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Sample records for 256-detector row ct

  1. CT Coronary Angiography: 256-Slice and 320-Detector Row Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Edward M.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Steigner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has rapidly evolved from 4-detector row systems in 1998 to 256-slice and 320-detector row CT systems. With smaller detector element size and faster gantry rotation speed, spatial and temporal resolution of the 64-detector MDCT scanners have made coronary artery imaging a reliable clinical test. Wide-area coverage MDCT, such as the 256-slice and 320-detector row MDCT scanners, has enabled volumetric imaging of the entire heart free of stair-step artifacts at a single time point within one cardiac cycle. It is hoped that these improvements will be realized with greater diagnostic accuracy of CT coronary angiography. Such scanners hold promise in performing a rapid high quality “triple rule-out” test without high contrast load, improved myocardial perfusion imaging, and even four-dimensional CT subtraction angiography. These emerging technical advances and novel applications will continue to change the way we study coronary artery disease beyond detecting luminal stenosis. PMID:20425186

  2. Multi-detector row CT of pancreatic islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Horton, Karen M; Hruban, Ralph H; Yeo, Charles; Fishman, Elliot K

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic islet cell tumors (ICTs) are neuroendocrine neoplasms that produce and secrete hormones to a variable degree. These neoplasms can present a diagnostic challenge, both clinically and radiologically. ICTs can be classified as either syndromic or nonsyndromic on the basis of their clinical manifestations. Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of both syndromic and nonsyndromic ICTs. In general, syndromic ICTs are less than 3 cm in size. They are typically hyperenhancing and are usually best seen on CT scans obtained during the arterial phase. Nonsyndromic ICTs tend to be larger than syndromic ICTs at presentation and are more likely to be cystic or necrotic. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with appropriate CT protocol for the evaluation of patients with suspected pancreatic ICT and to understand the variable CT appearances of these neoplasms. (c) RSNA, 2006.

  3. Multidetector-row CT with a 64-row amorphous silicon flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Edward G.; Colbeth, Richard E.; Daley, Earl T.; Job, Isaias D.; Mollov, Ivan P.; Mollov, Todor I.; Pavkovich, John M.; Roos, Pieter G.; Star-Lack, Josh M.; Tognina, Carlo A.

    2007-03-01

    A unique 64-row flat panel (FP) detector has been developed for sub-second multidetector-row CT (MDCT). The intent was to explore the image quality achievable with relatively inexpensive amorphous silicon (a-Si) compared to existing diagnostic scanners with discrete crystalline diode detectors. The FP MDCT system is a bench-top design that consists of three FP modules. Each module uses a 30 cm x 3.3 cm a-Si array with 576 x 64 photodiodes. The photodiodes are 0.52 mm x 0.52 mm, which allows for about twice the spatial resolution of most commercial MDCT scanners. The modules are arranged in an overlapping geometry, which is sufficient to provide a full-fan 48 cm diameter scan. Scans were obtained with various detachable scintillators, e.g. ceramic Gd IIO IIS, particle-in-binder Gd IIO IIS:Tb and columnar CsI:Tl. Scan quality was evaluated with a Catphan-500 performance phantom and anthropomorphic phantoms. The FP MDCT scans demonstrate nearly equivalent performance scans to a commercial 16-slice MDCT scanner at comparable 10 - 20 mGy/100mAs doses. Thus far, a high contrast resolution of 15 lp/cm and a low contrast resolution of 5 mm @ 0.3 % have been achieved on 1 second scans. Sub-second scans have been achieved with partial rotations. Since the future direction of MDCT appears to be in acquiring single organ coverage per scan, future efforts are planned for increasing the number of detector rows beyond the current 64- rows.

  4. Diagnostic Imaging of Pulmonary Thromboembolism by Multidetector-row CT

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    For diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism, multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) is a minimally invasive imaging technique that can be performed rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity, and has been increasingly employed as the imaging modality of first choice for this disease. Since deep vein thrombosis in the legs, which is important as a thrombus source, can be evaluated immediately after the diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism, this diagnostic method is considered to provide important information when deciding on a comprehensive therapeutic strategy for this disease. PMID:23555409

  5. Recent technologic advances in multi-detector row cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra Simon

    2009-11-01

    Recent technical advances in multi-detector row CT have resulted in lower radiation dose, improved temporal and spatial resolution, decreased scan time, and improved tissue differentiation. Lower radiation doses have resulted from the use of pre-patient z collimators, the availability of thin-slice axial data acquisition, the increased efficiency of ECG-based tube current modulation, and the implementation of iterative reconstruction algorithms. Faster gantry rotation and the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources have led to improvements in temporal resolution, and gains in spatial resolution have been achieved through application of the flying x-ray focal-spot technique in the z-direction. Shorter scan times have resulted from the design of detector arrays with increasing numbers of detector rows and through the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources to allow higher helical pitch. Some improvement in tissue differentiation has been achieved with dual energy CT. This article discusses these recent technical advances in detail.

  6. Classification of lung area using multidetector-row CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukaibo, Tsutomu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2002-05-01

    Recently, we can get high quality images in the short time for the progress of X-ray CT scanner. And the three dimensional (3-D) analysis of pulmonary organs using multidetector-row CT (MDCT) images, is expected. This paper presents a method for classifying lung area into each lobe using pulmonary MDCT images of the whole lung area. It is possible to recognize the position of nodule by classifying lung area into these lobes. The structure of lungs differs on the right one and left one. The right lung is divided into three domains by major fissure and minor fissure. And, the left lung is divided into two domains by major fissure. Watching MDCT images carefully, we find that the surroundings of fissures have few blood vessels. Therefore, lung area is classified by extraction of the domain that the distance from pulmonary blood vessels is large and connective search of these extracted domains. These extraction and search are realized by 3-D weighted Hough transform.

  7. Minimizing the acquisition phase in coronary CT angiography using the second generation 320-row CT.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Nobuo; Kanno, Shigeaki; Maeda, Eriko; Akahane, Masaaki; Torigoe, Rumiko; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2014-07-01

    We aimed to compare the radiation dose and image quality of a minimal phase window centered at 77 % compared with a wide phase window in coronary CT angiography using the second-generation 320-row CT. Eighty patients with heart rate ≤75 bpm were retrospectively included. The first 40 patients underwent scanning with a wide phase window (65-85 %), while the last 40 patients underwent scanning with a minimal phase window centered at 77 %. Subjective image quality was graded using a 4-point scale (4 = excellent). Image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio at the proximal segments were also analyzed. The mean effective dose was derived from the dose length product multiplied by a chest conversion coefficient (κ = 0.014 mSv mGy(-1) cm(-1)). Minimal phase window scanning centered at 77 % reduced the radiation dose by 30 % compared with wide phase window scanning (1.7 vs 2.4 mSv, p = 0.0009). The subjective image quality showed no significant difference (3.75 vs 3.76, p = 0.77). No significant difference was observed in the image noise, CT number, and contrast-to-noise ratio. Radiation dose could be reduced while maintaining image quality by use of a minimal phase window centered at 77 % compared with a wide phase window in coronary CT angiography using the second generation 320-row CT.

  8. Relationship between noise, dose, and pitch in cardiac multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Primak, Andrew N; McCollough, Cynthia H; Bruesewitz, Michael R; Zhang, Jie; Fletcher, Joel G

    2006-01-01

    In spiral computed tomography (CT), dose is always inversely proportional to pitch. However, the relationship between noise and pitch (and hence noise and dose) depends on the scanner type (single vs multi-detector row) and reconstruction mode (cardiac vs noncardiac). In single detector row spiral CT, noise is independent of pitch. Conversely, in noncardiac multi-detector row CT, noise depends on pitch because the spiral interpolation algorithm makes use of redundant data from different detector rows to decrease noise for pitch values less than 1 (and increase noise for pitch values > 1). However, in cardiac spiral CT, redundant data cannot be used because such data averaging would degrade the temporal resolution. Therefore, the behavior of noise versus pitch returns to the single detector row paradigm, with noise being independent of pitch. Consequently, since faster rotation times require lower pitch values in cardiac multi-detector row CT, dose is increased without a commensurate decrease in noise. Thus, the use of faster rotation times will improve temporal resolution, not alter noise, and increase dose. For a particular application, the higher dose resulting from faster rotation speeds should be justified by the clinical benefits of the improved temporal resolution.

  9. Intercostal Artery Supplying Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Demonstration of a Tumor Feeder by C-arm CT and Multidetector Row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo-Cheol Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, In Joon; An, Sangbu; Seong, Nak Jong; Son, Kyu Ri; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-02-15

    This study was designed to describe tumor feeders from the intercostal artery supplying hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on C-arm CT and multidetector row CT. From March 2008 to May 2009, C-arm CT of the intercostal artery was prospectively performed in 24 HCC patients. Two interventional radiologists, who performed C-arm CT, evaluated tumor feeders on C-arm CT and multidetector row CT scans by consensus. In total, 35 intercostal arteries were examined by C-arm CT. All tumor feeders except one showed a sharp upward turn at or near the costochondral junction. On axial C-arm CT images, all tumor feeders were observed as an enhancing dot in the upper intercostal space along the diaphragm. On multidetector CT scans, 17 tumor feeders were observed and 18 were not. Tumor feeders from the intercostal artery are observed as an enhancing dot along the diaphragm on C-arm CT and can be seen on multidetector row CT in approximately half of patients.

  10. Clinical indications and utilization of 320-detector row CT in 2500 outpatients.

    PubMed

    Tabibian, Benjamin; Roach, Cayce J; Hanson, Eric H; Wynn, Brad L; Orrison, William W

    2011-06-01

    Clinical indications and utilization patterns for 3963 CT scans on 2500 consecutive patents on a 320-detector row CT in an outpatient setting were retrospectively analyzed and compared with previously reported CT studies. The impact of the latest generation CT technology, including whole organ perfusion, on indications and utilization patterns during the study period was also assessed. The top five requested CT scan types were abdomen/pelvis, chest, head, sinuses, and coronary CT angiography. Indication and utilization rates were similar to prior studies for abdomen/pelvis, non-cardiac chest, and head CT scans. Abdominal pain and headaches were the most frequent indications for abdomen/pelvis and head CTs, respectively. The 7.3% cardiac CT scan utilization rate was not comparable to rates of up to 72% in self-referral outpatient settings. Whole organ volume CT imaging was utilized in 100% of coronary CT angiography and 22.7% of head CTs. The 320-row CT had fewer negative head and body CT findings as compared to prior reports. The availability of new technology, such as whole organ dynamic scans, appears to have influenced CT indications, utilization and finding rates with a decrease in negative brain and body results. Comparisons with previous outpatient CT studies were similar for multiple categories with the exception of cardiac CT utilization, which is heavily influenced by self-referral. Further study of outpatient imaging indications and utilization rates from multiple centers may benefit from a standardized categorization to improve understanding of the disparate outpatient imaging environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimization of multiplanar reformations from isotropic data sets acquired with 16-detector row helical CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Tracy A; Nelson, Rendon C; Johnson, G Allan; Lee, Ellie R; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Lowry, Carolyn R; Bullard, Anthony B; DeLong, David M; Paulson, Erik K

    2006-01-01

    Institutional review board approval and waiver of consent were obtained for the patient component of this retrospective HIPAA-compliant study. By using an anthropomorphic phantom and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors, radiation dose was determined for one eight-detector row and two 16-detector row computed tomographic (CT) protocols. A custom phantom was scanned by using the three protocols to identify isotropy. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were determined for the same protocols by using a third phantom. Seven patients had undergone isotropic 16-detector row CT of the abdomen and pelvis. Anonymized coronal reformations at various thicknesses were ranked qualitatively by three radiologists. Effective dose equivalents were similar for the eight- and 16-detector row protocols. When transverse and coronal reformations of data acquired in the custom phantom were compared, coronal reformations obtained with the 16-detector row and 0.625-mm section thickness protocol were found to be nearly identical to the transverse image for all sets of line pairs. CNRs were consistently highest on 5-mm-thick coronal reformations (CNR range, 1.2-3.3). For qualitative assessment, 2- and 3-mm-thick coronal reformations were consistently preferred.

  12. [Multidetector row CT in assessment of coronary artery calcification on hemodialisis].

    PubMed

    Caro, P; Delgado, R; Dapena, F; Núñez, A

    2007-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a strong predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Coronary artery calcification is more frequent, more extensive and progresses more rapidly in CKD than in general population. They are also considered a marker of coronary heart disease, with high prevalence and functional significance. It suggests that detection and surveillance may be worthwhile in general clinical practice. New non-invasive image techniques, like Multi-detector row CT, a type of spiral scanner, assess density and volume of calcification at multiple sites and allow quantitative scoring of vascular calcification using calcium scores analogous to those from electron-beam CT. We have assessed and quantified coronary artery calcification with 16 multidetector row CT in 44 patients on hemodialysis and their relationship with several cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary artery calcification prevalence was of 84 % with mean calcium score of 1580 +/- 2010 ( r 0-9844) with calcium score > 400 in 66% of patients. It was usually multiple, affecting more than two vessels in more than 50%. In all but one patient, left anterior descending artery was involved with higher calcium score level at right coronary artery. Advanced age, male, diabetes, smoking, more morbidity, cerebrovascular disease previous, and calcium-binders phosphate and analogous vitamin D treatment would seem to be associated with coronary artery calcification. Coronary artery calcification is very frequent and extensive, usually multiple and associated to modifiable risk factors in hemodialysis patients. Multi-detector-row CT seems an effective, suitable, readily applicable method to assess and quantify coronary artery calcification.

  13. Computed tomography dose assessment for a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Geleijns, J; Salvadó Artells, M; de Bruin, P W; Matter, R; Muramatsu, Y; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2009-05-21

    Computed tomography (CT) dosimetry should be adapted to the rapid developments in CT technology. Recently a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner that challenges the existing Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) dosimetry paradigm was introduced. The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric characteristics of this cone beam scanner, to study the appropriateness of existing CT dose metrics and to suggest a pragmatic approach for CT dosimetry for cone beam scanners. Dose measurements with a small Farmer-type ionization chamber and with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers were performed free in air to characterize the cone beam. According to the most common dose metric in CT, namely CTDI, measurements were also performed in 150 mm and 350 mm long CT head and CT body dose phantoms with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers, respectively. To explore effects that cannot be measured with ionization chambers, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the dose distribution in 150 mm, 350 mm and 700 mm long CT head and CT body phantoms were performed. To overcome inconsistencies in the definition of CTDI100 for the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner, doses were also expressed as the average absorbed dose within the pencil chamber (D100). Measurements free in air revealed excellent correspondence between CTDI300air and D100air, while CTDI100air substantially underestimates CTDI300air. Results of measurements in CT dose phantoms and corresponding MC simulations at centre and peripheral positions were weighted and revealed good agreement between CTDI300w, D100w and CTDI600w, while CTDI100w substantially underestimates CTDI300w. D100w provides a pragmatic metric for characterizing the dose of the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner. This quantity can be measured with the widely available 100 mm pencil ionization chamber within 150 mm long CT dose phantoms. CTDI300w measured in 350 mm long CT dose phantoms serves as an appropriate standard of

  14. Noninvasive imaging of coronary arteries: current and future role of multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Halliburton, Sandra S; Stillman, Arthur E; Kuzmiak, Stacie A; Nissen, Steven E; Tuzcu, E Murat; White, Richard D

    2004-07-01

    While invasive imaging techniques, especially selective conventional coronary angiography, will remain vital to planning and guiding catheter-based and surgical treatment of significantly stenotic coronary lesions, the comprehensive and serial assessment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic stages of coronary artery disease (CAD) for preventive purposes will eventually need to rely on noninvasive imaging techniques. Cardiovascular imaging with tomographic modalities, including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, has great potential for providing valuable information. This review article will describe the current and future role of cardiac CT, and in particular that of multi-detector row CT, for imaging of atherosclerotic and other pathologic changes of the coronary arteries. It will describe how tomographic coronary imaging may eventually supplement traditional angiographic techniques in understanding the patterns of atherosclerotic CAD development.

  15. The radiological diagnosis of fenestral otosclerosis: the utility of histogram analysis using multidetector row CT.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Togao, Osamu; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Inoguchi, Takashi; Kumazawa, Seiji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Bone density measurements using high-resolution CT have been reported to be useful to diagnose fenestral otosclerosis. However, small region of interest (ROI) chosen by less-experienced radiologists may result in false-negative findings. Semi-automatic analysis such as CT histogram analysis may offer improved assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of CT histogram analysis in diagnosing fenestral otosclerosis. Temporal bone CT of consecutive patients with otosclerosis and normal controls was retrospectively analyzed. The control group consisted of the normal-hearing contralateral ears of patients with otitis media, cholesteatoma, trauma, facial nerve palsy, or tinnitus. All CT images were obtained using a 64-detector-row CT scanner with 0.5-mm collimation. AROI encompassing 10 × 10 pixels was placed in the bony labyrinth located anterior to the oval window. The mean CT value, variance and entropy were compared between otosclerosis patients and normal controls using Student's t test. The number of pixels below mean minus SD in the control (%Lowcont) and total subjects (%Lowtotal) were also compared. In addition, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) value for the discrimination between otosclerosis patients and normal controls was calculated. 51 temporal bones of 38 patients with otosclerosis and 30 temporal bones of 30 control subjects were included. The mean CT value was significantly lower in otosclerosis cases than in normal controls (p < 0.01). In addition, variance, entropy, %Lowcont and %Lowtotal were significantly higher in otosclerosis cases than in normal controls (p < 0.01, respectively). The AUC values for the mean CT value, %Lowcont and %Lowtotal were 0.751, 0.760 and 0.765, respectively. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that histogram analysis of CT image may be of clinical value in diagnosing otosclerosis.

  16. Comparison of cerebral blood flow data obtained by computed tomography (CT) perfusion with that obtained by xenon CT using 320-row CT.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Tanizaki, Yoshio; Kimura, Hiroaki; Akaji, Kazunori; Kano, Tadashige; Suzuki, Kentaro; Takayama, Youhei; Kanzawa, Takao; Shidoh, Satoka; Nakazawa, Masaki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Mihara, Ban

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) data obtained by computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging have been shown to be qualitative data rather than quantitative, in contrast with data obtained by other imaging methods, such as xenon CT (XeCT) imaging. Thus, interpatient comparisons of CBF values themselves obtained by CTP may be inaccurate. In this study, we have compared CBF ratios as well as CBF values obtained from CTP-CBF data to those obtained from XeCT-CBF data for the same patients to determine CTP-CBF parameters that can be used for interpatient comparisons. The data used in the present study were obtained as volume data using 320-row CT. The volume data were applied to an automated region of interest-determining software (3DSRT, version 3.5.2 ) and converted to 59 slices of 2 mm interval standardized images. In the present study, we reviewed 10 patients with occlusive cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs) undergoing both CTP and XeCT in the same period. Our study shows that ratios of CBF measurements, such as hemodynamic stress distribution (perforator-to-cortical flow ratio of middle cerebral artery [MCA] region) or the left/right ratio for the region of the MCA, calculated using CTP data have been shown to correlate well with the same ratios calculated using XeCT data. These results suggest that such CBF ratios could be useful for generating interpatient comparisons of CTP-CBF data obtained by 320-row CT among patients with occlusive CVD.

  17. 320-row CT renal perfusion imaging in patients with aortic dissection: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongting; Liu, Jiayi; Wen, Zhaoying; Li, Yu; Sun, Zhonghua; Xu, Qin; Fan, Zhanming

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical value of renal perfusion imaging in patients with aortic dissection (AD) using 320-row computed tomography (CT), and to determine the relationship between renal CT perfusion imaging and various factors of aortic dissection. Methods Forty-three patients with AD who underwent 320-row CT renal perfusion before operation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Diagnosis of AD was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. Blood flow (BF) of bilateral renal perfusion was measured and analyzed. CT perfusion imaging signs of AD in relation to the type of AD, number of entry tears and the false lumen thrombus were observed and compared. Results The BF values of patients with type A AD were significantly lower than those of patients with type B AD (P = 0.004). No significant difference was found in the BF between different numbers of intimal tears (P = 0.288), but BF values were significantly higher in cases with a false lumen without thrombus and renal arteries arising from the true lumen than in those with thrombus (P = 0.036). The BF values measured between the true lumen, false lumen and overriding groups were different (P = 0.02), with the true lumen group having the highest. Also, the difference in BF values between true lumen and false lumen groups was statistically significant (P = 0.016), while no statistical significance was found in the other two groups (P > 0.05). The larger the size of intimal entry tears, the greater the BF values (P = 0.044). Conclusions This study shows a direct correlation between renal CT perfusion changes and AD, with the size, number of intimal tears, different types of AD, different renal artery origins and false lumen thrombosis, significantly affecting the perfusion values. PMID:28182709

  18. Comparison of air kerma between C-arm CT and 64-multidetector-row CT using a phantom.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Seiki; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Murotani, Kazuhiro; Nishioku, Tadayoshi; Shirai, Shintaro; Sonomura, Tetsuo

    2014-05-01

    To compare air kerma after scanning a phantom with C-arm CT and with 64-multidetector row CT (64MDCT). A phantom was scanned using parameters based on data of ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who had C-arm CT during hepatic arteriography and 64MDCT during arterial portography. Radiation monitors were used to measure air kerma ten times at each of five points: the center (A), top (B), left side (C), bottom (D), and right side (E). For C-arm CT vs. 64MDCT, air kerma after scanning was 10.5 ± 0.2 vs. 6.4 ± 0.0 for A, 1.5 ± 0.0 vs. 11.6 ± 0.2 for B, 37.1 ± 0.2 vs. 11.1 ± 0.1 for C, 55.6 ± 1.0 vs. 10.6 ± 0.1 for D, and 40.5 ± 0.5 vs. 11.7 ± 0.1 for E, respectively. Air kerma for A, B, C, D, and E was 1.64, 0.13, 3.34, 5.24, and 3.46 times greater for C-arm CT than for 64MDCT, respectively. Using the same scanning parameters as for clinical cases, air kerma values were greater with C-arm CT than with 64MDCT; at the dorsal side of the phantom, they were 5.24 times greater with C-arm CT compared with 64MDCT.

  19. Superior CT coronary angiography image quality at lower radiation exposure with second generation 320-detector row CT in patients with elevated heart rate: a comparison with first generation 320-detector row CT

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Siang Y.; Ko, Brian S. H.; Cameron, James D.; Crossett, Marcus; Nasis, Arthur; Troupis, John; Meredith, Ian T.; Seneviratne, Sujith K.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to compare the image quality of second generation versus first generation 320-computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with heart rate ≥65 bpm as it has not been specifically reported. Methods Consecutive patients who underwent CTCA using second-generation-320-detector-row-CT were prospectively enrolled. A total of 50 patients with elevated (≥65 bpm) heart rate and 50 patients with controlled (<65 bpm) heart rate were included. Age and gender matched patients who were scanned with the first-generation-320-detector-row-CT were retrospectively identified. Image quality in each coronary artery segment was assessed by two blinded CT angiographers using the five-point Likert scale. Results In the elevated heart rate cohorts, while there was no significant difference in heart rate during scan-acquisition (66 vs. 69 bpm, P=0.308), or body mass index (28.5 vs. 29.6, P=0.464), the second generation scanner was associated with better image quality (3.94±0.6 vs. 3.45±0.8, P=0.001), and with lower radiation (2.8 vs. 4.3 mSv, P=0.009). There was no difference in scan image quality for the controlled heart rate cohorts. Conclusions The second generation CT scanner provides better image quality at lower radiation dose in patients with elevated heart rate (≥65 bpm) compared to first generation CT scanner. PMID:25276615

  20. Bronchial anatomy of left lung: a study of multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinya; Ju, Yuanrong; Liu, Cheng; Li, Jianfeng; Huang, Min; Sun, Jian; Wang, Tao

    2009-02-01

    Familiarity with prevailing pattern and variations in the bronchial tree is not only essential for the anatomist to explain bronchial variation in bronchial specimens, but also useful for guiding bronchoscopy and instructing pulmonary segmental resection. The purpose of this study was designed to demonstrate various branching patterns of left lung with 3D images, with special attention given to identify the major types at transverse thin-section CT. Two hundred and sixteen patients with routine thorax scans were enrolled. The images of bronchial tree, virtual bronchoscopy were reconstructed using post-processing technique of multi-detector row CT. We attempted to classify the segmental bronchi by interpreting the post-processing images, and identified them in transverse thin-section CT. Our results showed that the segmental bronchial ramifications of the left superior lobe were classified into three types mainly, i.e., common stem of apical and posterior segmental bronchi (64%, 138/216); trifurcation (23%, 50/216); common stem of apical and anterior segmental bronchi (10%, 22/216), and they could be identified at two typical sections of transverse thin-section CT. There were two major types in left basal segmental bronchi, i.e., bifurcation (75%, 163/216), trifurcation (18%, 39/216), and they could also be identified at two typical sections of transverse thin-section CT. In conclusion, our study have offered simplified branching patterns of bronchi and demonstrated various unusual bronchial branching patterns perfectly with 3D images, and have also revealed how to identify the main branching patterns in transverse thin-section CT.

  1. Respiratory-gated segment reconstruction for radiation treatment planning using 256-slice CT-scanner during free breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Kohno, Ryosuke; Minohara, Shinichi; Kohno, Kazutoshi; Asakura, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya

    2005-04-01

    The conventional respiratory-gated CT scan technique includes anatomic motion induced artifacts due to the low temporal resolution. They are a significant source of error in radiotherapy treatment planning for the thorax and upper abdomen. Temporal resolution and image quality are important factors to minimize planning target volume margin due to the respiratory motion. To achieve high temporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio, we developed a respiratory gated segment reconstruction algorithm and adapted it to Feldkamp-Davis-Kress algorithm (FDK) with a 256-detector row CT. The 256-detector row CT could scan approximately 100 mm in the cranio-caudal direction with 0.5 mm slice thickness in one rotation. Data acquisition for the RS-FDK relies on the assistance of the respiratory sensing system by a cine scan mode (table remains stationary). We evaluated RS-FDK in phantom study with the 256-detector row CT and compared it with full scan (FS-FDK) and HS-FDK results with regard to volume accuracy and image noise, and finally adapted the RS-FDK to an animal study. The RS-FDK gave a more accurate volume than the others and it had the same signal-to-noise ratio as the FS-FDK. In the animal study, the RS-FDK visualized the clearest edges of the liver and pulmonary vessels of all the algorithms. In conclusion, the RS-FDK algorithm has a capability of high temporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore it will be useful when combined with new radiotherapy techniques including image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and 4D radiation therapy.

  2. Evaluation of different small bowel contrast agents by multi - detector row CT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Ren; Yu, Xiao-Li; Peng, Zhi-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different oral small bowel contrast agents towards the intestinal dilatation and intestinal wall structure exhibition by the abdominal multi - detector row CT (MDCT) examination. Methods: 80 patients were performed the whole abdominal CT examination, then randomly divided into four groups, with 20 patients in each group. 45 minutes before the CT examination, the patients were served with a total of 1800 ml pure water, pure milk, dilute lactulose solution and isotonic mannitol solution, respectively. Results: The images were blinded read by two experienced abdominal radiologists in the workstation, the cross-sectional diameters of duodenum, jejunum, proximal and terminal ends of ileum of each patient were measured, then the analysis of variance was performed to analyze the differences in the intestinal dilatation among the experimental groups. The scoring method was used to score the intestinal dilatation and intestinal structure exhibition. The diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the best intestinal dilation degrees. Similarly, the diluted lactulose solution and 2.5% mannitol exhibited the highest scores in the entire small bowel dilatation degree and intestinal structure exhibition. Conclusions: 2.5% osmotic mannitol and the diluted lactulose solution enabled the full dilatation of small bowel, and could clearly exhibit the wall structure. PMID:26629131

  3. Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H.

    2007-05-15

    We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

  4. Coronary CT angiography using 64 detector rows: methods and design of the multi-centre trial CORE-64

    PubMed Central

    Vavere, Andrea L.; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; de Roos, Albert; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Lemos, Pedro A.; Bush, David E.; Lardo, Albert C.; Texter, John; Brinker, Jeffery; Cox, Christopher; Clouse, Melvin E.; Lima, João A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenoses is a promising candidate for widespread clinical application because of its noninvasive nature and high sensitivity and negative predictive value as found in several previous studies using 16 to 64 simultaneous detector rows. A multi-centre study of CT coronary angiography using 16 simultaneous detector rows has shown that 16-slice CT is limited by a high number of nondiagnostic cases and a high false-positive rate. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant interaction between the size of the study sample and the diagnostic odds ratios suggestive of small study bias, highlighting the importance of evaluating MSCT using 64 simultaneous detector rows in a multi-centre approach with a larger sample size. In this manuscript we detail the objectives and methods of the prospective “CORE-64” trial (“Coronary Evaluation Using Multidetector Spiral Computed Tomography Angiography using 64 Detectors”). This multi-centre trialwas unique in that it assessed the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in nine centres worldwide in comparison to conventional coronary angiography. In conclusion, the multi-centre, multi-institutional and multi-continental trial CORE-64 has great potential to ultimately assess the per-patient diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography using 64 simultaneous detector rows. PMID:18998142

  5. Coronary CT angiography using 64 detector rows: methods and design of the multi-centre trial CORE-64.

    PubMed

    Miller, Julie M; Dewey, Marc; Vavere, Andrea L; Rochitte, Carlos E; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; de Roos, Albert; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Lemos, Pedro A; Bush, David E; Lardo, Albert C; Texter, John; Brinker, Jeffery; Cox, Christopher; Clouse, Melvin E; Lima, João A C

    2009-04-01

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenoses is a promising candidate for widespread clinical application because of its non-invasive nature and high sensitivity and negative predictive value as found in several previous studies using 16 to 64 simultaneous detector rows. A multi-centre study of CT coronary angiography using 16 simultaneous detector rows has shown that 16-slice CT is limited by a high number of nondiagnostic cases and a high false-positive rate. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant interaction between the size of the study sample and the diagnostic odds ratios suggestive of small study bias, highlighting the importance of evaluating MSCT using 64 simultaneous detector rows in a multi-centre approach with a larger sample size. In this manuscript we detail the objectives and methods of the prospective "CORE-64" trial ("Coronary Evaluation Using Multidetector Spiral Computed Tomography Angiography using 64 Detectors"). This multi-centre trial was unique in that it assessed the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in nine centres worldwide in comparison to conventional coronary angiography. In conclusion, the multi-centre, multi-institutional and multi-continental trial CORE-64 has great potential to ultimately assess the per-patient diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography using 64 simultaneous detector rows.

  6. Overbeaming and overlapping of volume-scan CT with tube current modulation in a 320-detector row CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Lan; Chen, Yan-Shi; Lai, Nan-Ku; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of volume scan tube current modulation (VS-ATCM) with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) technique in abdomen CT examinations. We scanned an elliptical cone-shaped phantom utilizing AIDR3D technique combined with VS-ATCM mode in a 320-detector row CT scanner. The image noise distributions with conventional filtered back-projction (FBP) technique and those with AIDR3D technique were compared. The radiation dose profile and tube current time product (mAs) in three noise levels of VS-ATCM modes were compared. The radiation beam profiles of five preset scan lengths were measured using Gafchromic film strips to assess the effects of overbeaming and everlapping. The results indicated that the image noises with AIDR3D technique was 13-74% lower than those in FBP technique. The mAs distributions can be a prediction for various abdominal sizes when undergoing a VS-ATCM mode scan. Patients can receive the radiation dose of overbeaming and overlapping during the VS-ATCM mode scans.

  7. Automated multidetector row CT dataset segmentation with an interactive watershed transform (IWT) algorithm: Part 2. Body CT angiographic and orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pamela T; Hahn, Horst K; Heath, David G; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-12-01

    The preceding manuscript describes the principles behind the Interactive Watershed Transform (IWT) segmentation tool. The purpose of this manuscript is to illustrate the clinical utility of this editing technique for body multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging. A series of cases demonstrates clinical applications where automated segmentation of skeletal structures with IWT is most useful. Both CT angiography and orthopedic applications are presented.

  8. Multi-detector row CT scanning in Paleoanthropology at various tube current settings and scanning mode.

    PubMed

    Badawi-Fayad, J; Yazbeck, C; Balzeau, A; Nguyen, T H; Istoc, A; Grimaud-Hervé, D; Cabanis, E- A

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal tube current setting and scanning mode for hominid fossil skull scanning, using multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Four fossil skulls (La Ferrassie 1, Abri Pataud 1, CroMagnon 2 and Cro-Magnon 3) were examined by using the CT scanner LightSpeed 16 (General Electric Medical Systems) with varying dose per section (160, 250, and 300 mAs) and scanning mode (helical and conventional). Image quality of two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstructions, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and native images was assessed by four reviewers using a four-point grading scale. An ANOVA (analysis of variance) model was used to compare the mean score for each sequence and the overall mean score according to the levels of the scanning parameters. Compared with helical CT (mean score=12.03), the conventional technique showed sustained poor image quality (mean score=4.17). With the helical mode, we observed a better image quality at 300 mAs than at 160 in the 3D sequences (P=0.03). Whereas in native images, a reduction in the effective tube current induced no degradation in image quality (P=0.05). Our study suggests a standardized protocol for fossil scanning with a 16 x 0.625 detector configuration, a 10 mm beam collimation, a 0.562:1 acquisition mode, a 0.625/0.4 mm slice thickness/reconstruction interval, a pitch of 5.62, 120 kV and 300 mAs especially when a 3D study is required.

  9. Acute appendicitis: comparison of low-dose and standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Keyzer, Caroline; Tack, Denis; de Maertelaer, Viviane; Bohy, Pascale; Gevenois, Pierre Alain; Van Gansbeke, Daniel

    2004-07-01

    To prospectively compare low- and standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) in patients suspected of having acute appendicitis. Ninety-five consecutive patients underwent two unenhanced multi-detector row CT examinations with 4 x 2.5-mm collimation, 120 kVp, and 30 and 100 effective mAs. Two radiologists independently read the images obtained at each dose during two sessions. Readers recorded visualization of the appendix and presence of gas in its lumen, appendicolith, periappendiceal fat stranding, cecal wall thickening, and abscess or phlegmon to measure the diameter of the appendix and to propose diagnosis (appendicitis or alternative). Data were compared according to dose and reader, with definite diagnosis established on basis of surgical findings (n = 37) or clinical follow-up. chi(2) tests and logistic regression were used. Measurement agreements were assessed with Cohen kappa statistics. Twenty-nine patients had a definite diagnosis of appendicitis. No difference was observed between the frequency of visualization of the appendix (P =.874) neither in its mean diameter (P =.101-.696, according to readers and sessions) nor in the readers' overall diagnosis (P =.788) at each dose. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of each sign were not different between doses. Fat stranding, appendicolith, and diameter were the most predictive signs, regardless of dose, yielding approximately 90% of correct diagnoses. The ability to propose a correct alternative diagnosis was not influenced by the dose. Low-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT has similar diagnostic performance as standard-dose unenhanced multi-detector row CT for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Copyright RSNA, 2004

  10. SimDoseCT: dose reporting software based on Monte Carlo simulation for a 320 detector-row cone-beam CT scanner and ICRP computational adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, Maria; Joemai, Raoul M. S.; Geleijns, Jacob; Molina, Diego; Salvadó, Marçal

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to develop and test software for assessing and reporting doses for standard patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations in a 320 detector-row cone-beam scanner. The software, called SimDoseCT, is based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code, which was developed to calculate organ doses and effective doses in ICRP anthropomorphic adult reference computational phantoms for acquisitions with the Aquilion ONE CT scanner (Toshiba). MC simulation was validated by comparing CTDI measurements within standard CT dose phantoms with results from simulation under the same conditions. SimDoseCT consists of a graphical user interface connected to a MySQL database, which contains the look-up-tables that were generated with MC simulations for volumetric acquisitions at different scan positions along the phantom using any tube voltage, bow tie filter, focal spot and nine different beam widths. Two different methods were developed to estimate organ doses and effective doses from acquisitions using other available beam widths in the scanner. A correction factor was used to estimate doses in helical acquisitions. Hence, the user can select any available protocol in the Aquilion ONE scanner for a standard adult male or female and obtain the dose results through the software interface. Agreement within 9% between CTDI measurements and simulations allowed the validation of the MC program. Additionally, the algorithm for dose reporting in SimDoseCT was validated by comparing dose results from this tool with those obtained from MC simulations for three volumetric acquisitions (head, thorax and abdomen). The comparison was repeated using eight different collimations and also for another collimation in a helical abdomen examination. The results showed differences of 0.1 mSv or less for absolute dose in most organs and also in the effective dose calculation. The software provides a suitable tool for dose assessment in standard adult patients undergoing CT

  11. SimDoseCT: dose reporting software based on Monte Carlo simulation for a 320 detector-row cone-beam CT scanner and ICRP computational adult phantoms.

    PubMed

    Cros, Maria; Joemai, Raoul M S; Geleijns, Jacob; Molina, Diego; Salvadó, Marçal

    2017-07-17

    This study aims to develop and test software for assessing and reporting doses for standard patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations in a 320 detector-row cone-beam scanner. The software, called SimDoseCT, is based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code, which was developed to calculate organ doses and effective doses in ICRP anthropomorphic adult reference computational phantoms for acquisitions with the Aquilion ONE CT scanner (Toshiba). MC simulation was validated by comparing CTDI measurements within standard CT dose phantoms with results from simulation under the same conditions. SimDoseCT consists of a graphical user interface connected to a MySQL database, which contains the look-up-tables that were generated with MC simulations for volumetric acquisitions at different scan positions along the phantom using any tube voltage, bow tie filter, focal spot and nine different beam widths. Two different methods were developed to estimate organ doses and effective doses from acquisitions using other available beam widths in the scanner. A correction factor was used to estimate doses in helical acquisitions. Hence, the user can select any available protocol in the Aquilion ONE scanner for a standard adult male or female and obtain the dose results through the software interface. Agreement within 9% between CTDI measurements and simulations allowed the validation of the MC program. Additionally, the algorithm for dose reporting in SimDoseCT was validated by comparing dose results from this tool with those obtained from MC simulations for three volumetric acquisitions (head, thorax and abdomen). The comparison was repeated using eight different collimations and also for another collimation in a helical abdomen examination. The results showed differences of 0.1 mSv or less for absolute dose in most organs and also in the effective dose calculation. The software provides a suitable tool for dose assessment in standard adult patients undergoing CT

  12. A new 3-D diagnosis strategy for duodenal malignant lesions using multidetector row CT, CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, and 3-D multicholangiography.

    PubMed

    Sata, N; Endo, K; Shimura, K; Koizumi, M; Nagai, H

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in multidetector row computed tomography (MD-CT) technology provide new opportunities for clinical diagnoses of various diseases. Here we assessed CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, and three-dimensional (3D) multicholangiography created by MD-CT for clinical diagnosis of duodenal malignant lesions. The study involved seven cases of periduodenal carcinoma (four ampullary carcinomas, two duodenal carcinomas, one pancreatic carcinoma). Biliary contrast medium was administered intravenously, followed by intravenous administration of an anticholinergic agent and oral administration of effervescent granules for expanding the upper gastrointestinal tract. Following intravenous administration of a nonionic contrast medium, an upper abdominal MD-CT scan was performed in the left lateral position. Scan data were processed on a workstation to create CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, 3D multicholangiography, and various postprocessing images, which were then evaluated for their effectiveness as preoperative diagnostic tools. Carcinoma location and extent were clearly demonstrated as defects or colored low-density areas in 3-D multicholangiography images and as protruding lesions in virtual duodenography and duodenoscopy images. These findings were confirmed using multiplanar or curved planar reformation images. In conclusion, CT virtual duodenoscopy, doudenography, 3-D multicholangiography, and various images created by MD-CT alone provided necessary and adequate preoperative diagnostic information.

  13. Coronary artery calcium score: influence of reconstruction interval at 16-detector row CT with retrospective electrocardiographic gating.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Thomas; Hunold, Peter; Schmermund, Axel; Kühl, Hilmar; Waltering, Kai-Uwe; Debatin, Jörg F; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2004-11-01

    In 30 patients, Agatston and volumetric scores were assessed by using retrospectively gated multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). For each patient, 10 data sets were created at different times and were evenly spaced throughout the cardiac cycle. For each reconstruction, patients were assigned a percentile that described the level of cardiovascular risk. Nineteen (63%) of 30 patients could be assigned to more than one risk group depending on the reconstruction interval used. Agatston and volumetric scores both proved highly dependent on the reconstruction interval used (coefficient of variation, < or =63.1%) even with the most advanced CT scanners. Accurate and reproducible quantification of coronary calcium seems to require analysis of multiple reconstructions.

  14. Evaluation of Deep Vein Thrombosis with Multidetector Row CT after Orthopedic Arthroplasty: a Prospective Study for Comparison with Doppler Sonography

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Sung Su; Kim, Youn Jeong; Chun, Yong Sun; Park, Chul Hi; Kim, Won-Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective This prospective study evaluated the ability of indirect 16-row multidetector CT venography, in comparison with Doppler sonography, to detect deep vein thrombosis after total hip or knee replacement. Materials and Methods Sixty-two patients had undergone orthopedic replacement surgery on a total of 30 hip joints and 54 knee joints. The CT venography (scan delay time: 180 seconds; slice thickness/increment: 2/1.5 mm) and Doppler sonography were performed 8 to 40 days after surgery. We measured the z-axis length of the beam hardening artifact that degraded the image quality so that the presence of deep vein thrombosis couldn't be evaluated on the axial CT images. The incidence and location of deep vein thrombosis was analyzed. The diagnostic performance of the CT venograms was evaluated and compared with that of Doppler sonography as a standard of reference. Results The z-axis length (mean±standard deviation) of the beam hardening artifact was 4.5 ± 0.8 cm in the arthroplastic knees and 3.9 ± 2.9 cm in the arthroplastic hips. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was found in the popliteal or calf veins on Doppler sonography in 30 (48%) of the 62 patients. The CT venography has a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of 90%, 97%, 96%, 91% and 94%, respectively. Conclusion The ability of CT venography to detect DVT was comparable to that of Doppler sonography despite of beam hardening artifact. Therefore, CT venography is feasible to use as an alternative modality for evaluating postarthroplasty patients. PMID:18253077

  15. Suspected aortic dissection and other aortic disorders: multi-detector row CT in 373 cases in the emergency setting.

    PubMed

    Hayter, Robert G; Rhea, James T; Small, Andrew; Tafazoli, Faranak S; Novelline, Robert A

    2006-03-01

    To retrospectively review the authors' experience with multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) for detection of aortic dissection in the emergency setting. The investigation was institutional review board approved, did not require informed patient consent, and was HIPAA compliant. In 373 clinical evaluations in the emergency setting, 365 patients suspected of having aortic dissection and/or other aortic disorders underwent multidetector CT. Criteria for acute aortic disorder were confirmed by using surgical and pathologic diagnoses or findings at clinical follow-up and any subsequent imaging as the reference standard. Positive cases were characterized according to type of disorder interpreted. Resulting sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy were calculated by using two-way contingency tables. All cases found to be negative for acute aortic disorders were grouped according to alternative CT findings. Sixty-seven (18.0%) of the 373 cases were interpreted as positive for acute aortic disorder. One hundred twelve acute aortic disorders were identified in these 67 cases: 23 acute aortic dissections, 14 acute aortic intramural hematomas, 20 acute penetrating aortic ulcers, 44 new or enlarging aortic aneurysms, and 11 acute aortic ruptures. Three hundred five (81.8%) cases were interpreted as negative for acute aortic disorder. In 48 negative cases, multidetector CT depicted alternative findings that accounted for the clinical presentation. Of these, three included both acute aortic disorders and alternative findings, and 45 included only alternative findings. One (0.3%) case was indeterminate for acute aortic disorder. Overall, 112 findings were interpreted as positive for acute aortic disorder, an alternative finding, or both at CT. No interpretations were false-positive, one was false-negative, 67 were true-positive, and 304 were true-negative. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy were

  16. Multi-detector row CT colonography: effect of collimation, pitch, and orientation on polyp detection in a human colectomy specimen.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stuart A; Halligan, Steve; Bartram, Clive I; Morgan, Paul R; Talbot, Ian C; Fry, Nicola; Saunders, Brian P; Khosraviani, Kirosh; Atkin, Wendy

    2003-10-01

    To investigate the effects of orientation, collimation, pitch, and tube current setting on polyp detection at multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) colonography and to determine the optimal combination of scanning parameters for screening. A colectomy specimen containing 117 polyps of different sizes was insufflated and imaged with a multi-detector row CT scanner at various collimation (1.25 and 2.5 mm), pitch (3 and 6), and tube current (50, 100, and 150 mA) settings. Two-dimensional multiplanar reformatted images and three-dimensional endoluminal surface renderings from the 12 resultant data sets were examined by one observer for the presence and conspicuity of polyps. The results were analyzed with Poisson regression and logistic regression to determine the effects of scanning parameters and of specimen orientation on polyp detection. The percentage of polyps that were detected significantly increased when collimation (P =.008) and table feed (P =.03) were decreased. Increased tube current resulted in improved detection only of polyps with a diameter of less than 5 mm. Polyps of less than 5 mm were optimally depicted with a collimation of 1.25 mm, a pitch of 3, and a tube current setting of 150 mA; polyps with a diameter greater than 5 mm were adequately depicted with 1.25-mm collimation and with either pitch setting and any of the three tube current settings. Small polyps in the transverse segment (positioned at a 90 degrees angle to the z axis of scanning) were significantly less visible than those in parallel or oblique orientations (P <.001). The effective radiation dose, calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation, was 1.4-10.0 mSv. Detection of small polyps (<5 mm) with multi-detector row CT is highly dependent on collimation, pitch, and, to a lesser extent, tube current. Collimation of 1.25 mm, combined with pitch of 6 and tube current of 50 mA, provides for reliable detection of polyps 5 mm or larger while limiting the effective radiation dose

  17. The role of multidetector-row CT in the diagnosis, classification and management of acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, I W; Peebles, C R; Harden, S P; Shambrook, J S

    2014-01-01

    The term “acute aortic syndrome” (AAS) encompasses several non-traumatic life-threatening pathologies of the thoracic aorta presenting in patients with a similar clinical profile. These include aortic dissection, intramural haematoma and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcers. These different pathological entities can be indistinguishable on clinical grounds alone and may be confused with other causes of chest pain, including myocardial infarction. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is the current modality of choice for imaging AAS with a sensitivity and specificity approaching 100%. Early diagnosis and accurate radiological classification is associated with improved clinical outcomes in AAS. We review the characteristic radiological features of the different pathologies that encompass AAS and highlight the vital role of MDCT in determining the management of these life-threatening conditions. PMID:25083552

  18. Whole brain CT perfusion deficits using 320-detector-row CT scanner in TIA patients are associated with ABCD2 score.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Bijal K; Mustafa, Ghulam; McMurtray, Aaron; Masud, Mohammed W; Gunukula, Sameer K; Kamal, Haris; Kandel, Amit; Beltagy, Abdelrahman; Li, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIA) are cerebral ischemic events without infarction. The uses of CT perfusion (CTP) techniques such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), time to peak (TTP), mean transit time (MTT) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) provide real time data about ischemia. It has been shown that CTP changes occur in less sensitive CTP scanners in patients with TIA. Larger detector row CTP (whole brain perfusion studies) may show that CTP abnormalities are more prevalent than previously noted. It is also unclear if these changes are associated with TIA severity. To demonstrate that TIA patients are associated with perfusion deficits using whole brain 320-detector-row CT perfusion, and to determine an association between ABCD2 score and perfusion deficit using whole brain perfusion. We retrospectively reviewed all TIA patients for CTP deficits from 2008-2010. Perfusion imaging was reviewed at admission; and it was determined if a perfusion deficit was present along with vascular territory involved. Of 364 TIA patients, 62 patients had CTP deficits. The largest group of patients had MCA territory involved with 48 of 62 patients (77.42%). The most common perfusion abnormality was increased TTP with 46 patients (74.19%). The ABCD2 score was reviewed in association with perfusion deficit. Increased age >60, severe hypertension (>180/100 mmHg), patients with speech abnormalities, and duration of symptoms >10 min were associated with a perfusion deficit but history of diabetes or minimal/moderate hypertension (140/90-179/99 mmHg) was not. There was no association between motor deficit and perfusion abnormality. Perfusion deficits are found in TIA patients using whole brain CTP and associated with components of the ABCD2 score.

  19. Value of Virtual Colonoscopy with 64 Row CT in Evaluation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Łasecki, Mateusz; Nienartowicz, Ewa; Pelak, Joanna; Słonina, Joanna; Olchowy, Cyprian; Ścieżka, Marek; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Virtual colonoscopy (VC) enables three-dimensional view of walls and internal lumen of the colon as a result of reconstruction of multislice CT images. The role of VC in diagnosis of the colon abnormalities systematically increases, and in many medical centers all over the world is carried out as a screening test of patients with high risk of colorectal cancer. Material/Methods We analyzed results of virtual colonoscopy of 360 patients with clinical suspicion of colorectal cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of CT colonoscopy for detection of colon cancers and polyps were assessed. Results Results of our research have shown high diagnostic efficiency of CT colonoscopy in detection of focal lesions in large intestine of 10 mm or more diameter. Sensitivity was 85.7%, specificity 89.2%. Conclusions Virtual colonoscopy is noninvasive and well tolerated by patients imaging method, which permits for early detection of the large intestine lesions with specificity and sensitivity similar to classical colonoscopy in screening exams in patients suspected for colorectal cancer. Good preparation of the patients for the examination is very important for proper diagnosis and interpretation of this imaginge procedure. PMID:25302086

  20. Prevalence of Temporal Bone Fractures in Patients with Mandibular Fractures Using Multidetector-Row CT.

    PubMed

    Ogura, I; Kaneda, T; Sasaki, Y; Buch, K; Sakai, O

    2015-06-01

    Temporal bone fracture after mandibular trauma is thought to be rare, and its prevalence has not been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of temporal bone fractures in patients with mandibular fractures and the relationship between temporal bone fractures and the mandibular fracture location using multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). A prospective study was performed in 201 patients with mandibular fractures who underwent 64-MDCT scans. The mandibular fracture locations were classified as median, paramedian, angle, and condylar types. Statistical analysis for the relationship between prevalence of temporal bone fractures and mandibular fracture locations was performed using χ(2) test with Fisher's exact test. A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The percentage of cases with temporal bone fracture was 3.0 % of all patients with mandibular fractures and 19.0 % of those with multiple mandibular fractures of paramedian and condylar type. There was a significant relationship between the incidence of temporal bone fracture and the paramedian- and condylar-type mandibular fracture (P = 0.001). Multiple mandibular fractures of paramedian and condylar type may be a stronger indicator for temporal bone fractures. This study suggests that patients with mandibular fracture, especially the paramedian and condylar type, should be examined for coexisting temporal bone fracture using MDCT.

  1. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI{sub 100} as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI{sub 100} is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, {sigma}. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI{sub 100} calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good

  2. Automatic vs semi-automatic global cardiac function assessment using 64-row CT

    PubMed Central

    Greupner, J; Zimmermann, E; Hamm, B; Dewey, M

    2012-01-01

    Objective Global cardiac function assessment using multidetector CT (MDCT) is time-consuming. Therefore we sought to compare an automatic software tool with an established semi-automatic method. Methods A total of 36 patients underwent CT with 64×0.5 mm detector collimation, and global left ventricular function was subsequently assessed by two independent blinded readers using both an automatic region-growing-based software tool (with and without manual adjustment) and an established semi-automatic software tool. We also analysed automatic motion mapping to identify end-systole. Results The time needed for assessment using the semi-automatic approach (12:12±6:19 min) was reduced by 75–85% with the automatic software tool (unadjusted, 01:34±0:29 min, adjusted, 02:53±1:19 min; both p<0.001). There was good correlation (r=0.89; p<0.001) for the ejection fraction (EF) between the adjusted automatic (58.6±14.9%) and the semi-automatic (58.0±15.3%) approaches. Also the manually adjusted automatic approach led to significantly smaller limits of agreement than the unadjusted automatic approach for end-diastolic volume (±36.4 ml vs ±58.5 ml, p>0.05). Using motion mapping to automatically identify end-systole reduced analysis time by 95% compared with the semi-automatic approach, but showed inferior precision for EF and end-systolic volume. Conclusion Automatic function assessment using MDCT with manual adjustment shows good agreement with an established semi-automatic approach, while reducing the analysis by 75% to less than 3 min. This suggests that automatic CT function assessment with manual correction may be used for fast, comfortable and reliable evaluation of global left ventricular function. PMID:22045953

  3. Use of an automatic exposure control mechanism for dose optimization in multi-detector row CT examinations: clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mulkens, Tom H; Bellinck, Patrick; Baeyaert, Michel; Ghysen, Dirk; Van Dijck, Xavier; Mussen, Elvier; Venstermans, Caroline; Termote, Jean-Luc

    2005-10-01

    To prospectively compare dose reduction and image quality achieved with an automatic exposure control system that is based on both angular (x-y axis) and z-axis tube current modulation with dose reduction and image quality achieved with an angular modulation system for multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). The study protocol was approved by the institutional review board, and oral informed consent was obtained. In two groups of 200 patients, five anatomic regions (ie, the thorax, abdomen-pelvis, abdomen-liver, lumbar spine, and cervical spine) were examined with this modulation system and a six-section multi-detector row CT scanner. Data from these patients were compared with data from 200 patients who were examined with an angular modulation system. Dose reduction by means of reduction of the mean effective tube current in 600 examinations, image noise in 200 examinations performed with each modulation system, and subjective image quality scores in 100 examinations per-formed with each modulation system were compared with Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Mean dose reduction for the angular and z-axis tube current modulation system and for the angular modulation system was as follows: thorax, 20% and 14%, respectively; abdomen-liver, 38% and 18%, respectively; abdomen-pelvis, 32% and 26%, respectively; lumbar spine, 37% and 10%, respectively; and cervical spine, 68% and 16%, respectively. These differences were statistically significant (P < .05). There was no significant difference in image noise and mean image quality scores between modulation systems, with the exception of cervical spinal examinations (P < .001 for both), where the examinations with angular modulation resulted in better scores. There is good correlation between the mean effective tube current level and the body mass index of patients with the new modulation system. Correlation was as follows: thorax, 0.77; abdomen-pelvis, 0.83; abdomen-liver, 0.84; lumbar spine, 0.8; and cervical spine, 0

  4. Scan time and patient dose for thoracic imaging in neonates and small children using axial volumetric 320-detector row CT compared to helical 64-, 32-, and 16- detector row CT acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Kroft, Lucia J M; Roelofs, Joost J H; Geleijns, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    Recently a 320-detector-row CT (MDCT) scanner has become available that allows axial volumetric scanning of a 16-cm-long range (50 cm field of view) in a single 0.35-s rotation. For imaging neonates and small children, volume scanning is potentially of great advantage as the entire scan range can be acquired in 0.35 s, which can reduce motion artefacts and may reduce the need for sedation in clinical CT imaging. Also, because there is no over-ranging associated with axial volumetric scanning, this may reduce patient radiation dose. To evaluate, by means of a phantom study, scan time and patient dose for thoracic imaging in neonates and small children by using axial cone-beam and helical fan-beam MDCT acquisitions. Paediatric imaging protocols were assessed for a 320-MDCT volumetric scanner (Aquilion ONE, Toshiba, Otawara, Japan). The 320-MDCT scanner allows for cone-beam acquisitions with coverage up to 160 mm, but it also allows for helical fan-beam acquisitions in 64-, 32-, or 16-MDCT modes. The acquisition configurations that were evaluated were 320 x 0.5 mm, 240 x 0.5 mm, and 160 x 0.5 mm for axial volumetric scanning, and 64 x 0.5 mm, 32 x 0.5 mm, and 16 x 0.5 mm for helical scanning. Dose assessment was performed for clinically relevant paediatric angiographic or chest/mediastinum acquisition protocols with tube voltages of 80 or 100 kVp and tube currents between 40 and 80 mA. Scan time was 0.35 s for 320-MDCT acquisitions, scan times varied between 1.9 s and 8.3 s for helical acquisitions. Dose savings varying between 18% and 40% were achieved with axial volumetric scanning as compared to helical scanning (for 320- versus 64-MDCT at 160 mm and 80 kVp, and for 320- versus 16-MDCT at 80 mm and 100 kVp, respectively). Statistically significant reduction in radiation dose was found for axial 320-MDCT volumetric scanning compared to helical 64-, 32-, and 16-MDCT scanning. Axial thoracic CT of neonates and small children with volumetric 320-MDCT can be performed

  5. Technical note: Electrocardiogram electrode repositioning for 320-row coronary CT angiography in patients with regular and recurrent premature ventricular contractions.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Matsutani, Hideyuki; Groarke, John; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Rybicki, Frank J; Kumamaru, Kanako K

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias can compromise image quality and increase radiation exposure during coronary CT angiography (CTA). However, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) can occur in a predictable recurrent and regular pattern (ie, bigeminy, trigeminy, quadrigeminy) with post-PVC compensatory pauses. Electrocardiographic (ECG) electrode repositioning can achieve relative amplification of the R waves of PVCs compared with R waves of sinus beats. This technical note describes how simple ECG electrode repositioning, combined with an absolute-delay strategy, facilitated selective R waves of PVC ECG triggering of image acquisition in 6 patients with PVC bigeminy or quadrigeminy at the time of 320-row coronary CTA. All 6 studies were single heartbeat acquisition scans with excellent image quality and a median effective radiation dose of 2.9 mSv (interquartile range, 2.1-3.8 mSv). Standard ECG electrode positions used for 2 patients with PVC bigeminy undergoing coronary CTA were associated with an acquisition over 2 heartbeats and effective radiation doses of 6.8 and 10.3 mSv, respectively. In conclusion, ECG electrode repositioning combined with an absolute-delay strategy for regularly recurring PVCs, such as ventricular bigeminy, facilitates high image quality and lower radiation dose during coronary CTA. This simple and straightforward technique can be considered for all patients with regular and recurrent PVCs undergoing coronary CTA. Copyright © 2014 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Technical Note: Evaluation of a 160-mm/256-row CT scanner for whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    So, Aaron; Imai, Yasuhiro; Nett, Brian; Jackson, John; Nett, Liz; Hsieh, Jiang; Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew; Islam, Ali; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-08-01

    The authors investigated the performance of a recently introduced 160-mm/256-row CT system for low dose quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) imaging of the whole heart. This platform is equipped with a gantry capable of rotating at 280 ms per full cycle, a second generation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR-V) to correct for image noise arising from low tube voltage potential/tube current dynamic scanning, and image reconstruction algorithms to tackle beam-hardening, cone-beam, and partial-scan effects. Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effectiveness of image noise and artifact reduction with a GE Healthcare Revolution CT system for three acquisition protocols used in quantitative CT MP imaging: 100, 120, and 140 kVp/25 mAs. The heart chambers of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were filled with iodinated contrast solution at different concentrations (contrast levels) to simulate the circulation of contrast through the heart in quantitative CT MP imaging. To evaluate beam-hardening correction, the phantom was scanned at each contrast level to measure the changes in CT number (in Hounsfield unit or HU) in the water-filled region surrounding the heart chambers with respect to baseline. To evaluate cone-beam artifact correction, differences in mean water HU between the central and peripheral slices were compared. Partial-scan artifact correction was evaluated from the fluctuation of mean water HU in successive partial scans. To evaluate image noise reduction, a small hollow region adjacent to the heart chambers was filled with diluted contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio in the region before and after noise correction with ASiR-V was compared. The quality of MP maps acquired with the CT system was also evaluated in porcine CT MP studies. Myocardial infarct was induced in a farm pig from a transient occlusion of the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a catheter-based interventional procedure. MP maps were generated

  7. [Comparison of a dental cone beam CT with a multi-detector row CT on effective doses and physical image quality].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Tokumori, Kenji; Okamura, Kazutoshi; Yoshiura, Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a dental cone beam computed tomography (dental CBCT) and a multi-detector row CT (MDCT) using effective doses and physical image quality. A dental mode (D-mode) and an implant mode (I-mode) were employed for calculating effective doses. Field of view (FOV) size of the MDCT was 150 mm. Three types of images were obtained using 3 different reconstruction functions: FC1 (for abdomen images), FC30 (for internal ear and bone images) and FC81 (for high resolution images). Effective doses obtained with the D-mode and with the I-mode were about 20% and 50% of those obtained with the MDCT, respectively. Resolution properties obtained with the D-mode and I-mode were superior to that of the MDCT in a high frequency range. Noise properties of the D-mode and the I-mode were better than those with FC81. It was found that the dental CBCT has better potential as compared with MDCT in both dental and implant modes.

