradiations within a contamination-free hot cell, capable of providing thermal and fast neutron fluxes exceeding 10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} at the sample. Total flux of {ge}10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} is feasible for large-volume irradiation rabbits within the {sup 252}Cf storage pool. Neutron and gamma transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP to estimate irradiation fluxes available for sample activation within the hot cell and storage pool and to design and optimize a prompt gamma NAA (PGNAA) configuration for large sample volumes. Confirmatory NAA irradiations have been performed within the pool. Gamma spectroscopy capabilities including PGNAA are being established within the CUF for sample analysis.

  11. New Data on the Ternary Fission of {sup 252}Cf from the Gammasphere Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Akopian, G.M.; Daniel, A.V.; Fomichev, A.S.; Popeko, G.S.; Rodin, A.M.; Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Hamilton, J.H.; Ramayya, A.V.; Kormicki, J.; Hwang, J.K.; Fong, D.; Gore, P.; Cole, J.D.; Jandel, M.; Kliman, J.; Krupa, L.; Rasmussen, J.O.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Fallon, P.

    2004-10-01

    Ternary fission of {sup 252}Cf was studied at Gammasphere using eight {delta}E x E particle telescopes. Helium, beryllium, boron, and carbon light charged particles (LCPs) emitted with kinetic energy more than 9, 21, 26, and 32 MeV, respectively, were identified. The 3368-keV {gamma} transition from the first 2{sup +} excited state in {sup 10}Be was found and the population probability ratio N(2{sup +})/N(0{sup +}) = 0.160 {+-} 0.025 was estimated. No evidence was found for 3368-keV {gamma} rays emitted from a triple molecular state. For the first time, charge distributions are obtained for ternary fission fragments emitted with helium, beryllium, and carbon LCPs.

  12. Relative Yields of 149-153Pr in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldridge, Jonathan; Wang, Enhong; Hwang, J. K.; Hamilton, Joe; Ramayya, A. V.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Zhu, S. J.; Liu, S. H.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.

    2013-10-01

    The relative yields of the fission partners of 149-153Pr, resulting from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf, were studied. This study was done by means of γ - γ - γ , and γ - γ - γ - γ coincidence data taken in 2000 by the multi-HPGe, Compton-suppressed, gamma detector array, Gammasphere, at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The coincidence data were analyzed by double- and triple-gating on transitions in 149-153Pr and obtaining the intensities of the 93-101Y transitions. For 150 , 151 , 152 , 153Pr the 3n channel was found to be the strongest. The 149Pr, however, was found to peak at the 4n channel. These results were used to verify the assignments of the level schemes of 151 , 152 , 153Pr. The data are found to be in agreement with Wahl's independent yield tables.

  13. Application of 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry in dental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Lothar; Köhl, Peter; Jungclas, Hartmut; Duschner, Heins

    1993-07-01

    Topically applied fluorides introduced in dental hygiene products elevate the concentration levels of fluoride in oral fluids and thus also affect chemical reactions of enamel de- and remineralisation. The chemical reactions on the surface of tooth enamel still are a subject of controversy. Here 252Cf-plasma desorption mass spectrometry and argon ion etching are used to analyse the molecular structure of the upper layes of enamel. The mass spectrum of untreated enamel is characterised by a series of cluster ions containing phosphate. It is evident that under certain conditions the molecular structure of the surface enamel is completely transformed by treatment with fluorides. The result of the degradation and precipitation processes is reflected by a total replacement of the phosphate by fluoride in the measured cluster ion distribution. Stepwise etching of the upper layers by Ar+ ions reveals the transition from a nearly pure CaF2 structure to the unchanged composition of the enamel mineral.

  14. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Reardon, W.A.; Lennox, D.H.; Nobles, R.G.

    1959-01-13

    A neutron source of the antimony--beryllium type is presented. The source is comprised of a solid mass of beryllium having a cylindrical recess extending therein and a cylinder containing antimony-124 slidably disposed within the cylindrical recess. The antimony cylinder is encased in aluminum. A berylliunn plug is removably inserted in the open end of the cylindrical recess to completely enclose the antimony cylinder in bsryllium. The plug and antimony cylinder are each provided with a stud on their upper ends to facilitate handling remotely.

  15. Characterization of a PN3 personal neutron dosimeter based on (n,α) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traoré, I.; Nachab, A.; Nourreddine, A.; Bâ, A.

    This study describes a new methodology for characterizing the sensitivity of personal neutron dose-equivalent dosimeters consisting of a PN3 (trade name of the CR-39 type) nuclear track detector coupled with a natural boron converter BN1 (20% 10B, 80% 11B) and enriched boron converter 10B (99% 10B). Both dosimeters (converter + detector) were mounted in an ISO water-filled phantom and were simultaneously irradiated in terms of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) ranging between 1 and 4 mSv under standard neutron radiation fields generated by (252Cf + D2O) and (252Cf + D2O)/Cd) sources. After irradiation, the latent tracks produced by alpha particles were revealed through a chemical solution. The optimum etching conditions (6.25 N, 70 °C for 7 h) used, were performed for an initial in-depth study. The response of the dosimeter was given by the ratio of the average track density obtained by subtracting the tracks due to the 252Cf + D2O and (252Cf + D2O)/Cd sources to the dose equivalent. The calibration factor was found to be 2826 ± 17 tracks.cm-2.mSv-1. The sensitivity of the dosimeter was observed to be increased significantly using a converter enriched in 10B (99% 10B).

  16. Neutron-induced peaks in Ge detectors from evaporation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gete, E.; Measday, D. F.; Moftah, B. A.; Saliba, M. A.; Stocki, T. J.

    1997-02-01

    We have studied the peak shapes at 596 and 691 keV resulting from fast neutron interactions inside germanium detectors. We have used neutrons from a 252Cf source, as well as from the 28Si(μ -, nv), and 209Bi(π -, xn) reactions to compare the peaks and to check for a dependence of peak shape on the incoming neutron energy. In our investigation, no difference between these three measurements has been observed. In a comparison of these peak shapes with other studies, we found similar results to ours except for those measurements using monoenergetic neutrons in which a significant variation with neutron energy has been observed.

  17. The development, characterization, and performance evaluation of a new combination type personnel neutron dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C.; Sims, C.S.; Poston, J.W.; Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1989-10-01

    A new combination type personnel neutron dosimeter has been designed and developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The combination personnel neutron dosimeter (CPND) consists of a Harshaw albedo neutron thermoluminescent dosimeter (two pairs of TLD-600/TLD- 700) and two bubble detectors (one BD-100R and one BDS-1500 from Bubble Technology Industries, Canada). The CPND was developed with the aim of having crude neutron spectrometric capability, universal applicability, better angular response, and an improved lower limit of detection (LLD). The CPND has been well characterized in the following areas: reusability, linearity, lower limit of detection (LLD), detection capability in mixed neutron-gamma fields, angular dependence, and neutron energy dependence. the characterization was accomplished with irradiations using a {sup 238}Pu-Be source, a {sup 252}Cf(D{sub 2}O) source, a {sup 252}Cf source, a {sup 252}Cf(PE) source, monoenergetic neutrons from accelerator and reactor filtered beams, {sup 137}Cs, and X-rays. Optimum signal readout procedures, signal processing techniques, routine operational usage, and neutron dose equivalent evaluation algorithms for the CPND were developed with the goals of having the best precision and accuracy as well as being convenient to use. 97 refs., 43 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. Kinetic energies of cluster fragments in ternary fission of 252 Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, K. R.; von Oertzen, W.; Balasubramaniam, M.

    2012-03-01

    The kinetic energy distribution and potential energies of fragments from the collinear cluster tripartition (CCT), the "true" ternary fission of 252Cf, have been calculated. It is assumed that the breakup of the nucleus into three fragments happens sequentially in two steps from a hyper-deformed shape. In the first step a first neck rupture occurs of the parent radioactive nucleus, forming two fragments (one of them is usually 132Sn) and, in the second step, one of the two fragments breaks into two other fragments, resulting finally in three fragments (the experiment is based on a binary coincidence where a missing mass is determined). We show the result for the principal combination of the three spherical fragments (semi-magic isotopes of Sn, Ca, Ni) observed recently experimentally. These isotopes are clusters with high Q -values, which produce the highest yields in the ternary fission bump. It is shown that the kinetic energies of the middle fragments have very low values, making their experimental detection quite difficult. This fact explains why the direct detection of true ternary fission with three fragments heavier than A > 40 has escaped experimental observation.

  19. The Various Collinear Ternary Fission Decays in 252Cf(sf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, W.; Nasirov, A. K.; Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Kamanin, D. V.

    2015-06-01

    The collinear cluster decay in 252Cf(sf,fff), with three cluster fragments of different masses (e.g.132Sn,52-48Ca,68-72Ni), which has been observed by the FOBOS group in JINR, has established a new decay mode, the CCT (Collinear Cluster Tri-partition) of heavy nuclei. The same type of ternary fission decay has been observed in the reaction 235U(nth,fff). This collinear "true ternary fission" of heavy nuclei has been predicted many times in theoretical works during the last decades. In the present contribution we show that other ternary decay modes occur, in particular the symmetric ternary fission (FFF) into three fragments of almost equal size (e.g. Z=98→Zi = 32, 34, 32) in the same system. The different ternary fission channels are predicted with potential energy (PES) calculations for two mass parameters, M1(A1) and M3(A3). The deeper valleys point to the favored decay channels. An important aspect for the probability of the ternary decay modes are the internal barriers, which are presented here. The PES's show pronounced minima for several choices for favored ternary fragmentations. With these predictions, a variety of collinear ternary fission modes in the experimental data have been established.

  20. Determining plutonium mass in spent fuel using Cf-252 interrogation with prompt neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jianwei; Tobin, Stephen J; Menlove, Howard O; Croft, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron (CIPN) detection is proposed as one of 14 NDA techniques to determine Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies (FAs). CIPN is a low-cost and portable instrument, and it looks like a modified fork detector combined with an active interrogation source. Fission chamber (FC) is chosen as neutron detector because of its insensitivity to {gamma} radiation. The CIPN assay is comprised of two measurements, a background count and an active count, without and with the {sup 252}Cf source next to the fuel respectively. The net signal above background is primarily due to the multiplication of Cf source neutrons caused by the fissile content. The capability of CIPN to detect diversion and to determine fissile content was quantified using MCNPX simulations. New schemes were proposed (such as burnup and cooling time correction, etc.) and the results show that the fissile content of a target spent fuel assembly can be determined using CIPN signal.

  1. Pre-scission configuration of the tri-nuclear system at spontaneous ternary fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirov, A. K.; Tashkhodjaev, R. B.; von Oertzen, W.

    2016-05-01

    The potential energy surface for the pre-scission configurations of tri-nuclear systems formed in the spontaneous ternary fission of 252Cf is calculated. The fission channel 70Ni + 50Ca + 132Sn is chosen as one of the more probable channels of true ternary fission of 252Cf . A study of the collinear arrangement of the reaction products for true ternary fission is the aim of this work. The results are presented as a function of the relative distance R12 between the centres of mass of 70Ni and 132Sn and the distance from the centre of mass of 50Ca , which is perpendicular to R12. The results show that only for a particular range of the R12 values the collinear tripartion of the fissioning nucleus occurs.

  2. Development of a new method for measurement of neutron detector efficiency up to 20 MeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kornilov, N. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Massey, T. N.; Brient, C. E.; Carter, D. E.; O'Donnell, J. E.; Bateman, F. B.; Carlson, A. D.; Haight, R. C.; Boukharouba, N.

    2014-09-03

    A new approach to neutron detector efficiency has been taken. A neutron detector has been calibrated with a 252Cf source at low energy. The calibration can be extended to energies above 8 MeV based on the 252Cf results. The techniques uses the fact that the cross section for a symmetric reaction with nucleus of atomic number A yielding a final nucleus with atomic number (2A-1) and a neutron A + A → (2A – 1) + n. This reaction must be symmetric about 90° in the center-of-mass system. Furthermore, the laboratory energies for the neutrons at the paired energies differmore » substantially. Thus, an efficiency known at one of the two angles can be used to determine the efficiency to higher energies or, for a negative Q, to lower neutron energies.« less

  3. Calibration of a Manganese Bath Relative to 252Cf Nu-Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, David M.; Yue, Andrew T.; Scott Dewey, M.

    2009-08-01

    A large manganese sulfate bath is employed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to calibrate isotopic neutron sources relative to the national standard neutron source NBS-I. In the past few years many low-emission Cf-252 neutron sources have been calibrated for testing of neutron detectors for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The low-emission DHS sources are about a factor of 100 lower in emission rate than NBS-I, so that background fluctuations become more significant in making accurate calibrations. To verify and improve the calibrations relative to NBS-I, a new calibration for sealed Cf-252 neutron sources has been made by measuring the fission rate of a bare Cf-252 deposit and inferring its neutron emission rate from Cf-252 nu-bar, the well-established neutron multiplicity of spontaneous fission in Cf-252. The fission rate of the bare deposit was measured by counting fission fragments in vacuum with a surface barrier detector behind an aperture and spacer, which provided a well-defined solid angle for detection. A thin polyimide film was placed just above the Cf deposit to prevent contamination of the detector by self-sputtering of the Cf material in vacuum. Tests with additional layers of polyimide were performed to observe any perturbation in the detection efficiency due to scattering or absorption of alpha particles or fission fragments in the polyimide film. The increase in the background count rate due to accumulation of Cf on the polyimide film was less than 0.02% of the fission fragment count rate from the sample, at the end of all runs. It is estimated that this increase in background would have been about 150 times higher without the polyimide film. The sealed Cf source NIST-DHSA was compared to the bare source by relative neutron counting in an assembly of polyethylene moderator and He-3 detectors. The calibration via Cf-252 nu-bar gave a result that was 1.7% higher than the previous calibration relative to NBS

  4. Fast-Neutron Spectrometry Using a 3He Ionization Chamber and Digital Pulse Shape Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; J. T. Johnson; E. H. Seabury

    2010-05-01

    Digital pulse shape analysis (dPSA) has been used with a Cuttler-Shalev type 3He proportional counter to measure the fast neutron spectra of bare 252Cf and 241AmBe neutron sources. Measurements have also been made to determine the attenuated fast neutron spectra of 252Cf shielded by several materials including water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, magnesium, and tungsten. Rise-time dPSA has been employed using the common rise-time approach for analyzing n +3He ? 1H + 3H ionization events and a new approach has been developed to improve the fidelity of these measurements. Simulations have been performed for the different experimental arrangements and are compared, demonstrating general agreement between the dPSA processed fast neutron spectra and predictions.

  5. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bernander, N.K. et al.

    1960-10-18

    An apparatus is described for producing neutrons through target bombardment with deuterons. Deuterium gas is ionized by electron bombardment and the deuteron ions are accelerated through a magnetic field to collimate them into a continuous high intensity beam. The ion beam is directed against a deuteron pervious metal target of substantially the same nnaterial throughout to embed the deuterous therein and react them to produce neutrons. A large quantity of neutrons is produced in this manner due to the increased energy and quantity of ions bombarding the target.

  6. Neutron detection technique

    SciTech Connect

    Oblath, N.S.; Poon, A.W.P.

    2000-09-14

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has the ability to measure the total flux of all active flavors of neutrinos using the neutral current reaction, whose signature is a neutron. By comparing the rates of the neutral current reaction to the charged current reaction, which only detects electron neutrinos, one can test the neutrino oscillation hypothesis independent of solar models. It is necessary to understand the neutron detection efficiency of the detector to make use of the neutral current reaction. This report demonstrates a coincidence technique to identify neutrons emitted from the {sup 252}Cf neutron calibration source. The source releases on average four neutrons when a {sup 252}Cf nucleus spontaneously fissions. Each neutron is detected as a separate event when the neutron is captured by a deuteron, releasing a gamma ray of approximately 6.25 MeV. This gamma ray is in turn detected by the photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. By investigating the time and spatial separation between neutron-like events, it is possible to obtain a pure sample of neutrons for calibration study. Preliminary results of the technique applied to two calibration runs are presented.

  7. Neutron field characteristics of Ciemat's Neutron Standards Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Garcia, Karen A; Mendez-Villafañe, Roberto; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to characterize the neutron field produced by the calibration neutron sources of the Neutron Standards Laboratory at the Research Center for Energy, Environment, and Technology (CIEMAT) in Spain. For (241)AmBe and (252)Cf neutron sources, the neutron spectra, the ambient dose equivalent rates and the total neutron fluence rates were estimated. In the calibration hall, there are several items that modify the neutron field. To evaluate their effects different cases were used, from point-like source in vacuum up to the full model. Additionally, using the full model, the neutron spectra were estimated to different distances along the bench; with these spectra, the total neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent rates were calculated. The hall walls induce the largest changes in the neutron spectra and the respective integral quantities. The free-field neutron spectrum is modified due the room return effect. PMID:25468287

  8. Dependence on neutron energy of neutron-induced peaks in Ge detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gete, E.; Measday, David F.; Moftah, B. A.; Saliba, M. A.; Stocki, Trevor J.

    1997-02-01

    We have studied the peak shapes at 596 and 691 KeV resulting from fast neutron interactions inside germanium detectors. We have used neutrons from a 252Cf source, as well as from the 28Si((mu) -, nv), and 209Bi((pi) -, xn) reactions to compare the peaks and to check for any dependence of peak shape on the incoming neutron energy. In our investigation, no dependence of these peak shapes on the neutron energy spectra has been observed. In a comparison of these peak shapes with other studies we found similar results to ours except for monoenergetic neutron irradiations from 1 to 8 MeV.

  9. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1960-04-19

    A compact electronic device capable of providing short time high density outputs of neutrons is described. The device of the invention includes an evacuated vacuum housing adapted to be supplied with a deuterium, tritium, or other atmosphere and means for establishing an electrical discharge along a path through the gas. An energized solenoid is arranged to constrain the ionized gas (plasma) along the path. An anode bearing adsorbed or adherent target material is arranged to enclose the constrained plasma. To produce neutrons a high voltage is applied from appropriate supply means between the plasma and anode to accelerate ions from the plasma to impinge upcn the target material, e.g., comprising deuterium.

  10. Development of a thin scintillation films fission-fragment detector and a novel neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Daum, J. K.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Roman, A. R.; Springs, R. K.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-08-01

    Investigation of prompt fission and neutron-capture Υ rays from fissile actinide samples at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) requires use of a fission-fragment detector to provide a trigger or a veto signal. A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillations were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U(n,f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described. A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the same type of scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements with it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  11. Neutron capture therapy: a comparison between dose enhancement of various agents, nanoparticles and chemotherapy drugs.

    PubMed

    Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Rahmani, Faezeh; Knaup, Courtney

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare dose enhancement of various agents, nanoparticles and chemotherapy drugs for neutron capture therapy. A (252)Cf source was simulated to obtain its dosimetric parameters, including air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and total dose rates. These results were compared with previously published data. Using (252)Cf as a neutron source, the in-tumour dose enhancements in the presence of atomic (10)B, (157)Gd and (33)S agents; (10)B, (157)Gd, (33)S nanoparticles; and Bortezomib and Amifostine chemotherapy drugs were calculated and compared in neutron capture therapy. Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used for simulation of the (252)Cf source, a soft tissue phantom, and a tumour containing each capture agent. Dose enhancement for 100, 200 and 500 ppm of the mentioned media was calculated. Calculated dosimetric parameters of the (252)Cf source were in agreement with previously published values. In comparison to other agents, maximum dose enhancement factor was obtained for 500 ppm of atomic (10)B agent and (10)B nanoparticles, equal to 1.06 and 1.08, respectively. Additionally, Bortezomib showed a considerable dose enhancement level. From a dose enhancement point of view, media containing (10)B are the best agents in neutron capture therapy. Bortezomib is a chemotherapy drug containing boron and can be proposed as an agent in boron neutron capture therapy. However, it should be noted that other physical, chemical and medical criteria should be considered in comparing the mentioned agents before their clinical use in neutron capture therapy. PMID:24961208

  12. Use of GEANT4 vs. MCNPX for the characterization of a boron-lined neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ende, B. M.; Atanackovic, J.; Erlandson, A.; Bentoumi, G.

    2016-06-01

    This work compares GEANT4 with MCNPX in the characterization of a boron-lined neutron detector. The neutron energy ranges simulated in this work (0.025 eV to 20 MeV) are the traditional domain of MCNP simulations. This paper addresses the question, how well can GEANT4 and MCNPX be employed for detailed thermal neutron detector characterization? To answer this, GEANT4 and MCNPX have been employed to simulate detector response to a 252Cf energy spectrum point source, as well as to simulate mono-energetic parallel beam source geometries. The 252Cf energy spectrum simulation results demonstrate agreement in detector count rate within 3% between the two packages, with the MCNPX results being generally closer to experiment than are those from GEANT4. The mono-energetic source simulations demonstrate agreement in detector response within 5% between the two packages for all neutron energies, and within 1% for neutron energies between 100 eV and 5 MeV. Cross-checks between the two types of simulations using ISO-8529 252Cf energy bins demonstrates that MCNPX results are more self-consistent than are GEANT4 results, by 3-4%.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of a lithium-glass-based composite neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, G. C.; Kazkaz, K.; Martinez, H. P.; Gushue, T.

    2015-09-01

    A novel composite, scintillating material intended for neutron detection and composed of small (1.5 mm) cubes of KG2-type lithium glass embedded in a matrix of scintillating plastic has been developed in the form of a 2.2 in.-diameter, 3.1 in.-tall cylindrical prototype loaded with (5.82±0.02)% lithium glass by mass. The response of the material when exposed to 252Cf fission neutrons and various γ-ray sources has been studied; using the charge-integration method for pulse shape discrimination, good separation between neutron and γ-ray events is observed and intrinsic efficiencies of (1.15±0.16)×10-2 and (2.28±0.21)×10-4 for 252Cf fission neutrons and 60Co γ rays are obtained; an upper limit for the sensitivity to 137Cs γ rays is determined to be < 3.70 ×10-8. The neutron/γ discrimination capabilities are improved in circumstances when a neutron capture signal in the lithium glass can be detected in coincidence with a preceding elastic scattering event in the plastic scintillator; with this coincidence requirement, the intrinsic efficiency of the prototype detector for 60Co γ rays is (2.42±0.61)×10-6 while its intrinsic efficiency for unmoderated 252Cf fission neutrons is (4.31±0.59)×10-3. Through use of subregion-integration ratios in addition to the coincidence requirement, the efficiency for γ rays from 60Co is reduced to (7.15±4.10)×10-7 while the 252Cf fission neutron efficiency becomes (2.78±0.38)×10-3.

  14. Performance of the electronic personal dosemeter for neutron 'Saphydose-N' at different workplaces of nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, T; Chau, Q; Ménard, S; Lacoste, V; Muller, H; Luszik-Bhadra, M; Reginatto, M; Bruguier, P

    2006-01-01

    This paper mainly aims at presenting the measurements and the results obtained with the electronic personal neutron dosemeter Saphydose-N at different facilities. Three campaigns were led in the frame of the European contract EVIDOS ('Evaluation of Individual Dosimetry in Mixed Neutron and Photon Radiation Fields'). The first one consisted in the measurements at the IRSN French research laboratory in reference neutron fields generated by a thermal facility (SIGMA), radionuclide ISO sources ((241)AmBe; (252)Cf; (252)Cf(D(2)O)\\Cd) and a realistic spectrum (CANEL/T400). The second one was performed at the Krümmel Nuclear Power Plant (Germany) close to the boiling water reactor and to a spent fuel transport cask. The third one was realised at Mol (Belgium), at the VENUS Research Reactor and at Belgonucléaire, a fuel processing factory. PMID:16820401

  15. Assessment of neutron dosemeters around standard sources and nuclear fissile objects.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, N; Tournier, B; Groetz, J E; Piot, J; Riebler, E; Crovisier, P; Chambaudet, A; Cabanné, N

    2002-01-01

    In order to evaluate the neutron doses around nuclear fissile objects, a comparative study has been made on several neutron dosemeters: bubble dosemeters, etched-track detectors (CR-39) and 3He-filled proportional counters used as dose-rate meters. The measurements were made on the ambient and the personal dose equivalents H*(10) and Hp(10). Results showed that several bubble dosemeters should have been used due to a low reproducibility in the measurements. A strong correlation with the neutron energy was also found, with about a 30% underestimation of Hp(10) for neutrons from the PuBe source, and about a 9% overestimation for neutrons from the 252Cf source. Measurements of the nuclear fissile objects were made using the CR-39 and the dose-rate meters. The CR-39 led to an underestimation of 30% with respect to the neutron dose-rate meter measurements. In addition, the MCNP calculation code was used in the different configurations. PMID:12382734

  16. Energy spectra of the pneumatically positioned neutron sources at LLNL's Hazards control standards and calibration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thorngate, J.H.

    1987-06-15

    The Hazards Control Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory maintains a Standards and Calibration Laboratory that includes three neutron sources (two /sup 252/Cf and one /sup 238/PuBe that can be positioned pneumatically for irradiations. Ten moderators exist to modify the neutron energy spectra produced by these sources. The thicknesses and materials of these moderators are: 25-cm water; 5-, 10-, 15-, and 25-cm heavy water; 20-cm aluminum; and 2-, 5-, 10-, and 15-cm polyethylene. We used a multisphere spectrometer to measure the neutron spectra at 2 m from both the PuBe source and the smaller Cf source, with the sources bare, and in all of the moderators. These data were reduced in 25 energy groups ranging from 0.25 eV to 16 MeV. Except for the 15-m polyethylene moderator, we also made measurements using a liquid-scintillator fast-neutron spectrometer. These data were reduced in 0.1-MeV increments from 0.5 to 12.5 MeV. Spectra from the measurements and from independent calculations are presented in tabular and graphic form. Dosimetric values, calculated from both the measured and calculated spectra, are also presented.

  17. Reliability of Monte Carlo simulations in modeling neutron yields from a shielded fission source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArthur, Matthew S.; Rees, Lawrence B.; Czirr, J. Bart

    2016-08-01

    Using the combination of a neutron-sensitive 6Li glass scintillator detector with a neutron-insensitive 7Li glass scintillator detector, we are able to make an accurate measurement of the capture rate of fission neutrons on 6Li. We used this detector with a 252Cf neutron source to measure the effects of both non-borated polyethylene and 5% borated polyethylene shielding on detection rates over a range of shielding thicknesses. Both of these measurements were compared with MCNP calculations to determine how well the calculations reproduced the measurements. When the source is highly shielded, the number of interactions experienced by each neutron prior to arriving at the detector is large, so it is important to compare Monte Carlo modeling with actual experimental measurements. MCNP reproduces the data fairly well, but it does generally underestimate detector efficiency both with and without polyethylene shielding. For non-borated polyethylene it underestimates the measured value by an average of 8%. This increases to an average of 11% for borated polyethylene.

  18. Neutron detection in a high-gamma field using solution-grown stilbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M. M.; Clarke, S. D.; Adamowicz, N.; Pozzi, S. A.; Zaitseva, N.; Carman, L.

    2016-01-01

    A solution-based technique for growing large-volume stilbene scintillators was developed in 2013; crystals up to diameters of 10 cm, or larger, have been grown while preserving excellent pulse shape discrimination (PSD) properties. The goal of this study is to evaluate the PSD capabilities of 5.08 by 5.08-cm stilbene crystals grown by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Inrad Optics when exposed to a 1000 to 1 gamma ray-neutron ratio and operating at a 100-kHz count rate. Results were compared to an equivalent EJ-309 liquid scintillation detector. 252Cf neutron pulses were recorded in two experiments where 60Co and 137Cs sources created the high-gamma field. The high count rate created numerous double pulses that were cleaned using fractional and template approaches designed to remove double pulses while preserving neutron counts. PSD was performed at a threshold of 42 keVee (440-keV proton) for stilbene and 60 keVee (610-keV proton) for EJ-309 liquid. The lower threshold in stilbene resulted in a neutron intrinsic efficiency of approximately 14.5%, 10% higher than EJ-309 liquid, for bare 252Cf and 13% for 252Cf in the high-gamma field. Despite the lower threshold, the gamma misclassification rate in stilbene was approximately 3×10-6, nearly a factor-of-five lower than what we found with the EJ-309 liquid.

  19. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dosemeters used in high-energy neutron environments.

    PubMed

    Lee, K W; Sheu, R J

    2015-04-01

    High-energy neutrons (>10 MeV) contribute substantially to the dose fraction but result in only a small or negligible response in most conventional moderated-type neutron detectors. Neutron dosemeters used for radiation protection purpose are commonly calibrated with (252)Cf neutron sources and are used in various workplace. A workplace-specific correction factor is suggested. In this study, the effect of the neutron spectrum on the accuracy of dose measurements was investigated. A set of neutron spectra representing various neutron environments was selected to study the dose responses of a series of Bonner spheres, including standard and extended-range spheres. By comparing (252)Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values based on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this paper presents recommendations for neutron field characterisation and appropriate correction factors for responses of conventional neutron dosemeters used in environments with high-energy neutrons. The correction depends on the estimated percentage of high-energy neutrons in the spectrum or the ratio between the measured responses of two Bonner spheres (the 4P6_8 extended-range sphere versus the 6″ standard sphere). PMID:25280480

  20. Prompt fission γ-rays from the reactions 252Cf(SF) and 235U(nth, f) - new data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, S.; Belgya, T.; Billnert, R.; Bryś, T.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Kis, Z.; Martinez, T.; Oberstedt, A.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Vidali, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present new spectral data of prompt γ-ray emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. This work was performed in direct response to an OECD/NEA high priority data request. We discuss the impact of our new data on evaluated nuclear data tables not only for this nuclide, but also for 238U and 241Pu, which are always produced in a reactor. Furthermore, we will show results from our investigation of prompt γ-ray emission from the reaction 235 U(nth, f), measured in at the Centre for Energy Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, Hungary. Spectral data obtained with three different detectors are consistent and led to an uncertainty on total energy and multiplicity considerably smaller than requested by the OECD/NEA.

  1. Intense fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  2. Neutron sources and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.; Rush, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  3. Thermal neutron analysis (TNA) explosive detection based on electronic neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. C.; Mahood, D. B.; Ryge, P.; Shea, P.; Gozani, T.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal neutron analysis explosive detection systems have been developed and demonstrated for inspection of checked airline baggage and for detection of buried land mines. Thermal neutrons from a moderated neutron source impinge on the inspected object, and the resulting capture gamma ray signatures provide detection information. Isotopic neutron sources, e.g. 252Cf, are compact, economical and reliable, but they are subject to the licensing requirements, safety concerns and public perception problems associated with radioactive material. These are mitigated by use of an electronic neutron generator — an ion accelerator with a target producing neutrons by a nuclear reaction such as D(d, n) 3He or 9Be(d, n) 10B. With suitable moderator designs based on neutron transport codes, operational explosive detection systems can be built and would provide effective alternatives to radioactive neutron sources. Calculations as well as laboratory and field experience with three generator types will be presented.

  4. Analysis of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized 4He fast neutron detector using pulse shape fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, R. P.; Murer, D.; Ray, H.; Jordan, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    An empirical investigation of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized 4He gas fast neutron detector was conducted using pulse shape fitting. Scintillation signals from neutron interactions were measured and averaged to produce a single generic neutron pulse shape from both a 252Cf spontaneous fission source and a (d,d) neutron generator. An expression for light output over time was then developed by treating the decay of helium excited states in the same manner as the decay of radioactive isotopes. This pulse shape expression was fitted to the measured neutron pulse shape using a least-squares optimization algorithm, allowing an empirical analysis of the mechanism of scintillation inside the 4He detector. A further understanding of this mechanism in the 4He detector will advance the use of this system as a neutron spectrometer. For 252Cf neutrons, the triplet and singlet time constants were found to be 970 ns and 686 ns, respectively. For neutrons from the (d,d) generator, the time constants were found to be 884 ns and 636 ns. Differences were noted in the magnitude of these parameters compared to previously published data, however the general relationships were noted to be the same and checked with expected trends from theory. Of the excited helium states produced from a 252Cf neutron interaction, 76% were found to be born as triplet states, similar to the result from the neutron generator of 71%. The two sources yielded similar pulse shapes despite having very different neutron energy spectra, validating the robustness of the fits across various neutron energies.

  5. Analysis of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized {sup 4}He fast neutron detector using pulse shape fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.P. Ray, H.; Jordan, K.A.; Murer, D.

    2015-03-15

    An empirical investigation of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized {sup 4}He gas fast neutron detector was conducted using pulse shape fitting. Scintillation signals from neutron interactions were measured and averaged to produce a single generic neutron pulse shape from both a {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission source and a (d,d) neutron generator. An expression for light output over time was then developed by treating the decay of helium excited states in the same manner as the decay of radioactive isotopes. This pulse shape expression was fitted to the measured neutron pulse shape using a least-squares optimization algorithm, allowing an empirical analysis of the mechanism of scintillation inside the {sup 4}He detector. A further understanding of this mechanism in the {sup 4}He detector will advance the use of this system as a neutron spectrometer. For {sup 252}Cf neutrons, the triplet and singlet time constants were found to be 970 ns and 686 ns, respectively. For neutrons from the (d,d) generator, the time constants were found to be 884 ns and 636 ns. Differences were noted in the magnitude of these parameters compared to previously published data, however the general relationships were noted to be the same and checked with expected trends from theory. Of the excited helium states produced from a {sup 252}Cf neutron interaction, 76% were found to be born as triplet states, similar to the result from the neutron generator of 71%. The two sources yielded similar pulse shapes despite having very different neutron energy spectra, validating the robustness of the fits across various neutron energies.

  6. Optimizing moderation of He-3 neutron detectors for shielded fission sources

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rees, Lawrence B.; Czirr, J. Bart

    2012-07-10

    Abstract: The response of 3-He neutron detectors is highly dependent on the amount of moderator incorporated into the detector system. If there is too little moderation, neutrons will not react with the 3-He. If there is too much moderation, neutrons will not reach the 3-He. In applications for portal or border monitors where 3He detectors are used to interdict illicit Importation of plutonium, the fission source is always shielded to some extent. Since the energy distribution of neutrons emitted from the source depends on the amount and type of shielding present, the optimum placement of moderating material around 3-He tubesmore » is a function of shielding. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo techniques to model the response of 3-He tubes placed in polyethylene boxes for moderation. To model the shielded fission neutron source, we use a 252-Cf source placed in the center of spheres of water of varying radius. Detector efficiency as a function of box geometry and shielding are explored. We find that increasing the amount of moderator behind and to the sides of the detector generally improves the detector response, but that benefits are limited if the thickness of the polyethylene moderator is greater than about 5-7 cm. The thickness of the moderator in front of the 3He tubes, however, is very important. For bare sources, about 5-6 cm of moderator is optimum, but as the shielding increases, the optimum thickness of this moderator decreases to 0-1 cm. A two-tube box with a moderator thickness of 5 cm in front of the first tube and a thickness of 1 cm in front of the second tube is proposed to improve the detector's sensitivity to lower-energy neutrons.« less

  7. Optimizing moderation of He-3 neutron detectors for shielded fission sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, Lawrence B.; Czirr, J. Bart

    2012-07-10

    Abstract: The response of 3-He neutron detectors is highly dependent on the amount of moderator incorporated into the detector system. If there is too little moderation, neutrons will not react with the 3-He. If there is too much moderation, neutrons will not reach the 3-He. In applications for portal or border monitors where 3He detectors are used to interdict illicit Importation of plutonium, the fission source is always shielded to some extent. Since the energy distribution of neutrons emitted from the source depends on the amount and type of shielding present, the optimum placement of moderating material around 3-He tubes is a function of shielding. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo techniques to model the response of 3-He tubes placed in polyethylene boxes for moderation. To model the shielded fission neutron source, we use a 252-Cf source placed in the center of spheres of water of varying radius. Detector efficiency as a function of box geometry and shielding are explored. We find that increasing the amount of moderator behind and to the sides of the detector generally improves the detector response, but that benefits are limited if the thickness of the polyethylene moderator is greater than about 5-7 cm. The thickness of the moderator in front of the 3He tubes, however, is very important. For bare sources, about 5-6 cm of moderator is optimum, but as the shielding increases, the optimum thickness of this moderator decreases to 0-1 cm. A two-tube box with a moderator thickness of 5 cm in front of the first tube and a thickness of 1 cm in front of the second tube is proposed to improve the detector's sensitivity to lower-energy neutrons.

  8. Theoretical and experimental analysis of ammonia ionic clusters produced by 252Cf fragment impact on an NH3 ice target.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lima, F A; Ponciano, C R; Chaer Nascimento, M A; da Silveira, E F

    2006-08-24

    Positive and negatively charged ammonia clusters produced by the impact of (252)Cf fission fragments (FF) on an NH(3) ice target have been examined theoretical and experimentally. The ammonia clusters generated by (252)Cf FF show an exponential dependence of the cluster population on its mass, and the desorption yields for the positive (NH(3))(n)NH(4)(+) clusters are 1 order of magnitude higher than those for the negative (NH(3))(n)NH(2)(-) clusters. The experimental population analysis of (NH(3))(n)NH(4)(+) (n = 0-18) and (NH(3))(n)NH(2)(-) (n = 0-8) cluster series show a special stability at n = 4 and 16 and n = 2, 4, and 6, respectively. DFT/B3LYP calculations of the (NH(3))(0)(-)(8)NH(4)(+) clusters show that the structures of the more stable conformers follow a clear pattern: each additional NH(3) group makes a new hydrogen bond with one of the hydrogen atoms of an NH(3) unit already bound to the NH(4)(+) core. For the (NH(3))(0)(-)(8)NH(2)(-) clusters, the DFT/B3LYP calculations show that, within the calculation error, the more stable conformers follow a clear pattern for n = 1-6: each additional NH(3) group makes a new hydrogen bond to the NH(2)(-) core. For n = 7 and 8, the additional NH(3) groups bind to other NH(3) groups, probably because of the saturation of the NH(2)(-) core. Similar results were obtained at the MP2 level of calculation. A stability analysis was performed using the commonly defined stability function E(n)(-)(1) + E(n)(+1) - 2E(n), where E is the total energy of the cluster, including the zero point correction energy (E = E(t) + ZPE). The trend on the relative stability of the clusters presents an excellent agreement with the distribution of experimental cluster abundances. Moreover, the stability analysis predicts that the (NH(3))(4)NH(4)(+) and the even negative clusters [(NH(3))(n)NH(2)(-), n = 2, 4, and 6] should be the most stable ones, in perfect agreement with the experimental results. PMID:16913675

  9. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  10. Pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development ar Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provide a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  11. Neutron standard data

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, R.; Conde, H.

    1988-01-01

    The neutron standards are reviewed with emphasis on the evaluation for ENDFB-VI. Also discussed are the neutron spectrum of /sup 252/Cf spontaneous fission, activation cross sections for neutron flux measurement, and standards for neutron energies greater than 20 MeV. Recommendations are made for future work. 21 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. The Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new user experimental facility planned to be operational at Oak Ridge in the late 1990's. The centerpiece of the ANS will be a steady-state research reactor of unprecedented thermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub th} {approx} 9{center dot}10{sup 19} m{sup -2}{center dot}s{sup -1}) accompanied by extensive and comprehensive equipment and facilities for neutron-based research. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  13. A portable measurement system for subcriticality measurements by the CF-source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Ragan, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    A portable system has been assembled that is capable of measuring the subcriticality of fissile materials using the /sup 252/CF-source-driven neutron noise analysis method. The measurement system consists of a parallel-plate ionization chamber containing /sup 252/CF, two /sup 3/He proportional counters with their associated electronics, and a small computer containing anti-aliasing filters and A/D convertors. The system Fourier analyzes the digitized data and forms the appropriate auto and cross-power spectral densities. These spectra are used to form a ratio of spectral densities, G/sub 12/G/sub 13//G/sub 11/G/sub 23/, where 1 refers to the ionization chamber, and 2 and 3 refer to the /sup 3/He counters, from which subcriticality can be determined. The chamber and detectors are located appropriately near the fissile material. The system is capable of sampling signals at rates of up to 80 kHz and processing these data at rates of 2 kHz to form the appropriate spectra. The presently configured system is a two-channel system, hence the measurement of G/sub 12/, G/sub 13/, and G/sub 23/ must be done sequentially before the ratio of spectral densities is obtained. Future improvements of the system will allow simultaneous measurement of all spectra and will further reduce size, thereby enhancing portability. This measurement system can provide reliable, cost effective, and convenient determination of the subcriticality of a wide variety of fissile materials and moderators.

  14. Neutron radiative capture methods for surface elemental analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trombka, J.I.; Senftle, F.; Schmadebeck, R.

    1970-01-01

    Both an accelerator and a 252Cf neutron source have been used to induce characteristic gamma radiation from extended soil samples. To demonstrate the method, measurements of the neutron-induced radiative capture and activation gamma rays have been made with both Ge(Li) and NaI(Tl) detectors, Because of the possible application to space flight geochemical analysis, it is believed that NaI(Tl) detectors must be used. Analytical procedures have been developed to obtain both qualitative and semiquantitative results from an interpretation of the measured NaI(Tl) pulse-height spectrum. Experiment results and the analytic procedure are presented. ?? 1970.

  15. Radioisotopic neutron transmission spectrometry: Quantitative analysis by using partial least-squares method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Yun; Choi, Yong Suk; Park, Yong Joon; Jung, Sung-Hee

    2009-01-01

    Neutron spectrometry, based on the scattering of high energy fast neutrons from a radioisotope and slowing-down by the light hydrogen atoms, is a useful technique for non-destructive, quantitative measurement of hydrogen content because it has a large measuring volume, and is not affected by temperature, pressure, pH value and color. The most common choice for radioisotope neutron source is (252)Cf or (241)Am-Be. In this study, (252)Cf with a neutron flux of 6.3x10(6)n/s has been used as an attractive neutron source because of its high flux neutron and weak radioactivity. Pulse-height neutron spectra have been obtained by using in-house built radioisotopic neutron spectrometric system equipped with (3)He detector and multi-channel analyzer, including a neutron shield. As a preliminary study, polyethylene block (density of approximately 0.947g/cc and area of 40cmx25cm) was used for the determination of hydrogen content by using multivariate calibration models, depending on the thickness of the block. Compared with the results obtained from a simple linear calibration model, partial least-squares regression (PLSR) method offered a better performance in a quantitative data analysis. It also revealed that the PLSR method in a neutron spectrometric system can be promising in the real-time, online monitoring of the powder process to determine the content of any type of molecules containing hydrogen nuclei. PMID:19285419

  16. Ultrashort pulsed neutron source.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, I; McCary, E; Meadows, A R; Arefiev, A; Bernstein, A C; Chester, C; Cortez, J; Donovan, M E; Dyer, G; Gaul, E W; Hamilton, D; Kuk, D; Lestrade, A C; Wang, C; Ditmire, T; Hegelich, B M

    2014-10-31

    We report on a novel compact laser-driven neutron source with an unprecedented short pulse duration (<50  ps) and high peak flux (>10(18)  n/cm(2)/s), an order of magnitude higher than any existing source. In our experiments, high-energy electron jets are generated from thin (<3  μm) plastic targets irradiated by a petawatt laser. These intense electron beams are employed to generate neutrons from a metal converter. Our method opens venues for enhancing neutron radiography contrast and for creating astrophysical conditions of heavy element synthesis in the laboratory. PMID:25396373

  17. Ultrashort Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantz, I.; McCary, E.; Meadows, A. R.; Arefiev, A.; Bernstein, A. C.; Chester, C.; Cortez, J.; Donovan, M. E.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E. W.; Hamilton, D.; Kuk, D.; Lestrade, A. C.; Wang, C.; Ditmire, T.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2014-10-01

    We report on a novel compact laser-driven neutron source with an unprecedented short pulse duration (<50 ps ) and high peak flux (>1018 n /cm2/s ), an order of magnitude higher than any existing source. In our experiments, high-energy electron jets are generated from thin (<3 μ m ) plastic targets irradiated by a petawatt laser. These intense electron beams are employed to generate neutrons from a metal converter. Our method opens venues for enhancing neutron radiography contrast and for creating astrophysical conditions of heavy element synthesis in the laboratory.

