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Sample records for 25k fp gene

  1. Comparative Studies of Lepidopteran Baculovirus-Specific Protein FP25K: Development of a Novel Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus-Based Vector with a Modified fp25K Gene▿

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Tadashi; Goto, Chie; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Kang, WonKyung; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Matsumoto, Shogo; Shimada, Toru; Katsuma, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Lepidopteran baculovirus-specific protein FP25K performs many roles during the infection cycle, including functions in the production of occlusion bodies (OBs) and budded viruses (BVs), oral infection, and postmortem host degradation. To explore the common and specific functions of FP25K proteins among lepidopteran baculoviruses, we performed comparative analyses of FP25K proteins from group I and group II nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs) and granulovirus (GV). Using recombinant Bombyx mori NPVs (BmNPVs), we showed that the FP25Ks from NPVs were able to eliminate all the phenotypic defects observed in an infection with a BmNPV mutant lacking functional fp25K but that FP25K from GV did not show abilities to recover oral infectivity and postmortem host degradation. We also observed that introduction of Autographa californica multiple NPV (AcMNPV) fp25K into the BmNPV genome enhanced OB and BV production. According to these results, we generated a novel BmNPV-based expression vector with AcMNPV fp25K and examined its potential in BmN cells and B. mori larvae. Our results showed that the introduction of AcMNPV fp25K significantly increases the expression of foreign gene products in cultured cells and shortens the time for obtaining the secreted recombinant proteins from larval hemolymph. PMID:20219904

  2. Effects of Deletion and Overexpression of the Autographa californica Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus FP25K Gene on Synthesis of Two Occlusion-Derived Virus Envelope Proteins and Their Transport into Virus-Induced Intranuclear Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Acosta, Germán; Braunagel, Sharon C.; Summers, Max D.

    2001-01-01

    Partial deletions within Autographa californica open reading frame 61 (FP25K) alter the expression and accumulation profile of several viral proteins and the transport of occlusion-derived virus (ODV)-E66 to intranuclear membranes during infection (S. C. Braunagel et al., J. Virol. 73:8559–8570, 1999). Here we show the effects of a full deletion and overexpression of FP25K on the transport and expression of two ODV envelope proteins, ODV-E66 (E66) and ODV-E25 (E25). Deletion and overexpression of FP25K substantially altered the levels of expression of E66 during infection. Compared with cells infected with wild-type (wt) virus, the levels of E66 were reduced fivefold in cells infected with a viral mutant lacking FP25KFP25K) and were slightly increased in cells infected with a viral mutant overexpressing FP25K (FP25Kpolh). In contrast, no significant changes were observed in the levels of E25 among wt-, ΔFP25K-, and FP25Kpolh-infected cells. The changes observed in the levels of E66 among the different viral mutants were not accompanied by changes in either the time of synthesis, membrane association, protein turnover, or steady-state transcript abundance. Deletion of FP25K also substantially altered the transport and localization of E66 during infection. In cells infected with the ΔFP25K mutant virus, E66 accumulated in localized regions at the nuclear periphery and the outer nuclear membrane and did not traffic to intranuclear membranes. In contrast, in cells infected with the FP25Kpolh mutant virus E66 trafficked to intranuclear membranes. For comparison, E25 was normally transported to intranuclear membranes in both ΔFP25K- and FP25Kpolh-infected cells. Altogether these studies suggest that FP25K affects the synthesis of E66 at a posttranscriptional level, probably by altering the translation of E66; additionally, the block in transport of E66 at the nuclear envelope in ΔFP25K-infected cells suggests that the pathway of E66 trafficking to the inner

  3. A Human "eFP" Browser for Generating Gene Expression Anatograms

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rohan V.; Hamanishi, Erin T.; Provart, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptomic studies help to further our understanding of gene function. Human transcriptomic studies tend to focus on a particular subset of tissue types or a particular disease state; however, it is possible to collate into a compendium multiple studies that have been profiled using the same expression analysis platform to provide an overview of gene expression levels in many different tissues or under different conditions. In order to increase the knowledge and understanding we gain from such studies, intuitive visualization of gene expression data in such a compendium can be useful. The Human eFP (“electronic Fluorescent Pictograph”) Browser presented here is a tool for intuitive visualization of large human gene expression data sets on pictographic representations of the human body as gene expression “anatograms”. Pictographic representations for new data sets may be generated easily. The Human eFP Browser can also serve as a portal to other gene-specific information through link-outs to various online resources. PMID:26954504

  4. Multipolar ordering in NpO2 below 25 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caciuffo, R.; Paixão, J. A.; Detlefs, C.; Longfield, M. J.; Santini, P.; Bernhoeft, N.; Rebizant, J.; Lander, G. H.

    2003-07-01

    The phase transition at T0 = 25 K in NpO2 and the single-ion nature of the Np 5f electrons is examined in the light of the results of resonant x-ray scattering experiments at the M4 Np edge. These experiments exclude usual magnetic dipole ordering at T0, and provide direct evidence of long-range order of the electric quadrupole moment with Gamma5 symmetry. The phase transition is purely electronic and does not involve either internal or external crystallographic distortions, so the symmetry of the system remains cubic. The primary order parameter (OP) is associated with Gamma4t magnetic octupoles, ordering in a triple-q longitudinal structure defined by the three wavevectors of the langle001rangle star. Magnetic octupolar order breaks invariance under time reversal and induces the order of electric quadrupoles as the secondary OP. The resulting ground state is a singlet with zero dipole magnetic moment.

  5. Identification and pharmacological characterization of the prostaglandin FP receptor and FP receptor variant complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Y; Woodward, D F; Guzman, V M; Li, C; Scott, D F; Wang, J W; Wheeler, L A; Garst, M E; Landsverk, K; Sachs, G; Krauss, A H-P; Cornell, C; Martos, J; Pettit, S; Fliri, H

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: A prostamide analogue, bimatoprost, has been shown to be effective in reducing intraocular pressure, but its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. Hence, to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of this effect of bimatoprost, we focused on pharmacologically characterizing prostaglandin FP receptor (FP) and FP receptor variant (altFP) complexes. Experimental approach: FP receptor mRNA variants were identified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The FP-altFP4 heterodimers were established in HEK293/EBNA cells co-expressing FP and altFP4 receptor variants. A fluorometric imaging plate reader was used to study Ca2+ mobilization. Upregulation of cysteine-rich angiogenic protein 61 (Cyr61) mRNA was measured by Northern blot analysis, and phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) by western analysis. Key results: Six splicing variants of FP receptor mRNA were identified in human ocular tissues. Immunoprecipitation confirmed that the FP receptor is dimerized with altFP4 receptors in HEK293/EBNA cells co-expressing FP and altFP4 receptors. In the studies of the kinetic profile for Ca2+ mobilization, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) elicited a rapid increase in intracellular Ca2+ followed by a steady state phase. In contrast, bimatoprost elicited an immediate increase in intracellular Ca2+ followed by a second phase. The prostamide antagonist, AGN211335, selectively and dose-dependently inhibited the bimatoprost-initiated second phase of Ca2+ mobilization, Cyr61 mRNA upregulation and MLC phosphorylation, but did not block the action of PGF2α. Conclusion and implications: Bimatoprost lacks effects on the FP receptor but may interact with the FP-altFP receptor heterodimer to induce alterations in second messenger signalling. Hence, FP-altFP complexes may represent the underlying basis of bimatoprost pharmacology. PMID:18587449

  6. Prostaglandin F2α receptor (FP) signaling regulates Bmp signaling and promotes chondrocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joohwee; Shim, Minsub

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandins are a group of lipid signaling molecules involved in various physiological processes. In addition, prostaglandins have been implicated in the development and progression of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and arthritis. Prostaglandins exert their effects through the activation of specific G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In this report, we examined the role of prostaglandin F2α receptor (FP) signaling as a regulator of chondrocyte differentiation. We found that FP expression was dramatically induced during the differentiation of chondrocytes and was up-regulated in cartilages. Forced expression of FP in ATDC5 chondrogenic cell line resulted in the increased expression of differentiation-related genes and increased synthesis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regardless of the presence of insulin. Similarly, PGF2α treatment induced the expression of chondrogenic marker genes. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous FP expression suppressed the expression of chondrocyte marker genes and ECM synthesis. Organ culture of cartilage rudiments revealed that PGF2α induces chondrocyte hypertrophy. Additionally, FP overexpression increased the levels of Bmp-6, phospho-Smad1/5, and Bmpr1a, while knockdown of FP reduced expression of those genes. These results demonstrate that up-regulation of FP expression plays an important role in chondrocyte differentiation and modulates Bmp signaling. PMID:25499765

  7. The 25 kW power module evolution study. Part 2: Payload supports system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The addition of system elements for the 25 kW power module and logical evolutionary paths, by discrete growth stages, to provide capability for accommodating the increasing mission requirements through the early 1990's within reasonable resources are conceptualized.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain W25K.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Liu, Gang; Yin, Jie; Chen, Shuai; Li, Tiejun; Kong, Xiangfeng; Peng, Yuanyi; Yin, Yulong; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and newly weaned pigs. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of ETEC strain W25K, which causes diarrhea in piglets. PMID:24970825

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain W25K

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Liu, Gang; Yin, Jie; Chen, Shuai; Li, Tiejun; Kong, Xiangfeng; Peng, Yuanyi; Hardwidge, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and newly weaned pigs. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of ETEC strain W25K, which causes diarrhea in piglets. PMID:24970825

  10. Knockdown of pre-mRNA cleavage factor Im 25 kDa promotes neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumitsu, Hidefumi; Soumiya, Hitomi; Furukawa, Shoei

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm25 knockdown promoted NGF-induced neurite out growth from PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of CFIm25 did not influence the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm regulated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth via coordinating RhoA activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFIm25 knockdown increase the number of primary dendrites of hippocampal neurons. -- Abstract: Mammalian precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) cleavage factor I (CFIm) plays important roles in the selection of poly(A) sites in a 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR), producing mRNAs with variable 3 Prime ends. Because 3 Prime -UTRs often contain cis elements that impact stability or localization of mRNA or translation, alternative polyadenylation diversifies utilization of primary transcripts in mammalian cells. However, the physiological role of CFIm remains unclear. CFIm acts as a heterodimer comprising a 25 kDa subunit (CFIm25) and one of the three large subunits-CFIm59, CFIm68, or CFIm72. CFIm25 binds directly to RNA and introduces and anchors the larger subunit. To examine the physiological roles of CFIm, we knocked down the CFIm25 gene in neuronal cells using RNA interference. Knockdown of CFIm25 increased the number of primary dendrites of developing hippocampal neurons and promoted nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite extension from rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells without affecting the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. On the other hand, CFIm25 knockdown did not influence constitutively active or dominantly negative RhoA suppression or promotion of NGF-induced neurite extension from PC12 cells, respectively. Taken together, our results indicate that endogenous CFIm may promote neuritogenesis in developing neurons by coordinating events upstream of NGF-induced RhoA inactivation.

  11. Identification of a functional nuclear export signal in the green fluorescent protein asFP499

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, Huseyin . E-mail: huseyinm@hotmail.com; Strasser, Bernd; Rauth, Sabine; Irving, Robert A.; Wark, Kim L.

    2006-04-21

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) asFP499 from Anemonia sulcata is a distant homologue of the GFP from Aequorea victoria. We cloned the asFP499 gene into a mammalian expression vector and showed that this protein was expressed in the human lymphoblast cell line Ramos RA1 and in the embryonic kidney 293T cell line (HEK 293T). In HEK 293T cells, asFP499 was localized mainly in the cytoplasm, suggesting that the protein was excluded from the nucleus. We identified {sub 194}LRMEKLNI{sub 201} as a candidate nuclear export signal in asFP499 and mutated the isoleucine at position 201 to an alanine. Unlike the wildtype form, the mutant protein was distributed throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus. This is First report of a GFP that contains a functional NES.

  12. 94 GHz, 25 kW CW, Harmonic Complex-Cavity Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, D. B.; Balkcum Luhmann, A. J., Jr.

    1997-11-01

    A low-voltage second-harmonic gyrotron has been designed and evaluated with a particle-tracing code and the PIC code MAGIC. The two codes are shown to be in excellent agreement when applied to a conventional fundamental-frequency gyrotron and also to the novel second-harmonic gyrotron. The 25 kW CW, 94 GHz gyrotron with a predicted conversion efficiency of 28.5% and device efficiency of 20% is driven by a 25 kV, 5 A, v_t/v_z=1.5, MIG electron beam with 15% axial velocity spread and employs a TE_021/TE_031 complex cavity for mode control. The compact 17 kG solenoid magnet utilizes the tremendous advances made in high-Tc superconducting technology. However, the 94 GHz prototype will be tested at low duty in pulse mode with a conventional low-Tc superconducting magnet that has been received and tested.

  13. Vitexin inhibits polyubiquitin synthesis by the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2-25K.

    PubMed

    Helms, Kimberli M; Wilson, Randall C; Ogungbe, Ifedayo V; Setzer, William N; Twigg, Pamela D

    2011-10-01

    An extract of bark from the tropical rainforest plant Byrsonima crassifolia was screened for inhibition of diubiquitin formation by the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2-25K. Activity assays with both the full-length enzyme and a truncated, active catalytic UBC domain revealed that the extract contained inhibitory properties. Separation of the extract into individual components and additional screens identified vitexin as the active inhibitor. An IC50 for vitexin was calculated to be approximately 0.5 mM. Molecular modeling simulations were used to predict the mode of inhibition and NMR spectra were used to confirm the binding site of vitexin to E2-25K. PMID:22164771

  14. Integrated FP/MCH hailed for Africa.

    PubMed

    1991-10-01

    From August 19-30, 1991, 17 family planning (FP) administrators and managers, health and medical officials, and technical staff from 8 Sub-Saharan African countries attended the 3rd African Regional Training Course on the Integrated Project (IP) in Dar es Salaam and the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania. (IP activities supplement clinic activities.) Participants learned technical skills to promote primary health care services acceptable to the community and with which participants could gain the community's confidence. Thus they can promote FP/maternal and child health (MCH) activities. Participants also learned that personal interaction skills between clients and providers were quite effective in reaching the rural population. This was helpful to learn since 80% of the population in Africa inhabit rural areas. An IP resource person spoke about the success of IP activities in the Philippines. He reminded participants that if FP focuses on health of the family and concern for the its economic stability and happiness, people will appreciate and understand FP. Therefore IP centers on MCH and considers the child the core for planning the family. This Philippine resource person took steps to strengthen the technical cooperation between Africa and Asia begun in 1983. Participants visited an IP pilot site at Masama, Hai District and at Tanganyika Planning Company, Moshi District in Kilimanjaro Region. They agreed that the field trip was worthwhile. In addition, participants found the training course to provide them with practical approaches to implement IP in their respective countries. PMID:12284380

  15. Software control program for 25 kW breadboard testing. [spacecraft power supplies; high voltage batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pajak, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A data acquisition software program developed to operate in conjunction with the automated control system of the 25 kW PM Electric Power System Breadboard Test facility is described. The proram provides limited interactive control of the breadboard test while acquiring data and monitoring parameters, allowing unattended continuous operation. The breadboard test facility has two positions for operating separate configurations. The main variable in each test setup is the high voltage Ni-Cd battery.

  16. Sterilization of allograft bone: is 25 kGy the gold standard for gamma irradiation?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huynh; Morgan, David A F; Forwood, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    For several decades, a dose of 25 kGy of gamma irradiation has been recommended for terminal sterilization of medical products, including bone allografts. Practically, the application of a given gamma dose varies from tissue bank to tissue bank. While many banks use 25 kGy, some have adopted a higher dose, while some choose lower doses, and others do not use irradiation for terminal sterilization. A revolution in quality control in the tissue banking industry has occurred in line with development of quality assurance standards. These have resulted in significant reductions in the risk of contamination by microorganisms of final graft products. In light of these developments, there is sufficient rationale to re-establish a new standard dose, sufficient enough to sterilize allograft bone, while minimizing the adverse effects of gamma radiation on tissue properties. Using valid modifications, several authors have applied ISO standards to establish a radiation dose for bone allografts that is specific to systems employed in bone banking. These standards, and their verification, suggest that the actual dose could be significantly reduced from 25 kGy, while maintaining a valid sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10(-6). The current paper reviews the methods that have been used to develop radiation doses for terminal sterilization of medical products, and the current trend for selection of a specific dose for tissue banks. PMID:16821106

  17. Assessment of 25 kW free-piston Stirling technology alternatives for solar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erbeznik, Raymond M.; White, Maurice A.; Penswick, L. B.; Neely, Ronald E.; Ritter, Darren C.; Wallace, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The final design, construction, and testing of a 25-kW free-piston advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) are examined. The final design of the free-piston hydraulic ASCS consists of five subsystems: heat transport subsystem (solar receiver and pool boiler), free-piston hydraulic Stirling engine, hydraulic subsystem, cooling subsystem, and electrical and control subsystem. Advantages and disadvantages are identified for each technology alternative. Technology alternatives considered are gas bearings vs flexure bearings, stationary magnet linear alternator vs moving magnetic linear alternator, and seven different control options. Component designs are generated using available in-house procedures to meet the requirements of the free-piston Stirling convertor configurations.

  18. Assessment of 25 kW free-piston Stirling technology alternatives for solar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbeznik, Raymond M.; White, Maurice A.; Penswick, L. B.; Neely, Ronald E.; Ritter, Darren C.; Wallace, David A.

    The final design, construction, and testing of a 25-kW free-piston advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) are examined. The final design of the free-piston hydraulic ASCS consists of five subsystems: heat transport subsystem (solar receiver and pool boiler), free-piston hydraulic Stirling engine, hydraulic subsystem, cooling subsystem, and electrical and control subsystem. Advantages and disadvantages are identified for each technology alternative. Technology alternatives considered are gas bearings vs flexure bearings, stationary magnet linear alternator vs moving magnetic linear alternator, and seven different control options. Component designs are generated using available in-house procedures to meet the requirements of the free-piston Stirling convertor configurations.

  19. Three-year performance study of the Mead, Nebraska, 25-kWp photovoltaic power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullwinkel, H. J.; Hopkinson, R. F.

    1981-03-01

    The performance of a 25 kWp photovoltaic (PV) solar energy system was studied. Electrical energy produced by the PV system provided 100% of the power needed throughout the growing season to meet the irrigation requirements for an 80 acre cornfield, as well as significant portions of power required for PV related crop drying and fertilizer manufacturing experiments. Field data indicate that the PV system performs up to expectations, if allowance is made for component degradation and seasonal soil/snow accumulation on the array.

  20. The 25 kW power module evolution study. Part 1: Payload requirements and growth scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Payload power level requirements and their general impact on the baseline and growth versions of the 25 kW power module during the 1983 to 1990 period are discussed. Extended duration Orbiter sortie flight, supported by a power module, with increased payload power requirements per flight, and free-flyer payload missions are included. Other payload disciplines considered, but not emphasized for the 1983 to 1986 period include astrophysics/astronomy, earth observations, solar power satellite, and life sciences. Of these, only the solar power satellite is a prime driver for the power module.

  1. Millimeter wave, 25 kW CW gyrotrons using permanent-magnets

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, D.B.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Two compact 25 kW cw, low magnetic field gyrotrons have been designed for use in Ka-Band and W-Band systems. Both 50 kV devices have been designed to minimize their size and weight by using a 4.5 kG Samarium cobalt permanent magnet. Their designs are presented. The 35 GHz gyrotron uses a 3 A MIG and operates at the third harmonic in the TE{sub 411} mode of a smooth-bore cylindrical cavity. For an output power of 25 kW, the predicted conversion efficiency is 25%, yielding an output efficiency of 17%. An ideal 33 kV single-stage depressed collector following a magnetic downtaper could increase the device efficiency to 50%. The 94 GHz gyrotron utilizes a Cusp gun and operates at the eight-harmonic in a sixteen-vane slotted cavity. The efficiency of the 95 GHz gyrotron is predicted to be 10%, which could also be boosted to {approximately} 50% with a depressed collector. Either device can be reconfigured as a tunable gyro-BWO. Mode competition will be controlled in both gyrotrons by slicing the cavities to interrupt the azimuthal wall currents of unwanted modes as utilized recently in the successful second-harmonic TE{sub 21} gyro-TWT amplifier experiment.

  2. Commercialization of a 2.5kW Utility Interactive Inverter for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Torrey, David A.

    2006-05-26

    Through this project, Advanced Energy Conversion (AEC) has developed, tested, refined and is preparing to commercialize a 2.5kW utility-interactive inverter system for distributed generation. The inverter technology embodies zero-voltage switching technology that will ultimately yield a system that is smaller, less expensive and more efficient than existing commercial technologies. This program has focused on commercial success through careful synthesis of technology, market-focus and business development. AEC was the primary participant. AEC is utilizing contract manufacturers in the early stages of production, allowing its technical staff to focus on quality control issues and product enhancements. The objective of this project was to bring the AEC inverter technology from its current pre-production state to a commercial product. Federal funds have been used to build and test production-intent inverters, support the implementation of the commercialization plan and bring the product to the point of UL certification.

  3. Oxidation of zirconium alloys in 2.5 kPa water vapor for tritium readiness.

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Bernice E.

    2007-11-01

    A more reactive liner material is needed for use as liner and cruciform material in tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBAR) in commercial light water nuclear reactors (CLWR). The function of these components is to convert any water that is released from the Li-6 enriched lithium aluminate breeder material to oxide and hydrogen that can be gettered, thus minimizing the permeation of tritium into the reactor coolant. Fourteen zirconium alloys were exposed to 2.5 kPa water vapor in a helium stream at 300 C over a period of up to 35 days. Experimental alloys with aluminum, yttrium, vanadium, titanium, and scandium, some of which also included ternaries with nickel, were included along with a high nitrogen impurity alloy and the commercial alloy Zircaloy-2. They displayed a reactivity range of almost 500, with Zircaloy-2 being the least reactive.

  4. Gifford-McMahon/Joule-Thomson Refrigerator Cools to 2.5 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcliffe, Michael; Fernandez, Jose; Hanson, Theodore

    2005-01-01

    A compact refrigerator designed specifically for cooling a microwave maser low-noise amplifier is capable of removing heat at a continuous rate of 180 mW at a temperature of 2.5 K. This refrigerator is a combination of (1) a commercial Gifford-McMahon (GM) refrigerator nominally rated for cooling to 4 K and (2) a Joule-Thomson (J-T) circuit. The GM refrigerator pre-cools the J-T circuit, which provides the final stage of cooling. The refrigerator is compact and capable of operating in any orientation. Moreover, in comparison with a typical refrigerator heretofore used to cool a maser to 4.5 K, this refrigerator is simpler and can be built at less than half the cost.

  5. A programmable power processor for a 25-kW power module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanier, R., Jr.; Kapustka, R. E.; Bush, J. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the power processor for an electrical power system for a 25-kW Power Module that could support the Space Shuttle program during the 1980's and 1990's and which could be a stepping stone to future large space power systems is presented. Trades that led to the selection of a microprocessor-controlled power processor are briefly discussed. Emphasis is given to the power processing equipment that uses a microprocessor to provide versatility that allows multiple use and to provide for future growth by reprogramming output voltage to a higher level (to 120 V from 30 V). Efficiency data from a breadboard programmable power processor are presented, and component selection and design considerations are also discussed.

  6. The 25 kW resonant dc/dc power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robson, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of processing 25-kW of power with a single, transistorized, series resonant converter stage was demonstrated by the successful design, development, fabrication, and testing of such a device which employs four Westinghouse D7ST transistors in a full-bridge configuration and operates from a 250-to-350 Vdc input bus. The unit has an overall worst-case efficiency of 93.5% at its full rated output of 1000 V and 25 A dc. A solid-state dc input circuit breaker and output-transient-current limiters are included in and integrated into the design. Full circuit details of the converter are presented along with the test data.

  7. 20 kHz, 25 kVA node power transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, S.

    1989-01-01

    The electrical and mechanical design information and the electrical and thermal testing performed on the 440-208-V rms, 20-kHz, 25-kVa prototype node transformer are summarized. The calculated efficiency of the node transformer is 99.3 percent based on core loss and copper loss test data, and its maximum calculated load regulation is 0.7 percent. The node transformer has a weight of 19.7 lb and has a power density of 0.8 lb/kW. The hot-spot temperature rise is estimated to be 33 C above the cold plate mounting base. This proof-of-concept transformer design is a viable candidate for the space station Freedom application.

  8. Update on the advanced Stirling conversion system project for 25 kW dish Stirling applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Wong, Wayne A.

    1992-01-01

    Technology development for Stirling convertors directed toward a dynamic power source for space applications is examined. The free-piston Stirling engine has the potential for both solar and nuclear space power applications. Two parallel design directions feature a solar receiver/liquid metal heat transport system, and a free-piston Stirling convertor which incorporates a linear alternator to directly provide the electrical output of about 25 kW to a utility grid. The Cummins Engine Company (CEC) free-piston Stirling convertor incorporates a linear alternator along with hydrodynamic gas bearings to provide noncontacting, wear-free support to the pistons. The Stirling Technology Company design incorporates linear alternator technology with flexures that provide noncontacting support while also supplying much of the spring stiffness needed to obtain proper resonance.

  9. Status of the advanced Stirling conversion system project for 25 kW dish Stirling applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    1991-01-01

    Technology development for Stirling convertors directed toward a dynamic power source for space applications is discussed. Space power requirements include high reliability with very long life, low vibration, and high system efficiency. The free-piston Stirling engine has the potential for future high power space conversion systems, either nuclear or solar powered. Although these applications appear to be quite different, their requirements complement each other. The advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) project at NASA Lewis Research Center is described. Each system design features a solar receiver/liquid metal heat transport system and a free-piston Stirling convertor with a means to provide nominally 25 kW of electric power to utility grid while meeting the US Department of Energy (DOE) performance and long term cost goals. The design is compared with other ASCS designs.

  10. A 2.5-kW industrial CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golov, V. K.; Ivanchenko, A. I.; Krasheninnikov, V. V.; Ponomarenko, A. G.; Shepelenko, A. A.

    1986-06-01

    A fast-flow laser is reported in which the active medium is excited by a self-sustained dc discharge produced by an electric-discharge device with nonsectioned electrodes. In the laser, two discharge gaps are formed by a flat anode and two cathodes, one on each side of the anode. A gas mixture is driven through the gasdynamic channel by a centrifugal fan rotating at 6000 rpm/min. With a mixture of CO2:N2:He = 2.5:7.5:5 mm Hg, the rated power is 2.5 kW; the maximum power is 4 kW with the mixture 2.5:7.5:10 mm Hg. The general design of the laser is described, and its principal performance characteristics are given.

  11. Design of a 25-kWe Surface Reactor System Based on SNAP Reactor Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, David D.; Hiatt, Matthew T.; Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    A Hastelloy-X clad, sodium-potassium (NaK-78) cooled, moderated spectrum reactor using uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH) fuel based on the SNAP program reactors is a promising design for use in surface power systems. This paper presents a 98 kWth reactor for a power system the uses multiple Stirling engines to produce 25 kWe-net for 5 years. The design utilizes a pin type geometry containing UZrHx fuel clad with Hastelloy-X and NaK-78 flowing around the pins as coolant. A compelling feature of this design is its use of 49.9% enriched U, allowing it to be classified as a category III-D attractiveness and reducing facility costs relative to highly-enriched space reactor concepts. Presented below are both the design and an analysis of this reactor's criticality under various safety and operations scenarios.

  12. Design of a 25-kWe Surface Reactor System Based on SNAP Reactor Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David D.; Hiatt, Matthew T.; Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.

    2006-01-20

    A Hastelloy-X clad, sodium-potassium (NaK-78) cooled, moderated spectrum reactor using uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH) fuel based on the SNAP program reactors is a promising design for use in surface power systems. This paper presents a 98 kWth reactor for a power system the uses multiple Stirling engines to produce 25 kWe-net for 5 years. The design utilizes a pin type geometry containing UZrHx fuel clad with Hastelloy-X and NaK-78 flowing around the pins as coolant. A compelling feature of this design is its use of 49.9% enriched U, allowing it to be classified as a category III-D attractiveness and reducing facility costs relative to highly-enriched space reactor concepts. Presented below are both the design and an analysis of this reactor's criticality under various safety and operations scenarios.

  13. A 25kW fiber-coupled diode laser for pumping applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malchus, Joerg; Krause, Volker; Koesters, Arnd; Matthews, David G.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we report the development of a new fiber-coupled diode laser for pumping applications capable of generating 25 kW with four wavelengths. The delivery fiber has 2.0 mm core diameter and 0.22 NA resulting in a Beam Parameter Product (BPP) of 220 mm mrad. To achieve the specifications mentioned above a novel beam transformation technique has been developed combining two high power laser stacks in one common module. After fast axis collimation and beam reformatting a beam with a BPP of 200 mm mrad x 40 mm mrad in the slow and fast-axis is generated. Based on this architecture a customer-specific pump laser with 25 kW optical output power has been developed, in which two modules are polarization multiplexed for each wavelength (980nm, 1020nm, 1040m and 1060nm). After slow-axis collimation these wavelengths are combined using dense wavelength coupling before focusing onto the fiber endface. This new laser is based on a turn-key platform, allowing straight-forward integration into any pump application. The complete system has a footprint of less than 1.4m² and a height of less than 1.8m. The laser diodes are water cooled, achieve a wall-plug efficiency of up to 60%, and have a proven lifetime of <30,000 hours. The new beam transformation techniques open up prospects for the development of pump sources with more than 100kW of optical output power.

  14. Operation of the 25kW NASA Lewis Research Center Solar Regenerative Fuel Cell Tested Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, S. H.; Voecks, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Assembly of the NASA Lewis Research Center(LeRC)Solar Regenerative Fuel Cell (RFC) Testbed Facility has been completed and system testing has proceeded. This facility includes the integration of two 25kW photovoltaic solar cell arrays, a 25kW proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis unit, four 5kW PEM fuel cells, high pressure hydrogen and oxygen storage vessels, high purity water storage containers, and computer monitoring, control and data acquisition.

  15. Alkali metal pool boiler life tests for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system to supply heat more uniformly to the heater head tubes. One issue with liquid metal pool boilers is unstable boiling. Stable boiling is obtained with an enhanced boiling surface containing nucleation sites that promote continuous boiling. Over longer time periods, it is possible that the boiling behavior of the system will change. An 800-h life test was conducted to verify that pool boiling with the chosen fluid/surface combination remains stable as the system ages. The apparatus uses NaK boiling on a - 100 + 140 stainless steel sintered porous layer, with the addition of a small amount of xenon. Pool boiling remained stable to the end of life test. The pool boiler life test included a total of 82 cold starts, to simulate startup each morning, and 60 warm restarts, to simulate cloud cover transients. The behavior of the cold and warm starts showed no significant changes during the life test. In the experiments, the fluid/surface combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  16. Pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Saaski, E. L.; Noble, J.; Tower, L.

    Experiments to determine alkali metal/enhanced surface combinations that have stable boiling at the temperatures and heat fluxes that occur in the Stirling engine are reported. Two enhanced surfaces and two alkali metal working fluids were evaluated. The enhanced surfaces were an EDM hole covered surface and a sintered-powder-metal porous layer surface. The working fluids tested were potassium and eutectic sodium-potasium alloy (NaK), both with and without undissolved noncondensible gas. Noncondensible gas (He and Xe) was added to the system to provide gas in the nucleation sites, preventing quenching of the sites. The experiments demonstrated the potential of an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system for use in a solar-powered Stirling engine. The most favorable fluid/surface combination tested was NaK boiling on a -100 +140 mesh 304L stainless steel sintered porous layer with no undissolved noncondensible gas. This combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Heat fluxes into the system ranged from 10 to 50 W/sq cm. The transition from free convection to nucleate boiling occurred at temperatures near 540 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  17. 25 kWe solar thermal stirling hydraulic engine system: Final conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This report documents the conceptual design and analysis of a solar thermal free-piston Stirling hydraulic engine system designed to deliver 25 kWe when coupled to the 11-meter Test Bed Concentrator at Sandia National Laboratories. A manufacturing cost assessment for 10,000 units per year was made by Pioneer Engineering and Manufacturing. The design meets all program objectives including a 60,000-hr design life, dynamic balancing, fully automated control, >33.3% overall system efficiency, properly conditioned power, maximum utilization of annualized insolation, and projected production costs of $300/kW. The system incorporates a simple, rugged, reliable pool boiler reflux heat pipe to transfer heat from the solar receiver to the Stirling engine. The free-piston engine produces high-pressure hydraulic flow which powers a commercial hydraulic motor that, in turn, drives a commercial rotary induction generator. The Stirling hydraulic engine uses hermetic bellows seals to separate helium working gas from hydraulic fluid which provides hydrodynamic lubrication to all moving parts. Maximum utilization of highly refined, field proven commercial components for electric power generation minimizes development cost and risk. The engine design is based on a highly refined Stirling hydraulic engine developed over 20 years as a fully implantable artificial heart power source. 4 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Preliminary designs for 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion systems for dish electric applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    1990-01-01

    Under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program, Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating heat engines for terrestrial Solar Distributed Heat Receivers. The Stirling engine has been identified by Sandia as one of the most promising engines for terrestrial applications. The Stirling engine also has the potential to meet DOE's performance and cost goals. The NASA Lewis Research Center is conducting Stirling engine technology development activities directed toward a dynamic power source for space applications. Space power systems requirements include high reliability, very long life, low vibration and high efficiency. The free-piston Stirling engine has the potential for future high power space conversion systems, either nuclear or solar powered. Although both applications appear to be quite different, their requirements complement each other. Preliminary designs feature a free-piston Stirling engine, a liquid metal heat transport system, and a means to provide nominally 25 kW electric power to a utility grid while meeting DOE's performance and long term cost goals. The Cummins design incorporates a linear alternator to provide the electrical output, while the STC design generates electrical power indirectly through a hydraulic pump/motor coupled to an induction generator. Both designs for the ASCS's will use technology which can reasonably be expected to be available in the early 1990's

  19. 35-GHz 25-kW CW low-voltage third-harmonic gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, D.B.; Balkcum, A.J.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    A 50-kV third-harmonic gyrotron is shown to be capable of high efficiency. Operation at the third harmonic allows the required magnetic field for 35 GHz generation to be supplied by a 4.5-kG permanent magnet. Two gyrotrons employing sliced circuits for mode control have been evaluated with a large-signal nonself-consistent particle-tracing simulation code and found to be capable of producing 25 kW continuously. The preliminary design of a third-harmonic TE{sub 41} gyrotron utilizing a magnetron injection electron gun is predicted to yield a device efficiency of 17%, which can potentially be increased to 46% with an ideal single-stage depressed collector, while an axis-encircling electron beam from a Cusp electron gun is predicted to drive a third-harmonic TE{sub 31} gyrotron with a device efficiency of 23%, which can theoretically be increased to 45% through the use of an ideal depressed collector.