  8. Split-Bolus Single-Pass Multidetector-Row CT Protocol for Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Scialpi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto; Cagini, Lucio; Brunese, Luca; Piscioli, Irene; Pierotti, Luisa; Bellantonio, Lucio; D’Andrea, Alfredo; Rotondo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Currently computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become a widely accepted clinical tool in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Objectives: To report split-bolus single-pass 64-multidetector-row CT (MDCT) protocol for diagnosis of PE. Patients and Methods: MDCT split-bolus results in 40 patients suspicious of PE were analyzed in terms of image quality of target pulmonary vessels (TPVs) and occurrence and severity of flow-related artifact, flow-related artifact, false filling defect of the pulmonary veins and beam hardening streak artifacts. Dose radiation to patients was calculated. Results: MDCT split-bolus protocol allowed diagnostic images of high quality in all cases. Diagnosis of PE was obtained in 22 of 40 patients. Mean attenuation for target vessels was higher than 250 HU all cases: 361 ± 98 HU in pulmonary artery trunk (PAT); 339 ± 93 HU in right pulmonary artery (RPA); 334 ± 100 HU in left pulmonary artery (LPA). Adequate enhancement was obtained in the right atrium (RA):292 ± 83 HU; right pulmonary vein (RPV): 302 ± 91 HU, and left pulmonary vein (LPV): 291 ± 83 HU. The flow related artifacts and the beam hardening streak artifacts have been detected respectively in 4 and 25 patients. No false filling defect of the pulmonary veins was revealed. Conclusion: MDCT split-bolus technique by simultaneous opacification of pulmonary arteries and veins represents an accurate technique for diagnosis of acute PE, removes the false filling defects of the pulmonary veins, and reduces flow related artifacts. PMID:27110334

  9. Coronary CT angiography using the second-generation 320-detector row CT: assessment of image quality and radiation dose in various heart rates compared with the first-generation scanner.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Nobuo; Maeda, Eriko; Akahane, Masaaki; Torigoe, Rumiko; Kiryu, Shigeru; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2013-10-01

    To assess the image quality and radiation dose reduction in various heart rates in coronary CT angiography using the second-generation 320-detector row CT compared with the first-generation CT. Ninety-six patients were retrospectively included. The first 48 patients underwent coronary CT angiography with the first-generation 320-detector row CT, while the last 48 patients underwent with the second-generation CT. Subjective image quality was graded using a 4-point scale (4, excellent; 1, unable to evaluate). Image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio were also analyzed. Subgroup analysis was performed based on the heart rate. The mean effective dose was derived from the dose length product multiplied by a conversion coefficient for the chest (κ = 0.014 mSv × mGy(-1) × cm(-1)). The overall subjective image quality score showed no significant difference (3.66 vs 3.69, respectively, p = 0.25). The image quality score of the second-generation group tended to be higher than that of the first-generation group in the 66- to 75-bpm subgroup (3.36 vs 3.53, respectively, p = 0.07). No significant difference was observed in image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio. The overall radiation dose reduced by 24 % (3.3 vs 2.5 mSv, respectively, p = 0.03), and the reduction was substantial in patients with higher heart rate (66- to 75-bpm, 4.3 vs 2.2 mSv, respectively, p = 0.009; >75 bpm, 8.2 vs 3.7 mSv, respectively, p = 0.005). The second-generation 320-detector row CT could maintain the image quality while reducing the radiation dose in coronary CT angiography. The dose reduction was larger in patients with higher heart rate.

  10. Multi-detector row CT as a "one-stop" examination in the preoperative evaluation of the morphology and function of living renal donors: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Su, Chen; Yan, Chaogui; Guo, Yan; Zhou, Xuhui; Chen, Yaqing; Liu, Mingjuan; Wang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2011-02-01

    We designed to investigate the feasibility of multi-detector row computerized tomography (CT) as a "one-stop" examination for the simultaneous preoperative evaluation of the morphology and function of living renal donors. 21 living renal donors were examined by 64-slice spiral CT with a three-phase enhancement CT scan and two inserted dynamic scans. The maximum intensity projection (MIP), multi-planar reformation (MPR), and volume reconstruction (VR) procedures were performed to compare the renal parenchyma, renal vessels, and collecting system with operational findings. The known Patlak equation was used to calculate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR); exact GFR information was acquired by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Our results as following, there were 3 cases of artery variation and 3 cases of vein variation. CT findings all corresponded with the operation, and the sensitivity, positive predictive value, specialty, and negative predictive value of CT were all 100%. The r of the GFR values estimated from CT is 0.894 (left) (P < 0.001) and 0.881 (right) (P < 0.001). In conclusions, our findings demonstrate that 64-slice spiral CT may offer a "one-stop" examination to replace SPECT in the preoperative evaluation of living renal donors to simultaneously provide information regarding both anatomy and the GFR of living renal donors.

  11. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  12. Thin-section CT of lung without ECG gating: 64-detector row CT can markedly reduce cardiac motion artifact which can simulate lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Masahiro; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Sumikawa, Hiromitsu; Inoue, Atsuo; Daimon, Tadahisa; Honda, Osamu; Mihara, Naoki; Johkoh, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hironobu

    2009-01-01

    Motion artifacts, which can mimic thickened bronchial wall and the cystic appearance of bronchiectasis, constitute a potential pitfall in the diagnosis of interstitial or bronchial disease. Therefore, purpose of our study was to evaluate whether 64-detector row CT (64-MDCT) enables a reduction in respiratory or cardiac motion artifacts in the lung area on thin-section CT without ECG gating, and to examine the correlation between cardiac motion artifact and heart rate. Thirty-two patients with suspected diffuse lung disease, who underwent both 8- and 64-MDCT (gantry rotation time, 0.5 and 0.4s, respectively), were included. The heart rates of an additional 155 patients were measured (range, 48-126 beats per minute; mean, 76 beats per minute) immediately prior to 64-MDCT, and compared to the degree of cardiac motion artifact. Two independent observers evaluated the following artifacts on a monitor without the knowledge of relevant clinical information: (1) artifacts on 8- and 64-MDCT images with 1.25-mm thickness and those on 64-MDCT images with 0.625-mm thickness in 32 patients; and (2) artifacts on 64-MDCT images with 0.625-mm thickness in 155 patients. Interobserver agreement was good in evaluating artifacts on 8-MDCT images with 1.25-mm thickness (weighted Kappa test, kappa=0.61-0.71), and fair or poor in the other evaluations (kappa<0.31). Two observers stated that cardiac motion artifacts were more significant on 8-MDCT than on 64-MDCT in all 32 patients. Statistically significant differences were found at various checkpoints only in comparing artifacts between 8- and 64-MDCT for 1.25-mm thickness (Wilcoxon's signed-rank test, p<0.0017). Cardiac motion artifacts on 64-MDCT had no significant correlation with heart rate (Spearman's correlation coefficient by rank test). The high temporal resolution of 64-MDCT appears to reduce cardiac motion artifact that can affect thin-section scans of the lung parenchyma.

  13. [Added diagnostic benefit of 16-row whole-body spiral CT in patients with multiple trauma differentiated by region and injury severity according to the ATLS concept].

    PubMed

    Maurer, M H; Knopke, S; Schröder, R J

    2008-12-01

    To determine the added diagnostic benefit of using MS-CT in multiple trauma patients differentiated by severity of injury and affected body region. A retrospective analysis was performed of the 16-row whole-body spiral CT findings in 275 multiple trauma patients (73 % men, 27 % women; age 39.6 +/- 18.9 years) with regard to additional findings and new findings obtained with CT compared to the findings obtained by conventional projection radiography and abdominal ultrasound in the emergency room. The additional and new findings were differentiated by body region (head, face, chest, pelvis, abdomen, spine) and the degree of severity according to the three classes of injuries distinguished by the ATLS concept (class 1: simple injury, class 2: potentially life threatening, class 3: immediately life threatening). A total of 921 additional findings (= findings potentially relevant for further diagnosis and therapy in addition to the findings obtained by conventional radiography or ultrasound) were obtained by MS-CT in all patients. The distribution by number of patients and body region was as follows: 22 neck, 76 face, 125 chest, 112 abdomen, 50 pelvis, and 91 spine. Most additional findings were categorized as potentially life threatening (ATLS class 2). In addition, there were 439 completely new findings, involving the head in 128 patients (mostly ATLS class 3), the face in 18, the chest in 47, the abdomen in 26, and the spine in 9 patients. Most new findings involving the face, abdomen, and spine were ATLS class 2 injuries. Compared with conventional radiography and ultrasound in the emergency room, 16-row whole-body spiral CT yields numerous additional and new findings in different body regions in patients with multiple traumas. New findings primarily involved the head, and the additional findings involved the chest, pelvis, and spine. Most findings obtained with CT were potentially life threatening (ATLS class 2).

  14. Influence of 320-detector-row volume scanning and AAPM report 111 CT dosimetry metrics on size-specific dose estimate: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Kinomura, Yutaka; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Masanao

    2016-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group 204 has recommended the use of size-dependent conversion factors to calculate size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) values from volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) values. However, these conversion factors do not consider the effects of 320-detector-row volume computed tomography (CT) examinations or the new CT dosimetry metrics proposed by AAPM task group 111. This study aims to investigate the influence of these examinations and metrics on the conversion factors reported by AAPM task group 204, using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations were performed modelling a Toshiba Aquilion ONE CT scanner, in order to compute dose values in water for cylindrical phantoms with 8-40-cm diameters at 2-cm intervals for each scanning parameter (tube voltage, bow-tie filter, longitudinal beam width). Then, the conversion factors were obtained by applying exponential regression analysis between the dose values for a given phantom diameter and the phantom diameter combined with various scanning parameters. The conversion factors for each scanning method (helical, axial, or volume scanning) and CT dosimetry method (i.e., the CTDI100 method or the AAPM task group 111 method) were in agreement with those reported by AAPM task group 204, within a percentage error of 14.2 % for phantom diameters ≥11.2 cm. The results obtained in this study indicate that the conversion factors previously presented by AAPM task group 204 can be used to provide appropriate SSDE values for 320-detector-row volume CT examinations and the CT dosimetry metrics proposed by the AAPM task group 111.

  15. Quantitative Features of Liver Lesions, Lung Nodules, and Renal Stones at Multi-Detector Row CT Examinations: Dependency on Radiation Dose and Reconstruction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Justin; Mileto, Achille; Nelson, Rendon C; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    To determine if radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm affect the computer-based extraction and analysis of quantitative imaging features in lung nodules, liver lesions, and renal stones at multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Retrospective analysis of data from a prospective, multicenter, HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved clinical trial was performed by extracting 23 quantitative imaging features (size, shape, attenuation, edge sharpness, pixel value distribution, and texture) of lesions on multi-detector row CT images of 20 adult patients (14 men, six women; mean age, 63 years; range, 38-72 years) referred for known or suspected focal liver lesions, lung nodules, or kidney stones. Data were acquired between September 2011 and April 2012. All multi-detector row CT scans were performed at two different radiation dose levels; images were reconstructed with filtered back projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms. A linear mixed-effects model was used to assess the effect of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm on extracted features. Among the 23 imaging features assessed, radiation dose had a significant effect on five, three, and four of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction had a significant effect on three, one, and one of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). MBIR reconstruction had a significant effect on nine, 11, and 15 of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Of note, the measured size of lung nodules and renal stones with MBIR was significantly different than those for the other two algorithms (P < .002 for all comparisons). Although lesion texture was significantly affected by the

  16. Multi-detector row CT of the left atrium and pulmonary veins before radio-frequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lacomis, Joan M; Wigginton, William; Fuhrman, Carl; Schwartzman, David; Armfield, Derek R; Pealer, Karen M

    2003-10-01

    Radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of the distal pulmonary veins and posterior left atrium is increasingly being used to treat recurrent or refractory atrial fibrillation that resists pharmacologic therapy or cardioversion. Successful RFCA of atrial fibrillation requires resolution of abnormal rhythms while minimizing complications and can be achieved with precise, preprocedural, three-dimensional (3D) anatomic delineation of the target, the atriopulmonary venous junction. Three-dimensional multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) of the pulmonary veins and left atrium provides the necessary anatomic information for successful RFCA, including (a) the number, location, and angulation of pulmonary veins and their ostial branches unobscured by adjacent cardiac and vascular anatomy, and (b) left atrial volume. The 3D multi-detector row CT scanning and postprocessing techniques used for pre-RFCA planning are straightforward. Radiologists must not only understand these techniques but must also be familiar with atrial fibrillation and the technical considerations and complications associated with RFCA of this condition. In addition, radiologists must be familiar with anatomic variants of the left atrium and distal pulmonary veins and understand the importance of these variants to the referring cardiac interventional electrophysiologist. Copyright RSNA, 2003

  17. CT venography after knee replacement surgery: comparison of dual-energy CT-based monochromatic imaging and single-energy metal artifact reduction techniques on a 320-row CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Hatemura, Masahiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-02-01

    An optimal metal artifact reduction (MAR) technique is needed for a reliable and accurate image-based diagnosis. Using a 320-row scanner, we compared the dual-energy computed tomography (CT)-based monochromatic and the single-energy metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) techniques for CT venography (CTV) to identify the better imaging method for diagnosing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients who had undergone knee replacement surgery. Twenty-three consecutive patients with suspected DVT after unilateral knee replacement surgery underwent dual-energy CT (135/80 kVp). Monochromatic images of 35-135 keV were generated; the monochromatic image with the best signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the popliteal vein near the metal prosthesis were selected. The projection data of 80 kVp were reconstructed using MAR algorithm. The mean SNR ON MAR and the best SNR ON monochromatic images were compared. Two radiologists evaluated visualization of the metal artifacts on a four-point scale where 1 = extensive artifacts, 2 = strong artifacts, 3 = mild artifacts, and 4 = minimal artifacts. The mean SNR was significantly higher on the MAR than the monochromatic images (12.8 ± 4.7 versus 7.7 ± 5.1, P < 0.01) and the visual scores were significantly higher for MAR than monochromatic images (2.6 ± 0.8 versus 1.3 ± 0.4, P < 0.01). For CTV after knee replacement surgery, the MAR technique is superior to the monochromatic imaging technique.

  18. CT venography after knee replacement surgery: comparison of dual-energy CT-based monochromatic imaging and single-energy metal artifact reduction techniques on a 320-row CT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Hatemura, Masahiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Background An optimal metal artifact reduction (MAR) technique is needed for a reliable and accurate image-based diagnosis. Purpose Using a 320-row scanner, we compared the dual-energy computed tomography (CT)-based monochromatic and the single-energy metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) techniques for CT venography (CTV) to identify the better imaging method for diagnosing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients who had undergone knee replacement surgery. Material and Methods Twenty-three consecutive patients with suspected DVT after unilateral knee replacement surgery underwent dual-energy CT (135/80 kVp). Monochromatic images of 35–135 keV were generated; the monochromatic image with the best signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the popliteal vein near the metal prosthesis were selected. The projection data of 80 kVp were reconstructed using MAR algorithm. The mean SNR ON MAR and the best SNR ON monochromatic images were compared. Two radiologists evaluated visualization of the metal artifacts on a four-point scale where 1 = extensive artifacts, 2 = strong artifacts, 3 = mild artifacts, and 4 = minimal artifacts. Results The mean SNR was significantly higher on the MAR than the monochromatic images (12.8 ± 4.7 versus 7.7 ± 5.1, P < 0.01) and the visual scores were significantly higher for MAR than monochromatic images (2.6 ± 0.8 versus 1.3 ± 0.4, P < 0.01). Conclusion For CTV after knee replacement surgery, the MAR technique is superior to the monochromatic imaging technique. PMID:28321330

  19. Optimal scan timing for artery-vein separation at whole-brain CT angiography using a 320-row MDCT volume scanner.

    PubMed

    Shirasaka, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Yamashita, Koji; Kondo, Masatoshi; Hamasaki, Hiroshi; Shimomiya, Yamato; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Funama, Yoshinori; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    A 320-row multidetector CT (MDCT) is expected for a good artery-vein separation in terms of temporal resolution. However, a shortened scan duration may lead to insufficient vascular enhancement. We assessed the optimal scan timing for the artery-vein separation at whole-brain CT angiography (CTA) when bolus tracking was used at 320-row MDCT. We analyzed 60 patients, who underwent whole-brain four-dimensional CTA. Difference in CT attenuation between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the superior sagittal sinus (Datt) was calculated in each phase. Using a visual evaluation score for the depiction of arteries and veins, we calculated the difference between the mean score for the intracranial arteries and the mean score for the veins (Dscore). We assessed the time at which the maximum Datt and Dscore were simultaneously observed. The maximum Datt was observed at 6.0 s and 8.0 s in the arterial-dominant phase and at 16.0 s and 18.0 s in the venous-dominant phase after the contrast media arrival time at the ICA (Taa). The maximum Dscore was observed at 6.0 s and 8.0 s in the arterial-dominant phase and at 16.0 s in the venous-dominant phase after the Taa. There were no statistically significant differences in Datt (p = 0.375) or Dscore (p = 0.139) between these scan timings. The optimal scan timing for artery-vein separation at whole-brain CTA was 6.0 s or 8.0 s for the arteries and 16.0 s for the veins after the Taa. Advances in knowledge: Optimal scan timing allowed us to visualize intracranial arteries or veins with minimal superimposition.

  20. Automated multidetector row CT dataset segmentation with an interactive watershed transform (IWT) algorithm: Part 1. Understanding the IWT technique.

    PubMed

    Heath, David G; Hahn, Horst K; Johnson, Pamela T; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-12-01

    Segmentation of volumetric computed tomography (CT) datasets facilitates evaluation of 3D CT angiography renderings, particularly with maximum intensity projection displays. This manuscript describes a novel automated bone editing program that uses an interactive watershed transform (IWT) technique to rapidly extract the skeletal structures from the volume. Advantages of this tool include efficient segmentation of large datasets with minimal need for correction. In the first of this two-part series, the principles of the IWT technique are reviewed, followed by a discussion of clinical utility based on our experience.

  1. Rowing Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinks, W. L.

    This review of the literature discusses and examines the methods used in physiological assessment of rowers, results of such assessments, and future directions emanating from research in the physiology of rowing. The first section discusses the energy demands of rowing, including the contribution of the energy system, anaerobic metabolism, and the…

  2. Coronary artery calcium measurement with multi-detector row CT: in vitro assessment of effect of radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cheng; Bae, Kyongtae T; Pilgram, Thomas K; Suh, Jongdae; Bradley, David

    2002-12-01

    The authors assessed in vitro the effect of radiation dose on coronary artery calcium quantification with multi-detector row computed tomography. A cardiac phantom with calcified cylinders was scanned at various milliampere second settings (20-160 mAs). A clear tendency was found for image noise to decrease as tube current increased (P <.001). No tendency was found for the Agatson score or calcium volume and mass errors to vary with tube current. Calcium measurements were not significantly affected by the choice of tube current. Calcium mass error was strongly correlated with calcium volume error (P <.001). The calcium mass measurement was more accurate and less variable than the calcium volume measurement.

  3. Radiation dose is reduced with a single-pass whole-body multi-detector row CT trauma protocol compared with a conventional segmented method: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Thomas; Rhea, James T; Novelline, Robert A

    2003-12-01

    Radiation dose data were collected from a calibrated multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) scanner during trauma CT. One protocol (used with 10 case subjects) involved a single-pass continuous whole-body acquisition from cranial vertex to symphysis pubis, while the other, conventional protocol (used with 10 control subjects) involved scouting and scanning body segments (head, cervical spine, chest, abdomen, and pelvis) individually. Technical factors were kept constant within each body segment for the single-pass and the segmented protocols. Statistics included univariate analysis, two-tailed t testing to evaluate statistical significance of the summary statistic, and power and subject population contingency tables. The mean dose length product (DLP) with the single-pass protocol was 17% lower than the sum of the DLPs of each of the individual body segment scans (P <.001). Analysis of power and subject population by using a difference in mean of 500 mGy. cm and an alpha of.05 revealed a (1-beta) of higher than 0.90 for a sample of 10 patients. Thus, a whole-body single-pass trauma protocol, compared with a typical segmented acquisition protocol matched for imaging technique, resulted in reduced total radiation dose. The reduction in radiation dose is thought to represent a reduction in redundant imaging at overlap zones between body segments scanned in the segmental protocol but not in the continuous acquisition.

  4. Submillisievert Median Radiation Dose for Coronary Angiography with a Second-Generation 320–Detector Row CT Scanner in 107 Consecutive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shanbhag, Sujata M.; Arai, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To (a) use a new second-generation wide-volume 320–detector row computed tomographic (CT) scanner to explore optimization of radiation exposure in coronary CT angiography in an unselected and consecutive cohort of patients referred for clinical purposes and (b) compare estimated radiation exposure and image quality with that from a cohort of similar patients who underwent imaging with a previous first-generation CT system. Materials and Methods: The study was approved by the institutional review board, and all subjects provided written consent. Coronary CT angiography was performed in 107 consecutive patients with a new second-generation 320–detector row unit. Estimated radiation exposure and image quality were compared with those from 100 consecutive patients who underwent imaging with a previous first-generation scanner. Effective radiation dose was estimated by multiplying the dose-length product by an effective dose conversion factor of 0.014 mSv/mGy ⋅ cm and reported with size-specific dose estimates (SSDEs). Image quality was evaluated by two independent readers. Results: The mean age of the 107 patients was 55.4 years ± 12.0 (standard deviation); 57 patients (53.3%) were men. The median body mass index was 27.3 kg/m2 (range, 18.1–47.2 kg/m2); however, 71 patients (66.4%) were overweight, obese, or morbidly obese. A tube potential of 100 kV was used in 97 patients (90.6%), single-volume acquisition was used in 104 (97.2%), and prospective electrocardiographic gating was used in 106 (99.1%). The mean heart rate was 57.1 beats per minute ± 11.2 (range, 34–96 beats per minute), which enabled single-heartbeat scans in 100 patients (93.4%). The median radiation dose was 0.93 mSv (interquartile range [IQR], 0.58–1.74 mSv) with the second-generation unit and 2.67 mSv (IQR, 1.68–4.00 mSv) with the first-generation unit (P < .0001). The median SSDE was 6.0 mGy (IQR, 4.1–10.0 mGy) with the second-generation unit and 13.2 mGy (IQR, 10.2–18

  5. The effect of bolus viscosity on laryngeal closure in swallowing: kinematic analysis using 320-row area detector CT.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Yoko; Saitoh, Eiichi; Okada, Sumiko; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Shibata, Seiko; Ota, Kikuo; Baba, Mikoto; Fujii, Naoko; Katada, Kazuhiro; Wattanapan, Pattra; Palmer, Jeffrey B

    2013-03-01

    The present study examined the effect of bolus viscosity on the onset of laryngeal closure (relative to hyoid elevation), the duration of laryngeal closure, and other key events of swallowing in ten healthy volunteers. All volunteers underwent 320-row area detector computed tomography swallow studies while swallowing 10 ml of honey-thick barium (5 % v/w) and thin barium (5 % v/w) in a 45° reclining position. Three-dimensional images of both consistencies were created in 29 phases at an interval of 0.10 s (100 ms) over a 2.90-s duration. The timing of the motions of the hyoid bone, soft palate, and epiglottis; the opening and closing of the laryngeal vestibule, true vocal cords (TVC), and pharyngoesophageal segment; and the bolus movement were measured and compared between the two consistencies. The result showed differing patterns of bolus movement for thin and thick liquids. With thin liquids, the bolus reached the hypopharynx earlier and stayed in the hypopharynx longer than with thick liquids. Among events of laryngeal closure, only the timing of TVC closure differed significantly between the two consistencies. With thin liquids, TVC closure started earlier and lasted longer than with thick liquids. This TVC movement could reflect a response to the faster flow of thin liquids. The results suggest that bolus viscosity alters the temporal characteristics of swallowing, especially closure of the TVC.

  6. Prospective evaluation of the influence of iterative reconstruction on the reproducibility of coronary calcium quantification in reduced radiation dose 320 detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andrew D; Leifer, Eric S; Yu, Jeannie; Shanbhag, Sujata M; Bronson, Kathie; Arai, Andrew E; Chen, Marcus Y

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC) predicts coronary heart disease events and is important for individualized cardiac risk assessment. This report assesses the interscan variability of CT for coronary calcium quantification using image acquisition with standard and reduced radiation dose protocols and whether the use of reduced radiation dose acquisition with iterative reconstruction (IR; "reduced-dose/IR ") allows for similar image quality and reproducibility when compared to standard radiation dose acquisition with filtered back projection (FBP; "standard-dose/FBP") on 320-detector row computed tomography (320-CT). 200 consecutive patients (60 ± 9 years, 59% male) prospectively underwent two standard- and two reduced-dose acquisitions (800 total scans, 1600 reconstructions) using 320 slice CT and 120 kV tube voltage. Automated tube current modulation was used and for reduced-dose scans, prescribed tube current was lowered by 70%. Image noise and Agatston scores were determined and compared. Regarding stratification by Agatston score categories (0, 1-10, 11-100, 101-400, >400), reduced-dose/IR versus standard-dose/FBP had excellent agreement at 89% (95% CI: 86-92%) with kappa 0.86 (95% CI: 0.81-0.90). Standard-dose/FBP rescan agreement was 93% (95% CI: 89-96%) with kappa = 0.91 (95% CI: 0.86-0.95) while reduced-dose/IR rescan agreement was similar at 91% (95% CI: 87-94%) with kappa 0.88 (95% CI: 0.83-0.93). Image noise was significantly higher but clinically acceptable for reduced-dose/IR (18 Hounsfield Unit [HU] mean) compared to standard-dose/FBP (16 HU; p < 0.0001). Median radiation exposure was 74% lower for reduced- (0.37 mSv) versus standard-dose (1.4 mSv) acquisitions. Rescan agreement was excellent for reduced-dose image acquisition with iterative reconstruction and standard-dose acquisition with filtered back projection for the quantification of coronary calcium by CT. These methods make it possible to reduce radiation exposure by 74%. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct

  7. Impaired left ventricular function has a detrimental effect on image quality in multi-detector row CT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Manghat, N E; Morgan-Hughes, G J; Shaw, S R; Marshall, A J; Roobottom, C A

    2008-04-01

    To determine whether there is a relationship between left ventricular (LV) haemodynamic parameters, circulation times, and arterial contrast opacification that might affect the image quality of computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography. Thirty-six patients were included in the study: 18 with cardiomyopathy (CM) and LV dilatation of suspected ischaemic aetiology [age 57.9+/-13.7 years, range 30-77 years; 14 male, four female; body mass index (BMI)=27.7+/-4.5, range 25.5-31.8] and 18 controls (age 62.3+/-9.4 years, range 47-89 years; 10 male, eight female; BMI 27.8+/-6.6; range 19.2-33.6). Coronary artery image quality was assessed using a three-point visual scale; contrast medium circulation times, aortic root contrast attenuation, and LV functional parameters were studied. Visually reduced contrast opacification impaired image quality more often in the CM group than the control group (27.4 versus 5.1%). A total of 55.6% CM patients had a contrast transit time ranging from 30-75 s; the number of "unassessable" segments increased with increasing transit time conforming to a fitted quadratic model (R2=0.74). The relationship between LV ejection fraction and contrast attenuation may also conform to a quadratic model (R2=0.71). LV haemodynamics influence coronary artery opacification using cardiac CT, and users imaging this subgroup must do so with the knowledge of this potential pitfall. The results indicate the need for further studies examining CT protocols in this clinical subgroup.

  8. Whole body 16-row multislice CT in emergency room: effects of different protocols on scanning time, image quality and radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Fanucci, Ezio; Fiaschetti, Valeria; Rotili, Anna; Floris, Roberto; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare two different scanning protocols in patients suspected to have multiple trauma using multidetector 16-row computed tomography (CT) to better define scanning time, imaging quality and radiation exposure. Forty-six patients, between March 2004 and March 2005, with suspected multiple trauma (cerebral, spine, chest, abdominal and pelvis) were evaluated with two different protocols: Protocol "A" 26 patients; Protocol "B" 20 patients. Protocol A consists of a single-pass continuous whole-body acquisition (from vertex to pubic symphysis), whereas Protocol B of conventional segmented acquisition with scanning of body segments individually. Both protocols were performed using a multidetector 16-rows CT (Light-Speed 16, General Electric Medical System, Milwaukee, WI, USA) with the same technical factors. Radiation dose was evaluated in two ways: computer tomography dose index (CTDI) = dose measured in central and peripheral region of the subjects as a direct result of a CT section acquisition of T millimeters thick (independent from the two protocols) and dose length product (DLP) = total dose deposited over the length of the acquisition (dependent from the two protocols). Image quality was rated according to the following scores: 1, excellent; 2, good; 3, satisfactory; 4, moderate and 5, poor. The results were compared using Wilcoxon's test to identify significant difference in terms of image quality, scanning time, radiation exposure and presence of artifacts, assuming significance at a p value of <0.05. In the single-pass scanning, DLP was 2.671 mGy x cm and a total scan time of 35 s. In whole-body protocols, we have seen artifacts due to arm adduction in thorax and less image quality in brain. In the conventional segmented study, DLP was 3.217 mGy x cm and a total scan time of 65 s; this protocol offered less extraction capabilities of off-axial on focused images of the entire spine, aorta, facial bones or hip without rescanning

  9. Time Efficiency and Diagnostic Accuracy of New Automated Myocardial Perfusion Analysis Software in 320-Row CT Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rief, Matthias; Stenzel, Fabian; Kranz, Anisha; Schlattmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy of automated myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) image analysis software. Materials and Methods 320-row CTP was performed in 30 patients, and analyses were conducted independently by three different blinded readers by the use of two recent software releases (version 4.6 and novel version 4.71GR001, Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan). Analysis times were compared, and automated epi- and endocardial contour detection was subjectively rated in five categories (excellent, good, fair, poor and very poor). As semi-quantitative perfusion parameters, myocardial attenuation and transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) were calculated for each myocardial segment and agreement was tested by using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Conventional coronary angiography served as reference standard. Results The analysis time was significantly reduced with the novel automated software version as compared with the former release (Reader 1: 43:08 ± 11:39 min vs. 09:47 ± 04:51 min, Reader 2: 42:07 ± 06:44 min vs. 09:42 ± 02:50 min and Reader 3: 21:38 ± 3:44 min vs. 07:34 ± 02:12 min; p < 0.001 for all). Epi- and endocardial contour detection for the novel software was rated to be significantly better (p < 0.001) than with the former software. ICCs demonstrated strong agreement (≥ 0.75) for myocardial attenuation in 93% and for TPR in 82%. Diagnostic accuracy for the two software versions was not significantly different (p = 0.169) as compared with conventional coronary angiography. Conclusion The novel automated CTP analysis software offers enhanced time efficiency with an improvement by a factor of about four, while maintaining diagnostic accuracy. PMID:23323027

  10. Optimization of Z-axis automatic exposure control for multidetector row CT evaluation of neck and comparison with fixed tube current technique for image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, S; Kalra, M K; Pottala, K M; Waldrop, S M; Hudgins, P A

    2006-01-01

    Z-axis automatic exposure control (AEC) technique automatically adjusts tube current based on size of body region scanned. The purpose of the current study was to compare diagnostic acceptability, noise, and radiation exposure of multidetector row CT (MDCT) of neck performed with z-axis AEC and with fixed current. Two study groups of 26 patients each underwent MDCT of neck using z-axis AEC with 8 noise index (NI), 150-440 mA, and 10 NI, 75-440 mA, respectively. A control group consisting of another 26 patients underwent MDCT of neck with fixed-current technique (300 mA). Objective noise and mean tube current-time products (mA . s) were recorded. Two radiologists evaluated images for diagnostic acceptability and subjective noise on a 5-point scale. All CT examinations of study and control groups were diagnostically acceptable, though objective noise was significantly more with z-axis AEC (shoulder: NI 8, 20.6 +/- 6.2 HU; NI 10, 22.2 +/- 4.6 HU) than with fixed current (16.2 +/- 6 HU) (P = .01). There was no significant difference between AEC and fixed current in diagnostic acceptability and subjective noise (P = .22-.42). AEC resulted in significant radiation dose reduction (NI 8, 186.3 +/- 20.5 mA . s; NI 10, 158.1 +/- 21.2 mA x s), compared with fixed current (235 +/- 21.8 mA x s). Z-axis AEC resulted in similar subjective noise and diagnostic acceptability, with radiation dose reduction of 21% for NI of 8 and 33% for NI of 10, respectively, for MDCT evaluation of neck, compared with those of fixed current technique.

  11. 64-Slice multidetector row CT angiography of the abdomen: comparison of low versus high concentration iodinated contrast media in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Holalkere, N-S; Matthes, K; Kalva, S P; Brugge, W R; Sahani, D V

    2011-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to assess the image quality and degree of vascular enhancement using low-concentration contrast media (LCCM) (300 mg I ml–1) and high-concentration contrast media (HCCM) (370 mg I ml–1) on 64-slice multidetector row CT (MDCT) abdominal CT angiography (CTA). In addition, we aimed to study the feasibility of using HCCM with a reduced total iodine dose. Methods CTA of the abdomen on a 64-slice MDCT was performed on 15 anaesthetised pigs. Study pigs were divided into three groups of five each based on the iodine concentration and dose received: Group A (LCCM; 300 mg I ml–1), Group B (HCCM; 370 mg I ml–1) and Group C HCCM with 20% less iodine dose. The total iodine injected was kept constant (600 mg kg–1) in Groups A and B. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed to study and compare each group for image quality, visibility of the branch order of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), artefacts, degree of enhancement in the aorta and main stem arteries and uniformity of enhancement in the aorta. Groups were compared using the analysis of variance test. Results The image quality of 64-slice MDCT angiography was excellent with a mean score of 4.63 and confident visualisation of the third to fifth order branches of the SMA in all groups. Group B demonstrated superior vascular enhancement, as compared with Groups A and C (p≤0.05). Uniform aortic enhancement was achieved with the use of LCCM and HCCM with 20% less iodine dose. Conclusion 64-slice MDCT angiography of the abdomen was of excellent quality. HCCM improves contrast enhancement and overall CTA image quality and allows the iodine dose to be reduced. PMID:21081582

  12. 64-Slice multidetector row CT angiography of the abdomen: comparison of low versus high concentration iodinated contrast media in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Holalkere, N-S; Matthes, K; Kalva, S P; Brugge, W R; Sahani, D V

    2011-03-01

    In this study we aimed to assess the image quality and degree of vascular enhancement using low-concentration contrast media (LCCM) (300 mg I ml(-1)) and high-concentration contrast media (HCCM) (370 mg I ml(-1)) on 64-slice multidetector row CT (MDCT) abdominal CT angiography (CTA). In addition, we aimed to study the feasibility of using HCCM with a reduced total iodine dose. CTA of the abdomen on a 64-slice MDCT was performed on 15 anaesthetised pigs. Study pigs were divided into three groups of five each based on the iodine concentration and dose received: Group A (LCCM; 300 mg I ml(-1)), Group B (HCCM; 370 mg I ml(-1)) and Group C HCCM with 20% less iodine dose. The total iodine injected was kept constant (600 mg kg(-1)) in Groups A and B. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed to study and compare each group for image quality, visibility of the branch order of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), artefacts, degree of enhancement in the aorta and main stem arteries and uniformity of enhancement in the aorta. Groups were compared using the analysis of variance test. The image quality of 64-slice MDCT angiography was excellent with a mean score of 4.63 and confident visualisation of the third to fifth order branches of the SMA in all groups. Group B demonstrated superior vascular enhancement, as compared with Groups A and C (p≤0.05). Uniform aortic enhancement was achieved with the use of LCCM and HCCM with 20% less iodine dose. 64-slice MDCT angiography of the abdomen was of excellent quality. HCCM improves contrast enhancement and overall CTA image quality and allows the iodine dose to be reduced.

  13. Assessment of organ absorbed doses and estimation of effective doses from pediatric anthropomorphic phantom measurements for multi-detector row CT with and without automatic exposure control.

    PubMed

    Brisse, Hervé J; Robilliard, Magalie; Savignoni, Alexia; Pierrat, Noelle; Gaboriaud, Geneviève; De Rycke, Yann; Neuenschwander, Sylvia; Aubert, Bernard; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude

    2009-10-01

    This study was designed to measure organ absorbed doses from multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) on pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms, calculate the corresponding effective doses, and assess the influence of automatic exposure control (AEC) in terms of organ dose variations. Four anthropomorphic phantoms (phantoms represent the equivalent of a newborn, 1-, 5-, and 10-y-old child) were scanned with a four-channel MDCT coupled with a z-axis-based AEC system. Two CT torso protocols were compared: a first protocol without AEC and constant tube current-time product and a second protocol with AEC using age-adjusted noise indices. Organ absorbed doses were monitored by thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Cu, P). Effective doses were calculated according to the tissue weighting factors of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (). For fixed mA acquisitions, organ doses normalized to the volume CT dose index in a 16-cm head phantom (CTDIvol16) ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 and effective doses ranged from 8.4 to 13.5 mSv. For the newborn-equivalent phantom, the AEC-modulated scan showed almost no significant dose variation compared to the fixed mA scan. For the 1-, 5- and 10-y equivalent phantoms, the use of AEC induced a significant dose decrease on chest organs (ranging from 61 to 31% for thyroid, 37 to 21% for lung, 34 to 17% for esophagus, and 39 to 10% for breast). However, AEC also induced a significant dose increase (ranging from 28 to 48% for salivary glands, 22 to 51% for bladder, and 24 to 70% for ovaries) related to the high density of skull base and pelvic bones. These dose increases should be considered before using AEC as a dose optimization tool in children.

  14. Role of multidetector-row CT in assessing the source of arterial haemorrhage in patients with pelvic vascular trauma. Comparison with angiography.

    PubMed

    Pinto, A; Niola, R; Tortora, G; Ponticiello, G; Russo, G; Di Nuzzo, L; Gagliardi, N; Scaglione, M; Merola, S; Stavolo, C; Maglione, F; Romano, L

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the role of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in identifying active bleeding and its source in polytrauma patients with pelvic vascular injuries with or without associated fractures of the pelvis. From January 2003 to December 2007, 28 patients (19 men and nine women, age range 16-80 years) with acute symptoms from blunt pelvic trauma and a drop in haematocrit underwent MDCT and angiography. Conventional radiography of the pelvis was performed in all patients at the time of admission to the emergency department. MDCT was performed with a four-row unit in 15 patients and a 16-row unit in the remaining 13 patients. The study included whole-body CT to identify craniocerebral, vertebral, thoracic, abdominal and pelvic injuries. CT was performed before and after rapid infusion (4-5 ml/s) of intravenous contrast material (120 ml) using a power injector. A triphasic contrast-enhanced study was performed in all patients. MDCT images were transferred to a workstation to assess pelvic fracture, site of haematoma and active extravasation of contrast material, visibility of possible vascular injuries and associated traumatic lesions. At angiography, an abdominal and pelvic aortogram was obtained in all cases before selective catheterisation of the internal iliac arteries and superselective catheterisation of their branches for embolisation purposes. Results related to identifying the source of bleeding at MDCT were compared with sites of bleeding or vascular injury identified by selective pelvic angiography. The sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of MDCT were determined. MDCT allowed us to identify pelvic bleeding in 21/28 patients (75%), with most cases being detected in the delayed contrast-enhanced phase (13/21 cases, 61.9%). Injured arteries were identified on MDCT in 12/21 cases (57%): the obturator artery (n=9), internal iliac artery (n=6), internal pudendal artery (n=6) and superior gluteal artery (n=5) were most frequently

  15. Optimum CT reconstruction parameters for vascular and hepatocellular carcinoma models in a liver phantom with multi-level dynamic computed tomography with 64 detector rows: a basic study.

    PubMed

    Murotani, Kazuhiro; Kazuhiro, Murotani; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Hosokawa, Seiki; Nishioku, Tadayoshi

    2013-07-01

    We quantified to clarify the optimum factors for CT image reconstruction of an enhanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model in a liver phantom obtained by multi-level dynamic computed tomography (M-LDCT) with 64 detector rows. After M-LDCT scanning of a water phantom and an enhanced HCC model, we compared the standard deviation (SD, 1 ± SD), noise power spectrum (NPS) values, contrast-noise ratios (CNR), and the M-LDCT image among the reconstruction parameters, including the convolution kernel (FC11, FC13, and FC15), post-processing quantum filters (2D-Q00, 2D-Q01, and 2D-Q02) and slice thicknesses/slice intervals. The SD and NPS values were lowest with FC11 and 2D-Q02. The CNR values were highest with 2D-Q02. The M-LDCT image quality was highest with FC11 and 2D-Q02, and with slice thicknesses/slice intervals of 0.5 mm/0.5 mm and 0.5 mm/0.25 mm. The optimum factors were the FC11 convolution kernel, 2D-Q02 quantum filter, and 0.5 mm slice thickness/0.5 mm slice interval or less.

  16. Rowing injuries.

    PubMed

    Rumball, Jane S; Lebrun, Constance M; Di Ciacca, Stephen R; Orlando, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Participation in the sport of rowing has been steadily increasing in recent decades, yet few studies address the specific injuries incurred. This article reviews the most common injuries described in the literature, including musculoskeletal problems in the lower back, ribs, shoulder, wrist and knee. A review of basic rowing physiology and equipment is included, along with a description of the mechanics of the rowing stroke. This information is necessary in order to make an accurate diagnosis and treatment protocol for these injuries, which are mainly chronic in nature. The most frequently injured region is the low back, mainly due to excessive hyperflexion and twisting, and can include specific injuries such as spondylolysis, sacroiliac joint dysfunction and disc herniation. Rib stress fractures account for the most time lost from on-water training and competition. Although theories abound for the mechanism of injury, the exact aetiology of rib stress fractures remains unknown. Other injuries discussed within, which are specific to ribs, include costochondritis, costovertebral joint subluxation and intercostal muscle strains. Shoulder pain is quite common in rowers and can be the result of overuse, poor technique, or tension in the upper body. Injuries concerning the forearm and wrist are also common, and can include exertional compartment syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, deQuervain's and intersection syndrome, and tenosynovitis of the wrist extensors. In the lower body, the major injuries reported include generalised patellofemoral pain due to abnormal patellar tracking, and iliotibial band friction syndrome. Lastly, dermatological issues, such as blisters and abrasions, and miscellaneous issues, such as environmental concerns and the female athlete triad, are also included in this article.Pathophysiology, mechanism of injury, assessment and management strategies are outlined in the text for each injury, with special attention given to ways to correct

  17. Characterization and correction of beam-hardening artifacts during dynamic volume CT assessment of myocardial perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Kakuya; George, Richard T; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Lima, João A C; Lardo, Albert C

    2010-07-01

    To fully characterize beam-hardening effects caused by iodinated contrast medium in the left ventricular (LV) cavity and aorta in the assessment of myocardial perfusion at computed tomography (CT) and to validate a beam-hardening artifact correction algorithm that considers fluid-filled vessels and chambers important sources of beam hardening. The Johns Hopkins University animal care and use committee approved all procedures. An anatomically correct LV and myocardial phantom to characterize beam-hardening artifacts was designed. Following validation in the phantom, the beam-hardening correction (BHC) algorithm was applied to 256-detector row dynamic volume CT images in a canine ischemia model (n = 5) during adenosine stress, and the effect of beam hardening was determined by comparing regional dynamic volume CT perfusion metrics (myocardial upslope normalized by maximum LV blood pool attenuation) with microsphere-derived myocardial blood flow (MBF). A paired Student t test was used to compare continuous variables from the same subject but under different conditions, while linear regression analysis was performed to estimate the slope and statistical significance of the relationship between CT-derived perfusion metrics and microsphere-derived MBF. Beam-hardening artifacts were successfully reproduced in phantom studies and were eliminated with the BHC algorithm. The correlation coefficient of CT-derived perfusion metrics and microsphere-derived MBF improved from 0.60 to 0.74 (P > .05) following correction in the animal model. Beam-hardening artifacts confound dynamic volume CT assessment of myocardial perfusion. Application of the BHC algorithm is helpful for improving accuracy of myocardial perfusion at dynamic volume CT.

  18. Is aortic atherothrombotic disease detected using multidetector-row CT associated with an increased risk of early ischemic lesion recurrence after acute ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Ko, Youngchai; Kim, Wook-Joo; Jang, Myung Suk; Yang, Mi Hwa; Park, Jung Hyun; Choi, Sang Il; Chun, Eun Ju; Lee, Soo Joo; Han, Moon-Ku; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2012-03-01

    Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is emerging as a new tool for diagnosing aortic atherothrombotic disease (AAD). We elucidated whether MDCT-detected AAD is associated with an increased risk of early ischemic lesion recurrence on diffusion-weighted MRI after ischemic stroke. A consecutive series of patients with acute ischemic stroke confirmed using diffusion-weighted MRI who were hospitalized within 48 hours after symptom onset and underwent MDCT were identified in a prospective stroke registry database. AAD on MDCT was defined as the presence of plaque formation that was noncalcified and ≥4 mm thick, ulcerative, or soft and thrombosed (vulnerable) in the proximal aortic arch. Ischemic lesion recurrence on diffusion-weighted MRI was defined as the occurrence of any new lesion separate from the index lesion on follow-up diffusion-weighted MRI performed within 14 days after symptom onset. A total of 138 patients was selected. MDCT detected AAD in 24 of 138 (17.4%); ≥4 mm thickness in 17 of 138 (12.3%); ulcerated plaque in 20 of 138 (14.5%); and vulnerable plaque in 16 of 138 (11.6%). With respect to diffusion-weighted MRI lesion recurrence, the crude ORs (95% CIs) were as follows: AAD, 3.56 (1.43-8.89); vulnerable plaque, 3.21 (1.11-9.30); ulcerated plaque, 3.37 (1.27-8.95); and ≥4 mm thickness of the noncalcified plaque, 4.23 (1.11-16.19). These results remained significant after adjustments for potential confounders were made. This study shows that AAD detected by MDCT increases the risk of early ischemic lesion recurrence after acute ischemic stroke, thus supporting the role of MDCT in diagnosing AAD and assessing its contribution to recurrence.

  19. The added diagnostic value of 64-row multidetector CT combined with contrast-enhanced US in the evaluation of hepatocellular nodule vascularity: implications in the diagnosis of malignancy in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Alaimo, Valerio; Baratella, Elisa; Medeot, Alessandro; Midiri, Massimo; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the added diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) combined with 64-row multidetector CT (CT) in the assessment of hepatocellular nodule vascularity in patients with liver cirrhosis. One hundred and six cirrhotic patients (68 male, 38 female; mean age +/- SD, 70 +/- 7 years) with 121 biopsy-proven hepatocellular nodules (72 hepatocellular carcinomas, 10 dysplastic and 15 regenerative nodules, 12 hemangiomas, and 12 other benignancies) detected during US surveillance were prospectively recruited. Each nodule was scanned by CEUS during the arterial (10-40 s), portal venous (45-90 s), and delayed sinusoidal phase (from 100 s after microbubble injection to microbubble disappearance). Nodule vascularity at CEUS, CT, and combined CEUS/CT was evaluated side-by-side by two independent blinded readers who classified nodules as benign or malignant according to reference diagnostic criteria. The combined assessment of CEUS/CT provided higher sensitivity (97%, both readers) than did separate assessment of CEUS (88% reader 1; 87% reader 2) and CT (74% reader 1; 71% reader 2; P < 0.05), while no change in specificity was provided by combined analysis. The combined assessment of hepatocellular nodule vascularity at CT and CEUS improved sensitivity in the diagnosis of malignancy in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  20. Comparison of dynamic contrast-enhanced 3T MR and 64-row multidetector CT angiography for the localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Oda, S; Utsunomiya, D; Hirai, T; Kai, Y; Ohmori, Y; Shigematsu, Y; Iryo, Y; Uetani, H; Azuma, M; Yamashita, Y

    2014-02-01

    For the localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas, it is not determined whether dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA is more reliable than multidetector CTA. The aim of this study was to compare the agreement between intra-arterial DSA, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA at 3T, and 64-row multidetector CTA for the localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas. We enrolled 12 consecutive patients (11 men, 1 woman; age range, 46-83 years; mean, 65 years) who underwent preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA at 3T and 64-row multidetector CTA. The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula location was confirmed by intra-arterial DSA as the reference standard. Two reviewers independently evaluated the level of the artery feeding the spinal dural arteriovenous fistula on the basis of continuity between the feeder and abnormal spinal vessels on 3T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA and 64-row multidetector CTA images. Interobserver and intermodality agreement was determined by calculation of the κ coefficient. On DSA, the vessel feeding the spinal dural arteriovenous fistula was the intercostal artery (7 cases), the lumbar artery (3 cases), and the internal iliac artery or the ascending pharyngeal artery (1 case each). For the fistula level, interobserver agreement was excellent for 3T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA (κ = 0.97; 95% CI, 0.92-1.00) and very good for 64-row multidetector CTA (κ = 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.96). Intermodality agreement with DSA was good for 3T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA (κ = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.49-1.00) and moderate for 64-row multidetector CTA (κ = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.020-0.84). For the localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas, 3T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA may be more reliable than 64-row multidetector CTA.

  1. Follow-up of multicentric HCC according to the mRECIST criteria: role of 320-Row CT with semi-automatic 3D analysis software for evaluating the response to systemic therapy

    PubMed Central

    TELEGRAFO, M.; DILORENZO, G.; DI GIOVANNI, G.; CORNACCHIA, I.; STABILE IANORA, A.A.; ANGELELLI, G.; MOSCHETTA, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the role of 320-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) with 3D analysis software in follow up of patients affected by multicentric hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with systemic therapy by using modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). Patients and methods 38 patients affected by multicentric HCC underwent MDCT. All exams were performed before and after iodinate contrast material intravenous injection by using a 320-detection row CT device. CT images were analyzed by two radiologists using multi-planar reconstructions (MPR) in order to assess the response to systemic therapy according to mRECIST criteria: complete response (CR), partial response (PR), progressive disease (PD), stable disease (SD). 30 days later, the same two radiologists evaluated target lesion response to systemic therapy according to mRECIST criteria by using 3D analysis software. The difference between the two systems in assessing HCC response to therapy was assessed by the analysis of the variance (Anova Test). Interobserver agreement between the two radiologists by using MPR images and 3D analysis software was calculated by using Cohen’s Kappa test. Results PR occurred in 10/38 cases (26%), PD in 6/38 (16%), SD in 22/38 (58%). Anova Test showed no statistically significant difference between the two systems for assessing target lesion response to therapy (p >0.05). Inter-observer agreement (k) was respectively of 0.62 for MPR images measurements and 0.86 for 3D analysis ones. Conclusions 3D Analysis software provides a semiautomatic system for assessing target lesion response to therapy according to mRE-CIST criteria in patient affected by multifocal HCC treated with systemic therapy. The reliability of 3D analysis software makes it useful in the clinical practice. PMID:28098056

  2. Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma by Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI: comparison with triple phase 64 detector row helical CT.

    PubMed

    Akai, Hiroyuki; Kiryu, Shigeru; Matsuda, Izuru; Satou, Jirou; Takao, Hidemasa; Tajima, Taku; Watanabe, Yasushi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Akahane, Masaaki; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2011-11-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI with that of triple phase 64-MDCT in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Thirty-four patients with 52 surgically proven lesions underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and triple phase 64-MDCT. Two observers independently evaluated MR and CT imaging on a lesion-by-lesion basis. Sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values and reproducibility were evaluated. The diagnostic accuracy of each modality was assessed with alternative-free response receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Both observers showed higher sensitivity in detecting lesions with MRI compared to CT, however, only the difference between the two imaging techniques for observer 2 was significant (P=0.034). For lesions 1cm or smaller, MRI and CT showed equal sensitivity (both 62.5%) with one observer, and MRI proved superior to CT with the other observer (MRI 75% vs. CT 56.3%), but the latter difference was not significant (P=0.083). The difference in positive and negative predictive value between the two imaging techniques for each observer was not significant (P>0.05). The areas under the ROC curve for each observer were 0.843 and 0.861 for MRI vs. 0.800 and 0.833 for CT and the differences were not significant. Reproducibility was higher using MRI for both observers, but the result was not significant (MRI 32/33 vs. CT 29/33, P=0.083). Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI tended to show higher diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and reproducibility compared to triple phase 64-MDCT in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma, however statistical significance was not achieved. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-02-23

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  4. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2008-10-14

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  5. Designing ROW Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1996-01-01

    There are many aspects to consider when designing a Rosenbrock-Wanner-Wolfbrandt (ROW) method for the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) solving initial value problems (IVP's). The process can be simplified by constructing ROW methods around good Runge-Kutta (RK) methods. The formulation of a new, simple, embedded, third-order, ROW method demonstrates this design approach.

  6. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Pinnow, Kurt Walter [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian Edward [Rochester, MN

    2012-02-07

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice multidetector-row CT for detection of in-stent restenosis vs detection of stenosis in nonstented coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Kefer, Joelle M; Coche, Emmanuel; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) for detecting in-stent restenosis. Fifty patients with 69 previously implanted coronary stents underwent 16-slice MDCT before quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Diagnostic accuracy of MDCT for detection of in-stent restenosis defined as >50% lumen diameter stenosis (DS) in stented and nonstented coronary segments >1.5-mm diameter was computed using QCA as reference. According to QCA, 18/69 (25%) stented segments had restenosis. In addition, 33/518 (6.4%) nonstented segments had >50% DS. In-stent restenosis was correctly identified on MDCT images in 12/18 stents, and absence of restenosis was correctly identified in 50/51 stents. Stenosis in native coronary arteries was correctly identified in 22/33 segments and correctly excluded in 482/485 segments. Thus, sensitivity (67% vs 67% p=1.0), specificity (98% vs 99%, p=0.96) and overall diagnostic accuracy (90% vs 97%, p=0.68) was similarly high for detecting in-stent restenosis as for detecting stenosis in nonstented coronary segments. MDCT has similarly high diagnostic accuracy for detecting in-stent restenosis as for detecting coronary artery disease in nonstented segments. This suggests that MDCT could be clinically useful for identification of restenosis in patients after coronary stenting.