  18. FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.

    1959-04-21

    A method is presented for preparing a neutron source from polonium-210 and substances, such as beryllium and boron, characterized by emission of neutrons upon exposure to alpha particles from the polonium. According to the invention, a source is prepared by placing powdered beryllium and a platinum foil electroplated with polonium-2;.0 in a beryllium container. The container is sealed and then heated by induction to a temperature of 450 to 1100 deg C to volatilize the polonium off the foil into the powder. The heating step is terminated upon detection of a maximum in the neutron flux level.

  19. Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Blasing, T.J.; Brown, R.A.; Cada, G.F.; Easterly, C.; Feldman, D.L.; Hagan, C.W.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kroodsma, R.L.; McCold, L.N.; Reich, W.J.; Scofield, P.A.; Socolof, M.L.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these neutrons in ANS experiment facilities would be an essential component of national research efforts in basic materials science. Additionally, ANS capabilities would include production of transplutonium isotopes, irradiation of potential fusion and fission reactor materials, activation analysis, and production of medical and industrial isotopes such as {sup 252}Cf. Although ANS would not require licensing by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE regards the design, construction, and operation of ANS as activities that would produce a licensable facility; that is, DOE is following the regulatory guidelines that NRC would apply if NRC were licensing the facility. Those guidelines include instructions for the preparation of an environmental report (ER), a compilation of available data and preliminary analyses regarding the environmental impacts of nuclear facility construction and operation. The ER, described and outlined in NRC Regulatory Guide 4.2, serves as a background document to facilitate the preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs). Using Regulatory Guide 4.2 as a model, this ANS ER provides analyses and information specific to the ANS site and area that can be adopted (and modified, if necessary) for the ANS EIS. The ER is being prepared in two phases. Phase 1 ER includes many of the data and analyses needed to prepare the EIS but does not include data or analyses of alternate sites or alternate technologies. Phase 2 ER will include the additional data and analyses stipulated by Regulatory Guide 4.2.

  20. FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.

    1959-01-20

    A method is presented for preparing a more efficient neutron source comprising inserting in a container a quantity of Po-210, inserting B powder coated with either Ag, Pt, or Ni. The container is sealed and then slowly heated to about 450 C to volatilize the Po and effect combination of the coated powder with the Po. The neutron flux emitted by the unit is moritored and the heating step is terminated when the flux reaches a maximum or selected level.

  1. Coded source neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip R; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2011-01-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100 m) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100um and 10um aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  2. DOSE PROFILE MODELING OF IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY’S ACTIVE NEUTRON INTERROGATION TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury; J. M. Zabriskie; J. Wharton; A. J. Caffrey

    2009-06-01

    A new research and development laboratory has been commissioned at Idaho National Laboratory for performing active neutron interrogation research and development. The facility is designed to provide radiation shielding for DT fusion (14.1 MeV) neutron generators (2 x 108 neutrons per second), DD fusion (2.5 MeV) neutron generators (up to 2 x 106 neutrons per second), and 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron sources (6.7 x 107 neutrons per second, 30 micrograms). Shielding at the laboratory is comprised of modular concrete shield blocks 0.76 m thick with tongue-in-groove features to prevent radiation streaming, arranged into one small and one large test vault. The larger vault is designed to allow operation of the DT generator and has walls 3.8 m tall, an entrance maze, and a fully integrated electrical interlock system; the smaller test vault is designed for 252Cf and DD neutron sources and has walls 1.9 m tall and a simple entrance maze. Both analytical calculations and numerical simulations were used in the design process for the building to assess the performance of the shielding walls and to ensure external dose rates are within required facility limits. Dose rate contour plots have been generated for the facility to visualize the effectiveness of the shield wall and entrance maze and to illustrate the spatial profile of the radiation dose field above the facility and the effects of skyshine around the vaults.

  3. Optimized geometry for bulk coal PGNAA with external moderation of the source neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C.; Salgado, J.; Carvalho, F. G.

    1995-10-01

    A simulation study of a PGNAA system for the analysis of coal with a 252Cf neutron source has been carried out using the MCNP code to investigate the effect on the system response of variable thickness, density and composition of the sample when the source is placed at the center of a moderating sphere of polyethylene. Results for different radii of the moderating sphere are reported. The results show that the geometry of the measuring arrangement can be chosen so that the γ count rate/wt % of an arbitrary element (including hydrogen) is independent both of the hydrogen content of the coal, ωH, expressed as a mass fraction, and of the bulk density, d, or volume hydrogen content of the sample νH, at least in the range of ωH-values commonly found in bituminous coals. The system response, defined as the magnitude of the output signal/wt % of an arbitrary element in the coal composition is then independent of composition and bulk density of the coal sample.

  4. Detecting energy dependent neutron capture distributions in a liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmer, Matthew J. I.; Gamage, Kelum A. A.; Taylor, Graeme C.

    2015-03-01

    A novel technique is being developed to estimate the effective dose of a neutron field based on the distribution of neutron captures in a scintillator. Using Monte Carlo techniques, a number of monoenergetic neutron source energies and locations were modelled and their neutron capture response was recorded. Using back propagation Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) the energy and incident direction of the neutron field was predicted from the distribution of neutron captures within a 6Li-loaded liquid scintillator. Using this proposed technique, the effective dose of 252Cf, 241AmBe and 241AmLi neutron fields was estimated to within 30% for four perpendicular angles in the horizontal plane. Initial theoretical investigations show that this technique holds some promise for real-time estimation of the effective dose of a neutron field.

  5. Fast-neutron spectrometry using a ³He ionization chamber and digital pulse shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Chichester, D L; Johnson, J T; Seabury, E H

    2012-08-01

    Digital pulse shape analysis (dPSA) has been used with a Cuttler-Shalev type (3)He ionization chamber to measure the fast-neutron spectra of a deuterium-deuterium electronic neutron generator, a bare (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron source, and of the transmitted fast neutron spectra of a (252)Cf source attenuated by water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, and magnesium. Rise-time dPSA has been employed using the common approach for analyzing n +(3)He→(1)H+(3)H ionization events and improved to account for wall-effect and pile-up events, increasing the fidelity of these measurements. Simulations have been performed of the different experimental arrangements and compared with the measurements, demonstrating general agreement between the dPSA-processed fast-neutron spectra and predictions. The fast-neutron resonance features of the attenuation cross sections of the attenuating materials are clearly visible within the resolution limits of the electronics used for the measurements, and the potential applications of high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry for nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards measurements are discussed. PMID:22728128

  6. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing.

    PubMed

    Iwatani, K; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Oka, T; Hasai, H

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate 152Eu and 60Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. PMID:8083048

  7. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: Indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazuo; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hiraoka, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Oka, Takamitsu

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate {sup 152}Eu and {sup 60}Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. 18 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. β-delayed neutron spectroscopy using trapped radioactive ions.

    PubMed

    Yee, R M; Scielzo, N D; Bertone, P F; Buchinger, F; Caldwell, S; Clark, J A; Deibel, C M; Fallis, J; Greene, J P; Gulick, S; Lascar, D; Levand, A F; Li, G; Norman, E B; Pedretti, M; Savard, G; Segel, R E; Sharma, K S; Sternberg, M G; Van Schelt, J; Zabransky, B J

    2013-03-01

    A novel technique for β-delayed neutron spectroscopy has been demonstrated using trapped ions. The neutron-energy spectrum is reconstructed by measuring the time of flight of the nuclear recoil following neutron emission, thereby avoiding all the challenges associated with neutron detection, such as backgrounds from scattered neutrons and γ rays and complicated detector-response functions. (137)I(+) ions delivered from a (252)Cf source were confined in a linear Paul trap surrounded by radiation detectors, and the β-delayed neutron-energy spectrum and branching ratio were determined by detecting the β(-) and recoil ions in coincidence. Systematic effects were explored by determining the branching ratio three ways. Improvements to achieve higher detection efficiency, better energy resolution, and a lower neutron-energy threshold are proposed. PMID:23496704

  9. Optimization of neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E.B.

    1993-11-09

    I consider here the optimization of the two component neutron source, allowing beam species and energy to vary. A simple model is developed, based on the earlier publications, that permits the optimum to be obtained simply. The two component plasma, with one species of hot ion (D{sup +} or T{sup +}) and the complementary species of cold ion, is easy to analyze in the case of a spatially uniform cold plasma, as to good approximation the total number of hot ions is important but not their spatial distribution. Consequently, the optimization can ignore spatial effects. The problem of a plasma with both types of hot ions and cold ions is rather more difficult, as the neutron production by hot-hot interactions is sensitive to their spatial distributions. Consequently, consideration of this problem will be delayed to a future memorandum. The basic model is that used in the published articles on the two-component, beam-plasma mirror source. I integrate the Fokker-Planck equation analytically, obtaining good agreement with previous numerical results. This simplifies the optimization, by providing a functional form for the neutron production. The primary result is expressed in terms of the power efficiency: watts of neutrons/watts of primary power. The latter includes the positive ion neutralization efficiency. At 150 keV, the present model obtains an efficiency of 0.66%, compared with 0.53% of the earlier calculation.

  10. A Comparison of Neutron-Based Non-Destructive Assessment Methods for Chemical Warfare Material and High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Seabury, E. H.; Chichester, D. L.; Wharton, C. J.; Caffrey, A. J.

    2009-03-10

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) systems employ neutrons as a probe to interrogate items, e.g. chemical warfare materiel-filled munitions. The choice of a neutron source in field-portable systems is determined by its ability to excite nuclei of interest, operational concerns such as radiological safety and ease-of-use, and cost. Idaho National Laboratory's PINS Chemical Assay System has traditionally used a {sup 252}Cf isotopic neutron source, but recently a deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generator (ENG) has been tested as an alternate neutron source. This paper presents the results of using both of these neutron sources to interrogate chemical warfare materiel (CWM) and high explosive (HE) filled munitions.

  11. A Comparison of Neutron-Based Non-Destructive Assessment Methods for Chemical Warfare Materiel and High Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabury, E. H.; Chichester, D. L.; Wharton, C. J.; Caffrey, A. J.

    2009-03-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) systems employ neutrons as a probe to interrogate items, e.g. chemical warfare materiel-filled munitions. The choice of a neutron source in field-portable systems is determined by its ability to excite nuclei of interest, operational concerns such as radiological safety and ease-of-use, and cost. Idaho National Laboratory's PINS Chemical Assay System has traditionally used a 252Cf isotopic neutron source, but recently a deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generator (ENG) has been tested as an alternate neutron source. This paper presents the results of using both of these neutron sources to interrogate chemical warfare materiel (CWM) and high explosive (HE) filled munitions.

  12. Method of searching for neutron clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, G. N.; Garapatskii, A. A.; Padalko, V. N.

    2014-10-01

    A new method of searching for neutron clusters (multineutrons) composed of neutrons bound by nuclear forces has been introduced and implemented. The method is based on the search for daughter nuclei that emerge at the nuclei cluster decay of 252Cf to neutron clusters. The effect of long-time build-up of daughter nuclei with a high atomic number and long half-life was utilized. The results are interpreted as evidence of the cluster decay of 252Cf to daughter nucleus 232U (half-life of T1/2= 68.9 years). The emergence of 232U is attributed to emission of neutron clusters consisting of eight neutrons - octaneutrons. The emission probability of octaneutrons against α-decay probability of 252Cf is defined equal to λC/λα=1.74×10-6.

  13. Monte Carlo Evaluation of the Improvements in Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) Resulting From a DT Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, S. A.; Mihalczo, J. T.

    2002-05-16

    Nuclear safeguards active measurements that rely on the time correlation between fast neutrons and gamma rays from the same fission are a promising technique. Previous studies have shown the feasibility of this method, in conjunction with the use of artificial neural networks, to estimate the mass and enrichment of fissile samples enclosed in special, sealed containers. This paper evaluates the use of the associated particle sealed tube neutron generator (APSTNG) as the interrogation source in correlation measurements. The results show that its use is of particular importance when floor reflections are present. The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) presently uses {sup 252}Cf ionization chambers as interrogation sources for the time-dependent coincidence measurements. Because triggers from this source are associated with neutrons emitted in any direction, adjacent materials such as the floor and nearby containers could affect the measurements and should be accounted for. Conversely, the APSTNG, together with an alpha particle detector, defines a cone of neutrons that can be aimed at the item under verification, thus removing the effects of nearby materials from the time-dependent coincidence distributions. Monte Carlo calculations were performed using MCNP-POLIMI, a modified version of the standard MCNP code. The code attempts to calculate more correctly quantities that depend on the second moment of the neutron and gamma distributions. The simulations quantified the sensitivity enhancements and removal of the effects of nearby materials by substituting the traditional {sup 252}Cf source with the APSTNG.

  14. Development of a thermal neutron sensor for Humanitarian Demining.

    PubMed

    Cinausero, M; Lunardon, M; Nebbia, G; Pesente, S; Viesti, G; Filippini, V

    2004-07-01

    A thermal neutron sensor prototype for Humanitarian Demining has been developed, trying to minimize cost and complexity of the system as required in such application. A (252)Cf source or a sealed-tube neutron generator is employed to produce primary fast neutrons that are thermalized in a moderator designed to optimize the neutron capture reaction yield in buried samples. A description of the sensor, including the performances of the acquisition system based on a Flash ADC card and final tests with explosive simulants are reported. A comparison of the sensor performance when using a radioactive source to that when employing a sealed-tube neutron generator is presented. Limitations and possible applications of this technique are discussed. PMID:15145439

  15. The neutron-gamma Feynman variance to mean approach: Gamma detection and total neutron-gamma detection (theory and practice)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernikova, Dina; Axell, Kåre; Avdic, Senada; Pázsit, Imre; Nordlund, Anders; Allard, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Two versions of the neutron-gamma variance to mean (Feynman-alpha method or Feynman-Y function) formula for either gamma detection only or total neutron-gamma detection, respectively, are derived and compared in this paper. The new formulas have particular importance for detectors of either gamma photons or detectors sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation. If applied to a plastic or liquid scintillation detector, the total neutron-gamma detection Feynman-Y expression corresponds to a situation where no discrimination is made between neutrons and gamma particles. The gamma variance to mean formulas are useful when a detector of only gamma radiation is used or when working with a combined neutron-gamma detector at high count rates. The theoretical derivation is based on the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation with the inclusion of general reactions and corresponding intensities for neutrons and gammas, but with the inclusion of prompt reactions only. A one energy group approximation is considered. The comparison of the two different theories is made by using reaction intensities obtained in MCNPX simulations with a simplified geometry for two scintillation detectors and a 252Cf-source. In addition, the variance to mean ratios, neutron, gamma and total neutron-gamma are evaluated experimentally for a weak 252Cf neutron-gamma source, a 137Cs random gamma source and a 22Na correlated gamma source. Due to the focus being on the possibility of using neutron-gamma variance to mean theories for both reactor and safeguards applications, we limited the present study to the general analytical expressions for Feynman-alpha formulas.

  16. Implementation of the Fissile Mass Flow Monitor Source Verification and Confirmation

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, Taner; March-Leuba, Jose A; Powell, Danny H; Nelson, Dennis; Radev, Radoslav

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the verification procedure for neutron sources installed in U.S. Department of Energy equipment used to measure fissile material flow. The Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) equipment determines the {sup 235}U fissile mass flow of UF{sub 6} gas streams by using {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for fission activation of the UF{sub 6} gas and by measuring the fission products in the flow. The {sup 252}Cf sources in each FMFM are typically replaced every 2 to 3 years due to their relatively short half-life ({approx} 2.65 years). During installation of the new FMFM sources, the source identity and neutronic characteristics provided by the manufacturer are verified with the following equipment: (1) a remote-control video television (RCTV) camera monitoring system is used to confirm the source identity, and (2) a neutron detection system (NDS) is used for source-strength confirmation. Use of the RCTV and NDS permits remote monitoring of the source replacement process and eliminates unnecessary radiation exposure. The RCTV, NDS, and the confirmation process are described in detail in this report.

  17. What happened to the moon? A lunar history mission using neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Breitkreutz, H.; Li, X.; Burfeindt, J.; Bernhardt, H. G.; Hoffmann, P.; Trieloff, M.; Schwarz, W. H.; Hopp, J.; Jessberger, E. K.; Hiesinger, H.

    2011-07-01

    The ages of lunar rocks can be determined using the {sup 40}Ar -{sup 39}Ar technique that can be used in-situ on the moon if a neutron source, a noble gas mass spectrometer and a gas extraction and purification system are brought to the lunar surface. A possible instrument for such a task is ISAGE, which combines a strong {sup 252}Cf neutron source and a compact spectrometer for in-situ dating of e.g. the South Pole Aitken impact basin or the potentially very young basalts south of the Aristachus Plateau. In this paper, the design of the neutron source will be discussed. The source is assumed to be a hollow sphere surrounded by a reflector, a geometry that provides a very homogeneous flux at the irradiation position inside the sphere. The optimal source geometry depending on the experimental conditions, the costs of transportation for the reflector and the costs of the source itself are calculated. A minimum {sup 252}Cf mass of 1.5 mg is determined. (authors)

  18. Neutron detection in a high gamma ray background with liquid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanato, L.; Cester, D.; Viesti, G.; Nebbia, G.

    2013-04-19

    The capability of liquid scintillator (namely 2'' Multiplication-Sign 2'' cells of EJ301 and EJ309) of detecting neutrons in a very high gamma ray background is explored. A weak {sup 252}Cf source has been detected in a high {sup 137}Cs gamma ray background corresponding to a dose rate of 100 {mu}Sv/h with probability of detection in compliance with IEC requirements for hand held instruments. Tests were performed with new generation of CAEN digitizers, in particular the V1720 (8 Channel 12bit 250 MS/s) one.

  19. Dosimetry of mixed neutron and gamma radiation with paired Fricke solutions in light and heavy water.

    PubMed

    Himit, M; Itoh, T; Endo, S; Fujikawa, K; Hoshi, M

    1996-06-01

    Paired Fricke solutions, made up from light water or heavy water and 0.8N in H2SO4 and 1 mM in Fe(NH4)2(SO4)2 and NaCl, were calibrated with 60Co gamma rays and with mixed neutron and gamma radiation from a 252Cf source. Absorbance increases, AL and AH, in light- and heavy-water Fricke dosimeters, respectively, increased with fast-neutron and gamma-ray tissue doses, Dn (GY) and D gamma (GY), of the mixed radiation as follows: AL = 0.00178Dn + 0.00371D gamma; AH = 0.00121Dn + 0.00442 D gamma. G-values of 7.2 and 5.5 were obtained for 252Cf neutrons in light- and heavy-water Fricke dosimeters, respectively. When we applied the pair of equations to AL and AH values observed after exposure to mixed radiation in a nuclear reactor, resulting Dn and D gamma values agreed within 10% to doses measured with paired ionization chambers. Doses required for Fricke dosimeters were 5 Gy or more. In contrast, we found that micronuclear yields in onion roots can measure the neutron component of mixed radiation fields at the order of 10 cGy with reasonable accuracy even if the neutron to gamma-ray dose ratio is unknown. PMID:8840720

  20. Simulation of response functions of fast neutron sensors and development of thin neutron silicon sensor.

    PubMed

    Takada, Masashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsuda, Mikihiko; Nunomiya, Tomoya

    2014-10-01

    On radiation detection using silicon sensor, signals are produced from collected charges in a depletion layer; however, for high-energy particles, this depletion layer is extended due to funnelling phenomenon. The lengths of charge collection were experimentally obtained from proton peak energies in measured pulse-heights. The length is extended with increasing proton energy of up to 6 MeV, and then, is constant over 6 MeV. The response functions of fast neutron sensors were simulated for 5- and 15-MeV monoenergetic and (252)Cf neutron sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code. The simulation results agree well with the experimental ones, including the effect of funnelling phenomenon. In addition, a thin silicon sensor was developed for a new real-time personal neutron dosemeter. Photon sensitivity is vanishingly smaller than neutron one by a factor of 5×10(-4). PMID:24516186

  1. ACCELERATOR BASED CONTINUOUS NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; RUGGIERO,A.G.; LUDEWIG,H.

    2003-03-25

    Until the last decade, most neutron experiments have been performed at steady-state, reactor-based sources. Recently, however, pulsed spallation sources have been shown to be very useful in a wide range of neutron studies. A major review of neutron sources in the US was conducted by a committee chaired by Nobel laureate Prof. W. Kohn: ''Neutron Sources for America's Future-BESAC Panel on Neutron Sources 1/93''. This distinguished panel concluded that steady state and pulsed sources are complementary and that the nation has need for both to maintain a balanced neutron research program. The report recommended that both a new reactor and a spallation source be built. This complementarity is recognized worldwide. The conclusion of this report is that a new continuous neutron source is needed for the second decade of the 20 year plan to replace aging US research reactors and close the US neutron gap. it is based on spallation production of neutrons using a high power continuous superconducting linac to generate protons impinging on a heavy metal target. There do not appear to be any major technical challenges to the building of such a facility since a continuous spallation source has been operating in Switzerland for several years.

  2. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    We review the current status of the development of accelerator sources of epithermal neutrons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a promising method of malignant tumor treatment. Particular attention is given to the source of epithermal neutrons on the basis of a new type of charged particle accelerator: tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation and lithium neutron-producing target. It is also shown that the accelerator with specialized targets makes it possible to generate fast and monoenergetic neutrons, resonance and monoenergetic gamma-rays, alpha-particles, and positrons.

  3. Neutron and Gamma Ray Pulse Shape Discrimination with Polyvinyltoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Stave, Jean A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2012-03-01

    The goal of this was research effort was to test the ability of two poly vinyltoluene research samples to produce recordable, distinguishable signals in response to gamma rays and neutrons. Pulse shape discrimination was performed to identify if the signal was generated by a gamma ray or a neutron. A standard figure of merit for pulse shape discrimination was used to quantify the gamma-neutron pulse separation. Measurements were made with gamma and neutron sources with and without shielding. The best figure of merit obtained was 1.77; this figure of merit was achieved with the first sample in response to an un-moderated 252Cf source shielded with 5.08 cm of lead.

  4. Monte Carlo N-particle simulation of neutron-based sterilisation of anthrax contamination

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B; Xu, J; Liu, T; Ouyang, X

    2012-01-01

    Objective To simulate the neutron-based sterilisation of anthrax contamination by Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) 4C code. Methods Neutrons are elementary particles that have no charge. They are 20 times more effective than electrons or γ-rays in killing anthrax spores on surfaces and inside closed containers. Neutrons emitted from a 252Cf neutron source are in the 100 keV to 2 MeV energy range. A 2.5 MeV D–D neutron generator can create neutrons at up to 1013 n s−1 with current technology. All these enable an effective and low-cost method of killing anthrax spores. Results There is no effect on neutron energy deposition on the anthrax sample when using a reflector that is thicker than its saturation thickness. Among all three reflecting materials tested in the MCNP simulation, paraffin is the best because it has the thinnest saturation thickness and is easy to machine. The MCNP radiation dose and fluence simulation calculation also showed that the MCNP-simulated neutron fluence that is needed to kill the anthrax spores agrees with previous analytical estimations very well. Conclusion The MCNP simulation indicates that a 10 min neutron irradiation from a 0.5 g 252Cf neutron source or a 1 min neutron irradiation from a 2.5 MeV D–D neutron generator may kill all anthrax spores in a sample. This is a promising result because a 2.5 MeV D–D neutron generator output >1013 n s−1 should be attainable in the near future. This indicates that we could use a D–D neutron generator to sterilise anthrax contamination within several seconds. PMID:22573293

  5. Radioactivity in atomic-bomb samples from exposure to environmental neutrons.

    PubMed

    Endo, S; Shizuma, K; Tanaka, K; Ishikawa, M; Rühm, W; Egbert, S D; Hoshi, M

    2007-12-01

    For about one decade, activation measurements performed on environmental samples from a distance larger than 1 km from the hypocenter of the atomic-bomb explosion over Hiroshima suggested much higher thermal neutron fluences to the survivors than predicted. This caused concern among the radiation protection community and prompted a complete re-evaluation of all aspects of survivor dosimetry. While it was shown recently that secondary neutrons from cosmic radiation and other sources have probably been the reason for the high measured concentrations of the long-lived radioisotope 36Cl in these samples, the source for high measured concentrations of the short-lived radionuclides 152Eu and 60Co has not yet been investigated in detail. In order to quantify the production of 152Eu and 60Co in environmental samples by secondary neutrons from cosmic radiation, thermal neutron fluxes were measured by means of a He gas proportional counter in various buildings where these samples had been and still are being stored. Because a 252Cf neutron source has been operated occasionally close to one of the sample storage rooms, additional neutron flux measurements were carried out when the neutron source was in operation. The thermal neutron fluxes measured ranged from 0.00017 to 0.00093 n cm(-2) s(-1) and depended on the floor number of the investigated building. Based on the measured neutron fluxes, the specific activities from the reactions 151Eu(n,gamma)152Eu and 59Co(n,gamma)60Co in the atomic-bomb samples were estimated to be 7.9 mBq g(-1) Eu and 0.27 mBq g(-1) Co, respectively, in saturation. These activities are much lower than those recently measured in samples that had been exposed to atomic-bomb neutrons. It is therefore concluded that environmental and moderated 252Cf neutrons are not the source for the high activities that had been measured in these samples. PMID:17993849

  6. Octupole Deformation Bands of πh11/2 in Neutron-Rich 145,147La Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sheng-jiang; S, Zhu J.; Wang, Mu-ge; J, Hamilton H.; A, Ramayya V.; B, Babu R. S.; W, Ma C.; Long, Gui-lu; Zhu, Ling-yan; Li, Ming; A, Sakhaee; Gan, Cui-yun; Yang, Li-ming; J, Komicki; J, Cole D.; R, Aryaeinejad; M, Drigert W.; J, Rasmussen O.; M, Stoyer A.; S, Chu Y.; K, Gregorich E.; M, Mohar F.; S, Prussin G.; I, Lee Y.; Yu, Oganessian Ts; G, Ter-Akopian M.; A, Daniel V.

    1999-03-01

    Octupole deformation bands built on πh11/2 orbital in neutron-rich odd-Z 145,147La nuclei have been investigated by measuring the prompt γ-rays emitted from the 252Cf source. The alternating parity band structures and strong E1 transitions observed between negative- and positive-parity bands in both nuclei indicate the octupole deformation enhanced by the h11/2 single proton coupling. According to observed energy displacements the octupole deformation becomes stable at the intermediate spin states.

  7. In-situ calibration of TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hendel, H.W.; Palladino, R.W.; Barnes, C.W.; Diesso, M.; Felt, J.S.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Ku, L.P.; Liu, Q.P.; Motley, R.W.; Murphy, H.B.; Murphy, J.; Nieschmidt, E.B.; Roberts, J.A.; Saito, T.; Strachan, J.D.; Waszazak, R.J.; Young, K.

    1990-03-01

    We report results of the TFTR fission detector calibration performed in December 1988. A NBS-traceable, remotely controlled {sup 252}Cf neutron source was moved toroidally through the TFTR vacuum vessel. Detection efficiencies for two {sup 235}U detectors were measured for 930 locations of the neutron point source in toroidal scans at 16 different major radii and vertical heights. These scans effectively simulated the volume-distributed plasma neutron source, and the volume-integrated detection efficiency was found to be insensitive to plasma position. The Campbell mode is useful due to its large overlap with the count rate mode and large dynamic range. The resulting absolute plasma neutron source calibration has an uncertainty of {plus minus} 13%. 21 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. A compact neutron beam generator system designed for prompt gamma nuclear activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Mostacci, D

    2011-08-01

    In this work a compact system was designed for bulk sample analysis using the technique of PGNAA. The system consists of (252)Cf fission neutron source, a moderator/reflector/filter assembly, and a suitable enclosure to delimit the resulting neutron beam. The moderator/reflector/filter arrangement has been optimised to maximise the thermal neutron component useful for samples analysis with a suitably low level of beam contamination. The neutron beam delivered by this compact system is used to irradiate the sample and the prompt gamma rays produced by neutron reactions within the sample elements are detected by appropriate gamma rays detector. Neutron and gamma rays transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP5). PMID:21129990

  9. Detection of fast neutrons from shielded nuclear materials using a semiconductor alpha detector.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, R; Siiskonen, T

    2014-08-01

    The response of a semiconductor alpha detector to fast (>1 MeV) neutrons was investigated by using measurements and simulations. A polyethylene converter was placed in front of the detector to register recoil protons generated by elastic collisions between neutrons and hydrogen nuclei of the converter. The developed prototype equipment was tested with shielded radiation sources. The low background of the detector and insensitivity to high-energy gamma rays above 1 MeV are advantages when the detection of neutron-emitting nuclear materials is of importance. In the case of a (252)Cf neutron spectrum, the intrinsic efficiency of fast neutron detection was determined to be 2.5×10(-4), whereas three-fold greater efficiency was obtained for a (241)AmBe neutron spectrum. PMID:24792122

  10. Neutron spectrometer based on a proton telescope with electronic collimation of recoil protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milkov, V. M.; Panteleev, Ts. Ts.; Bogdzel, A.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Kutuzov, S.; Borzakov, S. B.; Sedyshev, P. V.

    2012-11-01

    A prototype of a neutron spectrometer based on a gas proportional counter with recoil-proton registration is created at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (FLNP JINR) in Dubna. The spectrometer is developed to measure the kinetic energy of protons scattered elastically at small angles that are produced by ( n, p) reaction in an environment containing hydrogen. The elaborated prototype consists of two cylindrical proportional counters used as cathodes. They are placed in a gas environment with a common centrally situated anode wire. Studies on the characteristics of the neutron spectrometer were conducted using 252Cf and 239Pu-Be radioisotope neutron sources. Measurements were made with monoenergetic neutrons produced by the 7Li( p, n)7Be reaction when a thin lithium target was bombarded with a proton beam from an EG-5 electrostatic accelerator, as well as with neutrons from the reaction D( d, n) 3He with a gas deuterium target.

  11. Neutron diffraction on pulsed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, V. L.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    The current capabilities of and major scientific problems solved by time-of-flight neutron diffraction are reviewed. The reasons for the rapid development of the method over the last two decades have been mainly the emergence of third-generation pulsed sources with a megawatt time-averaged power and advances in neutron optical devices and detector systems. The paper discusses some historical aspects of time-of-flight neutron diffraction and examines the contribution to this method from F L Shapiro, the centennial of whose birth was celebrated in 2015. The state of the art with respect to neutron sources for studies on extracted beams is reviewed in a special section.

  12. Detailed dose distribution prediction of Cf-252 brachytherapy source with boron loading dose enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Mostacci, D; Molinari, V; Jehouani, A

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dose rate distribution and to determine the boron effect on dose rate distribution for (252)Cf brachytherapy source. This study was carried out using a Monte Carlo simulation. To validate the Monte Carlo computer code, the dosimetric parameters were determined following the updated TG-43 formalism and compared with current literature data. The validated computer code was then applied to evaluate the neutron and photon dose distribution and to illustrate the boron loading effect. PMID:19889549

  13. The Development, Characterization, and Performance Evaluation of a New Combination Type Personnel Neutron Dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chwei-Jeng

    A new combination type personnel neutron dosimeter has been designed and developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The combination personnel neutron dosimeter (CPND) consists of a Harshaw albedo neutron thermoluminescent dosimeter (two pairs of TLD-600/TLD-700) and two bubble detectors (one BD-100R and one BDS-1500 from Bubble Technology Industries, Canada). The CPND was developed with the aim of having crude neutron spectrometric capability, universal applicability, better angular response, and an improved lower limit of detection (LLD). The CPND has been well characterized in the following areas: reusability, linearity, lower limit of detection (LLD), detection capability in mixed neutron-gamma fields, angular dependence, and neutron energy dependence. The characterization was accomplished with irradiations using a ^{238} Pu-Be source, a ^{252} Cf(D_2O) source, a ^{252}Cf source, a ^ {252}Cf(PE) source, monoenergetic neutrons from accelerator and reactor filtered beams, ^ {137}Cs, and X-rays. Optimum signal readout procedures, signal processing techniques, routine operational usage, and neutron dose equivalent evaluation algorithms for the CPND were developed with the goals of having the best precision and accuracy as well as being convenient to use. Various reference spectra were developed to evaluate the performance (mainly the spectrometric and the dose equivalent measurement capabilities) of the CPND. The performance of the CPND was evaluated by in-situ tests in radiation fields existing in the working environment at ORNL. The spectra in these areas were measured previously with a calibrated Bonner multisphere spectrometer. The CPND also was tested with laboratory radioisotopic sources in single-source and multi-source exposure situations. Finally, the CPND was tested by participating in the fourteenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study. The results of the tests mentioned above demonstrated that the CPND meets the ambitious design purposes

  14. Neutron noise measurements at the Delphi subcritical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Szieberth, M.; Klujber, G.; Kloosterman, J. L.; De Haas, D.

    2012-07-01

    The paper presents the results and evaluations of a comprehensive set of neutron noise measurements on the Delphi subcritical assembly of the Delft Univ. of Technology. The measurements investigated the effect of different source distributions (inherent spontaneous fission and {sup 252}Cf) and the position of the detectors applied (both radially and vertically). The evaluation of the measured data has been performed by the variance-to-mean ratio (VTMR, Feynman-{alpha}), the autocorrelation (ACF, Rossi-{alpha}) and the cross-correlation (CCF) methods. The values obtained for the prompt decay constant show a strong bias, which depends both on the detector position and on the source distribution. This is due to the presence of higher modes in the system. It has been observed that the {alpha} value fitted is higher when the detector is close to the boundary of the core or to the {sup 252}Cf point-source. The higher alpha-modes have also been observed by fitting functions describing two alpha-modes. The successful set of measurement also provides a good basis for further theoretical investigations including the Monte Carlo simulation of the noise measurements and the calculation of the alpha-modes in the Delphi subcritical assembly. (authors)

  15. Fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A. A.; Zubarev, P. V.; Ivanenko, S. V.; Khilchenko, A. D.; Kotelnikov, A. I.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Puryga, E. A.; Shvyrev, V. G.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of subthermonuclear plasma confinement and heating in magnetic fusion devices such as GOL-3 and GDT at the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk, Russia) requires sophisticated equipment for neutron-, gamma- diagnostics and upgrading data acquisition systems with online data processing. Measurement of fast neutron flux with stilbene scintillation detectors raised the problem of discrimination of the neutrons (n) from background cosmic particles (muons) and neutron-induced gamma rays (γ). This paper describes a fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse-shape discrimination (DPSD) algorithm FPGA-implemented for the GOL-3 and GDT devices. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with the help of 137Cs and 252Cf radiation sources. The Figures of Merit (FOM) calculated for different energy cuts are presented.

  16. Long counter and its application for the calibration of the neutron irradiators.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeonseo; Kim, Jungho; Choi, Kil-Oung

    2014-10-01

    The Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) has constructed a new long counter that can be disassembled in parts and reassembled. This counter can be easily transported and used as a transfer standard instrument for neutron fluence measurements. The response function and the effective centre of the counter are investigated by calculating neutron energies from thermal to 30 MeV using MCNPX. By carrying out measurements using a (252)Cf source in the KRISS irradiation room, the accuracy of the evaluated effective centre position is confirmed. The 'distance variation method' is adopted to eliminate the effect of inscatter neutrons. This method is effective and used for the experimental determination of the effective centre. The neutron emission rates determined by the neutron fluence measurements using the long counter developed are compared with those measured by a manganese sulphate bath, and show good agreement within 3 %. PMID:24381205

  17. Research on fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryaznevich, M. P.

    2012-06-01

    The use of fusion devices as powerful neutron sources has been discussed for decades. Whereas the successful route to a commercial fusion power reactor demands steady state stable operation combined with the high efficiency required to make electricity production economic, the alternative approach to advancing the use of fusion is free of many of complications connected with the requirements for economic power generation and uses the already achieved knowledge of Fusion physics and developed Fusion technologies. "Fusion for Neutrons" (F4N), has now been re-visited, inspired by recent progress achieved on comparably compact fusion devices, based on the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept. Freed from the requirement to produce much more electricity than used to drive it, a fusion neutron source could be efficiently used for many commercial applications, and also to support the goal of producing energy by nuclear power. The possibility to use a small or medium size ST as a powerful or intense steady-state fusion neutron source (FNS) is discussed in this paper in comparison with the use of traditional high aspect ratio tokamaks. An overview of various conceptual designs of compact fusion neutron sources based on the ST concept is given and they are compared with a recently proposed Super Compact Fusion Neutron Source (SCFNS), with major radius as low as 0.5 metres but still able to produce several MW of neutrons in a steady-state regime.

  18. Neutron counting and gamma spectroscopy with PVT detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2011-06-01

    Radiation portals normally incorporate a dedicated neutron counter and a gamma-ray detector with at least some spectroscopic capability. This paper describes the design and presents characterization data for a detection system called PVT-NG, which uses large polyvinyl toluene (PVT) detectors to monitor both types of radiation. The detector material is surrounded by polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which emits high-energy gamma rays following neutron capture reactions. Assessments based on high-energy gamma rays are well suited for the detection of neutron sources, particularly in border security applications, because few isotopes in the normal stream of commerce have significant gamma ray yields above 3 MeV. Therefore, an increased count rate for high-energy gamma rays is a strong indicator for the presence of a neutron source. The sensitivity of the PVT-NG sensor to bare {sup 252}Cf is 1.9 counts per second per nanogram (cps/ng) and the sensitivity for {sup 252}Cf surrounded by 2.5 cm of polyethylene is 2.3 cps/ng. The PVT-NG sensor is a proof-of-principal sensor that was not fully optimized. The neutron detector sensitivity could be improved, for instance, by using additional moderator. The PVT-NG detectors and associated electronics are designed to provide improved resolution, gain stability, and performance at high-count rates relative to PVT detectors in typical radiation portals. As well as addressing the needs for neutron detection, these characteristics are also desirable for analysis of the gamma-ray spectra. Accurate isotope identification results were obtained despite the common impression that the absence of photopeaks makes data collected by PVT detectors unsuitable for spectroscopic analysis. The PVT detectors in the PVT-NG unit are used for both gamma-ray and neutron detection, so the sensitive volume exceeds the volume of the detection elements in portals that use dedicated components to detect each type of radiation.

  19. A physics investigation of deadtime losses in neutron counting at low rates with Cf252

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Croft, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission sources are used for the characterization of neutron counters and the determination of calibration parameters; including both neutron coincidence counting (NCC) and neutron multiplicity deadtime (DT) parameters. Even at low event rates, temporally-correlated neutron counting using {sup 252}Cf suffers a deadtime effect. Meaning that in contrast to counting a random neutron source (e.g. AmLi to a close approximation), DT losses do not vanish in the low rate limit. This is because neutrons are emitted from spontaneous fission events in time-correlated 'bursts', and are detected over a short period commensurate with their lifetime in the detector (characterized by the system die-away time, {tau}). Thus, even when detected neutron events from different spontaneous fissions are unlikely to overlap in time, neutron events within the detected 'burst' are subject to intrinsic DT losses. Intrinsic DT losses for dilute Pu will be lower since the multiplicity distribution is softer, but real items also experience self-multiplication which can increase the 'size' of the bursts. Traditional NCC DT correction methods do not include the intrinsic (within burst) losses. We have proposed new forms of the traditional NCC Singles and Doubles DT correction factors. In this work, we apply Monte Carlo neutron pulse train analysis to investigate the functional form of the deadtime correction factors for an updating deadtime. Modeling is based on a high efficiency {sup 3}He neutron counter with short die-away time, representing an ideal {sup 3}He based detection system. The physics of dead time losses at low rates is explored and presented. It is observed that new forms are applicable and offer more accurate correction than the traditional forms.

  20. Neutron dosimetry at commercial nuclear plants. Annual report of Subtask D: TEPC feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; Endres, G.W.R.; McDonald, J.C.; Brackenbush, L.W.

    1984-06-01

    This study was designed to observe the feasibility of the use by NRC licensees of the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) system as a neutron monitoring instrument. Laboratory tissue equivalent proportional counters were irradiated using /sup 252/Cf sources at NBS and PNL and were irradiated inside containment of four operating nuclear power plants (two boiling water reactors and two pressurized water reactors). On the average, neutron dose-equivalent rates determined using the TEPC were 1.05 times the calculated dose-equivalent rates for the bare and moderated /sup 252/Cf sources and 0.86 times the dose-equivalent rates determined using the multispheres inside containment of nuclear power plants. Further, neutron dose equivalent rates determined using portable remmeters were an average of 1.71 times the dose equivalent determined using the multispheres inside the containment of nuclear power plants. It was observed that while electronic noise from temperature and vibrational effects inside containment prohibited an adequate measure of absorbed dose from gammas, the measurement of neutron absorbed dose was unaffected by these environmental parameters. It is recommended that for use inside containment at nuclear power plants: (1) the laboratory scale TEPC is the superior technique for accurate determination of neutron dose equivalent, (2) for remmeters similar to the one evaluated in this study, neutron dose equivalent response should be corrected to account for dependence of response on neutron energy or the remmeters should be calibrated using a moderated neutron source, and (3) at present, the TEPC should not be used to measure absorbed dose from gammas. Upon the advent of a proven miniaturized TEPC, this instrument may prove to be a desirable replacement for current portable neutron monitoring devices for the determination of dose equivalent inside containment of commercial nuclear power plants.

  1. Neutron-fragment and Neutron-neutron Correlations in Low-energy Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestone, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    A computational method has been developed to simulate neutron emission from thermal-neutron induced fission of 235U and from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Measured pre-emission mass-yield curves, average total kinetic energies and their variances, both as functions of mass split, are used to obtain a representation of the distribution of fragment velocities. Measured average neutron multiplicities as a function of mass split and their dependence on total kinetic energy are used. Simulations can be made to reproduce measured factorial moments of neutron-multiplicity distributions with only minor empirical adjustments to some experimental inputs. The neutron-emission spectra in the rest-frame of the fragments are highly constrained by ENDF/B-VII.1 prompt-fission neutron-spectra evaluations. The n-f correlation measurements of Vorobyev et al. (2010) are consistent with predictions where all neutrons are assumed to be evaporated isotropically from the rest frame of fully accelerated fragments. Measured n-f and n-n correlations of others are a little weaker than the predictions presented here. These weaker correlations could be used to infer a weak scission-neutron source. However, the effect of neutron scattering on the experimental results must be studied in detail before moving away from a null hypothesis that all neutrons are evaporated from the fragments.

  2. The tokamak as a neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Hendel, H.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1989-11-01

    This paper describes the tokamak in its role as a neutron source, with emphasis on experimental results for D-D neutron production. The sections summarize tokamak operation, sources of fusion and non-fusion neutrons, principal neutron detection methods and their calibration, neutron energy spectra and fluxes outside the tokamak plasma chamber, history of neutron production in tokamaks, neutron emission and fusion power gain from JET and TFTR (the largest present-day tokamaks), and D-T neutron production from burnup of D-D tritons. This paper also discusses the prospects for future tokamak neutron production and potential applications of tokamak neutron sources. 100 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Materials for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.; Daemen, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    The Workshop on Materials for Spallation Neutron Sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, February 6 to 10, 1995, gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss areas in which work is needed, successful designs and use of materials, and opportunities for further studies. During the first day of the workshop, speakers presented overviews of current spallation neutron sources. During the next 3 days, seven panels allowed speakers to present information on a variety of topics ranging from experimental and theoretical considerations on radiation damage to materials safety issues. An attempt was made to identify specific problems that require attention within the context of spallation neutron sources. This proceedings is a collection of summaries from the overview sessions and the panel presentations.