  20. Operation of the 25 kW NASA Lewis Solar Regenerative Fuel Cell Testbed Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Voecks, G.E.; Rohatgi, N.K.; Moore, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    Assembly of the NASA Lewis Research Center Solar Regenerative Fuel Cell Testbed Facility has recently been completed and system testing is in progress. This facility includes the integration of 50 kW photovoltaic solar cell arrays, a 25 kW proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis unit, four 5 kW PEM fuel cells, high pressure hydrogen and oxygen storage vessels, high purity water storage containers, and computer monitoring, control and data acquisition. The purpose of this facility is multi-faceted, but was originally intended to serve as a testbed for evaluating a closed-loop powerplant for future NASA extended life support operations, such as a Lunar outpost, and also as a terrestrial powerplant example for remote or continuous back-up support operations. The fuel cell and electrolyzer subsystems design and assembly were conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the photovoltaic arrays and electrical interconnect to the electrolyzer were provided by the US Navy/China Lake Naval Weapons Center, and testing and operations are being carried out by JPL.

  1. Concentrated solar power on demand demonstration: Construction and operation of a 25 kW prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Antoni; Codd, Daniel S.; Zhou, Lei; Trumper, David; Calvet, Nicolas; Slocum, Alexander H.

    2016-05-01

    Currently, the majority of concentrated solar power (CSP) plants built worldwide integrate thermal energy storage (TES) systems which enable dispatchable output and higher global plant efficiencies. TES systems are typically based on two tank molten salt technology which involves inherent drawbacks such as parasitic pumping losses and electric tracing of pipes, risk of solidification and high capital costs. The concept presented in this paper is based on a single tank where the concentrated sunlight is directly focused on the molten salt. Hot and cold volumes of salt (at 565 °C and 280 °C, respectively) are axially separated by an insulated divider plate which helps maintain the thermal gradient. The concept, based on existing technologies, seeks to avoid the listed drawbacks as well as reducing the final cost of the TES system. In order to demonstrate its feasibility, Masdar Institute (MI) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology are developing a 25 kW prototype to be tested in the Masdar Solar Platform beam down facility.

  2. Crystal Structure of the 25 kDa Subunit of Human Cleavage Factor I{m}

    SciTech Connect

    Coseno,M.; Martin, G.; Berger, C.; Gilmartin, G.; Keller, W.; Doublie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Cleavage factor Im is an essential component of the pre-messenger RNA 3'-end processing machinery in higher eukaryotes, participating in both the polyadenylation and cleavage steps. Cleavage factor Im is an oligomer composed of a small 25 kDa subunit (CF Im25) and a variable larger subunit of either 59, 68 or 72 kDa. The small subunit also interacts with RNA, poly(A) polymerase, and the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein. These protein-protein interactions are thought to be facilitated by the Nudix domain of CF Im25, a hydrolase motif with a characteristic {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} fold and a conserved catalytic sequence or Nudix box. We present here the crystal structures of human CF Im25 in its free and diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) bound forms at 1.85 and 1.80 Angstroms, respectively. CF Im25 crystallizes as a dimer and presents the classical Nudix fold. Results from crystallographic and biochemical experiments suggest that CF Im25 makes use of its Nudix fold to bind but not hydrolyze ATP and Ap4A. The complex and apo protein structures provide insight into the active oligomeric state of CF Im and suggest a possible role of nucleotide binding in either the polyadenylation and/or cleavage steps of pre-messenger RNA 3'-end processing.

  3. Three-year performance study of the Mead, Nebraska, 25-kWp photovoltaic power system

    SciTech Connect

    Bullwinkel, H. J.; Hopkinson, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    During the past three years (1978 to 1980), a 25-kWp photovoltaic (PV) solar energy system has provided 107-MW hours of energy to the University of Nebraska's Agricultural Research Station in Mead, Nebraska. Electrical energy produced by the PV system has provided 100% of the power needed throughout the growing season to meet the irrigation requirements for an 80-acre cornfield, as well as significant portions of power required for PV-related crop-drying and fertilizer-manufacturing experiments. Annual array output averaged 21.4 kWh (1978), 20.4 kWh (1979) and 19.0 kWh (1980) for every 1.0 kWh/m/sup 2/ of insolation. Field data indicate that the PV system, developed and maintained jointly by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Lincoln Laboratory and the University of Nebraska under US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship, has performed up to expectations, if due allowance is made for component degradation and seasonal soil/snow accumulation on the array.

  4. Preliminary designs for 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion systems for dish electric applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    1990-01-01

    Under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program, Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating heat engines for terrestrial Solar Distributed Heat Receivers. The Stirling engine has been identified by Sandia as one of the most promising engines for terrestrial applications. The Stirling engine also has the potential to meet DOE's performance and cost goals. The NASA Lewis Research Center is conducting Stirling engine technology development activities directed toward a dynamic power source for space applications. Space power systems requirements include high reliability, very long life, low vibration and high efficiency. The free-piston Stirling engine has the potential for future high power space conversion systems, either nuclear or solar powered. Although both applications appear to be quite different, their requirements complement each other. Preliminary designs feature a free-piston Stirling engine, a liquid metal heat transport system, and a means to provide nominally 25 kW electric power to a utility grid while meeting DOE's performance and long term cost goals. The Cummins design incorporates a linear alternator to provide the electrical output, while the STC design generates electrical power indirectly through a hydraulic pump/motor coupled to an induction generator. Both designs for the ASCS's will use technology which can reasonably be expected to be available in the early 1990's.

  5. Pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Saaski, E. L.; Noble, J.; Tower, L.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments to determine alkali metal/enhanced surface combinations that have stable boiling at the temperatures and heat fluxes that occur in the Stirling engine are reported. Two enhanced surfaces and two alkali metal working fluids were evaluated. The enhanced surfaces were an EDM hole covered surface and a sintered-powder-metal porous layer surface. The working fluids tested were potassium and eutectic sodium-potasium alloy (NaK), both with and without undissolved noncondensible gas. Noncondensible gas (He and Xe) was added to the system to provide gas in the nucleation sites, preventing quenching of the sites. The experiments demonstrated the potential of an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system for use in a solar-powered Stirling engine. The most favorable fluid/surface combination tested was NaK boiling on a -100 +140 mesh 304L stainless steel sintered porous layer with no undissolved noncondensible gas. This combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Heat fluxes into the system ranged from 10 to 50 W/sq cm. The transition from free convection to nucleate boiling occurred at temperatures near 540 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  6. Alkali metal pool boiler life tests for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.

    1991-01-01

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system to supply heat more uniformly to the heater head tubes. One issue with liquid metal pool boilers is unstable boiling. Stable boiling is obtained with an enhanced boiling surface containing nucleation sites that promote continuous boiling. Over longer time periods, it is possible that the boiling behavior of the system will change. An 800-h life test was conducted to verify that pool boiling with the chosen fluid/surface combination remains stable as the system ages. The apparatus uses NaK boiling on a - 100 + 140 stainless steel sintered porous layer, with the addition of a small amount of xenon. Pool boiling remained stable to the end of life test. The pool boiler life test included a total of 82 cold starts, to simulate startup each morning, and 60 warm restarts, to simulate cloud cover transients. The behavior of the cold and warm starts showed no significant changes during the life test. In the experiments, the fluid/surface combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  7. Preliminary designs for 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion systems for dish electric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    Under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program, Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating heat engines for terrestrial Solar Distributed Heat Receivers. The Stirling engine has been identified by Sandia as one of the most promising engines for terrestrial applications. The Stirling engine also has the potential to meet DOE's performance and cost goals. The NASA Lewis Research Center is conducting Stirling engine technology development activities directed toward a dynamic power source for space applications. Space power systems requirements include high reliability, very long life, low vibration and high efficiency. The free-piston Stirling engine has the potential for future high power space conversion systems, either nuclear or solar powered. Although both applications appear to be quite different, their requirements complement each other. Preliminary designs feature a free-piston Stirling engine, a liquid metal heat transport system, and a means to provide nominally 25 kW electric power to a utility grid while meeting DOE's performance and long term cost goals. The Cummins design incorporates a linear alternator to provide the electrical output, while the STC design generates electrical power indirectly through a hydraulic pump/motor coupled to an induction generator. Both designs for the ASCS's will use technology which can reasonably be expected to be available in the early 1990's.

  8. Fuel flexibility study of an integrated 25 kW SOFC reformer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yaofan; Rao, Ashok D.; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    The operation of solid oxide fuel cells on various fuels, such as natural gas, biogas and gases derived from biomass or coal gasification and distillate fuel reforming has been an active area of SOFC research in recent years. In this study, we develop a theoretical understanding and thermodynamic simulation capability for investigation of an integrated SOFC reformer system operating on various fuels. The theoretical understanding and simulation results suggest that significant thermal management challenges may result from the use of different types of fuels in the same integrated fuel cell reformer system. Syngas derived from coal is simulated according to specifications from high-temperature entrained bed coal gasifiers. Diesel syngas is approximated from data obtained in a previous NFCRC study of JP-8 and diesel operation of the integrated 25 kW SOFC reformer system. The syngas streams consist of mixtures of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrogen. Although the SOFC can tolerate a wide variety in fuel composition, the current analyses suggest that performance of integrated SOFC reformer systems may require significant operating condition changes and/or system design changes in order to operate well on this variety of fuels.

  9. The 25 kWe solar thermal Stirling hydraulic engine system: Conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Maurice; Emigh, Grant; Noble, Jack; Riggle, Peter; Sorenson, Torvald

    1988-01-01

    The conceptual design and analysis of a solar thermal free-piston Stirling hydraulic engine system designed to deliver 25 kWe when coupled to a 11 meter test bed concentrator is documented. A manufacturing cost assessment for 10,000 units per year was made. The design meets all program objectives including a 60,000 hr design life, dynamic balancing, fully automated control, more than 33.3 percent overall system efficiency, properly conditioned power, maximum utilization of annualized insolation, and projected production costs. The system incorporates a simple, rugged, reliable pool boiler reflux heat pipe to transfer heat from the solar receiver to the Stirling engine. The free-piston engine produces high pressure hydraulic flow which powers a commercial hydraulic motor that, in turn, drives a commercial rotary induction generator. The Stirling hydraulic engine uses hermetic bellows seals to separate helium working gas from hydraulic fluid which provides hydrodynamic lubrication to all moving parts. Maximum utilization of highly refined, field proven commercial components for electric power generation minimizes development cost and risk.

  10. 2.5-kHz magnetostrictive Tonpilz sonar transducer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Stephen C.

    2002-07-01

    Naval Undersea Warfare Center has fabricated and tested a 2.5 kHz magnetostrictive sonar transducer to validate various modeling techniques. The transducer selected is a longitudinal vibrator Tonpilz type consisting of Terfenol-D driver, tail mass, radiating head mass, and stress rod bolt with 21 MPa (3000 psi) prestress. The Terfenol-D drive rod is interlaced with three samarium cobalt magnets, one in the center and one on either end magnetically biasing the Terfenol to 60 kA/m (750 Oe). Both the Terfenol-D rods and magnets were laminated to reduce eddy currents. The magnetic circuit is comprised of pole piece discs on each end of the Terfenol-D magnet assembly and an external magnetic cylinder (return path) made of a high-permeability, high-resistivity, high-saturation powdered metal 'T2'. The transducer has a 25 cm (9.8in) diameter radiating face (piston), is 28 cm (11 in.) long, and weighs 15 kg (32 lb.) without the housing. It is 41 cm (16 in.) long and 25 kg (56 lb.) with the underwater housing. The measured results are compared to a finite element model using 'ATILA' and distributed plane wave element equivalent circuit model. The coupling coefficient, permeability and mechanical loss effects for different prestress loads were measured on a resonant Terfenol 'dumbbell' device. The in-water measured results indicate a mechanical Q of 2.5, an effective coupling coefficient of 0.36, an electro-acoustic efficiency of 60 percent, beam pattern directivity index of 6 dB, a maximum Source Level of 214.6 dB re 1uPa/m at 15 Amps AC drive and bandwidth of 2 kHz to 5.4 kHz +/- 1.5 dB.

  11. Status of the Advanced Stirling Conversion System Project for 25 kW dish Stirling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shaltens, R.K.; Schreiber, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program, Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating heat engines for terrestrial Solar Heat Receivers. The Stirling engine has been identified by Sandia as one of the most promising heat engines for terrestrial applications. The Stirling engine also has the potential to meet DOE's performance and cost goals. The NASA Lewis Research Center is conducting technology development for Stirling convertors directed toward a dynamic power source for space applications. Space power requirements include high reliability with very long life, low vibration and high system efficiency. The free-piston Stirling engine has the potential for future high power space conversion systems, either nuclear or solar powered. Although both applications appear to be quite different, their requirements complement each other. NASA Lewis is providing management of the Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) Project through an Interagency Agreement (IAA) with the DOE. Parallel contracts continue with both Cummins Engine Company (CEC), Columbus, Indiana, and Stirling Technology Company (STC), Richland, Washington for the designs of an ASCS. Each system'' design features a solar receiver/liquid metal heat transport system, and a free-piston Stirling convertor with a means to provide nominally 25 kW of electric power to a utility grid while meeting DOE's performance and long-term'' cost goals. The Cummins free- piston Stirling convertor incorporates a linear alternator to directly provide the electrical output, while the STC design generates electrical power indirectly through a hydraulic pump/motor coupled to an induction generator. Both the Cummins and STC ASCS designs will use technology which can reasonably be expected to be available in the early 1990's. 17 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. PanFP: Pangenome-based functional profiles for microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Se -Ran; Hauser, Loren John; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Gorin, Andrey A.; Robeson, Michael S.

    2015-09-26

    For decades there has been increasing interest in understanding the relationships between microbial communities and ecosystem functions. Current DNA sequencing technologies allows for the exploration of microbial communities in two principle ways: targeted rRNA gene surveys and shotgun metagenomics. For large study designs, it is often still prohibitively expensive to sequence metagenomes at both the breadth and depth necessary to statistically capture the true functional diversity of a community. Although rRNA gene surveys provide no direct evidence of function, they do provide a reasonable estimation of microbial diversity, while being a very cost effective way to screen samples of interest for later shotgun metagenomic analyses. However, there is a great deal of 16S rRNA gene survey data currently available from diverse environments, and thus a need for tools to infer functional composition of environmental samples based on 16S rRNA gene survey data. As a result, we present a computational method called pangenome based functional profiles (PanFP), which infers functional profiles of microbial communities from 16S rRNA gene survey data for Bacteria and Archaea. PanFP is based on pangenome reconstruction of a 16S rRNA gene operational taxonomic unit (OTU) from known genes and genomes pooled from the OTU s taxonomic lineage. From this lineage, we derive an OTU functional profile by weighting a pangenome s functional profile with the OTUs abundance observed in a given sample. We validated our method by comparing PanFP to the functional profiles obtained from the direct shotgun metagenomic measurement of 65 diverse communities via Spearman correlation coefficients. These correlations improved with increasing sequencing depth, within the range of 0.8 0.9 for the most deeply sequenced Human Microbiome Project mock community samples. PanFP is very similar in performance to another recently released tool, PICRUSt, for almost all of survey data analysed here. But, our

  13. PanFP: Pangenome-based functional profiles for microbial communities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jun, Se -Ran; Hauser, Loren John; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Gorin, Andrey A.; Robeson, Michael S.

    2015-09-26

    For decades there has been increasing interest in understanding the relationships between microbial communities and ecosystem functions. Current DNA sequencing technologies allows for the exploration of microbial communities in two principle ways: targeted rRNA gene surveys and shotgun metagenomics. For large study designs, it is often still prohibitively expensive to sequence metagenomes at both the breadth and depth necessary to statistically capture the true functional diversity of a community. Although rRNA gene surveys provide no direct evidence of function, they do provide a reasonable estimation of microbial diversity, while being a very cost effective way to screen samples of interestmore » for later shotgun metagenomic analyses. However, there is a great deal of 16S rRNA gene survey data currently available from diverse environments, and thus a need for tools to infer functional composition of environmental samples based on 16S rRNA gene survey data. As a result, we present a computational method called pangenome based functional profiles (PanFP), which infers functional profiles of microbial communities from 16S rRNA gene survey data for Bacteria and Archaea. PanFP is based on pangenome reconstruction of a 16S rRNA gene operational taxonomic unit (OTU) from known genes and genomes pooled from the OTU s taxonomic lineage. From this lineage, we derive an OTU functional profile by weighting a pangenome s functional profile with the OTUs abundance observed in a given sample. We validated our method by comparing PanFP to the functional profiles obtained from the direct shotgun metagenomic measurement of 65 diverse communities via Spearman correlation coefficients. These correlations improved with increasing sequencing depth, within the range of 0.8 0.9 for the most deeply sequenced Human Microbiome Project mock community samples. PanFP is very similar in performance to another recently released tool, PICRUSt, for almost all of survey data analysed here. But

  14. Isolation of a 25-kDa protein binding to a curved DNA upstream the origin of the L strand replication in the rat mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Gadaleta, G; D'Elia, D; Capaccio, L; Saccone, C; Pepe, G

    1996-06-01

    The presence of a curved DNA sequence in the gene for the NADH-dehydrogenase subunit 2 of rat mitochondrial genome, upstream from the origin of the light strand replication have been demonstrated through theoretical analysis and experimental approaches. Gel retardation assays showed that this structure makes a complex with a protein component extracted from the mitochondrial matrix. The isolation and purification of this protein is reported. With a Sepharose CL-6B and magnetic DNA affinity chromatography a polypeptide was purified to homogeneity having 25-kDa mass as shown by gel electrophoresis. To functionally characterize this protein, its capability to bind to other sequences of the homologous or heterologous DNA and to specific riboprobes was also investigated. A role for this protein as a trans-acting agent required for the expression of the mammalian mitochondrial genome is suggested. PMID:8662779

  15. A comparison of Stirling engines for use with a 25 kW dish-electric conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    Two designs for an advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) are described. The objective of the ASCS is to generate about 25 kW of electric power to an electric utility grid at an engine/alternator target cost of $300.00/kW at the manufacturing rate of 10,000 unit/yr. Both designs contain a free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE), a heat transport system, solar receiver, a means to generate electric power, the necessary auxiliaries, and a control system. The major differences between the two concepts are: one uses a 25 kWe single-piston FPSE which incorporates a linear alternator to directly convert the energy to electricity on the utility grid; and in the second design, electrical power is generated indirectly using a hydraulic output to a ground based hydraulic motor coupled to a rotating alternator. Diagrams of the two designs are presented.

  16. Structure of full-length ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2-25K (huntingtin-interacting protein 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Randall C.; Hughes, Ronny C.; Flatt, Justin W.; Meehan, Edward J.; Ng, Joseph D.; Twigg, Pamela D.

    2009-08-07

    The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2-25K has been identified as a huntingtin (the key protein in Huntington's disease) interacting protein and has been shown to play a role in mediating the toxicity of A{beta}, the principal protein involved in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. E2-25K is a dual-domain protein with an ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain as well as a conserved ubiquitin-conjugating (UBC) domain which catalyzes the formation of a covalent bond between the C-terminal glycine of an ubiquitin molecule and the {var_epsilon}-amine of a lysine residue on the acceptor protein as part of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The crystal structures of E2-25K M172A mutant protein at pH 6.5 and pH 8.5 were determined to 1.9 and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Examination of the structures revealed domain-domain interactions between the UBC and UBA domains which have not previously been reported

  17. Recombinant mussel adhesive protein fp-5 (MAP fp-5) as a bulk bioadhesive and surface coating material.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Kang, Dong Gyun; Lim, Seonghye; Yang, Yun Jung; Kim, Chang Sup; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2011-08-01

    Mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) attach to all types of inorganic and organic surfaces, even in wet environments. MAP of type 5 (fp-5), in particular, has been considered as a key adhesive material. However, the low availability of fp-5 has hampered its biochemical characterization and practical applications. Here, soluble recombinant fp-5 is mass-produced in Escherichia coli. Tyrosinase-modified recombinant fp-5 showed ∼1.11 MPa adhesive shear strength, which is the first report of a bulk-scale adhesive force measurement for purified recombinant of natural MAP type. Surface coatings were also performed through simple dip-coating of various objects. In addition, complex coacervate using recombinant fp-5 and hyaluronic acid was prepared as an efficient adhesive formulation, which greatly improved the bulk adhesive strength. Collectively, it is expected that this work will enhance basic understanding of mussel adhesion and that recombinant fp-5 can be successfully used as a realistic bulk-scale bioadhesive and an efficient surface coating material. PMID:21770718

  18. Oxygen-independent FbFP: Fluorescent sentinel and oxygen sensor component in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Eichhof, Isabel; Ernst, Joachim F

    2016-07-01

    FMN-binding fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) outperform GFP and its derivatives because of their oxygen-independence, small size and rapid maturation. FbFPs have been used successfully as reliable reporters of gene expression in the cytoplasm of pro- and eukaryotes. Here we extend previous findings on the codon-adapted CaFbFP variant, which functions in the apathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. In both fungal species, CaFbFP could be targeted to the nucleus and the cell wall by endogenous signals (H2B-/Aga2-fusions) demonstrating its use as a fluorescent beacon in these relevant cellular locations. Transformants of both fungal species producing a CaFbFP-YFP fusion (YFOS) showed variable energy transfer from CaFbFP to YFP (FRET) that depended in its extent on external O2 concentrations. Applications as fluorescent sentinel and oxygen biosensor expand the FbFP toolbox to study oxygen-independent cellular processes under hypoxia. PMID:27126475

  19. DoFP polarimeter based polarization microscope for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jintao; He, Honghui; He, Chao; Ma, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Polarization microscope is a useful technique to observe the optical anisotropic nature of biomedical specimens and provide more microstructural information than the conventional microscope. In this paper, we present a division of focal plane (DoFP) polarimeter based polarization microscope which is capable of imaging both the Stokes vector and the 3×4 Mueller matrix. The Mueller matrix measurement can help us completely understand the polarization properties of the sample and the Stokes vector measurement is a simultaneous technology. First, we calibrate a DoFP polarimeter using the polarization data reduction method for accurate Stokes vector measurements. Second, as the Stokes vector computation for all pixels using the calibrated instrument matrix is usually time consuming, we develop a GPU acceleration algorithm for real time Stokes vector calculations. Third, based on the accurate and fast Stokes vector calculation, we present an optimal 4-states of polarization (4-SoP) illumination scheme for Mueller matrix measurement using the DoFP polarimeter. Finally, we demonstrate the biomedical applications of the DoFP polarimeter based polarization microscope. Experiment results show that the characteristic features of many biomedical samples can be observed in the "polarization staining" images using the circularly polarized light as illumination. In this way, combined with GPU acceleration algorithm, the DoFP polarization microscope has the capacity for real time polarization monitoring of dynamic processes in biological samples.

  20. Comparison of conceptual designs for 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion systems for dish electric application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) Project is managed by NASA Lewis Research Center through a cooperative interagency agreement with DOE. Conceptual designs for the ASCS's were completed under parallel contracts in 1987 by Mechanical Technology Inc. (MTI) of Latham, NY, and Stirling Technology Company (STC) of Richland, WA. Each design features a free-piston Stirling engine, a liquid metal heat pipe receiver, and a means to provide about 25 kW of electric power to a utility grid while meeting DOE's long term performance and cost goals. An independent assessment showed that both designs are manufacturable and have the potential to easily meet DOE's long term cost goals.

  1. Comparison of conceptual designs for 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion systems for dish electric applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) Project is managed by NASA Lewis Research Center through a cooperative interagency agreement with DOE. Conceptual designs for the ASCS's were completed under parallel contracts in 1987 by Mechanical Technology Inc. (MTI) of Latham, NY, and Stirling Technology Company (STC) of Richland, WA. Each design features a free-piston Stirling engine, a liquid metal heat pipe receiver, and a means to provide about 25 kW of electric power to a utility grid while meeting DOE's long term performance and cost goals. An independent assessment showed that both designs are manufacturable and have the potential to easily meet DOE's long term cost goals.

  2. Structure analysis of the Ag (001) surface at 25 K by synchrotron x-ray crystal truncation rod scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sakata, O.; Shimada, Y.; Walker, C.J.; Yi, M.-S.; Imai, Y.

    2004-05-12

    We have commissioned an ultra-high vacuum chamber for surface structure determination at an undulator beamline BL13XU, SPring-8. As a test experiment, a structure of a Ag (001) surface at a temperature of 25 K has been studied by analyzing x-ray scattering intensities along several surface crystal truncation rods (CTR). Results of least-squares fits to the CTR data show that the top atomic layer was shifted inwards by 0.0011 nm {+-} 0.0003 nm relative to the bulk position.

  3. Current leads and joints for HTS DC cable of 2.5 kA 20 kV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Andrey V.; Diev, Dmitry N.; Dinisilov, Andrey N.; Anashkin, Oleg P.; Keilin, Victor E.; Kovalev, Ivan A.; Lobyntsev, Vladimir V.; Scherbakov, Vladimir I.; Shutova, Darya I.; Sytnykov, Victor E.

    2014-01-01

    Design of current lead boxes and joint boxes for 2.5 km long St. Petersbubrg HTS DC cable project (2.5 kA, 20 kV) is described. Maximum internal pressure of sub-cooled nitrogen is 1.4 MPa. Both current lead boxes and joint boxes are equipped with terminals for temperature and pressure measurements. Current leads of different polarities have independent electrical insulators. Two current lead boxes and one joint box have been preliminary tested. The first test results are reported.

  4. Different effects of 25-kDa amelogenin on the proliferation, attachment and migration of various periodontal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiting; Shu, Rong; Liu, Dali; Jiang, Shaoyun

    2010-04-09

    Previous studies have assumed that amelogenin is responsible for the therapeutic effect of the enamel matrix derivative (EMD) in periodontal tissue healing and regeneration. However, it is difficult to confirm this hypothesis because both the EMD and the amelogenins are complex mixtures of multiple proteins. Further adding to the difficulties is the fact that periodontal tissue regeneration involves various types of cells and a sequence of associated cellular events including the attachment, migration and proliferation of various cells. In this study, we investigated the potential effect of a 25-kDa recombinant porcine amelogenin (rPAm) on primarily cultured periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLF), gingival fibroblasts (GF) and gingival epithelial cells (GEC). The cells were treated with 25-kDa recombinant porcine amelogenin at a concentration of 10 {mu}g/mL. We found that rPAm significantly promoted the proliferation and migration of PDLF, but not their adhesion. Similarly, the proliferation and adhesion of GF were significantly enhanced by treatment with rPAm, while migration was greatly inhibited. Interestingly, this recombinant protein inhibited the growth rate, cell adhesion and migration of GEC. These data suggest that rPAm may play an essential role in periodontal regeneration through the activation of periodontal fibroblasts and inhibition of the cellular behaviors of gingival epithelial cells.

  5. The Lymantria dispar nucleopolyhedrovirus contains the capsid-associated p24 protein gene.

    PubMed

    Slavicek, James M; Hayes-Plazolles, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    During the course of investigations on a wild-type strain of Lymantria dispar multinucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV), a region of the viral genome was analyzed and found to contain 697 bp that is lacking in the sequenced strain (5-6) of LdMNPV (Kuzio et al., Virology 253, 17-34, 1999). The sequenced strain of LdMNPV contains a mutation in the 25 K few polyhedra (FP) gene, and exhibits the phenotype of a FP mutant. The additional sequence was located at approximately 81.4 map units within the viral genome, and was found in 10 different wild-type LdMNPV genotypic variants analyzed. Since the additional sequence wasfound in all wild-type virus strains analyzed, this sequence should be included in the representative LdMNPV genome. Sequence analysis of the genomic region containing the additional sequences revealed the presence of a homologue of the Autographa californica MNPV capsid-associated p24 gene (ORF 129). This gene, absent in LdMNPV isolate 5-6, is also present in the Orgyia pseudotsugata MNPV, Bombyx mori NPV, Spodoptera exigua MNPV, S. litura MNPV, Mamestra configurata MNPV, Helicoverpa armigera SNPV, H. zea SNPV, Buzura suppressaria SNPV, Xestia c-nigrum granulovirus, Plutella xylostella GV, and Cydia pomonella GV. PMID:12680688

  6. Motion-based nonuniformity correction in DoFP polarimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Tyo, J. Scott; Ratliff, Bradley M.

    2007-09-01

    Division of Focal Plane polarimeters (DoFP) operate by integrating an array of micropolarizer elements with a focal plane array. These devices have been investigated for over a decade, and example systems have been built in all regions of the optical spectrum. DoFP devices have the distinct advantage that they are mechanically rugged, inherently temporally synchronized, and optically aligned. They have the concomitant disadvantage that each pixel in the FPA has a different instantaneous field of view (IFOV), meaning that the polarization component measurements that go into estimating the Stokes vector across the image come from four different points in the field. In addition to IFOV errors, microgrid camera systems operating in the LWIR have the additional problem that FPA nonuniformity (NU) noise can be quite severe. The spatial differencing nature of a DoFP system exacerbates the residual NU noise that is remaining after calibration, and is often the largest source of false polarization signatures away from regions where IFOV error dominates. We have recently presented a scene based algorithm that uses frame-to-frame motion to compensate for NU noise in unpolarized IR imagers. In this paper, we have extended that algorithm so that it can be used to compensate for NU noise on a DoFP polarimeter. Furthermore, the additional information provided by the scene motion can be used to significantly reduce the IFOV error. We have found a reduction of IFOV error by a factor of 10 if the scene motion is known exactly. Performance is reduced when the motion must be estimated from the scene, but still shows a marked improvement over static DoFP images.

  7. Design of a pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.; Kesseli, J.

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding a heat transport system to more uniformly supply heat to the heater head tubes. One heat transport system with favorable characteristics is an alkali metal pool boiler. An alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system was designed for a 25-kW advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS). Solar energy concentrated on the absorber dome boils a eutectic mixture of sodium and potassium. The alkali metal vapors condense on the heater head tubes, supplying the Stirling engine with a uniform heat flux at a constant temperature. Boiling stability is achieved with the use of an enhanced boiling surface and noncondensible gas.

  8. Comparison of conceptual designs for 25 kWe Advanced Stirling Conversion Systems for dish electric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shaltens, R.K.; Schreiber, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) Project is managed by NASA Lewis Research Center through a cooperative Interagency Agreement with DOE. Conceptual designs for the ASCS's were completed under parallel contracts in 1987 by Mechanical Technology Inc. (MTI) of Latham, NY, and Stirling Technology Company (STC) of Richland, WA. Each design features a free-piston Stirling engine, a liquid metal heat pipe receiver, and a means to provide about 25 kW of electric power to a utility grid while meeting DOE's long term performance and cost goals. An independent assessment showed that both designs are manufacturable and have the potential to easily meet DOE's long term cost goals. 9 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. A 2.5 kW cascaded Schwarz converter for 20 kHz power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetler, Russell E.; Stuart, Thomas A.

    1989-01-01

    Because it avoids the high currents in a parallel loaded capacitor, the cascaded Schwarz converter should offer better component utilization than converters with sinusoidal output voltages. The circuit is relatively easy to protect, and it provides a predictable trapezoidal voltage waveform that should be satisfactory for 20-kHz distribution systems. Analysis of the system is enhanced by plotting curves of normalized variables vs. gamma(1), where gamma(1) is proportional to the variable frequency of the first stage. Light-load operation is greatly improved by the addition of a power recycling rectifier bridge that is back biased at medium to heavy loads. Operation has been verified on a 2.5-kW circuit that uses input and output voltages in the same range as those anticipated for certain future spacecraft power systems.

  10. A 2.5 kW cascaded Schwarz converter for 20 kHz power distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetler, Russell E.; Stuart, Thomas A.

    Because it avoids the high currents in a parallel loaded capacitor, the cascaded Schwarz converter should offer better component utilization than converters with sinusoidal output voltages. The circuit is relatively easy to protect, and it provides a predictable trapezoidal voltage waveform that should be satisfactory for 20-kHz distribution systems. Analysis of the system is enhanced by plotting curves of normalized variables vs. gamma(1), where gamma(1) is proportional to the variable frequency of the first stage. Light-load operation is greatly improved by the addition of a power recycling rectifier bridge that is back biased at medium to heavy loads. Operation has been verified on a 2.5-kW circuit that uses input and output voltages in the same range as those anticipated for certain future spacecraft power systems.

  11. Design of a pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.; Kesseli, J.

    1991-01-01

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding a heat transport system to more uniformly supply heat to the heater head tubes. One heat transport system with favorable characteristics is an alkali metal pool boiler. An alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system was designed for a 25-kW advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS). Solar energy concentrated on the absorber dome boils a eutectic mixture of sodium and potassium. The alkali metal vapors condense on the heater head tubes, supplying the Stirling engine with a uniform heat flux at a constant temperature. Boiling stability is achieved with the use of an enhanced boiling surface and noncondensible gas.

  12. Effect of oxygen and heliox breathing on air bubbles in adipose tissue during 25-kPa altitude exposures.

    PubMed

    Randsøe, T; Kvist, T M; Hyldegaard, O

    2008-11-01

    At altitude, bubbles are known to form and grow in blood and tissues causing altitude decompression sickness. Previous reports indicate that treatment of decompression sickness by means of oxygen breathing at altitude may cause unwanted bubble growth. In this report we visually followed the in vivo changes of micro air bubbles injected into adipose tissue of anesthetized rats at 101.3 kPa (sea level) after which they were decompressed from 101.3 kPa to and held at 25 kPa (10,350 m), during breathing of oxygen or a heliox(34:66) mixture (34% helium and 66% oxygen). Furthermore, bubbles were studied during oxygen breathing preceded by a 3-h period of preoxygenation to eliminate tissue nitrogen before decompression. During oxygen breathing, bubbles grew from 11 to 198 min (mean: 121 min, +/-SD 53.4) after which they remained stable or began to shrink slowly. During heliox breathing bubbles grew from 30 to 130 min (mean: 67 min, +/-SD 31.0) from which point they stabilized or shrank slowly. No bubbles disappeared during either oxygen or heliox breathing. Preoxygenation followed by continuous oxygen breathing at altitude caused most bubbles to grow from 19 to 179 min (mean: 51 min, +/-SD 47.7) after which they started shrinking or remained stable throughout the observation period. Bubble growth time was significantly longer during oxygen breathing compared with heliox breathing and preoxygenated animals. Significantly more bubbles disappeared in preoxygenated animals compared with oxygen and heliox breathing. Preoxygenation enhanced bubble disappearance compared with oxygen and heliox breathing but did not prevent bubble growth. The results indicate that oxygen breathing at 25 kPa promotes air bubble growth in adipose tissue regardless of the tissue nitrogen pressure. PMID:18756005

  13. Operation of the 25 kW NASA Lewis Research Center solar regenerative fuel cell testbed facility

    SciTech Connect

    Voecks, G.E.; Rohatgi, N.K.; Jan, D.L.; Ferraro, N.W.; Moore, S.H.; Warshay, M.; Prokopius, P.R.; Edwards, H.S.; Smith, G.D.