  8. Consideration of the Pathological Features of Pediatric Congenital Heart Diseases Which Are Ideally Suitable for Diagnosing With Multidetector-row CT

    PubMed Central

    Hayabuchi, Yasunobu; Inoue, Miki; Watanabe, Noriko; Sakata, Miho; Ohnishi, Tatsuya; Kagami, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Background A lots of articles published regarding the usefulness of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) mostly describe that it can be an alternative to the invasive catheterization and angiography. The unique diagnostic features of this imaging modality have been largely ignored or disregarded. We described the pathological conditions that cannot be diagnosed by conventional angiography with cardiac catheterization but can be accurately diagnosed by MDCT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed non-ECG-gated MDCT images acquired from 452 children and young adults with CHD between 2005 and 2010 in our institute. In this article, we focused on the diagnostic advantages of MDCT, and indicated five pathological conditions. (1) When Blalock-Taussig shunt total occlusion prevents catheter insertion into the artificial vessel and angiography is ruled out, the peripheral pulmonary artery during the peripheral pulmonary artery can be imaged and diagnosed using MDCT based on blood flow supplied from many small collateral vessels originating from the aorta. (2) The location and protrusion of the device in the vessel after coil embolization to treat patent ductus arteriosus can be accurately visualized by virtual endoscopy using MDCT. (3) Calcification of patches, synthetic blood vessels, and other prostheses that is indistinct on conventional angiograms is clear on MDCT. (4) Simultaneous MDCT observations of the anatomical relationships between arterial and venous systems on the same image can clarify the detail diagnosis for surgical treatment. (5) Compression of the airways by the great vessels and pulmonary segmental emphysematous change can be diagnosed by MDCT. Results and Conclusions Among patients with CHD, MDCT is useful not only as a non-invasive alternative to conventional angiography, but also as a tool for specific morphological diagnoses. In the future, it will be necessary to accumulate experience in the

  9. INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR EAST END LOOKING WEST AT NORTH ROW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR- EAST END LOOKING WEST AT NORTH ROW OF MUSHROOM COLUMNS. - Colt Fire Arms Company, South Armory Building, 36-150 Huyshope Avenue, 17-170 Van Dyke Avenue, 49 Vredendale Avenue, Hartford, Hartford County, CT

  10. INTERIOR, SOUTH PART, CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. DOUBLE ROW OF CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR, SOUTH PART, CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. DOUBLE ROW OF CENTER COLUMNS REFLECTS SOUTH PART'S RE-USE OF ANOTHER BUILDING'S STRUCTURAL FRAME. - New Haven Rail Yard, Work Equipment Shop, Vicinity of Cedar & Lamberton Streets, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  11. 4. VIEW NORTHWEST, INTERIOR OF GATEHOUSE, SHOWING ROW OF GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHWEST, INTERIOR OF GATEHOUSE, SHOWING ROW OF GATE OPERATING MECHANISMS; HEIGHT OF STEMS INDICATES FOREGROUND GATE IS OPEN - Norwich Water Power Company, Headgates, West bank of Shetucket River opposite Fourteenth Street, Greenville section, Norwich, New London County, CT

  12. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms.

    PubMed

    Brisse, H J; Brenot, J; Pierrat, N; Gaboriaud, G; Savignoni, A; De Rycke, Y; Neuenschwander, S; Aubert, B; Rosenwald, J-C

    2009-04-07

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD(1%) assessed in a Catphan phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol(16) with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR(2.8%)), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1(%), adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy(-1). Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD(1%) for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol(16) values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  13. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisse, H. J.; Brenot, J.; Pierrat, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Savignoni, A.; DeRycke, Y.; Neuenschwander, S.; Aubert, B.; Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD1% assessed in a Catphan® phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol16 with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR2.8%), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1%, adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy-1. Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD1% for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol16 values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  14. Clinical evaluation of new automatic coronary-specific best cardiac phase selection algorithm for single-beat coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Fan, Zhanming; Liang, Junfu; Yan, Zixu; Sun, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the workflow efficiency of a new automatic coronary-specific reconstruction technique (Smart Phase, GE Healthcare—SP) for selection of the best cardiac phase with least coronary motion when compared with expert manual selection (MS) of best phase in patients with high heart rate. A total of 46 patients with heart rates above 75 bpm who underwent single beat coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) were enrolled in this study. CCTA of all subjects were performed on a 256-detector row CT scanner (Revolution CT, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin, US). With the SP technique, the acquired phase range was automatically searched in 2% phase intervals during the reconstruction process to determine the optimal phase for coronary assessment, while for routine expert MS, reconstructions were performed at 5% intervals and a best phase was manually determined. The reconstruction and review times were recorded to measure the workflow efficiency for each method. Two reviewers subjectively assessed image quality for each coronary artery in the MS and SP reconstruction volumes using a 4-point grading scale. The average HR of the enrolled patients was 91.1±19.0bpm. A total of 204 vessels were assessed. The subjective image quality using SP was comparable to that of the MS, 1.45±0.85 vs 1.43±0.81 respectively (p = 0.88). The average time was 246 seconds for the manual best phase selection, and 98 seconds for the SP selection, resulting in average time saving of 148 seconds (60%) with use of the SP algorithm. The coronary specific automatic cardiac best phase selection technique (Smart Phase) improves clinical workflow in high heart rate patients and provides image quality comparable with manual cardiac best phase selection. Reconstruction of single-beat CCTA exams with SP can benefit the users with less experienced in CCTA image interpretation. PMID:28231322

  15. Clinical evaluation of new automatic coronary-specific best cardiac phase selection algorithm for single-beat coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Xu, Lei; Fan, Zhanming; Liang, Junfu; Yan, Zixu; Sun, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the workflow efficiency of a new automatic coronary-specific reconstruction technique (Smart Phase, GE Healthcare-SP) for selection of the best cardiac phase with least coronary motion when compared with expert manual selection (MS) of best phase in patients with high heart rate. A total of 46 patients with heart rates above 75 bpm who underwent single beat coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) were enrolled in this study. CCTA of all subjects were performed on a 256-detector row CT scanner (Revolution CT, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin, US). With the SP technique, the acquired phase range was automatically searched in 2% phase intervals during the reconstruction process to determine the optimal phase for coronary assessment, while for routine expert MS, reconstructions were performed at 5% intervals and a best phase was manually determined. The reconstruction and review times were recorded to measure the workflow efficiency for each method. Two reviewers subjectively assessed image quality for each coronary artery in the MS and SP reconstruction volumes using a 4-point grading scale. The average HR of the enrolled patients was 91.1±19.0bpm. A total of 204 vessels were assessed. The subjective image quality using SP was comparable to that of the MS, 1.45±0.85 vs 1.43±0.81 respectively (p = 0.88). The average time was 246 seconds for the manual best phase selection, and 98 seconds for the SP selection, resulting in average time saving of 148 seconds (60%) with use of the SP algorithm. The coronary specific automatic cardiac best phase selection technique (Smart Phase) improves clinical workflow in high heart rate patients and provides image quality comparable with manual cardiac best phase selection. Reconstruction of single-beat CCTA exams with SP can benefit the users with less experienced in CCTA image interpretation.

  16. Quantification of coronary flow using dynamic angiography with 320-detector row CT and motion coherence image processing: Detection of ischemia for intermediate coronary stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Michinobu; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Kamitani, Takeshi; Kawanami, Satoshi; Sagiyama, Koji; Yamanouchi, Torahiko; Shimomiya, Yamato; Matoba, Tetsuya; Mukai, Yasushi; Odashiro, Keita; Baba, Shingo; Maruoka, Yasuhiro; Kitamura, Yoshiyuki; Nishie, Akihiro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Anatomical coronary stenosis is not always indicative of functional stenosis, particularly for intermediate coronary lesions. The purpose of this study is to propose a new method for quantifying coronary flow using dynamic CT angiography for the whole heart (heart-DCT) and investigate its ability for detecting ischemia from intermediate coronary stenosis. Participants comprised 36 patients with coronary artery disease who underwent heart-DCT using 320-detector CT with tube voltage of 80kV and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). Heart-DCT was continuously performed at mid-diastole throughout 15-25 cardiac cycles with prospective ECG-gating after bolus injection of contrast media (12-24ml). Dynamic datasets were computed into 90-100 data sets by motion coherence image processing (MCIP). Next, time-density curves (TDCs) for coronary arteries with a diameter >3mm were automatically calculated for all phases using MCIP. On the basis of the maximum slope method, coronary flow index (CFI) was defined as the ratio of the maximum upslope of coronary artery attenuation to the upslope of ascending aorta attenuation on the TDC, and was used to quantify coronary flow. CFIs for the proximal and distal sites of coronary arteries with mild-to-moderate stenosis were calculated. Coronary territories were categorized as non-ischemic or ischemic by MPS. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal cutoff for CFI to detect ischemia. Distal CFI was significantly lower for ischemia (0.26±0.08) than for non-ischemia (0.50±0.17, p<0.0001). No significant difference in proximal CFI was seen between ischemia (0.55±0.23) and non-ischemia (0.62±0.24). ROC analysis revealed 0.39 as the optimal cutoff for distal CFI to detect ischemia, with C-statistics of 0.91, 100% sensitivity, and 75% specificity. This novel imaging technique allows coronary flow quantification using heart-DCT. Distal CFI can detect myocardial ischemia derived from

  17. The Impact of Different Levels of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D on Image Quality of 320-Row Coronary CT Angiography: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Sarah; Rief, Matthias; Zimmermann, Elke; Martus, Peter; Schuijf, Joanne Désirée; Blobel, Jörg; Richter, Felicitas; Dewey, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was the systematic image quality evaluation of coronary CT angiography (CTA), reconstructed with the 3 different levels of adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR 3D) and compared to filtered back projection (FBP) with quantum denoising software (QDS). Methods Standard-dose CTA raw data of 30 patients with mean radiation dose of 3.2 ± 2.6 mSv were reconstructed using AIDR 3D mild, standard, strong and compared to FBP/QDS. Objective image quality comparison (signal, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), contour sharpness) was performed using 21 measurement points per patient, including measurements in each coronary artery from proximal to distal. Results Objective image quality parameters improved with increasing levels of AIDR 3D. Noise was lowest in AIDR 3D strong (p≤0.001 at 20/21 measurement points; compared with FBP/QDS). Signal and contour sharpness analysis showed no significant difference between the reconstruction algorithms for most measurement points. Best coronary SNR and CNR were achieved with AIDR 3D strong. No loss of SNR or CNR in distal segments was seen with AIDR 3D as compared to FBP. Conclusions On standard-dose coronary CTA images, AIDR 3D strong showed higher objective image quality than FBP/QDS without reducing contour sharpness. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00967876 PMID:25945924

  18. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization Therapy for a Hypoplastic Pelvic Kidney with a Single Vaginal Ectopic Ureter to Control Incontinence: The Usefulness of Three-Dimensional CT Angiography Using Multidetector-Row Helical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoh, Kouichi Kadota, Masataka; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Imuta, Masanori; Yasuda, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Inadome, Akito; Yoshida, Masaki; Ueda, Shouichi

    2003-09-15

    A girl with continuous urinary incontinence was successfully treated by angiographic embolization of a hypoplastic pelvic kidney with a single unilateral vaginal ectopic opening of the ureter. For this intervention, CT angiography was useful for detecting the corresponding renal artery of the hypoplastic kidney.

  19. Biomechanics of Rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Kazunori; Kaya, Motoshi; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    Compared with the other exercise, such as walking and cycling, rowing was expected to have some fitness advantage, while there were some misgivings about the risk of injury. The objectives of this study were to quantify biomechanical characteristics of rowing for fitness and rehabilitation and to offer normative data for the prevention of injury and for determining effective exercise. An experiment was performed to collect the kinematic and kinetic data during rowing by experienced and non-experienced subjects. A three-dimensional whole-body musculo-skeletal model was used to calculate the biomechanical loads, such as the joint moments, the muscular tensions, the joint contact forces and the energy consumption. The results of this study indicate that rowing is an effective exercise for rehabilitation and fitness. However, the non-experienced rower should acquire considerable skill to obtain sufficient exercise. The rowing cadence should be decided according to the purpose of the exercise.

  20. 32. TYPICAL BRYANT ITEMS FROM THE 1930S; TOP ROW LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. TYPICAL BRYANT ITEMS FROM THE 1930S; TOP ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: PORCELAIN CASED SWITCH, ROTARY SWITCH, SHORTING PLUG TO BYPASS FUSE; SECOND ROW: BRASS INCANDESCENT LAMP SURFACE RECEPTACLE, INCANDESCENT LAMPHOLDER WITH ADAPTER FOR GLASS GLOBE; THIRD ROW: PORCELAIN BASE ROTARY SWITCH, APPLIANCE BREAKER WITH COVER REMOVED, APPLIANCE BREAKER - Bryant Electric Company, 1421 State Street, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  1. Suicide on Death Row.

    PubMed

    Tartaro, Christine; Lester, David

    2016-11-01

    Despite the level of supervision of inmates on death row, their suicide rate is higher than both the male prison population in the United States and the population of males over the age of 14 in free society. This study presents suicide data for death row inmates from 1978 through 2010. For the years 1978 through 2010, suicide rates on death row were higher than that for the general population of males over the age of 15 and for state prisons for all but 2 years.

  2. Physics of rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Jean-Philippe; Labbe, Romain; Mouterde, Timothee; Clanet, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    Synchronization in rowing seems like a crucial condition for those who aim at winning top-level rowing races. However, in nature, one can observe animals with many legs, such as krill, swimming in a desynchronized manner which is nearly metachronal. From a physicist point of view, rowing by following a metachronal wave also seems like a great idea because, at high Reynolds number, the metachronal gait has one big advantage over the synchronized gait: it reduces the fluctuations of speed and thus the drag on the body. In this experimental study, we have built a scale model of a rowing boat to deal with the question of the effect of synchronization on the boat performance.

  3. Mechanical efficiency in rowing.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, T; Matsuo, A; Yamamoto, K; Asami, T

    1986-01-01

    Five university oarsmen participated in a determination of mechanical efficiency when rowing in a tank. In the tank, water was circulated at 3 m X s-1 by a motor driven pump. The subjects rowed with the stepwise incremental loading, in which the intensity increased by 10% of the maximum force of rowing (maxFc) every 2 min. Power (WO) was calculated from the force applied to the oarlock pin (FC) and its angular displacement (theta H). Oxygen uptake and heart rate were measured every 30 s during rowing. Anaerobic threshold (AT) was determined from expired gas variables by Wasserman's method. AT of oarsmen was 74.6 +/- 6.01% as a percentage of VO2max. As the displacement of the handgrip in the stroke was independent of WO, the increment of WO was caused by the increase of both FC and stroke frequency. Gross efficiency without base-line correction (GE) increased with FC with low intensities of rowing. In the region of 124-182 W of WO GE was almost constant at 17.5%. Efficiency was 19.8 +/- 1.4%, with resting metabolism as base-line correction (net efficiency), and 27.5 +/- 2.9% when using the unloaded rowing as the base-line correction (work efficiency), and 22.8 +/- 2.2% when calculating the work rate as the base-line correction (delta efficiency).

  4. Scottish Short Stone Rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Short stone rows received a good deal of attention during the 1980s and 1990s, at a time when archaeoastronomy in prehistoric Britain and Ireland was moving beyond reassessments of Alexander Thom's "megalithic observatories" by identifying coherent groups of similar monuments with clear orientation trends. Many such rows are found in western Scotland, with the main concentration in Argyll and the island of Mull. Systematic analyses of their orientations produced credible evidence of an awareness of the 18.6-year lunar node cycle, within a "primary-secondary" pattern whereby isolated rows were oriented close to moonrise or moonset at the southern major standstill limit, while others oriented in this way were accompanied by a second row oriented in a declination range that could be interpreted either as lunar or solar. A detailed investigation of the landscape situation of the sites in northern Mull, accompanied by excavations at two of the sites, suggested that they were deliberately placed in locations where critical moonsets would be seen against prominent distant landscape features, but where the distant horizon in most or all other directions was hidden from view. A lack of independent archaeological evidence may help to explain why archaeoastronomical investigations at short stone rows have never progressed beyond "data-driven" studies of orientations and landscape situation. Nonetheless, the work that was done at these sites raised important general methodological issues, and pioneered techniques, that remain relevant across archaeoastronomy today.

  5. Biomechanics of Rowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Kazunori; Andrews, Brian J.; Zavatsky, Amy B.; Halliday, Suzanne E.

    A new control model for the study of biomechanical simulation of human movement was investigated using rowing as an example. The objectives were to explore biological and mechanical alternatives to optimal control methods. The simulation methods included simple control mechanisms based on proportional and derivative (PD) control, consideration of a simple neural model, introduction of an inverse dynamics system for feedback, and computational adjustment of control parameters by using an evaluative criterion and optimization method. By using simulation, appropriate rowing motions were synthesized. The generated rowing motion was periodic, continuous, and adaptable so that the pattern was stable against the mechanical force and independent of the initial condition. We believe that the simulation model is not only practical as a computational research tool from a biomechanical-engineering viewpoint but also significant from the point of view of fundamental biological theories of movement.

  6. Applied physiology of rowing.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, F C

    1984-01-01

    Elite oarsmen and oarswomen possess large body dimensions and show outstanding aerobic and anaerobic qualities. Oarsmen have VO2max values of 6.1 +/- 0.6 L/min and have incurred O2 debts of between 10 and 20 litres. The caloric expenditure of rowing estimated from the O2 cost of a 6-minute rowing ergometer exercise was calculated at 36 kcal/min, one of the highest energy costs so far reported for any predominantly aerobic-type sport. Aerobic and anaerobic calculations show that 70 to 75% of the energy necessary to row the standard 2000m distance for men is derived from aerobiosis while the remaining 25 to 30% is anaerobic. Women achieve VO2max values of 4.1 +/- 0.4 L/min and slightly lower anaerobic values than men. The relative 60 to 65% energy contribution of aerobic metabolism and 35 to 40% for anaerobiosis is not surprising since women compete at 1000m. Rowers also exhibit excellent isokinetic leg strength and power when compared with other elite athletes and oarswomen produced higher relative leg strength values than men when lean body mass is considered. Muscle fibre type distributions in oarsmen resemble those of distance runners while women tend to have a slightly higher proportion of fast-twitch fibres. An average power output of 390 +/- 13.6W was produced by oarsmen for 6 minutes of simulated rowing while women were able to develop 300 +/- 18.4 for 3 minutes of the same activity. Mechanical efficiency for rowing was calculated at 20 +/- 0.9%. Oarsmen also achieve very high ventilation volumes being able to average above 200 L/min BTPS for 6 minutes of simulated rowing; women ventilate 170 L/min BTPS for 3 minutes of this exercise. Excellent VO2/VE and O2 pulse values demonstrate outstanding cardiorespiratory efficiency. Both oarsmen and oarswomen utilise a unique physiological pattern of race pacing; they begin exertion with a vigorous sprint which places excessive demands on anaerobic metabolism followed by a severely high aerobic steady-state and then

  7. Rowing competitions and perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Alfinio; Bernhardt, Stephen A.; Shipman, Henry L.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is about integrating the use of graphing technology (specifically, GeoGebra) with principles of motion, principles of perspective, and the concept of vanishing points to model a dynamic event. Students were asked to analyse video images of a rowing competition filmed with a single camera positioned perpendicular to the race. The fixed position of the camera in such races makes it difficult to determine whether a scull closer to the camera is actually overtaking another, more distant scull. The paper illustrates how students in their first year at the university can integrate the use of technology, science, mathematics, and writing to solve a real world problem involving motion.

  8. Measures of rowing performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, T Brett; Hopkins, Will G

    2012-04-01

    Accurate measures of performance are important for assessing competitive athletes in practi~al and research settings. We present here a review of rowing performance measures, focusing on the errors in these measures and the implications for testing rowers. The yardstick for assessing error in a performance measure is the random variation (typical or standard error of measurement) in an elite athlete's competitive performance from race to race: ∼1.0% for time in 2000 m rowing events. There has been little research interest in on-water time trials for assessing rowing performance, owing to logistic difficulties and environmental perturbations in performance time with such tests. Mobile ergometry via instrumented oars or rowlocks should reduce these problems, but the associated errors have not yet been reported. Measurement of boat speed to monitor on-water training performance is common; one device based on global positioning system (GPS) technology contributes negligible extra random error (0.2%) in speed measured over 2000 m, but extra error is substantial (1-10%) with other GPS devices or with an impeller, especially over shorter distances. The problems with on-water testing have led to widespread use of the Concept II rowing ergometer. The standard error of the estimate of on-water 2000 m time predicted by 2000 m ergometer performance was 2.6% and 7.2% in two studies, reflecting different effects of skill, body mass and environment in on-water versus ergometer performance. However, well trained rowers have a typical error in performance time of only ∼0.5% between repeated 2000 m time trials on this ergometer, so such trials are suitable for tracking changes in physiological performance and factors affecting it. Many researchers have used the 2000 m ergometer performance time as a criterion to identify other predictors of rowing performance. Standard errors of the estimate vary widely between studies even for the same predictor, but the lowest

  9. CT enterography.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Giulia A; Raptopoulos, Vassilios

    2010-04-01

    Conventional radiologic and endoscopic evaluations of the small bowel are often limited by the length, caliber, and motility of the small bowel loops. The development of new multidetector-row CT scanners, with faster scan times and isotropic spatial resolution, allows high-resolution multiphasic and multiplanar assessment of the bowel, bowel wall, and lumen. CT Enterography (CTE) is a variant of routine abdominal scanning, geared toward more sustained bowel filling with oral contrast material, and the use of multiplanar images, that can enhance gastrointestinal (GI) tract imaging. This article examines the techniques and clinical applications of CTE in comparison with CT enteroclysis, focusing on Crohn disease, obscure GI bleeding, GI tumors, acute abdominal pain, and bowel obstruction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Demise of Skid Row.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Inciardi, James A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the history and evolution of the American skid row; analyzes the changes it has undergone, particularly in the face of urban renewal; and speculates on its future. Includes opinions of the inhabitants of skid row which were obtained from interviews. (MJL)

  11. The Demise of Skid Row.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Inciardi, James A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the history and evolution of the American skid row; analyzes the changes it has undergone, particularly in the face of urban renewal; and speculates on its future. Includes opinions of the inhabitants of skid row which were obtained from interviews. (MJL)

  12. Louisiana farm discussion: 8 foot row spacing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This year several tests in growers’ fields were used to compare traditional 6-foot row spacing to 8-foot row spacing. Cane is double-drilled in the wider row spacing. The wider row spacing would accommodate John Deere 3522 harvester. Field data indicate the sugarcane yields are very comparable in 8-...

  13. Determining contrast medium dose and rate on basis of lean body weight: does this strategy improve patient-to-patient uniformity of hepatic enhancement during multi-detector row CT?

    PubMed

    Ho, Lisa M; Nelson, Rendon C; Delong, David M

    2007-05-01

    To prospectively evaluate the use of lean body weight (LBW) as the main determinant of the volume and rate of contrast material administration during multi-detector row computed tomography of the liver. This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval. All patients gave written informed consent. Four protocols were compared. Standard protocol involved 125 mL of iopamidol injected at 4 mL/sec. Total body weight (TBW) protocol involved 0.7 g iodine per kilogram of TBW. Calculated LBW and measured LBW protocols involved 0.86 g of iodine per kilogram and 0.92 g of iodine per kilogram calculated or measured LBW for men and women, respectively. Injection rate used for the three experimental protocols was determined proportionally on the basis of the calculated volume of contrast material. Postcontrast attenuation measurements during portal venous phase were obtained in liver, portal vein, and aorta for each group and were summed for each patient. Patient-to-patient enhancement variability in same group was measured with Levene test. Two-tailed t test was used to compare the three experimental protocols with the standard protocol. Data analysis was performed in 101 patients (25 or 26 patients per group), including 56 men and 45 women (mean age, 53 years). Average summed attenuation values for standard, TBW, calculated LBW, and measured LBW protocols were 419 HU +/- 50 (standard deviation), 443 HU +/- 51, 433 HU +/- 50, and 426 HU +/- 33, respectively (P = not significant for all). Levene test results for summed attenuation data for standard, TBW, calculated LBW, and measured LBW protocols were 40 +/- 29, 38 +/- 33 (P = .83), 35 +/- 35 (P = .56), and 26 +/- 19 (P = .05), respectively. By excluding highly variable but poorly perfused adipose tissue from calculation of contrast medium dose, the measured LBW protocol may lessen patient-to-patient enhancement variability while maintaining satisfactory hepatic and vascular enhancement.

  14. Image quality and radiation reduction of 320-row area detector CT coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection and an automatic exposure control system: comparison with body mass index-adapted protocol.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jiyeon; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; Shim, Hackjoon; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-06-01

    To assess the image quality and radiation exposure of 320-row area detector computed tomography (320-ADCT) coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in comparison with a body mass index (BMI)-adapted protocol. Twenty-two patients (study group) underwent 320-ADCT coronary angiography using an automatic exposure control system with the target standard deviation value of 33 as the image quality index and the lowest possible tube voltage. For comparison, a sex- and BMI-matched group (control group, n = 22) using a BMI-adapted protocol was established. Images of both groups were reconstructed by an iterative reconstruction algorithm. For objective evaluation of the image quality, image noise, vessel density, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) were measured. Two blinded readers then subjectively graded the image quality using a four-point scale (1: nondiagnostic to 4: excellent). Radiation exposure was also measured. Although the study group tended to show higher image noise (14.1 ± 3.6 vs. 9.3 ± 2.2 HU, P = 0.111) and higher vessel density (665.5 ± 161 vs. 498 ± 143 HU, P = 0.430) than the control group, the differences were not significant. There was no significant difference between the two groups for SNR (52.5 ± 19.2 vs. 60.6 ± 21.8, P = 0.729), CNR (57.0 ± 19.8 vs. 67.8 ± 23.3, P = 0.531), or subjective image quality scores (3.47 ± 0.55 vs. 3.59 ± 0.56, P = 0.960). However, radiation exposure was significantly reduced by 42 % in the study group (1.9 ± 0.8 vs. 3.6 ± 0.4 mSv, P = 0.003). Optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in 320-ADCT coronary angiography allows substantial radiation reduction without significant impairment of image quality, compared to the results obtained using a BMI-based protocol.

  15. Sixteen-row multislice computed tomography: basic concepts, protocols, and enhanced clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Cademartiri, Filippo; Luccichenti, Giacomo; van Der Lugt, Aad; Pavone, Paolo; Pattynama, Peter M; de Feyter, Pim J; Krestin, Gabriel P

    2004-02-01

    Since its introduction, spiral computed tomography (CT) technology underwent a continuous and fast technical and clinical development. In particular, spatial and temporal resolutions were constantly increased during the last decade. The main breakthrough for clinical application was the introduction of multislice technology, first with 2-row and 4-row equipment and more recently with 16-row scanners. A high-resolution sub-millimeter CT dataset can be acquired easily, although with an increased x-ray exposure for the patient. The high speed of the scan requires up-to-date and careful protocol optimization. Scanner technology and geometry affect image formation procedure and imaging protocols should be adapted accordingly. The technical foundations of spiral CT imaging and the main scan and reconstruction parameters are described in this article. Updated protocols and clinical examples of the latest applications are also discussed.

  16. Alcoholic Women on Skid Row.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sandra C.

    1987-01-01

    Examined women (N=20) who were receiving alcoholism treatment in the skid-row area of Portland, Oregon. Women had histories of problem drinking and extensive treatment for alcoholism. Most had been married and had children. Despite transiency, the majority maintained contact with friends and relatives. Compared these women to New York City's…

  17. Mechanical performance of aquatic rowing and flying.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J A; Westneat, M W

    2000-01-01

    Aquatic flight, performed by rowing or flapping fins, wings or limbs, is a primary locomotor mechanism for many animals. We used a computer simulation to compare the mechanical performance of rowing and flapping appendages across a range of speeds. Flapping appendages proved to be more mechanically efficient than rowing appendages at all swimming speeds, suggesting that animals that frequently engage in locomotor behaviours that require energy conservation should employ a flapping stroke. The lower efficiency of rowing appendages across all speeds begs the question of why rowing occurs at all. One answer lies in the ability of rowing fins to generate more thrust than flapping fins during the power stroke. Large forces are necessary for manoeuvring behaviours such as accelerations, turning and braking, which suggests that rowing should be found in slow-swimming animals that frequently manoeuvre. The predictions of the model are supported by observed patterns of behavioural variation among rowing and flapping vertebrates. PMID:11052539

  18. Billet planting, 8-foot rows, residue updates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cultural practices are continually tested and upgraded to maximize sugarcane yield in Louisiana. Over the past 3 years extensive research went in to comparing the industry standard 6-foot row spacing to a wider, 8 foot row. Each 8 foot row was double drilled with seed canes that were 2-3 feet apart....

  19. Bilateral Second Carpal Row Duplication Associated with Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cladiere-Nassif, Victoire; Delaroche, Caroline; Pottier, Edwige; Feron, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting a hitherto undescribed condition of bilateral second carpal row duplication. She was diagnosed in childhood with both Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, with no clear evidence and no further medical follow-up. She presented throughout her life with various articular symptoms, which appeared to be compatible with a diagnosis of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, and underwent several surgical procedures on her knees and hips. Most recently, she was reporting pain at the base of the fifth metacarpal bone of the left hand. X-ray images and computed tomography (CT) were obtained for exploration and showed a total second row duplication in both carpi, with a total number of 18 carpal bones in each wrist. PMID:26649258

  20. Comparison of the Diagnostic Image Quality of the Canine Maxillary Dentoalveolar Structures Obtained by Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, Jason W.; Drees, Randi; Koenig, Lisa J.; Snyder, Christopher J.; Hetzel, Scott; Miles, Chanda R.; Schwarz, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Summary The objective of this blinded study was to validate the use of cone beam computed tomography (CT) for imaging of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures by comparing its diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT. Sagittal slices of a tooth-bearing segment of the maxilla of a commercially purchased dog skull embedded in methyl methacrylate were obtained along a line parallel with the dental arch using a commercial histology diamond saw. The slice of tooth-bearing bone that best depicted the dentoalveolar structures was chosen and photographed. The maxilla segment was imaged with cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT. Four blinded evaluators compared the cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT images and image quality was scored as it related to the anatomy of dentoalveolar structures. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, and lamina dura were scored. In addition, a score depicting the evaluators overall impression of the image was recorded. Images acquired with cone beam CT were found to be significantly superior in image quality to images acquired with 64-multidetector row CT overall, and in all scored categories. In our study setting, cone beam CT was found to be a valid and clinically superior imaging modality for the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures when compared to 64-multidetector row CT. PMID:26415384

  1. Comparison of the Diagnostic Image Quality of the Canine Maxillary Dentoalveolar Structures Obtained by Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jason W; Drees, Randi; Koenig, Lisa J; Snyder, Christopher J; Hetzel, Scott; Miles, Chanda R; Schwarz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this blinded study was to validate the use of cone beam computed tomography (C) for imaging of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures by comparing its diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT Sagittal slices of a tooth-bearing segment of the maxilla of a commercially purchased dog skull embedded in methylmethacrylate were obtained along a line parallel with the dental arch using a commercial histology diamond saw. The slice of tooth-bearing bone that best depicted the dentoalveolar structures was chosen and photographed. The maxillary segment was imaged with cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT. Four blinded evaluators compared the cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT images and image quality was scored as it related to the anatomy of dentoalveolar structures. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, and lamina dura were scored In addition, a score depicting the evaluators overall impression of the image was recorded. Images acquired with cone beam CT were found to be significantly superior in image quality to images acquired with 64-multidetector row CT overall, and in all scored categories. In our study setting cone beam CT was found to be a valid and clinically superior imaging modality for the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures when compared to 64-multidetector row CT.

  2. Hepatocellular carcinoma: prediction of blood supply from an intercostal artery with multidetector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Uk; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; An, Sangbu; Seong, Nak Jong; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the ability of multidetector row computed tomography (CT) to detect blood supply from the intercostal artery in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Between January 2003 and December 2007, angiography of the intercostal artery was performed in 93 patients (76 men and 17 women, mean age 58 years) with HCC who had also undergone multidetector row CT. CT scans and digital subtraction angiograms of these patients were retrospectively reviewed by two investigators in consensus to evaluate tumor feeding vessels. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors that predict the presence of an HCC blood supply from an intercostal artery. Tumor staining fed by an intercostal artery was noted in 65 patients (70%; 112 tumor feeding vessels) by intercostal angiography. Readers interpreted that tumor feeding vessels were evident by CT in 35 (54%) of these 65 patients with tumor staining supplied by an intercostal artery by angiography. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a visible tumor feeding vessel by CT (P = .003) and hepatic artery attenuation by angiography (P = .014) were significantly related to the presence of a blood supply from an intercostal artery. Visualization of a tumor feeding vessel from the intercostal artery by multidetector row CT is an important sign of parasitic supply to an HCC. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. YIELD AND GRADE OF VALENCIA PEANUT IN SINGLE ROW, TWIN ROW, AND DIAMOND PLANTING PATTERNS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted at Wayne Baker’s farm South of Clovis in 2006 to compare single row, twin row, and diamond planting patterns in Valencia peanut on 36 inch beds. The twin row and diamond pattern treatments were planted with an experimental planter developed at the USDA-ARS National Peanut Rese...

  4. : Light Interception in Single Row, Twin Row, and Diamond Planting Patterns of Valencia Peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A field study was conducted on a growers farm South of Clovis, NM in 2006 to compare light interception and radiation use efficiency in single row, twin row, and diamond planted Valencia peanuts with line quantum sensors (Apogee instruments, Logan) installed across the crop row. Data were recorded ...

  5. Advances and perspectives in lung cancer imaging using multidetector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel

    2012-10-01

    The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (CT) into clinical practice has revolutionized many aspects of the clinical work-up. Lung cancer imaging has benefited from various breakthroughs in computing technology, with advances in the field of lung cancer detection, tissue characterization, lung cancer staging and response to therapy. Our paper discusses the problems of radiation, image visualization and CT examination comparison. It also reviews the most significant advances in lung cancer imaging and highlights the emerging clinical applications that use state of the art CT technology in the field of lung cancer diagnosis and follow-up.

  6. Mary Budd Rowe: A Storyteller of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchini, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines Mary Budd Rowe's groundbreaking and far-reaching contributions to science education. Rowe is best known for her research on wait-time: the idea that teachers can improve the quality and length of classroom discussions by waiting at least 3 s before and after student responses. Her wait-time research grew from and helped…

  7. On Row Rank Equal Column Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalili, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    We will prove a well-known theorem in Linear Algebra, that is, for any "m x n" matrix the dimension of row space and column space are the same. The proof is based on the subject of "elementary matrices" and "reduced row-echelon" form of a matrix.

  8. Rows=Wildlife Corridors: An Urban Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Darrell D.

    1983-01-01

    Linear strips of land associated with highways, electrical transmission lines, gas/oil pipelines (called right-of-way or ROWs) are inhibited by a variety of wildlife and offer a unique opportunity to study the wildlife in the urban setting. Types of wildlife found in and importance of ROWs are discussed. (JN)

  9. On Row Rank Equal Column Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalili, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    We will prove a well-known theorem in Linear Algebra, that is, for any "m x n" matrix the dimension of row space and column space are the same. The proof is based on the subject of "elementary matrices" and "reduced row-echelon" form of a matrix.

  10. Dynamic volume CT: the next revolution in clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedeker, Kirsten; Mather, Rich

    2008-08-01

    The need for table motion in multi-detector CT causes image volumes acquired for whole organ motion and perfusion studies to lack temporal uniformity. The next revolution in clinical CT, dynamic volume CT, mitigates this limitation by providing the ability to acquire an entire organ with isotropic resolution in a single gantry rotation with no table movement. The first dynamic volume CT scanner has recently been introduced and comprises 320 detector rows of 0.5mm channel thickness, covering 16cm of anatomy in one rotation of 0.35sec. This scanner offers many advancements in terms of temporal uniformity, reconstruction, and radiation dose. This system significantly reduces motion artifact and eliminates contrast phase differences within the volume. Because this scanner does not require helical acquisition for volumetric imaging, it delivers significantly less dose for applications such as CT coronary angiography exams as well as reduced dose in most other applications. Furthermore, by eliminating table motion, the need for complex interpolation methods that can distort cardiac images is removed. Image quality is not sacrificed compared with standard 64-row CT scanners, as demonstrated via low contrast, resolution, and accuracy measurements presented in this work. By capturing the entire brain in one rotation, brain perfusion, bone subtraction, and quantitative perfusion analysis are now possible with a single low dose exam. Dynamic volume CT offers to change the way medicine approaches stroke patients, myocardial perfusion studies, and imaging of other moving body parts such as the lung and joints.

  11. Galaxies with "rows": A new catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butenko, M. A.; Khoperskov, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    Galaxies with "rows" in Vorontsov-Velyaminov's terminology stand out among the variety of spiral galactic patterns. A characteristic feature of such objects is the sequence of straight-line segments that forms the spiral arm. In 2001 A. Chernin and co-authors published a catalog of such galaxies which includes 204 objects from the Palomar Atlas. In this paper, we supplement the catalog with 276 objects based on an analysis of all the galaxies from the New General Catalogue and Index Catalogue. The total number of NGC and IC galaxies with rows is 406, including the objects of Chernin et al. (2001). The use of more recent galaxy images allowed us to detect more "rows" on average, compared with the catalog of Chernin et al. When comparing the principal galaxy properties we found no significant differences between galaxies with rows and all S-typeNGC/IC galaxies.We discuss twomechanisms for the formation of polygonal structures based on numerical gas-dynamic and collisionless N-body calculations, which demonstrate that a spiral pattern with rows is a transient stage in the evolution of galaxies and a system with a powerful spiral structure can pass through this stage. The hypothesis of A. Chernin et al. (2001) that the occurrence frequency of interacting galaxies is twice higher among galaxies with rows is not confirmed for the combined set of 480 galaxies. The presence of a central stellar bar appears to be a favorable factor for the formation of a system of "rows".

  12. Mary Budd Rowe: a storyteller of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Julie A.

    2008-12-01

    This article examines Mary Budd Rowe's groundbreaking and far-reaching contributions to science education. Rowe is best known for her research on wait-time: the idea that teachers can improve the quality and length of classroom discussions by waiting at least 3 s before and after student responses. Her wait-time research grew from and helped inform her staunch advocacy of science education as inquiry; Rowe saw wonder and excitement as central to the teaching and learning of science. She spent much of her professional life designing professional development experiences and innovative curriculum materials to help teachers, particularly elementary school teachers, enact inquiry in their classrooms.

  13. Memory hierarchy using row-based compression

    DOEpatents

    Loh, Gabriel H.; O'Connor, James M.

    2016-10-25

    A system includes a first memory and a device coupleable to the first memory. The device includes a second memory to cache data from the first memory. The second memory includes a plurality of rows, each row including a corresponding set of compressed data blocks of non-uniform sizes and a corresponding set of tag blocks. Each tag block represents a corresponding compressed data block of the row. The device further includes decompression logic to decompress data blocks accessed from the second memory. The device further includes compression logic to compress data blocks to be stored in the second memory.

  14. Effect of row-to-row shading on the output of flat-plate south-facing photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, D.Y.; Hassan, A.Y.; Collis, J. ); Stefanakos, E.K. )

    1989-08-01

    When solar arrays (photovoltaic, thermal, etc.) are arranged in multiple rows of modules, all but the first row suffer reduction in (power) output, even when sufficient spacing between rows is provided. The reduction in output power occurs because the first row prevents some of the diffuse and reflected radiation from reaching the row directly behind it. This work presents estimates of the effect of shading on the amounts of solar radiation received by consecutive rows of flat-plate arrays.

  15. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT

    PubMed Central

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J.; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T.; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm. Guy

    2013-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and the coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology (BEST) Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging. PMID:22551595

  16. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm Guy

    2012-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging.

  17. Developing Formulas by Skipping Rows in Pascal's Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buonpastore, Robert J.; Osler, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    A table showing the first thirteen rows of Pascal's triangle, where the rows are, as usual numbered from 0 to 12 is presented. The entries in the table are called binomial coefficients. In this note, the authors systematically delete rows from Pascal's triangle and, by trial and error, try to find a formula that allows them to add new rows to the…

  18. Developing Formulas by Skipping Rows in Pascal's Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buonpastore, Robert J.; Osler, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    A table showing the first thirteen rows of Pascal's triangle, where the rows are, as usual numbered from 0 to 12 is presented. The entries in the table are called binomial coefficients. In this note, the authors systematically delete rows from Pascal's triangle and, by trial and error, try to find a formula that allows them to add new rows to the…

  19. Comparison of Single Row, Twin Row, and Diamond Planting Patterns in Valencia Peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most Valencia peanuts are grown in single rows on 36 to 40 inch beds. Because of their bunch-type and erect growth habit, Valencia peanuts do not spread over the whole bed and have the opportunity to benefit from multiple row planting arrangements. This study was conducted at locations near Portal...

  20. Comparisons of single-row and twin-row soybean production in the Mid South

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A Maturity Group (MG) IV and MG V soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] cultivar were planted in single-rows and twin-rows on 102 cm beds at 20, 30, 40, and 50 seeds m-2 in a Beulah fine sandy loam (coarse-loamy, mixed thermic Typic Dystrochrepts) in 2008, 2009, 2010 and Sharkey clay (Vertic Haplaquept) i...

  1. Optical RAM row access using WDM-enabled all-passive row/column decoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Sotirios; Alexoudi, Theoni; Kanellos, George T.; Miliou, Amalia; Pleros, Nikos

    2014-03-01

    Towards achieving a functional RAM organization that reaps the advantages offered by optical technology, a complete set of optical peripheral modules, namely the Row (RD) and Column Decoder (CD) units, is required. In this perspective, we demonstrate an all-passive 2×4 optical RAM RD with row access operation and subsequent all-passive column decoding to control the access of WDM-formatted words in optical RAM rows. The 2×4 RD exploits a WDM-formatted 2-bit-long memory WordLine address along with its complementary value, all of them encoded on four different wavelengths and broadcasted to all RAM rows. The RD relies on an all-passive wavelength-selective filtering matrix (λ-matrix) that ensures a logical `0' output only at the selected RAM row. Subsequently, the RD output of each row drives the respective SOA-MZI-based Row Access Gate (AG) to grant/block the entry of the incoming data words to the whole memory row. In case of a selected row, the data word exits the row AG and enters the respective CD that relies on an allpassive wavelength-selective Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG) for decoding the word bits into their individual columns. Both RD and CD procedures are carried out without requiring any active devices, assuming that the memory address and data word bits as well as their inverted values will be available in their optical form by the CPU interface. Proof-of-concept experimental verification exploiting cascaded pairs of AWGs as the λ-matrix is demonstrated at 10Gb/s, providing error-free operation with a peak power penalty lower than 0.2dB for all optical word channels.

  2. Neutron camera employing row and column summations

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G.; Diawara, Yacouba; Donahue, Jr, Cornelius; Montcalm, Christopher A.; Riedel, Richard A.; Visscher, Theodore

    2016-06-14

    For each photomultiplier tube in an Anger camera, an R.times.S array of preamplifiers is provided to detect electrons generated within the photomultiplier tube. The outputs of the preamplifiers are digitized to measure the magnitude of the signals from each preamplifier. For each photomultiplier tube, a corresponding summation circuitry including R row summation circuits and S column summation circuits numerically add the magnitudes of the signals from preamplifiers for each row and for each column to generate histograms. For a P.times.Q array of photomultiplier tubes, P.times.Q summation circuitries generate P.times.Q row histograms including R entries and P.times.Q column histograms including S entries. The total set of histograms include P.times.Q.times.(R+S) entries, which can be analyzed by a position calculation circuit to determine the locations of events (detection of a neutron).

  3. Yankee Rowe simulator core model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the validation of the Yankee Rowe simulator core model. Link-Miles Simulation Corporation is developing the Yankee Rowe simulator and Yankee Atomic Electric Company is involved in input and benchmark data generation, as well as simulator validation. Core model validation by Yankee comprises three tasks: (1) careful generation of fuel reactivity characteristics (B constants); (2) nonintegrated core model testing; and (3) fully integrated core model testing. Simulator core model validation and verification is a multistage process involving input and benchmark data generation as well as interactive debugging. Core characteristics were brought within acceptable criteria by this process. This process was achieved through constant communication between Link-Miles and Yankee engineers. Based on this validation, the Yankee Rowe simulator core model is found to be acceptable for training purposes.

  4. Optimal Lateral Row Anchor Positioning in Posterior-Superior Transosseous Equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zumstein, Matthias A.; Raniga, Sumit; Labrinidis, Agatha; Eng, Kevin; Bain, Gregory I.; Moor, Beat K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The optimal placement of suture anchors in transosseous-equivalent (TOE) double-row rotator cuff repair remains controversial. Purpose: A 3-dimensional (3D) high-resolution micro–computed tomography (micro-CT) histomorphometric analysis of cadaveric proximal humeral greater tuberosities (GTs) was performed to guide optimal positioning of lateral row anchors in posterior-superior (infraspinatus and supraspinatus) TOE rotator cuff repair. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Thirteen fresh-frozen human cadaveric proximal humeri underwent micro-CT analysis. The histomorphometric parameters analyzed in the standardized volumes of interest included cortical thickness, bone volume, and trabecular properties. Results: Analysis of the cortical thickness of the lateral rows demonstrated that the entire inferior-most lateral row, 15 to 21 mm from the summit of the GT, had the thickest cortical bone (mean, 0.79 mm; P = .0001), with the anterior-most part of the GT, 15 to 21 mm below its summit, having the greatest cortical thickness of 1.02 mm (P = .008). There was a significantly greater bone volume (BV; posterior, 74.5 ± 27.4 mm3; middle, 55.8 ± 24.9 mm3; anterior, 56.9 ± 20.7 mm3; P = .001) and BV as a percentage of total tissue volume (BV/TV; posterior, 7.3% ± 2.7%, middle, 5.5% ± 2.4%; anterior, 5.6% ± 2.0%; P = .001) in the posterior third of the GT than in intermediate or anterior thirds. In terms of both BV and BV/TV, the juxta-articular medial row had the greatest value (BV, 87.3 ± 25.1 mm3; BV/TV, 8.6% ± 2.5%; P = .0001 for both) followed by the inferior-most lateral row 15 to 21 mm from the summit of the GT (BV, 62.0 ± 22.7 mm3; BV/TV, 6.1% ± 2.2%; P = .0001 for both). The juxta-articular medial row had the greatest value for both trabecular number (0.3 ± 0.06 mm–1; P = .0001) and thickness (0.3 ± 0.08 μm; P = .0001) with the lowest degree of trabecular separation (1.3 ± 0.4 μm; P = .0001). The structure model index

  5. Single-row repair versus double-row repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Prasathaporn, Niti; Kuptniratsaikul, Somsak; Kongrukgreatiyos, Kitiphong

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to assess whether there are differences in the outcomes between single-row and double-row rotator cuff repair. Using MEDLINE, SCOPUS, SCIRUS, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library, as well as a hand search, we searched for articles comparing single-row and double-row rotator cuff repair that were published before September 2009. The controlled clinical studies that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were assessed for quality of methodology. Two of the authors performed this review and assessment. Any disagreements were resolved by the third author. Three randomized controlled studies and two controlled clinical cohort studies were included in this meta-analysis. These studies were assessed as having a moderate to high level of evidence. The results showed that double-row repair improved tendon healing and provided greater external rotation but with significantly increased operative time. Furthermore, this study found that double-row repair decreased the recurrence rate. However, there were no statistically significant differences found in shoulder function as assessed by Constant score; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score; Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score; muscle strength; forward flexion; internal rotation; patient satisfaction; return to work; and adverse events. Despite the fact that double-row repair shows a significantly higher rate of tendon healing and greater external rotation than does single-row repair, there is no significant improvement in shoulder function, muscle strength, forward flexion, internal rotation, patient satisfaction, or return to work. Level II, meta-analysis of Level I and Level II studies. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  6. Extended abstract: Partial row projection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bramley, R.; Lee, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Accelerated row projection (RP) algorithms for solving linear systems Ax = b are a class of iterative methods which in theory converge for any nonsingular matrix. RP methods are by definition ones that require finding the orthogonal projection of vectors onto the null space of block rows of the matrix. The Kaczmarz form, considered here because it has a better spectrum for iterative methods, has an iteration matrix that is the product of such projectors. Because straightforward Kaczmarz method converges slowly for practical problems, typically an outer CG acceleration is applied. Definiteness, symmetry, or localization of the eigenvalues, of the coefficient matrix is not required. In spite of this robustness, work has generally been limited to structured systems such as block tridiagonal matrices because unlike many iterative solvers, RP methods cannot be implemented by simply supplying a matrix-vector multiplication routine. Finding the orthogonal projection of vectors onto the null space of block rows of the matrix in practice requires accessing the actual entries in the matrix. This report introduces a new partial RP algorithm which retains advantages of the RP methods.

  7. Dose performance of a 64-channel dual-source CT scanner.

    PubMed

    McCollough, Cynthia H; Primak, Andrew N; Saba, Osama; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl; Raupach, Rainer; Suess, Christoph; Schmidt, Bernhard; Ohnesorge, Bernd M; Flohr, Thomas G

    2007-06-01

    To prospectively compare the dose performance of a 64-channel multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) scanner and a 64-channel dual-source CT scanner from the same manufacturer. To minimize dose in the cardiac (dual-source) mode, the evaluated dual-source CT system uses a cardiac beam-shaping filter, three-dimensional adaptive noise reduction, heart rate-dependent pitch, and electrocardiographically based modulation of the tube current. Weighted CT dose index per 100 mAs was measured for the head, body, and cardiac beam-shaping filters. Kerma-length product was measured in the spiral cardiac mode at four pitch values and three electrocardiographic modulation temporal windows. Noise was measured in an anthropomorphic phantom. Data were compared with data from a 64-channel multi-detector row CT scanner. For the multi-detector row and dual-source CT systems, respectively, weighted CT dose index per 100 mAs was 14.2 and 12.2 mGy (head CT), 6.8 and 6.4 mGy (body CT), and 6.8 and 5.3 mGy (cardiac CT). In the spiral cardiac mode (no electrocardiographically based tube current modulation, 0.2 pitch), equivalent noise occurred at volume CT dose index values of 23.7 and 35.0 mGy (coronary artery calcium CT) and 58.9 and 61.2 mGy (coronary CT angiography) for multi-detector row CT and dual-source CT, respectively. The use of heart rate-dependent pitch values reduced volume CT dose index to 46.2 mGy (0.265 pitch), 34.0 mGy (0.36 pitch), and 26.6 mGy (0.46 pitch) compared with 61.2 mGy for 0.2 pitch. The use of electrocardiographically based tube current-modulation and temporal windows of 110, 210, and 310 msec further reduced volume CT dose index to 9.1-25.1 mGy, dependent on the heart rate. For electrocardiographically gated coronary CT angiography, image noise equivalent to that of multi-detector row CT can be achieved with dual-source CT at doses comparable to or up to a factor of two lower than the doses at multi-detector row CT, depending on heart rate of the patient

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive coronary angiography with 320-detector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nasis, Arthur; Leung, Michael C; Antonis, Paul R; Cameron, James D; Lehman, Sam J; Hope, Sarah A; Crossett, Marcus P; Troupis, John M; Meredith, Ian T; Seneviratne, Sujith K

    2010-11-15

    We sought to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive coronary angiography using 320-detector row computed tomography, which provides 16-cm craniocaudal coverage in 350 ms and can image the entire coronary tree in a single heartbeat, representing a significant advance from previous-generation scanners. We evaluated 63 consecutive patients who underwent 320-detector row computed tomography and invasive coronary angiography for the investigation of suspected coronary artery disease. Patients with known coronary artery disease were excluded. Computed tomographic (CT) studies were assessed by 2 independent observers blinded to results of invasive coronary angiography. A single observer unaware of CT results assessed invasive coronary angiographic images quantitatively. All available coronary segments were included in the analysis, regardless of size or image quality. Lesions with >50% diameter stenoses were considered significant. Mean heart rate was 63 ± 7 beats/min, with 6 patients (10%) in atrial fibrillation during image acquisition. Thirty-three patients (52%) and 70 of 973 segments (7%) had significant coronary stenoses on invasive coronary angiogram. Seventeen segments (2%) were nondiagnostic on computed tomogram and were assumed to contain significant stenoses on an "intention-to-diagnose" analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of computed tomography for detecting significant stenoses were 94%, 87%, 88%, and 93%, respectively, by patient (n = 63), 89%, 95%, 82%, and 97%, respectively, by artery (n = 260), and 87%, 97%, 73%, and 99%, respectively, by segment (n = 973). In conclusion, noninvasive 320-detector row CT coronary angiography provides high diagnostic accuracy across all coronary segments, regardless of size, cardiac rhythm, or image quality.

  9. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  10. Multiphase contrast-saline mixture injection with dual-flow in 64-row MDCT coronary CTA.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lizhen; Du, Xiangying; Li, Pengyu; Liu, Yaou; Li, Kuncheng

    2009-03-01

    To explore the feasibility of multiphase contrast-saline mixture with dual-flow injection technique for visualization of right ventricular (RV) cavity and interventricular septum (IVS) in 64-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography. Twenty-four patients underwent coronary CT angiography (CTA) imaging with 64-row MDCT. In twelve patients (group A), 60 ml contrast medium (CM) bolus was followed by 40 ml saline, and in the other twelve patients (group B), 50 ml CM bolus was followed by 50 ml contrast-saline mixture at 60:40 ratio. The CM, saline and contrast-saline mixture flow rate were all 5.0 ml/s. Two experienced radiologists measured the CT values of ascending aorta, descending aorta, pulmonary artery and RV, rated the uniformity of RV cavity, the visualization of coronary arteries and IVS independently. By Kappa test, agreement between the two radiologists was 0.93 and 0.86 concerning the CT value measurements and the grades of the three indexes, respectively. By t-test, the mean CT values of ascending aorta and descending aorta of the two groups had no statistical difference (t=1.459, P>0.05; t=1.619, P>0.05); while the mean CT values of pulmonary artery and RV cavity had statistical differences (t=8.316, P<0.05; t=10.372, P<0.05). By two-related rank sum test, according to the visualization of coronary arteries and the uniformity of RV cavity, there were no statistical differences (U=66.00, P>0.05; U=54.00, P>0.05); while according to the visualization of IVS, group B was better than group A (U=8.00, P<0.05). In coronary CTA, a contrast-saline mixture after CM bolus can provide clear visualization of RV and IVS and LV without impairing coronary CTA image.

  11. Blade row interaction effects on flutter and forced response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, Daniel H.

    1993-01-01

    In the flutter or forced response analysis of a turbomachine blade row, the blade row in question is commonly treated as if it is isolated from the neigboring blade rows. Disturbances created by vibrating blades are then free to propagate away from this blade row without being disturbed. In reality, neighboring blade rows will reflect some portion of this wave energy back toward the vibrating blades, causing additional unsteady forces on them. It is of fundamental importance to determine whether or not these reflected waves can have a significant effect on the aeroelastic stability or forced response of a blade row. Therefore, a procedure to calculate intra-blade-row unsteady aerodynamic interactions was developed which relies upon results available from isolated blade row unsteady aerodynamic analyses. In addition, an unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique is used to obtain a model for the vibratory response in which the neighboring blade rows are also flexible. The flutter analysis shows that interaction effects can be destabilizing, and the forced response analysis shows that interaction effects can result in a significant increase in the resonant response of a blade row.

  12. Hand Replantation with Proximal Row Carpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Keun; Lee, Hang-Ho; Park, Ji-Kang; Kim, Joo-Yong; Dhawan, Vikas

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present our operative technique and postoperative results of the hand replantation with proximal row carpectomy in cases of complete amputation at the level of wrist joint. From May 2003 to April 2005, five patients suffered from complete amputation of the hand due to industrial trauma. Amputation level was radiocarpal joint in three cases and midcarpal joint in two cases. Three cases represented guillotine type and two cases with local crush type injuries. All were men and the mean age was 26.6 years. The mean follow-up period was 26.8 months. At the time of replantation, the wrist joint was stabilized with transarticular fixation using three to four Kirschner’s wires after performing proximal row carpectomy. Postoperatively, functional results such as muscle strength, range of motion of the wrist and fingers, and sensory recovery were assessed according to Chen’s criteria. Joint width and arthritic changes of the radio-capitate joint were evaluated with radiologic tools. According to Chen’s criteria, the overall results in five cases were classified as grade II. Intrinsic muscle power of hands was found to be grade 4. The mean grip and pinch powers were 41% and 45%, respectively, compared to contralateral hand. The mean arc of flexion–extension of wrist was 53°. Total mean active motion of fingers was 215 degrees. Static two-point discrimination of fingertip ranged from 8 to 13 mm. On the follow-up, computerized tomography showed well-preserved radio-capitate joint space without any arthritic changes. While performing hand replantation after amputation at the radiocarpal or midcarpal level, proximal row carpectomy is a useful procedure to preserve joint motion of the wrist in selected cases. PMID:18855073

  13. Comparison of transplenic multidetector CT portography to multidetector CT-angiography in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Echandi, Rita L; Morandi, Federica; Daniel, William T; Paquette, Janet L; Daniel, Gregory B

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated transplenic injection of iodinated contrast medium for computed tomography (CT) assessment of the portal vasculature. Specific aims were to: (1) establish a protocol for transplenic transplenic CT portography using a 40-row multidetector scanner; (2) compare transplenic CT portography to dual-phase CT angiography in terms of image quality, opacification of the portal system, and contrast enhancement of the portal vasculature and liver; (3) compare personnel exposure during transplenic CT portography and transplenic portal scintigraphy. Seven juvenile dogs underwent transplenic portal scintigraphy, CT angiography, and transplenic CT portography. Transplenic portal scintigraphy and CT angiography were performed using previously established protocols. For transplenic CT portography, a 20- or 22 gauge needle attached to an extension set was placed into the splenic parenchyma using CT guidance. Iodinated contrast medium (175 mg I/ml) was administered, and CT acquisition was started at the time of the injection. Transplenic CT portography was simple, rapid and provided more intense enhancement of the splenic and portal veins, with a lower contrast medium dose (median dose: 525 mg I for transplenic CT portography, 7700 mg I for CT angiography), but caused inconsistent intrahepatic portal branches and parenchymal opacification due to streamlining and streak artifacts. Despite significantly lower attenuation values in the portal vein, CT angiography provided sufficient enhancement for vessel identification and more consistent parenchymal hepatic enhancement. Personnel radiation exposure rate was higher during transplenic CT portography (0.0725 mSv/min) compared with transplenic portal scintigraphy (0.000125 mSv/min). As transplenic CT portography requires an average injection time of 1 min per study; over 650 [corrected] studies must be performed before reaching the maximum permissible whole body dose of 0.05 [corrected] Sv.

