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Sample records for 252cf-plasma desorption mass

  1. Application of 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry in dental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Lothar; Köhl, Peter; Jungclas, Hartmut; Duschner, Heins

    1993-07-01

    Topically applied fluorides introduced in dental hygiene products elevate the concentration levels of fluoride in oral fluids and thus also affect chemical reactions of enamel de- and remineralisation. The chemical reactions on the surface of tooth enamel still are a subject of controversy. Here 252Cf-plasma desorption mass spectrometry and argon ion etching are used to analyse the molecular structure of the upper layes of enamel. The mass spectrum of untreated enamel is characterised by a series of cluster ions containing phosphate. It is evident that under certain conditions the molecular structure of the surface enamel is completely transformed by treatment with fluorides. The result of the degradation and precipitation processes is reflected by a total replacement of the phosphate by fluoride in the measured cluster ion distribution. Stepwise etching of the upper layers by Ar+ ions reveals the transition from a nearly pure CaF2 structure to the unchanged composition of the enamel mineral.

  2. Analusis by 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry of Bordetella pertussis endotoxin after nitrous deamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deprun, C.; Karibian, D.; Caroff, M.

    1993-07-01

    Endotoxic lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are the major components of Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane. Like many amphipathic molecules, they pose problems of heterogeneity, purity, solubility, and aggregation. Nevertheless, PDMS has recently have been applied to unmodified endotoxins composed of LPS having uip to five sugar units in their saccharide chain. The B. Pertussis LPSs, most of which have a dodecasaccharide domain, ahve been analysed by classical methods and the masses of the separate lipid and saccharide domains determined after rupture of the bond linking them. However, the acid treatment employed for these and most chemical analyses can also modify structures in the vicinity of the bond. In order to investigate this biologically-important region, the endotoxin was treated to nitrous deamination, which shortens the saccharide chain to five sugars, but preserves the acid-labile region of the LPS. The PDM spectrum of this derivative, which required new conditions for its desorption, confirmed the structure analysis and demonstrated the presence of at least four molecular species.

  3. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: The application of [sup 252]Cf-plasma desorption mass spectrometry to analysis of direct coal liquefaction heavy products

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Lapucha, A.R.

    1992-10-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using [sup 252]Cf PDMS, GPC, and MPLC for the examination of the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble portion of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. The [sup 252]Cf-PDMS technique was used to determine molecular weight distributions of twenty-five THF-soluble resids. In order to detemine if [sup 252]Cf-PDMS responds differently to different chemical classes of compounds, Lehigh separated five of the samples into chemically distinct fractions by MPLC, then analyzed the parent samples, their fractions, and the re-mixed fractions by [sup 252]Cf-PDMS and GPC. Irreversible alteration of the samples upon separation was noted by Lehigh. This was confirmed by use of gas chromatographic (GC) analyses. The noted irreversible alterations prevented a direct comparison of the remixed materials and the original samples. Thus, the selective response of [sup 252]Cf-PDMS to different chemical classes of compounds could not be confirmed or ruled out. The number average molecular weights (M[sub n]) obtained by [sup 252]Cf-PDMS and GPC agreed well. However, the weight average molecular weights (M[sub w]) obtained by GPC are always higher than the corresponding [sup 252]Cf-PDMS results. Number average molecular weights and weight average molecular weights obtained with [sup 252]Cf-PDMS and GPC were compared with those obtained by field ionization mass spectrometry (FIMS), previously reported by SRI International for the parent resid samples from which the Lehigh THF-soluble samples were derived.

  4. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: The application of {sup 252}Cf-plasma desorption mass spectrometry to analysis of direct coal liquefaction heavy products

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Lapucha, A.R.

    1992-10-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using {sup 252}Cf PDMS, GPC, and MPLC for the examination of the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble portion of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. The {sup 252}Cf-PDMS technique was used to determine molecular weight distributions of twenty-five THF-soluble resids. In order to detemine if {sup 252}Cf-PDMS responds differently to different chemical classes of compounds, Lehigh separated five of the samples into chemically distinct fractions by MPLC, then analyzed the parent samples, their fractions, and the re-mixed fractions by {sup 252}Cf-PDMS and GPC. Irreversible alteration of the samples upon separation was noted by Lehigh. This was confirmed by use of gas chromatographic (GC) analyses. The noted irreversible alterations prevented a direct comparison of the remixed materials and the original samples. Thus, the selective response of {sup 252}Cf-PDMS to different chemical classes of compounds could not be confirmed or ruled out. The number average molecular weights (M{sub n}) obtained by {sup 252}Cf-PDMS and GPC agreed well. However, the weight average molecular weights (M{sub w}) obtained by GPC are always higher than the corresponding {sup 252}Cf-PDMS results. Number average molecular weights and weight average molecular weights obtained with {sup 252}Cf-PDMS and GPC were compared with those obtained by field ionization mass spectrometry (FIMS), previously reported by SRI International for the parent resid samples from which the Lehigh THF-soluble samples were derived.

  5. [An improved method of preparing protein and peptide probes in mass spectrometry with ionization of division fragments by californium-252 (TOF-PDMS)].

    PubMed

    Chivanov, V D; Zubarev, R A; Aksenov, S A; Bordunova, O G; Eremenko, V I; Kabanets, V M; Tatarinova, V I; Mishnev, A K; Kuraev, V V; Knysh, A N; Eremenko, I A

    1996-08-01

    The addition of organic acids (picric, oxalic, citric, or tartaric) to peptide and protein samples was found to significantly increase the yield of their quasi-molecular ions (QMI) in time-of-flight 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry. The yield of the ions depended on the pKa of the acid added.

  6. Sequence determination of protected oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing phosphotriester linkages by californium-252 plasma desorption mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    McNeal, C J; Narang, S A; Macfarlane, R D; Hsiung, H M; Brousseau, R

    1980-01-01

    A mass spectrometric method for determining the sequence and molecular weight of protected oligodeoxyribonucleotides is described. By using the method of 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry [Macfarlane, R. D. & Torgerson, D. F. (1976) Science 191, 920--925], positive-ion mass spectra were obtained for a series of protected oligonucleotides extending to a decanucleotide; the spectra were dominated by the presence of the oligonucleotide molecular ion. The negative-ion mass spectra were characterized by a nested set of fragment ions extending from the 3'- or 5'-terminal nucleotide to the opposite terminal nucleotide, thereby identifying the sequence. The utility of this method has been demonstrated by the sequence determination of protected tetra-, penta-, and hexanucleotides synthesized by the improved phosphotriester method. PMID:6928675

  7. Self-assembled chlorophyll a systems as studied by californium-252 plasma desorption mass spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, J. E.; Macfarlane, R. D.; Katz, J. J.; Dougherty, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Self-assembled chlorophyll a and pheophytin a systems in thin solid films have been studied by 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry (PDMS). The 252Cf-PDMS spectra of these films show monomer cation and anion molecular ions, ions of molecular aggregates, and positive and negative ion fragmentation patterns arising from the loss of various aliphatic side chains from the chlorin ring. Chlorophyll a films cast from dry carbon tetrachloride solution, in which chlorophyll a is known to occur as the dimer, produced an abundant dimer ion. The highest degree of chlorophyll a self-assembly was observed in chlorophyll a films cast from n-octane solutions. Oligomer ions extending upwards in size to the heptamer were detected in this system. Images PMID:16592795

  8. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e., ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed.

  9. Desorption in Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek Tursunbayevich; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Sakai, Yuji; Takaishi, Rio; Habib, Ahsan; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry, analytes must be released in the gas phase. There are two representative methods for the gasification of the condensed samples, i.e., ablation and desorption. While ablation is based on the explosion induced by the energy accumulated in the condensed matrix, desorption is a single molecular process taking place on the surface. In this paper, desorption methods for mass spectrometry developed in our laboratory: flash heating/rapid cooling, Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD), solid/solid friction, liquid/solid friction, electrospray droplet impact (EDI) ionization/desorption, and probe electrospray ionization (PESI), will be described. All the methods are concerned with the surface and interface phenomena. The concept of how to desorb less-volatility compounds from the surface will be discussed. PMID:28337398

  10. Thermal desorption mass spectrometer for mass metrology.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Z; Azouigui, S; Bouhtiyya, S; Macé, S; Plimmer, M D; Pinot, P; Tayeb-Chandoul, F; Hannachi, R

    2014-04-01

    This article presents a device for the study of physisorbed elements on polished surfaces (diameter ⩽56 mm) of the kind used in mass metrology. The technique is based on mass spectrometry of molecules desorbed after heating under vacuum of the analyzed surface. We describe a first application of the device to study current and future mass standards in order to understand how their surface reactivity depends on storage conditions, cleaning processes, and polishing methods. Surface contamination analysis by thermal desorption mass spectrometry to examine the effect of cleaning on pure iridium is given as an example.

  11. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  12. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  13. 4,5-methylenedithio-4',5'-propylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene (MPT) and 4,5-ethylenedithio-4',5'-propylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene (EPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Kini, A.M.; Tytko, S.F.; Hunt, J.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The title electron donors, unsymmetrical analogs of Bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene, are synthesized. The utility of /sup 252/Cf Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry in the characterization and purity determinations is also reported.

  14. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for molecular diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Zhu, Y. F.; Allman, S. L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K. J.; Chang, L. Y.; Chung, C. N.; Martin, Steve; Haff, Lawrence

    1996-04-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been used for molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Both 3-base deletion and single-base point mutation have been successfully detected by clinical samples. This new detection method can possibly speed up the diagnosis by one order of magnitude in the future. It may become a new biotechnology technique for population screening of genetic disease.

  15. Mass spectrometric peptide mapping analysis and structural characterization of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase isoenzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Gauss, C; Klein, J; Post, K; Suckau, D; Schneider, K; Thomas, H; Oesch, F; Przybylski, M

    1990-01-01

    The direct molecular weight determination and structural analysis of polypeptides and peptide mixtures have become amenable by the recent development of fast atom bombardment (FABMS) and 252Cf-plasma desorption (PDMS) mass spectrometry. FABMS and PDMS peptide mapping, i.e., the direct analysis of peptide mixtures resulting from proteolytic digestion, have been developed as powerful methods for the structural characterization of epoxide-metabolizing isoenzymes. The major advantage of this approach is provided by the selectivity of the endoproteolytic cleavage, combined with the specific and accurate molecular weight determination of complex digest mixtures containing peptides up to several thousands daltons in size. Furthermore, the mass spectrometric peptide mapping analysis can be combined with a range of protein-chemical modification reactions and with sequential degradation such as by carboxypeptidases. Both FABMS and PDMS peptide mapping have already been successfully applied to the structural differentiation of glutathione transferase and epoxide hydrolase isoenzymes in cases where references sequence data for at least one isoenzyme form was available. In the application described here, for a series of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (DDH) isoenzymes with hitherto undetermined primary structures, a direct correlation between the structural differentiation from peptide mapping data and differences in their substrate specificities could be demonstrated. The mass spectrometric peptide mapping analysis of isoenzymes proved to be an efficient basis for the elucidation of the structure of one major DDH isoenzyme form; partial sequence data for this protein are reported. PMID:2272334

  16. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  17. Charge Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Jorabchi, Kaveh; Westphall, Michael S.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-01-01

    We propose and evaluate a new mechanism to account for analyte ion signal enhancement in ultraviolet-laser desorption mass spectrometry of droplets in the presence of corona ions. Our new insights are based on timing control of corona ion production, laser desorption, and peptide ion extraction achieved by a novel pulsed corona apparatus. We demonstrate that droplet charging rather than gas-phase ion-neutral reactions is the major contributor to analyte ion generation from an electrically isolated droplet. Implications of the new mechanism, termed charge assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI), are discussed and contrasted to those of the laser desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization method (LD-APCI). It is also demonstrated that analyte ion generation in CALDI occurs with external electric fields about one order of magnitude lower than those needed for atmospheric pressure matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization or electrospray ionization of droplets. PMID:18387311

  18. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of intact bacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used to differentiate 7 bacterial species based on their measured DESI-mass spectral profile. Both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were tested and included Escherichia coli, Staphyloccocus aureus, Enterococcus sp., Bordete...

  19. Quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Roder, Heinrich; Hunsucker, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes the essential characteristics of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), especially as they relate to its applications in quantitative analysis. Approaches to quantification by MALDI-TOF MS are presented and published applications are critically reviewed. PMID:19106161

  20. Laser desorption in an ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, G.C.; Cisper, M.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Hemberger, P.H.; Nogar, N.S.

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption in a ion-trap mass spectrometer shows significant promise for both qualitative and trace analysis. Several aspects of this methodology are discussed in this work. We previously demonstrated the generation of both negative and positive ions by laser desorption directly within a quadrupole ion trap. In the present work, we explore various combinations of d.c., r.f., and time-varying fields in order to optimize laser generated signals. In addition, we report on the application of this method to analyze samples containing compounds such as amines, metal complexes, carbon clusters, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. In some cases the ability to rapidly switch between positive and negative ion modes provides sufficient specificity to distinguish different compounds of a mixture with a single stage of mass spectrometry. In other experiments, we combined intensity variation studies with tandem mass spectrometry experiments and positive and negative ion detection to further enhance specificity.

  1. Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    A two-step laser desorption lamp ionization source coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (LDLI-ITMS) has been constructed and characterized. The pulsed infrared (IR) output of an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) is directed to a target inside a chamber evacuated to ~15 Pa causing desorption of molecules from the target's surface. The desorbed molecules are ionized by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp (filled with xenon, major wavelength at 148 nm). The resulting ions are stored and detected in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap modified from a Finnigan Mat LCQ mass spectrometer operated at a pressure of ≥ 0.004 Pa. The limit of detection for desorbed coronene molecules is 1.5 pmol, which is about two orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry using a fluorine excimer laser (157 nm) as the ionization source. The mass spectrum of four standard aromatic compounds (pyrene, coronene, rubrene and 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (OPC)) shows that parent ions dominate. By increasing the infrared laser power, this instrument is capable of detecting inorganic compounds. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry of Substituted Silane High Polymers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    REPORT NO. 170) ’ Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry of Substituted Silane High Polymers* T. Mgnea, . Baaji R. by T. Magnera, V. Balaji, R...reverse it necessary and identify by block number) Laser ablation of a variety of polysilanes at 308 nm using fluences of 150-250 m./Q per pulse, well...rapid ablation of neat solid polysilanes with UV laser light suggested their potential utility as self-developing phocoresists. 3 Further interest in this

  3. Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Heath, Brandi S.; Roach, Patrick J.; Cazares, Lisa H.; Semmes, O. John

    2012-01-03

    We present the first results showing the ambient imaging of biological samples in their native environment using nanospray desorption ionization (nanoDESI) mass spectrometry. NanoDESI is an ambient pressure ionization technique that enables precise control of ionization of molecules from substrates. We demonstrate highly sensitive and robust analysis of tissue samples with high spatial resolution (<12 {mu}m) without sample preparation, which will be essential for applications in clinical diagnostics, drug discovery, molecular biology, and biochemistry.

  4. Infrared laser-assisted desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rezenom, Yohannes H; Dong, Jianan; Murray, Kermit K

    2008-02-01

    We have used an infrared laser for desorption of material and ionization by interaction with electrosprayed solvent. Infrared laser-assisted desorption electrospray ionization (IR LADESI) mass spectrometry was used for the direct analysis of water-containing samples under ambient conditions. An ion trap mass spectrometer was modified to include a pulsed Er:YAG laser at 2.94 microm wavelength coupled into a germanium oxide optical fiber for desorption at atmospheric pressure and a nanoelectrospray source for ionization. Analytes in aqueous solution were placed on a stainless steel target and irradiated with the pulsed IR laser. Material desorbed and ablated from the target was ionized by a continuous stream of charged droplets from the electrosprayed solvent. Peptide and protein samples analyzed using this method yield mass spectra similar to those obtained by conventional electrospray. Blood and urine were analyzed without sample pretreatment to demonstrate the capability of IR LADESI for direct analysis of biological fluids. Pharmaceutical products were also directly analyzed. Finally, the role of water as a matrix in the IR LADESI process is discussed.

  5. Characterization of polymer decomposition products by laser desorption mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallix, Joan B.; Lincoln, Kenneth A.; Miglionico, Charles J.; Roybal, Robert E.; Stein, Charles; Shively, Jon H.

    1993-01-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been used to characterize the ash-like substances formed on the surfaces of polymer matrix composites (PMC's) during exposure on LDEF. In an effort to minimize fragmentation, material was removed from the sample surfaces by laser desorption and desorbed neutrals were ionized by electron impact. Ions were detected in a time-of-flight mass analyzer which allows the entire mass spectrum to be collected for each laser shot. The method is ideal for these studies because only a small amount of ash is available for analysis. Three sets of samples were studied including C/polysulfone, C/polyimide and C/phenolic. Each set contains leading and trailing edge LDEF samples and their respective controls. In each case, the mass spectrum of the ash shows a number of high mass peaks which can be assigned to fragments of the associated polymer. These high mass peaks are not observed in the spectra of the control samples. In general, the results indicate that the ash is formed from decomposition of the polymer matrix.

  6. Unexpected Analyte Oxidation during Desorption Electrospray Ionization - Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    During the analysis of surface spotted analytes using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS), abundant ions are sometimes observed that appear to be the result of oxygen addition reactions. In this investigation, the effect of sample aging, the ambient lab environment, spray voltage, analyte surface concentration, and surface type on this oxidative modification of spotted analytes, exemplified by tamoxifen and reserpine, during analysis by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was studied. Simple exposure of the samples to air and to ambient lighting increased the extent of oxidation. Increased spray voltage lead also to increased analyte oxidation, possibly as a result of oxidative species formed electrochemically at the emitter electrode or in the gas - phase by discharge processes. These oxidative species are carried by the spray and impinge on and react with the sampled analyte during desorption/ionization. The relative abundance of oxidized species was more significant for analysis of deposited analyte having a relatively low surface concentration. Increasing spray solvent flow rate and addition of hydroquinone as a redox buffer to the spray solvent were found to decrease, but not entirely eliminate, analyte oxidation during analysis. The major parameters that both minimize and maximize analyte oxidation were identified and DESI-MS operational recommendations to avoid these unwanted reactions are suggested.

  7. LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY ON SILICON NANOWELL ARRAYS

    PubMed Central

    Gulbakan, Basri; Park, Dooho; Kang, Myungchan; Kececi, Kaan; Martin, Charles R.; Powell, David H.; Tan, Weihong

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique for fabrication of nanostructured porous silicon (pSi) for laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Porous silicon nanowell arrays were prepared by argon plasma etching through an alumina mask. Porous silicon prepared in this way proved to be an excellent substrate for desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS) mass spectrometry (MS) using adenosine, Pro-Leu-Gly tripeptide and [Des-Arg9]-bradykinin as the model compounds. It also allows the analyses of complex biological samples such as a tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin, and a carnitine standard mixture. Nanowell array surfaces were also used for direct quantification of the illicit drug fentanyl in red blood cell extracts. This method also allows full control of the surface features. MS results suggested that the pore depth has significant effect on the ion signals. Significant improvement in the ionization was observed by increasing the pore depth from 10 nm to 50 nm. These substrates are useful for laser desorption ionization in both the atmospheric pressure and vacuum regimes. PMID:20731384

  8. Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry on silicon nanowell arrays.

    PubMed

    Gulbakan, Basri; Park, Dooho; Kang, Myungchan; Kececi, Kaan; Martin, Charles R; Powell, David H; Tan, Weihong

    2010-09-15

    This paper describes a new technique for fabrication of nanostructured porous silicon (pSi) for laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Porous silicon nanowell arrays were prepared by argon plasma etching through an alumina mask. Porous silicon prepared in this way proved to be an excellent substrate for desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS) mass spectrometry (MS) using adenosine, Pro-Leu-Gly tripeptide, and [Des-Arg(9)]-bradykinin as the model compounds. It also allows the analyses of complex biological samples such as a tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin and a carnitine standard mixture. Nanowell array surfaces were also used for direct quantification of the illicit drug fentanyl in red blood cell extracts. This method also allows full control of the surface features. MS results suggested that the pore depth has a significant effect on the ion signals. Significant improvement in the ionization was observed by increasing the pore depth from 10 to 50 nm. These substrates are useful for laser desorption ionization in both the atmospheric pressure and vacuum regimes.

  9. Improved Imaging Resolution in Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    Imaging resolution of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was investigated using printed patterns on paper and thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plate surfaces. Resolution approaching 40 m was achieved with a typical DESI-MS setup, which is approximately 5 times better than the best resolution reported previously. This improvement was accomplished with careful control of operational parameters (particularly spray tip-to-surface distance, solvent flow rate, and spacing of lane scans). Also, an appropriately strong analyte/surface interaction and uniform surface texture on the size scale no larger that the desired imaging resolution were required to achieve this resolution. Overall, conditions providing the smallest possible effective desorption/ionization area in the DESI impact plume region and minimizing the analyte redistribution on the surface during analysis led to the improved DESI-MS imaging resolution.

  10. Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dow, Alex M; Wittrig, Ashley R; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2012-01-01

    Large thermally labile molecules were not amenable to mass spectrometric analysis until the development of atmospheric pressure evaporation/ionization methods, such as electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), since attempts to evaporate these molecules by heating induces degradation of the sample. While ESI and MALDI are relatively soft desorption/ionization techniques, they are both limited to preferential ionization of acidic and basic analytes. This limitation has been the driving force for the development of other soft desorption/ionization techniques. One such method employs laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) to evaporate neutral sample molecules into mass spectrometers. LIAD utilizes acoustic waves generated by a laser pulse in a thin metal foil. The acoustic waves travel through the foil and cause desorption of neutral molecules that have been deposited on the opposite side of the foil. One of the advantages of LIAD is that it desorbs low-energy molecules that can be ionized by a variety of methods, thus allowing the analysis of large molecules that are not amenable to ESI and MALDI. This review covers the generation of acoustic waves in foils via a laser pulse, the parameters affecting the generation of acoustic waves, possible mechanisms for desorption of neutral molecules, as well as the various uses of LIAD by mass spectrometrists. The conditions used to generate acoustic or stress waves in solid materials consist of three regimes: thermal, ablative, and constrained. Each regime is discussed, in addition to the mechanisms that lead to the ablation of the metal from the foil and generation of acoustic waves for two of the regimes. Previously proposed desorption mechanisms for LIAD are presented along with the flaws associated with some of them. Various experimental parameters, such as the exact characteristics of the laser pulse and foil used, are discussed. The internal and kinetic energy of the neutral

  11. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA analysis and sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Tang, K.; Allman, S.L.

    1995-03-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been considered as a potential new method for fast DNA sequencing. Our approach is to use matrix-assisted laser desorption to produce parent ions of DNA segments and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to identify the sizes of DNA segments. Thus, the approach is similar to gel electrophoresis sequencing using Sanger`s enzymatic method. However, gel, radioactive tagging, and dye labeling are not required. In addition, the sequencing process can possibly be finished within a few hundred microseconds instead of hours and days. In order to use mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing, the following three criteria need to be satisfied. They are (1) detection of large DNA segments, (2) sensitivity reaching the femtomole region, and (3) mass resolution good enough to separate DNA segments of a single nucleotide difference. It has been very difficult to detect large DNA segments by mass spectrometry before due to the fragile chemical properties of DNA and low detection sensitivity of DNA ions. We discovered several new matrices to increase the production of DNA ions. By innovative design of a mass spectrometer, we can increase the ion energy up to 45 KeV to enhance the detection sensitivity. Recently, we succeeded in detecting a DNA segment with 500 nucleotides. The sensitivity was 100 femtomole. Thus, we have fulfilled two key criteria for using mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing. The major effort in the near future is to improve the resolution. Different approaches are being pursued. When high resolution of mass spectrometry can be achieved and automation of sample preparation is developed, the sequencing speed to reach 500 megabases per year can be feasible.

  12. Counting Molecules by Desorption Ionization and Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooks, R. G.; Busch, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses two newer methods in mass spectrometry and shows how they can increase signal and signal-to-noise ratios, respectively. The first method, desorption ionization (DI), increases sensitivity while the second method, mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), increases specificity. Together, the two methods offer improved analytical…

  13. The laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectra of some methylated xanthines and the laser desorption of caffeine and theophylline from thin layer chromatography plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Milnes, John; Gormally, John

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption/laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and xanthine are reported. These mass spectra are compared with published spectra obtained using electron impact ionization. Mass spectra of caffeine and theophylline obtained by IR laser desorption from thin layer chromatography plates are also described. The laser desorption of materials from thin layer chromatography plates is discussed.

  14. Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry for DNA Sequencing and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Golovlev, V. V.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    1998-03-01

    Rapid DNA sequencing and/or analysis is critically important for biomedical research. In the past, gel electrophoresis has been the primary tool to achieve DNA analysis and sequencing. However, gel electrophoresis is a time-consuming and labor-extensive process. Recently, we have developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) to achieve sequencing of ss-DNA longer than 100 nucleotides. With LDMS, we succeeded in sequencing DNA in seconds instead of hours or days required by gel electrophoresis. In addition to sequencing, we also applied LDMS for the detection of DNA probes for hybridization LDMS was also used to detect short tandem repeats for forensic applications. Clinical applications for disease diagnosis such as cystic fibrosis caused by base deletion and point mutation have also been demonstrated. Experimental details will be presented in the meeting. abstract.

  15. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F.

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F.

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Multistage Reactive Transmission-Mode Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Kevin C.; Comi, Troy J.; Perry, Richard H.

    2015-09-01

    Elucidating reaction mechanisms is important for advancing many areas of science such as catalyst development. It is often difficult to probe fast reactions at ambient conditions with high temporal resolution. In addition, systems involving reagents that cross-react require analytical methods that can minimize interaction time and specify their order of introduction into the reacting system. Here, we explore the utility of transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization (TM-DESI) for reaction monitoring by directing a microdroplet spray towards a series of meshes with micrometer-sized openings coated with reagents, an approach we call multistage reactive TM-DESI (TM n -DESI, where n refers to the number of meshes; n = 2 in this report). Various stages of the reaction are initiated at each mesh surface, generating intermediates and products in microdroplet reaction vessels traveling towards the mass spectrometer. Using this method, we investigated the reactivity of iron porphyrin catalytic hydroxylation of propranolol and other substrates. Our experimental results indicate that TM n -DESI provides the ability to spatially separate reagents and control their order of introduction into the reacting system, thereby minimizing unwanted reactions that lead to catalyst deactivation and degradation products. In addition, comparison with DESI-MS analyses (the Zare and Latour laboratories published results suggesting accessible reaction times <1 ms) of the reduction of dichlorophenolindophenol by L-ascorbic acid suggest that TM 1 -DESI can access reaction times less than 1 ms. Multiple meshes allow sequential stages of desorption/ionization per MS scan, increasing the number of analytes and reactions that can be characterized in a single experiment.

  18. Laser desorption studies of high mass biomolecules in Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Solouki, T; Russell, D H

    1992-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization is used to obtain Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra of model peptides (e.g., gramicidin S, angiotensin I, renin substrate, melittin, and bovine insulin). Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization yields ions having appreciable kinetic energies. Two methods for trapping the high kinetic energy ions are described: (i) the ion signal for [M+H]+ ions is shown to increase with increasing trapping voltages, and (ii) collisional relaxation is used for the detection of [M+H]+ ions of bovine insulin. Images PMID:1378614

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM BY MATRIX-ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION -- IONIZATION TIME OF FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry was used to investigate whole and freeze thawed Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. Whole oocysts revealed some mass spectral features. Reproducible patterns of spectral markers and increased sensitivity were obtai...

  20. Solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haapala, Markus; Teppo, Jaakko; Ollikainen, Elisa; Kiiski, Iiro; Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-03-17

    A new ambient mass spectrometry method, solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization (DCPI), is described. The method uses a solvent jet generated by a coaxial nebulizer operated at ambient conditions with nitrogen as nebulizer gas. The solvent jet is directed onto a sample surface, from which analytes are extracted into the solvent and ejected from the surface in secondary droplets formed in collisions between the jet and the sample surface. The secondary droplets are directed into the heated capillary photoionization (CPI) device, where the droplets are vaporized and the gaseous analytes are ionized by 10 eV photons generated by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) krypton discharge lamp. As the CPI device is directly connected to the extended capillary inlet of the MS, high ion transfer efficiency to the vacuum of MS is achieved. The solvent jet DCPI provides several advantages: high sensitivity for nonpolar and polar compounds with limit of detection down to low fmol levels, capability of analyzing small and large molecules, and good spatial resolution (250 μm). Two ionization mechanisms are involved in DCPI: atmospheric pressure photoionization, capable of ionizing polar and nonpolar compounds, and solvent assisted inlet ionization capable of ionizing larger molecules like peptides. The feasibility of DCPI was successfully tested in the analysis of polar and nonpolar compounds in sage leaves and chili pepper.

  1. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for fast DNA analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Ch`ang, L.Y.; Taranenko, N.I.; Allman, S.L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K.J.

    1995-09-01

    During the past few years, major effort has been directed toward developing mass spectrometry to measure biopolymers because of the great potential benefit to biomedical research. Hellenkamp and his co-workers were the first to report that large polypeptide molecules can be ionized and detected without significant fragmentation when a greater number of nicotinic acid molecules are used as a matrix. This method is now well known as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Since then, various groups have reported measurements of very large proteins by MALDI. Reliable protein analysis by MALDI is more or less well established. However, the application of MALDI to nucleic acids analysis has been found to be much more difficult. Most research on the measurement of nucleic acid by MALDI were stimulated by the Human Genome Project. Up to now, the only method for reliable routine analysis of nucleic acid is gel electrophoresis. Different sizes of nucleic acids can be separated in gel medium when a high electric field is applied to the gel. However, the time needed to separate different sizes of DNA segments usually takes from several minutes to several hours. If MALDI can be successfully used for nucleic acids analysis, the analysis time can be reduced to less than I millisecond. In addition, no tagging with radioactive materials or chemical dyes is needed. In this work, we will review recent progress related to MALDI for DNA analysis.

  2. Liquid Beam Ion Desorption Mass Spectrometry for Evaluating CASSINI Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, Ferdinand; Reviol, Rene; Srama, Ralf; Trieloff, Mario; Postberg, Frank; Abel, Bernd

    2013-04-01

    Saturn's moon Enceladus emits plumes of ice particles from an area near its south pole which are detected and chemically analyzed by the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on board the CASSINI spacecraft. Studying these ice particles provides unique insights into Enceladus geological properties. Technically the CDA is a time-of-flight mass spectrometer which delivers mass spectra of the particles and their fragments. Since interpretation of the available CDA data is particularly challenging we employ a laboratory experiment to imitate experimental conditions in space. Key part of our experimental setup is a micron-sized water beam in high vacuum. This beam is rapidly heated up by an infrared laser pulse, which is tuned to excite the OH-stretch vibration of water molecules. This causes the water beam to dissipate into small droplets, some of which carry a net charge even though the laser energy is well below the molecular ionisation energy. The charged droplets are then analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. With this experimental setup we successfully simulated the space born ice particles measured at Enceladus. By varying the laser intensity in our experiments, we can vary the amount of energy deposited in the liquid beam, and thus model different particle velocities. Also, variation of solute concentration in the water beam provides valuable information about ice particle composition. Some examples for anorganic solutes studied so far are sodium chloride, ammonia and hydrogen sulfite. A special feature of our experimental technique is that desorption of particles from the liquid beam is particularly soft. This is explained by the fact that all laser energy is absorbed by the water molecules. In this way molecular bonds of solutes stay intact and molecular solutes are transferred into the droplet phase without getting destroyed. This is particularly interesting in the context of analyzing organic compounds - some of which have been detected at Enceladus. Using

  3. A Combined Desorption Ionization by Charge Exchange (DICE) and Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Source for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chang-Ching; Bolgar, Mark S.; Miller, Scott A.; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2011-01-01

    A source that couples the desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) techniques together was demonstrated to broaden the range of compounds that can be analyzed in a single mass spectrometric experiment under ambient conditions. A tee union was used to mix the spray reagents into a partially immiscible blend before this mixture was passed through a conventional electrospray (ES) probe capillary. Using this technique, compounds that are ionized more efficiently by the DICE method and those that are ionized better with the DESI procedure could be analyzed simultaneously. For example, hydroquinone, which is not detected when subjected to DESI-MS in the positive-ion generation mode, or the sodium adduct of guaifenesin, which is not detected when examined by DICE-MS, could both be detected in one experiment when the two techniques were combined. The combined technique was able to generate the molecular ion, proton and metal adduct from the same compound. When coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer, the combined source enabled the generation of product ion spectra from the molecular ion and the [M + H]+ or [M + metal]+ ions of the same compound without the need to physically change the source from DICE to DESI. The ability to record CID spectra of both the molecular ion and adduct ions in a single mass spectrometric experiment adds a new dimension to the array of mass spectrometric methods available for structural studies.

  4. Spatially resolved thermal desorption/ionization coupled with mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2013-02-26

    A system and method for sub-micron analysis of a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The method includes providing a specimen for evaluation and a thermal desorption probe, thermally desorbing an analyte from a target site of said specimen using the thermally active tip to form a gaseous analyte, ionizing the gaseous analyte to form an ionized analyte, and analyzing a chemical composition of the ionized analyte. The thermally desorbing step can include heating said thermally active tip to above 200.degree. C., and positioning the target site and the thermally active tip such that the heating step forms the gaseous analyte. The thermal desorption probe can include a thermally active tip extending from a cantilever body and an apex of the thermally active tip can have a radius of 250 nm or less.

  5. Feasibility of desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to monitor urinary steroid metabolites during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Kauppila, Tiina J; Cvačka, Josef; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-06-23

    Steroids have important roles in the progress of pregnancy, and their study in maternal urine is a non-invasive method to monitor the steroid metabolome and its possible abnormalities. However, the current screening techniques of choice, namely immunoassays and gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, do not offer means for the rapid and non-targeted multi-analyte studies of large sample sets. In this study, we explore the feasibility of two ambient mass spectrometry methods in steroid fingerprinting. Urine samples from pregnant women were screened by desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The urine samples were processed by solid phase extraction for the DESI measurements and by enzymatic hydrolysis and liquid-liquid-extraction for DAPPI. Consequently, steroid glucuronides and sulfates were detected by negative ion mode DESI-HRMS, and free steroids by positive ion mode DAPPI-HRMS. In DESI, signals of eleven steroid metabolite ions were found to increase as the pregnancy proceeded, and in DAPPI ten steroid ions showed at least an order of magnitude increase during pregnancy. In DESI, the increase was seen for ions corresponding to C18 and C21 steroid glucuronides, while DAPPI detected increased excretion of C19 and C21 steroids. Thus both techniques show promise for the steroid marker screening in pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Applications of plasma desorption mass spectrometry to the analysis of bioactive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Alai, M.

    1988-01-01

    The applications of Cf-252 plasma desorption mass spectrometry to the analysis of peptides is evaluated. Sample preparation is a critical stage in such type of analyses. The plasma desorption mass spectra of compounds dissolved and electrosprayed in solutions containing reduced glutathione, showed increased molecular ion signal, reduced peak widths and an increase in multiply charged ions. Plasma desorption mass spectrometry was also evaluated for the analysis of glycopeptides, especially the glycosylation site microheterogeneity. The three N-linked sites of bovine fetuin, as a model glycoprotein, digested with trypsin and treated with neuraminidase, were identified by a combination of amino acid composition, amino acid sequence and molecular ions obtained by mass spectrometry. Methodology has also been developed for the study of mixed disulfides formed between the Cys residue of peptides and glutathione by mass spectrometry.

  7. Surface-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry techniques for application in forensics.

    PubMed

    Guinan, Taryn; Kirkbride, Paul; Pigou, Paul E; Ronci, Maurizio; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent analytical technique for the rapid and sensitive analysis of macromolecules (>700 Da), such as peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and synthetic polymers. However, the detection of smaller organic molecules with masses below 700 Da using MALDI-MS is challenging due to the appearance of matrix adducts and matrix fragment peaks in the same spectral range. Recently, nanostructured substrates have been developed that facilitate matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI), contributing to an emerging analytical paradigm referred to as surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) MS. Since SALDI enables the detection of small organic molecules, it is rapidly growing in popularity, including in the field of forensics. At the same time, SALDI also holds significant potential as a high throughput analytical tool in roadside, work place and athlete drug testing. In this review, we discuss recent advances in SALDI techniques such as desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS), nano-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) and nano assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI™) and compare their strengths and weaknesses with particular focus on forensic applications. These include the detection of illicit drug molecules and their metabolites in biological matrices and small molecule detection from forensic samples including banknotes and fingerprints. Finally, the review highlights recent advances in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using SALDI techniques.

  8. A Comparison of Mass Transport Models for Evaluating U(VI) Desorption at the Decimeter Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannappan, R.; Hay, M. B.; Miller, A. W.; Kohler, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Curtis, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    Uranium (VI) is a contaminant of concern in aquifers at many former uranium mills and processing facilities. Estimating the time-scale for desorption is important for addressing the long term risk of groundwater contamination. Determination of the rate limiting processes in desorption requires the evaluation of hydrodynamic and chemical conditions at a site along with the nature of the processes themselves. This research compares different mass transport models against the results of a decimeter scale laboratory desorption experiment. Different grain size fractions of contaminated sediments from the Naturita Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Act site were used to create porous media systems with known physical and chemical heterogeneity. The goal is to better understand the mass transport limitations associated with uranium desorption. Two dimensional reactive transport models with no immobile zones, a single immobile zone and multiple immobile zones with a distribution of rate coefficients were compared with observations at selected monitoring locations in the domain and with the flux-averaged concentrations in the effluent. The artificial heterogeneity provided regions with a contrast of desorption rates relative to the adjacent advective rates; flow interruption events showed variable extents of the commonly observed concentration rebound indicative of mass transfer out of immobile zones which were generally reproduced by the model. A comparison of the alternative model results will be used to determine the level of complexity necessary to accurately represent mass transport in the individual breakthrough curves at sampling ports and in the integrated breakthrough curve for the entire experiment.

  9. Analysis of lipids with desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS) and desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Suni, Niina M; Aalto, Henni; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2012-05-01

    In this article, the effect of spray solvent on the analysis of selected lipids including fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins, triacylglycerols, steroids, phospholipids, and sphingolipids has been studied by two different ambient mass spectrometry (MS) methods, desorption electrospray ionization-MS (DESI-MS) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-MS (DAPPI-MS). The ionization of the lipids with DESI and DAPPI was strongly dependent on the spray solvent. In most cases, the lipids were detected as protonated or deprotonated molecules; however, other ions were also formed, such as adduct ions (in DESI), [M-H](+) ions (in DESI and DAPPI), radical ions (in DAPPI), and abundant oxidation products (in DESI and DAPPI). DAPPI provided efficient desorption and ionization for neutral and less polar as well as for ionic lipids but caused extensive fragmentation for larger and more labile compounds because of a thermal desorption process. DESI was more suitable for the analysis of the large and labile lipids, but the ionization efficiency for less polar lipids was poor. Both methods were successfully applied to the direct analysis of lipids from pharmaceutical and food products. Although DESI and DAPPI provide efficient analysis of lipids, the multiple and largely unpredictable ionization reactions may set challenges for routine lipid analysis with these methods. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Laser desorption and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of 29-kDa Au:SR cluster compounds.

    PubMed

    Schaaff, T Gregory

    2004-11-01

    Positive and negative ions generated by laser-based ionization methods from three gold:thiolate cluster compounds are mass analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The three compounds have similar inorganic core masses ( approximately 29 kDa, approximately 145 Au atoms) but different n-alkanethiolate ligands associated with each cluster compound (Au:SR, R = butane, hexane, dodecane). Irradiation of neat films (laser desorption/ionization) and films generated by dilution of the cluster compounds in an organic acid matrix (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization) with a nitrogen laser (337 nm) produced distinct ion abundances that are relevant to different structural aspects of the cluster compound. Laser desorption/ionization of neat Au:SR compound films produces ions consistent with the inorganic core mass (i.e., devoid of original hydrocarbon content). Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization produces either ions with m/z values consistent with the core mass of the cluster compounds or ions with m/z values consistent with the approximate molecular weight of the cluster compounds, depending on ionization conditions. The ion abundances, and ionization conditions under which they are detected, provide insight into desorption/ionization processes for these unique cluster compounds as well as other analytes typically studied by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization.

  11. High-Speed Tandem Mass Spectrometric in Situ Imaging by Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Thomas, Mathew; Short, Joshua TL; Carson, James P.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Yang, Pengxiang; Prieto Conaway, Maria C.; Laskin, Julia

    2013-10-15

    Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), high-resolution mass analysis (m/m=17,500 at m/z 200), and rapid spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous imaging and identification of more than 300 molecules from 92 selected m/z windows (± 1 Da) with a spatial resolution of better than 150 um. Uterine sections of implantation sites on day 6 of pregnancy were analyzed in the ambient environment without any sample pre-treatment. MS/MS imaging was performed by scanning the sample under the nano-DESI probe at 10 um/s while acquiring higher-energy collision-induced dissociation (HCD) spectra for a targeted inclusion list of 92 m/z values at a rate of ~6.3 spectra/s. Molecular ions and their corresponding fragments, separated using high-resolution mass analysis, were assigned based on accurate mass measurement. Using this approach, we were able to identify and image both abundant and low-abundance isobaric species within each m/z window. MS/MS analysis enabled efficient separation and identification of isobaric sodium and potassium adducts of phospholipids. Furthermore, we identified several metabolites associated with early pregnancy and obtained the first 2D images of these molecules.

  12. High-speed tandem mass spectrometric in situ imaging by nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin; Thomas, Mathew; Short, Joshua; Carson, James P; Cha, Jeeyeon; Dey, Sudhansu K; Yang, Pengxiang; Prieto Conaway, Maria C; Laskin, Julia

    2013-10-15

    Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), high-resolution mass analysis of the fragment ions (m/Δm = 17 500 at m/z 200), and rapid spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous imaging and identification of a large number of metabolites and lipids from 92 selected m/z windows (±1 Da) with a spatial resolution of better than 150 μm. Mouse uterine sections of implantation sites on day 6 of pregnancy were analyzed in the ambient environment without any sample pretreatment. MS/MS imaging was performed by scanning the sample under the nano-DESI probe at 10 μm/s, while higher-energy collision-induced dissociation (HCD) spectra were acquired for a targeted inclusion list of 92 m/z values at a rate of ∼6.3 spectra/s. Molecular ions and their corresponding fragments, separated by high-resolution mass analysis, were assigned on the basis of accurate mass measurement. Using this approach, we were able to identify and image both abundant and low-abundance isobaric and isomeric species within each m/z window. MS/MS analysis enabled efficient separation and identification of isomeric and isobaric phospholipids that are difficult to separate in full-scan mode. Furthermore, we identified several metabolites associated with early pregnancy and obtained the first 2D images of these molecules.

  13. Recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Qian; Liang, Yong; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have attracted great interest over past decades owing to their unique physical properties, versatile functionalization chemistry, and biological compatibility. In this article, we review recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS). Various types of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon nanodots, nanodiamond, nanofibers, nanohorns, and their derivative forms, are involved. The applications of these materials as new matrices or probes in matrix-assisted or surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI or SELDI MS) are discussed. Finally, we summarize current challenges and give our perspectives on the future of applications of carbon nanomaterials in LDI MS.

  14. Derivatization of small biomolecules for optimized matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tholey, Andreas; Wittmann, Christoph; Kang, Min-Jung; Bungert, Ditte; Hollemeyer, Klaus; Heinzle, Elmar

    2002-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) is a powerful tool for the measurement of low molecular mass compounds of biological interest. The limitations for this method are the volatility of many analytes, possible interference with matrix signals or bad ionization or desorption behavior of the compounds. We investigated the application of well-known and straightforward one-pot derivatization procedures to circumvent these problems. The derivatizations tested allow the measurement and the labeling of alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids, alpha-ketocarboxylic acids and amines.

  15. Fossil fuel characterization using laser desorption mass spectrometry: Applications and limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    Laser desorption mass spectroscopy (LDMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI) are applicable to the high molecular weight compounds in fossil fuels which resist intact ionization. LD or MALDI of coals and extracts do not show reproducible ion intensity over mass 2000. This paper describes the scope and limitations of LD and MALD in time-of-flight mass spectrometers applied to high molecular weight molecules such as proteins and polymers. Coal was also analyzed. It is concluded that the sample preparation step is perhaps the most important part in MALDI. Observed high mass ions in coal may be from contaminant proteins. Optimal matrices must be found. Finally, the mass spectrum is senstive to number average molecular weight; a low value, however, does not preclude presence of high molecular weight species.

  16. Depth-Resolved Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry in Biofilms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-16

    microcapillary system delivered a solvent (ethanol) from one capillary while the other capillary collected and transported a charged liquid to the mass ...Apr-2013 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Depth Resolved Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass ...U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Depth-resolved, mass spectroscopy, biofilm, protein, microcapillary

  17. Rapid screening of pharmaceutical drugs using thermal desorption - SALDI mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnikov, A. A.; Kubasov, A. E.; Georgieva, V. B.; Borodkov, A. S.; Nikiforov, S. M.; Simanovsky, Ya O.; Alimpiev, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    A novel approach to the rapid screening of pharmaceutical drugs by surface assisted laser desorption-ionization (SALDI) mass spectrometry with the rotating ball interface coupled with temperature programmed thermal desorption has been developed. Analytes were thermally desorbed and deposited onto the surface of amorphous silicon substrate attached to the rotating ball. The ball was rotated and the deposited analytes were analyzed using SALDI. The effectiveness of coupling SALDI mass spectrometry with thermal desorption was evaluated by the direct and rapid analysis of tablets containing lidocaine, diphenhydramine and propranolol without any sample pretreatment. The overall duration of the screening procedure was 30÷40 sec. Real urine samples were studied for drug analysis. It is shown that with simple preparation steps, urine samples can be quantitatively analyzed using the proposed technique with the detection limits in the range of 0.2÷0.5 ng/ml.

  18. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for high-throughput DNA analysis and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Golovlev, Valeri V.; Taranenko, N. I.; Allman, S. L.; Isola, Narayana R.; Potter, N. T.; Matteson, K. J.; Chang, Linus Y.

    1999-05-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) has been developed for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and DNA fingerprinting for forensic applications. With LDMS, the speed of DNA analysis can be much faster than conventional gel electrophoresis. No dye or radioactive tagging to DNA segments for detection is needed. LDMS is emerging as a new alternative technology for DNA analysis.

  19. Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry for High Throughput DNA Analysis and Its Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, S.L.; Chen, C.H.; Golovlev, V.V.; Isola, N.R.; Matteson, K.J.; Potter, N.T.; Taranenko, N.I.

    1999-01-23

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) has been developed for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and DNA Fingerprinting for forensic applications. With LDMS, the speed of DNA analysis can be much faster than conventional gel electrophoresis. No dye or radioactive tagging to DNA segments for detection is needed. LDMS is emerging as a new alternative technology for DNA analysis.

  20. Identification of Bacteria Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kedney, Mollie G.; Strunk, Kevin B.; Giaquinto, Lisa M.; Wagner, Jennifer A.; Pollack, Sidney; Patton, Walter A.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS or simply MALDI) has become ubiquitous in the identification and analysis of biomacromolecules. As a technique that allows for the molecular weight determination of otherwise nonvolatile molecules, MALDI has had a profound impact in the molecular…

  1. Cellular localization of quinolizidine alkaloids by laser desorption mass spectrometry (LAMMA 1000).

    PubMed

    Wink, M; Heinen, H J; Vogt, H; Schiebel, H M

    1984-12-01

    Stem sections of Lupinus polyphyllus and Cytisus scoparius have been analyzed for the distribution of quinolizidine alkaloids by laser desorption mass spectrometry, employing a LAMMA 1000 instrument. Sparteine and lupanine could be recorded and were found to be restricted to the epidermis and probably also to the neighbouring 1 or 2 subepidermal cell layers.

  2. Characterization of nanoparticles by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramalinga, Uma; Clogston, Jeffrey D; Patri, Anil K; Simpson, John T

    2011-01-01

    Determining the molecular weight of nanoparticles can be challenging. The molecular weight characterization of dendrimers, for example, with varying covalent and noncovalent modifications is critical to their use as therapeutics. As such, we describe in this chapter a protocol for the analysis of these molecules by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

  3. Identification of carbohydrates by matrix-free material-enhanced laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hashir, Muhammad Ahsan; Stecher, Guenther; Bakry, Rania; Kasemsook, Saowapak; Blassnig, Bernhard; Feuerstein, Isabel; Abel, Gudrun; Popp, Michael; Bobleter, Ortwin; Bonn, Guenther K

    2007-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) is a sensitive mass spectrometric technique which utilises acidic materials as matrices for laser energy absorption, desorption and ionisation of analytes. These matrix materials produce background signals particularly in the low-mass range and make the detection and identification of small molecules difficult and nearly impossible. To overcome this problem this paper introduces matrix-free material-enhanced laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (mf-MELDI-MS) for the screening and analysis of small molecules such as carbohydrates. For this purpose, 4,4'-azo-dianiline was immobilised on silica gel enabling the absorption of laser energy sufficient for successful desorption and ionisation of low molecular weight compounds. The particle and pore sizes, the solvent system for suspension and the sample preparation procedures have been optimised. The newly synthesised MELDI material delivered excellent spectra with regard to signal-to-noise ratio and detection sensitivity. Finally, wheat straw degradation products and Salix alba L. plant extracts were analysed proving the high performance and excellent behaviour of the introduced material.

  4. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.W.; Martin, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer which can be broadly used for biomedical research. Tasks include: pulsed ion extraction to improve resolution; two-component matrices to enhance ionization; and solid phase DNA purification.

  5. Identification of Bacteria Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kedney, Mollie G.; Strunk, Kevin B.; Giaquinto, Lisa M.; Wagner, Jennifer A.; Pollack, Sidney; Patton, Walter A.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS or simply MALDI) has become ubiquitous in the identification and analysis of biomacromolecules. As a technique that allows for the molecular weight determination of otherwise nonvolatile molecules, MALDI has had a profound impact in the molecular…

  6. Tandem Mass Spectrometry on a Miniaturized Laser Desorption Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiang; Cornish, Timothy; Getty, Stephanie A.; Brinckerhoff, William B.

    2016-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MSMS) is a powerful and widely-used technique for identifying the molecular structure of organic constituents of a complex sample. Application of MSMS to the study of unknown planetary samples on a remote space mission would contribute to our understanding of the origin, evolution, and distribution of extraterrestrial organics in our solar system. Here we report on the realization of MSMS on a miniaturized laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LD-TOF-MS), which is one of the most promising instrument types for future planetary missions. This achievement relies on two critical components: a curved-field reflectron and a pulsed-pin ion gate. These enable use of the complementary post-source decay (PSD) and laser-assisted collision induced dissociation (L-CID) MSMS methods on diverse measurement targets with only modest investment in instrument resources such as volume and weight. MSMS spectra of selected molecular targets in various organic standards exhibit excellent agreement when compared with results from a commercial, laboratory-scale TOF instrument, demonstrating the potential of this powerful technique in space and planetary environments.

  7. Quantitative analysis of polypropyleneglycol mixtures by desorption/ionization on porous silicon mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Shoji; Wada, Yoshinao; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2005-02-01

    Mixtures of diol and triol types of polypropyleneglycol (PPG) bearing two and three hydroxyl end groups were analyzed quantitatively by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS) with the conventional dried droplet method. The reproducibility of MALDI mass spectra depended on the factors regarding sample preparation such as the analyte/matrix ratio, and the type of solvent and/or chemical matrix employed. For DIOS, the analyte concentration and the selection of solvents were important for good reproducibility. Optimization of these factors allowed reliable quantification of the polymer mixtures. Under optimized conditions, DIOS would be suitable than MALDI for this purpose.

  8. Laser desorption mass spectrometry: Technical limitations, fundamentals, and application to coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Objective of this study is to assess scope and limitations of laser desorption (LD) and matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALDI) as applied to coals. LD and MALDI mass spectrometry are increasingly used to detect intact molecular species, such as proteins with masses from 1000 to 100,000 amu and beyond. MALDI is also being used for high molecular weight polymers. A good example, related to coal-type systems, is the report on lignin mass spectrometry by MALDI. The mass spectrum shows a wide molecular distribution of several hundred to larger than 16000, with the center of gravity of the distribution around 2600. Results are interpreted in terms of oligomeric lignin molecules. Thus, if there are indeed large molecular species in a polymeric content in coals or coal extracts, MALDI is an attractive technique.

  9. Graphene matrix for signal enhancement in ambient plasma assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cuilan; Li, Xianjiang; Bai, Yu; Xu, Gege; Feng, Baosheng; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2013-09-30

    In this work, the signal intensity of ambient plasma assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (PALDI-MS) was significantly increased with graphene as matrix. The graphene functions as a substrate to trap analytes, absorb energy from the visible laser irradiation and transfer energy to the analytes to facilitate the laser desorption process. The desorbed analytes are further ionized by helium plasma and analyzed by MS. Compared with a traditional organic matrix, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), graphene exhibited much higher desorption efficiency for most of the compounds benefitting from the strong optical absorption at 532nm. The performance has been confirmed by the facile analysis of more than forty compounds with various structures. Additionally, this method was successfully applied to distinguish three kinds of Chinese tea leaves by detecting the endogenous caffeine and theanine, which proved the utility, facility and convenience of this method for rapid screening of main components in real samples.

  10. Remote mass spectrometric sampling of electrospray- and desorption electrospray-generated ions using an air ejector.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R Brent; Bereman, Michael S; Muddiman, David C; Hawkridge, Adam M

    2007-10-01

    A commercial air ejector was coupled to an electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ) to transport remotely generated ions from both electrospray (ESI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. We demonstrate the remote analysis of a series of analyte ions that range from small molecules and polymers to polypeptides using the AE-LTQ interface. The details of the ESI-AE-LTQ and DESI-AE-LTQ experimental configurations are described and preliminary mass spectrometric data are presented.

  11. Mass-tag enhanced immuno-laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for sensitive detection of intact protein antigens.

    PubMed

    Lorey, Martina; Adler, Belinda; Yan, Hong; Soliymani, Rabah; Ekström, Simon; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Laurell, Thomas; Baumann, Marc

    2015-05-19

    A new read-out method for antibody arrays using laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is presented. Small, photocleavable reporter molecules with a defined mass called "mass-tags" are used for detection of immunocaptured proteins from human plasma. Using prostate specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker for prostate cancer, as a model antigen, a high sensitivity generic detection methodology based immunocapture with a primary antibody and with a biotin labeled secondary antibody coupled to mass-tagged avidin is demonstrated. As each secondary antibody can bind several avidin molecules, each having a large number of mass-tags, signal amplification can be achieved. The developed PSA sandwich mass-tag analysis method provided a limit of detection below 200 pg/mL (6 pM) for a 10 μL plasma sample, well below the clinically relevant cutoff value of 3-4 ng/mL. This brings the limit of detection (LOD) for detection of intact antigens with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) down to levels comparable to capture by anti-peptide antibodies selected reaction monitoring (SISCAPA SRM) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), as 6 pM corresponds to a maximal amount of 60 amol PSA captured on-spot. We propose the potential use of LDI (laser desorption/ionization) with mass-tag read-out implemented in a sandwich assay format for low abundant and/or early disease biomarker detection.

  12. Laser desorption fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Shahar, T; Dagan, S; Amirav, A

    1998-06-01

    A novel method for fast analysis is presented. It is based on laser desorption injection followed by fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in supersonic molecular beams. The sample was placed in an open air or purged laser desorption compartment, held at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature conditions. Desorption was performed with a XeCl Excimer pulsed laser with pulse energy of typically 3 mJ on the surface. About 20 pulses at 50 Hz were applied for sample injection, resulting in about 0.4 s injection time and one or a few micrograms sample vapor or small particles. The laser desorbed sample was further thermally vaporized at a heated frit glass filter located at the fast GC inlet. Ultrafast GC separation and quantification was achieved with a 50-cm-long megabore column operated with a high carrier gas flow rate of up to 240 mL/min. The high carrier gas flow rate provided effective and efficient entrainment of the laser desorbed species in the sweeping gas. Following the fast GC separation, the sample was analyzed by mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams. Both electron ionization and hyperthermal surface ionization were employed for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity. Typical laser desorption analysis time was under 10 s. The laser desorption fast GC-MS was studied and demonstrated with the following sample/matrices combinations, all without sample preparation or extraction: (a) traces of dioctylphthalate plasticizer oil on stainless steel surface and the efficiency of its cleaning; (b) the detection of methylparathion and aldicarb pesticides on orange leaves; (c) water surface analysis for the presence of methylparathion pesticide; (d) caffeine analysis in regular and decaffeinated coffee powder; (e) paracetamol and codeine drug analysis in pain relieving drug tablets; (f) caffeine trace analysis in raw urine; (g) blood analysis for the presence of 1 ppm lidocaine drug. The features and advantages of the laser desorption fast GC

  13. Matrix-assisted laser desorption fourier transform mass spectrometry for biological compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hettich, R.; Buchanan, M.

    1990-01-01

    The recent development of matrix-assisted UV laser desorption (LD) mass spectrometry has made possible the ionization and detection of extremely large molecules (with molecular weights exceeding 100,000 Daltons). This technique has generated enormous interest in the biological community for the direct examination of large peptides and oligonucleotides. Although this matrix-assisted ionization method has been developed and used almost exclusively with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers, research is currently in progress to demonstrate this technique with trapped ion mass spectrometers, such as Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTMS). The potential capabilities of FTMS for wide mass range, high resolution measurement, and ion trapping experiments suggest that this instrumental technique should be useful for the detailed structural characterization of large ions generated by the matrix-assisted technique. We have recently demonstrated that matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption can be successfully used with FTMS for the ionization of small peptides. The objective of this report is to summarize the application and current limitations of matrix-assisted laser desorption FTMS for the characterization of peptides and oligonucleotides at the isomeric level. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, James P.; Galloway, Ewan C. King, Martin O.; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F.

    2016-08-15

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  15. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonks, James P.; Galloway, Ewan C.; King, Martin O.; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F.

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  16. Comparison of Three Plasma Sources for Ambient Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Kirsty; Salter, Tara L.; Bowfield, Andrew; Walsh, James L.; Gilmore, Ian S.; Bradley, James W.

    2014-09-01

    Plasma-based desorption/ionization sources are an important ionization technique for ambient surface analysis mass spectrometry. In this paper, we compare and contrast three competing plasma based desorption/ionization sources: a radio-frequency (rf) plasma needle, a dielectric barrier plasma jet, and a low-temperature plasma probe. The ambient composition of the three sources and their effectiveness at analyzing a range of pharmaceuticals and polymers were assessed. Results show that the background mass spectrum of each source was dominated by air species, with the rf needle producing a richer ion spectrum consisting mainly of ionized water clusters. It was also seen that each source produced different ion fragments of the analytes under investigation: this is thought to be due to different substrate heating, different ion transport mechanisms, and different electric field orientations. The rf needle was found to fragment the analytes least and as a result it was able to detect larger polymer ions than the other sources.

  17. Silver nanoparticles as matrix for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Lin; Chen, Jianrong; Ge, Liya; Tan, Swee Ngin

    2007-12-01

    Silver nanoparticle synthesized from chemical reduction has been successfully utilized as a matrix in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) of peptides. Acting as a substrate to adsorb analytes, as well as a transmission medium for UV laser, silver nanoparticle was found to assist in the desorption/ionization of peptides with little or no induced fragmentation. The size of the nanoparticle was typically in the range of 160 ± 20 nm. One of the key advantages of silver nanoparticle for peptides analysis is its simple step for on-probe sample preparation. In addition, it also minimizes the interferences of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant background signal, resulting in cleaner mass spectra and more sensitive signal, when compared to α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CCA) matrix.

  18. Matrix-assisted laser desorption and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of carminic acid isolated from cochineal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Marta S.; Parera, Sara D.; Seldes, Alicia M.

    2004-04-01

    Carminic acid, isolated from cochineal, was analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Application of both techniques to the analysis of carminic acid suspended in linseed oil and applied to a piece of canvas, demonstrated the ability of MALDI and ESI-MS to identify this organic dye in a mixture as those used in easel painting.

  19. Thin-Layer Chromatography/Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Investigation of Goldenseal Alkaloids

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2007-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was investigated as a means to qualitatively identify and to quantify analytes directly from developed normal-phase thin layer chromatography plates. The atmospheric sampling capillary of a commercial ion trap mass spectrometer was extended to permit sampling and ionization of analytes in bands separated on intact TLC plates (up to 10 cm x 10 cm). A surface positioning software package and the appropriate hardware enabled computer-controlled surface scanning along the length of development lanes or at fixed RF value across the plates versus the stationary desorption electrospray emitter. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and related alkaloids and commercial dietary supplements were used as standards and samples. Alkaloid standards and samples were spotted and separated on aluminum- or glass-backed plates using established literature methods. The mass spectral signal levels as a function of desorption spray solvent were investigated with acetonitrile proving superior to methanol. The detection levels (ca. 5 ng each or 14 -28 pmol) in mass spectral full scan mode were determined statistically from the calibration curves (2.5 - 100 pmol) for the standards berberine, palmatine and hydrastinine spotted as a mixture and separated on the plates. Qualitative screening of the major alkaloids present in six different over-the-counter "goldenseal" dietary supplements was accomplished by obtaining full scan mass spectra during surface scans along the development lane in the direction of increasing RF value. In one sample, alkaloids were detected that strongly suggested the presence of at least one additional herb undeclared on the product label. These same data indicated the misidentification of one of the alkaloids in the TLC literature. Quantities of the alkaloids present in two of the samples determined using the mass spectral data were in reasonable agreement with the label values indicating the quantitative ability of

  20. The Application of Ultrafast Laser Pulses to Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yang

    Ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses display exceptional performance for the selective ablation of materials, includes metals, semiconductors, and biological tissues. They do not damage the remaining unablated portion of a sample, which permits the possibility of depth profiling by repeat sampling at the same location. With sufficiently micro-focused fs laser pulse length beam, high lateral resolution mass spectrometry imaging is possible, while sample damage may degrade ultimate lateral resolution in some other methods. Combining imaging and depth profiling could ultimately leads to tomographical mass spectrometry or 3D imaging MS. Laser postionization, a "soft" ionization method, was combined with ultrafast laser desorption for enhanced molecular analysis. A customized femtosecond laser desorption/ablation postionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer was designed and built. The construction and performance of both phases including the VUV source are detailed. Instrument control software was written to operate this instrument, and many automated experiments were successfully demonstrated by this software. Elemental and molecular analysis was carried out on the instrument and demonstrated exceptional performance for fs laser pulse sampling of small areas. Studies demonstrated the imaging and depth profiling capability of fs-LDPI on metals, semiconductors and intact biofilm tissues. Attempts were made to reach the limit of lateral resolution of imaging by fs-LDPI-MS. The results showed similar lateral resolution of <2 mum for both fs 800 nm and 400 nm desorption beams. To improve the repetition rate for high speed imaging application, an alternative LDPI scheme was designed and constructed. The fs 800 beam was tripled to 267 nm and delivered into the ion source as an ionization laser, while a ns 349 nm pulse laser was used for desorption. Preliminary data showed certain intact molecular ions can be detected. Fragmentation tendency was measured against various

  1. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry on nanostructured semiconductor substrates: DIOS(TM) and QuickMass(TM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, K. P.