  4. High intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    This invention relates to a high intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source comprising a neutron-producing source which emits pulses of fast neutrons, a moderator block adjacent to the last neutron source, a reflector block which encases the fast neutron source and the moderator block and has a thermal neutron exit port extending therethrough from the moderator block, and a neutron energy- dependent decoupling reflector liner covering the interior surfaces of the thermal neutron exit port and surrounding all surfaces of the moderator block except the surface viewed by the thermal neutron exit port. (Official Gazette)

  5. Benchmark test of transport calculations of gold and nickel activation with implications for neutron kerma at Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, M; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Sawada, S; Munaka, M; Kuramoto, A; Oka, T; Iwatani, K; Shizuma, K; Hasai, H

    1992-11-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a 252Cf fission neutron source to validate the use of the code for the energy spectrum analyses of Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons. Nuclear data libraries used in the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code calculation were ENDF/B-III, ENDF/B-IV, LASL-SUB, and ENDL-73. The neutron moderators used were granite (the main component of which is SiO2, with a small fraction of hydrogen), Newlight [polyethylene with 3.7% boron (natural)], ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), and water (H2O). Each moderator was 65 cm thick. The neutron detectors were gold and nickel foils, which were used to detect thermal and epithermal neutrons (4.9 eV) and fast neutrons (> 0.5 MeV), respectively. Measured activity data from neutron-irradiated gold and nickel foils in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which correspond to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For both gold and nickel detectors, the measured activities and the calculated values agreed within 10%. The slopes of the depth-yield relations in each moderator, except granite, were similar for neutrons detected by the gold and nickel foils. From the results of these studies, the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code was verified to be accurate enough for use with the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, chlorine, and cadmium, and for the incident 252Cf fission spectrum neutrons. PMID:1399639

  6. Study of degraded neutron spectra through metal matrix composites using CR-39 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalani, Deepak; Kumar, S.; Ramaseshu, P.; Sundaram, V. K.; Mehta, S. K.

    1998-06-01

    Considerable interest has grown in the last decade in the use of CR-39 films in routine neutron monitoring and dosimetry. In addition, work in neutron spectrometry has been undertaken by various workers ( Decossas et al., 1984; Faermann et al., 1983; Fews et al., 1984; Turner et al., 1984). In the present study metal matrix composites (MMC) samples of Pb-Li, Pb-Cd, Al-Li and Al-B 4C were prepared by using powder metallurgy and alloying elements techniques. The density was obtained for these MMC samples in the range of 80-90% of the metal density. Degraded neutron spectra were obtained by exposing these samples to a 252Cf source housed in a camera and the detector used was CR-39 films covered with a 1 mm PE radiator. These spectra have also been validated through Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code (1983).

  7. A method of neutron energy evaluation by using an imaging plate and cone-like acryl converters with a geometrical modulation concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohtomi, A.; Sugiura, N.; Itoh, T.; Wakabayashi, G.; Sakae, T.; Terunuma, T.; Yabuta, K.; Tamura, M.; Fujibuchi, T.; Takata, T.; Kume, K.

    2011-03-01

    Cone-like acryl converters have been used for transforming the energy-distribution information of incident fast neutrons into the spatial-distribution information of recoil protons. The characteristics of neutron-proton conversion have been studied up to around 10 MeV by using an imaging plate (IP). A notable and interesting signal enhancement due to recoil protons generated in an acryl converter was observed on IP images for irradiation with a 252Cf source. Similar experiments were also performed in the radiation field of a research nuclear reactor and an accelerator-based neutron generator. A Monte Carlo calculation was carried out in order to understand the spatial distributions of the signal enhancement by recoil protons; these distributions promisingly involve the energy information of incident neutrons in principle. Consequently, it has been revealed that the neutron energy evaluation is surely possible by analyzing the spatial distributions of signal enhancement that is caused by recoil protons.

  8. Calibration experiments of 3He neutron detectors for analyzing neutron emissivity in the hot-ion mode on the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohagura, J.; Cho, T.; Hirata, M.; Watanabe, H.; Minami, R.; Numakura, T.; Yoshida, M.; Ito, H.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yatsu, K.; Miyoshi, S.; Ogura, K.; Kondoh, T.; Nishitani, T.; Kwon, M.; England, A. C.

    2003-03-01

    Under the international fusion cooperating research, 3He neutron detectors in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror are calibrated by the use of a 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron source (8.96×104 n/s). The calibration experiments are carried out with a "rail system" placed along the magnetic axis of the GAMMA 10 central-cell region, where hot ions in the plasma experiments with the bulk temperatures of ˜10 keV are produced. As compared to a previous neutron monitoring system with a BF3 detector in GAMMA 10, the present 3He systems are designed with about two orders-of-magnitude higher neutron-counting efficiency for analyzing a neutron emissivity from the plasmas in a single plasma discharge alone. Two 3He systems are installed near the middle and the end of the central cell so as to identify the central-cell hot-ion axial profile. The filling pressure of 3He, the effective length, and the diameter of the detector are designed as 5 bar, 300 mm, and 50 mm, respectively. The detector output spectra are carefully analyzed by the use of a preamplifier, a shaping amplifier, as well as a multichannel analyzer for each 3He detector. In the present article, the neutron-counting data from the two 3He detectors due to the on-axis 252Cf scan are interpreted in terms of the d-2 intensity dependence (d being the distance between the detector and the neutron source) as well as the effects of the central-cell magnetic coils and the other machine structural components.

  9. Micronucleus induction in Vicia faba roots. Part 2. Biological effects of neutrons below 1 cGy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, I; Bianchi, M

    1983-08-01

    A dose-effect relationship has been established for high-energy neutrons (maximum energy 600 MeV) within a dose range of 0.2 to 80 cGy and for low-energy neutrons produced by a 252Cf source (mean energy 2.35 MeV) for doses between 0.2 and 5 cGy. The frequency of micronuclei was found to increase linearly with dose. The relative biological effectiveness (r.b.e) values calculated using 60Co radiation as a reference were, in the high-dose region, 4.7 +/- 0.4 and 11.8 +/- 1.3 for the high- and low-energy neutrons, respectively. At doses below 1 cGy constant values of 25.4 +/- 4.4 and 63.7 +/- 12 were reached for the respective neutron energies. PMID:6603437

  10. In-vivo assessment of total body protein in rats by prompt-γ neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatelatos, Ion E.; Boozer, Carol N.; Ma, Ruimei; Yasumura, Seiichi

    1997-02-01

    A prompt-(gamma) neutron activation analysis facility for in vivo determination of total body protein (TBP) in rats has been designed. TBP is determined in vivo by assessment of total body nitrogen. The facility is based on a 252Cf radionuclide neutron source within a heavy water moderator assembly and two NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors. The in vivo precision of the technique, as estimated by three repeated measurements of 15 rats is 6 percent, for a radiation dose equivalent of 60 mSv. The radiation dose per measurement is sufficiently low to enable serial measurements on the same animal. MCNP-4A Monte Carlo transport code was utilized to calculate thermal neutron flux correction factors to account for differences in size and shape of the rats and calibration phantoms. Good agrement was observed in comparing body nitrogen assessment by prompt-(gamma) neutron activation and chemical carcass analysis.

  11. Study of a nTHGEM-based thermal neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Zhou, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Tao; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Yu-Guang; Zhou, Liang; Xu, Hong; Yang, Gui-An; Wang, Yan-Feng; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jin-Jie; Sun, Zhi-Jia; Hu, Bi-Tao

    2016-07-01

    With new generation neutron sources, traditional neutron detectors cannot satisfy the demands of the applications, especially under high flux. Furthermore, facing the global crisis in 3He gas supply, research on new types of neutron detector as an alternative to 3He is a research hotspot in the field of particle detection. GEM (Gaseous Electron Multiplier) neutron detectors have high counting rate, good spatial and time resolution, and could be one future direction of the development of neutron detectors. In this paper, the physical process of neutron detection is simulated with Geant4 code, studying the relations between thermal conversion efficiency, boron thickness and number of boron layers. Due to the special characteristics of neutron detection, we have developed a novel type of special ceramic nTHGEM (neutron THick GEM) for neutron detection. The performance of the nTHGEM working in different Ar/CO2 mixtures is presented, including measurements of the gain and the count rate plateau using a copper target X-ray source. A detector with a single nTHGEM has been tested for 2-D imaging using a 252Cf neutron source. The key parameters of the performance of the nTHGEM detector have been obtained, providing necessary experimental data as a reference for further research on this detector. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11127508, 11175199, 11205253, 11405191), Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, CAEP (2013DB06, 2013BB04) and CAS (YZ201512)

  12. Optical polarizing neutron devices designed for pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, M.; Kurahashi, K.; Endoh, Y.; Itoh, S.

    1997-09-01

    We have designed two polarizing neutron devices for pulsed cold neutrons. The devices have been tested at the pulsed neutron source at the Booster Synchrotron Utilization Facility of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. These two devices proved to have a practical use for experiments to investigate condensed matter physics using pulsed cold polarized neutrons.

  13. Passive neutron design study for 200-L waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Beddingfield, D.B.; Pickrell, M.M.

    1997-09-01

    We have developed a passive neutron counter for the measurement of plutonium in 200-L drums of scrap and waste. The counter incorporates high efficiency for the multiplicity counting in addition to the traditional coincidence counting. The {sup 252}Cf add-a-source feature is used to provide an accurate assay over a wide range of waste matrix materials. The room background neutron rate is reduced by using 30 cm of external polyethylene shielding and the cosmic-ray background is reduced by statistical filtering techniques. Monte Carlo Code calculations were used to determine the optimum detector design, including the gas pressure, size, number, and placement of the {sup 3}He tubes in the moderator. Various moderators, including polyethylene, plastics, teflon, and graphite, were evaluated to obtain the maximum efficiency and minimum detectable mass of plutonium.

  14. Compact ion source neutron generator

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali; Chang-Hasnain, Constance; Rangelow, Ivo; Kwan, Joe

    2015-10-13

    A neutron generator includes a conductive substrate comprising a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips and a source of an atomic species to introduce the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips. A target placed apart from the substrate is voltage biased relative to the substrate to ionize and accelerate the ionized atomic species toward the target. The target includes an element capable of a nuclear fusion reaction with the ionized atomic species to produce a one or more neutrons as a reaction by-product.

  15. Determining the 6Li doped side of a glass scintillator for ultra cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, Blair; Rebenitsch, Lori Ann

    2015-08-01

    Ultracold neutron (UCN) detectors using two visually very similar, to the microscopic level, pieces of optically contacted cerium doped lithium glasses have been proposed for high rate UCN experiments. The chief difference between the two glass scintillators is that one side is 6Li depleted and the other side 6Li doped. This note outlines a method to determine which side of the glass stack is doped with 6Li using AmBe and 252Cf neutron sources, and a Si surface barrier detector. The method sees an excess of events around the α and triton energies of neutron capture on 6Li when the enriched side is facing the Si surface barrier detector.

  16. Effect of diameter of nanoparticles and capture cross-section library on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farhood, Bagher

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is evaluation of the effect of diameter of 10B nanoparticles and various neutron capture cross-section libraries on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Material and methods MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used for simulation of a 252Cf source, a soft tissue phantom and a tumor containing 10B nanoparticles. Using 252Cf as a neutron source, macroscopic dose enhancement factor (MDEF) and total dose rate in tumor in the presence of 100, 200, and 500 ppm of 10B nanoparticles with 25 nm, 50 nm, and 100 nm diameters were calculated. Additionally, the effect of ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, and CENDL neutron capture cross-section libraries on MDEF was evaluated. Results There is not a linear relationship between the average MDEF value and nanoparticles’ diameter but the average MDEF grows with increased concentration of 10B nanoparticles. There is an increasing trend for average MDEF with the tumor distance. The average MDEF values were obtained the same for various neutron capture cross-section libraries. The maximum and minimum doses that effect on the total dose in tumor were neutron and secondary photon doses, respectively. Furthermore, the boron capture related dose component reduced in some extent with increase of diameter of 10B nanoparticles. Conclusions Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that from physical point of view, various nanoparticle diameters have no dominant effect on average MDEF value in tumor. Furthermore, it is concluded that various neutron capture cross-section libraries are resulted to the same macroscopic dose enhancements. However, it is predicted that taking into account the biological effects for various nanoparticle diameters will result in different dose enhancements. PMID:25834582

  17. Composite polycrystalline semiconductor neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, M.; Zuck, A.; Marom, G.; Khakhan, O.; Roth, M.; Alfassi, Z. B.

    2007-08-01

    Composite polycrystalline semiconductor detectors bound with different binders, both inorganic molten glasses, such as B 2O 3, PbO/B 2O 3, Bi 2O 3/PbO, and organic polymeric binders, such as isotactic polypropylene (iPP), polystyrene or nylon-6, and coated with different metal electrodes were tested at room temperature for α-particles and very weak thermal neutron sources. The detector materials tested were natural occurring hexagonal BN and cubic LiF, where both are not containing enriched isotopes of 10B or 6Li. The radiation sources were 5.5 MeV α's from 241Am, 5.3 MeV from 210Po and also 4.8 MeV from 226Ra. Some of these detectors were also tested with thermal neutrons from very weak 227Ac 9Be, 241Am- 10Be sources and also from a weak 238Pu+ 9Be and somewhat stronger 252Cf sources. The neutrons were thermalized with paraffin. Despite very low signal to noise ratio of only ˜2, the neutrons could be counted by subtracting the noise from the signal.

  18. Design and feasibility of a multi-detector neutron spectrometer for radiation protection applications based on thermoluminescent 6LiF:Ti,Mg (TLD-600) detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, M.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Bedogni, R.; Delgado, A.

    2008-01-01

    The design of a neutron detector with spectrometric capability based on thermoluminescent (TL) 6LiF:Ti,Mg (TLD-600) dosimeters located along three perpendicular axis within a single polyethylene (PE) sphere has been analyzed. The neutron response functions have been calculated in the energy range from 10 -8 to 100 MeV with the Monte Carlo (MC) code MCNPX 2.5 and their shape and behaviour have been used to discuss a suitable configuration for an actual instrument. The feasibility of such a device has been preliminary evaluated by the simulation of exposure to 241Am-Be, bare 252Cf and Fe-PE moderated 252Cf sources. The expected accuracy in the evaluation of energy quantities has been evaluated using the unfolding code FRUIT. The obtained results together with additional calculations performed using MAXED and GRAVEL codes show the spectrometric capability of the proposed design for radiation protection applications, especially in the range 1 keV-20 MeV.

  19. Neutron spallation sources in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, P. J.

    1996-11-01

    After a brief general and historical discussion, the main design features of spallation sources are described. At the present time, Europe not only has the world-leading pulsed neutron spallation source, the SNS-ISIS at RAL, UK, but it is on the point of commissioning a world-leading continuous cyclotron-driven source, the SINQ at PSI, Switzerland. Looking to the future, yet more powerful pulsed sources are actively under study and the difficult problem of high-power target design (>250 kW) is leading to a new technology for liquid targets. The accelerator designs, although basically classical, require custom-built solutions that are often at the limit of present day accelerator technology.

  20. Neutron spallation sources in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, P. J.

    1996-11-01

    After a brief general and historical discussion, the main design features of spallation sources are described. At the present time, Europe not only has the world-leading pulsed neutron spallation source, the SNS-ISIS at RAL, UK, but it is on the point of commissioning a world-leading continuous cyclotron-driven source, the SINQ at PSI, Switzerland. Looking to the future, yet more powerful pulsed sources are actively under study and the difficult problem of high-power target design (>250 kW) is leading to a new technology for liquid targets. The accelerator designs, although basically classical, require custom-built solutions that are often at the limit of presentday accelerator technology.

  1. Investigation of neutron converters for production of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) neutron dosimeters using Al 2O 3:C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittani, J. C. R.; da Silva, A. A. R.; Vanhavere, F.; Akselrod, M. S.; Yukihara, E. G.

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) properties of neutron dosimeters in powder and in the form of pellets prepared with a mixture of Al 2O 3:C and neutron converters. The neutron converters investigated were high density polyethylene (HDPE), lithium fluoride (LiF), lithium fluoride 95% enriched with 6Li ( 6LiF), lithium carbonate 95% enriched with 6Li ( 6Li 2CO 3), boric acid enriched with 99% of 10B (H310BO) and gadolinium oxide (Gd 2O 3). The proportion of Al 2O 3:C and neutron converter in the mixture was varied to optimize the total OSL signal and neutron sensitivity. The neutron sensitivity and dose-response were determined for the OSL dosimeters using a bare 252Cf source and compared to the response of Harshaw TLD-600 and TLD-700 dosimeters ( 6LiF:Mg,Ti and 7LiF:Mg,Ti). The results demonstrate the possibility of developing an OSL dosimeter made of Al 2O 3:C powder and neutron converter with a neutron sensitivity (defined as the ratio between the 60Co equivalent gamma dose and the reference neutron absorbed dose) and neutron-gamma discrimination comparable to the TLD-600/TLD-700 combination. It was shown that the shape of the OSL decay curves varied with the type of the neutron converter, demonstrating the influence of the energy deposition mechanism and ionization density on the OSL process in Al 2O 3:C.

  2. Advanced Neutron Source equipment data base. [Advanced Neutron Source Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Coffin, D.B. )

    1990-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new experimental facility planned to meet the national need for an intense, steady-state source of neutrons. It will be open for use by scientists from universities, industry, and other federal laboratories. The ANS will be equipped with an initial complement of advanced instruments for neutron scattering and nuclear physics research, with facilities for isotope production and for the study of materials in high radiation fields. The central structure is a 60-m ({approximately}200-ft) diam cylindrical, domed reactor building. This building will house the reactor itself, with its lower floors dedicated to beam and irradiation experiments and with a high-bay floor dedicated to reactor operations. A reactor support building, to be adjacent to the reactor building, will house other large reactor equipment and the general support equipment not located in the reactor building. The primary heat exchanger and circulating pumps will be located in cell banks within reactor containment. The guide hall building, connected to the reactor dome outside reactor containment, is dedicated to beam experiment use. The fourth building will be an office building serving both the extensive user community and the reactor operations staff. These buildings will contain many of the systems needed for operation of the ANS and will be comprised of equipment requiring specification of performance, test, and operating parameters. The number of equipment items, the possibility for multiple application of a particular piece of equipment, and the need for a single source of information for all equipment led to a requirement to develop and equipment-related data base. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. A National Spallation Neutron Source for neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Appleton, B.R.

    1996-10-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source is a collaborative project or perform the conceptual design for a next generation neutron source for the Department of Energy. This paper reviews the need and justification for a new neutron source, the origins and structure of the collaboration formed to address this need, and the community input leading up to the current design approach. A reference design is presented for an accelerator based spallation neutron source that would begin operation at about 1 megawatt of power but designed so that it could be upgraded to significantly higher powers in the future. The technology approach, status, and progress on the conceptual design to date are presented.

  4. Dose profile modeling of Idaho National Laboratory's active neutron interrogation laboratory.

    PubMed

    Chichester, D L; Seabury, E H; Zabriskie, J M; Wharton, J; Caffrey, A J

    2009-06-01

    A new laboratory has been commissioned at Idaho National Laboratory for performing active neutron interrogation research and development. The facility is designed to provide radiation shielding for deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion (14.1 MeV) neutron generators (2 x 10(8) n/s), deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion (2.5 MeV) neutron generators (1 x 10(7) n/s), and (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron sources (6.96 x 10(7) n/s, 30 microg). Shielding at the laboratory is comprised of modular concrete shield blocks 0.76 m thick with tongue-in-groove features to prevent radiation streaming, arranged into one small and one large test vault. The larger vault is designed to allow operation of the DT generator and has walls 3.8m tall, an entrance maze, and a fully integrated electrical interlock system; the smaller test vault is designed for (252)Cf and DD neutron sources and has walls 1.9 m tall and a simple entrance maze. Both analytical calculations and numerical simulations were used in the design process for the building to assess the performance of the shielding walls and to ensure external dose rates are within required facility limits. Dose rate contour plots have been generated for the facility to visualize the effectiveness of the shield walls and entrance mazes and to illustrate the spatial profile of the radiation dose field above the facility and the effects of skyshine around the vaults. PMID:19217792

  5. Apparatus for irradiating a continuously flowing stream of fluid. [For neutron activation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Speir, L.G.; Adams, E.L.

    1982-05-13

    An apparatus for irradiating a continuously flowing stream of fluid is disclosed. The apparatus consists of a housing having a spherical cavity and a spherical moderator containing a radiation source positioned within the spherical cavity. The spherical moderator is of lesser diameter than the spherical cavity so as to define a spherical annular volume around the moderator. The housing includes fluid intake and output conduits which open onto the spherical cavity at diametrically opposite positions. Fluid flows through the cavity around the spherical moderator and is uniformly irradiated due to the 4..pi.. radiation geometry. The irradiation source, for example a /sup 252/Cf neutron source, is removable from the spherical moderator through a radial bore which extends outwardly to an opening on the outside of the housing. The radiation source may be routinely removed without interrupting the flow of fluid or breaching the containment of the fluid.

  6. Development and characterization of a high sensitivity segmented Fast Neutron Spectrometer (FaNS-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, T. J.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Heimbach, C. R.; Ji, G.; Nico, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the development of a segmented fast neutron spectrometer (FaNS-2) based upon plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters. It was designed to measure both the flux and spectrum of fast neutrons in the energy range of few MeV to 1 GeV. FaNS-2 utilizes capture-gated spectroscopy to identify neutron events and reject backgrounds. Neutrons deposit energy in the plastic scintillator before capturing on a 3He nucleus in the proportional counters. Segmentation improves neutron energy reconstruction while the large volume of scintillator increases sensitivity to low neutron fluxes. A main goal of its design is to study comparatively low neutron fluxes, such as cosmogenic neutrons at the Earth's surface, in an underground environment, or from low-activity neutron sources. In this paper, we present details of its design and construction as well as its characterization with a calibrated 252Cf source and monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV. Detected monoenergetic neutron spectra are unfolded using a Singular Value Decomposition method, demonstrating a 5% energy resolution at 14 MeV. Finally, we discuss plans for measuring the surface and underground cosmogenic neutron spectra with FaNS-2.

  7. The Frankfurt neutron source FRANZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzubaidi, Suha; Bartz, Ulrich; Basten, Markus; Bechtold, Alexander; Chau, Long Phi; Claessens, Christine; Dinter, Hannes; Droba, Martin; Fix, Christopher; Hähnel, Hendrik; Heilmann, Manuel; Hinrichs, Ole; Huneck, Simon; Klump, Batu; Lotz, Marcel; Mäder, Dominik; Meusel, Oliver; Noll, Daniel; Nowottnick, Tobias; Obermayer, Marcus; Payir, Onur; Petry, Nils; Podlech, Holger; Ratzinger, Ulrich; Schempp, Alwin; Schmidt, Stefan; Schneider, Philipp; Seibel, Anja; Schwarz, Malte; Schweizer, Waldemar; Volk, Klaus; Wagner, Christopher; Wiesner, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    A 2MeV proton beam will produce a quasi-Maxwellian neutron spectrum of around 30 keV by the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction. The experiments are mainly focused on the measurement of differential neutron capture cross sections relevant for the astrophysical s-process in nuclear synthesis. Moreover, proton capture cross sections for the astrophysical p-process can be measured directly with the proton beam. For an efficient time of flight measurement of the neutron energies along the 0.7 m long drift from the Li-target to the sample, 1ns short, intense proton pulses are needed at the target. Additionally, to reach 107 n/cm2/s at the sample, a pulse repetition rate of 250 kHz is intended. After completion and successful running in, FRANZ will become a user facility with internal and external users. The 120 kV injector terminal and the 200mA proton source as well as the low-energy beam transport section and the FRANZ cave have been realized successfully. The 1.9 MV RF accelerator consists of a combined 4-Rod-RFQ/IH-DTL-resonator and is in the RF tuning and power testing phase. The 2 MeV transport and rebuncher section is ready for installation. In a first step FRANZ will offer experimental areas for neutron activation experiments and for proton beam experiments, as mentioned above. From the accelerator physics point of view, FRANZ will be an excellent facility for high current beam investigations and for beam wall interaction studies.

  8. Development of a modular directional and spectral neutron detection system using solid-state detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltz, A.; Torres, B.; McElwain, L.; Dahal, R.; Huang, J.; Bhat, I.; Lu, J.; Danon, Y.

    2015-08-01

    A detection system using room-temperature, microstructured solid-state thermal neutron detectors with very low leakage current has been developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) with the ability to provide positional and spectral information about an unknown neutron source. The Directional and Spectral Neutron Detection System (DSNDS) utilizes a set of small-but-scalable, zero-bias solid-state thermal neutron detectors which have demonstrated high thermal neutron efficiency and adequate gamma insensitivity. The DSNDS can gather spectral information about an unknown neutron source with a relatively small number of detectors, simplifying the detector electronics and minimizing cost; however, the DSNDS is modular in design, providing the capability to increase the detection efficiency and angular resolution. The system used in this paper was comprised of a stack of five high-density polyethylene (HDPE) disks with a thickness of 5 cm and a diameter of 30 cm, the middle disk containing 16 detectors positioned as one internal (moderated) and one external (unmoderated) ring of solid-state neutron detectors. These two detector rings provide the ability to determine the directionality of a neutron source. The system gathers spectral information about a neutron source in two ways: by measuring the relative responses of the internal ring of detectors as well as measuring the ratio of the internal-to-external detector responses. Experiments were performed with variable neutron spectra: a 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron source which was HDPE moderated, HDPE reflected, lead (Pb) shielded, and bare in order to benchmark the system for spectral sensitivity. Simulations were performed in order to characterize the neutron spectra corresponding to each of the source configurations and showed agreement with experimental measurements. The DSNDS demonstrates the ability to determine the relative angle of the source and the hardness of the neutron spectrum. By using the

  9. Characterization of a prototype neutron portal monitor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhoul, Nabil

    The main objective of this thesis is to provide characterization measurements on a prototype neutron portal monitor (NPM) detector constructed at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. NPM detectors are deployed at all United States border crossings and shipping ports to stop the illicit transfer of weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) into our country. This large prototype detector with its 0.93 square meter face area is based on thermal neutron capture in 6Li as an alternate technology to the current, very expensive, 3He-based NPM. A neutron detection efficiency of 27.5 % is measured with a 252Cf source which has a spontaneous fission neutron spectrum very similar to that of 240Pu in WGPu. Measurements with an intense 137Cs source establish the extreme insensitivity of the prototype NPM to gamma-ray backgrounds with only one additional count registered for 1.1 million incident gamma rays. This detector also has the ability to locate neutron sources to within an angle of a few degrees. Its sensitivity is further demonstrated by discovering in a few-second measurement the presence of a 2 curie PuBe neutron source even at a distance of 95.5 feet. This thesis also covers in considerable detail the design features that give rise to both a high intrinsic neutron detection efficiency and an extreme gamma-ray insensitivity.

  10. Laser generated neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; Bartal, T.; McNaney, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Hey, D. S.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A.; Kodama, R.; Tanaka, K. A.; Mariscal, D.; Beg, F. N.; Nakamura, H.; Nakanii, N.

    2010-10-15

    A neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy has been developed using high-intensity, short-pulse lasers. This technique will allow robust measurement of interior ion temperature of laser-shocked materials and provide insight into material equation of state. The neutron generation technique uses laser-accelerated protons to create neutrons in LiF through (p,n) reactions. The incident proton beam has been diagnosed using radiochromic film. This distribution is used as the input for a (p,n) neutron prediction code which is validated with experimentally measured neutron yields. The calculation infers a total fluence of 1.8x10{sup 9} neutrons, which are expected to be sufficient for neutron resonance spectroscopy temperature measurements.

  11. The Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Geoffrey; Cianciolo, Vince; Koehler, Paul; Allen, Richard; Snow, William Michael; Huffman, Paul; Gould, Chris; Bowman, David; Cooper, Martin; Doyle, John

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), currently under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with an anticipated start-up in early 2006, will provide the most intense pulsed beams of cold neutrons in the world. At a projected power of 1.4 MW, the time averaged fluxes and fluences of the SNS will approach those of high flux reactors. One of the flight paths on the cold, coupled moderator will be devoted to fundamental neutron physics. The fundamental neutron physics beamline is anticipated to include two beam-lines; a broad band cold beam, and a monochromatic beam of 0.89 nm neutrons for ultracold neutron (UCN) experiments. The fundamental neutron physics beamline will be operated as a user facility with experiment selection based on a peer reviewed proposal process. An initial program of five experiments in neutron decay, hadronic weak interaction and time reversal symmetry violation have been proposed. PMID:27308112

  12. A multitask neutron beam line for spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Festa, G.; Grazzi, F.; Barzagli, E.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Civita, F.

    2011-08-01

    Here we present a new concept for a time-of-flight neutron scattering instrument allowing for simultaneous application of three different techniques: time-of-flight neutron diffraction, neutron resonance capture analysis and Bragg edge transmission analysis. The instrument can provide average resolution neutron radiography too. The potential of the proposed concept was explored by implementing the necessary equipment on INES (Italian Neutron Experimental Station) at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). The results obtained show the effectiveness of the proposed instrument to acquire relevant quantitative information in a non-invasive way on a historical metallurgical sample, namely a Japanese hand guard (tsuba). The aforementioned neutron techniques simultaneously exploited the extended neutron energy range available from 10 meV to 1 keV. This allowed a fully satisfactory characterization of the sample in terms of metal components and their combination in different phases, and forging and assembling methods.

  13. Ion sources for sealed neutron tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, E.J.T.; Bischoff, G.C.

    1996-11-01

    Fast and thermal neutron activation analysis with sealed neutron generators has been used to detect oil (oil logging), hazardous waste, fissile material, explosives, and contraband (drugs). Sealed neutron generators, used in the above applications, must be small and portable, have good electrical efficiency and long life. The ion sources used in the sealed neutron tubes require high gas utilization efficiencies or low pressure operation with high ionization efficiencies. In this paper, the authors compare a number of gas ion sources that can be used in sealed neutron tubes. The characteristics of the most popular ion source, the axial Penning discharge will be discussed as part of the zetatron neutron generator. Other sources to be discussed include the SAMIS source and RF ion source.

  14. SELF-REACTIVATING NEUTRON SOURCE FOR A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.

    1959-02-01

    Reactors of the type employing beryllium in a reflector region around the active portion and to a neutron source for use therewith are discussed. The neutron source is comprised or a quantity of antimony permanently incorporated in, and as an integral part of, the reactor in or near the beryllium reflector region. During operation of the reactor the natural occurring antimony isotope of atomic weight 123 absorbs neutrons and is thereby transformed to the antimony isotope of atomic weight 124, which is radioactive and emits gamma rays. The gamma rays react with the beryllium to produce neutrons. The beryllium and antimony thus cooperate to produce a built in neutron source which is automatically reactivated by the operation of the reactor itself and which is of sufficient strength to maintain the slow neutron flux at a sufficiently high level to be reliably measured during periods when the reactor is shut down.

  15. Switchable radioactive neutron source device

    DOEpatents

    Stanford, G.S.; Rhodes, E.A.; Devolpi, A.; Boyar, R.E.

    1987-11-06

    This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons. 3 figs.

  16. Switchable radioactive neutron source device

    DOEpatents

    Boyar, Robert E.; DeVolpi, Alexander; Stanford, George S.; Rhodes, Edgar A.

    1989-01-01

    This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons.

  17. Slow neutron leakage spectra from spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.G.; Carpenter, J.M.; Prael, R.E.

    1980-02-01

    An efficient technique is described for Monte Carlo simulation of neutron beam spectra from target-moderator-reflector assemblies typical of pulsed spallation neutron sources. The technique involves the scoring of the transport-theoretical probability that a neutron will emerge from the moderator surface in the direction of interest, at each collision. An angle-biasing probability is also introduced which further enhances efficiency in simple problems. These modifications were introduced into the VIM low energy neutron transport code, representing the spatial and energy distributions of the source neutrons approximately as those of evaporation neutrons generated through the spallation process by protons of various energies. The intensity of slow neutrons leaking from various reflected moderators was studied for various neutron source arrangements. These include computations relating to early measurements on a mockup-assembly, a brief survey of moderator materials and sizes, and a survey of the effects of varying source and moderator configurations with a practical, liquid metal cooled uranium source Wing and slab, i.e., tangential and radial moderator arrangements, and Be vs CH/sub 2/ reflectors are compared. Results are also presented for several complicated geometries which more closely represent realistic arrangements for a practical source, and for a subcritical fission multiplier such as might be driven by an electron linac. An adaptation of the code was developed to enable time dependent calculations, and investigated the effects of the reflector, decoupling and void liner materials on the pulse shape.

  18. New sources and instrumentation for neutron science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Alina

    2011-04-01

    Neutron-scattering research has a lot to do with our everyday lives. Things like medicine, food, electronics, cars and airplanes have all been improved by neutron-scattering research. Neutron research also helps scientists improve materials used in a multitude of different products, such as high-temperature superconductors, powerful lightweight magnets, stronger, lighter plastic products etc. Neutron scattering is one of the most effective ways to obtain information on both, the structure and the dynamics of condensed matter. Most of the world's neutron sources were built decades ago, and although the uses and demand for neutrons have increased throughout the years, few new sources have been built. The new construction, accelerator-based neutron source, the spallation source will provide the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world for scientific research and industrial development. In this paper it will be described what neutrons are and what unique properties make them useful for science, how spallation source is designed to produce neutron beams and the experimental instruments that will use those beams. Finally, it will be described how past neutron research has affected our everyday lives and what we might expect from the most exciting future applications.

  19. An Ultra-Short Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantz, Ishay; McCary, Eddie; Meadows, Alexander R.; Arefiev, Alexey; Bernstein, Aaron C.; Chester, Clay; Cortez, Jose; Donovan, Michael E.; Dyer, Gilliss; Gaul, Erhard W.; Hamilton, David; Kuk, Donghoon; Lestrade, Arantxa; Wang, Chunhua; Ditmire, Todd; Hegelich, Manuel B.

    2014-10-01

    We report on a novel compact laser-driven neutron source with unprecedented short pulse duration (<50 ps) and high flux (>1018 neutrons/cm2/s), an order of magnitude higher than any existing source. In our experiments, high-energy electron jets are generated from thin (<1 μm) plastic targets irradiated by a petawatt laser. These intense electron beams are employed to generate neutrons from a metal converter. Our method opens venues for enhancing neutron radiography contrast, conducting time-resolved neutron-damage studies at their characteristic evolution time-scales and for creating astrophysical conditions of heavy element synthesis in the laboratory.

  20. Neutron sources: Present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500 MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-producing efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: fundamental neutron-nuclear research, nuclear data acquisition, materials damage studies, engineering tests, and biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections. 90 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Neutron sources: present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500+ MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-production efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: (i) fundamental neutron-nuclear research, (ii) nuclear-data acquisition, (iii) materials-damage studies, (iv) engineering test, and (v) biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections.

  2. Materials and neutronic research at the Low Energy Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, David V.

    2016-04-01

    In the decade since the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM) produced its first neutrons, the facility has made important contributions to the international neutron scattering community. LENS employs a 13MeV proton beam at up to 4kW beam power onto one of two Be targets to produce neutrons for research in fields ranging from radiation effects in electronics to studies of the structure of fluids confined in nanoporous materials. The neutron source design at the heart of LENS facilitates relatively rapid hands-on access to most of its components which provides a foundation for a research program in experimental neutronics and affords numerous opportunities for novel educational experiences. We describe in some detail a number of the unique capabilities of this facility.

  3. Neutron spectrum unfolding using artificial neural network and modified least square method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Abolfazl

    2016-09-01

    MLSQR and ANN methods for 252Cf and 241Am-9Be source are validated against the ISO spectrum. The unfolded neutron energy spectra from both MLSQR and ANN methods show a good agreement with the actual spectrum of 252Cf and 241Am-9Be source.

  4. Neutron Sources for Standard-Based Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, Radoslav; McLean, Thomas

    2014-11-10

    The DHS TC Standards and the consensus ANSI Standards use 252Cf as the neutron source for performance testing because its energy spectrum is similar to the 235U and 239Pu fission sources used in nuclear weapons. An emission rate of 20,000 ± 20% neutrons per second is used for testing of the radiological requirements both in the ANSI standards and the TCS. Determination of the accurate neutron emission rate of the test source is important for maintaining consistency and agreement between testing results obtained at different testing facilities. Several characteristics in the manufacture and the decay of the source need to be understood and accounted for in order to make an accurate measurement of the performance of the neutron detection instrument. Additionally, neutron response characteristics of the particular instrument need to be known and taken into account as well as neutron scattering in the testing environment.

  5. A neutron Albedo system with time rejection for landmine and IED detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaltchouk, V. D.; Andrews, H. R.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Faust, A. A.; Ing, H.; McFee, J. E.

    2011-10-01

    A neutron Albedo system has been developed for imaging of buried landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). It involves irradiating the ground with fast neutrons and subsequently detecting the thermalized neutrons that return. A scintillating 6Li loaded ZnS(Ag) screen with a sensitive area of 40 cm×40 cm is used as a thermal neutron detector. Scintillation light is captured by orthogonal arrays of wavelength-shifting fibers placed on either side of the scintillator surface and then transferred to X and Y multi-pixel PMTs. A timing circuit, used with pulsed neutron sources, records the time when a neutron detection takes place relative to an external synchronization pulse from the pulsed source. Experimental tests of the Albedo system performance have been done in a sand box with a 252Cf neutron source (no time gating) and with pulsed D-D (2.6 MeV) neutrons from the Defense R&D Ottawa Van de Graaff accelerator (with time gating). Information contained in the time evolution of the thermal neutron field provided improved detection capability and image reconstruction. The detector design is described and experimental results are discussed.

  6. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2010-01-08

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  7. Dose measurements around spallation neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulou, M; Stoulos, S; Manolopoulou, M; Krivopustov, M; Zamani, M

    2008-01-01

    Neutron dose measurements and calculations around spallation sources appear to be of great importance in shielding research. Two spallation sources were irradiated by high-energy proton beams delivered by the Nuclotron accelerator (JINR), Dubna. Neutrons produced by the spallation sources were measured by using solid-state nuclear track detectors. In addition, neutron dose was calculated after polyethylene and concrete, using a phenomenological model based on empirical relations applied in high-energy physics. The study provides an analytical and experimental neutron benchmark analysis using the transmission factor and a comparison between the experimental results and calculations. PMID:18957519

  8. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2009-09-30

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  9. Neutron producing reactions in PuBe neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagi, János; Lakosi, László; Nguyen, Cong Tam

    2016-01-01

    There are a plenty of out-of-use plutonium-beryllium neutron sources in Eastern Europe presenting both nuclear safeguards and security issues. Typically, their actual Pu content is not known. In the last couple of years different non-destructive methods were developed for their characterization. For such methods detailed knowledge of the nuclear reactions taking place within the source is necessary. In this paper we investigate the role of the neutron producing reactions, their contribution to the neutron yield and their dependence on the properties of the source.

  10. Neutron sources for a neutron capture therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    Recent advances in the development of boron pharmaceuticals have reopened the possibility of using epithermal neutrons to treat brain tumors containing boron-10. This paper summarizes the approaches being used to generate the neutron sources and identifies specific areas where more research and development are needed.

  11. Neutron fan beam source for neutron radiography purpose

    SciTech Connect

    Le Tourneur, P.; Bach, P.; Dance, W. E.

    1999-06-10

    The development of the DIANE neutron radiography system included a sealed-tube neutron generator for this purpose and the optimization of the system's neutron beam quality in terms of divergence and useful thermal neutron yield for each 14-MeV neutron produced. Following this development, the concept of a DIANE fan beam source is herewith introduced. The goal which drives this design is one of economy: by simply increasing the aperture dimension of a conventional DIANE beam in one plane of its collimator axis to a small-angle, fan-shaped output, the useful beam area for neutron radiography would be substantially increased. Thus with the same source, the throughput, or number of objects under examination at any given time, would be augmented significantly. Presented here are the design of this thermal neutron source and the initial Monte Carlo calculations. Taking into account the experience with the conventional DIANE neutron radiography system, these result are discussed and the potential of and interest in such a fan-beam source are explored.

  12. Neutron spectroscopy with {sup 6}LiF bolometers

    SciTech Connect

    Gironnet, J.; Brandt, B. van den; Hautle, P.; Filges, U.; Konter, J. A.; Coron, N.; Marcillac, P. de; Torres, L.

    2009-12-16

    A compact and semi-portable neutron detector has been built based on the bolometric technique. Its unique features open new possibilities for the radioprotection survey of fast neutrons at nuclear installations and the investigations of background problems of sensitive neutron scattering instruments. This cryogenic detector, operated at 300-400 mK, consists of a 0.5 g LiF 95%{sup 6}Li enriched crystal read out by a NTD-Ge sensor and is based on the {sup 6}Li(n, {alpha}){sup 3}H neutron capture reaction. It is used to define the energy of neutrons up to 5 MeV. Measurements with {sup 252}Cf source have been performed to determine the energy resolution of the detector. We report the first results obtained with this neutron detector. From developments made in view of the ROSEBUD (Rare Objects SEarch with Bolometers UndergrounD) collaboration we suggest a possible further improvement of the neutron detector by employing a combined heat and light detection. In the case of dark matter experiments, such a detector would allow to monitor the residual fast neutron component.

  13. Nested Focusing Optics for Compact Neutron Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) have developed novel neutron grazing incidence optics for use with small-scale portable neutron generators. The technology was developed to enable the use of commercially available neutron generators for applications requiring high flux densities, including high performance imaging and analysis. Nested grazing incidence mirror optics, with high collection efficiency, are used to produce divergent, parallel, or convergent neutron beams. Ray tracing simulations of the system (with source-object separation of 10m for 5 meV neutrons) show nearly an order of magnitude neutron flux increase on a 1-mm diameter object. The technology is a result of joint development efforts between NASA and MIT researchers seeking to maximize neutron flux from diffuse sources for imaging and testing applications.

  14. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-19

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  15. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation & treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8×109 neutrons/cm2/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with 10B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  16. Basic physics with spallation-neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Michaudon, A.F.

    1994-05-01

    The neutron has unique intrinsic properties widely used in basic and applied sciences. The neutron plays a well-known role in applied sciences and technology and is a unique probe well suited for the exploration of condensed-matter properties. But the neutron is also used for many other basic-physics studies, including nuclear physics, particle physics, fundamental physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. These last studies are briefly reviewed in this paper. Spallation-neutron sources today have unmatched neutron-beam properties for such studies and have great potential in future technological developments whereby these studies could be carried out under much improved conditions.

  17. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Franklyn, C. B.

    2011-12-13

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >10{sup 11} n{center_dot}s{sup -1}. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  18. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklyn, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >1011 nṡs-1. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  19. International workshop on cold neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. )

    1991-08-01

    The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

  20. Neutron scattering instrumentation for biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1994-12-31

    Conventional wisdom holds that since biological entities are large, they must be studied with cold neutrons, a domain in which reactor sources of neutrons are often supposed to be pre-eminent. In fact, the current generation of pulsed spallation neutron sources, such as LANSCE at Los Alamos and ISIS in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a capability for small angle scattering (SANS) - a typical cold- neutron application - that was not anticipated five years ago. Although no one has yet built a Laue diffractometer at a pulsed spallation source, calculations show that such an instrument would provide an exceptional capability for protein crystallography at one of the existing high-power spoliation sources. Even more exciting is the prospect of installing such spectrometers either at a next-generation, short-pulse spallation source or at a long-pulse spallation source. A recent Los Alamos study has shown that a one-megawatt, short-pulse source, which is an order of magnitude more powerful than LANSCE, could be built with today`s technology. In Europe, a preconceptual design study for a five-megawatt source is under way. Although such short-pulse sources are likely to be the wave of the future, they may not be necessary for some applications - such as Laue diffraction - which can be performed very well at a long-pulse spoliation source. Recently, it has been argued by Mezei that a facility that combines a short-pulse spallation source similar to LANSCE, with a one-megawatt, long-pulse spallation source would provide a cost-effective solution to the global shortage of neutrons for research. The basis for this assertion as well as the performance of some existing neutron spectrometers at short-pulse sources will be examined in this presentation.