  14. Myocardial perfusion 320-row multidetector computed tomography-guided treatment strategy for the clinical management of patients with recent acute-onset chest pain: Design of the CArdiac cT in the treatment of acute CHest pain (CATCH)-2 randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sørgaard, Mathias; Linde, Jesper J; Hove, Jens D; Petersen, Jan R; Jørgensen, Tem B S; Abdulla, Jawdat; Heitmann, Merete; Kragelund, Charlotte; Hansen, Thomas Fritz; Udholm, Patricia M; Pihl, Christian; Kühl, J Tobias; Engstrøm, Thomas; Jensen, Jan Skov; Høfsten, Dan E; Kelbæk, Henning; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2016-09-01

    Patients admitted with chest pain are a diagnostic challenge because the majority does not have coronary artery disease (CAD). Assessment of CAD with coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is safe, cost-effective, and accurate, albeit with a modest specificity. Stress myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) has been shown to increase the specificity when added to CCTA, without lowering the sensitivity. This article describes the design of a randomized controlled trial, CATCH-2, comparing a clinical diagnostic management strategy of CCTA alone against CCTA in combination with CTP. Patients with acute-onset chest pain older than 50 years and with at least one cardiovascular risk factor for CAD are being prospectively enrolled to this study from 6 different clinical sites since October 2013. A total of 600 patients will be included. Patients are randomized 1:1 to clinical management based on CCTA or on CCTA in combination with CTP, determining the need for further testing with invasive coronary angiography including measurement of the fractional flow reserve in vessels with coronary artery lesions. Patients are scanned with a 320-row multidetector computed tomography scanner. Decisions to revascularize the patients are taken by the invasive cardiologist independently of the study allocation. The primary end point is the frequency of revascularization. Secondary end points of clinical outcome are also recorded. The CATCH-2 will determine whether CCTA in combination with CTP is diagnostically superior to CCTA alone in the management of patients with acute-onset chest pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Modelling the deflection of rowing oar shafts.

    PubMed

    Laschowski, Brock; Hopkins, Cameron C; de Bruyn, John R; Nolte, Volker

    2017-03-01

    The deflection of rowing oar shafts subjected to a static load was investigated. Two sets of sculling oars of different design stiffness were tested at three different lengths from 2.66 to 2.70 m. Loads up to 201 N were applied to the blade end of the oar shafts, and deflections were measured at six positions along the length of the shafts. The experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions obtained by modelling the oar shafts as homogenous end-loaded cantilever beams. The results show that the oar shafts are not uniform, in contradiction to the assumed model, but rather are most compliant near the sleeves and up to 80% stiffer towards the blades. The effect of oar shaft stiffness and length on the deflection angle at the blade end of the oar shaft was at most 1.18 ± 0.01°. The measured variation of stiffness along the shaft has implications for boat propulsion and rowing performance.

  16. 97. VIEW OF CENTER OF INTERIOR ROW OF EQUIPMENT CABINETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. VIEW OF CENTER OF INTERIOR ROW OF EQUIPMENT CABINETS ON SOUTH SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM. THREE ADDITIONAL GOULD BRUSH CHART RECORDERS ARE IN THIS ROW (NOT VISIBLE IN PHOTOGRAPH) LOCATED IMMEDIATELY EAST (LEFT) OF THESE CABINETS. Another row of cabinets south of (behind) this one is not accessible for photography. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  17. Compact Spare-Row Decoder For Computer Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard B.; Rakow, Glenn P.; Bickler, Thomas C.; Barto, Rod

    1992-01-01

    Spare-row memory-address-decoder circuit commanded to address ninth row in computer memory instead of addressing one of eight others it would address normally. Variants used to construct small, highly reliable computers. Spare-row decoder offers advantages of compactness, efficiency, and performance. Requires only 12.5 percent memory overhead. System equipped with spare-row decoder requires less glue logic and exhibits greater through-put. Applications include computers in Hitchhiker Central Unit embedded computer on Cassini spacecraft. Concept of circuit applicable to most flight computer systems.

  18. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  19. Imaging the pericardium: appearances on ECG-gated 64-detector row cardiac computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, S M; Williams, P L; Williams, M P; Edwards, A J; Roobottom, C A; Morgan-Hughes, G J; Manghat, N E

    2010-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) with its high spatial and temporal resolution has now become an established and complementary method for cardiac imaging. It can now be used reliably to exclude significant coronary artery disease and delineate complex coronary artery anomalies, and has become a valuable problem-solving tool. Our experience with MDCT imaging suggests that it is clinically useful for imaging the pericardium. It is important to be aware of the normal anatomy of the pericardium and not mistake normal variations for pathology. The pericardial recesses are visible in up to 44% of non-electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated MDCT images. Abnormalities of the pericardium can now be identified with increasing certainty on 64-detector row CT; they may be the key to diagnosis and therefore must not be overlooked. This educational review of the pericardium will cover different imaging techniques, with a significant emphasis on MDCT. We have a large research and clinical experience of ECG-gated cardiac CT and will demonstrate examples of pericardial recesses, their variations and a wide variety of pericardial abnormalities and systemic conditions affecting the pericardium. We give a brief relevant background of the conditions and reinforce the key imaging features. We aim to provide a pictorial demonstration of the wide variety of abnormalities of the pericardium and the pitfalls in the diagnosis of pericardial disease. PMID:20197434

  20. Photon counting spectral CT versus conventional CT: comparative evaluation for breast imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Fritz, Shannon G.

    2011-04-01

    Spectral CT systems with photon counting detectors have more advantages compared to conventional CT systems. However, clinical applications have been hampered for a long time due to the high demands of clinical systems and limitations of spectroscopic x-ray detectors. Photon counting detector technology has gained considerable improvements in the past decade, and spectral CT has become a hot topic. Several experimental spectral CT systems are under investigation. The purpose of this work was to perform the first direct, side-by-side comparison of existing spectral CT technology with a mature clinical CT system based on a conventional energy integrating detector. We have built an experimental spectral CT system whose main parameters are similar to the parameters of a clinical CT system. The system uses a spectroscopic cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector. The detector includes two rows of CZT pixels with 256 pixels in each row. The pixel size is 1 × 1 mm2, and the maximum count rate is 2 Mcounts/pixel/s. The spectral CT system has a magnification factor of 1.62 and the source to detector and source to image distances of 85 and 53 cm, respectively. The above parameters are similar to those of the clinical CT system, Siemens Sensation 16, used for comparison. The two systems were compared by imaging spatial resolution and contrast resolution phantoms made from acrylic cylinders with 14 cm diameters. The resolution phantom included Al wires with 0.3, 0.6, and 1 mm diameters, and 0.25 g cc-1 CaCO3 contrast. The contrast phantom included contrast elements with 1.7, 5, and 15 mg cc-1 iodine, and 1.1, 3.3, and 10 mg cc-1 gadolinium. The phantoms were imaged with the two systems using 120 kVp tube voltage and 470 mR total skin exposure. The spectral CT showed CT numbers, image noise, and spatial and contrast resolutions to be similar within 10% compared to the Siemens 16 system, and provided an average of 10% higher CNR. However, the spectral CT system had a major

  1. Photon counting spectral CT versus conventional CT: comparative evaluation for breast imaging application.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M; Fritz, Shannon G

    2011-04-07

    Spectral CT systems with photon counting detectors have more advantages compared to conventional CT systems. However, clinical applications have been hampered for a long time due to the high demands of clinical systems and limitations of spectroscopic x-ray detectors. Photon counting detector technology has gained considerable improvements in the past decade, and spectral CT has become a hot topic. Several experimental spectral CT systems are under investigation. The purpose of this work was to perform the first direct, side-by-side comparison of existing spectral CT technology with a mature clinical CT system based on a conventional energy integrating detector. We have built an experimental spectral CT system whose main parameters are similar to the parameters of a clinical CT system. The system uses a spectroscopic cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector. The detector includes two rows of CZT pixels with 256 pixels in each row. The pixel size is 1 × 1 mm(2), and the maximum count rate is 2 Mcounts/pixel/s. The spectral CT system has a magnification factor of 1.62 and the source to detector and source to image distances of 85 and 53 cm, respectively. The above parameters are similar to those of the clinical CT system, Siemens Sensation 16, used for comparison. The two systems were compared by imaging spatial resolution and contrast resolution phantoms made from acrylic cylinders with 14 cm diameters. The resolution phantom included Al wires with 0.3, 0.6, and 1 mm diameters, and 0.25 g cc(-1) CaCO(3) contrast. The contrast phantom included contrast elements with 1.7, 5, and 15 mg cc(-1) iodine, and 1.1, 3.3, and 10 mg cc(-1) gadolinium. The phantoms were imaged with the two systems using 120 kVp tube voltage and 470 mR total skin exposure. The spectral CT showed CT numbers, image noise, and spatial and contrast resolutions to be similar within 10% compared to the Siemens 16 system, and provided an average of 10% higher CNR. However, the spectral CT system had a

  2. CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution vs CT enteroclysis in small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Minordi, L M; Vecchioli, A; Mirk, P; Bonomo, L

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study is to compare CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution (PEG-CT) with CT enteroclysis (CT-E) in patients with suspected small bowel disease. Methods 145 patients underwent abdominal contrast-enhanced 16-row multidetector CT after administration of 2000 ml of PEG by mouth (n = 75) or after administration of 2000 ml of methylcellulose by nasojejunal tube (n = 70). Small bowel distension, luminal and extraluminal findings were evaluated and compared with small bowel follow-through examination in 60 patients, double contrast enema in 50, surgery in 25 and endoscopy in 35. Statistical evaluation was carried out by χ2 testing. For both techniques we have also calculated the effective dose and the equivalent dose in a standard patient. Results Crohn's disease was diagnosed in 64 patients, neoplasms in 16, adhesions in 6. Distension of the jejunum was better with CT-E than PEG-CT (p<0.05: statistically significant difference). No significant difference was present for others sites (p>0.05). Evaluation of pathological ileal loops was good with both techniques. The values of sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were respectively 94%, 100% and 96% with CT-E, and 93%, 94% and 93% with PEG-CT. The effective dose for PEG-CT was less than the dose for the CT-E (34.7 mSv vs 39.91 mSv). Conclusion PEG-CT shows findings of Crohn's disease as well as CT-E does, although CT-E gives better bowel distension, especially in the jejunum, and has higher specificity than PEG-CT. PMID:20959377

  3. System manual for the University of Pennsylvania retrofitted solar heated Philadelphia row home (SolaRow)

    SciTech Connect

    Zinnes, I.; Lior, N.

    1980-05-01

    The University of Pennsylvania SolaRow house, an urban row home retrofitted for comfort and domestic hot water heating, was extensively instrumented for performance monitoring and acquisition of weather and solar radiation data. This report describes the heating and instrumentation systems, provides the details for instrumentation, piping and valve identification, and specifies the operation and maintenance of the heating and data acquisition systems. The following are included: (1) system flow diagrams; (2) valve and cable identification tables; (3) wiring diagrams; and (4) start-up, normal operation, shut-down, maintenance and trouble-shooting procedures. It thus provides the necessary technical information to permit system operation and monitoring, overall system performance analysis and optimization, and acquisition of climatological data.

  4. Improving Spectral Results Using Row-by-Row Fourier Transform of Spatial Heterodyne Raman Spectrometer Interferogram.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Patrick D; Strange, K Alicia; Angel, S Michael

    2016-12-12

    This work describes a method of applying the Fourier transform to the two-dimensional Fizeau fringe patterns generated by the spatial heterodyne Raman spectrometer (SHRS), a dispersive interferometer, to correct the effects of certain types of optical alignment errors. In the SHRS, certain types of optical misalignments result in wavelength-dependent and wavelength-independent rotations of the fringe pattern on the detector. We describe here a simple correction technique that can be used in post-processing, by applying the Fourier transform in a row-by-row manner. This allows the user to be more forgiving of fringe alignment and allows for a reduction in the mechanical complexity of the SHRS.

  5. [CT - diagnosis and differential diagnosis of inflammatory acute intestinal conditions].

    PubMed

    Wiesner, W

    2011-08-24

    Multidetector-row CT has shown over the past years that it is able to provide reliable diagnoses in various acute intestinal conditions. The presented article provides an overview of primary and secondary inflammatory acute intestinal pathologies and their differential diagnoses.

  6. Effect of corn or soybean row position on soil water

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop plants can funnel water to the soil and increase water content more in the row relative to the interrow. Because the row intercepts more soil water after rains and higher root density, the soil may also dry out more between rains than does soil in the interrow. The purpose of this study was to ...

  7. 19. VIEW OF THE TWO ROWS OF COKE OVENS, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF THE TWO ROWS OF COKE OVENS, LOOKING EAST. THE OVENS LIE TO THE EAST OF THE MINE BUILDINGS. BEEHIVE OVENS FORM THE ROW ON THE LEFT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THE RECTANGULAR OVENS ARE ON THE RIGHT. - Tower Hill No. 2 Mine, Approximately 0.47 mile Southwest of intersection of Stone Church Road & Township Route 561, Hibbs, Fayette County, PA

  8. Screening for carotid injury in trauma patients: image quality of 16-detector-row computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Borisch, I; Boehme, T; Butz, B; Hamer, O W; Feuerbach, S; Zorger, N

    2007-09-01

    The introduction of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) has revolutionized the initial management of multiply injured patients. This technology has the potential to improve the imaging of traumatic vascular injuries. To evaluate the quality of multidetector-row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) of the carotid arteries in the setting of a routine whole-body trauma scan. 87 trauma patients underwent a routine whole-body CT scan in a 16-detector-row scanner including an MDCTA with a reconstructed axial slice thickness of 3 mm. Images were reviewed by three experienced radiologists with emphasis on image quality. Contrast density, severity, and origin of artifacts and the occurrence of vessel lesions were assessed for different vessel segments. 3642 separate vessel segments were evaluated. Contrast density was rated good or sufficient for diagnosis in 99.8%. A total of 67.3% of vessel segments were free of artifacts, while 27.9% of vessel segments showed minor artifacts not impairing diagnostic evaluation. Clinically relevant artifacts obscuring a vessel segment occurred in 4.7% and were mostly caused by dental hardware. Four dissections of the internal carotid artery were diagnosed by all three radiologists. As a rapid screening test for blunt carotid artery injury, integration of MDCTA in the routine imaging workup of trauma patients utilizing a whole-body CT trauma scan is possible and practicable. Image quality is mostly sufficient for diagnosis, but impaired in a few cases by artifacts deriving primarily from dental hardware.

  9. Proximal Row Carpectomy Combined with Wrist Hemiarthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Culp, Randall W.; Bachoura, Abdo; Gelman, Scott E.; Jacoby, Sidney M.

    2012-01-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) combined with distal radius hemiarthroplasty is a relatively novel procedure that rivals total wrist arthrodesis and offers a new surgical treatment option for select patients with painful, end-stage wrist disease. We present our early experience with this procedure. A retrospective chart review was conducted for nonrheumatoid patients diagnosed with wrist arthritis and subsequently treated with wrist hemiarthroplasty combined with PRC. The minimum follow-up duration was 12 months. Preoperative and postoperative flexion, extension, and grip strength were recorded. Postoperative radiographic findings were assessed. The Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) questionnaire was administered to gauge postoperative pain and function. The records of 10 patients were reviewed. The mean age was 64 years and the mean postoperative follow-up duration was 19 months. Postoperative flexion, extension, and grip strength were all found to be less than the preoperative levels. The mean postoperative PRWE score for pain and function were 26 and 23, respectively. The complications were diverse and occurred at a relatively high rate. PRC combined with distal radius hemiarthroplasty is a novel procedure that offers a potential surgical option for the treatment of wrist arthritis in select patients. Our early experience has lead us to modify our technique with regard to the implant material, and at this stage, the surgical technique and the most appropriate implant may require further optimization. The level of evidence for this study is IV (therapeutic). PMID:23904978

  10. Distal radius fracture after proximal row carpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Igeta, Yuka; Naito, Kiyohito; Sugiyama, Yoichi; Obata, Hiroyuki; Aritomi, Kentaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We encountered a patient with distal radius fracture (DRF) after proximal row carpectomy (PRC). The mechanism of the DRF after PRC is discussed in this report. Presentation of case The patient was a 73-year-old female who had undergone PRC due to Kienböck disease before. The wrist range of motion was: 45° on dorsiflexion and 20° on flexion. DRF has occurred at 3 years after PRC. The fracture type was extra-articular fracture. Osteosynthesis was performed using a volar locking plate. No postoperative complication developed, the Mayo score was excellent at 6 months after surgery, and the daily living activity level recovered to that before injury. Discussion Since the wrist range of motion decreased and the lunate fitted into the joint surface after PRC, making the forearm join with the hand like a single structure, pressure may have been loaded on the weak distal end of the radius from the dorsal side, causing volar displacement and fracture. Conclusion The pressure distribution and range of motion of the radiocarpal joint after PRC are different from those of a normal joint, and the mechanism of fracture also changes due to PRC. PMID:25623755

  11. Fuel metabolism during severe rowing exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, R.W.; Lubowitz, J.; Asakura, T.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-03-01

    Eight elite oarsmen were studied during and after six min of severe ergometer exercise. Power output averaged 380 +/- 28 watts. Serial venous blood samples and gas exchange measurements were obtained during exercise. In 4 of the 8 subjects, a primed periodic oral dose of the tracer (6,6-/sup 2/H/sub 2/)glucose was used to determine the effects of severe exercise on glucose metabolism. During exercise, the levels of lactate progressively increased to 12.2 +/- 1.3 mM (SE). There was little change in isotopic glucose enrichment during exercise (from 2.95 +/- 0.30 to 2.55 +/- 0.23 atom percent excess, APE). During recovery, isotopic glucose enrichment decreased significantly to 1.40 +/- 0.14 APE, indicating a substantial post-exercise plasma glucose flux. There were significant post-exercise increases in plasma glucose accumulation (from 84 +/- 5 to 131 +/- 3 mg/dl) and insulin concentration (0.57 +/- 0.08 to 1.34 +/- 0.15 ng/ml). These results suggest that muscle glycogen is the primary source of fuel during six minutes of maximal rowing exercise.

  12. Hydrodynamic performance of multiple-row slotted breakwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbisy, Moussa S.; Mlybari, Ehab M.; Helal, Medhat M.

    2016-06-01

    This study examines the hydrodynamic performance of multiple-row vertical slotted breakwaters. We developed a mathematical model based on an eigenfunction expansion method and a least squares technique for Stokes second-order waves. The numerical results obtained for limiting cases of double-row and triple-row walls are in good agreement with results of previous studies and experimental results. Comparisons with experimental measurements of the reflection, transmission, and dissipation coefficients ( C R , C T , and C E ) for double-row walls show that the proposed mathematical model adequately reproduces most of the important features. We found that for double-row walls, the C R increases with increasing wave number, kd, and with a decreasing permeable wall part, dm. The C T follows the opposite trend. The C E slowly increases with an increasing kd for lower kd values, reaches a maximum, and then decreases again. In addition, an increasing porosity of dm would significantly decrease the C R , while increasing the C T . At lower values of kd, a decreasing porosity increases the C E , but for high values of kd, a decreasing porosity reduces the C E . The numerical results indicate that, for triple-row walls, the effect of the arrangement of the chamber widths on hydrodynamic characteristics is not significant, except when kd<0.5. Double-row slotted breakwaters may exhibit a good wave-absorbing performance at kd>0.5, where by the horizontal wave force may be smaller than that of a single wall. On the other hand, the difference between double-row and triple-row vertical slotted breakwaters is marginal.

  13. CT Enterography

    MedlinePlus

    ... during the procedure. Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the ...

  14. Noise simulation in x-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoumzadeh, Parinaz; Earl, Orville A.; Whiting, Bruce R.

    2005-04-01

    A method is presented for accurately simulating the effects of dose reduction in x-ray computed tomography (CT) by adding synthetic noise to raw projection data. A model for realistic noise in projection data was generated, incorporating the mechanisms of stochastic noise in energy-integrating x-ray detectors, electronic system noise, and bowtie beam filtering (used for patient dose reduction). Parameters for the model were extracted from phantom measurements on a variety of clinical CT scanners (helical single row, four-row, and 16-row). Dose reduction simulations were performed by adding synthetic noise based on the noise model to raw data acquired from clinical scanners. Qualitative and quantitative validation of the process was accomplished by comparing phantom scans acquired under high and low dose conditions with simulated imagery. The importance of including alternative noise mechanisms (bowtie filter and system noise) was demonstrated. Henceforth, scans of clinical patients were acquired using conventional protocols; through simulations, image sets were presented at a variety of lower dose procedures. The methodology promises to be a useful tool for radiologists to explore dose reduction protocols in an effort to produce diagnostic images with radiation dose "as low as reasonably achievable".

  15. The Row-Column Multiplication of High Dimensional Rhotrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sani, B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the row-column multiplication of rhotrices that are of high dimension. This is an extension of the same multiplication carried out on rhotrices of dimension three, considered to be the base rhotrices.

  16. THERMALWATER FLOW METER. Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THERMAL-WATER FLOW METER. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Superior Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  17. 1. View looking southeast down senior officer row. Building 6 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View looking southeast down senior officer row. Building 6 on left and senior officer housing on right. Galaxy Street in foreground. - Chanute Air Force Base, East of Route 45 & south of Rantoul, Rantoul, Champaign County, IL

  18. 26. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING ROW OF TIMBER SUPPORT TOWERS BUILT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING ROW OF TIMBER SUPPORT TOWERS BUILT AS TEMPORARY TRUSS REINFORCEMENT (NOTE STEEL STRUCTURES ATOP TIMBER BRACING) - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  19. Detail, starpattern balustrade of north span, from northwest, showing row ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, star-pattern balustrade of north span, from northwest, showing row of four star-pattern railing slabs bracketed by simple molded concrete balusters - Horner Street Bridge, Horner Street over Stonycreek River, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  20. General view of building in context showing row of residences ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of building in context showing row of residences adjacent to golf course, facing northeast. - Marine Barracks, Panama Canal, Officers' Quarters, 800' West of Bruja Road, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  1. Detail view of stylized panel on end of seating row ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of stylized panel on end of seating row - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Wadsworth Theater, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Rows of barrack, Building No. 909 (left) and Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rows of barrack, Building No. 909 (left) and Building No. 910 (right), looking 82 degrees east - Presidio of San Francisco, Enlisted Men's Barracks Type, West end of Crissy Field, between Pearce & Maudlin Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  3. Row of barracks, Building No. 902 (right) and Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Row of barracks, Building No. 902 (right) and Building No. 903 (left), looking 277 degrees west - Presidio of San Francisco, Enlisted Men's Barracks Type, West end of Crissy Field, between Pearce & Maudlin Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. Effect of BMI on knee joint torques in ergometer rowing.

    PubMed

    Roemer, Karen; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Richter, Chris; Munoz-Maldonado, Yolanda; Hamilton, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    Although an authoritative panel recommended the use of ergometer rowing as a non-weight-bearing form of exercise for obese adults, the biomechanical characterization of ergometer rowing is strikingly absent. We examined the interaction between body mass index (BMI) relative to the lower extremity biomechanics during rowing in 10 normal weight (BMI 18-25), 10 overweight (BMI 25-30 kg·m⁻²), and 10 obese (BMI > 30 kg·m⁻²) participants. The results showed that BMI affects joint kinematics and primarily knee joint kinetics. The data revealed that high BMI leads to unfavorable knee joint torques, implying increased loads of the medial compartment in the knee joint that could be avoided by allowing more variable foot positioning on future designs of rowing ergometers.

  5. 7. Row of pumps against first floor interior west wall. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Row of pumps against first floor interior west wall. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Scranton Yards, Oil House, 650 feet Southeast of Cliff & Mechanic Streets, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  6. Row effect for R-11 condensation on enhanced tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.L.; Murawski, C.G. )

    1990-08-01

    Experimental results of a condensation row effect study on enhanced tubes are presented. A test cell was constructed to condense Refrigerant-11 on the shell side of a vertical bank of five horizontal tubes. Four distinctly different commercially available tubes were tested. The tubes are a 1024-fpm integral fin, the Wolverine Tube-C, Wieland GEWA-SC, and the Tred-D. A modified Turbo-C tube was also tested. Experimental and visual observations are used to understand the row effect due to condensate loading. By plotting the data in the form of the local condensation coefficient versus condensate Reynolds number, the results may be interpreted for any number of tube rows, up to the maximum Reynolds numbers tested. Bundle average condensation coefficients may be established by integrating the h versus Re values over the number of tube rows.

  7. Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, facing north (note cell block fifteen to the right and cell block fourteen in the distance_ - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. Harvester Productivity for Row Thinning Loblolly Pine Plantations

    Treesearch

    James E. Granskog; Walter C. Anderson

    1980-01-01

    Tivo tree harvesters currently being used to thin southern pine plantations were evaluated to determine the effects of stand characteristics on machine productivity. Production rates for row thinning loblolly plantations are presented by stand age, site index, and stand density.

  9. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-05-28

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. Ninety-one patients with biopsy proven rectal adenocarcinoma referred for thoracic and abdominal CT staging were enrolled in this study. The contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 row scanner (ICT, Philips) with the following acquisition parameters: tube voltage 120 KV, tube current 150-300 mAs. Imaging data were reviewed as axial and as multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) images along the rectal tumor axis. MRI study, performed on 1.5 T with dedicated phased array multicoil, included multiplanar T2 and axial T1 sequences and diffusion weighted images (DWI). Axial and MPR CT images independently were compared to MRI and MRF involvement was determined. Diagnostic accuracy of both modalities was compared and statistically analyzed. According to MRI, the MRF was involved in 51 patients and not involved in 40 patients. DWI allowed to recognize the tumor as a focal mass with high signal intensity on high b-value images, compared with the signal of the normal adjacent rectal wall or with the lower tissue signal intensity background. The number of patients correctly staged by the native axial CT images was 71 out of 91 (41 with involved MRF; 30 with not involved MRF), while by using the MPR 80 patients were correctly staged (45 with involved MRF; 35 with not involved MRF). Local tumor staging suggested by MDCT agreed with those of MRI, obtaining for CT axial images sensitivity and specificity of 80.4% and 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 80.4%, negative predictive value (NPV) 75% and accuracy 78%; while performing MPR the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88% and 87.5%, PPV was 90%, NPV 85.36% and accuracy 88%. MPR images showed higher diagnostic accuracy, in terms of MRF involvement, than native axial images, as compared to the

  10. Functional Outcomes after Double Row Versus Single Row Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Stephen J.; Lee, Steven J.; Mullaney, Michael John; Tyler, Timothy F.; Johnson, Christopher D.; Fukunaga, Takumi; McHugh, Malachy P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The effect of single row (SR) versus double row (DR) rotator cuff repair on functional outcomes was examined in a prospective randomized design. Methods: Fifty patients were randomized to DR or SR repairs; 39 patients (13 women, 26 men, 23 SR, 16 DR, age 62±7 yr) were assessed at an average of 2.2±1.6 yr after surgery (range 1-7 yr; tear size 17 medium, 13 large, 9 massive). The following data were recorded prior to surgery and at follow-up: Penn, ASES and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores; range of motion (ROM) for shoulder flexion, external rotation (ER) at 0º and 90º abduction, and internal rotation (IR) at 90º abduction; shoulder strength (Lafayette Manual Muscle Tester) in empty and full can tests, abduction and ER at 0º abduction. Treatment (SR vs. DR) by Time (pre-op vs. post-op) mixed model analysis of variance was used to assess the effect of rotator cuff repair. It was estimated that with 20 patients per group a 10-point difference in improvement in ASES scores between SR and DR treatments could be detected at an alpha level of 0.05 with 80% power. Results: Outcome Scores: RC repair markedly improved Penn, ASES and SST scores (P<0.001), with similar improvement between single versus double row repairs (Treatment by Time P=.49 to P=.67), and excellent scores at follow-up (Double Row vs. Single Row: Penn 91±11 vs. 91±12, P=.98; ASES 92±9 vs 87 ±15, P=.24; SST 11.2±1.2 vs. 11.4±1.0, P=.58). ROM: Patients with DR repairs lost ER ROM at 0º abduction (pre-op to final follow-up 7±10º loss, P=.013). ER ROM did not change with SR repair (3.9±15.6º gain, P=.24; Treatment by Time P=.017). This effect was not apparent for ER ROM at 90º abduction (Treatment by Time P=.26). IR ROM improved from pre-op to final follow-up (P<0.01, SR 17±18º, DR 13±23º, Treatment by Time P=.31). Strength: RC repair markedly improved strength in Empty Can (51%), Full Can (54%), Abduction (45%) and ER (31 %) strength (all P<.001), with no difference between

  11. Double row repair: is it worth the hassle?

    PubMed

    Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Del Buono, Angelo; Zampogna, Biagio; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2011-12-01

    In the operative management of rotator cuff disease, comparable functional results have been reported after open or mini-open repair and arthroscopic fixation. Surgical repair aims to re-establish an anatomical configuration of the tendon-bone construct for restoring its mechanical performance. Single row repair is the most commonly used technique, but recently some authors have proposed to re-establish the rotator cuff footprint with 2 rows of suture anchors ("double row" repair). In regard to imaging assessment, at time zero double row repair results being more anatomic and allows for structurally sound restoration of the rotator cuff footprint. However, this does not seem to translate into superior clinical outcomes for the double row repair when evaluating all different sizes of rotator cuff tears as a whole. The scientific basis for recommending single or double row repair as preferred treatment for patients with rotator cuff tear is questionable, as minimal differences have been measured on clinical and functional rating scales.

  12. Gross efficiency during rowing is not affected by stroke rate.

    PubMed

    Hofmijster, Mathijs J; Van Soest, Arthur J; De Koning, Jos J

    2009-05-01

    It has been suggested that the optimal stroke rate in rowing is partly determined by the stroke-rate dependence of internal power losses. This should be reflected in a stroke-rate dependency of gross efficiency (e(gross)). The purpose of this study was to investigate if e(gross) is affected by stroke rate. A second aim was to determine whether internal power losses can be estimated by the negative power output during the stroke cycle (P(negative)). Seventeen well-trained female rowers participated in this study. They rowed three trials on a modified rowing ergometer on slides at a submaximal intensity, with a respiratory exchange ratio of 1 or close to 1. Stroke rates were 28, 34, and 40 strokes per minute. The trials were fully randomized. Power transfer to the flywheel was kept constant whereas e(gross) was determined during each trial. No significant differences in e(gross) were found between conditions. This finding suggests that in rowing internal power losses are not influenced by stroke rate. Furthermore, although P(negative) increased at increasing stroke rate (P < 0.001), no relationship was found with e(gross). This suggests that P(negative) is not a reliable measure to estimate internal power losses. This study shows that within the range of stroke rates applied in competitive rowing, internal power losses are unrelated to rowing cycle frequency.

  13. 77 FR 74237 - T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc., et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... COMMISSION T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc., et al.; Notice of Application December 7, 2012. AGENCY: Securities... for an exemption from sections 12(d)(1)(A) and (B) of the Act. Applicants: T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (``TRP''), T. Rowe Price Institutional Income Funds, Inc. (the ``Corporation'') and T. Rowe Price...

  14. Comparison between CT Net enhancement and PET/CT SUV for N staging of gastric cancer: A case series.

    PubMed

    Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Telegrafo, Michele; Lucarelli, Nicola Maria; Lorusso, Valentina; Scardapane, Arnaldo; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; Moschetta, Marco

    2017-09-01

    The therapeutic approach of gastric cancer strictly depends on TNM staging mainly provided by CT and PET/CT. However, the lymph node size criterion as detected by MDCT causes a poor differential diagnosis between reactive and metastatic enlarged lymph nodes with low specificity values. Our study aims to compare 320-row CT Net enhancement and fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-FDG PET/CT) SUV for N staging of gastric cancer. 45 patients with histologically proven gastric cancer underwent CT and F-FDG PET/CT. Two radiologists in consensus evaluated all images and calculated the CT Net enhancement and F-FDG PET/CT SUV for N staging, having the histological findings as the reference standard. CT and F-FDG PET/CT sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were evaluated and compared by using the Mc Nemar test. The histological examination revealed nodal metastases in 29/45 cases (64%). CT Net enhancement obtained sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of 90%, 81%, 87%, 90% and 81%, respectively. F-FDG PET/CT SUV obtained sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of 66%, 88%, 73%, 90% and 58%, respectively. No statistically significant difference between the two imaging modalities was found (p = 0.1). CT Net enhancement represents an accurate tool for N staging of gastric cancer and could be considered as the CT corresponding quantitative parameter of F-FDG PET/CT SUV. It could be applied in the clinical practice for differentiating reactive lymph nodes from metastatic ones improving accuracy and specificity of CT.

  15. Right heart on multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Gopalan, D

    2011-01-01

    Right ventricular function plays an integral role in the pathogenesis and outcome of many cardiovascular diseases. Imaging the right ventricle has long been a challenge because of its complex geometry. In recent years there has been a tremendous expansion in multidetector row CT (MDCT) and its cardiac applications. By judicious modification of contrast medium protocol, it is possible to achieve good opacification of the right-sided cardiac chambers, thereby paving the way for exploring the overshadowed right heart. This article will describe the key features of right heart anatomy, review MDCT acquisition techniques, elaborate the various morphological and functional information that can be obtained, and illustrate some important clinical conditions associated with an abnormal right heart. PMID:22723537

  16. The extension of a uniform canopy reflectance model to include row effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The effect of row structure is assumed to be caused by the variation in density of vegetation across rows rather than to a profile in canopy height. The calculation of crop reflectance using vegetation density modulation across rows follows a parallel procedure to that for a uniform canopy. Predictions using the row model for wheat show that the effect of changes in sun to row azimuth are greatest in Landsat Band 5 (red band) and can result in underestimation of crop vigor.

  17. Validated biomechanical model for efficiency and speed of rowing.

    PubMed

    Pelz, Peter F; Vergé, Angela

    2014-10-17

    The speed of a competitive rowing crew depends on the number of crew members, their body mass, sex and the type of rowing-sweep rowing or sculling. The time-averaged speed is proportional to the rower's body mass to the 1/36th power, to the number of crew members to the 1/9th power and to the physiological efficiency (accounted for by the rower's sex) to the 1/3rd power. The quality of the rowing shell and propulsion system is captured by one dimensionless parameter that takes the mechanical efficiency, the shape and drag coefficient of the shell and the Froude propulsion efficiency into account. We derive the biomechanical equation for the speed of rowing by two independent methods and further validate it by successfully predicting race times. We derive the theoretical upper limit of the Froude propulsion efficiency for low viscous flows. This upper limit is shown to be a function solely of the velocity ratio of blade to boat speed (i.e., it is completely independent of the blade shape), a result that may also be of interest for other repetitive propulsion systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... Standards for Barley Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.204 Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of—...

  19. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... Standards for Barley Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.204 Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of—...

  20. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... Standards for Barley Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.204 Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of—...

  1. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... Standards for Barley Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.204 Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of—...

  2. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... Standards for Barley Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.204 Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of—...

  3. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z CT Colonography Computed tomography (CT) colonography or virtual colonoscopy uses special x-ray equipment to examine ... and blood vessels. CT colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy, uses low dose radiation CT scanning to ...

  4. Dipyridamole stress and rest transmural myocardial perfusion ratio evaluation by 64 detector-row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cury, Roberto C; Magalhães, Tiago A; Paladino, Antonio T; Shiozaki, Afonso A; Perini, Marcela; Senra, Tiago; Lemos, Pedro A; Cury, Ricardo C; Rochitte, Carlos E

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial stress CT perfusion (CTP) can detect myocardial ischemia. We evaluated the transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) of dipyridamole stress CTP to detect significant coronary stenosis (>70%) defined by quantitative invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Twenty-six patients (61.6 ± 8.0 years old; 14 males), without prior myocardial infarction, with positive single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT; <2 months) and clinical indication for ICA, underwent a customized multidetector-row CT (MDCT) protocol with rest/stress myocardial perfusion evaluation and coronary CT angiography. TPR was defined as mean subendocardial divided by mean subepicardial attenuation and quantified on rest and stress MDCT images. Abnormal TPR was defined as 2 SDs below the mean rest TPR. All 26 patients completed the CT protocol with no adverse events. Rest TPR was measured in all patients with a mean of 1.06 ± 0.11, and abnormal TPR was considered <0.85. For 6 patients with normal coronary arteries by ICA, the mean TPR of territories with a previous positive perfusion defect in SPECT was 1.02 ± 0.18 (95% CI, 0.86-1.18; n = 6), and mean TPR of territories without perfusion defect in SPECT was 1.03 ± 0.09 (95% CI, -0.95 to 1.11; n = 12; P = 0.83). Mean stress TPR in territories with positive SPECT and significant coronary artery disease by quantitative ICA was 0.71 ± 0.13 (95% CI, -0.64 to 0.77) and in the remote myocardial was 1.01 ± 0.09 (95% CI, -0.96 to 1.06; P < 0001). In these territories, a significant Pearson's correlation was observed (r = -0.74, P < 0.001). TPR has a good correlation with SPECT and ICA to detect significant coronary stenosis. Copyright © 2011 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Single-Row or Double-Row Fixation Technique for Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiaojiao; Yuan, Chaoqun; Chen, Kai; Cheng, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Background The single-row and double-row fixation techniques have been widely used for rotator cuff tears. However, whether the double-row technique produces superior clinical or anatomic outcomes is still considered controversial. This study aims to use meta-analysis to compare the clinical and anatomical outcomes between the two techniques. Methods The Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases were searched for relevant studies published before November 1, 2012. Studies clearly reporting a comparison of the single-row and double-row techniques were selected. The Constant, ASES, and UCLA scale systems and the rotator cuff integrity rate were evaluated. The weighted mean differences and relative risks were calculated using a fixed-effects or random-effects model. Results Eight studies were included in this meta-analysis. The weighted mean differences of the ASES (−0.84; P = 0.04; I2 = 0%) and UCLA (−0.75; P = 0.007; I2 = 0%) scales were significantly low in the single-row group for full-thickness rotator cuff tears. For tear sizes smaller than 3 cm, no significant difference was found between the groups no matter in Constant (P = 0.95; I2 = 0%), ASES (P = 0.77; I2 = 0%), or UCLA (P = 0.24; I2 = 13%) scales. For tear sizes larger than 3 cm, the ASES (−1.95; P = 0.001; I2 = 49%) and UCLA (−1.17; P = 0.006; I2 = 0%) scales were markedly lower in the single-row group. The integrity of the rotator cuff (0.81; P = 0.0004; I2 = 10%) was greater and the partial thickness retear rate (1.93; P = 0.007; I2 = 10%) was less in the double-row group. Full-thickness retears showed no difference between the groups (P = 0.15; I2 = 0%). Conclusion The meta-analysis suggests that the double-row fixation technique increases post-operative rotator cuff integrity and improves the clinical outcomes, especially for full-thickness rotator cuff tears larger than 3 cm. For tear sizes smaller than 3 cm

  6. A parallelization of the row-searching algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaici, Malika; Khaled, Hayet; Khaled, Zakia; Bentahar, Athmane

    2012-11-01

    The problem dealt in this paper concerns the parallelization of the row-searching algorithm which allows the search for linearly dependant rows on a given matrix and its implementation on MPI (Message Passing Interface) environment. This algorithm is largely used in control theory and more specifically in solving the famous diophantine equation. An introduction to the diophantine equation is presented, then two parallelization approaches of the algorithm are detailed. The first distributes a set of rows on processes (processors) and the second makes a distribution per blocks. The sequential algorithm and its two parallel forms are implemented using MPI routines, then modelled using UML (Unified Modelling Language) and finally evaluated using algorithmic complexity.

  7. Hydrodynamic characteristics of three rows of vertical slotted wall breakwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaydalani, Majed O.; Saif, Mohammed A. N.; Helal, Medhat M.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we examine the hydrodynamic characteristics of three rows of vertical slotted wall breakwaters in which the front and middle walls are permeable and partially immersed in a water channel of constant depth, whereas the third wall is impermeable. The wave-structure interaction and flow behavior of this type of breakwater arrangement are complicated and must be analyzed before breakwaters can be appropriately designed. To study the hydrodynamic breakwater performance, we developed a mathematical model based on the eigenfunction expansion method and a least squares technique for predicting wave interaction with three rows of vertical slotted wall breakwaters. We theoretically examined the wave transmission, reflection, energy loss, wave runup, and wave force under normal regular waves. Comparisons with experimental measurements show that the mathematical model results adequately reproduce most of the important features. The results of this investigation provide a better understanding of the hydrodynamic performance of triple-row vertical slotted wall breakwaters.

  8. Nutrition and Supplements for Elite Open-Weight Rowing.

    PubMed

    Boegman, Susan; Dziedzic, Christine E

    2016-01-01

    Competitive rowing events are raced over 2,000 m requiring athletes to have highly developed aerobic and anaerobic systems. Elite rowers therefore undertake training sessions focused on lactate tolerance, strength and power as well as aerobic and anaerobic capacity development, that can amount to a 24-h training week. The training stimuli and consequent metabolic demands of each session in a rowing training program differ depending on type, length, and intensity. Nutrition guidelines for endurance- and power-based sports should be drawn upon; however, individualized and flexible nutrition plans are critical to successfully meet the daily, weekly, and cyclic nutrient requirements of a rower. This review will provide an overview of key nutritional strategies to optimize training and enhance adaptation, and briefly discuss supplement strategies that may support health and enhance performance in elite rowing.

  9. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm2 pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  10. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2015-03-21

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm(2) pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  11. Breast CT.

    PubMed

    Glick, Stephen J

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer is a serious disease that accounts for approximately 40,000 deaths per year in the United States. Unfortunately, there is no known cause of breast cancer, and therefore the best way to prevent mortality is early detection. In the past 15 years, breast cancer mortality has been reduced significantly, which is in part due to screening with film-screen mammography. Nonetheless, conventional mammography lacks sensitivity, especially for certain subgroups of women such as those with dense breast tissue, those under 50 years old, and pre- or perimenopausal women. In addition, mammography has a very poor positive predictive value for biopsy, with 70%-90% of biopsies performed turning out negative. By improving visualization of breast tissue, X-ray computerized tomography (CT) of the breast can potentially provide improvements in diagnostic accuracy over conventional mammography. Owing to recent technological developments in digital detector technology, flat-panel CT imagers dedicated to imaging of the breast are now feasible. A number of academic groups are currently researching dedicated breast CT and prototype systems are currently being evaluated in the clinical setting.

  12. Low-dose triple-rule-out using 320-row-detector volume MDCT--less contrast medium and lower radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Tahir; Rogalla, Patrik; Lembcke, Alexander; Mühler, Matthias R; Hamm, Bernd; Hein, Patrick A

    2011-07-01

    To investigate image quality of triple-rule-out (TRO) computed tomography (CT) using a 320-row-detector CT system with substantially reduced contrast medium volume at 100 kV. Forty-six consecutive patients with noncritical, acute chest pain underwent 320-row-detector CT using a two-step TRO protocol consisting of a non-spiral, non-gated chest CT acquisition (150 mA) followed by a non-spiral, electrocardiography-gated cardiac acquisition (200-500 mA based on body mass index (BMI)). Data were acquired using a biphasic injection protocol with a total iodinated contrast medium volume of 60 ml (370 mg/ml). Vessel attenuation and effective doses were recorded. Image quality was scored independently by two readers. Mean attenuation was 584 ± 114 Hounsfield units (HU) in the ascending aorta, 335 ± 63HU in the aortic arch, 658 ± 136HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 521 ± 97HU and 549 ± 102HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. In all but one patient, attenuation and image quality allowed accurate visualization of the pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta, and coronary arteries in a single examination. Ninety-six percent of all coronary artery segments were rated diagnostic. Radiation exposure ranged between 2.0 and 3.3 mSv. Using 320-row-detector CT the investigated low-dose TRO protocol resulted in excellent opacification and image quality with substantial reduction of contrast medium volume compared to recently published TRO protocols.

  13. The clinical outcome of occult pulmonary contusion on multidetector-row computed tomography in blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Deunk, Jaap; Poels, Tielke C; Brink, Monique; Dekker, Helena M; Kool, Digna R; Blickman, Johan G; van Vugt, Arie B; Edwards, Michael John Richard

    2010-02-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is a more sensitive modality as compared with conventional radiography (CR) in detecting pulmonary injuries. MDCT often detects pulmonary contusion that is not visualized by CR, defined as occult pulmonary contusion (OPC). The aim of this study was to investigate whether OPC on MDCT has implications for the outcome in blunt trauma patients. We used prospectively collected data from 1,040 adult high-energy blunt trauma patients who were primarily presented at our emergency department and who underwent CR and MDCT of the chest. All patients with pulmonary contusion were identified and divided into two groups: The "CR/computed tomography (CT) group" consisted of patients with pulmonary contusion visible on both CR and MDCT. The "CT-only" group consisted of patients with OPC, visible exclusively on MDCT. The control group consisted of blunt trauma patients without pulmonary contusion. These groups were compared with respect to difference in mortality and other outcome measures. In addition, a multivariate analysis was performed. Two hundred fifty-five patients suffered pulmonary contusion: The CT-only group consisted of 157 and the CR/CT group of 98 patients. The CT-only group did not differ from the control group with respect to mortality rate and other outcome measures. However, compared with the CR/CT group, mortality rate was significantly lower (8% versus 16%, p = 0.039) and most other outcome measures were significantly better in the CT-only group. OPC on MDCT is not associated with a worse outcome as compared with patients without pulmonary contusion. OPC has a better outcome as compared with pulmonary contusion visible on both CR and MDCT.

  14. Multidetector row computed tomography evaluation of potential living laparoscopic renal donors: the story so far.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Saravanan; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Small, William C; Torres, William E; Mittal, Pardeep K

    2006-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease. Living related kidney donation is the major source of renal grafts due to limited availability of cadaveric kidneys. Open nephrectomy was used to harvest donor kidneys. However, the laparoscopic approach is associated with less postoperative pain and quick recovery. So, most centers now prefer a laparoscopic approach to explant donor kidneys. Laparoscopic approach is technically challenging due to limited operative visibility. Hence, accurate preoperative detection of renal arterial and venous anomalies is imperative to avoid inadvertent vascular injury and bleeding. The preoperative workup of renal donors includes clinical evaluation, laboratory tests, and imaging. Traditionally, the renal donors were evaluated with conventional imaging techniques, which included renal catheter angiography and intravenous urography. However, conventional imaging is invasive, expensive, and less accurate for evaluation of complex renal venous anomalies, small calculi, and diffuse or focal renal parenchymal lesions. The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) revolutionized the CT technology by enabling isotropic resolution with faster scan coverage in a single, short breath-hold. Consequently, MDCT has now replaced conventional imaging for comprehensive imaging of potential living renal donors. MDCT is a minimally invasive technique that can accurately detect urolithiasis, renal arterial and venous anomalies, renal parenchymal lesions, and urinary tract anomalies. Renal vascular anomalies detected by MDCT can help the surgeon in planning donor nephrectomy. MDCT with three-dimensional CT angiography enables accurate preoperative renal vascular mapping. This article reviews the role of MDCT in preoperative evaluation of potential laparoscopic renal donors.

  15. 4. ROW OF SPARE THREEHIGH ROLL STANDS ADJACENT TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. ROW OF SPARE THREE-HIGH ROLL STANDS ADJACENT TO THE 32/28 STRUCTURAL MILL. AN OVERHEAD CRANE LIFTED THESE STANDS INTO PLACE ON THE 32/28 MILL. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Structural Mill, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  16. Effect of row orientation on energy balance components

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Solar irradiance is the primary source of energy that is converted into sensible and latent heat fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The orientation of agricultural crop rows relative to the sun’s zenith angle determines the amount of solar irradiance reaching the plant and soil surfaces...

  17. Relation of baseflow to row crop intensity in Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing baseflow and baseflow percentage over the second half of the 20th century in Iowa has contributed to increasing nitrate-nitrogen concentrations measured in Iowa rivers because nitrate is primarily delivered to streams as baseflow and tile drainage. The relation of baseflow and baseflow percentage to row crop land use was evaluated for 11 Iowa rivers and their watersheds for their period of streamflow record (58-73 years period). Results indicated increasing baseflow in Iowa's rivers is significantly related to increasing row crop intensity. A 13-52% increase in row crop percentage in many Iowa watersheds has contributed to an increase of 33-135 mm increase in baseflow and 7-31% increase in baseflow percentage. Limited historical water quality data from two larger Iowa rivers (Cedar and Raccoon rivers) suggest that increasing row crop land use over the 20th century has produced more baseflow and contributed to increasing nitrate concentrations in Iowa's rivers. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Interior view to the east, note the row of transmitters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view to the east, note the row of transmitters and the cables in the foreground - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Six Transmitter Building, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  19. Cotton Response to Herbicide Technologies, Row Patterns, and Tillage Systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton producers must make decisions related to cotton varieties, herbicide systems, tillage systems, and row patterns. A study was conducted to compare a conventional variety, a glyphosate tolerant variety, and a glufosinate tolerant variety in both conventional tillage and conservation tillage sys...

  20. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Row Crop Production Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in occupations in the row crop production cluster. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and…

  1. 102. VIEW OF WEST ROW OF CABINETS IN LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    102. VIEW OF WEST ROW OF CABINETS IN LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106), LSB (BLDG. 770). LOGIC CONTROL AND MONITOR UNITS BOOSTER AND FUEL SYSTEMS ON LEFT; LANDLINE SIGNAL CONDITIONERS ON RIGHT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. A mathematical model concerning reflectance from a row crop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggi, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    The recent work of Allen, Gayle, and Richardson (1970) and Suits (1972) has been extended to compute directional reflectance from a crop row. A model is constructed which takes into account edge effects and aids in discriminating crops with leaf orientation in preferred directions. This report only contains the development of the mathematical equations. Numerical results will be published in a forthcoming report.

  3. Power, Consent and Resistance: An Autoethnography of Competitive Rowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Laura; Potrac, Paul; Jones, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    This study builds upon existing socio-cultural work into sports coaching by probing the meanings and varieties of the shared coach-athlete experience. Specifically, the paper utilises an autoethnographic approach in an attempt to chart the complex and dynamic relationship that existed between me, the principal author, as a rowing coxswain and my…

  4. 1. Elevator row at Duluth. Rice's Point showing context of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Elevator row at Duluth. Rice's Point showing context of Peavey Duluth Terminal and Occident Terminal. - Peavey Duluth Terminal Elevator, South side of first slip, north from outer end of Rice's Point, east of Garfield Avenue, Duluth, St. Louis County, MN

  5. Strip tillage for single and twin-row peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil degradation and rising production costs have prompted grower interest in conservation tillage with high residue cover crops for peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). The objective was to evaluate single and twin-row peanut production across three different strip tillage implements with and without a c...

  6. New insights on COPD imaging via CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sverzellati, N; Molinari, F; Pirronti, T; Bonomo, L; Spagnolo, P; Zompatori, M

    2007-01-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to quantify morphological features and investigate structure/function relationship in COPD. This approach allows a phenotypical definition of COPD patients, and might improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and suggest new therapeutical options. In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has also become potentially suitable for the assessment of ventilation, perfusion and respiratory mechanics. This review focuses on the established clinical applications of CT, and novel CT and MRI techniques, which may prove valuable in evaluating the structural and functional damage in COPD. PMID:18229568

  7. PET/CT: underlying physics, instrumentation, and advances.

    PubMed

    Torres Espallardo, I

    2017-01-12

    Since it was first introduced, the main goal of PET/CT has been to provide both PET and CT images with high clinical quality and to present them to radiologists and specialists in nuclear medicine as a fused, perfectly aligned image. The use of fused PET and CT images quickly became routine in clinical practice, showing the great potential of these hybrid scanners. Thanks to this success, manufacturers have gone beyond considering CT as a mere attenuation corrector for PET, concentrating instead on design high performance PET and CT scanners with more interesting features. Since the first commercial PET/CT scanner became available in 2001, both the PET component and the CT component have improved immensely. In the case of PET, faster scintillation crystals with high stopping power such as LYSO crystals have enabled more sensitive devices to be built, making it possible to reduce the number of undesired coincidence events and to use time of flight (TOF) techniques. All these advances have improved lesion detection, especially in situations with very noisy backgrounds. Iterative reconstruction methods, together with the corrections carried out during the reconstruction and the use of the point-spread function, have improved image quality. In parallel, CT instrumentation has also improved significantly, and 64- and 128-row detectors have been incorporated into the most modern PET/CT scanners. This makes it possible to obtain high quality diagnostic anatomic images in a few seconds that both enable the correction of PET attenuation and provide information for diagnosis. Furthermore, nowadays nearly all PET/CT scanners have a system that modulates the dose of radiation that the patient is exposed to in the CT study in function of the region scanned. This article reviews the underlying physics of PET and CT imaging separately, describes the changes in the instrumentation and standard protocols in a combined PET/CT system, and finally points out the most important

  8. Functional Outcomes After Double-Row Versus Single-Row Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Stephen J.; Lee, Steven J.; Mullaney, Michael J.; Tyler, Timothy F.; Fukunaga, Takumi; Johnson, Christopher D.; McHugh, Malachy P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The functional benefits of double-row (DR) versus single-row (SR) rotator cuff repair are not clearly established. Purpose: To examine the effect of DR versus SR rotator cuff repair on functional outcomes and strength recovery in patients with full-thickness tears. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Forty-nine patients were randomized to DR or SR repairs; 36 patients (13 women, 23 men; mean age, 62 ± 7 years; 20 SR, 16 DR) were assessed at a mean 2.2 ± 1.6 years after surgery (range, 1-7 years; tear size: 17 medium, 13 large, 9 massive). The following data were recorded prior to surgery and at follow-up: Penn shoulder score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) results; range of motion (ROM) for shoulder flexion, external rotation (ER) at 0° and 90° of abduction, and internal rotation (IR) at 90° of abduction; and shoulder strength (Lafayette manual muscle tester) in empty- and full-can tests, abduction, and ER at 0° of abduction. Treatment (SR vs DR) × time (pre- vs postoperative) mixed-model analysis of variance was used to assess the effect of rotator cuff repair. Results: Rotator cuff repair markedly improved Penn, ASES, and SST scores (P < .001), with similar improvement between SR and DR repairs (treatment × time, P = .38-.10) and excellent scores at follow-up (DR vs SR: Penn, 91 ± 11 vs 92 ± 11 [P = .73]; ASES, 87 ± 12 vs 92 ± 12 [P = .21]; SST, 11.4 ± 1.0 vs 11.3 ± 1.0 [P = .76]). Patients with DR repairs lost ER ROM at 0° of abduction (preoperative to final follow-up, 7° ± 10° loss [P = .013]). ER ROM did not significantly change with SR repair (5° ± 14° gain, P = .16; treatment by time, P = .008). This effect was not apparent for ER ROM at 90° of abduction (treatment × time, P = .26). IR ROM improved from preoperative to final follow-up (P < .01; SR, 17° ± 27°; DR, 7° ± 21°; treatment × time, P = .23). Rotator cuff repair markedly

  9. Rowing Crew Coordination Dynamics at Increasing Stroke Rates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In rowing, perfect synchronisation is important for optimal performance of a crew. Remarkably, a recent study on ergometers demonstrated that antiphase crew coordination might be mechanically more efficient by reducing the power lost to within-cycle velocity fluctuations of the boat. However, coupled oscillator dynamics predict the stability of the coordination to decrease with increasing stroke rate, which in case of antiphase may eventually yield breakdowns to in-phase. Therefore, this study examined the effects of increasing stroke rate on in- and antiphase crew coordination in rowing dyads. Eleven experienced dyads rowed on two mechanically coupled ergometers on slides, which allowed the ergometer system to move back and forth as one ‘boat’. The dyads performed a ramp trial in both in- and antiphase pattern, in which stroke rates gradually increased from 30 strokes per minute (spm) to as fast as possible in steps of 2 spm. Kinematics of rowers, handles and ergometers were captured. Two dyads showed a breakdown of antiphase into in-phase coordination at the first stroke rate of the ramp trial. The other nine dyads reached between 34–42 spm in antiphase but achieved higher rates in in-phase. As expected, the coordinative accuracy in antiphase was worse than in in-phase crew coordination, while, somewhat surprisingly, the coordinative variability did not differ between the patterns. Whereas crew coordination did not substantially deteriorate with increasing stroke rate, stroke rate did affect the velocity fluctuations of the ergometers: fluctuations were clearly larger in the in-phase pattern than in the antiphase pattern, and this difference significantly increased with stroke rate. Together, these results suggest that although antiphase rowing is less stable (i.e., less resistant to perturbation), potential on-water benefits of antiphase over in-phase rowing may actually increase with stroke rate. PMID:26185987

  10. Assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability from routine contrast-enhanced 16-detector-row computed tomography of the heart: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Konstantin; Sanz, Javier; Poon, Michael; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Ohnesorge, Bernd; Rius, Teresa; Fayad, Zahi A; Reiser, Maximilian F; Becker, Christoph R

    2005-05-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of 16-detector-row computed tomography (16DCT) of the heart in the assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability in comparison to stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (SP-MRI) and delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI). A number of 30 patients underwent both 16DCT and MRI of the heart. Contrast-enhanced 16DCT data sets were reviewed for areas of myocardium with reduced attenuation. Both CT and MRI data were examined by independent reviewers for the presence of myocardial perfusion defects or myocardial infarctions (MI). Volumetric analysis of the hypoperfusion areas in CT and the infarct sizes in DE-MRI were performed. According to MRI, myocardial infarctions were detected in 11 of 30 cases, and perfusion defects not corresponding to an MI were detected in six of 30 patients. CTA was able to detect ten of 11 MI correctly (sensitivity 91%, specificity 79%, accuracy 83%), and detected three of six hypoperfusions correctly (sensitivity 50%, specificity 92%, accuracy 79%). Assessing the volume of perfusion defects correlating to history of MI on the CT images, a systematic underestimation of the true infarct size as compared to the results of DE-MRI was found (P<0.01). Routine, contrast-enhanced 16-detector row CT of the heart can detect chronic myocardial infarctions in the majority of cases, but ischemic perfusion defects are not reliably detected under resting conditions.

  11. Data Correction for Gantry-tilted Local CT.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongzhu; Zhang, Cishen; Yan, Ming; Zhou, Jiayin

    2005-01-01

    Gantry-tilted helical multi-slice computed tomography (CT) refers to the helical scanning CT system equipped with multi-row detector operating at some gantry tilting angle. Its purpose is to avoid the area which is vulnerable to the X-ray radiation. The local tomography is to reduce the total radiation dose by only scanning the region of interest for image reconstruction. In this paper we consider the scanning scheme, and incorporate the local tomography technique with the gantry-tilted helical multi-slice CT. The image degradation problem caused by gantry tilting is studied, and a new error correction method is proposed to deal with this problem in the local CT. Computer simulation shows that the proposed method can enhance the local imaging performance in terms of image sharpness and artifacts reduction.