    2010-02-01

    In the era of systems biology, new analytical platforms are under demand. Desorption/ionization on silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS) is a promising high throughput laser mass spectrometry approach that has attracted a lot of attention, and has been commercialized. Another substrate material manufactured by physical method has also been made commercially available under the trade name of QuickMass(TM). These two commercial substrates, DIOS(TM) and QuickMass(TM), were investigated independently from the manufacturers and were characterized by a number of advanced surface techniques. This work determined (1) the correlation between the substrate physicochemical properties and their LDI activity, (2) the feasibility of metabolic profiling from complex biological matrices and (3) the laser desorption/ionization mechanism. The DIOS(TM) substrate was characterized with a thick nano-sized porous layer, a high surface concentration of fluorocarbon and silicon oxides and super-hydrophobicity. In contrast, the QuickMass(TM) substrate consisted of a non-porous germanium thin-film. The relatively high ionization efficiency obtained from the DIOS(TM) substrate was contributed to the fluorosilane manufacturing processes and its porous morphology. Despite the QuickMass(TM) substrate being less effective, it was noted that the use of germanium affords a self-cleaning mechanism and suppresses background interference of mass spectra. The suitability of DIOS(TM) substrates for metabolic profiling of complex biological matrices was demonstrated. DIOS mass spectra of human blood plasma, human urine and animal liver tissue extracts were produced. Suitable extraction methods were found to be important, but relatively simplified approaches were sufficient. Further investigations of the DIOS desorption/ionization mechanism were carried out. The previously proposed sub-surface state reaction could be a molten-solid interfacial state reaction of the substrate and this had a significant

  2. The Need for Speed in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has emerged as a powerful analytical tool enabling the direct molecular mapping of many types of tissue. Specifically, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization (MALDI) represents one of the most broadly applicable IMS technologies. In recent years, advances in solid state laser technology, mass spectrometry instrumentation, computer technology, and experimental methodology have produced IMS systems capable of unprecedented data acquisition speeds (>50 pixels/second). In applications of this technology, throughput is an important consideration when designing an IMS experiment. As IMS becomes more widely adopted, continual improvements in experimental setups will be important to address biologically and clinically relevant time scales. PMID:27570788

  3. Forensic applications of desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Morelato, Marie; Beavis, Alison; Kirkbride, Paul; Roux, Claude

    2013-03-10

    Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is an emerging analytical technique that enables in situ mass spectrometric analysis of specimens under ambient conditions. It has been successfully applied to a large range of forensically relevant materials. This review assesses and highlights forensic applications of DESI-MS including the analysis and detection of illicit drugs, explosives, chemical warfare agents, inks and documents, fingermarks, gunshot residues and drugs of abuse in urine and plasma specimens. The minimal specimen preparation required for analysis and the sensitivity of detection achieved offer great advantages, especially in the field of forensic science. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Brominated Tyrosine and Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Analysis by Laser Desorption VUV Postionization and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    University of Illinois at Chicago; Blaze, Melvin M. T.; Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Gasper, Gerald; Pleticha, F. Douglas; Hanley, Luke

    2011-03-14

    The small molecular analyte 3,5-dibromotyrosine (Br2Y) and chitosan-alginate polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) with and without adsorbed Br2Y were analyzed by laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). LDPI-MS using 7.87 eV laser and tunable 8 ? 12.5 eV synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation found that desorption of clusters from Br2Y films allowed detection by≤8 eV single photon ionization. Thermal desorption and electronic structure calculations determined the ionization energy of Br2Y to be ~;;8.3?0.1 eV and further indicated that the lower ionization energies of clusters permitted their detection at≤8 eV photon energies. However, single photon ionization could only detect Br2Y adsorbed within PEMs when using either higher photon energies or matrix addition to the sample. All samples were also analyzed by 25 keV Bi3 + secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), with the negative ion spectra showing strong parent ion signal which complemented that observed by LDPI-MS. The negative ion SIMS depended strongly on the high electron affinity of this specific analyte and the analyte?s condensed phase environment.

  5. Precursor ion scan profiles of acylcarnitines by atmospheric pressure thermal desorption chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paglia, Giuseppe; D'Apolito, Oceania; Corso, Gaetano

    2008-12-01

    The fatty acyl esters of L-carnitine (acylcarnitines) are useful biomarkers for the diagnosis of some inborn errors of metabolism analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In this study the acylcarnitines were analyzed by atmospheric pressure thermal desorption chemical ionization using a commercial tandem mass spectrometer (APTDCI-MS/MS). The method is based on the precursor ion scan mode determination of underivatized acylcarnitines desorbed from samples by a hot desolvation gas flow and ionized by a corona pin discharge. During desorption/ionization step the temperature induces the degradation of acylcarnitines; nevertheless, the common fragment to all acylcarnitines [MH-59](+) is useful for analyzing their profile. APTDCI parameters, including angle of collection and incidence, gas flows and temperatures, were optimized for acylcarnitines. The experiments were performed drying 2 microL of an equimolar mixture of acylcarnitine standards on a glass slide. The specificity was evaluated by comparing product ion spectra and the precursor ion spectra of 85 m/z of acylcarnitines obtained by the APTDCI method and by electrospray ionization flow injection analysis (ESI-FIA). The method was also employed to analyze acylcarnitines extracted from a pathological dried blood spot and a control. The method enables analysis of biological samples and recognition of some acylcarnitines that are diagnostic markers of inherited metabolic diseases. The intrinsic high-throughput analysis of the ambient desorption ionization methods offers a new opportunity either for its potential application in clinical chemistry and for the expanded screening of some inborn errors of metabolism.

  6. Laser-desorption tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry with continuous liquid introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Evan R.; Jones, Glenn C., Jr.; Fang, LiLing; Nagata, Takeshi; Zare, Richard N.

    1992-05-01

    A new method to combine aqueous sample introduction with matrix assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry (MS) for interfacing liquid-chromatographic techniques, such as capillary electrophoresis, to MS is described. Aqueous sample solution is introduced directly into the ion source of a time-of-. flight (TOF) mass spectrometer through a fused silica capillary; evaporative cooling results in ice formation at the end of the capillary. The ice can be made to extrude continuously by using localized resistive heating. With direct laser desorption, molecular ions from proteins as large as bovine insulin (5734 Da) can be produced. Two-step desorption/photoionization with a variety of wavelengths is demonstrated, and has the advantages of improved resolution and shot-to-shot reproducibility. Ion structural information is obtained using surface-induced dissociation with an in-line collision device in the reflectron mirror of the TOF instrument. Product ion resolution of ~70 is obtained at m/z77. Extensive fragmentation can be produced with dissociation efficiencies between 7-15% obtained for molecular ions of small organic molecules. Efficiencies approaching 30% are obtained for larger peptide ions.

  7. Brominated Tyrosine and Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Analysis by Laser Desorption VUV Postionization and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Melvin Blaze, M.T.; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Gasper, Gerald L.; Pleticha, F. Douglas; Hanley, Luke

    2011-01-01

    The small molecular analyte 3,5-dibromotyrosine (Br2Y) and chitosan-alginate polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) with and without adsorbed Br2Y were analyzed by laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). LDPI-MS using 7.87 eV laser and tunable 8 – 12.5 eV synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation found that desorption of clusters from Br2Y films allowed detection by ≤8 eV single photon ionization. Thermal desorption and electronic structure calculations determined the ionization energy of Br2Y to be ~8.3±0.1 eV and further indicated that the lower ionization energies of clusters permitted their detection at ≤8 eV photon energies. However, single photon ionization could only detect Br2Y adsorbed within PEMs when using either higher photon energies or matrix addition to the sample. All samples were also analyzed by 25 keV Bi3+ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), with the negative ion spectra showing strong parent ion signal which complemented that observed by LDPI-MS. However, the negative ion SIMS appeared strongly dependent on the high electron affinity of this specific analyte and the analyte’s condensed phase environment. PMID:21548612

  8. Pyroelectricity Assisted Infrared-Laser Desorption Ionization (PAI-LDI) for Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanyan; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wei, Zhenwei; Gong, Xiaoyun; Yang, Chengdui; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-08-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization method termed pyroelectricity-assisted infrared laser desorption ionization (PAI-LDI) was developed in this study. The pyroelectric material served as both sample target plate and enhancing ionization substrate, and an IR laser with wavelength of 1064 nm was employed to realize direct desorption and ionization of the analytes. The mass spectra of various compounds obtained on pyroelectric material were compared with those of other substrates. For the five standard substances tested in this work, LiNbO3 substrate produced the highest ion yield and the signal intensity was about 10 times higher than that when copper was used as substrate. For 1-adamantylamine, as low as 20 pg (132.2 fmol) was successfully detected. The active ingredient in (Compound Paracetamol and 1-Adamantylamine Hydrochloride Capsules), 1-adamantylamine, can be sensitively detected at an amount as low as 150 pg, when the medicine stock solution was diluted with urine. Monosaccharide and oligosaccharides in Allium Cepa L. juice was also successfully identified with PAI-LDI. The method did not require matrix-assisted external high voltage or other extra facility-assisted set-ups for desorption/ionization. This study suggested exciting application prospect of pyroelectric materials in matrix- and electricity-free atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry research.

  9. In-Situ Organic Compound Analysis of the Meteorite Surface by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Coupled with an Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naraoka, H.; Hashiguchi, M.

    2016-08-01

    It-situ analysis of organic compounds on the meteorite surface was performed by desorption electrospray ionization coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry. Indigenous peaks of meteorite origin were discriminated from the background.

  10. Development of Laser Desorption Imaging Mass Spectrometry Methods to Investigate the Molecular Composition of Latent Fingermarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauzon, Nidia; Dufresne, Martin; Chauhan, Vinita; Chaurand, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    For a century, fingermark analysis has been one of the most important and common methods in forensic investigations. Modern chemical analysis technologies have added the potential to determine the molecular composition of fingermarks and possibly identify chemicals a suspect may have come into contact with. Improvements in analytical detection of the molecular composition of fingermarks is therefore of great importance. In this regard, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and laser desorption ionization (LDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) have proven to be useful technologies for fingermark analysis. In these analyses, the choice of ionizing agent and its mode of deposition are critical steps for the identification of molecular markers. Here we propose two novel and complementary IMS approaches for endogenous and exogenous substance detection in fingermarks: sublimation of 2-mercaptobenzothiazol (2-MBT) matrix and silver sputtering.

  11. Large scale nanoparticle screening for small molecule analysis in laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yagnik, Gargey B.; Hansen, Rebecca L.; Korte, Andrew R.; Reichert, Malinda D.; Vela, Javier; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-08-30

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as efficient matrixes for small molecule profiling and imaging by laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), but so far there has been no systematic study comparing different NPs in the analysis of various classes of small molecules. Here, we present a large scale screening of 13 NPs for the analysis of two dozen small metabolite molecules. Many NPs showed much higher LDI efficiency than organic matrixes in positive mode and some NPs showed comparable efficiencies for selected analytes in negative mode. Our results suggest that a thermally driven desorption process is a key factor for metal oxide NPs, but chemical interactions are also very important, especially for other NPs. Furthermore, the screening results provide a useful guideline for the selection of NPs in the LDI-MS analysis of small molecules.

  12. Large Scale Nanoparticle Screening for Small Molecule Analysis in Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yagnik, Gargey B; Hansen, Rebecca L; Korte, Andrew R; Reichert, Malinda D; Vela, Javier; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-09-20

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as efficient matrixes for small molecule profiling and imaging by laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), but so far there has been no systematic study comparing different NPs in the analysis of various classes of small molecules. Here, we present a large scale screening of 13 NPs for the analysis of two dozen small metabolite molecules. Many NPs showed much higher LDI efficiency than organic matrixes in positive mode and some NPs showed comparable efficiencies for selected analytes in negative mode. Our results suggest that a thermally driven desorption process is a key factor for metal oxide NPs, but chemical interactions are also very important, especially for other NPs. The screening results provide a useful guideline for the selection of NPs in the LDI-MS analysis of small molecules.

  13. Large scale nanoparticle screening for small molecule analysis in laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yagnik, Gargey B.; Hansen, Rebecca L.; Korte, Andrew R.; Reichert, Malinda D.; Vela, Javier; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-08-30

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as efficient matrixes for small molecule profiling and imaging by laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), but so far there has been no systematic study comparing different NPs in the analysis of various classes of small molecules. Here, we present a large scale screening of 13 NPs for the analysis of two dozen small metabolite molecules. Many NPs showed much higher LDI efficiency than organic matrixes in positive mode and some NPs showed comparable efficiencies for selected analytes in negative mode. Our results suggest that a thermally driven desorption process is a key factor for metal oxide NPs, but chemical interactions are also very important, especially for other NPs. Furthermore, the screening results provide a useful guideline for the selection of NPs in the LDI-MS analysis of small molecules.

  14. Large scale nanoparticle screening for small molecule analysis in laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Yagnik, Gargey B.; Hansen, Rebecca L.; Korte, Andrew R.; ...

    2016-08-30

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as efficient matrixes for small molecule profiling and imaging by laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), but so far there has been no systematic study comparing different NPs in the analysis of various classes of small molecules. Here, we present a large scale screening of 13 NPs for the analysis of two dozen small metabolite molecules. Many NPs showed much higher LDI efficiency than organic matrixes in positive mode and some NPs showed comparable efficiencies for selected analytes in negative mode. Our results suggest that a thermally driven desorption process is a key factor for metalmore » oxide NPs, but chemical interactions are also very important, especially for other NPs. Furthermore, the screening results provide a useful guideline for the selection of NPs in the LDI-MS analysis of small molecules.« less

  15. Fast Differential Analysis of Propolis Using Surface Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xue-yong; Guo, Xia-li; Luo, Huo-lin; Fang, Xiao-wei; Zhu, Teng-gao; Zhang, Xing-lei; Chen, Huan-wen; Luo, Li-ping

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectral fingerprints of 24 raw propolis samples, including 23 from China and one from the United States, were directly obtained using surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (SDAPCI-MS) without sample pretreatment. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the most abundant signals were detected in the mass ranges of 70 to 500 m/z and 200 to 350 m/z, respectively. Principal component analyses (PCA) for the two mass ranges showed similarities in that the colors had a significant correlation with the first two PCs; in contrast there was no correlation with the climatic zones from which the samples originated. Analytes such as chrysin, pinocembrin, and quercetin were detected and identified using multiple stage mass spectrometry within 3 min. Therefore, SDAPCI-MS can be used for rapid and reliable high-throughput analysis of propolis. PMID:26339245

  16. Molecular typing of Meningiomas by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Surgical Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Norton, Isaiah; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Dunn, Ian F.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2014-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most frequent intracranial tumors. The majority is benign slow-growing tumors but they can be difficult to treat depending on their location and size. While meningiomas are well delineated on magnetic resonance imaging by their uptake of contrast, surgical limitations still present themselves from not knowing the extent of invasion of the dura matter by meningioma cells. The development of tools to characterize tumor tissue in real or near real time could prevent recurrence after tumor resection by allowing for more precise surgery, i.e. removal of tumor with preservation of healthy tissue. The development of ambient ionization mass spectrometry for molecular characterization of tissue and its implementation in the surgical decision-making workflow carry the potential to fulfill this need. Here, we present the characterization of meningioma and dura mater by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to validate the technique for the molecular assessment of surgical margins and diagnosis of meningioma from surgical tissue in real-time. Nine stereotactically resected surgical samples and three autopsy samples were analyzed by standard histopathology and mass spectrometry imaging. All samples indicated a strong correlation between results from both techniques. We then highlight the value of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the molecular subtyping/subgrouping of meningiomas from a series of forty genetically characterized specimens. The minimal sample preparation required for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry offers a distinct advantage for applications relying on real-time information such as surgical decision-making. The technology here was tested to distinguish meningioma from dura mater as an approach to precisely define surgical margins. In addition we classify meningiomas into fibroblastic and meningothelial subtypes and more notably recognize meningiomas with NF2 genetic aberrations. PMID

  17. Desorption electro-flow focusing ionization of explosives and narcotics for ambient pressure mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas P; Brewer, Tim M; Gillen, Greg

    2013-10-07

    Desorption electro-flow focusing ionization (DEFFI), a desorption-based ambient ion source, was developed, characterized, and evaluated as a possible source for field deployable ambient pressure mass spectrometry (APMS). DEFFI, based on an electro-flow focusing system, provides a unique configuration for the generation of highly charged energetic droplets for sample analysis and ionization. A concentrically flowing carrier gas focuses the liquid emanating from a capillary through a small orifice, generating a steady fluid jet. An electric field is applied across this jet formation region, producing high velocity charged droplets that impinge on an analyte laden surface. This configuration separates the jet charging region from the external environment, eliminating detrimental effects from droplet space charge or target surface charging. The sample desorption and ionization processes operate similar to desorption electrospray ionization (DESI). DEFFI demonstrated strong signal intensities and improved signal-to-noise ratios in both positive and negative mode mass spectrometry for narcotics, i.e., cocaine, and explosives, i.e., cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), respectively. A characterization of DEFFI ionization mechanisms identified operation regimes of both electrospray and corona discharge based analyte ionization, as well as limitations in overall signal. In addition, the DEFFI response was directly compared to DESI-MS under similar operating conditions. This comparison established a wider and more stable optimal operating range, while requiring an order of magnitude lower applied gas pressure and applied potential for DEFFI than DESI. These reductions are due to the physical mode of jet formation and geometric configuration differences between DEFFI and DESI, pointing to a potential benefit of DEFFI-MS for field implementation.

  18. Ambient femtosecond laser vaporization and nanosecond laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, Paul; Levis, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations of ambient laser-based transfer of molecules into the gas phase for subsequent mass spectral analysis have undergone a renaissance resulting from the separation of vaporization and ionization events. Here, we seek to provide a snapshot of recent femtosecond (fs) duration laser vaporization and nanosecond (ns) duration laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments. The former employs pulse durations of <100 fs to enable matrix-free laser vaporization with little or no fragmentation. When coupled to electrospray ionization, femtosecond laser vaporization provides a universal, rapid mass spectral analysis method requiring no sample workup. Remarkably, laser pulses with intensities exceeding 10(13) W cm(-2) desorb intact macromolecules, such as proteins, and even preserve the condensed phase of folded or unfolded protein structures according to the mass spectral charge state distribution, as demonstrated for cytochrome c and lysozyme. Because of the ability to vaporize and ionize multiple components from complex mixtures for subsequent analysis, near perfect classification of explosive formulations, plant tissue phenotypes, and even the identity of the manufacturer of smokeless powders can be determined by multivariate statistics. We also review the more mature field of nanosecond laser desorption for ambient mass spectrometry, covering the wide range of systems analyzed, the need for resonant absorption, and the spatial imaging of complex systems like tissue samples.

  19. Ambient Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanosecond Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanigan, Paul; Levis, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Recent investigations of ambient laser-based transfer of molecules into the gas phase for subsequent mass spectral analysis have undergone a renaissance resulting from the separation of vaporization and ionization events. Here, we seek to provide a snapshot of recent femtosecond (fs) duration laser vaporization and nanosecond (ns) duration laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments. The former employs pulse durations of <100 fs to enable matrix-free laser vaporization with little or no fragmentation. When coupled to electrospray ionization, femtosecond laser vaporization provides a universal, rapid mass spectral analysis method requiring no sample workup. Remarkably, laser pulses with intensities exceeding 1013 W cm-2 desorb intact macromolecules, such as proteins, and even preserve the condensed phase of folded or unfolded protein structures according to the mass spectral charge state distribution, as demonstrated for cytochrome c and lysozyme. Because of the ability to vaporize and ionize multiple components from complex mixtures for subsequent analysis, near perfect classification of explosive formulations, plant tissue phenotypes, and even the identity of the manufacturer of smokeless powders can be determined by multivariate statistics. We also review the more mature field of nanosecond laser desorption for ambient mass spectrometry, covering the wide range of systems analyzed, the need for resonant absorption, and the spatial imaging of complex systems like tissue samples.

  20. Towards matrix-free femtosecond-laser desorption mass spectrometry for in situ space research.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Pavel; Grimaudo, Valentine; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter; Broekmann, Peter

    2016-04-30

    There is an increasing interest in the quest for low molecular weight biomarkers that can be studied on extra-terrestrial objects by direct laser desorption mass spectrometry (LD-MS). Although molecular structure investigations have recently been carried out by direct LD-MS approaches, there is still a lack of suitable instruments for implementation on a spacecraft due to weight, size and power consumption demands. In this contribution we demonstrate the feasibility of LD-MS structural analysis of molecular species by a miniature laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometer (instrument name LMS) originally designed for in situ elemental and isotope analysis of solids in space research. Direct LD-MS studies with molecular resolution were carried out by means of a Laser Ablation/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LIMS) technique. Two polymer samples served as model systems: neutral polyethylene glycol (PEG) and cationic polymerizates of imidazole and epichlorohydrin (IMEP). Optimal conditions for molecular fragmentation could be identified for both polymers by tuning the laser energy and the instrument-sample distance. PEG and IMEP polymers show sufficient stability over a relatively wide laser energy range. Under mild LD conditions only moderate fragmentation of the polymers takes place so that valuable structural characterization based on fragment ions can be achieved. As the applied laser pulse energy rises, the abundance of fragment ions increases, reaches a plateau and subsequently drops down due to more severe fragmentation and atomization of the polymers. At this final stage, usually referred to as laser ablation, only elemental/isotope analysis can be achieved. Our investigations demonstrate the versatility of the LMS instrument that can be tuned to favourable laser desorption conditions that successfully meet molecule-specific requirements and deliver abundant fragment ion signals with detailed structural information. Overall, the results show promise for use in

  1. Laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry of antibiotic-treated bacterial biofilms using tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Gasper, Gerald L; Takahashi, Lynelle K; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Moore, Jerry F; Hanley, Luke

    2010-09-01

    Laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) with 8.0-12.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation is used to single photon ionize antibiotics and extracellular neutrals that are laser desorbed both from neat and intact bacterial biofilms. Neat antibiotics are optimally detected using 10.5 eV LDPI-MS but can be ionized using 8.0 eV radiation, in agreement with prior work using 7.87 eV LDPI-MS. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation also postionizes laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotics and extracellular material from within intact bacterial biofilms. Different extracellular material is observed by LDPI-MS in response to rifampicin or trimethoprim antibiotic treatment. Once again, 10.5 eV LDPI-MS displays the optimum trade-off between improved sensitivity and minimum fragmentation. Higher energy photons at 12.5 eV produce significant parent ion signal, but fragment intensity and other low mass ions are also enhanced. No matrix is added to enhance desorption, which is performed at peak power densities insufficient to directly produce ions, thus allowing observation of true VUV postionization mass spectra of antibiotic treated biofilms.

  2. Laser Desorption Postionization Mass Spectrometry of Antibiotic-Treated Bacterial Biofilms using Tunable Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gasper, Gerald L; Takahashi, Lynelle K; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Moore, Jerry F; Hanley, Luke

    2010-08-04

    Laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) with 8.0 ? 12.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation is used to single photon ionize antibiotics andextracellular neutrals that are laser desorbed both neat and from intact bacterial biofilms. Neat antibiotics are optimally detected using 10.5 eV LDPI-MS, but can be ionized using 8.0 eV radiation, in agreement with prior work using 7.87 eV LDPI-MS. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation also postionizes laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotics and extracellular material from within intact bacterial biofilms. Different extracellular material is observed by LDPI-MS in response to rifampicin or trimethoprim antibiotic treatment. Once again, 10.5 eV LDPI-MS displays the optimum trade-off between improved sensitivity and minimum fragmentation. Higher energy photons at 12.5 eV produce significant parent ion signal, but fragment intensity and other low mass ions are also enhanced. No matrix is added to enhance desorption, which is performed at peak power densities insufficient to directly produce ions, thus allowing observation of true VUV postionization mass spectra of antibiotic treated biofilms.

  3. Laser Desorption Postionization Mass Spectrometry of Antibiotic-Treated Bacterial Biofilms using Tunable Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, Gerald L.; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Moore, Jerry F.; Hanley, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) with 8.0 – 12.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation is used to single photon ionize antibiotics and extracellular neutrals that are laser desorbed both neat and from intact bacterial biofilms. Neat antibiotics are optimally detected using 10.5 eV LDPI-MS, but can be ionized using 8.0 eV radiation, in agreement with prior work using 7.87 eV LDPI-MS. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation also postionizes laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotics and extracellular material from within intact bacterial biofilms. Different extracellular material is observed by LDPI-MS in response to rifampicin or trimethoprim antibiotic treatment. Once again, 10.5 eV LDPI-MS displays the optimum trade-off between improved sensitivity and minimum fragmentation. Higher energy photons at 12.5 eV produce significant parent ion signal, but fragment intensity and other low mass ions are also enhanced. No matrix is added to enhance desorption, which is performed at peak power densities insufficient to directly produce ions, thus allowing observation of true VUV postionization mass spectra of antibiotic treated biofilms. PMID:20712373

  4. Identification of Microalgae by Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Multiple Nanomatrices.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lung-Hsiang; Unnikrishnan, Binesh; Shih, Chi-Yu; Hsiung, Tung-Ming; Chang, Jeng; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Chiu, Tai-Chia; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a simple method to identify microalgae by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) using three different substrates: HgSe, HgTe, and HgTeSe nanostructures. The fragmentation/ionization processes of complex molecules in algae varied according to the heat absorption and transfer efficiency of the nanostructured matrices (NMs). Therefore, the mass spectra obtained for microalgae showed different patterns of m/z values for different NMs. The spectra contained both significant and nonsignificant peaks. Constructing a Venn diagram with the significant peaks obtained for algae when using HgSe, HgTe, and HgTeSe NMs in m/z ratio range 100-1000, a unique relationship among the three sets of values was obtained. This unique relationship of sets is different for each species of microalgae. Therefore, by observing the particular relationship of sets, we successfully identified different algae such as Isochrysis galbana, Emiliania huxleyi, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Nannochloris sp., Skeletonema cf. costatum, and Tetraselmis chui. This simple and cost-effective SALDI-MS analysis method coupled with multi-nanomaterials as substrates may be extended to identify other microalgae and microorganisms in real samples. Graphical Abstract Identification of microalgae by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry coupled with three different mercury-based nanosubstrates.

  5. Chemical reactivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Enjalbal; Sauvagnat; Lamaty; Lazaro; Martinez; Mouchet; Roux; Aubagnac

    1999-01-01

    During the control of a multistep organic synthesis on a soluble polymer (PEG) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry, a chemical reactivity was encountered when the matrix was acidic, for the samples where the amino moiety of the anchored compounds was protected as a Schiff base. Such imine hydrolysis was proven to be solely mediated by the acidic matrix during analyses since the expected protected structures were detected when the experiments were duplicated with a non-acidic matrix. Even if MALDI mass spectrometry was found to be more convenient than electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the monitoring of liquid phase organic syntheses, the chemical reactivity imparted by the use of a matrix must be taken into account to avoid erroneous spectra interpretations. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Imaging of Lipids and Metabolites Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-17

    In recent years, mass spectroscopy imaging (MSI) has emerged as a foundational technique in metabolomics and drug screening providing deeper understanding of complex mechanistic pathways within biochemical systems and biological organisms. We have been invited to contribute a chapter to a new Springer series volume, entitled “Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Small Molecules”. The volume is planned for the highly successful lab protocol series Methods in Molecular Biology, published by Humana Press, USA. The volume is aimed to equip readers with step-by-step mass spectrometric imaging protocols and bring rapidly maturing methods of MS imaging to life science researchers. The chapter will provide a detailed protocol of ambient MSI by use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization.

  7. Elemental and isotopic analysis of inorganic salts by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jayasekharan, T.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-05

    Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is applied for the analysis of elements as well as their isotopic composition in different inorganic salts. At very low laser energies the inorganic ions are desorbed and ionized from the thin layer of the sample surface. The naturally occurring isotopes of alkali and silver ions are resolved using time of flight mass spectrometer. Further increase in laser energy shows the appearance of Al, Cr, and Fe ions in the mass spectra. This indicates the penetration laser beam beyond the sample surface leading to the ablation of sample target at higher energies. The simultaneous appearance of atomic ions from the sample target at relatively higher laser energies hampers the unambiguous identification of amino acid residues from the biomolecular ions in MALDI-MS.

  8. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of discrete mass poly(butylene glutarate) oligomers.

    PubMed

    Williams, John B; Chapman, Toby M; Hercules, David M

    2003-07-01

    The mass dependency of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) response has been studied using equimolar mixtures of synthetic discrete mass poly(butylene glutarate) (PBG) oligomers of known structure having degrees of polymerization of 8, 16, 32, and 64. Mass discrimination observed was attributed to choice of matrix and detector saturation caused by higher laser intensity and inclusion of matrix ions in the MALDI spectra. Optimization of sample preparation and instrumental parameters provided uniform response over the mass ranged spanned by these four oligomers. The oligomer mixture was shown to serve as a model of more complex polymer distributions in the mass range 780-6000 Da, and application of the discrete mass oligomers as internal and calibration standards was demonstrated. Inclusion of PBG discrete mass oligomers as an internal standard in a quasi-equimolar mixture with polydispersed poly(butylene adipate) (PBA) indicated that some diminution of response occurred during the analysis of this mixture of materials. Reasons for differences in the corrected molecular weight averages of the polydispersed PBA obtained from measurements using MALDI and GPC were studied using individual discrete mass oligomers as calibration standards for GPC. The data indicated that differences in hydrodynamic volumes of PBG oligomers and PEG standards at similar masses resulted in an overestimation by GPC of the molecular weight averages of the PBA distribution.

  9. Trace Level Detection of Explosives in Solution Using Leidenfrost Phenomenon Assisted Thermal Desorption Ambient Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Shida, Yasuo; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    The present paper demonstrates the detection of explosives in solution using thermal desorption technique at a temperature higher than Leidenfrost temperature of the solvent in combination with low temperature plasma (LTP) ionization. Leidenfrost temperature of a solvent is the temperature above which the solvent droplet starts levitation instead of splashing when placed on a hot metallic surface. During this desorption process, slow and gentle solvent evaporation takes place, which leads to the pre-concentration of less-volatile explosive molecules in the droplet and the explosive molecules are released at the last moment of droplet evaporation. The limits of detection for explosives studied by using this thermal desorption LTP ionization method varied in a range of 1 to 10 parts per billion (ppb) using a droplet volume of 20 μL (absolute sample amount 90–630 fmol). As LTP ionization method was applied and ion–molecule reactions took place in ambient atmosphere, various ion–molecule adduct species like [M+NO2]−, [M+NO3]−, [M+HCO3]−, [M+HCO4]− were generated together with [M−H]− peak. Each peak was unambiguously identified using ‘Exactive Orbitrap’ mass spectrometer in negative ionization mode within 3 ppm deviation compared to its exact mass. This newly developed technique was successfully applied to detect four explosives contained in the pond water and soil sample with minor sample pre-treatment and the explosives were detected with ppb levels. The present method is simple, rapid and can detect trace levels of explosives with high specificity from solutions. PMID:24349927

  10. Trace level detection of explosives in solution using leidenfrost phenomenon assisted thermal desorption ambient mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Shida, Yasuo; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    The present paper demonstrates the detection of explosives in solution using thermal desorption technique at a temperature higher than Leidenfrost temperature of the solvent in combination with low temperature plasma (LTP) ionization. Leidenfrost temperature of a solvent is the temperature above which the solvent droplet starts levitation instead of splashing when placed on a hot metallic surface. During this desorption process, slow and gentle solvent evaporation takes place, which leads to the pre-concentration of less-volatile explosive molecules in the droplet and the explosive molecules are released at the last moment of droplet evaporation. The limits of detection for explosives studied by using this thermal desorption LTP ionization method varied in a range of 1 to 10 parts per billion (ppb) using a droplet volume of 20 μL (absolute sample amount 90-630 fmol). As LTP ionization method was applied and ion-molecule reactions took place in ambient atmosphere, various ion-molecule adduct species like [M+NO2](-), [M+NO3](-), [M+HCO3](-), [M+HCO4](-) were generated together with [M-H](-) peak. Each peak was unambiguously identified using 'Exactive Orbitrap' mass spectrometer in negative ionization mode within 3 ppm deviation compared to its exact mass. This newly developed technique was successfully applied to detect four explosives contained in the pond water and soil sample with minor sample pre-treatment and the explosives were detected with ppb levels. The present method is simple, rapid and can detect trace levels of explosives with high specificity from solutions.

  11. Determination of proflavine in rat whole blood without sample pretreatment by laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiaxin; Hu, Yongjun; Lu, Qiao; Wang, Pengchao; Zhan, Huaqi

    2017-02-10

    A novel pretreatment-free method involving laser desorption postionization (LDPI) coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) was developed for the monitoring of proflavine level in rat whole blood. It comprises a protocol for dosing via intravenous administration and collection of whole blood, followed by direct LDPI-MS analysis without any sample pretreatment. An intense ion signal at m/z 209 was observed from whole blood without any interference signals, except some background signals below m/z 100. The calibration curve was established with use of 9-phenylacridine as the internal standard for proflavine determination from the plotting of the peak ratios of proflavine to the internal standard, with a correlation coefficient (R (2)) greater than 0.99. The limit of detection was estimated to be 0.48 pmol/mm(2) and the quantification range was 0.5-16.5 μg/mL for proflavine. In addition, only a minimal matrix effect was observed, as expected from considerations of the desorption and ionization mechanism. Interday and intraday accuracy and precision were calculated to be within 13% and 82-114%, respectively. Estimated concentrations of proflavine residue in whole blood were also successfully obtained at selected time points after dosing. The proposed method is simple, low cost, and sensitive, and should be seen as a complementary method for monitoring drug levels in blood. Graphical Abstract Monitoring proflavine levels in rat whole blood at different time points using laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS).

  12. Internal energy deposition with silicon nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SPALDI) mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, Shai; Hua, Yimin; Boday, Dylan J.; Somogyi, Arpad; Wysocki, Ronald J.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2009-06-01

    The use of silicon nanoparticles for laser desorption/ionization (LDI) is a new appealing matrix-less approach for the selective and sensitive mass spectrometry of small molecules in MALDI instruments. Chemically modified silicon nanoparticles (30 nm) were previously found to require very low laser fluence in order to induce efficient LDI, which raised the question of internal energy deposition processes in that system. Here we report a comparative study of internal energy deposition from silicon nanoparticles to previously explored benzylpyridinium (BP) model compounds during LDI experiments. The internal energy deposition in silicon nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SPALDI) with different fluorinated linear chain modifiers (decyl, hexyl and propyl) was compared to LDI from untreated silicon nanoparticles and from the organic matrix, [alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). The energy deposition to internal vibrational modes was evaluated by molecular ion survival curves and indicated that the ions produced by SPALDI have an internal energy threshold of 2.8-3.7 eV. This is slightly lower than the internal energy induced using the organic CHCA matrix, with similar molecular survival curves as previously reported for LDI off silicon nanowires. However, the internal energy associated with desorption/ionization from the silicon nanoparticles is significantly lower than that reported for desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS). The measured survival yields in SPALDI gradually decrease with increasing laser fluence, contrary to reported results for silicon nanowires. The effect of modification of the silicon particle surface with semifluorinated linear chain silanes, including fluorinated decyl (C10), fluorinated hexyl (C6) and fluorinated propyl (C3) was explored too. The internal energy deposited increased with a decrease in the length of the modifier alkyl chain. Unmodified silicon particles exhibited the highest analyte internal energy

  13. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Gregory T.; Wilhide, Joshua A.; LaCourse, William R.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot.

  14. Microfabricated glow discharge plasma (MFGDP) for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuelu; Zhan, Xuefang; Yuan, Xin; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2013-10-01

    A novel ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry, microfabricated glow discharge plasma (MFGDP), is reported. This device is made of a millimeter-sized ceramic cavity with two platinum electrodes positioned face-to-face. He or Ar plasma can be generated by a direct current voltage of several hundreds of volts requiring a total power below 4 W. The thermal plume temperature of the He plasma was measured and found to be between 25 and 80 °C at a normal discharge current. Gaseous, liquid, creamy, and solid samples with molecular weights up to 1.5 kDa could be examined in both positive and negative mode, giving limits of detection (LOD) at or below the fg/mm(2) level. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of manual sampling ranged from 10% to ~20%, while correlation coefficients of the working curve (R(2)) are all above 0.98 with the addition of internal standards. The ionization mechanisms are examed via both optical and mass spectrometry. Due to the low temperature characteristics of the microplasma, nonthermal momentum desorption is considered to dominate the desorption process.

  15. Laser desorption mass spectrometry and small angle neutron scattering of heavy fossil materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1997-09-01

    The determination of the structural building blocks and the molecular weight range of heavy hydrocarbon materials is of crucial importance in research on their reactivity and for their processing. The chemically and physically heterogenous nature of heavy hydrocarbon materials, such as coals, heavy petroleum fractions, and residues, dictates that their structure and reactivity patterns be complicated. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the molecular structure and molecular weight distribution of these materials is not dependent on a single molecule, but on a complex mixture of molecules which vary among coals and heavy petroleum samples. Laser Desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) is emerging as a technique for molecular weight determination having found widespread use in biological polymer research, but is still a relatively new technique in the fossil fuel area. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) provides information on the size and shape of heavy fossil materials. SANS offers the advantages of high penetration power even in thick cells at high temperatures and high contrast for hydrocarbon systems dispersed in deuterated solvents. LDMS coupled with time of flight has the advantages of high sensitivity and transmission and high mass range. We have used LDMS to examine various heavy fossil-derived materials including: long chain hydrocarbons, asphaltenes from petroleum vacuum resids, and coals. This paper describes the application of laser desorption and small angle neutron scattering techniques to the analysis of components in coals, petroleum resids and unsaturated polymers.

  16. Revisiting the quantitative features of surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Yi; Lee, Kai-Chieh; Kuo, Yen-Ling; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-10-28

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) is frequently used to analyse small organics owing to its clean background. Inorganic materials can be used as energy absorbers and the transfer medium to facilitate the desorption/ionization of analytes; thus, they are used as SALDI-assisting materials. Many studies have demonstrated the usefulness of SALDI-MS in quantitative analysis of small organics. However, some characteristics occurring in SALDI-MS require certain attention to ensure the reliability of the quantitative analysis results. The appearance of a coffee-ring effect in SALDI sample preparation is the primary factor that can affect quantitative SALDI-MS analysis results. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reports relating to quantitative SALDI-MS analysis that discuss or consider this effect. In this study, the coffee-ring effect is discussed using nanoparticles and nanostructured substrates as SALDI-assisting materials to show how this effect influences SALDI-MS analysis results. Potential solutions for overcoming the existing problems are also suggested.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  17. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry of vacuum UV photo-processed methanol ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, D. M.; Bossa, J.-B.; Linnartz, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Methanol in the interstellar medium mainly forms upon sequential hydrogenation of solid CO. With typical abundances of up to 15% (with respect to water) it is an important constituent of interstellar ices where it is considered as a precursor in the formation of large and complex organic molecules (COMs), e.g. upon vacuum UV (VUV) photo-processing or exposure to cosmic rays. Aims: This study aims at detecting novel complex organic molecules formed during the VUV photo-processing of methanol ice in the laboratory using a technique more sensitive than regular surface diagnostic tools. In addition, the formation kinetics of the main photo-products of methanol are unravelled for an astronomically relevant temperature (20 K) and radiation dose. Methods: The VUV photo-processing of CH3OH ice is studied by applying laser desorption post-ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDPI TOF-MS), and analysed by combining molecule-specific fragmentation and desorption features. Results: The mass spectra correspond to fragment ions originating from a number of previously recorded molecules and from new COMs, such as the series (CO)xH, with x = 3 and y < 3x-1, to which prebiotic glycerin belongs. The formation of these large COMs has not been reported in earlier photolysis studies and suggests that such complex species may form in the solid state under interstellar conditions.

  18. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Winter, Gregory T; Wilhide, Joshua A; LaCourse, William R

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot.

  19. Ammonium Bicarbonate Addition Improves the Detection of Proteins by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarvar, Elahe; Venter, Andre R.

    2017-03-01

    The analysis of protein by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is considered impractical due to a mass-dependent loss in sensitivity with increase in protein molecular weights. With the addition of ammonium bicarbonate to the DESI-MS analysis the sensitivity towards proteins by DESI was improved. The signal to noise ratio (S/N) improvement for a variety of proteins increased between 2- to 3-fold relative to solvent systems containing formic acid and more than seven times relative to aqueous methanol spray solvents. Three methods for ammonium bicarbonate addition during DESI-MS were investigated. The additive delivered improvements in S/N whether it was mixed with the analyte prior to sample deposition, applied over pre-prepared samples, or simply added to the desorption spray solvent. The improvement correlated well with protein pI but not with protein size. Other ammonium or bicarbonate salts did not produce similar improvements in S/N, nor was this improvement in S/N observed for ESI of the same samples. As was previously described for ESI, DESI also caused extensive protein unfolding upon the addition of ammonium bicarbonate.

  20. Desorption ElectroSpray Ionization - Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry of synthetic polymers and copolymers.

    PubMed

    Friia, Manel; Legros, Véronique; Tortajada, Jeanine; Buchmann, William

    2012-08-01

    Desorption ElectroSpray Ionization (DESI) - Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry (MS) was evaluated as a new tool for the characterization of various industrial synthetic polymers (poly(ethylene glycol), poly(propylene glycol), poly(methylmethacrylate), poly(dimethylsiloxane)) and copolymers, with masses ranging from 500 g.mol(-1) up to more than 20 000 g.mol(-1) . Satisfying results in terms of signal stability and sensitivity were obtained from hydrophobic surfaces (HTC Prosolia) with a mixture water/methanol (10/90) as spray solvent in the presence of sodium salt. Taking into account the formation of multiplied charged species by DESI-MS, a strategy based on the use of a deconvolution software followed by the automatic assignment of the ions was described allowing the rapid determination of M(n) , M(w) and PDI values. DESI-Orbitrap MS results were compared to those obtained from matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization- time-of-flight MS and gel permeation chromatography. An application of DESI-Orbitrap MS for the detection and identification of polymers directly from cosmetics was described. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Ammonium Bicarbonate Addition Improves the Detection of Proteins by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarvar, Elahe; Venter, Andre R.

    2017-06-01

    The analysis of protein by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is considered impractical due to a mass-dependent loss in sensitivity with increase in protein molecular weights. With the addition of ammonium bicarbonate to the DESI-MS analysis the sensitivity towards proteins by DESI was improved. The signal to noise ratio (S/N) improvement for a variety of proteins increased between 2- to 3-fold relative to solvent systems containing formic acid and more than seven times relative to aqueous methanol spray solvents. Three methods for ammonium bicarbonate addition during DESI-MS were investigated. The additive delivered improvements in S/N whether it was mixed with the analyte prior to sample deposition, applied over pre-prepared samples, or simply added to the desorption spray solvent. The improvement correlated well with protein pI but not with protein size. Other ammonium or bicarbonate salts did not produce similar improvements in S/N, nor was this improvement in S/N observed for ESI of the same samples. As was previously described for ESI, DESI also caused extensive protein unfolding upon the addition of ammonium bicarbonate. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Multivariate analysis of progressive thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2010-09-01

    Thermal decomposition of poly dimethyl siloxane compounds, Sylgard{reg_sign} 184 and 186, were examined using thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. This work describes a method of producing multiway data using a stepped thermal desorption. The technique involves sequentially heating a sample of the material of interest with subsequent analysis in a commercial GC/MS system. The decomposition chromatograms were analyzed using multivariate analysis tools including principal component analysis (PCA), factor rotation employing the varimax criterion, and multivariate curve resolution. The results of the analysis show seven components related to offgassing of various fractions of siloxanes that vary as a function of temperature. Thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique for analyzing chemical mixtures. It has great potential in numerous analytic areas including materials analysis, sports medicine, in the detection of designer drugs; and biological research for metabolomics. Data analysis is complicated, far from automated and can result in high false positive or false negative rates. We have demonstrated a step-wise TD/GC-MS technique that removes more volatile compounds from a sample before extracting the less volatile compounds. This creates an additional dimension of separation before the GC column, while simultaneously generating three-way data. Sandia's proven multivariate analysis methods, when applied to these data, have several advantages over current commercial options. It also has demonstrated potential for success in finding and enabling identification of trace compounds. Several challenges remain, however, including understanding the sources of noise in the data, outlier detection, improving the data pretreatment and analysis methods, developing a software tool for ease of use by the chemist, and demonstrating our belief that

  3. New sample preparation for quantitative laser desorption mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefliger, Olivier P.; Zenobi, Renato

    1998-04-01

    Several analytical mass spectrometric and optical spectroscopic methods require a step during which a nonvolatile substance is desorbed by a laser pulse. It is, however, very difficult to use these methods for quantitative measurements because an accurate control over the amount desorbed by the laser pulse is generally not possible, especially when mixtures of several substances are used. We report a new fast and convenient sample preparation procedure that solves these problems. A solution of the analytes is mixed with a solution of poly(vinyl chloride) to obtain a homogeneous and vacuum-stable thin polymer membrane after the solvent has evaporated. Laser ablation is then performed directly from this membrane, allowing an accurate control of the amount of ablated analytes and excellent reproducibility. Quantitative laser desorption mass spectrometry over three orders of magnitude as well as optical spectroscopic measurements using this sample preparation method are demonstrated for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  4. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry: In Situ Molecular Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Peggi M.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a relatively new imaging modality that allows mapping of a wide range of biomolecules within a thin tissue section. The technology uses a laser beam to directly desorb and ionize molecules from discrete locations on the tissue that are subsequently recorded in a mass spectrometer. IMS is distinguished by the ability to directly measure molecules in situ ranging from small metabolites to proteins, reporting hundreds to thousands of expression patterns from a single imaging experiment. This article reviews recent advances in IMS technology, applications, and experimental strategies that allow it to significantly aid in the discovery and understanding of molecular processes in biological and clinical samples. PMID:23259809

  5. Rapid determination of drugs and semivolatile organics by direct thermal desorption ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Ilgner, R.H.; Buchanan, M.V.; Guerin, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Direct thermal desorption of analytes into an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) is being investigated as a technique for the rapid screening of a wide variety of samples for target semivolatile organic compounds. This includes the direct detection of drugs in physiological fluids, semivolatile organic pollutants in water and waste samples, and air pollutants collected on sorbent cartridges. In order to minimize the analysis time, chromatographic separation is not performed on the sample prior to introduction into the ITMS. Instead, selective chemical ionization and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) are used achieve the specificity required for the target analytes. Detection limits are typically 10--50 ppb using a 1 uL aliquot of a liquid sample without preconcentration. Sample turn-around time is 2 to 5 minutes and 3 to 5 target analytes can be quantitatively determined simultaneously. 6 figs.

  6. Atomic force microscope controlled topographical imaging and proximal probe thermal desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kjoller, Kevin; Hurst, Gregory B; Pelletier, Dale A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-21

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nanothermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed, and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 μm × 0.8 μm) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 μm × 2.0 μm), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  7. Atomic Force Microscope Controlled Topographical Imaging and Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kjoller, Kevin; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Pelletier, Dale A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nano-thermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 m x 0.8 m) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 m x 2.0 m), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  8. Cobalt coated substrate for matrix-free analysis of small molecules by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin, Talat; Li, Liang

    2009-12-01

    Small molecule analysis is one of the most challenging issues in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. We have developed a cobalt coated substrate as a target for matrix-free analysis of small molecules in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Cobalt coating of 60-70 nm thickness has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. This target facilitates hundreds of samples to be spotted and analyzed without mixing any matrices, in a very short time. This can save a lot of time and money and can be a very practical approach for the analysis of small molecules by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  9. Analysis of nitrogen-based explosives with desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, T J; Flink, A; Pukkila, J; Ketola, R A

    2016-02-28

    Fast methods that allow the in situ analysis of explosives from a variety of surfaces are needed in crime scene investigations and home-land security. Here, the feasibility of the ambient mass spectrometry technique desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) in the analysis of the most common nitrogen-based explosives is studied. DAPPI and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) were compared in the direct analysis of trinitrotoluene (TNT), trinitrophenol (picric acid), octogen (HMX), cyclonite (RDX), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and nitroglycerin (NG). The effect of different additives in DAPPI dopant and in DESI spray solvent on the ionization efficiency was tested, as well as the suitability of DAPPI to detect explosives from a variety of surfaces. The analytes showed ions only in negative ion mode. With negative DAPPI, TNT and picric acid formed deprotonated molecules with all dopant systems, while RDX, HMX, PETN and NG were ionized by adduct formation. The formation of adducts was enhanced by addition of chloroform, formic acid, acetic acid or nitric acid to the DAPPI dopant. DAPPI was more sensitive than DESI for TNT, while DESI was more sensitive for HMX and picric acid. DAPPI could become an important method for the direct analysis of nitroaromatics from a variety of surfaces. For compounds that are thermally labile, or that have very low vapor pressure, however, DESI is better suited. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Characterization of ballpoint pen inks by thermal and desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen H; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2005-09-01

    The characterization of ink on paper is of importance for dating and comparing questioned ink entries in forensic document examination. Inks are commonly characterized by their colorant profile that is identified by well-established analytical methods. Numerous ink formulations show identical colorant profiles, though. In order to differentiate inks that are not distinguishable by colorant analysis, a method for the characterization of colorless ink ingredients, namely binders, solvents and additives is necessary. In this paper, we propose a technique for the analysis of colorless compounds in ballpoint inks using direct thermal desorption of the ink on paper followed by chemical analysis of the desorbed volatile compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As compared to liquid extraction and subsequent analysis of the extracts, the technique avoids possible contamination risks. Sensitivity is very high due to the enrichment of volatile components by thermal desorption. Even from old samples, the chromatograms obtained by the method enable the determination of binder polymers, solvents and additives. Pure binders as used by ink manufacturers were analyzed for unambiguous assignment of analytical results to specific polymers. To prove the practical applicability, we analyzed 121 ballpoint pens, not all having the same colorant profile, and grouped the pens into resin and solvent categories.

  11. Detection of Biosignatures by Geomatrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (GALDI) Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jill R. Scott; Beizhan Yan; Daphne L. Stoner; J. Michelle Kotler; Nancy W. Hinman

    2007-04-01

    Identification of mineral-associated biosignatures is of significance for retrieving biochemical information from geological records here on Earth and detecting signs of life on other planets, such as Mars. The importance of the geomatrix for identifying amino acids (e.g., histidine, threonine, and cysteine) and small proteins (e.g., gramicidin S) was investigated by laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry. The investigated geomatrices include analogues of Fe-bearing minerals such as hematite and Na-bearing evaporites (e.g., halite). Samples were prepared by two methods: 1) application of analyte to the geomatrix surface and 2) production of homogenous analyte:geomatrix mixtures. Comparison of the two sample preparation methods revealed that the mixing method produces a better signal/noise ratio than surface application for the analyses of amino acids. The composition of the geomatrix has a profound influence on the detection of biomolecules. Peaks corresponding to the cation-attached biomolecular ions were observed for the Na-bearing evaporite analogue. No detectable peaks for the biomolecular ion species were observed when the biomolecules were associated with Fe-bearing minerals. Instead, only minor peaks were observed that may correspond to ions from fragments of the biomolecules. Depending on the underlying mineral composition, geomatrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization shows promise for directly identifying biosignatures associated with minerals.

  12. High-resolution laser desorption mass spectrometry of peptides and small proteins.

    PubMed Central

    McIver, R T; Li, Y; Hunter, R L

    1994-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) has been used with an external ion source Fourier-transform mass spectrometer to obtain the highest mass resolution ever, to our knowledge, demonstrated for laser-produced ions (m/delta m = 1,100,000 for [Arg8]vasopressin, 228,000 for melittin, and 90,000 for bovine insulin). The peaks in the isotope cluster for bovine insulin are fully resolved, and the mass measurement accuracy is an order of magnitude better than can be achieved with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. With the method described here, analyte is applied to a sample probe and mixed with a solution containing a matrix material (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid) that strongly absorbs ultraviolet light. Upon irradiation with a pulse from an excimer laser (353 nm, 2 mJ), a large number of intact protonated molecular ions are produced. The ions are focused by a 117-cm-long quadrupole ion guide and injected into an ion cyclotron resonance analyzer cell located inside the bore of a 6.5-T superconducting magnet. A pulse of argon buffer gas cools the ions prior to detection. One of the principal advantages of an external ion source Fourier-transform mass spectrometer is that the ion formation and ion detection processes are separated and can be independently optimized. PMID:8197138

  13. Electroless plating of silver nanoparticles on porous silicon for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hong; Xu, Ning; Huang, Wen-Yi; Han, Huan-Mei; Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2009-03-01

    An improved DIOS (desorption ionization on porous silicon) method for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) by electroless plating of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on porous silicon (PSi) was developed. By addition of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) into the AgNO3 plating solution, the plating speed can be slowed down and simultaneously 4-ATP self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on AgNPs (4-ATP/AgNPs) were formed. Both AgNPs and 4-ATP/AgNPs coated PSi substrates present much higher stability, sensitivity and reproducibility for LDI MS than the un-treated porous silicon ones. Their shelf life in air was tested for several weeks to a month and their mass spectra still displayed the same high quality and sensitivity as the freshly prepared ones. And more 4-ATP SAMs partly play a role of matrix to increase the ionization efficiency. A small organic molecule of tetrapyridinporphyrin (TPyP), oligomers of polyethylene glycol (PEG 400 and 2300), and a peptide of oxytocin were used as examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the silver-plated PSi as a matrix-free-like method for LDI MS. This approach can obtain limits of detection to femtomoles for TPyP, subpicomoles for oxytocin, and picomoles for PEG 400 and 2300, comparable to the traditional matrix method and much better than the DIOS method. It simplifies the sample preparation as a matrix-free-like method without addition of matrix molecules and homogenizes the sample spread over the spot for better and more even mass signals.

  14. Generation of CsI cluster ions for mass calibration in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xianwen; van Dongen, Joost L J; Meijer, E W

    2010-07-01

    A simple method was developed for the generation of cesium iodide (CsI) cluster ions up to m/z over 20,000 in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). Calibration ions in both positive and negative ion modes can readily be generated from a single MALDI spot of CsI(3) with 2-[(2E)-3-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-2-methylprop-2-enylidene] malononitrile (DCTB) matrix. The major cluster ion series observed in the positive ion mode is [(CsI)(n)Cs](+), and in the negative ion mode is [(CsI)(n)I](-). In both cluster series, ions spread evenly every 259.81 units. The easy method described here for the production of CsI cluster ions should be useful for MALDI MS calibrations. Copyright 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Silver nanoparticles on zeolite surface for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of low molecular weight compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mengrui; Fujino, Tatsuya

    2013-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles loaded on NH4+-type zeolite, AgNPs-NH4ZSM5, was developed as an inorganic matrix for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of low molecular weight compounds. It was found that AgNPs-NH4ZSM5 could work as an efficient Ag+ donor to ionize analytes and that zeolite worked as a heat bath to prevent the destruction of AgNPs after the photoexcitation. The AgNPs-NH4ZSM5 was applied to laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of biologically active substances with low molecular weights including acetylsalicylic acid, L-histidine, glucose, urea, cholesterol, and those in human serum.

  16. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Mechanistic Studies and Methods for Improving the Structural Identification of Carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yin-Hung; Wang, Yi-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Although matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is one of the most widely used soft ionization methods for biomolecules, the lack of detailed understanding of ionization mechanisms restricts its application in the analysis of carbohydrates. Structural identification of carbohydrates achieved by MALDI mass spectrometry helps us to gain insights into biological functions and pathogenesis of disease. In this review, we highlight mechanistic details of MALDI, including both ionization and desorption. Strategies to improve the ion yield of carbohydrates are also reviewed. Furthermore, commonly used fragmentation methods to identify the structure are discussed. PMID:28959517

  17. Isomeric differentiation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using silver nitrate reactive desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhari, Mohammad; Ismail, Ali I.; Zare, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are nonpolar and difficult to detect by desorption electrospray ionization. We present a new detection method based on cationization with silver ions, which has the added advantage of being able to differentiate PAHs with the same mass but different structure. METHODS 9,10-Diphenylanthracene and triptycene, in addition to four different groups of PAH isomers: (1) anthracene and phenanthrene, (2) pyrene and fluoranthene, (3) benz[a]anthracene, benz[b]anthracene (tetracene), and chrysene (4) benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]fluoranthene, were deposited on a paper surface and bombarded with methanol droplets containing silver nitrate. The resulting microdroplets entered a quadruple mass spectrometer for mass analysis. RESULTS The mass spectrum shows [PAH]+, [Ag + OH + PAH]+, and [Ag(PAH)n]+ n (n = 1, 2) (and [PAH + O2]+ in the case of benz[b]anthracene) ions. PAHs having a bay structure, such as phenanthrene, showed a different tendency to interact with silver ions from those PAHs having a linear arrangement of the fused benzene rings, such as anthracene. The ratios of the [PAH]+ peak intensity to that of [Ag–PAH]+, [Ag + OH + PAH]+, [Ag(PAH)2]+, and [PAH + O2]+ were used to differentiate the PAH isomers sharing the same molecular formula with different structures. For isomeric mixtures the [PAH]+ to [Ag + OH + PAH]+ ratio was found to be the most useful parameter. The uncertainty in the mole fraction of an isomeric mixture was ±0.09, 0.13, ±0.25, and ±0.1 for phenanthrene-anthracene, fl benz[a] anthracene-chrysene, and benzo[a]pyrene-benzo[k]fluoranthene, respectively. CONCLUSIONS A simple method has been developed for the detection of PAHs in desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry based on Ag(I) cationization. The method showed a capability to differentiate PAHs isomers (having the same molecular mass) in isomeric mixture with an uncertainty in the mole fraction of about 0.1. At high inlet temperature

  18. Review of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Imaging Mass Spectrometry for Lipid Biochemical Histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Emine B.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Imaging Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) is a rapidly evolving method used for the in situ visualization and localization of molecules such as drugs, lipids, peptides, and proteins in tissue sections. Therefore, molecules such as lipids, for which antibodies and other convenient detection reagents do not exist, can be detected, quantified, and correlated with histopathology and disease mechanisms. Furthermore, MALDI-IMS has the potential to enhance our understanding of disease pathogenesis through the use of “biochemical histopathology”. Herein, we review the underlying concepts, basic methods, and practical applications of MALDI-IMS, including post-processing steps such as data analysis and identification of molecules. The potential utility of MALDI-IMS as a companion diagnostic aid for lipid-related pathological states is discussed. PMID:26209083

  19. Direct Surface Analysis of Fungal Species by Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, Nancy B. ); Wahl, Jon H. ); Kingsley, Mark T. ); Wahl, Karen L. )

    2001-12-01

    Intact spores and/or hyphae of Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus oryzae, Trichoderma reesei and Phanerochaete chrysosporium are analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). This study investigates various methods of sample preparation and matrices to determine optimum collection and analysis criteria for fungal analysis by MALDI-MS. Fungi are applied to the MALDI sample target as untreated, sonicated, acid/heat treated, or blotted directly from the fungal culture with double-stick tape. Ferulic acid or sinapinic acid matrix solution is layered over the dried samples and analyzed by MALDI-MS. Statistical analysis of the data show that simply using double stick tape to collect and transfer to a MALDI sample plate typically worked as well as the other preparation methods, but requires the least sample handling.

  20. Shotgun Approach for Quantitative Imaging of Phospholipids Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Laskin, Julia

    2014-02-04

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been extensively used for determining spatial distributions of molecules in biological samples, and there is increasing interest in using MSI for quantification. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, or nano-DESI, is an ambient MSI technique where a solvent is used for localized extraction of molecules followed by nanoelectrospray ionization. Doping the nano-DESI solvent with carefully selected standards enables online quantification during MSI experiments. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate this quantification approach can be extended to provide shotgun-like quantification of phospholipids in thin brain tissue sections. Specifically, two phosphatidylcholine (PC) standards were added to the nano-DESI solvent for simultaneous imaging and quantification of 22 PC species observed in nano-DESI MSI. Furthermore, by combining the quantitative data obtained in the individual pixels, we demonstrate quantification of these PC species in seven different regions of a rat brain tissue section.

  1. Detection of dimethylarginines in protein hydrolysates by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cheng-Hsilin; Tam, Ming F

    2006-03-01

    We report a method to detect the presence of dimethylarginines on proteins. Peptides with dimethylarginines were hydrolyzed in acid. The hydrolysates were subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometric analysis using a mixture of alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and nitrocellulose as matrix. Both asymmetric omega-N(G),N(G)-dimethylarginine and symmetric omega-N(G),N(G')-dimethylarginine give a clear signal at m/z 203. Recombinant Sbp1p modified by Hmt1p in vivo were isolated by affinity chromatography followed by electrophoresis on a polyacrylamide gel and subjected to acid hydrolysis. MALDI-TOF analysis of the acid hydrolysates confirmed the presence of dimethylarginines. The detection limit of the method is estimated at approximately 1pmol of protein.

  2. Laser desorption mass spectrometry. II. Applications to structural analysis. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hercules, D.M.; Day, R.J.; Balasanmugam, K.; Dang, T.A.; Li, C.P.

    1982-02-02

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) is reviewed with focus on application to structural analysis of nonvolatile organic compounds. Models for the ionization-volatilization step are discussed with reference to solid-state vs. 'gas-phase' reactions. General characteristics of LDMS of organic compounds are discussed; for example, classes of compounds that generate M+ ions or (M+H)+ ions. Cationization reactions are considered; organic salts are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on LDMS of high molecular weight compounds such as polysaccharides, polymers and vitamin B12 and its relatives. Problems of ion-molecule reactions complicating spectra are considered, particularly for transition metal coordination compounds. Other topics considered include quantitative analysis, microprobe applications and sample handling.