  1. Semiconductor neutron detectors using depleted uranium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschwitz, Craig A.; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Schwellenbach, David; Meek, Thomas; Shaver, Brandon; Cunningham, Taylor; Auxier, Jerrad Philip

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports on recent attempts to develop and test a new type of solid-state neutron detector fabricated from uranium compounds. It has been known for many years that uranium oxide (UO2), triuranium octoxide (U3O8) and other uranium compounds exhibit semiconducting characteristics with a broad range of electrical properties. We seek to exploit these characteristics to make a direct-conversion semiconductor neutron detector. In such a device a neutron interacts with a uranium nucleus, inducing fission. The fission products deposit energy-producing, detectable electron-hole pairs. The high energy released in the fission reaction indicates that noise discrimination in such a device has the potential to be excellent. Schottky devices were fabricated using a chemical deposition coating technique to deposit UO2 layers a few microns thick on a sapphire substrate. Schottky devices have also been made using a single crystal from UO2 samples approximately 500 microns thick. Neutron sensitivity simulations have been performed using GEANT4. Neutron sensitivity for the Schottky devices was tested experimentally using a 252Cf source.

  2. Response characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Fix, J.J.; Hadley, R.T.; Holbrook, K.L.; Yoder, R.C.; Roberson, P.L.; Endres, G.W.R.; Nichols, L.L.; Schwartz, R.B.

    1983-09-01

    Performance characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters in current use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were determined from their evaluation of neutron dose equivalent received after irradiations with specific neutron sources at either the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) or the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The characteristics assessed included: lower detection level, energy response, precision and accuracy. It was found that when all of the laboratories employed a common set of calibrations, the overall accuracy was approximately +-20%, which is within uncertainty expected for these dosimeters. For doses above 80 mrem, the accuracy improved to better than 10% when a common calibration was used. Individual differences found in this study may reflect differences in calibration technique rather than differences in the dose rates of actual calibration standards. Second, at dose rates above 100 mrem, the precision for the best participants was generally below +-10% which is also within expected limits for these types of dosimeters. The poorest results had a standard deviation of about +-25%. At the lowest doses, which were sometimes below the lower detection limit, the precision often approached or exceeded +-100%. Third, the lower level of detection for free field /sup 252/Cf neutrons generally ranged between 20 and 50 mrem. Fourth, the energy dependence study provided a characterization of the response of the dosimeters to neutron energies far from the calibration energy. 11 references, 22 figures, 26 tables.

  3. Modulating the Neutron Flux from a Mirror Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D

    2011-09-01

    A 14-MeV neutron source based on a Gas-Dynamic Trap will provide a high flux of 14 MeV neutrons for fusion materials and sub-component testing. In addition to its main goal, the source has potential applications in condensed matter physics and biophysics. In this report, the author considers adding one more capability to the GDT-based neutron source, the modulation of the neutron flux with a desired frequency. The modulation may be an enabling tool for the assessment of the role of non-steady-state effects in fusion devices as well as for high-precision, low-signal basic science experiments favoring the use of the synchronous detection technique. A conclusion is drawn that modulation frequency of up to 1 kHz and modulation amplitude of a few percent is achievable. Limitations on the amplitude of modulations at higher frequencies are discussed.

  4. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McBee, M.R.; Chance, C.M. ); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J. )

    1990-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the advanced neutron source: quality assurance (QA) program; reactor core development; fuel element specification; corrosion loop tests and analyses; thermal-hydraulic loop tests; reactor control concepts; critical and subcritical experiments; material data, structural tests, and analysis; cold source development; beam tube, guide, and instrument development; hot source development; neutron transport and shielding; I C research and development; facility concepts; design; and safety.

  5. Characterization of the CLYC detector for neutron and photon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M. M.; Mussi, C.; Miller, E. C.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.; Gueorguiev, A.

    2014-02-01

    Cs2LiYCl6 (CLYC) is a new scintillator that is suitable for dual gamma-neutron detectors due to its gamma spectroscopic capabilities while producing monoenergetic pulses from neutron captures with 6Li. We present new characterization results for a 2×2 cm2 CLYC crystal. The detector resolution was characterized using weak check photon sources including 137Cs, and the detector's neutron capture capabilities were characterized with several measurements of 252Cf with varying thicknesses of polyethylene moderator. It was found that the 6Li neutron capture rate was maximized when using approximately 7.6 cm of polyethylene moderator. A 5% resolution for the 662-keV line of 137Cs and a 3.4% resolution of the 6Li neutron capture peak were measured with our experimental set-up. MCNPX-PoliMi was used to model the measurements performed with the CLYC detector, and MPPost was used to determine the light output distribution, convert 6Li neutron captures into light, and apply energy resolution. It was found that the modeling technique was capable of predicting 137Cs photon light output distributions for all light output greater than 200 keVee, and also to predict the same optimal polyethylene thickness as the measurement. Intrinsic neutron capture efficiency was estimated to be about 10%, which is a factor-of-5 improvement over an equivalent volume of 3He at a pressure of 10 atm.

  6. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  7. Neutron detection by large NaI crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavagno, A.; Gervino, G.

    2016-07-01

    In present days new neutron detection methods are under developed due to the global shortage of 3He and the toxicity of BF3. Neutrons can be indirectly detected by high-energy photons. The performance of a cylindrical NaI crystal, 4 in. diameter and 8 in. length as an indirect neutron detector has been investigated. Measurements were performed with 252Cf source with bare and shielded NaI detector. With a proper converter and moderator structure for the NaI detector, the detection efficiencies and the minimum detectable activities are improved, making the method very interesting for security applications. The indirect detection of neutrons by photons has several advantages. First, this method can in principle be suited by any gamma spectrometer with only slight modifications that do not compromise with its gamma spectrometry measurements. Second, fission neutron sources and neutron generators can be discriminated thanks to their different gamma energy spectra, a discrimination easily done by a NaI spectrometer.

  8. The University of Texas Cold Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünlü, Kenan; Ríos-Martínez, Carlos; Wehring, Bernard W.

    1994-12-01

    A cold neutron source has been designed, constructed, and tested by the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) at The University of Texas at Austin. The Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) is located in one of the beam ports of the NETL 1-MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor. The main components of the TCNS are a cooled moderator, a heat pipe, a cryogenic refrigerator, and a neutron guide. 80 ml of mesitylene moderator are maintained at about 30 K in a chamber within the reactor graphite reflector by the heat pipe and cryogenic refrigerator. The heat pipe is a 3-m long aluminum tube that contains neon as the working fluid. The cold neutrons obtained from the moderator are transported by a curved 6-m long neutron guide. This neutron guide has a radius of curvature of 300 m, a 50 × 15 mm cross-section, 58Ni coating, and is separated into three channels. The TCNS will provide a low-background subthermal neutron beam for neutron capture and scattering research. After the installation of the external portion of the neutron guide, a neutron focusing system and a Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis facility will be set up at the TCNS.

  9. Characterization of a Pulse Neutron Source Yield under Field Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Womble, Phillip C.; Hopper, Lindsay

    2009-03-10

    Technique of rapid evaluation of a pulse neutron sources such as neutron generators under field conditions has been developed. The phoswich sensor and pulse-shape discrimination techniques have been used for the simultaneous measurements of fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and photons. The sensor has been calibrated using activation neutron detectors and a pulse deuterium-tritium fusion neutron source.

  10. Neutronic Design Studies for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, LA

    2001-08-01

    Neutronics analyses are now in progress to support initial selection of target system design features, materials, geometry, and component sizes for the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Calculations have been performed to determine the neutron, proton, heavy ion, and gamma-ray flux spectra as a function of time, energy, and space for the major components of the target station (target, moderators, reflectors, etc.). These analyses were also performed to establish an initial set of performance characteristics for the neutron source. The methodology, reference performance characteristics, and results of initial optimization studies involving moderator poison plate location, target material performance, reflector performance, moderator position and premoderator performance for the target system are presented in this paper.

  11. Measurement of the Surface and Underground Neutron Spectra with the UMD/NIST Fast Neutron Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, Thomas J.

    The typical fast neutron detector falls into one of two categories, Bonner sphere spectrometers and liquid scintillator proton recoil detectors. These two detector types have traditionally been used to measure fast neutrons at the surface and in low background environments. The cosmogenic neutron spectrum and flux is an important parameter for a number of experimental efforts, including procurement of low background materials and the prediction of electronic device faults. Fast neutrons can also cause problems for underground low-background experiments, through material activation or signals that mimic rare events. Current detector technology is not sufficient to properly characterize these backgrounds. To this end, the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology designed, developed, and deployed two Fast Neutron Spectrometers (FaNS) comprised of plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters. The detectors are based upon capture-gated spectroscopy, a technique that demands a delayed coincidence between a neutron scatter and the resulting neutron capture after thermalization. This technique provides both particle identification and knowledge that the detected neutron fully thermalized. This improves background rejection capabilities and energy resolution. Presented are the design, development, and deployment of FaNS-1 and FaNS-2. Both detectors were characterized using standard fields at NIST, including calibrated 252Cf neutron sources and two monoenergetic neutron generators. Measurements of the surface fast neutron spectrum and flux have been made with both detectors, which are compared with previous measurements by traditional detectors. Additionally, FaNS-1 was deployed at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) in Ripplemead, VA. A measurement of the fast neutron spectrum and flux at KURF is presented as well. FaNS-2 is currently installed in a shallow underground laboratory where it is measuring the muon

  12. Neutronic moderator design for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, L.A.; Barnes, J.M.; Johnson, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1998-11-01

    Neutronics analyses are now in progress to support the initial selection of moderator design parameters for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The results of the initial optimization studies involving moderator poison plate location, moderator position, and premoderator performance for the target system are presented in this paper. Also presented is an initial study of the use of a composite moderator to produce a liquid methane like spectrum.

  13. Cryogenic hydrogen circulation system of neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Y. N.; Hu, Z. J.; Wu, J. H.; Li, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, P.; Wang, G. P.

    2014-01-29

    Cold neutron sources of reactors and spallation neutron sources are classic high flux neutron sources in operation all over the world. Cryogenic fluids such as supercritical or supercooled hydrogen are commonly selected as a moderator to absorb the nuclear heating from proton beams. By comparing supercritical hydrogen circulation systems and supercooled hydrogen circulation systems, the merits and drawbacks in both systems are summarized. When supercritical hydrogen circulates as the moderator, severe pressure fluctuations caused by temperature changes will occur. The pressure control system used to balance the system pressure, which consists of a heater as an active controller for thermal compensation and an accumulator as a passive volume controller, is preliminarily studied. The results may provide guidelines for design and operation of other cryogenic hydrogen system for neutron sources under construction.

  14. DIRECTIONAL DETECTION OF A NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    VANIER, P.E.; FORMAN, L.

    2006-10-23

    Advantages afforded by the development of new directional neutron detectors and imagers are discussed. Thermal neutrons have mean free paths in air of about 20 meters, and can be effectively imaged using coded apertures. Fission spectrum neutrons have ranges greater than 100 meters, and carry enough energy to scatter at least twice in multilayer detectors which can yield both directional and spectral information. Such strategies allow better discrimination between a localized spontaneous fission source and the low, but fluctuating, level of background neutrons generated by cosmic rays. A coded aperture thermal neutron imager will be discussed as well as a proton-recoil double-scatter fast-neutron directional detector with time-of-flight energy discrimination.

  15. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  16. An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, Thomas, E

    2006-03-14

    The overall goal of this project was to develop an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Specifically, our goals were to design, and confirm by measurement, a target assembly and a moderator assembly that would fulfill the design requirements of the ABNS. These design requirements were 1) that the neutron field quality be as good as the neutron field quality for the reactor-based neutron sources for BNCT, 2) that the patient treatment time be reasonable, 3) that the proton current required to treat patients in reasonable times be technologially achievable at reasonable cost with good reliability, and accelerator space requirements which can be met in a hospital, and finally 4) that the treatment be safe for the patients.

  17. Selective perturbation of in vivo linear energy transfer using high- Z vaginal applicators for Cf-252 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivard, M. J.; Evans, K. E.; Leal, L. C.; Kirk, B. L.

    2004-01-01

    Californium-252 ( 252Cf) brachytherapy sources emit both neutrons and photons, and have the potential to vastly improve the current standard-of-practice for brachytherapy. While hydrogenous materials readily attenuate the 252Cf fission energy neutrons, high- Z materials are utilized to attenuate the 252Cf gamma-rays. These differences in shielding materials may be exploited when treating with a vaginal applicator to possibly improve patient survival through perturbation of the in vivo linear energy transfer radiation.

  18. Design and verification of the shielding around the new Neutron Standards Laboratory (LPN) at CIEMAT.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Villafañe, R; Guerrero, J E; Embid, M; Fernández, R; Grandio, R; Pérez-Cejuela, P; Márquez, J L; Alvarez, F; Ortego, P

    2014-10-01

    The construction of the new Neutron Standards Laboratory at CIEMAT (Laboratorio de Patrones Neutrónicos) has been finalised and is ready to provide service. The facility is an ∼8 m×8 m×8 m irradiation vault, following the International Organization for Standardization 8529 recommendations. It relies on several neutron sources: a 5-GBq (5.8× 10(8) s(-1)) (252)Cf source and two (241)Am-Be neutron sources (185 and 11.1 GBq). The irradiation point is located 4 m over the ground level and in the geometrical centre of the room. Each neutron source can be moved remotely from its storage position inside a water pool to the irradiation point. Prior to this, an important task to design the neutron shielding and to choose the most appropriate materials has been developed by the Radiological Security Unit and the Ionizing Radiations Metrology Laboratory. MCNPX was chosen to simulate the irradiation facility. With this information the walls were built with a thickness of 125 cm. Special attention was put on the weak points (main door, air conditioning system, etc.) so that the ambient dose outside the facility was below the regulatory limits. Finally, the Radiation Protection Unit carried out a set of measurements in specific points around the installation with an LB6411 neutron monitor and a Reuter-Stokes high-pressure ion chamber to verify experimentally the results of the simulation. PMID:24478306

  19. Calculated and measured depth dose profiles in a phantom exposed to neutron radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, R.I.; Tanner, J.E.; Sigalla, L.A.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1989-05-01

    An accurate evaluation of doses caused by external sources of neutron radiation depends on knowledge of the transport of radiation inside the human body. Health physicists use two primary methods for studying this radiation transport: computer calculations and measurements. Both computer calculations and measurements were performed under well controlled, nearly identical conditions to determine the extent of their agreement. A comparison of the dose profiles predicted by both measurements and calculations was thus possible. The measurements were performed in a cylindrical phantom made of tissue equivalent plastic. The phantom size, 61 cm high and 30 cm in diameter, was chosen to approximate the human torso and to match the dimensions of cylindrical phantoms used by previous calculations. Holes were drilled down through the phantom to accommodate small tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) at various depths in the phantom. These counters were used to measure the neutron dose inside the phantom when it was exposed to various sources of neutrons. The holes in the phantom could also accommodate miniature Geiger-Mueller detectors to measure the gamma component of the dose. Neutron and gamma dose profiles were measured for two different sources of neutrons: an unmoderated /sup 252/Cf source and a 733-keV neutron beam generated by a Van de Graaff accelerator. 14 refs., 13 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Equivalent properties of single event burnout induced by different sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shi-Yu; Cao, Zhou; Da, Dao-An; Xue, Yu-Xiong

    2009-05-01

    The experimental results of single event burnout induced by heavy ions and 252Cf fission fragments in power MOSFET devices have been investigated. It is concluded that the characteristics of single event burnout induced by 252Cf fission fragments is consistent to that in heavy ions. The power MOSFET in the “turn-off" state is more susceptible to single event burnout than it is in the “turn-on" state. The thresholds of the drain-source voltage for single event burnout induced by 173 MeV bromine ions and 252Cf fission fragments are close to each other, and the burnout cross section is sensitive to variation of the drain-source voltage above the threshold of single event burnout. In addition, the current waveforms of single event burnouts induced by different sources are similar. Different power MOSFET devices may have different probabilities for the occurrence of single event burnout.

  1. Compact Neutron Sources for Energy and Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Hitoshi

    We choose nuclear data and nuclear material inspection for energy application, and nondestructive testing of explosive and hidden nuclear materials for security application. Low energy (~100 keV) electrostatic accelerators of deuterium are commercially available for nondestructive testing. For nuclear data measurement, electrostatic ion accelerators and L-band (1.428GHz) and S-band (2.856GHz) electron linear accelerators (linacs) are used for the neutron source. Compact or mobile X-band (9.3, 11.424GHz) electron linac neutron sources are under development. A compact proton linac neutron source is used for nondestructive testing, especially water in solids. Several efforts for more neutron intensity using proton and deuteron accelerators are also introduced.

  2. Compact Neutron Sources for Energy and Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Hitoshi

    We choose nuclear data and nuclear material inspection for energy application, and nondestructive testing of explosive and hidden nuclear materials for security application. Low energy (˜100keV) electrostatic accelerators of deuterium are commercially available for nondestructive testing. For nuclear data measurement, electrostatic ion accelerators and L-band (1.428GHz) and S-band (2.856GHz) electron linear accelerators (linacs) are used for the neutron source. Compact or mobile X-band (9.3, 11.424GHz) electron linac neutron sources are under development. A compact proton linac neutron source is used for nondestructive testing, especially water in solids. Several efforts for more neutron intensity using proton and deuteron accelerators are also introduced.

  3. Applicability of the Ge(n,γ) Reaction for Estimating Thermal Neutron Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, J.; Medić, Ž.; Jovančević, N.; Hansman, J.; Todorović, N.; Krmar, M.

    A simple experimental setup was used to measure gamma lines appearing in spectra after interactions of neutrons with Ge in the active volume of a high-purity germanium detector placed in a low-background shield. As source of neutrons a 252Cf spontaneous fission source and different thicknesses of PVC plates were used to slow down neutrons. A cadmiumenvelope was placed over the detector dipstick to identify the effect from slow and fast neutrons. Intensities of several characteristic γ-lines were measured, including intensity of the 139.9 keV γ-line from the reaction 74Ge(n,γ)75mGe, usually used for estimation of thermal neutron flux. Obtained results signify that only a part of the detected 139.9 keV γ-rays originate from thermal neutron capture. Some preliminary results indicate that in our detection setup thermal neutron capture contributes with 30% to 50% to the total intensity of the 139.9 keV γ-line, depending on the thickness of the PVC plates.

  4. Site-specific calibration of the Hanford personnel neutron dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Endres, A.W.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Baumgartner, W.V.; Rathbone, B.A.

    1994-10-01

    A new personnel dosimetry system, employing a standard Hanford thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and a combination dosimeter with both CR-39 nuclear track and TLD-albedo elements, is being implemented at Hanford. Measurements were made in workplace environments in order to verify the accuracy of the system and establish site-specific factors to account for the differences in dosimeter response between the workplace and calibration laboratory. Neutron measurements were performed using sources at Hanford`s Plutonium Finishing Plant under high-scatter conditions to calibrate the new neutron dosimeter design to site-specific neutron spectra. The dosimeter was also calibrated using bare and moderated {sup 252}Cf sources under low-scatter conditions available in the Hanford Calibration Laboratory. Dose equivalent rates in the workplace were calculated from spectrometer measurements using tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and multisphere spectrometers. The accuracy of the spectrometers was verified by measurements on neutron sources with calibrations directly traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  5. Double Chooz Neutron Detection Efficiency with Calibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Pi-Jung

    2012-03-01

    The Double Chooz experiment is designed to search for a non-vanishing mixing angle theta13 with unprecedented sensitivity. The first results obtained with the far detector only indicate a non-zero value of theta13. The Double Chooz detector system consists of a main detector, an outer veto system and a number of calibration systems. The main detector consists of a series of concentric cylinders. The target vessel, a liquid scintillator loaded with 0.1% Gd, is surrounded by the gamma-catcher, a non-loaded liquid scintillator. A buffer region of non-scintillating liquid surrounds the gamma-catcher and serves to decrease the level of accidental background. There is the Inner Veto region outside the buffer. The experiment is calibrated with light sources, radioactive point sources, cosmics and natural radioactivity. The radio-isotopes sealed in miniature capsules are deployed in the target and the gamma-catcher. Neutron detection efficiency is one of the major systematic components in the measurement of anti-neutrino disappearance. An untagged 252Cf source was used to determine fractions of neutron captures on Gd, neutron capture time systematic and neutron delayed energy systematic. The details will be explained in the talk.

  6. Studies on new neutron-sensitive dosimeters using an optically stimulated luminescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, M. S.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Behrens, R.; Muthe, K. P.; Rawat, N. S.; Gupta, S. K.; Sharma, D. N.

    2011-07-01

    The neutron response of detectors prepared using α-Al 2O 3:C phosphor developed using a melt processing technique and mixed with neutron converters was studied in monoenergetic neutron fields. The detector pellets were arranged in two different pairs: α-Al 2O 3:C + 6LiF/α-Al 2O 3:C + 7LiF and α-Al 2O 3:C + high-density polyethylene/α-Al 2O 3:C + Teflon, for neutron dosimetry using albedo and recoil proton techniques. The optically stimulated luminescence response of the Al 2O 3:C + 6,7LiF dosimeter to radiation from a 252Cf source was 0.21, in terms of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) and relative to radiation from a 137Cs source. This was comparable to results obtained with similar detectors prepared using commercially available α-Al 2O 3:C phosphor. The Hp(10) response of the α-Al 2O 3:C + 6,7LiF dosimeters was found to decrease by more than two orders of magnitude with increasing neutron energy, as expected for albedo dosimeters. The response of the α-Al 2O 3:C + high-density polyethylene/α-Al 2O 3:C + Teflon dosimeters was small, of the order of 1% to 2% in terms of Hp(10) and relative to radiation from a 137Cs source, for neutron energies greater than 1 MeV.

  7. Neutron science opportunities at pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Using the IPNS Upgrade plan developed at Argonne National Laboratory as a worked example of the design of a pulsed spallation neutron source, this paper explores some of the scientific applications of an advanced facility for materials science studies and the instrumentation for those purposes.

  8. Iterative Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Bingham, Philip R; Gregor, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Use of a coded source facilitates high-resolution neutron imaging but requires that the radiographic data be deconvolved. In this paper, we compare direct deconvolution with two different iterative algorithms, namely, one based on direct deconvolution embedded in an MLE-like framework and one based on a geometric model of the neutron beam and a least squares formulation of the inverse imaging problem.

  9. Advanced Neutron Source: The users' perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    User experiments will cover fields such as activation analysis of pollutants, irradiation of materials for the fusion program, and neutron scattering studies of materials as diverse as viruses, aerospace composites, and superconductors. Production capabilities must also be provided for the production of isotopes, especially of transuranic elements. The different ways in which these research areas and their required infrastructure influence the design of the Advanced Neutron Source will be the subject of this paper.

  10. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited).

    PubMed

    Vondrasek, R; Levand, A; Pardo, R; Savard, G; Scott, R

    2012-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi (252)Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci (252)Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 10(6) ions∕s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for (23)Na(8+), 15.6% for (84)Kr(17+), and 13.7% for (85)Rb(19+) with typical breeding times of 10 ms∕charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for (143)Cs(27+) and 14.7% for (143)Ba(27+). The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of (143)Ba(27+) accelerated to 6.1 MeV∕u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities. PMID:22380254

  11. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2012-02-15

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi {sup 252}Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci {sup 252}Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 10{sup 6} ions/s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for {sup 23}Na{sup 8+}, 15.6% for {sup 84}Kr{sup 17+}, and 13.7% for {sup 85}Rb{sup 19+} with typical breeding times of 10 ms/charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for {sup 143}Cs{sup 27+} and 14.7% for {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+}. The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+} accelerated to 6.1 MeV/u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities.

  12. THERMAL NEUTRON INTENSITIES IN SOILS IRRADIATED BY FAST NEUTRONS FROM POINT SOURCES. (R825549C054)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal-neutron fluences in soil are reported for selected fast-neutron sources, selected soil types, and selected irradiation geometries. Sources include 14 MeV neutrons from accelerators, neutrons from spontaneously fissioning 252Cf, and neutrons produced from alp...

  13. Directional measurements for sources of fission neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, R.C.; Auchampaugh, G.F.; Feldman, W.C.

    1993-11-01

    Although penetrating neutron and gamma-ray emissions arguably provide the most effective signals for locating sources of nuclear radiation, their relatively low fluxes make searching for radioactive materials a tedious process. Even assuming lightly shielded sources and detectors with large areas and high efficiencies, estimated counting times can exceed several minutes for source separations greater than ten meters. Because determining the source position requires measurements at several locations, each with its own background, the search procedure can be lengthy and difficult to automate. Although directional measurements can be helpful, conventional collimation reduces count rates and increases the detector size and weight prohibitively, especially for neutron instruments. We describe an alternative approach for locating radiation sources that is based on the concept of a polarized radiation field. In this model, the presence of a source adds a directional component to the randomly oriented background radiation. The net direction of the local field indicates the source angle, and the magnitude provides an estimate of the distance to the source. The search detector is therefore seen as a device that responds to this polarized radiation field. Our proposed instrument simply substitutes segmented detectors for conventional single-element ones, so it requires little or no collimating material or additional weight. Attenuation across the detector creates differences in the count rates for opposite segments, whose ratios can be used to calculate the orthogonal components of the polarization vector. Although this approach is applicable to different types of radiation and detectors, in this report we demonstrate its use for sources of fission neutrons by using a prototype fast-neutron detector, which also provides background-corrected energy spectra for the incident neutrons.

  14. Iterative Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Bingham, Philip R; Gregor, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Use of a coded source facilitates high-resolution neutron imaging through magnifications but requires that the radiographic data be deconvolved. A comparison of direct deconvolution with two different iterative algorithms has been performed. One iterative algorithm is based on a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-like framework and the second is based on a geometric model of the neutron beam within a least squares formulation of the inverse imaging problem. Simulated data for both uniform and Gaussian shaped source distributions was used for testing to understand the impact of non-uniformities present in neutron beam distributions on the reconstructed images. Results indicate that the model based reconstruction method will match resolution and improve on contrast over convolution methods in the presence of non-uniform sources. Additionally, the model based iterative algorithm provides direct calculation of quantitative transmission values while the convolution based methods must be normalized base on known values.

  15. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39.55 Section 39... Equipment § 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target...) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source, containing quantities exceeding 1,110 GBg or in...

  16. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39.55 Section 39... Equipment § 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target...) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source, containing quantities exceeding 1,110 GBg or in...

  17. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39.55 Section 39... Equipment § 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target...) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source, containing quantities exceeding 1,110 GBg or in...

  18. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39.55 Section 39... Equipment § 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target...) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source, containing quantities exceeding 1,110 GBg or in...

  19. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39.55 Section 39... Equipment § 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target...) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source, containing quantities exceeding 1,110 GBg or in...

  20. Verification of threshold activation detection (TAD) technique in prompt fission neutron detection using scintillators containing 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibczynski, P.; Kownacki, J.; Moszyński, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Gójska, A.; Gierlik, M.; Kaźmierczak, Ł.; Jakubowska, E.; Kędzierski, G.; Kujawiński, Ł.; Wojnarowicz, J.; Carrel, F.; Ledieu, M.; Lainé, F.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study ⌀ 5''× 3'' and ⌀ 2''× 2'' EJ-313 liquid fluorocarbon as well as ⌀ 2'' × 3'' BaF2 scintillators were exposed to neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source and a Sodern Genie 16GT deuterium-tritium (D+T) neutron generator. The scintillators responses to β- particles with maximum endpoint energy of 10.4 MeV from the n+19F reactions were studied. Response of a ⌀ 5'' × 3'' BC-408 plastic scintillator was also studied as a reference. The β- particles are the products of interaction of fast neutrons with 19F which is a component of the EJ-313 and BaF2 scintillators. The method of fast neutron detection via fluorine activation is already known as Threshold Activation Detection (TAD) and was proposed for photofission prompt neutron detection from fissionable and Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in the field of Homeland Security and Border Monitoring. Measurements of the number of counts between 6.0 and 10.5 MeV with a 252Cf source showed that the relative neutron detection efficiency ratio, defined as epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'', is 32.0% ± 2.3% and 44.6% ± 3.4% for front-on and side-on orientation of the BaF2, respectively. Moreover, the ⌀ 5'' EJ-313 and side-on oriented BaF2 were also exposed to neutrons from the D+T neutron generator, and the relative efficiency epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'' was estimated to be 39.3%. Measurements of prompt photofission neutrons with the BaF2 detector by means of data acquisition after irradiation (out-of-beam) of nuclear material and between the beam pulses (beam-off) techniques were also conducted on the 9 MeV LINAC of the SAPHIR facility.

  1. Field parameters and dosimetric characteristics of a fast neutron calibration facility: experimental and Monte Carlo evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, R.; Gualdrini, G.; Monteventi, F.

    2002-01-01

    At the ENEA Institute for Radiation Protection (IRP) the fast neutron calibration facility consists of a remote control device which allows locating different sources (Am-Be, Pu-Li, bare and D 2O moderated 252Cf) at the reference position, at the desired height from the floor, inside a 10×10×3 m 3 irradiation room. Either the ISO reference sources or the Pu-Li source have been characterised in terms of uncollided H*(10) and neutron fluence according to the ISO calibration procedures. A spectral fluence mapping, carried out with the Monte Carlo Code MCNP TM, allowed characterising the calibration point, in scattered field conditions, according to the most recent international recommendations. Moreover, the irradiation of personal dosemeters on the ISO water filled slab phantom was simulated to determine the field homogeneity of the calibration area and the variability of the neutron field (including the backscattered component) along the phantom surface. At the ENEA Institute for Radiation Protection the calibration of neutron area monitors as well as personal dosemeters can now be performed according to the international standards, at the same time guaranteeing suitable conditions for research and qualification purposes in the field of neutron dosimetry.

  2. Enrico Fermi's Discovery of Neutron-Induced Artificial Radioactivity: Neutrons and Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Francesco; Leone, Matteo; Robotti, Nadia

    2006-09-01

    We reconstruct and analyze the path leading from James Chadwick’s discovery of the neutron in February 1932 through Frédéric Joliot and Irène Curie’s discovery of artificial radioactivity in January 1934 to Enrico Fermi’s discovery of neutron-induced artificial radioactivity in March 1934. We show, in particular, that Fermi’s innovative construction and use of radon-beryllium neutron sources permitted him to make his discovery.

  3. Source storage and transfer cask: Users Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Eccleston, G.W.; Speir, L.G.; Garcia, D.C.

    1985-04-01

    The storage and shield cask for the dual californium source is designed to shield and transport up to 3.7 mg (2 Ci) of /sup 252/Cf. the cask meets Department of Transportation (DOT) license requirements for Type A materials (DOT-7A). The cask is designed to transfer sources to and from the Flourinel and Fuel Storage (FAST) facility delayed-neutron interrogator. Californium sources placed in the cask must be encapsulated in the SR-CF-100 package and attached to Teleflex cables. The cask contains two source locations. Each location contains a gear box that allows a Teleflex cable to be remotely moved by a hand crank into and out of the cask. This transfer procedure permits sources to be easily removed and inserted into the delayed-neutron interrogator and reduces personnel radiation exposure during transfer. The radiation dose rate with the maximum allowable quantity of californium (3.7 mg) in the cask is 30 mR/h at the surface and less than 2 mR/h 1 m from the cask surface. This manual contains information about the cask, californium sources, describes the method to ship the cask, and how to insert and remove sources from the cask. 28 figs.

  4. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, John P.; McCollister, Daryl R.

    1998-01-01

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof

  5. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, J.P.; McCollister, D.R.

    1998-04-28

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter is disclosed. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof. 4 figs.

  6. Status Report on the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1998-10-12

    The purpose of the Spallation Neutron Source Project (SNS) is to generate low-energy neutrons (ambient [{approximately}200 meV] and cold [{approximately}50 meV]) which can be used by up to 18 neutron beam lines to study the structure and functionality of materials. The neutrons are generated by the spallation process initiated by the interactions of 1-GeV protons with a Hg target. These neutrons are reflected by a Pb reflector and are moderated by 2 water (ambient) and 2 super critical hydrogen (cryogenic) moderators. The pulse structure for the 1 MW proton beam is 60 Hertz and < 0.7 {micro}s/pulse. The facility must be upgradable to higher power levels (2- and 4- MW) with minimal operational interruptions. Although not included in the current funding or baseline, a second target station and associated support structure which will be designed to utilize cold neutrons is also considered to be an upgrade that must be incorporated with minimal impact on operations.

  7. A capture-gated fast neutron detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Yang, Yi-Gang; Tai, Yang; Zhang, Zhi

    2016-07-01

    To address the problem of the shortage of neutron detectors used in radiation portal monitors (RPMs), caused by the 3He supply crisis, research on a cadmium-based capture-gated fast neutron detector is presented in this paper. The detector is composed of many 1 cm × 1 cm × 20 cm plastic scintillator cuboids covered by 0.1 mm thick film of cadmium. The detector uses cadmium to absorb thermal neutrons and produce capture γ-rays to indicate the detection of neutrons, and uses plastic scintillator to moderate neutrons and register γ-rays. This design removes the volume competing relationship in traditional 3He counter-based fast neutron detectors, which hinders enhancement of the neutron detection efficiency. Detection efficiency of 21.66% ± 1.22% has been achieved with a 40.4 cm × 40.4 cm × 20 cm overall detector volume. This detector can measure both neutrons and γ-rays simultaneously. A small detector (20.2 cm × 20.2 cm × 20 cm) demonstrated a 3.3 % false alarm rate for a 252Cf source with a neutron yield of 1841 n/s from 50 cm away within 15 s measurement time. It also demonstrated a very low (<0.06%) false alarm rate for a 3.21×105 Bq 137Cs source. This detector offers a potential single-detector replacement for both neutron and the γ-ray detectors in RPM systems. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175098, 11375095)

  8. Cold moderators for pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cold moderators in pulsed neutron sources and provides details of the performance of different cold moderator materials and configurations. Analytical forms are presented which describe wavelength spectra and emission time distributions. Several types of cooling arrangements used in pulsed source moderators are described. Choices of materials are surveyed. The author examines some of the radiation damage effects in cold moderators, including the phenomenon of burping'' in irradiated cold solid methane. 9 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. COHERENT at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raybern, Justin; Scholberg, Kate

    2015-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense isotropic flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure which is beneficial for background rejection. This talk will describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS), the physics reach of such a measurement, and the status of COHERENT, the planned experimental program.

  10. Neutron beam characterization at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, E. B.

    1998-05-18

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen neutron scattering instruments and test facilities. The moderators at IPNS are of cryogenic methane (CH{sub 4}); one of liquid methane at 100 K, and two of solid methane at 30 K. These moderators produce intense beams of both cold and thermal neutrons. The moderators are each of a different physical configuration in order to tailor their performance for the instruments and facilities that operate on the neutron beams. As part of the ongoing operation of IPNS, as well as new enhancements to the target, moderator, and reflector systems, we have performed experiments characterizing the energy and time distribution of neutrons in the various beams. These measurements provide absolutely normalized energy spectra using foil activation techniques joined with time-of-flight measurements, and energy-dependent time distributions using a time-focused crystal analyzer. The IPNS accelerator system delivers 14 {micro}A of 450 MeV protons, in 100 ns pulses at 30 Hz, to a target composed of water-cooled depleted uranium disks. The solid methane ''H'' moderator is 100 by 100 by 45 mm in size, centerline poisoned with 0.25 mg/mm{sup 2} gadolinium, and decoupled from the graphite reflector with 0.5 mm of cadmium. The liquid methane ''F'' moderator, which is viewed from both faces, is also 100 by 100 by 45 mm in size, gadolinium poisoned 16 mm below each of the two viewed surfaces, and decoupled from the graphite reflector with cadmium. The solid methane ''C'' moderator has a re-entrant ''grooved'' geometry. The moderator is 100 by 100 by 80 mm overall, with 40 mm deep 12 mm wide horizontal grooves in the viewed surface. These grooves cover 50% of the viewed surface area. The ''C'' moderator is unpoisoned, but is decoupled from the graphite reflector with 0.5 mm of cadmium.

  11. A combined neutron and gamma-ray multiplicity counter based on liquid scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enqvist, Andreas; Flaska, Marek; Dolan, Jennifer L.; Chichester, David L.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2011-10-01

    Multiplicity counters for neutron assay have been extensively used in materials control and accountability for nonproliferation and nuclear safeguards. Typically, neutron coincidence counters are utilized in these fields. In this work, we present a measurement system that makes use not only of neutron (n) multiplicity counting but also of gamma-ray ( γ) multiplicity counting and the combined higher-order multiples containing both neutrons and gamma rays. The benefit of this approach is in using both particle types available from the sample, leading to a reduction in measurement times compared with single-particle measurements. We present measurement results of n, γ, nn, nγ, γγ, nnn, nnγ, nγγ and γγγ multiples emitted by Mixed-Oxide (MOX) samples measured at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The MOX measurement is compared to initial validation of the detection system done using a 252Cf source. The dual radiation measuring system proposed here uses extra measurables to improve the statistics when compared to a neutron-only system and allows for extended analysis and interpretation of sample parameters. New challenges such as the effect of very high intrinsic gamma-ray sources in the case of MOX samples are discussed. Successful measurements of multiple rates can be performed also when using high-Z shielding.

  12. A capture-gated neutron calorimeter using plastic scintillators and 3He drift tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher L; Spaulding, Randy J; Bacon, Jeffrey D; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Chung, Kiwhan; Clark, Deborah J; Green, Jesse A; Greene, Steven J; Hogan, Gary E; Jason, Andrew; Lisowski, Paul W; Makela, Mark F; Mariam, Fessaha G; Miyadera, Haruo; Murray, Matthew M; Saunders, Alexander; Wysocki, Frederick J; Gray, Frederick E

    2010-01-01

    A segmented neutron calorimeter using nine 4-inch x 4-inch x 48-inch plastic scintillators and sixteen 2-inch-diameter 48-inch-long 200-mbar-{sup 3}He drift tubes is described. The correlated scintillator and neutron-capture events provide a means for n/{gamma} discrimination, critical to the neutron calorimetry when the {gamma} background is substantial and the {gamma} signals are comparable in amplitude to the neutron signals. A single-cell prototype was constructed and tested. It can distinguish between a {sup 17}N source and a {sup 252}Cf source when the {gamma} and the thermal neutron background are sufficiently small. The design and construction of the nine-cell segmented detector assembly follow the same principle. By recording the signals from individual scintillators, additional {gamma}-subtraction schemes, such as through the time-of-flight between two scintillators, may also be used. The variations of the light outputs from different parts of a scintillator bar are less than 10%.

  13. A militarily fielded thermal neutron activation sensor for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, E. T. H.; McFee, J. E.; Ing, H.; Andrews, H. R.; Tennant, D.; Harper, E.; Faust, A. A.

    2007-08-01

    The Canadian Department of National Defence has developed a teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multi-sensor system to detect anti-tank landmines on roads and tracks in peacekeeping operations. A key part of the system is a thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensor which is placed above a suspect location to within a 30 cm radius and confirms the presence of explosives via detection of the 10.835 MeV gamma ray associated with thermal neutron capture on 14N. The TNA uses a 100 μg252Cf neutron source surrounded by four 7.62 cm×7.62 cm NaI(Tl) detectors. The system, consisting of the TNA sensor head, including source, detectors and shielding, the high-rate, fast pulse processing electronics and the data processing methodology are described. Results of experiments to characterize detection performance are also described. The experiments have shown that anti-tank mines buried 10 cm or less can be detected in roughly a minute or less, but deeper mines and mines significantly displaced horizontally take considerably longer time. Mines as deep as 30 cm can be detected for long count times (1000 s). Four TNA detectors are now in service with the Canadian Forces as part of the four multi-sensor systems, making it the first militarily fielded TNA sensor and the first militarily fielded confirmation sensor for landmines. The ability to function well in adverse climatic conditions has been demonstrated, both in trials and operations.

  14. HIGH FLUENCE NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE CHARACTERIZATION OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose to research the basic plasma physics necessary to develop a high fluence neutron source based on the inertial electrostatically confined (IEC) plasma. An intense neutron source directly addresses the capability to characterize nuclear materials under difficult measurem...

  15. Portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source provides increased experimental accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, W. C.; Stewart, D. C.; Wahlgren, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Small portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source combines twelve curium-americium beryllium sources. This high intensity of neutrons, with a flux which slowly decreases at a known rate, provides for increased experimental accuracy.

  16. Development Of A Digital Technique For The Determination Of Fission Fragments And Emitted Prompt Neutron Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varapai, N.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Serot, O.; Barreau, G.; Kornilov, N.; Zeinalov, Sh.

    2005-11-01

    The present work demonstrates the application of the digital technique for nuclear measurements. This method has been implemented for measurements of promptly emitted fission neutrons in coincidence with fission fragments from 252Cf(sf). A double Frisch-grid ionization chamber is used as fission fragment detector. The promptly emitted neutrons are detected by a NE213 liquid scintillation detector. The experimental set-up is installed at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements. Preliminary results are presented.

  17. First experiments on neutron detection on the accelerator-based source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Malyshkin, G. N.; Makarov, A. N.; Sorokin, I. N.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2009-04-01

    A pilot accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons, which is intended for wide application in clinics for boron neutron capture therapy, has been constructed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). A stationary proton beam has been obtained and near-threshold neutron generation regime has been realized. Results of the first experiments on neutron generation using the proposed source are described.

  18. Compact neutron source development at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, Jani; Lou, Tak Pui; Tolmachoff, Bryan; Leung, K.N.

    2001-07-25

    A compact neutron generator based on D-D or D-T fusion reactions is being developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced in a radio-frequency (RF) driven multicusp plasma source. Seven beamlets are extracted and are accelerated to energy of 100 keV by means of a three-electrode electrostatic accelerator column. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium coated copper target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated by fusion reaction. The development of the neutron tube is divided into three phases. First, the accelerator column is operated at hydrogen beam intensity of 15 mA. Second phase consists of deuterium beam runs at pulsed, low duty cycle 150 mA operation. The third phase consists of deuterium or tritium operation at 1.5 A beam current. Phase one is completed and the results of hydrogen beam testing are discussed. Low duty cycle 150 mA deuterium operation is being investigated. Neutron flux will be measured. Finally the phase three operation and the advance neutron generator designs are described.

  19. Compact neutron source development at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijonen, Jani; Lou, Tak P.; Tolmachoff, Bryan; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2001-12-01

    A compact neutron generator based on D-D or D-T fusion reactions is being developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National laboratory. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced in a radio-frequency (RF) driven multicusp plasma source. Seven beamlets are extracted and are accelerated to energy of 100 keV by means of a three-electrode electrostatic accelerator column. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium coated copper target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 13 MeV D-T neutrons are generated by fusion reaction. The development of the neutron tube is divided into three phases. First, the accelerator column is operated at hydrogen beam intensity of 15 mA. Second phase consists of deuterium beam runs at pulsed, low duty cycle 150 mA operation. The third phase consists of deuterium or tritium operation at 1.5 A beam current. Phase one is completed and the results of hydrogen beam testing are discussed. Low duty cycle 150 mA deuterium operation is being investigated. Neutron flux will be measured. Finally the phase three operation and the advance neutron generator designs are described.

  20. Physics design of a cold neutron source for KIPT neutron source facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.; Kellogg, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-17

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of a neutron source facility. It is based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility with low enriched uranium fuel, using the existing electron accelerators at KIPT of Ukraine [1]. The neutron source of the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100-KW electron beam, which has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, with a natural uranium target [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Neutron beam experiments and material studies are also included. Over the past two-three decades, structures with characteristic lengths of 100 {angstrom} and correspondingly smaller vibrational energies have become increasingly important for both science and technology [3]. The characteristic dimensions of the microstructures can be well matched by neutrons with longer vibrational wavelength and lower energy. In the accelerator-driven subcritical facility, most of the neutrons are generated from fission reactions with energy in the MeV range. They are slowed down to the meV energy range through scattering reactions in the moderator and reflector materials. However, the fraction of neutrons with energies less than 5 meV in a normal moderator spectrum is very low because of up-scattering caused by the thermal motion of moderator or reflector molecules. In order to obtain neutrons with energy less than 5 meV, cryogenically cooled moderators 'cold neutron sources' should be used to slow down the neutrons. These cold moderators shift the neutron energy spectrum down because the thermal motion of moderator molecules as well as the up-scattering is very small, which provides large gains in intensity of low energy neutrons, E < 5 meV. The

  1. Spallation neutron source and other high intensity froton sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2003-02-06

    This lecture is an introduction to the design of a spallation neutron source and other high intensity proton sources. It discusses two different approaches: linac-based and synchrotron-based. The requirements and design concepts of each approach are presented. The advantages and disadvantages are compared. A brief review of existing machines and those under construction and proposed is also given. An R&D program is included in an appendix.