  12. Entrance surface dose measurements using a small OSL dosimeter with a computed tomography scanner having 320 rows of detectors.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Yamada, Kenji; Mihara, Yoshiki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Higashino, Kousaku; Yamashita, Kazuta; Hayashi, Fumio; Okazaki, Tohru; Hashizume, Takuya; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2017-03-01

    Entrance surface dose (ESD) measurements are important in X-ray computed tomography (CT) for examination, but in clinical settings it is difficult to measure ESDs because of a lack of suitable dosimeters. We focus on the capability of a small optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter. The aim of this study is to propose a practical method for using an OSL dosimeter to measure the ESD when performing a CT examination. The small OSL dosimeter has an outer width of 10 mm; it is assumed that a partial dose may be measured because the slice thickness and helical pitch can be set to various values. To verify our method, we used a CT scanner having 320 rows of detectors and checked the consistencies of the ESDs measured using OSL dosimeters by comparing them with those measured using Gafchromic™ films. The films were calibrated using an ionization chamber on the basis of half-value layer estimation. On the other hand, the OSL dosimeter was appropriately calibrated using a practical calibration curve previously proposed by our group. The ESDs measured using the OSL dosimeters were in good agreement with the reference ESDs from the Gafchromic™ films. Using these data, we also estimated the uncertainty of ESDs measured with small OSL dosimeters. We concluded that a small OSL dosimeter can be considered suitable for measuring the ESD with an uncertainty of 30 % during CT examinations in which pitch factors below 1.000 are applied.

  13. Diagnostic performance of combined noninvasive coronary angiography and myocardial perfusion imaging using 320 row detector computed tomography: design and implementation of the CORE320 multicenter, multinational diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Vavere, Andrea L; Simon, Gregory G; George, Richard T; Rochitte, Carlos E; Arai, Andrew E; Miller, Julie M; Di Carli, Marcello; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Zadeh, Armin A; Dewey, Marc; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Laham, Roger; Rybicki, Frank J; Schuijf, Joanne D; Paul, Narinder; Hoe, John; Kuribyashi, Sachio; Sakuma, Hajime; Nomura, Cesar; Yaw, Tan Swee; Kofoed, Klaus F; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Clouse, Melvin E; Brinker, Jeffrey; Cox, Christopher; Lima, Joao A C

    2011-01-01

    Multidetector coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) is a promising modality for widespread clinical application because of its noninvasive nature and high diagnostic accuracy as found in previous studies using 64 to 320 simultaneous detector rows. It is, however, limited in its ability to detect myocardial ischemia. In this article, we describe the design of the CORE320 study ("Combined coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial perfusion evaluation using 320 detector row computed tomography"). This prospective, multicenter, multinational study is unique in that it is designed to assess the diagnostic performance of combined 320-row CTA and myocardial CT perfusion imaging (CTP) in comparison with the combination of invasive coronary angiography and single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI). The trial is being performed at 16 medical centers located in 8 countries worldwide. CT has the potential to assess both anatomy and physiology in a single imaging session. The co-primary aim of the CORE320 study is to define the per-patient diagnostic accuracy of the combination of coronary CTA and myocardial CTP to detect physiologically significant coronary artery disease compared with (1) the combination of conventional coronary angiography and SPECT-MPI and (2) conventional coronary angiography alone. If successful, the technology could revolutionize the management of patients with symptomatic CAD.

  14. Simulation of design-unbiased point-to-particle sampling compared to alternatives on plantation rows

    Treesearch

    Thomas B. Lynch; David Hamlin; Mark J. Ducey

    2016-01-01

    Total quantities of tree attributes can be estimated in plantations by sampling on plantation rows using several methods. At random sample points on a row, either fixed row lengths or variable row lengths with a fixed number of sample trees can be assessed. Ratio of means or mean of ratios estimators can be developed for the fixed number of trees option but are not...

  15. Radiation dose-reduction strategies for neuroradiology CT protocols.

    PubMed

    Smith, A B; Dillon, W P; Gould, R; Wintermark, M

    2007-10-01

    Within the past 2 decades, the number of CT examinations performed has increased almost 10-fold. This is in large part due to advances in multidetector-row CT technology, which now allows faster image acquisition and improved isotropic imaging. The increased use, along with multidetector technique, has led to a significantly increased radiation dose to the patient from CT studies. This places increased responsibility on the radiologist to ensure that CT examinations are indicated and that the "as low as reasonably achievable" concept is adhered to. Neuroradiologists are familiar with factors that affect patient dose such as pitch, milliamperes, kilovolt peak (kVp), collimation, but with increasing attention being given to dose reduction, they are looking for additional ways to further reduce the radiation associated with their CT protocols. In response to increasing concern, CT manufacturers have developed dose-reduction tools, such as dose modulation, in which the tube current is adjusted along with the CT acquisition, according to patient's attenuation. This review will describe the available techniques for reducing dose associated with neuroradiologic CT imaging protocols.

  16. Alternate row placement is ineffective for cultural control of Meloidogyne incognita in cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to determine if planting cotton into the space between the previous year's rows reduces crop loss due to nematodes compared to planting in the same row every year. Row placement had a significant (P = 0.05) effect on nematode counts only on 8 July 2005. Plots receiv...

  17. Row-Sum of a Class of M-Bonomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2011-01-01

    Formulae for row-sum of M-bonomial coefficients [image omitted] where G is an mth g-gonal number is developed from a study of the ratio between consecutive terms of the sequence of row-sum. The result generalizes the formula for row-sum of binomial coefficients: [image omitted].

  18. Row Spacing and Plant Population Effects on Cotton Produced With or Without Irrigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field studies were conducted from 2006 through 2008 to evaluate the effects of twin-row spacings, populations, and irrigation on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) lint yields. Twin row systems, consisting of twin 18-, 25- and 38-cm rows on a 1-m bed at populations of 111,000 and 148,000 plants/acre, w...

  19. Growth and yield of valencia, spanish, virginia and runner market type peanuts in various row spacings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Currently, the majority of peanuts grown in New Mexico and West Texas are planted in single rows on beds 36 to 40 inches apart. In 2006-2008, several field studies were conducted with Valencia peanuts comparing single row, twin row, and diamond planting patterns in various populations. The basic c...

  20. Cultural practices to improve in-row weed control with cultivation in organic peanut production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cultivation is a proven effective means of weed control in organic peanut. However, weeds in-row often escape control. Research trials were conducted in Ty Ty, GA to modify cultural practices to help peanut suppress weed emergence in-row. Modified cultural practices were three row pattern/seeding...

  1. Effects of stroke resistance on rowing economy in club rowers post-season.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Mackenzie, S J; Jensen, R L; Watts, P B

    2013-02-01

    In the sport of rowing, increasing the impulse applied to the oar handle during the stroke can result in greater boat velocities; this may be facilitated by increasing the surface area of the oar blade and/or increasing the length of the oars. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of different rowing resistances on the physiological response to rowing. 5 male and 7 female club rowers completed progressive, incremental exercise tests on an air-braked rowing ergometer, using either low (LO; 100) or high (HI; 150) resistance (values are according to the adjustable "drag factor" setting on the ergometer). Expired air, blood lactate concentration, heart rate, rowing cadence, and ergometer power output were monitored during the tests. LO rowing elicited significantly greater cadences (P<0.01) and heart rates (P<0.05), whereas rowing economy (J · L O(2) equivalents(-1)) was significantly greater during HI rowing (P<0.05). These results suggest that economically, rowing with a greater resistance may be advantageous for performance. Moreover, biomechanical analysis of ergometer rowing support the notion that the impulse generated during the stroke increases positively as a function of rowing resistance. We conclude that an aerobic advantage associated with greater resistance parallels the empirical trend toward larger oar blades in competitive rowing. This may be explained by a greater stroke impulse at the higher resistance.

  2. Row-Sum of a Class of M-Bonomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2011-01-01

    Formulae for row-sum of M-bonomial coefficients [image omitted] where G is an mth g-gonal number is developed from a study of the ratio between consecutive terms of the sequence of row-sum. The result generalizes the formula for row-sum of binomial coefficients: [image omitted].

  3. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  4. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. Case Report A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. Conclusions In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management. PMID:25593635

  5. Skid-row rescue missions: A religious approach to alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Fagan, R W

    1987-06-01

    The focus of this study is on the religious service at which many skid-row rescue missions require attendance to receive benefits. Data were obtained from an observation study of thirty-seven skid-row rescue missions in Los Angeles and Seattle, interviews with ten mission directors, and mission newsletters. The missions use material benefits to attract potential converts. The theme of spiritual conversion is predominant in the mission service (sermons, songs, testimonies). Mission personnel feel they have been called by God, often have backgrounds similar to the people they serve, and view the skid rowers' problems as primarily personal and spiritual. Skid rowers resent the use of religion as bait, view their problems as primarily structural, and use the missions only as a last resort. The missions need to be compared to other alcoholism rehabilitation and religious institutions. A key component to their continued existence is outside Christian supporters.

  6. High Energy-Efficiency Retrofits to Baltimore's Row Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Chalk, J.; Johnson, A.L.; Lipscomb, L.; Wendt, R.

    1999-04-19

    The purpose of the research project is to develop high-perfommnce, energy-eflicient retrofits of existing row homes in Baltimore, Maryland. These efficiency enhancements are to optimize building envelope improvements, mechanical equipment improvements and operational improvements to the highest cost-effective level. Furthermore, this project is to investigate and demonstrate the impact of high-performance energy-efficiency retrofit improvements on row homes in the Historic East area of Baltimore. Three homes awaiting renovation are planned to receive building envelope, mechanical system, and electrical system improvements that will improve their energy petiormance. An incremental additional cost ceiling of $4000 for the energy eftlciency improvements, beyond those normally installed, has been set by the project.

  7. A parallel householder tridiagonalization stratagem using scattered row decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. Y.; Utku, S.; Salama, M.; Rapp, D.

    1988-01-01

    Householder's method for tridiagonalizing a real symmetric matrix, a major step in evaluating eigenvalues of the matrix, is modified into a parallel algorithm for a concurrent machine of message passing type. Each processor of the concurrent machine has its own CPU, communications control and local memory. Messages are passed through connections between processors. Although the basic algorithm is inherently serial, the computations can be spread over all processors by scattering different rows of the matrix into processors, hence the term 'Scattered Row Decomposition'. The steps in the serial and the parallel algorithms are identified. Expressions for efficiency and speedup are given in terms of problem and machine parameters. For a concurrent machine of ring type interconnection, a selected representative problem of large order exhibits efficiency approaching 66 per cent.

  8. Optimisation of the mean boat velocity in rowing.

    PubMed

    Rauter, G; Baumgartner, L; Denoth, J; Riener, R; Wolf, P

    2012-01-01

    In rowing, motor learning may be facilitated by augmented feedback that displays the ratio between actual mean boat velocity and maximal achievable mean boat velocity. To provide this ratio, the aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an algorithm calculating an individual maximal mean boat velocity. The algorithm optimised the horizontal oar movement under constraints such as the individual range of the horizontal oar displacement, individual timing of catch and release and an individual power-angle relation. Immersion and turning of the oar were simplified, and the seat movement of a professional rower was implemented. The feasibility of the algorithm, and of the associated ratio between actual boat velocity and optimised boat velocity, was confirmed by a study on four subjects: as expected, advanced rowing skills resulted in higher ratios, and the maximal mean boat velocity depended on the range of the horizontal oar displacement.

  9. Astronaut Hammond gets microgravity exercise on rowing machine

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-10

    STS064-09-026 (9-20 Sept. 1994) --- Astronaut L. Blaine Hammond, STS-64 pilot, gets microgravity exercise on the rowing machine. This area of the space shuttle Discovery's middeck was also used for the treadmill exercising device. Blaine and five other NASA astronauts spent almost 11 days in Earth orbit in support of the mission. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  10. A review of turbomachinery blade-row interaction research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Todd E.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical and experimental research in the area of unsteady aerodynamics of turbomachinery has conventionally been applied to blading which oscillates when placed in a uniformly flowing fluid. Comparatively less effort has been offered for the study of blading which is subjected to nonuniformities within the flow field. The fluid dynamic environment of a blade-row embedded within multi-stage turbomachines is dominated by such highly unsteady fluid flow conditions. The production of wakes and circumferential pressure variations from adjacent blade-rows causes large unsteady energy transfers between the fluid and the blades. Determination of the forced response of a blade requires the ability to predict the unsteady loads which are induced by these aerodynamic sources. A review of research publications was done to determine recent investigations of the response of turbomachinery blading subjected to aerodynamic excitations. Such excitations are a direct result of the blade-row aerodynamic interaction which occurs between adjacent cascades of blades. The reports and papers reviewed have been organized into areas emphasizing experimental or analytical efforts.

  11. Fluctuating asymmetry as a predictor for rowing ergometer performance.

    PubMed

    Longman, D; Stock, J T; Wells, J C K

    2011-08-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) can be defined as an organism's deviation from perfect bilateral symmetry. FA has been of interest to evolutionary biologists as it may be indicative of the ability of an individual to express its genotype in a stable manner. Asymmetry has been shown to correlate with success in both intra- and inter-sexual selection in various species, including humans. A growing body of knowledge is emerging concerning the relationship between asymmetry and sporting ability. This study seeks to expand upon understanding of developmental stability and athletics by investigating the association between asymmetry and performance in rowers. Both male and female competitors from a range of abilities were tested (76 males and 70 females), with asymmetry being determined through bilateral digit measurements and performance through personal best time over 2000 m on the Concept 2 indoor rowing ergometer. Significant negative correlations were observed between asymmetry and 2000 m ergometer performance in both males and females. The relationship remained significant after adjustment for rowing experience and height. These results suggest that asymmetry may serve as a predictor of potential ability in the sport of rowing. The cause for the association between asymmetry and sporting performance has yet to be identified. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Imaging of cochlear implant electrode array with flat-detector CT and conventional multislice CT: comparison of image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Struffert, Tobias; Hertel, Victoria; Kyriakou, Yannis; Krause, Jens; Engelhorn, Tobias; Schick, Bernhard; Iro, Heinrich; Hornung, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2010-04-01

    Cochlear implantation assessment is possible using commercially available standard flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT) protocols. Image quality is superior to multislice CT (MSCT). The radiation dose of FD-CT is lower in comparison with MSCT standard protocols and may therefore overcome the limitations of MSCT in the evaluation of cochlear implants. FD-CT offers higher spatial resolution than MSCT. Our objective was to compare the image quality of FD-CT to conventional MSCT in the visualization of a cochlear implant electrode array with respect to radiation exposure. An isolated temporal bone specimen was scanned using a commercially available FD-CT system and a 4 and 64 row MSCT scanner. Different scanning protocols were used. Image quality was assessed by four independent readers using a scoring system with different criteria describing delineation of the cochlea and the electrode array, image noise and spatial resolution. Radiation dose was measured using the CT dose index (CTDI) and a 16 cm acrylic phantom. Image quality was rated superior for FD-CT for all criteria by all readers. Single electrode contacts were only visible in FD-CT and assessment of implant position was improved by FD-CT. The radiation dose of FD-CT was half that of MSCT standard protocols.

  13. An experimental investigation of turbomachine blade row aeromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiereisen, John Michael

    This research was directed at understanding two major issues in turbomachine unsteady aerodynamics: (1) two-dimensional modeling of the unsteady aerodynamic excitation to a blade row within the constraints of linearized theory, and (2) the resulting unsteady aerodynamic loading of a blade row utilizing linearized theory analysis. These objectives were pursued by means of a series of experiments in the Purdue Annular Cascade Research Facility. This facility experimentally reproduces the fundamental unsteady flow phenomena inherent in axial flow turbomachines. The unsteady periodic flow field generated by rotating rows of perforated plates and airfoil cascades was measured with a two-component hot-wire anemometer and an unsteady total pressure probe and characterized in terms of the two-dimensional unsteady velocity and unsteady static pressure perturbations. The resulting unsteady periodic chordwise surface pressure distributions on a downstream stator row were measured with miniature high-frequency response pressure transducers mounted within the stator airfoils. Thus the unsteady aerodynamic excitation and resulting unsteady aerodynamic response were quantitatively ascertained. The periodic unsteady flow perturbations were analyzed as superpositions of harmonic vortical and potential flow perturbations, with each of these fundamental perturbations modeled as a spatial flow nonuniformity which is temporally steady in an appropriately rotating reference frame. The unsteady velocity associated with an harmonic vortical perturbation was shown to be parallel to the mean velocity vector in the rotating relative reference frame. The unsteady potential perturbations were shown to either propagate or decay axially depending upon flow conditions, with the propagation or decay determined by the mean relative Mach number in the rotating reference frame. Unsteady flow fields generated by rotating rows of perforated plates were found to be almost purely vortical perturbations

  14. Length to diameter ratio and row number effects in short pin fin heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brigham, B. A.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The relative effects of pin length to diameter ratio and of pin row geometry on the heat transfer from pin fins, was determined. Array averaged heat transfer coefficients on pin and endwall surfaces were measured for two configurations of staggered arrays of short pin fins (length to diameter ratio of 4). One configuration contained eight streamwise rows of pins, while the other contained only four rows. Results showed that both the 8-row and the 4-row configurations for an L sub p/D of 4, exhibit higher heat transfer than in similar tests on shorter pin fns (L sub p/D of 1/2 and 2). It was also found that for this L sub p/D ratio, the array averaged heat transfer was slightly higher with eight rows of staggered pins than with only four rows.

  15. Length to diameter ratio and row number effects in short pin fin heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brigham, B. A.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    The relative effects of pin length to diameter ratio and of pin row geometry on the heat transfer from pin fins, was determined. Array averaged heat transfer coefficients on pin and endwall surfaces were measured for two configurations of staggered arrays of short pin fins (length to diameter ratio of 4). One configuration contained eight streamwise rows of pins, while the other contained only four rows. Results showed that both the 8-row and the 4-row configurations for an L sub p/D of 4, exhibit higher heat transfer than in similar tests on shorter pin fins (L sub p/D of 1/2 and 2). It was also found that for this L sub p/D ratio, the array averaged heat transfer was slightly higher with eight rows of staggered pins than with only four rows. Previously announced in STAR as N83-14431

  16. The effect of including a series of isometric conditioning contractions to the rowing warm-up on 1,000-m rowing ergometer time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Feros, Simon A; Young, Warren B; Rice, Anthony J; Talpey, Scott W

    2012-12-01

    Rowing requires strength, power, and strength-endurance for optimal performance. A rowing-based warm-up could be enhanced by exploiting the postactivation potentiation (PAP) phenomenon, acutely enhancing power output at the beginning of a race where it is needed most. Minimal research has investigated the effects of PAP on events of longer duration (i.e. 1,000-m rowing). The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of PAP on 1,000-m rowing ergometer performance through the use of 2 different warm-up procedures: (a) a rowing warm-up combined with a series of isometric conditioning contractions, known as the potentiated warm-up (PW), and (b) a rowing warm-up only (NW). The isometric conditioning contractions in the PW were performed by "pulling" an immovable handle on the rowing ergometer, consisting of 5 sets of 5 seconds (2 seconds at submaximal intensity, and 3 seconds at maximal intensity), with a 15-second recovery between sets. The 1,000-m rowing ergometer time trial was performed after each warm-up condition, whereby mean power output, mean stroke rate, and split time were assessed every 100 m. Ten Australian national level rowers served as the subjects and performed both conditions in a counterbalanced order on separate days. The PW reduced 1,000-m time by 0.8% (p > 0.05). The PW improved mean power output by 6.6% (p < 0.01) and mean stroke rate by 5.2% (p < 0.01) over the first 500 m; resulting in a reduction of 500-m time by 1.9% (p < 0.01), compared with the NW. It appears that the inclusion of isometric conditioning contractions to the rowing warm-up enhance short-term rowing ergometer performance (especially at the start of a race) to a greater extent than a rowing warm-up alone.

  17. Flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, technology, and applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajiv; Cheung, Arnold C; Bartling, Soenke H; Lisauskas, Jennifer; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Brady, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) systems have an innovative design that allows coverage of a large volume per rotation, fluoroscopic and dynamic imaging, and high spatial resolution that permits visualization of complex human anatomy such as fine temporal bone structures and trabecular bone architecture. In simple terms, flat-panel volume CT scanners can be thought of as conventional multidetector CT scanners in which the detector rows have been replaced by an area detector. The flat-panel detector has wide z-axis coverage that enables imaging of entire organs in one axial acquisition. Its fluoroscopic and angiographic capabilities are useful for intraoperative and vascular applications. Furthermore, the high-volume coverage and continuous rotation of the detector may enable depiction of dynamic processes such as coronary blood flow and whole-brain perfusion. Other applications in which flat-panel volume CT may play a role include small-animal imaging, nondestructive testing in animal survival surgeries, and tissue-engineering experiments. Such versatility has led some to predict that flat-panel volume CT will gain importance in interventional and intraoperative applications, especially in specialties such as cardiac imaging, interventional neuroradiology, orthopedics, and otolaryngology. However, the contrast resolution of flat-panel volume CT is slightly inferior to that of multidetector CT, a higher radiation dose is needed to achieve a comparable signal-to-noise ratio, and a slower scintillator results in a longer scanning time.

  18. Tilted cone-beam reconstruction with row-wise fan-to-parallel rebinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Jiang; Tang, Xiangyang

    2006-10-01

    Reconstruction algorithms for cone-beam CT have been the focus of many studies. Several exact and approximate reconstruction algorithms were proposed for step-and-shoot and helical scanning trajectories to combat cone-beam related artefacts. In this paper, we present a new closed-form cone-beam reconstruction formula for tilted gantry data acquisition. Although several algorithms were proposed in the past to combat errors induced by the gantry tilt, none of the algorithms addresses the scenario in which the cone-beam geometry is first rebinned to a set of parallel beams prior to the filtered backprojection. We show that the image quality advantages of the rebinned parallel-beam reconstruction are significant, which makes the development of such an algorithm necessary. Because of the rebinning process, the reconstruction algorithm becomes more complex and the amount of iso-centre adjustment depends not only on the projection and tilt angles, but also on the reconstructed pixel location. In this paper, we first demonstrate the advantages of the row-wise fan-to-parallel rebinning and derive a closed-form solution for the reconstruction algorithm for the step-and-shoot and constant-pitch helical scans. The proposed algorithm requires the 'warping' of the reconstruction matrix on a view-by-view basis prior to the backprojection step. We further extend the algorithm to the variable-pitch helical scans in which the patient table travels at non-constant speeds. The algorithm was tested extensively on both the 16- and 64-slice CT scanners. The efficacy of the algorithm is clearly demonstrated by multiple experiments.

  19. Effects of row-type, row-spacing, seeding rate, soil-type, and cultivar differences on soybean seed nutrition under US Mississippi Delta conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Management practices such as seeding rate (SR), planting date (PD), and row-type (RT: single- and twin-rows) may alter seed nutrition in soybean. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of SR and PD on soybean seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars) and mineral...

  20. [Weighted-averaging multi-planar reconstruction method for multi-detector row computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Mitsuhiro; Nishikawa, Keiichi; Sasaki, Keita; Kobayashi, Norio; Yama, Mitsuru; Sano, Tsukasa; Murakami, Shin-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Development of multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) has enabled three-dimensions (3D) scanning with minute voxels. Minute voxels improve spatial resolution of CT images. At the same time, however, they increase image noise. Multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) is one of effective 3D-image processing techniques. The conventional MPR technique can adjust slice thickness of MPR images. When a thick slice is used, the image noise is decreased. In this case, however, spatial resolution is deteriorated. In order to deal with this trade-off problem, we have developed the weighted-averaging multi-planar reconstruction (W-MPR) technique to control the balance between the spatial resolution and noise. The weighted-average is determined by the Gaussian-type weighting function. In this study, we compared the performance of W-MPR with that of conventional simple-addition-averaging MPR. As a result, we could confirm that W-MPR can decrease the image noise without significant deterioration of spatial resolution. W-MPR can adjust freely the weight for each slice by changing the shape of the weighting function. Therefore, W-MPR can allow us to select a proper balance of spatial resolution and noise and at the same time produce suitable MPR images for observation of targeted anatomical structures.

  1. Effect of sodium bicarbonate supplementation on 2000-m rowing performance.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Ruth M; Harris, Roger C; Martin, Dan; Smith, Perry; Macklin, Ben; Elliott-Sale, Kirsty J; Sale, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The ability to buffer H+ could be vital to exercise performance, as high concentrations of H+ contribute to the development of fatigue. The authors examined the effect of sodium bicarbonate (SB) supplementation on 2000-m rowing-ergometer performance. Twenty male rowers (age 23 ± 4 y, height 1.85 ± 0.08 m, mass 82.5 ± 8.9 kg, 2000-m personal-best time 409 ± 16 s) completed two 2000-m rowing-ergometer time trials, separated by 48 h. Participants were supplemented before exercise with 0.3 g/kg body mass of SB or a placebo (maltodextrin; PLA). The trials were conducted using a double-blinded, randomized, counterbalanced crossover study design. Time to complete the 2000-m and time taken for each 500-m split were recorded. Blood lactate, bicarbonate, pH, and base excess were determined preexercise, immediately postexercise, and 5 min postexercise. Performance data were analyzed using paired t tests, as well as magnitude-based inferences; hematological data were analyzed using a repeated-measures ANOVA. Using paired t tests, there was no benefit of SB over PLA (P = .095). However, using magnitude-based inferences there was a likely beneficial effect of SB compared with PLA (PLA 412.0 ± 15.1 s, SB 410.7 ± 14.9 s). Furthermore, SB was 0.5 ± 1.2 s faster than PLA in the third 500 m (P = .035; possibly beneficial) and 1.1 ± 1.7 s faster in the fourth 500 m (P = .004; very likely beneficial). All hematological data were different between SB and PLA and were different from preexercise to postexercise. SB supplementation is likely to be beneficial to the performance of those competing in 2000-m rowing events, particularly in the second half of the event.

  2. Functional results after proximal row carpectomy to salvage a wrist.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Thomas; Sauerbier, Michael; Trankle, Markus; Dragu, Adrian; Germann, Guenter; Baumeister, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Proximal row carpectomy is a movement-preserving procedure in the treatment of arthrosis of the wrist. We have retrospectively assessed the objective and subjective functional results after proximal row carpectomy. Assessment of outcome included measurement of range of movement (ROM), grip strength and self-assessment of pain relief with a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Disabilities of arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire. Results were graded using the Mayo and Krimmer wrist scores. Fourty-five patients (mean age 48 (30-67) years) were evaluated with a follow-up of 32 (8-115) months. Underlying conditions included: degenerative arthritis secondary to scapholunate advanced collapse deformity, or chronic scaphoid non-union (n=35), Kienbock disease stage III (n=4), chronic perilunate dislocation and fracture-dislocation (n=4), avascular necrosis of the scaphoid (n=1), and severe radiocarpal arthrosis secondary to distal radial fracture (n=1). Active ROM for wrist extension and flexion was 70 degrees and mean radial and ulnar deviation 30.8 degrees . Grip strength was 51% of the unaffected side. The average DASH score was 26. The intensity of the pain, measured by VAS, was reduced by 44% after strenuous activities and by 71% at rest. The Mayo and Krimmer wrist scores were 55 and 62 points indicating good results; 32 patients returned to work and 25 patients to their former occupation. Our results show that proximal row carpectomy is a technically easy operation that preserves a satisfying ROM and pain relief, and is recommended when the head of the capitate and the lunate fossa are not affected by arthrosis.

  3. The Energetic Assessment of Frictional Instability Based on Rowe's Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, M.; Muto, J.; Nagahama, H.

    2015-12-01

    Frictional instability that controls the occurrence of unstable slips has been related to (1) rate and state dependent friction law (Dieterich, 1979; Ruina, 1983) and (2) shear localization in a gouge layer (e.g., Byerlee et al., 1978; Logan et al., 1979). Ikari et al. (2011) indicated that the transitions of frictional parameters obtained from the rate and state dependent friction law involve shear localization. However, the underlining theoretical background for their link has been unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigate their relation theoretically and experimentally based on Rowe's theory on constant minimum energy ratio (Rowe, 1962) describing particle deformations quantitatively by energetic analysis. In theoretical analysis using analytical dynamics and irreversible thermodynamics, the energetic criterion about frictional instability is obtained; unstable slip occurs at energy ratios below 1. In friction experiments using a gas medium apparatus, simulated fault gouge deforms obeying the Rowe's theory. Additionally, the energy ratios change gradually with shear and show below 1 before the occurrence of unstable slip. Moreover, energy ratios are derived from volume changes. Transition of energy ratios from increase to decrease, which has been confirmed at the end of compaction, indicates the onset of volume increase toward the occurrence of unstable slip. The volume increases likely correspond to the formation of R1-shears with open mode character, which occurs prior to the unstable slip. Shear localization leads to a change in internal friction angle which is a statistical parameter to constitute a energy ratio. In short, changes in internal friction angle play an important role in evolving from being frictionally stable to unstable. From these results, the physical and energetic background for their link between the frictional parameter and shear localization becomes clear.

  4. Film cooling: case of double rows of staggered jets.

    PubMed

    Dorignac, E; Vullierme, J J; Noirault, P; Foucault, E; Bousgarbiès, J L

    2001-05-01

    An experimental investigation of film cooling of a wall in a case of double rows of staggered hot jets (65 degrees C) in an ambient air flow. The wall is heated at a temperature value between the one of the jets and the one of the main flow. Experiments have been carried out for different injection rates, the main flow velocity is maintained at 32 m/s. Association of the measures of temperature profiles by cold wire and the measures of wall temperature by infrared thermography allows us to describe the behaviour of the flows and to propose the best injection which assures a good cooling of the plate.

  5. 9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row of columns indicates the former location of the exterior mill wall before World War II era expansion. The unusual column and beam connection was a key part of the mill structural system patented by Providence, Rhode Island engineers Charles Praray and Charles Makepeace in 1894. Each column was originally located in the apex of triangular window bay, but not connected to the exterior wall. Modifications on the right side of each column support the beams of the addition. - Dixie Cotton Mill, 710 Greenville Street, La Grange, Troup County, GA

  6. Plant, soil, and shadow reflectance components of row crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, A. J.; Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Cuellar, J. A.; Gerbermann, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Data from the first Earth Resource Technology Satellite (LANDSAT-1) multispectral scanner (MSS) were used to develop three plant canopy models (Kubelka-Munk (K-M), regression, and combined K-M and regression models) for extracting plant, soil, and shadow reflectance components of cropped fields. The combined model gave the best correlation between MSS data and ground truth, by accounting for essentially all of the reflectance of plants, soil, and shadow between crop rows. The principles presented can be used to better forecast crop yield and to estimate acreage.

  7. Plant, soil, and shadow reflectance components of row crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, A. J.; Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Cuellar, J. A.; Gerbermann, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Data from the first Earth Resource Technology Satellite (LANDSAT-1) multispectral scanner (MSS) were used to develop three plant canopy models (Kubelka-Munk (K-M), regression, and combined K-M and regression models) for extracting plant, soil, and shadow reflectance components of cropped fields. The combined model gave the best correlation between MSS data and ground truth, by accounting for essentially all of the reflectance of plants, soil, and shadow between crop rows. The principles presented can be used to better forecast crop yield and to estimate acreage.

  8. Detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma: Comparison of multi-detector CT with digital subtraction angiography and Lipiodol CT

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao-Hua; Guan, Yong-Song; Zhou, Xiang-Ping; Huang, Juan; Sun, Long; Li, Xiao; Liu, Yuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of biphasic multi-detector row helical computed tomography (MDCT), digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and Lipiodol computed tomography (CT) in detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with nodular HCC underwent biphasic MDCT examination: hepatic arterial phase (HAP) 25 s and portal venous phase (PVP) 70 s after injection of the contrast medium (1.5 mL/kg). They also underwent hepatic angiography and intra-arterial infusion of iodized oil. Lipiodol CT was performed 3-4 wk after infusion. MDCT images were compared with DSA and Lipiodol CT images for detection of hepatic nodules. RESULTS: The three imaging techniques had the same sensitivity in detecting nodules >20 mm in diameter. There was no significant difference in the sensitivity among HAP-MDCT, Lipiodol CT and DSA for nodules of 10-20 mm in diameter. For the nodules <10 mm in diameter, HAP-MDCT identified 47, Lipiodol CT detected 27 (χ2 = 11.3, P = 0.005<0.01, HAP-MDCT vs Lipiodol CT) and DSA detected 16 (χ2 = 9.09, P = 0.005<0.01 vs Lipiodol CT and χ2 = 29.03, P = 0.005<0.01vs HAP-MDCT). However, six nodules <10 mm in diameter were detected only by Lipiodol CT. CONCLUSION: MDCT and Lipiodol CT are two complementary modalities. At present, MDCT does not obviate the need for DSA and subsequent Lipiodol CT as a preoperative examination for HCC. PMID:15633215

  9. Can Row Spacing Influence Arthropod Communities in Soybean? Implications for Early and Late Planting.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Amanda L; Zobel, Emily; Hinds, Jermaine; Rosario-Lebron, Armando; Hooks, Cerruti R R

    2015-06-01

    Row spacing in agricultural systems can influence crop yield as well as pest and predator abundances. Soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) growers in Maryland typically plant in narrow (∼19 cm), medium (∼38 cm), or wide (∼76 cm)-spaced rows, and there is a general lack of information on how these row-spacing schemes influence arthropod abundance and soybean yields. A study was conducted during two growing seasons to determine the effect of soybean row spacing and planting date (early and late) on soybean arthropods and yield. Despite a great deal of variation in arthropod responses to row spacing, and interactions between row spacing and study year, leaf-feeding herbivores were generally more abundant in narrow-spaced soybeans. All arthropod functional groups were more abundant, and yield was greater in early-planted soybeans relative to late-planted soybeans. Potential causes and implications of these finding are discussed.

  10. [Study of renal veins by multidetector-row computed tomography scans].

    PubMed

    Bouali, O; Mouttalib, S; Labarre, D; Munzer, C; Lopez, R; Lauwers, F; Moscovici, J

    2014-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of renal vein variants. To investigate the distribution of renal veins. We retrospectively reviewed spiral computed tomography (CT) scans of the abdomen performed during a two-month period. The same protocol was used for all CT scans: same multidetector-row CT scanner (Siemens(®)), 1 to 2-mm section thickness, injection of intravenous iomeprol. The study group included 121 patients, aged 21.7 to 93.4 years (mean age 60.9 ± 15.4 years). The sex ratio was 2/1, with 80 men and 41 women. Seventy-three percent of the study group (88 patients) had no variants of the renal veins. Indeed almost 40% (48 patients) had one artery and one vein on each side, with typical course, and 33% (40 patients) had course and/or number variants of the renal arteries. Variants of the right renal vein consisted in multiple veins in 20.6% (25 cases). We detected no case of multiple left renal veins, but we described variations of its course in 9.1% (11 cases): 5 cases of retroaortic left renal vein (4.1%) and 6 cases of circumaortic left renal vein (5%). Three of these 11 patients had an associated double right renal vein. The probability to have a right renal vein variant was significantly higher than a left one (OR = 2.6, P = 0.01). And we found a significantly higher risk of having a venous variant in women (OR = 2.4, P = 0.04). We detected no case of inferior vena cava variant. In our study, prevalence of a circum- or retroaortic left renal vein appeared higher than previously reported in the literature (9.1%). Knowledge of anatomical variants of renal vasculature is crucial and this study puts the emphasis on variations of course and number of renal vessels. Those variations are not so uncommon and should be known by radiologists and also by surgeons. Their knowledge has major clinical implications in practice and it contributes to the safety of renal and retroperitoneal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Dose response of caffeine on 2000-m rowing performance.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Tina L; Jenkins, David G; Coombes, Jeff S; Taaffe, Dennis R; Leveritt, Michael D

    2010-03-01

    To determine whether a dose-response relationship exists between caffeine and 2000-m rowing performance. In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study, 10 competitive male rowers (mean +/- SD: age = 20.6 +/- 1.4 yr, body mass = 87.7 +/- 10.5 kg, height = 186.8 +/- 6.8 cm, (.)VO2peak = 5.1 +/- 0.6 L x min(-1)) consumed 2, 4, or 6 mg x kg(-1) caffeine or a placebo 60 min before completing a 2000-m time trial on a rowing ergometer. The trials were preceded by a 24-h standardized diet (including a light preexercise meal of 2 g x kg(-1) CHO), and subjects were tested preexercise for hydration, caffeine abstinence, and blood glucose concentrations. Time trial performance was not significantly different across the three caffeine doses or placebo (P = 0.249). After the three caffeine trials, postexercise plasma glucose and lactate concentrations were higher compared with the placebo trial (P < 0.05). Plasma caffeine concentrations after 60 min of ingestion were lower than the values reported previously by others following the same dose, and there was considerable interindividual variation in plasma caffeine concentrations in response to the various caffeine doses. The large interindividual response to the caffeine doses suggests that individual characteristics need to be considered when administering caffeine for performance enhancement. In addition, preexercise feeding may significantly affect plasma caffeine concentrations and the potential for caffeine to improve performance.

  12. Development of Magnetorheological Resistive Exercise Device for Rowing Machine

    PubMed Central

    Žiliukas, Pranas

    2016-01-01

    Training equipment used by professional sportsmen has a great impact on their sport performance. Most universal exercisers may help only to improve the general physical condition due to the specific kinematics and peculiar resistance generated by their loading units. Training of effective techniques and learning of psychomotor skills are possible only when exercisers conform to the movements and resistance typical for particular sports kinematically and dynamically. Methodology of developing a magnetorheological resistive exercise device for generating the desired law of passive resistance force and its application in a lever-type rowing machine are described in the paper. The structural parameters of a controllable hydraulic cylinder type device were found by means of the computational fluid dynamics simulation performed by ANSYS CFX software. Parameters describing the magnetorheological fluid as non-Newtonian were determined by combining numerical and experimental research of the resistance force generated by the original magnetorheological damper. A structural scheme of the device control system was developed and the variation of the strength of magnetic field that affects the magnetorheological fluid circulating in the device was determined, ensuring a variation of the resistance force on the oar handle adequate for the resistance that occurs during a real boat rowing stroke. PMID:27293479

  13. Development of Magnetorheological Resistive Exercise Device for Rowing Machine.

    PubMed

    Grigas, Vytautas; Šulginas, Anatolijus; Žiliukas, Pranas

    2015-01-01

    Training equipment used by professional sportsmen has a great impact on their sport performance. Most universal exercisers may help only to improve the general physical condition due to the specific kinematics and peculiar resistance generated by their loading units. Training of effective techniques and learning of psychomotor skills are possible only when exercisers conform to the movements and resistance typical for particular sports kinematically and dynamically. Methodology of developing a magnetorheological resistive exercise device for generating the desired law of passive resistance force and its application in a lever-type rowing machine are described in the paper. The structural parameters of a controllable hydraulic cylinder type device were found by means of the computational fluid dynamics simulation performed by ANSYS CFX software. Parameters describing the magnetorheological fluid as non-Newtonian were determined by combining numerical and experimental research of the resistance force generated by the original magnetorheological damper. A structural scheme of the device control system was developed and the variation of the strength of magnetic field that affects the magnetorheological fluid circulating in the device was determined, ensuring a variation of the resistance force on the oar handle adequate for the resistance that occurs during a real boat rowing stroke.

  14. Women's religious conversions on death row: theorizing religion and state.

    PubMed

    Cooey, P M

    2002-01-01

    Most scholars of religion who approach the phenomena associated with religious conversion in order to theorize religion tend to ignore the legal and political implications of the actual context in which conversion occurs for theorizing religion itself. Meanwhile, political and legal theorists who attend to the implications of executing convicted murderers who undergo religious conversion on death row err in a different direction. They virtually ignore the significance of the claims made by the converts and their associates about the conversion themselves for theorizing the state. Scholars across disciplines increasingly address issues of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation in respect to theorizing religion and theorizing the state independently of one another. At the same time, they do not seize the opportunity to incorporate their analyses into a wider study of the sociocultural production of religion and state in relation to each other. I examine the religious conversion of Karla Faye Tucker and Wanda Jean Allen on death row, as well as the scholarship that their convictions, conversions, and executions have generated across academic disciplines and fields. Close examination illustrates well the necessity for theorizing religion and the state in relation to one another in order to understand either adequately.

  15. Directional reflectance factor distributions of a cotton row crop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Newcomb, W. W.; Schutt, J. B.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Jackson, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The directional reflectance factor distribution spanning the entire exitance hemisphere was measured for a cotton row crop (Gossypium barbadense L.) with 39 percent ground cover. Spectral directional radiances were taken in NOAA satellite 7 AVHRR bands 1 and 2 using a three-band radiometer with restricted 12 deg full angle field of view at half peak power points. Polar co-ordinate system plots of directional reflectance factor distributions and three-dimensional computer graphic plots of scattered flux were used to study the dynamics of the directional reflectance factor distribution as a function of spectral band, geometric structure of the scene, solar zenith and azimuth angles, and optical properties of the leaves and soil. The factor distribution of the incomplete row crops was highly polymodal relative to that for complete vegetation canopies. Besides the enhanced reflectance for the antisolar point, a reflectance minimum was observed towards the forwardscatter direction in the principle plane of the sun. Knowledge of the mechanics of the observed dynamics of the data may be used to provide rigorous validation for two- or three-dimensional radiative transfer models, and is important in interpreting aircraft and satellite data where the solar angle varies widely.

  16. Complete inclusion of adaptive rowing only 1000 m ahead.

    PubMed

    Smoljanovic, Tomislav; Bojanic, Ivan; Hannafin, Jo A; Urhausen, Axel; Theisen, Daniel; Seil, Romain; Lacoste, Alain

    2013-09-01

    Adaptive rowing (AR) at the Paralympic level is accessible for rowers with physical disability. AR was included for the first time in the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. Racing distance for all AR events is currently 1000 m, which impedes public recognition of this sport and leads to many organisational challenges during the inclusive World Rowing Championships. The aim of this report was to discuss the feasibility of increasing AR race distance to 2000 m from a sports injury and athletic health perspective. As limited data on injury and illness risks exist in AR, knowledge and experiences had to be taken from other Paralympic sports. The anticipated duration of 2000 m AR competitions is either comparable or considerably lower than that of the other Paralympic disciplines with similar characteristics. AR has inherent injury and health risks especially within thorax, shoulders and low back region, but they are not expected to be significantly modified by increased racing times. Specific considerations need to be taken into account for athletes with a spinal cord injury, like in other sport disciplines. There are no distinctive contra-indications for AR events of 2000 m based on the current literature review and a 10-year experience in this sport. Long-term follow-ups are needed to understand fully the injury and health risk associated with AR and to develop appropriate prevention strategies.

  17. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF BIOMECHANICS OF PROXIMAL ROW CARPAL INSTABILITY].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinhai; Huang, Fuguo

    2015-01-01

    To review the research progress of the biomechanics of proximal row carpal instability (IPRC). The related literature concerning IPRC was extensively reviewed. The biomechanical mechanism of the surrounding soft tissue in maintaining the stability of the proximal row carpal (PRC) was analyzed, and the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of the PRC were summarized from two aspects including basic biomechanics and clinical biomechanics. The muscles and ligaments of the PRC are critical to its stability. Most scholars have reached a consensus about biomechanical mechanism of the PRC, but there are still controversial conclusions on the biomechanics mechanism of the surrounding soft tissue to stability of distal radioulnar joint when the triangular fibrocartilage complex are damaged and the biomechanics mechanism of the scapholunate ligament. At present, there is no unified standard about the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of the PRC. So, it is difficult for clinical practice. Some strides have been made in the basic biomechanical study on muscle and ligament and clinical biomechanical study on the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of PRC, but it will be needed to further study the morphology of carpal articular surface and the adjacent articular surface, the pressure of distal carpals to proximal carpal and so on.

  18. Yankee Rowe isotopics benchmark using MCNP-XT

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Whitmer, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Yankee Rowe spent fuel isotopic data provides a valuable source to benchmark the burnup calculations as part of verification and validation (V and V) efforts for the TerraPower's Monte Carlo depletion code, MCNP-XT. A total of 71 fuel rods were selected in the Yankee Rowe isotopic measurements covering a burnup range up to 44 MWd/kg ({approx}4.4%) under both the asymptotic spectrum and the non-asymptotic spectrum. The MCNP-XT pin cell depletion provides a comparison against the asymptotic spectrum measurement; and full assembly depletion with 322 depletion materials provides comparisons against various non-asymptotic depletion conditions. All calculations are performed based on the recent ENDF/B-VII.O data. Furthermore, the Monte Carlo depletion uncertainties and biases were examined showing their effect as insignificant. The set of burnup calculations cover the scattered experimental measurements demonstrating excellent agreement with the measured values. This benchmark exercise demonstrates the depletion analysis capability of the MCNP-XT code and validates the low burnup range. (authors)

  19. Optimization of oar blade design for improved performance in rowing.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Nicholas; Gardner, Trevor N

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to find a more optimal blade design for rowing performance than the Big Blade, which has been shown to be less than optimal for propulsion. As well as the Big Blade, a flat Big Blade, a flat rectangular blade, and a rectangular blade with the same curvature and projected area as the Big Blade were tested in a water flume to determine their fluid dynamic characteristics at the full range of angles at which the oar blade might present itself to the water. Similarities were observed between the flat Big Blade and rectangular blades. However, the curved rectangular blade generated significantly more lift in the angle range 0-90 degrees than the curved Big Blade, although it was similar between 90 and 180 degrees. This difference was attributed to the shape of the upper and lower edges of the blade and their influence on the fluid flow around the blade. Although the influence of oar blade design on boat speed was not investigated here, the significant increases in fluid force coefficients for the curved rectangular blade suggest that this new oar blade design could elicit a practically significant improvement in rowing performance.

  20. Comparison of the Clinical and Radiological Oucomes of Conventional Double row and Double row Suture Bridge Repairs in Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Muiño, José María Silberberg; Gimenez, Martín Alejandro; Salvucci, Mauro Gabriel Maroa; Ferro, Diego; Rullan, Ramón Muiña; Blanchero, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To compare clinical and radiological results of two types of rotator cuff (RC) repairs: the double row and double row-suture bridge. Methods: Forty-two patients with a complete tear (medium and large size) of the RC were repaired by a double row arthroscopic technique. Minimum follow-up was 19 months (range, 19-28 months). Clinical outcomes were assessed by the Modified Constant Scale and satisfaction rate by an independent observer; VAS, UCLA and ASES. Radiological results were assed by a postoperative MRI by a musculoskeletal radiologist. Results: Series of 22 patients in the double row technique (Group A) and 20 patients in the double-row suture bridge (Gruop B). Statistically there was a significant improvement in the Constant Scale, satisfaction rate, muscle assessment, VAS, UCLA and ASES in both groups after the surgical procedure. There were no significant clinical differences between both groups at any time after the surgical procedure. According to MRI postop, 19/22 shoulders in Group A and 18/20 in Group B remained intact, with no significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion: RC repairs with double row and double-row-suture bridge techniques provide clinical and radiological good and excelent results. In our retrospective, mid-size study, we have found no differences between these two repair techniques.

  1. Muscle Synergies of Untrained Subjects during 6 min Maximal Rowing on Slides and Fixed Ergometer.

    PubMed

    Shaharudin, Shazlin; Zanotto, Damiano; Agrawal, Sunil

    2014-12-01

    The slides ergometer (SE) was an improvisation from fixed ergometer (FE) to bridge the gap of mechanics between ergometer rowing and on-water rowing. The specific mechanical constraints of these two types of ergometers may affect the pattern of muscle recruitment, coordination and adaptation. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the muscle synergy during 6 minutes maximal rowing on slides (SE) and fixed ergometers (FE). The laterality of muscle synergy was also examined. Surface electromyography activity, power output, heart rate, stroke length and stroke rate were analyzed from nine physically active subjects to assess the rowing performance. Physically active subjects, who were not specifically trained in rowing, were chosen to exclude the training effect on muscle synergy. Principal component analysis (PCA) with varimax rotation was applied to extract muscle synergy. Three muscle synergies were sufficient to explain the majority of variance in SE (94.4 ± 2.2 %) and FE (92.8 ± 1.7 %). Subjects covered more rowing distance, exerted greater power output and attained higher maximal heart rate during rowing on SE than on FE. The results proved the flexibility of muscle synergy to adapt to the mechanical constraints. Rowing on SE emphasized on bi-articular muscles contrary to rowing on FE which relied on cumulative effect of trunk and upper limb muscles during propulsive phase. Key pointsThree muscle synergies were extracted during maximal rowing on both fixed and slides ergometerUntrained subjects emphasized leg muscles while rowing on SEUntrained subjects focused on back muscles during FE rowing.

  2. Changes in Rowing Technique Over a Routine One Hour Low Intensity High Volume Training Session

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Hugh A.M.; Bull, Anthony M.J.; McGregor, Alison H.

    2008-01-01

    High volume low intensity training sessions such as one hour rowing ergometer sessions are frequently used to improve the fitness of elite rowers. Early work has suggested that technique may decline over this time period. This study sought to test the hypothesis that “elite rowers can maintain technique over a one hour rowing ergometer session”. An electromagnetic device, in conjunction with a load cell, was used to assess rowing technique in terms of force generation and spinal kinematics in six male elite sweep oarsmen (two competed internationally and the remainder at a club senior level). All subjects performed one hour of rowing on a Concept II indoor rowing ergometer using a stroke rate of 18-20 strokes per minute and a heart rate ranging between 130-150 beats per minute, following a brief 5 minute warm- up. Recordings of rowing technique and force were made every 10 minutes. The elite group of rowers were able to sustain their rowing technique and force parameters over the hour session. Subtle changes in certain parameters were observed including a fall in force output of approximately 10N after the first seven minutes of rowing, and a change in leg compression of three degrees at the end of the one hour rowing piece which corresponded with a small increase in anterior rotation of the pelvis. However, it is unclear if such changes reflect a “warm-up” effect or if they are indicative of early signs of fatigue. These findings suggest that low intensity high volume ergometer rowing sessions do not have a detrimental effect on the technique of a group of experienced and highly trained rowers. Key pointsElite rowers do not demonstrate changes in rowing kinematics over and hour rowing piece.Rowers require an adequate warm-up to establish their technique. PMID:24149955

  3. CT and MR imaging of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Splendiani, Alessandra; Barile, Antonio; Squillaci, Ettore; Di Cesare, Annamaria; Brunese, Luca; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At present time, both CT and MRI are valuable techniques in the study of the thoracic aorta. Nowadays, CT represents the most widely employed technique for the study of the thoracic aorta. The new generation CTs show sensitivities up to 100% and specificities of 98-99%. Sixteen and wider row detectors provide isotropic pixels, mandatory for the ineludible longitudinal reconstruction. The main limits are related to the X-ray dose expoure and the use of iodinated contrast media. MRI has great potential in the study of the thoracic aorta. Nevertheless, if compared to CT, acquisition times remain longer and movement artifact susceptibility higher. The main MRI disadvantages are claustrophobia, presence of ferromagnetic implants, pacemakers, longer acquisition times with respect to CT, inability to use contrast media in cases of renal insufficiency, lower spatial resolution and less availability than CT. CT is preferred in the acute aortic disease. Nevertheless, since it requires iodinated contrast media and X-ray exposure, it may be adequately replaced by MRI in the follow up of aortic diseases. The main limitation of MRI, however, is related to the scarce visibility of stents and calcifications. PMID:28352783

  4. 7 CFR 718.108 - Measuring acreage including skip row acreage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FARM MARKETING QUOTAS, ACREAGE ALLOTMENTS, AND PRODUCTION ADJUSTMENT PROVISIONS... production planting techniques. (d) The Deputy Administrator has the discretionary authority to allow row...

  5. Muscle synergies during incremental rowing VO2max test of collegiate rowers and untrained subjects.

    PubMed

    Shaharudin, Shazlin; Agrawal, Sunil

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the muscle synergies during incremental rowing VO2 max Test of collegiate rowers and untrained subjects. As a power endurance sport, high aerobic capacity was one of the determinants of rowing performance. The modulation of muscle recruitment patterns following specific physiological demands was an indication of the robustness of muscle synergies composition which was overlooked in previous studies. Ten male collegiate rowers and physically active untrained subjects were recruited. Muscle synergies were extracted from 16 rowing-specific muscles using Principal Component Analysis with varimax rotation. Incremental rowing VO2 max Test was performed on slides ergometer (SE). Rowing performance and physiological variables were analyzed. Rowers exerted greater power output, more energy expenditure and better rowing economy compared to untrained subjects. Rowers preferred to row slower with longer strokes compared to the untrained subjects. Three muscle synergies with high indices of similarity of waveform patterns were extracted in both groups. Significant association was found between muscle synergies and rowing economy. The findings of this study showed that muscle synergies were robust during aerobic-dominant activity for collegiate rowers and untrained subjects. Rowers and coaches could utilize the findings by emphasizing on muscle coordination training, which may enhance the rowing economy.

  6. Heat Transfer, Adiabatic Effectiveness and Injectant Distributions Downstream of Single Rows and Two Staggered Rows of Film-Cooling Holes with Simple and Compound Angles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    ROWS AND TWO STAGGERED ROWS OF FILM-COOLING HOLES WITH SIMPLE AND COMPOUND ANGLES 92-01241 by DIII l, p111111~ 11I Stephen Mark Jackson DECEMBER 1991...HOLES WITH SIMPLE AND COMPOUND ANGLES 12. PERSONAL AUTHORS STEPHEN MARK JACKSON 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year. A4int, Day...Rows of Film-Cooling Holes with Simple and Compound Angles by Stephen Mark Jackson lieutenant, United States Navy B.S., United States Naval Academy, 1983

  7. Triple-Loaded Single-Row Versus Suture-Bridge Double-Row Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair With Platelet-Rich Plasma Fibrin Membrane: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Barber, F Alan

    2016-05-01

    To compare the structural healing and clinical outcomes of triple-loaded single-row with suture-bridging double-row repairs of full-thickness rotator cuff tendons when both repair constructs are augmented with platelet-rich plasma fibrin membrane. A prospective, randomized, consecutive series of patients diagnosed with full-thickness rotator cuff tears no greater than 3 cm in anteroposterior length were treated with a triple-loaded single-row (20) or suture-bridging double-row (20) repair augmented with platelet-rich plasma fibrin membrane. The primary outcome measure was cuff integrity by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 12 months postoperatively. Secondary clinical outcome measures were American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Rowe, Simple Shoulder Test, Constant, and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation scores. The mean MRI interval was 12.6 months (range, 12-17 months). A total of 3 of 20 single-row repairs and 3 of 20 double-row repairs (15%) had tears at follow-up MRI. The single-row group had re-tears in 1 single tendon repair and 2 double tendon repairs. All 3 tears failed at the original attachment site (Cho type 1). In the double-row group, re-tears were found in 3 double tendon repairs. All 3 tears failed medial to the medial row near the musculotendinous junction (Cho type 2). All clinical outcome measures were significantly improved from the preoperative level (P < .0001), but there was no statistical difference between groups postoperatively. There is no MRI difference in rotator cuff tendon re-tear rate at 12 months postsurgery between a triple-loaded single-row repair or a suture-bridging double-row repair when both are augmented with platelet-rich plasma fibrin membrane. No difference could be demonstrated between these repairs on clinical outcome scores. I, Prospective randomized study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  8. Noninvasive coronary angiography by 320-row computed tomography with lower radiation exposure and maintained diagnostic accuracy: comparison of results with cardiac catheterization in a head-to-head pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Marc; Zimmermann, Elke; Deissenrieder, Florian; Laule, Michael; Dübel, Hans-Peter; Schlattmann, Peter; Knebel, Fabian; Rutsch, Wolfgang; Hamm, Bernd

    2009-09-08

    Noninvasive coronary angiography with the use of multislice computed tomography (CT) scanners is feasible with high sensitivity and negative predictive value; however, the radiation exposure associated with this technique is rather high. We evaluated coronary angiography using whole-heart 320-row CT, which avoids exposure-intensive overscanning and overranging. A total of 30 consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease referred for clinically indicated conventional coronary angiography (CCA) were included in this prospective intention-to-diagnose study. CT was performed with the use of up to 320 simultaneous detector rows before same-day CCA, which, together with quantitative analysis, served as the reference standard. The per-patient sensitivity and specificity for CT compared with CCA were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 72 to 100) and 94% (95% CI, 73 to 100), respectively. Per-vessel versus per-segment sensitivity and specificity were 89% (95% CI, 62 to 98) and 96% (95% CI, 90 to 99) versus 78% (95% CI, 56 to 91) and 98% (95% CI, 96 to 99), respectively. Interobserver agreement between the 2 readers was significantly better for CCA (97% of 121 coronary arteries) than for CT (90%; P=0.04). Percent diameter stenosis determined with the use of CT showed good correlation with CCA (P<0.001, R=0.81) without significant underestimation or overestimation (-3.1+/-24.4%; P=0.08). Intraindividual comparison of CT with CCA revealed a significantly smaller effective radiation dose (median, 4.2 versus 8.5 mSv; P<0.05) and amount of contrast agent required (median, 80 versus 111 mL; P<0.001) for 320-row CT. The majority of patients (87%) indicated that they would prefer CT over CCA for future diagnostic imaging (P<0.001). CT with the use of emerging technology has the potential to significantly reduce the radiation dose and amount of contrast agent required compared with CCA while maintaining high diagnostic accuracy.