  3. Development and Applications of Liquid Sample Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiuling; Chen, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is a recent advance in the field of analytical chemistry. This review surveys the development of liquid sample DESI-MS (LS-DESI-MS), a variant form of DESI-MS that focuses on fast analysis of liquid samples, and its novel analy-tical applications in bioanalysis, proteomics, and reaction kinetics. Due to the capability of directly ionizing liquid samples, liquid sample DESI (LS-DESI) has been successfully used to couple MS with various analytical techniques, such as microfluidics, microextraction, electrochemistry, and chromatography. This review also covers these hyphenated techniques. In addition, several closely related ionization methods, including transmission mode DESI, thermally assisted DESI, and continuous flow-extractive DESI, are briefly discussed. The capabilities of LS-DESI extend and/or complement the utilities of traditional DESI and electrospray ionization and will find extensive and valuable analytical application in the future.

  4. Reconstruction and feature selection for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Liangjia; Norton, Isaiah; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) provides a highly sensitive imaging technique for differentiating normal and cancerous tissue at the molecular level. This can be very useful, especially under intra-operative conditions where the surgeon has to make crucial decision about the tumor boundary. In such situations, the time it takes for imaging and data analysis becomes a critical factor. Therefore, in this work we utilize compressive sensing to perform the sparse sampling of the tissue, which halves the scanning time. Furthermore, sparse feature selection is performed, which not only reduces the dimension of data from about 104 to less than 50, and thus significantly shortens the analysis time. This procedure also identifies biochemically important molecules for further pathological analysis. The methods are validated on brain and breast tumor data sets.

  5. Reconstruction and Feature Selection for Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectroscopy Imagery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Liangjia; Norton, Isaiah; Agar, Nathalie Y R; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-12

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) provides a highly sensitive imaging technique for differentiating normal and cancerous tissue at the molecular level. This can be very useful, especially under intra-operative conditions where the surgeon has to make crucial decision about the tumor boundary. In such situations, the time it takes for imaging and data analysis becomes a critical factor. Therefore, in this work we utilize compressive sensing to perform the sparse sampling of the tissue, which halves the scanning time. Furthermore, sparse feature selection is performed, which not only reduces the dimension of data from about 10(4) to less than 50, and thus significantly shortens the analysis time. This procedure also identifies biochemically important molecules for pathological analysis. The methods are validated on brain and breast tumor data sets.

  6. Effect of sample compositions on chemical analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schriemer, David; Dai, Yuqin; Li, Liang

    1996-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) is an effective ionization technique for mass spectrometry. It take advantages of some unique properties of certain organic chemicals to provide entrapment, isolation, vaporization, and ionization of the analyte of interest. While the main application of the MALDI technique is currently in the area of biological molecule analysis, it is possible to use this technique for monitoring polymer chemistry such as degradation processes. This is potentially important for studying and developing environmentally degradable polymers. Direct analysis of the analyte in real-world samples is possible with MALDI. However, there is a significant effect of the overall composition of a sample on the detectability and performance of MALDI. Two examples are given to illustrate the positive and negative effects of buffers, salts, and additives on the MALDI sample preparation.

  7. Analysis of pigmented inkjet printer inks and printed documents by laser desorption/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Shawn; Marrero, Josette E; Cornell, Trevor; Fowler, Kevin; Allison, John

    2010-01-01

    Anyone with a computer, scanner, and color printer has the capability for creating documents such as identification cards, passports, and counterfeit currency. Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) has been demonstrated as a powerful tool for colorant analysis. Inkjet printers are now moving largely toward the use of pigments as colorants; their insolubility makes analysis by simpler methods such as thin-layer chromatography no longer an option. Recent developments in pigmented inkjet printer inks, such as gloss optimizers that coat pigment particles, may prohibit colorant analysis by LDMS. We demonstrate here that pigments used in inks from two Epson printers can be detected and analyzed by LDMS. Also, LDMS spectra of various colors created using a 4-cartridge (cyan/magenta/yellow/black, CMYK) inkset are evaluated, to begin to develop an approach for unraveling LDMS data from real samples, to determine the number of inks used by a printer, and the chemical composition of the colorants.

  8. Identification of Bacillus Spores by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hathout, Yetrib; Demirev, Plamen A.; Ho, Yen-Peng; Bundy, Jonathan L.; Ryzhov, Victor; Sapp, Lisa; Stutler, James; Jackman, Joany; Fenselau, Catherine

    1999-01-01

    Unique patterns of biomarkers were reproducibly characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)–mass spectrometry and were used to distinguish Bacillus species members from one another. Discrimination at the strain level was demonstrated for Bacillus cereus spores. Lipophilic biomarkers were invariant in Bacillus globigii spores produced in three different media and in B. globigii spores stored for more than 30 years. The sensitivity was less than 5,000 cells deposited for analysis. Protein biomarkers were also characterized by MALDI analysis by using spores treated briefly with corona plasma discharge. Protein biomarkers were readily desorbed following this treatment. The effect of corona plasma discharge on the spores was examined. PMID:10508053

  9. Desorption chemical ionization and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometric studies of the glucuronide metabolites of doxylamine.

    PubMed

    Lay, J O; Korfmacher, W A; Miller, D W; Siitonen, P; Holder, C L; Gosnell, A B

    1986-11-01

    Three glucuronide metabolites of doxylamine succinate were collected in a single fraction using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) from the urine of dosed male Fischer 344 rats. The metabolites were then separated using an additional HPLC step into fractions containing predominantly a single glucuronide metabolite. Analysis of the metabolites by methane and ammonia desorption chemical ionization, with and without derivatization, revealed fragment ions suggestive of a hydroxylated doxylamine moiety. Identification of the metabolites as glucuronides of doxylamine, desmethyldoxylamine and didesmethyldoxylamine was accomplished, based on determination of the molecular weight and exact mass of each metabolite using fast atom bombardment (FAB) ionization. This assignment was confirmed by the fragmentation observed in FAB mass spectrometric and tandem mass spectrometric experiments. Para-substitution of the glucuronide on the phenyl moiety was observed by 500-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. A fraction containing all three glucuronide metabolites, after a single stage of HPLC separation, was also analysed by FAB mass spectrometry, and the proton- and potassium-containing quasimolecular ions for all three metabolites were observed.

  10. Analysis of mainstream and sidestream cigarette smoke particulate matter by laser desorption mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Sébastien; Carré, Vincent; Scheffler, Jean-Luc; Aubriet, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Laser desorption ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LDI-FTICRMS) was used to investigate particulate matter (PM) associated with mainstream (MSS) and sidestream cigarette smokes (SSS). The high mass resolution and the high mass measurement accuracy allowed a molecular formula for each detected signal in the 150-500 m/z range to be assigned. The high number of peaks observed in mass spectra required additional data processing to extract information. In this context, Kendrick maps and Van Krevelen diagrams were drawn. These postacquisition treatments were used to more easily compare different cigarette smokes: (i) MSS from different cigarettes and (ii) MSS and SSS from the same cigarette. In both ion detection modes, most of the detected species were found to be attributed to C(6-31)H(2-35)N(0-7)O(0-9) compounds. The compounds observed in the study of SSS appeared to be more unsaturated and less oxygenated than those observed when MSS of the same cigarette was investigated.

  11. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  12. High-mass matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry of integral membrane proteins and their complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fan; Gerber, Sabina; Heuser, Katrin; Korkhov, Vladimir M; Lizak, Christian; Mireku, Samantha; Locher, Kaspar P; Zenobi, Renato

    2013-04-02

    Analyzing purified membrane proteins and membrane protein complexes by mass spectrometry has been notoriously challenging and required highly specialized buffer conditions, sample preparation methods, and apparatus. Here we show that a standard matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) protocol, if used in combination with a high-mass detector, allows straightforward mass spectrometric measurements of integral membrane proteins and their complexes, directly following purification in detergent solution. Molecular weights can be determined precisely (mass error ≤ 0.1%) such that high-mass MALDI-MS was able to identify the site for N-linked glycosylation of the eukaryotic multidrug ABC transporter Cdr1p without special purification steps, which is impossible by any other current approach. After chemical cross-linking with glutaraldehyde in the presence of detergent micelles, the subunit stoichiometries of a series of integral membrane protein complexes, including the homomeric PglK and the heteromeric BtuCD as well as BtuCDF, were unambiguously resolved. This thus adds a valuable tool for biophysical characterization of integral membrane proteins.

  13. Non-traditional applications of laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpin, Casey R.

    Seven studies were carried out using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) to develop enhanced methodologies for a variety of analyte systems by investigating analyte chemistries, ionization processes, and elimination of spectral interferences. Applications of LDI and matrix assisted laser/desorption/ionization (MALDI) have been previously limited by poorly understood ionization phenomena, and spectral interferences from matrices. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization MS is well suited to the analysis of proteins. However, the proteins associated with bacteriophages often form complexes which are too massive for detection with a standard MALDI mass spectrometer. As such, methodologies for pretreatment of these samples are discussed in detail in the first chapter. Pretreatment of bacteriophage samples with reducing agents disrupted disulfide linkages and allowed enhanced detection of bacteriophage proteins. The second chapter focuses on the use of MALDI MS for lipid compounds whose molecular mass is significantly less than the proteins for which MALDI is most often applied. The use of MALDI MS for lipid analysis presented unique challenges such as matrix interference and differential ionization efficiencies. It was observed that optimization of the matrix system, and addition of cationization reagents mitigated these challenges and resulted in an enhanced methodology for MALDI MS of lipids. One of the challenges commonly encountered in efforts to expand MALDI MS applications is as previously mentioned interferences introduced by organic matrix molecules. The third chapter focuses on the development of a novel inorganic matrix replacement system called metal oxide laser ionization mass spectrometry (MOLI MS). In contrast to other matrix replacements, considerable effort was devoted to elucidating the ionization mechanism. It was shown that chemisorption of analytes to the metal oxide surface produced acidic adsorbed species which then

  14. Laser-induced acoustic desorption coupled with a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Habicht, Steven C; Amundson, Lucas M; Duan, Penggao; Vinueza, Nelson R; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2010-01-15

    In recent years, laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) coupled with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer has been demonstrated to provide a valuable technique for the analysis of a wide variety of nonvolatile, thermally labile compounds, including analytes that could not previously be analyzed by mass spectrometry. Although FT-ICR instruments are very powerful, they are also large and expensive and, hence, mainly used as research instruments. In contrast, linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) mass spectrometers are common due to several qualities that make these instruments attractive for both academic and industrial settings, such as high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and experimental versatility. Further, the relatively small size of the instruments, comparatively low cost, and the lack of a magnetic field provide some distinct advantages over FT-ICR instruments. Hence, we have coupled the LIAD technique with a commercial LQIT, the Thermo Fischer Scientific LTQ mass spectrometer. The LQIT was modified for a LIAD probe by outfitting the removable back plate of the instrument with a 6 in. ConFlat flange (CFF) port, gate valve, and sample lock. Reagent ions were created using the LQIT's atmospheric pressure ionization source and trapped in the mass analyzer for up to 10 s to allow chemical ionization reactions with the neutral molecules desorbed via LIAD. These initial experiments focused on demonstrating the feasibility of performing LIAD in the LQIT. Hence, the results are compared to those obtained using an FT-ICR mass spectrometer. Despite the lower efficiency in the transfer of desorbed neutral molecules into the ion trap, and the smaller maximum number of available laser pulses, the intrinsically higher sensitivity of the LQIT resulted in a higher sensitivity relative to the FT-ICR.

  15. High-Resolution Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Chemical Characterization of Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Roach, Patrick J.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Bones, David L.; Nguyen, Lucas

    2010-03-01

    Characterization of the chemical composition and chemical transformations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is both a major challenge and the area of greatest uncertainty in current aerosol research. This study presents the first application of desorption electrospray ionization combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) for detailed chemical characterization and studies of chemical aging of OA collected on Teflon substrates. DESI-MS offers unique advantages both for detailed characterization of chemically labile components in OA that cannot be detected using more traditional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and for studying chemical aging of OA. DESI-MS enables rapid characterization of OA samples collected on substrates by eliminating the sample preparation stage. In addition, it enables detection and structural characterization of chemically labile molecules in OA samples by minimizing the residence time of analyte in the solvent. SOA produced by the ozonolysis of limonene (LSOA) was allowed to react with gaseous ammonia. Chemical aging resulted in measurable changes in the optical properties of LSOA observed using UV- visible spectroscopy. DESI-MS combined with tandem mass spectrometry experiments (MS/MS) enabled identification of species in aged LSOA responsible for absorption of the visible light. Detailed analysis of the experimental data allowed us to identify chemical changes induced by reactions of LSOA constituents with ammonia and distinguish between different mechanisms of chemical aging.

  16. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry of ultraviolet photo-processed ices

    SciTech Connect

    Paardekooper, D. M. Bossa, J.-B.; Isokoski, K.; Linnartz, H.

    2014-10-01

    A new ultra-high vacuum experiment is described that allows studying photo-induced chemical processes in interstellar ice analogues. MATRI²CES - a Mass Analytical Tool to study Reactions in Interstellar ICES applies a new concept by combining laser desorption and time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the ultimate goal to characterize in situ and in real time the solid state evolution of organic compounds upon UV photolysis for astronomically relevant ice mixtures and temperatures. The performance of the experimental setup is demonstrated by the kinetic analysis of the different photoproducts of pure methane (CH₄) ice at 20 K. A quantitative approach provides formation yields of several new species with up to four carbon atoms. Convincing evidence is found for the formation of even larger species. Typical mass resolutions obtained range from M/ΔM ~320 to ~400 for CH₄ and argon, respectively. Additional tests show that the typical detection limit (in monolayers) is ⩽0.02 ML, substantially more sensitive than the regular techniques used to investigate chemical processes in interstellar ices.

  17. GoAmazon 2014/15 Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, JN

    2016-04-01

    The Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) deployment to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, was motivated by two main scientific objectives of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014/15 field campaign. 1) Study the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions by determining important molecular species in ambient nanoparticles. To address this, TDCIMS data will be combined with coincident measurements such as gas-phase sulfuric acid to determine the contribution of sulfuric acid condensation to nucleation and growth. We can then compare that result to TDCIMS-derived nanoparticle composition to determine the fraction of growth that can be attributed to the uptake of organic compounds. The molecular composition of sampled particles will also be used to attribute specific chemical species and mechanisms to growth, such as the condensation of low-volatility species or the oligomerization of α-dicarbonyl compounds. 2) Determine the source of new ambient nanoparticles in the Amazon. The hypothesis prior to measurements was that potassium salts formed from the evaporation of primary particles emitted by fungal spores can provide a unique and important pathway for new particle production in the Amazon basin. To explore this hypothesis, the TDCIMS recorded the mass spectra of sampled ambient particles using a protonated water cluster Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Laboratory tests performed using potassium salts show that the TDCIMS can detect potassium with high sensitivity with this technique.

  18. Identification of Fatty Acids, Phospholipids, and Their Oxidation Products Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Christopher W.; Mang, Stephen A.; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) have found increasing application in the analysis of biological samples. Using these techniques to solve problems in analytical chemistry should be an essential component of the training of undergraduate chemists. We…

  19. Gene analysis using mass spectrometric cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (MS-CAPS) with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF).

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometric cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (MS-CAPS) is a method for detecting genes using a combination of short PCR and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). MS-CAPS can identify a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in less than one hour and is suitable for plants, animals, bacteria, and food.

  20. Identification of Fatty Acids, Phospholipids, and Their Oxidation Products Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Christopher W.; Mang, Stephen A.; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) have found increasing application in the analysis of biological samples. Using these techniques to solve problems in analytical chemistry should be an essential component of the training of undergraduate chemists. We…

  1. Near-infrared laser desorption/ionization aerosol mass spectrometry for measuring organic aerosol at atmospherically relevant aerosol mass loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, S.; Nichols, B.; Todd, K.; Zahardis, J.; Petrucci, G. A.

    2010-08-01

    A new method, near-infrared laser desorption/ionization aerosol mass spectrometry (NIR-LDI-AMS), is described for the real time analysis of organic aerosols at atmospherically relevant total mass loadings. Particles are sampled with an aerodynamic lens onto an aluminum probe. A moderate energy NIR laser pulse at 1064 nm is directed onto the probe to vaporize and ionize particle components. Delayed pulse extraction is then used to sample the ions into a reflectron time of flight mass spectrometer for chemical analysis. The soft ionization afforded by the NIR photons results in minimal fragmentation (loss of a hydrogen atom) producing intact pseudo-molecular anions at [M-H]-. The limit of detection measured for pure oleic acid particles (geometric mean diameter and standard deviation of 180 nm and 1.3, respectively) was 140 fg (or 1.7 ng m-3 per minute sampling time). As an example of the utility of NIR-LDI-AMS to measurements of atmospheric importance, the method was applied to laboratory chamber measurements of the secondary organic aerosol formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene. High quality mass spectra were recorded with a 2-min time resolution for total aerosol mass loadings ranging from 1.5 to 8.7 μg m-3. These results demonstrate the potential of NIR-LDI-AMS to allow for more accurate measurements of the organic fraction of atmospheric particulate at realistic mass loadings. Measurements at ambient-levels of SOA mass loading are important to improve parameterizations of chamber-based SOA formation for modeling regional and global SOA fluxes and to aid in remediating the discrepancy between modeled and observed atmospheric total SOA production rates and concentrations.

  2. Near-infrared laser desorption/ionization aerosol mass spectrometry for measuring organic aerosol at atmospherically relevant aerosol mass loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, S.; Nichols, B.; Todd, K.; Zahardis, J.; Petrucci, G. A.

    2010-05-01

    A new method, near-infrared laser desorption/ionization aerosol mass spectrometry (NIR-LDI-AMS), is described for the real time analysis of organic aerosols at atmospherically relevant total mass loadings. Particles are sampled with an aerodynamic lens onto an aluminium probe and moderate energy NIR laser pulse at 1064 nm is directed onto the probe to vaporize and ionize particle components. Delayed pulse extraction is then used to sample the ions into a reflectron time of flight mass spectrometer for chemical analysis. The soft ionization afforded by the NIR photons results in minimal fragmentation (loss of a hydrogen atom) producing intact pseudo-molecular anions at [M-H]-. The limit of detection measured for pure oleic acid particles (geometric mean diameter and standard deviation of 180 nm and 1.3, respectively) was 140 fg (or 1.7 ng m-3 per minute sampling time). As an example of the utility of NIR-LDI-AMS to measurements of atmospheric importance, the method was applied to laboratory chamber measurements of the secondary organic aerosol formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene. High quality mass spectra were recorded with a 2-min time resolution for total aerosol mass loadings ranging from 1.5 to 8.7 μg m-3. These results demonstrate the potential of NIR-LDI-AMS to allow for more accurate measurements of the organic fraction of atmospheric particulate at realistic mass loadings. Measurements at ambient-levels of SOA mass loading are important to improve parameterizations of chamber-based SOA formation for modeling regional and SOA fluxes and to aid in remediating the discrepancy between modeled and observed atmospheric total SOA production rates and concentrations.

  3. Development of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for plant metabolite analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, Andrew R

    2014-12-01

    This thesis presents efforts to improve the methodology of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) as a method for analysis of metabolites from plant tissue samples. The first chapter consists of a general introduction to the technique of MALDI-MSI, and the sixth and final chapter provides a brief summary and an outlook on future work.

  4. Surface tuning laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (STLDI-MS) for the analysis of small molecules using quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2017-08-01

    In most applications of quantum dots (QDs) for surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS), one side of QDs is supported by a solid substrate (stainless - steel plate), whereas the other side is in contact with the target analytes. Therefore, the surface capping agent of QDs is a key parameter for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) modified with different capping agents are synthesized, characterized, and applied for surface tuning laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (STLDI-MS). Data shows that CdTe quantum dot modified cysteine (cys@CdTe QDs) has an absorption that matches with the wavelength of the N2 laser (337 nm). The synergistic effect of large surface area and absorption of the laser irradiation of cys@CdTe QDs enhances the LDI-MS process for small - molecule analysis, including α-, β-, and γ-cyclodextrin, gramicidin D, perylene, pyrene, and triphenylphosphine. Cys@CdTe QDs are also applied using Al foils as substrates. Aluminum foil combined with cys@CdTe QDs enhances the ionization efficiency and is cheap compared to traditional matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) with a stainless - steel plate.

  5. Flash Desorption/Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Less- and Nonvolatile Samples Using a Linearly Driven Heated Metal Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek T.; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the important issue of the desorption of less- and nonvolatile compounds with minimal sample decomposition in ambient mass spectrometry is approached using ambient flash desorption mass spectrometry. The preheated stainless steel filament was driven down and up along the vertical axis in 0.3 s. At the lowest position, it touched the surface of the sample with an invasion depth of 0.1 mm in 50 ms (flash heating) and was removed from the surface (fast cooling). The heating rate corresponds to ~104 °C/s at the filament temperature of 500 °C. The desorbed gaseous molecules were ionized by using a dielectric barrier discharge ion source, and the produced ions were detected by a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Less-volatile samples, such as pharmaceutical tablets, narcotics, explosives, and C60 gave molecular and protonated molecule ions as major ions with thermal decomposition minimally suppressed. For synthetic polymers (PMMA, PLA, and PS), the mass spectra reflected their backbone structures because of the suppression of the sequential thermal decompositions of the primary products. The present technique appears to be suitable for high-throughput qualitative analyses of many types of solid samples in the range from a few ng to 10 μg with minimal sample consumption. Some contribution from tribodesorption in addition to thermal desorption was suggested for the desorption processes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Atmospheric Pressure-Thermal Desorption (AP-TD)/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for the Rapid Analysis of Bacillus Spores

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A technique is described where an atmospheric pressure-thermal desorption (AP-TD) device and electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry are coupled and used for the rapid analysis of Bacillus spores in complex matrices. The resulting AP-TD/ESI-MS technique combines the generation of volatile co...

  7. Analysis of neonicotinoids from plant material by desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Schmidt, Henning S; Kiiski, Iiro; Rämö, Sari; Hakala, Kati; Haapala, Markus; Kostiainen, Risto; Kauppila, Tiina J

    2015-03-15

    Neonicotinoids are widely used insecticides which have been shown to affect the memory and learning abilities of honey bees, and are suspected to play a part in the unexplainable, large-scale loss of honey bee colonies. Fast methods, such as ambient mass spectrometry (MS), for their analysis from a variety of matrices are necessary to control the use of forbidden products and study the spreading of insecticides in nature. The feasibilities of two ambient MS methods, desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI), for the analysis of five most used neonicotinoid compounds, thiacloprid, acetamiprid, clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, were tested. In addition, DAPPI was used to analyze fresh rose leaves treated with commercially available thiacloprid insecticide and dried and powdered turnip rape flowers, which had been collected from a field treated with thiacloprid-containing insecticide. DAPPI was found to be more sensitive than DESI, with 2-11 times better signal-to-noise ratios, and limits of detection at 0.4-5.0 fmol for the standard compounds. DAPPI was able to detect thiacloprid from the rose leaves even 2.5 months after the treatment and from the turnip rape flower samples collected from a field. The analysis of plant material by DAPPI did not require extraction or other sample preparation. DAPPI was found to be suitable for the fast and direct qualitative analysis of thiacloprid neonicotinoid from plant samples. It shows promise as a fast tool for screening of forbidden insecticides, or studying the distribution of insecticides in nature. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Thermal desorption mass spectrometric and x-ray photoelectron studies of etched surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rye, R. R.; Kelber, J. A.

    1987-12-01

    The etching of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with Na solutions is known to lead to a loss of F, a loss which is correlated with enhanced adhesion. Subsequent heating partially restores surface F with a concurrent loss of adhesion strength. We have combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and gas phase mass spectroscopy for in situ measurements of the processes that occur as the fluorocarbon is heated. An array of volatile products, which vary with the specific treatment, desorb from etched PTFE. Among these are: N 2 and low molecular weight fluorocarbons, the amounts of which monotonically decrease with increasing exposure to the etching solution (and probably result from the bulk); species such as CO and CO 2, which in part result from surface impurities; and water and acetone which result from the rinse steps following the etching process. XPS measurements show that etching produces a major loss of surface F and a gain of surface O. The latter probably results from the subsequent rinse steps. Heating produces a substantial recovery in surface F with only a small decrease in the surface O, and the gain in surface F is shown to occur at a higher temperature than the desorption of any species from the surface. Thus, desorption of products from the surface is decoupled, in terms of both the distribution of products and their relative temperatures, from the surface changes as monitored by XPS. This decoupling suggests that the increase in surface F results from diffusion of low molecular weight fluorocarbons from the bulk or a transition region, or from a rearrangement of the sponge-like surface region produced in the etching process.

  9. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for trace analysis of agrochemicals in food.

    PubMed

    García-Reyes, Juan F; Jackson, Ayanna U; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-01-15

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is applied to the rapid, in situ, direct qualitative and quantitative (ultra)trace analysis of agrochemicals in foodstuffs. To evaluate the potential of DESI mass spectrometry (MS) in toxic residue testing in food, 16 representative multiclass agricultural chemicals (pesticides, insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides) were selected (namely, ametryn, amitraz, azoxystrobin, bitertanol, buprofezin, imazalil, imazalil metabolite, isofenphos-methyl, malathion, nitenpyram, prochloraz, spinosad, terbuthylazine, thiabendazole, and thiacloprid). The DESI-MS experiments were performed using 3 microL of solution spotted onto conventional smooth poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) surfaces, with examination by MS and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using an ion trap mass spectrometer. Optimization of the spray solvent led to the use of acetonitrile/water (80:20) (v/v), with 1% formic acid. Most of the compounds tested showed remarkable sensitivity in the positive ion mode, approaching that attainable with conventional direct infusion electrospray mass spectrometry. To evaluate the potential of the proposed approach in real samples, different experiments were performed including the direct DESI-MS/MS analysis of fruit peels and also of fruit/vegetable extracts. The results proved that DESI allows the detection and confirmation of traces of agrochemicals in actual market-purchased samples. In addition, MS/MS confirmation of selected pesticides in spiked vegetable extracts was obtained at absolute levels as low as 1 pg for ametryn. Quantitation of imazalil residues was also undertaken using an isotopically labeled standard. The data obtained were in agreement with those from the liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) reference method, with relative standard deviation (RSD) values consistently below 15%. The results obtained demonstrate the sensitivity of DESI as they meet the stringent European Union pesticide regulation

  10. Detection and imaging of thermochromic ink compounds in erasable pens using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Amin; Prova, Shamina S; Bagga, Aafreen K; Yan Chi Ting, Michelle; Brar, Gurnoor; Ifa, Demian R

    2017-06-30

    Thermochromic ink pens are widely accessible worldwide and have gained popularity among the general public. These pens are very useful to undo mistakes while writing important documents or exams. They are also, however, misused in committing crimes such as counterfeiting checks or wills. Thus, the forensics community is in need of techniques that will allow these forgeries to be detected rapidly, reliably and conveniently. Thermochromic ink compounds were investigated using Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) coupled with an LTQ mass spectrometer and Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC). Tandem mass spectrometric analysis was conducted using Electrospray Ionization (ESI) coupled with an Orbitrap LTQ mass spectrometer performing Collision-Induced Dissociation (CID) for identification of ink traces. Chemical marker ions characteristic of the state of ink (visible or invisible) were identified and mapped in ink traces by the use of DESI-MS imaging. These ions can be employed by forensic experts as fingerprint markers in forged documents. The marker ions were also characterised by conducting tandem mass spectrometry using paper spray in an Orbitrap LTQ mass spectrometer. Specific chemical components yielding ions of m/z 400, 405, 615 and 786 were distinguished as only being apparent in the invisible and reappeared state of the ink. The absence of these compounds in the original state of the ink enabled their recognition as useful chemical determinants in detecting forgery. DESI-MSI was thus shown to be a very useful, convenient and reliable technique for detecting forgery in paper documents due to its fast and reproducible mode of analysis, with no sample preparation and minimal damage to the document under investigation. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Sorption-desorption behavior of phenanthrene elucidated by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry studies of soil organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, L.F.; Young, T.M.; Higashi, R.M.

    1999-08-01

    Commonly used partitioning models of hydrophobic organic contaminant sorption in soil, which treat all soil organic matter (SOM) as having identical structure, are unable to explain differences in organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficients (K{sub OC}) among sorbents, isotherm nonlinearity, and sorption-desorption hysteresis. This study relates one index of SOM composition, structural fragments quantified by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to aqueous and supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO{sub 2}) sorption-desorption parameters. Results show positive correlations between aqueous K{sub OC}s and hydrocarbon fragment peak areas and negative correlation to N- and O-containing peaks, which is consistent with hypotheses attributing sorption of phenanthrene to hydrophobic sorbent domains. Positive correlation between Freundlich n values in SC CO{sub 2} and hydrocarbon fragments with negative correlation to N- and O-containing fragments suggests that energetic heterogeneity of polar environments controls nonlinearity in this solvent of limited polarity. Aqueous sorption-desorption hysteresis appears to be suppressed by N- and O-containing moieties and correlates with decreased thermal desorption of phenanthrene at 800 C. The SC CO{sub 2} extraction efficiency and, to a lesser degree, the desorption response when methanol is added as a cosolvent indicate that polar functional groups play a role in retarding phenanthrene desorption during SC CO{sub 2} extraction. Organic matter pyrolysis under varying time and temperature conditions indicates that pyrolysis fragments that do not significantly correlated with functional trends likely evolve by a different pyrolytic mechanism and are generally poorly correlated with sorption-desorption properties. The level of structural detail utilized in structure-function correlations in this work exceeds previous efforts to relate sorption behavior to sorbent structure. However, the work reveals that certain sorption

  12. Epithelial ovarian carcinoma diagnosis by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dória, Maria Luisa; McKenzie, James S.; Mroz, Anna; Phelps, David L.; Speller, Abigail; Rosini, Francesca; Strittmatter, Nicole; Golf, Ottmar; Veselkov, Kirill; Brown, Robert; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Takats, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is highly prevalent among European women, and is the leading cause of gynaecological cancer death. Current histopathological diagnoses of tumour severity are based on interpretation of, for example, immunohistochemical staining. Desorption electrospray mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) generates spatially resolved metabolic profiles of tissues and supports an objective investigation of tumour biology. In this study, various ovarian tissue types were analysed by DESI-MSI and co-registered with their corresponding haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained images. The mass spectral data reveal tissue type-dependent lipid profiles which are consistent across the n = 110 samples (n = 107 patients) used in this study. Multivariate statistical methods were used to classify samples and identify molecular features discriminating between tissue types. Three main groups of samples (epithelial ovarian carcinoma, borderline ovarian tumours, normal ovarian stroma) were compared as were the carcinoma histotypes (serous, endometrioid, clear cell). Classification rates >84% were achieved for all analyses, and variables differing statistically between groups were determined and putatively identified. The changes noted in various lipid types help to provide a context in terms of tumour biochemistry. The classification of unseen samples demonstrates the capability of DESI-MSI to characterise ovarian samples and to overcome existing limitations in classical histopathology. PMID:27976698

  13. Study of Electrochemical Reactions Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Pengyuan; Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Laskin, Julia; Dewald, Howard D.; Chen, Hao

    2012-07-03

    The combination of electrochemistry (EC) and mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical tool for studying mechanisms of redox reactions, identification of products and intermediates, and online derivatization/recognition of analytes. This work reports a new coupling interface for EC/MS by employing nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), a recently developed ambient ionization method. We demonstrate online coupling of nano-DESI-MS with a traditional electrochemical flow cell, in which the electrolyzed solution emanating from the cell is ionized by nano-DESI for MS analysis. Furthermore, we show first coupling of nano-DESI-MS with an interdigitated array (IDA) electrode enabling chemical analysis of electrolyzed samples directly from electrode surfaces. Because of its inherent sensitivity, nano-DESI enables chemical analysis of small volumes and concentrations of sample solution. Specifically, good-quality signal of dopamine and its oxidized form, dopamine ortho-quinone, was obtained using 10 μL of 1 μM solution of dopamine on the IDA. Oxidation of dopamine, reduction of benzodiazepines, and electrochemical derivatization of thiol groups were used to demonstrate the performance of the technique. Our results show the potential of nano-DESI as a novel interface for electrochemical mass spectrometry research.

  14. Differentiation Using Microwave Plasma Torch Desorption Mass Spectrometry of Navel Oranges Cultivated in Neighboring Habitats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinchen; Yang, Meiling; Wang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Guofeng; Deng, Min; Chen, Huanwen; Luo, Liping

    2017-03-22

    The molecular fingerprinting of intact fruit samples combined with statistical data analysis can allow the assessment of fruit quality and location of origin. Herein, microwave plasma torch desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MPT-MS) was applied to produce molecular fingerprints for the juice sac and exocarp of navel oranges cultivated in three closely located habitats, and the mass spectrometric fingerprints were differentiated by principal component analysis (PCA). Because of the relatively high temperature and high ionization efficiency of MPT, the volatile aroma compounds and semivolatile chemicals in the navel oranges were sensitively detected and confidently identified by collision induced dissociation (CID). The limit of detection (LOD) of MPT-MS for vanillin was 0.119 μg/L, with the relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 10) of 1.7%. The results showed that MPT-MS could be a powerful analytical platform for the sensitive molecular analysis of fruits at molecular level with high chemical specificity, allowing differentiation between the same sorts grown in neighboring habitats.

  15. Rapid Detection of Necrosis in Breast Cancer with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tata, Alessandra; Woolman, Michael; Ventura, Manuela; Bernards, Nicholas; Ganguly, Milan; Gribble, Adam; Shrestha, Bindesh; Bluemke, Emma; Ginsberg, Howard J.; Vitkin, Alex; Zheng, Jinzi; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Identification of necrosis in tumors is of prognostic value in treatment planning, as necrosis is associated with aggressive forms of cancer and unfavourable outcomes. To facilitate rapid detection of necrosis with Mass Spectrometry (MS), we report the lipid MS profile of necrotic breast cancer with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (DESI-MS) imaging validated with statistical analysis and correlating pathology. This MS profile is characterized by (1) the presence of the ion of m/z 572.48 [Cer(d34:1) + Cl]− which is a ceramide absent from the viable cancer subregions; (2) the absence of the ion of m/z 391.25 which is present in small abundance only in viable cancer subregions; and (3) a slight increase in the relative intensity of known breast cancer biomarker ions of m/z 281.25 [FA(18:1)-H]− and 303.23 [FA(20:4)-H]−. Necrosis is accompanied by alterations in the tissue optical depolarization rate, allowing tissue polarimetry to guide DESI-MS analysis for rapid MS profiling or targeted MS imaging. This workflow, in combination with the MS profile of necrosis, may permit rapid characterization of necrotic tumors from tissue slices. Further, necrosis-specific biomarker ions are detected in seconds with single MS scans of necrotic tumor tissue smears, which further accelerates the identification workflow by avoiding tissue sectioning and slide preparation. PMID:27734938

  16. Matrix assisted laser desorption time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in clinical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Angeletti, Silvia

    2016-09-06

    The microbiological management of patients with suspected bacterial infection includes the identification of the pathogen and the determination of the antibiotic susceptibility. These traditional approaches, based on the pure culture of the microorganism, require at least 36-48h. A new method, Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), has been recently developed to profile bacterial proteins from whole cell extracts and obtain a bacterial fingerprint able to discriminate microorganisms from different genera and species. By whole cell-mass spectrometry, microbial identification can be achieved within minutes from cultured isolate, rather than traditional phenotypic or genotypic characterizations. From the year 2009 an explosion of applications of this technology has been observed with promising results. Several studies have been performed and showed that MALDI-TOF represents a reliable alternative method for rapid bacteria and fungi identification in clinical setting. A future area of expansion is represented by the application of MALDI-TOF technology to the antibiotic susceptibility test. In conclusion, the revision of the literature available up to date demonstrated that MALDI-TOF MS represents an innovative technology for the rapid and accurate identification of bacterial and fungal isolates in clinical settings. By an earlier microbiological diagnosis, MALDI-TOF MS contributes to a reduced mortality and hospitalization time of the patients and consequently has a significant impact on cost savings and public health.

  17. Personal Information from Latent Fingerprints Using Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Zare, Richard N

    2017-01-17

    Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) was applied to latent fingerprints to obtain not only spatial patterns but also chemical maps. Samples with similar lipid compositions as those of the fingerprints were collected by swiping a glass slide across the forehead of consenting adults. A machine learning model called gradient boosting tree ensemble (GDBT) was applied to the samples that allowed us to distinguish between different genders, ethnicities, and ages (within 10 years). The results from 194 samples showed accuracies of 89.2%, 82.4%, and 84.3%, respectively. Specific chemical species that were determined by the feature selection of GDBT were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. As a proof-of-concept, the machine learning model trained on the sample data was applied to overlaid latent fingerprints from different individuals, giving accurate gender and ethnicity information from those fingerprints. The results suggest that DESI-MSI imaging of fingerprints with GDBT analysis might offer a significant advance in forensic science.

  18. Identification of colorants in pigmented pen inks by laser desorption mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Papson, Kaitlin; Stachura, Sylwia; Boralsky, Luke; Allison, John

    2008-01-01

    Pigments are rapidly replacing dyes as colorants in pen and printer inks, due to their superior colors and stability. Unfortunately, tools commonly used in questioned document examination for analyzing pen inks, such as TLC, cannot be used for the analysis of insoluble pigments on paper. Laser desorption mass spectrometry is demonstrated here as a tool for analyzing pigment-based pen inks. A pulsed nitrogen laser can be focused onto a pen stroke from a pigmented ink pen on paper, and positive and negative ions representative of the pigment can be generated for subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. Targeted pens for this work were a set of Uni-ball 207 pigmented ink pens containing blue, light blue, orange, green, violet, red, pink, and black inks. Copper phthalocyanine was identified as the pigment used to make both blue inks. A mixture of halogenated copper phthalocyanines were identified in the green ink. Unexpectedly, the pink ink was found to contain a red pigment, Pigment Red 12, treated with a mixture of water-soluble dyes. Each sample yielded ions representative of the pigments present.

  19. An Automated Platform for High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Heath, Brandi S.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-10-02

    An automated platform has been developed for acquisition and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). The new system enables robust operation of the nano-DESI imaging source over many hours. This is achieved by controlling the distance between the sample and the probe by mounting the sample holder onto an automated XYZ stage and defining the tilt of the sample plane. This approach is useful for imaging of relatively flat samples such as thin tissue sections. Custom software called MSI QuickView was developed for visualization of large data sets generated in imaging experiments. MSI QuickView enables fast visualization of the imaging data during data acquisition and detailed processing after the entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. High resolution mass analysis combined with MS/MS experiments enabled identification of lipids and metabolites in the tissue section. In addition, high dynamic range and sensitivity of the technique allowed us to generate ion images of low-abundance isobaric lipids. High-spatial resolution image acquired over a small region of the tissue section revealed the spatial distribution of an abundant brain metabolite, creatine, in the white and gray matter that is consistent with the literature data obtained using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  20. Online coupling of electrochemical reactions with liquid sample desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiwen; Dewald, Howard D; Chen, Hao

    2009-12-01

    The combination of electrochemistry (EC) and mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical tool to study redox reactions. This work reports the online coupling of a thin-layer electrochemical flow cell with liquid sample desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) and its applications in investigating various electrochemical reactions of biological molecules such as oxidative formation and reductive cleavage of disulfide bonds and online derivatization of peptides/proteins. As a result of the direct sampling nature of DESI, several useful features of such a coupling have been found, including simple instrumentation, fast response time (e.g., 3.6 s in the case of dopamine oxidation), freedom to choose a favorable ionization mode of DESI or traditional electrolysis solvent systems, and the absence of background signal possibly resulting from ionization when the cell is off (e.g., in the case of dopamine oxidation). More importantly, with the use of this new coupling apparatus, three disulfide bonds of insulin were fully cleaved by electrolytic reduction and both the A and B chains of the protein were successfully detected online by DESI-MS. In addition, online tagging of free cysteine residues of peptides/proteins employing electrogenerated dopamine o-quinone can be performed. These revealed characteristics of the coupling along with examined electrochemical reactions suggest that EC/DESI-MS has good potential in bioanalysis.

  1. Thin-layer chromatography/laser-induced acoustic desorption/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Huang, Min-Zong; Shiea, Jentaie

    2009-11-15

    The combination of laser-induced acoustic desorption and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LIAD/ESI/MS) can be used to rapidly characterize chemical compounds separated on a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate. We performed LIAD analysis by irradiating the rear side of an aluminum-based TLC plate with a pulsed infrared (IR) laser. To efficiently generate and transfer acoustic and shock waves to ablate the analyte-containing TLC gels, a glass slide was attached to the rear of the TLC plate and the gap between the glass slide and the TLC plate was filled with a viscous solution (glycerol). Although the diameter of the laser spot created on the rear of the TLC plate was approximately 0.35 mm, the ablated areas on the front sides of the silica gel bed and the C(18) reverse-phase gel bed had diameters of approximately 1.3 and 3 mm, respectively. The ablated analyte molecules were ionized in an ESI plume and then detected by an ion trap mass analyzer. This TLC/LIAD/ESI/MS approach allowed the components in mixtures of dye standards, drug standards, and rosemary essential oil to be separated and rapidly characterized.

  2. Detection of trace ink compounds in erased handwritings using electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yi-Ying; Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Cheng, Chu-Nian; Shiea, Jentaie; Ho, Hsiu-O

    2014-06-01

    Writings made with erasable pens on paper surfaces can either be rubbed off with an eraser or rendered invisible by changing the temperature of the ink. However, trace ink compounds still remain in the paper fibers even after rubbing or rendering. The detection of these ink compounds from erased handwritings will be helpful in knowing the written history of the paper. In this study, electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry was used to characterize trace ink compounds remaining in visible and invisible ink lines. The ink compounds were desorbed from the paper surface by irradiating the handwritings with a pulsed laser beam; the desorbed analytes were subsequently ionized in an electrospray plume and detected by a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry mass analyzer. Because of the high spatial resolution of the laser beam, electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry analysis resulted in minimal damage to the sample documents. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Development of capabilities for imaging mass spectrometry under ambient conditions with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifa, Demian R.; Wiseman, Justin M.; Song, Qingyu; Cooks, R. Graham

    2007-01-01

    Aspects of the development of mass spectrometry over the past three decades are briefly reviewed and growth points in the subject are identified. Molecular imaging by mass spectrometry is one such growth area. The development of a capability for 2D chemical imaging of surfaces is described, based on the combination of a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) ion source with an automated surface stage capable of x, y translational motion. The lateral resolution of this new system is found to be less than 200 microns, using a test ink pattern. Chemical imaging of surfaces is demonstrated using model examples of organic and biological systems: (i) imaging of a 2D pattern written in different colored inks on photographic paper and (ii) imaging of thin coronal sections of rat brain tissue fixed onto a glass microscope slide. In both cases, full mass spectra are recorded as a function of x,y-position on the surface. In the chemical imaging example, the distributions of the two different inks on the paper surface were mapped by tracking the abundance of the intact organic cation which characterizes each particular ink dye. In the tissue imaging example, distributions of specific lipids in coronal sections of rat brain tissue were followed from the abundance distributions in 2D space of the deprotonated lipid molecules recorded in the negative ion mass spectra. These latter distributions reveal distinct anatomical features of the rat brain. The results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of performing surface imaging studies using DESI and show that at this stage of its development it has a lateral spatial resolution of a few hundred microns.

  4. Nanostructured solid substrates for efficient laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) of low molecular weight compounds.

    PubMed

    Silina, Yuliya E; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2013-12-07

    Analytical applications often require rapid measurement of compounds from complex sample mixtures. High-speed mass spectrometry approaches frequently utilize techniques based on direct ionization of the sample by laser irradiation, mostly by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Compounds of low molecular weight are difficult to analyze by MALDI, however, because of severe interferences in the low m/z range from the organic matrix used for desorption/ionization. In recent years, surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) techniques have shown promise for small molecule analysis, due to the unique properties of nanostructured surfaces, in particular, the lack of a chemical background in the low m/z range and enhanced production of analyte ions by SALDI. This short review article presents a summary of the most promising recent developments in SALDI materials for MS analysis of low molecular weight analytes, with emphasis on nanostructured materials based on metals and semiconductors.

  5. Photoionization and Dissociative Photoionization Study of Cholesterol by IR Laser Desorption/Tunable Synchrotron VUV Photoionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yang; Zhang, Li-dong; Guo, Hui-jun; Yin, Hao; Qi, Fei

    2009-04-01

    Elementary cholesterol was analyzed with IR laser desorption/tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry. An exclusive molecular ion of cholesterol is observed by near threshold single-photon ionization with high efficiency. Fragments are yielded with the increase of photon energy. The structures of various fragments are determined with commercial electron ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Dominant fragmentation pathways are discussed in detail with the aid of ab initio calculations.

  6. Study of Adsorption and Desorption Performances of Zr-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks Using Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoting; Chen, Ying; Zheng, Yajun; Zhang, Zhiping

    2017-07-08

    The dynamic pore systems and high surface areas of flexible metal-organic framework materials make them excellent candidates to be used in different kinds of adsorption processes. However, the adsorption and desorption behaviors of therapeutic drugs on metal-organic frameworks in solution are not fully developed. Here, we systematically investigated the adsorption and desorption behaviors of a typical therapeutic drug, verapamil, over several Zr-based metal-organic frameworks [e.g., Zr-FUM, UiO-66(Zr), UiO-66(Zr)-NH₂ and UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH] as well as ZrO₂ in an acetonitrile solution by using paper spray mass spectrometry. In contrast to other materials, UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH demonstrated a superior adsorption performance to verapamil due to their strong acid-base and/or hydrogen-bond interactions, and the adsorption process fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. As verapamil-adsorbed materials were used for desorption experiments, ZrO₂ demonstrated the most favorable desorption performance, whereas UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH yielded the poorest desorption capability. These Zr-based materials had also been coated at the surface with filter papers for the analysis of various drugs and proteins in the process of paper spray mass spectrometry. The results demonstrated that among the studied materials, ZrO₂-coated paper gave the most favorable desorption performance as a pure drug solution, whereas the paper from UiO-66(Zr) demonstrated the optimal capability in the analyses of therapeutic drugs in a complex matrix (e.g., blood) and a protein (e.g., myoglobin).

  7. Study of Adsorption and Desorption Performances of Zr-Based Metal–Organic Frameworks Using Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoting; Chen, Ying; Zheng, Yajun

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic pore systems and high surface areas of flexible metal–organic framework materials make them excellent candidates to be used in different kinds of adsorption processes. However, the adsorption and desorption behaviors of therapeutic drugs on metal–organic frameworks in solution are not fully developed. Here, we systematically investigated the adsorption and desorption behaviors of a typical therapeutic drug, verapamil, over several Zr-based metal–organic frameworks [e.g., Zr-FUM, UiO-66(Zr), UiO-66(Zr)-NH2 and UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH] as well as ZrO2 in an acetonitrile solution by using paper spray mass spectrometry. In contrast to other materials, UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH demonstrated a superior adsorption performance to verapamil due to their strong acid-base and/or hydrogen-bond interactions, and the adsorption process fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. As verapamil-adsorbed materials were used for desorption experiments, ZrO2 demonstrated the most favorable desorption performance, whereas UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH yielded the poorest desorption capability. These Zr-based materials had also been coated at the surface with filter papers for the analysis of various drugs and proteins in the process of paper spray mass spectrometry. The results demonstrated that among the studied materials, ZrO2-coated paper gave the most favorable desorption performance as a pure drug solution, whereas the paper from UiO-66(Zr) demonstrated the optimal capability in the analyses of therapeutic drugs in a complex matrix (e.g., blood) and a protein (e.g., myoglobin). PMID:28773131

  8. Rapid screening of residual pesticides on fruits and vegetables using thermal desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shiea, Christopher; Huang, Yeou-Lih; Liu, De-Lin; Chou, Chih-Chang; Chou, Jo-Han; Chen, Peng-Yu; Shiea, Jentaie; Huang, Min-Zong

    2015-01-30

    Conventional mass spectrometry is encumbered by laborious and inconvenient sample pretreatment. Ambient thermal desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (TD-ESI-MS) is most noted for its rapid, simple, and sensitive detection capabilities. In this study, TD-ESI-MS was used to rapidly characterize residual pesticides on the surfaces of fruits and vegetables. A direct sampling probe was used to obtain analytes from sample surfaces. MS and MS/MS analyses were performed on fruits and vegetables via TD-ESI-MS. External calibration curves and reproducibility tests were performed using liquid pesticide standards. Pesticide decay and distribution on samples was studied, as well as the removal of residual pesticides via soaking in water or detergent baths. Since sample pretreatment was unnecessary, an analysis was completed in approximately 15 s or less, with no visible sample damage. Mass spectra were obtained for 22 pesticides. Linear calibrations (R(2) from 0.9414-0.999) had limits of detection as low as 0.5 µg·L(-1), with satisfactory reproducibilities for liquids and solids. Pesticides on sample surfaces decayed over 2 weeks under ambient conditions. Residual pesticides localized at the fruit peel. Detergent baths removed more pesticide than water baths. TD-ESI-MS was used to rapidly screen residual pesticides in liquids and solids. Pesticides were found on fruits and vegetables, where the decay, distribution, and removal of pesticides on samples were also explored. Due to short analysis times, the technique allows for high-throughput analyses for applications in food and environmental safety. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Automated platform for high-resolution tissue imaging using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Heath, Brandi S; Liyu, Andrey; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P; Laskin, Julia

    2012-10-02

    An automated platform has been developed for acquisition and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). The new system enables robust operation of the nano-DESI imaging source over many hours by precisely controlling the distance between the sample and the nano-DESI probe. This is achieved by mounting the sample holder onto an automated XYZ stage, defining the tilt of the sample plane, and recalculating the vertical position of the stage at each point. This approach is useful for imaging of relatively flat samples such as thin tissue sections. Custom software called MSI QuickView was developed for visualization of large data sets generated in imaging experiments. MSI QuickView enables fast visualization of the imaging data during data acquisition and detailed processing after the entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. Low background noise enables simultaneous detection of lipids and metabolites in the tissue section. High-resolution mass analysis combined with tandem mass spectometry (MS/MS) experiments enabled identification of the observed species. In addition, the high dynamic range (>2000) of the technique allowed us to generate ion images of low-abundance isobaric lipids. A high-spatial resolution image was acquired over a small region of the tissue section revealing the distribution of an abundant brain metabolite, creatine, on the boundary between the white and gray matter. The observed distribution is consistent with the literature data obtained using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  10. Characterization of the Cathode Electrolyte Interface in Lithium Ion Batteries by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao-Min; G Nicolau, Bruno; Esbenshade, Jennifer L; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-07-19

    The solid electrolyte interface (SEI) formed via electrolyte decomposition on the anode of lithium ion batteries is largely responsible for the stable cycling of conventional lithium ion batteries. Similarly, there is a lesser-known analogous layer on the cathode side of a lithium ion battery, termed the cathode electrolyte interface (CEI), whose composition and role are debated. To confirm the existence and composition of the CEI, desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is applied to study common lithium ion battery cathodes. We observe CEI formation on the LiMn2O4 cathode material after cycling between 3.5 and 4.5 V vs Li/Li(+) in electrolyte solution containing 1 M LiPF6 or LiClO4 in 1:1 (v/v) ethylene carbonate (EC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC). Intact poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether is identified as the electrolyte degradation product on the cathode surface by the high mass-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometer. When EC is paired with ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether, poly(ethylene glycol) ethyl methyl ether, and poly(ethylene glycol) are found on the surface simultaneously. The presence of ethoxy and methoxy end groups indicates both methoxide and ethoxide are produced and involved in the process of oligomerization. Au surfaces cycled under different electrochemical windows as model systems for Li-ion battery anodes are also examined. Interestingly, the identical oligomeric species to those found in the CEI are found on Au surfaces after running five cycles between 2.0 and 0.1 V vs Li/Li(+) in half-cells. These results show that DESI-MS provides intact molecular information on battery electrodes, enabling deeper understanding of the SEI or CEI composition.

  11. Online Investigation of Aqueous-Phase Electrochemical Reactions by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mei; Liu, Yong; Helmy, Roy; Martin, Gary E; Dewald, Howard D; Chen, Hao

    2015-10-01

    Electrochemistry (EC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool for elucidation of electrochemical reaction mechanisms. However, direct online analysis of electrochemical reaction in aqueous phase was rarely explored. This paper presents the online investigation of several electrochemical reactions with biological relevance in the aqueous phase, such as nitrosothiol reduction, carbohydrate oxidation, and carbamazepine oxidation using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). It was found that electroreduction of nitrosothiols [e.g., nitrosylated insulin B (13-23)] leads to free thiols by loss of NO, as confirmed by online MS analysis for the first time. The characteristic mass shift of 29 Da and the reduced intensity provide a quick way to identify nitrosylated species. Equally importantly, upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the reduced peptide ion produces more fragment ions than its nitrosylated precursor ion (presumably the backbone fragmentation cannot compete with the facile NO loss for the precursor ion), thus facilitating peptide sequencing. In the case of saccharide oxidation, it was found that glucose undergoes electro-oxidation to produce gluconic acid at alkaline pH, but not at neutral and acidic pHs. Such a pH-dependent electrochemical behavior was also observed for disaccharides such as maltose and cellobiose. Upon electrochemical oxidation, carbamazepine was found to undergo ring contraction and amide bond cleavage, which parallels the oxidative metabolism observed for this drug in leucocytes. The mechanistic information of these redox reactions revealed by EC/DESI-MS would be of value in nitroso-proteome research and carbohydrate/drug metabolic studies.

  12. Online Investigation of Aqueous-Phase Electrochemical Reactions by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mei; Liu, Yong; Helmy, Roy; Martin, Gary E.; Dewald, Howard D.; Chen, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Electrochemistry (EC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool for elucidation of electrochemical reaction mechanisms. However, direct online analysis of electrochemical reaction in aqueous phase was rarely explored. This paper presents the online investigation of several electrochemical reactions with biological relevance in the aqueous phase, such as nitrosothiol reduction, carbohydrate oxidation, and carbamazepine oxidation using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). It was found that electroreduction of nitrosothiols [e.g., nitrosylated insulin B (13-23)] leads to free thiols by loss of NO, as confirmed by online MS analysis for the first time. The characteristic mass shift of 29 Da and the reduced intensity provide a quick way to identify nitrosylated species. Equally importantly, upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the reduced peptide ion produces more fragment ions than its nitrosylated precursor ion (presumably the backbone fragmentation cannot compete with the facile NO loss for the precursor ion), thus facilitating peptide sequencing. In the case of saccharide oxidation, it was found that glucose undergoes electro-oxidation to produce gluconic acid at alkaline pH, but not at neutral and acidic pHs. Such a pH-dependent electrochemical behavior was also observed for disaccharides such as maltose and cellobiose. Upon electrochemical oxidation, carbamazepine was found to undergo ring contraction and amide bond cleavage, which parallels the oxidative metabolism observed for this drug in leucocytes. The mechanistic information of these redox reactions revealed by EC/DESI-MS would be of value in nitroso-proteome research and carbohydrate/drug metabolic studies.

  13. Characterisation of Dissolved Organic Carbon by Thermal Desorption - Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materić, Dušan; Peacock, Mike; Kent, Matthew; Cook, Sarah; Gauci, Vincent; Röckmann, Thomas; Holzinger, Rupert

    2017-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an integral component of the global carbon cycle. DOC represents an important terrestrial carbon loss as it is broken down both biologically and photochemically, resulting in the release of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. The magnitude of this carbon loss can be affected by land management (e.g. drainage). Furthermore, DOC affects autotrophic and heterotrophic processes in aquatic ecosystems, and, when chlorinated during water treatment, can lead to the release of harmful trihalomethanes. Numerous methods have been used to characterise DOC. The most accessible of these use absorbance and fluorescence properties to make inferences about chemical composition, whilst high-performance size exclusion chromatography can be used to determine apparent molecular weight. XAD fractionation has been extensively used to separate out hydrophilic and hydrophobic components. Thermochemolysis or pyrolysis Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) give information on molecular properties of DOC, and 13C NMR spectroscopy can provide an insight into the degree of aromaticity. Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a sensitive, soft ionisation method suitable for qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile and semi-volatile organic vapours. So far, PTR-MS has been used in various environmental applications such as real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from natural and anthropogenic sources, chemical composition measurements of aerosols etc. However, as the method is not compatible with water, it has not been used for analysis of organic traces present in natural water samples. The aim of this work was to develop a method based on thermal desorption PTR-MS to analyse water samples in order to characterise chemical composition of dissolved organic carbon. We developed a clean low-pressure evaporation/sublimation system to remove water from samples and thermal desorption system to introduce

  14. The dissociation kinetics of NO on Rh(111) as studied by temperature programmed static secondary ion mass spectrometry and desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, H. J.; Reijerse, J. F. C.-J. M.; van Santen, R. A.; Niemantsverdriet, J. W.

    1994-12-01

    Temperature programmed static secondary ion mass spectrometry (TPSSIMS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) have been used to study the kinetics of adsorption, dissociation, and desorption of NO on Rh(111). At 100 K, NO adsorption is molecular and proceeds via mobile precursor state kinetics with a high initial sticking probability. SSIMS indicates the presence of two distinct NO adsorption states, indicative of threefold adsorption at low coverage, and occupation of bridge sites at higher coverages. Three characteristic coverage regimes appear with respect to NO dissociation. At low coverages θNO<0.25 ML, NO dissociates completely at temperatures between 275 and 340 K. If we neglect lateral interactions and assume pure first order dissociation kinetics, we find effective values for the activation barrier and preexponential factor of 40±6 kJ/mol and 106±1 s-1 for the dissociation of 0.15-0.20 ML NO. However, if we assume that a NO molecule needs an ensemble of three to four vacant sites in order to dissociate, the preexponential factor and activation energy are ˜1011 s-1 and 65 kJ/mol, in better agreement with transition state theory expectations. The Nads and Oads dissociation products desorb as N2 and O2, respectively, with desorption parameters Edes=118±10 kJ/mol and νdes=1010.1±1.0 s-1 for N2 in the zero coverage limit. At higher coverages, the desorption kinetics of N2 is strongly influenced by the presence of coadsorbed oxygen. In the medium coverage range 0.25<θNO<0.50 ML, part of the NO desorbs molecularly, with an estimated desorption barrier of 113±10 kJ/mol and a preexponential of 1013.5±1.0 s-1. Dissociation of NO becomes progressively inhibited due to site blocking, the onset shifting from 275 K at 0.25 ML to 400 K, coinciding with the NO desorption temperature, at a coverage of 0.50 ML. The accumulation of nitrogen and oxygen atoms on the highly covered surface causes a destabilization of the nitrogen atoms, which results in an

  15. Approaches for the analysis of low molecular weight compounds with laser desorption/ionization techniques and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Nina; Shevchenko, Denys; Bergquist, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes various approaches for the analysis of low molecular weight (LMW) compounds by different laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry techniques (LDI-MS). It is common to use an agent to assist the ionization, and small molecules are normally difficult to analyze by, e.g., matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) using the common matrices available today, because the latter are generally small organic compounds themselves. This often results in severe suppression of analyte peaks, or interference of the matrix and analyte signals in the low mass region. However, intrinsic properties of several LDI techniques such as high sensitivity, low sample consumption, high tolerance towards salts and solid particles, and rapid analysis have stimulated scientists to develop methods to circumvent matrix-related issues in the analysis of LMW molecules. Recent developments within this field as well as historical considerations and future prospects are presented in this review.

  16. Enzyme kinetics by directly imaging a porous silicon microfluidic reactor using desorption/ionization on silicon mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Kevin P; Azoz, Seyla; Gardeniers, Han J G E

    2008-11-01

    Enzyme kinetics were obtained in a porous silicon microfluidic channel by combining an enzyme and substrate droplet, allowing them to react and deposit a small amount of residue on the channel walls, and then analyzing this residue by directly ionizing the channel walls using a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) laser source. The porous silicon of the channel walls functions in a manner analogous to the matrix in MALDI-MS, and is referred to as a desorption/ionization on silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS) target when used in this configuration. Mass spectrometry signal intensity of substrate residue correlates with relative concentration, and position in the microchannel correlates with time, thus allowing determination of kinetic parameters. The system is especially suitable for initial reaction velocity determination. This microreactor is broadly applicable to time-resolved kinetic assays as long as at least one substrate or product of the reaction is ionizable by DIOS-MS.

  17. Comparison of sample pre-treatments for laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging of Miscanthus x giganteus.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Bohn, Paul W; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2010-07-01

    Efforts to further the potential of the large perennial grass Miscanthusxgiganteus as a biofuel feedstock would be aided by the ability to image the chemical species present during the fuel production process. Toward this end, two mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) approaches have been investigated here-laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). As a first step, cross sections of Miscanthus were subjected to a variety of sample preparation methods to optimize conditions for MSI. For LDI-MS, a thin metal coating (2 nm thick Au) provided high quality signals of saccharide-related ions. The traditional matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, also showed high efficiency for the desorption of saccharide-related ions. In contrast, with alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid matrix, these ions were nearly absent in the mass spectra. Direct laser ablation of untreated Miscanthus sections was also performed. High resolution images, where the fine structure of the vascular bundle could be clearly visualized, were obtained using SIMS. Although coating the sections with a nanometer thick Au layer can greatly enhance the quality of SIMS images, the coating had limited effect on secondary ion signal enhancement. Using the optimized mass spectrometry approaches described here, information on the spatial distribution of several saccharides was obtained.

  18. A laser desorption-electron impact ionization ion trap mass spectrometer for real-time analysis of single atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Hanna, S. J.; Robb, D. B.; Hepburn, J. H.; Blades, M. W.; Bertram, A. K.

    2009-04-01

    A novel aerosol ion trap mass spectrometer combining pulsed IR laser desorption with electron impact (EI) ionization for single particle studies is described. The strengths of this instrument include a two-step desorption and ionization process to minimize matrix effects; electron impact ionization, a universal and well-characterized ionization technique; vaporization and ionization inside the ion trap to improve sensitivity; and an ion trap mass spectrometer for MSn experiments. The instrument has been used for mass spectral identification of laboratory generated pure aerosols in the 600 nm-1.1 [mu]m geometric diameter range of a variety of aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as for tandem mass spectrometry studies (up to MS3) of single caffeine particles. We investigate the effect of various operational parameters on the mass spectrum and fragmentation patterns. The single particle detection limit of the instrument was found to be a 325 nm geometric diameter particle (8.7 × 107 molecules or 22 fg) for 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Lower single particle detection limits are predicted to be attainable by modifying the EI pulse. The use of laser desorption-electron impact (LD-EI) in an ion trap is a promising technique for determining the size and chemical composition of single aerosol particles in real time.