  2. Identification and rejection of scattered neutrons in AGATA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şenyiğit, M.; Ataç, A.; Akkoyun, S.; Kaşkaş, A.; Bazzacco, D.; Nyberg, J.; Recchia, F.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Farnea, E.; Giaz, A.; Gottardo, A.; Kempley, R.; Ljungvall, J.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Million, B.; Palacz, M.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Şahin, E.; Söderström, P. A.; Valiente Dobon, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    γ Rays and neutrons, emitted following spontaneous fission of 252Cf, were measured in an AGATA experiment performed at INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro in Italy. The setup consisted of four AGATA triple cluster detectors (12 36-fold segmented high-purity germanium crystals), placed at a distance of 50 cm from the source, and 16 HELENA BaF2 detectors. The aim of the experiment was to study the interaction of neutrons in the segmented high-purity germanium detectors of AGATA and to investigate the possibility to discriminate neutrons and γ rays with the γ-ray tracking technique. The BaF2 detectors were used for a time-of-flight measurement, which gave an independent discrimination of neutrons and γ rays and which was used to optimise the γ-ray tracking-based neutron rejection methods. It was found that standard γ-ray tracking, without any additional neutron rejection features, eliminates effectively most of the interaction points due to recoiling Ge nuclei after elastic scattering of neutrons. Standard tracking rejects also a significant amount of the events due to inelastic scattering of neutrons in the germanium crystals. Further enhancements of the neutron rejection was obtained by setting conditions on the following quantities, which were evaluated for each event by the tracking algorithm: energy of the first and second interaction point, difference in the calculated incoming direction of the γ ray, and figure-of-merit value. The experimental results of tracking with neutron rejection agree rather well with GEANT4 simulations.

  3. Synchrotron based spallation neutron source concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.

    1998-07-01

    During the past 20 years, rapid-cycling synchrotrons (RCS) have been used very productively to generate short-pulse thermal neutron beams for neutron scattering research by materials science communities in Japan (KENS), the UK (ISIS) and the US (IPNS). The most powerful source in existence, ISIS in the UK, delivers a 160-kW proton beam to a neutron-generating target. Several recently proposed facilities require proton beams in the MW range to produce intense short-pulse neutron beams. In some proposals, a linear accelerator provides the beam power and an accumulator ring compresses the pulse length to the required {approx} 1 {micro}s. In others, RCS technology provides the bulk of the beam power and compresses the pulse length. Some synchrotron-based proposals achieve the desired beam power by combining two or more synchrotrons of the same energy, and others propose a combination of lower and higher energy synchrotrons. This paper presents the rationale for using RCS technology, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of synchrotron-based spallation sources.

  4. Crystal Driven Neutron Source: A New Paradigm for Miniature Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V; Morse, J; Meyer, G; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Kerr, P; Park, H G; Rusnak, B; Sampayan, S; Schmid, G; Spadaccini, C; Wang, L

    2008-08-08

    Neutron interrogation techniques have specific advantages for detection of hidden, shielded, or buried threats over other detection modalities in that neutrons readily penetrate most materials providing backscattered gammas indicative of the elemental composition of the potential threat. Such techniques have broad application to military and homeland security needs. Present neutron sources and interrogation systems are expensive and relatively bulky, thereby making widespread use of this technique impractical. Development of a compact, high intensity crystal driven neutron source is described. The crystal driven neutron source approach has been previously demonstrated using pyroelectric crystals that generate extremely high voltages when thermal cycled [1-4]. Placement of a sharpened needle on the positively polarized surface of the pyroelectric crystal results in sufficient field intensification to field ionize background deuterium molecules in a test chamber, and subsequently accelerate the ions to energies in excess of {approx}100 keV, sufficient for either D-D or D-T fusion reactions with appropriate target materials. Further increase in ion beam current can be achieved through optimization of crystal thermal ramping, ion source and crystal accelerator configuration. The advantage of such a system is the compact size along with elimination of large, high voltage power supplies. A novel implementation discussed incorporates an independently controlled ion source in order to provide pulsed neutron operation having microsecond pulse width.

  5. Crystal Driven Neutron Source: A New Paradigm for Miniature Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, V.; Morse, J.; Meyer, G.; Falabella, S.; Guethlein, G.; Kerr, P.; Park, H. G.; Rusnak, B.; Sampayan, S.; Schmid, G.; Spadaccini, C.; Wang, L.

    2009-03-01

    Neutron interrogation techniques have specific advantages for detection of hidden, shielded, or buried threats over other detection modalities in that neutrons readily penetrate most materials providing backscattered gammas indicative of the elemental composition of the potential threat. Such techniques have broad application to military and homeland security needs. Present neutron sources and interrogation systems are expensive and relatively bulky, thereby making widespread use of this technique impractical. Development of a compact, high intensity crystal driven neutron source is described. The crystal driven neutron source approach has been previously demonstrated using pyroelectric crystals that generate extremely high voltages when thermal cycled [1-4]. Placement of a sharpened needle on the positively polarized surface of the pyroelectric crystal results in sufficient field intensification to field ionize background deuterium molecules in a test chamber, and subsequently accelerate the ions to energies in excess of ˜100 keV, sufficient for either D-D or D-T fusion reactions with appropriate target materials. Further increase in ion beam current can be achieved through optimization of crystal thermal ramping, ion source and crystal accelerator configuration. The advantage of such a system is the compact size along with elimination of large, high voltage power supplies. A novel implementation discussed incorporates an independently controlled ion source in order to provide pulsed neutron operation having microsecond pulse width.

  6. DIVERSE ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE COUNTER UTILITY AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R; Saleem Salaymeh, S

    2007-01-08

    In this paper we describe use of the Aquila active well neutron coincidence counter for nuclear material assays of {sup 235}U in multiple analytical techniques at Savannah River Site (SRS), at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and at Argonne West National Laboratory (AWNL). The uses include as a portable passive neutron counter for field measurements searching for evidence of {sup 252}Cf deposits and storage; as a portable active neutron counter using an external activation source for field measurements searching for trace {sup 235}U deposits and holdup; for verification measurements of U-Al reactor fuel elements; for verification measurements of uranium metal; and for verification measurements of process waste of impure uranium in a challenging cement matrix. The wide variety of uses described demonstrate utility of the technique for neutron coincidence verification measurements over the dynamic ranges of 100 g-5000 g for U metal, 200 g-1300 g for U-Al, and 8 g-35 g for process waste. In addition to demonstrating use of the instrument in both the passive and active modes, we also demonstrate its use in both the fast and thermal neutron modes.

  7. INJECTION CHOICE FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRODOWSKI,J.; FEDOTOV,A.; GARDNER,C.; LEE,Y.Y.; RAPARIA,D.; DANILOV,V.; HOLMES,J.; PRIOR,C.; REES,G.; MACHIDA,S.

    2001-06-18

    Injection is key in the low-loss design of high-intensity proton facilities like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). During the design of both the accumulator and the rapid-cycling-synchrotron version of the SNS, extensive comparison has been made to select injection scenarios that satisfy SNS's low-loss design criteria. This paper presents issues and considerations pertaining to the final choice of the SNS injection systems.

  8. COHERENT at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholberg, Kate; Coherent Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense isotropic flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure which is beneficial for background rejection. This talk will describe aspects of COHERENT, the experimental program underway to measure CEvNS (Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering) using low-energy nuclear recoil detectors.

  9. The design of a high-efficiency neutron counter for waste drums to provide optimized sensitivity for plutonium assay

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Beddingfield, D.H.; Pickrell, M.M.

    1997-11-01

    An advanced passive neutron counter has been designed to improve the accuracy and sensitivity for the nondestructive assay of plutonium in scrap and waste containers. The High-Efficiency Neutron Counter (HENC) was developed under a Cooperative Research Development Agreement between the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Canberra Industries. The primary goal of the development was to produce a passive assay system for 200-L drums that has detectability limits and multiplicity counting features that are superior to previous systems. A detectability limit figure of merit (FOM) was defined that included the detector efficiency, the neutron die-away time, and the detector`s active volume and density that determine the cosmic-ray background. Monte Carlo neutron calculations were performed to determine the parameters to provide an optimum FOM. The system includes the {sup 252}Cf {open_quotes}add-a-source{close_quotes} feature to improve the accuracy as well as statistical filters to reduce the cosmic-ray spallation neutron background. The final decision gave an efficiency of 32% for plutonium with a detector {sup 3}He tube volume that is significantly smaller than for previous high-efficiency systems for 200-L drums. Because of the high efficiency of the HENC, we have incorporated neutron multiplicity counting for matrix corrections for those cases where the plutonium is localized in nonuniform hydrogenous materials. The paper describes the design and performance testing of the advanced system. 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Linac-driven spallation-neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.J.

    1995-05-01

    Strong interest has arisen in accelerator-driven spallation-neutron sources that surpass existing facilities (such as ISIS at Rutherford or LANSCE at Los Alamos) by more than an order of magnitude in beam power delivered to the spallation target. The approach chosen by Los Alamos (as well as the European Spallation Source) provides the full beam energy by acceleration in a linac as opposed to primary acceleration in a synchrotron or other circular device. Two modes of neutron production are visualized for the source. A short-pulse mode produces 1 MW of beam power (at 60 pps) in pulses, of length less than 1 ms, by compression of the linac macropulse through multi-turn injection in an accumulator ring. A long-pulse mode produces a similar beam power with 1-ms-long pulses directly applied to a target. This latter mode rivals the performance of existing reactor facilities to very low neutron energies. Combination with the short-pulse mode addresses virtually all applications.

  11. Unfolding the neutron spectrum of a NE213 scintillator using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Sharghi Ido, A; Bonyadi, M R; Etaati, G R; Shahriari, M

    2009-10-01

    Artificial neural networks technology has been applied to unfold the neutron spectra from the pulse height distribution measured with NE213 liquid scintillator. Here, both the single and multi-layer perceptron neural network models have been implemented to unfold the neutron spectrum from an Am-Be neutron source. The activation function and the connectivity of the neurons have been investigated and the results have been analyzed in terms of the network's performance. The simulation results show that the neural network that utilizes the Satlins transfer function has the best performance. In addition, omitting the bias connection of the neurons improve the performance of the network. Also, the SCINFUL code is used for generating the response functions in the training phase of the process. Finally, the results of the neural network simulation have been compared with those of the FORIST unfolding code for both (241)Am-Be and (252)Cf neutron sources. The results of neural network are in good agreement with FORIST code. PMID:19586776

  12. An underwater neutron coincidence counter for measurement of spent fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, P.; Halbig, J.; Lestone, J.; Sprinkle, J.

    1999-07-01

    An underwater neutron coincident counter has been designed and constructed for the measurement of spent nuclear fuel--the spent-fuel coincident counter (SFCC). The SFCC is a medium-detection-efficiency design that incorporates an ionization chamber (IC) for gamma-ray dose evaluation from the spent nuclear fuel. The absolute neutron detection efficiency is 14.5% for {sup 252}Cf sources. The SFCC is hermetically sealed, as it is installed {approximately}5 m below water level in a spent-fuel storage pond. There are 20 {sup 3}He tubes arranged within a polyethylene ring in a single band. There is an inner ring of 6.8 cm of lead to provide shielding from the fission product gamma rays. A single IC is primarily used to determine the dose impinging upon the {sup 3}He tubes and to determine the appropriate operational parameters to avoid gamma-ray pile effects in the {sup 3}He tubes. To further minimize gamma-ray pileup effects, each {sup 3}He tube is connected to a PDT110A preamplifier. The single and double neutron count rates, in addition to the IC measurement information from the SFCC, are used to determine the Pu mass of the spent-fuel assemblies and the decay heat and for classification of the assembly type. This information is required such that safety criteria are met for the safe packaging of the spent-fuel assemblies.

  13. The advanced neutron source reactor: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will be a new user facility for all kinds of neutron research, including neutron scattering, materials testing, materials analysis, isotope production and nuclear physics experiments. The centerpiece of the facility is to be the world's highest flux beam reactor. There will be beams of hot, cold and thermal neutrons for more than 40 simultaneous scattering and nuclear physics experiments. In addition, there will be irradiation positions and rabbit tubes for in-pile experiments, testing and isotopes production (including transuranium isotopes). To reduce technical risks and to minimize safety issues, the reactor design is based on technology already employed in existing research reactors. The fuel elements are annular assemblies of aluminum clad involute fuel plates, similar to the design of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge and the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) Reactor in Grenoble. As is common with many other research reactors, the core is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water. The preferred fuel is U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} - a high-density fuel form developed by Argonne National Laboratory and Babcock and Wilcox that has been extensively tested in reactors in the United States, Europe and Japan. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Advanced Neutron Sources: Plant Design Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new, world class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. At the heart of the facility is a 350-MW{sub th}, heavy water cooled and moderated reactor. The reactor is housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides fans out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Office, laboratory, and shop facilities are included to provide a complete users facility. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the end of the decade. This Plant Design Requirements document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of the ANS. This document also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this Plant Design Requirements document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of the ANS.

  15. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  16. Physics and technology of spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G. S.

    2001-05-01

    A substantial body of research is necessary in order to be able to make reliable predictions on the performance and safety of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), in particular of their spallation targets. So far, practical experience has resulted from the development of research neutron sources only. Next to fission and fusion, spallation is an efficient process for releasing neutrons from nuclei. Unlike the other two reactions, it is an endothermal process and can, therefore, not be used per se in energy generation. In order to sustain a spallation reaction, an energetic beam of particles, most commonly protons, must be supplied onto a heavy target. Spallation can, however, play an important role as a source of neutrons whose flux can be easily controlled via the driving beam. Although sophisticated Monte Carlo codes exist to compute all aspects of a spallation facility, many features can be understood on the basis of simple physics arguments. Technically a spallation facility is very demanding, not only because a reliable and economic accelerator of high power is needed to drive the reaction, but also, and in particular, because high levels of radiation and heat are generated in the target which are difficult to cope with. Radiation effects in a spallation environment are different from those commonly encountered in a reactor and are probably even more temperature dependent than the latter because of the high gas production rate. A commonly favored solution is the use of molten heavy metal targets. While radiation damage is not a problem in this case, except for the container, other issues need to be considered. R&D carried out for the development of spallation neutron sources will thus be beneficial also directly for ADS.

  17. A neutron multiplicity analysis method for uranium samples with liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao; Lin, Hongtao; Liu, Guorong; Li, Jinghuai; Liang, Qinglei; Zhao, Yonggang

    2015-10-01

    A new neutron multiplicity analysis method for uranium samples with liquid scintillators is introduced. An active well-type fast neutron multiplicity counter has been built, which consists of four BC501A liquid scintillators, a n/γdiscrimination module MPD-4, a multi-stop time to digital convertor MCS6A, and two Am-Li sources. A mathematical model is built to symbolize the detection processes of fission neutrons. Based on this model, equations in the form of R=F*P*Q*T could be achieved, where F indicates the induced fission rate by interrogation sources, P indicates the transfer matrix determined by multiplication process, Q indicates the transfer matrix determined by detection efficiency, T indicates the transfer matrix determined by signal recording process and crosstalk in the counter. Unknown parameters about the item are determined by the solutions of the equations. A 252Cf source and some low enriched uranium items have been measured. The feasibility of the method is proven by its application to the data analysis of the experiments.

  18. The Advanced Neutron Source liquid deuterium cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will employ two cold sources to moderate neutrons to low energy (<10 meV). The cold neutrons produced are then passed through beam guides to various experiment stations. Each cold source moderator is a sphere of 410-mm internal diameter. The moderator material is liquid deuterium flowing at a rate of 1 kg/s and maintained at subcooled temperatures at all points of the circuit, to prevent boiling. Nuclear beat deposited within the liquid deuterium and its containment structure totals more than 30 kW. All of this heat is removed by the liquid deuterium, which raises its temperature by 5 K. The liquid prime mover is a cryogenic circulator that is situated in the return leg of the flow loop. This arrangement minimizes the heat added to the liquid between the heat exchanger and the moderator vessel, allowing the moderator to be operated at the minimum practical temperature. This report describes the latest thinking at the time of project termination. It also includes the status of various systems at that time and outlines anticipated directions in which the design would have progressed. In this regard, some detail differences between this report and official design documents reflect ideas that were not approved at the time of closure but are considered noteworthy.

  19. Intense steady state neutron source. The CNR reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, F.C.; Moon, R.M.; Gambill, W.R.; Moon, R.M.; Primm, R.T. III; West, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Center for Neutron Research (CNR) has been proposed in response to the needs - neutron flux, spectrum, and experimental facilities - that have been identified through workshops, studies, and discussions by the neutron-scattering, isotope, and materials irradiation research communities. The CNR is a major new experimental facility consisting of a reactor-based steady state neutron source of unprecedented flux, together with extensive facilities and instruments for neutron scattering, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other areas of research.

  20. Neutron diffractometers for structural biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenborn, B.P.; Pitcher, E.

    1994-12-31

    Spallation neutron sources are ideal for diffraction studies of proteins and oriented molecular complexes. With spoliation neutrons and their time dependent wavelength structure, it is easy to electronically select data with an optimal wavelength bandwidth and cover the whole Laue spectrum as time (wavelength) resolved snapshots. This optimized data quality with best peak-to-background ratios and provides adequate spatial and energy resolution to eliminate peak overlaps. The application of this concept will use choppers to select the desired Laue wavelength spectrum and employ focusing optics and large cylindrical {sup 3}He detectors to optimize data collection rates. Such a diffractometer will cover a Laue wavelength range from 1 to 5{Angstrom} with a flight path length of 10m and an energy resolution of 0.25{Angstrom}. Moderator concepts for maximal flux distribution within this energy range will be discussed using calculated flux profiles. Since the energy resolution required for such timed data collection in this super Laue techniques is not very high, the use of a linac only (LAMPF) spoliation target is an exciting possibility with an order of magnitude increase in flux.

  1. New sources and instrumentation for neutrons in biology

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, S.C.M.; Ankner, J.; Bellissent-Funel, M.C.; Bewley, R.; Blakeley, M.P.; Coates, L.; Dahint, R.; Dalgliesh, R.; Dencher, N.; Dhont, J.; Fischer, P.; Forsyth, V.T.; Fragneto, G.; Frick, B.; Geue, T.; Gilles, R.; Gutberlet, T.; Haertlein, M.; Hauß, T.; Häußler, W.; Heller, W.T.; Herwig, K.; Holderer, O.; Juranyi, F.; Kampmann, R.; Knott, R.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Kreuger, S.; Langan, P.; Lechner, R.; Lynn, G.; Majkrzak, C.; May, R.; Meilleur, F.; Mo, Y.; Mortensen, K.; Myles, D.A.A.; Natali, F.; Neylon, C.; Niimura, N.; Ollivier, J.; Ostermann, A.; Peters, J.; Pieper, J.; Rühm, A.; Schwahn, D.; Shibata, K.; Soper, A.K.; Straessle, T.; Suzuki, U.-i.; Tanaka, I.; Tehei, M.; Timmins, P.; Torikai, N.; Unruh, T.; Urban, V.; Vavrin, R.; Weiss, K.; Zaccai, G.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron radiation offers significant advantages for the study of biological molecular structure and dynamics. A broad and significant effort towards instrumental and methodological development to facilitate biology experiments at neutron sources worldwide is reviewed. PMID:19132140

  2. Dual-mode operation of a neutron source, a concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givens, W. W.; Mills, W. R., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    Pulsed neutron source operates in conjunction with a photomultiplier tube coupled to a gamma ray scintillation crystal. This allows measurements of gamma radiation from both inelastic scattering and thermal neutron capture in a single experiment.

  3. The possible use of a spallation neutron source for neutron capture therapy with epithermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Grusell, E.; Conde, H.; Larsson, B.; Roennqvist, T.; Sornsuntisook, O.; Crawford, J.; Reist, H.; Dahl, B.; Sjoestrand, N.G.; Russel, G. . Dept. of Radiation Sciences; Paul Scherrer Inst. , Villigen; Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg . Dept. of Reactor Physics; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    Spallation is induced in a heavy material by 72 MeV protons. The hereby produced neutrons with essentially an evaporation spectrum with a peak energy of less than 2 MeV are moderated in two steps, first in iron, and then in carbon. Results from neutron fluence measurements in a perspex phantom placed close to the moderator are presented. Monte Carlo calculations of neutron fluence in a water phantom are also presented under some chosen configurations of spallation source and moderator. The calculations and measurements show a good agreement and also show that useful thermal neutron fluences are attainable in the depth of the brain, at proton currents of less than 0.5 mA. 3 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Multi-purpose fast neutron spectrum analyzer with real-time signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Puryga, E. A.; Khilchenko, A. D.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Burdakov, A. V.; Grishnyaev, E. V.

    2013-08-01

    Diagnostics of hot ion component of plasma on the products of fusion reactions is widely used on thermonuclear facilities. In case of employment of neutron spectrometers, based on organics scintillators, there is advanced technique developed to eliminate neutron pulses from gamma background—digital pulse shape discrimination. For every DPSD application it is necessary to use the fast (2-5 ns) and precise (12 bit) transient ADC unit with large amount of onboard memory for storing every digitized scintillation pulses during shot time. At present time the duration of hot thermonuclear plasma burning in large tokamaks approximate to 1 min, and this requires very high onboard memory capacity (˜100 GB). This paper describes a neutron spectrum analyzer with real-time DPSD algorithm, implemented to ADC unit. This approach saves about two orders of onboard memory capacity, gives the possibility of instant use of outcome to feedback systems. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with help of 60Co and 252Cf radiation sources, and deuterium neutron generator.

  5. Status of the intense pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Crawford, R.K.; Rauchas, A.V.; Schulke, A.W.; Worlton, T.G.

    1988-01-01

    IPNS is not unique in having concerns about the level of funding, and the future looks good despite these concerns. This report details the progress made at IPNS during the last two years. Other papers in these proceedings discuss in detail the status of the enriched uranium Booster target, the two instruments that are under construction, GLAD and POSY II, and a proposal for research on an Advanced Pulsed Neutron Source (ASPUN) that has been submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE). Further details on IPNS are available in the IPNS Progress Report 1987--1988, available by writing the IPNS Division Office. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Spallation neutron source beam loss monitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassner, D.; Witkover, R.; Cameron, P.; Power, J.

    2000-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source facility to be built at ORNL is designed to accumulate 2×1014 protons at 1.0 GeV and deliver them to the experimental target in one bunch at 60 Hz. To achieve this goal and protect the machine from excessive radiation activation, an uncontrolled loss criteria of 1 part in 104 (1 W/m) has been specified. Measured losses will be conditioned to provide machine tuning data, a beam abort trigger, and logging of loss history. The design of the distributed loss monitor system utilizing argon-filled glass ionization chambers and scintillator-photomultipliers will be presented.

  7. Neutron star binaries, pulsars and burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.

    1981-01-01

    Unresolved issues involving neutron star binaries, pulsars, and burst sources are described. Attention is drawn to the types of observations most likely to resolve them. Many of these observations are likely to be carried out during the next decade by one or more missions that have been approved or proposed. Flux measurements with an imaging detector and broad-band spectroscopic studies in the energy range 30-150 keV are discussed. The need for soft X-ray and X-ray observations with an instrument which has arcminute angular resolution and an effective area substantially greater than of ROSAT or EXOSAT is also discussed.

  8. Optimization and Characterization of a Novel Self Powered Solid State Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, Justin

    There is a strong interest in detecting both the diversion of special nuclear material (SNM) from legitimate, peaceful purposes and the transport of illicit SNM across domestic and international borders and ports. A simple solid-state detector employs a planar solar-cell type p-n junction and a thin conversion layer that converts incident neutrons into detectable charged particles, such as protons, alpha-particles, and heavier ions. Although simple planar devices can act as highly portable, low cost detectors, they have historically been limited to relatively low detection efficiencies; ˜10% and ˜0.2% for thermal and fast detectors, respectively. To increase intrinsic detection efficiency, the incorporation of 3D microstructures into p-i-n silicon devices was proposed. In this research, a combination of existing and new types of detector microstructures were investigated; Monte Carlo models, based on analytical calculations, were constructed and characterized using the GEANT4 simulation toolkit. The simulation output revealed that an array of etched hexagonal holes arranged in a honeycomb pattern and filled with either enriched (99% 10B) boron or parylene resulted in the highest intrinsic detection efficiencies of 48% and 0.88% for thermal and fast neutrons, respectively. The optimal parameters corresponding to each model were utilized as the basis for the fabrication of several prototype detectors. A calibrated 252Cf spontaneous fission source was utilized to generate fast neutrons, while thermal neutrons were created by placing the 252Cf in an HDPE housing designed and optimized using the MCNP simulation software. Upon construction, thermal neutron calibration was performed via activation analysis of gold foils and measurements from a 6Li loaded glass scintillator. Experimental testing of the prototype detectors resulted in maximum intrinsic efficiencies of 4.5 and 0.12% for the thermal and fast devices, respectively. The prototype thermal device was filled

  9. A method to measure prompt fission neutron spectrum using gamma multiplicity tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, E.; Daskalakis, A.; Block, R. C.; Barry, D.; Danon, Y.

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve on current prompt fission neutron spectrum measurements, a gamma multiplicity tagging method was developed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Gearttner Linear Accelerator Center. This method involves using a coincidence requirement on an array of BaF2 gamma detectors to determine the timing of a fission event. This allows for much larger fission samples to be used due to the higher penetrability of gammas compared to fission fragments. Additionally, since the method relies on gammas as opposed to fission fragments, the effects of the low level discriminator, used in fission chambers to eliminate alpha events, are not seen. A 252Cf fission chamber was constructed in order to determine the viability of this method as well as the efficiency when compared to a fission chamber. The implemented multiple gamma tagging method was found to accurately reproduce the prompt fission neutron spectrum for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and to detect 30% of fission events.

  10. LENS: A New Pulsed Neutron Source for Research and Education

    PubMed Central

    Leuschner, M.; Baxter, D. V.; Cameron, J. M.; Derenchuk, V.; Lavelle, C.; Lone, A.; Nann, H.; Rinckel, T.; Snow, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    A new pulsed neutron source is under construction at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). Neutrons are produced via (p,n) reactions by a low-energy proton beam incident on a thin beryllium target. The source is tightly coupled to a cold methane moderator held at a temperature of 20 K or below. The resulting time-averaged cold neutron flux is expected to be comparable to that of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The initial experimental suite will include instrumentation for small angle neutron scattering (SANS), moderator studies, radiography, and zero-field spin-echo SANS. PMID:27308113

  11. Experimental benchmark of MCNPX calculations against self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry (SINRD) fresh fuel measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T; La Fleur, Adrienne M; Charlton, William S; Lee, S Y; Tobin, S J

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the use of Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) to measure the {sup 235}U concentration in a PWR 15 x 15 fresh LEU fuel assembly in air. Different measurement configurations were simulated in Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended transport code (MCNPX) and benchmarked against experimental results. The sensitivity of SINRD is based on using the same fissile materials in the fission chambers as are present in the fuel because the effect of resonance absorption lines in the transmitted flux is amplified by the corresponding (n,j) reaction peaks in fission chamber. Due to the low spontaneous fission rate of {sup 238}U (i.e. no curium in the fresh fuel), {sup 252}Cf sources were used to self-interrogate the fresh fuel pins. The resonance absorption of these neutrons in the fresh fuel pins can be measured using {sup 235}U fission chambers placed adjacent to the assembly. We used ratios of different fission chambers to reduce the number of unknowns we are trying measure because the neutron source strength and detector-fuel assembly coupling cancel in the ratios. The agreement between MCNPX results and experimental measurements confirms the accuracy of the MCNPX models used. The development of SINRD to measure the fissile content in spent fuel is important to the improvement of nuclear safeguards and material accountability. Future work includes the use of this technique to measure the fissile content in LWR spent fuel in water.

  12. Using spallation neutron sources for defense research

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Sterbenz, S.M.; Weinacht, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced characterization techniques and accelerated simulation are the cornerstones of the Energy Department`s science-based program to maintain confidence in the safety, reliability, and performance of the US nuclear deterrent in an era of no nuclear testing. Neutrons and protons provided by an accelerator-based facility have an important role to play in this program, impacting several of the key stockpile stewardship and management issues identified by the Department of Defense. Many of the techniques used for defense research at a spallation source have been used for many years for the basic research community, and to a lesser extent by industrial scientists. By providing access to a broad spectrum of researchers with different backgrounds, a spallation source such as the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is able to promote synergistic interaction between defense, basic and industrial researchers. This broadens the scientific basis of the stockpile stewardship program in the short term and will provide spin-off to industrial and basic research in the longer term.

  13. European Spallation Source and Neutron Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeck, James

    2014-03-01

    International collaborations in large-scale scientific projects can link Sciences and Society. Following this goal, the European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries. Scandinavia is providing 50 percent of the construction cost whilst the other member states are providing financial support mainly via in-kind contribution from institutes, laboratories or industries of the given countries. Scientists and engineers from 35 different countries are members of the workforce in Lund who participate in its design and construction. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics by producing very high flux neutrons to study condensed matter physics, chemistry, biology, nuclear physics and materials science. The ESS will be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. A tungsten target and a 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator, composed mainly of superconducting Radio-Frequency components, are used to achieve these goals.

  14. Status of the intense pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.; Brown, B.S.; Kustom, R.L.; Lander, G.H.; Potts, C.W.; Schulke, A.W.; Wuestefeld, G.

    1985-01-01

    Fortunately in spite of some premature reports of its impending demise, IPNS has passed the fourth anniversary of the first delivery of protons to the targets (May 5, 1981) and is approaching the fourth anniversary of its operation as a scattering facility (August 4, 1981). On June 10, 1984, the RCS delivered its one billionth pulse to the IPNS target - the total number of protons delivered to the targets amounted then to 75 stp cm/sup 3/ of H/sub 2/ gas. Since startup IPNS has improved steadily in terms of the performance of the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron, the source and its moderators and the scattering instruments, and a substantial and productive user program has evolved. This report summarizes the current status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source at Argonne National Laboratory. We include reference to recent accelerator operating experience, neutron facility operating experience, improvements to these systems, design work on the ASPUN high-current facility, booster target design, the new solid methane moderator, characterization of the room temperature moderators, and provide some examples of recent results from several of the spectrometers.

  15. The Jülich high-brilliance neutron source project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rücker, U.; Cronert, T.; Voigt, J.; Dabruck, J. P.; Doege, P.-E.; Ulrich, J.; Nabbi, R.; Beßler, Y.; Butzek, M.; Büscher, M.; Lange, C.; Klaus, M.; Gutberlet, T.; Brückel, T.

    2016-01-01

    With the construction of the European Spallation Source ESS, the European neutron user community is looking forward to the brightest source worldwide. At the same time there is an ongoing concentration of research with neutrons to only a few but very powerful neutron facilities. Responding to this situation the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science has initiated a project for a compact accelerator driven high-brilliance neutron source, optimized for neutron scattering on small samples and to be realized at reasonable costs. The project deals with the optimization of potential projectiles, target and moderator concepts, versatile accelerator systems, cold sources, beam extraction systems and optimized instrumentation. A brief outline of the project, the achievements already reached, will be presented, as well as a vision for the future neutron landscape in Europe.

  16. Reflection Asymmetric Shapes in the Neutron-Rich 140,143Ba Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu Sheng-jiang (S, J. Zhu; Wang, Mu-ge; J, H. Hamilton; A, V. Ramayya; B, R. S. Babu; W, C. Ma; Long, Gui-lu; Deng, Jing-kang; Zhu, Ling-yan; Li, Ming; T, N. Ginter; J, Komicki; J, D. Cole; R, Aryaeinejad; Y, K. Dardenne; M, W. Drigert; J, O. Rasmussen; Ts, Yu Oganessian; M, A. Stoyer; S, Y. Chu; K, E. Gregorich; M, F. Mohar; S, G. Prussin; I, Y. Lee; N, R. Johnson; F, K. McGowan

    1997-08-01

    Level schemes for the neutron-rich 140,143Ba nuclei have been determined by study of prompt γ-rays in spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The level pattern and enhanced E1 transitions between π = + and π = - bands show reflection asymmetric shapes with simplex quantum number s = +1 in 140Ba and s = ±i in 143Ba, respectively. The octupole deformation stability with spin variation has been discussed.

  17. Digital fast neutron radiography of steel reinforcing bar in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitton, K.; Jones, A.; Joyce, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Neutron imaging has previously been used in order to test for cracks, degradation and water content in concrete. However, these techniques often fall short of alternative non-destructive testing methods, such as γ-ray and X-ray imaging, particularly in terms of resolution. Further, thermal neutron techniques can be compromised by the significant expense associated with thermal neutron sources of sufficient intensity to yield satisfactory results that can often precipitate the need for a reactor. Such embodiments are clearly not portable in the context of the needs of field applications. This paper summarises the results of a study to investigate the potential for transmission radiography based on fast neutrons. The objective of this study was to determine whether the presence of heterogeneities in concrete, such as reinforcement structures, could be identified on the basis of variation in transmitted fast-neutron flux. Monte-Carlo simulations have been performed and the results from these are compared to those arising from practical tests using a 252Cf source. The experimental data have been acquired using a digital pulse-shape discrimination system that enables fast neutron transmission to be studied across an array of liquid scintillators placed in close proximity to samples under test, and read out in real time. Whilst this study does not yield sufficient spatial resolution, a comparison of overall flux ratios does provide a basis for the discrimination between samples with contrasting rebar content. This approach offers the potential for non-destructive testing that gives less dose, better transportability and better accessibility than competing approaches. It is also suitable for thick samples where γ-ray and X-ray methods can be limited.

  18. Radiation Transport Analysis in Chalcogenide-Based Devices and a Neutron Howitzer Using MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Herbert

    As photons, electrons, and neutrons traverse a medium, they impart their energy in ways that are analytically difficult to describe. Monte Carlo methods provide valuable insight into understanding this behavior, especially when the radiation source or environment is too complex to simplify. This research investigates simulating various radiation sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, characterizing their impact on various materials, and comparing the simulation results to general theory and measurements. A total of five sources were of interest: two photon sources of different incident particle energies (3.83 eV and 1.25 MeV), two electron sources also of different energies (30 keV and 100 keV), and a californium-252 (Cf-252) spontaneous fission neutron source. Lateral and vertical programmable metallization cells (PMCs) were developed by other researchers for exposure to these photon and electron sources, so simplified PMC models were implemented in MCNP to estimate the doses and fluences. Dose rates measured around the neutron source and the predicted maximum activity of activation foils exposed to the neutrons were determined using MCNP and compared to experimental results obtained from gamma-ray spectroscopy. The analytical fluence calculations for the photon and electron cases agreed with MCNP results, and differences are due to MCNP considering particle movements that hand calculations do not. Doses for the photon cases agreed between the analytical and simulated results, while the electron cases differed by a factor of up to 4.8. Physical dose rate measurements taken from the neutron source agreed with MCNP within the 10% tolerance of the measurement device. The activity results had a percent error of up to 50%, which suggests a need to further evaluate the spectroscopy setup.

  19. First neutron generation in the BINP accelerator based neutron source.

    PubMed

    Bayanov, B; Burdakov, A; Chudaev, V; Ivanov, A; Konstantinov, S; Kuznetsov, A; Makarov, A; Malyshkin, G; Mekler, K; Sorokin, I; Sulyaev, Yu; Taskaev, S

    2009-07-01

    Pilot innovative facility for neutron capture therapy was built at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk. This facility is based on a compact vacuum insulation tandem accelerator designed to produce proton current up to 10 mA. Epithermal neutrons are proposed to be generated by 1.915 MeV protons bombarding a lithium target using (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be threshold reaction. The results of the first experiments on neutron generation are reported and discussed. PMID:19375928

  20. HFIR cold neutron source moderator vessel design analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.J.

    1998-04-01

    A cold neutron source capsule made of aluminum alloy is to be installed and located at the tip of one of the neutron beam tubes of the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Cold hydrogen liquid of temperature approximately 20 degree Kelvin and 15 bars pressure is designed to flow through the aluminum capsule that serves to chill and to moderate the incoming neutrons produced from the reactor core. The cold and low energy neutrons thus produced will be used as cold neutron sources for the diffraction experiments. The structural design calculation for the aluminum capsule is reported in this paper.

  1. Proton recoil spectroscopy 400 meters from a fission neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Stanka, M.B.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron kerma and spectrum measurements have been made at the US Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) to 400m in an air-over-ground geometry from a fission neutron source and have been compared to Monte Carlo transport calculations. The neutron spectra measurements were made using a rotating neutron spectrometer. This spectrometer consists of four spherical proton-recoil detectors mounted on a common rotating base. Detector radius, gas composition, and pressure have been varied to allow sensitivity over a neutron range of 50 keV to 4.5 MeV. Neutron kerma was determined by using the Kerr soft-tissue kerma factors. Measured neutron kerma agreed with the calculated neutron kerma to within 5%. Comparisons with other neutron spectrometers such as NE213 and Bonner Spheres are presented and agreement between the different spectrometers is better than 20%.

  2. The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Abraham, W.; Aleksandrov, A.; Allen, C.; Alonso, J.; Anderson, D.; Arenius, D.; Arthur, T.; Assadi, S.; Ayers, J.; Bach, P.; Badea, V.; Battle, R.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Bergmann, B.; Bernardin, J.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Birke, T.; Bjorklund, E.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Blind, B.; Blokland, W.; Bookwalter, V.; Borovina, D.; Bowling, S.; Bradley, J.; Brantley, C.; Brennan, J.; Brodowski, J.; Brown, S.; Brown, R.; Bruce, D.; Bultman, N.; Cameron, P.; Campisi, I.; Casagrande, F.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Champion, M.; Champion, M.; Chen, Z.; Cheng, D.; Cho, Y.; Christensen, K.; Chu, C.; Cleaves, J.; Connolly, R.; Cote, T.; Cousineau, S.; Crandall, K.; Creel, J.; Crofford, M.; Cull, P.; Cutler, R.; Dabney, R.; Dalesio, L.; Daly, E.; Damm, R.; Danilov, V.; Davino, D.; Davis, K.; Dawson, C.; Day, L.; Deibele, C.; Delayen, J.; DeLong, J.; Demello, A.; DeVan, W.; Digennaro, R.; Dixon, K.; Dodson, G.; Doleans, M.; Doolittle, L.; Doss, J.; Drury, M.; Elliot, T.; Ellis, S.; Error, J.; Fazekas, J.; Fedotov, A.; Feng, P.; Fischer, J.; Fox, W.; Fuja, R.; Funk, W.; Galambos, J.; Ganni, V.; Garnett, R.; Geng, X.; Gentzlinger, R.; Giannella, M.; Gibson, P.; Gillis, R.; Gioia, J.; Gordon, J.; Gough, R.; Greer, J.; Gregory, W.; Gribble, R.; Grice, W.; Gurd, D.; Gurd, P.; Guthrie, A.; Hahn, H.; Hardek, T.; Hardekopf, R.; Harrison, J.; Hatfield, D.; He, P.; Hechler, M.; Heistermann, F.; Helus, S.; Hiatt, T.; Hicks, S.; Hill, J.; Hill, J.; Hoff, L.; Hoff, M.; Hogan, J.; Holding, M.; Holik, P.; Holmes, J.; Holtkamp, N.; Hovater, C.; Howell, M.; Hseuh, H.; Huhn, A.; Hunter, T.; Ilg, T.; Jackson, J.; Jain, A.; Jason, A.; Jeon, D.; Johnson, G.; Jones, A.; Joseph, S.; Justice, A.; Kang, Y.; Kasemir, K.; Keller, R.; Kersevan, R.; Kerstiens, D.; Kesselman, M.; Kim, S.; Kneisel, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kuneli, T.; Kurennoy, S.; Kustom, R.; Kwon, S.; Ladd, P.; Lambiase, R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Lewis, S.; Liaw, C.; Lionberger, C.; Lo, C. C.; Long, C.; Ludewig, H.; Ludvig, J.; Luft, P.; Lynch, M.; Ma, H.; MacGill, R.; Macha, K.; Madre, B.; Mahler, G.; Mahoney, K.; Maines, J.; Mammosser, J.; Mann, T.; Marneris, I.; Marroquin, P.; Martineau, R.; Matsumoto, K.; McCarthy, M.; McChesney, C.; McGahern, W.; McGehee, P.; Meng, W.; Merz, B.; Meyer, R.; Meyer, R.; Miller, B.; Mitchell, R.; Mize, J.; Monroy, M.; Munro, J.; Murdoch, G.; Musson, J.; Nath, S.; Nelson, R.; Nelson, R.; O`Hara, J.; Olsen, D.; Oren, W.; Oshatz, D.; Owens, T.; Pai, C.; Papaphilippou, I.; Patterson, N.; Patterson, J.; Pearson, C.; Pelaia, T.; Pieck, M.; Piller, C.; Plawski, T.; Plum, M.; Pogge, J.; Power, J.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Prokop, M.; Pruyn, J.; Purcell, D.; Rank, J.; Raparia, D.; Ratti, A.; Reass, W.; Reece, K.; Rees, D.; Regan, A.; Regis, M.; Reijonen, J.; Rej, D.; Richards, D.; Richied, D.; Rode, C.; Rodriguez, W.; Rodriguez, M.; Rohlev, A.; Rose, C.; Roseberry, T.; Rowton, L.; Roybal, W.; Rust, K.; Salazer, G.; Sandberg, J.; Saunders, J.; Schenkel, T.; Schneider, W.; Schrage, D.; Schubert, J.; Severino, F.; Shafer, R.; Shea, T.; Shishlo, A.; Shoaee, H.; Sibley, C.; Sims, J.; Smee, S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K.; Spitz, R.; Staples, J.; Stein, P.; Stettler, M.; Stirbet, M.; Stockli, M.; Stone, W.; Stout, D.; Stovall, J.; Strelo, W.; Strong, H.; Sundelin, R.; Syversrud, D.; Szajbler, M.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Tang, J.; Tanke, E.; Tepikian, S.; Thomae, R.; Thompson, D.; Thomson, D.; Thuot, M.; Treml, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tuzel, W.; Vassioutchenko, A.; Virostek, S.; Wallig, J.; Wanderer, P.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. G.; Wangler, T.; Warren, D.; Wei, J.; Weiss, D.; Welton, R.; Weng, J.; Weng, W.-T.; Wezensky, M.; White, M.; Whitlatch, T.; Williams, D.; Williams, E.; Wilson, K.; Wiseman, M.; Wood, R.; Wright, P.; Wu, A.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Young, K.; Young, L.; Yourd, R.; Zachoszcz, A.; Zaltsman, A.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed and constructed by a collaboration of six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. The SNS accelerator system consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator and an accumulator ring providing 1.4 MW of proton beam power in microsecond-long beam pulses to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The accelerator complex consists of a front-end negative hydrogen-ion injector system, an 87 MeV drift tube linear accelerator, a 186 MeV side-coupled linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, a 248-m circumference accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines. The accelerator complex is supported by ~100 high-power RF power systems, a 2 K cryogenic plant, ~400 DC and pulsed power supply systems, ~400 beam diagnostic devices and a distributed control system handling ~100,000 I/O signals. The beam dynamics design of the SNS accelerator is presented, as is the engineering design of the major accelerator subsystems.

  3. Experimental test of a newly developed single-moderator, multi-detector, directional neutron spectrometer in reference monochromatic fields from 144 keV to 16.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, R.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Pola, A.; Bortot, D.; Gentile, A.; Introini, M. V.; Buonomo, B.; Lorenzoli, M.; Mazzitelli, M.; Sacco, D.