  9. CT appearance of splenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  10. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  11. Proximal row carpectomy: minimum 20-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B; Didonna, Michael L; Kiefhaber, Thomas R; Stern, Peter J

    2013-08-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is a motion-sparing procedure for degenerative disorders of the proximal carpal row. Reported results at a minimum 10-year follow-up consistently show maintenance of strength, motion, and satisfaction with an average conversion rate to radiocarpal arthrodesis of 12%. We hypothesized that PRC would continue to provide a high level of satisfaction and function at a minimum of 20 years. Seventeen wrists in 16 patients, including 7 laborers, underwent PRC for symptomatic degenerative disorders of the proximal carpal row at an average age of 36 years. Patients returned for radiographic and clinical evaluation, and the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) questionnaire and Patient-Related Wrist Evaluation were used for subjective assessment. Follow-up was a minimum of 20 years (average, 24 y). Eleven wrists (65%) underwent no further surgery at a minimum 20-year follow-up. The average time to failure of PRC, defined as the time from PRC to radiocarpal arthrodesis, was 11 years (range, 8 mo to 20 y). Ten of 11 patients who did not undergo radiocarpal arthrodesis continued to be satisfied, with minimal decrease in motion and grip strength compared with the uninvolved side. Average score for QuickDASH was 16 and for Patient-Related Wrist Evaluation was 26. The flexion-extension arc was 68°, and grip strength was 72% of the contralateral side. All patients returned to their original employment. There was no correlation between degenerative radiographic changes and satisfaction level. The predicted probability of failure revealed a higher risk in patients who underwent PRC at a younger age, which leveled off at age 40 years. PRC provides satisfaction at a minimum of 20 years with a survival rate of 65%. Whereas we recommend a minimum age for PRC between 35 and 40 years, young patients should not be excluded as PRC candidates; these patients should undergo appropriate preoperative counseling of their increased failure risk

  12. Assessment of Renal Function in Patients with Unilateral Ureteral Obstruction Using Whole-Organ Perfusion Imaging with 320-Detector Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Juan; Feng, You-Zhen; Xian, Zhao-Hui; Yang, Wen-Cai; Mo, Xu-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructed nephropathy is a common complication of several disease processes. Accurate evaluation of the functional status of the obstructed kidney is important to achieve a good outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate renal cortical and medullary perfusion changes associated with unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) using whole-organ perfusion imaging with 320-detector row computed tomography (CT). Methodology/Principle Findings Sixty-four patients with UUO underwent whole-organ CT perfusion imaging. Patients were divided into 3 groups, mild, moderate, and severe, based on hydronephrosis severity. Twenty sex- and age-matched patients without renal disease, who referred to abdominal CT, were chosen as control subjects. Mean cortical and medullary perfusion parameters of obstructed and contralateral kidneys were compared, and mean perfusion ratios between obstructed and contralateral kidneys were calculated and compared. Mean cortical or medullary blood flow (BF) and blood volume (BV) of the obstructed kidneys in the moderate UUO and BF, BV, and clearance (CL) in the severe UUO were significantly lower than those of the contralateral kidneys (p < 0.05). The mean cortical or medullary BF of the obstructed kidney in the moderate UUO, and BF, BV, and CL in the severe UUO were significantly lower than those of the kidneys in control subjects (p < 0.05). Mean cortical or medullary BF of the non-obstructed kidneys in the severe UUO were statistically greater than that of normal kidneys in control subjects (p < 0.05). An inverse correlation was observed between cortical and medullary perfusion ratios and grades of hydronephosis (p < 0.01). Conclusions/Significance Perfusion measurements of the whole kidney can be obtained with 320-detector row CT, and estimated perfusion ratios have potential for quantitatively evaluating UUO renal injury grades. PMID:25874690

  13. Role of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer; comparison with multidetector row computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Ergul, N; Gundogan, C; Tozlu, M; Toprak, H; Kadıoglu, H; Aydin, M; Cermik, T F

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to analyze the contribution of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) imaging to the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer compared with multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). We retrospectively scanned the data of 52 patients who were referred for FDG PET/CT imaging for evaluation of pancreatic lesions greater than 10mm. The diagnostic performances of 4 imaging methods and the impact of PET/CT on the management of pancreatic cancer were defined. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in 33 of 52 patients (63%), 15 patients had benign diseases of pancreas (29%), and 4 patients were normal (8%). Sensitivity and NPV of EUS and PET/CT were equal (100%) and higher than MDCT and MRI. Specificity, PPV and NPV of PET/CT were significantly higher than MDCT. However, sensitivities of two imaging methods were not significantly different. There was no significant difference between PET/CT and MRI and EUS for these values. When the cut-off value of SUVmax was 3.2, the most effective sensitivity and specificity values were obtained. PET/CT contributed to the management of pancreatic cancer in 30% of patients. FDG PET/CT is a valuable imaging method for the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer, especially when applied along with EUS as first line diagnostic tools. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  14. Configuring bonds between first-row transition metals.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Reed J; Clouston, Laura J; Lu, Connie C

    2015-11-17

    Alfred Werner, who pioneered the field of coordination chemistry, envisioned coordination complexes as a single, transition metal atom at the epicenter of a vast ligand space. The idea that the locus of a coordination complex could be shared by multiple metals held together with covalent bonds would eventually lead to the discovery of the quadruple and quintuple bond, which have no analogues outside of the transition metal block. Metal-metal bonding can be classified into homometallic and heterometallic groups. Although the former is dominant, the latter is arguably more intriguing because of the inherently larger chemical space in which metal-metal bonding can be explored. In 2013, Lu and Thomas independently reported the isolation of heterometallic multiple bonds with exclusively first-row transition metals. Structural and theoretical data supported triply bonded Fe-Cr and Fe-V cores. This Account describes our continued efforts to configure bonds between first-row transition metals from titanium to copper. Double-decker ligands, or binucleating platforms that brace two transition metals in proximity, have enabled the modular synthesis of diverse metal-metal complexes. The resulting complexes are also ideal for investigating the effects of an "ancillary" metal on the properties and reactivities of an "active" metal center. A total of 38 bimetallic complexes have been compiled comprising 18 unique metal-metal pairings. Twenty-one of these bimetallics are strictly isostructural, allowing for a systematic comparison of metal-metal bonding. The nature of the chemical bond between first-row metals is remarkably variable and depends on two primary factors: the total d-electron count, and the metals' relative d-orbital energies. Showcasing the range of covalent bonding are a quintuply bonded (d-d)(10) Mn-Cr heterobimetallic and the singly bonded late-late pairings, e.g., Fe-Co, which adopt unusually high spin states. A long-term goal is to rationally tailor the

  15. Design and testing of a tandem row pump inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etter, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The design and testing of a tandem row pump inducer having a supercavitating first stage with a 0.60 hub ratio is presented. The second stage tested was a helical impeller with a 0.70 hub ratio. A cubic arc transition was utilized to accomplish the hub change. The first stage had two blades and the free-vortex design approach was empirically modified based on previous experience. The recommended second stage design having four blades and using cambered blade section is presented but the model was not built or tested. The more simple helix was built instead to reduce cost. Data taken included head generation, cavitation observations and unsteady head fluctuations over the 0-100Hz range.

  16. Transfer of Complex Skill Learning from Virtual to Real Rowing

    PubMed Central

    Rauter, Georg; Sigrist, Roland; Koch, Claudio; Crivelli, Francesco; van Raai, Mark; Riener, Robert; Wolf, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Simulators are commonly used to train complex tasks. In particular, simulators are applied to train dangerous tasks, to save costs, and to investigate the impact of different factors on task performance. However, in most cases, the transfer of simulator training to the real task has not been investigated. Without a proof for successful skill transfer, simulators might not be helpful at all or even counter-productive for learning the real task. In this paper, the skill transfer of complex technical aspects trained on a scull rowing simulator to sculling on water was investigated. We assume if a simulator provides high fidelity rendering of the interactions with the environment even without augmented feedback, training on such a realistic simulator would allow similar skill gains as training in the real environment. These learned skills were expected to transfer to the real environment. Two groups of four recreational rowers participated. One group trained on water, the other group trained on a simulator. Within two weeks, both groups performed four training sessions with the same licensed rowing trainer. The development in performance was assessed by quantitative biomechanical performance measures and by a qualitative video evaluation of an independent, blinded trainer. In general, both groups could improve their performance on water. The used biomechanical measures seem to allow only a limited insight into the rowers' development, while the independent trainer could also rate the rowers' overall impression. The simulator quality and naturalism was confirmed by the participants in a questionnaire. In conclusion, realistic simulator training fostered skill gains to a similar extent as training in the real environment and enabled skill transfer to the real environment. In combination with augmented feedback, simulator training can be further exploited to foster motor learning even to a higher extent, which is subject to future work. PMID:24376518

  17. Biomechanical Performance of Medial Row Suture Placement Relative to the Musculotendinous Junction in Transosseous Equivalent Suture Bridge Double-Row Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Virk, Mandeep S; Bruce, Benjamin; Hussey, Kristen E; Thomas, Jacqueline M; Luthringer, Tyler A; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Wang, Vincent M; Verma, Nikhil N; Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J

    2017-02-01

    To compare the biomechanical performance of medial row suture placement relative to the musculotendinous junction (MTJ) in a cadaveric transosseous equivalent suture bridge (TOE-SB) double-row (DR) rotator cuff repair (RCR) model. A TOE-SB DR technique was used to reattach experimentally created supraspinatus tendon tears in 9 pairs of human cadaveric shoulders. The medial row sutures were passed either near the MTJ (MTJ group) or 10 mm lateral to the MTJ (rotator cuff tendon [RCT] group). After the supraspinatus repair, the specimens underwent cyclic loading and load to failure tests. The localized displacement of the markers affixed to the tendon surface was measured with an optical tracking system. The MTJ group showed a significantly higher (P = .03) medial row failure (5/9; 3 during cyclic testing and 2 during load to failure testing) compared with the RCT group (0/9). The mean number of cycles completed during cyclic testing was lower in the MTJ group (77) compared with the RCT group (100; P = .07) because 3 specimens failed in the MTJ group during cyclic loading. There were no significant differences between the 2 study groups with respect to biomechanical properties during the load to failure testing. In a cadaveric TOE-SB DR RCR model, medial row sutures through the MTJ results in a significantly higher rate of medial row failure. In rotator cuff tears with tendon tissue loss, passage of medial row sutures through the MTJ should be avoided in a TOE-SB RCR technique because of the risk of medial row failure. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Rowing increases stroke volume and cardiac output to a greater extent than cycling.

    PubMed

    Horn, P; Ostadal, P; Ostadal, B

    2015-01-01

    Exercise stimulates increases in heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). These adaptive mechanisms are strongly dependent on the type of exercise. Both rowing and cycling are widely used for physical training worldwide; however, evidence regarding the differences in major hemodynamic parameters during rowing and cycling remains insufficient. Ten healthy male volunteers were randomly assigned to perform either a rowing or cycling exercise. After 20 min rest, the group who had rowed first performed the cycling exercise and vice versa. Exercise was performed at a power-to-weight ratio of 2 W/kg for 2 min. HR, SV, CO and blood pressure (BP) were measured noninvasively using pulse-wave analysis at baseline and immediately after each exercise. HR, SV and CO were significantly higher after exercise than at rest. Whereas HR was comparable between rowing and cycling, SV and CO were significantly higher after rowing than after cycling. BP was comparable among all three measurements. Rowing increased SV and CO to a greater extent than cycling, whereas HR and BP were not influenced by the type of exercise. Our data suggest that rowing leads to more extensive stimulation of cardiac contractility and/or decreases in peripheral vascular resistance compared with cycling.

  19. STS-42 Commander Grabe uses DTO 653 MK1 Rowing Machine on OV-103's middeck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-01-30

    STS042-05-037 (30 Jan 1992) --- Astronaut Ronald J. Grabe, STS-42 commander, exercises using MK1 Rowing Machine on the middeck of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. Grabe is using the exercise device as part of Development Test Objective (DTO) 653, Evaluation of MK1 Rowing Machine. The forward lockers appear at Grabe's right and the sleep station behind him.

  20. A parallel row-based algorithm for standard cell placement with integrated error control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Jeff S.; Banerjee, Prith

    1989-01-01

    A new row-based parallel algorithm for standard-cell placement targeted for execution on a hypercube multiprocessor is presented. Key features of this implementation include a dynamic simulated-annealing schedule, row-partitioning of the VLSI chip image, and two novel approaches to control error in parallel cell-placement algorithms: (1) Heuristic Cell-Coloring; (2) Adaptive Sequence Length Control.

  1. The effects of color plastic mulches and row covers on the growth and yield of okra

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Okra [Abelmoschus esculentus (l.) Moench'Clemson Spineless'] was grown on an Orangeburg sandy loam soil in shorter, AL. Okra was direct seeded in single rows. The experiment consisted of twelve experimental treatments as follows: (1) Black plastic mulch (BPM) + spunbonded row cover (RC), (2) BPM, (3...

  2. Effects of an Aerobic Rowing Training Regimen in Young Adults with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varela, Ana Maria; Sardinha, Luis Bettencount; Pitetti, Kenneth H.

    2001-01-01

    Eight young adult males with Down syndrome received a 16-week rowing ergometry training regimen. Following training, no changes in cardiovascular fitness were found but participants did achieve significantly higher levels of work performance on both treadmill and rowing ergometer tests than did a control group. (Contains references.) (Author/DB)

  3. Plastic Mulches and Row Covers on the grow and production of Summer Squash.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Summer squash [Cucurbita pepo (L) ‘Prelude II’] was grown on an Orangeburg sandy loam soil in Shorter, AL. The summer squash was direct seeded in single rows. The experiment consisted of twelve experimental treatments as follows: (1) Black plastic mulch (BPM) + spunbonded row cover (RC), (2) BPM, (...

  4. 77 FR 15597 - Special Local Regulation; USAT Triathlon/Race Rowing Competition; Black Warrior River; Tuscaloosa...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... The University of Alabama Women's rowing team is sponsoring a Race Rowing Competition between the... or copying at the Docket Management Facility (M-30), U.S. Department of Transportation, West Building...., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays; and U.S. Coast Guard Sector Mobile (spw), Building...

  5. Implements and cultivation frequency to improve in-row weed control in organic peanut production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weed control in organic peanut production is difficult and costly, which limits expansion of the production system. Sweep cultivation in the row middles is effective, but weeds remain in the crop row causing yield loss. Research trials were conducted in Tifton, GA to evaluate implements and freque...

  6. 33 CFR 100.724 - Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. 100.724 Section 100.724 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.724 Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. (a) Definitions. (1) Regulated area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah...

  7. 33 CFR 100.724 - Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. 100.724 Section 100.724 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.724 Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. (a) Definitions. (1) Regulated area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah...

  8. 33 CFR 100.724 - Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. 100.724 Section 100.724 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.724 Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. (a) Definitions. (1) Regulated area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah...

  9. 33 CFR 100.724 - Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. 100.724 Section 100.724 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.724 Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. (a) Definitions. (1) Regulated area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah...

  10. STS-42 Commander Grabe uses DTO 653 MK1 Rowing Machine on OV-103's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 Commander Ronald J. Grabe exercises using MK1 Rowing Machine on the middeck of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. Grabe is using the exercise device as part of Development Test Objective (DTO) 653, Evaluation of MK1 Rowing Machine. The forward lockers appear at Grabe's right and the sleep station behind him.

  11. Building Generalized Inverses of Matrices Using Only Row and Column Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Most students complete their first and only course in linear algebra with the understanding that a real, square matrix "A" has an inverse if and only if "rref"("A"), the reduced row echelon form of "A", is the identity matrix I[subscript n]. That is, if they apply elementary row operations via the Gauss-Jordan algorithm to the partitioned matrix…

  12. Single- and double-row repair for rotator cuff tears - biology and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Vasta, Sebastiano; Zampogna, Biagio; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    We critically review the existing studies comparing the features of single- and double-row repair, and discuss suggestions about the surgical indications for the two repair techniques. All currently available studies comparing the biomechanical, clinical and the biological features of single and double row. Biomechanically, the double-row repair has greater performances in terms of higher initial fixation strength, greater footprint coverage, improved contact area and pressure, decreased gap formation, and higher load to failure. Results of clinical studies demonstrate no significantly better outcomes for double-row compared to single-row repair. Better results are achieved by double-row repair for larger lesions (tear size 2.5-3.5 cm). Considering the lack of statistically significant differences between the two techniques and that the double row is a high cost and a high surgical skill-dependent technique, we suggest using the double-row technique only in strictly selected patients. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Spray deposition inside multiple-row nursery trees with a laser-guided sprayer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multiple-row container-grown trees require specially designed sprayers to achieve efficient spray delivery quality. A five-port air-assisted sprayer with both automatic and manual control modes was developed to discharge adequate spray deposition inside multiple-row tree plants. The sprayer resulted...

  14. Building Generalized Inverses of Matrices Using Only Row and Column Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Most students complete their first and only course in linear algebra with the understanding that a real, square matrix "A" has an inverse if and only if "rref"("A"), the reduced row echelon form of "A", is the identity matrix I[subscript n]. That is, if they apply elementary row operations via the Gauss-Jordan algorithm to the partitioned matrix…

  15. Inter-row evapotranspiration in arid and humid wine-grape vineyards

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The architecture of wine-grape vineyards is characterized by tall plants (approx. 1.5 m) and widely spaced rows (approx. 3 m). This wide row spacing, developed to allow sunlight interception, air flow, and field operations, creates a complex system for water and energy budgets. Because of the wide r...

  16. Assessment of modification factors for a row of bolts or timber connectors

    Treesearch

    Thomas Lee Wilkinson

    1980-01-01

    When bolts or timber connectors are used in a row, with load applied parallel to the row, load will be unequally distributed among the fasteners. This study assessed methods of predicting this unequal load distribution, looked at how joint variables can affect the distribution, and compared the predictions with data existing in the literature. Presently used design...

  17. Radiometer footprint model to estimate sunlit and shaded components for row crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper describes a geometric model for computing the relative proportion of sunlit vegetation, shaded vegetation, sunlit soil, and shaded soil appearing in a circular or elliptical radiometer footprint for row crops, where the crop rows were modeled as continuous ellipses. The model was validate...

  18. Biomechanical advantages of triple-loaded suture anchors compared with double-row rotator cuff repairs.

    PubMed

    Barber, F Alan; Herbert, Morley A; Schroeder, F Alexander; Aziz-Jacobo, Jorge; Mays, Matthew M; Rapley, Jay H

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the strength and suture-tendon interface security of various suture anchors triply and doubly loaded with ultrahigh-molecular weight polyethylene-containing sutures and to evaluate the relative effectiveness of placing these anchors in a single-row or double-row arrangement by cyclic loading and then destructive testing. The infraspinatus muscle was reattached to the original humeral footprint by use of 1 of 5 different repair patterns in 40 bovine shoulders. Two single-row repairs and three double-row repairs were tested. High-strength sutures were used for all repairs. Five groups were studied: group 1, 2 triple-loaded screw suture anchors in a single row with simple stitches; group 2, 2 triple-loaded screw anchors in a single row with simple stitches over a fourth suture passed perpendicularly ("rip-stop" stitch); group 3, 2 medial and 2 lateral screw anchors with a single vertical mattress stitch passed from the medial anchors and 2 simple stitches passed from the lateral anchors; group 4, 2 medial double-loaded screw anchors tied in 2 mattress stitches and 2 push-in lateral anchors capturing the medial sutures in a "crisscross" spanning stitch; and group 5, 2 medial double-loaded screw anchors tied in 2 mattress stitches and 2 push-in lateral anchors creating a "suture-bridge" stitch. The specimens were cycled between 10 and 180 N at 1.0 Hz for 3,500 cycles or until failure. Endpoints were cyclic loading displacement (5 and 10 mm), total displacement, and ultimate failure load. A single row of triply loaded anchors was more resistant to stretching to a 5- and 10-mm gap than the double-row repairs with or without the addition of a rip-stop suture (P < .05). The addition of a rip-stop stitch made the repair more resistant to gap formation than a double row repair (P < .05). The crisscross double row created by 2 medial double-loaded suture anchors and 2 lateral push-in anchors stretched more than any other group (P < .05). Double-row repairs with

  19. Clinical significance of multidetector-row computed tomography in breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Doihara, Hiroyoshi; Fujita, Takeo; Takabatake, Daisuke; Takahashi, Hirotoshi; Ogasawara, Yutaka; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Several reports support the association of higher ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence rates with positive or intermediate margins compared with negative pathologic margins. Precise evaluation of tumor extension and adequate surgical margin are important factors affecting tumor recurrence after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Many studies have reported the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosing the tumor extension of breast cancer, but few have evaluated the utility of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). The results of this study show the clinical significance of MDCT for detecting cancer extension and demonstrate the clinical role of MDCT in BCS. Subjects comprised 136 patients grouped into two categories based on whether or not tumor extension was evaluated with MDCT preoperatively. The positive surgical margin rate and breast conservation rate were analyzed in each group and the clinical role of MDCT in BCS was evaluated. Moreover, evaluation of intraductal extension was done both with MDCT and histologically, and computed tomography (CT)-pathologic correlations were examined retrospectively. Finally, the margin-positive cases were analyzed in relation to their clinical characteristics. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for detection of the intraductal component were 71.8%, 85.7%, 82.1%, and 76.9%, respectively. The positive surgical margin rate and conservation rate are 7.46% and 81.9%, respectively, for those who were diagnosed with MDCT preoperatively; their corresponding rates without MDCT were 16.67% and 67.9%. Most margin-positive patients have remarkable lymphatic space invasion. Positive surgical margins were often recognized toward the nipple. For diagnosing the intraductal extension, MDCT shows sufficient diagnosability. Moreover, MDCT can provide appropriate information for the determination of adequate surgical margins and contribute to increases in breast conservation

  20. Positive ions of the first- and second-row transition metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical dissociation energies for the first- and second-row transition metal hydride positive ions are critically compared against recent experimental values obtained from ion beam reactive scattering methods. Theoretical spectroscopic parameters and dipole moments are presented for the ground and several low-lying excited states. The calculations employ large Gaussian basis sets and account for electron correlation using the single-reference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction and coupled-pair-functional methods. The Darwin and mass-velocity contributions to the relativistic energy are included in the all-electron calculations on the first-row systems using first-order perturbation theory, and in the second-row systems using the Hay and Wadt relativistic effective core potentials. The theoretical D(0) values for the second-row transition metal hydride positive ions should provide a critical measure of the experimental values, which are not as refined as many of those in the first transition row.

  1. Significance of agricultural row structure on the microwave emissivity of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Promes, P. M.; Jackson, T. J.; O'Neill, P. E.

    1987-01-01

    A series of field experiments was carried out to extend the data base available for verifying agricultural row effect models of emissivity. The row effects model was used to simulate a data base from which an algorithm could be developed to account for row effects when the scene dielectric constant and small-scale roughness are unknown. One objective of the study was to quantify the significance of row structure and to develop a practical procedure for removing the effects of periodic row structure on the microwave emissivity of a soil in order to use the emissivity values to estimate the soil moisture. A second objective was to expand the data set available for model verification through field observations using a truck-mounted 1.4-GHz microwave radiometer.

  2. Don't rock the boat: how antiphase crew coordination affects rowing.

    PubMed

    de Brouwer, Anouk J; de Poel, Harjo J; Hofmijster, Mathijs J

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that crew rowing requires perfect synchronization between the movements of the rowers. However, a long-standing and somewhat counterintuitive idea is that out-of-phase crew rowing might have benefits over in-phase (i.e., synchronous) rowing. In synchronous rowing, 5 to 6% of the power produced by the rower(s) is lost to velocity fluctuations of the shell within each rowing cycle. Theoretically, a possible way for crews to increase average boat velocity is to reduce these fluctuations by rowing in antiphase coordination, a strategy in which rowers perfectly alternate their movements. On the other hand, the framework of coordination dynamics explicates that antiphase coordination is less stable than in-phase coordination, which may impede performance gains. Therefore, we compared antiphase to in-phase crew rowing performance in an ergometer experiment. Nine pairs of rowers performed a two-minute maximum effort in-phase and antiphase trial at 36 strokes min(-1) on two coupled free-floating ergometers that allowed for power losses to velocity fluctuations. Rower and ergometer kinetics and kinematics were measured during the trials. All nine pairs easily acquired antiphase rowing during the warm-up, while one pair's coordination briefly switched to in-phase during the maximum effort trial. Although antiphase interpersonal coordination was indeed less accurate and more variable, power production was not negatively affected. Importantly, in antiphase rowing the decreased power loss to velocity fluctuations resulted in more useful power being transferred to the ergometer flywheels. These results imply that antiphase rowing may indeed improve performance, even without any experience with antiphase technique. Furthermore, it demonstrates that although perfectly synchronous coordination may be the most stable, it is not necessarily equated with the most efficient or optimal performance.

  3. Coordinated movement of the three rows of outer hair cells is essential for cochlear amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakoshi, Michio; Suzuki, Sho; Wada, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The process known as cochlear amplification is realized by coordinated movement of the outer hair cells (OHCs) in response to changes in their membrane potential. In this process, the displacement amplitude of the basilar membrane (BM) is thought to be increased, thereby leading to the high sensitivity, wide dynamic range and sharp frequency selectivity of our hearing. Unfortunately, however, OHCs are vulnerable to noise exposure, ototoxic acid, aging and so on. Previous studies have shown that exposure to intense noise causes functional loss of OHCs from the innermost row (i.e., close to the modiolus) to the outermost row (i.e., close to the cochlear wall). On the contrary, by other traumatic stimuli such as ototoxic acid, aging and ischemia, such loss of OHCs has been reported to occur from the outermost row toward the innermost row. However, how the cochlear amplification changes when coordinated movement of OHCs is impaired, that is when the OHCs in one, two or all three rows have become dysfunctional, remains unclear. In the present study, therefore, a finite element (FE) model of the gerbil cochlea, which takes the motility of OHCs into account, was developed based on our previous FE model. Using this model, changes in the displacement amplitude of the BM due to the functional loss of OHCs in one, two or all three rows were investigated and the effects of incoordination of the three rows of OHCs on cochlear amplification were estimated. Results showed that the displacement amplitude of the BM significantly decreased when either the innermost row or the outermost row of OHCs lost its function, suggesting that all three rows of OHCs are required for cochlear amplification.

  4. Don’t Rock the Boat: How Antiphase Crew Coordination Affects Rowing

    PubMed Central

    de Brouwer, Anouk J.; de Poel, Harjo J.; Hofmijster, Mathijs J.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that crew rowing requires perfect synchronization between the movements of the rowers. However, a long-standing and somewhat counterintuitive idea is that out-of-phase crew rowing might have benefits over in-phase (i.e., synchronous) rowing. In synchronous rowing, 5 to 6% of the power produced by the rower(s) is lost to velocity fluctuations of the shell within each rowing cycle. Theoretically, a possible way for crews to increase average boat velocity is to reduce these fluctuations by rowing in antiphase coordination, a strategy in which rowers perfectly alternate their movements. On the other hand, the framework of coordination dynamics explicates that antiphase coordination is less stable than in-phase coordination, which may impede performance gains. Therefore, we compared antiphase to in-phase crew rowing performance in an ergometer experiment. Nine pairs of rowers performed a two-minute maximum effort in-phase and antiphase trial at 36 strokes min−1 on two coupled free-floating ergometers that allowed for power losses to velocity fluctuations. Rower and ergometer kinetics and kinematics were measured during the trials. All nine pairs easily acquired antiphase rowing during the warm-up, while one pair’s coordination briefly switched to in-phase during the maximum effort trial. Although antiphase interpersonal coordination was indeed less accurate and more variable, power production was not negatively affected. Importantly, in antiphase rowing the decreased power loss to velocity fluctuations resulted in more useful power being transferred to the ergometer flywheels. These results imply that antiphase rowing may indeed improve performance, even without any experience with antiphase technique. Furthermore, it demonstrates that although perfectly synchronous coordination may be the most stable, it is not necessarily equated with the most efficient or optimal performance. PMID:23383024

  5. An Unusual Cause of the Ring Artifact on Transaxial CT Images.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Purandare, Nilendu C; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-09-01

    Artifacts and image quality are two sides of the same coin. The ring artifact is scanner-based and caused mainly by either a miscalibrated element or a defective element of a detector row. We describe a rare cause of the ring artifact that appeared on a transaxial CT image because of a loose electronic contact. To our knowledge, this particular cause of the ring artifact has not been described in literature.

  6. 30 CFR 285.303 - How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING... Renewable Energy Activities Row Grants and Rue Grants § 285.303 How long will my ROW grant or RUE...

  7. Does a bout of strength training affect 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance and rowing-specific maximal power 24 h later?

    PubMed

    Gee, Thomas I; French, Duncan N; Howatson, Glyn; Payton, Stephen J; Berger, Nicolas J; Thompson, Kevin G

    2011-11-01

    Rowers regularly undertake rowing training within 24 h of performing bouts of strength training; however, the effect of this practice has not been investigated. This study evaluated the impact of a bout of high-intensity strength training on 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance and rowing-specific maximal power. Eight highly trained male club rowers performed baseline measures of five separate, static squat jumps (SSJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ), maximal rowing ergometer power strokes (PS) and a single 2,000 m rowing ergometer test (2,000 m). Subsequently, participants performed a high-intensity strength training session consisting of various multi-joint barbell exercises. The 2,000 m test was repeated at 24 and 48 h post-ST, in addition SSJ, CMJ and PS tests were performed at these time points and also at 2 h post-ST. Muscle soreness, serum creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were assessed pre-ST and 2, 24 and 48 h post-ST. Following the ST, there were significant elevations in muscle soreness (2 and 24 h, P < 0.01), CK (2, 24 and 48 h, P < 0.01), and LDH (2 h, P < 0.05) in comparison to baseline values. There were significant decrements across all time points for SSJ, CMJ and PS, which ranged between 3 and 10% (P < 0.05). However, 2,000 m performance and related measurements of heart rate and blood lactate were not significantly affected by ST. In summary, a bout of high-intensity strength training resulted in symptoms of muscle damage and decrements in rowing-specific maximal power, but this did not affect 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance in highly trained rowers.

  8. Effect of inter-row cultivation on soil CO2 emission in a peach plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, E.; Farkas, Cs.; Gelybó, Gy.; Lagzi, I.

    2012-04-01

    We examined the effect of inter-row cultivation on soil CO2 emission in a peach plantation planted in 1991. The soil is Ramann type brown forest soil /Mollic Cambisol/ developed on sandy loam. Every second row in the orchard is covered with undisturbed grass, and every other row is disked (depth: 12-15cm) with a two-three-week frequency. The humus content varies from 1,69% to 2,28% in the upper 20 cm layer, where the sand, loam and clay contents are 58%, 21% and 19 %, respectively. The average annual precipitation total is 570 mm (330 mm for the growing season) at the site. During the vegetation period of 2009 soil CO2 emission measurements were carried out with static chamber method in the differently managed rows. Parallel with CO2 measurements soil volumetric water content and soil temperature were also determined. Soil microbiological properties water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) and water-extractable nitrogen (WEN) as well as substrate-induced respiration (SIR) were determined from disturbed soil samples collected on the first measurement day. The measured soil physical properties showed that different soil management practices influence soil water content, bulk density and soil temperature as well. Soil water content was higher in the grass covered row on 10 of the 13 measurement days, the difference - which reached 10 v% - was the highest on the warmest days. Soil temperature is also different in case of disked and grass covered rows, found to be lower in the grass covered rows on every measurement days. SIR, WEOC and WEN were all higher in the grass covered row (19.45 μg CO2-C g-1 soil 36.91 μg g-1 soil, 139.36 μg g-1 soil, respectively) than in the disked row (4.88 μg CO2-C g-1 soil 25.43 μg C g-1 soil, 61.25 μg N g-1 soil, respectively) in 2009. Soil CO2 emission also differed between the two rows, grass covered rows produced higher emission in all measurements days without exemption. The difference between CO2 fluxes from the two cultivation

  9. CT findings in leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1984-12-01

    Review of 84 computed tomographic (CT) scans in leukemic patients demonstrate a wide spectrum of abnormalities. Findings caused by leukemia were lymphadenopathy, visceral enlargement, focal defects, and tissue infiltration. Hemorrhage was by far the most common complication and could usually be characterized on the noncontrast CT scan. The distinction between old hematomas, foci of infection, and leukemia infiltration could not be made with certainty without CT-guided aspiration. Unusual instances of sepsis, such as microabscesses of the liver and typhlitis, were seen.

  10. CT of Castleman disease

    SciTech Connect

    Onik, G.; Goodman, P.C.

    1983-04-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in distinguishing among mediastinal fatty tumors, vascular abnormalities, and fluid-filled cystic masses is well established. However, little has been written about the use of CT to identify mediastinal masses with soft-tissue characteristics nor of the ability of CT to assess the degree of enhancement of these lesions after contrast material administration. We report a case of Castleman disease which presented as a densely enhancing, soft-tissue lesion on dynamic CT scanning and suggest that enhancement characteristics may be helpful in limiting the differential diagnosis of mediastinal masses.

  11. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  12. 77 FR 25077 - Special Local Regulation; Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta, Trenton... navigable waters immediately prior to, during, and immediately after the Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta. This special....35T09-0342 Special Local Regulation; Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta, Wyandotte, MI. (a) Regulated Area. A...

  13. 78 FR 25572 - Special Local Regulation; Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta, Trenton... navigable waters immediately prior to, during, and immediately after the Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta. This special... to read as follows: Sec. 100.T09-0287 Special Local Regulation; Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta, Wyandotte, MI...

  14. Volume and crown characteristics of juvenile loblolly pine grown at various ratios of between and within row spacings

    Treesearch

    John R. Britt; Jason P. Reynolds

    2013-01-01

    In plantation forestry, several silvicultural treatments can be row oriented. When rows are treated individually, planting trees in wider rows may result in lower silvicultural treatment cost, facilitate future operations, such as thinning and fire fighting, and provide a longer period with open canopy conditions. All these scenarios could provide benefit to landowners...

  15. Multichannel Double-Row Transmission Line Array for Human MR Imaging at Ultrahigh Fields.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinqiang; Pedersen, Jan Ole; Wei, Long; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Xue, Rong

    2015-06-01

    In microstrip transmission line (MTL) transmit/receive (transceive) arrays used for ultrahigh field MRI, the array length is often constrained by the required resonant frequency, limiting the image coverage. The purpose of this study is to increase the imaging coverage and also improve its parallel imaging capability by utilizing a double-row design. A 16-channel double-row MTL transceive array was designed, constructed, and tested for human head imaging at 7 T. Array elements between two rows were decoupled by using the induced current elimination or magnetic wall decoupling technique. In vivo human head images were acquired, and g-factor results were calculated to evaluate the performance of this double-row array. Testing results showed that all coil elements were well decoupled with a better than -18 dB transmission coefficient between any two elements. The double-row array improves the imaging quality of the lower portion of the human head, and has low g-factors even at high acceleration rates. Compared with a regular single-row MTL array, the double-row array demonstrated a larger imaging coverage along the z-direction with improved parallel imaging capability. The proposed technique is particularly suitable for the design of large-sized transceive arrays with large channel counts, which ultimately benefits the imaging performance in human MRI.

  16. Stiffness matrix formulation for double row angular contact ball bearings: Analytical development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunduz, Aydin; Singh, Rajendra

    2013-10-01

    Though double row angular contact ball bearings are widely used in industrial, automotive, and aircraft applications, the scientific literature on double row bearings is sparse. It is also shown that the stiffness matrices of two single row bearings may not be simply superposed to obtain the stiffness matrix of a double row bearing. To overcome the deficiency in the literature, a new, comprehensive, analytical approach is proposed based on the Hertzian theory for back-to-back, face-to-face, and tandem arrangements. The elements of the five-dimensional stiffness matrix for double row angular contact ball bearings are computed given either the mean bearing displacement or the mean load vector. The diagonal elements of the proposed stiffness matrix are verified with a commercial code for all arrangements under three loading scenarios. Some changes in stiffness coefficients are investigated by varying critical kinematic and geometric parameters to provide more insight. Finally, the calculated natural frequencies of a shaft-bearing experiment are successfully compared with measurements, thus validating the proposed stiffness formulation. For double row angular contact ball bearings, the moment stiffness and cross-coupling stiffness terms are significant, and the contact angle changes under loads. The proposed formulation is also valid for paired (duplex) bearings which behave as an integrated double row unit when the surrounding structural elements are sufficiently rigid.

  17. Arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation of minimally displaced greater tuberosity fractures.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Ra, Ki-Hang

    2007-10-01

    In cases of displaced greater tuberosity fractures, treatments by arthroscopic-assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation have been reported. However, in cases in which there is a comminuted fracture or a minimally displaced fracture combined with concomitant lesions such as rotator cuff tear or labral pathology, it is difficult to reduce the fracture and to treat other pathologies by use of a percutaneous screw. Recently, many surgeons have used the double-row repair method in rotator cuff repair, which provides a tendon-bone interface better suited for biologic healing and restoring normal anatomy. In accordance with this method, we used the arthroscopic technique of double-row suture anchor fixation for a minimally displaced greater tuberosity fracture without additional incision. Initially, debridement was performed on the fracture surface by use of a shaver, and the medial-row anchor was inserted through the anterior portal or the intact cuff. Two lateral-row anchors were inserted just anterior and posterior to the lower margin of the fractured fragment under C-arm guidance. The medial-row sutures and lateral-row sutures were then placed. Arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation of a displaced greater tuberosity fracture restores the original footprint of the rotator cuff and normal tendon-bone interface of the displaced greater tuberosity fracture.

  18. Closely-spaced double-row microstrip RF arrays for parallel MR imaging at ultrahigh fields.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinqiang; Xue, Rong; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2015-11-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) coil arrays with high count of elements, e.g., closely-spaced multi-row arrays, exhibit superior parallel imaging performance in MRI. However, it is technically challenging and time-consuming to build multi-row arrays due to complex coupling issues. This paper presents a novel and simple method for closely-spaced multi-row RF array designs. Induced current elimination (ICE) decoupling method has shown the capability of reducing coupling between microstrip elements from different rows. In this study, its capability for decoupling array elements from the same row was investigated and validated by bench tests, with an isolation improvement from -8.9 dB to -20.7 dB. Based on this feature, a closely-spaced double-row microstrip array with 16 elements was built at 7T. S21 between any two elements of the 16-channel closely-spaced was better than -14 dB. In addition, its feasibility and performance was validated by MRI experiments. No significant image reconstruction- related noise amplifications were observed for parallel imaging even when reduced factor (R) achieves 4. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed design might be a simple and efficient approach in fabricating closely-spaced multi-row RF arrays.

  19. Multichannel Double-Row Transmission Line Array for Human MR Imaging at Ultrahigh Fields

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinqiang; Pedersen, Jan Ole; Wei, Long

    2017-01-01

    Objective In microstrip transmission line (MTL) transmit/receive (transceive) arrays used for ultrahigh field MRI, the array length is often constrained by the required resonant frequency, limiting the image coverage. The purpose of this study is to increase the imaging coverage and also improve its parallel imaging capability by utilizing a double-row design. Methods A 16-channel double-row MTL transceive array was designed, constructed, and tested for human head imaging at 7 T. Array elements between two rows were decoupled by using the induced current elimination or magnetic wall decoupling technique. In vivo human head images were acquired, and g-factor results were calculated to evaluate the performance of this double-row array. Results Testing results showed that all coil elements were well decoupled with a better than −18 dB transmission coefficient between any two elements. The double-row array improves the imaging quality of the lower portion of the human head, and has low g-factors even at high acceleration rates. Conclusion Compared with a regular single-row MTL array, the double-row array demonstrated a larger imaging coverage along the z-direction with improved parallel imaging capability. Significance The proposed technique is particularly suitable for the design of large-sized transceive arrays with large channel counts, which ultimately benefits the imaging performance in human MRI. PMID:25706499

  20. The effect of row structure on soil moisture retrieval accuracy from passive microwave data.

    PubMed

    Xingming, Zheng; Kai, Zhao; Yangyang, Li; Jianhua, Ren; Yanling, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Row structure causes the anisotropy of microwave brightness temperature (TB) of soil surface, and it also can affect soil moisture retrieval accuracy when its influence is ignored in the inversion model. To study the effect of typical row structure on the retrieved soil moisture and evaluate if there is a need to introduce this effect into the inversion model, two ground-based experiments were carried out in 2011. Based on the observed C-band TB, field soil and vegetation parameters, row structure rough surface assumption (Q p model and discrete model), including the effect of row structure, and flat rough surface assumption (Q p model), ignoring the effect of row structure, are used to model microwave TB of soil surface. Then, soil moisture can be retrieved, respectively, by minimizing the difference of the measured and modeled TB. The results show that soil moisture retrieval accuracy based on the row structure rough surface assumption is approximately 0.02 cm(3)/cm(3) better than the flat rough surface assumption for vegetated soil, as well as 0.015 cm(3)/cm(3) better for bare and wet soil. This result indicates that the effect of row structure cannot be ignored for accurately retrieving soil moisture of farmland surface when C-band is used.

  1. Closely-spaced double-row microstrip RF arrays for parallel MR imaging at ultrahigh fields

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinqiang; Xue, Rong; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) coil arrays with high count of elements, e.g., closely-spaced multi-row arrays, exhibit superior parallel imaging performance in MRI. However, it is technically challenging and time-consuming to build multi-row arrays due to complex coupling issues. This paper presents a novel and simple method for closely-spaced multi-row RF array designs. Induced current elimination (ICE) decoupling method has shown the capability of reducing coupling between microstrip elements from different rows. In this study, its capability for decoupling array elements from the same row was investigated and validated by bench tests, with an isolation improvement from −8.9 dB to −20.7 dB. Based on this feature, a closely-spaced double-row microstrip array with 16 elements was built at 7T. S21 between any two elements of the 16-channel closely-spaced was better than −14 dB. In addition, its feasibility and performance was validated by MRI experiments. No significant image reconstruction- related noise amplifications were observed for parallel imaging even when reduced factor (R) achieves 4. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed design might be a simple and efficient approach in fabricating closely-spaced multi-row RF arrays. PMID:26508810

  2. The Effect of Row Structure on Soil Moisture Retrieval Accuracy from Passive Microwave Data

    PubMed Central

    Xingming, Zheng; Kai, Zhao; Yangyang, Li; Jianhua, Ren; Yanling, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Row structure causes the anisotropy of microwave brightness temperature (TB) of soil surface, and it also can affect soil moisture retrieval accuracy when its influence is ignored in the inversion model. To study the effect of typical row structure on the retrieved soil moisture and evaluate if there is a need to introduce this effect into the inversion model, two ground-based experiments were carried out in 2011. Based on the observed C-band TB, field soil and vegetation parameters, row structure rough surface assumption (Qp model and discrete model), including the effect of row structure, and flat rough surface assumption (Qp model), ignoring the effect of row structure, are used to model microwave TB of soil surface. Then, soil moisture can be retrieved, respectively, by minimizing the difference of the measured and modeled TB. The results show that soil moisture retrieval accuracy based on the row structure rough surface assumption is approximately 0.02 cm3/cm3 better than the flat rough surface assumption for vegetated soil, as well as 0.015 cm3/cm3 better for bare and wet soil. This result indicates that the effect of row structure cannot be ignored for accurately retrieving soil moisture of farmland surface when C-band is used. PMID:25386626

  3. Direction-specific recruitment of rotator cuff muscles during bench press and row.

    PubMed

    Wattanaprakornkul, Duangjai; Halaki, Mark; Cathers, Ian; Ginn, Karen A

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that rotator cuff (RC) muscles are recruited in a reciprocal, direction-specific pattern during shoulder flexion and extension exercises. The main purpose of this study was to determine if similar reciprocal RC recruitment occurs during bench press (flexion-like) and row (extension-like) exercises. In addition, shoulder muscle activity was comprehensively compared between bench press and flexion; row and extension; and bench press and row exercises. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from 9 shoulder muscles sites in 15 normal volunteers. All exercises were performed at 20, 50 and 70% of subjects' maximal load. EMG data were normalized to standard maximal voluntary contractions. Infraspinatus activity was significantly higher than subscapularis during bench press, with the converse pattern during the row exercise. Significant differences in activity levels were found in pectoralis major, deltoid and trapezius between the bench press and flexion exercises and in lower trapezius between the row and extension exercises. During bench press and row exercises, the recruitment pattern in each active muscle did not vary with load. During bench press and row exercises, RC muscles contract in a reciprocal direction-specific manner in their role as shoulder joint dynamic stabilizers to counterbalance antero-posterior translation forces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Single-Versus Double-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Massive Tears

    PubMed Central

    Wang, EnZhi; Wang, Liang; Gao, Peng; Li, ZhongJi; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, SongGang

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons to treat massive rotator cuff tears. The optimal management of massive rotator cuff tears remains controversial. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare arthroscopic single- versus double-row rotator cuff repair with a larger sample size. Material/Methods Of the subjects with massive rotator cuff tears, 146 were treated using single-row repair, and 102 were treated using double-row repair. Pre- and postoperative functional outcomes and radiographic images were collected. The clinical outcomes were evaluated for a minimum of 2 years. Results No significant differences were shown between the groups in terms of functional outcomes. Regarding the integrity of the tendon, a lower rate of post-treatment retear was observed in patients who underwent double-row repair compared with single-row repair. Conclusions The results suggest that double-row repair is relatively superior in shoulder ROM and the strength of tendon compared with single-row repair. Future studies involving more patients in better-designed randomized controlled trials will be required. PMID:26017641

  5. Evaluation of native bees as pollinators of cucurbit crops under floating row covers.

    PubMed

    Minter, Logan M; Bessin, Ricardo T

    2014-10-01

    Production of cucurbit crops presents growers with numerous challenges. Several severe pests and diseases can be managed through the use of rotation, trap cropping, mechanical barriers, such as row covers, and chemical applications. However, considerations must also be made for pollinating insects, as adequate pollination affects the quantity and quality of fruit. Insecticides may negatively affect pollinators; a concern enhanced in recent years due to losses in managed Apis melifera L. colonies. Row covers can be used in place of chemical control before pollination, but when removed, pests have access to fields along with the pollinators. If pollination services of native bees could be harnessed for use under continuous row covers, both concerns could be balanced for growers. The potential of two bee species which specialize on cucurbit flowers, Peponapis pruinosa Say and Xenoglossa strenua Cresson, were assessed under continuous row covers, employed over acorn squash. Experimental treatments included plots with either naturally or artificially introduced bees under row covers and control plots with row covers either permanently removed at crop flowering, or employed continuously with no added pollinating insects. Pests in plots with permanently removed row covers were managed using standard practices used in certified organic production. Marketable yields from plots inoculated with bees were indistinguishable from those produced under standard practices, indicating this system would provide adequate yields to growers without time and monetary inputs of insecticide applications. Additionally, application of this technique was investigated for muskmelon production and discussed along with considerations for farm management.

  6. Validity of blood flow measurement using 320 multi-detectors CT and first-pass distribution theory: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Yu, Xuefang; Xu, Shaopeng; Zhou, Kenneth J.

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of measuring the myocardial blood flow using 320 row detector CT by first-pass technique. Heart was simulated with a container that was filled with pipeline of 3mm diameter; coronary artery was simulated with a pipeline of 2 cm diameter and connected with the simulated heart. The simulated coronary artery was connected with a big container with 1500 ml saline and 150ml contrast agent. One pump linking with simulated heart will withdraw with a speed of 10 ml/min, 15 ml/min, 20 ml/min, 25 ml/min and 30 ml/min. First CT scan starts after 30 s of pumpback with certain speed. The second CT scan starts 5 s after first CT scans. CT images processed as follows: The second CT scan images subtract first CT scan images, calculate the increase of CT value of simulated heart and the CT value of the unit volume of simulated coronary artery and then to calculate the total inflow of myocardial blood flow. CT myocardial blood flows were calculated as: 0.94 ml/s, 2.09 ml/s, 2.74 ml/s, 4.18 ml/s, 4.86 ml/s. The correlation coefficient is 0.994 and r2 = 0.97. The method of measuring the myocardial blood flow using 320 row detector CT by 2 scans is feasible. It is possible to develop a new method for quantitatively and functional assessment of myocardial perfusion blood flow with less radiation does.

  7. Valence calculations of binding energies of mid-row lanthanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Steven M.; Beck, Donald R.

    2008-05-01

    Binding energies of mid-row lanthanides have been calculated by taking advantage of the >90% LS purity of the 4f^n subgroups of their neutral ground states ootnotetextAtomic Energy Levels -- The Rare-Earth Elements, edited by W. C. Martin, R. Zalubas, and L. Hagan, Natl. Bur. Stand. Ref. Data Ser. Natl. Bur. Stand. (U.S.) Circ. No. 60 (U.S. GPO, Washington, D.C., 1978).. As described in our recent work on Nd^- ootnotetextS. M. O'Malley and D. R. Beck, Phy. Rev. A 77, 012505 (2008)., the 4f^n electrons were treated as core-like and restricted to a single LS term throughout all Dirac-Fock and correlation configurations, resulting in manageable relativistic configuration-interaction calculations for these computationally complex systems. Several weakly bound 6p attachments (<200 meV) were found for each negative ion, and these were carefully analyzed with respect to approximate LS total configuration as well as the j's of the the 4f^n subgroup and 6p electron.

  8. On Drawn K-In-A-Row Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Sheng-Hao; Wu, I.-Chen; Lin, Ping-Hung

    In 2005, Wu and Huang [9] presented a generalized family of k-in-a-row games. The current paper simplifies the family to Connect(k, p). Two players alternately place p stones on empty squares of an infinite board in each turn. The player who first obtains k consecutive stones of his own horizontally, vertically, diagonally wins. A Connect(k, p)game is drawn if both have no winning strategy. Given p, this paper derives the value k draw(p), such that Connect(k draw(p), p) is drawn, as follows. (1) k draw(2) = 11. (2) For all p ≥ 3, k draw(p) = 3p+3d+8, where d is a logarithmic function of p. So, the ratio k draw(p)/p is approximate to 3 for sufficiently large p. To our knowledge, our k draw(p) are currently the smallest for all 2 ≤ p < 1000, except for p = 3.

  9. Rows of ATP Synthase Dimers in Native Mitochondrial Inner Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Buzhynskyy, Nikolay; Sens, Pierre; Prima, Valerie; Sturgis, James N.; Scheuring, Simon

    2007-01-01

    The ATP synthase is a nanometric rotary machine that uses a transmembrane electrochemical gradient to form ATP. The structures of most components of the ATP synthase are known, and their organization has been elucidated. However, the supramolecular assembly of ATP synthases in biological membranes remains unknown. Here we show with submolecular resolution the organization of ATP synthases in the yeast mitochondrial inner membranes. The atomic force microscopy images we have obtained show how these molecules form dimers with characteristic 15 nm distance between the axes of their rotors through stereospecific interactions of the membrane embedded portions of their stators. A different interaction surface is responsible for the formation of rows of dimers. Such an organization elucidates the role of the ATP synthase in mitochondrial morphology. Some dimers have a different morphology with 10 nm stalk-to-stalk distance, in line with ATP synthases that are accessible to IF1 inhibition. Rotation torque compensation within ATP synthase dimers stabilizes the ATP synthase structure, in particular the stator-rotor interaction. PMID:17557793

  10. On the transonic aerodynamics of a compressor blade row

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, J. C., Jr.; Lordi, J. A.; Rae, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Linearized analyses have been carried out for the induced velocity and pressure fields within a compressor blade row operating in an infinite annulus at transonic Mach numbers of the flow relative to the blades. In addition, the relationship between the induced velocity and the shape of the mean blade surface has been determined. A computational scheme has been developed for evaluating the blade mean surface ordinates and surface pressure distributions. The separation of the effects of a specified blade thickness distribution from the effects of a specified distribution of the blade lift has been established. In this way, blade mean surface shapes that are necessary for the blades to be locally nonlifting have been computed and are presented for two examples of blades with biconvex parabolic arc sections of radially tapering thickness. Blade shapes that are required to achieve a zero thickness, uniform chordwise loading, constant work spanwise loading are also presented for two examples. In addition, corresponding surface pressure distributions are given. The flow relative to the blade tips has a high subsonic Mach number in the examples that have been computed. The results suggest that at near-sonic relative tip speeds the effective blade shape is dominated by the thickness distribution, with the lift distribution playing only a minor role.

  11. Supplemental basis functions for the second transition row elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S. P.; Nelin, C. J.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    It is noted that for molecular calculations, the basis sets presented by Huzinaga (1977) need to be augmented by (1) 5p functions to describe the 5s - 5p near degeneracy; (2) a diffuse 4d function to provide for a balanced description of the 5s2 4dn, 5s1 4d(n+1), and 4d(n+2) states of the atom; and (3) a set of 4f functions to correlate the 4d functions. Here, the diffuse 4d function is similar in function to the diffuse 3d function for the first transition row elements recommended by Hay (1977). A table is included giving the optimized values for the diffuse 4d, the 5p, and 4f (STO exponent) functions. The diffuse 4d function and the 5p functions are optimized at the SCF level on the basis of the 5s1 4d(n+1) state (except for Pd, which is optimized for the 4d10 state) and the 5s1 5p1 4dn state, respectively. The table also gives the energies and the atomic symmetries for each of the SCF calculations.

  12. Characterization of Genome-Wide Variation in Four-Row Wax, a Waxy Maize Landrace with a Reduced Kernel Row Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanmei; Wang, Xuewen; Wei, Bin; Wang, Yongbin; Liu, Yinghong; Zhang, Junjie; Hu, Yufeng; Yu, Guowu; Li, Jian; Xu, Zhanbin; Huang, Yubi

    2016-01-01

    In southwest China, some maize landraces have long been isolated geographically, and have phenotypes that differ from those of widely grown cultivars. These landraces may harbor rich genetic variation responsible for those phenotypes. Four-row Wax is one such landrace, with four rows of kernels on the cob. We resequenced the genome of Four-row Wax, obtaining 50.46 Gb sequence at 21.87× coverage, then identified and characterized 3,252,194 SNPs, 213,181 short InDels (1-5 bp) and 39,631 structural variations (greater than 5 bp). Of those, 312,511 (9.6%) SNPs were novel compared to the most detailed haplotype map (HapMap) SNP database of maize. Characterization of variations in reported kernel row number (KRN) related genes and KRN QTL regions revealed potential causal mutations in fea2, td1, kn1, and te1. Genome-wide comparisons revealed abundant genetic variations in Four-row Wax, which may be associated with environmental adaptation. The sequence and SNP variations described here enrich genetic resources of maize, and provide guidance into study of seed numbers for crop yield improvement.

  13. Does management intensity in inter rows effect soil physical properties in Austrian and Romanian vineyards?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thomas; Strauss, Peter; Stiper, Katrin; Klipa, Vladimir; Popescu, Daniela; Winter, Silvia; Zaller, Johann G.

    2016-04-01

    Successful viticulture is mainly influenced by soil and climate. The availability of water during the growing season highly influences wine quality and quantity. To protect soil from being eroded most of the winegrowers keep the inter row zones of the vineyards green. Greening also helps to provide water-stress to the grapes for harvesting high quality wines. However, these greening strategies concerning the intensity of inter row management differ from farm to farm and are mainly based on personal experience of the winegrowers. However to what extent different inter row management practices affect soil physical properties are not clearly understood yet. To measure possible effects of inter row management in vineyards on soil physical parameters we selected paired vineyards with different inter row management in Austria and Romania. In total more than 7000 soil analysis were conducted for saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, soil water retention, water stable aggregates, total organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, potassium, phosphorous, soil texture, bulk density and water infiltration. The comparison between high intensity management with at least one soil disturbance per year, medium intensity with one soil disturbance every second inter row per year and low intensity management with no soil disturbance since at least 5 years indicates that investigated soil physical properties did not improve for the upper soil layer (3-8cm). This is in contrast to general perceptions of improved soil physical properties due to low intensity of inter row management, i.e. permanent vegetated inter rows. This may be attributed to long term and high frequency mechanical stress by agricultural machinery in inter rows.

  14. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results.

    PubMed

    Tudisco, Cosimo; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Savarese, Eugenio; Fiori, Roberto; Bartolucci, Dario A; Masala, Salvatore; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-27

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR) repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR) repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA), showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, surgical time and implant expense. The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no difference in clinical outcomes. We think that

  15. Simultaneous Rotator Cuff Repair and Arthroscopic Biceps Tenodesis Using Lateral Row Anchor

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Jonathan C.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of concomitant long head of the biceps pathology in the setting of rotator cuff repair is often required. When a tenodesis of the biceps is used, additional anchors and surgical dissection are typically required. This adds additional surgical time, morbidity of additional surgical dissection, and additional anchor load and cost. We describe a novel technique for arthroscopic biceps tenodesis that uses the anterior lateral row anchor of a double-row rotator cuff repair to simultaneously secure the biceps tenodesis and rotator cuff tear. This technique provides a simple, reproducible, cost-effective means of performing a simultaneous biceps tenodesis and double-row rotator cuff repair. PMID:23766961

  16. Diurnal changes in reflectance factor due to Sun-row direction interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Vanderbilt, V. C.; Kollenkark, J. C.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.; Ranson, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    Over a two year period, data were collected regarding the canopies of soybeans grown in rows in planter boxes placed on a turntable in an effort to investigate changes in the spectral reflectance factor related to row direction, Sun direction, soil background, and crop development stage. Results demonstrate that the direction of rows in a soybean canopy can affect the reflectance factor of the canopy by as much as 230%. The results for the red spectral region tend to support the validity of canopy reflectance models; results for the infrared region do not.

  17. The relationship of nitrate concentrations in streams to row crop land use in Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Libra, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between row crop land use and nitrate N concentrations in surface water was evaluated for 15 Iowa watersheds ranging from 1002 to 2774 km2 and 10 smaller watersheds ranging from 47 to 775 km2 for the period 1996 to 1998. The percentage of land in row crop varied from 24 to >87% in the 15 large watersheds, and mean annual NO3-N concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 10.8 mg/L. In the small watersheds, row crop percentage varied from 28 to 87% and mean annual NO3-N concentrations ranged from 3.0 to 10.5 mg/L. In both cases, nitrate N concentrations were directly related to the percentage of row crop in the watershed (p 87% in the 15 large watersheds, and mean annual NO3-N concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 10.8 mg/L. In the small watersheds, row crop percentage varied from 28 to 87% and mean annual NO3-N concentrations ranged from 3.0 to 10.5 mg/L. In both cases, nitrate N concentrations were directly related to the percentage of row crop in the watershed (p<0.0003). Linear regression showed similar slope for both sets of watersheds (0.11) suggesting that average annual surface water nitrate concentrations in Iowa, and possibly similar agricultural areas in the midwestern USA, can be approximated by multiplying a watershed's row crop percentage by 0.1. Comparing the Iowa watershed data with similar data collected at a subwatershed scale in Iowa (0.1 to 8.1 km2) and a larger midcontinent scale (7300 to 237 100 km2) suggests that watershed scale affects the relationship of nitrate concentration and land use. The slope of nitrate concentration versus row crop percentage decreases with increasing watershed size.Mean nitrate concentrations and row crop land use were summarized for 15 larger and ten smaller watersheds in Iowa, and the relationship between NO3 concentration and land use was examined. Linear regression of mean NO3 concentration and percent row crop was highly significant for both sets of watershed data, but a stronger correlation was noted in the

  18. [Exclusion of coronary artery disease using cardiac CT. What impact do CT results have on patient management?].