    1997-12-31

    Assembly of the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Solar Regenerative Fuel Cell (RFC) Testbed Facility has been completed and system testing has proceeded. This facility includes the integration of two 25 kW photovoltaic solar cell arrays, a 25 kW proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis unit, four 5 kW PEM fuel cells, high pressure hydrogen and oxygen storage vessels, high purity water storage containers, and computer monitoring, control and data acquisition. The fuel cell and electrolyzer subsystems` installation was carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The photovoltaic arrays and electrical interconnect to the electrolyzer were provided by the US Navy/China Lake Naval Air Warfare Center. JPL is responsible for conducting the testing and operations at the LeRC facility. There are multiple objectives for this program. The near term objectives are: (1) design, assemble, and test the solar RFC power plant system to serve as a pre-prototype operational testbed facility; (2) evaluate performance criteria of the total system, subsystems, and components against various operational duty cycles; and (3) develop automation and controls commensurate with advanced system operating requirements. The long term objectives are: (1) develop a highly reliable, long life, highly efficient solar RFC power system for future manned space missions; and (2) demonstrate the dual use aspects of RFCs applicable to commercial and military applications. The system description and initiation of system testing constitute Phase 1 of multiple activities planned to take place in the next few years. System modeling is being performed in parallel with the experimental testing and will be used to determine the most efficient system design, from the standpoint of weight, volume and cost of electrical power.

  14. Gottfried sum rule and the ratio Fn2/Fp2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz

    1995-07-01

    We describe the nucleon as a bound state of three constituent objects, called ``valons,'' which themselves have structure. At high enough Q2 it is the valon structure, governed by QCD, which is probed and, thus, the nucleon structure is described in terms of its partonic distributions, while at low Q2 the nucleon is described in terms of its valon distributions, independent of a probe and controlled by nonperturbative QCD. The implications of this phenomenological model, then, are applied to the New Muon Collaboration (NMC) data for Fn2/Fp2 and on the Gottfried sum rule. It is shown that the model successfully reproduces the experimental value of the Gottfried sum rule SG[0<=x1,=4 GeV2]=0.243, consistent with the experimental results as well as the ratio Fn2/Fp2 down to the lowest x value.

  15. Rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, Sergei; Morozova, Kateryna S.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2009-09-01

    An analysis of the rotational order–disorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is presented. In the last decade, advances in instrumentation and software development have made crystallography a powerful tool in structural biology. Using this method, structural information can now be acquired from pathological crystals that would have been abandoned in earlier times. In this paper, the order–disorder (OD) structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is discussed. The structure is composed of tetramers with 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different ways, namely rotated 90° with respect to each other around the crystal c axis, with tetramer axes coincident with crystallographic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates a rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry, although the presence of very weak and diffuse additional reflections suggests that the randomness is only approximate.

  16. Quality care for community-based FP / MCH.

    PubMed

    1995-02-01

    The Regional Workshop on Quality Care for Community-based FP/MCH in Asia was organized by the Family Planning Association of Nepal (FPAN) in cooperation with JOICFP and held in Kathmandu, Nepal, December 4-9. Representatives of counterpart organizations in Bangladesh, Laos, Nepal, and the Philippines implementing the UNFPA-supported Sustainable Community-based FP/MCH Project with Special Focus on Women were included among the forty participants. Representatives of China and Vietnam as well as resource persons from Mexico and Japan also attended the event. The workshop was held with the goal of providing participants with effective strategies for promoting quality care for community-based FP/MCH activities based upon the Nepalese experience. The event also provided the opportunity for participants to share experiences, develop strategies for project sustainability, and identify strategies and action plans suitable for their particular country situations. In field trips to Panchkhal, Sunsari, and Morang where the project is being implemented in 26 villages, participants noted the strong community involvement and village leader support. They were also impressed by the communities' awareness of services provided under the project. FPAN has succeeded despite geographical and cultural difficulties in promoting fee-based services toward project sustainability. By paying nominal fees, villagers also enjoy access to drugs and services which may not have been available through the government free of charge. Participants at the end of the workshop recommended the identification of specific indicators and systems for monitoring services and activities, training and orientation at all levels to improve the skills and attitudes of health care workers, the development of potential income-generating activities, the provision of essential FP/MCH equipment, and the equal involvement of men and women at the policy and implementation levels. PMID:12288392

  17. Monitoring intracranial pressure based on F-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ting; Tong, Xinglin; Chen, Guangxi

    2013-09-01

    Intracranial pressure is an important monitoring indicator of neurosurgery. In this paper we adopt all-fiber FP fiber optic sensor, using a minimally invasive operation to realize real-time dynamic monitoring intracranial pressure of the hemorrhage rats, and observe their intracranial pressure regularity of dynamic changes. Preliminary results verify the effectiveness of applications and feasibility, providing some basis for human brain minimally invasive intracranial pressure measurement.

  18. Revision of the JENDL FP Fission Yield Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakura, Jun-ichi; Minato, Futoshi; Ohgama, Kazuya

    2016-03-01

    Some fission yields data of JENDL FP Fission Yields Data File 2011 (JENDL/FPY-2011) revealed inadequacies when applied to delayed neutron related subjects. The sensitivity analyses of decay heat summation calculations also showed some problems. From these results the fission yields of JENDL/FPY-2011 have been revised. The present report describes the revision of the yield data by emphasizing the sensitivity analyses.

  19. Expression of two membrane fusion proteins, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein, in choroid plexus epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chung, I; Burkart, A; Szmydynger-Chodobska, J; Dodd, K A; Trimble, W S; Miller, K V; Shim, M; Chodobski, A

    2003-01-01

    In addition to being the major site of cerebrospinal fluid formation, the choroid plexus epithelium emerges as an important source of polypeptides in the brain. Physiologically regulated release of some polypeptides synthesized by the choroid plexus has been shown. The molecular mechanisms underlying this polypeptide secretion have not been characterized, however. In the present study, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein, two membrane fusion proteins playing a critical role in exocytosis in neurons and endocrine cells, were found to be expressed in the choroid plexus epithelium. It was also shown that in choroidal epithelium, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein stably interact. Two members of the vesicle-associated membrane protein family, vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 and vesicle-associated membrane protein-2, were expressed in the rat choroid plexus at the messenger RNA and protein level. However, their newly discovered isoforms, vesicle-associated membrane protein-1b and vesicle-associated membrane protein-2b, produced by alternative RNA splicing, were not detected in choroidal tissue. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that vesicle-associated membrane protein is confined to the cytoplasm of choroidal epithelium, whereas synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa is associated with plasma membranes, albeit with a varied cellular distribution among species studied. Specifically, in the rat choroid plexus, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa was localized to the basolateral membrane domain of choroidal epithelium and was expressed in small groups of cells. In comparison, in ovine and human choroidal tissues, apical staining for synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa was found in the majority of epithelial cells. These species-related differences in cellular synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa distribution suggested that the synaptosome-associated protein of

  20. Comparison of Stirling engines for use with a 25-kW disk-electric conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    Heat engines were evaluated for terrestrial solar heat receivers. The Stirling Engine was identified as one of the most promising engines for terrestrial applications. The potential to meet the Department of Energy (DOE) goals for performance and cost can be met by the free-piston Stirling engine. NASA Lewis is providing technical management for an Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) through a cooperative interagency agreement with DOE. Parallel contracts were awarded for conceptual designs of an ASCS. Each design will feature a free-piston Stirling engine, a liquid-metal heat pipe receiver, and a means to provide about 25 kW of electric power to a utility grid while meeting long-term performance and goals. The Mechanical Technology, Ins. (MTI) design incorporates a linear alternator to directly convert the solar energy to electricity while the Stirling Technology Company (STC) generates electrical power indirectly by using a hydraulic output to a ground-bases hydraulic pump/motor coupled to a rotating alternator. Both designs use technology which can reasonably be expected to be available in the 1980's. The ASCS designs using a free-piston Stirling engine, a heat transport system, a receiver, and the methods of providing electricity to the utility grid will be discussed.

  1. Enhanced Proton Beam Focusing due to Proximal Target Structures on the 1.25 kJ OMEGA EP Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffey, Chris; Kim, J.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Evans, M.; Stephens, R. B.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S. N.; Nilson, P. M.; Canning, D.; Mastrosimone, D.; Foord, M. E.; McLean, H. S.

    2013-10-01

    Understanding how to generate and control laser-driven proton beams has shown significant progress in the last 15 years. However, to exploit promising applications, practical aspects must be addressed, such as the effect of structures holding the target and dynamics when the beam enters any sample. Using the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP BL laser and spherically curved C targets we studied the spot size of a high-density proton beam directed at a Cu foil using three target mounting configurations: 1 on a stalk, 2 with an open-sided wedge structure on the back, and 3 with a conical structure. The brightness of Cu Kα fluorescence from the center of the foil was weakest from the stalk-mounted target, 5x brighter with the wedge, and 8x brighter with the cone, indicating enhanced focusing due to the structures. Plasma features and fields from the interaction were temporally and spatially resolved using proton radiography from a separate broad-spectrum proton beam (0-40 MeV) driven by OMEGA EP SL. We also discuss a follow-on experiment that will study transport of the proton beam through various materials. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA NLUF program, Grant DE-NA0002034.

  2. Design and development of a prototype 25 kV, 10 A long pulse Marx modulator for high power klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Mahesh; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-02-01

    Research, design, and development of high average power modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are in progress at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of 25 kV, 10 A, 1 ms Marx modulator at repetition rate of 1 Hz has been designed and developed which serves as a proof of principle and technology assessment stage for further development of high repetition rate high voltage high average power modulators. Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) based modules of 2.8 kV switching capability have been used as main modules. The modulator had 8.2% droop in output voltage pulse without any droop compensation circuit. A droop compensation involving 15 corrector modules has been used to reduce the droop up to 1%. We have used IGBT based 250 V switches to realize the corrector module. A microcontroller based control unit was designed and developed for triggering the main and corrector modules. With this control unit, programmable output pulse has been achieved. Electrical isolation between high voltage circuits and control circuit has been achieved by the use of fiber optic based control signal transmission. Output pulses of 1 ms pulse width, 800 ns rise time, and 5 μs fall time have been achieved. The modulator has advantages of modular design, adjustable pulse width, adjustable rise time, and fall time.

  3. High switching speed copper phthalocyanine thin film transistors with cut-off frequency up to 25 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zeying; Wang, Dong Xing; Zhang, Yongshuang; Wang, Yueyue

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of high frequency and high speed are demonstrated in vertical structure organic thin film transistors (VOTFTs) fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering and vacuum evaporation. The saturated current-voltage characteristics can be determined by drain-source negative bias voltage. Responsive frequency of the device is as high as 20 kHz when rectangular wave dynamic signal is applied to the gate-source electrode, and switch characteristic time reaches the microsecond. The unsaturated current-voltage characteristics are observed when the drain-source bias voltage is positive. In the condition of VDS = 3 V and VGS = 0 V, the drain-source current IDS is 2.986 × 10-5 A, and the current density is 1.194 mA/cm2. Cut-off frequency fc is 25 kHz when a small sine wave dynamic signal is applied to the gate-source electrode. The volt-ampere characteristic of VOTFTs transfers from linear to nonlinear with increasing of drain-source bias voltage.

  4. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20-25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids.

  5. Bearing development program for a 25 kWe solar-powered organic Rankine-cycle engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesmith, B.

    1985-01-01

    The bearing development program is summarized for a 25-kWe power conversion subsystem (PCS) consisting of an organic Rankine-cycle engine, and permanent magnetic alternator (PMA) and rectifier to be used in a 100-kWe point-focusing distributed receiver solar power plant. The engine and alternator were hermetically sealed and used toluene as the working fluid. The turbine, alternator, and feed pump (TAP) were mounted on a single shaft operating at speeds up to 60,000 rev/min. Net thermal-to-electric efficiencies in the range of 21 to 23% were demonstrated at the maximum working fluid temperature of 400 C (750 F). A chronological summary of the bearing development program is presented. The primary causes of bearing wear problems were traced to a combination of rotordynamic instability and electrodynamic discharge across the bearing surfaces caused by recirculating currents from the PMA. These problems were resolved by implementing an externally supplied, flooded-bearing lubrication system and by electrically insulating all bearings from the TAP housing. This program resulted in the successful development of a stable, high-speed, toluene-lubricated five-pad tilting-pad journal bearing and Rayleigh step thrust bearing system capable of operating at all inclinations between horizontal and vertical.

  6. Design and development of a prototype 25 kV, 10 A long pulse Marx modulator for high power klystron.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Mahesh; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-02-01

    Research, design, and development of high average power modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are in progress at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of 25 kV, 10 A, 1 ms Marx modulator at repetition rate of 1 Hz has been designed and developed which serves as a proof of principle and technology assessment stage for further development of high repetition rate high voltage high average power modulators. Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) based modules of 2.8 kV switching capability have been used as main modules. The modulator had 8.2% droop in output voltage pulse without any droop compensation circuit. A droop compensation involving 15 corrector modules has been used to reduce the droop up to 1%. We have used IGBT based 250 V switches to realize the corrector module. A microcontroller based control unit was designed and developed for triggering the main and corrector modules. With this control unit, programmable output pulse has been achieved. Electrical isolation between high voltage circuits and control circuit has been achieved by the use of fiber optic based control signal transmission. Output pulses of 1 ms pulse width, 800 ns rise time, and 5 μs fall time have been achieved. The modulator has advantages of modular design, adjustable pulse width, adjustable rise time, and fall time. PMID:26931898

  7. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20–25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier (Thurber et al., J. Magn. Reson. 2008) [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids. PMID:23238592

  8. Safety and immunogenicity of an FP9-vectored candidate tuberculosis vaccine (FP85A), alone and with candidate vaccine MVA85A in BCG-vaccinated healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Rosalind; Pathan, Ansar A.; Satti, Iman; Poulton, Ian D.; Matsumiya, Magali M. L.; Whittaker, Megan; Minassian, Angela M.; O’Hara, Geraldine A.; Hamill, Matthew; Scott, Janet T.; Harris, Stephanie A.; Poyntz, Hazel C.; Bateman, Cynthia; Meyer, Joel; Williams, Nicola; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Lawrie, Alison M.; Hill, Adrian V.S.; McShane, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The safety and immunogenicity of a new candidate tuberculosis (TB) vaccine, FP85A was evaluated alone and in heterologous prime-boost regimes with another candidate TB vaccine, MVA85A. This was an open label, non-controlled, non-randomized Phase I clinical trial. Healthy previously BCG-vaccinated adult subjects were enrolled sequentially into three groups and vaccinated with FP85A alone, or both FP85A and MVA85A, with a four week interval between vaccinations. Passive and active data on adverse events were collected. Immunogenicity was evaluated by Enzyme Linked Immunospot (ELISpot), flow cytometry and Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Most adverse events were mild and there were no vaccine-related serious adverse events. FP85A vaccination did not enhance antigen 85A-specific cellular immunity. When MVA85A vaccination was preceded by FP85A vaccination, cellular immune responses were lower compared with when MVA85A vaccination was the first immunisation. MVA85A vaccination, but not FP85A vaccination, induced anti-MVA IgG antibodies. Both MVA85A and FP85A vaccinations induced anti-FP9 IgG antibodies. In conclusion, FP85A vaccination was well tolerated but did not induce antigen-specific cellular immune responses. We hypothesize that FP85A induced anti-FP9 IgG antibodies with cross-reactivity for MVA85A, which may have mediated inhibition of the immune response to subsequent MVA85A. ClinicalTrials.gov identification number: NCT00653770 PMID:23143773

  9. The 25 kW power module evolution study. Part 3: Conceptual designs for power module evolutions. Volume 3: Cost estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Cost data generated for the evolutionary power module concepts selected are reported. The initial acquisition costs (design, development, and protoflight unit test costs) were defined and modeled for the baseline 25 kW power module configurations. By building a parametric model of this initial building block, the cost of the 50 kW and the 100 kW power modules were derived by defining only their configuration and programmatic differences from the 25 kW baseline module. Variations in cost for the quantities needed to fulfill the mission scenarios were derived by applying appropriate learning curves.

  10. Comparison of Stirling engines for use with a 25-kW dish-electric conversion system

    SciTech Connect

    Shaltens, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program, Sandia National Laboratories (SNLA), is evaluating heat engines for terrestrial solar distributed heat receivers. The Stirling engine has been identified by SNLA as one of the most promising engines for terrestrial applications. The potential to meet DOE's goals for performance and cost can be met by the free-piston Stirling engine. NASA Lewis is providing technical management for an Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) through a cooperative Interagency Agreement with DOE. Parallel contracts have been awarded to Mechanical Technology, Inc. (MIT) of Latham, New York, and Stirling Technology Company (STC) of Richland, Washington, for the conceptual designs of an ASCS. Each design will feature a free-piston Stirling engine, a liquid-metal heat pipe receiver, and a means to provide about 25 kW of electric power to a utility grid while meeting DOE's long-term performance and cost goals. The MTI design incorporates a linear alternator to directly convert the solar energy to electricity while STC generates electrical power indirectly by using a hydraulic output to a ground-based hydraulic pump/motor coupled to a rotating alternator. Both designs for the ASCS's will use technology which can reasonably be expected to be available in the 1980's. Both the MTI and STC concepts will be evaluated by the same, but independent, contractor to provide a manufacturing and cost analysis including life cycle cost. The ASCS designs using a free-piston Stirling engine, a heat transport system, a receiver, and the methods of providing electricity to the utility grid will be discussed.

  11. Mongolia. IEC guidelines elaborated to support MCH / FP project.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    Information, education, and communication (IEC) guidelines for implementing the IEC component of the maternal and child health(MCH)/family planning(FP) project (MON/93/P01) of the Ministry of Health of Mongolia (the result of a mission by the CST for the East and South East Asia Adviser on Population Communication) target 3 groups: all women of reproductive age; adolescents and young adults aged 15-34 (36.7% of the total population); and children under 14 (41% of the total population). Government policy makers, legislators, administrators, school teachers, media practitioners, and health educators will receive IEC messages. Initial efforts will be in urban areas. The messages will cover reproductive health and hygiene, responsible sex, family life education, delaying marriage and first pregnancy, dangers of abortion, sexually transmitted disease (STD), safe motherhood, breastfeeding, child care, contraceptive methods, and misconceptions about family planning. Specific messages will be used for 5 high risk groups of women (those aged 20 or less; those older than 35; those with 4 or more children; those with children less than 2 years apart; and those 15-34 years of age). Messages will first be broadcast over radio and television and then confirmed, supported, and reinforced through use of print materials and face to face interactions with service providers. The proposed workplan includes activities on audience research; training on communication design; production of IEC materials, and planning and implementing IEC campaigns; IEC materials development and FP counseling workshops; newsletter production; and establishment of a Documentation Centre. PMID:12345769

  12. Potent and long-term antiangiogenic efficacy mediated by FP3-expressing oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Il-Kyu; Shin, Hyewon; Oh, Eonju; Yoo, Ji Young; Hwang, June Kyu; Shin, Kyungsub; Yu, De-Chao; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-11-01

    Various ways to inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a key facilitator in tumor angiogenesis, are being developed to treat cancer. The soluble VEGF decoy receptor (FP3), due to its high affinity to VEGF, is a highly effective and promising strategy to disrupt VEGF signaling pathway. Despite potential advantage and potent therapeutic efficacy, its employment has been limited by very poor in vivo pharmacokinetic properties. To address this challenge, we designed a novel oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) expressing FP3 (RdB/FP3). To demonstrate the VEGF-specific nature of RdB/FP3, replication-incompetent Ad expressing FP3 (dE1/FP3) was also generated. dE1/FP3 was highly effective in reducing VEGF expression and functionally elicited an antiangiogeneic effect. Furthermore, RdB/FP3 exhibited a potent antitumor effect compared with RdB or recombinant FP3. Consistent with these data, RdB/FP3 was shown to greatly decrease VEGF expression level and vessel density and increase apoptosis in both tumor endothelial and tumor cells, verifying potent suppressive effects of RdB/FP3 on VEGF-mediated tumor angiogenesis in vivo. Importantly, the therapeutic mechanism of antitumor effect mediated by RdB/FP3 is associated with prolonged VEGF silencing efficacy and enhanced oncolysis via cancer cell-specific replication of oncolytic Ad. Taken together, RdB/FP3 provides a new promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of cancer and angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25944623

  13. The 25 kW power module evolution study. Part 3: Conceptual designs for power module evolution. Volume 1: Power module evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Candidate power module confugurations which will directly support an evolutionary scenario allowing growth from 25 kW to 100 kW are described. The growth rationale is structured to support a nominal scenario for sortie mission support to the POrbiter and to free-flying payloads during the 1983 to 1990 era.

  14. Preliminary test Results for a 25K Sorption Cryocooler Designed for the UCSB Long Duration Balloon Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, L. A.; Levy, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    A continuous operation, vibration-free, long-life 25K sorption cryocooler has been built and is now in final integration and performance testing. This cooler wil be flown on the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) Long Duration Balloon (LDB) Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Experiment.

  15. System Description for the K-25/K-27 D&D Project Polyurethane Foam Delivery System, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Boris, G.

    2008-02-21

    The Foam Delivery System used in the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project for the K-25/K-27 Buildings at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is comprised of a trailer-mounted Gusmer{reg_sign} H20/35 Pro-TEC Proportioning Unit and the associated equipment to convey electrical power, air, and foam component material to the unit. This high-pressure, plural-component polyurethane foam pouring system will be used to fill process gas and non-process equipment/piping (PGE/P) within the K-25/K-27 Buildings with polyurethane foam to immobilize contaminants prior to removal. The system creates foam by mixing isocyanate and polyol resin (Resin) component materials. Currently, the project plans to utilize up to six foaming units simultaneously during peak foaming activities. Also included in this system description are the foam component material storage containers that will be used for storage of the component material drums in a staging area outside of the K-25/K-27 Buildings. The Foam Delivery System and foam component material storage enclosures (i.e., Foaming Component Protective Enclosures) used to store polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (PMDI) component material are identified as Safety Significant (SS) Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) in the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the project, Documented Safety Analysis for the K-25 and K-27 Facilities at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DSA-ET-K-25/K-27-0001.

  16. Structural basis for bathochromic shift of fluorescence in far-red fluorescent proteins eqFP650 and eqFP670

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, Sergei; Pletneva, Nadya V.; Souslova, Ekaterina A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Vladimir

    2012-09-01

    The crystal structures of the far-red fluorescent proteins eqFP650 and eqFP670 have been solved at 1.8 and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. This permitted identification of the structural elements responsible for the bathochromic shift in both considered far-red fluorescent proteins. The crystal structures of the far-red fluorescent proteins (FPs) eqFP650 (λ{sub ex}{sup max}/λ{sub em}{sup max} 592/650 nm) and eqFP670 (λ{sub ex}{sup max}/λ{sub em}{sup max} 605/670 nm), the successors of the far-red FP Katushka (λ{sub ex}{sup max}/λ{sub em}{sup max} 588/635 nm), have been determined at 1.8 and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. An examination of the structures demonstrated that there are two groups of changes responsible for the bathochromic shift of excitation/emission bands of these proteins relative to their predecessor. The first group of changes resulted in an increase of hydrophilicity at the acylimine site of the chromophore due to the presence of one and three water molecules in eqFP650 and eqFP670, respectively. These water molecules provide connection of the chromophore with the protein scaffold via hydrogen bonds causing an ∼15 nm bathochromic shift of the eqFP650 and eqFP670 emission bands. The second group of changes observed in eqFP670 arises from substitution of both Ser143 and Ser158 by asparagines. Asn143 and Asn158 of eqFP670 are hydrogen bonded with each other, as well as with the protein scaffold and with the p-hydroxyphenyl group of the chromophore, resulting in an additional ∼20 nm bathochromic shift of the eqFP670 emission band as compared to eqFP650. The role of the observed structural changes was verified by mutagenesis.

  17. Modulus, strength and thermal exposure studies of FP-Al2O3/aluminum and FP-Al2O3/magnesium composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanical properties of FP-Al2O3 fiber reinforced composites prepared by liquid infiltration techniques are improved. A strengthening addition, magnesium, was incorporated with the aluminum-lithium matrix alloy usually selected for these composites because of its good wetting characteristics. This ternary composite, FP-Al2O3/Al-(2-3)Li-(3-5)Mg, showed improved transverse strength compared with FP-Al2O3/Al-(2-3)Li composites. The lower axial strengths found for the FP-Al2O3/Al-(2-3)Li-(3-5)Mg composites were attributed to fabrication related defects. Another technique was the use of Ti/B coated FP-Al2O3 fibers in the composites. This coating is readily wet by molten aluminum and permitted the use of more conventional aluminum alloys in the composites. However, the anticipated improvements in the axial and transverse strengths were not obtained due to poor bonding between the fiber coating and the matrix. A third approach studied to improve the strengths of FP-Al2O3 reinforced composites was the use of magnesium alloys as matrix materials. While these alloys wet fibers satisfactorily, the result indicated that the magnesium alloy composites used offered no axial strength or modulus advantage over FP-Al2O3/Al-(2-3)Li composites.

  18. File Specification for GEOS-5 FP (Forward Processing)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchesi, R.

    2013-01-01

    The GEOS-5 FP Atmospheric Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5 ADAS) uses an analysis developed jointly with NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), which allows the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) to take advantage of the developments at NCEP and the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA). The GEOS-5 AGCM uses the finite-volume dynamics (Lin, 2004) integrated with various physics packages (e.g, Bacmeister et al., 2006), under the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) including the Catchment Land Surface Model (CLSM) (e.g., Koster et al., 2000). The GSI analysis is a three-dimensional variational (3DVar) analysis applied in grid-point space to facilitate the implementation of anisotropic, inhomogeneous covariances (e.g., Wu et al., 2002; Derber et al., 2003). The GSI implementation for GEOS-5 FP incorporates a set of recursive filters that produce approximately Gaussian smoothing kernels and isotropic correlation functions. The GEOS-5 ADAS is documented in Rienecker et al. (2008). More recent updates to the model are presented in Molod et al. (2011). The GEOS-5 system actively assimilates roughly 2 × 10(exp 6) observations for each analysis, including about 7.5 × 10(exp 5) AIRS radiance data. The input stream is roughly twice this volume, but because of the large volume, the data are thinned commensurate with the analysis grid to reduce the computational burden. Data are also rejected from the analysis through quality control procedures designed to detect, for example, the presence of cloud. To minimize the spurious periodic perturbations of the analysis, GEOS-5 FP uses the Incremental Analysis Update (IAU) technique developed by Bloom et al. (1996). More details of this procedure are given in Appendix A. The assimilation is performed at a horizontal resolution of 0.3125-degree longitude by 0.25- degree latitude and at 72 levels, extending to 0.01 hPa. All products are generated at the native resolution of the

  19. Effect of oxygen breathing on micro oxygen bubbles in nitrogen-depleted rat adipose tissue at sea level and 25 kPa altitude exposures.

    PubMed

    Randsoe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2012-08-01

    The standard treatment of altitude decompression sickness (aDCS) caused by nitrogen bubble formation is oxygen breathing and recompression. However, micro air bubbles (containing 79% nitrogen), injected into adipose tissue, grow and stabilize at 25 kPa regardless of continued oxygen breathing and the tissue nitrogen pressure. To quantify the contribution of oxygen to bubble growth at altitude, micro oxygen bubbles (containing 0% nitrogen) were injected into the adipose tissue of rats depleted from nitrogen by means of preoxygenation (fraction of inspired oxygen = 1.0; 100%) and the bubbles studied at 101.3 kPa (sea level) or at 25 kPa altitude exposures during continued oxygen breathing. In keeping with previous observations and bubble kinetic models, we hypothesize that oxygen breathing may contribute to oxygen bubble growth at altitude. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 3 h of oxygen prebreathing at 101.3 kPa (sea level). Micro oxygen bubbles of 500-800 nl were then injected into the exposed abdominal adipose tissue. The oxygen bubbles were studied for up to 3.5 h during continued oxygen breathing at either 101.3 or 25 kPa ambient pressures. At 101.3 kPa, all bubbles shrank consistently until they disappeared from view at a net disappearance rate (0.02 mm(2) × min(-1)) significantly faster than for similar bubbles at 25 kPa altitude (0.01 mm(2) × min(-1)). At 25 kPa, most bubbles initially grew for 2-40 min, after which they shrank and disappeared. Four bubbles did not disappear while at 25 kPa. The results support bubble kinetic models based on Fick's first law of diffusion, Boyles law, and the oxygen window effect, predicting that oxygen contributes more to bubble volume and growth during hypobaric conditions. As the effect of oxygen increases, the lower the ambient pressure. The results indicate that recompression is instrumental in the treatment of aDCS. PMID:22653987

  20. The 25 kW power module evolution study. Part 3: Conceptual design for power module evolution. Volume 6: WBS and dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Program elements of the power module (PM) system, are identified, structured, and defined according to the planned work breakdown structure. Efforts required to design, develop, manufacture, test, checkout, launch and operate a protoflight assembled 25 kW, 50 kW and 100 kW PM include the preparation and delivery of related software, government furnished equipment, space support equipment, ground support equipment, launch site verification software, orbital verification software, and all related data items.

  1. COST Action FP1005 ``Fibre suspension flow modelling''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchioli, Cristian

    2013-11-01

    Fibre suspensions are extremely complex solid-liquid systems since their components (fibres, flocs, air bubbles and additives) interact mutually in a complex way. The dynamics of fibre suspensions are crucial in many real-life applications, such as pulp and paper production. Current understanding of suspension flow dynamics remains poor and incomplete, resulting in conservative design of industrial equipments, low energy efficiency and equipment oversizing. In this paper, the most recent advancements in modelling and experimentation of fibre suspensions dynamics are presented. These advancements have been obtained in the framework of Action FP1005, funded by the COST Programme (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) to coordinate nationally-funded research on a European level. The Action aims at developing and validating numerical models for prediction of fibre suspensions as well as measurement techniques. The Action offers a forum to solve test cases and to compare simulated results to experiments, resulting in more reliable simulation tools to industry. Successfull introduction of such tool into industrial practice is crucial to innovate and increase competitivity of papermaking industry.

  2. Research Progress on F-P Interference-Based Fiber-Optic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi Wen; Tao, Jin; Huang, Xu Guang

    2016-01-01

    We review our works on Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometric fiber-optic sensors with various applications. We give a general model of F-P interferometric optical fiber sensors including diffraction loss caused by the beam divergence and the Gouy phase shift. Based on different structures of an F-P cavity formed on the end of a single-mode fiber, the F-P interferometric optical sensor has been extended to measurements of the refractive index (RI) of liquids and solids, temperature as well as small displacement. The RI of liquids and solids can be obtained by monitoring the fringe contrast related to Fresnel reflections, while the ambient temperature and small displacement can be obtained by monitoring the wavelength shift of the interference fringes. The F-P interferometric fiber-optic sensors can be used for many scientific and technological applications. PMID:27598173

  3. Thermal-hydraulic post-test analysis of OECD LOFT LP-FP-2 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, J.J. ); Enciso, S. ); Reventos, F. )

    1992-04-01

    An assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 and SCDAP/MOD1 against the OECD LOFT experiment LP-FP-2 is presented. LP-FP-2 studies the hypothetical release of fission products and their transport following a large-break LOCA scenario. The report comprises a general description of the LP-FP-2 experiment, a summary of thermal-hydraulic data, a simulation of the LP-FP-2 experiment, results of the RELAP5/MOD2 base calculation, the RELAP5/MOD2 sensitivity analysis, the SCDAP/MOD1 nodalization for an LP-FP-2 experiment, the results of the SCDAP/MOD1 calculation, and the summary and conclusions.

  4. FP core carrier technique: thermoplasticized gutta-percha root canal obturation technique using polypropylene core.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kan-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    Core carrier techniques are unique among the various root canal filling techniques for delivering and compacting gutta-percha in the prepared root canal system. Thermafil (TF), considered the major core carrier device, is provided as an obturator consisting of a master core coated with thermoplasticized gutta-percha. We have devised a thermoplasticized gutta-percha filling technique using a polypropylene core, FlexPoint® NEO (FP), which was developed as a canal filling material that can be sterilized in an autoclave. Therefore, FP can be coated onto thermoplasticized gutta-percha and inserted into the prepared canal as a core carrier. The FP core carrier technique offers many advantages over the TF system: the core can be tested in the root canal and verified radiographically; the core can be adjusted to fit and surplus material easily removed; furthermore the core can be easily removed for retreatment. The clinical procedure of the FP core carrier technique is simple, and similar that with the TF system. Thermoplasticized gutta-percha in a syringe is heated in an oven and extruded onto the FP core carrier after a trial insertion. The FP core carrier is inserted into the root canal to the working length. Excess FP is then removed with a red-hot plastic instrument at the orifice of the root canal. The FP core carrier technique incorporates the clinical advantages of the existing TF system while minimizing the disadvantages. Hence the FP core carrier technique is very useful in clinical practice. This paper describes the FP core carrier technique as a new core based method. PMID:21139375

  5. Soluble Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Decoy Receptor FP3 Exerts Potent Antiangiogenic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yu, De-Chao; Lee, Jung-Sun; Yoo, Ji Young; Shin, Hyewon; Deng, Hongxin; Wei, Yuquan; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2012-01-01

    The binding of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to its receptors stimulates tumor growth; therefore, modulation of VEGF would be a viable approach for antiangiogenic therapy. We constructed a series of soluble decoy receptors containing different VEGF receptor 1 (FLT1) and VEGF receptor 2 (KDR) extracellular domains fused with the Fc region of human immunoglobulin (Ig) and evaluated their antiangiogenic effects and antitumor effects. Results of in vitro binding and cell proliferation assays revealed that decoy receptor FP3 had the highest affinity to VEGF-A and -B. Compared with bevacizumab, FP3 more effectively inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) migration and vessel sprouting from rat aortic rings. FP3 significantly reduced phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2, critical proteins in the VEGF-mediated survival pathway in endothelial cells. Moreover, FP3 inhibited tumor growth in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), breast cancer (MCF-7), and colorectal cancer (LoVo) tumor models, and reduced microvessel density in tumor tissues. The FP3-mediated inhibition of tumor growth was significantly higher than that of bevacizumab at the same dose. FP3 also demonstrated synergistic antitumor effects when combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Taken together, FP3 shows a high affinity for VEGF and produced antiangiogenic effects, suggesting its potential for treating angiogenesis-related diseases such as cancer. PMID:22273580

  6. CCD Photometry of Low Mass Ratio Contact Binary FP Boo - IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyu-Dong; Lee, Woo-Baik

    2009-03-01

    We present new B, V, and R CCD photometric light curves for the low mass ratio contact binay FP Boo. A new photometric solution and absolute physical dimensions of the system were derived by applying the Wilson-Devinney program to our observed light curves and to previously published Rucinski et al.'s radial velocity curves. From the H-R diagram of 24 low mass ratio contact binary system including FP Boo, the evolutionary stage of FP Boo was found to coincide with those of the general low mass ratio contact binary systems. The light curves obtained in this season show a small asymmetry in their shapes.

  7. Spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-16fp with the Nordic Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias-Rosa, N.; Mattila, S.; Lundqvist, P.; Stritzinger, M.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Harmanen, J.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Blagorodnova, N.; Davis, S.; Dong, S.; Fraser, M.; Gall, C.; Harrison, D.; Hodgkin, S.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Jonker, P.; Kangas, T.; Kankare, E.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Nielsen, M.; Ochner, P.; Prieto, J. L.; Reynolds, T.; Romero-Canizales, C.; Taddia, F.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Wyrzykowski, L.