    2015-05-01

    A new directional neutron spectrometer called CYSP (CYlindrical SPectrometer) was developed within the NESCOFI@BTF (2011-2013) collaboration. The device, composed by seven active thermal neutron detectors located along the axis of a cylindrical moderator, was designed to simultaneously respond from the thermal domain up to hundreds of MeV neutrons. The new spectrometer condenses the performance of the Bonner Sphere Spectrometer in a single moderator; thus requiring only one exposure to determine the whole spectrum. The CYSP response matrix, determined with MCNP, has been experimentally evaluated with monochromatic reference neutron fields from 144 keV to 16.5 MeV, plus a 252Cf source, available at NPL (Teddington, UK). The results of the experiment confirmed the correctness of the response matrix within an overall uncertainty of ±2.5%. The new active spectrometer CYSP offers an innovative option for real-time monitoring of directional neutron fields as those produced in neutron beam-lines.

  4. PREFACE: Neutrino physics at spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avignone, F. T.; Chatterjee, L.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Strayer, M.

    2003-11-01

    Unique because of their super-light masses and tiny interaction cross sections, neutrinos combine fundamental physics on the scale of the miniscule with macroscopic physics on the scale of the cosmos. Starting from the ignition of the primal p-p chain of stellar and solar fusion reactions that signal star-birth, these elementary leptons (neutrinos) are also critical players in the life-cycles and explosive deaths of massive stars and the production and disbursement of heavy elements. Stepping beyond their importance in solar, stellar and supernova astrophysics, neutrino interactions and properties influence the evolution, dynamics and symmetries of the cosmos as a whole. Further, they serve as valuable probes of its material content at various levels of structure from atoms and nuclei to valence and sea quarks. In the light of the multitude of physics phenomena that neutrinos influence, it is imperative to enhance our understanding of neutrino interactions and properties to the maximum. This is accentuated by the recent evidence of finite neutrino mass and flavour mixing between generations that reverberates on the plethora of physics that neutrinos influence. Laboratory experiments using intense neutrino fluxes would allow precision measurements and determination of important neutrino reaction rates. These can then complement atmospheric, solar and reactor experiments that have enriched so valuably our understanding of the neutrino and its repertoire of physics applications. In particular, intermediate energy neutrino experiments can provide critical information on stellar and solar astrophysical processes, along with advancing our knowledge of nuclear structure, sub-nuclear physics and fundamental symmetries. So where should we look for such intense neutrino sources? Spallation neutron facilities by their design are sources of intense neutrino pulses that are produced as a by-product of neutron spallation. These neutrino sources could serve as unique laboratories

  5. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.

    SciTech Connect

    KESSELMAN,M.; DAWSON,W.C.

    2002-05-06

    This paper will discuss the present electronics design for the beam current monitor system to be used throughout the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The beam is composed of a micro-pulse structure due to the 402.5MHz RF, and is chopped into mini-pulses of 645ns duration with a 300ns gap, providing a macro-pulse of 1060 mini-pulses repeating at a 60Hz rate. Ring beam current will vary from about 15ma peak during studies, to about 50Amps peak (design to 100 amps). A digital approach to droop compensation has been implemented and initial test results presented.

  6. BNL feasibility studies of spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Van Steenbergen, A.; Weng, W.T.

    1995-12-01

    This paper is the summary of conceptual design studies of a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS) conducted by an interdepartmental study group at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The study was made of two periods. First, a scenario based on the use of a 600 MeV Linac followed by two fast-cycling 3.6 GeV Synchrotrons was investigated. Then, in a subsequent period, the attention of the study was directed toward an Accumulator scenario with two options: (1) a 1.25 GeV normal conducting Linac followed by two Accumulator Rings, and (2) a 2.4 GeV superconducting Linac followed by a single Accumulator Ring. The study did not make any reference to a specific site.

  7. Shielding Ddsign and analyses of KIPT neutron source facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of a neutron source facility. An electron accelerator drives a sub-critical facility (ADS) is used for generating the neutron source. The facility will be utilized for performing basic and applied nuclear researches, producing medical isotopes, and training young nuclear specialists. Monte Carlo code MCNPX has been utilized as the major design tool for the design, due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons at high energies. However the ADS shielding calculations with MCNPX need enormous computational resources and the small neutron yield per electron makes sampling difficulty for the Monte Carlo calculations. The high energy electrons (E > 100 MeV) generate very high energy neutrons and these neutrons dominant the total radiation dose outside the shield. The radiation dose caused by high energy neutrons is {approx}3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that of the photons. However, the high energy neutron fraction within the total generated neutrons is very small, which increases the sampling difficulty and the required computational time. To solve these difficulties, the user subroutines of MCNPX are utilized to generate a neutron source file, which record the generated neutrons from the photonuclear reactions caused by electrons. This neutron source file is utilized many times in the following MCNPX calculations for weight windows (importance function) generation and radiation dose calculations. In addition, the neutron source file can be sampled multiple times to improve the statistics of the calculated results. In this way the expensive electron transport calculations can be performed once with good statistics for the different ADS shielding problems. This paper presents the method of generating and utilizing the neutron source file by MCNPX for the ADS shielding calculation

  8. Development of a technique using MCNPX code for determination of nitrogen content of explosive materials using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Bakhshi, F.; Jalali, M.; Mohammadi, A.

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear-based explosive detection methods can detect explosives by identifying their elemental components, especially nitrogen. Thermal neutron capture reactions have been used for detecting prompt gamma 10.8 MeV following radioactive neutron capture by 14N nuclei. We aimed to study the feasibility of using field-portable prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) along with improved nuclear equipment to detect and identify explosives, illicit substances or landmines. A 252Cf radio-isotopic source was embedded in a cylinder made of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and the cylinder was then placed in another cylindrical container filled with water. Measurements were performed on high nitrogen content compounds such as melamine (C3H6N6). Melamine powder in a HDPE bottle was placed underneath the vessel containing water and the neutron source. Gamma rays were detected using two NaI(Tl) crystals. The results were simulated with MCNP4c code calculations. The theoretical calculations and experimental measurements were in good agreement indicating that this method can be used for detection of explosives and illicit drugs.

  9. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H-ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Fuja, Raymond E; Goulding, Richard Howell; Hardek, Thomas W; Lee, Sung-Woo; McCarthy, Mike; Piller, Chip; Shin, Ki; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering 38 mA H beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride AlN plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier. 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  10. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H- ion source.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y W; Fuja, R; Goulding, R H; Hardek, T; Lee, S-W; McCarthy, M P; Piller, M C; Shin, K; Stockli, M P; Welton, R F

    2010-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering approximately 38 mA H(-) beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier. PMID:20192394

  11. Development of a neutron measurement system in unified non-destructive assay for the PRIDE facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hee; Park, Se-Hwan; Won, Byung-Hee; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Shin, Hee-Sung; Na, Sang-Ho; Song, Dae-Yong; Kim, Ho-Dong; Lee, Seung Kyu

    2013-12-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has made an effort to develop pyroprocessing technology to resolve an on-going problem in Korea, i.e., the management of spent nuclear fuels. To this end, a test-bed facility for pyroprocessing, called PRIDE (PyRoprocessing Integrated inactive DEmonstration facility), is being constructed at KAERI. The main objective of PRIDE is to evaluate the performance of the unit processes, remote operation, maintenance, and proliferation resistance. In addition, integrating all unit processes into a one-step process is also one of the main goals. PRIDE can also provide a good opportunity to test safeguards instrumentations for a pyroprocessing facility such as nuclear material accounting devices, surveillance systems, radiation monitoring systems, and process monitoring systems. In the present study, a non-destructive assay (NDA) system for the testing of nuclear material accountancy of PRIDE was designed by integrating three different NDA techniques, i.e., neutron, gamma-ray, and mass measurements. The developed neutron detection module consists of 56 3He tubes and 16 AMPTEK A111 signal processing circuits. The amplifiers were matched in terms of the gain and showed good uniformity after a gain-matching procedure (%RSD=0.37%). The axial and the radial efficiency distributions within the cavity were then measured using a 252Cf neutron source and were compared with the MCNPX calculation results. The measured efficiency distributions showed excellent agreement with the calculations, which confirmed the accuracy of the MCNPX model of the system.

  12. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  13. Electronic neutron sources for compensated porosity well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allan Xi; Antolak, Arlyn J; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2012-02-01

    The viability of replacing Americium–Beryllium (Am–Be) radiological neutron sources in compensated porosity nuclear well logging tools with D–T or D–D accelerator-driven neutron sources is explored. The analysis consisted of developing a model for a typical well-logging borehole configuration and computing the helium-3 detector response to varying formation porosities using three different neutron sources (Am–Be, D–D, and D–T). The results indicate that, when normalized to the same source intensity, the use of a D–D neutron source has greater sensitivity for measuring the formation porosity than either an Am–Be or D–T source. The results of the study provide operational requirements that enable compensated porosity well logging with a compact, low power D–D neutron generator, which the current state-of-the-art indicates is technically achievable.

  14. Electronic neutron sources for compensated porosity well logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.

    2012-08-01

    The viability of replacing Americium-Beryllium (Am-Be) radiological neutron sources in compensated porosity nuclear well logging tools with D-T or D-D accelerator-driven neutron sources is explored. The analysis consisted of developing a model for a typical well-logging borehole configuration and computing the helium-3 detector response to varying formation porosities using three different neutron sources (Am-Be, D-D, and D-T). The results indicate that, when normalized to the same source intensity, the use of a D-D neutron source has greater sensitivity for measuring the formation porosity than either an Am-Be or D-T source. The results of the study provide operational requirements that enable compensated porosity well logging with a compact, low power D-D neutron generator, which the current state-of-the-art indicates is technically achievable.

  15. Pulsed neutron sources for condensed-matter research

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    The efforts around the world to provide higher neutron intensities are now focussed on accelerator-driven spallation sources in which neutrons are produced by bombardment of heavy metal targets with high energy protons. Spallation sources can be pulsed or quasi-continuous depending on the nature of the proton accelerator. Pulsed spallation sources, based on rapid cycling synchrotrons or storage rings, are especially attractive since a moderate average proton current (10/sup -5/ - 10/sup -3/A) can produce high instantaneous neutron intensities which can be used with time-of-flight methods to provide powerful neutron spectrometers.

  16. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R; Roseberry, Ron T; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  17. Neutron calibration sources in the Daya Bay experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, J.; Carr, R.; Dwyer, D. A.; Gu, W. Q.; Li, G. S.; McKeown, R. D.; Qian, X.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Wu, F. F.; Zhang, C.

    2015-07-09

    We describe the design and construction of the low rate neutron calibration sources used in the Daya Bay Reactor Anti-neutrino Experiment. Such sources are free of correlated gamma-neutron emission, which is essential in minimizing induced background in the anti-neutrino detector. Thus, the design characteristics have been validated in the Daya Bay anti-neutrino detector.

  18. Advancements in the development of a directional-position sensing fast neutron detector using acoustically tensioned metastable fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, Brian C.; Webster, Jeffrey A.; Grimes, Thomas F.; Fischer, Kevin F.; Hagen, Alex R.; Taleyakhan, Rusi P.

    2015-06-01

    Advancements in the development of a direction and position sensing fast neutron detector which utilizes the directional acoustic tensioned metastable fluid detector (D-ATMFD) are described. The resulting D-ATMFD sensor is capable of determining the direction of neutron radiation with a single compact detector versus use of arrays of detectors in conventional directional systems. Directional neutron detection and source positioning offer enhanced detection speeds in comparison to traditional proximity searching; including enabling determination of the neutron source shape, size, and strength in near real time. This paper discusses advancements that provide the accuracy and precision of ascertaining directionality and source localization information utilizing enhanced signal processing-cum-signal analysis, refined computational algorithms, and on-demand enlargement capability of the detector sensitive volume. These advancements were accomplished utilizing experimentation and theoretical modeling. Benchmarking and qualifications studies were successfully conducted with random and fission based special nuclear material (SNM) neutron sources (239Pu-Be and 252Cf). These results of assessments have indicated that the D-ATMFD compares well in technical performance with banks of competing directional fast neutron detector technologies under development worldwide, but it does so with a single detector unit, an unlimited field of view, and at a significant reduction in both cost and size while remaining completely blind to common background (e.g., beta-gamma) radiation. Rapid and direct SNM neutron source imaging with two D-ATMFD sensors was experimentally demonstrated, and furthermore, validated via multidimensional nuclear particle transport simulations utilizing MCNP-PoliMi. Characterization of a scaled D-ATMFD based radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a cost-effective and efficient 3He sensor replacement was performed utilizing MCNP-PoliMi simulations, the results of which

  19. The European scene regarding spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.S.

    1996-06-01

    In Europe, a short pulse spallation neutron source, ISIS, has been operating for over 10 years, working its way up to a beam power level of 200 kW. A continuous source, SINQ, designed for a beam power of up to 1 MW, is scheduled to start operating at the end of 1996, and a detailed feasibility study has been completed for a 410 kW short pulse source, AUSTRON. Each of these sources seems to have settled for a target concept which is at or near the limits of its feasibility: The ISIS depleted uranium plate targets, heavy water cooled and Zircaloy clad, have so far not shown satisfactory service time and operation is likely to continue with a Ta-plate target, which, in the past has been used successfully for the equivalent of one full-beam-year before it was taken out of service due to degrading thermal properties. SINQ will initially use a rod target, made of Zircaloy only, but plans exist to move on to clad lead rods as quickly as possible. Apart from the not yet explored effect of hydrogen and helium production, there are also concerns about the generation of 7-Be in the cooling water from the spallation of oxygen, which might result in undesirably high radioactivity in the cooling plant room. A Liquid metal target, also under investigation for SINQ, would not only reduce this problem to a level of about 10 %, but would also minimize the risk of radiolytic corrosion in the beam interaction zone. Base on similar arguments, AUSTRON has been designed for edge cooled targets, but thermal and stress analyses show, that this concept is not feasible at higher power levels.

  20. Active neutron methods for nuclear safeguards applications using Helium-4 gas scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Jason M.

    Active neutron methods use a neutron source to interrogate fissionable material. In this work a 4He gas scintillation fast neutron detection system is used to measure neutrons created by the interrogation. Three new applications of this method are developed: spent nuclear fuel assay, fission rate measurement, and special nuclear material detection. Three active neutron methods are included in this thesis. First a non-destructive plutonium assay technique called Multispectral Active Neutron Interrogation Analysis is developed. It is based on interrogating fuel with neutrons at several different energies. The induced fission rates at each interrogation energy are compared with results from a neutron transport model of the irradiation geometry in a system of equations to iteratively solve the inverse problem for isotopic composition. The model is shown to converge on the correct composition for a material with 3 different fissionable components, a representative neutron absorber, and any neutron transparent material such as oxygen in a variety of geometries. Next an experimental fission rate measurement technique is developed using 4He gas scintillation fast neutron detector. Several unique features of this detector allow it to detect and provide energy information on fast neutrons with excellent gamma discrimination efficiency. The detector can measure induced fission rate by energetically differentiating between interrogation neutrons and higher energy fission neutrons. The detector response to a mono-energetic deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a 252Cf source are compared to examine the difference in detected energy range. Finally we demonstrate a special nuclear material detection technique by detecting an unambiguous fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium neutron generator and a high pressure 4He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. Energy histograms resulting from this

  1. A bright neutron source driven by relativistic transparency of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M.; Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Merrill, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    Neutrons are a unique tool to alter and diagnose material properties and excite nuclear reactions with a large field of applications. It has been stated over the last years, that there is a growing need for intense, pulsed neutron sources, either fast or moderated neutrons for the scientific community. Accelerator based spallation sources provide unprecedented neutron fluxes, but could be complemented by novel sources with higher peak brightness that are more compact. Lasers offer the prospect of generating a very compact neutron source of high peak brightness that could be linked to other facilities more easily. We present experimental results on the first short pulse laser driven neutron source powerful enough for applications in radiography. For the first time an acceleration mechanism (BOA) based on the concept of relativistic transparency has been used to generate neutrons. This mechanism not only provides much higher particle energies, but also accelerated the entire target volume, thereby circumventing the need for complicated target treatment and no longer limited to protons as an intense ion source. As a consequence we have demonstrated a new record in laser-neutron production, not only in numbers, but also in energy and directionality based on an intense deuteron beam. The beam contained, for the first time, neutrons with energies in excess of 100 MeV and showed pronounced directionality, which makes then extremely useful for a variety of applications. The results also address a larger community as it paves the way to use short pulse lasers as a neutron source. They can open up neutron research to a broad academic community including material science, biology, medicine and high energy density physics as laser systems become more easily available to universities and therefore can complement large scale facilities like reactors or particle accelerators. We believe that this has the potential to increase the user community for neutron research largely.

  2. Fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananyev, S. S.; Spitsyn, A. V.; Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a tokamak-based stationary fusion neutron source (FNS) for scientific research (neutron diffraction, etc.), tests of structural materials for future fusion reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, fission reactor fuel production, and control of subcritical nuclear systems (fusion-fission hybrid reactor) is being developed in Russia. The fuel cycle system is one of the most important systems of FNS that provides circulation and reprocessing of the deuterium-tritium fuel mixture in all fusion reactor systems: the vacuum chamber, neutral injection system, cryogenic pumps, tritium purification system, separation system, storage system, and tritium-breeding blanket. The existing technologies need to be significantly upgraded since the engineering solutions adopted in the ITER project can be only partially used in the FNS (considering the capacity factor higher than 0.3, tritium flow up to 200 m3Pa/s, and temperature of reactor elements up to 650°C). The deuterium-tritium fuel cycle of the stationary FNS is considered. The TC-FNS computer code developed for estimating the tritium distribution in the systems of FNS is described. The code calculates tritium flows and inventory in tokamak systems (vacuum chamber, cryogenic pumps, neutral injection system, fuel mixture purification system, isotope separation system, tritium storage system) and takes into account tritium loss in the fuel cycle due to thermonuclear burnup and β decay. For the two facility versions considered, FNS-ST and DEMO-FNS, the amount of fuel mixture needed for uninterrupted operation of all fuel cycle systems is 0.9 and 1.4 kg, consequently, and the tritium consumption is 0.3 and 1.8 kg per year, including 35 and 55 g/yr, respectively, due to tritium decay.

  3. Fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Ananyev, S. S. Spitsyn, A. V. Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-12-15

    The concept of a tokamak-based stationary fusion neutron source (FNS) for scientific research (neutron diffraction, etc.), tests of structural materials for future fusion reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, fission reactor fuel production, and control of subcritical nuclear systems (fusion–fission hybrid reactor) is being developed in Russia. The fuel cycle system is one of the most important systems of FNS that provides circulation and reprocessing of the deuterium–tritium fuel mixture in all fusion reactor systems: the vacuum chamber, neutral injection system, cryogenic pumps, tritium purification system, separation system, storage system, and tritium-breeding blanket. The existing technologies need to be significantly upgraded since the engineering solutions adopted in the ITER project can be only partially used in the FNS (considering the capacity factor higher than 0.3, tritium flow up to 200 m{sup 3}Pa/s, and temperature of reactor elements up to 650°C). The deuterium–tritium fuel cycle of the stationary FNS is considered. The TC-FNS computer code developed for estimating the tritium distribution in the systems of FNS is described. The code calculates tritium flows and inventory in tokamak systems (vacuum chamber, cryogenic pumps, neutral injection system, fuel mixture purification system, isotope separation system, tritium storage system) and takes into account tritium loss in the fuel cycle due to thermonuclear burnup and β decay. For the two facility versions considered, FNS-ST and DEMO-FNS, the amount of fuel mixture needed for uninterrupted operation of all fuel cycle systems is 0.9 and 1.4 kg, consequently, and the tritium consumption is 0.3 and 1.8 kg per year, including 35 and 55 g/yr, respectively, due to tritium decay.

  4. Neutron sources in a 24-MV medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    LaRiviere, P D

    1985-01-01

    During the assembly of the prototype Clinac 2500, a unique opportunity arose to measure the cumulative total neutron yield of the machine as the major subassemblies were added, section by section. Differentiation of the results led to an inventory of the relative strength of the several neutron sources identified. The method utilized the fact that the scattered neutron fluence in a cavity in concrete is nearly uniform throughout the space and proportional to the fast neutron source strength. When normalized to the neutron output of the guide with bend magnet vacuum chamber, the relative neutron source strengths found were target, 1.9; primary collimator, 2.4; steel filter, 0.6; tungsten filter, 1.5; and jaw system, 0.8 open and approximately 2.0 closed. There is reasonable agreement between these measurements and published estimates of the yields from the major components of the treatment head. PMID:4079876

  5. Two detector arrays for fast neutrons at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haight, R. C.; Lee, H. Y.; Taddeucci, T. N.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Perdue, B. A.; Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Laptev, A.; Bredeweg, T.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R. O.; Wender, S. A.; White, M. C.; Wu, C. Y.; Kwan, E.; Chyzh, A.; Henderson, R.; Gostic, J.

    2012-03-01

    from the WNR/LANSCE neutron beam, and efficiency calibration with 252Cf spontaneous fission neutrons. Design considerations and test results are presented.

  6. Accelerator-based neutron source for the neutron-capture and fast neutron therapy at hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayanov, B. F.; Belov, V. P.; Bender, E. D.; Bokhovko, M. V.; Dimov, G. I.; Kononov, V. N.; Kononov, O. E.; Kuksanov, N. K.; Palchikov, V. E.; Pivovarov, V. A.; Salimov, R. A.; Silvestrov, G. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Soloviov, N. A.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    The proton accelerator complex for neutron production in lithium target discussed, which can operate in two modes. The first provides a neutron beam kinematically collimated with good forward direction in 25° and average energy of 30 keV, directly applicable for neutron-capture therapy with high efficiency of proton beam use. The proton energy in this mode is 1.883-1.890 MeV that is near the threshold of the 7Li( p, n) 7Be reaction. In the second mode, at proton energy of 2.5 MeV, the complex-produced neutron beam with maximum energy board of 790 keV which can be used directly for fast neutron therapy and for neutron-capture therapy after moderation. The project of such a neutron source is based on the 2.5 MeV original electrostatic accelerator tandem with vacuum insulation developed at BINP which is supplied with a high-voltage rectifier. The rectifier is produced in BINP as a part of ELV-type industrial accelerator. Design features of the tandem determining its high reliability in operation with a high-current (up to 40 mA) H - ion beam are discussed. They are: the absence of ceramic accelerator columns around the beam passage region, good conditions for pumping out of charge-exchange gaseous target region, strong focusing optics and high acceleration rate minimizing the space charge effects. The possibility of stabilization of protons energy with an accuracy level of 0.1% necessary for operation in the near threshold region is considered. The design description of H - continuous ion source with a current of 40 mA is also performed. To operate with a 100 kW proton beam it is proposed to use liquid-lithium targets. A thin lithium layer on the surface of a tungsten disk cooled intensively by a liquid metal heat carrier is proposed for use in case of the vertical beam, and a flat liquid lithium jet flowing through the narrow nozzle - for the horizontal beam.

  7. Experimental determination of detection limits for performing neutron activation analysis for gold in the field

    SciTech Connect

    Jarzemba, M.S.; Weldy, J.; Pearcy, E.; Prikryl, J.; Pickett, D.

    1999-11-01

    Measurements are presented of gold concentration in rock/soil samples by delayed neutron activation analysis using a device and method that are potentially field portable. The device consists of a polyethylene moderator and {sup 252}Cf as the source of neutrons for activating the samples and a high-purity germanium detector to measure the 412-keV gamma-ray emissions from activated gold. This information is used to extract the gold concentration in the sample. Two types of samples were investigated: (1) pure SiO{sub 2} doped with a known amount of gold chloride and (2) US Geological Survey standards. The former types were used to evaluate optimum device performance and to calibrate the device and method. The latter types were used to show typical system performance for the intended application (field exploration for gold deposits). It was found that the device was capable of determining gold concentrations to {approximately}10 ppb with a turnaround time (the sum of irradiation, decay, and counting times) of {approximately}10 days. For samples where the gold concentration was much higher (i.e., gold ore), turnaround times are {approximately}2 days and could be shortened further by sacrificing accuracy (e.g., lessening irradiation, decay, and counting times) or by augmenting source strength.

  8. Measurement and simulation of stilbene scintillator response for the KSTAR neutron diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Kyu; Son, Jae Bum; Kang, JeongSoo; Seo, Hee; Won, Byung-Hee; Park, Se-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Dong; Kang, Byoung Hwi; Kim, Gi Dong; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2014-03-01

    The Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) project was started in December 1995, and its construction was completed in August 2007. On June 13, 2008, the KSTAR successfully produced its first plasma, and the diagnostic systems played an important role in achieving the first successful plasma operation. In fact, various diagnostic systems are required to protect reactor devices, to the control plasma, and to evaluate the plasma's performance in fusion reactors. One of the most essential tools for control of the burning plasma in fusion reactors may be a neutron diagnostic system to prove the presence of the plasma by measuring the neutrons from fusion reactions directly. The stilbene scintillator has been proposed as a good candidate for a neutron diagnostic system in the KSTAR fusion reactor because the stilbene scintillator is well-known to be an excellent material for detection of fast neutrons in a high gamma-ray background environment. If fast-neutron spectra are to be measured amid a high gamma-ray background, especially-designed electronics are necessary. For instance, a digital charge pulse shape discrimination (PSD) method, utilizing a total-to-partial-charge-ratio analysis, discriminates neutron from gamma-ray signals. Also, a flash analog-to-digital convertor (FADC) with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) increases the data-transfer rate for real-time evaluation of plasma performance. In the present study, measurements and simulations were performed in order to confirm the stilbene scintillator's response to D-D fusion reaction neutrons. Additionally, the count-rate limit of the neutron diagnostic system was determined by using measurements with a 252Cf source at different distances.

  9. Fissile mass estimation by pulsed neutron source interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelashvili, I.; Dubi, C.; Ettedgui, H.; Ocherashvili, A.; Pedersen, B.; Beck, A.; Roesgen, E.; Crochmore, J. M.; Ridnik, T.; Yaar, I.

    2015-06-01

    Passive methods for detecting correlated neutrons from spontaneous fissions (e.g. multiplicity and SVM) are widely used for fissile mass estimations. These methods can be used for fissile materials that emit a significant amount of fission neutrons (like plutonium). Active interrogation, in which fissions are induced in the tested material by an external continuous source or by a pulsed neutron source, has the potential advantages of fast measurement, alongside independence of the spontaneous fissions of the tested fissile material, thus enabling uranium measurement. Until recently, using the multiplicity method, for uranium mass estimation, was possible only for active interrogation made with continues neutron source. Pulsed active neutron interrogation measurements were analyzed with techniques, e.g. differential die away analysis (DDA), which ignore or implicitly include the multiplicity effect (self-induced fission chains). Recently, both, the multiplicity and the SVM techniques, were theoretically extended for analyzing active fissile mass measurements, made by a pulsed neutron source. In this study the SVM technique for pulsed neutron source is experimentally examined, for the first time. The measurements were conducted at the PUNITA facility of the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. First promising results, of mass estimation by the SVM technique using a pulsed neutron source, are presented.

  10. Superthermal source of ultracold neutrons for fundamental physics experiments.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Oliver; Piegsa, Florian M; Ivanov, Sergey N

    2011-09-23

    Ultracold neutrons (UCNs) play an important role for precise measurements of the properties of the neutron and its interactions. During the past 25 years, a neutron turbine coupled to a liquid deuterium cold neutron source at a high-flux reactor has defined the state of the art for UCN production, despite a long history of efforts towards a new generation of UCN sources. This Letter reports a world-best UCN density available for users, achieved with a new source based on conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium. A conversion volume of 5 liters provides at least 274,000 UCN in a single accumulation run. Cyclically repeated operation of the source has been demonstrated, as well. PMID:22026860

  11. Superthermal Source of Ultracold Neutrons for Fundamental Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Oliver; Piegsa, Florian M.; Ivanov, Sergey N.

    2011-09-23

    Ultracold neutrons (UCNs) play an important role for precise measurements of the properties of the neutron and its interactions. During the past 25 years, a neutron turbine coupled to a liquid deuterium cold neutron source at a high-flux reactor has defined the state of the art for UCN production, despite a long history of efforts towards a new generation of UCN sources. This Letter reports a world-best UCN density available for users, achieved with a new source based on conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium. A conversion volume of 5 liters provides at least 274 000 UCN in a single accumulation run. Cyclically repeated operation of the source has been demonstrated, as well.

  12. Neutron energy spectrum adjustment using deposited metal films on Teflon in the miniature neutron source reactor.

    PubMed

    Nassan, L; Abdallah, B; Omar, H; Sarheel, A; Alsomel, N; Ghazi, N

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this article was on the experimental estimation of the neutron energy spectrum in the inner irradiation site of the miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR), using, for the first time, a selected set of deposited metal films on Teflon (DMFTs) neutron detectors. Gold, copper, zinc, titanium, aluminum, nickel, silver, and chromium were selected because of the dependence of their neutron cross-sections on neutron energy. Emphasis was placed on the usability of this new type of neutron detectors in the total neutron energy spectrum adjustment. The measured saturation activities per target nucleus values of the DMFTs, and the calculated neutron spectrum in the inner irradiation site using the MCNP-4C code were used as an input for the STAY'SL computer code during the adjustment procedure. The agreement between the numerically calculated and experimentally adjusted spectra results was discussed. PMID:26562448

  13. BINP accelerator based epithermal neutron source.

    PubMed

    Aleynik, V; Burdakov, A; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Kanygin, V; Kuznetsov, A; Makarov, A; Sorokin, I; Taskaev, S

    2011-12-01

    Innovative facility for neutron capture therapy has been built at BINP. This facility is based on compact vacuum insulation tandem accelerator designed to produce proton current up to 10 mA. Epithermal neutrons are proposed to be generated by 1.915-2.5 MeV protons bombarding a lithium target using (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be threshold reaction. In the article, diagnostic techniques for proton beam and neutrons developed are described, results of experiments on proton beam transport and neutron generation are shown, discussed, and plans are presented. PMID:21439836

  14. Real-Time Active Cosmic Neutron Background Reduction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    from man-made sources like 252Cf or Am-Be was removed.

  15. Real-time active cosmic neutron background reduction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    from man-made sources like 252Cf or Am-Be was removed.

  16. A Dipole Assisted IEC Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Prajakti Joshi Shrestha

    2005-11-28

    A potential opportunity to enhance Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion exists by augmenting it with a magnetic dipole configuration. The theory is that the dipole fields will enhance the plasma density in the center region of the IEC and the combined IEC and dipole confinement properties will reduce plasma losses. To demonstrate that a hybrid Dipole-IEC configuration can provide an improved neutron source vs. a stand alone IEC, a first model Dipole-IEC experiment was benchmarked against a reference IEC. A triple Langmuir probe was used to find the electron temperature and density. It was found that the magnetic field increases the electron density by a factor of 16, the electron temperature decreases in the presence of a magnetic field, the discharge voltage decreases in the presence of a magnetic field, the potential of the dipole strongly influences the densities obtained in the center. The experimental set-up and plasma diagnostics are discussed in detail, as well as the results, and the developmental issues.

  17. NSDann2BS, a neutron spectrum unfolding code based on neural networks technology and two bonner spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solís Sánches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castañeda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2013-07-01

    In this work a neutron spectrum unfolding code, based on artificial intelligence technology is presented. The code called "Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry with Artificial Neural Networks and two Bonner spheres", (NSDann2BS), was designed in a graphical user interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. The main features of this code are to use an embedded artificial neural network architecture optimized with the "Robust design of artificial neural networks methodology" and to use two Bonner spheres as the only piece of information. In order to build the code here presented, once the net topology was optimized and properly trained, knowledge stored at synaptic weights was extracted and using a graphical framework build on the LabVIEW programming environment, the NSDann2BS code was designed. This code is friendly, intuitive and easy to use for the end user. The code is freely available upon request to authors. To demonstrate the use of the neural net embedded in the NSDann2BS code, the rate counts of 252Cf, 241AmBe and 239PuBe neutron sources measured with a Bonner spheres system.

  18. NSDann2BS, a neutron spectrum unfolding code based on neural networks technology and two bonner spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-Rodriguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solis Sanches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castaneda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2013-07-03

    In this work a neutron spectrum unfolding code, based on artificial intelligence technology is presented. The code called ''Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry with Artificial Neural Networks and two Bonner spheres'', (NSDann2BS), was designed in a graphical user interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. The main features of this code are to use an embedded artificial neural network architecture optimized with the ''Robust design of artificial neural networks methodology'' and to use two Bonner spheres as the only piece of information. In order to build the code here presented, once the net topology was optimized and properly trained, knowledge stored at synaptic weights was extracted and using a graphical framework build on the LabVIEW programming environment, the NSDann2BS code was designed. This code is friendly, intuitive and easy to use for the end user. The code is freely available upon request to authors. To demonstrate the use of the neural net embedded in the NSDann2BS code, the rate counts of {sup 252}Cf, {sup 241}AmBe and {sup 239}PuBe neutron sources measured with a Bonner spheres system.

  19. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S.; Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S.; Platt, S. P.

    2008-03-17

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10{sup 7}. Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays.

  20. Microtron MT 25 as a source of neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kralik, M.; Solc, J.; Chvatil, D.; Krist, P.; Turek, K.; Granja, C.

    2012-08-15

    The objective was to describe Microtron MT25 as a source of neutrons generated by bremsstrahlung induced photonuclear reactions in U and Pb targets. Bremsstrahlung photons were produced by electrons accelerated at energy 21.6 MeV. Spectral fluence of the generated neutrons was calculated with MCNPX code and then experimentally determined at two positions by means of a Bonner spheres spectrometer in which the detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by activation Mn tablets or track detectors CR-39 with a {sup 10}B radiator. The measured neutron spectral fluence and the calculated anisotropy served for the estimation of neutron yield from the targets and for the determination of ambient dose equivalent rate at the place of measurement. Microtron MT25 is intended as one of the sources for testing neutron sensitive devices which will be sent into the space.

  1. Microtron MT 25 as a source of neutrons.

    PubMed

    Králík, M; Šolc, J; Chvátil, D; Krist, P; Turek, K; Granja, C

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to describe Microtron MT25 as a source of neutrons generated by bremsstrahlung induced photonuclear reactions in U and Pb targets. Bremsstrahlung photons were produced by electrons accelerated at energy 21.6 MeV. Spectral fluence of the generated neutrons was calculated with MCNPX code and then experimentally determined at two positions by means of a Bonner spheres spectrometer in which the detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by activation Mn tablets or track detectors CR-39 with a (10)B radiator. The measured neutron spectral fluence and the calculated anisotropy served for the estimation of neutron yield from the targets and for the determination of ambient dose equivalent rate at the place of measurement. Microtron MT25 is intended as one of the sources for testing neutron sensitive devices which will be sent into the space. PMID:22938289

  2. Characterization of short-pulse laser driven neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Katerina; Jung, Daniel; Guler, Nevzat; Deppert, Oliver; Devlin, Matthew; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We present a full spectral characterization of a novel laser driven neutron source, which employed the Break Out Afterburner ion acceleration mechanism. Neutrons were produced by nuclear reactions of the ions deposited on Be or Cu converters. We observed neutrons at energies up to 150 MeV. The neutron spectra were measured by five neutron time-of-flight detectors at various positions and distances from the source. The nTOF detectors observed that emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component peaking at 3.5--5 MeV resulting from nuclear reactions in the converter and a directional component at 25--70 MeV, which was a product of break-up reaction of the forward moving deuterons. Energy shifts due to geometrical effects in BOA were also observed.

  3. A potential alternative/complement to the traditional thermal neutron based counting in Nuclear Safeguards and Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernikova, Dina; Naeem, Syed F.; Axell, Kåre; Trnjanin, Nermin; Nordlund, Anders

    2016-02-01

    A new concept for thermal neutron based correlation and multiplicity measurements is proposed in this paper. The main idea of the concept consists of using 2.223 MeV gammas (or 1.201 MeV, DE) originating in the 1 H (n , γ) 2 D-reaction instead of using traditional thermal neutron counting. Results of investigations presented in this paper indicate that gammas from thermal neutron capture reactions preserve the information about the correlation characteristics of thermal (fast) neutrons in the same time scale. Therefore, instead of thermal neutron detectors (or as a complement) one may use traditional and inexpensive gamma detectors, such as NaI, BGO, CdZnTe or any other gamma detector. In this work we used D8×8 cm2 NaI scintillator to test the concept. Thus, the new approach helps to address the problem of replacement of 3He-counters and problems related to the specific measurements of spent nuclear fuel directly in the spent fuel pool. It has a particular importance for Nuclear Safeguards and Security. Overall, this work represents the proof of concept study and reports on the experimental and numerical evidence that thermal neutron capture gammas may be used in the context of correlation and multiplicity measurements. Investigations were performed using a 252Cf-correlated neutron source and an 241Am-Be-random neutron source. The related idea of the Gamma Differential Die-Away approach is investigated numerically in this paper as well, and will be tested experimentally in future work.

  4. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project Progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Thompson, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following about the Advanced Neutron Source: Project Management; Research and Development; Fuel Development; Corrosion Loop Tests and Analyses; Thermal-Hydraulic Loop Tests; Reactor Control and Shutdown Concepts; Critical and Subcritical Experiments; Material Data, Structural Tests, and Analysis; Cold-Source Development; Beam Tube, Guide, and Instrument Development; Hot-Source Development; Neutron Transport and Shielding; I & C Research and Development; Design; and Safety.

  5. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project Progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H. ); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. ); Thompson, P.B. . Engineering Division)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following about the Advanced Neutron Source: Project Management; Research and Development; Fuel Development; Corrosion Loop Tests and Analyses; Thermal-Hydraulic Loop Tests; Reactor Control and Shutdown Concepts; Critical and Subcritical Experiments; Material Data, Structural Tests, and Analysis; Cold-Source Development; Beam Tube, Guide, and Instrument Development; Hot-Source Development; Neutron Transport and Shielding; I C Research and Development; Design; and Safety.

  6. Pulsed neutron source cold moderators --- concepts, design and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Guenter S.

    1997-01-01

    Moderator design for pulsed neutron sources is becoming more and more an interface area between source designers and instrument designers. Although there exists a high degree of flexibility, there are also physical and technical limitations. This paper aims at pointing out these limitations and examining ways to extend the current state of moderator technology in order to make the next generation neutron sources even more versatile and flexible tools for science in accordance with the users' requirements. (auth)

  7. A new approach to prompt fission neutron TOF data treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Zeynalova, O. V.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. A new mathematical approach, applicable to single events, was developed for prompt fission neutron (PFN) time-offlight distribution unfolding. The main goal was to understand the reasons of the long existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fission fragments (FF). Since the 252Cf (sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data the understanding of the PFN emission mechanism is very important both for nuclear fission theory and nuclear data. The experimental data were taken with a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in an experimental setup similar to the well known work of C. Budtz-Jorgensen and H.-H. Knitter. About 2.5 × 105 coincidences between fission fragment (FF) and neutron detector response to prompt fission neutron detection have been registered (∼ 1.6 × 107 of total recorded fission events). Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12-bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. The main goal of this work was a detailed description of the prompt fission neutron treatment.

  8. Fundamental neutron physics at a 1 MW long pulse spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    Modern neutron sources and modern neutron science share a common origin in mid twentieth century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for the study of condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and primarily justified) as tools for condensed matter research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities carried out at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for the continuation of this program of research.

  9. Neutron Capture and Fission Measurements on Actinides at Dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzh, A.; Wu, C. Y.; Kwan, E.; Henderson, R. A.; Gostic, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Couture, A. J.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Lee, H. Y.

    2013-03-01

    The prompt γ-ray energy and multiplicity distributions in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf have been measured using a highly granular 4π γ-ray calorimeter. Corrections were made for both energy and multiplicity distributions according to the detector response, which is simulated numerically using a model validated with the γ-ray calibration sources. A comparison of the total γray energy distribution was made between the measurement and a simulation by random sampling of the corrected γ-ray energy and multiplicity distributions through the detector response. A reasonable agreement is achieved between the measurement and simulation, indicating weak correlations between γ-ray energy and multiplicity. Moreover, the increasing agreement with increasing multiplicity manifests the stochastic aspect of the prompt γ decay in spontaneous fission. This calorimeter was designed for the study of neutron capture reactions and an example is given, where the238Pu(n, γ) measurement was carried out in the laboratory environment for the first time.

  10. Inertial electrostatic confinement I(IEC) neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nebel, R.A.; Barnes, D.C.; Caramana, E.J.; Janssen, R.D.; Nystrom, W.D.; Tiouririne, T.N.; Trent, B.C.; Miley, G.H.; Javedani, J.

    1995-12-01

    Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) is one of the earliest plasma confinement concepts, having first been suggested by P.T. Farnsworth in the 1950s. The concept involves a simple apparatus of concentric spherical electrostatic grids or a combination of grids and magnetic fields. An electrostatic structure is formed from the confluence of electron or ion beams. Gridded IEC systems have demonstrated neutron yields as high as 2*10 [10]. neutrons/sec in steady state. These systems have considerable potential as small, inexpensive, portable neutron sources for assaying applications. Neutron tomography is also a potential application. This paper discusses the IEC concept and how it can be adapted to a steady-state assaying source and an intense pulsed neutron source. Theoretical modeling and experimental results are presented.

  11. Summary of alpha-neutron sources in GADRAS.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean James; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Harding, Lee T.

    2012-05-01

    A common source of neutrons for calibration and testing is alpha-neutron material, named for the alpha-neutron nuclear reaction that occurs within. This material contains a long-lived alpha-emitter and a lighter target element. When the alpha particle from the emitter is absorbed by the target, neutrons and gamma rays are released. Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) includes built-in alpha-neutron source definitions for AcC, AmB, AmBe, AmF, AmLi, CmC, and PuC. In addition, GADRAS users may create their own alpha-neutron sources by placing valid alpha-emitters and target elements in materials within their one-dimensional models (1DModel). GADRAS has the ability to use pre-built alpha-neutron sources for plotting or as trace-sources in 1D models. In addition, if any material (existing or user-defined) specified in a 1D model contains both an alpha emitter in conjunction with a target nuclide, or there is an interface between such materials, then the appropriate neutron-emission rate from the alpha-neutron reaction will be computed. The gamma-emissions from these sources are also computed, but are limited to a subset of nine target nuclides. If a user has experimental data to contribute to the alpha-neutron gamma emission database, it may be added directly or submitted to the GADRAS developers for inclusion. The gadras.exe.config file will be replaced when GADRAS updates are installed, so sending the information to the GADRAS developers is the preferred method for updating the database. This is also preferable because it enables other users to benefit from your efforts.

  12. A Bright Neutron Source Driven by a Short Pulse Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus

    2012-10-01

    Neutrons are a unique tool to alter and diagnose material properties, and to exciting nuclear reactions, for many applications. Accelerator based spallation sources provide high neutron fluxes for research, but there is a growing need for more compact sources with higher peak brightness, whether fast or moderated neutrons. Intense lasers promise such as source, readily linkable to other experimental facilities, or deployable outside a laboratory setting. We present experimental results on the first short-pulse laser-driven neutron source powerful enough for radiography. A novel laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism (Breakout Afterburner), operating in the relativistic transparency regime, is used. Based on the mechanism's advantages, a laser-driven deuteron beam is used to achieve a new record in laser-neutron production, in numbers, energy and directionality. This neutron beam is a highly directional pulse < 1 ns at ˜ 1 cm from the target, with a flux > 40/2̂, and thus suitable for imaging applications with high temporal resolution. The beam contained, for the first time, neutrons with energies of up to 150 MeV. Thus using short pulse lasers, it is now possible to use the resulting hard x-rays and neutrons of different energies to radiograph an unknown object and to determine its material composition. Our data matches the simulated data for our test samples.