  19. Leidenfrost phenomenon-assisted thermal desorption (LPTD) and its application to open ion sources at atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Subhrakanti; Chen, Lee Chuin; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-03-01

    This work describes the development and application of a new thermal desorption technique that makes use of the Leidenfrost phenomenon in open ion sources at atmospheric pressure for direct mass spectrometric detection of ultratrace levels of illicit, therapeutic, and stimulant drugs, toxicants, and peptides (molecular weight above 1 kDa) in their unaltered state from complex real world samples without or with minor sample pretreatment. A low temperature dielectric barrier discharge ion source was used throughout the experiments and the analytical figures of merit of this technique were investigated. Further, this desorption technique coupled with other ionization sources such as electrospray ionization (ESI) and dc corona discharge atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in open atmosphere was also investigated. The use of the high-resolution 'Exactive Orbitrap' mass spectrometer provided unambiguous identification of trace levels of the targeted compounds from complex mixtures and background noise; the limits of detection for various small organic molecules and peptides treated with this technique were at the level of parts per trillion and 10(-9) M, respectively. The high sensitivity of the present technique is attributed to the spontaneous enrichment of analyte molecules during the slow evaporation of the solvent, as well as to the sequential desorption of molecules from complex mixtures based on their volatilities. This newly developed desorption technique is simple and fast, while molecular ions are observed as the major ions.

  20. Leidenfrost Phenomenon-assisted Thermal Desorption (LPTD) and Its Application to Open Ion Sources at Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Subhrakanti; Chen, Lee Chuin; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-03-01

    This work describes the development and application of a new thermal desorption technique that makes use of the Leidenfrost phenomenon in open ion sources at atmospheric pressure for direct mass spectrometric detection of ultratrace levels of illicit, therapeutic, and stimulant drugs, toxicants, and peptides (molecular weight above 1 kDa) in their unaltered state from complex real world samples without or with minor sample pretreatment. A low temperature dielectric barrier discharge ion source was used throughout the experiments and the analytical figures of merit of this technique were investigated. Further, this desorption technique coupled with other ionization sources such as electrospray ionization (ESI) and dc corona discharge atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in open atmosphere was also investigated. The use of the high-resolution `Exactive Orbitrap' mass spectrometer provided unambiguous identification of trace levels of the targeted compounds from complex mixtures and background noise; the limits of detection for various small organic molecules and peptides treated with this technique were at the level of parts per trillion and 10-9 M, respectively. The high sensitivity of the present technique is attributed to the spontaneous enrichment of analyte molecules during the slow evaporation of the solvent, as well as to the sequential desorption of molecules from complex mixtures based on their volatilities. This newly developed desorption technique is simple and fast, while molecular ions are observed as the major ions.

  1. Application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging in breast cancer margin analysis

    PubMed Central

    Calligaris, David; Caragacianu, Diana; Liu, Xiaohui; Norton, Isaiah; Thompson, Christopher J.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Golshan, Mehra; Easterling, Michael L.; Santagata, Sandro; Dillon, Deborah A.; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing tumor from normal glandular breast tissue is an important step in breast-conserving surgery. Because this distinction can be challenging in the operative setting, up to 40% of patients require an additional operation when traditional approaches are used. Here, we present a proof-of-concept study to determine the feasibility of using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) for identifying and differentiating tumor from normal breast tissue. We show that tumor margins can be identified using the spatial distributions and varying intensities of different lipids. Several fatty acids, including oleic acid, were more abundant in the cancerous tissue than in normal tissues. The cancer margins delineated by the molecular images from DESI-MSI were consistent with those margins obtained from histological staining. Our findings prove the feasibility of classifying cancerous and normal breast tissues using ambient ionization MSI. The results suggest that an MS-based method could be developed for the rapid intraoperative detection of residual cancer tissue during breast-conserving surgery. PMID:25246570

  2. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J.; Owen, Benjamin C.; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M.; Madden, Jeremy T.; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. Four APCI reagent systems were tested: the traditionally used mixture of methanol and water, neat benzene, neat carbon disulfide, and nitrogen gas (no liquid reagent). The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar amount of fragmentation was observed for these reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent(nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to form stable molecular ions. PMID:21472571

  3. Pharmaceutical cleaning validation using non-proximate large-area desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soparawalla, Santosh; Salazar, Gary A; Perry, Richard H; Nicholas, Mark; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is a droplet-based ionization method that is applied to samples in the ambient environment with little or no sample preparation. Its utility for industrial applications is explored here for the case of pharmaceutical cleaning validation. A non-proximate large-area DESI system was built to examine representative areas of the surfaces of reaction vessels used in active product ingredient (API) manufacturing. A large-area sprayer capable of sampling an area of approximately 2.5 cm(2) was coupled with a transport tube to allow sensitive, representative sampling of APIs from a stainless steel surface 1 m away from the mass spectrometer. The system was used to detect the APIs neostigmine, acebutolol, amiloride, amiodarone, ibuprofen, montelukast, potassium clavulanate, and beta-estradiol, at levels as low as 30-10 ng/cm(2), easily satisfying the general acceptable limits set by the pharmaceutical industry. These levels were achieved from surfaces resembling the equipment used in API manufacturing processes at a rate of 30 s per analysis.

  4. Document authentication at molecular levels using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Jia, Bin; Ding, Liying; Hong, Feng; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Chen, Rui; Zhou, Shumin; Chen, Huanwen; Fang, Xiang

    2013-09-01

    Molecular images of documents were obtained by sequentially scanning the surface of the document using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS), which was operated in either a gasless, solvent-free or methanol vapor-assisted mode. The decay process of the ink used for handwriting was monitored by following the signal intensities recorded by DAPCI-MS. Handwritings made using four types of inks on four kinds of paper surfaces were tested. By studying the dynamic decay of the inks, DAPCI-MS imaging differentiated a 10-min old from two 4 h old samples. Non-destructive forensic analysis of forged signatures either handwritten or computer-assisted was achieved according to the difference of the contour in DAPCI images, which was attributed to the strength personalized by different writers. Distinction of the order of writing/stamping on documents and detection of illegal printings were accomplished with a spatial resolution of about 140 µm. A Matlab® written program was developed to facilitate the visualization of the similarity between signature images obtained by DAPCI-MS. The experimental results show that DAPCI-MS imaging provides rich information at the molecular level and thus can be used for the reliable document analysis in forensic applications.

  5. Design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic nebulizer chip for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sen, A K; Darabi, J; Knapp, D R

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents design, microfabrication, and test of a microfluidic nebulizer chip for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) in proteomic analysis. The microfluidic chip is fabricated using cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) substrates. The fluidic channels are thermally embossed onto a base substrate using a nickel master and then a top substrate is thermally bonded to seal the channels. Carbon ink embossed into the top COC substrate is used to established electrical connection between the external power supply and the liquid in the channel. The microfluidic chip to external capillary connection is fabricated using Nanoport™ interconnection system. Preliminary leakage test was performed to demonstrate the interconnection system is leak-free and pressure test was performed to evaluate the burst pressure. Finally, the nebulizer chip was used to perform DESI-MS for analyzing peptides (BSA and bradykinin) and reserpine on the nanoporous alumina surface. DESI-MS performance of the microfluidic nebulizer chip is compared with that obtained using a conventional DESI nebulizer. PMID:20161284

  6. Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Smith, Jordan N.; Timchalk, Charles; Laskin, Julia

    2013-01-15

    Imaging mass spectrometry offers simultaneous detection of drugs, drug metabolites and endogenous substances in a single experiment. This is important when evaluating effects of a drug on a complex organ system such as the brain, where there is a need to understand how regional drug distribution impacts function. Nicotine is an addictive drug and its action in the brain is of high interest. Here we use nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, nano-DESI, imaging to discover the localization of nicotine in rat brain tissue after in vivo administration of nicotine. Nano-DESI is a new ambient technique that enables spatially-resolved analysis of tissue samples without special sample pretreatment. We demonstrate high sensitivity of nano-DESI imaging that enables detection of only 0.7 fmole nicotine per pixel in the complex brain matrix. Furthermore, by adding deuterated nicotine to the solvent, we examined how matrix effects, ion suppression, and normalization affect the observed nicotine distribution. Finally, we provide preliminary results suggesting that nicotine localizes to the hippocampal substructure called dentate gyrus.

  7. Rapid determination of nicotine in urine by direct thermal desorption ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Ilgner, R.H.; Guerin, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of nicotine and cotinine in physiological fluids (urine, blood serum, and saliva) is widely used as a means of assessing human exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Although numerous analytical methods exist for these measurements, they generally involve extensive sample preparation which increases cost and decreases sample throughput. We report the use of thermal desorption directly into an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) for the rapid determination of nicotine and cotinine in urine. A 1{mu}L aliquot of urine is injected into a specially designed inlet and flash vaporized directly into an ITMS through an open-split capillary restrictor interface. Isobutane chemical ionization is used to generate (M+H){sup +} ions of the analytes and collision induced dissociation is used to generate characteristic fragment ions which are used to confirm their identity. Quantification is achieved by integrating the ion current for the characteristic ions and comparing with an external working curve. Detection limits are approximately 50 pg per analyte and the sample turnaround time is approximately 3 minutes without the need for extensive sample preparation. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Direct detection of chloramphenicol in honey by neutral desorption-extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, X Y; Fang, X W; Zhang, X; Dai, X M; Guo, X L; Chen, H W; Luo, L P

    2014-11-01

    Herein, we constructed a platform of neutral desorption-extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ND-EESI-MS) for direct and rapid detection of chloramphenicol (CAP) in honey samples diluted with methanol. Under the optimized working conditions, the quantitative information of CAP residues was acquired effectively by EESI-Ion Trap MS (n) . Using heated methanol-N2 as spray reagent, we reduced the limit of determination (LOD) from 73.3 ng/mL to 0.3 ng/mL, and the CAP detection is linear in the range of 1-5000 ng/mL (R = 0.9947). For the honey samples with CAP of 10, 100, and 1000 ng/mL, the recoveries were 133.0, 80.6, and 101.1%, and the relative standard deviations were 5.96, 8.82, and 8.71%, respectively. The reproducibility assays showed the stability of this method. Therefore, this ND-EESI-MS method is powerful for direct, rapid, and quantitative CAP analysis in honey samples with high sensitivity, precision, and specificity.

  9. Efficient Methods to Generate Reproducible Mass Spectra in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sung Hee; Park, Kyung Man; Bae, Yong Jin; Kim, Myung Soo

    2013-06-01

    In our previous matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) studies of peptides, we found that their mass spectra were virtually determined by the effective temperature in the early matrix plume, Tearly, when samples were rather homogeneous. This empirical rule allowed acquisition of quantitatively reproducible spectra. A difficulty in utilizing this rule was the complicated spectral treatment needed to get Tearly. In this work, we found another empirical rule that the total number of particles hitting the detector, or TIC, was a good measure of the spectral temperature and, hence, selection of spectra with the same TIC resulted in reproducible spectra. We also succeeded in obtaining reproducible spectra throughout a measurement by controlling TIC near a preset value through feedback adjustment of laser pulse energy. Both TIC selection and TIC control substantially reduced the shot-to-shot spectral variation in a spot, spot-to-spot variation in a sample, and even sample-to-sample variation in MALDI using α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid or 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as matrix. Based on the utilization of acquired data, TIC control was more efficient than TIC selection by an order of magnitude. Both techniques produced calibration curves with excellent linearity, suggesting their utility in quantification of peptides.

  10. Quantum dots assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection of carbohydrates: qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Aisha; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-04-01

    A quantum dots (QDs) assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (QDA-LDI-MS) strategy was proposed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of a series of carbohydrates. The adsorption of carbohydrates on the modified surface of different QDs as the matrices depended mainly on the formation of hydrogen bonding, which led to higher MS intensity than those with conventional organic matrix. The effects of QDs concentration and sample preparation method were explored for improving the selective ionization process and the detection sensitivity. The proposed approach offered a new dimension to the application of QDs as matrices for MALDI-MS research of carbohydrates. It could be used for quantitative measurement of glucose concentration in human serum with good performance. The QDs served as a matrix showed the advantages of low background, higher sensitivity, convenient sample preparation and excellent stability under vacuum. The QDs assisted LDI-MS approach has promising application to the analysis of carbohydrates in complex biological samples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Environmental and food analysis by desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Luosujärvi, Laura; Kanerva, Sanna; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Kostiainen, Risto; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kauppila, Tiina J

    2010-05-15

    Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS) is a versatile surface analysis technique for a wide range of analytes, especially for neutral and non-polar analytes. Here, a set of analytes typically found in environmental or food samples was analyzed by DAPPI-MS. The set included five polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), one N-PAH, one brominated flame retardant, and nine pesticides, which were studied with three different spray solvents: acetone and toluene in positive ion mode, and anisole in negative ion mode. The analytes showed [M + H](+), M(+*), and [M-H](-) ions as well as fragmentation and substitution products. Detection limits for the studied compounds ranged from 30 pg to 1 ng (from 0.14 to 5.6 pmol). To demonstrate the feasibility of the use of DAPPI-MS two authentic samples - a circuit board and orange peel - and a spiked soil sample were analyzed. Tetrabromobisphenol A, imazalil, and PAHs were observed from the three above-mentioned samples, respectively. The method is best suited for rapid screening analysis of environmental or food samples. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Tracing origins of complex pharmaceutical preparations using surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinglei; Jia, Bin; Huang, Keke; Hu, Bin; Chen, Rong; Chen, Huanwen

    2010-10-01

    A novel strategy to trace the origins of commercial pharmaceutical products has been developed based on the direct chemical profiling of the pharmaceutical products by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). Besides the unambiguous identification of active drug components, various compounds present in the matrixes are simultaneously detected without sample pretreatment, providing valuable information for drug quality control and origin differentiation. Four sources of commercial amoxicillin products made by different manufacturers have been successfully differentiated. This strategy has been extended to secerning six sources of Liuwei Dihuang Teapills, which are herbal medicine preparations with extremely complex matrixes. The photolysis status of chemical drug products and the inferior natural herd medicine products prepared with different processes (e.g., extra heating) were also screened using the method reported here. The limit of detection achieved in the MS/MS experiments was estimated to be 1 ng/g for amoxicillin inside the capsule product. Our experimental data demonstrate that DAPCI-MS is a useful tool for rapid pharmaceutical analysis, showing promising perspectives for tracking the entire pharmaceutical supply chain to prevent counterfeit intrusions.

  13. Efficient methods to generate reproducible mass spectra in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization of peptides.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Hee; Park, Kyung Man; Bae, Yong Jin; Kim, Myung Soo

    2013-06-01

    In our previous matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) studies of peptides, we found that their mass spectra were virtually determined by the effective temperature in the early matrix plume, Tearly, when samples were rather homogeneous. This empirical rule allowed acquisition of quantitatively reproducible spectra. A difficulty in utilizing this rule was the complicated spectral treatment needed to get Tearly. In this work, we found another empirical rule that the total number of particles hitting the detector, or TIC, was a good measure of the spectral temperature and, hence, selection of spectra with the same TIC resulted in reproducible spectra. We also succeeded in obtaining reproducible spectra throughout a measurement by controlling TIC near a preset value through feedback adjustment of laser pulse energy. Both TIC selection and TIC control substantially reduced the shot-to-shot spectral variation in a spot, spot-to-spot variation in a sample, and even sample-to-sample variation in MALDI using α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid or 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as matrix. Based on the utilization of acquired data, TIC control was more efficient than TIC selection by an order of magnitude. Both techniques produced calibration curves with excellent linearity, suggesting their utility in quantification of peptides.

  14. Iron oxide nanomatrix facilitating metal ionization in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Obena, Rofeamor P; Lin, Po-Chiao; Lu, Ying-Wei; Li, I-Che; del Mundo, Florian; Arco, Susan dR; Nuesca, Guillermo M; Lin, Chung-Chen; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2011-12-15

    The significance and epidemiological effects of metals to life necessitate the development of direct, efficient, and rapid method of analysis. Taking advantage of its simple, fast, and high-throughput features, we present a novel approach to metal ion detection by matrix-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle (matrix@MNP)-assisted MALDI-MS. Utilizing 21 biologically and environmentally relevant metal ion solutions, the performance of core and matrix@MNP against conventional matrixes in MALDI-MS and laser desorption ionization (LDI) MS were systemically tested to evaluate the versatility of matrix@MNP as ionization element. The matrix@MNPs provided 20- to >100-fold enhancement on detection sensitivity of metal ions and unambiguous identification through characteristic isotope patterns and accurate mass (<5 ppm), which may be attributed to its multifunctional role as metal chelator, preconcentrator, absorber, and reservoir of energy. Together with the comparison on the ionization behaviors of various metals having different ionization potentials (IP), we formulated a metal ionization mechanism model, alluding to the role of exciton pooling in matrix@MNP-assisted MALDI-MS. Moreover, the detection of Cu in spiked tap water demonstrated the practicability of this new approach as an efficient and direct alternative tool for fast, sensitive, and accurate determination of trace metal ions in real samples.

  15. Measuring Protein-Ligand Interactions Using Liquid Sample Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengyuan; Zhang, Jiang; Ferguson, Carly N.; Chen, Hao; Loo, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown previously that liquid sample desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is able to measure large proteins and noncovalently-bound protein complexes (to 150 kDa) (Ferguson et al., Anal. Chem. 2011, 83, 6468-6473). In this study, we further investigate the application of liquid sample DESI-MS to probe protein-ligand interactions. Liquid sample DESI allows the direct formation of intact protein-ligand complex ions by spraying ligands toward separate protein sample solutions. This type of “reactive” DESI methodology can provide rapid information on binding stiochiometry, selectivity, and kinetics, as demonstrated by the binding of ribonuclease A (RNaseA, 13.7 kDa) with cytidine nucleotide ligands and the binding of lysozyme (14.3 kDa) with acetyl chitose ligands. A higher throughput method for ligand screening by liquid sample DESI was demonstrated, in which different ligands were sequentially injected as a segmented flow for DESI ionization. Furthermore, supercharging to enhance analyte charge can be integrated with liquid sample DESI-MS without interfering with the formation of protein-ligand complexes. PMID:24237005

  16. Direct analysis of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on concrete by reactive-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, D; Reiller, P E; Lamouroux, C

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of organic ligands such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is today an important challenge due to their ability to increase the mobility of radionuclides and metals. Reactive desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (reactive-DESI-MS) was used for direct analysis of EDTA on concrete samples. EDTA forms complexes and those with Fe(III) ions are among the most thermodynamically favored. This complexing capacity was used to improve the specific detection of EDTA directly on a concrete matrix by doping the solvent spray of DESI with a solution of FeCl3 to selectively create the complex between EDTA and Fe(III). Thus, EDTA sensitivity was largely improved by two orders of magnitude with reactive-DESI-MS experiments thanks to the specific detection of EDTA as a [EDTA-4H+Fe(III)](-) complex. The proof of principle that reactive DESI can be applied to concrete samples to detect EDTA has been demonstrated. Its capacity for semi-quantitative determination and localization of EDTA under ambient conditions and with very little sample preparation, minimizing sample manipulations and solvent volumes, two important conditions for the development of new methodologies in the field of analytical chemistry, has been shown.

  17. Laser-induced acoustic desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J; Owen, Benjamin C; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M; Madden, Jeremy T; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2011-03-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a commercial linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. From the four APCI reagent systems tested, neat carbon disulfide provided the best results. The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar but minor amount of fragmentation was observed for these two reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent (nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to predominantly form stable molecular ions.

  18. Metabolic Profiling Directly from the Petri Dish Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Roach, Patrick J.; Heath, Brandi S.; Alexandrov, Theodore; Laskin, Julia; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-11-05

    Understanding molecular interaction pathways in complex biological systems constitutes a treasure trove of knowledge that might facilitate the specific, chemical manipulation of the countless microbiological systems that occur throughout our world. However, there is a lack of methodologies that allow the direct investigation of chemical gradients and interactions in living biological systems, in real time. Here, we report the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) imaging mass spectrometry for in vivo metabolic profiling of living bacterial colonies directly from the Petri dish with absolutely no sample preparation needed. Using this technique, we investigated single colonies of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Bacillus subtilis 3610, and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as well as a mixed biofilm of S. oneidensis MR-1 and B. subtilis 3610. Data from B. subtilis 3610 and S. coelicolor A3(2) provided a means of validation for the method while data from S. oneidensis MR-1 and the mixed biofilm showed a wide range of compounds that this bacterium uses for the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular metal oxides, including riboflavin, iron-bound heme and heme biosynthetic intermediates, and the siderophore putrebactin.

  19. Online Monitoring of Enzymatic Reactions Using Time-Resolved Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Si; Wu, Qiuhua; Xiao, He; Chen, Hao

    2017-02-21

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is powerful for determining enzymatic reaction kinetics because of its soft ionization nature. However, it is limited to use ESI-favored solvents containing volatile buffers (e.g., ammonium acetate). In addition, lack of a quenching step for online ESI-MS reaction monitoring might introduce inaccuracy, due to the possible acceleration of reaction in the sprayed microdroplets. To overcome these issues, this study presents a new approach for online measuring enzymatic reaction kinetics using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). By using DESI-MS, enzymatic reaction products in a buffered aqueous media (e.g., a solution containing Tris buffer or high concentration of inorganic salts) could be directly detected. Furthermore, by adjusting the pH and solvent composition of the DESI spray, reaction can be online quenched to avoid the postionization reaction event, leading to fast and accurate measurement of kinetic constants. Reaction time control can be obtained simply by adjusting the injection flow rates of enzyme and substrate solutions. Enzymatic reactions examined in this study include hydrolysis of 2-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside by β-galactosidase and hydrolysis of acetylcholine by acetylcholinesterase. Derived Michaelis-Menten constants Km for these two reactions were determined to be 214 μM and 172 μM, respectively, which are in good agreement with the values of 300 μM and 230 μM reported in literature, validating the DESI-MS approach. Furthermore, this time-resolved DESI-MS also allowed us to determine Km and turnover number kcat for trypsin digestion of angiotensin II (Km and kcat are determined to be 6.4 mM and 1.3 s(-1), respectively).

  20. Characterization of Coordination Complexes by Desorption Electrospray Mass Spectrometry with a Capillary Target

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold; Anthony D. Appelhans; Michael E. McIlwain; Garold L. Gresham

    2011-03-01

    Metal coordination complexes were formed directly from liquid surfaces using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry. The approach is attractive because it separates complexities of ESI spray droplet formation from delivery of the analyte solution, and thereby gets around difficulty resulting from alteration of the spray process by changes in solution chemistry. Cs+, Ba2+, and La3+ coordination complexes were formed using 18-crown-6 (18c6) and triethylphosphate (TEP) as ligands (L), that had the general formula [Mn+(NO3-)n-1(L)m]+. Formation of singly charged cation complexes was preferred, with charge reduction at the metal site accomplished by attachment of nitrate. Using TEP as a model phosphoryl ligand, alkali metals coordinate with up to three ligands, with Cs+ preferring fewer than Na+. Ba2+ and La3+ are formed as ion pair complexes [Ba(NO3)]+ and [La(NO3)2]+, and both will coordinate with up to four TEP ligands. Using 18c6, Cs+ forms a bis-ligand complex. In contrast, [Ba(NO3)]+ prefers a single 18c6 ligand, while La forms mainly [La(NO3)2(18c6)]+, for which DFT calculations suggested a structure in which the nitrate ligands occupy pseudo-axial positions on opposing sides of the crown. Lower abundances of bis-18c6 complexes were also formed together with doubly charged [La(NO3)(18c6)n]2+ complexes (n = 2 – 4). The results suggest an alternative strategy for probing metal speciation in solution that is less perturbed by the droplet formation and ionization mechanisms operating in conventional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

  1. Engineering matrix-free laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry using glancing angle deposition films.

    PubMed

    Singh, Reshma; Bezuidenhout, Louis W; Jemere, Abebaw; Wang, Zhen; Brett, Michael; Harrison, D Jed

    2017-04-15

    Thin, nanoporous films fabricated using Glancing Angle Deposition (GLAD) technology are demonstrated for solid matrix laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SMALDI-MS). GLAD allows facile engineering of nanoporosity, film thickness, post alignment, and material composition, as demonstrated here by the fabrication of Co-GLAD and Si-GLAD films for SMALDI, and by exploration of the SMALDI performance as a function of thickness, post density, and angle of the post relative to surface normal. GLAD films were prepared by electron beam evaporation onto silicon substrates, using steep angles of incidence for the vacuum deposition, with computer controlled substrate rotation. LDI from the GLAD films was evaluated using an MDS-Sciex time-of-flight (TOF) MALDI mass spectrometer. Co-GLAD films give a limit of quantitation of 6 fmol for complex carbohydrate derivatives, and slanted-post Si-GLAD films show up to three times higher sensitivity than vertical post structures. Reproducibility of both Si and Co films is much higher than conventional MALDI methods for m/z below at least 2100 Da. Both reproducibility and detection limits are comparable to or better than other nano-structured materials. Co-GLAD films are significantly better in performance than Co powders or Co thin films on silicon substrates previously evaluated. The flexibility of GLAD for thin film fabrication of LDI materials is demonstrated by the range of nanoporous materials that can be grown, and the fine control over structural conformation, thickness and porosity. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Qualitative analysis of seized cocaine samples using desorption electrospray ionization- mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Stojanovska, Natasha; Tahtouh, Mark; Kelly, Tamsin; Beavis, Alison; Fu, Shanlin

    2015-05-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is a useful technique for the qualitative analysis of compounds found in seized drug material. In this study, DESI-MS was utilized in the screening analysis of illicit cocaine samples. The technique was also applied to the geographical origin determination of these samples. The limit of detection was determined to be 24.3 µg (or 3.47 µg/mm(2) ) and the analysis time was less than 1 minute per sample. The intra-day and inter-day precision for the detection of cocaine was 11 % and 42 %, respectively; therefore the quantitative data provided by DESI-MS was limited in its use for accurate determination of cocaine concentration in a sample. Using the quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometer, the presence of cocaine and impurities detected were confirmed by accurate tandem MS data. The qualitative chemical profiles obtained using DESI-MS were compared to two popular analysis techniques, GC-MS and LC-MS. The effects of a range of adulterants including caffeine, procaine, levamisole, lignocaine, paracetamol, and atropine on the detectability of cocaine were also investigated. It was found that the addition of these adulterants in a cocaine sample did not prevent the detection of the analyte itself (there was slight enhancement in some samples), which was useful in drug detection. The detection of truxillines in the seized samples by DESI-MS aided in the preliminary determination of geographical origin, i.e., Bolivian, Peruvian or Colombian leaf origin. The application of DESI-MS to the qualitative analysis and screening of seized cocaine samples demonstrates the potential and applicability of the technique to the fast chemical profiling of illicit samples. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization mass spectrometry of proteins using a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, R.; Hillenkamp, F.; Haglund, R.

    1995-12-31

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the most promising techniques for spectral fingerprinting large molecules, such as proteins, oligonucleotides and carbohydrates. In the usual implementation of this technique, the analyte molecule is dissolved in an aromatic liquid matrix material which resonantly absorbs ultraviolet laser light. Resonant absorption by {pi}-{pi}* transitions volatilizes the matrix and initiates subsequent charge transfer to the analyte molecules, which are detected by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Recent MALDI-MS studies with Er:YAG (2.94 {mu}m) and CO{sub 2}{sup 4} (9.4-10.6 {mu}m) lasers suggest that them is significant unexplored potential for mass spectrometry of macromolecules, including oligonucleotide, in the mid-infrared. Preliminary experiments show that it is possible to capitalize on the rich rovibronic absorption spectrum of virtually all organics to initiate resonant desorption in matrix material over the entire range of pH values. However, the mechanism of charge transfer is particularly problematic for infrared MALDI because of the low photon energy. In this paper, we report the results of MALI-MS studies on small proteins using the Vanderbilt FEL and several matrix materials. Proteins with masses up to roughly 6,000 amu were detected with high resolution in a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. By varying the pulse duration using a broadband Pockels cell, we have been able to compare the results of relatively long (5 {mu}s) and short (0.1 {mu}s) irradiation on the desorption and ionization processes. Compared to uv-MALDI spectra of identical analytes obtained with a nitrogen laser (337 nm) in the same time-of-flight spectrometer, the infrared results appear to show that the desorption and ionization process goes on over a somewhat longer time scale.

  4. Structural features of lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Determination of molecular mass by laser desorption mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Venisse, A; Berjeaud, J M; Chaurand, P; Gilleron, M; Puzo, G

    1993-06-15

    It was recently shown that mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan (LAM) can be classified into two types (Chatterjee, D., Lowell, K., Rivoire B., McNeil M. R., and Brennan, P. J. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 6234-6239) according to the presence or absence of mannosyl residues (Manp) located at the nonreducing end of the oligoarabinosyl side chains. These two types of LAM were found in a pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain and in an avirulent M. tuberculosis strain, respectively, suggesting that LAM with Manp characterizes virulent and "disease-inducing strains." We now report the structure of the LAM from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) strain Pasteur, largely used throughout the world as vaccine against tuberculosis. Using an up-to-date analytical approach, we found that the LAM of M. bovis BCG belongs to the class of LAMs capped with Manp. By means of two-dimensional homonuclear and heteronuclear scalar coupling NMR analysis and methylation data, the sugar spin system assignments were partially established, revealing that the LAM contained two types of terminal Manp and 2-O-linked Manp. From the following four-step process: (i) partial hydrolysis of deacylated LAM (dLAM), (ii) oligosaccharide derivatization with aminobenzoic ethyl ester, (iii) HPLC purification, (iv) FAB/MS-MS analysis; it was shown that the dimannosyl unit alpha-D-Manp-(1-->2)-alpha-D-Manp is the major residue capping the termini of the arabinan of the LAM. In this report, LAM molecular mass determination was established using matrix-assisted UV-laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry which reveals that the LAM molecular mass is around 17.4 kDa. The similarity of the LAM structures between M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv is discussed in regard to their function in the immunopathology of mycobacterial infection.

  5. Ionic liquids as matrices in microfluidic sample deposition for high-mass matrix- assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Simon; Kemmerling, Simon; Mädler, Stefanie; Stahlberg, Henning; Braun, Thomas; Zenobi, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Sample preparation for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) via a microfluidic deposition device using ionic liquid matrices addresses several problems of standard protocols with crystalline matrices, such as the heterogeneity of sample spots due to the co-crystallization of sample and matrix and the limited capability for high-throughput analysis. Since ionic liquid matrices do not solidify during the measurement, the resulting sample spots are homogeneous. The use of these matrices is also beneficial for automated sample preparation, since crystallization of the matrix is avoided and, thus, no clogging of the spotting device can occur. The applicability of ionic liquids to the analysis of biomolecules with high molecular weights, up to ≈ 1 MDa is shown, as well as a good sensitivity (5 fmol) for recombinant human fibronectin, a protein with a molecular weight of 226 kDa. Microfluidic sample deposition of proteins with high molecular weights will, in the future, allow parallel sample preparation for MALDI-MS and for electron microscopy.

  6. Measurement of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xiu-Xiu; Bian, Lei; Luo, Zong-Xiu; Chen, Zong-Mao

    2015-12-01

    Determination of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air is important to understand chemical communication between plants and insects and will aid the development of semiochemicals from plants for pest control. In this study, a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to measure ultra-trace levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. The desorption parameters of TD, including sorbent tube material, tube desorption temperature, desorption time, and cold trap temperature, were selected and optimized. In GC-MS analysis, the selected ion monitoring mode was used for enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. This method was sufficiently sensitive to detect part-per-trillion levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. Laboratory and field evaluation revealed that the method presented high precision and accuracy. Field studies indicated that the background odor of tea plantations contained some common volatile plant compounds, such as (Z)-3-hexenol, methyl salicylate, and (E)-ocimene, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 3400 ng m(-3). In addition, the background odor in summer was more abundant in quality and quantity than in autumn. Relative to previous methods, the TD-GC-MS method is more sensitive, permitting accurate qualitative and quantitative measurements of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air.

  7. Rapid Detection of OXA-48-Producing Enterobacteriaceae by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization−Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Oviaño, Marina; Barba, Maria José; Fernández, Begoña; Ortega, Adriana; Aracil, Belén; Oteo, Jesús; Campos, José

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive (100%) matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization−time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) assay was developed to detect OXA-48-type producers, using 161 previously characterized clinical isolates. Ertapenem was monitored to detect carbapenem resistance, and temocillin was included in the assay as a marker for OXA-48-producers. Structural analysis of temocillin is described. Data are obtained within 60 min. PMID:26677247

  8. Nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: Novel sample preparation methods and nanoparticle screening for plant metabolite imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yagnik, Gargey B.

    2016-02-19

    The main goal of the presented research is development of nanoparticle based matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). This dissertation includes the application of previously developed data acquisition methods, development of novel sample preparation methods, application and comparison of novel nanoparticle matrices, and comparison of two nanoparticle matrix application methods for MALDI-MS and MALDI-MS imaging.

  9. High-throughput proteomics using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Rainer; Gobom, Johan; Nordhoff, Eckhard

    2005-06-01

    It has become evident that the mystery of life will not be deciphered just by decoding its blueprint, the genetic code. In the life and biomedical sciences, research efforts are now shifting from pure gene analysis to the analysis of all biomolecules involved in the machinery of life. One area of these postgenomic research fields is proteomics. Although proteomics, which basically encompasses the analysis of proteins, is not a new concept, it is far from being a research field that can rely on routine and large-scale analyses. At the time the term proteomics was coined, a gold-rush mentality was created, promising vast and quick riches (i.e., solutions to the immensely complex questions of life and disease). Predictably, the reality has been quite different. The complexity of proteomes and the wide variations in the abundances and chemical properties of their constituents has rendered the use of systematic analytical approaches only partially successful, and biologically meaningful results have been slow to arrive. However, to learn more about how cells and, hence, life works, it is essential to understand the proteins and their complex interactions in their native environment. This is why proteomics will be an important part of the biomedical sciences for the foreseeable future. Therefore, any advances in providing the tools that make protein analysis a more routine and large-scale business, ideally using automated and rapid analytical procedures, are highly sought after. This review will provide some basics, thoughts and ideas on the exploitation of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization in biological mass spectrometry - one of the most commonly used analytical tools in proteomics - for high-throughput analyses.

  10. Age determination of ballpoint pen ink by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen H; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2008-07-01

    Two main approaches can be used for determining the age of an ink: indirect dating and direct dating. Indirect dating is based on the chemical analysis of an ink followed by comparison with known samples in a reference collection. The collection should contain information about the inks including the market introduction dates. This approach may allow for an anachronism to be detected. The second concept is based on measuring ink components that change with age. The analysis of solvents in ballpoint inks may be a useful parameter for determining the age of ink on paper. In a previous study, the authors demonstrated that thermal desorption of ink directly from paper, followed by chemical analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), is a promising procedure for characterizing ink-binder resins and solvents. Preliminary tests showed that monitoring the evaporation of ink solvent from ink on paper is not a suitable method for ink dating. Thermal analysis of ink on paper in two steps revealed that fresh ink releases a relative amount of solvent at a certain low temperature in a defined period of time, which decreases as the ink ages. As a consequence, this relative amount of solvent released at a certain low temperature, and its decrease with time, can be used to estimate ink age. This age-dependent parameter was studied in 85 different inks ranging in age from 1 week to 1.5 years. It was found that some inks showed a significant decrease of this parameter up to an age of several months, and that the aging process can be monitored within this period. For other inks, however, the age-dependent parameter decreases relatively fast, e.g., within a few days, to a constant level, which can be too fast for casework. Based on these results, a general procedure for assessing the age of ballpoint pen inks on paper was developed.

  11. Triple sorbent thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry determination of vapor phase organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C.Y.; Skeen, J.T.; Dindal, A.B.; Higgins, C.E.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    A thermal desorption/ps chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) has been evaluated for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in vapor phase samples using Carbosieve S-III/Carbotrap/Carotrap C triple sorbent traps (TST) similar to those available from a commercial source. The analysis was carried out with a Hewlett-Packard 5985A or 5995 GC/MS system with a modified injector to adapt an inhouse manufactured short-path desorber for transferring desorbate directly onto a cryofocusing loop for subsequent GC/MS analysis. Vapor phase standards generated from twenty six compounds were used for method validation, including alkanes, alkyl alcohols, alkyl ketones, and alkyl nitrites, a group of representative compounds that have previously been identified in a target airborne matrix. The method was validated based on the satisfactory results in terms of reproducibility, recovery rate, stability, and linearity. A relative, standard deviation of 0.55 to 24.3 % was obtained for the entire TD process (generation of gas phase standards, spiking the standards on and desorbing from TST) over a concentration range of 20 to 500 ng/trap. Linear correlation coefficients for the calibration curves as determined ranged from 0.81 to 0.99 and limits of detection ranged from 3 to 76 ng. For a majority of standards, recoveries of greater than 90% were observed. For three selected standards spiked on TSTS, minimal loss (10 to 22%) was observed after storing the spiked in, a 4{degree}C refrigerator for 29 days. The only chromatographable artifact observed was a 5% conversion of isopropanol to acetone. The validated method been successfully applied, to the determination of VOCs collected from various emission sources in a diversified concentration range.

  12. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: Imaging drugs and metabolites in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Justin M.; Ifa, Demian R.; Zhu, Yongxin; Kissinger, Candice B.; Manicke, Nicholas E.; Kissinger, Peter T.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2008-01-01

    Ambient ionization methods for MS enable direct, high-throughput measurements of samples in the open air. Here, we report on one such method, desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), which is coupled to a linear ion trap mass spectrometer and used to record the spatial intensity distribution of a drug directly from histological sections of brain, lung, kidney, and testis without prior chemical treatment. DESI imaging provided identification and distribution of clozapine after an oral dose of 50 mg/kg by: i) measuring the abundance of the intact ion at m/z 327.1, and ii) monitoring the dissociation of the protonated drug compound at m/z 327.1 to its dominant product ion at m/z 270.1. In lung tissues, DESI imaging was performed in the full-scan mode over an m/z range of 200-1100, providing an opportunity for relative quantitation by using an endogenous lipid to normalize the signal response of clozapine. The presence of clozapine was detected in all tissue types, whereas the presence of the N-desmethyl metabolite was detected only in the lung sections. Quantitation of clozapine from the brain, lung, kidney, and testis, by using LC-MS/MS, revealed concentrations ranging from 0.05 μg/g (brain) to a high of 10.6 μg/g (lung). Comparisons of the results recorded by DESI with those by LC-MS/MS show good agreement and are favorable for the use of DESI imaging in drug and metabolite detection directly from biological tissues. PMID:18697929

  13. Spatially resolved metabolic phenotyping of breast cancer by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Sabine; Muirhead, Laura J; Speller, Abigail V M; Golf, Ottmar; Strittmatter, Nicole; Ramakrishnan, Rathi; Goldin, Robert D; Jones, Emrys; Veselkov, Kirill; Nicholson, Jeremy; Darzi, Ara; Takats, Zoltan

    2015-05-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease characterized by varying responses to therapeutic agents and significant differences in long-term survival. Thus, there remains an unmet need for early diagnostic and prognostic tools and improved histologic characterization for more accurate disease stratification and personalized therapeutic intervention. This study evaluated a comprehensive metabolic phenotyping method in breast cancer tissue that uses desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI MSI), both as a novel diagnostic tool and as a method to further characterize metabolic changes in breast cancer tissue and the tumor microenvironment. In this prospective single-center study, 126 intraoperative tissue biopsies from tumor and tumor bed from 50 patients undergoing surgical resections were subject to DESI MSI. Global DESI MSI models were able to distinguish adipose, stromal, and glandular tissue based on their metabolomic fingerprint. Tumor tissue and tumor-associated stroma showed evident changes in their fatty acid and phospholipid composition compared with normal glandular and stromal tissue. Diagnosis of breast cancer was achieved with an accuracy of 98.2% based on DESI MSI data (PPV 0.96, NVP 1, specificity 0.96, sensitivity 1). In the tumor group, correlation between metabolomic profile and tumor grade/hormone receptor status was found. Overall classification accuracy was 87.7% (PPV 0.92, NPV 0.9, specificity 0.9, sensitivity 0.92). These results demonstrate that DESI MSI may be a valuable tool in the improved diagnosis of breast cancer in the future. The identified tumor-associated metabolic changes support theories of de novo lipogenesis in tumor tissue and the role of stroma tissue in tumor growth and development and overall disease prognosis.

  14. High-throughput detection of drugs binding to proteins using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenxi; Na, Na; Huang, Lingyun; He, Dacheng; Ouyang, Jin

    2013-09-10

    In this paper, we present a strategy for screening drugs that bind to proteins by combining centrifugal filtration with desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). Membrane filtration was used to remove any unbound drugs. Then, drug-protein complexes deposited on the DESI substrate were dissociated during the DESI-MS analytical process, and the liberated drugs were measured. To validate the methodology, the screening of a series of drugs against two types of proteins was performed. Three DNA topoisomerase I (Topo I) inhibitors (camptothecin (CPT), hydroxycamptothecin (OHCPT) and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38)) were screened against Topo I and the DNA-Topo I complex using DESI-MS. The results indicated that none of the inhibitors bound to Topo I, because the inhibitors had binding affinities only to the DNA-Topo I complex. Among the three drugs that bound to the DNA-Topo I complex, SN-38 had the strongest relative binding affinity, and CPT had the weakest relative binding affinity. The impact of the DESI spray solvent composition on the analysis of drug-protein complex binding was evaluated. Seven alkaloid drugs were also screened against Topo I using DESI-MS. Berberine and palmatine had good binding affinities. A screening of 21 types of drugs was carried out to determine whether the drugs bound to human serum albumin (HSA). The DESI-MS screening process could be achieved within 1.75min. The study provides a method to qualitatively detect compounds that bind to proteins, showing great potential in drug design and screening. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An investigation of liquid secondary ion and laser desorption mass spectroscopy for the analysis of planar chromatograms

    SciTech Connect

    Dunphy, J.C.

    1990-11-01

    In the work described in this dissertation, interfaces between two mass spectrometric methods, liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (LSIMS) and laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LD/FTMS), and thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and slab gel electrophoresis were developed for bioanalytical applications. In an investigation of direct LSIMS for TLC analysis (TLC/LSIMS), mass spectra of bile acids and bile salts were characterized directly from high-performance TLC plates. The scanning ability of the LSIMS instrument was used to generate spatial profiles of the characteristic bile acid ions in the mass spectra. A procedure for the analysis of bile salts in dog bile was developed involving an extraction step, followed by TLC separation and direct TLC/LSIMS detection and semi-quantitation. For peptides, an experiment called ``selected-sequence monitoring`` was developed to locate target peptides related in structure in complex mixtures developed on TLC plates. Ions characteristic of the bradykinin and enkephalin peptides were used to generate spatial profiles of members of those peptide families on TLC plates. Using a Fourier transform mass spectrometer (FTMS), a fundamental investigation was conducted into the factors affecting the quality of analytical data obtained using direct laser desorption/ionization to produce mass spectra from TLC plates.

  16. An investigation of liquid secondary ion and laser desorption mass spectroscopy for the analysis of planar chromatograms

    SciTech Connect

    Dunphy, J.C.

    1990-11-01

    In the work described in this dissertation, interfaces between two mass spectrometric methods, liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (LSIMS) and laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LD/FTMS), and thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and slab gel electrophoresis were developed for bioanalytical applications. In an investigation of direct LSIMS for TLC analysis (TLC/LSIMS), mass spectra of bile acids and bile salts were characterized directly from high-performance TLC plates. The scanning ability of the LSIMS instrument was used to generate spatial profiles of the characteristic bile acid ions in the mass spectra. A procedure for the analysis of bile salts in dog bile was developed involving an extraction step, followed by TLC separation and direct TLC/LSIMS detection and semi-quantitation. For peptides, an experiment called selected-sequence monitoring'' was developed to locate target peptides related in structure in complex mixtures developed on TLC plates. Ions characteristic of the bradykinin and enkephalin peptides were used to generate spatial profiles of members of those peptide families on TLC plates. Using a Fourier transform mass spectrometer (FTMS), a fundamental investigation was conducted into the factors affecting the quality of analytical data obtained using direct laser desorption/ionization to produce mass spectra from TLC plates.

  17. Broad spectrum infrared thermal desorption of wipe-based explosive and narcotic samples for trace mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas P; Staymates, Matthew; Sisco, Edward

    2017-08-07

    Wipe collected analytes were thermally desorbed using broad spectrum near infrared heating for mass spectrometric detection. Employing a twin tube filament-based infrared emitter, rapid and efficiently powered thermal desorption and detection of nanogram levels of explosives and narcotics was demonstrated. The infrared thermal desorption (IRTD) platform developed here used multi-mode heating (direct radiation and secondary conduction from substrate and subsequent convection from air) and a temperature ramp to efficiently desorb analytes with vapor pressures across eight orders of magnitude. The wipe substrate experienced heating rates up to (85 ± 2) °C s(-1) with a time constant of (3.9 ± 0.2) s for 100% power emission. The detection of trace analytes was also demonstrated from complex mixtures, including plastic-bonded explosives and exogenous narcotics, explosives, and metabolites from collected artificial latent fingerprints. Manipulation of the emission power and duration directly controlled the heating rate and maximum temperature, enabling differential thermal desorption and a level of upstream separation for enhanced specificity. Transitioning from 100% power and 5 s emission duration to 25% power and 30 s emission enabled an order of magnitude increase in the temporal separation (single seconds to tens of seconds) of the desorption of volatile and semi-volatile species within a collected fingerprint. This mode of operation reduced local gas-phase concentrations, reducing matrix effects experienced with high concentration mixtures. IRTD provides a unique platform for the desorption of trace analytes from wipe collections, an area of importance to the security sector, transportation agencies, and customs and border protection.

  18. Chemical analysis of diesel engine nanoparticles using a nano-DMA/thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tobias, H J; Beving, D E; Ziemann, P J; Sakurai, H; Zuk, M; McMurry, P H; Zarling, D; Waytulonis, R; Kittelson, D B

    2001-06-01

    Diesel engines are known to emit high number concentrations of nanoparticles (diameter < 50 nm), but the physical and chemical mechanisms by which they form are not understood. Information on chemical composition is lacking because the small size, low mass concentration, and potential for contamination of samples obtained by standard techniques make nanoparticles difficult to analyze. A nano-differential mobility analyzer was used to size-select nanoparticles (mass median diameter approximately 25-60 nm) from diesel engine exhaust for subsequent chemical analysis by thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometry. Mass spectra were used to identify and quantify nanoparticle components, and compound molecular weights and vapor pressures were estimated from calibrated desorption temperatures. Branched alkanes and alkyl-substituted cycloalkanes from unburned fuel and/or lubricating oil appear to contribute most of the diesel nanoparticle mass. The volatility of the organic fraction of the aerosol increases as the engine load decreases and as particle size increases. Sulfuric acid was also detected at estimated concentrations of a few percent of the total nanoparticle mass. The results are consistent with a mechanism of nanoparticle formation involving nucleation of sulfuric acid and water, followed by particle growth by condensation of organic species.

  19. Few layer graphene matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cho, Donghyun; Hong, Sangsu; Shim, Sangdeok

    2013-08-01

    We present the employment of few layer graphene (FLG) as a matrix for the analysis of low molecular weight polymeric compounds using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The practicality of FLG as a matrix for MALDI experiments is demonstrated by analyzing low molecular weight polymers, polar polyethylene glycol (PEG) of 1000 Da and nonpolar polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) of 650 Da. The high quality MS spectra without low-mass interference signals without any further sampling procedure were acquired.

  20. Direct analysis of anabolic steroids in urine using Leidenfrost phenomenon assisted thermal desorption-dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Nonami, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2014-08-11

    Rapid detection of trace level anabolic steroids in urine is highly desirable to monitor the consumption of performance enhancing anabolic steroids by athletes. The present article describes a novel strategy for identifying the trace anabolic steroids in urine using Leidenfrost phenomenon assisted thermal desorption (LPTD) coupled to dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ionization mass spectrometry. Using this method the steroid molecules are enriched within a liquid droplet during the thermal desorption process and desorbed all-together at the last moment of droplet evaporation in a short time domain. The desorbed molecules were ionized using a dielectric barrier discharge ion-source in front of the mass spectrometer inlet at open atmosphere. This process facilitates the sensitivity enhancement with several orders of magnitude compared to the thermal desorption at a lower temperature. The limits of detection (LODs) of various steroid molecules were found to be in the range of 0.05-0.1 ng mL(-1) for standard solutions and around two orders of magnitude higher for synthetic urine samples. The detection limits of urinary anabolic steroids could be lowered by using a simple and rapid dichloromethane extraction technique. The analytical figures of merit of this technique were evaluated at open atmosphere using suitable internal standards. The technique is simple and rapid for high sensitivity and high throughput screening of anabolic steroids in urine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to determine phthalate and organophosphate esters from air samples.

    PubMed

    Aragón, M; Borrull, F; Marcé, R M

    2013-08-16

    A method based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has been developed to determine four organophosphate esters, seven phthalate esters, and bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate in the gas phase from harbour and urban air samples. The method involves the sampling of 1.5L of air in a Tenax TA sorbent tube followed by thermal desorption (using a Tenax TA cryogenic trap) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The repeatability of the method expressed as %RSD (n=3) is less than 15% and the MQLs are between 0.007μgm(-3) (DMP, TBP, BBP, TPP and DnOP) and 6.7μgm(-3) (DEHP). The method was successfully applied in two areas (urban and harbour) testing two and three points in each one, respectively. Some of these compounds were found in both urban and harbour samples. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was the most abundant compound found in both areas at concentration levels between 6.7μgm(-3) and 136.4μgm(-3). This study demonstrates that thermal desorption is an efficient method for the determination of these semi-volatile compounds in the gas phase fraction of air samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of silver ions adsorbed on gold nanorods: surface analysis by using surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niidome, Yasuro; Nakamura, Yuki; Honda, Kanako; Akiyama, Yasuyuki; Nishioka, Koji; Kawasaki, Hideya; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2009-04-07

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) indicated AgBr2-, which adsorbed on gold nanorod surfaces, was a key material to control the anisotropic growth of gold nanorods.

  3. Jarosite as a Storage Mineral for Small Organic Molecules: Investigations of Natural Samples Using an 'In Situ' Laser Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, J. M.; Hinman, N. W.; Yan, B.; Stoner, D. L.; Scott, J. R.

    2007-03-01

    The use of laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry has revealed the presence of organic matter in several jarosite samples from various locations worldwide including jarosite precipitated in the lab by acidothiobacillus ferroxidans.

  4. Quantitative analysis of synthetic polymers using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; He, Meiyu; Pei, Jian; He, Haifeng

    2003-12-01

    Quantitative analyses of synthetic polymers were accomplished using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS). Many factors have hindered the development of quantitative measurement of polymers via MALDI TOF MS, e.g., laser power, matrix, cation salt, and cocrystallization. By probing the optimal conditions, two sets of polymers were studied. Fair repeatability of the samples ensures acceptable results. In set 1, two poly(ethylene glycols) with different end groups showed equal desorption/ionization efficiencies. Two synthetic polymers in set 2 with different chemical properties resulted in different MALDI responses. Good linearity was achieved by plotting the relationship between the sample concentration ratio and the total signal intensity ratio in both sets.

  5. Laser Desorption 7.87 eV Postionization Mass Spectrometry of Antibiotics in Staphylococcus epidermidis Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, Gerald L.; Carlson, Ross; Akhmetov, Artem; Moore, Jerry F.; Hanley, Luke

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of laser desorption 7.87 eV vacuum ultraviolet postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) to detect antibiotics within intact bacterial colony biofilms. As >99% of the molecules ejected by laser desorption are neutrals, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of these neutrals can provide significantly increased signal compared to detection of directly emitted ions. Postionization with VUV radiation from the molecular fluorine laser single photon ionizes laser desorbed neutrals with ionization potentials below the 7.87 eV photon energy. Antibiotics with structures indicative of sub-7.87 eV ionization potentials were examined for their ability to be detected by 7.87 eV LDPI-MS. Tetracycline, sulfadiazine, and novobiocin were successfully detected neat as dried films physisorbed on porous silicon oxide substrates. Tetracycline and sulfadiazine were then detected within intact Staphylococcus epidermidis colony biofilms, the former with LOD in the micromolar concentration range. PMID:18704905

  6. Screening of gluten avenins in foods by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Camafeita, E; Méndez, E

    1998-10-01

    The first procedure capable of analysing gluten avenins in gluten-free food samples aimed at the diet control of coeliac patients is described. The method is based on the direct observation of the characteristic avenin mass pattern, around 20-30 kDa, as revealed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS). The mass range where avenin signals appear is free from mass peaks arising from wheat gliadin, barley hordein and rye secalin protein components, which are also toxic to coeliac patients. Therefore, avenins can easily be screened in complex formula food samples elaborated with mixtures of wheat, barley, rye and oats. In addition, a procedure to quantify avenins in food samples is described on the basis of avenin mass area measurement with a detection limit of 0.4 mg of avenins per 100 g of food.

  7. Black phosphorus-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of low-molecular-weight compounds in biofluids.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Mei; Ding, Jun; Yu, Lei; Hussain, Dilshad; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of small molecules by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been a challenging task due to matrix-derived interferences in low m/z region and poor reproducibility of MS signal response. In this study, we developed an approach by applying black phosphorus (BP) as a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) matrix for the quantitative analysis of small molecules for the first time. Black phosphorus-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (BP/ALDI-MS) showed clear background and exhibited superior detection sensitivity toward quaternary ammonium compounds compared to carbon-based materials. By combining stable isotope labeling (SIL) strategy with BP/ALDI-MS (SIL-BP/ALDI-MS), a variety of analytes labeled with quaternary ammonium group were sensitively detected. Moreover, the isotope-labeled forms of analytes also served as internal standards, which broadened the analyte coverage of BP/ALDI-MS and improved the reproducibility of MS signals. Based on these advantages, a reliable method for quantitative analysis of aldehydes from complex biological samples (saliva, urine, and serum) was successfully established. Good linearities were obtained for five aldehydes in the range of 0.1-20.0 μM with correlation coefficients (R (2)) larger than 0.9928. The LODs were found to be 20 to 100 nM. Reproducibility of the method was obtained with intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 10.4 %, and the recoveries in saliva samples ranged from 91.4 to 117.1 %. Taken together, the proposed SIL-BP/ALDI-MS strategy has proved to be a reliable tool for quantitative analysis of aldehydes from complex samples. Graphical Abstract An approach for the determination of small molecules was developed by using black phosphorus (BP) as a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) matrix.

  8. Characterization of surface ligands on functionalized magnetic nanoparticles using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Jeong, Youngdo; Mercante, Luiza A.; Tonga, Gülen Yesilbag; Kim, Chaekyu; Zhu, Zheng-Jiang; Vachet, Richard W.; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2013-05-01

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been characterized by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). Quantitative information about surface ligand composition and structure for monolayer and mixed monolayer protected Fe3O4 and FePt NPs can be obtained rapidly with very little sample consumption.Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been characterized by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). Quantitative information about surface ligand composition and structure for monolayer and mixed monolayer protected Fe3O4 and FePt NPs can be obtained rapidly with very little sample consumption. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: synthesis of surface ligands and magnetic NPs, LDI-MS fragmentation pathway of dopamine-terminated ligand bound on FePt NPs, LDI-mass spectra of Fe3O4 NPs, LDI-mass spectra of 5 different mixed-monolayer FePt NPs, identities of additional ions in LDI-mass spectrum of FePt NP with ligand T, 3 day reproducibility result, and HPLC-MS result. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01384g

  9. Structural characterization and biological activity of recombinant human epidermal growth factor proteins with different N-terminal sequences.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, M; Bauhofer, A; Schwind, P; Bade, E; Rasched, I; Przybylski, M

    1994-05-18

    The primary structures and molecular homogeneity of recombinant human epidermal growth factors from different suppliers were characterized and their biological activities evaluated by a standard DNA synthesis assay. Molecular weight determinations using 252Cf-plasma-desorption and electrospray mass spectrometry in combination with N- and C-terminal sequence analysis and determination of intramolecular disulfide bridges revealed that one recombinant protein had the correct human-identical structure (54 aa residues; 6347 Da). In contrast, a second recombinant protein (7020 Da) was found to contain a pentapeptide (KKYPR) insert following its N-terminal methionine. This structural variant showed a significant reduction in its capacity to stimulate DNA synthesis.

  10. Discrimination of Penicillium isolates by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Hettick, Justin M; Green, Brett J; Buskirk, Amanda D; Kashon, Michael L; Slaven, James E; Janotka, Erika; Blachere, Francoise M; Schmechel, Detlef; Beezhold, Donald H

    2008-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used to generate highly reproducible mass spectral 'fingerprints' for twelve Penicillium species. Prior to MALDI-TOF MS analysis, eight replicate cultures of each Penicillium species were subjected to three one-minute bead-beating cycles in an acetonitrile/trifluoroacetic acid solvent. The mass spectra contained abundant peaks in the range of m/z 5000-20 000, and allowed unambiguous discrimination between species. In addition, a biomarker common to all Penicillium mass spectra was observed at m/z 13 900. Discriminant analysis using the MALDI-TOF MS data yielded classification error rates of 0% (i.e. 100% correct identification), indicating that MALDI-TOF MS data may be a useful diagnostic tool for the objective identification of Penicillium species of environmental and clinical importance.

  11. Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometric Imaging of the Distribution of Rohitukine in the Seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. F

    PubMed Central

    Mohana Kumara, Patel; Srimany, Amitava; Arunan, Suganya; Ravikanth, Gudasalamani; Uma Shaanker, Ramanan; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2016-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometric imaging of all parts of the seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. f (Meliaceae) was performed to reconstruct the molecular distribution of rohitukine (Rh) and related compounds. The species accumulates Rh, a prominent chromone alkaloid, in its seeds, fruits, and stem bark. Rh possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and immuno-modulatory properties. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI MSI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis detected Rh as well as its glycosylated, acetylated, oxidized, and methoxylated analogues. Rh was predominantly distributed in the main roots, collar region of the stem, and young leaves. In the stem and roots, Rh was primarily restricted to the cortex region. The identities of the metabolites were assigned based on both the fragmentation patterns and exact mass analyses. We discuss these results, with specific reference to the possible pathways of Rh biosynthesis and translocation during seedling development in D. binectariferum. PMID:27362422

  12. Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometric Imaging of the Distribution of Rohitukine in the Seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. F.

    PubMed

    Mohana Kumara, Patel; Srimany, Amitava; Arunan, Suganya; Ravikanth, Gudasalamani; Uma Shaanker, Ramanan; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2016-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometric imaging of all parts of the seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. f (Meliaceae) was performed to reconstruct the molecular distribution of rohitukine (Rh) and related compounds. The species accumulates Rh, a prominent chromone alkaloid, in its seeds, fruits, and stem bark. Rh possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and immuno-modulatory properties. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI MSI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis detected Rh as well as its glycosylated, acetylated, oxidized, and methoxylated analogues. Rh was predominantly distributed in the main roots, collar region of the stem, and young leaves. In the stem and roots, Rh was primarily restricted to the cortex region. The identities of the metabolites were assigned based on both the fragmentation patterns and exact mass analyses. We discuss these results, with specific reference to the possible pathways of Rh biosynthesis and translocation during seedling development in D. binectariferum.

  13. Cellular-level mass spectrometry imaging using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) by oversampling.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Milad; Muddiman, David C

    2015-03-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) allows for the direct and simultaneous analysis of the spatial distribution of molecular species from sample surfaces such as tissue sections. One of the goals of MSI is monitoring the distribution of compounds at the cellular resolution in order to gain insights about the biology that occurs at this spatial level. Infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) imaging of cervical tissue sections was performed using a spot-to-spot distance of 10 μm by utilizing the method of oversampling, where the target plate is moved by a distance that is less than the desorption radius of the laser. In addition to high spatial resolution, high mass accuracy (±1 ppm) and high mass resolving power (140,000 at m/z = 200) were achieved by coupling the IR-MALDESI imaging source to a hybrid quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Ion maps of cholesterol in tissues were generated from voxels containing <1 cell, on average. Additionally, the challenges of imaging at the cellular level in terms of loss of sensitivity and longer analysis time are discussed.

  14. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct profiling and imaging of small molecules from raw biological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Sangwon

    2008-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization(MALDI) mass spectrometry(MS) has been widely used for analysis of biological molecules, especially macromolecules such as proteins. However, MALDI MS has a problem in small molecule (less than 1 kDa) analysis because of the signal saturation by organic matrixes in the low mass region. In imaging MS (IMS), inhomogeneous surface formation due to the co-crystallization process by organic MALDI matrixes limits the spatial resolution of the mass spectral image. Therefore, to make laser desorption/ionization (LDI) MS more suitable for mass spectral profiling and imaging of small molecules directly from raw biological tissues, LDI MS protocols with various alternative assisting materials were developed and applied to many biological systems of interest. Colloidal graphite was used as a matrix for IMS of small molecules for the first time and methodologies for analyses of small metabolites in rat brain tissues, fruits, and plant tissues were developed. With rat brain tissues, the signal enhancement for cerebroside species by colloidal graphite was observed and images of cerebrosides were successfully generated by IMS. In addition, separation of isobaric lipid ions was performed by imaging tandem MS. Directly from Arabidopsis flowers, flavonoids were successfully profiled and heterogeneous distribution of flavonoids in petals was observed for the first time by graphite-assisted LDI(GALDI) IMS.

  15. Evaluation of combined matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry experiments for peptide mass fingerprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, David; Wasselin, Thierry; Carré, Vincent; Chaimbault, Patrick; Bezdetnaya, Lina; Maunit, Benoît; Muller, Jean-François

    2011-07-15

    Peptide Mass Fingerprinting (PMF) is still of significant interest in proteomics because it allows a large number of complex samples to be rapidly screened and characterized. The main part of post-translational modifications is generally preserved. In some specific cases, PMF suffers from ambiguous or unsuccessful identification. In order to improve its reliability, a combined approach using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICRMS) was evaluated. The study was carried out on bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. The influence of several important parameters (the matrix, the sample preparation method, the amount of the analyte) on the MOWSE score and the protein sequence coverage were evaluated to allow the identification of specific effects. A careful investigation of the sequence coverage obtained by each kind of experiment ensured the detection of specific peptides for each experimental condition. Results highlighted that DHB-FTICRMS and DHB- or CHCA-TOFMS are the most suited combinations of experimental conditions to achieve PMF analysis. The association (convolution) of the data obtained by each of these techniques ensured a significant increase in the MOWSE score and the protein sequence coverage.

  16. Filtration efficiency validation of glass wool during thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis of fine atmospheric particles.