    2016-05-01

    The NOT Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) collaboration reports the spectroscopic classifications of supernova ASASSN-16fp in UGC 11868. The candidate was discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN, ATEL#9086).

  8. Genetics, structure, and prevalence of FP967 (CDC Triffid) T-DNA in flax.

    PubMed

    Young, Lester; Hammerlindl, Joseph; Babic, Vivijan; McLeod, Jamille; Sharpe, Andrew; Matsalla, Chad; Bekkaoui, Faouzi; Marquess, Leigh; Booker, Helen M

    2015-01-01

    The detection of T-DNA from a genetically modified flaxseed line (FP967, formally CDC Triffid) in a shipment of Canadian flaxseed exported to Europe resulted in a large decrease in the amount of flax planted in Canada. The Canadian flaxseed industry undertook major changes to ensure the removal of FP967 from the supply chain. This study aimed to resolve the genetics and structure of the FP967 transfer DNA (T-DNA). The FP967 T-DNA is thought to be inserted in at single genomic locus. The junction between the T-DNA and genomic DNA consisted of two inverted Right Borders with no Left Border (LB) flanking genomic DNA sequences recovered. This information was used to develop an event-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay. This assay and an existing assay specific to the T-DNA construct were used to determine the genetics and prevalence of the FP967 T-DNA. These data supported the hypothesis that the T-DNA is present at a single location in the genome. The FP967 T-DNA is present at a low level (between 0.01 and 0.1%) in breeder seed lots from 2009 and 2010. None of the 11,000 and 16,000 lines selected for advancement through the Flax Breeding Program in 2010 and 2011, respectively, tested positive for the FP967 T-DNA, however. Most of the FP967 T-DNA sequence was resolved via PCR cloning and next generation sequencing. A 3,720 bp duplication of an internal portion of the T-DNA (including a Right Border) was discovered between the flanking genomic DNA and the LB. An event-specific assay, SAT2-LB, was developed for the junction between this repeat and the LB. PMID:25883881

  9. Derivation of F=FeFp as the continuum limit of crystalline slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reina, Celia; Schlömerkemper, Anja; Conti, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we provide a proof of the multiplicative kinematic description of crystal elastoplasticity in the setting of large deformations, i.e. F =FeFp, for a two dimensional single crystal. The proof starts by considering a general configuration at the mesoscopic scale, where the dislocations are discrete line defects (points in the two-dimensional description used here) and the displacement field can be considered continuous everywhere in the domain except at the slip surfaces, over which there is a displacement jump. At such scale, as previously shown by two of the authors, there exists unique physically based definitions of the total deformation tensor F and the elastic and plastic tensors Fe and Fp that do not require the consideration of any non-realizable intermediate configuration and do not assume any a priori relation between them of the form F =FeFp. This mesoscopic description is then passed to the continuum limit via homogenization, i.e. by increasing the number of slip surfaces to infinity and reducing the lattice parameter to zero. We show for two-dimensional deformations of initially perfect single crystals that the classical continuum formulation is recovered in the limit with F =FeFp, det Fp = 1 and G = Curl Fp the dislocation density tensor.

  10. Preliminary results of the PREFER FP7 Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusilli, Lorenzo; Laneve, Giovanni; De Bonis, Roberto; Sebastian, Ana; Ferrucci, Fabrizio; Oliveira, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    The need to improve the information and intelligence support for forest fire prevention is widely recognized. Fire prevention is still the most cost-effective strategy when compared to firefighting and extinguishing that are costly, local, and triggered only in response to already ongoing crises. PREFER project, funded under the EU FP7 (G.A. 312931), intends to contribute at responding to such a pragmatic need of southern Europe's forests by: providing timely information products based on the exploitation of all available spacecraft sensors, offering a portfolio of products focused on pre- and post-crisis forest fire emergency, suitable for the users in the different countries of the European Mediterranean area. The PREFER Service portfolio consists of two main services: 1. Information Support to Fire Preparedness/Prevention Phase" (ISP) Service 2. Information Support to Fire Recovery/Reconstruction Phase" (ISR) Service This service is already at an advanced stage having completed the first year of activity. During this time several products have been consolidated: seasonal fuel maps; daily and seasonal fire hazard maps; seasonal risk maps; prescribed fire maps. This paper aims at presenting the preliminary results of the research activity carried out in the framework of the PREFER project, focusing, in particular, on these recalled above. As for Fire Risk and Hazard assessment, many indexes have been developed in the last years. Hardly any of them uses data derived from satellite images. The FPI index is an exception to this rule which, in addition, makes use of meteorological data. In spite of being a very complete index, the FPI still allows room for improvement which justify the interest of PREFER in it. PREFER's innovative approach to FPI will allow taking into account the effect of solar illumination conditions in determining the humidity present in the dead vegetation, and therefore its proneness to burn. PREFER innovation also focus in allowing the index to

  11. 25 kW solar photovoltaic flat panel power supply for an electrodialysis water desalination unit in New Mexico. Final report, 1 October 1978-31 May 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.R.; Crutcher, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The stand-alone system designed by Mobil Tyco Solar Energy Corporation consists of a 25 kW flat panel array employing silicon ribbon solar cells, used in conjunction with a lead-acid battery bank to provide the complete power requirements of an electrodialysis water desalination unit. The Mobil Tyco system design is intended to be prototypical of part of the drinking water supply for a remote village. The specific task which this system will perform during Phase III is to aid in the restoration of an aquifer following a uranium leaching operation by the Energy Minerals Division of Mobil Oil Corporation at a site which is approximately four miles from the township of Crownpoint in northwestern New Mexico. System design is described, and a detailed description of a mathematical model and computerized simulation of the system is included. (WHK)

  12. Polarization properties of irradiated ammonia (NH/sub 3/ and ND/sub 3/) at 1 K and 25 kG

    SciTech Connect

    Riechert, H.

    1983-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of irradiated ammonia was examined in some detail at 1 K and 25 kG. It was attempted to gain information about the prevailing mechanism of DNP in this material. Therefore the frequency dependence of DNP in NH/sub 3/, of deuterons and unsubstituted protons in ND/sub 3/, as well as the polarizing time tau and the relaxation time T/sub 1/ in NH/sub 3/ were measured. The polarization measurements in ND/sub 3/ rule out the equal spin temperature (EST) behavior of proton and deuteron DNP that is observed in most of the currently used target materials. It is attempted to explain the observations with a differential solid state effect model. Results of calculations for NH/sub 3/ and ND/sub 3/ incorporating the measured EPR-spectra are presented. 7 references, 11 figures.

  13. Evaluation of data from the Vaisala CT25K for Estimation of PM10 Concentration and Mixing Heights in an Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunter, R. L.; Hosker, R. P.

    2005-12-01

    During the month of August, the Urban Dispersion Project was conducted in New York City. NOAA's Atmospheric and Turbulence Division (ATDD), Oak Ridge, TN operated a Vaisala CT25K Ceilometer for a two-week timeframe during the project. Typically, ceilometer measurements are used for cloud height determination. It has been found that during dry conditions, there is a good correlation between the ceilometer near- range backscatter and in situ PM10 concentration readings. In addition, it also has been determined that the ceilometer is a suitable instrument for determining the convective mixing height (MH). Aerosol concentrations are calculated and mixing heights are estimated using data from the ceilometer during dry conditions in Manhattan. Mixing heights are compared to radiosonde data taken during the project.

  14. Preparation and characterization of (Pu, U, Np, Am, simulated FP) O2-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, K.; Kato, M.; Uno, H.; Hanari, A.; Tamura, T.; Sugata, H.; Sunaoshi, T.; Kono, S.

    2005-02-01

    The development of low decontaminated mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, which contains minor actinoides (MA) and fission products (FP), is in progress to established Advanced Fast Reactor (FR) Fuel Cycle system. This paper describes the study on the sintering characteristics and the physical properties of MOX fuel containing Am, Np, and simulated FP. MOX powder containing Am, Np and simulated FP were sintered at high temperature in various oxygen partial pressure. From the result of ceramography, it is found that the grain growth rate of the pellets sintered in high oxygen partial pressure is high. From the result of EPMA analysis (Pu, Am, Ln) oxide was observed in the pellets. The melting points of the pellets with oxygen to metal (O/M) ratio of 1.95 are higher than those with O/M ratio of 1.98. This tendency is similar to that of MOX fuel containing about 30% Pu.

  15. Measurement error analysis of Brillouin lidar system using F-P etalon and ICCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Niu, Qunjie; Liang, Kun

    2016-09-01

    Brillouin lidar system using Fabry-Pérot (F-P) etalon and Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) is capable of real time remote measuring of properties like temperature of seawater. The measurement accuracy is determined by two key parameters, Brillouin frequency shift and Brillouin linewidth. Three major errors, namely the laser frequency instability, the calibration error of F-P etalon and the random shot noise are discussed. Theoretical analysis combined with simulation results showed that the laser and F-P etalon will cause about 4 MHz error to both Brillouin shift and linewidth, and random noise bring more error to linewidth than frequency shift. A comprehensive and comparative analysis of the overall errors under various conditions proved that colder ocean(10 °C) is more accurately measured with Brillouin linewidth, and warmer ocean (30 °C) is better measured with Brillouin shift.

  16. New cationic biodegradable poly(urethane-co-ester): synthesis, structural characterization, modification and gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Yang; Hsiao, Yu-Che; Shau, Min-Da

    2012-01-01

    To improve the transfection efficiency of poly(urethane-co-ester) and the cytotoxicity of PEI25k with DNA, we synthesized a new poly(urethane-co-ester), PUE, bearing ester linkages and amino groups in the backbone and urethane linkages in the side-chain, and then prepared a binary mixture, PUE-PEI25k, using a physical blending method. The structure of PUE was confirmed by FT-IR and NMR spectra. Both poly(urethane-co-ester), PUE, and binary mixture PUE-PEI25k, readily self-assembled with plasmid DNA (pCMV-βgal) in a HEPES buffer, were characterized by dynamic light scattering. The results revealed that PUE and PUE-PEI25k were able to self-assemble plasmid DNA into PUE/DNA and PUE-PEI25k/DNA nano-complexes small enough to enter a cell through endocytosis. Titration studies were performed to determine the buffering capacities of PUE and PUE-PEI25k. The COS-7 cell viability in the presence of PEI25k, PUE and PUE-PEI25k was studied. At low mass ratio of PUE/PEI25k (150:1), it was found that the PUE-PEI25k/DNA complexes were able to transfect COS-7 cells in vitro with a high efficiency comparable to a well-known gene carrier, PEI25k/DNA. The results indicate that the binary mixture PUE-PEI25k is an attractive cationic carrier for gene delivery and an interesting candidate for further study. PMID:21156103

  17. Experimental study of upper sd shell nuclei and evolution of sd-fp shell gap

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, M. Saha

    2012-06-27

    The intruder orbitals from the fp shell play important role in the structure of nuclei around the line of stability in the upper sd shell. Experimentally we have studied {sup 35}Cl, {sup 30}P, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 37}Ar and {sup 34}Cl in this mass region using the INGA setup. Large basis cross-shell shell model calculations have indicated the need for change of the sd-fp energy gap for reliable reproduction of negative parity and high spin positive parity states. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. Theoretical interpretation of these states has been discussed.

  18. Characterization and fibrinolytic activity of Acetobacter sp. FP1 isolated from fermented pine needle extract.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeyoung; Yoon, Seohyeon; Kim, Seongsim; Lee, Beomgi; Cheong, Hyeonsook

    2012-02-01

    The strain KCTC 11629BP, isolated from spontaneously fermented pine needle extract (FPE), showed fibrinolysis activity. The isolated strain was analyzed in physiological and biochemical experiments. Based on 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenic tree analysis, the strain was identified to be a part of the genus Acetobacter, with Acetobacter senegalensis and Acetobacter tropicalis as the closest phylogenetic neighbors. Based on genotypic and phenotypic results, it was proposed that bacterial strain KCTC 11629BP represents a species of the genus Acetobacter. The strain was thusly named Acetobacter sp. FP1. In conclusion, Acetobacter sp. FP1 isolated from FPE possesses fibrinolytic activity. PMID:22370351

  19. Versatile device for low temperature in situ generation of forces up to 25 kN: Application to hydrostatic pressure experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salce, B.; Thomasson, J.; Demuer, A.; Blanchard, J. J.; Martinod, J. M.; Devoille, L.; Guillaume, A.

    2000-06-01

    We describe a versatile modular device built to generate forces up to 25 kN at cryogenic temperatures in order to achieve very fine in situ hydrostatic pressure tuning in the range 0-21 GPa. This device was designed to save time during measurements and protect the experimental setup by avoiding warming and cooling cycles to vary the pressure. The force is generated by a bellow operated with pressurized 4He and amplified mechanically. Diamond and sapphire anvil cells are used to perform electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and specific heat measurements under highly hydrostatic conditions by using helium as the transmitting medium. The pressure is determined by the ruby fluorescence technique. The performance of the device is illustrated by measurements of the superconducting transition of Pb and the magnetic transitions of CeRu2Ge2 in the range 0-10 GPa. This device is currently being adapted in a dilution fridge in order to be operated down to 50 mK.

  20. Development and testing of a 2.5 kW synchronous generator with a high temperature superconducting stator and permanent magnet rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Timing; Song, Peng; Yu, Xiaoyu; Gu, Chen; Li, Longnian; Li, Xiaohang; Wang, Dewen; Hu, Boping; Chen, Duxing; Zeng, Pan; Han, Zhenghe

    2014-04-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) armature windings have the potential for increasing the electric loading of a synchronous generator due to their high current transport capacity, which could increase the power density of an HTS rotating machine. In this work, a novel synchronous generator prototype with an HTS stator and permanent magnet rotor has been developed. It has a basic structure of four poles and six slots. The armature winding was constructed from six double-pancake race-track coils with 44 turns each. It was designed to deliver 2.5 kW at 300 rpm. A concentrated winding configuration was proposed, to prevent interference at the ends of adjacent HTS coils. The HTS stator was pressure mounted into a hollow Dewar cooled with liquid nitrogen. The whole stator could be cooled down to around 82 K by conduction cooling. In the preliminary testing, the machine worked properly and could deliver 1.8 kW power when the armature current was 14.4 A. Ic for the HTS coils was found to be suppressed due to the influence of the temperature and the leakage field.

  1. Development and implementation of a radwaste volume minimization program at FP and L

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, P.J.; Robinson, P.J.; Deltete, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    The Low Level Waste Policy Amendments Acts of 1985 established specific waste volume allocations that each utility must comply with until new disposal facilities are built within each of the established compact regions. In the case of the Florida Power and Light Co. (FP and L) St. Lucie and Turkey Point generating facilities, which are pressurized water reactor units located within a region that currently has an operating disposal facility each of the four units is limited to specified quantities. Based on FP and L's waste generation history over the past 10 yr, it is likely these allocations will be exceeded if waste generation rates are not reduced. To assure that allocation allotments are not exceeded, FP and L is developing and implementing a comprehensive volume minimization/reduction program aimed primarily at minimizing waste generation at the source through the implementation of relatively low-cost management techniques. The program will develop detailed characterizations of each relevant waste stream, select waste minimization techniques appropriate for the waste streams and operations at each plant, implement the respective techniques, and track the effectiveness of each technique in relation to the overall program. A key element to this program is its development through FP and L's Quality Improvement Program.

  2. The relationship of biofilm production to biocontrol activity of Burkholderia pyrrocinia FP62

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar biocontrol agent (BCA) efficacy is often inconsistent due to poor colonization and survival on plant surfaces. Burkholderia pyrrocinia FP62, a superior leaf colonist and BCA of Botrytis cinerea, forms unsaturated biofilms on plant surfaces. To determine the relationship between biocontrol act...

  3. AMI 15 GHz detection of ASASSN-16fp (AT 2016coi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooley, K. P.; Fender, R. P.; Cantwell, T.; Titterington, D.; Carey, S.; Hickish, J.; Perrott, Y. C.; Razavi-Ghods, N.; Scott, P.; Grainge, K.; Scaife, A.

    2016-06-01

    We observed the type Ic supernova ASASSN-16fp in UGC 11868 (Holoien et al., ATel #9086; Elias-Rosa ATel #9090; d=10Mpc; discovery date 2016 May 27.55) with the AMI Large Array at 15 GHz between 28-31 May 2016.

  4. Quantification of Azospirillum brasilense FP2 Bacteria in Wheat Roots by Strain-Specific Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Stets, Maria Isabel; Alqueres, Sylvia Maria Campbell; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Azospirillum is a rhizobacterial genus containing plant growth-promoting species associated with different crops worldwide. Azospirillum brasilense strains exhibit a growth-promoting effect by means of phytohormone production and possibly by N2 fixation. However, one of the most important factors for achieving an increase in crop yield by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria is the survival of the inoculant in the rhizosphere, which is not always achieved. The objective of this study was to develop quantitative PCR protocols for the strain-specific quantification of A. brasilense FP2. A novel approach was applied to identify strain-specific DNA sequences based on a comparison of the genomic sequences within the same species. The draft genome sequences of A. brasilense FP2 and Sp245 were aligned, and FP2-specific regions were filtered and checked for other possible matches in public databases. Strain-specific regions were then selected to design and evaluate strain-specific primer pairs. The primer pairs AzoR2.1, AzoR2.2, AzoR5.1, AzoR5.2, and AzoR5.3 were specific for the A. brasilense FP2 strain. These primer pairs were used to monitor quantitatively the population of A. brasilense in wheat roots under sterile and nonsterile growth conditions. In addition, coinoculations with other plant growth-promoting bacteria in wheat were performed under nonsterile conditions. The results showed that A. brasilense FP2 inoculated into wheat roots is highly competitive and achieves high cell numbers (∼107 CFU/g [fresh weight] of root) in the rhizosphere even under nonsterile conditions and when coinoculated with other rhizobacteria, maintaining the population at rather stable levels for at least up to 13 days after inoculation. The strategy used here can be applied to other organisms whose genome sequences are available. PMID:26187960

  5. Quantification of Azospirillum brasilense FP2 Bacteria in Wheat Roots by Strain-Specific Quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Stets, Maria Isabel; Alqueres, Sylvia Maria Campbell; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Cruz, Leonardo Magalhães

    2015-10-01

    Azospirillum is a rhizobacterial genus containing plant growth-promoting species associated with different crops worldwide. Azospirillum brasilense strains exhibit a growth-promoting effect by means of phytohormone production and possibly by N2 fixation. However, one of the most important factors for achieving an increase in crop yield by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria is the survival of the inoculant in the rhizosphere, which is not always achieved. The objective of this study was to develop quantitative PCR protocols for the strain-specific quantification of A. brasilense FP2. A novel approach was applied to identify strain-specific DNA sequences based on a comparison of the genomic sequences within the same species. The draft genome sequences of A. brasilense FP2 and Sp245 were aligned, and FP2-specific regions were filtered and checked for other possible matches in public databases. Strain-specific regions were then selected to design and evaluate strain-specific primer pairs. The primer pairs AzoR2.1, AzoR2.2, AzoR5.1, AzoR5.2, and AzoR5.3 were specific for the A. brasilense FP2 strain. These primer pairs were used to monitor quantitatively the population of A. brasilense in wheat roots under sterile and nonsterile growth conditions. In addition, coinoculations with other plant growth-promoting bacteria in wheat were performed under nonsterile conditions. The results showed that A. brasilense FP2 inoculated into wheat roots is highly competitive and achieves high cell numbers (∼10(7) CFU/g [fresh weight] of root) in the rhizosphere even under nonsterile conditions and when coinoculated with other rhizobacteria, maintaining the population at rather stable levels for at least up to 13 days after inoculation. The strategy used here can be applied to other organisms whose genome sequences are available. PMID:26187960

  6. Evaluating the Latent Structure of the MMPI-2 F(p) Scale in a Forensic Sample: A Taxometric Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, David R.; Glassmire, David M.; Frederick, Richard I.; Greene, Roger L.

    2006-01-01

    P. A. Arbisi and Y. S. Ben-Porath (1995) originally proposed that the Infrequency Psychopathology scale, F(p), be used as the final step in an algorithm to determine the validity of a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) protocol. The current study used taxometric procedures to determine the latent structure of F(p) among…

  7. Thermal analysis for the HTS stator consisting of HTS armature windings and an iron core for a 2.5 kW HTS generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P.; Qu, T.-M.; Lai, L.-F.; Wu, M.-S.; Yu, X.-Y.; Han, Z.

    2016-05-01

    Most present demonstrations of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) synchronous motors/generators are partially superconducting, only installing HTS coils on the rotor as excitation windings. The possible applicability of HTS armature windings is an interesting research topic because these windings can certainly increase the power density attributed to a potentially high armature loading capacity. In this study, we analysed the thermal behaviours of a developed 2.5 kW-300 rpm synchronous generator prototype that consists of an HTS stator with Bi-2223-Ag armature windings on an iron core and a permanent magnet (PM) rotor. The entire HTS stator, including the iron core, is cooled with liquid nitrogen through conduction cooling. The rated frequency is set at 10 Hz to reduce AC loss. The properties of the HTS windings and the iron core are characterized, and the temperatures in the HTS stator under different operation conditions are measured. The estimated iron loss is 11.5 W under operation in 10 Hz at liquid nitrogen temperature. Conduction cooling through the silicon iron core is sufficient to cool the iron core and to compensate for the temperature increment caused by iron loss. The stable running capacity is limited to 1.6 kW when the armature current is 12.6 A (effective values) due to the increasing temperature in the slots as a result of the AC loss in the HTS coils. The thermal contact between the HTS coils and the cooling media should be improved in the future to take away the heat generated by AC loss.

  8. The 25 kDa Subunit of Cleavage Factor Im Is a RNA-Binding Protein That Interacts with the Poly(A) Polymerase in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Pezet-Valdez, Marisol; Fernández-Retana, Jorge; Ospina-Villa, Juan David; Ramírez-Moreno, María Esther; Orozco, Esther; Charcas-López, Socorro; Soto-Sánchez, Jacqueline; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; López-Casamicha, Mavil; López-Camarillo, César; Marchat, Laurence A.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, polyadenylation of pre-mRNA 3´ end is essential for mRNA export, stability and translation. Taking advantage of the knowledge of genomic sequences of Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, we previously reported the putative polyadenylation machinery of this parasite. Here, we focused on the predicted protein that has the molecular features of the 25 kDa subunit of the Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm25) from other organisms, including the Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate linked to another moiety X) domain, as well as the RNA binding domain and the PAP/PAB interacting region. The recombinant EhCFIm25 protein (rEhCFIm25) was expressed in bacteria and used to generate specific antibodies in rabbit. Subcellular localization assays showed the presence of the endogenous protein in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays, rEhCFIm25 was able to form specific RNA-protein complexes with the EhPgp5 mRNA 3´ UTR used as probe. In addition, Pull-Down and LC/ESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry assays evidenced that the putative EhCFIm25 was able to interact with the poly(A) polymerase (EhPAP) that is responsible for the synthesis of the poly(A) tail in other eukaryotic cells. By Far-Western experiments, we confirmed the interaction between the putative EhCFIm25 and EhPAP in E. histolytica. Taken altogether, our results showed that the putative EhCFIm25 is a conserved RNA binding protein that interacts with the poly(A) polymerase, another member of the pre-mRNA 3´ end processing machinery in this protozoan parasite. PMID:23840799

  9. The 25 kDa subunit of cleavage factor Im Is a RNA-binding protein that interacts with the poly(A) polymerase in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Pezet-Valdez, Marisol; Fernández-Retana, Jorge; Ospina-Villa, Juan David; Ramírez-Moreno, María Esther; Orozco, Esther; Charcas-López, Socorro; Soto-Sánchez, Jacqueline; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; López-Casamicha, Mavil; López-Camarillo, César; Marchat, Laurence A

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, polyadenylation of pre-mRNA 3' end is essential for mRNA export, stability and translation. Taking advantage of the knowledge of genomic sequences of Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, we previously reported the putative polyadenylation machinery of this parasite. Here, we focused on the predicted protein that has the molecular features of the 25 kDa subunit of the Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm25) from other organisms, including the Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate linked to another moiety X) domain, as well as the RNA binding domain and the PAP/PAB interacting region. The recombinant EhCFIm25 protein (rEhCFIm25) was expressed in bacteria and used to generate specific antibodies in rabbit. Subcellular localization assays showed the presence of the endogenous protein in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays, rEhCFIm25 was able to form specific RNA-protein complexes with the EhPgp5 mRNA 3´ UTR used as probe. In addition, Pull-Down and LC/ESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry assays evidenced that the putative EhCFIm25 was able to interact with the poly(A) polymerase (EhPAP) that is responsible for the synthesis of the poly(A) tail in other eukaryotic cells. By Far-Western experiments, we confirmed the interaction between the putative EhCFIm25 and EhPAP in E. histolytica. Taken altogether, our results showed that the putative EhCFIm25 is a conserved RNA binding protein that interacts with the poly(A) polymerase, another member of the pre-mRNA 3' end processing machinery in this protozoan parasite. PMID:23840799

  10. Space weather in the EU's FP7 Space Theme. Preface to the special issue on "EU-FP7 funded space weather projects"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarini, Paola

    2013-11-01

    Technological infrastructures in space and on ground provide services on which modern society and economies rely. Space weather related research is funded under the 7th Framework Programme for Research and Innovation (FP7) of the European Union in response to the need of protecting such critical infrastructures from the damage which could be caused by extreme space weather events. The calls for proposals published under the topic "Security of space assets from space weather events" of the FP7 Space Theme aimed to improve forecasts and predictions of disruptive space weather events as well as identify best practices to limit the impacts on space- and ground-based infrastructures and their data provision. Space weather related work was also funded under the topic "Exploitation of space science and exploration data", which aims to add value to space missions and Earth-based observations by contributing to the effective scientific exploitation of collected data. Since 2007 a total of 20 collaborative projects have been funded, covering a variety of physical phenomena associated with space weather, from ionospheric disturbances and scintillation, to geomagnetically induced currents at Earth's surface, to coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles. This article provides an overview of the funded projects, touching upon some results and referring to specific websites for a more exhaustive description of the projects' outcomes.

  11. Release of DR molecules from complexes with invariant chain through the formation of a C-terminal 25 kDa invariant chain fragment.

    PubMed

    Demotz, S; Danieli, C

    1993-12-01

    To investigate how class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are released from complexes with invariant chain (Ii), we studied a 25 kDa Ii fragment (p25) detected by Western blotting in affinity chromatographed DR preparations. The p25 species corresponds to the non-transmembrane, C-terminal Ii fragment 107-232. It was determined by gel filtration chromatography that the p25 fragment has a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 46 kDa, indicating that this Ii fragment is present as dimers in B cell lysate. Two independent approaches were followed to demonstrate that generation of the p25 fragment takes place shortly before, or concomitantly to, loading of class II MHC molecules with antigen fragments. First, it was shown that a fraction of the p25 molecules is resistant to endoglycosidase H digestion, indicating that the p25 polypeptide can exit the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is transported at least to the cis-Golgi compartment. Second, treatment of class II MHC-positive B cells with leupeptin blocks the formation of p25, further indicating that this Ii fragment is generated in the endosomal compartment. The role of the p25 Ii species in the assembly of complexes between peptides and DR molecules was then investigated. While the p25 fragment was totally unable to prevent binding of a synthetic tetanus toxin peptide to DR molecules, the full-length Ii species (p33/35) effectively inhibited peptide binding, indicating that, by contrast with the p33/35 species, the p25 fragment does not occlude the peptide binding site of DR molecules. We concluded that the p25 fragment, which is produced by proteolytic cleavage at the N-terminal side of Methionine 107, has a decreased affinity for DR molecules as compared with the p33/35 species. Dissociation of the p25 fragment from DR molecules exposes the peptide binding site, which is thus made accessible for antigen fragments. This model of the complexes between DR and antigen fragments proposes that a stretch of

  12. Simulations on the kindling mechanism of the asFP595 fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, Bella L.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.; Savitsky, Alexander P.

    2008-02-01

    We report the results of quantum mechanical - molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations aiming to elucidate the mechanism of kindling of the initially non-fluorescent protein asFP595, which is a mutated variant of the chromoprotein asCP from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata. asFP595 becomes brightly fluorescent (kindles) with emission at 595 nm in response to intense light irradiation at 568 nm. In simulations, we use the flexible effective fragment QM/MM method with the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wavefunctions in the quantum part and the AMBER force field parameters in the molecular mechanical part. We analyze the computed scans over potential energy surfaces of the ground and excited electronic states and consider details of the working hypothesis that the trans-cis isomerization of the chromophore group inside the protein is responsible for kindling.

  13. S5FP: Spectrally Selective Suppression with Steady State Free Precession

    PubMed Central

    Derbyshire, J. A.; Herzka, D. A.; McVeigh, E. R.

    2007-01-01

    A method is presented that employs the inherent spectral selectivity of the Steady-State Free Precession (SSFP) pulse sequence to provide a spectral band of suppression. At TE = TR/2, SSFP partitions the magnetization into two phase-opposed spectral components. Z-storing one of these components simultaneously further excites the other, which is then suppressed by gradient crushing and RF spoiling. The Spectrally Selective Suppression with SSFP (S5FP) method is shown to provide significant attenuation of fat signals, while the water signals are essentially unaffected and provide the normal SSFP contrast. Fat suppression is achieved with relatively little temporal overhead (less than 10% reduction in temporal resolution). S5FP was validated using simulations, phantoms, and human studies. Published 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.† PMID:16155880

  14. A theory for the 2f(p) radiation upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Melrose, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the radiation observed near the earth bow shock at twice the plasma frequency f(p) is investigated theoretically. A model comprising two three-wave steps and involving Langmuir (L), ion-sound (S), and EM (t) waves is proposed: L + or - S yields L-prime; L + L-prime yields t. This model is shown to be consistent with observations of low-frequency S-like waves (Anderson et al., 1981), and further observational tests are suggested. A critical examination of the theory of Fung et al. (1982) is included, and it is found that an important term in the absorption coefficient was neglected. Correcting this error leads to an intrinsic theoretical brightness-temperature limit of 3 x 10 to the 9th K, well below the observed brightness temperature of the 2 f(p) radiation, about 10 to the 11th K.

  15. [New FP Therapy Was Effective for a Case of Massive Hepatocellular Carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Keita; Maeno, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Shunji; Munechika, Taro; Yonemitsu, Kimihiro; Nomi, Masako; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Nagao, Shuji; Yanagisawa, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A 62 year-old woman was hospitalized with the diagnosis of pneumonia, and a huge mass was recognized in the right lobe of the liver during a CT scan. AFP and PIVKA-Ⅱ were elevated to 101.05 ng/mL and 2,177 mAU/mL. The liver function test indicated Child-Pugh classification A, liver damage degree B, and ICG R15 34%. We judged a radical cure resection impossible. We treated the patient with arterial injections of modified new FP therapy. No side effect occurred during the first course. Liver dysfunction with fever and hematuria occurred during the second course, leading to discontinuation of therapy. Because a prominent reduction in the size of the tumor was achieved, liver resection is scheduled. New FP therapy can be expected to attain a favorable result that may allow for curative resection of the tumor. PMID:26805202

  16. GMRT radio detection of broad lined Type Ic supernova ASASSN-16fp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayana, A. J.; Chandra, Poonam

    2016-06-01

    We observed broad lined Type Ic supernova ASASSN-16fp (ATel #9086, #9124, #9128, #9134) with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) on 2016 June 29.00 UT in 1390 MHz band. We clearly detect radio emission from the supernova position. The flux density of the supernova in this band is 252+/-74 uJy. More observations are planned. We thanks GMRT staff for carrying out the observations.

  17. Integrated Medium for Planetary Exploration (IMPEx): a new EU FP7-SPACE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodachenko, M. L.; Génot, V.; Kallio, E.; Alexeev, I.; Modolo, R.; Al-Ubaidi, T.; André, N.; Gangloff, M.; Schmidt, W.; Belenkaya, E.; Topf, F.; Stoeckler, R.

    2011-10-01

    A new FP7-SPACE project Integrated Medium for Planetary Exploration (IMPEx) has been started in June 2011. It will create an interactive framework for exploitation of space missions' data. Data analysis and visualization will be based on the advanced computational models of the planetary environments. The project infrastructure will enable joint interconnected operation of spacecraft data bases and the scientific modelling tools, serving to better understanding of related physical phenomena.

  18. Serial Femtosecond Crystallography and Ultrafast Absorption Spectroscopy of the Photoswitchable Fluorescent Protein IrisFP.

    PubMed

    Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Sliwa, Michel; Gallat, François-Xavier; Sugahara, Michihiro; Guillon, Virginia; Schirò, Giorgio; Coquelle, Nicolas; Woodhouse, Joyce; Roux, Laure; Gotthard, Guillaume; Royant, Antoine; Uriarte, Lucas Martinez; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Joti, Yasumasa; Byrdin, Martin; Mizohata, Eiichi; Nango, Eriko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Adam, Virgile; Cammarata, Marco; Schlichting, Ilme; Bourgeois, Dominique; Weik, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins find growing applications in cell biology, yet mechanistic details, in particular on the ultrafast photochemical time scale, remain unknown. We employed time-resolved pump-probe absorption spectroscopy on the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein IrisFP in solution to study photoswitching from the nonfluorescent (off) to the fluorescent (on) state. Evidence is provided for the existence of several intermediate states on the pico- and microsecond time scales that are attributed to chromophore isomerization and proton transfer, respectively. Kinetic modeling favors a sequential mechanism with the existence of two excited state intermediates with lifetimes of 2 and 15 ps, the second of which controls the photoswitching quantum yield. In order to support that IrisFP is suited for time-resolved experiments aiming at a structural characterization of these ps intermediates, we used serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free electron laser and solved the structure of IrisFP in its on state. Sample consumption was minimized by embedding crystals in mineral grease, in which they remain photoswitchable. Our spectroscopic and structural results pave the way for time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography aiming at characterizing the structure of ultrafast intermediates in reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins. PMID:26866390

  19. THG113: a novel selective FP antagonist that delays preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Peri, Krishna G; Quiniou, Christiane; Hou, Xin; Abran, Daniel; Varma, Daya R; Lubell, William D; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2002-12-01

    PGF2alpha is an important smooth muscle contractile agent that exerts significant effects on myometrium and is implicated in labor. THG113 was recently identified as a PGF2alpha receptor (FP) antagonist. We characterized the specificity and selectivity of THG113, tested its effects on PGF2alpha-induced smooth muscle contraction, and assessed its efficacy in a model of endotoxin (LPS)-induced preterm labor. [125I]THG113 bound specifically to FP-expressing but not to native (not expressing FP) HEK293 cells. In FP-expressing HEK293 cells, THG113 markedly reduced PGF2alpha-elicited phosphoinositide hydrolysis (IC50 27 nM). Similarly, PGF2alpha-evoked microvascular (retinal) contraction was noncompetitively blocked (by > 90%) by THG113. In contrast, contraction to agonists of homologous prostanoid receptors EP1 and TP (17-phenyl-trinor PGE2 and U46619) was unaffected (< 1%) by high concentrations of THG113 (100 micromol/L); THG113 (100 micromol/L) also did not affect contraction to numerous other agents including platelet activating factor, endothelin, and angiotensin II. Force and duration of PGF2alpha-evoked contractions of myometrial strips of pig (non-pregnant, luteal phase) and mouse (immediately postpartum) were markedly reduced by THG113. In an endotoxin-induced preterm mouse model, lipopolysaccharide (50 microg intraperitioneal) injection at 16 days' gestation resulted in 100% delivery within 15 h; in contrast, 70% of those treated with THG113 (1 mg/day) delivered > 24 h later (at 18 days' gestation; term: 19 days). In addition, in mice injected with lipopolysaccharide and treated 6 h later with THG113 (0.1 mg bolus followed by 1 mg/day) 40% delivered > 48 h later. Fetuses of pregnant mice treated with THG113 were born alive, had higher birth weights (1.6 +/- 0.1 v 1.4 +/- 0.05 g), and appeared healthy. This study describes an effective and selective noncompetitive FP antagonist, THG113, which significantly delays preterm delivery; this provides the basis for

  20. File Specification for GEOS-5 FP-IT (Forward Processing for Instrument Teams)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchesi, R.