  13. Tagging fast neutrons from an (241)Am/(9)Be source.

    PubMed

    Scherzinger, J; Annand, J R M; Davatz, G; Fissum, K G; Gendotti, U; Hall-Wilton, R; Håkansson, E; Jebali, R; Kanaki, K; Lundin, M; Nilsson, B; Rosborge, A; Svensson, H

    2015-04-01

    Shielding, coincidence, and time-of-flight measurement techniques are employed to tag fast neutrons emitted from an (241)Am/(9)Be source resulting in a continuous polychromatic energy-tagged beam of neutrons with energies up to 7MeV. The measured energy structure of the beam agrees qualitatively with both previous measurements and theoretical calculations. PMID:25644080

  14. Ultra-bright laser-driven neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M.; Favalli, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Bridgewater, J.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Falk, K.; Fernndez, J.; Gautier, D.; Guler, N.; Henzlova, D.; Hornung, J.; Iliev, M.; Ianakiev, K.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Koehler, K.; Palaniyappan, S.; Poth, P.; Schaumann, G.; Swinhoe, M.; Taddeucci, T.; Tebartz, A.; Wagner, Florian; Wurden, G.

    2015-11-01

    Short-pulse laser-driven neutron sources have become a topic of interest since their brightness and yield have recently increased by orders of magnitude. Using novel target designs, high contrast - high power lasers and compact converter/moderator setups, these neutron sources have finally reached intensities that make many interesting applications possible. We present the results of two experimental campaigns on the GSI PHELIX and the LANL Trident lasers from 2015. We have produced an unprecedented neutron flux, mapped the spatial distribution of the neutron production as well as its energy spectra and ultimately used the beam for first applications to show the prospect of these new compact sources. We also made measurements for the conversion of energetic neutrons into short epithermal and thermal neutron pulses in order to evaluate further applications in dense plasma research. The results address a large community as it paves the way to use short pulse lasers as a neutron source. This can open up neutron research to a broad academic community including material science, biology, medicine and high energy density physics to universities and therefore can complement large scale facilities like reactors or particle accelerators.

  15. Event-by-Event Fission Modeling of Prompt Neutrons and Photons from Neutron-Induced and Spontaneous Fission with FREYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Ramona; Randrup, Jorgen

    2013-04-01

    The event-by-event fission Monte Carlo code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) generates large samples of complete fission events. Using FREYA, it is possible to obtain the fission products as well as the prompt neutrons and photons emitted during the fission process, all with complete kinematic information. We can therefore extract any desired correlation observables. Concentrating on ^239Pu(n,f), ^240Pu(sf) and ^252Cf(sf), we compare our FREYA results with available data on prompt neutron and photon emission and present predictions for novel fission observables that could be measured with modern detectors.

  16. On the Development of a Miniature Neutron Generator for the Brachytherapy Treatment of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, L.

    2009-03-10

    Brachytherapy refers to application of an irradiation source within a tumor. {sup 252}Cf needles used in brachytherapy have been successfully applied to treatment of some of the most virulent cancers but it is doubtful that it will be widely used because of difficulty in dealing with unwanted dose (source cannot be turned off) and in adhering to stringent NRC regulations that have been exacerbated in our post 911 environment. We have been working on the development of a miniature neutron generator with the reaction target placed at the end of a needle (tube) for brachytherapy applications. Orifice geometries are most amenable, e.g. rectum and cervix, but interstitial use is possible with microsurgery. This paper dicusses the results of a 30 watt DD neutron generator SBU project that demonstrates that sufficient hydrogen isotope current can be delivered down a small diameter needle required for a DT neutron treatment device, and, will summarize the progress of building a commercial device pursued by the All Russian Institute for Automatics (VNIIA) supported by the DOE's Industrial Proliferation Prevention Program (IPP). It is known that most of the fast neutron (FN) beam cancer treatment facilities have been closed down. It appears that the major limitation in the use of FN beams has been damage to healthy tissue, which is relatively insensitive to photons, but this problem is alleviated by brachytherapy. Moreover, recent clinical results indicate that fast neutrons in the boost mode are most highly effective in treating large, hypoxic, and rapidly repopulating diseases. It appears that early boost application of FN may halt angiogenesis (development and repair of tumor vascular system) and shrink the tumor resulting in lower hypoxia. The boost brachytherapy application of a small, low cost neutron generator holds promise of significant contribution to the treatment of cancer.

  17. On the Development of a Miniature Neutron Generator for the Brachytherapy Treatment of Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, L.

    2009-03-01

    Brachytherapy refers to application of an irradiation source within a tumor. 252Cf needles used in brachytherapy have been successfully applied to treatment of some of the most virulent cancers but it is doubtful that it will be widely used because of difficulty in dealing with unwanted dose (source cannot be turned off) and in adhering to stringent NRC regulations that have been exacerbated in our post 911 environment. We have been working on the development of a miniature neutron generator with the reaction target placed at the end of a needle (tube) for brachytherapy applications. Orifice geometries are most amenable, e.g. rectum and cervix, but interstitial use is possible with microsurgery. This paper dicusses the results of a 30 watt DD neutron generator SBU project that demonstrates that sufficient hydrogen isotope current can be delivered down a small diameter needle required for a DT neutron treatment device, and, will summarize the progress of building a commercial device pursued by the All Russian Institute for Automatics (VNIIA) supported by the DOE's Industrial Proliferation Prevention Program (IPP). It is known that most of the fast neutron (FN) beam cancer treatment facilities have been closed down. It appears that the major limitation in the use of FN beams has been damage to healthy tissue, which is relatively insensitive to photons, but this problem is alleviated by brachytherapy. Moreover, recent clinical results indicate that fast neutrons in the boost mode are most highly effective in treating large, hypoxic, and rapidly repopulating diseases. It appears that early boost application of FN may halt angiogenesis (development and repair of tumor vascular system) and shrink the tumor resulting in lower hypoxia. The boost brachytherapy application of a small, low cost neutron generator holds promise of significant contribution to the treatment of cancer.

  18. Advanced Neutron Source radiological design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    The operation of the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) facility will present a variety of radiological protection problems. Because it is desired to design and operate the ANS according to the applicable licensing standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), it must be demonstrated that the ANS radiological design basis is consistent not only with state and Department of Energy (DOE) and other usual federal regulations, but also, so far as is practicable, with NRC regulations and with recommendations of such organizations as the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Also, the ANS radiological design basis is in general to be consistent with the recommendations of authoritative professional and scientific organizations, specifically the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). As regards radiological protection, the principal goals of DOE regulations and guidance are to keep occupational doses ALARA [as low as (is) reasonably achievable], given the current state of technology, costs, and operations requirements; to control and monitor contained and released radioactivity during normal operation to keep public doses and releases to the environment ALARA; and to limit doses to workers and the public during accident conditions. Meeting these general design objectives requires that principles of dose reduction and of radioactivity control by employed in the design, operation, modification, and decommissioning of the ANS. The purpose of this document is to provide basic radiological criteria for incorporating these principles into the design of the ANS. Operations, modification, and decommissioning will be covered only as they are affected by design.

  19. Spallation neutron source target station design, development, and commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, J. R.; McManamy, T. J.; Gabriel, T. A.; Battle, R. E.; Chipley, K. K.; Crabtree, J. A.; Jacobs, L. L.; Lousteau, D. C.; Rennich, M. J.; Riemer, B. W.

    2014-11-01

    The spallation neutron source target station is designed to safely, reliably, and efficiently convert a 1 GeV beam of protons to a high flux of about 1 meV neutrons that are available at 24 neutron scattering instrument beam lines. Research and development findings, design requirements, design description, initial checkout testing, and results from early operation with beam are discussed for each of the primary target subsystems, including the mercury target, neutron moderators and reflector, surrounding vessels and shielding, utilities, remote handling equipment, and instrumentation and controls. Future plans for the mercury target development program are also briefly discussed.

  20. Accelerator-driven neutron source for cargo screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewigt, B. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Hoff, M. D.; Kwan, J. W.; Li, D.; Ratti, A.; Staples, J. W.; Virostek, S. P.; Wells, R. P.

    2007-08-01

    Advanced neutron interrogation systems for screening sea-land cargo containers for shielded special nuclear materials (SNM) require a high-yield neutron source to achieve the desired detection probability, false alarm rate, and throughput. The design of an accelerator-driven neutron source is described that utilizes the D(d,n)3He reaction to produce a forward directed beam of up to 8.5 MeV neutrons. The key components of the neutron source are a high-current radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator and a neutron production gas target. The 5.1 m long, 200 MHz RFQ accelerates a 40 mA deuteron beam from a microwave-driven ion source coupled to an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT) system to 6 MeV. At a 5% duty factor, the time-average D+ beam current on target is 1.5 mA. A thin entrance window has been designed for the deuterium gas target that can withstand the high beam power and the gas pressure. The source will be capable of delivering a flux >1 × 107 n/(cm2 s) at a distance of 2.5 m from the target and will allow full testing and demonstration of a cargo screening system based on neutron stimulated SNM signatures.

  1. Compact, energy EFFICIENT neutron source: enabling technology for various applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.; Roser, T.

    2009-12-01

    A novel neutron source comprising of a deuterium beam (energy of about 100 KeV) injected into a tube filled with tritium gas and/or tritium plasma that generates D-T fusion reactions, whose products are 14.06 MeV neutrons and 3.52 MeV alpha particles, is described. At the opposite end of the tube, the energy of deuterium ions that did not interact is recovered. Beryllium walls of proper thickness can be utilized to absorb 14 MeV neutrons and release 2-3 low energy neutrons. Each ion source and tube forms a module. Larger systems can be formed from multiple units. Unlike currently proposed methods, where accelerator-based neutron sources are very expensive, large, and require large amounts of power for operation, this neutron source is compact, inexpensive, easy to test and to scale up. Among possible applications for this neutron source concept are sub-critical nuclear breeder reactors and transmutation of radioactive waste.

  2. Fundamental neutron physics beamline at the spallation neutron source at ORNL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Allen, R. R.; Cianciolo, V.; Crawford, C.; Tito, T. M.; Huffman, P. R.; Iverson, E. B.; Mahurin, R.; Snow, W. M.

    2014-11-04

    In this paper, we describe the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FnPB) facility located at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The FnPB was designed for the conduct of experiments that investigate scientific issues in nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology using a pulsed slow neutron beam. Finally, we present a detailed description of the design philosophy, beamline components, and measured fluxes of the polychromatic and monochromatic beams.

  3. The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer MaNDi at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Leighton; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Frost, Matthew J.; He, Junhong; Weiss, Kevin L.; McFeeters, Hana; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Langan, Paul; Iverson, Erik B.

    2015-07-18

    The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi) is located on beamline 11B of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Moreover, the instrument is a neutron time-of-flight wavelength-resolved Laue diffractometer optimized to collect diffraction data from single crystals. Finally, the instrument has been designed to provide flexibility in several instrumental parameters, such as beam divergence and wavelength bandwidth, to allow data collection from a range of macromolecular systems.

  4. The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer MaNDi at the Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coates, Leighton; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Frost, Matthew J.; He, Junhong; Weiss, Kevin L.; McFeeters, Hana; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Langan, Paul; Iverson, Erik B.

    2015-07-18

    The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi) is located on beamline 11B of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Moreover, the instrument is a neutron time-of-flight wavelength-resolved Laue diffractometer optimized to collect diffraction data from single crystals. Finally, the instrument has been designed to provide flexibility in several instrumental parameters, such as beam divergence and wavelength bandwidth, to allow data collection from a range of macromolecular systems.

  5. Coded source neutron imaging with a MURA mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Y. B.; Schillinger, B.; Wang, S.; Zhang, X. S.; Guo, Z. Y.; Lu, Y. R.

    2011-09-01

    In coded source neutron imaging the single aperture commonly used in neutron radiography is replaced with a coded mask. Using a coded source can improve the neutron flux at the sample plane when a very high L/ D ratio is needed. The coded source imaging is a possible way to reduce the exposure time to get a neutron image with very high L/ D ratio. A 17×17 modified uniformly redundant array coded source was tested in this work. There are 144 holes of 0.8 mm diameter on the coded source. The neutron flux from the coded source is as high as from a single 9.6 mm aperture, while its effective L/ D is the same as in the case of a 0.8 mm aperture. The Richardson-Lucy maximum likelihood algorithm was used for image reconstruction. Compared to an in-line phase contrast neutron image taken with a 1 mm aperture, it takes much less time for the coded source to get an image of similar quality.

  6. An ultra-cold neutron source at the MLNSC

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.; Brun, T.; Hill, R.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.J.; Crow, L.; Serebrov, A.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have carried out the research and development of an Ultra-Cold Neutron (UCN) source at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC). A first generation source was constructed to test the feasibility of a rotor source. The source performed well with an UCN production rate reasonably consistent with that expected. This source can now provide the basis for further development work directed at using UCN in fundamental physics research as well as possible applications in materials science.

  7. Systematic evaluation of neutron shielding effects for materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ueki, K.; Ohashi, A.; Nariyama, N.; Nagayama, S.; Fujita, T.; Hattori, K.; Anayama, Y.

    1996-11-01

    Three types of experiments with a {sup 252}Cf neutron source are proposed to evaluate systematically the neutron shielding effects of a material. The type 1 experiment deals with each shielding material alone, the type 2 experiment combines a shielding material and a structural material, and the type 3 experiment constructs the optimization with the materials used in the type 2 experiment. In the stainless steel (SS) + polyethylene shielding system, because of the location of the SS slabs at the source side, the tenth layer of the polyethylene becomes approximately one-half the value as when the polyethylene is employed alone. This is the enhancement effect of the SS. In the type 3 experiment, the total thickness of the SS + polyethylene shielding system is 40 cm, and the total thicknesses of the SS and the polyethylene slabs are fixed at 25 and 15 cm thick, respectively. The minimum total dose-equivalent rate (neutron + secondary gamma rays) is observed when the polyethylene slabs are located at a 20-cm depth from the source side, with an arrangement of 20-cm-thick SS + 15-cm-thick polyethylene + 5-cm-thick and SS, and with a ratio of the maximum to the minimum dose-equivalent rate of 2.5. The shielding optimization can be constructed by combining the materials having different shielding characteristics. The experimental results of the three types of experiments are reproduced fairly well by using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP 4A with a next-event surface crossing estimator.

  8. A route to the brightest possible neutron source?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew; Dunne, Mike; Bennington, Steve; Ansell, Stuart; Gardner, Ian; Norreys, Peter; Broome, Tim; Findlay, David; Nelmes, Richard

    2007-02-23

    We review the potential to develop sources for neutron scattering science and propose that a merger with the rapidly developing field of inertial fusion energy could provide a major step-change in performance. In stark contrast to developments in synchrotron and laser science, the past 40 years have seen only a factor of 10 increase in neutron source brightness. With the advent of thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory, coupled to innovative approaches in how this may be achieved, we calculate that a neutron source three orders of magnitude more powerful than any existing facility can be envisaged on a 20- to 30-year time scale. Such a leap in source power would transform neutron scattering science. PMID:17322053

  9. Fast-neutron, coded-aperture imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a large-scale, coded-aperture imager for fast neutrons, building off a proof-of concept instrument developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The Space Science Division at the NRL has a heritage of developing large-scale, mobile systems, using coded-aperture imaging, for long-range γ-ray detection and localization. The fast-neutron, coded-aperture imaging instrument, designed for a mobile unit (20 ft. ISO container), consists of a 32-element array of 15 cm×15 cm×15 cm liquid scintillation detectors (EJ-309) mounted behind a 12×12 pseudorandom coded aperture. The elements of the aperture are composed of 15 cm×15 cm×10 cm blocks of high-density polyethylene (HDPE). The arrangement of the aperture elements produces a shadow pattern on the detector array behind the mask. By measuring of the number of neutron counts per masked and unmasked detector, and with knowledge of the mask pattern, a source image can be deconvolved to obtain a 2-d location. The number of neutrons per detector was obtained by processing the fast signal from each PMT in flash digitizing electronics. Digital pulse shape discrimination (PSD) was performed to filter out the fast-neutron signal from the γ background. The prototype instrument was tested at an indoor facility at the NRL with a 1.8-μCi and 13-μCi 252Cf neutronsource at three standoff distances of 9, 15 and 26 m (maximum allowed in the facility) over a 15-min integration time. The imaging and detection capabilities of the instrument were tested by moving the source in half- and one-pixel increments across the image plane. We show a representative sample of the results obtained at one-pixel increments for a standoff distance of 9 m. The 1.8-μCi source was not detected at the 26-m standoff. In order to increase the sensitivity of the instrument, we reduced the fastneutron background by shielding the top, sides and back of the detector array with 10-cm-thick HDPE. This shielding configuration led

  10. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1996-12-19

    The goals of this three-year study were: (1) design a neutron focusing system for use with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of cold neutrons appropriate for prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA); (2) orchestrate the construction of the focusing system, integrate it into the TCNS neutron guide complex, and measure its performance; and (3) design, setup, and test a cold-neutron PGAA system which utilizes the guided focused cold neutron beam. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which the authors wrote to trace neutrons through the curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, the authors obtained gains of 3 to 5 for 4 different converging guide geometries. During the second year of the DOE grant, the subject of this final report, Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company was contracted to build a converging neutron guide focusing system to the specifications. Considerable time and effort were spent working with Ovonics on selecting the materials for the converging neutron guide system. The major portion of the research on the design of a cold-neutron PGAA system was also completed during the second year. At the beginning of the third year of the grant, a converging neutron guide focusing system had been ordered, and a cold-neutron PGAA system had been designed. Since DOE did not fund the third year, there was no money to purchase the required equipment for the cold-neutron PGAA system and no money to perform tests of either the converging neutron guide or the cold-neutron PGAA system. The research already accomplished would have little value without testing the systems which had been designed. Thus the project was continued at a pace that could be sustained with internal funding.

  11. Status of the Ultracold neutron source upgrade at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Pattie, Robert Wayne Jr.

    2015-10-31

    Several slides show the source and flux of ultracold neutrons produced. In summary, an upgraded UCN source has been designed, and parts are currently being fabricated. Nickel phosphorus-coated guides will improve transport to the experiment hall. The source will be installed in the spring of 2016 and commissioned in the fall of 2016.

  12. Secondary neutron source modelling using MCNPX and ALEPH codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakas, Christos; Kerkar, Nordine

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring the subcritical state and divergence of reactors requires the presence of neutron sources. But mainly secondary neutrons from these sources feed the ex-core detectors (SRD, Source Range Detector) whose counting rate is correlated with the level of the subcriticality of reactor. In cycle 1, primary neutrons are provided by sources activated outside of the reactor (e.g. Cf252); part of this source can be used for the divergence of cycle 2 (not systematic). A second family of neutron sources is used for the second cycle: the spontaneous neutrons of actinides produced after irradiation of fuel in the first cycle. Both families of sources are not sufficient to efficiently monitor the divergence of the second cycles and following ones, in most reactors. Secondary sources cluster (SSC) fulfil this role. In the present case, the SSC [Sb, Be], after activation in the first cycle (production of Sb124, unstable), produces in subsequent cycles a photo-neutron source by gamma (from Sb124)-neutron (on Be9) reaction. This paper presents the model of the process between irradiation in cycle 1 and cycle 2 results for SRD counting rate at the beginning of cycle 2, using the MCNPX code and the depletion chain ALEPH-V1 (coupling of MCNPX and ORIGEN codes). The results of this simulation are compared with two experimental results of the PWR 1450 MWe-N4 reactors. A good agreement is observed between these results and the simulations. The subcriticality of the reactors is about at -15,000 pcm. Discrepancies on the SRD counting rate between calculations and measurements are in the order of 10%, lower than the combined uncertainty of measurements and code simulation. This comparison validates the AREVA methodology, which allows having an SRD counting rate best-estimate for cycles 2 and next ones and optimizing the position of the SSC, depending on the geographic location of sources, main parameter for optimal monitoring of subcritical states.

  13. Outline of a proposal for a new neutron source: The pulsed neutron research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    Accelerator-based, pulsed spallation neutron sources have been performing neutron scattering research for about fifteen years. During this time beam intensities have increased by a factor of 100 and more than 50 spectrometers are now operating on four major sources worldwide. The pulsed sources have proven to be highly effective and complementary to reactor-based sources in that there are important scientific areas for which each type of source has unique capabilities. We describe a proposal for a new pulsed neutron facility based on a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient synchrotron. The specifications for this new machine, which are now only being formulated, are for an accelerator that will produce (100 {divided_by} 200) {mu}A of time-averaged proton current at (500 {divided_by} 1000) MeV, in short pulses at 30 Hz. Appropriate target and moderator systems and an array of scattering instruments will be provided to make the facility a full-blown research installation. The neutron source, named the Pulsed Neutron Research Facility (PNRF), will be as powerful as any pulsed source now operating in the world and will also act as a test bed for the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Synchrotron concept as a basis for more powerful sources in the future. The peak thermal neutron flux in PNRF will be about 5{center_dot}10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s.

  14. Outline of a proposal for a new neutron source: The pulsed neutron research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    Accelerator-based, pulsed spallation neutron sources have been performing neutron scattering research for about fifteen years. During this time beam intensities have increased by a factor of 100 and more than 50 spectrometers are now operating on four major sources worldwide. The pulsed sources have proven to be highly effective and complementary to reactor-based sources in that there are important scientific areas for which each type of source has unique capabilities. We describe a proposal for a new pulsed neutron facility based on a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient synchrotron. The specifications for this new machine, which are now only being formulated, are for an accelerator that will produce (100 {divided by} 200) {mu}A of time-averaged proton current at (500 {divided by} 1000) MeV, in short pulses at 30 Hz. Appropriate target and moderator systems and an array of scattering instruments will be provided to make the facility a full-blown research installation. The neutron source, named the Pulsed Neutron Research Facility (PNRF), will be as powerful as any pulsed source now operating in the world and will also act as a test bed for the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Synchrotron concept as a basis for more powerful sources in the future. The peak thermal neutron flux in PNRF will be about 5{center dot}10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s.

  15. Design and demonstration of a quasi-monoenergetic neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, T. H.; Sangiorgio, S.; Mozin, V.; Norman, E. B.; Sorensen, P.; Foxe, M.; Bench, G.; Bernstein, A.

    2014-08-01

    The design of a neutron source capable of producing 24 and 70 keV neutron beams with narrow energy spread is presented. The source exploits near-threshold kinematics of the 7Li (p,n)7Be reaction while taking advantage of the interference ‘notches’ found in the scattering cross-sections of iron. The design was implemented and characterized at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Alternative filters such as vanadium and manganese are also explored and the possibility of studying the response of different materials to low-energy nuclear recoils using the resultant neutron beams is discussed.

  16. Design and Demonstration of a Quasi-monoenergetic Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, T.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Norman, E. B.; Sorensen, Peter F.; Foxe, Michael P.; Bench, G.; Bernstein, A.

    2014-03-05

    The design of a neutron source capable of producing 24 and 70 keV neutron beams with narrow energy spread is presented. The source exploits near-threshold kinematics of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction while taking advantage of the interference `notches' found in the scattering cross-sections of iron. The design was implemented and characterized at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Alternative lters such as vanadium and manganese are also explored and the possibility of studying the response of di*erent materials to low-energy nuclear recoils using the resultant neutron beams is discussed.

  17. Thermal neutron activation system for confirmatory nonmetallic land mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Cousins, Thomas; Jones, Trevor; Brisson, Jean R.; Jamieson, Terry; Waller, Ed; LeMay, Francois; Ing, Harry; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Selkirk, Barkley

    1998-09-01

    To detect and locate buried landmines, the Canadian Department of National Defence (DND) is developing a teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multisensor system called ILDP. In operation, a suite of 4 detectors scan ahead of the vehicle. Their outputs are combined through data fusion to indicate the possibility of a mine at a particular location, within a 30 cm radius. A thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensor, mounted behind the vehicle, is used to confirm the presence of explosives via detection of the 10.83 MeV gamma-ray associated with neutron capture on 14N. The TNA system developed for this uses a 100 microgram 252Cf neutron source surrounded by four 7.62 cm X 7.62 cm NaI(Tl) detectors. A combination of the use of state-of-the art radiation transport codes for design, judicious choice of specialized shielding materials and development of high-rate, fast pulse processing electronics has led to a system which can; (1) confirm the presence of all surface-laid or shallowly-buried anti-tank mines in a few seconds to a minute (depending on mass of explosive) (2) confirm the presence of anti-tank mines down to 20 cm depth in less than 5 minutes. (3) confirm the presence of large (greater than 100 g Nitrogen) anti-personnel mines in less than five minutes (4) operate in adverse climatic conditions. These results have been verified in field trials using the prototype sensor. Work is now ongoing to miniaturize the electronics, make the system robust and easy to use and investigate the use of an electronic neutron generator expected to enter service by the year 2000.

  18. Experiments and Simulations of the Use of Time-Correlated Thermal Neutron Counting to Determine the Multiplication of an Assembly of Highly Enriched Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Mathew T. Kinlaw; Scott M. Watson; Jeffrey M. Kalter; Eric C. Miller; William A. Noonan

    2014-11-01

    A series of experiments and numerical simulations using thermal-neutron time-correlated measurements has been performed to determine the neutron multiplication, M, of assemblies of highly enriched uranium available at Idaho National Laboratory. The experiments used up to 14.4 kg of highly-enriched uranium, including bare assemblies and assemblies reflected with high-density polyethylene, carbon steel, and tungsten. A small 252Cf source was used to initiate fission chains within the assembly. Both the experiments and the simulations used 6-channel and 8-channel detector systems, each consisting of 3He proportional counters moderated with polyethylene; data was recorded in list mode for analysis. 'True' multiplication values for each assembly were empirically derived using basic neutron production and loss values determined through simulation. A total of one-hundred and sixteen separate measurements were performed using fifty-seven unique measurement scenarios, the multiplication varied from 1.75 to 10.90. This paper presents the results of these comparisons and discusses differences among the various cases.

  19. Use of Neutron Benchmark Fields for the Validation of Dosimetry Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of validation metrics for dosimetry cross sections in neutron benchmark fields is explored. The strength of some of the metrics in providing validation evidence is examined by applying them to the 252Cf spontaneous fission standard neutron benchmark field, the 235U thermal neutron fission reference benchmark field, the ACRR pool-type reactor central cavity reference benchmark fields, and the SPR-III fast burst reactor central cavity. The IRDFF dosimetry cross section library is used in the validation study and observations are made on the amount of coverage provided to the library contents by validation data available in these benchmark fields.

  20. Nuclear and dosimetric features of an isotopic neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Hernández-Dávila, V. M.; Rivera, T.; Sánchez, A.

    2014-02-01

    A multisphere neutron spectrometer was used to determine the features of a 239PuBe neutron source that is used to operate the ESFM-IPN Subcritical Reactor. To determine the source main features it was located a 100 cm from the spectrometer which was a 6LiI(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 in.-diameter polyethylene spheres. Count rates obtained with the spectrometer were unfolded using the NSDUAZ code and neutron spectrum, total fluence, and ambient dose equivalent were determined. A Monte Carlo calculation was carried out to estimate the spectrum and integral features being less than values obtained experimentally due to the presence of 241Pu in the Pu used to fabricate the source. Actual neutron yield and the mass fraction of 241Pu was estimated.

  1. A New Method of Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectrum Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalova, O. V.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2010-11-01

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. The goal was to find out the reasons of a long time existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of fission fragments (FF). On the one hand the 252Cf (sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data, on the other hand the understanding of PFN emission mechanism is very important for nuclear fission theory. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in total about 107 fission fragment-neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. For the first time the dependence of the number of emitted neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations in the range of TKE from 140-220 MeV.

  2. A New Method of Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectrum Unfolding

    SciTech Connect

    Zeynalova, O. V.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2010-11-25

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. The goal was to find out the reasons of a long time existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of fission fragments (FF). On the one hand the {sup 252}Cf(sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data, on the other hand the understanding of PFN emission mechanism is very important for nuclear fission theory. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in total about 10{sup 7} fission fragment-neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. For the first time the dependence of the number of emitted neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations in the range of TKE from 140-220 MeV.

  3. Digital front-end electronics for a tagged neutron inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Cester, D.; Stevanato, L.; Viesti, G.; Nebbia, G.

    2013-04-19

    In this paper, we shall present a simple VME front-end system that employs the FADC CAEN V1720 8- channel 12-bit 250-MS/s digitizer. This system produces coincidence spectra between the trigger particle and other detectors and it replaces the traditional technique of chaining analog electronics. Tests have been performed using a pulser working at different frequencies as well as employing a {sup 252}Cf source in concert with an array of detectors.

  4. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  5. Conceptual design of an RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron-capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Stovall, J.E.; Bhatia, T.S.; Wang, C.K.; Blue, T.E.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a conceptual design of a low-energy neutron generator for treatment of brain tumors by boron neutron capture theory (BNCT). The concept is based on a 2.5-MeV proton beam from a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, and the neutrons are produced by the /sup 7/Li(p,n)/sup 7/Be reaction. A liquid lithium target and modulator assembly are designed to provide a high flux of epithermal neutrons. The patient is administered a tumor-specific /sup 10/Be-enriched compound and is irradiated by the neutrons to create a highly localized dose from the reaction /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li. An RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT is compact, which makes it practical to site the facility within a hospital. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Epithermal Neutron Source for Neutron Resonance Spectroscopy (NRS) using High Intensity, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D P; McNaney, J M; Swift, D C; Bartal, T; Hey, D S; Pape, S L; Mackinnon, A; Mariscal, D; Nakamura, H; Nakanii, N; Beg, F N

    2010-04-22

    A neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy (NRS) has been developed using high intensity, short pulse lasers. This measurement technique will allow for robust measurements of interior ion temperature of laser-shocked materials and provide insight into equation of state (EOS) measurements. The neutron generation technique uses protons accelerated by lasers off of Cu foils to create neutrons in LiF, through (p,n) reactions with {sup 7}Li and {sup 19}F. The distribution of the incident proton beam has been diagnosed using radiochromic film (RCF). This distribution is used as the input for a (p,n) neturon prediction code which is compared to experimentally measured neutron yields. From this calculation, a total fluence of 1.8 x 10{sup 9} neutrons is infered, which is shown to be a reasonable amount for NRS temperature measurement.

  7. Utilization of the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, R.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Popek, R.J.; Schulke, A.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) neutron scattering facility (NSF) has been investigated for its applicability to neutron activation analysis. A polyethylene insert has been added to the vertical hole VT3 which enhances the thermal neutron flux by a factor of two. The neutron spectral distribution at this position has been measured by the multiple-foil technique which utilized 28 activation reactions and the STAYSL computer code. The validity of this spectral measurement was tested by two irradiations of National Bureau of Standards SRM-1571 (orchard leaves), SRM-1575 (pine needles), and SRM-1645 (river sediment). The average thermal neutron flux for these irradiations normalized to 10 ..mu..amp proton beam is 4.0 x 10/sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/-s. Concentrations of nine trace elements in each of these SRMs have been determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Agreement of measured values to certified values is demonstrated to be within experiment error.

  8. Towards detectors for next generation spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, B.

    2004-12-01

    Neutron scattering and diffraction methods are of utmost importance for probing the structure and dynamics of condensed matter at an atomic, molecular and mesoscopic level. However, today's experiments, using either wavelength-selected cw beams from steady-state reactor or spallation sources or, on the other hand, comparatively weak pulsed spallation source beams (with the exception of the pulsed IBR-2 reactor in Dubna), suffer from relatively low source strengths, e.g. compared to synchrotron-radiation investigations. Therefore, neutron scattering methods can greatly benefit from next generation pulsed spallation neutron sources with 1-10 MW average proton beam power, which will allow analyzing wavelengths by time-of-flight (TOF) and thus utilizing in an experiment simultaneously a large fraction of the full wavelength band. However, the improved instantaneous flux will pose great challenges on the detection systems, since for instance for ESS, the strongest of the projected sources, the peak thermal neutron flux will be higher by nearly two orders of magnitude than at the presently strongest sources. Owing to current improvements in neutron optics and spectrometer design, the fluxes impinging on the samples will be further enhanced by another factor 5-10; however, this will be compensated for by the tendency to investigate smaller samples becoming accessible due to smaller foci and higher beam fluxes. Hence, thermal neutron detectors with up to two orders of magnitude higher peak count rate capacity in conjunction with microsecond TOF and for some applications sub-millimeter position resolutions are required, in addition to other characteristics like e.g. high long-term stability and low sensitivity to photon background. In this review article an overview will be given on the current state-of-the-art and on currently investigated novel solutions for thermal neutron detectors for very high rate and resolution time-resolved experiments, comprising silicon

  9. Optimizing Moderator Dimensions for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinkui; Robertson, Lee; Herwig, Kenneth W; Gallmeier, Franz X; Riemer, Bernie

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. In a recent study of the planned second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility [1,2], we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter for a smaller viewing area [4]. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories, those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. We found that the cross-sections of the sample and the neutron guide, respectively, are the deciding factors for choosing the moderator. Beam divergence plays no role as long as it is within the reach of practical constraints. Namely, the required divergence is not too large for the guide or sample to be located close enough to the moderator on an actual spallation source.

  10. A Neutron Source Facility for Neutron Cross-Section Measurements on Radioactive Targets at RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L E; Bernstein, L; Rusnak, B; Berio, R

    2003-05-20

    The stockpile stewardship program is interested in neutron cross-section measurements on nuclei that are a few nucleons away from stability. Since neutron targets do not exist, radioactive targets are the only way to directly perform these measurements. This requires a facility that can provide high production rates for these short-lived nuclei as well as a source of neutrons. The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) promises theses high production rates. Thus, adding a co-located neutron source facility to the RIA project baseline would allow these neutron cross-section measurements to be made. A conceptual design for such a neutron source has been developed, which would use two accelerators, a Dynamitron and a linac, to create the neutrons through a variety of reactions (d-d, d-t, deuteron break-up, p-Li). This range of reactions is needed in order to provide the desired energy range from 10's of keV to 20 MeV. The facility would also have hot cells to perform chemistry on the radioactive material both before and after neutron irradiation. The present status of this design and direction of future work will be discussed.

  11. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, I D

    2006-05-25

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on {sup 6}LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, {alpha}) reactions with fast neutrons in {sup 6}Li and {sup 10}B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies k{sub B}T on the order of {mu}eV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution {Delta}E {approx} (k{sub B}T{sup 2}C){sup 1/2}, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB{sub 2} absorber using thermal neutrons from a {sup 252}Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in {sup 7}Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a {sup 6}Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the {sup 6}Li(n, {alpha}){sup 3}H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  12. Gyrotron-driven high current ECR ion source for boron-neutron capture therapy neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Sidorov, A.; Maslennikova, A.; Volovecky, A.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O.

    2014-12-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a perspective treatment method for radiation resistant tumors. Unfortunately its development is strongly held back by a several physical and medical problems. Neutron sources for BNCT currently are limited to nuclear reactors and accelerators. For wide spread of BNCT investigations more compact and cheap neutron source would be much more preferable. In present paper an approach for compact D-D neutron generator creation based on a high current ECR ion source is suggested. Results on dense proton beams production are presented. A possibility of ion beams formation with current density up to 600 mA/cm2 is demonstrated. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron target bombarded by such deuteron beams would theoretically yield a neutron flux density up to 6·1010 cm-2/s. Thus, neutron generator based on a high-current deuteron ECR source with a powerful plasma heating by gyrotron radiation could fulfill the BNCT requirements significantly lower price, smaller size and ease of operation in comparison with existing reactors and accelerators.

  13. Plans for an Ultra Cold Neutron source at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Greene, G.L.

    1996-10-01

    Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) can be produced at spallation sources using a variety of techniques. To date the technique used has been to Bragg scatter and Doppler shift cold neutrons into UCN from a moving crystal. This is particularly applicable to short-pulse spallation sources. We are presently constructing a UCN source at LANSCE using this method. In addition, large gains in UCN density should be possible using cryogenic UCN sources. Research is under way at Gatchina to demonstrate technical feasibility of a frozen deuterium source. If successful, a source of this type could be implemented at future spallation source, such as the long pulse source being planned at Los Alamos, with a UCN density that may be two orders of magnitude higher than that presently available at reactors.

  14. Development of an ultra cold neutron source at MLNSC

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Greene, G.L.; Morris, C.L.

    1996-09-01

    Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) can be produced at spallation sources using a variety of techniques. To date the technique used has been to Bragg scatter and Doppler shift cold neutrons into UCN from a moving crystal. This is particularly applicable to short-pulse spallation sources. We are presently constructing a UCN source at LANSCE using this method. In addition, large gains in UCN density should be possible using cryogenic UCN sources. Research is under way at Gatchina to demonstrate technical feasibility of a frozen deuterium source. If successful, a source of this type could be implemented at future spallation sources, such as the long pulse source being planned at Los Alamos, with a UCN density that may be two orders of magnitude higher than that presently available at reactors.

  15. Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Van B; Dayton, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

  16. Systematic neutron guide misalignment for an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendler, C.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a long pulse spallation neutron source that is currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. A considerable fraction of the 22 planned instruments extend as far as 75-150 m from the source. In such long beam lines, misalignment between neutron guide segments can decrease the neutron transmission significantly. In addition to a random misalignment from installation tolerances, the ground on which ESS is built can be expected to sink with time, and thus shift the neutron guide segments further away from the ideal alignment axis in a systematic way. These systematic errors are correlated to the ground structure, position of buildings and shielding installation. Since the largest deformation is expected close to the target, even short instruments might be noticeably affected. In this study, the effect of this systematic misalignment on short and long ESS beam lines is analyzed, and a possible mitigation by overillumination of subsequent guide sections investigated.

  17. LOW VOLTAGE 14 Mev NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Little, R.N. Jr.; Graves, E.R.

    1959-09-29

    An apparatus yielding high-energy neutrons at the rate of 10/sup 8/ or more per second by the D,T or D,D reactions is described. The deuterium gas filling is ionized by electrons emitted from a filament, and the resulting ions are focused into a beam and accelerated against a fixed target. The apparatus is built in accordance with the relationship V/sub s/ = A--B log pd, where V/sub s/ is the sparking voltage, p the gas pressure, and d the gap length between the high voltage electrodes. Typical parameters to obtain the high neutron yields are 55 to 80 kv, 0.5 to 7.0 ma beam current, 5 to 12 microns D/sub 2/, and a gap length of 1 centimeter.

  18. High Intensity Accelerator and Neutron Source in China

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Xialing; Wei, J.; Loong Chun

    2011-06-28

    High intensity Accelerator is being studied all over world for numerous applications, which includes the waste transmutation, spallation neutron source and material irradiation facilities. The R/D activities of the technology of High intensity accelerator are also developed in China for some year, and have some good facilities around China. This paper will reports the status of some high intensity accelerators and neutron source in China, which including ADS/RFQ; CARR; CSNS; PKUNIFTY and CPHS. This paper will emphatically report the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) led by the Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.

  19. Spent-fuel photon and neutron source spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, O.W.; Alexander, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Computational activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been performed to develop appropriate data and techniques for computing the photon and neutron source spectra of spent fuel. The methods reviewed here include both the determination of spent-fuel composition and the radiation source spectra associated with these isotopic inventories.

  20. Design considerations for neutron activation and neutron source strength monitors for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Jassby, D.L.; LeMunyan, G.; Roquemore, A.L.; Walker, C.

    1997-12-31

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will require highly accurate measurements of fusion power production in time, space, and energy. Spectrometers in the neutron camera could do it all, but experience has taught us that multiple methods with redundancy and complementary uncertainties are needed. Previously, conceptual designs have been presented for time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron source strength monitors, both of which will be important parts of the integrated suite of neutron diagnostics for this purpose. The primary goals of the neutron activation system are: to maintain a robust relative measure of fusion energy production with stability and wide dynamic range; to enable an accurate absolute calibration of fusion power using neutronic techniques as successfully demonstrated on JET and TFTR; and to provide a flexible system for materials testing. The greatest difficulty is that the irradiation locations need to be close to plasma with a wide field of view. The routing of the pneumatic system is difficult because of minimum radius of curvature requirements and because of the careful need for containment of the tritium and activated air. The neutron source strength system needs to provide real-time source strength vs. time with {approximately}1 ms resolution and wide dynamic range in a robust and reliable manner with the capability to be absolutely calibrated by in-situ neutron sources as done on TFTR, JT-60U, and JET. In this paper a more detailed look at the expected neutron flux field around ITER is folded into a more complete design of the fission chamber system.

  1. Neutron source reconstruction from pinhole imaging at National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Volegov, P; Danly, C R; Fittinghoff, D N; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Izumi, N; Ma, T; Merrill, F E; Warrick, A L; Wilde, C H; Wilson, D C

    2014-02-01

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the ignition stage of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at NIF. Since the neutron source is small (∼100 μm) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-μm resolution are 20-cm long, single-sided tapers in gold. These apertures, which have triangular cross sections, produce distortions in the image, and the extended nature of the pinhole results in a non-stationary or spatially varying point spread function across the pinhole field of view. In this work, we have used iterative Maximum Likelihood techniques to remove the non-stationary distortions introduced by the aperture to reconstruct the underlying neutron source distributions. We present the detailed algorithms used for these reconstructions, the stopping criteria used and reconstructed sources from data collected at NIF with a discussion of the neutron imaging performance in light of other diagnostics. PMID:24593362

  2. Neutron source reconstruction from pinhole imaging at National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volegov, P.; Danly, C. R.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Merrill, F. E.; Warrick, A. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2014-02-01

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the ignition stage of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at NIF. Since the neutron source is small (˜100 μm) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-μm resolution are 20-cm long, single-sided tapers in gold. These apertures, which have triangular cross sections, produce distortions in the image, and the extended nature of the pinhole results in a non-stationary or spatially varying point spread function across the pinhole field of view. In this work, we have used iterative Maximum Likelihood techniques to remove the non-stationary distortions introduced by the aperture to reconstruct the underlying neutron source distributions. We present the detailed algorithms used for these reconstructions, the stopping criteria used and reconstructed sources from data collected at NIF with a discussion of the neutron imaging performance in light of other diagnostics.

  3. Neutron source reconstruction from pinhole imaging at National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Volegov, P.; Danly, C. R.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Warrick, A. L.

    2014-02-15

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the ignition stage of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at NIF. Since the neutron source is small (∼100 μm) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-μm resolution are 20-cm long, single-sided tapers in gold. These apertures, which have triangular cross sections, produce distortions in the image, and the extended nature of the pinhole results in a non-stationary or spatially varying point spread function across the pinhole field of view. In this work, we have used iterative Maximum Likelihood techniques to remove the non-stationary distortions introduced by the aperture to reconstruct the underlying neutron source distributions. We present the detailed algorithms used for these reconstructions, the stopping criteria used and reconstructed sources from data collected at NIF with a discussion of the neutron imaging performance in light of other diagnostics.

  4. Feasibility of sealed D-T neutron generator as neutron source for liver BNCT and its beam shaping assembly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Li, Gang; Liu, Linmao

    2014-04-01

    This paper involves the feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver tumor with four sealed neutron generators as neutron source. Two generators are placed on each side of the liver. The high energy of these emitted neutrons should be reduced by designing a beam shaping assembly (BSA) to make them useable for BNCT. However, the neutron flux decreases as neutrons pass through different materials of BSA. Therefore, it is essential to find ways to increase the neutron flux. In this paper, the feasibility of using low enrichment uranium as a neutron multiplier is investigated to increase the number of neutrons emitted from D-T neutron generators. The neutron spectrum related to our system has a proper epithermal flux, and the fast and thermal neutron fluxes comply with the IAEA recommended values. PMID:24448270

  5. 14-MeV Neutron Generator Used as a Thermal Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Dioszegi,I.