    PubMed

    Hao, Liang; Wu, Dapeng; Ding, Kun; Meng, Hu; Yan, Xiaohui; Guan, Yafeng

    2015-02-06

    Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TD-GC-MS) technique has been widely used for analysis of semi-violate organic compounds on atmospheric aerosol. To prevent GC column from being damaged by fine solid particles during thermal desorption process, glass wool as filter mat is indispensible. However, the filtration efficiency has never been validated. In this paper, the most penetrating particle size and the minimum packing thickness of glass wool were calculated based on classical filtration theory. According to the calculation results, packing parameters of glass wool were optimized experimentally using silica particles. It is demonstrated that glass wool with a packing thickness of 30 mm, solidity of 0.039 can effectively block these fine solid particles from penetrating at normal thermal desorption conditions (T=300°C, u=0.4-4 cm/s). Finally, the filtration efficiency of glass wool was further confirmed with real PM2.5 samples. Under the validated filtration condition, TD-GC-MS was applied for the analysis of non-polar organic compounds on real PM2.5 samples, and very good results were obtained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High-Resolution Live-Cell Imaging and Analysis by Laser Desorption/Ionization Droplet Delivery Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Jansson, Erik T; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N

    2016-05-17

    We have developed a new ambient-ionization mass spectrometric technique named laser desorption/ionization droplet delivery mass spectrometry (LDIDD-MS). LDIDD-MS permits high-resolution, high-sensitivity imaging of tissue samples as well as measurements of both single-cell apoptosis and live-cell exocytosis. A pulsed (15 Hz) UV laser beam (266 nm) is focused on a surface covered with target analytes to trigger their desorption and ionization. A spray of liquid droplets is simultaneously directed onto the laser-focused surface region to capture the ionized analytes and deliver them to a mass spectrometer. The approach of rapid and effective capturing of molecules after laser desorption/ionization allows the limit of detection for the amino acid lysine to be as low as 2 amol under ambient ionization conditions. Two-dimensional maps of the desorbed/ionized species are recorded by moving the sample on an XY translational stage. The spatial resolution for imaging with LDIDD-MS was determined to be 2.4 μm for an ink-printed pattern and 3 μm for mouse brain tissue. We applied LDIDD-MS to single-cell analysis of apoptotic HEK cells. Differences were observed in the profiles of fatty acids and lipids between healthy HEK cells and those undergoing apoptosis. We observed upregulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) with a relatively shorter carbon chain length and downregulation of PC with a relatively longer carbon chain length. We also applied LDIDD-MS for a real-time direct measurements of live-cell exocytosis. The catecholamine dopamine and trace amines (phenethylamine and tyramine) were detected from live PC12 cells without damaging them.

  18. [Special application of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in clinical microbiological diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Erzsébet; Abrók, Marianna; Bartha, Noémi; Bereczki, László; Juhász, Emese; Kardos, Gábor; Kristóf, Katalin; Miszti, Cecilia; Urbán, Edit

    2014-09-21

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry as a new possibility for rapid identification of bacteria and fungi revolutionized the clinical microbiological diagnostics. It has an extreme importance in the routine microbiological laboratories, as identification of the pathogenic species rapidly will influence antibiotic selection before the final determination of antibiotic resistance of the isolate. The classical methods for identification of bacteria or fungi, based on biochemical tests, are influenced by many environmental factors. The matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a rapid method which is able to identify a great variety of the isolated bacteria and fungi based on the composition of conserved ribosomal proteins. Recently several other applications of the method have also been investigated such as direct identification of pathogens from the positive blood cultures. There are possibilities to identify bacteria from the urine samples in urinary tract infection or from other sterile body fluids. Using selective enrichment broth Salmonella sp from the stool samples can be identified more rapidly, too. The extended spectrum beta-lactamase or carbapenemase production of the isolated bacteria can be also detected by this method helping the antibiotic selection in some cases. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry based methods are suitable to investigate changes in deoxyribonucleic acid or ribonucleic acid, to carry out rapid antibiotic resistance determination or other proteomic analysis. The aim of this paper is to give an overview about present possibilities of using this technique in the clinical microbiological routine procedures.

  19. Liquid injection field desorption ionization mass spectrometry of cyclic metal carbonyl complexes with tetra-antimony ligands.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Hans J; Linden, H Bernhard; Moldovan, Ovidiu

    2013-01-01

    Reactions of (norbornadiene)Cr(CO)(4) or cis-(piperidine)(2)Mo(CO)(4) with R(2)Sb-SbR(2), and cyclo-(R'Sb)(n) (R' = Et, n-Pr; n = 4, 5) give the complexes cyclo-[M(CO)(4)(R(2)Sb-SbR'- SbR'-SbR(2))] (1: M = Cr, R = Me, R'= Et; 2: M = Mo, R = Et, R' = Et; 3: M = Mo, R = Et, R' = n-Pr). Not accessible to established characterization methods, the oily, extremely reactive unpurified mixture of 3 with scrambled ligands was characterized by mass spectrometry using liquid injection field desorption ionization (LIFDI).

  20. Organic chemical analysis on a microscopic scale using two-step laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalenko, L. J.; Philippoz, J.-M.; Bucenell, J. R.; Zenobi, R.; Zare, R. N.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of PAHs in the Allende meteorite has been measured using two-step laser desorption and laser multiphoton-ionization mass spectrometry. This method enables in situ analysis (with a spatial resolution of 1 mm or better) of selected organic molecules. Results show that PAH concentrations are locally high compared to the average concentration found by analysis of pulverized samples, and are found primarily in the fine-grained matrix; no PAHs were detected in the interiors of individual chondrules at the detection limit (about 0.05 ppm).

  1. Current status of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kok, Jen; Chen, Sharon C A; Dwyer, Dominic E; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    The integration of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) into many clinical microbiology laboratories has revolutionised routine pathogen identification. MALDI-TOF MS complements and has good potential to replace existing phenotypic identification methods. Results are available in a more clinically relevant timeframe, particularly in bacteraemic septic shock. Novel applications include strain typing and the detection of antimicrobial resistance, but these are not widely used. This review discusses the technical aspects, current applications, and limitations of MALDI-TOF MS.

  2. Organic chemical analysis on a microscopic scale using two-step laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, L. J.; Philippoz, J.-M.; Bucenell, J. R.; Zenobi, R.; Zare, R. N.

    1991-04-01

    The distribution of PAHs in the Allende meteorite has been measured using two-step laser desorption and laser multiphoton-ionization mass spectrometry. This method enables in situ analysis (with a spatial resolution of 1 mm or better) of selected organic molecules. Results show that PAH concentrations are locally high compared to the average concentration found by analysis of pulverized samples, and are found primarily in the fine-grained matrix; no PAHs were detected in the interiors of individual chondrules at the detection limit (about 0.05 ppm).

  3. Gold nanoparticles loaded on zeolite as inorganic matrix for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mengrui; Fujino, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were loaded on zeolite to produce an inorganic matrix for the laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of low molecular weight compounds. Owing to the strong acidity of zeolite, amino acids were detected as H+- or Na+-adducted species regardless of their isoelectric points. AuNPs on zeolite could also be used as an efficient Au+ supplier. By utilizing Au+ generated by photoexcitation, the ionization of the amino acids mixture, urea, and acetylsalicylic acid by Au+ adduction was demonstrated.

  4. Identification of Aeromonas isolates by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Brigitte; Kodjo, Angeli; Laurent, Frédéric

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for identifying aeromonads with an extraction procedure. Genus-level accuracy was 100%. Compared to rpoB gene sequencing, species-level accuracy was 90.6% (29/32) for type and reference strains and 91.4% for a collection of 139 clinical and environmental isolates, making this system one of the most accurate and rapid methods for phenotypic identification. The reliability of this technique was very promising, although some improvements in database composition, taxonomy, and discriminatory power are needed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry of gas-phase peptide-metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortal, Ana R.; Hurtado, Paola; Martínez-Haya, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Cation attachment to a model peptide has been investigated in matrix-assisted laser desorption experiments. Angiotensin I (Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe-His-Leu) is chosen as a system for study, and Cu2+ and K+ salts are used as cationizing agents. Three fundamentally different types of samples are investigated: (1) a crystalline sample of Ang I, metal salt and MALDI matrix, prepared with the conventional dried droplet method; (2) a solvent-free fine powder mixture of the same three compounds, and (3) a solution of the angiotensin and the metal salt in an ionic liquid matrix (a molten organic salt that acts as a MALDI active solvent). Effective protonation and cationization of the peptide are achieved with the three methods. The transition metal systematically provides more efficient cationization than the alkali metal. At sufficiently high concentration of the salt, the attachment of up to four copper cations to the angiotensin is observed in the MALDI spectrum. In contrast, only one K+ cation is efficiently bound to the peptide. For a given salt concentration, the highest degree of cationization is obtained in the laser desorption from the ionic liquid matrix. This is attributed to the efficient transfer of free metal cations to the desorption plume, where the complexation takes place.

  6. Detection of trace organics in Mars analog samples containing perchlorate by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Danell, Ryan M; Brinckerhoff, William B; Pinnick, Veronica T; van Amerom, Friso; Arevalo, Ricardo D; Getty, Stephanie A; Mahaffy, Paul R; Steininger, Harald; Goesmann, Fred

    2015-02-01

    Evidence from recent Mars missions indicates the presence of perchlorate salts up to 1 wt % level in the near-surface materials. Mixed perchlorates and other oxychlorine species may complicate the detection of organic molecules in bulk martian samples when using pyrolysis techniques. To address this analytical challenge, we report here results of laboratory measurements with laser desorption mass spectrometry, including analyses performed on both commercial and Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) breadboard instruments. We demonstrate that the detection of nonvolatile organics in selected spiked mineral-matrix materials by laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry is not inhibited by the presence of up to 1 wt % perchlorate salt. The organics in the sample are not significantly degraded or combusted in the LDI process, and the parent molecular ion is retained in the mass spectrum. The LDI technique provides distinct potential benefits for the detection of organics in situ on the martian surface and has the potential to aid in the search for signs of life on Mars.

  7. Direct Visualization of Neurotransmitters in Rat Brain Slices by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI - MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Anna Maria A. P.; Vendramini, Pedro H.; Galaverna, Renan; Schwab, Nicolas V.; Alberici, Luciane C.; Augusti, Rodinei; Castilho, Roger F.; Eberlin, Marcos N.

    2016-12-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of neurotransmitters has so far been mainly performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) where derivatization reagents, deuterated matrix and/or high resolution, or tandem MS have been applied to circumvent problems with interfering ion peaks from matrix and from isobaric species. We herein describe the application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI)-MSI in rat brain coronal and sagittal slices for direct spatial monitoring of neurotransmitters and choline with no need of derivatization reagents and/or deuterated materials. The amino acids γ-aminobutyric (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, serine, as well as acetylcholine, dopamine, and choline were successfully imaged using a commercial DESI source coupled to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the analyzed compounds in different brain regions was determined. We conclude that the ambient matrix-free DESI-MSI is suitable for neurotransmitter imaging and could be applied in studies that involve evaluation of imbalances in neurotransmitters levels.

  8. Characterization of organic aerosol in Beijing by laser desorption ionization coupled with Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jinjuan; Li, Yafeng; Xie, Xiaobo; Xiong, Caiqiao; Liu, Huihui; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu; Chen, Chuncheng; Zhao, Jincai

    2017-06-01

    In order to resolve the organic compositions in the atmospheric aerosol which is significant for understanding the formation mechanism of particulate matter and their harm for human health, a direct laser desorption ionization (LDI) coupled with Fourier Transform Resonance Mass (FT-ICR MS) was utilized for characterizing the aerosol particles collected in Beijing during winter. A lot of organic compounds can be detected by direct laser desorption ionization of the aerosol particular with different size collected on aluminum foil without complicated sample pretreatment process. In addition, semi quantification of the organic compounds can be achieved with solvent extraction procedure. It was found that the ubiquitous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contaminants in the aerosol could serve as matrix, which helps the detection of many kinds of compounds including highly saturated amphiphilic long alkyl chain compounds (carbon number>16), like aliphatic amines in positive ion mode and organosulfates in negative ion mode. Based on the accurate mass measurement results, elemental compositions of over 1500 peaks in the mass spectrum were derived, and we categorized them into five groups according to their elemental compositions in order to provide helpful information for tracing the pollution source. It is demonstrated that abundant information about the organic components in the atmospheric aerosol can be provided by direct LDI FT-ICR MS method, and these information will largely facilitate further studies on origin and formation process of the aerosol.

  9. plasma desorption mass spectrometry of quinolinium salts and method of estimation of their intermolecular interactions with phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrievsky, Grigory V.; Lisnyak, Yury V.; Klochkov, Vladimir K.; Volyansky, Yury L.; Malaya, Lubov T.

    1997-06-01

    Using plasma desorption mass spectrometry, the fragmentation of 1-phenyl-2(p-aminostyryl)quinolinium and 1-phenyl-2(p-aminostyryl)benzo(f)quinolinium derivatives, with various substituents at the amino nitrogen, was studied. With plasma desorption ionization, the fragmentation features of the compounds studied are mainly determined by the nature of the N',N'' substituents. The behaviour of some quinolinium derivatives in the presence of lecithin, a basic component of the phospholipid fraction of cell membranes, was investigated. For the benzo(f)quinolinium derivative, the analysis of changes in the mass spectra indicates a strong interaction between these substances, leading to the formation of a molecular complex stabilized by the interactions of the negatively charged phosphate group of lecithin with the quinolinium quaternary nitrogen and the lecithin quaternary nitrogen with the benzene part of the aminophenyl fragment. The effect of the third aromatic ring of the benzoquinolinium system on complex stabilization is discussed. For the benzoquinolinium derivative with lecithin, the changes in the mass spectrometric fragmentation pattern of the molecule can be used as a sensitive and informative method for the characterization of intermolecular interactions which may result in molecular complex formation.

  10. Rapid extraction and structural characterization of biomolecules in agarose gels by laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dunphy, J.C.; Busch, K.L. ); Hettich, R.L.; Buchanan, M.V. )

    1993-05-15

    A method originally developed for the extraction of biomolecules from agarose gel slices has been utilized as a rapid means of isolating biological compounds from gels for subsequent structural characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry (MALDI/FTMS). This [open quotes]freeze-squeeze[close quotes] extraction method involves pressure extrusion of fluid from frozen gel slices and provides near 50% recovery of analyte in less than 5 min. Experiments were directed at examining the recovery efficiency of the extraction method using [sup 14]C-labeled adenosine monophosphate and investigating the effect of high buffer concentrations on the laser desorption mass spectra. When coupled with this extraction technique, MALDI/FTMS can be used to detect and identify biomolecules at the low picomole level in agarose gel slices. The accurate mass measurements and MS/MS capabilities of the FTMS were exploited to provide detailed structural information at the isomeric level for oligonucleotides electrophoresed into agarose gels. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Direct Visualization of Neurotransmitters in Rat Brain Slices by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI - MS).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Anna Maria A P; Vendramini, Pedro H; Galaverna, Renan; Schwab, Nicolas V; Alberici, Luciane C; Augusti, Rodinei; Castilho, Roger F; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2016-12-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of neurotransmitters has so far been mainly performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) where derivatization reagents, deuterated matrix and/or high resolution, or tandem MS have been applied to circumvent problems with interfering ion peaks from matrix and from isobaric species. We herein describe the application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI)-MSI in rat brain coronal and sagittal slices for direct spatial monitoring of neurotransmitters and choline with no need of derivatization reagents and/or deuterated materials. The amino acids γ-aminobutyric (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, serine, as well as acetylcholine, dopamine, and choline were successfully imaged using a commercial DESI source coupled to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the analyzed compounds in different brain regions was determined. We conclude that the ambient matrix-free DESI-MSI is suitable for neurotransmitter imaging and could be applied in studies that involve evaluation of imbalances in neurotransmitters levels. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Surface analysis using a new plasma assisted desorption/ionisation source for mass spectrometry in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowfield, A.; Barrett, D. A.; Alexander, M. R.; Ortori, C. A.; Rutten, F. M.; Salter, T. L.; Gilmore, I. S.; Bradley, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    The authors report on a modified micro-plasma assisted desorption/ionisation (PADI) device which creates plasma through the breakdown of ambient air rather than utilising an independent noble gas flow. This new micro-PADI device is used as an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry to analyse species released from the surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene, and generic ibuprofen and paracetamol tablets through remote activation of the surface by the plasma. The mass spectra from these surfaces compare favourably to those produced by a PADI device constructed using an earlier design and confirm that the new ion source is an effective device which can be used to achieve ambient mass spectrometry with improved spatial resolution.

  13. Understanding the molecular signatures in leaves and flowers by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS) imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemalatha, R G; Pradeep, T

    2013-08-07

    The difference in size, shape, and chemical cues of leaves and flowers display the underlying genetic makeup and their interactions with the environment. The need to understand the molecular signatures of these fragile plant surfaces is illustrated with a model plant, Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don). Flat, thin layer chromatographic imprints of leaves/petals were imaged using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS), and the results were compared with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) of their extracts. Tandem mass spectrometry with DESI and ESI, in conjunction with database records, confirmed the molecular species. This protocol has been extended to other plants. Implications of this study in identifying varietal differences, toxic metabolite production, changes in metabolites during growth, pest/pathogen attack, and natural stresses are shown with illustrations. The possibility to image subtle features like eye color of petals, leaf vacuole, leaf margin, and veins is demonstrated.

  14. Analysis of chlorophylls and their derivatives by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Midonoya, Hitoshi; Shioi, Yuzo

    2009-07-01

    The analysis of chlorophylls and their derivatives by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry is described. Four matrices-sinapinic acid, a-cyano-4-hydroxycinnnamic acid, terthiophene, and 3-aminoquinoline-were examined to determine optimal conditions for analysis of the molecular mass and structure of chlorophyll a as a representative chlorophyll. Among them, terthiophene was the most efficient without releasing metal ions, although it caused fragmentation of the phytol-ester linkage. Terthiophene was useful for the analyses of chlorophyll derivatives as well as porphyrin products such as 8-deethyl-8-vinyl-chlorophyll a, pheophorbide a, pyropheophorbide a, bacteriochlorophyll a esterified phytol, and protoporphyrin IX. The current method is suitable for rapid and accurate determination of the molecular mass and structure of chlorophylls and porphyrins.

  15. Tryptic peptide purification using polyvinylidene difluoride membrane for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2009-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) is extremely sensitive to minor impurities in tryptic peptide digests, resulting in suppression of the signal obtained. Therefore, it becomes necessary to purify the sample, especially those samples that fail to yield good mass spectra. Here, we describe a simple protocol using polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane for purifying tryptic peptides prior to mass spectrometric analysis. The tryptic digest is spotted on a PVDF membrane, air-dried, and washed. The membrane is then extracted with trifluoroacetic acid/acetonitrile and the extract is then subjected to MALDI TOF MS. Using this procedure, we were able to identify a cross-reactive D1 autoantigen on the surface of neutrophils that bound antibodies targeting Ro 60 autoantigen in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  16. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging and its development for plant protein imaging

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) uses the power of high mass resolution time of flight (ToF) mass spectrometry coupled to the raster of lasers shots across the cut surface of tissues to provide new insights into the spatial distribution of biomolecules within biological tissues. The history of this technique in animals and plants is considered and the potential for analysis of proteins by this technique in plants is discussed. Protein biomarker identification from MALDI-MSI is a challenge and a number of different approaches to address this bottleneck are discussed. The technical considerations needed for MALDI-MSI are reviewed and these are presented alongside examples from our own work and a protocol for MALDI-MSI of proteins in plant samples. PMID:21726462

  17. Structural characterization of phospholipids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marto, J A; White, F M; Seldomridge, S; Marshall, A G

    1995-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry provides for structural analysis of the principal biological phospholipids: glycerophosphatidylcholine, -ethanolamine, -serine, and -inositol. Both positive and negative molecular or quasimolecular ions are generated in high abundance. Isolated molecular ions may be collisionally activated in the source side of a dual trap mass analyzer, yielding fragments serving to identify the polar head group (positive ion mode) and fatty acid side chains (negative ion mode). Azimuthal quadrupolar excitation following collisionally activated dissociation refocuses productions close to the solenoid axis; subsequent transfer of product ions to the analyzer ion trap allows for high-resolution mass analysis. Cyro-cooling of the sample probe with liquid nitrogen greatly reduces matrix adduction encountered in the negative ion mode.

  18. Direct Detection of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products from Aqueous Samples with Thermally-Assisted Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Ian S.; Ton, Alain T.; Mulligan, Christopher C.

    2011-07-01

    An ambient mass spectrometric method based on desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) has been developed to allow rapid, direct analysis of contaminated water samples, and the technique was evaluated through analysis of a wide array of pharmaceutical and personal care product (PPCP) contaminants. Incorporating direct infusion of aqueous sample and thermal assistance into the source design has allowed low ppt detection limits for the target analytes in drinking water matrices. With this methodology, mass spectral information can be collected in less than 1 min, consuming ~100 μL of total sample. Quantitative ability was also demonstrated without the use of an internal standard, yielding decent linearity and reproducibility. Initial results suggest that this source configuration is resistant to carryover effects and robust towards multi-component samples. The rapid, continuous analysis afforded by this method offers advantages in terms of sample analysis time and throughput over traditional hyphenated mass spectrometric techniques.

  19. Improved spatial resolution for spot sampling in thermal desorption atomic force microscopy – mass spectrometry via rapid heating functions

    DOE PAGES

    Somnath, Suhas; Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J.; ...

    2017-04-17

    The key to advancing materials is to understand and control their structure and chemistry. However, thorough chemical characterization is challenging since existing techniques characterize only a few properties of the specimen, thereby necessitating multiple measurement platforms to acquire the necessary information. The multimodal combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and mass spectrometry (MS) transcends existing analytical capabilities for nanometer scale spatially resolved correlation of the chemical and physical properties of a sample surface. One such hybrid system employs heated AFM cantilevers for thermal desorption (TD) sampling of molecules from a surface and subsequent gas phase ionization and detection of themore » liberated species by MS. Here in this paper, we report on the use of voltage pulse trains to tailor cantilever heating such that spot sampling size was reduced and mass spectral signal was improved compared to constant voltage, static heating of the cantilever. Desorption efficiency (DE), defined as the quotient of the mass spectral signal intensity and the volume of the desorption crater, was used to judge the effectiveness of a particular tailored heating function. To guide the development and optimization of the heating functions and aid in interpreting experimental results, a 1D finite element model was developed that predicted the cantilever response to different heating functions. Three tailored heating functions that used different combinations, magnitudes, and durations of rectangular voltage pulses, were used for surface spot sampling. The resultant sampling spot size and DE were compared to the same metrics obtained with the conventional method that uses a single voltage pulse. Using a model system composed of a thin film of ink containing pigment yellow 74 as a model system, desorption craters shrunk from 2 μm, using the conventional approach, to 310 nm using the optimum tailored heating function. This same pulsed heating

  20. Rapid identification of pesticides in human oral fluid for emergency management by thermal desorption electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Wei; Su, Hung; Chen, Peng-Yu; Lin, Shiang-Jiun; Shiea, Jentaie; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Chen, Bai-Hsiun

    2016-02-01

    Self-poisoning with pesticides accounts for approximately one-third of all suicides worldwide. To expedite rescue in the emergency department, it is essential to develop a point-of-care analytical method for rapid identification of ingested pesticides. In this study, five of the most common pesticides ingested by self-poisoning patients in Taiwan were analyzed from oral fluid samples. Pesticide-oral fluid mixtures were applied on a cotton swab and then transferred into methanol. A metallic probe was used to sample the methanol solution for subsequent thermal desorption-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis. Altogether, pesticide sampling, transfer, desorption, ionization, and detection took less than 1 min. The reproducibility of this method (n = 6) was shown in the observed low-relative standard deviation (<7%) in the detection of pesticide in oral fluid. The detection limits of the pesticides in oral fluid obtained from four human subjects by thermal desorption-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were between 1-10 ppb with relative standard deviation 10.7%. Moreover, in this study, linear responses of five pesticides in oral fluid with concentrations between 1 ppb-1 ppm (R2 between 0.9938 and 0.9988) were observed. As the whole analytical process is extremely short, this technique allows for early non-invasive point-of-care identification of pesticides in the oral fluid of self-poisoning patients in the emergency room, providing important toxicological information for decision-making during critical resuscitation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Highly reproducible laser beam scanning device for an internal source laser desorption microprobe Fourier transform mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, mass spectrometry has relied on manipulating the sample target to provide scanning capabilities for laser desorption microprobes. This has been problematic for an internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LD-FTMS) because of the high magnetic field (7 Tesla) and geometric constraints of the superconducting magnet bore. To overcome these limitations, we have implemented a unique external laser scanning mechanism for an internal source LD-FTMS. This mechanism provides adjustable resolution enhancement so that the spatial resolution at the target is not limited to that of the stepper motors at the light source (˜5 μm/step). The spatial resolution is now limited by the practical optical diffraction limit of the final focusing lens. The scanning mechanism employs a virtual source that is wavelength independent up to the final focusing lens, which can be controlled remotely to account for focal length dependence on wavelength. A binary index provides an automatic alignment feature. The virtual source is located ˜9 ft from the sample; therefore, it is completely outside of the vacuum system and beyond the 50 G line of the fringing magnetic field. To eliminate reproducibility problems associated with vacuum pump vibrations, we have taken advantage of the magnetic field inherent to the FTMS to utilize Lenz's law for vibrational dampening. The LD-FTMS microprobe has exceptional reproducibility, which enables successive mapping sequences for depth-profiling studies.

  2. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for high-throughput analysis of pharmaceutical samples in the ambient environment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanwen; Talaty, Nari N; Takáts, Zoltán; Cooks, R Graham

    2005-11-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) allows mass spectrometry to be used for on-line high-throughput monitoring of pharmaceutical samples in the ambient environment, without prior sample preparation. Positive and negative ion DESI are used to characterize the active ingredients in pharmaceutical samples formulated as tablets, ointments, and liquids. Compounds of a wide variety of chemical types are detected in these complex matrices. The effects on analytical performance of operating parameters, including the electrospray high voltage, heated capillary temperature, solvent infusion rate, and solvent composition, are evaluated and optimized. In addition to experiments in which a simple solvent is sprayed onto the solid analyte samples, reactive desorption is performed by adding reagents to the solvent spray to generate particularly stable or characteristic ions with the analytes of interest. A variable-speed moving belt was built for high-throughput sampling and used to provide rapid qualitative and semiquantitative information on drug constituents in tablets. Sampling rates as high as 3 samples/s are achieved in the ambient environment. Relative standard deviations of the relative ion abundances for major components in the mass spectra are in the range of 2-8%. Impurities and components present at levels as low as approximately 0.1% are identified and carryover effects are minimized in high-throughput on-line analysis of pharmaceutical samples.

  3. Electrospun Nanofiber Mats as "Smart Surfaces" for Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (DESI MS)-Based Analysis and Imprint Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemalatha, R G; Ganayee, Mohd Azhardin; Pradeep, T

    2016-06-07

    In this paper, desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS)-based molecular analysis and imprint imaging using electrospun nylon-6 nanofiber mats are demonstrated for various analytical contexts. Uniform mats of varying thicknesses composed of ∼200 nm diameter fibers were prepared using needleless electrospinning. Analytical applications requiring rapid understanding of the analytes in single drops, dyes, inks, and/or plant extracts incorporated directly into the nanofibers are discussed with illustrations. The possibility to imprint patterns made of printing inks, plant parts (such as petals, leaves, and slices of rhizomes), and fungal growth on fruits with their faithful reproductions on the nanofiber mats is illustrated with suitable examples. Metabolites were identified by tandem mass spectrometry data available in the literature and in databases. The results highlight the significance of electrospun nanofiber mats as smart surfaces to capture diverse classes of compounds for rapid detection or to imprint imaging under ambient conditions. Large surface area, appropriate chemical functionalities exposed, and easiness of desorption due to weaker interactions of the analyte species are the specific advantages of nanofibers for this application.

  4. Solvent Separating Secondary Metabolites Directly from Biosynthetic Tissue for Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, David; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioactive metabolites are often heterogeneously expressed in tissues both spatially and over time. Therefore, traditional solvent extraction methods benefit from an understanding of the in situ sites of biosynthesis and storage to deal with heterogeneity and maximize yield. Recently, surface-assisted mass spectrometry (MS) methods namely nanostructure-assisted laser desorption ionisation (NALDI) and desorption ionisation on porous silicon (DIOS) surfaces have been developed to enable the direct detection of low molecular weight metabolites. Since direct tissue NALDI-MS or DIOS-MS produce complex spectra due to the wide variety of other metabolites and fragments present in the low mass range, we report here the use of “on surface” solvent separation directly from mollusc tissue onto nanostructured surfaces for MS analysis, as a mechanism for simplifying data annotation and detecting possible artefacts from compound delocalization during the preparative steps. Water, ethanol, chloroform and hexane selectively extracted a range of choline esters, brominated indoles and lipids from Dicathais orbita hypobranchial tissue imprints. These compounds could be quantified on the nanostructured surfaces by comparison to standard curves generated from the pure compounds. Surface-assisted MS could have broad utility for detecting a broad range of secondary metabolites in complex marine tissue samples. PMID:25786067

  5. Highly Reproducible Laser Beam Scanning Device for an Internal Source Laser Desorption Microprobe Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Jill Rennee; Tremblay, Paul Leland

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, mass spectrometry has relied on manipulating the sample target to provide scanning capabilities for laser desorption microprobes. This has been problematic for an internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LD-FTMS) because of the high magnetic field (7 Tesla) and geometric constraints of the superconducting magnet bore. To overcome these limitations, we have implemented a unique external laser scanning mechanism for an internal source LD-FTMS. This mechanism provides adjustable resolution enhancement so that the spatial resolution at the target is not limited to that of the stepper motors at the light source (~5 µm/step). The spatial resolution is now limited by the practical optical diffraction limit of the final focusing lens. The scanning mechanism employs a virtual source that is wavelength independent up to the final focusing lens, which can be controlled remotely to account for focal length dependence on wavelength. A binary index provides an automatic alignment feature. The virtual source is located ~9 ft from the sample; therefore, it is completely outside of the vacuum system and beyond the 50 G line of the fringing magnetic field. To eliminate reproducibility problems associated with vacuum pump vibrations, we have taken advantage of the magnetic field inherent to the FTMS to utilize Lenz's law for vibrational dampening. The LD-FTMS microprobe has exceptional reproducibility, which enables successive mapping sequences for depth-profiling studies.

  6. Combined chemical and topographic imaging at atmospheric pressure via microprobe laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry-atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, James A; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Meyer, Kent A; Goeringer, Douglas E

    2009-12-01

    The operational characteristics and imaging performance are described for a new instrument comprising an atomic force microscope coupled with a pulsed laser and a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The operating mode of the atomic force microscope is used to produce topographic surface images having sub-micrometer spatial and height resolution. Spatially resolved mass spectra of ions, produced from the same surface via microprobe-mode laser desorption/ionization at atmospheric pressure, are also used to create a 100 x 100 microm chemical image. The effective spatial resolution of the image (approximately 2 microm) was constrained by the limit of detection (estimated to be 10(9)-10(10) molecules) rather than by the diameter of the focused laser spot or the step size of the sample stage. The instrument has the potential to be particularly useful for surface analysis scenarios in which chemical analysis of targeted topographic features is desired; consequently, it should have extensive application in a number of scientific areas. Because the number density of desorbed neutral species in laser desorption/ionization is known to be orders-of-magnitude greater than that of ions, it is expected that improvements in imaging performance can be realized by implementation of post-ionization methods.

  7. Thin-layer chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry using particle suspension matrices.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, Anna; Clench, Malcolm R; Richards, Don S; Parr, Vic

    2002-06-07

    Particle suspension matrices have been successfully utilized for the analysis of tetracycline antibiotics by thin-layer chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TLC-MALDI-TOF-MS). Particles of different materials and sizes have been investigated (Co-UFP, TiN, TiO2, Graphite and Silicon) by applying particle suspensions to eluted TLC plates. Mass spectra and mass chromatograms have been recorded directly from the TLC plates. Strong cationization by sodium and potassium was obtained in the positive ion mode, with [M+Na-NH3]+ ions being the predominant signals. The TLC-MALDI mass spectra recorded from graphite suspensions showed the lowest background noise and the highest peak intensities from the range of suspension matrices studied. The mass accuracy from graphite films was improved by adding the peptide Phe-Phe to the graphite suspensions. This allowed internal recalibration of the TLC-MALDI mass spectra acquired during a run. One major potential advantage of TLC-MALDI-TOF-MS has been demonstrated in the analysis of chlortetracycline and tetracycline in a mixture of oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, tetracycline and minocycline. Examination of the TLC plate prior to MALDI analysis showed only an unresolved spot for chlortetracycline and tetracycline. However by investigation of the MALDI mass spectra and plotting of single ion chromatograms separate peaks for chlortetracycline and tetracycline could be obtained.

  8. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry method for selectively producing either singly or multiply charged molecular ions.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah; Inutan, Ellen D; Herath, Thushani N; McEwen, Charles N

    2010-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is noted for its ability to produce primarily singly charged ions. This is an attribute when using direct ionization for complex mixtures such as protein digests or synthetic polymers. However, the ability to produce multiply charged ions, as with electrospray ionization (ESI), has advantages such as extending the mass range on mass spectrometers with limited mass-to-charge (m/z) range and enhancing fragmentation for structural characterization. We designed and fabricated a novel field free transmission geometry atmopsheric pressure (AP) MALDI source mounted to a high-mass resolution Orbitrap Exactive mass spectrometer. We report the ability to produce at will either singly charged ions or highly charged ions using a MALDI process by simply changing the matrix or the matrix preparation conditions. Mass spectra with multiply charged ions very similar to those obtained with ESI of proteins such as cytochrome c and ubiquitin are obtained with low femtomole amounts applied to the MALDI target plate and for peptides such as angiotensin I and II with application of attomole amounts. Single scan acquisitions produce sufficient ion current even from proteins.

  9. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis of uncomplexed highly sulfated oligosaccharides using ionic liquid matrices.

    PubMed

    Laremore, Tatiana N; Murugesan, Saravanababu; Park, Tae-Joon; Avci, Fikri Y; Zagorevski, Dmitri V; Linhardt, Robert J

    2006-03-15

    Direct UV matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric analysis of uncomplexed, underivatized, highly sulfated oligosaccharides has been carried out using ionic liquids as matrices. Under conventionally used MALDI time-of-flight experimental conditions, uncomplexed polysulfated oligosaccharides do not produce any signal. We report that 1-methylimidazolium alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and butylammonium 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate ionic liquid matrices allow the detection of picomole amounts of the sodium salts of a disaccharide, sucrose octasulfate, and an octasulfated pentasaccharide, Arixtra. The experimental results indicate that both analytes undergo some degree of thermal fragmentation with a mass loss corresponding to cleavage of O-SO3Na bonds in the matrix upon laser irradiation, reflecting lability of sulfo groups.

  10. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Uncomplexed Highly Sulfated Oligosaccharides Using Ionic Liquid Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Laremore, Tatiana N.; Murugesan, Saravanababu; Park, Tae-Joon; Avci, Fikri Y.; Zagorevski, Dmitri V.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Direct UV matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric analysis of uncomplexed, underivatized, highly sulfated oligosaccharides has been carried out using ionic liquids as matrices. Under conventionally used MALDI time-of-flight experimental conditions, uncomplexed polysulfated oligosaccharides do not produce any signal. We report that 1-methylimidazolium α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and butylammonium 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate ionic liquid matrices allow the detection of picomole amounts of the sodium salts of a disaccharide, sucrose octasulfate, and an octasulfated pentasaccharide, Arixtra. The experimental results indicate that both analytes undergo some degree of thermal fragmentation with a mass loss corresponding to cleavage of O–SO3Na bonds in the matrix upon laser irradiation, reflecting lability of sulfo groups. PMID:16536411

  11. Rapid assignment of malting barley varieties by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation - Time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Šedo, Ondrej; Kořán, Michal; Jakešová, Michaela; Mikulíková, Renata; Boháč, Michal; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2016-09-01

    A method for discriminating malting barley varieties based on direct matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionisation - time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) fingerprinting of proteins was developed. Signals corresponding to hordeins were obtained by simple mixing of powdered barley grain with a MALDI matrix solution containing 12.5mgmL(-1) of ferulic acid in an acetonitrile:water:formic acid 50:33:17 v/v/v mixture. Compared to previous attempts at MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis of barley proteins, the extraction and fractionation steps were practically omitted, resulting in a significant reduction in analytical time and costs. The discriminatory power was examined on twenty malting barley varieties and the practicability of the method was tested on sixty barley samples acquired from Pilsner Urquell Brewery. The method is proposed as a rapid tool for variety assignment and purity determination of malting barley that may replace gel electrophoresis currently used for this purpose.

  12. Automated Sampling and Imaging of Analytes Separated on Thin-Layer Chromatography Plates Using Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2006-01-01

    Modest modifications to the atmospheric sampling capillary of a commercial electrospray mass spectrometer and upgrades to an in-house developed surface positioning control software package (HandsFree TLC/MS ) were used to enable the automated sampling and imaging of analytes on and/or within large area surface substrates using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Sampling and imaging of rhodamine dyes separated on TLC plates were used to illustrate some of the practical applications of this system. Examples are shown for user-defined spot sampling from separated bands on a TLC plate (one or multiple spots), scanning of a complete development lane (one or multiple lanes), or imaging of analyte bands in a development lane (i.e. multiple lane scans with close spacing). The post data processing and data display aspects of the software system are also discussed.

  13. Vitamin D-metabolites from human plasma and mass spectrometric analysis by fast heavy ion induced desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fohlman, J.; Peterson, P. A.; Kamensky, I.; Håkansson, P.; Sundqvist, B.

    1982-07-01

    D-vitamin metabolites have been isolated from human serum employing chromatographic techniques. The serum carrier protein for vitamin D (DBP) was first isolated by immunosorbent chromatography. Lipid ligands associated with DBP were then extracted with hexane and separated by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Detection of vitamin D metabolites by their absorbance of ultraviolet light is not sufficiently sensitive to monitor all vitamin D derivatives from a few millilitres of serum. Therefore, further analyses are necessary to quantitate these compounds. We have begun to develop a mass spectrometric method to achieve a reliable, quantitative procedure. As a first step towards this goal a number of pure samples of vitamin D compounds have been studied in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on fast heavy ion induced desorption. All vitamin D compounds examined could be detected and identified by their molecular ion and fragment spectra.

  14. Determination and imaging of metabolites from Vitis vinifera leaves by laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Gregory; Carré, Vincent; Poutaraud, Anne; Maunit, Benoît; Frache, Gilles; Merdinoglu, Didier; Muller, Jean-François

    2010-02-01

    Analysis of grapevine phytoalexins at the surface of Vitis vinifera leaves has been achieved by laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-ToFMS) without matrix deposition. This simple and rapid sampling method was successfully applied to map small organic compounds at the surface of grapevine leaves. It was also demonstrated that the laser wavelength is a highly critical parameter. Both 266 and 337 nm laser wavelengths were used but the 266 nm wavelength gave increased spatial resolution and better sensitivity for the detection of the targeted metabolites (resveratrol and linked stilbene compounds). Mass spectrometry imaging of grapevine Cabernet Sauvignon leaves revealed specific locations with respect to Plasmopara viticola pathogen infection or light illumination.

  15. Rapid analysis of animal drug residues by microcolumn solid-phase extraction and thermal desorption-ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1994-11-01

    A new approach was developed for the rapid and quantitative determination of an anthelmintic drug, phenothiazine, in milk. The technique involves a simple extraction procedure using a C{sub 18} microcolumn disc, followed by thermal desorption of the analyte from the disc directly into an ion trap mass spectrometer. The compounds are selectively ionized by isobutane chemical ionization and detected by tandem mass spectrometry. With this approach, 10 ppb detection limits were achieved with as little as 100 {mu}L mild and only 10 min of analysis time. This approach was used to analyze samples of milk taken from a cow administered a one-time therapeutic dose of phenothiazine. The target compound could be detected at 56 post-dosage, corresponding to a concentration of 30 ppb. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Aptamer Conjugated Multifunctional Nanoflowers as a Platform for Targeting, Capture and Detection in Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ocsoy, Ismail; Gulbakan, Basri; Shukoor, Mohammed Ibrahim; Xiong, Xiangling; Chen, Tao; Powell, David H.; Tan, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    Although many different nanomaterials have been tested as substrates for laser desorption and ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), this emerging field still requires more efficient multifuncional nanomaterials for targeting, enrichment and detection. Here, we report the use of gold-manganese oxide (Au@MnO) hybrid nanoflowers as an efficient matrix for LDI–MS. The nanoflowers were also functionalized with two different aptamers to target cancer cells and capture adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respectively. These nanoflowers were successfully used for metabolite extraction from cancer cell lysates. Thus, in one system, our multifunctional nanoflowers can 1) act as an ionization substrate for mass spectrometry, 2) target cancer cells, and 3) detect and analyze metabolites from cancer cells. PMID:23211039

  17. Aptamer-conjugated multifunctional nanoflowers as a platform for targeting, capture, and detection in laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ocsoy, Ismail; Gulbakan, Basri; Shukoor, Mohammed Ibrahim; Xiong, Xiangling; Chen, Tao; Powell, David H; Tan, Weihong

    2013-01-22

    Although many different nanomaterials have been tested as substrates for laser desorption and ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), this emerging field still requires more efficient multifuncional nanomaterials for targeting, enrichment, and detection. Here, we report the use of gold manganese oxide (Au@MnO) hybrid nanoflowers as an efficient matrix for LDI-MS. The nanoflowers were also functionalized with two different aptamers to target cancer cells and capture adenosine triphosphate (ATP). These nanoflowers were successfully used for metabolite extraction from cancer cell lysates. Thus, in one system, our multifunctional nanoflowers can (1) act as an ionization substrate for mass spectrometry, (2) target cancer cells, and (3) detect and analyze metabolites from cancer cells.

  18. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of covalently cationized polyethylene as a function of sample temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, W. E.; Blair, W. R.

    2007-05-01

    A pre-charged, low molecular mass, low polydispersity linear polyethylene was analyzed with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry as a function of sample temperature between 25 °C and 150 °C. This temperature range crosses the polyethylene melting temperature. Buckminsterfullerene (C60) was used as MALDI matrix due to the high volatility of typical MALDI matrices making them unsuitable for heating in vacuum. Starting at 90 °C there is an increase in polyethylene ion intensity at fixed laser energy. By 150 °C the integrated total ion intensity had grown by six-fold indicating that melting did indeed increase ion yield. At 150 °C the threshold laser intensity to produce intact polyethylene ions decreased by about 25%. Nevertheless, significant fragmentation accompanied the intact polyethylene ions even at the highest temperatures and the lowest laser energies.

  19. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry for the Investigation of Proteins and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnum, Kristin E.; Frappier, Sara L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2008-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent technology for molecular imaging because of its high data dimensionality. MS can monitor thousands of individual molecular data channels measured as mass-to-charge (m/z). We describe the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS for the image analysis of proteins, peptides, lipids, drugs, and metabolites in tissues. We discuss the basic instrumentation and sample preparation methods needed to produce high-resolution images and high image reproducibility. Matrix-addition protocols are briefly discussed along with normal operating procedures, and selected biological and medical applications of MALDI imaging MS are described. We give examples of both two- and three-dimensional imaging, including normal mouse embryo implantation, sperm maturation in mouse epididymis, protein distributions in brain sections, protein alterations as a result of drug administration, and protein changes in brain due to neurodegeneration and tumor formation. Advantages of this technology and future challenges for its improvement are discussed.

  20. Characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, Matthew L.; Owens, James H.; Kelty, Catherine A.

    2000-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used to investigate whole and freeze-thawed Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. Whole oocysts revealed some mass spectral features. Reproducible patterns of spectral markers and increased sensitivity were obtained after the oocysts were lysed with a freeze-thaw procedure. Spectral-marker patterns for C. parvum were distinguishable from those obtained for Cryptosporidium muris. One spectral marker appears specific for the genus, while others appear specific at the species level. Three different C. parvum lots were investigated, and similar spectral markers were observed in each. Disinfection of the oocysts reduced and/or eliminated the patterns of spectral markers. PMID:11055915

  1. Application of Atmospheric Pressure Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Identification of Neisseria Species

    PubMed Central

    Gudlavalleti, Seshu K.; Sundaram, Appavu K; Razumovski, Jane; Doroshenko, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (AP-MALDI MS) was applied to develop a proteomics-based method to detect and identify Neisseria species. Heat-inactivated clinical isolate cell suspensions of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and strains belonging to five serogroups (A, B, C, W135, and Y) of Neisseria meningitidis were subjected to on-probe protein/peptide extraction and tryptic digestion followed by AP-MALDI tandem MS (MS/MS)-based proteomic analysis. Amino acid sequences derived from three protonated peptides with m/z values of 1743.8, 1894.8, and 1946.8 were identified by AP-MALDI MS/MS and MASCOT proteome database search analysis as belonging to neisserial acyl carrier protein, neisserial-conserved hypothetical protein, and neisserial putative DNA binding protein, respectively. These three peptide masses can thus be potential biomarkers for neisserial species identification by AP-MALDI MS. PMID:19137107

  2. Surface-enhanced transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization: increasing the specificity of ambient ionization mass spectrometric analyses.

    PubMed

    Chipuk, Joseph E; Gelb, Michael H; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2010-01-01

    Fabrication and utilization of mesh materials specifically designed to capture analytes from solution facilitates the direct coupling of affinity capture and ambient ionization mass spectrometry via surface-enhanced transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization (TM-DESI). Incorporation of photolabile groups within the linkage between the mesh surface and the covalently modified reactive probe affords facile release of mass tagged analytes directly to mesh surfaces that have been rinsed free of matrix interferences. The approach introduces increased specificity to the already rapid TM-DESI analysis technique, resulting in a powerful tool for high-throughput screening of targeted analytes. Specific capture of thiols is discussed herein, but the surface-enhanced TM-DESI technique can be readily extended to other functional groups by alteration of the capture agent.

  3. Organic ion imaging of biological tissue with secondary ion mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization.

    PubMed

    Todd, P J; Schaaff, T G; Chaurand, P; Caprioli, R M

    2001-04-01

    Organic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry can be used to produce molecular images of samples. This is achieved through ionization from a clearly identified point on a flat sample, and performing a raster of the sample by moving the point of ionization over the sample surface. The unique analytical capabilities of mass spectrometry for mapping a variety of biological samples at the tissue level are discussed. SIMS provides information on the spatial distribution of the elements and low molecular mass compounds as well as molecular structures on these compounds, while MALDI yields spatial information about higher molecular mass compounds, including their distributions in tissues at very low levels, as well as information on the molecular structures of these compounds. Application of these methods to analytical problems requires appropriate instrumentation, sample preparation methodology, and a data presentation usually in a three-coordinate plot where x and y are physical dimensions of the sample and z is the signal amplitude. The use of imaging mass spectrometry is illustrated with several biological systems.

  4. A SIMPLE AND RAPID MATRIX-ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION/IONIZATION TIME OF FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETRY METHOD TO SCREEN FISH PLASMA SAMPLES FOR ESTROGEN-RESPONSIVE BIOMARKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we describe and evaluate the performance of a simple and rapid mass spectral method for screening fish plasma for estrogen-responsive biomarkers using matrix assisted laster desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) couopled with a short...

  5. A SIMPLE AND RAPID MATRIX-ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION/IONIZATION TIME OF FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETRY METHOD TO SCREEN FISH PLASMA SAMPLES FOR ESTROGEN-RESPONSIVE BIOMARKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we describe and evaluate the performance of a simple and rapid mass spectral method for screening fish plasma for estrogen-responsive biomarkers using matrix assisted laster desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) couopled with a short...

  6. Development of a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for determining personal care products in air.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Noelia; Marcé, Rosa Maria; Borrull, Francesc

    2010-06-25

    This study describes the development of a new analytical method for determining 14 personal care products (PCPs) - nine synthetic musks, four parabens and one insect repellent - in air samples. The method is based on active sampling on sorbent tubes and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, and is rapid, sensitive and drastically reduces the risk of sample contamination. Three kinds of tubes and traps were tested, those filled with Tenax TA being the most suitable for this study. Method validation showed good repeatability and reproducibility, low detection limits (between 0.03 ng m(-3) for DPMI and 12.5 ng m(-3) for propyl paraben) and good linearity for all compounds. Stability during storage indicated that samples must be kept refrigerated at 4 degrees C and analysed within 1 week of collection. The applicability of the technique to real samples was tested in different indoor and outdoor atmospheres. The total PCP values for indoor air ranged from 135 ng m(-3) in a pharmacy to 2838 ng m(-3) in a hairdresser's, whereas the values for outdoor air ranged from 14 ng m(-3) for a suburban environment to 26 ng m(-3) for an urban environment. In general, the most abundant synthetic musks were galaxolide (5.9-1256 ng m(-3)), musk xylene (1.6-766 ng m(-3)) and tonalide (1.1-138 ng m(-3)). Methyl and ethyl paraben (2.4-313 ng m(-3) and 1.8-117 ng m(-3), respectively) were the most abundant parabens. Although thermal desorption methods have been widely used for determining volatile organic compounds, they are rarely used with semi-volatile compounds. This study thus demonstrates that the thermal desorption method performs well with semi-volatile compounds and, for the first time, that it can be used for determining PCPs.

  7. Detecting Biosignatures Associated with Minerals by Geomatrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Fourier Transorm Mass Spectromety (GALDI-FTMS)

    SciTech Connect

    C. Doc Richardson; J. Michelle Kotler; Nancy W. Hinman; Timothy R. McJunkin; Jill R. Scott

    2008-07-01

    The ability to detect carbon signatures that can be linked to complex, possibly biogenic, organic molecules is imperative in research into the origin and distribution of life in our solar system particularly when used in conjunction with inorganic, mineralogical, and isotopic signatures that provide strong evidence for geochemical influences of living organisms on their environment. Ideally, the method used to detect these signatures must (i) accurately and automatically translate the organic and other information into usable forms, (ii) precisely distinguish such information from alternative compositions, (iii) operate with high spatial resolution coupled with precise location abilities, and (iv) require little to no sample preparation because of the potential for contamination. Geomatrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (GALDI) in conjunction with a Fourier transform mass spectrometer (FTMS) has been used to determine the presence of bio/organic molecules (BOM) associated with different minerals and mineraloids including oxide, sulfate, carbonate, chloride, and silicate minerals. BOM is defined as an organic structure that can be produced by living organisms or derived from another organic compound made by living organisms (i.e., degradation product). GALDI requires no sample preparation because the mineral matrix assists desorption. Ultimately, however, the detectability of BOM is controlled by the desorption efficiency, ionization efficiency, and the specific experimental conditions. Results from experiments with combinations of known BOM and mineral standards indicated that the detectability of BOM increased with decreasing concentration, contrary to most analytical procedures. Results suggest that BOM when combined with certain minerals is more easily detected than when combined with other minerals. Such conclusions can guide selection of appropriate samples for sample return missions.

  8. High Spatial Resolution Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Organic Layers in an Organic Light-Emitting Diode

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Yuko; Nakajima, Yoji; Isemura, Tsuguhide; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Satoh, Takaya; Aoki, Jun; Toyoda, Michisato

    2016-01-01

    To improve the durability of organic materials in electronic devices, an analytical method that can obtain information about the molecular structure directly from specific areas on a device is desired. For this purpose, laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (LDI-MSI) is one of the most promising methods. The high spatial resolution stigmatic LDI-MSI with MULTUM-IMG2 in the direct analysis of organic light-emitting diodes was shown to obtain a detailed mass image of organic material in the degraded area after air exposure. The mass image was observed to have a noticeably improved spatial resolution over typical X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, generally used technique in analysis of electronic devices. A prospective m/z was successfully deduced from the high spatial resolution MSI data. Additionally, mass resolution and accuracy using a spiral-orbit TOF mass spectrometer, SpiralTOF, were also investigated. The monoisotopic mass for the main component, N,N′-di-1-naphthalenyl-N,N′-diphenyl-1,1′-biphenyl-4,4′-diamine (m/z 588), was measured with a mass resolution of approximately 80,000 and a mass error of about 5 mDa using an external calibrant. This high mass resolution and accuracy data successfully deduced a possible elemental composition of partially remained material in the degraded area, C36H24, which was determined as anthracene, 9-[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl-10-(2-naphthalenyl) by combining structural information with high-energy CID data. The high spatial resolution of 1 μm in LDI-MSI along with high mass resolution and accuracy could be useful in obtaining molecular structure information directly from specific areas on a device, and is expected to contribute to the evolution of electrical device durability. PMID:28101440

  9. Thermally annealed gold nanoparticles for surface-assisted laser desorption ionisation-mass spectrometry of low molecular weight analytes.

    PubMed

    Pilolli, Rosa; Ditaranto, Nicoletta; Di Franco, Cinzia; Palmisano, Francesco; Cioffi, Nicola

    2012-10-01

    Metal nanomaterials have an emerging role in surface-assisted laser desorption ionisation-mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) providing a useful tool to overcome some limitations intrinsically related to the use of conventional organic matrices in matrix-assisted LDI-MS. In this contribution, the possibility to use a stainless-steel-supported gold nanoparticle (AuNP) film as a versatile platform for SALDI-MS was assessed. A sacrificial anode electrosynthetic route was chosen in order to obtain morphologically controlled core-shell AuNPs; the colloidal AuNPs were, thereafter, drop cast onto a stainless-steel sample plate and the resulting AuNP film was thermally annealed in order to improve its effectiveness as LDI-MS promoter. Spectroscopic characterization of the nanostructured film by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was crucial for understanding how annealing induced changes in the surface chemistry and influenced the performance of AuNPs as desorption/ionisation promoter. In particular, it was demonstrated that the post-deposition treatments were essential to enhance the AuNP core/analyte interaction, thus resulting in SALDI-MS spectra of significantly improved quality. The AuNP films were applied to the detection of three different classes of low molecular weight (LMW) analytes, i.e. amino acids, peptides and LMW polymers, in order to demonstrate the versatility of this nanostructured material.

  10. Preparation of porous n-type silicon sample plates for desorption/ionization on silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS).

    PubMed

    Tuomikoski, S; Huikko, K; Grigoras, K; Ostman, P; Kostiainen, R; Baumann, M; Abian, J; Kotiaho, T; Franssila, S

    2002-11-01

    This study focuses on porous silicon (pSi) fabrication methods and properties for desorption ionization on silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS). PSi was prepared using electrochemical etching of n-type silicon in HF-ethanol solution. Porous areas were defined by a double-sided illumination arrangement: front-side porous areas were masked by a stencil mask, eliminating the need for standard photolithography, and backside illumination was used for the backside ohmic contact. Backside illumination improved the uniformity of the porosified areas. Porosification conditions, surface derivatizations and storage conditions were explored to optimize pSi area, pore size and pore depth. Chemical derivatization of the pSi surfaces improved the DIOS-MS performance providing better ionization efficiency and signal stability with lower laser energy. Droplet spreading and drying patterns on pSi were also examined. Pore sizes of 50-200 nm were found to be optimal for droplet evaporation and pore filling with the sample liquid, as measured by DIOS efficiency. With DIOS, significantly better detection sensitivity was obtained (e.g. 150 fmol for midazolam) than with desorption ionization from a standard MALDI steel plate without matrix addition (30 pmol for midazolam). Also the noise that disturbs the detection of low-molecular weight compounds at m/z < 500 with MALDI could be clearly reduced with DIOS. Low background MS spectra and good detection sensitivity at the 100-150 fmol level for pharmaceutical compounds were achieved with DIOS-MS.

  11. 7.87 eV Laser Desorption Postionization Mass Spectrometry of Adsorbed and Covalently Bound Bisphenol A Diglycidyl Methacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Manshui; Wu, Chunping; Akhmetov, Artem; Edirisinghe, Praneeth D.; Drummond, James L.; Hanley, Luke

    2007-01-01

    Bisphenol A diglycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA) was adsorbed onto or covalently bound to a porous silicon oxide surface. Laser desorption 10.5 eV postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) was previously demonstrated for surface analysis of adsorbed and surface bound Bis-GMA, but signal to noise levels were low and ion fragmentation was extensive. 7.87 eV postionization using the fluorine laser was demonstrated here for Bis-GMA. However, signal levels remained low for LDPI-MS of Bis-GMA as its ionization potential was only ∼7.8 eV, near threshold for single photon ionization by the 7.87 eV fluorine laser. It is known that aromatic tagging of molecular analytes can lower the overall IP of the tagged molecular complex, allowing 7.87 eV single photon ionization. Therefore, Bis-GMA was also derivatized with several tags whose IPs were either below or above 7.87 eV: the tag with an IP below 7.87 eV enhanced single photon ionization while the tags with higher IPs did not. However, signal intensities were enhanced by resonant laser desorption for two of the derivatized Bis-GMAs. Intact ions of Bis-GMA and its derivatives were generally observed by 7.87 eV LDPI-MS, consistent with the formation of ions with relatively little internal energy upon threshold single photon ionization. PMID:17449273

  12. Matrix-Free UV-Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry as a Versatile Approach for Accelerating Dereplication Studies on Lichens.

    PubMed

    Le Pogam, Pierre; Schinkovitz, Andreas; Legouin, Béatrice; Le Lamer, Anne-Cécile; Boustie, Joël; Richomme, Pascal

    2015-10-20

    The present study examined the suitability of laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) for the rapid chemical fingerprinting of lichen extracts. Lichens are known to produce a wide array of secondary metabolites. Most of these compounds are unique to the symbiotic condition but some can be found in many species. Therefore, dereplication, that is, the rapid identification of known compounds within a complex mixture is crucial in the search for novel natural products. Over the past decade, significant advances were made in analytical techniques and profiling methods specifically adapted to crude lichen extracts, but LDI-MS has never been applied in this context. However, most classes of lichen metabolites have UV chromophores, which are quite similar to commercial matrix molecules used in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). It is consequently postulated that these molecules could be directly detectable by matrix-free LDI-MS. The present study evaluated the versatility of this technique by investigating the LDI properties of a vast array of single lichen metabolites as well as lichen extracts of known chemical composition. Results from the LDI experiments were compared with those obtained by direct ESI-MS detection as well as LC-ESI-MS. It was shown that LDI ionization leads to strong molecular ion formation with little fragmentation, thus, facilitating straightforward spectra interpretation and representing a valuable alternative to time-consuming LC-MS analysis.

  13. Vacuum compatible sample positioning device for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Aizikov, Konstantin; Smith, Donald F.; Chargin, David A.; Ivanov, Sergei; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Heeren, Ron M. A.; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    The high mass accuracy and resolving power of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (FT-ICR MS) make them ideal mass detectors for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), promising to provide unmatched molecular resolution capabilities. The intrinsic low tolerance of FT-ICR MS to RF interference, however, along with typically vertical positioning of the sample, and MSI acquisition speed requirements present numerous engineering challenges in creating robotics capable of achieving the spatial resolution to match. This work discusses a two-dimensional positioning stage designed to address these issues. The stage is capable of operating in ∼1 × 10–8 mbar vacuum. The range of motion is set to 100 mm × 100 mm to accommodate large samples, while the positioning accuracy is demonstrated to be less than 0.4 micron in both directions under vertical load over the entire range. This device was integrated into three different matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) FT-ICR instruments and showed no detectable RF noise. The “oversampling” MALDI-MSI experiments, under which the sample is completely ablated at each position, followed by the target movement of the distance smaller than the laser beam, conducted on the custom-built 7T FT-ICR MS demonstrate the stability and positional accuracy of the stage robotics which delivers high spatial resolution mass spectral images at a fraction of the laser spot diameter. PMID:21639522

  14. Identification and Classification of Rhizobia by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Rui Zong; Zhang, Rong Juan; Wei, Qing; Chen, Wen Feng; Cho, Il Kyu; Chen, Wen Xin; Li, Qing X

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been widely used for specific, sensitive and rapid analysis of proteins and has shown a high potential for bacterial identification and characterization. Type strains of four species of rhizobia and Escherichia coli DH5α were employed as reference bacteria to optimize various parameters for identification and classification of species of rhizobia by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS (MALDI TOF MS). The parameters optimized included culture medium states (liquid or solid), bacterial growth phases, colony storage temperature and duration, and protein data processing to enhance the bacterial identification resolution, accuracy and reliability. The medium state had little effects on the mass spectra of protein profiles. A suitable sampling time was between the exponential phase and the stationary phase. Consistent protein mass spectral profiles were observed for E. coli colonies pre-grown for 14 days and rhizobia for 21 days at 4°C or 21°C. A dendrogram of 75 rhizobial strains of 4 genera was constructed based on MALDI TOF mass spectra and the topological patterns agreed well with those in the 16S rDNA phylogenetic tree. The potential of developing a mass spectral database for all rhizobia species was assessed with blind samples. The entire process from sample preparation to accurate identification and classification of species required approximately one hour.

  15. Vacuum compatible sample positioning device for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Aizikov, Konstantin; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Smith, Donald F.; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Chargin, David A.; Ivanov, Sergei; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2011-05-15

    The high mass accuracy and resolving power of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (FT-ICR MS) make them ideal mass detectors for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), promising to provide unmatched molecular resolution capabilities. The intrinsic low tolerance of FT-ICR MS to RF interference, however, along with typically vertical positioning of the sample, and MSI acquisition speed requirements present numerous engineering challenges in creating robotics capable of achieving the spatial resolution to match. This work discusses a two-dimensional positioning stage designed to address these issues. The stage is capable of operating in {approx}1 x 10{sup -8} mbar vacuum. The range of motion is set to 100 mm x 100 mm to accommodate large samples, while the positioning accuracy is demonstrated to be less than 0.4 micron in both directions under vertical load over the entire range. This device was integrated into three different matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) FT-ICR instruments and showed no detectable RF noise. The ''oversampling'' MALDI-MSI experiments, under which the sample is completely ablated at each position, followed by the target movement of the distance smaller than the laser beam, conducted on the custom-built 7T FT-ICR MS demonstrate the stability and positional accuracy of the stage robotics which delivers high spatial resolution mass spectral images at a fraction of the laser spot diameter.