    2013-01-01

    The GEOS-5 FP-IT Atmospheric Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5 ADAS) uses an analysis developed jointly with NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), which allows the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) to take advantage of the developments at NCEP and the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA). The GEOS-5 AGCM uses the finite-volume dynamics (Lin, 2004) integrated with various physics packages (e.g, Bacmeister et al., 2006), under the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) including the Catchment Land Surface Model (CLSM) (e.g., Koster et al., 2000). The GSI analysis is a three-dimensional variational (3DVar) analysis applied in grid-point space to facilitate the implementation of anisotropic, inhomogeneous covariances (e.g., Wu et al., 2002; Derber et al., 2003). The GSI implementation for GEOS-5 FP-IT incorporates a set of recursive filters that produce approximately Gaussian smoothing kernels and isotropic correlation functions. The GEOS-5 ADAS is documented in Rienecker et al. (2008). More recent updates to the model are presented in Molod et al. (2011). The GEOS-5 system actively assimilates roughly 2 × 10(exp 6) observations for each analysis, including about 7.5 × 10(exp 5) AIRS radiance data. The input stream is roughly twice this volume, but because of the large volume, the data are thinned commensurate with the analysis grid to reduce the computational burden. Data are also rejected from the analysis through quality control procedures designed to detect, for example, the presence of cloud. To minimize the spurious periodic perturbations of the analysis, GEOS-5 FP-IT uses the Incremental Analysis Update (IAU) technique developed by Bloom et al. (1996). More details of this procedure are given in Appendix A. The analysis is performed at a horizontal resolution of 0.625-degree longitude by 0.5-degree latitude and at 72 levels, extending to 0.01 hPa. All products are generated at the native resolution of the

  1. Hybrid wireless-over-fiber transmission system based on multiple injection-locked FP LDs.

    PubMed

    Li, Chung-Yi; Lu, Hai-Han; Chu, Chien-An; Ying, Cheng-Ling; Lu, Ting-Chien; Peng, Peng-Chun

    2015-07-27

    A hybrid wireless-over-fiber (WoF) transmission system based on multiple injection-locked Fabry-Perot laser diodes (FP LDs) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Unlike the traditional hybrid WoF transmission systems that require multiple distributed feedback (DFB) LDs to support different kinds of services, the proposed system employs multiple injection-locked FP LDs to provide different kinds of applications. Such a hybrid WoF transmission system delivers downstream intensity-modulated 20-GHz microwave (MW)/60-GHz millimeter-wave (MMW)/550-MHz cable television (CATV) signals and upstream phase-remodulated 20-GHz MW signal. Excellent bit error rate (BER), carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR), composite second-order (CSO), and composite triple-beat (CTB) are observed over a 40-km single-mode fiber (SMF) and a 4-m radio frequency (RF) wireless transport. Such a hybrid WoF transmission system has practical applications for fiber-wireless convergence to provide broadband integrated services, including telecommunication, data communication, and CATV services. PMID:26367647

  2. A Magnetic Field Sensor Based on a Magnetic Fluid-Filled FP-FBG Structure.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ji; Wang, Fuyin; Luo, Hong; Wang, Qi; Xiong, Shuidong

    2016-01-01

    Based on the characteristic magnetic-controlled refractive index property, in this paper, a magnetic fluid is used as a sensitive medium to detect the magnetic field in the fiber optic Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity. The temperature compensation in fiber Fabry-Perot magnetic sensor is demonstrated and achieved. The refractive index of the magnetic fluid varies with the applied magnetic field and external temperature, and a cross-sensitivity effect of the temperature and magnetic field occurs in the Fabry-Perot magnetic sensor and the accuracy of magnetic field measurements is affected by the thermal effect. In order to overcome this problem, we propose a modified sensor structure. With a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) written in the insert fiber end of the Fabry-Perot cavity, the FBG acts as a temperature compensation unit for the magnetic field measurement and it provides an effective solution to the cross-sensitivity effect. The experimental results show that the sensitivity of magnetic field detection improves from 0.23 nm/mT to 0.53 nm/mT, and the magnetic field measurement resolution finally reaches 37.7 T. The temperature-compensated FP-FBG magnetic sensor has obvious advantages of small volume and high sensitivity, and it has a good prospect in applications in the power industry and national defense technology areas. PMID:27136564

  3. First-principles calculation of Z2 topological invariants within the FP-LAPW formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, wanxiang; Wen, Jun; Zhou, Jinjian; Yao, yugui

    2012-01-01

    n this paper, we report the implementation of first-principles calculations of Z2 topological invariants within the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FP-LAPW) formalism. In systems with both time-reversal and spatial inversion symmetry (centrosymmetric), one can use the parity analysis of Bloch functions at time-reversal invariant momenta to determine the Z2 invariants. In systems without spatial inversion symmetry (noncentrosymmetric), however, a more complex and systematic method in terms of the Berry gauge potential and the Berry curvature is required to identify the band topology. We show in detail how both methods are implemented in FP-LAPW formalism and applied to several classes of materials including centrosymmetric compounds Bi2Se3 and Sb2Se3 and noncentrosymmetric compounds LuPtBi, AuTlS2 and CdSnAs2. Our work provides an accurate and effective implementation of first-principles calculations to speed up the search of new topological insulators.

  4. Spectroscopy of Mirror Nuclei in the Upper-fp Shell Using GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Roderick; Henry, Thomas; Bentley, Michael; E11025 Gretina@Msu Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Isospin symmetry breaking in nuclei of the upper-fp shell has been investigated in a recent experiment at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University (MSU). A 78Kr primary beam (with energy 150 MeV.A) was fragmented on a Be target to produce a cocktail of secondary beams, including 66As, 65Ge, and 64Ga, which were selected with the A1900 separator. These secondary beams were in turn fragmented at the target position of S800 magnetic spectrograph, which was used to identify neutron-deficient reaction products including 62,63Ga, 63Ge, and 65As. Gamma-rays emitted from excited states in these nuclei were detected with GRETINA, which comprises 28 highly-segmented, tapered hexagonal, close-packed HPGe and is a first generation gamma-ray tracking array. Many new states and transitions have been identified in these nuclei of the upper-fp shell, including a candidate for the T = 1 2+ state in 62Ga. Preliminary results from the analysis of this data will be presented and the implications for our understanding of isospin-symmetry breaking effects will be discussed. This work supported in part by the United States Department of Energy under grant no. DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL).

  5. The Easy Way of Finding Parameters in IBM (EWofFP-IBM)

    SciTech Connect

    Turkan, Nureddin

    2008-11-11

    E2/M1 multipole mixing ratios of even-even nuclei in transitional region can be calculated as soon as B(E2) and B(M1) values by using the PHINT and/or NP-BOS codes. The correct calculations of energies must be obtained to produce such calculations. Also, the correct parameter values are needed to calculate the energies. The logic of the codes is based on the mathematical and physical Statements describing interacting boson model (IBM) which is one of the model of nuclear structure physics. Here, the big problem is to find the best fitted parameters values of the model. So, by using the Easy Way of Finding Parameters in IBM (EWofFP-IBM), the best parameter values of IBM Hamiltonian for {sup 102-110}Pd and {sup 102-110}Ru isotopes were firstly obtained and then the energies were calculated. At the end, it was seen that the calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental ones. In addition, it was carried out that the presented energy values obtained by using the EWofFP-IBM are dominantly better than the previous theoretical data.

  6. A Magnetic Field Sensor Based on a Magnetic Fluid-Filled FP-FBG Structure

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ji; Wang, Fuyin; Luo, Hong; Wang, Qi; Xiong, Shuidong

    2016-01-01

    Based on the characteristic magnetic-controlled refractive index property, in this paper, a magnetic fluid is used as a sensitive medium to detect the magnetic field in the fiber optic Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity. The temperature compensation in fiber Fabry-Perot magnetic sensor is demonstrated and achieved. The refractive index of the magnetic fluid varies with the applied magnetic field and external temperature, and a cross-sensitivity effect of the temperature and magnetic field occurs in the Fabry-Perot magnetic sensor and the accuracy of magnetic field measurements is affected by the thermal effect. In order to overcome this problem, we propose a modified sensor structure. With a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) written in the insert fiber end of the Fabry-Perot cavity, the FBG acts as a temperature compensation unit for the magnetic field measurement and it provides an effective solution to the cross-sensitivity effect. The experimental results show that the sensitivity of magnetic field detection improves from 0.23 nm/mT to 0.53 nm/mT, and the magnetic field measurement resolution finally reaches 37.7 T. The temperature-compensated FP-FBG magnetic sensor has obvious advantages of small volume and high sensitivity, and it has a good prospect in applications in the power industry and national defense technology areas. PMID:27136564

  7. Effects of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} on human melanocytes and regulation of the FP receptor by ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Glynis . E-mail: Glynis_Scott@urmc.rochester.edu; Jacobs, Stacey; Leopardi, Sonya; Anthony, Frank A.; Learn, Doug; Malaviya, Rama; Pentland, Alice

    2005-04-01

    Prostaglandins are potent lipid hormones that activate multiple signaling pathways resulting in regulation of cellular growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In the skin, prostaglandins are rapidly released by keratinocytes following ultraviolet radiation and are chronically present in inflammatory skin lesions. We have shown previously that melanocytes, which provide photoprotection to keratinocytes through the production of melanin, express several receptors for prostaglandins, including the PGE{sub 2} receptors EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} and the PGF{sub 2{alpha}} receptor FP, and that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} stimulates melanocyte dendricity. We now show that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} stimulates the activity and expression of tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis. Analysis of FP receptor regulation showed that the FP receptor is regulated by ultraviolet radiation in melanocytes in vitro and in human skin in vivo. We also show that ultraviolet irradiation stimulates production of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} by melanocytes. These results show that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} binding to the FP receptor activates signals that stimulate a differentiated phenotype (dendricity and pigmentation) in melanocytes. The regulation of the FP receptor and the stimulation of production of PGF{sub 2{alpha}} in melanocytes in response to ultraviolet radiation suggest that PGF{sub 2{alpha}} could act as an autocrine factor for melanocyte differentiation.

  8. Chromophore Protonation State Controls Photoswitching of the Fluoroprotein asFP595

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Lars V.; Groenhof, Gerrit; Boggio-Pasqua, Martial; Robb, Michael A.; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have been widely used as genetically encodable fusion tags for biological imaging. Recently, a new class of fluorescent proteins was discovered that can be reversibly light-switched between a fluorescent and a non-fluorescent state. Such proteins can not only provide nanoscale resolution in far-field fluorescence optical microscopy much below the diffraction limit, but also hold promise for other nanotechnological applications, such as optical data storage. To systematically exploit the potential of such photoswitchable proteins and to enable rational improvements to their properties requires a detailed understanding of the molecular switching mechanism, which is currently unknown. Here, we have studied the photoswitching mechanism of the reversibly switchable fluoroprotein asFP595 at the atomic level by multiconfigurational ab initio (CASSCF) calculations and QM/MM excited state molecular dynamics simulations with explicit surface hopping. Our simulations explain measured quantum yields and excited state lifetimes, and also predict the structures of the hitherto unknown intermediates and of the irreversibly fluorescent state. Further, we find that the proton distribution in the active site of the asFP595 controls the photochemical conversion pathways of the chromophore in the protein matrix. Accordingly, changes in the protonation state of the chromophore and some proximal amino acids lead to different photochemical states, which all turn out to be essential for the photoswitching mechanism. These photochemical states are (i) a neutral chromophore, which can trans-cis photoisomerize, (ii) an anionic chromophore, which rapidly undergoes radiationless decay after excitation, and (iii) a putative fluorescent zwitterionic chromophore. The overall stability of the different protonation states is controlled by the isomeric state of the chromophore. We finally propose that radiation-induced decarboxylation of the glutamic acid Glu215 blocks the

  9. Focal 123I-FP-CIT SPECT Abnormality in Midbrain Vascular Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Solla, Paolo; Cannas, Antonino; Arca, Roberta; Fonti, Davide; Orofino, Gianni; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are considered among possible causes of acute/subacute parkinsonism, representing up to 22% of secondary movement disorders. In cases of suspected vascular parkinsonism (VP), dopamine transporter SPECT has been highly recommended to exclude nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration. We report the case of a hemiparkinsonism related to a left midbrain infarct with focal lateralized putaminal abnormalities at 123I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging. The asymmetric uptake at dopamine transporter SPECT was different to findings commonly observed in typical PD pattern, because the ipsilateral striatum, in opposite to idiopathic PD, showed normal tracer binding. However, this selective parkinsonism after infarction of the midbrain was responsive to levodopa. In conclusion, we retain that there is a need of more functional imaging studies in VP addressed to a more consistent classification of its different clinical forms and to a better understanding of the adequate pharmacological management. PMID:26550502

  10. mEosFP-Based Green-to-Red Photoconvertible Subcellular Probes for Plants1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Jaideep; Radhamony, Resmi; Sinclair, Alison M.; Donoso, Ana; Dunn, Natalie; Roach, Elyse; Radford, Devon; S. Mohammad Mohaghegh, P.; Logan, David C.; Kokolic, Ksenija; Mathur, Neeta

    2010-01-01

    Photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (FPs) are recent additions to the biologists’ toolbox for understanding the living cell. Like green fluorescent protein (GFP), monomeric EosFP is bright green in color but is efficiently photoconverted into a red fluorescent form using a mild violet-blue excitation. Here, we report mEosFP-based probes that localize to the cytosol, plasma membrane invaginations, endosomes, prevacuolar vesicles, vacuoles, the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi bodies, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and the two major cytoskeletal elements, filamentous actin and cortical microtubules. The mEosFP fusion proteins are smaller than GFP/red fluorescent protein-based probes and, as demonstrated here, provide several significant advantages for imaging of living plant cells. These include an ability to differentially color label a single cell or a group of cells in a developing organ, selectively highlight a region of a cell or a subpopulation of organelles and vesicles within a cell for tracking them, and understanding spatiotemporal aspects of interactions between similar as well as different organelles. In addition, mEosFP probes introduce a milder alternative to fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, whereby instead of photobleaching, photoconversion followed by recovery of green fluorescence can be used for estimating subcellular dynamics. Most importantly, the two fluorescent forms of mEosFP furnish bright internal controls during imaging experiments and are fully compatible with cyan fluorescent protein, GFP, yellow fluorescent protein, and red fluorescent protein fluorochromes for use in simultaneous, multicolor labeling schemes. Photoconvertible mEosFP-based subcellular probes promise to usher in a much higher degree of precision to live imaging of plant cells than has been possible so far using single-colored FPs. PMID:20940350

  11. Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations on the Disintegration of PVDF, FP-POSS, and Their Composite during Atomic Oxygen Impact.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fanlin; Peng, Chao; Liu, Yizhi; Qu, Jianmin

    2015-07-30

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) is a kind of important piezoelectric polymer used in spacecraft industry. But the atomic oxygen (AO) is the most abundant element in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. AO collision degradation is an important issue in the application of PVDF on spacecrafts. To investigate the erosion behaviors of PVDF during AO impacts and how to improve the stability of PVDF against AO impacts, the temperature evolution, mass loss, and erosion yields of neat PVDF, neat polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes compound (3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)8Si8O12 (FP-POSS) and the PVDF/FP-POSS composite under AO impacts, as well as some key disintegrated structures and separated chemical compositions, were researched using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the reactive ReaxFF force field. The simulation erosion yield result of PVDF is very close to the experiment results, which shows our simulations are reliable. The results of the temperature evolution, mass loss, and erosion yield of three materials show that the antierosion performance of PVDF is not outstanding. However, incorporating FP-POSS into PVDF matrix enhances the stability of PVDF against AO impact greatly and reduces the temperature rise, mass loss, and the erosion yield of PVDF rapidly. A detailed analysis on the flight chemical compositions and key snapshots of the structures reveals that the erosion process on PVDF and PVDF/FP-POSS is continuous and should be derived from the same PVDF matrix in two materials. In contrast, the erosion process on FP-POSS is stepped. The erosion will not take place until the number of AO reaches a specific value. There is a barrier for the erosion of high-energy AO because of the stable cagelike Si-O frame in FP-POSS molecules. This should be chiefly responsible for the high stability of FP-POSS and the reinforcement mechanism of FP-POSS on PVDF against AO impacts. This work is helpful for people to understand the erosion details of PVDF and POSS and

  12. Focal increased 18F FP-CIT uptake in a recent ischemic lesion in the frontal lobe.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Miju; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2015-02-01

    A 65-year-old male patient was referred for rapid functional decline over 1 month with dysphagia and dysarthria. Past history disclosed left side weakness for 5 years. F FP-CIT PET/CT was performed to evaluate the possibility of pseudobulbar palsy. Images showed a defect in the right posterior putamen that was consistent with an old cerebral infarction lesion. Unexpectedly, an oval area of intense F FP-CIT uptake was found in the left frontal lobe. MRI and F-FDG PET/CT indicated the lesion to be caused by recent cerebral ischemia. PMID:25140548

  13. Impact of fowlpox-vectored Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine Vectormune FP MG on layer hen egg production and egg quality parameters.

    PubMed

    Leigh, S A; Branton, S L; Evans, J D; Collier, S D

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the impact of vaccination with Vectormune FP MG on egg production and egg quality characteristics of Single Comb White Leghorn hens. Due to questions of the efficacy of this vaccine in preventing Mycoplasma gallisepticum-mediated pathology, the ability of this vaccine to protect against postproduction-peak egg losses associated with F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) vaccination was also investigated. Vaccination with Vectormune FP MG did not result in any significant change in egg production or egg quality parameters compared with control (unvaccinated) hens. Subsequent revaccination with FMG at 45 wk of age (woa) yielded no impact on egg production or egg quality parameters of Vectormune FP MG vaccinated hens, unlike prior results for postproduction-peak vaccination of M. gallisepticum-clean hens with FMG, which exhibited a drop in egg production of approximately 6%. No difference in egg size distribution was observed for any of the treatment groups before or after FMG revaccination. These results suggest that hens can be safely vaccinated with Vectormune FP MG as pullets and can be revaccinated with a live M. gallisepticum vaccine such as FMG at a later date with no deleterious effects on egg production or egg or eggshell quality parameters. PMID:24235227

  14. Prostanoid receptors EP2, EP4, and FP are regulated by estradiol in bovine oviductal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Huang, Na; Liu, Bo; Dong, Zhiheng; Mao, Wei; Zhang, Nan; Li, Changyou; Cao, Jinshan

    2015-09-01

    Gamete and embryo transport is an important function of the oviduct. This transport involves both smooth muscle contraction and epithelial cell secretions, the former of which is mediated by prostaglandins (PGs) and their receptors. Our aim was to study the regulation of prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2α receptors (EP2, EP4, and FP receptor) by estradiol in bovine oviduct smooth muscle. EP2, EP4, and FP receptor mRNA and protein expression was investigated using real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses, respectively. To evaluate the contraction or relaxation of cultured bovine oviductal smooth muscle tissue, peristalsis was used to assess contractile activity. EP2, EP4, and FP receptor mRNA and protein expression was increased in oviductal smooth muscle tissue after treatment with different concentrations of estradiol for various durations. The expression of all receptors peaked at an estradiol concentration of 10(-11)mol/L after 8h of treatment, whereas no increase in expression was observed after fulvestrant (a selective antagonist of E2 receptor) treatment, indicating that E2 interacts with specific E2 nuclear receptors to regulate EP2, EP4, and FP receptor expression. Although PGF2α and PGE2 induced both contraction and relaxation, no significant differences were found in contractility between the estradiol-treated and control groups, with both groups of cultured smooth muscle strips showing similar vitality. In conclusion, estradiol increases EP2, EP4, and FP receptor mRNA and protein expression in bovine oviductal smooth muscle when added for different periods of time and at different concentrations. Additionally, E2 is transported intracellularly and interacts with specific E2 nuclear receptors to regulate their expression. PMID:26319698

  15. Net radiation, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, and cross-valley FP tracer sampling in the Anderson Creek Valley area

    SciTech Connect

    Orgill, M.M.; Schreck, R.I.; Nickola, P.W.; Horst, T.W.; Glover, D.W.; Doran, J.C.; Abbey, O.B.; Neff, W.D.; Larson, R.S.

    1980-07-01

    The Department of Atmospheric Sciences of PNL assisted the ASCOT program during its July 1979 field effort by collecting data from a 30 m tower, tethersonde, monostatic acoustic sounder, FP sampling stations, surface wind sensors and two net radiometers. Preliminary results from the net radiometers, PNL (and WPL) tethersonde, and the FP tracer sampling are discussed in this report.

  16. Transforming the treatment for hemophilia B patients: update on the clinical development of recombinant fusion protein linking recombinant coagulation factor IX with recombinant albumin (rIX-FP).

    PubMed

    Santagostino, Elena

    2016-05-01

    Recombinant fusion protein linking recombinant coagulation factor IX with recombinant albumin (rIX-FP; Idelvion®(†)) is an innovative new treatment designed to extend the half-life of factor IX (FIX) and ease the burden of care for hemophilia B patients. The rIX-FP clinical development program - PROLONG-9FP - is in its advanced phases, with pivotal studies in previously treated adults, adolescents, and pediatrics now completed. Across all age groups studied, rIX-FP has demonstrated a markedly improved pharmacokinetic profile compared with plasma-derived and recombinant FIX treatments, with a 30-40% higher incremental recovery, an approximately 5-fold longer half-life, a lower clearance, and a greater area under the curve. rIX-FP has been very well tolerated with an excellent safety profile. In the pivotal studies, there have been no reports of FIX inhibitors or antidrug antibodies, and few treatment-related adverse events have been observed. Prophylactic regimens of rIX-FP administered once weekly to once every 14 days have been highly effective. When used for surgical prophylaxis, a single infusion of rIX-FP has been sufficient to maintain hemostasis, even during major orthopedic surgery. An ongoing study is now enrolling previously untreated patients and evaluating the possibility of extending the dosing interval to every 21 days. There is little doubt that rIX-FP will transform the treatment of hemophilia B. PMID:27288064

  17. The ULISSE FP7 project new system for data exploration and dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, Luigi; Rothkaehl, Hanna; Berthier, Audrey; Słomińska, Ewa

    2010-05-01

    The ULISSE FP7 project is aimed at providing the users with tools for improving data valorisation and exploitation of European space science experimentation. The activities are aimed at increasing the involvement of specialized communities and the awareness of general public.ULISSE will provide scientific and technical data concerning most scientific disciplines, as Life Sciences including Space Medicine and Exobiology, Biotechnology, Material and Fluid Sciences, Space Science. Data that will be available through ULISSE concern previous space experiments on ISS as well as data from other space platforms, like sounding rockets, Foton capsule, Space Shuttle, etc. This dataset, coming from a wide ensemble of experiments, represents a relevant resource that ULISSE brings to a new life, exploited for testing and demonstrative purposes. A relevant part of the project foresees that data, services and tools are integrated through the ULISSE middleware platform, developing a distributed infrastructure for the distribution of the scientific data coming from space experiments. ULISSE expected benefits maximise the return from scientific space missions by maximizing the exploitation of available data and preparing the exploitation of future space mission and increase the public awareness about space research results and benefits involving a wider community also including educational bodies. The aim of this presentation is also to show the survey of space physics experiments performed on ISS.

  18. The ULISSE FP7 project new system for data exploration and dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothkaehl, Hanna; Slominska, Ewa; Carotenuto, Luigi; Berthier, Audrey

    The ULISSE FP7 project, which name stands for USOCs knowLedge Integrations and dissem-ination for Space Science Experimentation, is aimed at providing the users with platform for improving data valorisation and exploitation of European space science experimentation. The activities are aimed at increasing the involvement of specialized communities and the awareness of general public. ULISSE will provide scientific and technical data concerning most scientific disciplines, as Life Sciences including Space Medicine and Exobiology, Biotechnology, Material and Fluid Sciences, Space Science. The focal point for the ULISSE project is International Space Station and experiments performed there. However, related experimental data from other space platforms, like sounding rockets, Foton capsule, Space Shuttle, parabolic flights etc. are also included. This dataset, coming from a wide ensemble of experiments, represents a relevant resource that ULISSE brings to a new life, exploited for testing and demonstrative purposes. A relevant part of the project foresees that data, services and tools are integrated through the ULISSE middleware platform, supporting actions for the dissemination of space culture, knowledge sharing and cooperation improvement. ULISSE expected benefits maxi-mize the return from scientific space missions by maximizing the exploitation of available data, preparing the exploitation of future space mission. Moreover ULISSE is a and increase the public awareness about space research results and benefits involving a wider community also including educational bodies.

  19. The severe accident research programme PHEBUS F.P.: First results and future tests

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, M.; Hardt, P. von der

    1996-03-01

    PHEBUS FP is an international programme, managed by the French Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Electricite de France and the European Commission in close collaboration with the USNRC (US), COG (Canada), NUPEC and JAERI (Japan) and KAERI (South Korea). Its objective is to investigate through a series of in-pile integral experiments, key phenomena involved in LWR severe accident such as the degradation of core materials up to molten pool, the subsequent release of fission products and of structural materials, their transport in the cooling system and their deposition in the containment with a special emphasis on the volatility of iodine. After a general programme description, the paper focuses on the status of analysis of the first test FPT-0, which involved trace irradiated fuel and which has shown some quite unexpected results regarding fuel degradation and iodine behaviour, and on the upcoming test FPT-1 which will use irradiated fuel. The status of the preparation of the remaining tests of the programme is also presented.

  20. Modeling the EUV/UV irradiance within the FP7 SOLID Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberreiter, Margit; Delouille, Veronique; Del Zanna, Giulio; Dammasch, Ingolf; Dominique, Marie; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Ermolli, Ilaria; Jones, Andrew; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Mampaey, Benjamin; Schaefer, Robert; Schmidtke, Gerhard; Schoell, Micha; Thuillier, Gerard; Verbeeck, Cis; Wieman, Seth; Woods, Tom; Schmutz, Werner

    2015-04-01

    The solar EUV irradiance has strong effects on the Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. Here we present latest results for the EUV spectral range carried out within the European FP7 Project SOLID. Specifically, we model the SSI variations in the EUV spectral range based on the analysis of images obtained with SOHO/EIT, PROBA2/SWAP, and SDO/AIA. These images are segmented to regions of solar activity using the SPoCA tool. Moreover, with the SOLar MODeling code (SOLMOD) we calculate intensity spectra representing the intensity emitted by these regions. We present the latest set of reconstructions and compare it to available data, such as SOHO/SEM, PROBA2/LYRA, ISS/SOLAR/SOLACES, and SDO/EVE. Furthermore, we will present a probabilistic method to obtain a consistent composite from the available data. These results are an important for understanding the spectral variability in the EUV/UV and as well as its effect on the Earth's upper atmosphere.

  1. APhoRISM FP7 project: the A Priori information for Earthquake damage mapping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignami, Christian; Stramondo, Salvatore; Pierdicca, Nazzareno

    2014-05-01

    The APhoRISM - Advanced PRocedure for volcanIc and Seismic Monitoring - project is an FP7 funded project, which aims at developing and testing two new methods to combine Earth Observation satellite data from different sensors, and ground data for seismic and volcanic risk management. The objective is to demonstrate that this two types of data, appropriately managed and integrated, can provide new improved products useful for seismic and volcanic crisis management. One of the two methods deals with earthquakes, and it concerns the generation of maps to address the detection and estimate of damage caused by a seism. The method is named APE - A Priori information for Earthquake damage mapping. The use of satellite data to investigate earthquake damages is not an innovative issue. Indeed, a wide literature and projects have addressed and focused such issue, but usually the proposed approaches are only based on change detection techniques and/or classifications algorithms. The novelty of APhoRISM-APE relies on the exploitation of a priori information derived by: - InSAR time series to measure surface movements - shakemaps obtained from seismological data - vulnerability information. This a priori information is then integrated with change detection map from earth observation satellite sensors (either Optical or Synthetic Aperture Radar) to improve accuracy and to limit false alarms.

  2. APhoRISM FP7 project: the Multi-platform volcanic Ash Cloud Estimation (MACE) infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merucci, Luca; Corradini, Stefano; Bignami, Christian; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    APHORISM is an FP7 project that aims to develop innovative products to support the management and mitigation of the volcanic and the seismic crisis. Satellite and ground measurements will be managed in a novel manner to provide new and improved products in terms of accuracy and quality of information. The Multi-platform volcanic Ash Cloud Estimation (MACE) infrastructure will exploit the complementarity between geostationary, and polar satellite sensors and ground measurements to improve the ash detection and retrieval and to fully characterize the volcanic ash clouds from source to the atmosphere. The basic idea behind the proposed method consists to manage in a novel manner, the volcanic ash retrievals at the space-time scale of typical geostationary observations using both the polar satellite estimations and in-situ measurements. The typical ash thermal infrared (TIR) retrieval will be integrated by using a wider spectral range from visible (VIS) to microwave (MW) and the ash detection will be extended also in case of cloudy atmosphere or steam plumes. All the MACE ash products will be tested on three recent eruptions representative of different eruption styles in different clear or cloudy atmospheric conditions: Eyjafjallajokull (Iceland) 2010, Grimsvotn (Iceland) 2011 and Etna (Italy) 2011-2012. The MACE infrastructure will be suitable to be implemented in the next generation of ESA Sentinels satellite missions.

  3. Modeling structure and spectra of the kindling fluorescent protein asFP595

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Jack R.; Topol, Igor A.; Savitsky, Alexander P.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2011-03-01

    Modern computational approaches based on quantum mechanical methods to characterize structures and optical spectra of biological chromophores in proteins are intensively used to gain knowledge of events occurring upon of their photoexcitation. Primary attention is paid to the species from the family of the green fluorescent protein applied as biomarkers in living cells. We apply quantum chemical approaches for accurate calculations of the structures of the chromophore binding pockets and to estimate spectral bands corresponding to the S0-S1 optical transitions of the intriguing kindling protein asFP595. Its precursor, the chromoprotein asCP from the sea anemony Anemonia sulcata is characterized by distinctive spectral properties: at low light intensities the wild-type protein is weakly fluorescent with the very low quantum yield, however, high intensity irradiation with green light leads to a drastic increase of quantum yield. This phenomenon is now termed "kindling". In simulations, the model system is designed as a molecular cluster constructed on the basis of available crystal structures of the related protein. The equilibrium geometry of the cluster is optimized using density functional theory approximations. The vertical excitation energies corresponding to the S0-S1 transitions are computed by using the semiempirical ZINDO technique. A special attention is paid to evaluate effects of point mutations in the vicinity of the chromophore group. Theoretical data provide important information on the chromophore properties aiming to interpret the results of experimental studies and applications of this fluorescent protein.

  4. Structural investigation of the antagonist LPS from the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria planktothrix FP1.

    PubMed

    Carillo, Sara; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Bedini, Emiliano; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Lanzetta, Rosa; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2014-03-31

    Cyanobacteria are aquatic and photosynthetic microorganisms, which contribute up to 30% of the yearly oxygen production on the earth. They have the distinction of being the oldest known fossils, more than 3.5 billion years old, and are one of the largest and most important groups of bacteria on earth. Cyanobacteria are an emerging source of potentially pharmacologically active products and, among these, there are the lipopolysaccharides. Despite their significant and well documented activity, very little is known about the cyanobacteria lipopolysaccharides (LPS) structure. The aim of this work is to investigate the structure of the highly TLR4-antagonist lipopolysaccharide from the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria plankthotrix FP1. The LPS was purified and analysed by means of chemical analysis and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The LPS was then degraded by Smith degradation, HF and acetic acid hydrolyses. All the obtained products were investigated in detail by chemical analysis, NMR spectroscopy and by mass spectrometry. The LPS consists of a high molecular mass and very complex molecule lacking Kdo and heptose residues, where the polysaccharide chain is mainly constituted by a backbone of 3-substituted α-l-rhamnose units. The core region is rich in galacturonic acid and mannose residues. Moreover a glycolipid portion, similar to Gram-negative lipid A, was identified. This was built up of a non phosphorylated (1'→6) linked glucosamine disaccharide, acylated with 3-hydroxylated fatty acids. In particular 3-hydroxypentadecanoic and 3-hydroxyesadecanoic acids were found, together with esadecanoic and tetradecanoic ones. Finally the presence of a galacturonic acid residue at 6-position of the distal glucosamine in place of the Kdo residue is suggested. PMID:24632212

  5. Integrated Medium for Planetary Exploration (IMPEx): a new EU FP7-SPACE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodachenko, M. L.; Genot, V. N.; Kallio, E. J.; Alexeev, I. I.; Modolo, R.; Al-Ubaidi, T.; André, N.; Gangloff, M.; Schmidt, W.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Topf, F.; Stoeckler, R.

    2011-12-01

    The FP7-SPACE project Integrated Medium for Planetary Exploration (IMPEx) has started in June 2011. It will create an interactive framework for exploitation of space missions' data. Data analysis and visualization will be based on the advanced computational models of the planetary environments. Specifically, the 'modeling sector' of IMPEx is formed of four well established numerical codes and their related computational infrastructures: 1) 3D hybrid modeling platform HYB for the study of planetary plasma environments, hosted at FMI; 2) an alternative 3D hybrid modeling platform, hosted at LATMOS; 3) MHD modelling platform GUMICS for 3D terrestrial magnetosphere, hosted at FMI; and 4) the global 3D Paraboloid Magnetospheric Model for simulation of magnetospheres of different Solar System objects, hosted at SINP. Modelling results will be linked to the corresponding experimental data from space and planetary missions via several online tools: 1/ AMDA (Automated Multi-Dataset Analysis, http://cdpp-amda.cesr.fr/) which provides cross-linked visualization and operation of experimental and numerical modelling data, 2/ 3DView which will propose 3D visualization of spacecraft trajectories in simulated and observed environments, and 3/ "CLWeb" software which enables computation of various micro-scale physical products (spectra, distribution functions, etc.). In practice, IMPEx is going to provide an external user with an access to an extended set of space and planetary missions' data and powerful, world leading computing models, equipped with advanced visualization tools. Via its infrastructure, IMPEx will bring the data and models outside of the mission teams and specialized modelling groups making them accessible and useful for a broad planetary science community.