    PubMed

    Kadalie, Clemens Themba; Sternitzky, Reinhardt

    2011-05-01

    Rapid advancement of multidetector head computed tomography (MDCT) during the past 10 years has facilitated noninvasive evaluation of CAD (coronary artery disease). Since the introduction of 320-row technology, examination of the whole heart in a single heart beat with diagnostic quality has become feasible. Direct imaging of vessel morphology, a high sensitivity for CAD above 96%, and low requirements of patient compliance represent advantages over other imaging modalities, such as MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), scintigraphy, and echocardiography. In some cases radiation exposure can be reduced to an effective dose below 1 mSV.Current data suggest that cardiac CT represents a more effective diagnostic tool than treadmill testing in order to decide whether cardiac catheterization is indicated. Treadmill testing has been an integral procedure of cardiac examinations for decades, although sensitivity for detecting CAD is as low as 70%.Cardiac CT represents a rather new modality and is almost exclusively performed in diagnostic imaging centers. Innovative concepts in the evaluation of CAD including CT are expected. Some authors propose cardiac CT as a major diagnostic tool for the exclusion of CAD. MRI, scintigraphy, or echocardiography in combination with a stress test remain important procedures in order to evaluate the hemodynamic relevance of coronary artery stenosis. Treadmill testing prior to cardiac CT has become questionable.The future role of cardiac CT in CAD in "change of management" concepts is promising. In order to optimize decisions of patient management on the basis of a cardiac CT examinations, awareness of current data is mandatory for the referring clinician and the performing radiological department.

  19. CT Scans - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tomography) Scan - العربية (Arabic) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) (简体中文) Expand Section CT ( ... Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section CT ( ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  1. Spreadsheet Calculations for Jets in Crossflow: Opposed Rows of Inline and Staggered Holes and Single and Opposed Rows with Alternating Hole Sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Clisset, James R.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this jet-in-crossflow study was to calculate expected results for two configurations for which limited or no experimental results have been published: (1) cases of opposed rows of closely-spaced jets from inline and staggered round holes and (2) rows of jets from alternating large and small round holes. Simulations of these configurations were performed using an Excel (Microsoft Corporation) spreadsheet implementation of a NASA-developed empirical model which had been shown in previous publications to give excellent representations of mean experimental scalar results suggesting that the NASA empirical model for the scalar field could confidently be used to investigate these configurations. The supplemental Excel spreadsheet is posted with the current report on the NASA Glenn Technical Reports Server (http://gltrs.grc.nasa.gov) and can be accessed from the Supplementary Notes section as TM-2010-216100-SUPPL1.xls. Calculations for cases of opposed rows of jets with the orifices on one side shifted show that staggering can improve the mixing, particularly for cases where jets would overpenetrate slightly if the orifices were in an aligned configuration. The jets from the larger holes dominate the mixture fraction for configurations with a row of large holes opposite a row of smaller ones although the jet penetration was about the same. For single and opposed rows with mixed hole sizes, jets from the larger holes penetrated farther. For all cases investigated, the dimensionless variance of the mixture fraction decreased significantly with increasing downstream distance. However, at a given downstream distance, the variation between cases was small.

  2. Subdural empyema: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.D.; Leeds, N.E.; Danziger, A.

    1984-02-01

    CT scans in 49 patients with surgically proven subdural empyema were evaluated. The empyemas were crescentic or lentiform extra-axial hypodense collections (density approximating that of cerebrospinal fluid) with prominent, sharply etched medial rim enhancement. Enhancement of the adjacent cerebral cortex was identified in many cases. Mass effect was always present and in 10 cases so extensive that it overshadowed a small extra-axial collection. CT allowed for precise localization of the lesion, including contiguous or isolated involvement of the interhemispheric subdural space. Mortality was 12% (6/49 cases), a marked improvement when compared with mortality figures obtained prior to the advent of CT (40%). CT findings indicative of involvement of the adjacent parenchyma via retrograde thrombophlebitis with resultant infarction and/or abscess formation were associated with poor prognosis. Improvement in prognosis since the advent of CT is the direct result of early accurate diagnosis and timely intervention.

  3. Treatment of acute perilunate dislocations: ORIF versus proximal row carpectomy.

    PubMed

    Muller, T; Hidalgo Diaz, J J; Pire, E; Prunières, G; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2017-02-01

    Some authors have proposed performing proximal row carpectomy (PRC) as the initial treatment for perilunate dislocations. The goal of this retrospective study was to compare the results of a cohort of perilunate dislocation cases that were operated by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) or by PRC between 2006 and 2011. The cohort consisted of 21 men with a mean age of 33years, who either had an isolated perilunate dislocation (7 cases) or a fracture-dislocation (14 cases). All dislocations were dorsal, with 10 stage I and 12 stage II. Thirteen patients had been treated by ORIF (group 1) a mean of 1.2days after the injury. Eight patients had been treated by PRC (group 2) a mean of 18.7days after the injury. Immobilization time was 6-12weeks in group 1 and 2weeks in group 2. The mean operative time was 95minutes in group 1 and 65minutes in group 2. After a mean follow-up of 35months, the following outcomes were found for groups 1 and 2, respectively: pain 3/10 and 1/10, strength 77% and 73%, strength in supination 79% and 93%, strength in pronation 67% and 95%, QuickDASH 27/100 and 16/100, PRWE 43/150 and 15.5/150, flexion 69% and 57%, extension 84% and 58%, pronation 97% and 103%, supination 98% and 97%. There were four cases of osteoarthritis in both groups. Treatment of acute perilunate dislocations by PRC leads to medium-term results that are at least as good as those with ORIF treatment. The surgery duration is shorter with PRC, as is the immobilization period. Retrospective comparative. III. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Meniscal Allograft Interposition Combined with Proximal Row Carpectomy.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Murphy M; Willsey, Matthew R; Werner, Frederick W; Harley, Brian J; Klein, Shay; Setter, Kevin J

    2017-02-01

    Background Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is contraindicated in wrists with preexisting arthritis of the proximal capitate or radiolunate fossa. Patients with these conditions frequently pursue wrist arthrodesis with its associated functional limitations. Questions/Purposes The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of using lateral meniscal allograft interposition (LMAI), in combination with PRC, in patients with symptomatic wrist arthritis. The primary question is whether this allograft will allow wrist function comparable to that in patients having only a PRC. A secondary question was to determine the short-term longevity of the allograft. Patients/Method Between 2006 and 2012, nine wrists underwent PRC with LMAI. Patient demographics and rates of complication or graft failure were determined. During independent clinical exams, functional outcomes were reviewed, patients completed a Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores, and radiographs were taken. Results Four patients met the inclusion criteria, having clinical follow-up at an average of 4.2 years. DASH scores at the time of follow-up ranged from 9 to 33, with an average of 24. Average radiocapitate joint space in the first postoperative radiograph was 2.8 mm compared with 1.8 mm at the time of final follow-up. No wrists went on to arthrodesis. Conclusion Early outcomes of PRC with LMAI are comparable to those results found in the literature of PRC alone. LMAI with PRC may be a valid short-term option as a motion-preserving procedure in those patients contraindicated to having a PRC alone. Level of Evidence Level IV.

  5. Row Spacing, Tillage System, and Herbicide Technology Affects Cotton Plant Growth and Yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) producers are faced with numerous production choices including cotton varieties, herbicide technology, tillage systems, and row spacing. A study was conducted to compare cotton production across conventional, glyphosate tolerant, and glufosinate tolerant varieties in ...

  6. Passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture - The effect of tilled row structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Newton, R. W.; Rouse, J. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The tilled row structure in agricultural fields is one of the important factors affecting observations of microwave emission from such fields. Measurements of this effect were performed with L-band and X-band radiometers mounted on a mobile truck on a bare 40 m x 45 m row tilled field; the soil moisture content during measurements ranged from 10 to 30% by dry weight. Results showed that the variations of the antenna temperatures with incident angle changed with the azimuth angle measured from the row direction. It is found that the observed difference between horizontally and vertically polarized antenna temperatures is due to the change in the local angle of field emission within the antenna field of view caused by the large-scale row structure.

  7. 33 CFR 100.724 - Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE... all non-participants. (2) After the termination of the Invitational Rowing Regatta each day, and...

  8. ROWS wave spectral data collected in SAXON-FPN, November 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F.; Vandemark, D.; Bailey, S.; Vaughn, C.; Hines, D.; Ward, J.; Stewart, K.; Chapron, B.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution directional wave spectra obtained with the NASA Ku-band radar ocean wave spectrometer (ROWS) on the Naval Research Laboratory P-3 aircraft during SAXON-FPN (SAR and X-Band Ocean Nonlinearities Experiment-Forschungsplattform Nordsee) experiments in the North Sea in November 1990 are presented. This experiment was the first in which the ROWS was operated with its new pc-based high-speed digital data acquisition system.

  9. Structure of the cobalt-filled missing-row reconstruction of Pt(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, C.; Koller, R.; Schmid, M.; Varga, P.; Lundgren, E.; Maca, F.

    2004-10-15

    The atomic structure of 0.5 monolayer (ML) Co deposited on Pt(110) was investigated by quantitative low-energy electron diffraction and ab initio density functional theory calculations, showing a pronounced inward relaxation and a filling of the missing-row sites of the Pt(110) substrate by Co atoms. Up to this Co coverage no significant intermixing of Pt atoms with Co atoms was observed by scanning tunneling microscopy, resulting in an alternating arrangement of pure Co and Pt rows.

  10. Analysis of anaerobic capacity in rowers using Wingate test on cycle and rowing ergometer.

    PubMed

    Klasnja, Aleksandar; Barak, Otto; Popadić-Gaćesa, Jelena; Drapsin, Miodrag; Knezević, Aleksandar; Grujić, Nikola

    2010-01-01

    The 30-s all-out Wingate test has been used in athletes of all sport specialties to measure the capacity for short duration, high power output while cycling. The aim of this study was to establish differences in measuring anaerobic capacity between the classic Wingate test on a cycling ergometer and the modified Wingate test on a rowing ergometer in rowers. A group of20 rowers was tested by both the cycle and rowing ergometers during 30s of maximum power to test anaerobic capacity and to make correlation between these tests. The parameters measured were the peak power and mean power. The peak power on the cycling ergometer was 475 +/- 75.1W and 522.4 +/- 81W (p < 0.05) on the rowing ergometer. The mean power on the cycling ergometer and the rowing ergometer was 344.4 +/- 51.1W and 473.7W +/- 67.2, (p < 0.05) respectively. The maximum values were achieved at the same time on both ergometers, but remained on the higher level till the end of the test on the rowing ergometer. By correlating the anaerobic parameters of the classic Wingate test and a modified Wingate test on the rowing ergometer a significant positive correlation was detected in the peak power (r = 0.63, p < 0.05) as well as in the mean power (r = 0.65, p < 0.05). The results show that the rowers achieved better results of the anaerobic parameters on the rowing ergometer compared to the cycling ergometer due to a better mechanical efficiency. It is concluded that the modified Wingate test on the rowing ergometer can be used in rowers for testing their anaerobic capacity as a sport specific test ergometer since it provides more precise results.

  11. Mapping wide row crops with video sequences acquired from a tractor moving at treatment speed.

    PubMed

    Sainz-Costa, Nadir; Ribeiro, Angela; Burgos-Artizzu, Xavier P; Guijarro, María; Pajares, Gonzalo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a mapping method for wide row crop fields. The resulting map shows the crop rows and weeds present in the inter-row spacing. Because field videos are acquired with a camera mounted on top of an agricultural vehicle, a method for image sequence stabilization was needed and consequently designed and developed. The proposed stabilization method uses the centers of some crop rows in the image sequence as features to be tracked, which compensates for the lateral movement (sway) of the camera and leaves the pitch unchanged. A region of interest is selected using the tracked features, and an inverse perspective technique transforms the selected region into a bird's-eye view that is centered on the image and that enables map generation. The algorithm developed has been tested on several video sequences of different fields recorded at different times and under different lighting conditions, with good initial results. Indeed, lateral displacements of up to 66% of the inter-row spacing were suppressed through the stabilization process, and crop rows in the resulting maps appear straight.

  12. Archaeogenetic Evidence of Ancient Nubian Barley Evolution from Six to Two-Row Indicates Local Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Sarah A.; Moore, Jonathan D.; Clapham, Alan J.; Rose, Pamela; Allaby, Robin G.

    2009-01-01

    Background Archaeobotanical samples of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) found at Qasr Ibrim display a two-row phenotype that is unique to the region of archaeological sites upriver of the first cataract of the Nile, characterised by the development of distinctive lateral bracts. The phenotype occurs throughout all strata at Qasr Ibrim, which range in age from 3000 to a few hundred years. Methodology and Findings We extracted ancient DNA from barley samples from the entire range of occupancy of the site, and studied the Vrs1 gene responsible for row number in extant barley. Surprisingly, we found a discord between the genotype and phenotype in all samples; all the barley had a genotype consistent with the six-row condition. These results indicate a six-row ancestry for the Qasr Ibrim barley, followed by a reassertion of the two-row condition. Modelling demonstrates that this sequence of evolutionary events requires a strong selection pressure. Conclusions The two-row phenotype at Qasr Ibrim is caused by a different mechanism to that in extant barley. The strength of selection required for this mechanism to prevail indicates that the barley became locally adapted in the region in response to a local selection pressure. The consistency of the genotype/phenotype discord over time supports a scenario of adoption of this barley type by successive cultures, rather than the importation of new barley varieties associated with individual cultures. PMID:19623249

  13. Arthroscopic Double-Row Suture Anchor Repair of Acute Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion.

    PubMed

    Ly, Justin A; Coleman, Erin M; Kropf, Eric J

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of anterior shoulder instability is well described with various techniques, including arthroscopic double-row repair, an alternative to open stabilization procedures in high-risk groups. The surgical management of posterior instability in high-risk and athletic populations is a less-explored entity. We describe our technique for an all arthroscopic double-row suture anchor repair of a large posterior bony Bankart lesion. We prefer this technique over percutaneous cannulated screw fixation because the double-row suture technique allows for incorporation of capsular plication with bony fixation in an effort to better restore normal anatomy for capsulolabral complex. Double-row repair capsulolabral repair or fixation of the bony Bankart is performed via a suture-bridge technique. Medial row anchors are placed down the glenoid neck and shuttled around the bony fragment and labrum. The lateral-row anchor is placed at the rim of the native glenoid. This repair technique has been shown to increase the surface area for healing and more closely reconstruct the native anatomic capsulolabral complex footprint, improve force distribution, and potentially impart enhanced posterior stability to the glenohumeral joint.

  14. The Double-Row Suture Technique: A Better Option for the Treatment of Haglund Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wang; Zhang, Kaibin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether double-row suture technique is a better option for the treatment of Haglund syndrome than single-row suture technique regarding the surgical outcomes. Methods. Thirty-two patients with Haglund syndrome were recruited in this study. Patients were divided into Group 1 (treated with single-row suture technique) and Group 2 (treated with double-row suture technique). There were 16 patients in each group. The AOFAS-ankle-hindfoot scale, VISA-A scores, and Arner-Lindholm standard were used to assess the clinical outcomes. The pre- and postoperative X-rays were used to assess the radiological outcome. Results. Both AOFAS-ankle-hindfoot scale score and VISA-A score had varying degrees of improvement in both groups. In latest follow-up assessment, the Arner-Lindholm standard investigation showed there were 7 excellent, 7 good, and 2 bad outcomes in Group 1 and 12 excellent and 4 good outcomes in Group 2. In Group 2 patients, there were no more posterosuperior bony prominence of the calcaneum in post-op X-rays and there were no recurrent cases. The ankle-related scale score was statistically significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P = 0.029). Conclusion. The double-row suture technique seems to be a better option to treat Haglund syndrome than single-row suture technique. PMID:28078282

  15. Influence of foot-stretcher height on rowing technique and performance.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, Erica M; Weinert-Aplin, Robert A; Bull, Anthony M J; McGregor, Alison H

    2016-11-01

    Strength, technique, and coordination are crucial to rowing performance, but external interventions such as foot-stretcher set-up can fine-tune technique and optimise power output. For the same resultant force, raising the height of foot-stretchers on a rowing ergometer theoretically alters the orientation of the resultant force vector in favour of the horizontal component. This study modified foot-stretcher heights and examined their instantaneous effect on foot forces and rowing technique. Ten male participants rowed at four foot-stretcher heights on an ergometer that measured handle force, stroke length, and vertical and horizontal foot forces. Rowers were instrumented with motion sensors to measure ankle, knee, hip, and lumbar-pelvic kinematics. Key resultant effects of increased foot-stretcher heights included progressive reductions in horizontal foot force, stroke length, and pelvis range of motion. Raising foot-stretcher height did not increase the horizontal component of foot force as previously speculated. The reduced ability to anteriorly rotate the pelvis at the front of the stroke may be a key obstacle in gaining benefits from raised foot-stretcher heights. This study shows that small changes in athlete set-up can influence ergometer rowing technique, and rowers must individually fine-tune their foot-stretcher height to optimise power transfer through the rowing stroke on an ergometer.

  16. Functional Outcomes After Double-Row Versus Single-Row Rotator Cuff Repair: A Prospective Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Stephen J; Lee, Steven J; Mullaney, Michael J; Tyler, Timothy F; Fukunaga, Takumi; Johnson, Christopher D; McHugh, Malachy P

    2016-10-01

    The functional benefits of double-row (DR) versus single-row (SR) rotator cuff repair are not clearly established. To examine the effect of DR versus SR rotator cuff repair on functional outcomes and strength recovery in patients with full-thickness tears. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Forty-nine patients were randomized to DR or SR repairs; 36 patients (13 women, 23 men; mean age, 62 ± 7 years; 20 SR, 16 DR) were assessed at a mean 2.2 ± 1.6 years after surgery (range, 1-7 years; tear size: 17 medium, 13 large, 9 massive). The following data were recorded prior to surgery and at follow-up: Penn shoulder score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) results; range of motion (ROM) for shoulder flexion, external rotation (ER) at 0° and 90° of abduction, and internal rotation (IR) at 90° of abduction; and shoulder strength (Lafayette manual muscle tester) in empty- and full-can tests, abduction, and ER at 0° of abduction. Treatment (SR vs DR) × time (pre- vs postoperative) mixed-model analysis of variance was used to assess the effect of rotator cuff repair. Rotator cuff repair markedly improved Penn, ASES, and SST scores (P < .001), with similar improvement between SR and DR repairs (treatment × time, P = .38-.10) and excellent scores at follow-up (DR vs SR: Penn, 91 ± 11 vs 92 ± 11 [P = .73]; ASES, 87 ± 12 vs 92 ± 12 [P = .21]; SST, 11.4 ± 1.0 vs 11.3 ± 1.0 [P = .76]). Patients with DR repairs lost ER ROM at 0° of abduction (preoperative to final follow-up, 7° ± 10° loss [P = .013]). ER ROM did not significantly change with SR repair (5° ± 14° gain, P = .16; treatment by time, P = .008). This effect was not apparent for ER ROM at 90° of abduction (treatment × time, P = .26). IR ROM improved from preoperative to final follow-up (P < .01; SR, 17° ± 27°; DR, 7° ± 21°; treatment × time, P = .23). Rotator cuff repair markedly improved strength in empty-can (54%), full-can (66

  17. Evaluation of stenosis severity of coronary calcified lesions using transluminal attenuation gradient: clinical application of 320-row volume CT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fengfeng; Dong, Jie; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiuting; Fu, Xiaojiao; Kumar, Nanda C; Zhang, Tong

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of transluminal attenuation gradient (TAG) in diagnosing the stenosis degree of difficult lesions to accurately assess the degree of luminal stenosis using coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). A total of 130 patients consecutively received CCTA and coronary angiography (CAG). The average transluminal Hounsfield units (HU) of the regions of interest were consecutively measured at an interval of 5 mm from the ostium to the distal level, followed by the calculation of TAG. The diagnostic performance of CCTA, TAG and CCTA+TAG for the stenosis degree of coronary calcified lesions and their reclassification for stenosis degree were analyzed, especially for calcified lesions. Compared with CAG, the TAG in CCTA was consistent with the largest stenosis degree of each blood vessel. TAG improved the accuracy of CCTA in the diagnosis of calcified lesions (P<0.0001). When threshold was ≤-6.9 HU/10 mm, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of CCTA+TAG in the diagnosis of coronary calcified lesions were 90.26%, 95.45%, 98.58% and 73.68%. TAG for calcified lesions had moderate sensitivity (86.61%; 95% CI: 81.8-90.5%) and high specificity (91.20%; 95% CI: 84.8-95.5%). In addition, TAG can help to improve the reclassification of CCTA for coronary stenosis degree, especially for calcified lesions (NRI=0.127, P=0.045). TAG can help to improve the diagnostic performance of CCTA for the stenosis degree of lesions, and it may also help to improve the reclassification of the stenosis degree of calcified lesions.

  18. Role of Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) in the detection of pulmonary nodules on 64 row multi detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Prakashini, K; Babu, Satish; Rajgopal, K V; Kokila, K Raja

    2016-01-01

    To determine the overall performance of an existing CAD algorithm with thin-section computed tomography (CT) in the detection of pulmonary nodules and to evaluate detection sensitivity at a varying range of nodule density, size, and location. A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted on 20 patients with 322 suspected nodules who underwent diagnostic chest imaging using 64-row multi-detector CT. The examinations were evaluated on reconstructed images of 1.4 mm thickness and 0.7 mm interval. Detection of pulmonary nodules, initially by a radiologist of 2 years experience (RAD) and later by CAD lung nodule software was assessed. Then, CAD nodule candidates were accepted or rejected accordingly. Detected nodules were classified based on their size, density, and location. The performance of the RAD and CAD system was compared with the gold standard that is true nodules confirmed by consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. The overall sensitivity and false-positive (FP) rate of CAD software was calculated. Of the 322 suspected nodules, 221 were classified as true nodules on the consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. Of the true nodules, the RAD detected 206 (93.2%) and 202 (91.4%) by the CAD. CAD and RAD together picked up more number of nodules than either CAD or RAD alone. Overall sensitivity for nodule detection with the CAD program was 91.4%, and FP detection per patient was 5.5%. The CAD showed comparatively higher sensitivity for nodules of size 4-10 mm (93.4%) and nodules in hilar (100%) and central (96.5%) location when compared to RAD's performance. CAD performance was high in detecting pulmonary nodules including the small size and low-density nodules. CAD even with relatively high FP rate, assists and improves RAD's performance as a second reader, especially for nodules located in the central and hilar region and for small nodules by saving RADs time.

  19. [The impact on diagnostic quality of using contrast media in PET-CT studies].

    PubMed

    García García-Esquinas, M; Ortega Candil, A; Lapeña Gutierrez, L; Mucientes Rasilla, J; Carreras Delgado, J L; Arrazola García, J

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of using radiologic contrast media on the quality of PET-CT studies at our center. This is a retrospective observational study to evaluate the quality of the PET-CT studies carried out with radiologic contrast media and the presence of artifacts due to these contrast agents. Oncologic patients in whom PET was indicated according to the manufacturer's specifications for FDG ((18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose) underwent PET-CT study on a PET-CT system with a six-detector-row CT scanner. Between February 2009 and June 2009, we performed 612 PET-CT examinations in 369 male patients and 243 female patients. Iodinated contrast media were administered intravenously in 48% and orally in 18%. Diagnostic quality was considered high in 93.5% of the studies, intermediate in 4.3%, and low in 2.2%. In the CT studies performed using intravenous contrast agents, artifacts were identified in 8% and resulted in diagnostic uncertainty in the PET study in 1.4%. We found no diagnostic problems caused by oral contrast agents in any case. The use of radiologic contrast agents in PET-CT studies does not negatively affect diagnostic quality or workflow. Given that we can improve the ability of PET-CT to detect lesions by enhancing the diagnostic quality of the CT study, we consider it appropriate to include the administration of contrast agents in protocols for PET-CT studies. Copyright © 2009 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Row-Type, Row-Spacing, Seeding Rate, Soil-Type, and Cultivar Differences on Soybean Seed Nutrition under US Mississippi Delta Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Bruns, Herbert A; Abbas, Hamed K; Mengistu, Alemu; Fisher, Daniel K; Reddy, Krishna N

    2015-01-01

    The new Early Soybean Production System (ESPS), developed in the Midsouth USA, including the Mississippi delta, resulted in higher yield under irrigated and non-irrigated conditions. However, information on the effects of the agricultural practices such as row-type (RT: twin- vs. single-row), row-spacing, (RS), seeding rate (SR), soil-type (ST) on seed nutrition under the ESPS environment in the Mississippi delta is very limited. Our previous research in the Mississippi delta showed these agricultural practices altered seed nutrients in one cultivar only. However, whether these effects on seed nutrients will be exhibited by other soybean cultivars with earlier and later maturities across multiple years are not yet known. Therefore, the objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of agricultural practices and cultivar (Cv) differences on seed nutrition in clay and sandy soils under ESPS environment of high heat and drought. Two field experiments were conducted; one experiment was conducted in 2009 and 2010, and the other in 2008, 2009, and 2010 under irrigated conditions. Soybean were grown on 102 cm single-rows and on 25 cm twin-rows with 102 cm centers at seeding rates of 20, 30, 40, and 50 seeds m(-2). Two soybean cultivars (94M80 with earlier maturity; and GP 533 with later maturity) were used. Results showed that increasing seeding rate resulted in increases of protein, sucrose, glucose, raffinose, B, and P concentrations on both single- and twin-rows. However, this increase became either constant or declined at the higher rates (40 and 50 seeds m(-2)). Protein and linolenic acid concentrations were higher in GP 533 than in 94M80 on both row-types, but oil and oleic acid concentrations were in 94M80 than GP 533. Generally, cultivar GP 533 accumulated more seed constituents in seeds than 94M80. In 2010, there were no clear responses of seed nutrients to SR increase in both cultivars, perhaps due to drier year and high heat in 2010. It is concluded

  1. Effects of Row-Type, Row-Spacing, Seeding Rate, Soil-Type, and Cultivar Differences on Soybean Seed Nutrition under US Mississippi Delta Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Krishna N.

    2015-01-01

    The new Early Soybean Production System (ESPS), developed in the Midsouth USA, including the Mississippi delta, resulted in higher yield under irrigated and non-irrigated conditions. However, information on the effects of the agricultural practices such as row-type (RT: twin- vs. single-row), row-spacing, (RS), seeding rate (SR), soil-type (ST) on seed nutrition under the ESPS environment in the Mississippi delta is very limited. Our previous research in the Mississippi delta showed these agricultural practices altered seed nutrients in one cultivar only. However, whether these effects on seed nutrients will be exhibited by other soybean cultivars with earlier and later maturities across multiple years are not yet known. Therefore, the objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of agricultural practices and cultivar (Cv) differences on seed nutrition in clay and sandy soils under ESPS environment of high heat and drought. Two field experiments were conducted; one experiment was conducted in 2009 and 2010, and the other in 2008, 2009, and 2010 under irrigated conditions. Soybean were grown on 102 cm single-rows and on 25 cm twin-rows with 102 cm centers at seeding rates of 20, 30, 40, and 50 seeds m–2. Two soybean cultivars (94M80 with earlier maturity; and GP 533 with later maturity) were used. Results showed that increasing seeding rate resulted in increases of protein, sucrose, glucose, raffinose, B, and P concentrations on both single- and twin-rows. However, this increase became either constant or declined at the higher rates (40 and 50 seeds m–2). Protein and linolenic acid concentrations were higher in GP 533 than in 94M80 on both row-types, but oil and oleic acid concentrations were in 94M80 than GP 533. Generally, cultivar GP 533 accumulated more seed constituents in seeds than 94M80. In 2010, there were no clear responses of seed nutrients to SR increase in both cultivars, perhaps due to drier year and high heat in 2010. It is concluded

  2. Biomechanical Comparison of Arthroscopic Single- and Double-Row Repair Techniques for Acute Bony Bankart Lesions.

    PubMed

    Spiegl, Ulrich J; Smith, Sean D; Todd, Jocelyn N; Coatney, Garrett A; Wijdicks, Coen A; Millett, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    Single- and double-row arthroscopic reconstruction techniques for acute bony Bankart lesions have been described in the literature. The double-row fixation technique would provide superior reduction and stability of a simulated bony Bankart lesion at time zero in a cadaveric model compared with the single-row technique. Controlled laboratory study. Testing was performed on 14 matched pairs of glenoids with simulated bony Bankart fractures with a defect width of 25% of the glenoid diameter. Half of the fractures were repaired with a double-row technique, while the contralateral glenoids were repaired with a single-row technique. The quality of fracture reduction was measured with a coordinate measuring machine. To determine the biomechanical stability of the repairs, specimens were preconditioned with 10 sinusoidal cycles between 5 and 25 N at 0.1 Hz and then pulled to failure in the anteromedial direction at a rate of 5 mm/min. Loads at 1 mm and 2 mm of fracture displacement were determined. The double-row technique required significantly higher forces to achieve fracture displacements of 1 mm (mean, 60.6 N; range, 39.0-93.3 N; P = .001) and 2 mm (mean, 94.4 N; range, 43.4-151.2 N; P = .004) than the single-row technique (1 mm: mean, 30.2 N; range, 14.0-54.1 N and 2 mm: mean, 63.7 N; range, 26.6-118.8 N). Significantly reduced fracture displacement was seen after double-row repair for both the unloaded condition (mean, 1.1 mm; range, 0.3-2.4 mm; P = .005) and in response to a 10-N anterior force applied to the defect (mean, 1.6 mm; range, 0.5-2.7 mm; P = .001) compared with single-row repair (unloaded: mean, 2.1 mm; range, 1.3-3.4 mm and loaded: mean, 3.4 mm; range, 1.9-4.7 mm). The double-row fixation technique resulted in improved fracture reduction and superior stability at time zero in this cadaveric model. This information may influence the surgical technique used to treat large osseous Bankart fractures and the postoperative rehabilitation protocols

  3. Correlation of iodine uptake and perfusion parameters between dual-energy CT imaging and first-pass dual-input perfusion CT in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoliang; Xu, Yanyan; Duan, Jianghui; Li, Chuandong; Sun, Hongliang; Wang, Wu

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the potential relationship between perfusion parameters from first-pass dual-input perfusion computed tomography (DI-PCT) and iodine uptake levels estimated from dual-energy CT (DE-CT).The pre-experimental part of this study included a dynamic DE-CT protocol in 15 patients to evaluate peak arterial enhancement of lung cancer based on time-attenuation curves, and the scan time of DE-CT was determined. In the prospective part of the study, 28 lung cancer patients underwent whole-volume perfusion CT and single-source DE-CT using 320-row CT. Pulmonary flow (PF, mL/min/100 mL), aortic flow (AF, mL/min/100 mL), and a perfusion index (PI = PF/[PF + AF]) were automatically generated by in-house commercial software using the dual-input maximum slope method for DI-PCT. For the dual-energy CT data, iodine uptake was estimated by the difference (λ) and the slope (λHU). λ was defined as the difference of CT values between 40 and 70 KeV monochromatic images in lung lesions. λHU was calculated by the following equation: λHU = |λ/(70 - 40)|. The DI-PCT and DE-CT parameters were analyzed by Pearson/Spearman correlation analysis, respectively.All subjects were pathologically proved as lung cancer patients (including 16 squamous cell carcinoma, 8 adenocarcinoma, and 4 small cell lung cancer) by surgery or CT-guided biopsy. Interobserver reproducibility in DI-PCT (PF, AF, PI) and DE-CT (λ, λHU) were relatively good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]Inter = 0.8726-0.9255, ICCInter = 0.8179-0.8842; ICCInter = 0.8881-0.9177, ICCInter = 0.9820-0.9970, ICCInter = 0.9780-0.9971, respectively). Correlation coefficient between λ and AF, and PF were as follows: 0.589 (P < .01) and 0.383 (P < .05). Correlation coefficient between λHU and AF, and PF were as follows: 0.564 (P < .01) and 0.388 (P < .05).Both the single-source DE-CT and dual-input CT perfusion analysis method can be applied to

  4. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... during the procedure. Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the ...

  5. Cardiac CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate. Before the test, a contrast dye, often iodine, may be injected into a vein in your ... should not receive more CT scans than the number that clinical guidelines recommend. Another risk is that ...

  6. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  7. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  8. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... your provider should weigh this risk against the benefits of getting a correct diagnosis for a medical ...

  9. Lumbosacral spine CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... reveal the following conditions or diseases: Cyst Herniated disk Infection Cancer that has spread to the spine ... M. Editorial team. CT Scans Read more Herniated Disk Read more Osteoarthritis Read more A.D.A. ...

  10. Investigating the Effects of Typical Rowing Strength Training Practices on Strength and Power Development and 2,000 m Rowing Performance.

    PubMed

    Ian Gee, Thomas; Caplan, Nicholas; Christian Gibbon, Karl; Howatson, Glyn; Grant Thompson, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of a short-term, strength training intervention, typically undertaken by club-standard rowers, on 2,000 m rowing performance and strength and power development. Twenty-eight male rowers were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. All participants performed baseline testing involving assessments of muscle soreness, creatine kinase activity (CK), maximal voluntary contraction (leg-extensors) (MVC), static-squat jumps (SSJ), counter-movement jumps (CMJ), maximal rowing power strokes (PS) and a 2,000 m rowing ergometer time-trial (2,000 m) with accompanying respiratory-exchange and electromyography (EMG) analysis. Intervention group participants subsequently performed three identical strength training (ST) sessions, in the space of five days, repeating all assessments 24 h following the final ST. The control group completed the same testing procedure but with no ST. Following ST, the intervention group experienced significant elevations in soreness and CK activity, and decrements in MVC, SSJ, CMJ and PS (p < 0.01). However, 2,000 m rowing performance, pacing strategy and gas exchange were unchanged across trials in either condition. Following ST, significant increases occurred for EMG (p < 0.05), and there were non-significant trends for decreased blood lactate and anaerobic energy liberation (p = 0.063 - 0.086). In summary, club-standard rowers, following an intensive period of strength training, maintained their 2,000 m rowing performance despite suffering symptoms of muscle damage and disruption to muscle function. This disruption likely reflected the presence of acute residual fatigue, potentially in type II muscle fibres as strength and power development were affected.

  11. Investigating the Effects of Typical Rowing Strength Training Practices on Strength and Power Development and 2,000 m Rowing Performance

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Nicholas; Christian Gibbon, Karl; Howatson, Glyn; Grant Thompson, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the effects of a short-term, strength training intervention, typically undertaken by club-standard rowers, on 2,000 m rowing performance and strength and power development. Twenty-eight male rowers were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. All participants performed baseline testing involving assessments of muscle soreness, creatine kinase activity (CK), maximal voluntary contraction (leg-extensors) (MVC), static-squat jumps (SSJ), counter-movement jumps (CMJ), maximal rowing power strokes (PS) and a 2,000 m rowing ergometer time-trial (2,000 m) with accompanying respiratory-exchange and electromyography (EMG) analysis. Intervention group participants subsequently performed three identical strength training (ST) sessions, in the space of five days, repeating all assessments 24 h following the final ST. The control group completed the same testing procedure but with no ST. Following ST, the intervention group experienced significant elevations in soreness and CK activity, and decrements in MVC, SSJ, CMJ and PS (p < 0.01). However, 2,000 m rowing performance, pacing strategy and gas exchange were unchanged across trials in either condition. Following ST, significant increases occurred for EMG (p < 0.05), and there were non-significant trends for decreased blood lactate and anaerobic energy liberation (p = 0.063 – 0.086). In summary, club-standard rowers, following an intensive period of strength training, maintained their 2,000 m rowing performance despite suffering symptoms of muscle damage and disruption to muscle function. This disruption likely reflected the presence of acute residual fatigue, potentially in type II muscle fibres as strength and power development were affected. PMID:28149354

  12. CT of pituitary abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, T.C.; Johns, R.D.; Long, M.; Myles, S.T.

    1985-06-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition, with only 50 cases reported in the literature. Of those, 29 cases were well documented for analysis. Preoperative diagnosis of pituitary abscess is difficult. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of pituitary abscess was first described in 1983; the abscess was depicted by axial images with coronal reconstruction. The authors recently encountered a case of pituitary abscess documented by direct coronal CT of the sella turcica.

  13. Coupled rows of PBS cores and PSII dimers in cyanobacteria: symmetry and structure.

    PubMed

    Zlenko, Dmitry V; Galochkina, Tatiana V; Krasilnikov, Pavel M; Stadnichuk, Igor N

    2017-09-01

    Phycobilisome (PBS) is a giant water-soluble photosynthetic antenna transferring the energy of absorbed light mainly to the photosystem II (PSII) in cyanobacteria. Under the low light conditions, PBSs and PSII dimers form coupled rows where each PBS is attached to the cytoplasmic surface of PSII dimer, and PBSs come into contact with their face surfaces (state 1). The model structure of the PBS core that we have developed earlier by comparison and combination of different fine allophycocyanin crystals, as reported in Zlenko et al. (Photosynth Res 130(1):347-356, 2016b), provides a natural way of the PBS core face-to-face stacking. According to our model, the structure of the protein-protein contact between the neighboring PBS cores in the rows is the same as the contact between the APC hexamers inside the PBS core. As a result, the rates of energy transfer between the cores can occur, and the row of PBS cores acts as an integral PBS "supercore" providing energy transfer between the individual PBS cores. The PBS cores row pitch in our elaborated model (12.4 nm) is very close to the PSII dimers row pitch obtained by the electron microscopy (12.2 nm) that allowed to unite a model of the PBS cores row with a model of the PSII dimers row. Analyzing the resulting model, we have determined the most probable locations of ApcD and ApcE terminal emitter subunits inside the bottom PBS core cylinders and also revealed the chlorophyll molecules of PSII gathering energy from the PBS.

  14. Long-Term Outcomes of Proximal Row Carpectomy: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Harvey; Moran, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Proximal row carpectomy is a well-established technique for the management of wrist arthritis; however, patient selection and long-term durability of proximal row carpectomy is still a matter of controversy. Hence, we conducted a systematic review of the English literature to determine the best evidence on long-term outcomes following proximal row carpectomy. Methods A MEDLINE search using the term “proximal row carpectomy” was performed. A total of 192 studies were identified. All studies with 10 or more years of follow-up were included in the review. Data extracted included patient demographics, indications for surgery, previous surgery, outcome assessment, and information on complications and failures. Results A total of 147 patients from six studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. The majority of patients were male and involved in manual labor. There was no significant difference between the preoperative and long-term postoperative motion. The weighted mean for postoperative grip strength was 68.4% compared with the contralateral side. Disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand; patient-rated wrist examination; and Mayo wrist scores were comparable to those reported for four-corner arthrodesis. There were 21 failures (14.3%) requiring re-operation. Failures were not associated with a specific preoperative diagnosis but distributed among patients with Kienböck disease, scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse, and scapholunate advanced collapse arthritis. Conclusions This systematic review confirms the long-term durability of proximal row carpectomy when used for the treatment of wrist arthritis. Although radiocapitate arthritis develops over time in most patients, the clinical significance of this finding is undetermined and does not necessarily correlate with failure of proximal row carpectomy. Poorer long-term outcomes are likely to result in patients engaged in heavy manual labor, whereas better outcomes may be

  15. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ROWING INJURIES AND THE FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT SCREEN™ IN FEMALE COLLEGIATE DIVISION I ROWERS

    PubMed Central

    Mansell, Jamie; Tierney, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background 48 percent of rowing injuries are due to overuse and occur more often in females. The Functional Movement Screen™ (FMS) is a screening tool utilized to identify the risk of musculoskeletal injury in field sport athletes based on movement patterns. It has not been used to identify risk of injury in rowing. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine if the scores on the FMS™ are predictors of incidence of all injuries, including low back pain (LBP) in female collegiate rowers during one season of rowing. Methods Prospective cohort conducted in a clinical setting. Thirty-seven Division I female collegiate rowers (33 rowers and 4 coxswains). Investigators performed pre-season FMS™ screening and collected demographic data, rowing data, and Oswestry Low Back Pain questionnaire scores. Based on FMS™ scores, individuals were grouped high or low risk for injury. Injury reports and patient complaints of LBP over the course of a season were compared to FMS™ group. Results Those in the high risk group were significantly more likely to experience LBP during the season (p=.036) and reported a 58 percent greater mean in years of rowing experience (p=.008) than individuals in the low risk group. Those with a history of LBP were six times more likely to experience LBP during season (p=.027). Discussion The FMS™ indicated that rowers at a high risk of injury and more years of rowing experience, have a higher probability of sustaining LBP. Results could be due to chronic overuse associated with the rowing motion. Low back pain was evident in 25 out of the 37 participants over the season. Conclusion While the FMS™ has been proven to predict injury in field athletes, there was no statistically significant evidence to support prediction of a reported time loss injury in female collegiate rowers. However, it did indicate a higher likelihood for subjective report of low back pain. Level of Evidence Cohort study, level 2b PMID:27274420

  16. Sports biomechanics in the research of the Department of Biomechanics of University School of Physical Education in Poznań. Part 1. Biomechanics of rowing: tests on rowing ergometers, reconstruction and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dworak, Lechosław B

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reconstruct the early phase of scientific research conducted at the Department of Biomechanics of the University School of Physical Education in Poznan, particularly the work on biomechanics of rowing, conducted as part of the Ministerial Project PR 105, entitled "The effectiveness of training and competition as well as regeneration in sports". Three kinds of research have been described, carried out with the use of the rowing ergometers. The first was the research on neuromuscular coordination in the rowing cycle, the second was the research on kinematic and dynamic characteristics of rowing on the Universal Rowing Ergometer UEW - 1, while the last one concerned determination of maximum forces generated by functional muscle groups in two characteristic rowing positions within the closed biochain of the torso and the limbs.

  17. Helical CT of abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Novelline, R A; Rhea, J T; Bell, T

    1999-05-01

    CT has revolutionized the diagnostic work-up of trauma patients with suspected abdominal injuries. A wide range of intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal organ injuries can be quickly and accurately diagnosed with CT. Today, helical CT technology permits even faster examinations, with improved intravenous contrast opacification of parenchymal organs and vascular structures and reduced CT artifacts caused by patient motion, respiration, and arterial pulsation. Severely injured and potentially unstable patients, who might not have been able to tolerate the long CT examinations of the past, may be quickly evaluated today with helical CT. Accurate diagnosis requires high quality CT examinations that are performed with optimum CT protocols. This article reviews the currently recommended helical CT protocols for evaluating patients with suspected abdominal injuries, and the CT findings when injuries are present.

  18. Weighted FBP--a simple approximate 3D FBP algorithm for multislice spiral CT with good dose usage for arbitrary pitch.

    PubMed

    Stierstorfer, Karl; Rauscher, Annabella; Boese, Jan; Bruder, Herbert; Schaller, Stefan; Flohr, Thomas

    2004-06-07

    A new 3D reconstruction scheme, weighted filtered backprojection (WFBP) for multirow spiral CT based on an extension of the two-dimensional SMPR algorithm is described and results are presented. In contrast to other 3D algorithms available, the algorithm makes use of all available data for all pitch values. The algorithm is a FBP algorithm: linear convolution of the parallel data along the row direction followed by a 3D backprojection. Data usage for arbitrary pitch values is maintained through a weighting scheme which takes into account redundant data. If proper row weighting is applied, the image quality is superior to the image quality of the SMPR algorithm.

  19. Three-dimensional image reconstruction of an anorectal malformation with multidetector-row helical computed tomography technology.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoshio; Ando, Hisami; Seo, Takahiko; Kaneko, Kentaro; Katsuno, Shinsuke; Shinohara, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Kensaku; Toriwaki, Junichiro

    2003-05-01

    The presentation of the surgical anatomy of anorectal malformation by standard anatomical figures is not suitable for individual anorectoplasty. It is essential to understand the anatomy of the pelvic muscle (striated muscle complex: SMC) including the external anal sphincter and their three-dimensional (3D) configuration in each patient. Thus, we studied the SMC three-dimensionally with multidetector-row helical computed tomography (MRH-CT) preoperatively, and evaluated its usefulness. Fourteen patients with anorectal malformations before anorectoplasty (types: high n=6, intermediate n=2, low n=6) and two patients without anorectal malformations as controls (total: male n=8, female n=8) were investigated. An image of pelvic region was prepared with a slice thickness of 0.5 mm and a reconstruction pitch of 0.5 mm. A 3D reconstruction on a conventional personal computer (PC) was made with a volume rendering method, and assisted by our own software. The SMC was analyzed with three modified modes of 3D reconstruction corresponding to the surrounding tissues. A length of the parasagittal muscle, and both the sagittal and transverse width of the vertical fibers in the SMC at the connection to the parasagittal muscle were measured on a 3D image and then compared among three different types and controls. To eliminate variations in age, a length index was used to allow comparison. The 3D configuration of the SMC was different in every case. The arranged image mode, which displayed the SMC and the pelvic bones simultaneously, enabled to use conventional knowledge in cysto-urethrography. The length of the parasagittal muscle was longest in the high type but the width of the vertical fibers was smallest. Anatomical figures of the SMC including the external anal sphincter were clearly demonstrated on a PC in every anorectal malformation by our program. A 3D reconstruction image provides positional information on the SMC for the body surface and pelvic bone at the same time

  20. Historical development and current status of organ procurement from death-row prisoners in China.

    PubMed

    Allison, Kirk C; Caplan, Arthur; Shapiro, Michael E; Els, Charl; Paul, Norbert W; Li, Huige

    2015-12-03

    In December 2014, China announced that only voluntarily donated organs from citizens would be used for transplantation after January 1, 2015. Many medical professionals worldwide believe that China has stopped using organs from death-row prisoners. In the present article, we briefly review the historical development of organ procurement from death-row prisoners in China and comprehensively analyze the social-political background and the legal basis of the announcement. The announcement was not accompanied by any change in organ sourcing legislations or regulations. As a fact, the use of prisoner organs remains legal in China. Even after January 2015, key Chinese transplant officials have repeatedly stated that death-row prisoners have the same right as regular citizens to "voluntarily donate" organs. This perpetuates an unethical organ procurement system in ongoing violation of international standards. Organ sourcing from death-row prisoners has not stopped in China. The 2014 announcement refers to the intention to stop the use of organs illegally harvested without the consent of the prisoners. Prisoner organs procured with "consent" are now simply labelled as "voluntarily donations from citizens". The semantic switch may whitewash sourcing from both death-row prisoners and prisoners of conscience. China can gain credibility only by enacting new legislation prohibiting use of prisoner organs and by making its organ sourcing system open to international inspections. Until international ethical standards are transparently met, sanctions should remain.

  1. Testing functional and morphological interpretations of enamel thickness along the deciduous tooth row in human children.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    The significance of a gradient in enamel thickness along the human permanent molar row has been debated in the literature. Some attribute increased enamel thickness from first to third molars to greater bite force during chewing. Others argue that thicker third molar enamel relates to a smaller crown size facilitated by a reduced dentin component. Thus, differences in morphology, not function, explains enamel thickness. This study draws on these different interpretive models to assess enamel thickness along the entire human deciduous tooth row. Average enamel thickness (AET), the area and proportion of crown enamel and dentin, and a crown size proxy are calculated for incisors, canines, and molars. Allometric scaling relationships are assessed within each tooth class, and then comparisons are undertaken along the row. Generally, AET was correlated with crown size and scaled with isometry, except for second molars which scaled with positive allometry. Mean AET increased along the row and was greater on molars, where bite forces are reported to be higher. Second molars combined the largest crown size with the thickest enamel and the smallest proportion of dentin, which is consistent with a reduction in the potential for cusp fracture under high bite forces. Resistance to wear may also account for some enamel thickness variation between tooth classes. Dental reduction did not explain the trend in AET from central to lateral incisors, or from first to second molars. The gradient in AET along the deciduous tooth row is partly consistent with a functional interpretation of enamel thickness.

  2. Representation of egomotion in rat's trident and E-row whisker cortices.

    PubMed

    Chorev, Edith; Preston-Ferrer, Patricia; Brecht, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The whisker trident, a three-whisker array on the rat's chin, has been implicated in egomotion sensing and might function as a tactile speedometer. Here we study the cortical representation of trident whiskers and E-row whiskers in barrel cortex. Neurons identified in trident cortex of anesthetized animals showed sustained velocity-sensitive responses to ground motion. In freely moving animals, about two-thirds of the units in the trident and E-row whisker cortices were tuned to locomotion speed, a larger fraction of speed-tuned cells than in the somatosensory dysgranular zone. Similarly, more units were tuned to acceleration and showed sensitivity to turning in trident and E-row whisker cortices than in the dysgranular zone. Microstimulation in locomoting animals evoked small but significant speed changes, and such changes were larger in the trident and E-row whisker representations than in the dysgranular zone. Thus, activity in trident and E-row cortices represents egomotion information and influences locomotion behavior.

  3. Remote sensing of row crop structure and component temperatures using directional radiometric temperatures and inversion techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    A physically based sensor response model of a row crop was used as the mathematical framework from which several inversion strategies were tested for extracting row structure information and component temperatures using a series of sensor view angles. The technique was evaluated on ground-based radiometric thermal infrared data of a cotton row crop that covered 48 percent of the ground in the vertical projection. The results showed that the accuracies of the predicted row heights and widths, vegetation temperatures, and soil temperatures of the cotton row crop were on the order of 5 cm, 1 deg, and 2 deg C, respectively. The inversion techniques can be applied to directional sensor data from aircraft platforms and even space platforms if the effects of atmospheric absorption and emission can be corrected. In theory, such inversion techniques can be applied to a wide variety of vegetation types and thus can have significant implications for remote sensing research and applications in disciplines that deal with incomplete vegetation canopies.

  4. [Rotator cuff repair: single- vs double-row. Clinical and biomechanical results].

    PubMed

    Baums, M H; Kostuj, T; Klinger, H-M; Papalia, R

    2016-02-01

    The goal of rotator cuff repair is a high initial mechanical stability as a requirement for adequate biological recovery of the tendon-to-bone complex. Notwithstanding the significant increase in publications concerning the topic of rotator cuff repair, there are still controversies regarding surgical technique. The aim of this work is to present an overview of the recently published results of biomechanical and clinical studies on rotator cuff repair using single- and double-row techniques. The review is based on a selective literature research of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Database on the subject of the clinical and biomechanical results of single- and double-row repair. In general, neither the biomechanical nor the clinical evidence can recommend the use of a double-row concept for the treatment for every rotator cuff tear. Only tears of more than 3 cm seem to benefit from better results on both imaging and in clinical outcome studies compared with the use of single-row techniques. Despite a significant increase in publications on the surgical treatment of rotator cuff tears in recent years, the clinical results were not significantly improved in the literature so far. Unique information and algorithms, from which the optimal treatment of this entity can be derived, are still inadequate. Because of the cost-effectiveness and the currently vague evidence, the double-row techniques cannot be generally recommended for the repair of all rotator cuff tears.

  5. Built for rowing: frog muscle is tuned to limb morphology to power swimming

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Christopher T.; Clemente, Christofer J.

    2013-01-01

    Rowing is demanding, in part, because drag on the oars increases as the square of their speed. Hence, as muscles shorten faster, their force capacity falls, whereas drag rises. How do frogs resolve this dilemma to swim rapidly? We predicted that shortening velocity cannot exceed a terminal velocity where muscle and fluid torques balance. This terminal velocity, which is below Vmax, depends on gear ratio (GR = outlever/inlever) and webbed foot area. Perhaps such properties of swimmers are ‘tuned’, enabling shortening speeds of approximately 0.3Vmax for maximal power. Predictions were tested using a ‘musculo-robotic’ Xenopus laevis foot driven either by a living in vitro or computational in silico plantaris longus muscle. Experiments verified predictions. Our principle finding is that GR ranges from 11.5 to 20 near the predicted optimum for rowing (GR ≈ 11). However, gearing influences muscle power more strongly than foot area. No single morphology is optimal for producing muscle power. Rather, the ‘optimal’ GR decreases with foot size, implying that rowing ability need not compromise jumping (and vice versa). Thus, despite our neglect of additional forces (e.g. added mass), our model predicts pairings of physiological and morphological properties to confer effective rowing. Beyond frogs, the model may apply across a range of size and complexity from aquatic insects to human-powered rowing. PMID:23676897

  6. Experiments in dilution jet mixing effects of multiple rows and non-circular orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E. B.; Meyers, G. D.; White, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and empirical model results are presented that extend previous studies of the mixing of single-sided and opposed rows of jets in a confined duct flow to include effects of non-circular orifices and double rows of jets. Analysis of the mean temperature data obtained in this investigation showed that the effects of orifice shape and double rows are significant only in the region close to the injection plane, provided that the orifices are symmetric with respect to the main flow direction. The penetration and mixing of jets from 45-degree slanted slots is slightly less than that from equivalent-area symmetric orifices. The penetration from 2-dimensional slots is similar to that from equivalent-area closely-spaced rows of holes, but the mixing is slower for the 2-D slots. Calculated mean temperature profiles downstream of jets from non-circular and double rows of orifices, made using an extension developed for a previous empirical model, are shown to be in good agreement with the measured distributions.

  7. No evidence of expertise-related changes in muscle synergies during rowing.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Nicolas A; Guével, Arnaud; Durand, Sylvain; Hug, François

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether expertise in rowing is driven by a specific structure in muscular coordination. We compared seven experienced rowers and eight untrained (i.e., inexperienced) subjects during rowing on an ergometer. Both surface electromyography activity and mechanical patterns (forces exerted at the handle and the foot-stretcher) were recorded during a high intensity rowing exercise. A non-negative matrix factorization was applied to 23 electromyographic patterns to differentiate muscle synergies. Results showed that expertise was not associated with different dimensionality in the electromyographic data and that three muscle synergies were sufficient to explain the majority of the variance accounted for (i.e., >90% of the total variance) in the two populations. The synergies extracted were similar in the two populations, with identical functional roles. While the temporal organization of the propulsive synergies was very similar, slight differences were found in the composition of the muscle synergies (muscle synergy vectors) between the two populations. The results suggests that rowing expertise would not require the development of novel muscle synergies but would imply intrinsic synergies already used in different behaviors. Performance in rowing is more probably linked to adjustments in the mechanical output of the muscle synergies rather than to differences in the shape and timing of their activations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging of Orthotopic Glioblastoma Xenografts in Mice Using a Clinical CT Scanner: Comparison with Micro-CT and Histology

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Stefanie; Mürle, Bettina; Felix, Manuela; Arns, Anna; Groden, Christoph; Wenz, Frederik; Hug, Andreas; Glatting, Gerhard; Kramer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is an increasing need for small animal in vivo imaging in murine orthotopic glioma models. Because dedicated small animal scanners are not available ubiquitously, the applicability of a clinical CT scanner for visualization and measurement of intracerebrally growing glioma xenografts in living mice was validated. Materials and Methods 2.5x106 U87MG cells were orthotopically implanted in NOD/SCID/ᵞc-/- mice (n = 9). Mice underwent contrast-enhanced (300 μl Iomeprol i.v.) imaging using a micro-CT (80 kV, 75 μAs, 360° rotation, 1,000 projections, scan time 33 s, resolution 40 x 40 x 53 μm) and a clinical CT scanner (4-row multislice detector; 120 kV, 150 mAs, slice thickness 0.5 mm, feed rotation 0.5 mm, resolution 98 x 98 x 500 μm). Mice were sacrificed and the brain was worked up histologically. In all modalities tumor volume was measured by two independent readers. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured from reconstructed CT-scans (0.5 mm slice thickness; n = 18). Results Tumor volumes (mean±SD mm3) were similar between both CT-modalities (micro-CT: 19.8±19.0, clinical CT: 19.8±18.8; Wilcoxon signed-rank test p = 0.813). Moreover, between reader analyses for each modality showed excellent agreement as demonstrated by correlation analysis (Spearman-Rho >0.9; p<0.01 for all correlations). Histologically measured tumor volumes (11.0±11.2) were significantly smaller due to shrinkage artifacts (p<0.05). CNR and SNR were 2.1±1.0 and 1.1±0.04 for micro-CT and 23.1±24.0 and 1.9±0.7 for the clinical CTscanner, respectively. Conclusion Clinical CT scanners may reliably be used for in vivo imaging and volumetric analysis of brain tumor growth in mice. PMID:27829015

  9. Low dose chest CT protocol (50 mAs) as a routine protocol for comprehensive assessment of intrathoracic abnormality.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishino, Mizuki; Lin, Pei-Jan; Gautam, Shiva; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic capability of low-dose CT (50 mAs) in comparison to standard-dose CT (150 mAs). Fifty-nine consecutive patients underwent two non-contrast chest CT scans with different current-time products (50 and 150 mAs at 120 kVp) on a 64-detector row CT scanner. Three board certified chest radiologists independently reviewed 118 series of 2 mm-thick images (2 series for each of 59 patients) in a random order. The readers assessed abnormal findings including emphysema, ground-glass opacity, reticular opacity, micronodules, bronchiectasis, honeycomb, nodules (>5 mm), aortic aneurysm, coronary artery calcification, pericardial and pleural effusion, pleural thickening, mediastinal tumor and lymph node enlargement. Five-point scale from 1 (definitely absent) to 5 (definitely present) was used to record the results. The rates of score agreement between two images were calculated. Deviation of one observer's score from other two observers was compared between low dose CT and standard dose CT. Mean agreement rate of the lung parenchymal findings between low dose CT and standard dose CT images was 0.836 (range, 0.746-0.926). Mean agreement rates for mediastinal and pleural findings were 0.920 (range, 0.735-1.000). There was no statistically significant difference in the deviation of the observers' scores between low-dose CT and standard-dose CT. Low dose CT protocol at 50 mAs can produce the screening results consistent with standard dose CT protocol (150 mAs), supporting routine use of low dose chest CT protocol.