  16. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry: a powerful tool for the mass and sequence analysis of natural and modified oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Pieles, U; Zürcher, W; Schär, M; Moser, H E

    1993-01-01

    We report the analysis and characterization of natural and modified oligonucleotides by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The present technology was highly improved for this class of compounds by using a new matrix, 2,4,6-trihydroxy acetophenone, together with di- and triammonium salts of organic or inorganic acids to suppress peak broadening due to multiple ion adducts. This methodology can be used in combination with time dependent degradation of oligonucleotides by exonucleases as powerful tool to determine sequence compositions. PMID:8341593

  17. Chemometric optimization of a low-temperature plasma source design for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Anastasia; Engelhard, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    Low-temperature plasmas (LTPs) are attractive sources for atomic and molecular mass spectrometry (MS). In the past, the LTP probe, which was first described by Harper et al., was used successfully for direct molecular mass spectrometric analysis with minimal sample pretreatment in a variety of applications. Unfortunately, the desorption/ionization source itself is commercially not available and custom-built LTP set-ups with varying geometry and operational configurations were utilized in the past. In the present study, a rapid chemometrics approach based on systematic experiments and multivariate data analysis was used to optimize the LTP probe geometry and positioning relative to the atmospheric-pressure inlet of a mass spectrometer. Several parameters were studied including the probe geometry, electrode configuration, quartz tube dimensions, probe positioning and operating conditions. It was found that the plasma-to-MS-inlet distance, the plasma-to-sample-plate distance, and the angle between the latter are very important. Additional effects on the analytical performance were found for the outer electrode width, the positioning of the electrodes, the inner diameter of the quartz tube, the quartz wall thickness, and the gas flow. All experiments were performed using additional heating of the sample to enhance thermal desorption and maximize the signal (T = 150 °C). After software-assisted optimization, attractive detection limits were achieved (e.g., 1.8 × 10- 7 mol/L for 4-acetamidothiophenol). Moreover, relative standard deviation (RSD) improved from values of up to 30% before optimization to < 15% RSD after the procedure was completed. This chemometrics approach for method optimization is not limited to LTP-MS and considered to be attractive for other plasma-based instrumentation as well.

  18. Platinum vapor deposition surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization for imaging mass spectrometry of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Hideya; Ozawa, Tomoyuki; Hisatomi, Hirotaka; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2012-08-30

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) allows for the simultaneous detection and imaging of several molecules in a sample. However, when using an organic matrix in the MALDI-IMS of small molecules, inhomogeneous matrix crystallization may yield poorly reproducible peaks in the mass spectra. We describe a solvent-free approach that employs a homogeneously deposited metal nanoparticle layer (or film) for small-molecule detection. Platinum vapor deposition surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (Pt vapor deposition SALDI-IMS) of small molecules was performed as a solvent-free and organic-matrix-free method. A commercially available magnetron sputtering device was used for Pt deposition. Vapor deposition of Pt produced a homogenous layer of nanoparticles over the surface of the target imaging sample. The effectiveness of Pt vapor deposition SALDI-IMS was demonstrated for the direct detection of small analytes of inkjet ink on printed paper as well as for various other analytes (saccharides, pigments, and drugs) separated by thin-layer chromatography (TLC), without the need for extraction or concentration processes. The advantage of choosing Pt instead of Au in SALDI-IMS was also shown. A solvent-free approach involving the direct deposition of Pt on samples (SALDI-IMS) is effective for the analysis of inkjet-printed papers and various analytes separated by TLC. This method would be useful in imaging analyses of various insulating materials such as polymers and biological materials. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Identification of the mass-silent post-transcriptionally modified nucleoside pseudouridine in RNA by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Patteson, K. G.; Rodicio, Lenore Polo; Limbach, Patrick A.

    2001-01-01

    A new method using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry for the direct analysis of the mass-silent post-transcriptionally modified nucleoside pseudouridine in nucleic acids has been developed. This method utilizes 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide to derivatize pseudouridine residues. After chemical derivatization all pseudouridine residues will contain a 252 Da ‘mass tag’ that allows the presence of pseudouridine to be identified using mass spectrometry. Pseudouridine residues can be identified in intact nucleic acids by obtaining a mass spectrum of the nucleic acid before and after derivatization. The mass difference (in units of 252 Da) will denote the number of pseudouridine residues present. To determine the sequence location of pseudouridine, a combination of enzymatic hydrolysis and mass spectrometric steps are used. Here, MALDI analysis of RNase T1 digestion products before and after modification are used to narrow the sequence location of pseudouridine to specific T1 fragments in the gene sequence. Further mass spectrometric monitoring of exonuclease digestion products from isolated T1 fragments is then used for exact sequence placement. This approach to pseudouridine identification is demonstrated using Escherichia coli tRNAs. This new method allows for the direct determination of pseudouridine in nucleic acids, can be used to identify modified pseudouridine residues and can be used with general modification mapping approaches to completely characterize the post-transcriptional modifications present in RNAs. PMID:11353094

  20. Direct matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry-based analysis of wine as a powerful tool for classification purposes.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Miranda, J D; Santos, Hugo M; Reboiro-Jato, Miguel; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Igrejas, G; Lodeiro, Carlos; Capelo, J L

    2012-03-15

    The variables affecting the direct matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry-based analysis of wine for classification purposes have been studied. The type of matrix, the number of bottles of wine, the number of technical replicates and the number of spots used for the sample analysis have been carefully assessed to obtain the best classification possible. Ten different algorithms have been assessed as classification tools using the experimental data collected after the analysis of fourteen types of wine. The best matrix was found to be α-Cyano with a sample to matrix ratio of 1:0.75. To correctly classify the wines, profiling a minimum of five bottles per type of wine is suggested, with a minimum of three MALDI spot replicates for each bottle. The best algorithm to classify the wines was found to be Bayes Net. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for direct visualization of plant metabolites in situ

    DOE PAGES

    Sturtevant, Drew; Lee, Young -Jin; Chapman, Kent D.

    2015-11-22

    Direct visualization of plant tissues by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has revealed key insights into the localization of metabolites in situ. Recent efforts have determined the spatial distribution of primary and secondary metabolites in plant tissues and cells. Strategies have been applied in many areas of metabolism including isotope flux analyses, plant interactions, and transcriptional regulation of metabolite accumulation. Technological advances have pushed achievable spatial resolution to subcellular levels and increased instrument sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. Furthermore, it is anticipated that MALDI-MSI and other MSI approaches will bring a new level of understanding tomore » metabolomics as scientists will be encouraged to consider spatial heterogeneity of metabolites in descriptions of metabolic pathway regulation.« less

  2. Detection of Posaconazole by Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry with Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Pin-Shiuan; Chang, Sarah Y.

    2015-03-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive method for the detection of posaconazole using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection (SALDI/MS) was developed. After the DLLME, posaconazole was detected using SALDI/MS with colloidal gold and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) as the co-matrix. Under optimal extraction and detection conditions, the calibration curve, which ranged from 1.0 to 100.0 nM for posaconazole, was observed to be linear. The limit of detection (LOD) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 was 0.3 nM for posaconazole. This novel method was successfully applied to the determination of posaconazole in human urine samples.

  3. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for direct visualization of plant metabolites in situ.

    PubMed

    Sturtevant, Drew; Lee, Young-Jin; Chapman, Kent D

    2016-02-01

    Direct visualization of plant tissues by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has revealed key insights into the localization of metabolites in situ. Recent efforts have determined the spatial distribution of primary and secondary metabolites in plant tissues and cells. Strategies have been applied in many areas of metabolism including isotope flux analyses, plant interactions, and transcriptional regulation of metabolite accumulation. Technological advances have pushed achievable spatial resolution to subcellular levels and increased instrument sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. It is anticipated that MALDI-MSI and other MSI approaches will bring a new level of understanding to metabolomics as scientists will be encouraged to consider spatial heterogeneity of metabolites in descriptions of metabolic pathway regulation.

  4. Au@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles for laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Lianglan; Mungra, Divyesh C; Xia, Sijing; Zhu, Jin

    2012-05-21

    In matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), the analysis capability, especially for small molecules, is often compromised by the addition of organic matrices due to the existence of background signals. Herein we report a new detection method on the utility of core-shell nanoparticles (CSNPs) as energy transfer structure in LDI-TOF-MS. The LDI-TOF-MS based on gold-silica core-shell nanoparticles with ultrathin silica shell of 2-4 nm (Au@utSiO(2) CSNPs) was effectively applied to the analysis of many compounds, especially for small functional molecules and polymers, which was more promising than MALDI-TOF-MS.

  5. Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry in the study of natural and synthetic melanins. II--Serotonin melanins.

    PubMed

    Bertazzo, A; Biasiolo, M; Costa, C; Allegri, G; Elli, G; Seraglia, R; Traldi, P

    1994-07-01

    Various biosynthetic melanins obtained by enzymic oxidation of serotonin with polyphenol oxidase from Psalliota campestris mushroom or potato, and with tyrosinase from Sepia officinalis or from Sigma were studied by means of laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Various oligomeric clusters were evidenced, proving that the examined melanins are composed of sets of different oligomers, the production of which strongly depends on the enzyme reaction. While serotonin melanins obtained with polyphenol oxidase from potato showed wide species distribution with molecular weights ranging from 2008 to 13,000 Da, the same melanins obtained from mushroom showed oligomer distributions from 1505 to 9000 Da. Serotonin melanins prepared with tyrosinase from Sepia showed oligomers from 1636 to 18,000 Da. A dopa-melanin obtained with mushroom polyphenol oxidase showed oligomer species from 1709 to 17,874 Da. Comparison of molecular weight distributions of the various oligomer sets in serotonin melanins with those in tyrosine melanins revealed clear differences, which are investigated and discussed.

  6. Analysis and Quantitation of Glycated Hemoglobin by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattan, Stephen J.; Parker, Kenneth C.; Vestal, Marvin L.; Yang, Jane Y.; Herold, David A.; Duncan, Mark W.

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of glycated hemoglobin is widely used for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes mellitus. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of patient samples is used to demonstrate a method for quantitation of total glycation on the β-subunit of hemoglobin. The approach is accurate and calibrated with commercially available reference materials. Measurements were linear (R2 > 0.99) across the clinically relevant range of 4% to 20% glycation with coefficients of variation of ≤ 2.5%. Additional and independent measurements of glycation of the α-subunit of hemoglobin are used to validate β-subunit glycation measurements and distinguish hemoglobin variants. Results obtained by MALDI-TOF MS were compared with those obtained in a clinical laboratory using validated HPLC methodology. MALDI-TOF MS sample preparation was minimal and analysis times were rapid making the method an attractive alternative to methodologies currently in practice.

  7. Identification of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bruin, J P; Kostrzewa, M; van der Ende, A; Badoux, P; Jansen, R; Boers, S A; Diederen, B M W

    2014-02-01

    Generally accepted laboratory methods that have been used for decades do not reliably distinguish between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus isolates. H. haemolyticus strains are often incorrectly identified as nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). To distinguish H. influenzae from H. haemolyticus we have created a new database on the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) bio-typer 2 and compared the results with routine determination of Haemophilus (growth requirement for X and V factor), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). In total we have tested 277 isolates, 244 H. influenzae and 33 H. haemolyticus. Using MLST as the gold standard, the agreement of MALDI-TOF MS was 99.6 %. MALDI-TOF MS allows reliable and rapid discrimination between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus.

  8. Recent advances in bacteria identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry using nanomaterials as affinity probes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tai-Chia

    2014-04-28

    Identifying trace amounts of bacteria rapidly, accurately, selectively, and with high sensitivity is important to ensuring the safety of food and diagnosing infectious bacterial diseases. Microbial diseases constitute the major cause of death in many developing and developed countries of the world. The early detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial in preventing, treating, and containing the spread of infections, and there is an urgent requirement for sensitive, specific, and accurate diagnostic tests. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is an extremely selective and sensitive analytical tool that can be used to characterize different species of pathogenic bacteria. Various functionalized or unmodified nanomaterials can be used as affinity probes to capture and concentrate microorganisms. Recent developments in bacterial detection using nanomaterials-assisted MALDI-MS approaches are highlighted in this article. A comprehensive table listing MALDI-MS approaches for identifying pathogenic bacteria, categorized by the nanomaterials used, is provided.

  9. Ink dating using thermal desorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry: comparison of results obtained in two laboratories.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Agnès; Bügler, Jürgen; Kirsch, Dieter; Köhler, Fritz; Weyermann, Céline

    2015-01-01

    An ink dating method based on solvent analysis was recently developed using thermal desorption followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and is currently implemented in several forensic laboratories. The main aims of this work were to implement this method in a new laboratory to evaluate whether results were comparable at three levels: (i) validation criteria, (ii) aging curves, and (iii) results interpretation. While the results were indeed comparable in terms of validation, the method proved to be very sensitive to maintenances. Moreover, the aging curves were influenced by ink composition, as well as storage conditions (particularly when the samples were not stored in "normal" room conditions). Finally, as current interpretation models showed limitations, an alternative model based on slope calculation was proposed. However, in the future, a probabilistic approach may represent a better solution to deal with ink sample inhomogeneity. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Science.

  10. Recent Advances in Bacteria Identification by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Nanomaterials as Affinity Probes

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Tai-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Identifying trace amounts of bacteria rapidly, accurately, selectively, and with high sensitivity is important to ensuring the safety of food and diagnosing infectious bacterial diseases. Microbial diseases constitute the major cause of death in many developing and developed countries of the world. The early detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial in preventing, treating, and containing the spread of infections, and there is an urgent requirement for sensitive, specific, and accurate diagnostic tests. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is an extremely selective and sensitive analytical tool that can be used to characterize different species of pathogenic bacteria. Various functionalized or unmodified nanomaterials can be used as affinity probes to capture and concentrate microorganisms. Recent developments in bacterial detection using nanomaterials-assisted MALDI-MS approaches are highlighted in this article. A comprehensive table listing MALDI-MS approaches for identifying pathogenic bacteria, categorized by the nanomaterials used, is provided. PMID:24786089

  11. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of dye-sensitized solar cells: identification of the dye-electrolyte interaction.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Hanna; Leandri, Valentina; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Bergquist, Jonas; Shevchenko, Denys

    2015-05-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have great potential to provide sustainable electricity from sunlight. The photoanode in DSCs consists of a dye-sensitized metal oxide film deposited on a conductive substrate. This configuration makes the photoanode a perfect sample for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). We applied LDI-MS for the study of molecular interactions between a dye and electrolyte on the surface of a TiO2 photoanode. We found that a dye containing polyoxyethylene groups forms complexes with alkali metal cations from the electrolyte, while a dye substituted with alkoxy groups does not. Guanidinium ion forms adducts with neither of the two dyes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Liquid Injection Field Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Cyclic Metal Carbonyl Complexes with Tetra-Antimony Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Hans J.; Linden, H. Bernhard; Moldovan, Ovidiu

    2013-01-01

    Reactions of (norbornadiene)Cr(CO)4 or cis-(piperidine)2Mo(CO)4 with R2Sb-SbR2, and cyclo-(R'Sb)n (R' = Et, n-Pr; n = 4, 5) give the complexes cyclo-[M(CO)4(R2Sb-SbR'- SbR'-SbR2)] ( 1: M = Cr, R = Me, R'= Et; 2: M = Mo, R = Et, R' = Et; 3: M = Mo, R = Et, R' = n-Pr). Not accessible to established characterization methods, the oily, extremely reactive unpurified mixture of 3 with scrambled ligands was characterized by mass spectrometry using liquid injection field desorption ionization (LIFDI). [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of synthetic polymers and peptides.

    PubMed

    Hyzak, Lukas; Moos, Rebecca; von Rath, Friederike; Wulf, Volker; Wirtz, Michaela; Melchior, David; Kling, Hans-Willi; Köhler, Michael; Gäb, Siegmar; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2011-12-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) is a very powerful and widely used mass spectrometric technique to ionize high molecular weight compounds. The most commonly used dried droplet (DD) technique can lead to a concentration distribution of the analyte on the target and is therefore often not suitable for reproducible analyses. We developed a new solvent-free deposition technique, called compressed sample (CS), to prevent the distribution of the analytes caused by the crystallization of the compounds. The CS technique presented in this work allows the quantitative analysis of synthetic polymers such as derivatized maltosides with correlation coefficients of 0.999 and peptides up to 3500 Da with correlation coefficients of at least 0.982 without the use of stable-isotope-labeled standards.

  14. Screening of the Binding of Small Molecules to Proteins by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with Protein Microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins.

  15. On plate graphite supported sample processing for simultaneous lipid and protein identification by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; van der Werf, Inez Dorothé; Sabbatini, Luigia; Palmisano, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous identification of lipids and proteins by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) after direct on-plate processing of micro-samples supported on colloidal graphite is demonstrated. Taking advantages of large surface area and thermal conductivity, graphite provided an ideal substrate for on-plate proteolysis and lipid extraction. Indeed proteins could be efficiently digested on-plate within 15 min, providing sequence coverages comparable to those obtained by conventional in-solution overnight digestion. Interestingly, detection of hydrophilic phosphorylated peptides could be easily achieved without any further enrichment step. Furthermore, lipids could be simultaneously extracted/identified without any additional treatment/processing step as demonstrated for model complex samples such as milk and egg. The present approach is simple, efficient, of large applicability and offers great promise for protein and lipid identification in very small samples.

  16. Direct determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solid matrices using laser desorption/laser photoionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Specht, A A; Blades, M W

    2003-06-01

    The development and characterization of a new instrument for solid sampling which couples IR laser desorption followed by UV laser photo-ionization and analysis using an ion trap mass spectrometer has been investigated. For calibration, a new type of solid sample preparation involving activated charcoal as the solid substrate was used. This solid sample provided a steady signal for several thousand laser shots, which allowed optimization of the experimental procedure. It was found that both the IR and UV intensity and the delay between them play an important role in both the magnitude and type of signals observed. A method of gas phase accumulation with multiple laser shots was examined. Finally, this technique was demonstrated to be effective in providing direct qualitative information for N.I.S.T. SRM 1944 river sediment sample with no sample pre-treatment.

  17. Detection of Metastatic Breast and Thyroid Cancer in Lymph Nodes by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jialing; Feider, Clara L.; Nagi, Chandandeep; Yu, Wendong; Carter, Stacey A.; Suliburk, James; Cao, Hop S. Tran; Eberlin, Livia S.

    2017-06-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry has been widely applied to image lipids and metabolites in primary cancer tissues with the purpose of detecting and understanding metabolic changes associated with cancer development and progression. Here, we report the use of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) to image metastatic breast and thyroid cancer in human lymph node tissues. Our results show clear alterations in lipid and metabolite distributions detected in the mass spectra profiles from 42 samples of metastatic thyroid tumors, metastatic breast tumors, and normal lymph node tissues. 2D DESI-MS ion images of selected molecular species allowed discrimination and visualization of specific histologic features within tissue sections, including regions of metastatic cancer, adjacent normal lymph node, and fibrosis or adipose tissues, which strongly correlated with pathologic findings. In thyroid cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of ceramides and glycerophosphoinisitols were observed. In breast cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of various fatty acids and specific glycerophospholipids were seen. Trends in the alterations in fatty acyl chain composition of lipid species were also observed through detailed mass spectra evaluation and chemical identification of molecular species. The results obtained demonstrate DESI-MSI as a potential clinical tool for the detection of breast and thyroid cancer metastasis in lymph nodes, although further validation is needed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Detection of Metastatic Breast and Thyroid Cancer in Lymph Nodes by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jialing; Feider, Clara L.; Nagi, Chandandeep; Yu, Wendong; Carter, Stacey A.; Suliburk, James; Cao, Hop S. Tran; Eberlin, Livia S.

    2017-02-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry has been widely applied to image lipids and metabolites in primary cancer tissues with the purpose of detecting and understanding metabolic changes associated with cancer development and progression. Here, we report the use of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) to image metastatic breast and thyroid cancer in human lymph node tissues. Our results show clear alterations in lipid and metabolite distributions detected in the mass spectra profiles from 42 samples of metastatic thyroid tumors, metastatic breast tumors, and normal lymph node tissues. 2D DESI-MS ion images of selected molecular species allowed discrimination and visualization of specific histologic features within tissue sections, including regions of metastatic cancer, adjacent normal lymph node, and fibrosis or adipose tissues, which strongly correlated with pathologic findings. In thyroid cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of ceramides and glycerophosphoinisitols were observed. In breast cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of various fatty acids and specific glycerophospholipids were seen. Trends in the alterations in fatty acyl chain composition of lipid species were also observed through detailed mass spectra evaluation and chemical identification of molecular species. The results obtained demonstrate DESI-MSI as a potential clinical tool for the detection of breast and thyroid cancer metastasis in lymph nodes, although further validation is needed.

  19. Principles of hydrogen radical mediated peptide/protein fragmentation during matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki

    2016-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) is a very easy way to obtain large sequence tags and, thereby, reliable identification of peptides and proteins. Recently discovered new matrices have enhanced the MALDI-ISD yield and opened new research avenues. The use of reducing and oxidizing matrices for MALDI-ISD of peptides and proteins favors the production of fragmentation pathways involving "hydrogen-abundant" and "hydrogen-deficient" radical precursors, respectively. Since an oxidizing matrix provides information on peptide/protein sequences complementary to that obtained with a reducing matrix, MALDI-ISD employing both reducing and oxidizing matrices is a potentially useful strategy for de novo peptide sequencing. Moreover, a pseudo-MS(3) method provides sequence information about N- and C-terminus extremities in proteins and allows N- and C-terminal side fragments to be discriminated within the complex MALDI-ISD mass spectrum. The combination of high mass resolution of a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) analyzer and the software suitable for MALDI-ISD facilitates the interpretation of MALDI-ISD mass spectra. A deeper understanding of the MALDI-ISD process is necessary to fully exploit this method. Thus, this review focuses first on the mechanisms underlying MALDI-ISD processes, followed by a discussion of MALDI-ISD applications in the field of proteomics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Mass Spec Rev 35:535-556, 2016. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric analysis of low vapor pressure chemical particulates collected from a surface.

    PubMed

    Ewing, K J; Gibson, D; Sanghera, J; Miklos, F

    2015-01-01

    The collection of a low vapor pressure chemical simulant triethyl phosphate sorbed onto silica gel (TEP/SG) from a surface with subsequent analysis of the TEP/SG particulates using desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is described. Collection of TEP/SG particulates on a surface was accomplished using a sticky screen sampler composed of a stainless steel screen coated with partially polymerized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). DESI-MS analysis of TEP/SG particulates containing different percentages of TEP sorbed onto silica gel enabled the generation of response curves for the TEP ions m/z 155 and m/z 127. Using the response curves the calculation of the mass of TEP in a 25 wt% sample of TEP/SG was calculated, results show that the calculated mass of TEP was 14% different from the actual mass of TEP in the sample using the m/z 127 TEP ion response curve. Detection limits for the TEP vapor and TEP/SG particulates were calculated to be 4 μg and 6 particles, respectively.

  1. Direct analysis of oligomeric tackifying resins in rubber compounds by automatic thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Kim

    1999-01-01

    Two analytical methods, automatic thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (ATD-GC/MS) and pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), were applied as direct methods for the analysis of oligomeric tackifying resins in a vulcanized rubber. The ATD-GC/MS method, based on discontinuous volatile extraction, was found to be an effective means for direct analysis of the oligomeric tackifying resins contained in a vulcanized rubber. The oligomeric tackifying resins, such as t-octylphenolformaldehyde (TOPF) resin, rosin-modified terpene resin, and cashew resin, could be directly analyzed in vulcanized rubber by ATD-GC/MS. Much simpler total ion chromatograms were obtained by ATD-GC/MS than by flash pyrolysis with a Curie-point pyrolyzer, permitting much easier interpretation. Ions at m/z 206, 135, and 107 were fingerprints in the characteristic mass spectra obtained by ATD-GC/MS for TOPF resin in the vulcanized rubber. 1H-Indene, styrene, and isolongifolene were observed as their characteristic mass spectra in the pyrolyzate of the rosin-modified terpene resin. From the cashew resin, phenol, 3-methylphenol, and 4-(1,1,3, 3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol were obtained as the characteristic pyrolyzates by discontinuous thermal extraction via ATD-GC/MS. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Developments and Applications of Electrophoresis and Small Molecule Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hui

    2007-01-01

    Ultra-sensitive native fluorescence detection of proteins with miniaturized one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was achieved with laser side-entry excitation, which provides both high excitation power and low background level. The detection limit for R-phycoerythrin protein spots in 1-D SDS-PAGE was as low as 15 fg, which corresponds to 40 thousand molecules only. The average detection limit of six standard native proteins was 5 pg per band and the dynamic range spanned more than 3 orders of magnitude. Approximately 150 protein spots from 30 ng of total Escherichia coli extraction were detected on a 0.8 cm x 1 cm gel in two-dimensional separation. Estrogen-DNA adducts as 4-OHE1(E2)-1-N3Ade and 4-OHEI(E2)-2-NacCys were hypothesized as early risk assessment of prostate and breast cancers. Capillary electrophoresis, luminescence/absorption spectroscopy and LC-MS were used to characterize and detect these adducts. Monoclonal antibodies against each individual adduct were developed and used to enrich such compounds from urine samples of prostate and breast cancer patients as well as healthy people. Adduct 4-OHE1-1-N3Ade was detected at much higher level in urine from subjects with prostate cancer patients compared to healthy males. The same adduct and 4-OHEI-2-NacCys were also detected at a much higher level in urine from a woman with breast carcinoma than samples from healthy controls. These two DNA adducts may serve as novel biomarkers for early diagnostic of cancers. The adsorption properties of R-phycoerythrin (RPE), on the fused-silica surface were studied using capillary electrophoresis (CE) and single molecule spectroscopy. The band shapes and migration times were measured in CE. Adsorption and desorption events were recorded at the single-molecule level by imaging of the evanescent-field layer using total internal reflection. The adsorbed RPE molecules on the fused-silica prism surface were

  3. Development of thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry as a rapid method for ambient particulate characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheya, Sue Anne N.

    A direct thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD GC/MS) method for air particulate matter (PM) analysis of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds was investigated. This technique uses a specially designed microdesorption GC inlet utilizing an inductively heated ferromagnetic foil with a Curie point temperature suitable for desorption, which can accommodate microgram amounts of material deposited on a thin strip of quartz fiber filter. Liquid or solid samples can be rapidly desorbed within 10 s at 315°C, followed by 30--40 min of chromatography time. The results obtained by this technique were found to be statistically equivalent to those obtained by the conventional solvent extraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SX GC/MS) method for analysis of aromatic and n alkane standards, single source soot particles, and PM 10 filter samples. Correlations between injecting an extract, desorbing an extract, and desorbing particles averaged R = 0.94, with a three way correlation averaging R = 0.97. High volume sampling conducted at 12 spatially distributed sites located along the US/Mexican border of the El Paso/Juarez metroplex supplied 24h PM 10 filters for an investigation combining thermal desorption with a rapid online chemical derivatization procedure, and multivariate methods of source attribution using principal component and canonical correlation analysis of the resultant chemical markers. Four major combustion related PM emission sources were revealed at these sites: automotive, waste burning, biomass burning and meat cooking. A second investigation conducted in the same area used mediumvolume sampling to collect 2 h timeresolved PM 10 receptor samples for TD GC/MS analysis. Additionally, 2 h samples for inorganic analysis, multichannel particle size distribution measurements, and meteorological data were collected enabling generation of circadian PM multicharacterization profiles. Factor analysis based receptor modeling using

  4. Furoic and mefenamic acids as new matrices for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-(MALDI)-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2013-10-15

    The present study introduces two novel organic matrices for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for the analysis of small molecules. The first matrix is "2-amino-4,5-diphenylfuran-3-carboxylic acid" (also called furoic acid, FA) which was synthesized and then characterized by ultraviolet (UV), infrared (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance NMR ((1)H and (13)C) and mass spectrometry. The compound has organic semiconductor properties and exhibits intense UV-absorption which is suitable for the UV-MALDI laser (N2 laser, 337 nm). The second matrix is mefenamic acid (MA). The two matrices can be successfully applied for various classes of compounds including adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP, 0.5 µL(10.0 nmol)), spectinomycin (spect, 0.5 µL(14.0 nmol)), glutathione (GSH, 0.5 µL(9.0 nmol)), sulfamethazole (SMT, 0.5 µL(2.0 nmol)) and mixture of peptides gramicidin D (GD, 0.5µL (9.0 nmol)). The two matrices can effectively absorb the laser energy, resulting in excellent desorption/ionization of small molecules. The new matrices offer a significant enhancement of ionization, less fragmentation, few interferences, nice reproducibility, and excellent stability under vacuum. Theoretical calculations of the physical parameters demonstrated increase in polarizability, molar volume and refractivity than the conventional organic matrices which can effectively enhance the proton transfer reactions between the matrices with the analyte molecules. While the reduction in density, surface tension and index of refraction can enhance homogeneity between the two new matrices with the analytes. Due to the sublimation energy of mefenamic acid is (1.2 times) higher than that of the DHB, it is more stable to be used in the vacuum.

  5. Block microstructural characterization of copolymers formed from fluorinated and non-fluorinated alkyl polyisocyanates using desorption chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guodong; Cooks, R. Graham; Jha, Salil K.; Oupicky, David; Green, Mark M.

    1997-11-01

    Homopolymers and copolymers of 1-isocyanato-4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,9-tridecafluorononane (monomer F) and n-hexylisocyanate (monomer H) were examined by desorption chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DCI-MS) to obtain information on the monomer distribution in the copolymers. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to characterize ions generated by DCI in the mass spectrometer ion source; ammonia and isobutane were selected as chemical ionization (CI) reagent gases. The major peaks in the ammonia DCI mass spectrum of poly(4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,9-tridecafluorononyl)isocyanate (poly (F)) are protonated and ammoniated trimers. This result suggests that on pyrolytic degradation poly (F) forms cyclic trimers as do alkyl isocyanate polymers. The isobutane DCI mass spectra display the characteristic alkene elimination sequence characteristic of poly(n-hexyl)isocyanate and poly(2,6-dimethylheptyl)isocyanate but with additional extensive fragmentation. The major fragment ion is the protonated monomer. The monomer distributions in copolymers comprised of monomer F and monomer H were deduced from the abundances of various protonated and ammoniated trimers in the ammonia DCI mass spectra using Markovian statistics. Both soluble and insoluble copolymer samples were isolated and found to have non-random monomer distributions. The soluble fraction is dominated by monomer H blocks while the insoluble fraction also contains a majority of monomer H blocks but relatively more monomer F blocks. This forms an example in the polyisocyanates, which hitherto exhibited only random copolymerization, of a non-living method of polymerization yielding a block microstructure for a mixture of two monomers with virtually identical polymerizable functions. Mass spectrometry offers information on chain microstructure which would be unavailable by other means.

  6. Droplet dynamics and ionization mechanisms in desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Venter, Andre; Sojka, Paul E; Cooks, R Graham

    2006-12-15

    A droplet pickup and other mechanisms have been suggested for the ionization of biomolecules like peptides and proteins by desorption electrospray ionization. To verify this hypothesis phase Doppler particle analysis was used to study the sizes and velocities of droplets involved in DESI. It was found that impacting droplets typically have velocities of 120 m/s and average diameters of 2-4 microm. Small differences in sprayer construction influence the operating conditions at which droplets of these dimensions are produced. Under these conditions, the kinetic energy per impacting water molecule is less than 0.6 meV and sputtering through momentum transfer during collisions or ionization by other electronic processes is unlikely. Droplets arrive at the surface with velocities well below the speed of sound in common materials, thereby excluding the possibility of ionization by shockwave formation. Some droplets appear to roll along the surface, increasing contact time and presumably the amount of material that is taken up into droplets during conditions typical of the DESI experiment.

  7. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles and Identification of Capping Agent Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Karthick, V; Kumar, V Ganesh; Dhas, T Stalin; Govindaraju, K; Sinha, Sweta; Singaravelu, G

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized using leaf extract of Syzygium jambolanum and capping agent has been explored. The synthesized AuNPs have been characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and atomic force microscopic (AFM) analysis. The AuNPs show intense surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 528 nm and were found to be spherical and hexagonal in shape with particle size ranging from 20-30 nm. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to analyze the surface morphology of synthesized AuNPs. The capping ligand has been evaluated using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis.

  8. Direct Analysis of Textile Fabrics and Dyes Using IR Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization (MALDESI) Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Kristin H.; Barry, Jeremy A.; Muddiman, David C.; Hinks, David

    2012-01-01

    The forensic analysis of textile fibers uses a variety of techniques from microscopy to spectroscopy. One such technique that is often used to identify the dye(s) within the fiber is mass spectrometry (MS). In the traditional MS method, the dye must be extracted from the fabric and the dye components are separated by chromatography prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Direct analysis of the dye from the fabric allows the omission of the lengthy sample preparation involved in extraction, thereby significantly reducing the overall analysis time. Herein, a direct analysis of dyed textile fabric was performed using the infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) source for MS. In MALDESI, an IR laser with wavelength tuned to 2.94 μm is used to desorb the dye from the fabric sample with the aid of water as the matrix. The desorbed dye molecules are then post-ionized by electrospray ionization (ESI). A variety of dye classes were analyzed from various fabrics with little to no sample preparation allowing for the identification of the dye mass and in some cases the fiber polymer. Those dyes that were not detected using MALDESI were also not observed by direct infusion ESI of the dye standard. PMID:23237031

  9. Direct matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging of cellulose and hemicellulose in Populus tissue.

    PubMed

    Lunsford, Kyle Ann; Peter, Gary F; Yost, Richard A

    2011-09-01

    Imaging applied toward lignocellulosic materials requires high molecular specificity to map specific compounds within intact tissue. Although secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) with a single stage of MS have been used to image lignocellulosic biomass, the complexity of the plant tissue requires tandem MS, which limits the interpretation of simple MS. MALDI linear ion trap (LIT) tandem MS offers the high molecular specificity needed for lignocellulosic analyses. MALDI-LIT MS analyses of cellulose and xylan (hemicellulose) standards were performed to determine mass-to-charge ratios and fragmentation pathways for identification of these compounds in intact tissue. The MALDI-LIT-MS images of young Populus wood stem showed even distribution of both cellulose and hemicellulose ions; in contrast, the tandem MS images of cellulose and hemicellulose generated by plotting characteristic fragment ions resulted in drastically different images. This demonstrates that isobaric ions are present during MALDI-LIT-MS analyses of wood tissue and tandem MS is necessary to distinguish between isobaric species for selective imaging of carbohydrates in biomass.

  10. Localization and quantification of drugs in animal tissues by use of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Vismeh, Ramin; Waldon, Daniel J; Teffera, Yohannes; Zhao, Zhiyang

    2012-06-19

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has emerged as a powerful technique to obtain spatial arrangement of individual molecular ions in animal tissues. Ambient desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) technique is uniquely suited for such imaging experiments, as it can be performed on animal tissues in their native environment without prior treatments. Although MSI has become a rapid growing technique for localization of proteins, lipids, drugs, and endogenous compounds in different tissues, quantification of imaged targets has not been explored extensively. Here we present a novel MSI approach for localization and quantification of drugs in animal thin tissue sections. DESI-MSI using an Orbitrap mass analyzer in full scan mode was performed on 6 μm coronal brain sections from rats that were administered 2.5 mg/kg clozapine. Clozapine was localized and quantified in individual brain sections 45 min postdose. External calibration curves were prepared by micropipetting standards with internal standard (IS) on top of the tissues, and average response factors were calculated for the scans in which both clozapine and IS were detected. All response factors were normalized to area units. Quantifications from DESI-MSI revealed 0.2-1.2 ng of clozapine in individual brain sections, results that were further confirmed by extraction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis.

  11. Analysis of wastewater samples by direct combination of thin-film microextraction and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Takáts, Zoltán

    2012-09-07

    An analysis method for aqueous samples by the direct combination of C18/SCX mixed mode thin-film microextraction (TFME) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was developed. Both techniques make analytical workflow simpler and faster, hence the combination of the two techniques enables considerably shorter analysis time compared to the traditional liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach. The method was characterized using carbamazepine and triclosan as typical examples for pharmaceuticals and personal care product (PPCP) components which draw increasing attention as wastewater-derived environmental contaminants. Both model compounds were successfully detected in real wastewater samples and their concentrations determined using external calibration with isotope labeled standards. Effects of temperature, agitation, sample volume, and exposure time were investigated in the case of spiked aqueous samples. Results were compared to those of parallel HPLC-MS determinations and good agreement was found through a three orders of magnitude wide concentration range. Serious matrix effects were observed in treated wastewater, but lower limits of detection were still found to be in the low ng L(-1) range. Using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer, the technique was found to be ideal for screening purposes and led to the detection of various different PPCP components in wastewater treatment plant effluents, including beta-blockers, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and UV filters.

  12. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to a portable mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Maher, Simon; Li, Anyin; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K; Taylor, Stephen; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-02-01

    Desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) is implemented on a portable mass spectrometer and applied to the direct detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkyl substituted benzenes. The presence of these compounds in the environment poses a significant threat to the health of both humans and wildlife because of their carcinogenic, toxic, and mutagenic properties. As such, instant detection outside of the laboratory is of particular importance to allow in-situ measurement at the source. Using a rapid, high throughput, miniature, handheld mass spectrometer, several alkyl substituted benzenes and PAHs (i.e., 1,2,3,5-tetramethylbenzene, pentamethylbenzene, hexamethylbenzene, fluoranthene, anthracene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene, acenaphthene, indeno[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene, 9-ethylfluorene, and 1-benzyl-3-methyl-naphthalene) were identified and characterized using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) from ambient surfaces, in the open air. This method can provide almost instantaneous information while minimizing sample preparation, which is advantageous in terms of both cost and simplicity of analysis. This MS-based technique is applicable to a wide range of environmental organic molecules.

  13. Targeted comparative proteomics by liquid chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Jeremy E; Chisholm, Kenneth A; Pinto, Devanand M

    2006-01-01

    Here we report the first application of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer for targeted proteomics. Employing an amine-specific isotopic labelling approach, the technique was validated using five randomly selected bovine serum albumin peptides differentially labelled at known ratios. An indirect benefit of the isotopic labelling technique is a significant enhancement of the a1 ion in tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra of all peptides studied. Therefore, the a1 ion was selected as the fragment ion for multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in all cases, eliminating tedious method development and optimization. Accurate quantification was achieved with an average relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5% (n = 5) and a detection limit of 14 amol. The technique was then applied to validate an important virulence biomarker of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which was not accurately quantified using global proteomics experiment employing two-dimensional liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC/ESI)-MS/MS. Using LC/MALDI-MRM analysis of five tryptic peptides, the protein PHR1 was found to be upregulated in the hyphal (pathogenic) form of C. albicans by a factor of 7.7 +/- 0.8.

  14. Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LDI-MS) of Lipids with Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Coated Targets

    PubMed Central

    Kusano, Maiko; Kawabata, Shin-ichirou; Tamura, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Daigou; Murouchi, Masato; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticle (NP)-coated target plates were employed for the direct detection and analysis of low molecular weight lipids by laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry (MS). We have demonstrated that the use of the iron oxide NP-coated target provides a simple, direct, and rapid detection method for lipid standards and epidermal surface lipids without any cumbersome sample pretreatment as well as mass spectra that are free of background matrix peaks. Lipid standards (1-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-linoleoyl-rac-glycerol, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) were detected as either protonated or cationated species. Clean MS/MS spectra for each lipid were also successfully obtained. Pre-MS surface cleaning of the target plates with UV-ozone treatment successfully removed organic contaminants that would interfere with the mass spectra especially in the low molecular weight region. Preliminary application of the presented target plate to the detection of endogenous lipids in latent fingerprints showed promising results and for potential use in the visualization and chemical composition determination of latent fingerprints by nanoparticle assistance. PMID:24860715

  15. Analysis of Phospholipid Mixtures from Biological Tissues by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption and Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): A Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eibisch, Mandy; Fuchs, Beate; Schiller, Jurgen; Sub, Rosmarie; Teuber, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is increasingly used to investigate the phospholipid (PL) compositions of tissues and body fluids, often without previous separation of the total mixture into the individual PL classes. Therefore, the questions of whether all PL classes are detectable…

  16. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry is a sensitive and specific method for identification of aerococci.

    PubMed

    Senneby, Erik; Nilson, Bo; Petersson, Ann-Cathrine; Rasmussen, Magnus

    2013-04-01

    Conventional methods for the identification of human-pathogenic aerococci to the species level are not reliable. We show that matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry correctly identifies aerococci to the species level and that it can be used to identify aerococci with high specificity in the diagnostic clinical microbiology laboratory.

  17. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Is a Sensitive and Specific Method for Identification of Aerococci

    PubMed Central

    Nilson, Bo; Petersson, Ann-Cathrine; Rasmussen, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Conventional methods for the identification of human-pathogenic aerococci to the species level are not reliable. We show that matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry correctly identifies aerococci to the species level and that it can be used to identify aerococci with high specificity in the diagnostic clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:23390276

  18. Determination of off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin, in salmon fillets using stir bar sorptive extraction–thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A sensitive and solvent-less method for the determination of musty and earthy off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin (GSM), in salmon tissue was developed using stir bar sorptive extraction -thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography -mass spectrometry (SBSE -TD -GCMS). M...

  19. THERMAL DESORPTION MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMED FROM REACTIONS OF 1-TETRADECENE AND O3 IN THE PRESENCE OF ALCOHOLS AND CARBOXYLIC ACIDS. (R826235)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemistry of secondary organic aerosol formation from reactions of
    1-tetradecene and O3 in dry air in the presence of excess alcohols
    and carboxylic acids was investigated in an environmental chamber using a
    thermal desorption particle beam mass spec...

  20. Rapid Identification of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry ▿

    PubMed Central

    McTaggart, Lisa R.; Lei, Eric; Richardson, Susan E.; Hoang, Linda; Fothergill, Annette; Zhang, Sean X.

    2011-01-01

    Compared to DNA sequence analysis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) correctly identified 100% of Cryptococcus species, distinguishing the notable pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii. Identification was greatly enhanced by supplementing a commercial spectral library with additional entries to account for subspecies variability. PMID:21653762

  1. Analysis of Phospholipid Mixtures from Biological Tissues by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption and Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): A Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eibisch, Mandy; Fuchs, Beate; Schiller, Jurgen; Sub, Rosmarie; Teuber, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is increasingly used to investigate the phospholipid (PL) compositions of tissues and body fluids, often without previous separation of the total mixture into the individual PL classes. Therefore, the questions of whether all PL classes are detectable…

  2. Evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for species identification of nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Traglia, Germán; Famiglietti, Angela; Ramirez, Maria Soledad; Vay, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify 396 Nonfermenting Gram-Negative Bacilli clinical isolates was evaluated in comparison with conventional phenotypic tests and/or molecular methods. MALDI-TOF MS identified to species level 256 isolates and to genus or complex level 112 isolates. It identified 29 genera including uncommon species.

  3. THE USE OF MATRIX-ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION/IONIZATION-MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF AEROMONAS ISOLATES OBTAINED FROM WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has long been established as a tool by which microorganisms can be characterized and identified. EPA is investigating the potential of using this technology as a way to rapidly identify Aeromonas species fo...

  4. THE USE OF MATRIX-ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION/IONIZATION-MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF AEROMONAS ISOLATES OBTAINED FROM WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has long been established as a tool by which microorganisms can be characterized and identified. EPA is investigating the potential of using this technology as a way to rapidly identify Aeromonas species fo...

  5. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Can Accurately Differentiate between Mycobacterium masilliense (M. abscessus subspecies bolletti) and M. abscessus (Sensu Stricto)

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Shih-Hua; Chen, Chung-Ming; Lee, Meng-Rui; Lee, Tai-Fen; Chien, Kun-Yi; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2013-01-01

    Among 36 Mycobacterium masilliense and 22 M. abscessus isolates identified by erm(41) PCR and sequencing analysis of rpoB and 23S rRNA genes, the rate of accurate differentiation between these two subspecies was 100% by cluster analysis of spectra generated by Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry. PMID:23824775

  6. Detection of drugs in lifted cyanoacrylate-developed latent fingermarks using two laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometric methods.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Latha; Rowell, Frederick

    2014-02-07

    This paper describes a method for lifting cyanoacrylate (CNA)-developed latent fingermarks from a glass surface and the detection of five drugs in lifted marks from fingers that had been in contact with the drugs, using Surface Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (SALDI-TOF-MS) or Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation TOF-MS (MALDI-TOF-MS). Two drugs of abuse (cocaine and methadone) and three therapeutic drugs (aspirin, paracetamol and caffeine) were used as contact residues. Latent fingermarks spiked with the drugs were subjected to CNA fuming followed by dusting with ARRO SupraNano™ MS black magnetic powder (SALDI-TOF-MS) or 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) (MALDI-TOF-MS). The dusted mark was then exposed to solvent vapour before lifting with a commercial fingerprint lifting tape following established procedures. The presence of the drugs was then confirmed by direct analysis on the tape without further processing using SALDI- or MALDI-TOF-MS. The black magnetic fingerprint powder provided visual enhancement of the CNA-fingermark while no visual enhancement was observed for marks dusted with DHB powder. Similar [M + H](+) peaks for all the drug analytes were observed for both methods along with some sodium and potassium adducts for SALDI-MS and some major fragment ions but the SALDI signals were generally more intense. Simple exposure to acetone vapour of the CNA-developed marks enabled their effective transfer onto the tape which was crucial for subsequent MS detection of the analytes.

  7. Detection of Biosignatures in Natural and Microbial Cultured Jarosites Using Laser- Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: Implications for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, J.; Hinman, N. W.; Yan, B.; Stoner, D. L.; Scott, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    The jarosite group minerals have received increasing attention since the discovery by the Mars Exploration Rover-Opportunity of jarosite on the Martian surface. The general chemical formula for jarosite is XFe3(SO4)2(OH)6 where the X represents both monovalent and divalent cations that can occupy the axial positions in the crystal structure. Commonly found ions include K+, Na+, H3O+, NH4+, and Pb2+ with reports of other large ions occupying this position in the literature. Modeling efforts have been performed to confirm that jarosite has the ability to incorporate a variety of "foreign" cations. The minerals unique ability to incorporate various large ions in its structure and its association with biological activity in terrestrial environments has lead to investigations regarding its use as an indicator of aqueous and/or biological activity. The use of laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LD-FTMS) has revealed the presence of organic matter including the amino acid, glycine, in several jarosite samples from various worldwide locations. Iron precipitates derived from acidophilic microbial cultures were also analyzed. Using attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), signals indicative of microbes or microbial exudates were weak and ambiguous. In contrast, LD-FTMS clearly detected bioorganic constituents in some desorption spots. However, the signals were sporadic and required the laser scanning/imaging capability of our laboratory built system to locate the microbial signatures in the heterogeneous samples. The ability to observe these bioorganic signatures in jarosite samples using the instrumental technique employed in this study furthers the goals of planetary geologists to determine whether signs of life (e.g., presence of biomolecules or biomolecule precursors) can be detected in the rock record of terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples.

  8. Raman spectroscopy and laser desorption mass spectrometry for minimal destructive forensic analysis of black and color inkjet printed documents.

    PubMed

    Heudt, Laetitia; Debois, Delphine; Zimmerman, Tyler A; Köhler, Laurent; Bano, Fouzia; Partouche, Franck; Duwez, Anne-Sophie; Gilbert, Bernard; De Pauw, Edwin

    2012-06-10

    Inkjet ink analysis is the best way to discriminate between printed documents, or even though more difficult, to connect an inkjet printed document with a brand or model of printers. Raman spectroscopy and laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) have been demonstrated as powerful tools for dyes and pigments analysis, which are ink components. The aim of this work is to evaluate the aforementioned techniques for inkjet inks analysis in terms of discriminating power, information quality, and nondestructive capability. So, we investigated 10 different inkjet ink cartridges (primary colors and black), 7 from the HP manufacturer and one each from Epson, Canon and Lexmark. This paper demonstrates the capabilities of three methods: Raman spectroscopy, LDMS and MALDI-MS. Raman spectroscopy, as it is preferable to try the nondestructive approach first, is successfully adapted to the analysis of color printed documents in most cases. For analysis of color inkjet inks by LDMS, we show that a MALDI matrix (9-aminoacridine, 9AA) is needed to desorb and to ionize dyes from most inkjet inks (except Epson inks). Therefore, a method was developed to apply the 9AA MALDI matrix directly onto the piece of paper while avoiding analyte spreading. The obtained mass spectra are very discriminating and lead to information about ink additives and paper compositions. Discrimination of black inkjet printed documents is more difficult because of the common use of carbon black as the principal pigment. We show for the first time the possibility to discriminate between two black-printed documents coming from different, as well as from the same, manufacturers. Mass spectra recorded from black inks in positive ion mode LDMS detect polyethylene glycol polymers which have characteristic mass distributions and end groups. Moreover, software has been developed for rapid and objective comparison of the low mass range of these positive mode LDMS spectra which have characteristic unknown peaks

  9. High-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–imaging mass spectrometry of lipids in rodent optic nerve tissue

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, David M. G.; Mills, Daniel; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Lambert, Wendi S.; Calkins, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a method for generating high spatial resolution (10 µm) matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) images of lipids in rodent optic nerve tissue. Methods Ice-embedded optic nerve tissue from rats and mice were cryosectioned across the coronal and sagittal axes of the nerve fiber. Sections were thaw mounted on gold-coated MALDI plates and were washed with ammonium acetate to remove biologic salts before being coated in 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid by sublimation. MALDI images were generated in positive and negative ion modes at 10 µm spatial resolution. Lipid identification was performed with a high mass resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Results Several lipid species were observed with high signal intensity in MALDI images of optic nerve tissue. Several lipids were localized to specific structures including in the meninges surrounding the optic nerve and in the central neuronal tissue. Specifically, phosphatidylcholine species were observed throughout the nerve tissue in positive ion mode while sulfatide species were observed in high abundance in the meninges surrounding the optic nerve in negative ion mode. Accurate mass measurements and fragmentation using sustained off-resonance irradiation with a high mass resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer instrument allowed for identification of lipid species present in the small structure of the optic nerve directly from tissue sections. Conclusions An optimized sample preparation method provides excellent sensitivity for lipid species present within optic nerve tissue. This allowed the laser spot size and fluence to be reduced to obtain a high spatial resolution of 10 µm. This new imaging modality can now be applied to determine spatial and molecular changes in optic nerve tissue with disease. PMID:23559852

  10. Microfluidic Chip Coupled with Thermal Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Tsung-Yi; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic chips have been used as platforms for a diversity of research purposes such as for separation and micro-reaction. One of the suitable detectors for microfluidic chip is mass spectrometry. Because microfluidic chips are generally operated in an open air condition, mass spectrometry coupled with atmospheric pressure ion sources can suit the requirement with minimum compromise. In this study, we develop a new interface to couple a microfluidic chip with mass spectrometry. A capillary tip coated with a layer of graphite, capable of absorbing energy of near-infrared (NIR) light is used to interface microfluidic chip with mass spectrometry. An NIR laser diode (λ=808 nm) is used to irradiate the capillary tip for assisting the generation of spray from the eluent of the microfluidic chip. An electrospray is provided to fuse with the spray generated from the microfluidic chip for post-ionization. Transesterification is used as the example to demonstrate the feasibility of using this interface to couple microfluidic chip with mass spectrometry. PMID:26839753

  11. A simple algorithm improves mass accuracy to 50-100 ppm for delayed extraction linear matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hack, Christopher A; Benner, W Henry

    2002-01-01

    A simple mathematical technique for improving mass calibration accuracy of linear delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (DE MALDI-TOFMS) spectra is presented. The method involves fitting a parabola to a plot of Delta(m) vs. mass data where Delta(m) is the difference between the theoretical mass of calibrants and the mass obtained from a linear relationship between the square root of m/z and ion time of flight. The quadratic equation that describes the parabola is then used to correct the mass of unknowns by subtracting the deviation predicted by the quadratic equation from measured data. By subtracting the value of the parabola at each mass from the calibrated data, the accuracy of mass data points can be improved by factors of 10 or more. This method produces highly similar results whether or not initial ion velocity is accounted for in the calibration equation; consequently, there is no need to depend on that uncertain parameter when using the quadratic correction. This method can be used to correct the internally calibrated masses of protein digest peaks. The effect of nitrocellulose as a matrix additive is also briefly discussed, and it is shown that using nitrocellulose as an additive to the alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (alphaCHCA) matrix does not significantly change initial ion velocity but does change the average position of ions relative to the sample electrode at the instant the extraction voltage is applied. Published in 2002 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Imprint Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Monitoring Secondary Metabolites Production during Antagonistic Interaction of Fungi.

    PubMed

    Tata, Alessandra; Perez, Consuelo; Campos, Michel L; Bayfield, Mark A; Eberlin, Marcos N; Ifa, Demian R

    2015-12-15

    Direct analysis of microbial cocultures grown on agar media by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is quite challenging. Due to the high gas pressure upon impact with the surface, the desorption mechanism does not allow direct imaging of soft or irregular surfaces. The divots in the agar, created by the high-pressure gas and spray, dramatically change the geometry of the system decreasing the intensity of the signal. In order to overcome this limitation, an imprinting step, in which the chemicals are initially transferred to flat hard surfaces, was coupled to DESI-MS and applied for the first time to fungal cocultures. Note that fungal cocultures are often disadvantageous in direct imaging mass spectrometry. Agar plates of fungi present a complex topography due to the simultaneous presence of dynamic mycelia and spores. One of the most devastating diseases of cocoa trees is caused by fungal phytopathogen Moniliophthora roreri. Strategies for pest management include the application of endophytic fungi, such as Trichoderma harzianum, that act as biocontrol agents by antagonizing M. roreri. However, the complex chemical communication underlying the basis for this phytopathogen-dependent biocontrol is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the metabolic exchange that takes place during the antagonistic interaction between M. roreri and T. harzianum. Using imprint-DESI-MS imaging we annotated the secondary metabolites released when T. harzianum and M. roreri were cultured in isolation and compared these to those produced after 3 weeks of coculture. We identified and localized four phytopathogen-dependent secondary metabolites, including T39 butenolide, harzianolide, and sorbicillinol. In order to verify the reliability of the imprint-DESI-MS imaging data and evaluate the capability of tape imprints to extract fungal metabolites while maintaining their localization, six representative plugs along the entire M. roreri/T. harzianum

  13. Characterization of B- and C-type low molecular weight glutenin subunits by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muccilli, Vera; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Foti, Salvatore; Masci, Stefania; Lafiandra, Domenico

    2005-02-01

    Low molecular weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS) are typically subdivided into three groups, according to their molecular weights and isoelectric points, namely the B-, C-, and D groups. Enriched B- and C-type LMW-GS fractions extracted from the bread wheat cultivar Chinese Spring were characterized using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) directly interfaced with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and HPLC coupled off-line with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, in order to ascertain the number and relative molecular masses of the components present in each fraction and determine the number of cysteine residues. About 70 components were detected in each of the fractions examined by the combined use of these two techniques, with 18 components common to both fractions. Analysis of the fractions after alkylation with 4-vinylpyridine allowed determination of the number of the cysteines present in about 40 subunits. The proteins detected were tentatively classified based on the relative molecular masses and number of cysteine residues. Cross-contamination was found in both B- and C- fractions, along with the presence of D-type LMW-GS. The two fractions also contained unexpected components, probably lipid transfer proteins and omega-gliadins. The presence of extensive microheterogeneity was suggested by the detection of several co-eluting proteins with minor differences in their molecular masses.

  14. High-Spatial and High-Mass Resolution Imaging of Surface Metabolites of Arabidopsis thaliana by Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Colloidal Silver

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Ji Hyun; Song, Zhihong; Liu, Zhenjiu; Nikolau, Basil J.; Yeung, Edward S.; and Lee, Young Jin

    2010-03-17

    High-spatial resolution and high-mass resolution techniques are developed and adopted for the mass spectrometric imaging of epicuticular lipids on the surface of Arabidopsis thaliana. Single cell level spatial resolution of {approx}12 {micro}m was achieved by reducing the laser beam size by using an optical fiber with 25 {micro}m core diameter in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer and improved matrix application using an oscillating capillary nebulizer. Fine chemical images of a whole flower were visualized in this high spatial resolution showing substructure of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anthers. The LTQ-Orbitrap with a MALDI ion source was adopted to achieve MS imaging in high mass resolution. Specifically, isobaric silver ion adducts of C29 alkane (m/z 515.3741) and C28 aldehyde (m/z 515.3377), indistinguishable in low-resolution LTQ, can now be clearly distinguished and their chemical images could be separately constructed. In the application to roots, the high spatial resolution allowed molecular MS imaging of secondary roots and the high mass resolution allowed direct identification of lipid metabolites on root surfaces.

  15. Desorption/Ionization Fluence Thresholds and Improved Mass Spectral Consistency Measured Using a Flattop Laser Profile in the Bioaerosol Mass Spectrometry of Single Bacillus Endospores

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, P T; Srivastava, A; Pitesky, M E; Fergenson, D P; Tobias, H J; Gard, E E; Frank, M

    2004-11-30

    Bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) is being developed to analyze and identify biological aerosols in real-time. Mass spectra of individual Bacillus endospores were measured here with a bipolar aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer in which molecular desorption and ionization were produced using a single laser pulse from a Q-switched, frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser that was modified to have an approximately flattop profile. The flattened laser profile allowed the minimum fluence required to desorb and ionize significant numbers of ions from single aerosol particles to be determined. For Bacillus spores this threshold had a mean value of approximately 1 nJ/{micro}m{sup 2} (0.1 J/cm{sup 2}). Thresholds for individual spores, however, could apparently deviate by 20% or more from the mean. Threshold distributions for clumps of MS2 bacteriophage and bovine serum albumin were subsequently determined. Finally, the flattened profile was observed to increase the reproducibility of single spore mass spectra. This is consistent with the general conclusions of our earlier paper on the fluence dependence of single spore mass spectra and is particularly significant because it is expected to enable more robust differentiation and identification of single bioaerosol particles.

  16. Towards a reliable molecular mass determination of intact glycoproteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Estela; Benavente, Fernando; Barbosa, José; Sanz-Nebot, Victoria

    2007-01-01

    Different matrices and sample-matrix preparation procedures have been tested in order to study their influence on the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra of intact glycoproteins, which present different degrees of glycosylation (human transferrin; bovine fetuin; bovine alpha(1)-acid-glycoprotein; recombinant human erythropoietin; and the novel erythropoiesis stimulating protein). Using sinapinic acid (SA) and the fast evaporation method, the studied glycoproteins became susceptible to fragmentation at any laser intensity, suggesting that this 'hot' matrix is unsuitable for a reliable molecular mass determination of glycosylated compounds. In contrast, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and 6-aza-2-thiothymine (ATT), with an adequate sample-matrix preparation, provided improved results. Samples containing DHB after crystallization by vacuum drying demonstrated the best performance because the labile functional groups from the glycoforms were apparently fragmented to a lower extent. The average molecular masses obtained using this methodology were in all cases a better estimation than those values reported in the literature. The results were reproducible, and sensitivity was similar to that obtained with SA and the fast evaporation method. These excellent results suggest that this MALDI-TOF-MS methodology could be useful for an improved determination of the average molecular mass values of microheterogeneous compounds such as glycoproteins, glycosylated compounds or, in general, molecular mass values of molecules with similar labile functional groups.

  17. Ionic (liquid) matrices for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry-applications and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tholey, Andreas; Heinzle, Elmar

    2006-09-01

    A large number of matrix substances have been used for various applications in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). The majority of matrices applied in ultraviolet-MALDI MS are crystalline, low molecular weight compounds. A problem encountered with many of these matrices is the formation of hot spots, which lead to inhomogeneous samples, thus leading to increased measurement times and hampering the application of MALDI MS for quantitative purposes. Recently, ionic (liquid) matrices (ILM or IM) have been introduced as a potential alternative to the classical crystalline matrices. ILM are equimolar mixtures of conventional MALDI matrix compounds such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CCA) or sinapinic acid (SA) together with organic bases [e.g., pyridine (Py), tributylamine (TBA) or N,N-dimethylethylenediamine (DMED)]. The present article presents a first overview of this new class of matrices. Characteristic properties of ILM, their influence on mass spectrometric parameters such as sensitivity, resolution and adduct formation and their application in the fields of proteome analysis, the measurement of low molecular weight compounds, the use of MALDI MS for quantitative purposes and in MALDI imaging will be presented. Scopes and limitations for the application of ILM are discussed.

  18. Imaging of a tribolayer formed from ionic liquids by laser desorption/ionization-reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gabler, Christoph; Pittenauer, Ernst; Dörr, Nicole; Allmaier, Günter

    2012-12-18

    For the first time, imaging using laser desorption/ionization (LDI) reflectron time-of-flight (RTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) was demonstrated to be a powerful tool for an offline monitoring of tribometrical experiments directly from disc specimen applying selected ammonium-, phosphonium-, and sulfonium-based ionic liquids (IL) with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide as counterion for lubrication. The direct measurement of IL tribolayers by LDI-MS allowed the visualization of the lubricants in the form of the distribution of their intact cations and the anion in and outside the wear scar after the tribometrical experiment with a low degree of in-source generated fragmentation. Besides, also, an oxidation product formed during a tribometrical experiment was detected and located exclusively in the wear track. Comparative data of identical wear tracks were obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) imaging not only enabling the determination of elemental distributions of the IL across the area imaged but also corroborating the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data, thus generating multimodal images. Merging data from MSI and XPS imaging exhibited that areas, where iron-fluorine bonds were detected in the wear track, are corresponding to data from LDI-MS imaging showing absence of IL cations and anions.

  19. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry coupled using proximal probe thermal desorption with electrospray or atmospheric pressure chemica lionization

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure proximal probe thermal desorption sampling method coupled with secondary ionization by electrospray or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was demonstrated for the mass spectrometric analysis of a diverse set of compounds (dyestuffs, pharmaceuticals, explosives and pesticides) separated on various high-performance thin-layer chromatography plates. Line scans along or through development lanes on the plates were carried out by moving the plate relative to a stationary heated probe positioned close to or just touching the stationary phase surface. Vapors of the compounds thermally desorbed from the surface were drawn into the ionization region of a combined electrospray ionization/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source where they merged with reagent ions and/or charged droplets from a corona discharge or an electrospray emitter and were ionized. The ionized components were then drawn through the atmospheric pressure sampling orifice into the vacuum region of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and detected using full scan, single ion monitoring, or selected reaction monitoring mode. Studies of variable parameters and performance metrics including the proximal probe temperature, gas flow rate into the ionization region, surface scan speed, read-out resolution, detection limits, and surface type are discussed.

  20. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Fingerprinting for Identification of Acacia Gum in Microsamples from Works of Art.

    PubMed

    Granzotto, Clara; Sutherland, Ken

    2017-03-07

    This paper reports an improved method for the identification of Acacia gum in cultural heritage samples using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) after enzymatic digestion of the polysaccharide component. The analytical strategy was optimized using a reference Acacia gum (gum arabic, sp. A. senegal) and provided an unambiguous MS profile of the gum, characterized by specific and recognized oligosaccharides, from as little as 0.1 μg of material. The enhanced experimental approach with reduced detection limit was successfully applied to the analysis of naturally aged (∼80 year) gum arabic samples, pure and mixed with lead white pigment, and allowed the detection of gum arabic in samples from a late painting (1949/1954) by Georges Braque in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. This first application of the technique to characterize microsamples from a painting, in conjunction with analyses by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), provided important insights into Braque's unusual mixed paint media that are also helpful to inform appropriate conservation treatments for his works. The robustness of the analytical strategy due to the reproducibility of the gum MS profile, even in the presence of other organic and inorganic components, together with the minimal sample size required, demonstrate the value of this new MALDI-TOF MS method as an analytical tool for the identification of gum arabic in microsamples from museum artifacts.