  6. Pulmonary nodule detection in PET/CT images: improved approach using combined nodule detection and hybrid FP reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Atsushi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Tomita, Yoya; Takahashi, Katsuaki; Yamamuro, Osamu; Tamaki, Tsuneo

    2012-03-01

    In this study, an automated scheme for detecting pulmonary nodules in PET/CT images has been proposed using combined detection and hybrid false-positive (FP) reduction techniques. The initial nodule candidates were detected separately from CT and PET images. FPs were then eliminated in the initial candidates by using support vector machine with characteristic values obtained from CT and PET images. In the experiment, we evaluated proposed method using 105 cases of PET/CT images that were obtained in the cancer-screening program. We evaluated true positive fraction (TPF) and FP / case. As a result, TPFs of CT and PET detections were 0.76 and 0.44, respectively. However, by integrating the both results, TPF was reached to 0.82 with 5.14 FPs/case. These results indicate that our method may be of practical use for the detection of pulmonary nodules using PET/CT images.

  7. Migration insertion polymerization (MIP) of cyclopentadienyldicarbonyldiphenylphosphinopropyliron (FpP): a new concept for main chain metal-containing polymers (MCPs).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaosong; Cao, Kai; Liu, Yibo; Tsang, Brian; Liew, Sean

    2013-03-01

    We report a conceptually new polymerization technique termed migration insertion polymerization (MIP) for main chain metal-containing polymer (MCP) synthesis. Cyclopentadienyldicarbonyldiphenylphosphinopropyliron (FpP) is synthesized and polymerized via MIP, resulting in air stable poly(cyclopentadienylcarbonyldiphenylphosphinobutanoyliron) (PFpP) displaying narrow molecular weight distribution. The backbone of PFpP contains asymmetric iron units connected by both phosphine coordination and Fe-acyl bonds, which is representative of a new type of polymer. Furthermore, PFpP is tested to be soluble in a wide range of organic solvents and shown to possess reactive Fp end groups. PFpP amphiphiles have therefore been prepared via an end group migration insertion reaction in the presence of oligoethylene phosphine. PMID:23425192

  8. Constitutive and inducible pectinolytic enzymes from Aspergillus flavipes FP-500 and their modulation by pH and carbon source

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Trujillo, Aurora; Aranda, Juan S.; Gómez-Sánchez, Carlos; Trejo-Aguilar, Blanca; Aguilar-Osorio, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    Growth and enzymes production by Aspergillus flavipes FP-500 were evaluated on pectin, polygalacturonic acid, galacturonic acid, arabinose, rhamnose, xylose, glycerol and glucose at different initial pH values. We found that the strain produced exopectinases, endopectinases and pectin lyases. Exopectinases and pectin lyase were found to be produced at basal levels as constitutive enzymes and their production was modulated by the available carbon source and pH of culture medium and stimulated by the presence of inducer in the culture medium. Endo-pectinase was basically inducible and was only produced when pectin was used as carbon source. Our results suggest that pectinases in A. flavipes FP-500 are produced in a concerted way. The first enzyme to be produced was exopectinase followed by Pectin Lyase and Endo-pectinase. PMID:24031315

  9. X-ray diffraction analysis and molecular-replacement solution of the cyan fluorescent protein dsFP483

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Meitian; Patel, Hetal N.; Wachter, Rebekka M.

    2005-10-01

    The coral-derived cyan fluorescent protein dsFP483 has been crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.1 Å. A molecular-replacement solution is presented for 83% of the protein contents of the asymmetric unit. A novel cyan fluorescent protein, dsFP483 from the coral Discosoma striata, has been crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.1 Å and processed in space group C2. Molecular-replacement methods were applied using the closely related red fluorescent protein DsRed as a search model. The asymmetric unit appears to contain six protein molecules (1.5 tetramers), five of which (83%) could be located by the molecular-replacement searches.

  10. Positron emission tomography imaging of cardiomyocyte apoptosis with a novel molecule probe [18F]FP-DPAZn2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ting; Tang, Ganghua; Tian, Hua; Hu, Kongzhen; Yao, Shaobo; Su, Yifan; Wang, Changqian

    2015-10-13

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis plays a causal role in the development and progression of heart failure. Currently, there is no effective imaging agent that can be used to detect cardiomyocyte apoptosis in vivo. To target phosphatidylserine (PS) on the surface of the dying cell, we synthesized a novel 18F-labeled Zn2+-dipicolylamine (DPA) analog, [18F]FP-DPAZn2, and evaluated it for noninvasive imaging of cardiomyocyte apoptosis. In vitro, the fluorescence imaging of dansyl-DPAZn2 was suitable for detecting cardiomyocyte apoptosis, which was confirmed by confocal immunofluorescence imaging, terminal dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and western blot assay. The in vivo biodistribution showed that the uptake ratios of [18F]FP-DPAZn2 in the heart were 4.41±0.29% ID/g at 5 min, 2.40 ± 0.43% ID/g at 30 min, 1.63 ± 0.26% ID/g at 60 min, and 1.43% ± 0.07 ID/g at 120 min post-injection. In vivo, the [18F]FP-DPAZn2 PET images showed more cardiac accumulation of radioactivity 60 min post-injection in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) rats than in normal rats, which was consistent with the findings of a histological analysis of the rat cardiac tissues in vitro. [18F]FP-DPAZn2 PET imaging has the capability for myocardial apoptosis detection, but the method will require improved myocardial uptake for the noninvasive evaluation of cardiomyocyte apoptosis in clinical settings. PMID:26416423

  11. Investigation of data-format-transparent multiwavelength all-optical clock recovery using a single FP-SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Xinliang; Xu, Enming

    2011-10-01

    Multiwavelength clock recovery (CR) is desired to perform all-optical parallel processing, which has potential application in optical communication systems that use WDM technology. Fabry-Pérot semiconductor optical amplifier (FP-SOA) can perform the similar filter function as passive FP filter, and can simultaneously provide gain for oscillation pulses in the cavity; it is essentially an active filter. We experimentally demonstrated simultaneous multiwavelength all-optical CR from input 36.47-Gb/s pseudo-return-zero (PRZ) data and non-return-zero (NRZ) data using a single multi-quantum-well (MQW) FP-SOA with facets reflectivity of 30%. The presented multiwavelength CR scheme is also suitable for PSK signals. Dual-channel CR from input two channels 36.47-Gb/s 2 23-1 NRZ-DPSK data located at different wavelength is experimentally demonstrated. This scheme is transparent for data formats, which is very important for next generation optical networks.

  12. Anterograde Degeneration of the Nigrostriatal Pathway Visualized by 123I-FP-CIT SPECT in a Patient With Artery of Percheron Infarction.

    PubMed

    Nakadate, Masashi; Miyamoto, Norikazu; Starkey, Jay; Toriihara, Akira; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2016-06-01

    I-FP-CIT SPECT is widely used for diagnosis in patients with parkinsonism. Vascular parkinsonism usually has nonspecific findings from normal uptake to radiotracer decrease in the infarcted region. Infarction of the substantia nigra has been reported as a rare cause of vascular parkinsonism. We present a case of artery of Percheron infarction involving the substantia nigra unilaterally with ipsilateral reduction of striatal uptake on I-FP-CIT SPECT, suggesting anterograde degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway. Infarction of the substantia nigra should be considered in cases of decreased striatal uptake with marked laterality on I-FP-CIT SPECT. PMID:26914571

  13. An FP7 "Space" project: Aphorism "Advanced PRocedures for volcanic and Seismic Monitoring"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Iorio, A., Sr.; Stramondo, S.; Bignami, C.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.

    2014-12-01

    APHORISM project proposes the development and testing of two new methods to combine Earth Observation satellite data from different sensors, and ground data. The aim is to demonstrate that this two types of data, appropriately managed and integrated, can provide new improved GMES products useful for seismic and volcanic crisis management. The first method, APE - A Priori information for Earthquake damage mapping, concerns the generation of maps to address the detection and estimate of damage caused by a seism. The use of satellite data to investigate earthquake damages is not an innovative issue. We can find a wide literature and projects concerning such issue, but usually the approach is only based on change detection techniques and classifications algorithms. The novelty of APE relies on the exploitation of a priori information derived by InSAR time series to measure surface movements, shake maps obtained from seismological data, and vulnerability information. This a priori information is then integrated with change detection map to improve accuracy and to limit false alarms. The second method deals with volcanic crisis management. The method, MACE - Multi-platform volcanic Ash Cloud Estimation, concerns the exploitation of GEO (Geosynchronous Earth Orbit) sensor platform, LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellite sensors and ground measures to improve the ash detection and retrieval and to characterize the volcanic ash clouds. The basic idea of MACE consists of an improvement of volcanic ash retrievals at the space-time scale by using both the LEO and GEO estimations and in-situ data. Indeed the standard ash thermal infrared retrieval is integrated with data coming from a wider spectral range from visible to microwave. The ash detection is also extended in case of cloudy atmosphere or steam plumes. APE and MACE methods have been defined in order to provide products oriented toward the next ESA Sentinels satellite missions.The project is funded under the European Union FP7

  14. EC FP6 Siberia-focused Enviro-RISKS Project and its Outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baklanov, A. A.; Gordov, E. P.

    2009-04-01

    The FP6 Project "Man-induced Environmental Risks: Monitoring, Management and Remediation of Man-made Changes in Siberia" (Enviro-RISKS) strategic objective is to facilitate elaboration of solid scientific background and understanding of man-made associated environmental risks, their influence on all aspects of regional environment and optimal ways for it remediation by means of coordinated initiatives of a range of relevant RTD projects as well as to achieve their improved integration thus giving the projects additional synergy in current activities and potential for practical applications. List of Partners includes 3 leading European research organizations, 6 leading Russian research organizations (5 - located in Siberia) and 1 organization from Kazakhstan. Additionally several Russian and European research organizations joined to the Project as Associated Partners. Scientific background and foundation for the project performance is formed by a number of different levels RTD projects carried out by Partners and devoted to near all aspects of the theme. The set comprise coordinated/performed by partners EC funded thematic international projects, Russian national projects and other projects performed by NIS partners. Project outcomes include, in particular, development and support of the bilingual Enviro-RISKS web portal (http://risks.scert.ru/) as the major tool for disseminations of environmental information and project results; achieved level of development of Siberia Integrated Regional Study (SIRS, http://sirs.scert.ru/), which is the Siberia-focused NEESPI Environmental Mega-Project ongoing under the auspices of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The main Project outcome are Memorandum on the state of the art of environmental RTD activity in Siberia and Recommendations on future environmental RTD activity in Siberia elaborated by four Working Experts Groups working in most important for Siberia Thematic Focuses. Three Thematic Focuses

  15. Molecular cloning, sequencing and expression in Escherichia coli of the 25-kDa growth-related protein of Ehrlich ascites tumor and its homology to mammalian stress proteins.

    PubMed

    Gaestel, M; Gross, B; Benndorf, R; Strauss, M; Schunk, W H; Kraft, R; Otto, A; Böhm, H; Stahl, J; Drabsch, H

    1989-01-15

    The growth-related 25-kDa protein (p25) of Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) has been characterized by molecular cloning and sequencing of cDNA clones detected by hybridization with oligonucleotide probes synthesized according to the amino acid sequence of a tryptic peptide of p25. Detection of p25 mRNA in EAT of the exponential growth phase and of the stationary phase using cDNA-derived RNA probes demonstrated that the abundance of p25 mRNA is also growth-related. High-level expression of p25 in Escherichia coli has been established by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis of cDNA and insertion of the mutated cDNA into a T7-promoter expression vector. Recombinant p25 from the expressed cDNA sequence has been shown to comigrate with EAT p25 in electrophoresis and to react with antibodies against the EAT p25. On the amino acid level, p25 shows about 80% sequence homology to the human stress protein hsp27. Furthermore, p25 has similar isoforms of phosphorylation as demonstrated for small mammalian stress proteins from rat and human. From the results obtained, it is concluded that p25 is a mammalian stress protein, the abundance of which is related to growth characteristics of the Ehrlich ascites tumor. PMID:2645135

  16. Crystallographic study of red fluorescent protein eqFP578 and its far-red variant Katushka reveals opposite pH-induced isomerization of chromophore

    SciTech Connect

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z.; Shemiakina, Irina I.; Chudakov, Dmitriy M.; Artemyev, Igor; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2012-08-10

    The wild type red fluorescent protein eqFP578 (from sea anemone Entacmaea quadricolor, {lambda}{sub ex} = 552 nm, {lambda}{sub em} = 578 nm) and its bright far-red fluorescent variant Katushka ({lambda}{sub ex} = 588 nm, {lambda}{sub em} = 635 nm) are characterized by the pronounced pH dependence of their fluorescence. The crystal structures of eqFP578f (eqFP578 with two point mutations improving the protein folding) and Katushka have been determined at the resolution ranging from 1.15 to 1.85 {angstrom} at two pH values, corresponding to low and high level of fluorescence. The observed extinguishing of fluorescence upon reducing pH in eqFP578f and Katushka has been shown to be accompanied by the opposite trans-cis and cis-trans chromophore isomerization, respectively. Asn143, Ser158, His197 and Ser143, Leu174, and Arg197 have been shown to stabilize the respective trans and cis fluorescent states of the chromophores in eqFP578f and Katushka at higher pH. The cis state has been suggested as being primarily responsible for the observed far-red shift of the emission maximum of Katushka relative to that of eqFP578f.

  17. Theoretical prediction of structural and elastic behavior of AlRu under pressure: A FP-LAPW study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ekta; Pagare, Gitanjali; Devi, Hansa; Sanyal, S. P.

    2015-06-01

    Using full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method, the structural and elastic properties of AlRu intermetallic compound have been determined within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The exchange correlation potential is used for generalized gradient approximations in the scheme of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA-PBE), Wu-Cohen (GGA-WC) and Perdew et. al. (GGA-PBEsol). Furthermore we have analyzed the trend of elastic constants (C11, C12 and C44) and elastic moduli (B, G and E) under variable pressure.

  18. Computer-assisted time-averaged holograms of the motion of the surface of the mammalian tympanic membrane with sound stimuli of 0.4 to 25 kHz

    PubMed Central

    Rosowski, John J.; Cheng, Jeffrey Tao; Ravicz, Michael E.; Hulli, Nesim; Hernandez-Montes, Maria; Harrington, Ellery; Furlong, Cosme

    2009-01-01

    Time-averaged holograms describing the sound-induced motion of the tympanic membrane (TM) in cadaveric preparations from three mammalian species and one live ear were measured using opto-electronic holography. This technique allows rapid measurements of the magnitude of motion of the tympanic membrane surface at frequencies as high as 25 kHz. The holograms measured in response to low and middle-frequency sound stimuli are similar to previously reported time-averaged holograms. However, at higher frequencies (f > 4 kHz), our holograms reveal unique TM surface displacement patterns that consist of highly-ordered arrangements of multiple local displacement magnitude maxima, each of which is surrounded by nodal areas of low displacement magnitude. These patterns are similar to modal patterns (two-dimensional standing waves) produced by either the interaction of surface waves traveling in multiple directions or the uniform stimulation of modes of motion that are determined by the structural properties and boundary conditions of the TM. From the ratio of the displacement magnitude peaks to nodal valleys in these apparent surface waves, we estimate a Standing Wave Ratio of at least 4 that is consistent with energy reflection coefficients at the TM boundaries of at least 0.35. It is also consistent with small losses within the uniformly stimulated modal surface waves. We also estimate possible TM surface wave speeds that vary with frequency and species from 20 to 65 m/s, consistent with other estimates in the literature. The presence of standing wave or modal phenomena has previously been intuited from measurements of TM function, but is ignored in some models of tympanic membrane function. Whether these standing waves result either from the interactions of multiple surface waves that travel along the membrane, or by uniformly excited modal displacement patterns of the entire TM surface is still to be determined. PMID:19328841

  19. Assessment of core damage models in SCDAP/RELAP5 during OECD LOFT LP-FP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Coryell, E.W.

    1991-12-31

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has sponsored a program to apply the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to analysis of the transient and reflood phases of the OECD LOFT LP-FP-2 Experiment. The principal objectives of the LP-FP-2 experiment were to determine the fission product release from the fuel during the early phases of a severe fuel damage scenario and to examine the phenomena controlling fission product transport in a vapor/aerosol environment. Calculations with the SCDAP/RELAP5 code, developed at the INEL with NRC support, have been performed to (1) examine the phenomena controlling the progression of both transient and reflood phases of the experiment, (2) enhance our understanding of the phenomena occurring during reflood and add credence to the postulated phenomenological sequence, (3) assess the ability of SCDAP/RELAP5 to examine severe fuel damage issues and phenomena, and (4) identify code strengths and deficiencies with the intent of prioritizing code improvements. Results indicate that the code is able to analyze the early phases of severe fuel damage reasonably well, with potential deficiencies in modelling interaction between molten control rod material and intact fuel.

  20. Assessment of core damadge models in SCDAP/RELAP5 during OECD LOFT LP-FP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Coryell, E.W.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has sponsored a program to apply the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to analysis of the transient and reflood phases of the OECD LOFT LP-FP-2 Experiment. The principal objectives of the LP-FP-2 experiment were to determine the fission product release from the fuel during the early phases of a severe fuel damage scenario and to examine the phenomena controlling fission product transport in a vapor/aerosol environment. Calculations with the SCDAP/RELAP5 code, developed at the INEL with NRC support, have been performed to (1) examine the phenomena controlling the progression of both transient and reflood phases of the experiment, (2) enhance our understanding of the phenomena occurring during reflood and add credence to the postulated phenomenological sequence, (3) assess the ability of SCDAP/RELAP5 to examine severe fuel damage issues and phenomena, and (4) identify code strengths and deficiencies with the intent of prioritizing code improvements. Results indicate that the code is able to analyze the early phases of severe fuel damage reasonably well, with potential deficiencies in modelling interaction between molten control rod material and intact fuel.

  1. eHeroes and Swiff: EC-Funded FP7 networks for modelling and observation of space weather events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni

    2013-04-01

    We report on two EC-FP7 funded projects: Swiff and eHeroes. Swiff (swiff.eu) is a modelling effort that aims at producing an integrated space weather modelling and forecasting network. We are unifying into a single approach fluid and kinetic models to track space weather events from their solar origin to their impact on the Earth environment, eHeores (eheroes.eu) is a observational and modelling effort that collects and processes data to produce new data services and new models to track and predict space weather. eHeores focuses on the impact of space weather on space exploration including the effects on spacecraft, on the exploration of the Moon and Mars. We will report on the results obtained in these projects highlighting their relevance to space weather and its impact on the Earth and on space exploration. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the grant agreement SWIFF (project n° 263340, www.swiff.eu).

  2. Analysis of Two Gene Clusters Involved in the Degradation of 4-Fluorophenol by Arthrobacter sp. Strain IF1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Maria Isabel M.; Iida, Toshiya; Hasan, Syed A.; Nakamura, Kaoru; Fraaije, Marco W.; Janssen, Dick B.; Kudo, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain IF1 is able to grow on 4-fluorophenol (4-FP) as a sole source of carbon and energy. To clone the 4-FP degradation genes, DNA libraries were constructed and screened with a probe obtained by PCR using primers designed on the basis of conserved regions of aromatic two-component monooxygenases. Sequencing of positive clones yielded two gene clusters, each harboring a gene encoding a monooxygenase with high sequence similarity to the oxygenase component of 4-nitrophenol and 4-chlorophenol monooxygenase systems. Both these monooxygenase genes were differentially expressed during growth on 4-FP, as revealed by Northern blotting and reverse transcription-PCR. One cluster also contained a gene for a flavin reductase. The monooxygenase and reductase were purified from Escherichia coli cells expressing the corresponding genes, and together they catalyzed NADH-dependent hydroxylation and dehalogenation of 4-halophenols. The results indicate that strain IF1 transforms 4-FP to hydroquinone by a two-component monooxygenase system of which one component provides reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide at the expense of NADH and the other catalyzes para-hydroxylation of 4-FP and other 4-substituted phenols. PMID:19837837

  3. Crystal structure investigations of ZrAs{sub x}Se{sub y} (x>y, x+y{<=}2) by single crystal neutron diffraction at 300 K, 25 K and 2.3 K

    SciTech Connect

    Niewa, Rainer; Czulucki, Andreas; Schmidt, Marcus; Auffermann, Gudrun; Cichorek, Tomasz; Meven, Martin; Pedersen, Bjoern; Steglich, Frank; Kniep, Ruediger

    2010-06-15

    Large single crystals of ZrAs{sub x}Se{sub y} (x>y, x+y{<=}2, PbFCl type of structure, space group P4/nmm) were grown by Chemical Transport. Structural details were studied by single crystal neutron diffraction techniques at various temperatures. One single crystal specimen with chemical composition ZrAs{sub 1.595(3)}Se{sub 0.393(1)} was studied at ambient temperature (R1=5.10 %, wR2=13.18 %), and a second crystal with composition ZrAs{sub 1.420(3)}Se{sub 0.560(1)} was investigated at 25 K (R1=2.70%, wR2=5.70 %) and 2.3 K (R1=2.30 %, wR2=4.70 %), respectively. The chemical compositions of the crystals under investigation were determined by wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The quantification of trace elements was carried out by Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. According to the crystal structure refinements the crystallographic 2a site is occupied by As, together with a significant amount of vacancies. One of the 2c sites is fully occupied by As and Se (random distribution). With respect to the fractional coordinates of the atoms, the crystal structure determinations based on the data obtained at 25.0 K and 2.3 K did not show significant deviations from ambient temperature results. The temperature dependence of the displacement parameters indicates a static displacement of As on the 2a sites (located on the (0 0 1) planes) for all temperatures. No indications for any occupation of interstitial sites or the presence of vacancies on the Zr (2a) site were found. - Graphical abstract: Large single crystals of ZrAs{sub x}Se{sub y} grown by Chemical Transport to study structural details as the As-Se order scheme by single crystal neutron diffraction.

  4. Localized surface plasmon resonance enhanced ultraviolet emission and F-P lasing from single ZnO microflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi; Li, Jitao; Xu, Chunxiang; Fan, Xuemei; Wang, Baoping

    2014-10-01

    In this work, monodispersed ZnO microflowers are fabricated by a vapor phase transport method, and Au nanoparticles (NPs) are directly decorated on the surface of the ZnO microflowers. The micro-photoluminescence of a single ZnO microflower demonstrates that the near band-edge emission is tremendously enhanced while the defect-related emission is completely suppressed after Au decoration. The average enhancement factor reaches up to 65 fold. The enhancement mechanism is assumed to be the electron transfer from excited Au NPs to the ZnO microflower induced by the localized surface plasmon resonance based on the time-resolved photoluminescence. The enhanced F-P lasing from a single ZnO sample is further realized.

  5. MINDO/3-FP atom-in-molecule polarizabilities of TCNQ, TTF, TMPD, and of their radical ions

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, R.M.

    1981-03-15

    The MINDO/3-FP method was used to obtain molecular polarizabilities ..cap alpha.. and atom-in-molecule polarizabilities ..cap alpha../sub i/ for the neutral molecules 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), tetrathiofulvalene (TTF), and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylparaphenylenediamine (TMPD), and their radical ions TCNQ/sup -/, TTF/sup +/, and TMPD/sup +/. Except for the direction perpendicular to the molecular plane, the ..cap alpha.. and the ..cap alpha../sub i/ describe fairly well the covalent bonding environment. The radical ions are more polarizable than their parent neutral molecules, but not spectacularly so. The ..cap alpha../sub i/ appear to be covalent bond polarizabilities, and are the largest for the atoms that lie on the longest molecular axis.

  6. Study of the electronic and magnetic properties of EuAlO{sub 3} using FP-LAPW method

    SciTech Connect

    Sandeep, Shankar, A.; Rai, D. P.; Thapa, R. K.; Ghimire, M. P.

    2015-05-15

    The electronic and magnetic properties of EuAlO{sub 3} is calculated by first-principles full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method based on density functional theory (DFT). Density of states (DOS), magnetic moments and band structures of the systems are presented. For the exchange and correlation energy, local spin density approximation (LSDA+U) with the inclusion of Hubbard potential U is used. Our calculation showed an indirect band gap of the order of 4 eV for EuAlO{sub 3} in the spin down channel of the DOS and band structures supporting HMF nature of the system. The effective magnetic moment of 6.00 µ{sub B} also supported the above conclusion with an integral value. The DOS of Eu were found responsible for the HMF nature of the system.

  7. Localized surface plasmon resonance enhanced ultraviolet emission and F-P lasing from single ZnO microflower

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi; Li, Jitao; Xu, Chunxiang Fan, Xuemei; Wang, Baoping

    2014-10-06

    In this work, monodispersed ZnO microflowers are fabricated by a vapor phase transport method, and Au nanoparticles (NPs) are directly decorated on the surface of the ZnO microflowers. The micro-photoluminescence of a single ZnO microflower demonstrates that the near band-edge emission is tremendously enhanced while the defect-related emission is completely suppressed after Au decoration. The average enhancement factor reaches up to 65 fold. The enhancement mechanism is assumed to be the electron transfer from excited Au NPs to the ZnO microflower induced by the localized surface plasmon resonance based on the time-resolved photoluminescence. The enhanced F-P lasing from a single ZnO sample is further realized.

  8. Coating Proteins: Structure and Cross-Linking in fp-1 from the Green Shell Mussel Perna canaliculus†‡

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Waite, J. Herbert

    2007-01-01

    The protein family known as fp-1 provides mussel byssus with a protective outer coating and has drawn much attention for its water resistant bioadhesive properties in vitro. A new fp-l isolated from the green shell mussel Perna canaliculus (pcfp-1) reveals a composition dominated by only four amino acids: 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa), lysine, proline, and valine at ~20 mol % each. SDS–PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry detected size variants at 48 and 52 kDa in preparations of purified Pcfp-1. The N-terminal sequence enabled construction of oligonucleotide primers for PCR and RACE-derived cDNAs from which the complete sequence of four variants was deduced. pcfp-1 deviates from all known homologues in other mussels in several notable respects: its mass is half, most of its sequence is represented by 75 tandem repeats of a tetrapeptide, i.e., PY*VK, in which Y* is dopa, prolines are not hydroxylated, and thiolate cysteines are clustered in homologous sequences at both the amino and carboxy termini. Amino acids in the repeat sequence show a striking resemblance to proline-rich cell wall proteins with tandemly repeated PPVYK pentapeptides [Hong, J. C., Nagao, R. T., and Key, J. L. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 8367–8376]. Cysteine plays a key role in cross-linking pcfp-1 by forming adducts with dopaquinone. Significant 5-S-cysteinyldopa and smaller amounts of 2-S-cysteinyldopa were detected in hydrolysates of the byssal threads of P. canaliculus. The cross-links could also be formed by oxidation of pcfp-1 in vitro using mushroom tyrosinase. Cysteinyldopa cross-links were present in trace amounts only in the byssus of other mussel species. PMID:16313194

  9. The purine degradation pathway: possible role in paralytic shellfish toxin metabolism in the cyanobacterium Planktothrix sp. FP1.

    PubMed

    Pomati, F; Manarolla, G; Rossi, O; Vigetti, D; Rossetti, C

    2001-12-01

    The paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are potent neurotoxic alkaloids and their major biological effect is due to the blockage of voltage-gated sodium channels in excitable cells. They have been recognised as an important health risk for humans, animals, and ecosystems worldwide. The metabolic pathways that lead to the production and the degradation of these toxic metabolites are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the possible link between PST accumulation and the activation of the metabolism that leads to purine degradation in the filamentous freshwater cyanobacterium Planktothrix sp. FP1. The purine catabolic pathway is related to the nitrogen microcycle in water environments, in which cyanobacteria use traces of purines and ureides as a nitrogen source for growth. Thus, the activity of allantoicase, a key inducible enzyme of this metabolism, was used as tool for assaying the activation of the purine degradation pathway. The enzyme and the pathway were induced by allantoic acid, the direct substrate of allantoicase, as well as by adenine and, to a lower degree, by urea, one of the main products of purine catabolism. Crude cell extract of Escherichia coli was also employed and showed the best induction of allantoicase activity. In culture, Planktothrix sp. FP1 showed a differential accumulation of PST in consequence of the induction with different substrates. The cyanobacterial culture induced with allantoic acid accumulated 61.7% more toxins in comparison with the control. On the other hand, the cultures induced with adenine, urea, and the E. coli extract showed low PST accumulation, respectively, 1%, 38%, and 5% of the total toxins content detected in the noninduced culture. A degradation pathway for the PSTs can be hypothesised: as suggested for purine alkaloids in higher plants, saxitoxin (STX) and derivatives may also be converted into xanthine, urea, and further to CO2 and NH4+ or recycled in the primary metabolism through the purine degradation

  10. Development of methodology for alternative testing strategies for the assessment of the toxicological profile of nanoparticles used in medical diagnostics. NanoTEST - EC FP7 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusinska, Maria; Fjellsbo, Lise Maria; Heimstad, Eldbjorg; Harju, Mikael; Bartonova, Alena; Tran, Lang; Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne; Halamoda, Blanka; Marano, Francelyne; Boland, Sonja; Saunders, Margaret; Cartwright, Laura; Carreira, Sara; Thawley, Susan; Whelan, Maurice; Klein, Christoph; Housiadas, Christos; Volkovova, Katarina; Tulinska, Jana; Beno, Milan; Sebekova, Katarina; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Mose, Tina; Castell, José V.; Vilà, Maya R.; Gombau, Lourdes; Jepson, Mark; Pojana, Giulio; Marcomini, Antonio

    2009-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have unique, potentially beneficial properties, but their possible impact on human health is still not known. The area of nanomedicine brings humans into direct contact with NPs and it is essential for both public confidence and the nanotech companies that appropriate risk assessments are undertaken in relation to health and safety. There is a pressing need to understand how engineered NPs can interact with the human body following exposure. The FP7 project NanoTEST (www.nanotest-fp7.eu) addresses these requirements in relation to the toxicological profile of NPs used in medical diagnostics.

  11. The genome of Chelonid herpesvirus 5 harbors atypical genes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackermann, Mathias; Koriabine, Maxim; Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lewis, Teresa D.; Schetle, Nelli; Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    The Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV; ChHV5) is believed to be the causative agent of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease of marine turtles. While clinical signs and pathology of FP are well known, research on ChHV5 has been impeded because no cell culture system for its propagation exists. We have cloned a BAC containing ChHV5 in pTARBAC2.1 and determined its nucleotide sequence. Accordingly, ChHV5 has a type D genome and its predominant gene order is typical for the varicellovirus genus within the alphaherpesvirinae. However, at least four genes that are atypical for an alphaherpesvirus genome were also detected, i.e. two members of the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily (F-lec1, F-lec2), an orthologue to the mouse cytomegalovirus M04 (F-M04) and a viral sialyltransferase (F-sial). Four lines of evidence suggest that these atypical genes are truly part of the ChHV5 genome: (1) the pTARBAC insertion interrupted the UL52 ORF, leaving parts of the gene to either side of the insertion and suggesting that an intact molecule had been cloned. (2) Using FP-associated UL52 (F-UL52) as an anchor and the BAC-derived sequences as a means to generate primers, overlapping PCR was performed with tumor-derived DNA as template, which confirmed the presence of the same stretch of "atypical" DNA in independent FP cases. (3) Pyrosequencing of DNA from independent tumors did not reveal previously undetected viral sequences, suggesting that no apparent loss of viral sequence had happened due to the cloning strategy. (4) The simultaneous presence of previously known ChHV5 sequences and F-sial as well as F-M04 sequences was also confirmed in geographically distinct Australian cases of FP. Finally, transcripts of F-sial and F-M04 but not transcripts of lytic viral genes were detected in tumors from Hawaiian FP-cases. Therefore, we suggest that F-sial and F-M04 may play a role in FP pathogenesis.