  10. The Influence of Rotation, Tillage and Row Spacing on Near-Surface Soil Temperature for Winter Wheat in Southern Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Larney, F. J.; Ren, Tennis L.; McGinn, Sean M.; Lindwall, C W.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.

    2003-02-01

    The influence of rotation, tillage and row spacing on near-surface soil temperature for winter wheat in southern Alberta. Rotation, tillage and row spacing and their effects on surface residue levels can modify soil temperature. Our study investigated the effect of rotation, tillage and row spacing on near-surface (0.025 m) soil temperature under winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in 1993-94 and 1994-95.

  11. Higher rate of fat oxidation during rowing compared with cycling ergometer exercise across a range of exercise intensities.

    PubMed

    Egan, B; Ashley, D T; Kennedy, E; O'Connor, P L; O'Gorman, D J

    2016-06-01

    The relative contribution of carbohydrate and fat oxidation to energy expenditure during exercise is dependent on variables including exercise intensity, mode, and recruited muscle mass. This study investigated patterns of substrate utilization during two non-weightbearing exercise modalities, namely cycling and rowing. Thirteen young, moderately trained males performed a continuous incremental (3-min stages) exercise test to exhaustion on separate occasions on an electronically braked cycle (CYC) ergometer and an air-braked rowing (ROW) ergometer, respectively. On two further occasions, participants performed a 20-min steady-state exercise bout at ∼50%VO2peak on the respective modalities. Despite similar oxygen consumption, rates of fat oxidation (FATox ) were ∼45% higher during ROW compared with CYC (P < 0.05) across a range of power output increments. The crossover point for substrate utilization occurred at a higher relative exercise intensity for ROW than CYC (57.8 ± 2.1 vs 42.1 ± 3.6%VO2peak , P < 0.05). During steady-state submaximal exercise, the higher FATox during ROW compared with CYC was maintained (P < 0.05), but absolute FATox were 42% (CYC) and 28% (ROW) lower than during incremental exercise. FATox is higher during ROW compared with CYC exercise across a range of exercise intensities matched for energy expenditure, and is likely as a consequence of larger muscle mass recruited during ROW.

  12. The Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture: the Effect of Tilled Row Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Newton, R. W.; Rouse, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    The tilled rowstructure is known to be one of the important factors affecting the observations of the microwave emission from a natural surface. Measurements of this effect were carried out with both I and X band radiometers mounted on a mobile truck on a bare 40 m x 45 m row tilled field. The soil moisture content during the measurements ranged from approximately 10 percent to approximately 30 percent by dry weight. The results of these measurements showed that the variations of the antenna temperatures with incident angle theta changed with the azimuthal angle a measured from the row direction. A numerical calculation based on a composite surface roughness was made and found to predict the observed features within the model's limit of accuracy. It was concluded that the difference between the horizontally and vertically polarized temperatures was due to the change in the local angle of field emission within the antenna field of view caused by the large scale row structure.

  13. On the Mixing of Single and Opposed Rows of Jets With a Confined Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Clisset, James R.; Moder, Jeffrey P.; Lear, William E.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were 1) to demonstrate that contour plots could be made using the data interface in the NASA GRC jet-in-crossflow (JIC) spreadsheet, and 2) to investigate the suitability of using superposition for the case of opposed rows of jets with their centerlines in-line. The current report is similar to NASA/TM-2005-213137 but the "basic" effects of a confined JIC that are shown in profile plots there are shown as contour plots in this report, and profile plots for opposed rows of aligned jets are presented here using both symmetry and superposition models. Although superposition was found to be suitable for most cases of opposed rows of jets with jet centerlines in-line, the calculation procedure in the JIC spreadsheet was not changed and it still uses the symmetry method for this case, as did all previous publications of the NASA empirical model.

  14. Group-theoretical search for rows or columns of the lepton mixing matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčiukonis, Darius; Lavoura, Luís

    2017-04-01

    We have used the SmallGroups library of groups, together with the computer algebra systems GAP and Mathematica, to search for groups with a three-dimensional irreducible representation in which one of the group generators has a twice-degenerate eigenvalue while another generator has non-degenerate eigenvalues. By assuming one of these group generators to commute with the charged-lepton mass matrix and the other one to commute with the neutrino (Dirac) mass matrix, one derives group-theoretical predictions for the moduli of the matrix elements of either a row or a column of the lepton mixing matrix. Our search has produced several realistic predictions for either the second row, or the third row, or for any of the columns of that matrix.

  15. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms of peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.

  16. CEnPiT: Helical cardiac CT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bontus, Claas; Koken, Peter; Koehler, Thomas; Grass, Michael

    2006-08-15

    Computer tomography (CT) scanners with an increasing number of detector rows offer the potential of shorter scanning times. Nevertheless, the reconstruction problem becomes more challenging, since cone beam artifacts are likely to enter. Here, we consider helical cardiac CT. We analyze how a relationship can be established between exact reconstruction algorithms and the demand to perform a cardiac gating. Utilizing the redundancies requires the consideration of all kinds of Radon planes. For the reconstruction algorithm proposed here, we separate the data into two parts. The first part contains contributions of Radon planes, which are measured with a large number of redundancies. The second part contains the remaining contributions. As it turns out, the second part contributes rather to the low-frequency contents of trans-axial slices. Therefore, we propose to perform a gated back-projection only for the first part, while the second part is back-projected in an ungated way. Data from the complete source trajectory are employed in the reconstruction process in contrary to conventional helical cardiac reconstruction methods. Moreover, all different types of Radon planes are taken into account in the reconstruction, though an ECG-dependent cardiac gating is applied. The reconstruction results, which we present for clinical and simulated data, demonstrate the high potential of CEnPiT for helical cardiac CT with large cone angle systems.

  17. Impact of wear and diet on molar row geometry and topography in the house mouse.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Sabrina; Ledevin, Ronan

    2017-09-01

    Dental evolution affects the geometry of the tooth, but the adaptive relevance of these changes is related to tooth sharpness, complexity, and relief (topography). On a set of laboratory mice, we assessed how wear related to age and food consistency affected molar geometry and topography. Three groups of laboratory inbred mice (C57BL/6J strain) were considered: Four week old mice close to weaning, six month old mice fed on regular rodent pellets, and six month old mice fed on rodent pellets that were powdered and served as jelly. Their upper and lower molar rows were imaged in 3D. The geometry of the surfaces was quantified using a template describing the whole surface of the rows. Topographic indices were estimated on the same surfaces. The geometry of the molar rows was heavily affected by age-related wear. Food consistency affected mostly the upper molar row, which was more worn and less helical in soft food eaters. Tooth sharpness and relief decreased with age-related wear. Tooth relief was lower in soft food eaters, but only on the upper molar row. Tooth complexity was insensitive to wear. The primary factor affecting tooth geometry and topography is age-related wear, as wear erodes the molar surfaces. Tooth complexity, however, appears to be insensitive to wear, making this index relevant for comparison of tooth morphology among wild mice of unknown age. Soft food eaters displayed more worn teeth, with less helical molar row occlusal surface, possibly because behavior and jaw morphology were disturbed due to this unusual food resource. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Peak Power Output Test on a Rowing Ergometer: A Methodological Study.

    PubMed

    Metikos, Boris; Mikulic, Pavle; Sarabon, Nejc; Markovic, Goran

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to examine the reliability and validity of the peak power output test on a rowing ergometer (Concept II Model D Inc.) and to establish the "optimal resistance" at which this peak power output was observed in 87 participants with varying levels of physical activity and rowing expertise: 15 male and 12 female physically inactive students (age: 21 ± 2 years), 16 male and 20 female physically active students (age: 23 ± 2 years), and 15 male and 9 female trained rowers (age: 19 ± 2 years). The participants performed countermovement jump (CMJ) test on a force plate, followed by 3 maximal-effort rowing trials using the lowest, medium, and the highest adjustable resistance settings (i.e., "1", "5," and "10" on the resistance control dial on the ergometer) in randomized order. The test proved to be reliable (coefficients of variation: 2.6-6.5%; intraclass correlation coefficients: 0.87-0.98). The correlation coefficients between CMJ peak power and rowing peak power (both in watts per kilogram) were fairly consistent across all 3 groups of participants and resistance levels, ranging between r = 0.70 and r = 0.78. Finally, the highest power output was observed at the highest resistance setting in 2 nonathletic groups (p < 0.01), whereas rowers seem to produce the highest power output at the moderate-resistance setting. We conclude that the power output test on a Concept II rowing ergometer may serve as a reliable and valid tool for assessing whole-body peak power output in untrained individuals and rowing athletes.

  19. Candidate perennial bioenergy grasses have a higher albedo than annual row crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. N.; VanLoocke, A.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The production of perennial cellulosic feedstocks for bioenergy presents the potential to diversify regional economies and the national energy supply, while also serving as climate 'regulators' due to a number of biogeochemical and biogeophysical differences relative to row crops. Numerous observational and model based approaches have investigated biogeochemical tradeoffs, such as increased carbon sequestration and increased water use, associated with growing cellulosic feedstocks. A less understood aspect is the biogeophysical changes associated with the difference in albedo (α), which could alter the local energy balance and cause local to regional cooling several times larger than that associated with offsetting carbon. Here, we established paired fields of Miscanthus × giganteus (miscanthus) and Panicum virgatum (switchgrass), two of the leading perennial cellulosic feedstock candidates, and traditional annual row crops in the highly productive "Corn-belt". Our results show that miscanthus did and switchgrass did not have an overall higher α than current row crops but a strong seasonal pattern existed. Both perennials had consistently higher growing season α than row crops and winter α did not differ. The lack of observed differences in winter α, however, masked an interaction between snow cover and species differences, with the perennial species, compared with the row crops, having a higher α when snow was absent and a much lower α when snow was present. Overall, these changes resulted in an average net reduction in annual absorbed energy of about 5 W/m2 for switchgrass and about 8 W/m2 for miscanthus relative to annual crops. Therefore, the conversion from annual row to perennial crops alters the radiative balance of the surface via changes in α and could lead to regional cooling.

  20. Comparison of Rowing on a Concept 2 Stationary and Dynamic Ergometer

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Aaron; Abendroth, Julianne; King, Deborah; Swensen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Biomechanical and physiological responses to rowing 1000 m at a power output equivalent to a 2000 m race were compared in 34 collegiate rowers (17 women, 17 men) rowing on a stationary and dynamic Concept 2 ergometer. Stroke ratio, peak handle force, rate of force development, impulse, and respiratory exchange ratio decreased by 15.7, 14.8, 10.9, 10.2 and 1.9%, respectively, on the dynamic ergometer. In contrast, percent time to peak force and stroke rate increased by 10.5 and 12.6%, respectively, during dynamic ergometry; the changes in stroke rate and impulse were greater for men than women. Last, VO2 was 5.1% higher and efficiency 5. 3% lower on the dynamic ergometer for men. Collegiate rowers used higher stoke rates and lower peak stroke forces to achieve a similar power output while rowing at race pace on the dynamic ergometer, which may have increased the cardiopulmonary demand and possibly reduced force production in the primary movers. Differences were more pronounced in males than females; this dichotomy may be more due to dynamic ergometer familiarity than sex. Key points When rowing at a constant power output, all rowers used higher stroke rates and lower stroke forces on the Concept 2 Dynamic ergometer as compared to the Concept 2 Stationary ergometer. When rowing at a constant power output, cardiopulmonary demand was higher for all rowers, as measured by heart rate, on the Concept 2 Dynamic ergometer as compared to the Concept 2 Stationary ergometer. When rowing at a constant power output, efficiency was lower for male rowers on the Concept 2 Dynamic ergometer as compared to the Concept 2 Stationary ergometer. PMID:24149871

  1. The simulation of turbomachinery blade rows in asymmetric flow using actuator disks

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, W.G.; Hynes, T.P.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes the development of actuator disk models to simulate the asymmetric flow through high-speed low hub-to-tip ratio blade rows. The actuator disks represent boundaries between regions of the flow in which the flow field is solved by numerical computation. The appropriate boundary conditions and their numerical implementation are described, and particular attention is paid to the problem of simulating the effect of blade row blockage near choking conditions. Guidelines on choice of axial position of the disk are reported. In addition, semi-actuator disk models are briefly described and the limitations in the application of the model to supersonic flow are discussed.

  2. Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) preprocessing program (PREROWS2.EXE). User's manual and program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Charles R.

    1993-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum is a user's manual with additional program documentation for the computer program PREROWS2.EXE. PREROWS2 works with data collected by an ocean wave spectrometer that uses radar (ROWS) as an active remote sensor. The original ROWS data acquisition subsystem was replaced with a PC in 1990. PREROWS2.EXE is a compiled QuickBasic 4.5 program that unpacks the recorded data, displays various variables, and provides for copying blocks of data from the original 8mm tape to a PC file.

  3. Automatic liver segmentation method featuring a novel filter for multiphase multidetector-row helical computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Tomohiro; Nitta, Norihisa; Tsudagawa, Masaru; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    To introduce an automatic liver segmentation method that includes a novel filter for multiphase multidetector-row helical computed tomography. We acquired 3-phase multidetector-row computed tomographic scans that included unenhanced, arterial, and portal phases. The liver was segmented using our novel adaptive linear prediction filter designed to reduce the difference between filter input and output values in the liver region and to increase these values outside the liver region. The segmentation algorithm produced a mean dice similarity coefficient (DSC) value of 91.4%. The application of our adaptive linear prediction filter was effective in automatically extracting liver regions.

  4. A numerical study of bench blast row delay timing and its influence on percent-cast

    SciTech Connect

    Preece, D.S.

    1993-11-01

    The computer program, DMC (Distinct Motion Code), which was developed for simulating the rock motion associated with blasting, has been used to study the influence of row delay timing on rock motion. The numerical simulations correspond with field observations in that very short delays (< 50ms) and very long delays (> 300ms) produce a lower percent-cast than a medium delay (100 to 200 ms). The DMC predicted relationship between row delay timing and percent-cast is more complex than expected with a dip in the curve where the optimum timing might be expected. More study is required to gain a full understanding of this phenomenon.

  5. AGU continues 2003 journal access for libraries affected by RoweCom bankruptcy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifland, Jonathan

    Following the default of one of its major journal subscription agents, AGU has committed itself to providing campus-wide electronic access for 2003 to libraries whose journal orders are affected by the bankruptcy. The company, RoweCom Inc. of Westwood, Massachusetts, filed for Chapter 11 protection on 27 January 2003.RoweCom folded in December with nearly $80 million in unfulfilled orders which were destined to thousands of publishers. Subscription agents consolidate orders from libraries and transmit payments to publishers for journal subscriptions. The bankruptcy could cost AGU up to $700,000 in lost revenue in 2003, approximately 7% of AGU's gross institutional subscriptions.

  6. Determination of the neutron flux for the Yankee Rowe experiment in the Ford Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciapouti, R.J.; Petrusha, L.

    1994-12-31

    Yankee Atomic Electric Company undertook a Test Irradiation Program at the Ford Nuclear Reactor of the University of Michigan. The program was implemented to characterize the irradiation response of representative Yankee Rowe reactor vessel beltline plate materials. The program was also intended to remove uncertainties in the existing reactor vessel fluence and damage predictions on the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel steel. Since this is the first in-core experiment of this type for the Ford Nuclear Reactor, the measurement of the reaction rate and the estimate of the fluence are presented.

  7. A Constructive Method for Computing Generalized Manley-Rowe Constants of Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashova, Elena; Tec, Loredana

    2013-10-01

    The Manley--Rowe constants of motion (MRC) are conservation laws written out for a dynamical system describing the time evolution of the amplitudes in resonant triad. In this paper we extend the concept of MRC to resonance clusters of any form yielding generalized Manley--Rowe constants (gMRC) and give a constructive method how to compute them. We also give details of a \\emph{Mathematica} implementation of this method. While MRC provide integrability of the underlying dynamical system, gMRC generally do not but may be used for qualitative and numerical study of dynamical systems describing generic resonance clusters.

  8. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair With Absorbable Sutures in the Medial-Row Anchors.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Makoto; Hayashida, Kenji; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Kakiuchi, Masaaki

    2015-11-01

    To report the retear rate and retear pattern after double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (DR-ARCR) with the use of absorbable sutures as medial anchor sutures and to address the advantage of the use of absorbable sutures in medial-row anchors. Fifty-seven shoulders (22 male and 35 female patients; mean age, 66.1 years) with complete rotator cuff tears treated with DR-ARCR using absorbable mattress sutures as medial-row anchor sutures were included in the study. They included 35 medium, 17 large, and 5 massive tears. For the medial row, medial anchor sutures were replaced with absorbable mattress sutures. High-strength simple sutures were used for the lateral anchors. We evaluated retear patterns by magnetic resonance imaging examinations performed at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. The clinical conditions of all patients preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively were assessed by the University of California, Los Angeles rating scale and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder index. A complete retear of the tendon at the footprint was observed in 5 shoulders. Complete discontinuity at the middle of the tendon around the medial-row anchors with a footprint remnant was observed in 1 shoulder. A thinned repaired rotator cuff was observed in 2 shoulders because of a partial retear of the deep layer. The overall retear rate was 14%. From before to after surgery, the University of California, Los Angeles score significantly improved from 18.4 to 32.9 (P < .0001) and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons index improved from 55.1 to 87.7 (P < .0001). No complications were observed. The retear rates after DR-ARCR with absorbable sutures as medial-row anchors were 8.8% for complete retears of the tendon at the footprint and 1.7% for complete discontinuity of tendon around the medial-row anchors. This procedure provided a low retear rate around the medial-row anchors. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015

  9. Precooling does not improve 2,000-m rowing performance of females in hot, humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lee; Mauger, Alexis R; Watkins, Samuel L; Fitch, Natalie; Brewer, John; Maxwell, Neil S; Webborn, Nick; Castle, Paul C

    2014-12-01

    Precooling lowers skin (Tsk) and core temperature (Tre) and can improve performance in hot conditions, but has predominantly been studied in males. This study investigated the effects of precooling on self-paced 2,000-m rowing performance, within females, in hot, humid conditions. Eight physically active females (19.9 ± 1.5 years, 66.8 ± 3.1 kg, 30.0 ± 5.0% body fat) performed 2,000-m rows in a randomized order within 3 conditions {control (CONT) (20° C, 40% relative humidity [RH]); hot (HOT) (35° C, 60% RH); precooling (PREC) (35° C, 60% RH, preceded by precooling)}. The precooling condition consisted of 20-minute precooling with a cold water shower, followed by a 2,000-m row. In contrast, CONT and HOT consisted of 20-minute passive rest in place of precooling. Tre, Tsk, and power output were recorded every 100 m of the rows. Muscle temperature (Tmu) was recorded at baseline, after 20-minute passive rest/precooling and post-row. No differences were observed between conditions for performance time (CONT, 8.89 ± 0.45 minutes; HOT, 9.01 ± 0.55 minutes; PREC, 8.87 ± 0.48 minutes; p = 0.42). Mean Tre during the row was not different between conditions (CONT, 37.8 ± 0.2° C; HOT, 37.7 ± 0.3° C; PREC, 37.5 ± 0.2° C; p = 0.12; main effect), although lower Tre was observed at 1,600 and 1,800 m in PREC compared with HOT (p ≤ 0.05). Tmu was significantly reduced after precooling (p = 0.03). Precooling did not enhance 2,000-m rowing performance, despite differences in Tre, Tsk, and Tmu. The lack of observed improvement in rowing performance after cold shower precooling may have been due to the short exercise time. An improvement in performance may have been observed using an alternate method of precooling, which has been shown to be ergogenic in other sports.

  10. On-the-fly generation of multiplanar reformation images independent of CT scanner type.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dong Kyun; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Bo Hyoung; Kim, Kil Joong; Kim, Young Hoon; Bajpai, Vasundhara; Shin, Yeong Gil

    2008-09-01

    We propose a system that automatically generates multiplanar reformation (MPR) images on-the-fly, which is independent of computed tomography (CT) scanner type. Triggered by digital imaging communication in medicine (DICOM) Storage Commitment or in a time threshold manner, this system generates MPR images from received thin-section CT data sets with predefined reformation parameters and then sends MPR images to DICOM stations. Users can specify the reformation parameters and the destination of the resulting MPR images for each CT study description. A pilot system was tested for 3 months. From thin-section data sets received from two 16- and one 64-detector-row CT scanners, this system generated MPR images and sent them to the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) without failure or any additional human operation. For 143 test thin-section CT studies (172-4,761 images in each study), the time to store reformatted images (axial and coronal with 5-mm thicknesses and 4-mm intervals) in PACS after the completion of the CT scan ranged from 92 to 1,772 s (mean +/- SD, 555.1 +/- 509.4).

  11. Single-slice reconstruction method for helical cone-beam differential phase-contrast CT.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Chen, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) can provide the internal structure information of biomedical specimens with high-quality cross-section images and has become an invaluable analysis tool. Here a simple and fast reconstruction algorithm is reported for helical cone-beam differential PC-CT (DPC-CT), which is called the DPC-CB-SSRB algorithm. It combines the existing CB-SSRB method of helical cone-beam absorption-contrast CT with the differential nature of DPC imaging. The reconstruction can be performed using 2D fan-beam filtered back projection algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter. The quality of the results for large helical pitches is surprisingly good. In particular, with this algorithm comparable quality is obtained using helical cone-beam DPC-CT data with a normalized pitch of 10 to that obtained using the traditional inter-row interpolation reconstruction with a normalized pitch of 2. This method will push the future medical helical cone-beam DPC-CT imaging applications.

  12. Dedicated breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, John

    2009-03-01

    Dedicated breast computed tomography (CT) systems were designed and fabricated in our laboratory, and patient scanning commenced in November 2004. The breast CT scanner was designed utilizing several off-the-shelf components, including the x-ray system, the flat-panel detector, and a position encoder - bearing - motor system. These components were integrated into a custom designed scanner frame and gantry. The breast CT scanners utilize a 17 second acquisition during patient breath-hold, and during this time 500 projection images are acquired over 360 degrees around the breast. The radiation levels are adjusted such that the mean glandular dose is equal to that of two-view mammography for each woman. As of November 2008, over 180 patients have been scanned. Of these, about 40 were imaged with and without contrast agent injection. We have also imaged 4 patients using an integrated PET system. Initial evaluation indicates that high-quality tomographic images of the breast can be achieved at dose levels comparable to two view mammography. The ultimate utility of breast CT may include breast cancer screening, diagnostic imaging, robotically controlled biopsy, and other interventional procedures.

  13. Seventh-generation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, G. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new dual-drum CT system architecture has been recently introduced with the potential to achieve significantly higher temporal resolution than is currently possible in medical imaging CT. The concept relies only on known technologies; in particular rotation speeds several times higher than what is possible today could be achieved leveraging typical x-ray tube designs and capabilities. However, the architecture lends itself to the development of a new arrangement of x-ray sources in a toroidal vacuum envelope containing a rotating cathode ring and a (optionally rotating) shared anode ring to potentially obtain increased individual beam power as well as increase total exposure per rotation. The new x-ray source sub-system design builds on previously described concepts and could make the provision of multiple conventional high-power cathodes in a CT system practical by distributing the anode target between the cathodes. In particular, relying on known magnetic-levitation technologies, it is in principle possible to more than double the relative speed of the electron-beam with respect to the target, thus potentially leading to significant individual beam power increases as compared to today's state-of-the-art. In one embodiment, the proposed design can be naturally leveraged by the dual-drum CT concept previously described to alleviate the problem of arranging a number of conventional rotating anode-stem x-ray tubes and power conditioners on the limited space of a CT gantry. In another embodiment, a system with three cathodes is suggested leveraging the architecture previously proposed by Franke.

  14. Technical aspects of CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Kuszyk, B S; Fishman, E K

    1998-10-01

    The basic tasks of spiral CT acquisition, image processing, and image display are the foundations underlying CT angiography regardless of the anatomic region of interest. Volume rendering is a rapidly emerging image processing technique for creating three-dimensional (3D) images from CT datasets, which has important advantages over other 3D rendering techniques including maximum intensity projection and surface rendering. This articles reviews the techniques that are commonly used in CT angiography and key considerations for optimization.

  15. Imaging the Parasinus Region with a Third-Generation Dual-Source CT and the Effect of Tin Filtration on Image Quality and Radiation Dose.

    PubMed

    Lell, M M; May, M S; Brand, M; Eller, A; Buder, T; Hofmann, E; Uder, M; Wuest, W

    2015-07-01

    CT is the imaging technique of choice in the evaluation of midface trauma or inflammatory disease. We performed a systematic evaluation of scan protocols to optimize image quality and radiation exposure on third-generation dual-source CT. CT protocols with different tube voltage (70-150 kV), current (25-300 reference mAs), prefiltration, pitch value, and rotation time were systematically evaluated. All images were reconstructed with iterative reconstruction (Advanced Modeled Iterative Reconstruction, level 2). To individually compare results with otherwise identical factors, we obtained all scans on a frozen human head. Conebeam CT was performed for image quality and dose comparison with multidetector row CT. Delineation of important anatomic structures and incidental pathologic conditions in the cadaver head was evaluated. One hundred kilovolts with tin prefiltration demonstrated the best compromise between dose and image quality. The most dose-effective combination for trauma imaging was Sn100 kV/250 mAs (volume CT dose index, 2.02 mGy), and for preoperative sinus surgery planning, Sn100 kV/150 mAs (volume CT dose index, 1.22 mGy). "Sn" indicates an additional prefiltration of the x-ray beam with a tin filter to constrict the energy spectrum. Exclusion of sinonasal disease was possible with even a lower dose by using Sn100 kV/25 mAs (volume CT dose index, 0.2 mGy). High image quality at very low dose levels can be achieved by using a Sn100-kV protocol with iterative reconstruction. The effective dose is comparable with that of conventional radiography, and the high image quality at even lower radiation exposure favors multidetector row CT over conebeam CT. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. 30 CFR 285.315 - What deposits are required for a competitive ROW grant or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ROW grant or RUE grant? 285.315 Section 285.315 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING... Renewable Energy Activities Financial Requirements for Row Grants and Rue Grants § 285.315 What deposits are...

  17. Comparing para-rowing set-ups on an ergometer using kinematic movement patterns of able-bodied rowers.

    PubMed

    Cutler, B; Eger, T; Merritt, T; Godwin, A

    2017-04-01

    While numerous studies have investigated the biomechanics of able-bodied rowing, few studies have been completed with para-rowing set-ups. The purpose of this research was to provide benchmark data for handle kinetics and joint kinematics for able-bodied athletes rowing in para- rowing set-ups on an indoor ergometer. Able-bodied varsity rowers performed maximal trials in three para-rowing set-ups; Legs, Trunk and Arms (LTA), Trunk and Arms (TA) and Arms and Shoulders (AS) rowing. The handle force kinetics of the LTA stroke were comparable to the values for able-bodied literature. Lumbar flexion at the catch, extension at the finish and total range of motion were, however, greater than values in the literature for able-bodied athletes in the LTA set-up. Additionally, rowers in TA and AS set-ups utilised more extreme ranges of motion for lumbar flexion, elbow flexion and shoulder abduction than the LTA set-up. This study provides the first biomechanical values of the para-rowing strokes for researchers, coaches and athletes to use while promoting the safest training programmes possible for para-rowing.

  18. Considerations for site-specific implementation of active downforce and seeding depth technologies on row-crop planters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Planter technology continues to rapidly advance including row-by-row control of parameters such as applied downforce and seeding depth that permit real-time adjustment to varying field conditions. The objective of this research was to investigate the relationship of seeding depth and applied downfo...

  19. Theoretical study of the bonding of the first- and second-row transition-metal positive ions to acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodupe, M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The bonding of transition-metal ions to acetylene is studied by using a theoretical treatment that includes electron correlation. The ions on the left side of the first and second transition rows insert into the pi bond to form a three-membered ring. On the right side of the row the bonding is electrostatic. The trends in bonding are discussed.

  20. 30 CFR 285.501 - What deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant? 285.501 Section 285.501 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... Payments § 285.501 What deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE...

  1. 30 CFR 585.501 - What deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant? 585.501 Section 585.501 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant? (a) For a...

  2. 30 CFR 585.501 - What deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant? 585.501 Section 585.501 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant? (a) For a...

  3. 30 CFR 285.501 - What deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant? 285.501 Section 285.501 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT... must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant? (a) For a competitive lease...

  4. 30 CFR 585.501 - What deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant? 585.501 Section 585.501 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... deposits must I submit for a competitively issued lease, ROW grant, or RUE grant? (a) For a...

  5. 126. MOTOR CONTROL CENTER 1 (MCC1), FACING NORTH IN ROW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    126. MOTOR CONTROL CENTER 1 (MCC-1), FACING NORTH IN ROW OF ELECTRICAL CABINETS JUST SOUTH OF TRANSFORMER SUBSTATION CABINETS IN TRANSFORMER ROOM (112), LSB (BLDG. 770) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  6. Some Half-Row Sums from Pascal's Triangle via Laplace Transforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dence, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents some identities on the sum of the entries in the first half of a row in Pascal's triangle. The results were discovered while the author was working on a problem involving Laplace transforms, which are used in proving of the identities.

  7. Whisker row deprivation affects the flow of sensory information through rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Vincent; Mitani, Akinori; Toyoizumi, Taro; Fox, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Whisker trimming causes substantial reorganization of neuronal response properties in barrel cortex. However, little is known about experience-dependent rerouting of sensory processing following sensory deprivation. To address this, we performed in vivo intracellular recordings from layers 2/3 (L2/3), layer 4 (L4), layer 5 regular-spiking (L5RS), and L5 intrinsically bursting (L5IB) neurons and measured their multiwhisker receptive field at the level of spiking activity, membrane potential, and synaptic conductance before and after sensory deprivation. We used Chernoff information to quantify the "sensory information" contained in the firing patterns of cells in response to spared and deprived whisker stimulation. In the control condition, information for flanking-row and same-row whiskers decreased in the order L4, L2/3, L5IB, L5RS. However, after whisker-row deprivation, spared flanking-row whisker information was reordered to L4, L5RS, L5IB, L2/3. Sensory information from the trimmed whiskers was reduced and delayed in L2/3 and L5IB neurons, whereas sensory information from spared whiskers was increased and advanced in L4 and L5RS neurons. Sensory information from spared whiskers was increased in L5IB neurons without a latency change. L5RS cells exhibited the largest changes in sensory information content through an atypical plasticity combining a significant decrease in spontaneous activity and an increase in a short-latency excitatory conductance.

  8. The influence of neighboring blade rows on the unsteady aerodynamic response of cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, K.C.; Silkowski, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present an analysis of the unsteady aerodynamic response of cascades due to incident gusts (the forced response problem) or blade vibration (the flutter problem) when the cascade is part of a multistage fan, compressor, or turbine. Most current unsteady aerodynamic models assume the cascade to be isolated in an infinitely long duct. This assumption, however, neglects the potentially important influence of neighboring blade rows. They present an elegant and computationally efficient method to model these neighboring blade row effects. In the present method, they model the unsteady aerodynamic response due to so-called spinning modes (pressure and vorticity waves), with each mode corresponding to a different circumferential wave number and frequency. Then, for each mode, they compute the reflection and transmission coefficients for each blade row. These coefficients can be obtained from any of the currently available unsteady linearized aerodynamic models of isolated cascades. A set of linear equations is then constructed that couples together the various spinning modes, and the linear equations are solved via LU decomposition. Numerical results are presented for both the gust response and blade vibration problems. To validate the model, the authors compare their results to other analytical models, and to a multistage vortex lattice model. They show that the effect of neighboring blade rows on the aerodynamic damping of vibrating cascades is significant, but nevertheless can be modeled with a small number of modes.

  9. Crewmember in the middeck exercising on the MK-1 rowing machine (DTO 653).

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-04-20

    STS059-11-014 (9-20 April 1994) --- Astronaut Michael R. (Rich) Clifford, mission specialist, uses the rowing machine temporarily deployed on the Space Shuttle Endeavour's middeck. Many of the crew members put in time on the device during the week and a half mission.

  10. Effects of acoustic feedback training in elite-standard Para-Rowing.

    PubMed

    Schaffert, Nina; Mattes, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Assessment and feedback devices have been regularly used in technique training in high-performance sports. Biomechanical analysis is mainly visually based and so can exclude athletes with visual impairments. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of auditory feedback on mean boat speed during on-water training of visually impaired athletes. The German National Para-Rowing team (six athletes, mean ± s, age 34.8 ± 10.6 years, body mass 76.5 ± 13.5 kg, stature 179.3 ± 8.6 cm) participated in the study. Kinematics included boat acceleration and distance travelled, collected with Sofirow at two intensities of training. The boat acceleration-time traces were converted online into acoustic feedback and presented via speakers during rowing (sections with and without alternately). Repeated-measures within-participant factorial ANOVA showed greater boat speed with acoustic feedback than baseline (0.08 ± 0.01 m·s(-1)). The time structure of rowing cycles was improved (extended time of positive acceleration). Questioning of athletes showed acoustic feedback to be a supportive training aid as it provided important functional information about the boat motion independent of vision. It gave access for visually impaired athletes to biomechanical analysis via auditory information. The concept for adaptive athletes has been successfully integrated into the preparation for the Para-Rowing World Championships and Paralympics.

  11. 30 CFR 585.305 - How do I request an ROW grant or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....305 Section 585.305 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants and Rights-of-Use and Easement Grants for Renewable Energy Activities Obtaining Row...

  12. 30 CFR 285.309 - When will MMS issue a noncompetitive ROW grant or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or RUE grant? 285.309 Section 285.309 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING... Renewable Energy Activities Obtaining Row Grants and Rue Grants § 285.309 When will MMS issue a...

  13. 30 CFR 585.305 - How do I request an ROW grant or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....305 Section 585.305 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants and Rights-of-Use and Easement Grants for Renewable Energy Activities Obtaining Row...

  14. 30 CFR 585.301 - What do ROW grants and RUE grants include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....301 Section 585.301 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants and Rights-of-Use and Easement Grants for Renewable Energy Activities Row Grants and...

  15. 30 CFR 585.301 - What do ROW grants and RUE grants include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....301 Section 585.301 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants and Rights-of-Use and Easement Grants for Renewable Energy Activities Row Grants and...

  16. 30 CFR 285.316 - What payments are required for ROW grants or RUE grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RUE grants? 285.316 Section 285.316 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING... Renewable Energy Activities Financial Requirements for Row Grants and Rue Grants § 285.316 What payments are...

  17. Concentrated animal feeding operations, row crops, and their relationship to nitrate in eastern Iowa Rivers.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Mark B; Hornbuckle, Keri C

    2006-05-15

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) and fertilizer application to row crops may contribute to poor water quality in surface waters. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated nutrient concentrations and fluxes in four Eastern Iowa watersheds sampled between 1996 and 2004. We found that these watersheds contribute nearly 10% of annual nitrate flux entering the Gulf of Mexico, while representing only 1.5% of the contributing drainage basin. Mass budget analysis shows streamflow to be a major loss of nitrogen (18% of total N output), second only to crop harvest (63%). The major watershed inputs of nitrogen include applied fertilizer for corn (54% of total N input) and nitrogen fixation by soybeans (26%). Despite the relatively small input from animal manure (approximately 5%), the results of spatial analysis indicate that row crop and CAFO densities are significantly and independently correlated to higher nitrate concentration in streams. Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.59 and 0.89 were found between nitrate concentration and row crop and CAFO density, respectively. Multiple linear regression analysis produced a correlation for nitrate concentration with an R2 value of 85%. High spatial density of row crops and CAFOs are linked to the highest river nitrate concentrations (up to 15 mg/L normalized over five years).

  18. 30 CFR 285.309 - When will MMS issue a noncompetitive ROW grant or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When will MMS issue a noncompetitive ROW grant or RUE grant? 285.309 Section 285.309 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL...

  19. 30 CFR 285.316 - What payments are required for ROW grants or RUE grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What payments are required for ROW grants or RUE grants? 285.316 Section 285.316 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF...

  20. 30 CFR 285.305 - How do I request an ROW grant or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I request an ROW grant or RUE grant? 285.305 Section 285.305 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants...

  1. 30 CFR 285.301 - What do ROW grants and RUE grants include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What do ROW grants and RUE grants include? 285.301 Section 285.301 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants...

  2. The Blue Glow from the Back Row: Live Theater and the Wireless Teen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Every year the author and his colleagues take their grade 12 English students to see four plays at one of Canada's major theaters. Chatting about the series on the last day of class, his students asked him if he had seen "the blue glow from the back row." Laughing at his bewilderment, they told him that during the performances so many…

  3. Radiation model for row crops: I. Geometric view factors and parameter optimization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Row crops with partial cover result in different radiation partitioning to the soil and canopy compared with full cover; however, methods to account for partial cover have not been adequately investigated. The objectives of this study were to: (i) develop geometric view factors to account for the sp...

  4. Accuracy and Feasibility of Optoelectronic Sensors for Weed Mapping in Wide Row Crops

    PubMed Central

    Andújar, Dionisio; Ribeiro, Ángela; Fernández-Quintanilla, César; Dorado, José

    2011-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to assess the accuracy of a ground-based weed mapping system that included optoelectronic sensors for weed detection, and to determine the sampling resolution required for accurate weed maps in maize crops. The optoelectronic sensors were located in the inter-row area of maize to distinguish weeds against soil background. The system was evaluated in three maize fields in the early spring. System verification was performed with highly reliable data from digital images obtained in a regular 12 m × 12 m grid throughout the three fields. The comparison in all these sample points showed a good relationship (83% agreement on average) between the data of weed presence/absence obtained from the optoelectronic mapping system and the values derived from image processing software (“ground truth”). Regarding the optimization of sampling resolution, the comparison between the detailed maps (all crop rows with sensors separated 0.75 m) with maps obtained with various simulated distances between sensors (from 1.5 m to 6.0 m) indicated that a 4.5 m distance (equivalent to one in six crop rows) would be acceptable to construct accurate weed maps. This spatial resolution makes the system cheap and robust enough to generate maps of inter-row weeds. PMID:22163740

  5. Some Half-Row Sums from Pascal's Triangle via Laplace Transforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dence, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents some identities on the sum of the entries in the first half of a row in Pascal's triangle. The results were discovered while the author was working on a problem involving Laplace transforms, which are used in proving of the identities.

  6. Radio/antenna mounting system for wireless networking under row-crop agriculture conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Interest in and deployment of wireless monitoring systems is increasing in many diverse environments, including row-crop agricultural fields. While many studies have been undertaken to evaluate various aspects of wireless monitoring and networking, such as electronic hardware components, data-colle...

  7. Accuracy and feasibility of optoelectronic sensors for weed mapping in wide row crops.

    PubMed

    Andújar, Dionisio; Ribeiro, Ángela; Fernández-Quintanilla, César; Dorado, José

    2011-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to assess the accuracy of a ground-based weed mapping system that included optoelectronic sensors for weed detection, and to determine the sampling resolution required for accurate weed maps in maize crops. The optoelectronic sensors were located in the inter-row area of maize to distinguish weeds against soil background. The system was evaluated in three maize fields in the early spring. System verification was performed with highly reliable data from digital images obtained in a regular 12 m × 12 m grid throughout the three fields. The comparison in all these sample points showed a good relationship (83% agreement on average) between the data of weed presence/absence obtained from the optoelectronic mapping system and the values derived from image processing software ("ground truth"). Regarding the optimization of sampling resolution, the comparison between the detailed maps (all crop rows with sensors separated 0.75 m) with maps obtained with various simulated distances between sensors (from 1.5 m to 6.0 m) indicated that a 4.5 m distance (equivalent to one in six crop rows) would be acceptable to construct accurate weed maps. This spatial resolution makes the system cheap and robust enough to generate maps of inter-row weeds.

  8. Yield in nonpungent jalapeno pepper established at different in-row spacings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Doubling the plant density in transplanted non-pungent jalapeno peppers (Capsicum annuum Mill.) improves yield. However, it is not known how other spacings affect yield. In-row plant spacing was examined to determine how it affects development of these peppers. Transplants of a non-pungent jalapen...

  9. Cotton response to crop row offset and orientation to subsurface drip irrigation laterals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The recent increase in the use of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) for cotton production in the Texas High Plains has resulted in questions concerning drip lateral position and orientation relative to crop rows. Field experiments were conducted at Halfway, Texas to evaluate traditional SDI installat...

  10. Wide row spacing for deep-furrow planting of winter wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A winter wheat, summer fallow rotation is practiced on 1.56 million cropland hectares in the low-precipitation (<300 mm annual) region of the Inland Pacific Northwest of the United States (PNW). Farmers use deep-furrow drills with rows spaced 40- to 45-cm apart to plant as deep as 20 cm to reach moi...

  11. Candidate perennial bioenergy grasses have a higher albedo than annual row crops in the Midwestern US

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The production of perennial cellulosic feedstocks for bioenergy presents the potential to diversify regional economies and the national energy supply, while also serving as climate ‘regulators’ due to a number of biogeochemical and biogeophysical differences relative to row crops. Numerous observati...

  12. Nitrogen placement, row spacing, and water management for furrow-irrigated field corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Banding and sidedressing N fertilizer on a never-irrigated side of a row of corn (Zea mays L.) were hypothesized to maintain yield and decrease nitrate leaching. In a two-year field study on Portneuf silt loam (Durinodic Xeric Haplocalcid) in southern Idaho, we evaluated effects on yield and N upta...

  13. The cervical spine of professional front-row rugby players: correlation between degenerative changes and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hogan, B A; Hogan, N A; Vos, P M; Eustace, S J; Kenny, P J

    2010-06-01

    Injuries to the cervical spine (C-spine) are among the most serious in rugby and are well documented. Front-row players are particularly at risk due to repetitive high-intensity collisions in the scrum. This study evaluates degenerative changes of the C-spine and associated symptomatology in front-row rugby players. C-spine radiographs from 14 professional rugby players and controls were compared. Players averaged 23 years of playing competitive rugby. Two consultant radiologists performed a blind review of radiographs evaluating degeneration of disc spaces and apophyseal joints. Clinical status was assessed using a modified AAOS/NASS/COSS cervical spine outcomes questionnaire. Front-row rugby players exhibited significant radiographic evidence of C-spine degenerative changes compared to the non-rugby playing controls (P < 0.005). Despite these findings the rugby players did not exhibit increased symptoms. This highlights the radiologic degenerative changes of the C-spine of front-row rugby players. However, these changes do not manifest themselves clinically or affect activities of daily living.

  14. The impact of fluctuations in boat velocity during the rowing cycle on race time.

    PubMed

    Hill, H; Fahrig, S

    2009-08-01

    In competitive rowing, the fluctuations in boat velocity during the rowing cycle are associated with an increased water resistance of the boat as compared with a boat moving at a constant velocity. We aimed to quantify the influence of the increased water resistance on race time using a mathematical approximation, based on the increase in physiological power being proportional to the 2nd power of boat speed. Biomechanical data (oar force, rowing angle, boat velocity, and boat acceleration) were measured when eight elite coxless pair crews performed a rowing test with a stepwise increasing stroke rate (SR: 20, 24, 28, and 32 min(-1)) that successively increased the mean boat speed. The results revealed a +4.59 s (SR 24.2) to +5.05 s (SR 31.5) 2000-m race-time difference compared with a boat hypothetically moving without velocity fluctuations. Velocity fluctuations were highly correlated with SR (r=0.93) because the accelerations of the rowers' body mass and the mass of the counteracting boat increase with SR. The possibilities to reduce velocity fluctuations and therefore race time are limited. For elite rowers, race time may be slightly reduced by a moderate reduction in SR that is compensated by an increased force output for each stroke.

  15. Pathways to Death Row for America's Disabled Youth: Three Case Studies Driving Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Julie; Guin, Cecile C.; Chaisson, Rebecca; Houchins, David

    2004-01-01

    This article uses the case study method to examine the lives of three youths with disabilities living in the southern part of the United States who have followed a pathway to death row. An empirically established developmental and theoretical framework is used to examine issues related to the influence of disabilities and race on children and…

  16. The removal and segmentation of the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel internals

    SciTech Connect

    Child, C.; McGough, M.; Smith, G.

    1995-12-31

    A major element of the reactor decommissioning of the Rowe Yankee reactor was the segmentation and packaging of the reactor internals. PCI Energy Services, specializing in remote cutting, machining, and welding, performed this work under contract to Yankee Atomic Electric Company. Removal techniques are described.

  17. Rowe and Kahn's Model of Successful Aging Revisited: Positive Spirituality--The Forgotten Factor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Martha R.; Parker, Michael W.; Achenbaum, W. A.; Larimore, Walter L.; Koenig, Harold G.

    2002-01-01

    Explains the concept of positive spirituality and offers evidence that links positive spirituality with health. Describes effective partnerships between health professionals and religious communities and summarized the information as a basis for strengthening the existing successful aging model proposed by Rowe and Kahn. (Contains 59 references…

  18. Three-wave interaction and Manley-Rowe relations in quantum hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, Erik; Zamanian, Jens; Brodin, Gert; Brodin

    2014-08-01

    The theory for nonlinear three-wave interaction in magnetized plasmas is reconsidered using quantum hydrodynamics. The general coupling coefficients are calculated for the generalized Bohm de Broglie term. It is found that the Manley-Rowe relations are fulfilled only if the form of the particle dispersive term coincides with the standard expression. The implications of our results are discussed.

  19. The Blue Glow from the Back Row: Live Theater and the Wireless Teen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Every year the author and his colleagues take their grade 12 English students to see four plays at one of Canada's major theaters. Chatting about the series on the last day of class, his students asked him if he had seen "the blue glow from the back row." Laughing at his bewilderment, they told him that during the performances so many…

  20. Convergent validity of a novel method for quantifying rowing training loads.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jacqueline; Rice, Anthony J; Main, Luana C; Gastin, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    Elite rowers complete rowing-specific and non-specific training, incorporating continuous and interval-like efforts spanning the intensity spectrum. However, established training load measures are unsuitable for use in some modes and intensities. Consequently, a new measure known as the T2minute method was created. The method quantifies load as the time spent in a range of training zones (time-in-zone), multiplied by intensity- and mode-specific weighting factors that scale the relative stress of different intensities and modes to the demands of on-water rowing. The purpose of this study was to examine the convergent validity of the T2minute method with Banister's training impulse (TRIMP), Lucia's TRIMP and Session-RPE when quantifying elite rowing training. Fourteen elite rowers (12 males, 2 females) were monitored during four weeks of routine training. Unadjusted T2minute loads (using coaches' estimates of time-in-zone) demonstrated moderate-to-strong correlations with Banister's TRIMP, Lucia's TRIMP and Session-RPE (rho: 0.58, 0.55 and 0.42, respectively). Adjusting T2minute loads by using actual time-in-zone data resulted in stronger correlations between the T2minute method and Banister's TRIMP and Lucia's TRIMP (rho: 0.85 and 0.81, respectively). The T2minute method is an appropriate in-field measure of elite rowing training loads, particularly when actual time-in-zone values are used to quantify load.

  1. Pathways to Death Row for America's Disabled Youth: Three Case Studies Driving Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Julie; Guin, Cecile C.; Chaisson, Rebecca; Houchins, David

    2004-01-01

    This article uses the case study method to examine the lives of three youths with disabilities living in the southern part of the United States who have followed a pathway to death row. An empirically established developmental and theoretical framework is used to examine issues related to the influence of disabilities and race on children and…

  2. Generalized Canonical Correlation Analysis of Matrices with Missing Rows: A Simulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Velden, Michel; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.

    2006-01-01

    A method is presented for generalized canonical correlation analysis of two or more matrices with missing rows. The method is a combination of Carroll's (1968) method and the missing data approach of the OVERALS technique (Van der Burg, 1988). In a simulation study we assess the performance of the method and compare it to an existing procedure…

  3. An analysis of spectral discrimination between corn and soybeans using a row crop reflectance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Reflectance calculations of soybeans and corn crops at two times during the growing season indicate that the high sensitivity of the thematic mapper mid-infrared band to exposed bare soil between soybean rows is most likely responsible for early season spectral discrimination of corn and soybean crops by this band.

  4. An analysis of spectral discrimination between corn and soybeans using a row crop reflectance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Reflectance calculations of soybeans and corn crops at two times during the growing season indicate that the high sensitivity of the thematic mapper mid-infrared band to exposed bare soil between soybean rows is most likely responsible for early season spectral discrimination of corn and soybean crops by this band.

  5. An analysis of spectral discrimination between corn and soybeans using a row crop reflectance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Reflectance calculations of soybeans and corn crops at two times during the growing season indicate that the high sensitivity of the thematic mapper mid-infrared band to exposed bare soil between soybean rows is most likely responsible for early season spectral discrimination of corn and soybean crops by this band.

  6. 30 CFR 585.301 - What do ROW grants and RUE grants include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....301 Section 585.301 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants and Rights-of-Use and Easement Grants for Renewable Energy Activities Row Grants...

  7. Registration of ‘Lyon’, a two-row, spring feed barley

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ‘Lyon’ (Reg. No. CV-356, PI 673045), a spring, two-row, hulled feed barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivar developed and tested as 05WA-316.K, was released in 2013 by Washington State University (WSU). Lyon was derived from the cross ‘Baronesse’/‘Spaulding’ and selected through single-seed descent fro...

  8. All Three Rows of Outer Hair Cells Are Required for Cochlear Amplification.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Michio; Suzuki, Sho; Wada, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian auditory system, the three rows of outer hair cells (OHCs) located in the cochlea are thought to increase the displacement amplitude of the organ of Corti. This cochlear amplification is thought to contribute to the high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and sharp frequency selectivity of the hearing system. Recent studies have shown that traumatic stimuli, such as noise exposure and ototoxic acid, cause functional loss of OHCs in one, two, or all three rows. However, the degree of decrease in cochlear amplification caused by such functional losses remains unclear. In the present study, a finite element model of a cross section of the gerbil cochlea was constructed. Then, to determine effects of the functional losses of OHCs on the cochlear amplification, changes in the displacement amplitude of the basilar membrane (BM) due to the functional losses of OHCs were calculated. Results showed that the displacement amplitude of the BM decreases significantly when a single row of OHCs lost its function, suggesting that all three rows of OHCs are required for cochlear amplification.

  9. Stagnation region gas film cooling: Spanwise angled injection from multiple rows of holes. [gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckey, D. W.; Lecuyer, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    The stagnation region of a cylinder in a cross flow was used in experiments conducted with both a single row and multiple rows of spanwise angled (25 deg) coolant holes for a range of the coolant blowing ratio with a freestream to wall temperature ratio approximately equal to 1.7 and R(eD) = 90,000. Data from local heat flux measurements are presented for injection from a single row located at 5 deg, 22.9 deg, 40.8 deg, 58.7 deg from stagnation using a hole spacing ratio of S/d(o) = 5 and 10. Three multiple row configurations were also investigated. Data are presented for a uniform blowing distribution and for a nonuniform blowing distribution simulating a plenum supply. The data for local Stanton Number reduction demonstrated a lack of lateral spreading by the coolant jets. Heat flux levels larger than those without film cooling were observed directly behind the coolant holes as the blowing ratio exceeded a particular value. The data were spanwise averaged to illustrate the influence of injection location, blowing ratio and hole spacing. The large values of blowing ratio for the blowing distribution simulating a plenum supply resulted in heat flux levels behind the holes in excess of the values without film cooling. An increase in freestream turbulence intensity from 4.4 to 9.5 percent had a negligible effect on the film cooling performance.

  10. Row and forage crop rotation effects on maize mineral nutrition and yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Extended crop rotations provide many attributes in support of sustainable agriculture. Objectives were to investigate rotations that included row crops and forages in terms of their effects on soil characteristics as well as on maize (Zea mays L.) stover biomass, grain yield, and mineral components...

  11. Row width influences wheat yield, but has little effect on wheat quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Growers are interested in wide-row wheat production due to reductions in equipment inventory (lack of grain drill) and to allow intercropping of soybean into wheat. A trial was established during the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 growing seasons in Wayne County and Wood County, Ohio to evaluate the effec...

  12. 76 FR 41532 - Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Yankee Nuclear Power Station (Yankee-Rowe); Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... COMMISSION Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Yankee Nuclear Power Station (Yankee-Rowe); Notice of... indirect transfer of the Facility Operating License No. DPR-3 for the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (Yankee... Officer Powers, and General Hearing Management for NRC Adjudicatory Hearings,'' of 10 CFR part 2....

  13. Starvation Can Result From Inadequate Dietary Planning for a 50-Day Rowing Expedition.

    PubMed

    Reid, Hamish Ab; Dennison, Nicholas C; Quayle, Jonathan; Preston, Tom

    2016-12-14

    Meeting the energy demands of prolonged arduous expeditions and endurance sport may be a significant barrier to success. Expedition rowing is associated with high levels of body mass loss, reflecting the challenge of meeting energy expenditure in this exacting environment. This study used the Doubly Labelled Water (DLW) technique to calculate the Total Energy Expenditure (TEE), and body composition changes of two 28-year-old healthy male athletes during a 50-day continuous and unsupported row around Great Britain. A measured dose of DLW was taken at the start of two separate study periods (days five to 19 and 34 to 48) followed by sequential urine collection, which was analysed on return to land. Mean TEE was 15.3MJ/day: Athlete 1 16.4MJ/day, Athlete 2 14.9MJ/day. Athlete 1 lost 11.2kg and Athlete 2 lost 14.9kg of body mass during the row. Average energy provision was 19.1MJ per 24-hour ration pack. These results highlight the difficulty of maintaining energy balance during expedition rowing. A starvation state was observed despite dietary provision in excess of estimated energy expenditure, indicating nutritional strategy rather than caloric availability was at fault. We recommend future expeditions prioritise thorough testing and the individualisation of rations to ensure they are both palatable and practical during the weeks to months at sea.

  14. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations, Row Crops and their Relationship to Nitrate in Eastern Iowa Rivers

    PubMed Central

    Weldon, Mark B.; Hornbuckle, Keri C.

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) and fertilizer application to row crops may contribute to poor water quality in surface waters. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated nutrient concentrations and fluxes in four Eastern Iowa watersheds sampled between 1996-2004. We found that these watersheds contribute nearly 10% of annual nitrate flux entering the Gulf of Mexico, while representing only 1.5% of the contributing drainage basin. Mass budget analysis shows stream flow to be a major loss of nitrogen (18% of total N output), second only to crop harvest (63%). The major watershed inputs of nitrogen include applied fertilizer for corn (54% of total N input) and nitrogen fixation by soybeans (26%). Despite the relatively small input from animal manure (~5%), the results of spatial analysis indicate that row crop and CAFO densities are significantly and independently correlated to higher nitrate concentration in streams. Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.59 and 0.89 were found between nitrate concentration and row crop and CAFO density, respectively. Multiple linear regression analysis produced a correlation for nitrate concentration with an R2 value of 85%. High spatial density of row crops and CAFOs are linked to the highest river nitrate concentrations (up to 15 mg/l normalized over five years). PMID:16749677

  15. 78 FR 24063 - Special Local Regulation; Hebda Cup Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... the Detroit River, Wyandotte, Michigan. This action is necessary and intended to ensure safety of life on the navigable waters immediately prior to, during, and immediately after the Hebda Cup Rowing... making this rule effective less than 30 days after publication in the Federal Register. For the same...

  16. 77 FR 25073 - Special Local Regulation; Hebda Cup Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... the Detroit River, Wyandotte, Michigan. This action is necessary and intended to ensure safety of life on the navigable waters immediately prior to, during, and immediately after the Hebda Cup Rowing...), the Coast Guard finds that good cause exists for making this rule effective less than 30 days after...

  17. Identification and phenotypic description of new wheat: six-rowed winter barley disomic additions.

    PubMed

    Molnár-Láng, Márta; Kruppa, Klaudia; Cseh, András; Bucsi, Julianna; Linc, Gabriella

    2012-04-01

    To increase the allelic variation in wheat-barley introgressions, new wheat-barley disomic addition lines were developed containing the 2H, 3H, 4H, 6H, and 7H chromosomes of the six-rowed Ukrainian winter barley 'Manas'. This cultivar is agronomically much better adapted to Central European environmental conditions than the two-rowed spring barley 'Betzes' previously used. A single 'Asakaze' × 'Manas' wheat × barley hybrid plant was multiplied in vitro and one backcross plant was obtained after pollinating 354 regenerant hybrids with wheat. The addition lines were selected from the self-fertilized seeds of the 16 BC(2) plants using genomic in situ hybridization. The addition lines were identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization using repetitive DNA probes (HvT01, GAA, pTa71, and Afa family), followed by confirmation with barley SSR markers. The addition lines were grown in the phytotron and in the field, and morphological parameters (plant height, fertility, tillering, and spike characteristics) were measured. The production of the disomic additions will make it possible to incorporate the DNA of six-rowed winter barley into the wheat genome. Addition lines are useful for genetic studies on the traits of six-rowed winter barley and for producing new barley dissection lines.

  18. Registration of ‘Kardia’, a Two-Rowed Spring Food Barley

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ‘Kardia’ (Reg. No. XXXX, XXXX), a two-rowed spring food barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) developed by the USDA-ARS, Aberdeen, ID, in cooperation with the University of Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station, was released in 2015. Kardia is derived from the cross of ‘03AH3054 / 98Ab12019’ and was advanced...

  19. 77 FR 60482 - Yankee Atomic Electric Company; Yankee Rowe Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation, Staff...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Yankee Atomic Electric Company; Yankee Rowe Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation, Staff Evaluation; Exemption 1.0 Background Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC, the licensee) is the holder of... for the storage of spent fuel in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) to...

  20. 7 CFR 810.205 - Grades and grade requirements for Two-rowed Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... barley. 810.205 Section 810.205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL UNITED STATES STANDARDS FOR GRAIN United States Standards for Barley Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.205 Grades and grade requirements for Two-rowed Malting...