  1. Improved matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection of glycosaminoglycan disaccharides as cesium salts.

    PubMed

    Laremore, Tatiana N; Linhardt, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (UV-MALDI-MS) analysis of highly acidic, thermally labile species such as glycosaminoglycan-derived oligosaccharides is complicated by their poor ionization efficiency and tendency to fragment through the loss of sulfo groups. We have utilized a systematic approach to evaluate the effect of alkali metal counterions on the degree of fragmentation through SO3 loss from a highly sulfated model compound, sucrose octasulfate (SOS). The lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium salts of SOS were analyzed by UV-MALDI-time-of-flight (TOF)MS using an ionic liquid matrix, bis-1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidinium alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate. The positive-ion and negative-ion MALDI mass spectra of five alkali metal salts of SOS were compared in terms of the degree of analyte fragmentation through the SO3 loss and the absolute intensity of a molecular ion signal. Experimental results demonstrate that the lithium, sodium, and potassium salts of SOS undergo some degree of fragmentation through the loss of SO3, whereas the fragmentation through the loss of SO3 in the rubidium and cesium salts of SOS is suppressed. A high detection sensitivity associated with the stability of sulfate half-esters was achieved for the cesium salt of SOS using positive-ion detection. Finally, the cesium salt of chondroitin sulfate A disaccharide was successfully analyzed using UV-MALDI-TOFMS.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Organic Aerosol Using Nanospray Desorption/Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: CalNex 2010 field study

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Liu, Shang; Weber, Robin; Russell, Lynn; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2013-04-01

    Aerosol samples from the CalNex 2010 field study were analyzed using high resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) coupled to a nanospray-desorption/electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) source. The samples were collected in Bakersfield, CA on June 22-23, 2010. The chemical formulas of over 1300 unique molecular species were detected in the mass range of 50-800 m/z. Our analysis focused on identification of two main groups: compounds containing only carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen (CHO only), and nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC). The NOC accounted for 35% (by number) of the compounds observed in the afternoon, and for 59% in the early morning samples. By comparing plausible reactant-product pairs, we propose that over 50% of the NOC in each sample could have been formed through reactions transforming carbonyls into imines. The CHO only compounds were dominant in the afternoon suggesting a photochemical source. The average O:C ratios of all observed compounds were fairly consistent throughout the day, ranging from 0.34 in the early morning to 0.37 at night. We conclude that both photooxidation and ammonia chemistry play important roles in forming the compounds observed in this mixed urban-rural environment.

  3. Chemical Characterization of Crude Petroleum Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Coupled with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, Peter A.; Roach, Patrick J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia

    2012-02-07

    Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry was used for the first time for the analysis of liquid petroleum crude oil samples. The analysis was performed in both positive and negative ionization modes using three solvents one of which (acetonitrile/toluene mixture) is commonly used in petroleomics studies while two other polar solvents (acetonitrile/water and methanol/water mixtures) are generally not compatible with petroleum characterization using mass spectrometry. The results demonstrate that nano-DESI analysis efficiently ionizes petroleum constituents soluble in a particular solvent. When acetonitrile/toluene is used as a solvent, nano-DESI generates electrospray-like spectra. In contrast, strikingly different spectra were obtained using acetonitrile/water and methanol/water. Comparison with the literature data indicates that these solvents selectively extract water-soluble constituents of the crude oil. Water-soluble compounds are predominantly observed as sodium adducts in nano-DESI spectra indicating that addition of sodium to the solvent may be a viable approach for efficient ionization of water-soluble crude oil constituents. Nano-DESI enables rapid screening of different classes of compounds in crude oil samples using solvents that are rarely used for petroleum characterization.

  4. Coupling Laser Diode Thermal Desorption with Acoustic Sample Deposition to Improve Throughput of Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening.

    PubMed

    Haarhoff, Zuzana; Wagner, Andrew; Picard, Pierre; Drexler, Dieter M; Zvyaga, Tatyana; Shou, Wilson

    2016-02-01

    The move toward label-free screening in drug discovery has increased the demand for mass spectrometry (MS)-based analysis. Here we investigated the approach of coupling acoustic sample deposition (ASD) with laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). We assessed its use in a cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition assay, where a decrease in metabolite formation signifies CYP inhibition. Metabolite levels for 3 CYP isoforms were measured as CYP3A4-1'-OH-midazolam, CYP2D6-dextrorphan, and CYP2C9-4'-OH-diclofenac. After incubation, samples (100 nL) were acoustically deposited onto a stainless steel 384-LazWell plate, then desorbed by an infrared laser directly from the plate surface into the gas phase, ionized by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and analyzed by MS/MS. Using this method, we achieved a sample analysis speed of 2.14 s/well, with bioanalytical performance comparable to the current online solid-phase extraction (SPE)-based MS method. An even faster readout speed was achieved when postreaction sample multiplexing was applied, where three reaction samples, one for each CYP, were transferred into the same well of the LazWell plate. In summary, LDTD coupled with acoustic sample deposition and multiplexing significantly decreased analysis time to 0.7 s/sample, making this MS-based approach feasible to support high-throughput screening (HTS) assays.

  5. The influence of electrospray deposition in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry sample preparation for synthetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Stephanie J; Guttman, Charles M; Flynn, Kathleen M

    2004-01-01

    Although electrospray sample deposition in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) sample preparation increases the repeatability of both the MALDI signal intensity and the measured molecular mass distribution (MMD), the electrospray sample deposition method may influence the apparent MMD of a synthetic polymer. The MMDs of three polymers of differing thermal stability, polystyrene (PS), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and poly(propylene glycol) (PPG), were studied by MALDI time-of-flight (TOF) MS as the electrospray deposition voltage was varied. The MMDs obtained using the electrospray deposition method were compared with those obtained for hand-spotted samples. No change was observed in the measured polymer MMD when the electrospray deposition voltage was varied in the analysis of PS, but those of PEG and PPG changed at higher electrospray voltages due to increased ion fragmentation. It was also shown that the fragmentation in the hand-spotted samples is dependent on the matrix used in sample preparation.

  6. Identification and localization of trauma-related biomarkers using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kirstin; Reilly, Matthew A.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2017-02-01

    Current treatments for ocular and optic nerve trauma are largely ineffective and may have adverse side effects; therefore, new approaches are needed to understand trauma mechanisms. Identification of trauma-related biomarkers may yield insights into the molecular aspects of tissue trauma that can contribute to the development of better diagnostics and treatments. The conventional approach for protein biomarker measurement largely relies on immunoaffinity methods that typically can only be applied to analytes for which antibodies or other targeting means are available. Matrix assisted laser-assisted desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) is a specialized application of mass spectrometry that not only is well suited to the discovery of novel or unanticipated biomarkers, but also provides information about the spatial localization of biomarkers in tissue. We have been using MALDI-IMS to find traumarelated protein biomarkers in retina and optic nerve tissue from animal models subjected to ocular injury produced by either blast overpressure or mechanical torsion. Work to date by our group, using MALDI-IMS, found that the pattern of protein expression is modified in the injured ocular tissue as soon as 24 hr post-injury, compared to controls. Specific proteins may be up- or down-regulated by trauma, suggesting different tissue responses to a given injury. Ongoing work is directed at identifying the proteins affected and mapping their expression in the ocular tissue, anticipating that systematic analysis can be used to identify targets for prospective therapies for ocular trauma.

  7. Evaluation of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Second-Generation Lignin Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richel, Aurore; Vanderghem, Caroline; Simon, Mathilde; Wathelet, Bernard; Paquot, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry is evaluated as an elucidation tool for structural features and molecular weights estimation of some extracted herbaceous lignins. Optimization of analysis conditions, using a typical organic matrix, namely α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), in combination with α-cyclodextrin, allows efficient ionization of poorly soluble lignin materials and suppression of matrix-related ions background. Analysis of low-mass fragments ions (m/z 100–600) in the positive ion mode offers a “fingerprint” of starting lignins that could be a fine strategy to qualitatively identify principal inter-unit linkages between phenylpropanoid units. The molecular weights of lignins are estimated using size exclusion chromatography and compared to MALDI-TOF-MS profiles. Miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus) and Switchgrass (Panicum Virgatum L.) lignins, recovered after a formic acid/acetic acid/water process or aqueous ammonia soaking, are selected as benchmarks for this study. PMID:23300342

  8. A method for high-sensitivity peptide sequencing using postsource decay matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Keough, T.; Youngquist, R. S.; Lacey, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    A method has been developed for de novo peptide sequencing using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. This method will facilitate biological studies that require rapid determination of peptide or protein sequences, e.g., determination of posttranslational modifications, identification of active compounds isolated from combinatorial peptide libraries, and the selective identification of proteins as part of proteome studies. The method involves fast, one-step addition of a sulfonic acid group to the N terminus of tryptic peptides followed by acquisition of postsource decay (PSD) fragment ion spectra. The derivatives are designed to promote efficient charge site-initiated fragmentation of the backbone amide bonds and to selectively enhance the detection of a single fragment ion series that contains the C terminus of the molecule (y-ions). The overall method has been applied to pmol quantities of peptides. The resulting PSD fragment ion spectra often exhibit uninterrupted sequences of 20 or more amino acid residues. However, fragmentation efficiency decreases considerably at amide bonds on the C-terminal side of Pro. The spectra are simple enough that de novo sequence tagging is routine. The technique has been successfully applied to peptide mixtures, to high-mass peptides (up to 3,600 Da) and to the unambiguous identification of proteins isolated from two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The PSD spectra of these derivatized peptides often allow far more selective protein sequence database searches than those obtained from the spectra of native peptides. PMID:10377380

  9. Proteomic-based prognosis of brain tumor patients using direct-tissue matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Sarah A; Weil, Robert J; Thompson, Reid C; Shyr, Yu; Moore, Jason H; Toms, Steven A; Johnson, Mahlon D; Caprioli, Richard M

    2005-09-01

    Clinical diagnosis and treatment decisions for a subset of primary human brain tumors, gliomas, are based almost exclusively on tissue histology. Approaches for glioma diagnosis can be highly subjective due to the heterogeneity and infiltrative nature of these tumors and depend on the skill of the neuropathologist. There is therefore a critical need to develop more precise, non-subjective, and systematic methods to classify human gliomas. To this end, mass spectrometric analysis has been applied to these tumors to determine glioma-specific protein patterns. Protein profiles have been obtained from human gliomas of various grades through direct analysis of tissue samples using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MS). Statistical algorithms applied to the MS profiles from tissue sections identified protein patterns that correlated with tumor histology and patient survival. Using a data set of 108 glioma patients, two patient populations, a short-term and a long-term survival group, were identified based on the tissue protein profiles. In addition, a subset of 57 patients diagnosed with high-grade, grade IV, malignant gliomas were analyzed and a novel classification scheme that segregated short-term and long-term survival patients based on the proteomic profiles was developed. The protein patterns described served as an independent indicator of patient survival. These results show that this new molecular approach to monitoring gliomas can provide clinically relevant information on tumor malignancy and is suitable for high-throughput clinical screening.

  10. In Situ Analysis of Bacterial Lipopeptide Antibiotics by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    PubMed

    Debois, Delphine; Ongena, Marc; Cawoy, Hélène; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is a technique developed in the late 1990s enabling the two-dimensional mapping of a broad variety of biomolecules present at the surface of a sample. In many applications including pharmaceutical studies or biomarker discovery, the distribution of proteins, lipids or drugs, and metabolites may be visualized within tissue sections. More recently, MALDI MSI has become increasingly applied in microbiology where the versatility of the technique is perfectly suited to monitor the metabolic dynamics of bacterial colonies. The work described here is focused on the application of MALDI MSI to map secondary metabolites produced by Bacilli, especially lipopeptides, produced by bacterial cells during their interaction with their environment (bacteria, fungi, plant roots, etc.). This chapter addresses the advantages and challenges that the implementation of MALDI MSI to microbiological samples entails, including detailed protocols on sample preparation (from both microbiologist and mass spectrometrist points of view), matrix deposition, and data acquisition and interpretation. Lipopeptide images recorded from confrontation plates are also presented.

  11. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Identification of Mycobacteria in Routine Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    El Khéchine, Amel; Couderc, Carine; Flaudrops, Christophe; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Background Non-tuberculous mycobacteria recovered from respiratory tract specimens are emerging confounder organisms for the laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis worldwide. There is an urgent need for new techniques to rapidly identify mycobacteria isolated in clinical practice. Matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has previously been proven to effectively identify mycobacteria grown in high-concentration inocula from collections. However, a thorough evaluation of its use in routine laboratory practice has not been performed. Methodology We set up an original protocol for the MALDI-TOF MS identification of heat-inactivated mycobacteria after dissociation in Tween-20, mechanical breaking of the cell wall and protein extraction with formic acid and acetonitrile. By applying this protocol to as few as 105 colony-forming units of reference isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, and 20 other Mycobacterium species, we obtained species-specific mass spectra for the creation of a local database. Using this database, our protocol enabled the identification by MALDI-TOF MS of 87 M. tuberculosis, 25 M. avium and 12 non-tuberculosis clinical isolates with identification scores ≥2 within 2.5 hours. Conclusions Our data indicate that MALDI-TOF MS can be used as a first-line method for the routine identification of heat-inactivated mycobacteria. MALDI-TOF MS is an attractive method for implementation in clinical microbiology laboratories in both developed and developing countries. PMID:21935444

  12. Detergent enhancement of on-tissue protein analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mainini, Veronica; Angel, Peggi M; Magni, Fulvio; Caprioli, Richard M

    2011-01-15

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) is a molecular technology that allows simultaneous investigation of the content and spatial distribution of molecules within tissue. In this work, we examine different classes of detergents, the anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), the nonionic detergents Triton X-100, Tween 20 and Tween 80, and the zwitterionic 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) for use in MALDI IMS of analytes above m/z 4000. These detergents were found to be compatible with MALDI MS and did not cause signal suppression relative to non-detergent applications and did not produce interfering background signals. In general, these detergents enhanced signal acquisition within the mass range m/z 4-40 000. Adding detergents into the matrix was comparable with the separate application of detergent and matrix. Evaluation of spectra collected from organ-specific regions of a whole mouse pup section showed that different detergents perform optimally with different organs, indicating that detergent selection should be optimized on the specific tissue for maximum gain. These data show the utility of detergents towards enhancement of protein signals for on-tissue MALDI IMS analysis.

  13. Analysis of ancient Greco-Roman cosmetic materials using laser desorption ionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Van Elslande, Elsa; Guérineau, Vincent; Thirioux, Vincent; Richard, Ghislaine; Richardin, Pascale; Laprévote, Olivier; Hussler, Georges; Walter, Philippe

    2008-04-01

    Microsamples of pink cosmetic powders from the Greco-Roman period were analyzed using two complementary analytical approaches for identification of the colouring agents (lake pigments originally manufactured from madder plants with an inert binder, usually a metallic salt) present in the samples. The first technique was a methanolic acidic extraction of the archaeological samples with an additional ethyl acetate extraction of the anthraquinone-type colouring agents which were identified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization with high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-HRMS), and the second was direct analysis of a microsample by laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). The latter technique is well suited when the quantity of samples is very low. This soft ionization technique enables the detection of very small quantities of compounds using the combination of positive and negative-ion modes. It was also successfully applied for the direct analysis of some laboratory-made reference compounds. However, the presence of lead in one of these ancient samples induced a spectral suppression phenomenon. In this case and conditional on a sufficient quantity of available sample, the former method is better adapted for the characterization of these anthraquinone-type molecules. This study also confirmed that purpurin, munjistin, and pseudopurpurin are the principal colouring agents present in these ancient cosmetic powders constituted from madder plants.

  14. Determination of gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a simple direct method using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martins, Gabriela V; Martins, Susana; Martins, Anabela O; Basto, M Clara P; Silva, Gabriela Ventura

    2013-08-01

    In the last decade, the development of novel analytical methodologies enabled the identification of several environmental pollutants responsible for health problems associated with indoor exposure. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are among the potential hazardous chemicals present in ambient air. Due to their bioaccumulation potential and carcinogenic/mutagenic effects, 16 PAHs are currently listed as priority air pollutants. The main goal of this work was to implement a new and simple method for sampling and determination of PAHs in air by using a thermal desorption (TD) technique followed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. A detailed study was carried out to optimise the experimental method in each of its phases, including (active) sampling, TD and chromatographic analysis. The results demonstrate that this approach allowed the detection and quantification of the six more volatile PAHs, namely, naphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, and anthracene. Acceptable precision and good linearity over the explored range were obtained. No carry-over was observed during experimental tests and the method provided a reproducible answer. The applicability of the novel methodology was tested in real environment, namely, on the roof of a building in an urban area, in a domestic kitchen and in a collective car garage. The method enabled the identification of two PAHs in the field samples, specifically, naphthalene (two rings) and phenanthrene (three rings). With regard to PAHs sample composition, the most abundant PAH found, in the three different locations, was naphthalene, accounting for about 84-100 % of the total PAH mass detected.

  15. Molecular differentiation of five Cinnamomum camphora chemotypes using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry of raw leaves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiali; Cui, Meng; Deng, Min; Liu, Xingxing; Huang, Xueyong; Zhang, Xinglei; Luo, Liping

    2017-04-20

    Five chemotypes, the isoborneol-type, camphora-type, cineole-type, linalool-type and borneol-type of Cinnamomum camphora (L.) Presl have been identified at the molecular level based on the multivariate analysis of mass spectral fingerprints recorded from a total of 750 raw leaf samples (i.e., 150 leaves equally collected for each chemotype) using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). Both volatile and semi-volatile metabolites of the fresh leaves of C. camphora were simultaneously detected by DAPCI-MS without any sample pretreatment, reducing the analysis time from half a day using conventional methods (e.g., GC-MS) down to 30 s. The pattern recognition results obtained using principal component analysis (PCA) was cross-checked by cluster analysis (CA), showing that the difference visualized by the DAPCI-MS spectral fingerprints was validated with 100% accuracy. The study demonstrates that DAPCI-MS meets the challenging requirements for accurate differentiation of all the five chemotypes of C. camphora leaves, motivating more advanced application of DAPCI-MS in plant science and forestry studies.

  16. Phosphopeptide screening using nanocrystalline titanium dioxide films as affinity matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization targets in mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niklew, Marie-Luise; Hochkirch, Ulrike; Melikyan, Anna; Moritz, Thomas; Kurzawski, Sandra; Schlüter, Hartmut; Ebner, Ingo; Linscheid, Michael W

    2010-02-01

    The use of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide films as affinity targets for the selective isolation and enrichment of phosphopeptides with subsequent analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is described. A strong affinity of phosphopeptides to anatase titanium dioxide surfaces is observed, and a standard protocol for the selective isolation and enrichment of phosphopeptides on titanium dioxide films using a proteolytic digest of alpha- and beta-casein was developed. All washing and elution procedures using these films can be processed directly on the MALDI target, thereby avoiding sample contamination and losses. In addition, the enrichment of the phosphopeptides was improved due to a considerable enlargement of the surface. Several film substrates compatible with routine inlet systems of mass spectrometers, as conductive glass, aluminum, and silicon, have been manufactured and tested. A biological application was examined by the human fibrinogen-thrombin system. For a quantification and comparison of different expression levels of phosphoproteins in biological systems, the peptides were labeled with S-methyl thioimidate reagents. The capability of this method for high-throughput applications make the use of mesoporous titanium dioxide films as an affinity MALDI target a promising tool in phosphoproteomics. A combination of an amidation protocol showed that a quantification of phosphorylated peptides can easily be performed using TiO(2) films.

  17. Molecular differentiation of five Cinnamomum camphora chemotypes using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry of raw leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiali; Cui, Meng; Deng, Min; Liu, Xingxing; Huang, Xueyong; Zhang, Xinglei; Luo, Liping

    2017-04-01

    Five chemotypes, the isoborneol-type, camphora-type, cineole-type, linalool-type and borneol-type of Cinnamomum camphora (L.) Presl have been identified at the molecular level based on the multivariate analysis of mass spectral fingerprints recorded from a total of 750 raw leaf samples (i.e., 150 leaves equally collected for each chemotype) using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). Both volatile and semi-volatile metabolites of the fresh leaves of C. camphora were simultaneously detected by DAPCI-MS without any sample pretreatment, reducing the analysis time from half a day using conventional methods (e.g., GC-MS) down to 30 s. The pattern recognition results obtained using principal component analysis (PCA) was cross-checked by cluster analysis (CA), showing that the difference visualized by the DAPCI-MS spectral fingerprints was validated with 100% accuracy. The study demonstrates that DAPCI-MS meets the challenging requirements for accurate differentiation of all the five chemotypes of C. camphora leaves, motivating more advanced application of DAPCI-MS in plant science and forestry studies.

  18. Lipid characterization of embryo zones by silica plate laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (SP-LDI-MSI).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Mônica S; de Oliveira, Diogo N; Gonçalves, Roseli F; Catharino, Rodrigo R

    2014-01-07

    Lipid pathways play important biological roles in mammalian embryology, directing early developmental pathways to differentiation. Phospholipids and triglycerides, among others, are the main composing lipids of zona pellucida in several embryo species. Lipid analysis in embryos by mass spectrometry usually requires sample preparation and/or matrix application. This novel approach using silica plate laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (SP-LDI-MSI) allows direct single-cell imaging and embryo region discrimination with no matrix coating. Its application is herein described for two- and eight-cell embryos. Lipid biomarkers for blastomere and intact zona pellucida are reported and corroborated by both fragmentation reactions (MS/MS) and images. Results obtained in this work are understood to be of great use for further developments on in vitro bovine fertilization. Since much of the processes can be monitored by characteristic biomarkers, it is now possible to precisely identify cell division errors during early embryo stages, as well as evaluate pre-implantation conditions.

  19. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry for direct measurement of clozapine in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yunsheng; Casale, Roger; Fukuda, Elaine; Chen, Jiwen; Knemeyer, Ian; Wingate, Julia; Morrison, Richard; Korfmacher, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization hyphenated with quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to directly determine the distribution of pharmaceuticals in rat brain tissue slices which might unravel their disposition for new drug development. Clozapine, an antipsychotic drug, and norclozapine were used as model compounds to investigate fundamental parameters such as matrix and solvent effects and irradiance dependence on MALDI intensity but also to address the issues with direct tissue imaging MS technique such as (1) uniform coating by the matrix, (2) linearity of MALDI signals, and (3) redistribution of surface analytes. The tissue sections were coated with various matrices on MALDI plates by airspray deposition prior to MS detection. MALDI signals of analytes were detected by monitoring the dissociation of the individual protonated molecules to their predominant MS/MS product ions. The matrices were chosen for tissue applications based on their ability to form a homogeneous coating of dense crystals and to yield greater sensitivity. Images revealing the spatial localization in tissue sections using MALDI-QTOF following a direct infusion of (3)H-clozapine into rat brain were found to be in good correlation with those using a radioautographic approach. The density of clozapine and its major metabolites from whole brain homogenates was further confirmed using fast high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) procedures.

  20. Determining enediol compounds in tea using surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with titanium dioxide nanoparticle matrices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun-Hong; Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Lin, Zong-Hong; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2007-01-01

    We describe the use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) as selective probes and matrices for the determination of catechins using surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS). The interactions between the enediol compounds and TiO2 NPs were evident by the change in color of the TiO2 NP solution from milky white to orange. Through these interactions, the TiO2 NPs could be used to concentrate enediol compounds, including catechins and ascorbic acid. The limits of detection (LODs) for three catechins--catechin, (-)-epigallocatechin, and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate--at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 were 0.45, 1.85 and 0.65 microM, respectively. The TiO2 NP matrices provide a number of advantages over conventional organic matrices (e.g. 2',4',6'-trihydroxyacetophenone), including ease of sample preparation, less background noise in the low-mass region, and high repeatability. The applicability of this method was confirmed through the high reproducibility of the determination of the two catechins in tea samples that had not been subjected to any sample preparation procedures (shot-to-shot variation: <10%).

  1. Tailored nanopost arrays (NAPA) for laser desorption ionization in mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Walker, Bennett N.; Stolee, Jessica A.; Retterer, Scott T.

    2016-11-08

    The production and use of semiconducting nanopost arrays made by nanofabrication is described herein. These nanopost arrays (NAPA) provide improved laser ionization yields and controllable fragmentation with switching or modulation capabilities for mass spectrometric detection and identification of samples deposited on them.

  2. Monitoring Toxic Ionic Liquids in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI-MSI).

    PubMed

    Perez, Consuelo J; Tata, Alessandra; de Campos, Michel L; Peng, Chun; Ifa, Demian R

    2016-10-24

    Ambient mass spectrometry imaging has become an increasingly powerful technique for the direct analysis of biological tissues in the open environment with minimal sample preparation and fast analysis times. In this study, we introduce desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) as a novel, rapid, and sensitive approach to localize the accumulation of a mildly toxic ionic liquid (IL), AMMOENG 130 in zebrafish (Danio rerio). The work demonstrates that DESI-MSI has the potential to rapidly monitor the accumulation of IL pollutants in aquatic organisms. AMMOENG 130 is a quaternary ammonium-based IL reported to be broadly used as a surfactant in commercialized detergents. It is known to exhibit acute toxicity to zebrafish causing extensive damage to gill secondary lamellae and increasing membrane permeability. Zebrafish were exposed to the IL in a static 96-h exposure study in concentrations near the LC50 of 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/L. DESI-MS analysis of zebrafish gills demonstrated the appearance of a dealkylated AMMOENG 130 metabolite in the lowest concentration of exposure identified by a high resolution hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer as the trimethylstearylammonium ion, [C21H46N](+). With DESI-MSI, the accumulation of AMMOENG 130 and its dealkylated metabolite in zebrafish tissue was found in the nervous and respiratory systems. AMMOENG 130 and the metabolite were capable of penetrating the blood brain barrier of the fish with significant accumulation in the brain. Hence, we report for the first time the simultaneous characterization, distribution, and metabolism of a toxic IL in whole body zebrafish analyzed by DESI-MSI. This ambient mass spectrometry imaging technique shows great promise for the direct analysis of biological tissues to qualitatively monitor foreign, toxic, and persistent compounds in aquatic organisms from the environment. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Monitoring Toxic Ionic Liquids in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI-MSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Consuelo J.; Tata, Alessandra; de Campos, Michel L.; Peng, Chun; Ifa, Demian R.

    2016-10-01

    Ambient mass spectrometry imaging has become an increasingly powerful technique for the direct analysis of biological tissues in the open environment with minimal sample preparation and fast analysis times. In this study, we introduce desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) as a novel, rapid, and sensitive approach to localize the accumulation of a mildly toxic ionic liquid (IL), AMMOENG 130 in zebrafish (Danio rerio). The work demonstrates that DESI-MSI has the potential to rapidly monitor the accumulation of IL pollutants in aquatic organisms. AMMOENG 130 is a quaternary ammonium-based IL reported to be broadly used as a surfactant in commercialized detergents. It is known to exhibit acute toxicity to zebrafish causing extensive damage to gill secondary lamellae and increasing membrane permeability. Zebrafish were exposed to the IL in a static 96-h exposure study in concentrations near the LC50 of 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/L. DESI-MS analysis of zebrafish gills demonstrated the appearance of a dealkylated AMMOENG 130 metabolite in the lowest concentration of exposure identified by a high resolution hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer as the trimethylstearylammonium ion, [C21H46N]+. With DESI-MSI, the accumulation of AMMOENG 130 and its dealkylated metabolite in zebrafish tissue was found in the nervous and respiratory systems. AMMOENG 130 and the metabolite were capable of penetrating the blood brain barrier of the fish with significant accumulation in the brain. Hence, we report for the first time the simultaneous characterization, distribution, and metabolism of a toxic IL in whole body zebrafish analyzed by DESI-MSI. This ambient mass spectrometry imaging technique shows great promise for the direct analysis of biological tissues to qualitatively monitor foreign, toxic, and persistent compounds in aquatic organisms from the environment.

  4. Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry: a complementary approach for the chemical analysis of atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Vaikkinen, Anu; Lipponen, Katriina; Vrkoslav, Vladimir; Cvačka, Josef; Kostiainen, Risto; Kotiaho, Tapio; Hartonen, Kari; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa; Kauppila, Tiina J

    2015-07-15

    On-line chemical characterization methods of atmospheric aerosols are essential to increase our understanding of physicochemical processes in the atmosphere, and to study biosphere-atmosphere interactions. Several techniques, including aerosol mass spectrometry, are nowadays available, but they all suffer from some disadvantages. In this research, desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution (Orbitrap) mass spectrometry (DAPPI-HRMS) is introduced as a complementary technique for the fast analysis of aerosol chemical composition without the need for sample preparation. Atmospheric aerosols from city air were collected on a filter, desorbed in a DAPPI source with a hot stream of toluene and nitrogen, and ionized using a vacuum ultraviolet lamp at atmospheric pressure. To study the applicability of the technique for ambient aerosol analysis, several samples were collected onto filters and analyzed, with the focus being on selected organic acids. To compare the DAPPI-HRMS data with results obtained by an established method, each filter sample was divided into two equal parts, and the second half of the filter was extracted and analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The DAPPI results agreed with the measured aerosol particle number. In addition to the targeted acids, the LC/MS and DAPPI-HRMS methods were found to detect different compounds, thus providing complementary information about the aerosol samples. DAPPI-HRMS showed several important oxidation products of terpenes, and numerous compounds were tentatively identified. Thanks to the soft ionization, high mass resolution, fast analysis, simplicity and on-line applicability, the proposed methodology has high potential in the field of atmospheric research. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Monitoring Toxic Ionic Liquids in Zebrafish ( Danio rerio) with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI-MSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Consuelo J.; Tata, Alessandra; de Campos, Michel L.; Peng, Chun; Ifa, Demian R.

    2017-06-01

    Ambient mass spectrometry imaging has become an increasingly powerful technique for the direct analysis of biological tissues in the open environment with minimal sample preparation and fast analysis times. In this study, we introduce desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) as a novel, rapid, and sensitive approach to localize the accumulation of a mildly toxic ionic liquid (IL), AMMOENG 130 in zebrafish ( Danio rerio). The work demonstrates that DESI-MSI has the potential to rapidly monitor the accumulation of IL pollutants in aquatic organisms. AMMOENG 130 is a quaternary ammonium-based IL reported to be broadly used as a surfactant in commercialized detergents. It is known to exhibit acute toxicity to zebrafish causing extensive damage to gill secondary lamellae and increasing membrane permeability. Zebrafish were exposed to the IL in a static 96-h exposure study in concentrations near the LC50 of 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/L. DESI-MS analysis of zebrafish gills demonstrated the appearance of a dealkylated AMMOENG 130 metabolite in the lowest concentration of exposure identified by a high resolution hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer as the trimethylstearylammonium ion, [C21H46N]+. With DESI-MSI, the accumulation of AMMOENG 130 and its dealkylated metabolite in zebrafish tissue was found in the nervous and respiratory systems. AMMOENG 130 and the metabolite were capable of penetrating the blood brain barrier of the fish with significant accumulation in the brain. Hence, we report for the first time the simultaneous characterization, distribution, and metabolism of a toxic IL in whole body zebrafish analyzed by DESI-MSI. This ambient mass spectrometry imaging technique shows great promise for the direct analysis of biological tissues to qualitatively monitor foreign, toxic, and persistent compounds in aquatic organisms from the environment. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Differentiation of Streptococcus pneumoniae Conjunctivitis Outbreak Isolates by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry▿

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Yulanda M.; Moura, Hercules; Woolfitt, Adrian R.; Pirkle, James L.; Barr, John R.; Carvalho, Maria Da Gloria; Ades, Edwin P.; Carlone, George M.; Sampson, Jacquelyn S.

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus [Pnc]) is a causative agent of many infectious diseases, including pneumonia, septicemia, otitis media, and conjunctivitis. There have been documented conjunctivitis outbreaks in which nontypeable (NT), nonencapsulated Pnc has been identified as the etiological agent. The use of mass spectrometry to comparatively and differentially analyze protein and peptide profiles of whole-cell microorganisms remains somewhat uncharted. In this report, we discuss a comparative proteomic analysis between NT S. pneumoniae conjunctivitis outbreak strains (cPnc) and other known typeable or NT pneumococcal and streptococcal isolates (including Pnc TIGR4 and R6, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, and Streptococcus pyogenes) and nonstreptococcal isolates (including Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus aureus) as controls. cPnc cells and controls were grown to mid-log phase, harvested, and subsequently treated with a 10% trifluoroacetic acid-sinapinic acid matrix mixture. Protein and peptide fragments of the whole-cell bacterial isolate-matrix combinations ranging in size from 2 to 14 kDa were evaluated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Additionally Random Forest analytical tools and dendrogramic representations (Genesis) suggested similarities and clustered the isolates into distinct clonal groups, respectively. Also, a peak list of protein and peptide masses was obtained and compared to a known Pnc protein mass library, in which a peptide common and unique to cPnc isolates was tentatively identified. Information gained from this study will lead to the identification and validation of proteins that are commonly and exclusively expressed in cPnc strains which could potentially be used as a biomarker in the rapid diagnosis of pneumococcal conjunctivitis. PMID:18708515

  7. Time-dependent oxidation during nano-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry: a useful tool for structure determination or a source of possible confusion?

    PubMed

    Pavlásková, Katerina; Strnadová, Marcela; Strohalm, Martin; Havlícek, Vladimír; Sulc, Miroslav; Volný, Michael

    2011-07-15

    This work reports on a new and extremely simple approach for determination of a double bond position by a laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. It is solely based on the catalytic properties of nanostructured surfaces used in nanoassisted laser desorption ionization experiments. These surfaces can induce oxidation of analytes, which results in a mass shift that can be detected by mass spectrometry. If a site of unsaturation is oxidized and cleaved, the m/z difference is diagnostic of the position of a double bond. By demonstrating that the oxidation depends on the analyte surface dwell time, it was proven that it is caused by the surface activity and not by the laser desorption ionization process itself. Control matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) experiment showed only a limited partial oxidation and no time dependency of the process. The ability to determine a position of a double bond was demonstrated on polyunsaturated phospholipids and cyclosporine A. In some other cases, however, the unexpected oxidation could cause confusion, as demonstrated for a glycosphingolipid from a porcine brain extract.

  8. A mass spectrometric system for analyzing thermal desorption spectra of ion-implanted argon and cesium in tungsten. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. M., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A mass spectrometric system for determining the characteristics of materials used in instrumental development and aerospace applications was developed. The desorption spectra of cesium that was ion-implanted into polycrystalline tungsten and the effects on the spectra of bombardment of the tungsten by low energy (70 eV) electrons were investigated. Work function changes were measured by the retarding potential diode method. Flash desorption characteristics were observed and gas-reaction mechanisms of the surface of heated metal filaments were studied. Desorption spectra were measured by linearly increasing the sample temperature at a selected rate, the temperature cycling being generated from a ramp-driven dc power supply, with the mass spectrometer tuned to a mass number of interest. Results of the study indicate an anomolous desorption mechanism following an electron bombardment of the sample surface. The enhanced spectra are a function of the post-bombardment time and energy and are suggestive of an increased concentration of cesium atoms, up to 10 or more angstroms below the surface.

  9. Comprehensive assignment of mass spectral signatures from individual Bacillus atrophaeus spores in matrix-free laser desorption/ionization bioaerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Abneesh; Pitesky, Maurice E; Steele, Paul T; Tobias, Herbert J; Fergenson, David P; Horn, Joanne M; Russell, Scott C; Czerwieniec, Gregg A; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Gard, Eric E; Frank, Matthias

    2005-05-15

    We have fully characterized the mass spectral signatures of individual Bacillus atrophaeus spores obtained using matrix-free laser desorption/ionization bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS). Mass spectra of spores grown in unlabeled, 13C-labeled, and 15N-labeled growth media were used to determine the number of carbon and nitrogen atoms associated with each mass peak observed in mass spectra from positive and negative ions. To determine the parent ion structure associated with fragment ion peaks, the fragmentation patterns of several chemical standards were independently determined. Our results confirm prior assignments of dipicolinic acid, amino acids, and calcium complex ions made in the spore mass spectra. The identities of several previously unidentified mass peaks, key to the recognition of Bacillus spores by BAMS, have also been revealed. Specifically, a set of fragment peaks in the negative polarity is shown to be consistent with the fragmentation pattern of purine nucleobase-containing compounds. The identity of m/z = +74, a marker peak that helps discriminate B. atrophaeus from Bacillus thuringiensis spores grown in rich media is [N1C4H12]+. A probable precursor molecule for the [N1C4H12]+ ion observed in spore spectra is trimethylglycine (+N(CH3)3CH2COOH), which produces a m/z = +74 peak when ionized in the presence of dipicolinic acid. A clear assignment of all the mass peaks in the spectra from bacterial spores, as presented in this work, establishes their relationship to the spore chemical composition and facilitates the evaluation of the robustness of "marker" peaks. This is especially relevant for peaks that have been used to discriminate Bacillus spore species, B. thuringiensis and B. atrophaeus, in our previous studies.

  10. Non-proximate detection of small and large molecules by desorption electrospray ionization and desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry: instrumentation and applications in forensics, chemistry, and biology.

    PubMed

    Cotte-Rodríguez, Ismael; Mulligan, Christopher C; Cooks, R Graham

    2007-09-15

    Ambient surfaces are examined by mass spectrometry at distances of up to 3 m from the instrument without any prior sample preparation. Non-proximate versions of the desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization experiments are shown to allow rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of trace amounts of active ingredients in pharmaceutical drug formulations, illicit drugs (methamphetamine, cocaine, and diacetylmorphine), organic salts, peptides, chemical warfare agent simulants, and other small organic compounds. Utilizing an ion transport tube to transport analyte ions to the mass spectrometer, nonproximate DESI allows one to collect high-quality, largely interference-free spectra with signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of more than 100. High selectivity is achieved by tandem mass spectrometry and by reactive DESI, a variant experiment in which reagents added into the solvent spray allow bond-forming reactions with the analyte. Ion/molecule reactions were found to selectively suppress the response of mixture components other than the analyte of interest in nonproximate-DESI. Flexible ion transport tubing is also investigated, allowing performance similar to stainless steel tubing in the transport of ions from the sample to the mass spectrometer. Transfer tube temperature effects are examined. A multiple sprayer DESI source capable of analyzing a larger sample area was evaluated to decrease the sampling time and increase sample throughput. Low nanogram detection limits were obtained for the compounds studied from a wide variety of surfaces, even those present in complex matrixes.

  11. Fuzzy Logic Classification of Imaging Laser Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. McJunkin; Jill R. Scott

    2008-06-01

    The fuzzy logic method is applied to classification of mass spectra obtained with an imaging internal source Fourier transform mass spectrometer (I2LD-FTMS). Traditionally, an operator uses the relative abundance of ions with specific mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios to categorize spectra. An operator does this by comparing the spectrum of m/z versus abundance of an unknown sample against a library of spectra from known samples. Automated positioning and acquisition allow the I2LD-FTMS to acquire data from very large grids, which would require classification of up to 3600 spectra per hour to keep pace with the acquisition. The tedious job of classifying numerous spectra generated in an I2LD-FTMS imaging application can be replaced by a fuzzy rule base if the cues an operator uses can be encapsulated. Appropriate methods for assigning fuzzy membership values for inputs (e.g., mass spectrum abundances) and choice of fuzzy inference operators to translate linguistic antecedent into confidence values for the consequence (or in this case the classification) is followed by using the maximum confidence and a necessary minimum threshold for making a crisp decision. This paper also describes a method for gathering statistics on ions, which are not currently used in the rule base, but which may be candidates for making the rule base more accurate and complete or to form new rule bases based on data obtained from known samples. A spatial method for classifying spectra with low membership values, based on neighboring sample classifications, is also presented.

  12. Large-Scale Metabolite Analysis of Standards and Human Serum by Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry from Silicon Nanopost Arrays.

    PubMed

    Korte, Andrew R; Stopka, Sylwia A; Morris, Nicholas; Razunguzwa, Trust; Vertes, Akos

    2016-09-20

    The unique challenges presented by metabolomics have driven the development of new mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques for small molecule analysis. We have previously demonstrated silicon nanopost arrays (NAPA) to be an effective substrate for laser desorption ionization (LDI) of small molecules for MS. However, the utility of NAPA-LDI-MS for a wide range of metabolite classes has not been investigated. Here we apply NAPA-LDI-MS to the large-scale acquisition of high-resolution mass spectra and tandem mass spectra from a collection of metabolite standards covering a range of compound classes including amino acids, nucleotides, carbohydrates, xenobiotics, lipids, and other classes. In untargeted analysis of metabolite standard mixtures, detection was achieved for 374 compounds and useful MS/MS spectra were obtained for 287 compounds, without individual optimization of ionization or fragmentation conditions. Metabolite detection was evaluated in the context of 31 metabolic pathways, and NAPA-LDI-MS was found to provide detection for 63% of investigated pathway metabolites. Individual, targeted analysis of the 20 common amino acids provided detection of 100% of the investigated compounds, demonstrating that improved coverage is possible through optimization and targeting of individual analytes or analyte classes. In direct analysis of aqueous and organic extracts from human serum samples, spectral features were assigned to a total of 108 small metabolites and lipids. Glucose and amino acids were quantitated within their physiological concentration ranges. The broad coverage demonstrated by this large-scale screening experiment opens the door for use of NAPA-LDI-MS in numerous metabolite analysis applications.

  13. MIL-101(Cr) as matrix for sensitive detection of quercetin by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Han, Guobin; Zeng, Qiaoling; Jiang, Zhongwei; Xing, Tiantian; Huang, Chengzhi; Li, Yuanfang

    2017-03-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has been proven as a useful and advanced technique in the identification of polymers and proteins. However, MALDI-TOF-MS still has the unavoidable drawback of self-signal interference with traditional organic matrices, which could suppress and overlap with the analyte signals in the low-mass region. In this work, MIL-101(Cr), a kind of metal-organic frameworks which possess high molecular weight, π-conjugated 3-D structure, coordinately unsaturated chromium sites (CUS) and strong absorption in the UV range, was employed to replace traditional organic matrices, and it was found that MIL-101(Cr) can dramatically eliminate the background peaks, showing high signal-to-noise level in the analysis of small molecules. As proof-of-concept, quercetin, daidzein, genistein and naringenin, members of flavonol family which widely exists in food and natural products, were successfully determined by utilizing MIL-101(Cr) as the surface-assisted matrix, and the detection of quercetin was sensitive with good salt tolerance and reproducibility. Under optimal conditions, the mass peak intensity exhibited good linear relationships in the range from 0.25µg/mL-7.00µg/mL for quercetin (R(2)=0.996) with detection limit 2.11ng/mL (3σ/k), making the identification of quercetin in sophora japonica successfully. With this strategy we have demonstrated the potentiality of MIL-101(Cr) nanomaterials as MALDI-MS matrix for the detection of small molecules.

  14. Large-scale metabolite analysis of standards and human serum by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry from silicon nanopost arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Korte, Andrew R.; Stopka, Sylwia A.; Morris, Nicholas; ...

    2016-07-11

    The unique challenges presented by metabolomics have driven the development of new mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques for small molecule analysis. We have previously demonstrated silicon nanopost arrays (NAPA) to be an effective substrate for laser desorption ionization (LDI) of small molecules for MS. However, the utility of NAPA-LDI-MS for a wide range of metabolite classes has not been investigated. Here we apply NAPA-LDI-MS to the large-scale acquisition of high-resolution mass spectra and tandem mass spectra from a collection of metabolite standards covering a range of compound classes including amino acids, nucleotides, carbohydrates, xenobiotics, lipids, and other classes. In untargeted analysismore » of metabolite standard mixtures, detection was achieved for 374 compounds and useful MS/MS spectra were obtained for 287 compounds, without individual optimization of ionization or fragmentation conditions. Metabolite detection was evaluated in the context of 31 metabolic pathways, and NAPA-LDI-MS was found to provide detection for 63% of investigated pathway metabolites. Individual, targeted analysis of the 20 common amino acids provided detection of 100% of the investigated compounds, demonstrating that improved coverage is possible through optimization and targeting of individual analytes or analyte classes. In direct analysis of aqueous and organic extracts from human serum samples, spectral features were assigned to a total of 108 small metabolites and lipids. Glucose and amino acids were quantitated within their physiological concentration ranges. Finally, the broad coverage demonstrated by this large-scale screening experiment opens the door for use of NAPA-LDI-MS in numerous metabolite analysis applications« less

  15. Determination of pharmaceutical compounds in skin by imaging matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Josephine; Clench, Malcolm R; Richards, Don S

    2004-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOFMS) has been used to detect and image the distribution of a xenobiotic substance in skin. Porcine epidermal tissue was treated with 'Nizoral', a medicated shampoo containing ketoconazole (+/-)-1-acetyl-4-[p-[[(2R,4S)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl]methoxy]phenyl]piperazine) as active ingredient. Following incubation for 1 h at 37 degrees C all excess formulation was washed from the surface. A cross-section of the drug-treated tissue was then blotted onto a cellulose membrane, precoated in matrix (alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA)), by airspray deposition. In separate experiments the tissue surface was treated with Nizoral within a triangular former, and subsequently blotted onto a matrix-coated membrane. Sample membranes were then mounted into the recess of specialised MALDI targets with adhesive tape. All samples were analysed by MALDI-TOFMS using an Applied Biosystem 'Q-star Pulsar i' hybrid Q-TOF mass spectrometer fitted with an orthagonal MALDI ion source and imaging software. Detection of the protonated molecule was readily achievable by this technique. Treatment of the tissue within a template gave rise to images depicting the expected distribution of the drug, demonstrating that this technique is capable of producing spatially useful data. Ion images demonstrating the permeation of the applied compound into the skin were achieved by imaging a cross-sectional imprint of treated tissue. A calibration graph for the determination of ketoconazole was prepared using the sodium adduct of the matrix ion as an internal standard. This enabled construction of a quantitative profile of drug in skin. Conventional haematoxylin and eosin staining and microscopy methods were employed to obtain a histological image of the porcine epidermal tissue. Superimposing the mass spectrometric and histological images appeared to indicate drug

  16. Identification of effective substrates for the direct analysis of lipids from cell lines using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Srimany, Amitava; Jayashree, Balasubramanyam; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Elchuri, Sailaja; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2015-02-28

    Various disease conditions, particularly tumours, can be understood easily by studying changes in the lipid profile of cells. While lipid profiles of tissues have been recorded by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (DESI-MS) imaging, there is paucity in standardized protocols for sample preparation involving cell cultures to generate reliable results. In this study, we report a method for the direct analysis of lipids from cultured cells by incorporating them onto Whatman 42 filter paper as a substrate for reliable DESI-MS analysis. The WERI-RB1 cell line was spotted on commonly used substrates for DESI-MS analysis, such as glass slides, Teflon coated glass slides, thin layer chromatography (TLC) plates, and Whatman 42 filter paper. A comparison of mass spectrometric images with two different lipids was made to understand the behaviour of different surfaces when the same sample was spotted on them. Relative intensities of different lipid peaks in the WERI-RB1 cell line were compared and relative lipid abundances were also compared across two different human retinoblastoma cell lines; WERI-RB1 and Y79. The study demonstrates that good lipid signals can be obtained by DESI-MS when the cells are spotted on Whatman 42 filter paper. Tandem mass spectrometry was performed to identify the lipids as glycerophosphocholines (PC). Better lipid images from assembly of cells were obtained with distinct boundary when they were spotted on Whatman 42 filter paper than other surfaces. We demonstrate the use of a simple substrate for reliable DESI-MS analysis of cultured cells. This method has the potential to understand various interactions of cells with other external agents. The current method would help in the application of DESI-MS for biology in general and medical sciences in particular. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Exploring the frontiers of synthetic eumelanin polymers by high-resolution matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reale, Samantha; Crucianelli, Marcello; Pezzella, Alessandro; d'Ischia, Marco; De Angelis, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    New trends in material science and nanotechnologies have spurred growing interest in eumelanins black insoluble biopolymers derived by tyrosinase-catalysed oxidation of tyrosine via 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and its 2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). Efficient antioxidant and photoprotective actions, associated with peculiar optoelectronic properties, are recognised as prominent functions of eumelanin macromolecules within the human and mammalian pigmentary system, making them unique candidates for the realisation of innovative bio-inspired functional soft materials, with structure-based physical-chemical properties. An unprecedented breakthrough into the mechanism of synthetic eumelanin buildup has derived from a detailed investigation of the oxidative polymerization of DHI and its N-methyl derivative (NMDHI) by linear and reflectron matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Regular collections of oligomers of increasing masses, spanning the entire m/z ranges up to 5000 Da (>30-mer) and 8000 Da (> 50-mer) for the two building blocks, respectively, were disclosed. It is the first time that the in vitro polymerisation of dihydroxyindoles to form synthetic eumelanins is explored up to its high mass limits, giving at the same time information on the polymerisation mode, whether it follows a stepwise pattern (being this the conclusion in our case) or a staking sequencing of small-sized entities. It also highlighted the influence of the N-methyl substituent on the polymerization process; this opens the way to the production of N-functionalized, synthetic eumelanin-inspired soft materials, for possible future technological applications. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The quantitative surface analysis of an antioxidant additive in a lubricant oil matrix by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Caitlyn; Reynolds, James C; Whitmarsh, Samuel; Lynch, Tom; Creaser, Colin S

    2013-11-15

    Chemical additives are incorporated into commercial lubricant oils to modify the physical and chemical properties of the lubricant. The quantitative analysis of additives in oil-based lubricants deposited on a surface without extraction of the sample from the surface presents a challenge. The potential of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) for the quantitative surface analysis of an oil additive in a complex oil lubricant matrix without sample extraction has been evaluated. The quantitative surface analysis of the antioxidant additive octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix was carried out by DESI-MS in the presence of 2-(pentyloxy)ethyl 3-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)propionate as an internal standard. A quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with an in-house modified ion source enabling non-proximal DESI-MS was used for the analyses. An eight-point calibration curve ranging from 1 to 80 µg/spot of octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix and in the presence of the internal standard was used to determine the quantitative response of the DESI-MS method. The sensitivity and repeatability of the technique were assessed by conducting replicate analyses at each concentration. The limit of detection was determined to be 11 ng/mm(2) additive on spot with relative standard deviations in the range 3-14%. The application of DESI-MS to the direct, quantitative surface analysis of a commercial lubricant additive in a native oil lubricant matrix is demonstrated. © 2013 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The quantitative surface analysis of an antioxidant additive in a lubricant oil matrix by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Caitlyn; Reynolds, James C; Whitmarsh, Samuel; Lynch, Tom; Creaser, Colin S

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE Chemical additives are incorporated into commercial lubricant oils to modify the physical and chemical properties of the lubricant. The quantitative analysis of additives in oil-based lubricants deposited on a surface without extraction of the sample from the surface presents a challenge. The potential of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) for the quantitative surface analysis of an oil additive in a complex oil lubricant matrix without sample extraction has been evaluated. METHODS The quantitative surface analysis of the antioxidant additive octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix was carried out by DESI-MS in the presence of 2-(pentyloxy)ethyl 3-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)propionate as an internal standard. A quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with an in-house modified ion source enabling non-proximal DESI-MS was used for the analyses. RESULTS An eight-point calibration curve ranging from 1 to 80 µg/spot of octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix and in the presence of the internal standard was used to determine the quantitative response of the DESI-MS method. The sensitivity and repeatability of the technique were assessed by conducting replicate analyses at each concentration. The limit of detection was determined to be 11 ng/mm2 additive on spot with relative standard deviations in the range 3–14%. CONCLUSIONS The application of DESI-MS to the direct, quantitative surface analysis of a commercial lubricant additive in a native oil lubricant matrix is demonstrated. © 2013 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24097398

  20. Coupling thin-layer chromatography with vibrational cooling matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry for the analysis of ganglioside mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ivleva, Vera B; Elkin, Yuri N; Budnik, Bogdan A; Moyer, Susanne C; O'Connor, Peter B; Costello, Catherine E

    2004-11-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC), which is widely used for separation of glycolipids, oligosaccharides, lipids, and compounds of environmental and pharmaceutical interest, can be readily coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometers, but this arrangement usually compromises mass spectral resolution due to the irregularity of the TLC surface. However, TLC can be coupled to an external ion source MALDI-Fourier transform (FT) MS instrument without compromising mass accuracy and resolution of the spectra. Furthermore, when the FTMS has a vibrationally cooled MALDI ion source, fragile glycolipids can be desorbed from TLC plates without fragmentation, even to the point that desorption of intact molecules from "hot"matrixes such as alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid is possible. In this work, whole brain gangliosides are separated using TLC; the TLC plates are attached directly to the MALDI target, where the gangliosides are desorbed, ionized, and detected in the FTMS with >70 000 resolving power.

  1. Composite glycerol/graphite/aromatic acid matrices for thin-layer chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of heterocyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Esparza, Cesar; Borisov, R S; Varlamov, A V; Zaikin, V G

    2016-10-28

    New composite matrices have been suggested for the analysis of mixtures of different synthetic organic compounds (N-containing heterocycles and erectile dysfunction drugs) by thin layer chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TLC/MALDI-TOF). Different mixtures of classical MALDI matrices and graphite particles dispersed in glycerol were used for the registration of MALDI mass spectra directly from TLC plates after analytes separation. In most of cases, the mass spectra possessed [M+H](+) ions; however, for some analytes only [M+Na](+) and [M+K](+) ions were observed. These ions have been used to generate visualized TLC chromatograms. The described approach increases the desorption/ionization efficiencies of analytes separated by TLC, prevent spot blurring, simplifies and decrease time for sample preparation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection of Non-aromatic Organic Compounds in Meteorites using Imaging Laser Desorption/Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. R.; Hinman, N. W.; Richardson, C. D.; Mahon, R. C.; McJunkin, T. R.

    2009-12-01

    Our most extensive understanding of extraterrestrial organic matter is based on what has been learned from meteorites that have been delivered naturally to Earth. Meteorites have been analyzed by a variety of techniques ranging from extensive sample preparation with extraction and subsequent chromatography to direct laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS). While extraction studies have reported a variety of organics (e.g., aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, ketones, aldehydes, and amino acids), LDMS studies have only reported polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This is rather surprising considering that Yan et al. (Talanta 2007, 72, 634-641) reported that even a small amount of PAH enables the detection of organics that are not otherwise ionized during the desorption event from minerals. Therefore, we have begun re-investigating meteorites because, regardless of the source of the organic compounds, the presences of PAHs should allow other organic molecules to be observed using imaging laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LD-FTICR-MS). Indeed, we have mapped meteorites (e.g., EETA 79001) and found many mass-to-charge peaks that are non-aromatic as determined by analysis of their mass defects. Mapping also revealed that the distribution of organics is heterogeneous, which necessitates the collection of a mass spectrum from a single laser shot so that minor peaks of interest are not lost in signal averaging. These studies have implications for analyzing future returned samples from Mars or elsewhere with minimal preparation or damage.

  3. Evaluation of laser diode thermal desorption-tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-MS-MS) in forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Bynum, Nichole D; Moore, Katherine N; Grabenauer, Megan

    2014-10-01

    Many forensic laboratories experience backlogs due to increased drug-related cases. Laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD) has demonstrated its applicability in other scientific areas by providing data comparable with instrumentation, such as liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, in less time. LDTD-MS-MS was used to validate 48 compounds in drug-free human urine and blood for screening or quantitative analysis. Carryover, interference, limit of detection, limit of quantitation, matrix effect, linearity, precision and accuracy and stability were evaluated. Quantitative analysis indicated that LDTD-MS-MS produced precise and accurate results with the average overall within-run precision in urine and blood represented by a %CV <14.0 and <7.0, respectively. The accuracy for all drugs in urine ranged from 88.9 to 104.5% and 91.9 to 107.1% in blood. Overall, LDTD has the potential for use in forensic toxicology but before it can be successfully implemented that there are some challenges that must be addressed. Although the advantages of the LDTD system include minimal maintenance and rapid analysis (∼10 s per sample) which makes it ideal for high-throughput forensic laboratories, a major disadvantage is its inability or difficulty analyzing isomers and isobars due to the lack of chromatography without the use of high-resolution MS; therefore, it would be best implemented as a screening technique.

  4. Identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fedorko, D P; Drake, S K; Stock, F; Murray, P R

    2012-09-01

    We evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) for the rapid identification of anaerobic bacteria that had been isolated from clinical specimens and previously identified by 16s rRNA sequencing. The Bruker Microflex MALDI-TOF instrument with the Biotyper Software was used. We tested 152 isolates of anaerobic bacteria from 24 different genera and 75 different species. A total of 125 isolates (82%) had Biotyper software scores greater than 2.0 and the correct identification to genus and species was made by MALDI-TOF for 120 (79%) of isolates. Of the 12 isolates with a score between 1.8 and 2.0, 2 (17%) organisms were incorrectly identified by MALDI-TOF. Only 15 (10%) isolates had a score less than 1.8 and MALDI-TOF gave the wrong genus and species for four isolates, the correct genus for two isolates, and the correct genus and species for nine isolates. Therefore, we found the Bruker MALDI-TOF MicroFlex LT with an expanded database and the use of bacteria extracts rather than whole organisms correctly identified 130 of 152 (86%) isolates to genus and species when the cut-off for an acceptable identification was a spectrum score ≥1.8.

  5. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis of aliphatic biodegradable photoluminescent polymers using new ionic liquid matrices.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Carlos A; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jian; Schug, Kevin A

    2011-05-15

    In this study, two novel ionic liquid matrices (ILMs), N,N-diisopropylethylammonium 3-oxocoumarate and N,N-diisopropylethylammonium dihydroxymonooxoacetophenoate, were tested for the structural elucidation of recently developed aliphatic biodegradable polymers by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The polymers, formed by a condensation reaction of three components, citric acid, octane diol, and an amino acid, are fluorescent, but the exact mechanism behind their luminescent properties has not been fully elucidated. In the original studies, which introduced the polymer class (J. Yang et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2009, 106, 10086-10091), a hyper-conjugated cyclic structure was proposed as the source for the photoluminescent behavior. With the use of the two new ILMs, we present evidence that supports the presence of the proposed cyclization product. In addition, the new ILMs, when compared with a previously established ILM, N,N-diisopropylethylammonium α-cyano-3-hydroxycinnimate, provided similar signal intensities and maintained similar spectral profiles. This research also established that the new ILMs provided good spot-to-spot reproducibility and high ionization efficiency compared with corresponding crystalline matrix preparations. Many polymer features revealed through the use of the ILMs could not be observed with crystalline matrices. Ultimately, the new ILMs highlighted the composition of the synthetic polymers, as well as the loss of water that was expected for the formation of the proposed cyclic structure on the polymer backbone. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Identification of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Phlebotomine sand flies are incriminated in the transmission of several human and veterinary pathogens. To elucidate their role as vectors, proper species identification is crucial. Since traditional morphological determination is based on minute and often dubious characteristics on their head and genitalia, which require certain expertise and may be damaged in the field-collected material, there is a demand for rapid, simple and cost-effective molecular approaches. Methods Six laboratory-reared colonies of phlebotomine sand flies belonging to five species and four subgenera (Phlebotomus, Paraphlebotomus, Larroussius, Adlerius) were used to evaluate the discriminatory power of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Various storage conditions and treatments, including the homogenization in either distilled water or given concentrations of formic acid, were tested on samples of both sexes. Results Specimens of all five analysed sand fly species produced informative, reproducible and species-specific protein spectra that enabled their conclusive species identification. The method also distinguished between two P. sergenti colonies originating from different geographical localities. Protein profiles within a species were similar for specimens of both sexes. Tested conditions of specimen storage and sample preparation give ground to a standard protocol that is generally applicable on analyzed sand fly specimens. Conclusions Species identification of sand flies by MALDI-TOF MS is feasible and represents a novel promising tool to improve biological and epidemiological studies on these medically important insects. PMID:24423215

  7. Differentiation of microbial species and strains in coculture biofilms by multivariate analysis of laser desorption postionization mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Chhavi; Cui, Yang; Hofstetter, Theresa; Liu, Suet Yi; Bernstein, Hans C; Carlson, Ross P; Ahmed, Musahid; Hanley, Luke

    2013-11-21

    7.87 to 10.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon energies were used in laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) to analyze biofilms comprised of binary cultures of interacting microorganisms. The effect of photon energy was examined using both tunable synchrotron and laser sources of VUV radiation. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to the MS data to differentiate species in Escherichia coli-Saccharomyces cerevisiae coculture biofilms. PCA of LDPI-MS also differentiated individual E. coli strains in a biofilm comprised of two interacting gene deletion strains, even though these strains differed from the wild type K-12 strain by no more than four gene deletions each out of approximately 2000 genes. PCA treatment of 7.87 eV LDPI-MS data separated the E. coli strains into three distinct groups, two "pure" groups, and a mixed region. Furthermore, the "pure" regions of the E. coli cocultures showed greater variance by PCA at 7.87 eV photon energies compared to 10.5 eV radiation. This is consistent with the expectation that the 7.87 eV photoionization selects a subset of low ionization energy analytes while 10.5 eV is more inclusive, detecting a wider range of analytes. These two VUV photon energies therefore give different spreads via PCA and their respective use in LDPI-MS constitute an additional experimental parameter to differentiate strains and species.

  8. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry applied to virus identification

    PubMed Central

    Calderaro, Adriana; Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina; Rodighiero, Isabella; Buttrini, Mirko; Gorrini, Chiara; Motta, Federica; Germini, Diego; Medici, Maria-Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; De Conto, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Virus detection and/or identification traditionally rely on methods based on cell culture, electron microscopy and antigen or nucleic acid detection. These techniques are good, but often expensive and/or time-consuming; furthermore, they not always lead to virus identification at the species and/or type level. In this study, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was tested as an innovative tool to identify human polioviruses and to identify specific viral protein biomarkers in infected cells. The results revealed MALDI-TOF MS to be an effective and inexpensive tool for the identification of the three poliovirus serotypes. The method was firstly applied to Sabin reference strains, and then to isolates from different clinical samples, highlighting its value as a time-saving, sensitive and specific technique when compared to the gold standard neutralization assay and casting new light on its possible application to virus detection and/or identification. PMID:25354905

  9. Rapid differentiation of Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolius by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ying-Han; So, Pui-Kin; Lo, Samual Chun-Lap; Ng, Eddy Wing Yin; Poon, Terence Chuen Wai; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2012-11-13

    A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS)-based method has been developed for rapid differentiation between Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolius, two herbal medicines with similar chemical and physical properties but different therapeutic effects. This method required only a small quantity of samples, and the herbal medicines were analyzed by MALDI-MS either after a brief extraction step, or directly on the powder form or small pieces of raw samples. The acquired MALDI-MS spectra showed different patterns of ginsenosides and small chemical molecules between P. ginseng and P. quinquefolius, thus allowing unambiguous differentiation between the two Panax species based on the specific ions, intensity ratios of characteristic ions or principal component analysis. The approach could also be used to differentiate red ginseng or P. quinquefolius adulterated with P. ginseng from pure P. ginseng and pure Panax quinquefolium. The intensity ratios of characteristic ions in the MALDI-MS spectra showed high reproducibility and enabled quantitative determination of ginsenosides in the herbal samples and percentage of P. quinquefolius in the adulterated binary mixture. The method is simple, rapid, robust, and can be extended for analysis of other herbal medicines.