  12. The Genome of Chelonid Herpesvirus 5 Harbors Atypical Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Mathias; Koriabine, Maxim; Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lewis, Teresa D.; Schetle, Nelli; Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    The Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV; ChHV5) is believed to be the causative agent of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease of marine turtles. While clinical signs and pathology of FP are well known, research on ChHV5 has been impeded because no cell culture system for its propagation exists. We have cloned a BAC containing ChHV5 in pTARBAC2.1 and determined its nucleotide sequence. Accordingly, ChHV5 has a type D genome and its predominant gene order is typical for the varicellovirus genus within the alphaherpesvirinae. However, at least four genes that are atypical for an alphaherpesvirus genome were also detected, i.e. two members of the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily (F-lec1, F-lec2), an orthologue to the mouse cytomegalovirus M04 (F-M04) and a viral sialyltransferase (F-sial). Four lines of evidence suggest that these atypical genes are truly part of the ChHV5 genome: (1) the pTARBAC insertion interrupted the UL52 ORF, leaving parts of the gene to either side of the insertion and suggesting that an intact molecule had been cloned. (2) Using FP-associated UL52 (F-UL52) as an anchor and the BAC-derived sequences as a means to generate primers, overlapping PCR was performed with tumor-derived DNA as template, which confirmed the presence of the same stretch of “atypical” DNA in independent FP cases. (3) Pyrosequencing of DNA from independent tumors did not reveal previously undetected viral sequences, suggesting that no apparent loss of viral sequence had happened due to the cloning strategy. (4) The simultaneous presence of previously known ChHV5 sequences and F-sial as well as F-M04 sequences was also confirmed in geographically distinct Australian cases of FP. Finally, transcripts of F-sial and F-M04 but not transcripts of lytic viral genes were detected in tumors from Hawaiian FP-cases. Therefore, we suggest that F-sial and F-M04 may play a role in FP pathogenesis. PMID:23056373

  13. The genome of Chelonid herpesvirus 5 harbors atypical genes.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Mathias; Koriabine, Maxim; Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; de Jong, Pieter J; Lewis, Teresa D; Schetle, Nelli; Work, Thierry M; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H; Leong, Jo-Ann C

    2012-01-01

    The Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV; ChHV5) is believed to be the causative agent of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease of marine turtles. While clinical signs and pathology of FP are well known, research on ChHV5 has been impeded because no cell culture system for its propagation exists. We have cloned a BAC containing ChHV5 in pTARBAC2.1 and determined its nucleotide sequence. Accordingly, ChHV5 has a type D genome and its predominant gene order is typical for the varicellovirus genus within the alphaherpesvirinae. However, at least four genes that are atypical for an alphaherpesvirus genome were also detected, i.e. two members of the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily (F-lec1, F-lec2), an orthologue to the mouse cytomegalovirus M04 (F-M04) and a viral sialyltransferase (F-sial). Four lines of evidence suggest that these atypical genes are truly part of the ChHV5 genome: (1) the pTARBAC insertion interrupted the UL52 ORF, leaving parts of the gene to either side of the insertion and suggesting that an intact molecule had been cloned. (2) Using FP-associated UL52 (F-UL52) as an anchor and the BAC-derived sequences as a means to generate primers, overlapping PCR was performed with tumor-derived DNA as template, which confirmed the presence of the same stretch of "atypical" DNA in independent FP cases. (3) Pyrosequencing of DNA from independent tumors did not reveal previously undetected viral sequences, suggesting that no apparent loss of viral sequence had happened due to the cloning strategy. (4) The simultaneous presence of previously known ChHV5 sequences and F-sial as well as F-M04 sequences was also confirmed in geographically distinct Australian cases of FP. Finally, transcripts of F-sial and F-M04 but not transcripts of lytic viral genes were detected in tumors from Hawaiian FP-cases. Therefore, we suggest that F-sial and F-M04 may play a role in FP pathogenesis. PMID:23056373

  14. The genome of Chelonid herpesvirus 5 harbors atypical genes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackermann, Mathias; Koriabine, Maxim; Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lewis, Teresa D.; Schetle, Nelli; Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    The Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV; ChHV5) is believed to be the causative agent of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease of marine turtles. While clinical signs and pathology of FP are well known, research on ChHV5 has been impeded because no cell culture system for its propagation exists. We have cloned a BAC containing ChHV5 in pTARBAC2.1 and determined its nucleotide sequence. Accordingly, ChHV5 has a type D genome and its predominant gene order is typical for the varicellovirus genus within thealphaherpesvirinae. However, at least four genes that are atypical for an alphaherpesvirus genome were also detected, i.e. two members of the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily (F-lec1, F-lec2), an orthologue to the mouse cytomegalovirus M04 (F-M04) and a viral sialyltransferase (F-sial). Four lines of evidence suggest that these atypical genes are truly part of the ChHV5 genome: (1) the pTARBAC insertion interrupted the UL52 ORF, leaving parts of the gene to either side of the insertion and suggesting that an intact molecule had been cloned. (2) Using FP-associated UL52 (F-UL52) as an anchor and the BAC-derived sequences as a means to generate primers, overlapping PCR was performed with tumor-derived DNA as template, which confirmed the presence of the same stretch of “atypical” DNA in independent FP cases. (3) Pyrosequencing of DNA from independent tumors did not reveal previously undetected viral sequences, suggesting that no apparent loss of viral sequence had happened due to the cloning strategy. (4) The simultaneous presence of previously known ChHV5 sequences and F-sial as well as F-M04 sequences was also confirmed in geographically distinct Australian cases of FP. Finally, transcripts of F-sial and F-M04 but not transcripts of lytic viral genes were detected in tumors from Hawaiian FP-cases. Therefore, we suggest that F-sial and F-M04 may play a role in FP pathogenesis

  15. Swept optical SSB-SC modulation technique for high-resolution large-dynamic-range static strain measurement using FBG-FP sensors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Li, Fang

    2015-04-01

    This Letter presents a static strain demodulation technique for FBG-FP sensors using a suppressed carrier LiNbO(3) (LN) optical single sideband (SSB-SC) modulator. A narrow-linewidth tunable laser source is generated by driving the modulator using a linear chirp signal. Then this tunable single-frequency laser is used to interrogate the FBG-FP sensors with the Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) technique, which is beneficial to eliminate the influence of light intensity fluctuation of the modulator at different tuning frequencies. The static strain is demodulated by calculating the wavelength difference of the PDH signals between the sensing FBG-FP sensor and the reference FBG-FP sensor. As an experimental result using the modulator, the linearity (R2) of the time-frequency response increases from 0.989 to 0.997, and the frequency-swept range (dynamic range) increases from hundreds of MHz to several GHz compared with commercial PZT-tunable lasers. The high-linearity time-wavelength relationship of the modulator is beneficial for improving the strain measurement resolution, as it can solve the problem of the frequency-swept nonlinearity effectively. In the laboratory test, a 0.67 nanostrain static strain resolution, with a 6 GHz dynamic range, is demonstrated. PMID:25831344

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION, TEST REPORT OF CONTROL OF BIOAEROSOLS IN HVAC SYSTEMS, FILTRATION GROUP, AEROSTAR FP-98 MINIPLEAT V-BLANK FILTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the AeroStar FP-98 Minipleat V-Bank Filter air filter for dust and bioaerosol filtration manufactured by Filtration Group. The pressure drop across the filter was 137 Pa clean and 348 Pa ...

  17. Impact of fowlpox-vectored Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine Vectormune® FP MG on layer hen egg production and egg quality parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to determine the impact of vaccination with Vectormune®FP MG on egg production and egg quality characteristics of white leghorn hens. Due to questions of the efficacy of this vaccine in preventing M. gallisepticum mediated pathology, the ability of this vaccine to protect a...

  18. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-01-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P < .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT0101496274. PMID:26755710

  19. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Santagostino, Elena; Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-04-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P< .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered atwww.clinicaltrials.govas #NCT0101496274. PMID:26755710

  20. A cell-specific poly(ethylene glycol) derivative with a wheat-like structure for efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanmei; Sun, Xun; Zhao, Dong; Zhang, Zhirong

    2012-11-01

    A novel anionic PEG derivative with a wheat-like structure, PEG-poly(AGE-Suc), was synthesized. The spikelet part of this polymer consisting of 9.3 pairs of carboxylic acid side chains was conjugated at one end of the PEG chain. The neutral linear PEG(1580) was designed as the stalk part to improve the biocompatibility of the vectors. The obtained polymer PEG-poly(AGE-Suc) was further modified by folate (FA) at the distal end to achieve the cell-specific targeting. It was confirmed that the negatively charged FA-PEG-poly(AGE-Suc) could coat the positively charged PEI 25K/DNA complex and form a ternary complex by electrostatic interaction. The addition of FA-PEG-poly(AGE-Suc) could change the positive charge of PEI 25K/DNA complexes to negative with no influence on the diameter. The ternary complex with the coat of FA-PEG-poly(AGE-Suc) could effectively condense DNA and protect it from degradation by DNase I. The nonspecific interaction between PEI 25K/DNA complexes and blood components was also significantly reduced by the addition of anionic PEG. The ternary complex PEI 25K/DNA/FA-PEG-poly(AGE-Suc) exhibited a 12-fold higher transfection efficiency on 293T cells compared to PEI 25K/DNA in the serum-containing medium. The competitive folate inhibition assay demonstrated that the higher transfection efficiency of PEI 25K/DNA/FA-PEG-poly(AGE-Suc) was attributed to the folate molecule conjugated to the distal end of FA-PEG-poly(AGE-Suc). The ternary complex PEI 25k/DNA/FA-PEG-poly(AGE-Suc) with low side effects and high transfection efficiency may be a novel effective gene delivery system. PMID:22957964

  1. Thermal degradation of the tensile properties of undirectionally reinforced FP-Al2O3/EZ 33 magnesium composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R.T.; Grimes, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of isothermal and cyclic exposure on the room temperature axial and transverse tensile strength and dynamic flexural modulus of 35 volume percent and 55 volume percent FP-Al203/EZ 33 magnesium composites were studied. The composite specimens were continuously heated in a sand bath maintained at 350 C for up to 150 hours or thermally cycled between 50 and 250 C or 50 and 350 C for up to 3000 cycles. Each thermal cycle lasted for a total of six minutes with a hold time of two minutes at the maximum temperature. Results indicate no significant loss in the room temperature axial tensile strength and dynamic flexural modulus of composites thermally cycled between 50 and 250 C or of composites isothermally heated at 350 C for up to 150 hours from the strength and modulus data for the untreated, as-fabricated composites. In contrast, thermal cycling between 50 and 350 C caused considerable loss in both room temperature strength and modulus. Fractographic analysis and measurement of composite transverse strength and matrix hardness of thermally cycled and isothermally heated composites indicated matrix softening and fiber/matrix debonding due to void growth at the interface and matrix cracking as the likely causes of the strength and modulus loss behavior. Previously announced in STAR as N82-21260

  2. Switching off perceptual learning: Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) at Fp3 eliminates perceptual learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Civile, Ciro; Verbruggen, Frederick; McLaren, Rossy; Zhao, Di; Ku, Yixuan; McLaren, I P L

    2016-07-01

    Perceptual learning can be acquired as a result of experience with stimuli that would otherwise be difficult to tell apart, and is often explained in terms of the modulation of feature salience by an error signal based on how well that feature can be predicted by the others that make up the stimulus. In this article we show that anodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) at Fp3 directly influences this modulation process so as to eliminate and possibly reverse perceptual learning. In 2 experiments, anodal stimulation disrupted perceptual learning (indexed by an inversion effect) compared with sham (Experiment 1) or cathodal (Experiment 2) stimulation. Our findings can be interpreted as showing that anodal tDCS severely reduced or even abolished the modulation of salience based on error, greatly increasing generalization between stimuli. This result supports accounts of perceptual learning based on variations in salience as a consequence of pre-exposure, and opens up the possibility of controlling this phenomenon. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27379720

  3. EUTEMPE-RX, an EC supported FP7 project for the training and education of medical physics experts in radiology.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, H; Bliznakova, K; Padovani, R; Christofides, S; Van Peteghem, N; Tsapaki, V; Caruana, C J; Vassileva, J

    2015-07-01

    The core activity of the medical physics expert (MPE) is to ensure optimal use of ionising radiation in healthcare. It is essential that these healthcare professionals are trained to the highest level, defined as European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning (EQF) level 8 by the European Commission's Radiation Protection Report 174 'Guidelines on the MPE'. The main objective of the EUTEMPE-RX project is to provide a model training scheme that allows the medical physicist in diagnostic and interventional radiology (D&IR) to reach this high level. A European network of partners was brought together in this FP7 EC project to ensure sufficient expertise in all aspects of the subject and to create a harmonised course programme. Targeted participants are medical physicists in D&IR in hospitals, engineers and scientists in medical device industries and officers working in regulatory authorities. Twelve course modules will be developed at EQF level 8, with radiation safety and diagnostic effectiveness being prevalent subjects. The modules will combine online with face-to-face teaching using a blended learning approach. PMID:25969526

  4. The implementation of the Open Access paradigm to the EC-FP7 MED-SUV (Mediterranean Supersite Volcanoes) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Brito, Fabrice; Caumont, Hervé; D'Auria, Luca; Fernandez, José; Mazzetti, Paolo; Mathieu, Pierre Philippe; Nativi, Stefano; Papeschi, Fabrizio; Pepe, Antonio; Reitano, Danilo; Sangianantoni, Agata; Scarpato, Giovanni; Spampinato, Letizia

    2016-04-01

    The overall goal of the EC-FP7 Mediterranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED-SUV) project is to apply the rationale of the Supersites GEO initiative to Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius and Mt. Etna to reduce the volcanic risk, by improving the understanding of the underlying geophysical processes, through the integration and sharing of the in-situ and Earth Observation (EO) data sets and the implementation of new instruments and monitoring systems. The project involves 24 EU and no-EU partners, including research and academic institutions, space agencies and SMEs. In this framework, the application of the Open Access paradigm has offered the opportunity to study and apply practical solutions concerning the data management (i.e. data polices, foreground exploitation and sustainability), intellectual property rights (i.e., ownership, licences, agreements) and technical issues (i.e., design and implementation of an interoperability e-infrastructure, access systems, etc.). This contribution presents pro and cons encountered in the project, as well as the main outcomes of the implementation of the Open Access to the Italian Supersites. This experience will be exploited in the building of international research infrastructures, such as EPOS, and the outcomes of the project will contribute to foster the Open Access to the research data in a wide context, as the GEO-GEOSS framework.

  5. Batch and Pulsed Fed-Batch Cultures of Aspergillus flavipes FP-500 Growing on Lemon Peel at Stirred Tank Reactor.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Márquez, V E; García-García, E; García-Rivero, M; Aguilar-Osorio, G; Martínez Trujillo, M A

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus flavipes FP-500 grew up on submerged cultures using lemon peel as the only carbon source, developing several batch and pulsed fed-batch trials on a stirred tank reactor. The effect of carbon source concentration, reducing sugar presence and initial pH on exopectinase and endopectinase production, was analyzed on batch cultures. From this, we observed that the highest substrate concentration favored biomass (X max) but had not influence on the corresponding specific production (q p) of both pectinases; the most acid condition provoked higher endopectinase-specific productions but had not a significant effect on those corresponding to exopectinases; and reducing sugar concentrations higher than 1.5 g/L retarded pectinase production. On the other hand, by employing the pulsed fed-batch operation mode, we observed a prolonged growth phase, and an increase of about twofold on endopectinase production without a significant raise on biomass concentration. So, pulsed fed-batch seems to be a good alternative for obtaining higher endopectinase titers by using high lemon peel quantities without having mixing and repression problems to the system. The usefulness of unstructured kinetic models for explaining, under a theoretic level, the behavior of the fungus along the batch culture with regard to pectinase production was evident. PMID:26304128

  6. Learning from the experience: preliminary results of integration experiments within PRE-EARTHQUAKES EU-FP7 Project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramutoli, V.; Inan, S.; Jakowski, N.; Pulinets, S.; Romanov, A.; Filizzola, C.; Shagimuratov, I.; Pergola, N.; Genzano, N.; Lisi, M.; Alparslan, E.; Wilken, V.; Tsybulia, K.; Romanov, A.; Paciello, R.; Balasco, M.; Zakharenkova, I.; Ouzounov, D.; Papadopoulos, G. A.; Parrot, M.

    2012-04-01

    PRE-EARTHQUAKES (Processing Russian and European EARTH observations for earthQUAKE precursors Studies) EU-FP7 project is devoted to demonstrate - integrating different observational data, comparing and improving different data analysis methods - how it is possible to progressively increase reliability of short term seismic risk assessment. Three main testing area were selected (Italy, Turkey and Sakhalin ) in order to concentrate observations and integration efforts starting with a learning phase on selected event in the past devoted to identify the most suitable parameters, observations technologies, data analysis algorithms. To this aim events offering major possibilities (variety) of integration were particularly considered - Abruzzo EQ (April 6th 2009 Mw 6.3) for Italy, Elazig EQ (March 8th 2010 Mw 6.1) for Turkey and Nevelsk EQ (August 2nd 2007 Mw 6.2) for Sakhalin - without excluding other significant events occurred during 2011 like the ones of Tōhoku in Japan and Van in Turkey. For these events, different ground (80 radon and 29 spring water stations in Turkey region, 2 magneto-telluric in Italy) and satellite (18 different systems) based observations, 11 data analysis methods, for 7 measured parameters, have been compared and integrated. Results achieved by applying a validation/confutation approach devoted to evaluate the presence/absence of anomalous space-time transients in single and/or integrated observation time-series will be discussed also in comparison with results independently achieved by other authors.

  7. Integrating Observations and Knowledges for Earthquake Precursors Studies. Preliminary results and strategy of PRE-EARTHQUAKES FP7 Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramutoli, V.; Inan, S.; Jakowski, N.; Pulinets, S. A.; Romanov, A.; Filizzola, C.; Shagimuratov, I.; Pergola, N.; Genzano, N.; Alparslan, E.; Wilken, V.; Tsybulia, K.; Romanov, A.; Paciello, R.; Zakharenkova, I.; Lisi, M.; Borrries, C.; Trusov, S.; Coviello, I.; PRE-EARTHQUAKES Team

    2011-12-01

    From the combined use of different observations/parameters, from the refinement of data analysis methods and the development of suitable physical models, we are expecting major progresses in the research on earthquake's preparatory phases. More than from the use of a single parameter approach, reduced false alarm rates and improved reliability and precision (in the space-time domain) of predictions, are expected from a multi-parameter observational, multi-disciplinary, research, strategy. Less than one year after its start, PRE-EARTHQUAKES FP7 Project already demonstrated its capability to commit together independent expertise and different observation capabilities in order: a) to substantially improve our knowledge of preparatory phases of earthquakes and their possible precursors; b) to promote a worldwide Earthquake Observation System (EQuOS) as a dedicated component of GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems); c) to develop and offer to the international scientific community an integration platform where independent observations and new data analysis methodologies devoted to the research on/of earthquake precursors can be collected and cross-validated. In this paper results achieved so far, in particular on the earthquakes selected as test cases occurred in recent years in Italy (M6.3 Abruzzo April 2009), Sakhalin (M6,2, Nevelsk, August 2007) and Turkey (M6,1, Elazig March 2010) will be presented emphasizing the significant added values guaranteed by a multi-parameter, multi-disciplinary strategy.

  8. Large Scale Modeling of Floodplain Inundation; Calibration and Forecast Based on Lisflood-FP Model and Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, M.; Durand, M. T.; Neal, J. C.; Moritz, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Logone floodplain located in the Chad basin in north Cameroon, Africa experiences seasonal flooding as the result of Logone River overbank flow. The seasonal and inter-annual variability of flood depths and extents have significant impacts on the socio-economic as well as eco-hydrology of the basin. Recent human interventions on the hydraulic characteristics of the basin have caused serious concerns for the future behavior of the system. Construction of the Maga dam and hundreds of fish canals along with the impact of climate change are potential factors which alternate the floodplain characteristics. To understand the hydraulics of the basin and predict future changes in flood inundation we calibrate the LISFLOOD-FP numerical model using the historical records of river discharge as well as satellite observations of flood depths and extents. LISFLOOD is a distributed 2D model which efficiently simulates large basins. Because of data limitations the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is considered to extract the DEM data. LISFLOOD subgrid 2D model is applied which allows for defining river channel widths smaller than the DEM resolution. River widths are extracted from Landsat 4 image obtained on Feb-1999. Model parameters including roughness coefficient and river bathymetry are then calibrated. The results demonstrate the potential application of the proposed model to simulate future changes in the floodplain. The sub-grid model has shown to improve hydraulic connectivity within the inundated area. DEM errors are major sources of uncertainty in model prediction.

  9. Thermal degradation of the tensile properties of undirectionally reinforced FP-AI203/EZ 33 magnesium composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Grimes, H. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of isothermal and cyclic exposure on the room temperature axial and transverse tensile strength and dynamic flexural modulus of 35 volume percent and 55 volume percent FP-Al2O3/EZ 33 magnesium composites were studied. The composite specimens were continuously heated in a sand bath maintained at 350 C for up to 150 hours or thermally cycled between 50 and 250 C or 50 and 350 C for up to 3000 cycles. Each thermal cycle lasted for a total of six minutes with a hold time of two minutes at the maximum temperature. Results indicate to significant loss in the room temperature axial tensile strength and dynamic flexural modulus of composites thermally cycled between 50 and 250 C or of composites isothermally heated at 350 C for up to 150 hours from the strength and modulus data for the untreated, as fabricated composites. In contrast, thermal cycling between 50 and 350 C caused considerable loss in both room temperature strength and modulus. Fractographic analysis and measurement of composite transverse strength and matrix hardness of thermally cycled and isothermally heated composites indicated matrix softening and fiber/matrix debonding due to void growth at the interface and matrix cracking as the likely causes of the strength and modulus loss behavior.

  10. FP-LAPW investigation of electronic, magnetic, elastic and thermal properties of Fe-doped zirconium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Sirajuddeen, M. Mohamed Sheik Banu, I. B. Shameem

    2014-05-15

    Full Potential- Linear Augmented Plane Wave (FP-LAPW) method has been employed to study the electronic, magnetic, elastic and thermal properties of Fe-doped Zirconium nitride. In this work, Fe-atoms were doped into the super cell of ZrN in doping concentrations of 12.5%, 25% and 37.5% to replace Zr atoms. Electronic properties such as band structure and DOS were plotted and compared for the doped compounds. Charge density contours were plotted for all the doped compounds. The non-magnetic ZrN doped in different Fe concentrations were found to be ferromagnetic. Magnetic moments have been calculated and compared. Elastic properties have been studied and compared with electronic properties. Appearance of magnetic ordering and its influence with the elastic properties have been reported. Impact of 3d states of Fe in DOS plot on the elastic nature of the compounds has been highlighted. Thermal properties such as Debye temperature and molar heat capacities at low temperature have been determined. Debye temperature is found to decrease with higher doping concentrations. Molar heat capacities are found to increase with higher concentrations of Fe atoms.

  11. VAMDC FP7 project and STARK-B database: C II Stark broadening parameters for white dwarf atmospheres research

    SciTech Connect

    Larbi-Terzi, Neila; Ben Nessib, Nebil; Sahal-Brechot, Sylvie; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.

    2010-11-23

    Stark broadening parameters of C II lines were determined within 3s-np spectral series within the semiclassical perturbation method. The atomic energy levels needed for calculations were taken from TOPBASE as well as the oscillator strengths, calculated additionally using the Coulomb approximation (the method of Bates and Damgaard). The both results were compared and the disagreement is found only in one case where the configuration mixing allows a forbidden transition to a close perturbing energy level. Calculations were performed for plasma conditions relevant for atmospheres of DQ white dwarfs and for a new type of white dwarfs, with surface composed mostly of carbon, discovered in 2007 by Dufour et al.. The aim of this work is to provide accurate C II Stark broadening data, which are crucial for this type of white dwarf atmosphere modellisation. Obtained results will be included in STARK-B database (http://stark-b.obspm.fr/), entering in the FP7 project of European Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center VAMDC aiming at building an interoperable e-Infrastructure for the exchange of atomic and molecular data (http://www.vamdc.org/).

  12. Identification and Characterization of the Cr_2O3 (0001) Surface by DFT FP-LAPW Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Scheffler, Matthias

    2000-03-01

    The physical and chemical properties of Cr_2O3 play an important role in a wide variety of industrial applications (e.g. catalysis and corrosion prevention). Though much has been learned about the Cr-oxide surfaces in recent years, the understanding of how and why this system behaves as it does, is still very shallow. In fact, even with respect to the surface composition and geometry the controversy is significant. Using density-functional theory (DFT) together with the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method, we investigated the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of the Cr_2O3 (0001) surface. Our results reveal that the surface structures depend crucially on the environment, i.e. on the partial pressure of oxygen. Under oxygen poor conditions (e.g. at low pressure), the Cr-terminated surface is the most stable one. However, with increasing oxygen pressure, a chromyl (O=Cr) terminated and a O_3-terminated surfaces become energetically favorable. They exhibit pronounced differences in their surface relaxations and surface chemical properties. The differences to Fe_2O3 [1] are significant and explained in terms of the different number of d-electrons. We also studied the adsorption and dissociation of O2 molecules. ^* Present address:Delphi Research and Development Center, Warren, MI 48090-9055, U.S.A. [1] X.G. Wang et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1038 (1998).

  13. Efficient Gene Transfection into Mammalian Cells Mediated by Cross-linked Polyethylenimine

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Li, Shufeng; Jin, Guanghui; Sun, Qiming; Ma, Dingyuan; Hua, Zichun

    2007-01-01

    25 kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI) has successfully been used for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery approaches, but it is cytotoxic. Smaller PEIs are usually non-cytotoxic but less efficient. In order to enhance the gene delivery efficiency and minimize cytotoxicity of PEI, we explored to synthesize cross-linked PEIs with degradable bonds by reacting amines of small branched 2000 Da PEI with small diacrylate (1,4-butanediol diacrylate or ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) for 2–6 hours. The efficiency of the cross-linked PEIs during in vitro delivering plasmid containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene reporter and their cytotoxicity were assessed in melanoma B16F10 cell and other cell lines. In vivo gene delivery efficiency was evaluated by direct injection delivery of the EGFP plasmid/cross-linked PEI complexes into mice and by estimating the EGFP expression in animal muscles. Compared to commercially available 25-kDa branched PEI, the cross-linked PEIs reported here could mediate more efficient expression of reporter gene than the 25-kDa PEI control, 19-fold more efficiently in B16F10 cells, 17-fold in 293T cells, 2.3-fold in 3T3 cells, and they exhibited essentially nontoxic at their optimized condition for gene delivery. Furthermore the transfection activity of polyplexs was preserved in the presence of serum proteins. The muscle transfected with the cross-linked PEI prepared here exhibited normal morphology and excellent gene expression. The cross-linked PEIs reported here were evidently more efficient than the commercial 25-kD PEI control and had less cytotoxicity in gene delivery in vitro and in vivo.

  14. The 5f localization/delocalization in square and hexagonal americium monolayers: a FP-LAPW electronic structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, D.; Ray, A. K.

    2006-04-01

    The electronic and geometrical properties of bulk americium and square and hexagonal americium monolayers have been studied with the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The effects of several common approximations are examined: (1) non-spin polarization (NSP) vs. spin polarization (SP); (2) scalar-relativity (no spin-orbit coupling (NSO)) vs. full-relativity (i.e., with spin-orbit (SO) coupling included); (3) local-density approximation (LDA) vs. generalized-gradient approximation (GGA). Our results indicate that both spin polarization and spin orbit coupling play important roles in determining the geometrical and electronic properties of americium bulk and monolayers. A compression of both americium square and hexagonal monolayers compared to the americium bulk is also observed. In general, the LDA is found to underestimate the equilibrium lattice constant and give a larger total energy compared to the GGA calculations. While spin orbit coupling shows a similar effect on both square and hexagonal monolayer calculations regardless of the model, GGA versus LDA, an unusual spin polarization effect on both square and hexagonal monolayers is found in the LDA results as compared with the GGA results. The 5f delocalization transition of americium is employed to explain our observed unusual spin polarization effect. In addition, our results at the LDA level of theory indicate a possible 5f delocalization could happen in the americium surface within the same Am II (fcc crystal structure) phase, unlike the usually reported americium 5f delocalization which is associated with crystal structure change. The similarities and dissimilarities between the properties of an Am monolayer and a Pu monolayer are discussed in detail.

  15. An optical pulse width modulation generator based on the injection-locking property of single mode FP-LD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Quoc Hoai; Nakarmi, Bikash; Won, Yong Hyub

    2013-03-01

    A novel simple optical pulse width modulation generator (OPWMG) based on injection-locking property of a single mode FP-LD (SMFP-LD) has been proposed and experimentally verified. The OPWMG consists of a SMFP-LD (which acts as comparator), an optical sinusoidal wave source (analog input), and a continuous optical beam (control signal). The power required for fully injection-locking the SMFP-LD acts as the referent power whereas the combination power of continuous optical beam and analog optical sinusoidal signals work as control signals for changing the duty cycle of the proposed OPWMG. The presence of only continuous optical beam is not sufficient to suppress the dominant mode of SMFP-LD with high ON/OFF contrast ratio; however, the application of additional sinusoidal wave of constant amplitude and frequency, the dominant mode of SMFP-LD can be suppressed for the certain time window. Since, injection-locking power is dependent with the combined power of input injected continuous beam and sinusoidal optical wave, the time window of injection-locking can be varied by changing input beam power which provides different duty cycle of 13% to 68% at the output. Current available schemes for generating PWM signals are in electrical domain, hence, they need to convert electrical signals into optical domain by using expensive O/E converters for application in optical control and signal processing. The proposed OPWMG scheme has several advantages, such as low cost, low power consumption (~0.5 mW) which can be used for various applications where the effect of EMI/EMR is considered as an important factor such as control circuit for high voltage converters in power plant and electrical vehicles.

  16. A simple calibration procedure to improve oxygen optode data quality developed and tested within the EU FP7 project HYPOX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, F.; Fischer, J.; Holtappels, M.; Lichtschlag, A.; Kononets, M.; Salvetat, F.; Tengberg, A.; Wenzhöfer, F.; Boetius, A.

    2012-04-01

    The presence of higher aquatic life and the occurrence of particular biogeochemical processes strongly depends on ambient dissolved oxygen levels with specific thresholds spanning from normoxia to trace levels. As oxygen availability in both coastal and open ocean environments is expected to decrease dramatically in response to eutrophication and global warming, oxygen concentrations need to be monitored as accurately as possible. Within the EU FP7 Project HYPOX (www.hypox.net), strategies for oxygen monitoring are developed and tested in a variety of aquatic ecosystems. In order to improve observation quality a simple optode calibration strategy was developed and tested. Main requirement was to minimize the need for sophisticated instrumentation as well as for wet chemical analyses of oxygen levels. Sequentially, up to eight oxygen concentrations ranging from approx. 10 to 400 micromol / kg were established in a closed calibration vessel by mixing of nitrogen- and oxygen- saturated water. In a final experimental run sodium dithionite was added to reduce the oxygen concentration to zero. At each concentration level, temperature was slowly increased from 2 and 35 degrees Celsius. This simple approach resulted in many different conditions of temperature and oxygen partial pressures, which were then used as reference data for calibrating the sensors by a higher order two-dimensional polynomial fit as well as by a temperature corrected Stern Volmer equation. Analyses of data obtained in different calibration runs showed substantial improvements in optode performance especially with respect to temperature compensation as compared to factory calibrations based on batch characterizations of the sensing foil. Accuracies obtained by the suggested calibration approach were far better than specifications of the manufacturer. A comparison of successive calibration runs performed in the closed calibration vessel as well as in an open calibration facility indicated that optode

  17. Kinematic description of crystal plasticity in the finite kinematic framework: A micromechanical understanding of F=FeFp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reina, C.; Conti, S.

    2014-07-01

    The plastic component of the deformation gradient plays a central role in finite kinematic models of plasticity. However, its characterization has been the source of extended debates in the literature and many important issues still remain unresolved. Some examples are the micromechanical understanding of F=FeFp with multiple active slip systems, the uniqueness of the decomposition, or the characterization of the plastic deformation without reference to the so-called intermediate configuration. In this paper, we shed some light to these issues via a two-dimensional kinematic analysis of the plastic deformation induced by discrete slip surfaces and the corresponding dislocation structures. In particular, we supply definitions for the elastic and plastic components of the deformation gradient as a function of the active slip systems without any a priori assumption on the decomposition of the total deformation gradient. These definitions are explicitly and uniquely given from the microstructure and do not make use of any unrealizable intermediate configuration. The analysis starts from a semi-continuous mathematical description of the deformation at the microscale, where the displacements are considered continuous everywhere in the domain except at the discrete slip surfaces, over which there is a displacement jump. At this scale, where the microstructure is resolved, the deformation is uniquely characterized from purely kinematic considerations and the elastic and plastic components of the deformation gradient can be defined based on physical arguments. These quantities are then passed to the continuous limit via homogenization, i.e. by increasing the number of slip surfaces to infinity and reducing the lattice parameter to zero. This continuum limit is computed for several illustrative examples, where the well-known multiplicative decomposition of the total deformation gradient is recovered. Additionally, by similar arguments, an expression of the dislocation

  18. 123I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging in early diagnosis of dementia in patients with and without a vascular component

    PubMed Central

    Garriga, Marina; Milà, Marta; Mir, Manzoor; Al-Baradie, Raid; Huertas, Sonia; Castejon, Cesar; Casas, Laura; Badenes, Dolors; Giménez, Nuria; Font, M. Angels; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Ysamat, Maria; Aguilar, Miguel; Slevin, Mark; Krupinski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common cause of dementia. Cerebral ischemia is a major risk factor for development of dementia. 123I-FP-CIT SPECT (DaTScan) is a complementary tool in the differential diagnoses of patients with incomplete or uncertain Parkinsonism. Additional application of DaTScan enables the categorization of Parkinsonian disease with dementia (PDD), and its differentiation from pure AD, and may further contribute to change the therapeutic decision. The aim of this study was to analyze the vascular contribution towards dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We evaluated the utility of DaTScan for the early diagnosis of dementia in patients with and without a clinical vascular component, and the association between neuropsychological function, vascular component and dopaminergic function on DaTScan. One-hundred and five patients with MCI or the initial phases of dementia were studied prospectively. We developed an initial assessment using neurologic examination, blood tests, cognitive function tests, structural neuroimaging and DaTScan. The vascular component was later quantified in two ways: clinically, according to the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and by structural neuroimaging using Wahlund Scale Total Score (WSTS). Early diagnosis of dementia was associated with an abnormal DaTScan. A significant association was found between a high WSTS and an abnormal DaTScan (p < 0.01). Mixed AD was the group with the highest vascular component, followed by the VaD group, while MCI and pure AD showed similar WSTS. No significant associations were found between neuropsychological impairment and DaTScan independently of associated vascular component. DaTScan seems to be a good tool to discriminate, in a first clinical assessment, patients with MCI from those with established dementia. There was bigger general vascular affectation observable in MRI or CT in patients with abnormal dopaminergic uptake seen on Da

  19. (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging in early diagnosis of dementia in patients with and without a vascular component.

    PubMed

    Garriga, Marina; Milà, Marta; Mir, Manzoor; Al-Baradie, Raid; Huertas, Sonia; Castejon, Cesar; Casas, Laura; Badenes, Dolors; Giménez, Nuria; Font, M Angels; Gonzalez, Jose M; Ysamat, Maria; Aguilar, Miguel; Slevin, Mark; Krupinski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common cause of dementia. Cerebral ischemia is a major risk factor for development of dementia. (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT (DaTScan) is a complementary tool in the differential diagnoses of patients with incomplete or uncertain Parkinsonism. Additional application of DaTScan enables the categorization of Parkinsonian disease with dementia (PDD), and its differentiation from pure AD, and may further contribute to change the therapeutic decision. The aim of this study was to analyze the vascular contribution towards dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We evaluated the utility of DaTScan for the early diagnosis of dementia in patients with and without a clinical vascular component, and the association between neuropsychological function, vascular component and dopaminergic function on DaTScan. One-hundred and five patients with MCI or the initial phases of dementia were studied prospectively. We developed an initial assessment using neurologic examination, blood tests, cognitive function tests, structural neuroimaging and DaTScan. The vascular component was later quantified in two ways: clinically, according to the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and by structural neuroimaging using Wahlund Scale Total Score (WSTS). Early diagnosis of dementia was associated with an abnormal DaTScan. A significant association was found between a high WSTS and an abnormal DaTScan (p < 0.01). Mixed AD was the group with the highest vascular component, followed by the VaD group, while MCI and pure AD showed similar WSTS. No significant associations were found between neuropsychological impairment and DaTScan independently of associated vascular component. DaTScan seems to be a good tool to discriminate, in a first clinical assessment, patients with MCI from those with established dementia. There was bigger general vascular affectation observable in MRI or CT in patients with abnormal dopaminergic uptake seen on Da

  20. The FP7 ULTimateCO2 project: a study of the long term fate of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audigane, Pascal; Waldmann, Svenja; Pearce, Jonathan; Dimier, Alain; Le Gallo, Yann; Frykman, Peter; Maurand, Nicolas; Gherardi, Fabrizio; Yalamas, Thierry; Cremer, Holger; Spiers, Chris; Nussbaum, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of the European FP7 ULTimateCO2 project are to study specific processes that could influence the long-term fate of geologically stored CO2, mainly: the trapping mechanisms occurring in the storage reservoir, the influence of fluid-rock interactions on mechanical integrity of caprock and well vicinity, and also the modifications induced at the regional scale (brine displacement, fault reactivation, hydrogeology changes...). A comprehensive approach combining laboratory experiments, numerical modeling and natural analogue studies is developed to assess all the processes mentioned above. A collection of data has been generated from natural and industrial (oil industry) analogues on the fluid flow and mechanical properties, structure, and mineralogy of faults and fractures that could affect the long-term storage capacity of underground CO2 storage sites. To address geochemical trapping at reservoir scale, an experimental approach is developed using sandstone core materials in batch reactive mode with CO2 and impurities at reservoir pressure and temperature conditions. Three inter-related lines of laboratory experiments investigate the long-term evolution of the mechanical properties and sealing integrity of fractured and faulted caprocks using Opalinus clay of Mont Terri Gallery (Switzerland), an analogue for caprock well investigated in the past for nuclear waste disposal purpose. To evaluate the interactions between CO2 (and formation fluid) and the well environment (formation, cement, casing) and to assess the consequences of these interactions on the transport properties of well materials, a 1 to 1 scale experiment has been set in the Mont Terri Gallery Opalinus clay to reproduce classical well objects (cemented annulus, casing and cement plug) perforating caprock formations. An extensive program of numerical modeling is also developed to calibrate, to reproduce and to extrapolate the experimental results at longer time scales including uncertainty

  1. Experiment study of bio-tissue's temperature irradiated by laser based on optical fiber F-P sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Ning; Liu, Xia

    2014-08-01

    Laser has several advantages, such as strong anti-interference ability, quick speed, high power, agility and precision. It is widely applied in military and medicine fields. When laser acts on human body, biological tissue of human body will appear the phenomenon of ablation and carbonization and solidification. In order to effectively defend excess damage by laser, the thermal effect research of skin tissue should be carried out. Temperature is a key parameter in the processing between laser and bio-tissue. It is the mostly foundation using analyze size of thermal damage area and forecast thermal damage degree. In this paper, the low fineness optical fiber F-P sensing system for temperature measurement is designed and established. The real-time measurement system of temperature generated by laser irradiating bio-tissue is build based on the sensing system. The temperature distributing generated by laser in the bio-tissue is studied through experiment when the spot diameter of emission laser is difference with the same energy density and the energy density is difference with the same spot diameter of emission laser. The experimental results show that the sensing system can be used to the real-time temperature measurement of bio-tissue efficiency. It has small bulk. Its outer diameter is 250μm. And the hurt for bio-tissue is small. It has high respond speed. The respond time of temperature is less than 1s. These can be satisfied with practice demand. When the energy density of laser is same, the temperature rising in the same location is low along the spot diameter of emission laser increasing. When the spot diameter of emission laser is same, the temperature rising in the same location is increasing along with the energy density of laser increasing.