    2008-08-10

    One of the most important applications of the general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNPS and MCNPX) codes is neutron shielding design. We employed this method to simulate the shield of a 14-MeV neutron generator used as a thermal neutron source providing an external thermal neutron beam for testing large area neutron detectors developed for diffraction studies in biology and also useful for national security applications. Nuclear reactors have been the main sources of neutrons used for scientific applications. In the past decade, however, a large number of reactors have been shut down, and the importance of other, smaller devices capable of providing neutrons for research has increased. At Brookhaven National Laboratory a moderated Am-Be neutron source with shielding is used for neutron detector testing. This source is relatively weak, but provides a constant flux of neutrons, even when not in use. The use of a 14 MeV energized neutron generator, with an order of magnitude higher neutron flux has been considered to replace the Am-Be source, but the higher fast neutron yield requires a more careful design of moderator and shielding. In the present paper we describe a proposed shielding configuration based on Monte Carlo calculations, and provide calculated neutron flux and dose distributions. We simulated the neutron flux distribution of our existing Am-Be source surrounded by a paraffin thermalizer cylinder (radius of 17.8 cm), 0.8 mm cadmium, and borated polyethylene as biological shield. The thermal neutrons are available through a large opening through the polyethylene and cadmium. The geometrical model for the MCNPS and MCNPX2 simulations is shown in Fig. 1. We simulated the Am-Be source neutron energy distribution as a point source having an energy distribution of four discrete lines at 3.0 (37%), 5.0 (35%), 8.0 (20%) and 11.0 (8%) MeV energies. The estimated source strength based on the original specifications is 6.6 {center_dot} 10{sup 6} neutrons

  6. The new cold neutron chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source: design and performance.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, G; Podlesnyak, A A; Niedziela, J L; Iverson, E B; Sokol, P E

    2011-08-01

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments. PMID:21895276

  7. The new cold neutron chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source: Design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, G.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Niedziela, J. L.; Iverson, E. B.; Sokol, P. E.

    2011-08-15

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  8. The new Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source -- Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Iverson, Erik B.; Sokol, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  9. A neutron producing target for BINP accelerator-based neutron source.

    PubMed

    Bayanov, B; Kashaeva, E; Makarov, A; Malyshkin, G; Samarin, S; Taskaev, S

    2009-07-01

    An innovative accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT has just started operation at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk. One of the main elements of the facility is a lithium target producing neutrons via the threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction at 25 kW proton beam with energies of 1.915 MeV or 2.5 MeV. The design of an optimal target and results of the investigation of radiation blistering of the lithium layer were presented at previous NCT Congresses. During the last two years the neutron target has been manufactured, assembled and placed in the facility. Optimization of the target is carried out with the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP. In this article, the design of the target is discussed, results of all previous investigations are summarized, results of target testing and neutron generation are described, and results of simulation of neutron spectra are presented. PMID:19376729

  10. Comparison of fission neutron and pulsed spallation neutron sources for radiation effects experiments on Cu/sub 3/Au

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.A.

    1983-10-01

    Through our recent experimental work on the neutron irradiation effects in Cu/sub 3/Au, we will compare fission and pulsed spallation neutron sources. Neutron characteristics of irradiation facilities at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) and the CP-5 reactor (now closed down), are briefly described. Defect cascade size distributions from irradiations of Cu/sub 3/Au at both neutron sources illustrated by transmission electron micrographs of disordered zones. Radiation-enhanced diffusion experiments in Cu/sub 3/Au are discussed along with the effect of pulsed neutron irradiations.

  11. Neutron energy spectrum characterization on TMR-1 at the Indiana University neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstead, Matthew R.; Lee, Sangjin; Petrosky, James; Bickley, Abigail; Sokol, Paul

    The energy spectrum of the Neutron Radiation Effects Program (NREP) beam line, Target-Moderator-Reflector-1 (TMR-1), at Indiana University has not been previously characterized. The facility has a unique proton source with variable pulse length (15-600 ms) and energy (13 MeV). Thus, it can produce a unique and tailored neutron beam when incident on a beryllium target. Through a combination of MCNP-X particle simulations, neutron activation experiments, and application of a spectrum unfolding code (SAND-II), the neutron source is characterized. Eight activation foils and wires were irradiated in the target area and the gamma activity measured. This information was used in an unfolding code, SAND-II, to deconvolve the spectrum, using the MCNP simulations as a basis for the spectral fitting.

  12. Low-Dose-Rate Californium-252 Neutron Intracavitary Afterloading Radiotherapy Combined With Conformal Radiotherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Min; Xu Hongde; Pan Songdan; Lin Shan; Yue Jianhua; Liu Jianren

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy of low-dose-rate californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) neutron intracavitary afterloading radiotherapy (RT) combined with external pelvic RT for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 96 patients treated for cervical cancer from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. For patients with tumors {<=}4 cm in diameter, external beam radiation was performed (1.8 Gy/day, five times/week) until the dose reached 20 Gy, and then {sup 252}Cf neutron intracavitary afterloading RT (once/week) was begun, and the frequency of external beam radiation was changed to four times/week. For patients with tumors >4 cm, {sup 252}Cf RT was performed one to two times before whole-pelvis external beam radiation. The tumor-eliminating dose was determined by using the depth limit of 5 mm below the mucosa as the reference point. In all patients, the total dose of the external beam radiation ranged from 46.8 to 50 Gy. For {sup 252}Cf RT, the dose delivered to point A was 6 Gy/fraction, once per week, for a total of seven times, and the total dose was 42 Gy. Results: The mean {+-} SD patient age was 54.7 {+-} 13.7 years. Six patients had disease assessed at stage IB, 13 patients had stage IIA, 49 patients had stage IIB, 3 patients had stage IIIA, 24 patients had stage IIIB, and 1 patient had stage IVA. All patients obtained complete tumor regression (CR). The mean {+-} SD time to CR was 23.5 {+-} 3.4 days. Vaginal bleeding was fully controlled in 80 patients within 1 to 8 days. The mean {+-} SD follow-up period was 27.6 {+-} 12.7 months (range, 6-48 months). Five patients died due to recurrence or metastasis. The 3-year survival and disease-free recurrence rates were 89.6% and 87.5 %, respectively. Nine patients experienced mild radiation proctitis, and 4 patients developed radiocystitis. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate {sup 252}Cf neutron RT combined with external pelvic RT is effective for treating cervical cancer, with a low incidence of

  13. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1995-03-06

    Funds were received for the first year of a three year DOE Nuclear Engineering Research Grant, ``Study of Neutron Focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source`` (FGO2-92ER75711). The purpose of this three year study was to develop a neutron focusing system to be used with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of neutrons. A prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) facility was also to be designed, setup, and tested under the three year project. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which we wrote to trace neutrons through the curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, we obtained gains of 3 to 5 for the neutron flux averaged over an area of 1 {times} 1 cm.

  14. Measurement of Fission Neutron Spectrum and Multiplicity using a Gamma Tag Double Time-of-flight Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, E.; Daskalakis, A.; Danon, Y.

    2014-05-01

    Recent efforts have been made to improve the prompt fission neutron spectrum and nu-bar measurements for Uranium and Plutonium isotopes particularly in the keV region. A system has been designed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) utilizing an array of EJ-301 liquid scintillators as well as lithium glass and plastic scintillators to experimentally determine these values. An array of BaF2 detectors was recently obtained from Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be used in conjunction with the neutron detectors. The system uses a novel gamma tagging method for fission which can offer an improvement over conventional fission chambers due to increased sample mass. A coincidence requirement on the gamma detectors from prompt fission gammas is used as the fission tag for the system as opposed to fission fragments in a conventional fission chamber. The system utilizes pulse digitization using Acqiris 8 bit digitizer boards which allow for gamma/neutron pulse height discrimination on the liquid scintillators during post processing. Additionally, a 252Cf fission chamber was designed and constructed at RPI which allowed for optimization and testing of the system without the need for an external neutron source. The characteristics of the gamma tagging method such as false detection rate and detection efficiency were determined using this fission chamber and verified using MCNP Polimi modeling. Prompt fission neutron spectrum data has been taken using the fission chamber focusing on the minimum detectable neutron energy for each of the various detectors. Plastic scintillators were found to offer a significant improvement over traditional liquid scintillators allowing energy measurements down to 50 keV. Background was also characterized for all detectors and will be discussed.

  15. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Jones, James L.; Nigg, David W.; Harker, Yale D.

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  16. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  17. Optimization of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kononov, O.E.; Kononov, V.N.; Bokhovko, M.V.; Korobeynikov, V.V.; Soloviev, A.N.; Chu, W.T.

    2004-02-20

    A modeling investigation was performed to choose moderator material and size for creating optimal epithermal neutron beams for BNCT based on a proton accelerator and the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction as a neutrons source. An optimal configuration is suggested for the beam shaping assembly made from polytetrafluoroethylene and magnesium fluorine. Results of calculation were experimentally tested and are in good agreement with measurements.

  18. Development and Characterization of Pulsed Neutron Sources at NTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Erik; Hammel, Ben; Lowe, Danny; Presura, Radu; Ivanov, Vladimir; Haque, Showera; Covington, Aaron; Iratcabal, Jeremy; McCormick, Zephyr; Darling, Tim; NTF Team; Nevada Security Technologies, LLC Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Short duration, high-intensity pulsed neutron sources are being developed on the Zebra 1-MA/100ns pulsed-power generator. Ion beam collisions above threshold energies in a Z-pinch containing deuterium are the primary production mechanism of the 2.45 MeV neutrons. Deuterium treated palladium wire-arrays have been successfully used to produce neutrons on Zebra, but the deuterium content of the Pd wire storage diminishes rapidly. More traditional single-shell gas puffs have also been designed and implemented and allow for much higher repetition rates and ability to control the load composition; both pure deuterium and binary mixtures of krypton and deuterium gases were used. Both sources are capable of producing 1e10 neutrons per pulse. The yield and spectrum of the neutron pulse was measured by a combination of Ag and Y activation detectors and time-of-flight scintillator-PMT detectors. A model of the experimental area was used in the MCNP code to determine the scattering contribution and assist in calibration of the neutron detectors. Support for this work is provided by DOE/NNSA grant DE-NA0002075.

  19. The experimental program at the WNR neutron source at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    There are two white neutron sources at Los Alamos National Laboratory which are used in broad scientific program over the energy range from thermal to about seven hundred MeV. Largely because of the increased intensity over such an unprecedented energy range, use of these two facilities for nuclear science research has grown from 36 experimenters in 1987 to 118 in 1990. This paper focuses on research underway or recently completed at the high-energy neutron source of the WNR facility. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Detection of supernova neutrinos at spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Yang; Guo, Xin-Heng; Young, Bing-Lin

    2016-07-01

    After considering supernova shock effects, Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, neutrino collective effects, and Earth matter effects, the detection of supernova neutrinos at the China Spallation Neutron Source is studied and the expected numbers of different flavor supernova neutrinos observed through various reaction channels are calculated with the neutrino energy spectra described by the Fermi-Dirac distribution and the “beta fit” distribution respectively. Furthermore, the numerical calculation method of supernova neutrino detection on Earth is applied to some other spallation neutron sources, and the total expected numbers of supernova neutrinos observed through different reactions channels are given. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205185, 11175020, 11275025, 11575023)

  1. The Spallation Neutron Source Beam Commissioning and Initial Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Stuart; Aleksandrov, Alexander V.; Allen, Christopher K.; Assadi, Saeed; Bartoski, Dirk; Blokland, Willem; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Chu, C.; Cousineau, Sarah M.; Crofford, Mark T.; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Deibele, Craig E.; Dodson, George W.; Feshenko, A.; Galambos, John D.; Han, Baoxi; Hardek, T.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.; Holtkamp, N.; Howell, Matthew P.; Jeon, D.; Kang, Yoon W.; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kravchuk, L.; Long, Cary D.; McManamy, T.; Pelaia, II, Tom; Piller, Chip; Plum, Michael A.; Pogge, James R.; Purcell, John David; Shea, T.; Shishlo, Andrei P; Sibley, C.; Stockli, Martin P.; Stout, D.; Tanke, E.; Welton, Robert F; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2015-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator delivers a one mega-Watt beam to a mercury target to produce neutrons used for neutron scattering materials research. It delivers ~ 1 GeV protons in short (< 1 us) pulses at 60 Hz. At an average power of ~ one mega-Watt, it is the highest-powered pulsed proton accelerator. The accelerator includes the first use of superconducting RF acceleration for a pulsed protons at this energy. The storage ring used to create the short time structure has record peak particle per pulse intensity. Beam commissioning took place in a staged manner during the construction phase of SNS. After the construction, neutron production operations began within a few months, and one mega-Watt operation was achieved within three years. The methods used to commission the beam and the experiences during initial operation are discussed.

  2. China Spallation Neutron Source: Design, R&D, and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jie; Chen, Hesheng; Chen, Yanwei; Chen, Yuanbo; Chi, Yunlong; Deng, Changdong; Dong, Haiyi; Dong, Lan; Fang, Shouxian; Feng, Ji; Fu, Shinian; He, Lunhua; He, Wei; Heng, Yuekun; Huang, Kaixi; Jia, Xuejun; Kang, Wen; Kong, Xiangcheng; Li, Jian; Liang, Tianjiao; Lin, Guoping; Liu, Zhenan; Ouyang, Huafu; Qin, Qing; Qu, Huamin; Shi, Caitu; Sun, Hong; Tang, Jingyu; Tao, Juzhou; Wang, Chunhong; Wang, Fangwei; Wang, Dingsheng; Wang, Qingbin; Wang, Sheng; Wei, Tao; Xi, Jiwei; Xu, Taoguang; Xu, Zhongxiong; Yin, Wen; Yin, Xuejun; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zong; Zhang, Zonghua; Zhou, Min; Zhu, Tao

    2009-02-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an accelerator based multidiscipline user facility planned to be constructed in Dongguan, Guangdong, China. The CSNS complex consists of an negative hydrogen linear accelerator, a rapid cycling proton synchrotron accelerating the beam to 1.6 GeV energy, a solid tungsten target station, and instruments for spallation neutron applications. The facility operates at 25 Hz repetition rate with an initial design beam power of 120 kW and is upgradeable to 500 kW. The primary challenge is to build a robust and reliable user's facility with upgrade potential at a fraction of "world standard" cost. We report the status, design, R&D, and upgrade outlook including applications using spallation neutron, muon, fast neutron, and proton, as well as related programs including medical therapy and accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor (ADS) programs for nuclear waste transmutation.

  3. DSP Algorithms for Fission Fragment and Prompt Fission Neutron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalova, O.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Fabry, I.

    2009-10-01

    Digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms are in high demand for modern nuclear fission investigation due to importance of increase the accuracy of fissile nuclear data for new generation of nuclear power stations. DSP algorithms for fission fragment (FF) and prompt fission neutron (PFN) spectroscopy are described in the present work. The twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber (GTIC) is used to measure the kinetic energy-, mass- and angular distributions of the FF in the 252Cf(SF) reaction. Along with the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurement the correlation between neutron emission and FF mass and energy is investigated. The TOF is measured between common cathode of the GTIC and the neutron detector (ND) pulses. Waveform digitizers (WFD) having 12 bit amplitude resolution and 100 MHz sampling frequency are used for the detector pulse sampling. DSP algorithms are developed as recursive procedures to perform the signal processing, similar to those available in various nuclear electronics modules, such as constant fraction discriminator (CFD), pulse shape discriminator (PSD), peak-sensitive analogue-to-digital converter (pADC) and pulse shaping amplifier (PSA). To measure the angle between FF and the cathode plane normal to the GTIC a new algorithm is developed having advantage over the traditional analogue pulse processing schemes. Algorithms are tested by comparing the numerical simulation of the data analysis of the 252Cf(SF) reaction with data available from literature.

  4. Fast neutron dosimeter using Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL)

    SciTech Connect

    Eschbach, P.A.; Miller, S.D.

    1991-10-01

    Data is presented that demonstrates the concept of a fast neutron dosimeter using Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence. CaF{sub 2}:Mn powder, compounded with polyethylene, was injection molded and pressed into 0.1-cm-thick sheets. The sheets were then cut to form dosimeters with dimensions, 1.25 cm by 1.25 cm. After a laser anneal, the dosimeters were exposed to various amounts (from 10 mSv to 100 mSv) of fast {sup 252}Cf neutrons. The exposed dosimeters were cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature, stimulated with laser light, and then allowed to warm up to room temperature whereupon the dose dependent luminescence was recorded with a photon counting system. When the control and gamma components were subtracted from the {sup 252}Cf response, a dose-dependent neutron response was observed. The design, construction, and preliminary performance of an automated system for the dose interrogation of individual CaF{sub 2}:Mn grains within the polyethylene matrix will also be discussed. The system uses a small CO{sub 2} laser to heat areas of the cooled dosimeter to room temperature. If the readout of very small grain within the plastic matrix is successful, it will enhance the neutron to gamma response of the dosimeter.

  5. DSP Algorithms for Fission Fragment and Prompt Fission Neutron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zeynalova, O.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Fabry, I.

    2009-10-29

    Digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms are in high demand for modern nuclear fission investigation due to importance of increase the accuracy of fissile nuclear data for new generation of nuclear power stations. DSP algorithms for fission fragment (FF) and prompt fission neutron (PFN) spectroscopy are described in the present work. The twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber (GTIC) is used to measure the kinetic energy-, mass- and angular distributions of the FF in the {sup 252}Cf(SF) reaction. Along with the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurement the correlation between neutron emission and FF mass and energy is investigated. The TOF is measured between common cathode of the GTIC and the neutron detector (ND) pulses. Waveform digitizers (WFD) having 12 bit amplitude resolution and 100 MHz sampling frequency are used for the detector pulse sampling. DSP algorithms are developed as recursive procedures to perform the signal processing, similar to those available in various nuclear electronics modules, such as constant fraction discriminator (CFD), pulse shape discriminator (PSD), peak-sensitive analogue-to-digital converter (pADC) and pulse shaping amplifier (PSA). To measure the angle between FF and the cathode plane normal to the GTIC a new algorithm is developed having advantage over the traditional analogue pulse processing schemes. Algorithms are tested by comparing the numerical simulation of the data analysis of the {sup 252}Cf(SF) reaction with data available from literature.

  6. A liquid-hydrogen cold neutron source for the NBSR

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.; Roew, J.M.; Kopetka, P. )

    1992-01-01

    The National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR) is a 20-MW research reactor operated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. It was designed with a 55-cm-diam beamport for the purpose of installing a D[sub 2]O-ice cold neutron source, completed in 1987. The success of the cold source led to the construction of the Cold Neutron Research Facility, an experimental hall ultimately to have 7 neutron guides and 15 instruments. A liquid-hydrogen cold neutron source is being developed to replace the D[sub 2]O ice in order to increase the cold neutron yield. A simple, passively safe system has been designed with multiple barriers that prevent air from mixing with hydrogen. A thermosiphon will be used to maintain the liquid-hydrogen inventory in the moderator chamber. The thermosiphon relies on natural circulation; no pumps or moving parts are required to adequately cool the moderator chamber. The hydrogen condenser is cooled by a 3.5-kW helium refrigerator. A ballast tank is connected to the condenser so the entire hydrogen inventory can expand freely into the tank, providing completely passive protection against refrigerator failures.

  7. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R.

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  8. Neutron-induced adaptive response studied in go human lymphocytes using the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Gajendiran, N; Tanaka, K; Kumaravel, T S; Kamada, N

    2001-03-01

    This study demonstrates that cells adapted to ionizing radiation developed reduced initial DNA damage when compared to non-adapted cells. The results were obtained by subjecting in vitro irradiated whole blood from 10 healthy volunteers (including 2 A-bomb survivors carrying 1.5-2 Gy in vivo exposure) in an unstimulated condition (G0) using the comet assay. The intensity of DNA damage was assessed by computing the 'tail moment'. Adaptive response (AR) was noticed in only donor 3, as indicated by reduced tail moment when the blood samples received priming + challenging doses over a 4 h interval. The priming dose was either 0.01 Gy 137Cs gamma-rays or 0.0025 Gy 252Cf neutrons. The delivered challenging dose was either 1 Gy 60Co g-rays or 0.25 Gy 252Cf neutrons. The irradiation was conducted using the HIRRAC facility. A prior exposure to 0.0025 Gy 252Cf neutrons nullified the excess tail moment caused by 0.25 Gy neutrons given during a 4 h gap. In a similar way, 0.01 Gy 137Cs gamma-rays offered a cross-adaptive response to the neutron challenging dose. The tail moment of A-bomb survivors after in vitro irradiation was less than that of the age-matched control and, at the same time, was not influenced by the priming dose. An altered subset and the immunological status of blood after A-bomb exposure were cited as possible factors. Because AR can affect the outcome of RBE, its individual variability only emphasizes the need to have individual biodosimetry for better risk assessment, especially in planning for a long space voyage. PMID:11393893

  9. Accelerator shield design of KIPT neutron source facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of a neutron source facility at KIPT utilizing an electron-accelerator-driven subcritical assembly. Electron beam power is 100 kW, using 100 MeV electrons. The facility is designed to perform basic and applied nuclear research, produce medical isotopes, and train young nuclear specialists. The biological shield of the accelerator building is designed to reduce the biological dose to less than 0.5-mrem/hr during operation. The main source of the biological dose is the photons and the neutrons generated by interactions of leaked electrons from the electron gun and accelerator sections with the surrounding concrete and accelerator materials. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX serves as the calculation tool for the shield design, due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons coupled problems. The direct photon dose can be tallied by MCNPX calculation, starting with the leaked electrons. However, it is difficult to accurately tally the neutron dose directly from the leaked electrons. The neutron yield per electron from the interactions with the surrounding components is less than 0.01 neutron per electron. This causes difficulties for Monte Carlo analyses and consumes tremendous computation time for tallying with acceptable statistics the neutron dose outside the shield boundary. To avoid these difficulties, the SOURCE and TALLYX user subroutines of MCNPX were developed for the study. The generated neutrons are banked, together with all related parameters, for a subsequent MCNPX calculation to obtain the neutron and secondary photon doses. The weight windows variance reduction technique is utilized for both neutron and photon dose calculations. Two shielding materials, i.e., heavy concrete and ordinary concrete, were considered for the shield design. The main goal is to maintain the total

  10. Cross correlation method application to prompt fission neutron investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalova, O. V.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Nazarenko, M. A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2012-10-01

    Do The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying cross correlation method and digital signal processing algorithms. A new mathematical approach for neutron/gamma pulse shape separation was developed and implemented for prompt fission neutron (PFN) time-of-flight measurement. The main goal was development of automated data analysis algorithms and procedures for data analysis with minimum human intervention. Experimental data was taken with a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in an experimental setup similar to well work of C. Budtz-Jorgensen and H.-H. Knitter [1]. About 2*107 fission events were registered with 2*105 neutron/gamma detection in coincidence with fission fragments. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer.

  11. Optimizing moderator dimensions for neutron scattering at the spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. K.; Robertson, J. L.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Riemer, Bernard W.

    2013-12-15

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent study of the planned second target station at the SNS facility, we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter over a smaller viewing area. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories: those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. For instruments using natural collimation, the optimal moderator selection depends on the size of the moderator, the sample, and the moderator brightness. The desired beam divergence only plays a role in determining the distance between sample and moderator. For instruments using neutron optical systems, the smallest moderator available that is larger than the entrance dimension of the closest optical element will perform the best (assuming, as is the case here that smaller moderators are brighter)

  12. Optimizing moderator dimensions for neutron scattering at the spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J K; Robertson, J L; Herwig, Kenneth W; Gallmeier, Franz X; Riemer, Bernard W

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent study of the planned second target station at the SNS facility, we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter over a smaller viewing area. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories: those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. For instruments using natural collimation, the optimal moderator selection depends on the size of the moderator, the sample, and the moderator brightness. The desired beam divergence only plays a role in determining the distance between sample and moderator. For instruments using neutron optical systems, the smallest moderator available that is larger than the entrance dimension of the closest optical element will perform the best (assuming, as is the case here that smaller moderators are brighter). PMID:24387465

  13. Fission-Fusion Neutron Source Progress Report July 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G; Daffin, F; Clarke, R

    2010-02-19

    In this report the authors describe progress in evaluating the feasibility of a novel concept for producing intense pulses of 14 MeV neutrons using the DT fusion reaction. In this new scheme the heating of the DT is accomplished using fission fragments rather than ion beams as in conventional magnet fusion schemes or lasers in ICF schemes. This has the great advantage that there is no need for any large auxiliary power source. The scheme does require large magnetic fields, but generating these fields, e.g. with superconducting magnets, requires only a modest power source. As a source of fission fragments they propose using a dusty reactor concept introduced some time ago by one of us (RC). The version of the dusty reactor that they propose using for our neutron source would operate as a thermal neutron reactor and use highly enriched uranium in the form of micron sized pellets of UC. Our scheme for using the fission fragments to produce intense pulses of 14 MeV neutrons is based on the fission fragment rocket idea. In the fission fragment rocket scheme it was contemplated that the fission fragments produced in a low density reactor core would then be guided out of the reactor by large magnetic fields. A simple version of this idea would be to use the fission fragments escaping from one side of a tandem magnet mirror to heat DT gas confined in the adjacent magnetic trap.

  14. A Californium-252 Neutron Source for Student Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate chemistry experiment which utilizes small samples of Californium 252 as a neutron source for the activation of 12 other elements. The students prepare decay curves of the radioactive isotopes and perform nondestructive activation analyses for gram amounts of some elements. (MLH)

  15. Opportunities for Neutrino Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Efremenko, Yuri; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss opportunities for a neutrino program at the Spallation Neutrons Source (SNS) being commissioning at ORNL. Possible investigations can include study of neutrino-nuclear cross sections in the energy rage important for supernova dynamics and neutrino nucleosynthesis, search for neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering, and various tests of the standard model of electro-weak interactions.

  16. The Spallation Neutron Source and the Neutrino Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Stancu, Ion

    2008-02-21

    In this paper we describe the recently-completed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), along with a proposed long-term neutrino physics program to study neutrino-nucleus cross-sections and neutrino oscillations.

  17. Neutrino Cross-Section Measurements at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stancu, Ion

    2008-02-21

    In this paper we discuss the proposal to build a neutrino facility at the recently-completed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This facility can host an extensive, long-term program to study neutrino-nucleus cross-sections in the range of interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear theory.

  18. Neutrino Cross-Section Measurements at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancu, Ion

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the proposal to build a neutrino facility at the recently-completed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This facility can host an extensive, long-term program to study neutrino-nucleus cross-sections in the range of interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear theory.

  19. The Low Energy Neutron Source at Indiana University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, David

    2004-03-01

    The National Science Foundation has recently approved funding for construction of LENS (the Low Energy Neutron Source) at Indiana University and construction of this facility has begun. LENS represents a new paradigm for economically introducing neutron scattering into a university or industrial setting. Neutrons are produced in a long-pulse (1ms) mode through (p,n) reactions on a water-cooled Be target and supplied to three instrument beam lines. In this talk we will describe how LENS will use neutrons to fulfill its three-fold mission in education, materials research, and developing novel instrumentation. Of particular interest are the facility's ability to study cryogenic moderators at significantly lower temperatures than is possible at other facilities and the development of instruments that make use of the neutron spin to perform high-precision measurements of momentum transfer without significant collimation of the beam. The potential for these developments to expand significantly the range of problems amenable to exploration with neutron techniques will be discussed.

  20. Beamline Performance Simulations for the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, P. R.; Greene, G. L.; Allen, R. R.; Cianciolo, V.; Huerto, R. R.; Koehler, P.; Desai, D.; Mahurin, R.; Yue, A.; Palmquist, G. R.; Snow, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are being performed to design and characterize the neutron optics components for the two fundamental neutron physics beamlines at the Spallation Neutron Source. Optimization of the cold beamline includes characterization of the guides and benders, the neutron transmission through the 0.89 nm monochromator, and the expected performance of the four time-of-flight choppers. The locations and opening angles of the choppers have been studied using a simple spreadsheet-based analysis that was developed for other SNS chopper instruments. The spreadsheet parameters are then optimized using Monte Carlo techniques to obtain the results presented in this paper. Optimization of the 0.89 nm beamline includes characterizing the double crystal monochromator and the downstream guides. The simulations continue to be refined as components are ordered and their exact size and performance specifications are determined.

  1. Neutronics performance and decay heat calculation of a solid target for a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nio, D.; Ooi, M.; Takenaka, N.; Furusaka, M.; Kawai, M.; Mishima, K.; Kiyanagi, Y.

    2005-08-01

    A solid target is expected to give higher neutron intensity than a liquid target of mercury at a spallation neutron source with a power of around 1 MW. We have studied the neutronic performance of a target-moderator-reflector assembly with a tungsten solid target. It is found that the neutron intensities from moderators were higher in the solid target system than in the mercury liquid target. However, the tungsten target required cladding to prevent tungsten from the corrosion of cooling water. A tungsten target with tantalum cladding has been already developed although tantalum has high decay heat. Therefore, we estimated the decay heat of the target and found that the decay heat of 0.5 mm thick tantalum was still high. We need a thinner tantalum or new cladding materials. It was revealed that adoption of a thinner tantalum or new cladding material such as chrome nitride reduced the decay heat effectively.

  2. Neutron sources and neutron-capture paths in asymptotic giant branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maria, Lugaro

    2016-04-01

    Roughly half of the abundances of the elements heavier than iron in the cosmos are produced by slow neutron captures (the s process) in hydrostatic conditions when the neutron density is below roughly 1013 n/cm-3. While it is observationally well confirmed that asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are the main site of the s process, we are still facing many problems in the theoretical models and nuclear inputs. Major current issues are the effect of stellar rotation and magnetic fields and the determination of the rate of the neutron source reactions. I will present these problems and discuss the observational constraints that can help us to solve them, including spectroscopically derived abundances, meteoritic stardust, and stellar seismology. Further, I will present evidence that the s process is not the only neutron-capture process to occur in AGB stars: an intermediate process is also required to explain recent observations of post-AGB stars.

  3. Simulations towards optimization of a neutron/anti-neutron oscillation experiment at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Matthew; Kamyshkov, Yuri; Castellanos, Luis; Klinkby, Esben; US NNbar Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The observation of Neutron/Anti-neutron oscillation would prove the existence of Baryon Number Violation (BNV), and thus an explanation for the dominance of matter over anti-matter in the universe. The latest experiments have shown the oscillation time to be greater than 8.6 x 107 seconds, whereas current theoretical predictions suggest times on the order of 108 to 109 seconds. A neutron oscillation experiment proposed at the European Spallation Source (ESS) would provide sensitivity of more than 1000 times previous experiments performed, thus providing a result well-suited to confirm or deny current theory. A conceptual design of the proposed experiment will be presented, as well as the optimization of key experiment components using Monte-Carlo simulation methods, including the McStas neutron ray-trace simulation package. This work is supported by the Organized Research Units Program funded by The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Office of Research and Engagement.

  4. Intense pulsed neutron source status report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Bohringer, D.E.; Brumwell, F.R.; Carpenter, J.M.; Crawford, R.K.; Rauchas, A.V.; Schulke, A.W.; Worlton, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    The status and future plans of IPNS will be reviewed. At the celebration of our 10th anniversary in 7 months, IPNS will have performed over 2000 experiments and has over 230 scientists visiting IPNS annually. Plans for a new spallation source concept using a fixed field alternating gradient synchrotron will be presented.

  5. Material issues relating to high power spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futakawa, M.

    2015-02-01

    Innovative researches using neutrons are being performed at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), in which a mercury target system is installed for MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. In order to produce neutrons by the spallation reaction, proton beams are injected into the mercury target. At the moment, when the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel, leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall, i.e. on the interface between liquid and solid metals. On the other hand, the structural materials are subjected to irradiation damage due to protons and neutrons, very high cycle fatigue damages and so-called "liquid metal embrittlement". That is, the structural materials must be said to be exposed to the extremely severe environments. In the paper, research and development relating to the material issues in the high power spallation neutron sources that has been performed so far at J-PARC is summarized.

  6. Concept of DT fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Anan'ev, S.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Kuteev, B.V.; Cherkez, D.I.; Shirnin, P.N.; Kazakovsky, N.T.

    2015-03-15

    A concept of DT-fusion neutron source (FNS) with the neutron yield higher than 10{sup 18} neutrons per second is under design in Russia. Such a FNS is of interest for many applications: 1) basic and applied research (neutron scattering, etc); 2) testing the structural materials for fusion reactors; 3) control of sub-critical nuclear systems and 4) nuclear waste processing (including transmutation of minor actinides). This paper describes the fuel cycle concept of a compact fusion neutron source based on a small spherical tokamak (FNS-ST) with a MW range of DT fusion power and considers the key physics issues of this device. The major and minor radii are ∼0.5 and ∼0.3 m, magnetic field ∼1.5 T, heating power less than 15 MW and plasma current 1-2 MA. The system provides the fuel mixture with equal fractions of D and T (D:T = 1:1) for all FNS technology systems. (authors)

  7. Emittance characterization of the spallation neutron source H- injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B. X.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N., Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.

    2013-02-01

    The H- injector for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory consists of a RF H- ion source and a compact electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) section. Up to 5 ion sources and up to 4 LEBT assemblies are alternated for the SNS beam operations. The beam current and emittance of the H- beam exiting the LEBT were characterized on the test-stand for different sources and LEBT assemblies in order to understand and minimize their performance variations.

  8. International workshop on plasma-based neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-09

    The workshop was devoted to discussion of the status and future directions of work on plasma-based neutron sources. The workshop presentations demonstrated significant progress in development of the concepts of these sources and in broadening the required data base. Two main groups of neutron source designs were presented at the workshop: tokamak-based and mirror-based. Designs of the tokamak- based devices use the extensive data base generated during decades of tokamak research. Their plasma physics performance can be predicted with a high degree of confidence. On the other hand, they are relatively large and expensive, and best suited for Volumetric Neutron Sources (VNSes) or other large scale test facilities. They also have the advantage of being on the direct path to a power- producing reactor as presently conceived, although alternatives to the tokamak are presently receiving serious consideration for a reactor. The data base for the mirror-based group of plasma sources is less developed, but they are generally more flexible and, with appropriate selection of parameters, have the potential to be developed as compact Accelerated Test Facilities (ATFs) as well as full-scale VNSes. Also discussed at the workshop were some newly proposed but potentially promising concepts, like those based on the flow-through pinch and electrostatic ion-beam sources.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of a fast neutron counter for use in neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkian, Mohsen

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation is employed to evaluate the response of a neutron detection sheet composed of a layer of plexiglas as neutron-to-proton converter and a layer of silver-activated zinc sulphide (ZnS(Ag)) as phosphor. ZnS(Ag) scintillators have the largest light output among the scintillators for fast-neutron spectroscopy. The simulations are performed for 252Cf neutrons which after impinging the converter layer of the detector produce recoil protons. Recoil protons that interact with the scintillator deposit energy which is converted to scintillation light. In this report, different aspects of the ZnS(Ag)-detector, such as the effective converter and scintillator thickness, as well as the detector response are investigated.

  10. A prospective pulsed source of ultracold neutrons for experiments in fundamental neutron physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, Th.; Zechlau, Th.

    2013-08-01

    Since their discovery, ultracold neutrons (UCNs) have been a unique tool for the investigation of fundamental properties of the free neutron and its interactions. The succesfull installation of a new pulsed superthermal source for ultracold neutrons based on solid deuterium at the TRIGA Mainz reactor is described. In a combination of solid hydrogen acting as pre-moderator and a solid deuterium converter of around 160 cm3, this new UCN source should provide at the experimental area ≥ 370000 UCN to the storage volume with the reactor operated in the pulse mode. In a storage experiment, a UCN density of 18 ± 2 UCN/cm3 was measured applying 1.5 pulses with a nominal power of 7 MJ. Assuming a linear behaviour of the UCN output as a function of reactor power this corresponds to a UCN density of 25 ± 3 UCN/cm3 for 2 (10 MJ) pulses.

  11. Thermal-hydraulic studies of the Advanced Neutron Source cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), in its conceptual design phase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was to be a user-oriented neutron research facility producing the most intense steady-state flux of thermal and cold neutrons in the world. Among its many scientific applications, the production of cold neutrons was a significant research mission for the ANS. The cold neutrons come from two independent cold sources positioned near the reactor core. Contained by an aluminum alloy vessel, each cold source is a 410-mm-diam sphere of liquid deuterium that functions both as a neutron moderator and a cryogenic coolant. With nuclear heating of the containment vessel and internal baffling, steady-state operation requires close control of the liquid deuterium flow near the vessel`s inner surface. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses supporting the cold source design were performed with heat conduction simulations of the vessel walls and multidimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of the liquid deuterium flow and heat transfer. This report presents the starting phase of a challenging program and describes the cold source conceptual design, the thermal-hydraulic feasibility studies of the containment vessel, and the future computational and experimental studies that were planned to verify the final design.

  12. INL Neutron Interrogation R&D: FY2010 MPACT End of Year Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury; J. Wharton; S. M. Watson

    2010-08-01

    Experiments have been carried out to investigate the feasibility and utility of using neutron interrogation and small-scale, portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) instruments for assaying uranium for safeguards applications. Prior work has shown the potential of the PGNAA technique for assaying uranium using reactor-based neutron sources and high-yield electronic neutron generators (ENGs). In this project we adapted Idaho National Laboratory's portable isotopic neutron spectroscopy (PINS) PGNAA system for measuring natural-enrichment uranium yellowcake and metallic depleted uranium and highly enriched uranium. This work used 252Cf as well as deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) ENGs. For PGNAA measurements a limiting factor when assaying large objects is the detector dead time due to fast-neutron scattering off of the uranium; this limits the maximum useable neutron source strength to O(107) neutrons per second. Under these conditions the low PGNAA reaction cross sections for uranium prohibited the collection of useful uranium PGNAA signatures from either the yellowcake or metallic uranium samples. Measurement of the decay product activation in these materials following irradiation in the PGNAA geometry similarly did not produce useful uranium activation product – fission product signatures. A customized irradiation geometry tailored to optimally thermalize the interrogation neutron source, intended only for generating long-lived activation products – fission products and not intended for PGNAA measurements, might be possible using small scale ENGs but an application need and a modeling and simulation exercise would be recommended before advancing to experiments. Neutron interrogation PGNAA using a DT-ENG was found to be a quick and useful qualitative method for detecting the presence of oxygen in natural-enrichment uranium yellowcake. With a low effort of development work it would be reasonable to expect this measurement

  13. The optimum choice of gate width for neutron coincidence counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, S.; Henzlova, D.; Favalli, A.; Hauck, D. K.; Santi, P. A.

    2014-11-01

    In the measurement field of international nuclear safeguards, passive neutron coincidence counting is used to quantify the spontaneous fission rate of certain special nuclear materials. The shift register autocorrelation analysis method is the most commonly used approach. However, the Feynman-Y technique, which is more commonly applied in reactor noise analysis, provides an alternative means to extract the correlation information from a pulse train. In this work we consider how to select the optimum gate width for each of these two time-correlation analysis techniques. The optimum is considered to be that which gives the lowest fractional precision on the net doublets rate. Our theoretical approach is approximate but is instructional in terms of revealing the key functional dependence. We show that in both cases the same performance figure of merit applies so that common design criteria apply to the neutron detector head. Our prediction is that near optimal results, suitable for most practical applications, can be obtained from both techniques using a common gate width setting. The estimated precision is also comparable in the two cases. The theoretical expressions are tested experimentally using 252Cf spontaneous fission sources measured in two thermal well counters representative of the type in common use by international inspectorates. Fast accidental sampling was the favored method of acquiring the Feynman-Y data. Our experimental study confirmed the basic functional dependences predicted although experimental results when available are preferred. With an appropriate gate setting Feynman-Y analysis provides an alternative to shift register analysis for safeguards applications which is opening up new avenues of data collection and data reduction to explore.

  14. A high power accelerator driver system for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.; Blind, B.; Channell, P.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For several years, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have provided a successful driver for the nearly 100-kW Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) source. The authors have studied an upgrade to this system. The goal of this effort was to establish a credible design for the accelerator driver of a next-generation source providing 1-MW of beam power. They have explored a limited subset of the possible approaches to a driver and have considered only the low 1-MW beam power. The next-generation source must utilize the optimum technology and may require larger neutron intensities than they now envision.

  15. Anisotropic Neutron Evaporation from Spinning Fission Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuttgé, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Gönnenwein, F.; Mutterer, M.; Kopatch, Yu.; Chernysheva, E.; Hanappe, F.; Hambsch, F.-J.

    2011-10-01

    Neutron evaporation anisotropy in the centre of mass of the rotating fission fragments in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated within the CORA experiments. If it is well accepted that the bulk of emitted neutrons originate from an isotropic evaporation in the centre of mass of the moving fragments, discrepancies in experimental as well as in theoretical energy and angular distributions appear throughout many attempts performed by various authors. Scission neutrons most probably contribute but don't allow to explain totally the observed anisotropy. Due to its weak contribution to the total anisotropy, the centre of mass anisotropy is very difficult to be highlighted. A novel experimental approach has been developed to extract this effect and will be presented as well as some first results.

  16. Tritium target fabrication for the rotating target neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adair, H. L.; Kobisk, E. H.; Byrum, B. L.

    1982-09-01

    The Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) prepares tritium targets that are used to produce an intense beam of 14.5 MeV neutrons by the 13H( 12H, 01n) 24He reaction. The intense beams of 14.5 MeV neutrons are used in programs involving cancer research, materials evaluation, and materials identification. Many of the tritium targets prepared by IRML for the past four years have been used in support of the Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS) programs at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The tritium targets are prepared by the vacuum evaporation of titanium from a rod-fed electron beam gun. The resulting vapor-condensed titanium layers are exposed to a tritium atmosphere to form titanium tritide. A summary of tritium target development at IRML with an emphasis on the RTNS programs is presented.

  17. The Spallation Neutron Source: A powerful tool for materials research

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Thom; Anderson, Ian S; Ankner, John Francis; Egami, Takeshi; Ekkebus, Allen E; Herwig, Kenneth W; Hodges, Jason P; Horak, Charlie M; Horton, Linda L; Klose, Frank Richard; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Myles, Dean A A; Ohl, M.; Zhao, Jinkui

    2006-01-01

    When completed in 2006, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will use an accelerator to produce the most intense beams of pulsed neutrons in the world. This unique facility is being built by a collaboration of six US Department of Energy laboratories and will serve a diverse community of users drawn from academia, industry, and government labs. The project continues on schedule and within budget, with commissioning and installation of all systems going well. Installation of 14 state-of-the-art instruments is under way, and design work is being completed for several others. These new instruments will enable inelastic and elastic-scattering measurements across a broad range of science such as condensed-matter physics, chemistry, engineering materials, biology, and beyond. Neutron Science at SNS will be complemented by research opportunities at several other facilities under way at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  18. Nuclear science research at the WNR and LANSCE neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.

    1994-06-01

    The Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility and the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) use 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) to generate intense bursts of neutrons. Experiments using time-of-flight (TOF) energy determination can cover an energy range from thermal to about 2 MeV at LANSCE and 0.1 to 800 MeV at WNR. At present, three flight paths at LANSCE and six flight paths at WNR are used in basic and applied nuclear science research. In this paper we present a status report on WNR and LANSCE, discuss plans for the future, and describe three experiments recently completed or underway that use the unique features of these sources.

  19. Target station shielding issues at the spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, P D; Gallmeier, F X; Iverson, E B; Popova, I I

    2005-01-01

    Recent spallation neutron source shielding activities in support of the neutron beam shutters and the hot cell walls are presented. Existing neutron beam shutters can be replaced with concrete at low power or with concrete and steel at approximately 500 kW of beam power. Potential voids in the hot cell walls are analysed to determine the impact on dose rates as a function of void size. A change in the type of shielding work is noted as the project moved from the early design stages as a 'green field' site to the current stage as a construction project nearing completion, where issues to be addressed are approaching retrofit-type analyses. PMID:16381707

  20. Magnified Neutron Radiography with Coded Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, P.; Santos-Villalobos, H.; Lavrik, N.; Gregor, J.; Bilheux, H.

    A coded source imaging (CSI) system has been developed and tested at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) CG-1D beamline at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this system is to use magnification to improve resolution of the imaging system beyond the detector resolution. For this system, coded masks have been manufactured at 10 μm resolution with 9 μm thick Gd patterned on Si wafers, a system model base iterative reconstruction code developed, and experiments have been performed at resolutions of 200 μm, 100 μm, 50 μm, 20 μm, and 10 μm with the object place greater than 5.5m from the detector giving magnifications up to 25 times.