  10. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Wade C.; Lewis, Charlotte R.; Openshaw, Anna P.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration.

  11. Detection of melamine in infant formula and grain powder by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Chen, Wen-Tsen; Tomalová, Iva; Preisler, Jan; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2012-06-30

    We have developed a method for the determination of melamine (MEL), ammeline (AMN), and ammelide (AMD) by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) using gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The major peaks for MEL, AMN, and AMD at m/z 127.07, 128.05, and 129.04 are assigned to the [MEL + H](+), [AMN + H](+), and [AMD + H](+) ions. Because the three tested compounds adsorb weakly onto the surfaces of the Au NPs through Au-N bonding, they can be easily concentrated from complex samples by applying a simple trapping/centrifugation process. The SALDI-MS method provides limits of detection of 5, 10, and 300 nM for MEL, AMN, and AMD, respectively, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The signal variation for 150-shot average spectra of the three analytes within the same spot was 15%, and the batch-to-batch variation was 20%. We have validated the practicality of this approach by the analysis of these three analytes in infant formula and grain powder. This simple and rapid SALDI-MS approach holds great potential for screening of MEL in foods. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Direct analysis of pharmaceutical tablet formulations using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    PubMed

    Earnshaw, Caroline J; Carolan, Vikki A; Richards, Don S; Clench, Malcolm R

    2010-06-15

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI MSI) has been used to directly analyse a range of tablets in order to assess the homogeneity of the active drug compound throughout the excipients contained within the tablets studied. The information gained from the imaging experiments can be used to improve and gain a greater understanding of the manufacturing process; such knowledge will enable improvements in finished product quality to make safer and more efficacious tablet formulations. Commercially available and prescription tablet formulations have been analysed, including aspirin, paracetamol, sildenafil citrate (Viagra(R)) and a batch of tablets in development (tablet X: placebo; 1 mg; 3 mg and 6 mg). MALDI MSI provides semi-quantitative information that is related to ion abundance, therefore Principal Component Analysis (PCA), a multivariate analysis technique, has been used to differentiate between tablets containing different amounts of active drug ingredient. Aspects of sample preparation have also been investigated with regard to tablet shape and texture. The results obtained indicate that MALDI MSI can be used effectively to analyse the spatial distribution of the active pharmaceutical component (API) in pharmaceutical tablet formulations.

  13. Effects of Tailored Surface Chemistry on Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: a Surface-Analytical Study by XPS and AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penna, Andrea; Careri, Maria; Spencer, Nicholas D.; Rossi, Antonella

    2015-08-01

    Since it was proposed for the first time, desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) has been evaluated for applicability in numerous areas. Elucidations of the ionization mechanisms and the subsequent formation of isolated gas-phase ions have been proposed so far. In this context, the role of both surface and pneumatic effects on ion-formation yield has recently been investigated. Nevertheless, the effect of the surface chemistry has not yet been completely understood. Functionalized glass surfaces have been prepared, in order to tailor surface performance for ion formation. Three substrates were functionalized by depositing three different silanes [3-mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane (MTES), octyltriethoxysilane (OTES), and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxy-silane (FOTES)] from toluene solution onto standard glass slides. Surface characterization was carried out by contact-angle measurements, tapping-mode atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Morphologically homogeneous and thickness-controlled films in the nm range were obtained, with surface free energies lying between 15 and 70 mJ/m2. These results are discussed, together with those of DESI-MS on low-molecular-weight compounds such as melamine, tetracycline, and lincomycin, also taking into account the effects of the sprayer potential and its correlation with surface wettability. The results demonstrate that ion-formation efficiency is affected by surface wettability, and this was demonstrated operating above and below the onset of the electrospray.

  14. Distinguishing chinese star anise from Japanese star anise using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Howes, Melanie-Jayne R; Kite, Geoffrey C; Simmonds, Monique S J

    2009-07-08

    The volatile compounds from the pericarps of Illicium anisatum L., Illicium brevistylum A.C.Sm., Illicium griffithii Hook.f. & Thomson, Illicium henryi Diels, Illicium lanceolatum A.C.Sm., Illicium majus Hook.f. & Thomson, Illicium micranthum Dunn, and Illicium verum Hook.f. were examined by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). The volatiles desorbed from the pericarps of I. verum (Chinese star anise), the species traded for culinary purposes, were generally characterized by a high proportion of (E)-anethole (57.6-77.1%) and the presence of foeniculin; the latter was otherwise only detected in the pericarps of I. lanceolatum. In the pericarps of all other species analyzed, the percentage composition of (E)-anethole was comparatively lower (

  15. Constant-Distance Mode Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Biological Samples with Complex Topography.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Son N; Liyu, Andrey V; Chu, Rosalie K; Anderton, Christopher R; Laskin, Julia

    2017-01-17

    A new approach for constant-distance mode mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of biological samples using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) was developed by integrating a shear-force probe with the nano-DESI probe. The technical concept and basic instrumental setup, as well as the general operation of the system are described. Mechanical dampening of resonant oscillations due to the presence of shear forces between the probe and the sample surface enabled the constant-distance imaging mode via a computer-controlled closed-feedback loop. The capability of simultaneous chemical and topographic imaging of complex biological samples is demonstrated using living Bacillus subtilis ATCC 49760 colonies on agar plates. The constant-distance mode nano-DESI MSI enabled imaging of many metabolites, including nonribosomal peptides (surfactin, plipastatin, and iturin) on the surface of living bacterial colonies, ranging in diameter from 10 to 13 mm, with height variations up to 0.8 mm above the agar plate. Co-registration of ion images to topographic images provided higher-contrast images. Based on this effort, constant-mode nano-DESI MSI proved to be ideally suited for imaging biological samples of complex topography in their native states.

  16. Direct identification of various copper phthalocyanine pigments in automotive paints and paint smears by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Tadashi; Nakazumi, Hiroyuki; Kawabata, Shin-ichirou; Kusatani, Masaru; Nakai, Seita; Honda, Sadao

    2008-01-01

    Direct identification of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and chlorinated CuPcs in paints for discrimination between blue automobile paints by means of laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) in the absence of a matrix is reported. The models consisted of eight commercially available CuPc pigments applied to a piece of plain white coating paper. The relationship between the peak intensity at m/z 575 of the CuPc, the number of pulsed laser shots, and laser power was compared to optimize laser abrasion. LDMS analysis of the model paints demonstrated that all characteristic components of the CuPc pigments in the paint films were in good agreement with those in the powder pigments. Further, the chlorinated CuPcs in the paint films could be distinguished. A quantity of 42 blue paint films, representing the paints used for painting Japanese domestic trucks, was examined by LDMS analysis. Results indicate that the paints can be classified into four categories based on the chlorinated CuPc components of the paints. Therefore, LDMS spectra of CuPc pigments would be useful for the identification of paints in forensic investigations. Herein, we report the successful identification of the CuPcs in a paint smear on the frame of a bicycle damaged in a hit-and-run accident, using the LDMS spectra.

  17. Rapid screening of mixed edible oils and gutter oils by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tsz-Tsun; So, Pui-Kin; Zheng, Bo; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2015-07-16

    Authentication of edible oils is a long-term issue in food safety, and becomes particularly important with the emergence and wide spread of gutter oils in recent years. Due to the very high analytical demand and diversity of gutter oils, a high throughput analytical method and a versatile strategy for authentication of mixed edible oils and gutter oils are highly desirable. In this study, an improved matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) method has been developed for direct analysis of edible oils. This method involved on-target sample loading, automatic data acquisition and simple data processing. MALDI-MS spectra with high quality and high reproducibility have been obtained using this method, and a preliminary spectral database of edible oils has been set up. The authenticity of an edible oil sample can be determined by comparing its MALDI-MS spectrum and principal component analysis (PCA) results with those of its labeled oil in the database. This method is simple and the whole process only takes several minutes for analysis of one oil sample. We demonstrated that the method was sensitive to change in oil compositions and can be used for measuring compositions of mixed oils. The capability of the method for determining mislabeling enables it for rapid screening of gutter oils since fraudulent mislabeling is a common feature of gutter oils.

  18. Direct matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry improves appropriateness of antibiotic treatment of bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Vlek, Anne L M; Bonten, Marc J M; Boel, C H Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) allows the identification of microorganisms directly from positive blood culture broths. Use of the MALDI-TOF MS for rapid identification of microorganisms from blood culture broths can reduce the turnaround time to identification and may lead to earlier appropriate treatment of bacteremia. During February and April 2010, direct MALDI-TOF MS was routinely performed on all positive blood cultures. During December 2009 and March 2010 no direct MALDI-TOF MS was used. Information on antibiotic therapy was collected from the hospital and intensive care units' information systems from all positive blood cultures during the study period. In total, 253 episodes of bacteremia were included of which 89 during the intervention period and 164 during the control period. Direct performance of MALDI-TOF MS on positive blood culture broths reduced the time till species identification by 28.8-h and was associated with an 11.3% increase in the proportion of patients receiving appropriate antibiotic treatment 24 hours after blood culture positivity (64.0% in the control period versus 75.3% in the intervention period (p0.01)). Routine implementation of this technique increased the proportion of patients on adequate antimicrobial treatment within 24 hours.

  19. Differentiation of blue ballpoint pen inks by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and high-performance thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Weyermann, Céline; Marquis, Raymond; Mazzella, Williams; Spengler, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    The differentiation of inks on a questioned document can highlight a fraudulent insertion and is usually carried out by optical comparison and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) may also be used for the analysis of dyes from ink. This analytical technique was compared with a standard method of high-performance TLC (HPTLC) according to their capacity to differentiate blue ballpoint inks. Ink entries on paper from 31 blue ballpoint pens have been analyzed and their dye ink formulations compared. The pens were classified into 26 classes by LDI-MS against 18 for HPTLC. LDI-MS proved to be a more powerful method for differentiating ink formulations because it provides information about dye structures (molecular weights) and relative quantification of dye classes (peak areas). Sample preparation was minimal and analysis time was short in contrast to the more complex extraction, application, and development steps of the HPTLC method. However, only basic dyes and pigments were identified using positive mode LDI-MS, while HPTLC did yield additional information about acid dyes.

  20. Differentiation of Aeromonas isolated from drinking water distribution systems using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Maura J; Best, Jennifer M; Smallwood, Anthony W; Kostich, Mitchell; Rodgers, Mark; Shoemaker, Jody A

    2007-03-01

    The genus Aeromonas is one of several medically significant genera that have gained prominence due to their evolving taxonomy and controversial role in human diseases. In this study, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was used to analyze the whole cells of both reference strains and unknown Aeromonas isolates obtained from water distribution systems. A library of over 45 unique m/z signatures was created from 40 strains that are representative of the 17 recognized species of Aeromonas, as well as 3 reference strains from genus Vibrio and 2 reference strains from Plesiomonas shigelloides. The library was used to help speciate 52 isolates of Aeromonas. The environmental isolates were broken up into 2 blind studies. Group 1 contained isolates that had a recognizable phenotypic profile and group 2 contained isolates that had an atypical phenotypic profile. MALDI-MS analysis of the water isolates in group 1 matched the phenotypic identification in all cases. In group 2, the MALDI-MS-based determination confirmed the identity of 18 of the 27 isolates. These results demonstrate that MALDI-MS analysis can rapidly and accurately classify species of the genus Aeromonas, making it a powerful tool especially suited for environmental monitoring and detection of microbial hazards in drinking water.

  1. Glycine identification in natural jarosites using laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry: implications for the search for life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Kotler, J Michelle; Hinman, Nancy W; Yan, Beizhan; Stoner, Daphne L; Scott, Jill R

    2008-04-01

    The jarosite group minerals have received increasing attention since the discovery of jarosite on the martian surface by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Given that jarosite can incorporate foreign ions within its structure, we have investigated the use of jarosite as an indicator of aqueous and biological processes on Earth and Mars. The use of laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry has revealed the presence of organic matter in several jarosite samples from various locations worldwide. One of the ions from the natural jarosites has been attributed to glycine because it was systematically observed in combinations of glycine with synthetic ammonium and potassium jarosites, Na(2)SO(4) and K(2)SO(4). The ability to observe these organic signatures in jarosite samples with an in situ instrumental technique, such as the one employed in this study, furthers the goals of planetary geologists to determine whether signs of life (e.g., the presence of biomolecules or biomolecule precursors) can be detected in the rock record of terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples.

  2. Identification of Leishmania at the species level with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cassagne, C; Pratlong, F; Jeddi, F; Benikhlef, R; Aoun, K; Normand, A-C; Faraut, F; Bastien, P; Piarroux, R

    2014-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flightMALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) is now widely recognized as a powerful tool with which to identify bacteria and fungi at the species level, and sometimes in a rapid and accurate manner. We report herein an approach to identify, at the species level, Leishmania promastigotes from in vitro culture. We first constructed a reference database of spectra including the main Leishmania species known to cause human leishmaniasis. Then, the performance of the reference database in identifying Leishmania promastigotes was tested on a panel of 69 isolates obtained from patients. Our approach correctly identified 66 of the 69 isolates tested at the species level with log (score) values superior to 2. Two Leishmania isolates yielded non-interpretable MALDI-TOF MS patterns, owing to low log (score) values. Only one Leishmania isolate of Leishmania peruviana was misidentified as the closely related species Leishmania braziliensis, with a log (score) of 2.399. MALDI-TOF MS is a promising approach, providing rapid and accurate identification of Leishmania from in vitro culture at the species level. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  3. Confirmation and 3D profiling of anabolic steroid esters in injection sites using imaging desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Rijke, Eva; Hooijerink, Dick; Sterk, Saskia S; Nielen, Michel W F

    2013-01-01

    In this study, desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) was applied for the confirmation and three-dimensional profiling of anabolic steroid esters in an injection site of bovine muscle. The spatial resolution of the DESI-MS(n) was demonstrated by scanning hormone esters and marker ink lines drawn at various distances on a microscopic slide at set distances, using an x-scanner with manual y and z adjustment. Tissue slices of bovine muscle injected with a hormone cocktail were analysed. All anabolic steroid esters could be directly detected in the sample and confirmed on the basis of identification points awarded for selected MS/MS transitions according to the performance criteria given in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Moreover, the injection site could be mapped by two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging MS, showing a horizontal and vertical distribution through the muscle tissue. This DESI approach offers potential for analysis of injection sites of steroid esters from illegally treated animals; moreover, direct analysis by ambient imaging DESI-MS still allows conventional extraction and analysis of the whole tissue for further confirmatory or contra-analysis afterwards.

  4. Generation and detection of gaseous W12O41-* and other tungstate anions by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Julius; Braida, Washington; Ogundipe, Adebayo; O'Connor, Gregory; Attygalle, Athula B

    2009-10-01

    The presence of a peak centered near m/z 2862, observed for the first time for the caged dodecatungstate radical-anion, [W12O41]-*, enables distinguishing WO2 from WO3 by Laser Desorption Ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). In addition to WO2, laser irradiation of dry deposits made from aqueous ammonium paratungstate, and calcium and lead orthotungstate also produce the [W12O41]-. In contrast, spectra recorded from deposits made from aqueous Na2WO4, sodium metatungstate, and WO3, or non-aqueous calcium and lead orthotungstate, and ammonium paratungstate, failed to show the m/z 2862 peak cluster. These observations support the hypothesis that polycondensation reactions to form [W12O41]-* occur solely in the presence of water. Although dry spots are irradiated for ionization, the solvent used for sample preparation plays an important role on the chemical composition endowed to ions detected. For example, the m/z 2862 peak seen from deposits made from aqueous ammonium paratungstate, and calcium and lead orthotungstate, is absent in the spectra recorded either from pristine deposits or those derived from solutions made with organic solvents such as acetonitrile or ethanol.

  5. Towards High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled to Shear Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Son N.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.; Ansong, Charles; Laskin, Julia

    2017-07-01

    Constant mode ambient mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of tissue sections with high lateral resolution of better than 10 μm was performed by combining shear force microscopy with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). Shear force microscopy enabled precise control of the distance between the sample and nano-DESI probe during MSI experiments and provided information on sample topography. Proof-of-concept experiments were performed using lung and brain tissue sections representing spongy and dense tissues, respectively. Topography images obtained using shear force microscopy were comparable to the results obtained using contact profilometry over the same region of the tissue section. Variations in tissue height were found to be dependent on the tissue type and were in the range of 0-5 μm for lung tissue and 0-3 μm for brain tissue sections. Ion images of phospholipids obtained in this study are in good agreement with literature data. Normalization of nano-DESI MSI images to the signal of the internal standard added to the extraction solvent allowed us to construct high-resolution ion images free of matrix effects. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Peptide mapping using capillary electrophoresis offline coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Stefan; Bakry, Rania; Huck, Christian W; Polato, Fabio; Corradini, Danilo; Bonn, Günther K

    2011-10-01

    This article reports the results of a study carried out to evaluate the offline hyphenation of capillary zone electrophoresis with matrix-assisted lased desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for the analysis of low-abundant complex samples, represented by the tryptic phosphorylated peptides of phosphoproteins, such as α-casein, β-casein, and fetuin. The proposed method employs a latex-coated capillary and consists in the online preconcentration of the tryptic peptides by a pH-mediated stacking method, their separation by capillary zone electrophoresis, and subsequent deposition of the separated analytes onto a MALDI target for their MS analysis. The online preconcentration method allows loading a large sample volume (∼150 nL), which is introduced into the capillary after the hydrodynamic injection of a short plug of 1.0 M ammonium hydroxide solution and is sandwiched between two plugs of the acidic background electrolyte solution (BGE) filling the capillary. The sample spotting of the separated analytes onto the MALDI target is performed either during or postseparation using an automatic spotting device connected to the exit of the separation capillary. The proposed method allows the separation and identification of multiphosphorylated peptides from other peptides and enables their identification at femtomole level with improved efficiency compared with LC approaches hyphenated to MS.

  7. Differentiation of Microbial Species and Strains in Coculture Biofilms by Multivariate Analysis of Laser Desorption Postionization Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Chhavi; Cui, Yang; Hofstetter, Theresa; Liu, Suet Yi; Bernstein, Hans C.; Carlson, Ross P.; Ahmed, Musahid; Hanley, Luke

    2013-01-01

    7.87 to 10.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon energies were used in laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) to analyze biofilms comprised of binary cultures of interacting microorganisms. The effect of photon energy was examined using both tunable synchrotron and laser sources of VUV radiation. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to the MS data to differentiate species in Escherichia coli-Saccharomyces cerevisiae coculture biofilms. PCA of LDPI-MS also differentiated individual E. coli strains in a biofilm comprised of two interacting gene deletion strains, even though these strains differed from the wild type K-12 strain by no more than four gene deletions each out of approximately 2000 genes. PCA treatment of 7.87 eV LDPI-MS data separated the E. coli strains into three distinct groups, two “pure” groups, and a mixed region. Furthermore, the “pure” regions of the E. coli cocultures showed greater variance by PCA at 7.87 eV photon energies compared to 10.5 eV radiation. This is consistent with the expectation that the 7.87 eV photoionization selects a subset of low ionization energy analytes while 10.5 eV is more inclusive, detecting a wider range of analytes. These two VUV photon energies therefore give different spreads via PCA and their respective use in LDPI-MS constitute an additional experimental parameter to differentiate strains and species. PMID:24067765

  8. Glycine Identification in Natural Jarosites Using Laser Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: Implications for the Search for Life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, J. Michelle; Hinman, Nancy W.; Yan, Beizhan; Stoner, Daphne L.; Scott, Jill R.

    2008-04-01

    The jarosite group minerals have received increasing attention since the discovery of jarosite on the martian surface by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Given that jarosite can incorporate foreign ions within its structure, we have investigated the use of jarosite as an indicator of aqueous and biological processes on Earth and Mars. The use of laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry has revealed the presence of organic matter in several jarosite samples from various locations worldwide. One of the ions from the natural jarosites has been attributed to glycine because it was systematically observed in combinations of glycine with synthetic ammonium and potassium jarosites, Na2SO4 and K2SO4. The ability to observe these organic signatures in jarosite samples with an in situ instrumental technique, such as the one employed in this study, furthers the goals of planetary geologists to determine whether signs of life (e.g., the presence of biomolecules or biomolecule precursors) can be detected in the rock record of terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples.

  9. Novel ionic liquid matrices for qualitative and quantitative detection of carbohydrates by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyong; Shen, Shanshan; Wu, Datong; Cai, Pengfei; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2017-09-08

    Analysis of carbohydrates based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is still challenging and researchers have been devoting themselves to efficient matrices discovery. In the present study, the design, synthesis, qualitative and quantitative performance of non-derivative ionic liquid matrices (ILMs) were reported. DHB/N-methylaniline (N-MA) and DHB/N-ethylaniline (N-EA), performing best for carbohydrate detection, have been screened out. The limit of detection for oligosaccharide provided by DHB/N-MA and DHB/N-EA were as low as 10 fmol. DHB/N-MA and DHB/N-EA showed significantly higher ion generation efficiency than DHB. The comparison of capacity to probe polysaccharide between these two ILMs and DHB also revealed their powerful potential. Their outstanding performance were probably due to lower proton affinities and stronger UV absorption at λ = 355 nm. What is more, taking DHB/N-MA as an example, quantitative analysis of fructo-oligosaccharide mixtures extracted and identified from rice noodles has been accomplished sensitively using an internal standard method. Overall, DHB/N-MA and DHB/N-EA exhibited excellent performance and might be significant sources as the carbohydrate matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Liquid-phase microextraction and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for identification and quantification of basic drugs in human urine.

    PubMed

    Thunig, Janina; Flø, Linda; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Janfelt, Christian

    2012-01-30

    Hollow fibre liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) were evaluated for the identification and quantification of basic drugs in human urine samples. The selective extraction capabilities of three-phase LPME provided a significant reduction in the matrix effects otherwise observed in direct DESI-MS analysis of urine samples. Aqueous LPME extracts (in 10 mM HCl) were deposited on porous Teflon, dried at room temperature, and the dried spots were then analyzed directly with DESI-MS in full scan mode. Pethidine, diphenhydramine, nortriptyline, and methadone were used as model compounds for identification, and their limits of identification were determined to be 100, 25, 100, and 30 ng/mL, respectively. In a reliability test with 19 spiked urine samples, 100% of the positive samples containing the model drugs in concentrations at or above the limit of identification were identified. Diphenhydramine was used as a model compound for quantitative analysis with diphenhydramine-d(5) as an internal standard. The calibration curve was linear in the range 50-2000 ng/mL (R(2) = 0.992) with a limit of quantification at approximately 140 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were <9.5%. In a reliability test with six spiked urine samples, deviations between the measured and the true values for diphenhydramine were in the range 0.2-22.9%. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Optimization of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis for Bacterial Identification

    PubMed Central

    Khot, Prasanna D.; Couturier, Marc R.; Wilson, Andrew; Croft, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a relatively new addition to the clinical microbiology laboratory. The performance of the MALDI Biotyper system (Bruker Daltonics) was compared to those of phenotypic and genotypic identification methods for 690 routine and referred clinical isolates representing 102 genera and 225 unique species. We systematically compared direct-smear and extraction methods on a taxonomically diverse collection of isolates. The optimal score thresholds for bacterial identification were determined, and an approach to address multiple divergent results above these thresholds was evaluated. Analysis of identification scores revealed optimal species- and genus-level identification thresholds of 1.9 and 1.7, with 91.9% and 97.0% of isolates correctly identified to species and genus levels, respectively. Not surprisingly, routinely encountered isolates showed higher concordance than did uncommon isolates. The extraction method yielded higher scores than the direct-smear method for 78.3% of isolates. Incorrect species were reported in the top 10 results for 19.4% of isolates, and although there was no obvious cutoff to eliminate all of these ambiguities, a 10% score differential between the top match and additional species may be useful to limit the need for additional testing to reach single-species-level identifications. PMID:22993178

  12. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, a revolution in clinical microbial identification.

    PubMed

    Bizzini, A; Greub, G

    2010-11-01

    Until recently, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) techniques for the identification of microorganisms remained confined to research laboratories. In the last 2 years, the availability of relatively simple to use MALDI-TOF MS devices, which can be utilized in clinical microbiology laboratories, has changed the laboratory workflows for the identification of pathogens. Recently, the first prospective studies regarding the performance in routine bacterial identification showed that MALDI-TOF MS is a fast, reliable and cost-effective technique that has the potential to replace and/or complement conventional phenotypic identification for most bacterial strains isolated in clinical microbiology laboratories. For routine bacterial isolates, correct identification by MALDI-TOF MS at the species level was obtained in 84.1-93.6% of instances. In one of these studies, a protein extraction step clearly improved the overall valid identification yield, from 70.3% to 93.2%. This review focuses on the current state of use of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of routine bacterial isolates and on the main difficulties that may lead to erroneous or doubtful identifications. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2010 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  13. Simultaneous imaging of multiple neurotransmitters and neuroactive substances in the brain by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Strittmatter, Nicole; Nilsson, Anna; Källback, Patrik; Alvarsson, Alexandra; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Vallianatou, Theodosia; Svenningsson, Per; Goodwin, Richard J A; Andren, Per E

    2016-08-01

    With neurological processes involving multiple neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, it is important to have the ability to directly map and quantify multiple signaling molecules simultaneously in a single analysis. By utilizing a molecular-specific approach, namely desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI), we demonstrated that the technique can be used to image multiple neurotransmitters and their metabolites (dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-methoxytyramine, serotonin, glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, γ-aminobutyric acid, adenosine) as well as neuroactive drugs (amphetamine, sibutramine, fluvoxamine) and drug metabolites in situ directly in brain tissue sections. The use of both positive and negative ionization modes increased the number of identified molecular targets. Chemical derivatization by charge-tagging the primary amines of molecules significantly increased the sensitivity, enabling the detection of low abundant neurotransmitters and other neuroactive substances previously undetectable by MSI. The sensitivity of the imaging approach of neurochemicals has a great potential in many diverse applications in fields such as neuroscience, pharmacology, drug discovery, neurochemistry, and medicine.

  14. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wade C; Lewis, Charlotte R; Openshaw, Anna P; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Acid-catalyzed Reactions in Model Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA): Insights using Desorption-electrospray Ionization (DESI) Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiddler, M. N.; Cooks, R. G.; Shepson, P.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are presently little understood in terms of their sources, formation, and effect on climate forcing, despite their significant impacts on climate change and respiratory health. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which were thought to arise entirely from simple gas-particle partitioning, have recently been found to contain oligomeric species which result from the condensed-phase reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The non-methane VOC with the greatest emission flux, isoprene, is known to produce aerosols through chemistry involving its oxidation products. We selected one of its major oxidation product, methacrolein, to assess its role in oligomeric SOA formation in response to the acidic conditions found in cloud water. Since it has been found that acidified aerosol produces oligomeric species with greater molecular weight and yield, acid-catalyzed oligomerization is likely a significant process in the formation of SOA. Aqueous solutions of methacrolein were acidified with sulfuric acid, and studied using linear ion trap mass spectrometry (LIT-MS) with a home-built desorption-electrospray ionization (DESI) source. An extremely heterogeneous mixture of products was produced in this system, resulting from hydrolysis, acid- catalyzed oxidation, reduction, and organosulfate formation. Evidence for disproportionation and heterocycle formation are proposed as reaction mechanisms hitherto unrecognized in the production of SOA. The proposed structure and formation mechanism for several species, based upon their MS/MS spectra, will also be presented.

  16. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry in Clinical Microbiology: What Are the Current Issues?

    PubMed

    van Belkum, Alex; Welker, Martin; Pincus, David; Charrier, Jean Philippe; Girard, Victoria

    2017-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has revolutionized the identification of microbial species in clinical microbiology laboratories. MALDI-TOF-MS has swiftly become the new gold-standard method owing to its key advantages of simplicity and robustness. However, as with all new methods, adoption of the MALDI-TOF MS approach is still not widespread. Optimal sample preparation has not yet been achieved for several applications, and there are continuing discussions on the need for improved database quality and the inclusion of additional microbial species. New applications such as in the field of antimicrobial susceptibility testing have been proposed but not yet translated to the level of ease and reproducibility that one should expect in routine diagnostic systems. Finally, during routine identification testing, unexpected results are regularly obtained, and the best methods for transmitting these results into clinical care are still evolving. We here discuss the success of MALDI-TOF MS in clinical microbiology and highlight fields of application that are still amenable to improvement. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine.

  17. Fast analysis of high-energy compounds and agricultural chemicals in water with desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Christopher C; MacMillan, Denise K; Noll, Robert J; Cooks, R Graham

    2007-01-01

    Novel sampling and detection methods using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) are examined in the detection of explosives (RDX, TNT, HMX, and TNB) and agricultural chemicals (atrazine, alachlor and acetochlor) from aqueous matrices and authentic contaminated groundwater samples. DESI allows analysis of solid and liquid compounds directly from surfaces of interest with little or no sample preparation. Significant savings in analysis time and sample preparation are realized. The methods investigated here include (i) immediate analysis of filter paper wetted with contaminated water samples without further sample preparation, (ii) rapid liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), and (iii) analyte extraction from contaminated groundwater samples on-site using solid-phase extraction (SPE) membranes, followed by direct DESI analysis of the membrane. The wetted filter paper experiment demonstrates the maximum sample throughput for DESI analysis of aqueous matrices but has inadequate sensitivity for some of these analytes. Both the LLE and the SPE methods have adequate sensitivity. The resulting SPE membranes and/or small volume solvent extracts produced in these experiments are readily transported to off-site facilities for direct analysis by DESI. This realizes a significant reduction in the costs of sample shipping compared with those for typical liter-sized samples of groundwater. Total analysis times for these preliminary DESI analyses are comparable with or shorter than those for GC/MS and limits of detection approach environmental action levels for these compounds while maintaining a modest relative standard deviation. Tandem mass spectrometric data is used to provide additional specificity as needed.

  18. Functionalized graphene-coated cobalt nanoparticles for highly efficient surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Hideya; Nakai, Keisuke; Arakawa, Ryuichi; Athanassiou, Evagelos K; Grass, Robert N; Stark, Wendelin J

    2012-11-06

    Graphene-coated cobalt nanoparticles surface-functionalized with benzylamine groups (CoC-NH(2) nanomagnets) were shown to effectively enrich analytes for surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (affinity SALDI-MS) analysis. These CoC-NH(2) nanomagnets are highly suited for use with affinity SALDI-MS because their mean diameter of 30 nm, high specific surface area of 15 m(2) g(-1), and high-strength saturation magnetization of 158 emu g(-1) led to efficient extraction of analytes by magnetic separation, which in turn enabled excellent SALDI-MS performance. Surface modification of CoC nanomagnets with benzylamine groups increased the yield of peptide ions and decreased fragmentation of benzylpyridinium ions, so-called "thermometer ions" formed through soft ionization. The CoC-NH(2) nanomagnets were used to extract perfluorooctanesulfonate from large volumes of aqueous solutions by magnetic separation, which was identified directly by SALDI-MS analysis with high sensitivity even at the sub-part-per-trillion level (∼0.1 ng/L). The applicability of CoC-NH(2) nanomagnets in conjunction with SALDI-MS for the enrichment and detection of pentachlorophenol, bisphenol A, and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) with varying chain length, which are environmentally significant compounds, as well as small drugs, was also evaluated.

  19. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, R; Ball, D; Dolphin, H; Dave, J

    2016-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was compared with the API NH biochemical method for the identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in routine clinical samples. A retrospective review of laboratory records for 1090 isolates for which both biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identifications were available was performed. Cases of discrepant results were examined in detail for evidence supportive of a particular organism identification. Of 1090 isolates, 1082 were identified as N. gonorrhoeae by API NH. MALDI-TOF MS successfully identified 984 (91%) of these after one analysis, rising to 1081 (99.9%) after two analyses, with a positive predictive value of 99.3%. For those isolates requiring a repeat analysis, failure to generate an identifiable proteomic signature was the reason in 76% of cases, with alternative initial identifications accounting for the remaining 24%. MALDI-TOF MS identified eight isolates as N. gonorrhoeae that were not identified as such by API NH-examination of these discrepant results suggested that the MALDI-TOF MS identification may be the more reliable. MALDI-TOF MS is at least as accurate and reliable a method of identifying N. gonorrhoeae as API NH. We propose that MALDI-TOF MS could potentially be used as a single method for N. gonorrhoeae identification in routine cases by laboratories with access to this technology.

  20. Desorption corona beam ionisation (DCBI) mass spectrometry for in-situ analysis of adsorbed phenol in cigarette acetate fiber filter.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen; Tang, Li-Juan; Wen, Jian-Hui; Zhong, Ke-Jun; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Wang, Hua; Chen, Bo; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The study of spatial distribution characteristics of the adsorbed compounds for absorbent materials has significant importance in understanding the behaviors of aerosols while they migrating in the absorbent materials. Herein, for the first time, desorption corona beam ionization-mass spectrometry (DCBI-MS) has proposed for direct in-situ analysis of adsorbed aerosol for absorbent materials. DCBI is a novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-related technique developed by our group in recent years. It can facilitate accurately localizing sampling by forming a visible thin corona beam and avoid the risk of sample contamination and matrix interference compared with other similar techniques. The advantages of DCBI-MS allow rapid screening of the spatial distribution characteristics of the adsorbed compounds for absorbent materials. The distribution characteristic of phenol in cigarette filter tip filled with cellulose acetate fiber was studied as a model case for demonstrating the feasibility of the developed method. As a comparison, conventional HPLC was also used for the study of the distribution characteristic of phenol. The results revealed DCBI-MS had highly improved assay simplicity in spatial distribution characteristic analysis of phenol for the acetate fiber tip, therefore, exhibiting a great potential for convenient, rapid and cost-efficient analysis of the spatial distribution characteristic investigation of adsorbed compounds for adsorbent materials.

  1. Fast surface acoustic wave-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of cell response from islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Bllaci, Loreta; Kjellström, Sven; Eliasson, Lena; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y; Nilsson, Staffan

    2013-03-05

    A desire for higher speed and performance in molecular profiling analysis at a reduced cost is driving a trend in miniaturization and simplification of procedures. Here we report the use of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer for fast sample handling in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) peptide and protein profiling of Islets of Langerhans, for future type 2 diabetes (T2D) studies. Here the SAW atomizer was used for ultrasound (acoustic) extraction of insulin and other peptide hormones released from freshly prepared islets, stimulated directly on a membrane. A high energy propagating SAW atomizes the membrane-bound liquid into approximately 2 μm diameter droplets, rich in cell-released molecules. Besides acting as a sample carrier, the membrane provides a purification step by entrapping cell clusters and other impurities within its fibers. A new SAW-based sample-matrix deposition method for MALDI MS was developed and characterized by a strong insulin signal, and a limit of detection (LOD) lower than 100 amol was achieved. Our results support previous work reporting the SAW atomizer as a fast and inexpensive tool for ultrasound, membrane-based sample extraction. When interfaced with MALDI MS, the SAW atomizer constitutes a valuable tool for rapid cell studies. Other biomedical applications of SAW-MALDI MS are currently being developed, aiming at fast profiling of biofluids. The membrane sampling is a simplistic and noninvasive collection method of limited volume biofluids such as the gingival fluid and the tearfilm.

  2. Direct Analysis of Triacylglycerols from Crude Lipid Mixtures by Gold Nanoparticle-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jeongjin; Lee, Gwangbin; Cha, Sangwon

    2014-05-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs), essential energy storage lipids, are easily detected by conventional MALDI MS when occurring on their own. However, their signals are easily overwhelmed by other lipids, mainly phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and, therefore, require purification. In order to profile TAGs from crude lipid mixtures without prefractionation, we investigated alternative matrixes that can suppress phospholipid ion signals and enhance cationization of TAGs. We found that an aqueous solution of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with a diameter of 12 nm is a superior matrix for the laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) of TAGs in crude lipid mixtures. The AuNP matrix effectively suppressed other lipid signals such as phospholipids and also provided 100 times lower detection limit for TAGs than 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), the best conventional MALDI matrix for TAGs. The AuNP-assisted LDI MS enabled us to obtain detailed TAG profiles including minor species directly from crude beef lipid extracts without phospholipid interference. In addition, we could detect TAGs at a trace level from a total brain lipid extract.

  3. Direct analysis of triacylglycerols from crude lipid mixtures by gold nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Son, Jeongjin; Lee, Gwangbin; Cha, Sangwon

    2014-05-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs), essential energy storage lipids, are easily detected by conventional MALDI MS when occurring on their own. However, their signals are easily overwhelmed by other lipids, mainly phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and, therefore, require purification. In order to profile TAGs from crude lipid mixtures without prefractionation, we investigated alternative matrixes that can suppress phospholipid ion signals and enhance cationization of TAGs. We found that an aqueous solution of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with a diameter of 12 nm is a superior matrix for the laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) of TAGs in crude lipid mixtures. The AuNP matrix effectively suppressed other lipid signals such as phospholipids and also provided 100 times lower detection limit for TAGs than 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), the best conventional MALDI matrix for TAGs. The AuNP-assisted LDI MS enabled us to obtain detailed TAG profiles including minor species directly from crude beef lipid extracts without phospholipid interference. In addition, we could detect TAGs at a trace level from a total brain lipid extract.

  4. Laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of triacylglycerols and other components in fingermark samples.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Beth; Gidden, Jennifer; Lay, Jackson O; Durham, Bill

    2011-03-01

    The chemical composition of fingermarks could potentially be important for determining investigative leads, placing individuals at the time of a crime, and has applications as biomarkers of disease. Fingermark samples containing triacylglycerols (TAGs) and other components were analyzed using laser desorption/ionization (LDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS). Only LDI appeared to be useful for this application while conventional matrix-assisted LDI-TOF MS was not. Tandem MS was used to identify/confirm selected TAGs. A limited gender comparison, based on a simple t-distribution and peaks intensities, indicated that two TAGs showed gender specificity at the 95% confidence level and two others at 97.5% confidence. Because gender-related TAGs differences were most often close to the standard deviation of the measurements, the majority of the TAGs showed no gender specificity. Thus, LDI-TOF MS is not a reliable indicator of gender based on fingermark analysis. Cosmetic ingredients present in some samples were identified. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Endogenous Lipids from Rat Brain Tissue Implanted with Silver Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Ludovic; Baldwin, Kathrine; Barbacci, Damon C.; Jackson, Shelley N.; Roux, Aurélie; Balaban, Carey D.; Brinson, Bruce E.; McCully, Michael I.; Lewis, Ernest K.; Schultz, J. Albert; Woods, Amina S.

    2017-08-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of tissue implanted with silver nanoparticulate (AgNP) matrix generates reproducible imaging of lipids in rodent models of disease and injury. Gas-phase production and acceleration of size-selected 8 nm AgNP is followed by controlled ion beam rastering and soft landing implantation of 500 eV AgNP into tissue. Focused 337 nm laser desorption produces high quality images for most lipid classes in rat brain tissue (in positive mode: galactoceramides, diacylglycerols, ceramides, phosphatidylcholines, cholesteryl ester, and cholesterol, and in negative ion mode: phosphatidylethanolamides, sulfatides, phosphatidylinositol, and sphingomyelins). Image reproducibility in serial sections of brain tissue is achieved within <10% tolerance by selecting argentated instead of alkali cationized ions. The imaging of brain tissues spotted with pure standards was used to demonstrate that Ag cationized ceramide and diacylglycerol ions are from intact, endogenous species. In contrast, almost all Ag cationized fatty acid ions are a result of fragmentations of numerous lipid types having the fatty acid as a subunit. Almost no argentated intact fatty acid ions come from the pure fatty acid standard on tissue.

  6. Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Endogenous Lipids from Rat Brain Tissue Implanted with Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Muller, Ludovic; Baldwin, Kathrine; Barbacci, Damon C; Jackson, Shelley N; Roux, Aurélie; Balaban, Carey D; Brinson, Bruce E; McCully, Michael I; Lewis, Ernest K; Schultz, J Albert; Woods, Amina S

    2017-08-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of tissue implanted with silver nanoparticulate (AgNP) matrix generates reproducible imaging of lipids in rodent models of disease and injury. Gas-phase production and acceleration of size-selected 8 nm AgNP is followed by controlled ion beam rastering and soft landing implantation of 500 eV AgNP into tissue. Focused 337 nm laser desorption produces high quality images for most lipid classes in rat brain tissue (in positive mode: galactoceramides, diacylglycerols, ceramides, phosphatidylcholines, cholesteryl ester, and cholesterol, and in negative ion mode: phosphatidylethanolamides, sulfatides, phosphatidylinositol, and sphingomyelins). Image reproducibility in serial sections of brain tissue is achieved within <10% tolerance by selecting argentated instead of alkali cationized ions. The imaging of brain tissues spotted with pure standards was used to demonstrate that Ag cationized ceramide and diacylglycerol ions are from intact, endogenous species. In contrast, almost all Ag cationized fatty acid ions are a result of fragmentations of numerous lipid types having the fatty acid as a subunit. Almost no argentated intact fatty acid ions come from the pure fatty acid standard on tissue. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Screening of the binding of small molecules to proteins by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry combined with protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Development of a stigmatic mass microscope using laser desorption/ionization and a multi-turn time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazama, Hisanao; Yoshimura, Hidetoshi; Aoki, Jun; Nagao, Hirofumi; Toyoda, Michisato; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Fujii, Kenichi; Tashima, Toshio; Naito, Yasuhide; Awazu, Kunio

    2011-04-01

    A novel stigmatic mass microscope using laser desorption/ionization and a multi-turn time-of-flight mass spectrometer, MULTUM-IMG, has been developed. Stigmatic ion images of crystal violet masked by a fine square mesh grid with a 12.7 μm pitch as well as microdot patterns with a 5 μm dot diameter and a 10 μm pitch made with rhodamine B were clearly observed. The estimated spatial resolution was about 3 μm in the linear mode with a 20-fold ion optical magnification. Separating stigmatic ion images according to the time-of-flight, i.e., the mass-to-charge ratio of the ions was successfully demonstrated by a microdot pattern made with two different dyes, crystal violet and methylene blue. Stigmatic ion images of a microdot pattern made with crystal violet were observed after circulation in MULTUM-IMG, and the pattern of the ion image was maintained after ten cycles in MULTUM-IMG. A section of a mouse brain stained with crystal violet and methylene blue was observed in the linear mode, and the stigmatic total ion image of crystal violet and methylene blue agreed well with the optical microphotograph of the hippocampus for the same section.

  9. Comparison of two common adsorption materials for thermal desorption gas chromatography - mass spectrometry of biogenic volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Marcillo, Andrea; Jakimovska, Viktorija; Widdig, Anja; Birkemeyer, Claudia

    2017-09-08

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are commonly collected from gaseous samples by adsorption to materials such as the porous polymer Tenax TA. Adsorbed compounds are subsequently released from these materials by thermal desorption (TD) and separated then by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization (FID) or mass spectrometry (MS) detection. Tenax TA is known to be particularly suitable for non-polar to semipolar volatiles, however, many volatiles from environmental and biological samples possess a rather polar character. Therefore, we tested if the polymer XAD-2, which so far is widely used to adsorb organic compounds from aqueous and organic solvents, could provide a broader coverage for (semi)polar VOCs during gas-phase sampling. Mixtures of volatile compounds covering a wide range of volatility (bp. 20-256°C) and different chemical classes were introduced by liquid spiking into sorbent tubes with one of the two porous polymers, Tenax TA or XAD-2, and analyzed by TD/GC-MS. At first, an internal standard mixture composed of 17 authentic standards was used to optimize desorption temperature with respect to sorbent degradation and loading time for calibration. Secondly, we tested the detectability of a complex standard mixture composed of 57 volatiles, most of them common constituents of the body odor of mammals. Moreover, the performance of XAD-2 compared with Tenax TA was assessed as limit of quantitation and linearity for the internal standard mixture and 33 compounds from the complex standard mixture. Volatiles were analyzed in a range between 0.01-∼250ng/tube depending on the compound and material. Lower limits of quantitation were between 0.01 and 3 ng±<25% RSD (R(2)>0.9). Interestingly, we found different kinetics for compound adsorption with XAD-2, and a partially better sensitivity in comparison with Tenax TA. For these analytes, XAD-2 might be recommended as an alternative of Tenax TA for TD/GC-MS analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  10. Identification of beer-spoilage bacteria using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wieme, Anneleen D; Spitaels, Freek; Aerts, Maarten; De Bruyne, Katrien; Van Landschoot, Anita; Vandamme, Peter

    2014-08-18

    Applicability of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for identification of beer-spoilage bacteria was examined. To achieve this, an extensive identification database was constructed comprising more than 4200 mass spectra, including biological and technical replicates derived from 273 acetic acid bacteria (AAB) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB), covering a total of 52 species, grown on at least three growth media. Sequence analysis of protein coding genes was used to verify aberrant MALDI-TOF MS identification results and confirmed the earlier misidentification of 34 AAB and LAB strains. In total, 348 isolates were collected from culture media inoculated with 14 spoiled beer and brewery samples. Peak-based numerical analysis of MALDI-TOF MS spectra allowed a straightforward species identification of 327 (94.0%) isolates. The remaining isolates clustered separately and were assigned through sequence analysis of protein coding genes either to species not known as beer-spoilage bacteria, and thus not present in the database, or to novel AAB species. An alternative, classifier-based approach for the identification of spoilage bacteria was evaluated by combining the identification results obtained through peak-based cluster analysis and sequence analysis of protein coding genes as a standard. In total, 263 out of 348 isolates (75.6%) were correctly identified at species level and 24 isolates (6.9%) were misidentified. In addition, the identification results of 50 isolates (14.4%) were considered unreliable, and 11 isolates (3.2%) could not be identified. The present study demonstrated that MALDI-TOF MS is well-suited for the rapid, high-throughput and accurate identification of bacteria isolated from spoiled beer and brewery samples, which makes the technique appropriate for routine microbial quality control in the brewing industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of Tsetse (Glossina spp.) Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenheit, Antje; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Bauer, Burkhard; Steuber, Stephan; Clausen, Peter-Henning; Roesler, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Glossina (G.) spp. (Diptera: Glossinidae), known as tsetse flies, are vectors of African trypanosomes that cause sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in domestic livestock. Knowledge on tsetse distribution and accurate species identification help identify potential vector intervention sites. Morphological species identification of tsetse is challenging and sometimes not accurate. The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) technique, already standardised for microbial identification, could become a standard method for tsetse fly diagnostics. Therefore, a unique spectra reference database was created for five lab-reared species of riverine-, savannah- and forest- type tsetse flies and incorporated with the commercial Biotyper 3.0 database. The standard formic acid/acetonitrile extraction of male and female whole insects and their body parts (head, thorax, abdomen, wings and legs) was used to obtain the flies' proteins. The computed composite correlation index and cluster analysis revealed the suitability of any tsetse body part for a rapid taxonomical identification. Phyloproteomic analysis revealed that the peak patterns of G. brevipalpis differed greatly from the other tsetse. This outcome was comparable to previous theories that they might be considered as a sister group to other tsetse spp. Freshly extracted samples were found to be matched at the species level. However, sex differentiation proved to be less reliable. Similarly processed samples of the common house fly Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae; strain: Lei) did not yield any match with the tsetse reference database. The inclusion of additional strains of morphologically defined wild caught flies of known origin and the availability of large-scale mass spectrometry data could facilitate rapid tsetse species identification in the future. PMID:23875040

  12. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) applied to the speciation of arsenic compounds from fern leaves.

    PubMed

    de Abreu, Lívia Botelho; Augusti, Rodinei; Schmidt, Lucas; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Erico Marlon de Moraes; Nascentes, Clésia Cristina

    2013-09-01

    The different chemical forms of arsenic compounds, including inorganic and organic species, present distinct environmental impacts and toxicities. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is an excellent technique for in situ analysis, as it operates under atmospheric pressure and room temperature and is conducted with no/minimal sample pretreatment. Aimed at expanding its scope, DESI-MS is applied herein for the quick and reliable detection of inorganic (arsenate--As(V): AsO4(3-) and arsenite--As(III): AsO2(-)) and organic (dimethylarsinic acid--DMA: (CH3)2AsO(OH) and disodium methyl arsonate hexahydrate: CH3AsO3·2Na·6H2O) arsenic compounds in fern leaves. Operational conditions of DESI-MS were optimized with DMA standard deposited on paper surfaces to improve ionization efficiency and detection limits. Mass spectra data for all arsenic species were acquired in both the positive and negative ion modes. The positive ion mode was shown to be useful in detecting both the organic and inorganic arsenic compounds. The negative ion mode was shown only to be useful in detecting As(V) species. Moreover, MS/MS spectra were recorded to confirm the identity of each arsenic compound by the characteristic fragmentation profiles. Optimized conditions of DESI-MS were applied to the analysis of fern leaves. LC-ICP-MS was employed to confirm the results obtained by DESI-MS and to quantify the arsenic species in fern leaves. The results confirmed the applicability of DESI-MS in detecting arsenic compounds in complex matrices.

  13. A binary matrix for improved detection of phosphopeptides in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Hua; Kang, Gum-Yong; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2009-08-01

    Application of matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) to analysis and characterization of phosphopeptides in peptide mixtures may have a limitation, because of the lower ionizing efficiency of phosphopeptides than nonphosphorylated peptides in MALDI MS. In this work, a binary matrix that consists of two conventional matrices of 3-hydroxypicolinic acid (3-HPA) and alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CCA) was tested for phosphopeptide analysis. 3-HPA and CCA were found to be hot matrices, and 3-HPA not as good as CCA and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) for peptide analysis. However, the presence of 3-HPA in the CCA solution with a volume ratio of 1:1 could significantly enhance ion signals for phosphopeptides in both positive-ion and negative-ion detection modes compared with the use of pure CCA or DHB, the most common phosphopeptide matrices. Higher signal intensities of phosphopeptides could be obtained with lower laser power using the binary matrix. Neutral loss of the phosphate group (-80 Da) and phosphoric acid (-98 Da) from the phosphorylated-residue-containing peptide ions with the binary matrix was decreased compared with CCA alone. In addition, since the crystal shape prepared with the binary matrix was more homogeneous than that prepared with DHB, searching for 'sweet' spots can be avoided. The sensitivity to detect singly or doubly phosphorylated peptides in peptide mixtures was higher than that obtained with pure CCA and as good as that obtained using DHB. We also used the binary matrix to detect the in-solution tryptic digest of the crude casein extracted from commercially available low fat milk sample, and found six phosphopeptides to match the digestion products of casein, based on mass-to-charge values and LIFT TOF-TOF spectra. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Identification and differentiation of the red ink entries of seals on document by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Feng; Zhang, Yun; Wu, Yao; Yu, Jing; Xie, Meng-Xia

    2014-03-01

    The establishment of approaches for the differentiation of the ink entries of seals on paper can provide evidence to authenticate the related documents and can play a key role in judicial expertise. The identification and discrimination method for 38 red ink entries of seals on paper has been investigated using laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). Six dye components for the ink pastes of seals, Scarlet powder (SP), Bronze Red C (BR), Fast Red R (FR), Basic Violet 3 (BV3), Pigment Red 22 (PR22) and Pigment Red 112 (PR112), have been identified by their LDI-MS spectra, and the results have been confirmed by electrospray ionization quadruple-time of flight mass spectrometry (QTOF-ESI-MS/MS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The 38 ink entries were classified into six groups based on the presence or the absence of the pigments in their positive and negative LDI-MS spectra, and the discrimination power (DP) was calculated to be about 82%. The ink entries within each group were further differentiated from the relative peak areas (RPA) of the fragments for the pigments and the profile of their LDI-MS spectra, and thus the DP was increased to 98%. All the 38 ink entries could be discriminated (the DP was 100%), if including the contribution of unknown peaks. Compared with the results obtained by the FTIR and Raman methods, the established LDI-MS approach could provide more information of the dye components in the ink entries. The results showed that the developed LDI-MS method is powerful, sensitive and rapid and can directly differentiate the red ink entries of seals from paper substrates, thus offering a novel approach to judge the authenticity of documents.

  15. Enhanced sample preparation for quantitation of microcystins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Puddick, Jonathan; Prinsep, Michèle R; Wood, Susanna A; Craig Cary, S; Hamilton, David P

    2012-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are a group of cyanotoxins which pose a serious health threat when present in aquatic systems. Quantitative analysis of MCs by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry has potential for the processing of large numbers of samples quickly and economically. The existing method uses an expensive internal standard and protocols that are incompatible with automated sample preparation and data acquisition. To produce a MALDI-TOF sample preparation technique for the quantitation of MCs that not only maintains reproducibility and sensitivity, but is also compatible with an automated work-flow. Seven different MALDI-TOF sample preparations were assessed for signal reproducibility (coefficient of variation) and sensitivity (method detection limit) using a cost-effective internal standard (angiotensin I). The best preparation was then assessed for its quantitative performance using three different MC congeners ([Dha⁷] MC-LR, MC-RR and MC-YR). The sensitivity of six of the preparations was acceptable, as was the reproducibility for two thin-layer preparations performed on a polished steel target. Both thin-layer preparations could be used with a MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer that automatically acquires data, and one could be used in an automated sample preparation work-flow. Further investigation using the thin-layer spot preparation demonstrated that linear quantification of three different MC congeners was possible. The study demonstrates that with different sample preparation methods and modern instrumentation, large numbers of samples can be analysed rapidly for MCs at low cost. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Rapid Identification of the Foodborne Pathogen Trichinella spp. by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Neumann, Jennifer; Bahn, Peter; Reckinger, Sabine; Nöckler, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Human trichinellosis occurs through consumption of raw or inadequately processed meat or meat products containing larvae of the parasitic nematodes of the genus Trichinella. Currently, nine species and three genotypes are recognized, of which T. spiralis, T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis have the highest public health relevance. To date, the differentiation of the larvae to the species and genotype level is based primarily on molecular methods, which can be relatively time consuming and labor intensive. Due to its rapidness and ease of use a matrix assisted laser desorption / ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) reference spectra database using Trichinella strains of all known species and genotypes was created. A formicacid/acetonitrile protein extraction was carried out after pooling 10 larvae of each Trichinella species and genotype. Each sample was spotted 9 times using α-cyano 4-hydoxy cinnamic acid matrix and a MicroFlex LT mass spectrometer was used to acquire 3 spectra (m/z 2000 to 20000 Da) from each spot resulting in 27 spectra/species or genotype. Following the spectra quality assessment, Biotyper software was used to create a main spectra library (MSP) representing nine species and three genotypes of Trichinella. The evaluation of the spectra generated by MALDI-TOF MS revealed a classification which was comparable to the results obtained by molecular methods. Also, each Trichinella species utilized in this study was distinct and distinguishable with a high confidence level. Further, different conservation methods such as freezing and conservation in alcohol and the host species origin of the isolated larvae did not have a significant influence on the generated spectra. Therefore, the described MALDI-TOF MS can successfully be implemented for both genus and species level identification and represents a major step forward in the use of this technique in foodborne parasitology.

  17. Laser-Induced Thermal Desorption and Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Molecular Adsorbates on Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Donald Paul

    The field of surface science is growing rapidly, fueled by the needs to refine petroleum more efficiently, to clean up automobile exhaust, to protect against corrosion and wear, and to shrink the size of electronic components and information storage systems. These are important aspects of daily life, all of which could benefit from a better understanding of the fundamental processes that occur at the interfaces between different phases of matter. For the technologies mentioned, the most important interface is that between the gas and the solid phases. The technique described in this dissertation merges several recently established methods into a powerful instrument for the analysis of the solid-gas interface, yielding information on the chemical nature of species at this interface, relative concentrations, and even reactivities and intermediates. Details of the design and construction of the instrument are followed by a performance evaluation and a presentation of characterization studies for postionization methods, including electron impact ionization, resonance -enhanced multiphoton ionization, and chemical ionization. The use of the technique for the analysis of unknowns on surfaces is then detailed, highlighting the ability to obtain accurate mass measurement using the high resolution capabilities of FTMS. The use of ion storage techniques results in further unique analysis methods via gas-phase charge exchange reactions. This technique opens the door to the study of more complex molecules on surfaces, as well as mixtures of surface species, because FT mass spectrometry is well suited for such analyses. In this dissertation, data is presented for desorption of tens of molecular species encompassing nearly every organic functional group and including species as widely varying as cyanogen, ethylene, cyclohexane, methanol, and even a tetra-peptide. In-depth analyses of the kinetics of ethylene dehydrogenation and the identification of cyclohexene and 1,6-hexa

  18. Rapid Identification of the Foodborne Pathogen Trichinella spp. by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Neumann, Jennifer; Bahn, Peter; Reckinger, Sabine; Nöckler, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Human trichinellosis occurs through consumption of raw or inadequately processed meat or meat products containing larvae of the parasitic nematodes of the genus Trichinella. Currently, nine species and three genotypes are recognized, of which T. spiralis, T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis have the highest public health relevance. To date, the differentiation of the larvae to the species and genotype level is based primarily on molecular methods, which can be relatively time consuming and labor intensive. Due to its rapidness and ease of use a matrix assisted laser desorption / ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) reference spectra database using Trichinella strains of all known species and genotypes was created. A formicacid/acetonitrile protein extraction was carried out after pooling 10 larvae of each Trichinella species and genotype. Each sample was spotted 9 times using α-cyano 4-hydoxy cinnamic acid matrix and a MicroFlex LT mass spectrometer was used to acquire 3 spectra (m/z 2000 to 20000 Da) from each spot resulting in 27 spectra/species or genotype. Following the spectra quality assessment, Biotyper software was used to create a main spectra library (MSP) representing nine species and three genotypes of Trichinella. The evaluation of the spectra generated by MALDI-TOF MS revealed a classification which was comparable to the results obtained by molecular methods. Also, each Trichinella species utilized in this study was distinct and distinguishable with a high confidence level. Further, different conservation methods such as freezing and conservation in alcohol and the host species origin of the isolated larvae did not have a significant influence on the generated spectra. Therefore, the described MALDI-TOF MS can successfully be implemented for both genus and species level identification and represents a major step forward in the use of this technique in foodborne parasitology. PMID:26999436

  19. Two-Step Resonance-Enhanced Desorption Laser Mass Spectrometry for In Situ Analysis of Organic-Rich Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, S. A.; Grubisic, A.; Uckert, K.; Li, X.; Cornish, T.; Cook, J. E.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.

    2016-01-01

    A wide diversity of planetary surfaces in the solar system represent high priority targets for in situ compositional and contextual analysis as part of future missions. The planned mission portfolio will inform our knowledge of the chemistry at play on Mars, icy moons, comets, and primitive asteroids, which can lead to advances in our understanding of the interplay between inorganic and organic building blocks that led to the evolution of habitable environments on Earth and beyond. In many of these environments, the presence of water or aqueously altered mineralogy is an important indicator of habitable environments that are present or may have been present in the past. As a result, the search for complex organic chemistry that may imply the presence of a feedstock, if not an inventory of biosignatures, is naturally aligned with targeted analyses of water-rich surface materials. Here we describe the two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) analytical technique that has seen broad application in the study of organics in meteoritic samples, now demonstrated to be compatible with an in situ investigation with technique improvements to target high priority planetary environments as part of a future scientific payload. An ultraviolet (UV) pulsed laser is used in previous and current embodiments of laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDMS) to produce ionized species traceable to the mineral and organic composition of a planetary surface sample. L2MS, an advanced technique in laser mass spectrometry, is selective to the aromatic organic fraction of a complex sample, which can provide additional sensitivity and confidence in the detection of specific compound structures. Use of a compact two-step laser mass spectrometer prototype has been previously reported to provide specificity to key aromatic species, such as PAHs, nucleobases, and certain amino acids. Recent improvements in this technique have focused on the interaction between the mineral matrix and the

  20. Oligomeric carbon and siloxane series observed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation and laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry during the analysis of soot formed in fuel-rich flames.

    PubMed

    Apicella, Barbara; Ciajolo, Anna; Millan, Marcos; Galmes, Carolina; Herod, Alan A; Kandiyoti, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    Oligomeric carbon and siloxane series have been observed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), during the analysis of the dichloromethane (DCM)-soluble fractions of condensable material recovered from fuel-rich flames. Laser desorption (LD) spectra showed a pattern of oligomeric dimethyl-siloxane structures with a spacing of 74 u. The siloxane series appears to have originated as contamination of samples by silicone oil used to lubricate connections of polymer tubing. This was confirmed by extracting silicone tubing and silicone grease with DCM followed by MALDI-MS analysis. A series of peaks with a mass spacing of 24 u was also observed, superimposed on the continuum of unresolved organic ions. This oligomeric series appears to correspond to polycyclic aromatics separated by (mainly) ethylene bridges. Thus LD-MS appears to have revealed a series of soot precursors, intermediate between polycyclic aromatics and particulate soot, which was not detected by MALDI-MS. More detailed work is necessary to define these species with precision. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Performance and cost analysis of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for routine identification of yeast.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Neelam; Hall, Leslie; Wohlfiel, Sherri L; Buckwalter, Seanne P; Wengenack, Nancy L

    2011-04-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry was compared to phenotypic testing for yeast identification. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry yielded 96.3% and 84.5% accurate species level identifications (spectral scores, ≥ 1.8) for 138 common and 103 archived strains of yeast. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is accurate, rapid (5.1 min of hands-on time/identification), and cost-effective ($0.50/sample) for yeast identification in the clinical laboratory.

  2. Determination of Macrolide Antibiotics Using Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Followed by Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Yang, Thomas C.; Chang, Sarah Y.

    2012-06-01

    A novel method for the determination of macrolide antibiotics using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection was developed. Acetone and dichloromethane were used as the disperser solvent and extraction solvent, respectively. A mixture of extraction solvent and disperser solvent were rapidly injected into a 1.0 mL aqueous sample to form a cloudy solution. After the extraction, macrolide antibiotics were detected using surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI/MS) with colloidal silver as the matrix. Under optimum conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 were 2, 3, 3, and 2 nM for erythromycin (ERY), spiramycin (SPI), tilmicosin (TILM), and tylosin (TYL), respectively. This developed method was successfully applied to the determination of macrolide antibiotics in human urine samples.

  3. Comparison of inert supports in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of peptides: pencil lead, porous silica gel, DIOS-chip and NALDI target.