  2. Hypoxia monitoring activities within the FP7 EU-project HYPOX: diverse approaches to understand a complex phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, F.; Waldmann, C.; Boetius, A.

    2012-04-01

    Hypoxic conditions in aquatic systems and the occurrence of 'dead zones' increase worldwide due to man-made eutrophication and global warming with consequences for biodiversity, ecosystem functions and services such as fisheries, aquaculture and tourism. Monitoring of hypoxia and its consequences has to (1) account for the appropriate temporal and spatial scales, (2) separate anthropogenic from natural drivers and long-term trends from natural variations, (3) assess ecosystem response, (4) use modeling tools for generalization and prediction, and (5) share data and obtained knowledge. In 2009 the EU FP7 project HYPOX (www.hypox.net) started out as a pioneering attempt to improve and integrate hypoxia observation capacities addressing these requirements. Target ecosystems selected for HYPOX cover a broad range of settings (e.g., hydrography, oxygenation status, biological activity, anthropogenic impact) and differ in their sensitivity towards change. Semi-enclosed basins with permanent anoxia (Black Sea, Baltic Sea), are included as well as seasonally or locally hypoxic land-locked systems (fjords, lagoons, lakes) and open ocean systems with high sensitivity to global warming (North Atlantic - Arctic transition). Adopted monitoring approaches involve autonomous, cabled, and shipboard instruments and include static and profiling moorings, benthic observatories, drifters, as well as classical CTD surveys. In order to improve observatory performance, project activities encompass developments of oxygen sensors as well as calibration procedures and technologies to reduce biofouling. Modeling and data assimilation are used to synthesize findings, to obtain an in-depth understanding of hypoxia causes and consequences, and to improve forecasting capacities. For integration of the collected information into a global oxygen observing system, results are disseminated through the HYPOX portal following GEOSS data sharing principles. This presentation will give an overview of

  3. Targeted gene delivery via N-acetylglucosamine receptor mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijay; Maharjan, Sushila; Kim, You-Kyoung; Jiang, Tai; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Kang, Sang-Kee; Cho, Myung-Haing; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su

    2014-11-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a promising approach of gene delivery into the target cells via receptor-ligand interaction. Vimentins at the cell surface are recently known to bind N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residue, therefore, the cell surfaces of vimentin-expressing cells could be targeted by using the GlcNAc residue as a specific ligand for receptor-mediated gene delivery. Here, we have developed polymeric gene delivery vectors, based on poly(ethylene oxide)(PEO) and poly(aspartamide), namely poly[(aspartamide)(diethylenetriamine)]-b-[PEO-(GlcNAc)] (PADPG) and poly[(aspartamide)(diethylenetriamine)]-b-[PEO] (PADP) to elucidate the efficiency of GlcNAc ligand for gene delivery through receptor mediated endocytosis. To determine the efficiency of these polymeric vectors for specific gene delivery, the DNA condensation ability of PADPG and PADP and the subsequent formation of polymeric nanoparticles were confirmed by gel retardation assay and transmission electron microscopy respectively. Both PADPG and PADP had lower cytotoxicity than polyethylenimine 25 K (PEI 25 K). However, their transfection efficiency was comparatively lower than PEI 25 K due to hydrophilic property of PEO in the vectors. To observe the stability of polymeric nanoparticles, the transfection of PADPG and PADP was carried out in the presence of serum. Favorably, the interfering effect of serum on the transfection efficiency of PADPG and PADP was also very low. Finally, when the cell specificity of these polymeric vectors was investigated, PADPG had high gene transfection in vimentin-expressing cells than vimentin-deficiency cells. The high transfection efficiency of PADPG was attributed to the GlcNAc in the polymeric vector which interact specifically with vimentin in the cells for the receptor-mediated endocytosis. The competitive inhibition assay further proved the receptor-mediated endocytosis of PADPG. Thus, this study demonstrates that conjugation of GlcNAc is an effective and rational

  4. All-optical diode structure based on asymmetrical coupling by a micro-cavity and FP cavity at two sides of photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Yun-Feng; Jia, Chen; He, Xing-Dao

    2016-06-01

    A high efficiency all-optical diode based on photonic crystal (PC) waveguide has been proposed and numerically investigated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The structure is asymmetrically coupled by a micro-cavity containing nonlinear Kerr medium and a FP cavity at sides of PC waveguide. Because of interference between two cavities, Fano peak and FP peak can both appear in transmission spectra and unidirectional transmission can be achieved. The working wavelength can set between two peaks and near to the Fano peak. For forward launch with suitable light intensity, nonlinear Kerr effect of micro-cavity can been excited. It will result in red shift of Fano peak and achieving forward transmission. But for backward launch, a stronger incidence light is needed to the excite Kerr effect due to the design of asymmetric structure. This design has many advantages, including high maximum transmittance, high transmittance contrast ratio, low power threshold, short response time, and ease of integration.

  5. Beta Decay Study of the Tz = - 256Zn Nucleus and the Determination of the Half-Lives of a Few fp-shell Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, B.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Kucuk, L.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Fujita, Y.; Fujita, H.; Blank, B.; Gelletly, W.; Adachi, T.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Cáceres, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; de France, G.; Ganioğlu, E.; Gerbaux, M.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grevy, S.; Kamalou, O.; Kozer, H. C.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Marqués, F. M.; Molina, F.; Oktem, Y.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Perrot, L.; Popescu, L.; Raabe, R.; Rogers, A. M.; Srivastava, P. C.; Susoy, G.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thomas, J. C.

    2014-06-01

    This paper concerns the experimental study of the β decay properties of few proton-rich fp-shell nuclei. The nuclei were produced at GANIL in fragmentation reactions, separated with the LISE spectrometer and stopped in an implantation detector surrounded by Ge detectors. The β-delayed gammas, β-delayed protons and the exotic β-delayed gamma-proton emission have been studied. Preliminary results are presented. The decay of the Tz = - 2 nucleus 56Zn has been studied in detail. Information from the β-delayed protons and β-delayed gammas has been used to deduce the decay scheme. The exotic beta-delayed gamma-proton decay has been observed for the first time in the fp-shell. The interpretation of the data was made possible thanks to the detailed knowledge of the mirror Charge Exchange (CE) process and the gamma de-excitation of the states in 56Co, the mirror nucleus of 56Cu.

  6. Analysis of X-ray absorption spectra of the K and L2,3 edges of GaN within the FP-LAPW method.

    PubMed

    Grad, Gabriela B; Bonzi, Edgardo V

    2016-04-01

    Gallium nitride, GaN, is a semiconductor material with several technological applications. In this work we obtain ab initio XANES spectra using FP-LAPW method within the DFT formalism using different potentials (LDA, PBE and TB-mBJ) in order to study the electronic properties of the system. The spectra calculated using the effect of the fractional core hole were compared with experimental data obtaining a very good agreement. PMID:26861041

  7. Theoretical investigation of the 19F(p, p0) differential cross section up to Ep = 2.3 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paneta, V.; Gurbich, A.; Kokkoris, M.

    2016-03-01

    The use of experimental cross-section data on fluorine in analytical EBS studies is quite problematic, because they are indeed inadequate and discrepant (up to ∼30%). The evaluated values on the other hand, being produced by incorporating the available experimental cross sections within a unified theoretical approach, provide the most reliable data to be used and are therefore very important. The present work contributes in this field by reproducing and attempting to extend the corresponding evaluation for 19F(p, p0), which ranges up to 1730 keV, to proton energies up to 2250 keV, using the AZURE code. The performed R-matrix calculations involved the simultaneous analysis of several experimental input datasets, as well as spectroscopic information concerning the formed compound nucleus 20Ne, while valuable feedback information was provided by proton benchmarking spectra on ZnF2 taken at Ep = 1730 and 2250 keV and at several backscattering angles for the fine tuning of the parameters used. The problem of the 19F(p, p‧) and 19F(p, αx) contributions in the obtained thick target yield spectra is also discussed.

  8. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  9. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  10. Spermine-alt-poly(ethylene glycol) polyspermine as a safe and efficient aerosol gene carrier for lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Kyoung; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing; Jiang, Hu-Lin

    2014-07-01

    The clinical success of gene therapy critically depends upon the safety and efficiency of delivery system used. Although polyethylenimine (PEI) has been commonly used as an efficient cationic polymeric gene carrier due to its high transfection efficiency, its cytotoxicity and nondegradability limit the polymer's therapeutic applications in clinical trials. In this study, biocompatible polyspermine based on spermine (SPE) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) diacrylate (SPE-alt-PEG) was synthesized using a Michael-type addition reaction, and its ability as an alternative gene carrier for lung cancer therapy was evaluated. SPE-alt-PEG polyspermine was complexed with plasmid DNA, and the resulting complexes were characterized by particle size and surface charge by dynamic light scattering, complex formation and DNA protection ability by gel retardation, and complex shape by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy. The SPE-alt-PEG copolymer showed low cytotoxicity, and SPE-alt-PEG/DNA complexes showed efficacious transfection efficiency compared with 25 kDa PEI (PEI 25K). Also SPE-alt-PEG/GFP complexes were efficiently transferred into the lungs after aerosol administration without toxicity, and delivery of Pdcd4 gene as a therapeutic gene with SPE-alt-PEG polyspermine greatly reduced tumor size as well as tumor numbers in K-ras(LA1) lung cancer model mice compared relative to the effect observed for PEI 25K. These results suggest that SPE-alt-PEG has potential as a gene carrier for lung cancer gene therapy. PMID:23929634

  11. Cloning and characterization of the gene cluster required for beauvericin biosynthesis in Fusarium proliferatum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhuo, Ying; Jia, Xiaopeng; Liu, Jintao; Gao, Hong; Song, Fuhang; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Lixin

    2013-07-01

    Beauvericin, a cyclohexadepsipeptide-possessing natural product with synergistic antifungal, insecticidal, and cytotoxic activities. We isolated and characterized the fpBeas gene cluster, devoted to beauvericin biosynthesis, from the filamentous fungus Fusarium proliferatum LF061. Targeted inactivation of the F. proliferatum genomic copy of fpBeas abolished the production of beauvericin. Comparative sequence analysis of the FpBEAS showed 74% similarity with the BbBEAS that synthesizes the cyclic trimeric ester beauvericin in Beauveria bassiana, which assembles N-methyl-dipeptidol monomer intermediates by the programmed iterative use of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules. Differences between the organization of the beauvericin loci in F. proliferaturm and B. bassiana revealed the mechanism for high production of beauvericin in F. proliferatum. Our work provides new insights into beauvericin biosynthesis, and may lead to beauvericin overproduction and creation of new analogs via synthetic biology approaches. PMID:23832252

  12. Multilaboratory evaluation of 15 bioassays for (eco)toxicity screening and hazard ranking of engineered nanomaterials: FP7 project NANOVALID.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Olesja M; Heinlaan, Margit; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Ivask, Angela; Kurvet, Imbi; Joonas, Elise; Jemec, Anita; Mannerström, Marika; Heinonen, Tuula; Rekulapelly, Rohit; Singh, Shashi; Zou, Jing; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Drobne, Damjana; Kahru, Anne

    2016-11-01

    Within EU FP7 project NANOVALID, the (eco)toxicity of 7 well-characterized engineered nanomaterials (NMs) was evaluated by 15 bioassays in 4 laboratories. The highest tested nominal concentration of NMs was 100 mg/l. The panel of the bioassays yielded the following toxicity order: Ag > ZnO > CuO > TiO2 > MWCNTs > SiO2 > Au. Ag, ZnO and CuO proved very toxic in the majority of assays, assumingly due to dissolution. The latter was supported by the parallel analysis of the toxicity of respective soluble metal salts. The most sensitive tests/species were Daphnia magna (towards Ag NMs, 24-h EC50 = 0.003 mg Ag/l), algae Raphidocelis subcapitata (ZnO and CuO, 72-h EC50 = 0.14 mg Zn/l and 0.7 mg Cu/l, respectively) and murine fibroblasts BALB/3T3 (CuO, 48-h EC50 = 0.7 mg Cu/l). MWCNTs showed toxicity only towards rat alveolar macrophages (EC50 = 15.3 mg/l) assumingly due to high aspect ratio and TiO2 towards R. subcapitata (EC50 = 6.8 mg Ti/l) due to agglomeration of TiO2 and entrapment of algal cells. Finally, we constructed a decision tree to select the bioassays for hazard ranking of NMs. For NM testing, we recommend a multitrophic suite of 4 in vitro (eco)toxicity assays: 48-h D. magna immobilization (OECD202), 72-h R. subcapitata growth inhibition (OECD201), 30-min Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition (ISO2010) and 48-h murine fibroblast BALB/3T3 neutral red uptake in vitro (OECD129) representing crustaceans, algae, bacteria and mammalian cells, respectively. Notably, our results showed that these assays, standardized for toxicity evaluation of "regular" chemicals, proved efficient also for shortlisting of hazardous NMs. Additional assays are recommended for immunotoxicity evaluation of high aspect ratio NMs (such as MWCNTs). PMID:27259032

  13. HCHO and NO2 MAXDOAS retrieval strategies harmonization: Recent results from the EU FP7 project QA4ECV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinardi, Gaia; Peters, Enno; Hendrick, François; Gielen, Clio; Van Roozendael, Michel; Richter, Andreas; Piters, Ankie; Wagner, Thomas; Wang, Yang; Drosoglou, Theano; Bais, Alkis; Wang, Shanshan; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso

    2016-04-01

    During the last decade, it has been extensively demonstrated that MAXDOAS is a useful and reliable technique to retrieve integrated column amounts of tropospheric trace gases and aerosols, as well as information on their vertical distributions. Since it is based on optical remote-sensing in the UV-visible region like nadir backscatter space-borne sensors, MAXDOAS is also increasingly recognized as a reference technique for validating satellite nadir observations of air quality species like NO2 and HCHO. However, building up an harmonized network of MAXDOAS spectrometers requires significant efforts in terms of common retrieval strategies and best-practices definitions. Within the EU FP7 project QA4ECV (Quality Assurance for Essential Climate Variables; see http://www.qa4ecv.eu/), harmonization activities have been initiated focusing on the two main steps of the MAXDOAS retrieval, i.e. the DOAS spectral fit providing the so-called differential slant column densities (DSCDs) and the conversion of the retrieved DSCDs to vertical profiles and/or vertical column densities (VCDs). Regarding the first step, the DOAS settings for HCHO and NO2 are optimized through an intercomparison exercise of slant column retrievals involving 15 groups of the MAXDOAS community including the QA4ECV partners, and based on the radiance spectra acquired during the MAD-CAT campaign held in Mainz (Germany) in June-July 2013 (see http://joseba.mpch-mainz.mpg.de/mad_cat.htm). The harmonization of the second step is done through the application of an AMF (aim mass factor) look-up table (LUT) approach on the optimized NO2 and HCHO DSCDs. The AMF LUTs depend on entry parameters like SZA, elevation and relative azimuth angles, wavelength, boundary layer height, AOD, and surface albedo. The advantages and drawbacks of the LUT approach are illustrated at several stations through comparison of the derived VCDs with those retrieved using the more sophisticated Optimal-Estimation-based profiling method

  14. Astrobiology Road Mapping (AstRoMap) - A project within FP7 of the European Commission: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Gomez, Felipe; Capria, Maria Teresa; Palomba, Ernesto; Walter, Nicolas; Rettberg, Petra; Muller, Christian; Horneck, Gerda

    AstRoMap (Astrobiology and Planetary Exploration Road Mapping) is a funded project formulated in the 5th Call of the European Commission FP7 framework. The main objectives of the AstRoMap are: 1. Identify the main astrobiology issues to be addressed by Europe in the next decades in relation with space exploration 2. Identify potential mission concepts that would allow addressing these issues 3. Identify the technology developments required to enable these missions 4. Provide a prioritized roadmap integrating science and technology activities as well as ground-based approach 5. Map scientific knowledge related to astrobiology in Europe To reach those objectives, AstRoMap is executed within the following steps: 1. Community consultation. In order to map the European astrobiology landscape and to provide a collaborative networking platform for this community, the AstRoMap project hosts a database of scientists (European and beyond) interested in astrobiology and planetary exploration (see: http://www.astromap.eu/database.html). It reflects the demography and the research and teaching activities of the astrobiology community, as well as their professional profiles and involvement in astrobiology projects. Considering future aspects of astrobiology in Europe, the need for more astrobiology-dedicated funding programmes at the EU level, especially for cross-disciplinary groups, was stressed. This might eventually lead to the creation of a European laboratory of Astrobiology, or even of a European Astrobiology Institute. 2. Workshops organisation. On the basis of the feedbacks from the community consultation, the potential participants and interesting topics are being identified to take part in the following workshops: 1-. Origin of organic compounds, steps to life; 2. Physico-chemical boundary conditions for habitability 3. Biosignatures as facilitating life detection 4. Origin of the Solar system 3. Astrobiology road-mapping. Based on the results and major conclusions

  15. The ISS SOLAR payload data preservation in the frame of the PERICLES FP-7 project: metadata aspects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Christian; Pandey, Praveen

    2016-04-01

    PERICLES (Promoting and Enhancing the Reuse of Information throughout the Content Lifecycle exploiting Evolving Semantics) is an FP7 project started on February 2013. It aims at preserving by design large and complex data sets. PERICLES is coordinated by King's College London, UK and its partners are University of Borås (Sweden), CERTH- ITI (Greece), DotSoft (Greece), Georg-August-Universität Göttingen (Germany), University of Liverpool (UK), Space Application Services (Belgium), XEROX France and University of Edinburgh (UK). Two additional partners provide the two case studies: Tate Gallery (UK) brings the digital art and media case study and B.USOC (Belgian Users Support and Operations Centre) brings the space science case study . PERICLES addresses the life-cycle of large and complex data sets in order to cater for the evolution of context of data sets and user communities, including groups unanticipated when the data was created. Semantics of data sets are thus also expected to evolve and the project includes elements which could address the reuse of data sets at periods where the data providers and even their institutions are not available any more. PERICLES uses the Linked Resources Model (LRM) which will be compared with the OAIS standard. In this study we present the space science case associated with PERICLES. B.USOC supports experiments on the International Space Station and is the curator of the collected data and operations history. B.USOC has chosen to analyse the SOLAR payload flying since 2008 on the ESA COLUMBUS module of the ISS as the PERICLES prime space science case. Solar observation data are prime candidates for long term data preservation as variabilities of the solar spectral irradiance have an influence on earth climate. The nature of the data to be preserved for the reuse of the current SOLAR series is much more extended than a simple set of time tagged tables of spectral irradiances, it is an important inventory of more than 50 classes

  16. EC FP6 Enviro-RISKS project outcomes in area of Earth and Space Science Informatics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordov, E. P.; Zakarin, E. A.

    2009-04-01

    exploit completely huge potential of web bases technologies. In particular, development of a region devoted web portal using approached suggested by the Open Geospatial Consortium has been started recently. The state of the art of the information-computational infrastructure in the targeted region is quite a step in the process of development of a distributed collaborative information-computational environment to support multidisciplinary investigations of Earth regional environment, especially those required meteorology, atmospheric pollution transport and climate modeling. Established in process of the Project carrying out cooperative links, new Partners initiatives, and gained expertise allow us to hope that this infrastructure rather soon will make significant input into understanding regional environmental processes in their relationships with Global Change. In particular, this infrastructure will play a role of the 'underlying mechanics' of the research work, leaving the earth scientists to concentrate on their investigations as well as providing the environment to make research results available and understandable to everyone. Additionally to the core FP6 Enviro-RISKS project (INCO-CT-2004-013427) support this activity was partially supported by SB RAS Integration Project 34, SB RAS Basic Program Project 4.5.2.2 and APN Project CBA2007-08NSY. Valuable input into the expert group work and elaborated outcomes of Profs. V. Lykosov and A. Starchenko, Drs. D. Belikov, , M. Korets, S. Kostrykin, B. Mirkarimova, I. Okladnikov, , A. Titov and A. Tridvornov is acknowledged.

  17. InSAR analysis of ground deformation over the Istanbul Area in the framework of the FP7 MARsite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano; Bonano, Manuela; Nobile, Adriano; Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Manzo, Mariarosaria; Solaro, Giuseppe; Moro, Marco; Saroli, Michele

    2015-04-01

    The FP7 MARsite project (New Directions in Seismic Hazard assessment through Focused Earth Observation in Marmara Supersite), is aiming at providing complete geodetic records of crustal deformation for major continental earthquake occurring in the Marmara region through repeated GPS, InSAR, gravity and seismological observations. One of the goals of the project is the long-term continuous geodetic monitoring of the crustal deformation affecting the Istanbul area using large archives of X-band satellite SAR data, made available through the GEO Supersites Initiative. To this aim, we processed the available SAR datasets by exploiting the multi-temporal and multi-scale InSAR techniques known as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS, Berardino et al., 2002) and StaMPS (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry, Hooper et al., 2007), which have the potential of providing new insights into the spatial and temporal patterns of the investigated phenomena. The results achieved in the first 2 years of the MARsite project over the megacity of Istanbul are presented. IREA-CNR applied the SBAS technique to a dataset of 101 SAR images acquired by the TerraSAR-X constellation over descending orbits, spanning the interval from November 2010 to August 2014. 312 differential interferograms were generated. INGV applied the StaMPS PSI approach (Hooper et al., 2007) to COSMO-SkyMed SAR images acquired from two different ascending tracks, consisting of 29 and 64 image strips for the Eastern and the Western tracks respectively, and covering the period between 2011 and 2013. Two sets of 28 and 63 differential interferograms were generated for the two tracks. The resulting ground velocity maps show several localized deformation sources in the urban area, due to subsidence and/or slope deformation. No clear long spatial wavelength tectonic patterns are visible, possibly due to the limited extent of the X-band satellite swaths (~40 km). We identified a displacement pattern related to the Istanbul airport

  18. I-123 - FP-CIT pharmacokinetics and dosimetry show great potential for the evaluation of dopamine transporter system in clinical routine

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, D.C.; Walker, S.; Waddington, W. |

    1996-05-01

    FP-CIT is a N-fluoropropyl analogue of the [2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane] which has been labelled with I-123 and developed as a new marker of the pre-synaptic dopamine transporter system. Its selective uptake in the striatum of non-human primates and human volunteers has been reported with advantageous faster brain kinetics than {beta}-CIT. In this pilot work we studied the whole body imaging kinetics of FP-CIT in one normal volunteer - NV (5, 60, 100, 360 minutes and 24 hours post-injection for 20 minutes each) and a drug-free patient with well established Parkinson`s disease - PD (100 minutes) after intravenous injection of 111 MBq. Both subjects had high resolution brain SPECT at 35 minutes and 3.5 hours post-injection. Percent of whole body uptake (geometric mean of anterior and posterior projections) in different organs, including total brain and basal ganglia shows rapid clearance from blood during the first hour with no significant change from 100 minutes to 24 hours. The basal ganglia uptake is approximately 0.4% of total body from 100 minutes onwards. Striatal uptake (ratio to frontal cortex) is different between subjects, mainly at 3.5 hours and more marked in the putamen: Calculated dosimetry (mSv/MBq) showed E.D.E.-0.034, and total doses to whole body - 0.01, total brain - 0.017, basal ganglia - 0.155, small intestine - 0.06, urinary bladder - 0.05 and liver - 0.03. These data confirm that FP-CIT has acceptable dosimetry with good pharmacokinetics enabling the study of pre-synaptic dopamine transport system in nigrostriatal degeneration with clinical SPECT at 3-4 hrs p.i.

  19. Validation of Reference Genes for Accurate Normalization of Gene Expression in Lilium davidii var. unicolor for Real Time Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A.; Wang, ChunXia; Sun, HongMei

    2015-01-01

    Lilium is an important commercial market flower bulb. qRT-PCR is an extremely important technique to track gene expression levels. The requirement of suitable reference genes for normalization has become increasingly significant and exigent. The expression of internal control genes in living organisms varies considerably under different experimental conditions. For economically important Lilium, only a limited number of reference genes applied in qRT-PCR have been reported to date. In this study, the expression stability of 12 candidate genes including α-TUB, β-TUB, ACT, eIF, GAPDH, UBQ, UBC, 18S, 60S, AP4, FP, and RH2, in a diverse set of 29 samples representing different developmental processes, three stress treatments (cold, heat, and salt) and different organs, has been evaluated. For different organs, the combination of ACT, GAPDH, and UBQ is appropriate whereas ACT together with AP4, or ACT along with GAPDH is suitable for normalization of leaves and scales at different developmental stages, respectively. In leaves, scales and roots under stress treatments, FP, ACT and AP4, respectively showed the most stable expression. This study provides a guide for the selection of a reference gene under different experimental conditions, and will benefit future research on more accurate gene expression studies in a wide variety of Lilium genotypes. PMID:26509446

  20. Analysis of the 19F(p, α0)16O reaction at low energies and the spectroscopy of 20Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, I.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Campajola, L.; Rosato, E.; Spadaccini, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2013-12-01

    The investigation of the 19F(p, α0) reaction at low bombarding energies allows the study of the spectroscopy of the 20Ne compound nucleus in an energy region where the existence of quartet excitations has been suggested in the literature. Moreover, this reaction plays a major role in the fourth branch of the CNO cycle since it is relevant for the correct description of the hydrogen burning of fluorine in stars. For these reasons, we decided to investigate the 19F(p, α0) reaction in the Ep ≃ 0.6-1 MeV energy range. The analysis of angular distributions and excitation functions allows one to improve the 20Ne spectroscopy in an excitation energy region where some ambiguities concerning Jπ assignments exist in the literature. In particular, the present data suggest a Jπ = 0+ assignment to the Ex = 13.642 MeV resonance. For this state, both partial and reduced widths for the α0 channel have been deduced. The trend of the astrophysical factor has been obtained from the integrated cross section. A comparison of the present results with data reported in the literature is also discussed.

  1. Reduction of mode partition noise of FP-LD by using Mach-Zehnder interferometer for RSOA-based DWDM applications.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang-Hwa; Moon, Sang-Rok; Kye, Myeonggyun; Lee, Chang-Hee

    2016-06-27

    We investigate reduction of mode partition noise of a spectrally sliced Fabry-Perot laser diode (FP-LD) for application to seeded DWDM systems. The proposed scheme for the noise reduction incorporates a fiber-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) and a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA). The MZI enables to reduce a relative intensity noise (RIN) more than 3 dB with better noise distributions. Experimental results of 10-Gb/s signal transmission exhibit a considerable bit-error-rate (BER) reduction by three orders of magnitude at the given received power. After the noise reduction, the FP-LD is applied to a 10-Gb/s DWDM system as a seed-light-source. In a local-seeding scheme, return-to-zero (RZ) and carrier-suppressed (CS)-RZ signal formats are compared as a function of transmission distance. Furthermore, a back-reflection induced impairment is evaluated in a remote-seeding scheme. We also count the number of useable channels to show the feasibility of DWDM transmission. PMID:27410602

  2. Research of narrow line-width Er3+-doped fiber ring laser with FBG F-P etalon and FBG Sagnac loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Zhonghua; Dai, Zhiyong; Wu, Bo; Zhang, Lixun; Peng, Zengshou; Liu, Yongzhi

    2008-12-01

    A novel method of narrow line-width Er3+-doped fiber ring laser based on FBG F-P etalon and FBG Sagnac loop is presented in this paper. The all-fiber single frequency and narrow line-width Er3+-doped fiber ring laser has been designed in which two 976 nm laser diodes are used as the pump sources, the high concentration Er3+-doped fiber as the gain medium, the fiber Faraday rotator is adopted to eliminate the spatial hole burning effect, the FBG F-P etalon and FBG Sagnac loop filter can discriminate and select laser longitudinal modes efficiently. The experiment system using 3m long Er3+-doped fibers is presented, when the maximum pump power of two 976nm laser diodes is 146mW, the fiber laser exhibits 16mW threshold and stable single frequency 1550nm laser with the output powers of 45mW is acquired, and the slope efficiency is about 34.6%. The 3dB line-width is less than 9.3 kHz, measured by the delayed selfheterodyne method with 15km single-mode fiber, and no mode hopping is observed. The fiber laser has the advantages of simple structure, high efficiency and high reliability and it has great potential applications in the fields of optical fiber sensing system.

  3. Dexamethasone-Conjugated Polyamidoamine Dendrimer for Delivery of the Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene into the Ischemic Brain.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Pureum; Choi, Manbok; Oh, Jungju; Lee, Minhyung

    2015-07-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, the HO-1 gene was delivered into the brain using dexamethasone-conjugated polyamidoamine generation 2 (PAMAM G2-Dexa) for the treatment of ischemic stroke. PAMAM G2-Dexa formed stable complexes with plasmid DNA (pDNA). The pDNA delivery efficiency of PAMAM G2-Dexa was higher than that of polyethylenimine (PEI25k, 25 kDa), dexamethasone-conjugated PEI (PEI-Dexa), and PAMAM G2 in Neuro2A cells. Therapeutic effect of PAMAM G2-Dexa/pHO-1 complexes was evaluated in a stroke animal model. PAMAM G2-Dexa delivered pHO-1 more efficiently into the ischemic brain than PEI25k and PEI-Dexa with higher therapeutic effect. Therefore, PAMAM G2-Dexa/pHO-1 complexes may be useful for ischemic stroke gene therapy. PMID:26033925

  4. H-H, C-H, and C-C NMR spin-spin coupling constants calculated by the FP-INDO method for aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, S. A. T.; Memory, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The FP-INDO (finite perturbation-intermediate neglect of differential overlap) method is used to calculate the H-H, C-H, and C-C coupling constants in hertz for molecules of six different benzenoid hydrocarbons: benzene, naphthalene, biphenyl, anthracene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. The calculations are based on both the actual and the average molecular geometries. It is found that only the actual molecular geometries can always yield the correct relative order of values for the H-H coupling constants. For the calculated C-C coupling constants, as for the calculated C-H coupling constants, the signs are positive (negative) for an odd (even) number of bonds connecting the two nuclei. Agreements between the calculated and experimental values of the coupling constants for all six molecules are comparable to those reported previously for other molecules.

  5. FP-LAPW calculations of the elastic, electronic and thermoelectric properties of the filled skutterudite CeRu4Sb12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, A.; Rai, D. P.; Chettri, Sandeep; Khenata, R.; Thapa, R. K.

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure, elastic and thermoelectric properties of the filled skutterudite CeRu4Sb12 using the density functional theory (DFT). The full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within a framework of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) approach is used to perform the calculations presented here. The electronic structure calculation suggests an indirect band gap semiconducting nature of the material with energy band gap of 0.08 eV. The analysis of the elastic constants at relaxed positions reveals the ductile nature of the sample material with covalent contribution in the inter-atomic bonding. The narrow band gap semiconducting nature with high value of Seebeck coefficient suggests the possibility of the thermoelectric application of the material. The analysis of the thermal transport properties confirms the result obtained from the energy band structure of the material with high thermopower and dimensionless figure of merit 0.19 at room temperature.

  6. Biodegradable Poly(aminoester)-Mediated p53 Gene Delivery for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Shen, He; Liu, Min; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy is a promising strategy in cancer treatment. However, efficient gene translation still remains challenging. In the previous work, a hydrolytically degradable poly(aminoester) with good biocompatibility was synthesized. Herein, the poly(aminoester) was explored as a vector for gene delivery and cancer therapy. The experiments revealed that the poly(aminoester) condensed plasmid DNA into nanosized particles via electrostatic interaction. The pEGFP-N1 and pGL-3 were first used as two reporter genes to study intracellular transfection. The poly(aminoester) showed higher GFP expression (33%) than PEI 25 kDa (21%). Intracellular trafficking of Cy3-labelled pGL-3 also indicated that the poly(aminoester) showed superior DNA delivery ability to nucleus compared to PEI 25 kDa. Furthermore, the therapeutic gene (p53) was translated into the breast cancer cell line (MCF-7), and then induced cell apoptosis. These results suggested that the degradable poly(aminoester) is a promising and efficient gene delivery vector for gene therapeutic applications. PMID:27455620

  7. Gray matter correlates of dopaminergic degeneration in Parkinson's disease: A hybrid PET/MR study using (18) F-FP-CIT.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hongyoon; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Han-Joon; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Yong-Il; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June-Key; Kim, E Edmund; Lee, Dong Soo

    2016-05-01

    Dopaminergic degeneration is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD), which causes various symptoms affected by corticostriatal circuits. So far, the relationship between cortical changes and dopamine loss in the striatum is unclear. Here, we evaluate the gray matter (GM) changes in accordance with striatal dopaminergic degeneration in PD using hybrid PET/MR. Sixteen patients with idiopathic PD underwent (18) F-FP-CIT PET/MR. To measure dopaminergic degeneration in PD, binding ratio (BR) of dopamine transporter in striatum was evaluated by (18) F-FP-CIT. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to evaluate GM density. We obtained voxelwise correlation maps of GM density according to the striatal BR. Voxel-by-voxel correlation between BR maps and GM density maps was done to evaluate region-specific correlation of striatal dopaminergic degeneration. There was a trend of positive correlation between striatal BR and GM density in the cerebellum, parahippocampal gyri, and frontal cortex. A trend of negative correlation between striatal BR and GM density in the medial occipital cortex was found. Voxel-by-voxel correlation revealed that the positive correlation was mainly dependent on anterior striatal BR, while posterior striatal BR mostly showed negative correlation with GM density in occipital and temporal cortices. Decreased GM density related to anterior striatal dopaminergic degeneration might demonstrate degeneration of dopaminergic nonmotor circuits. Furthermore, the negative correlation could be related to the motor circuits of posterior striatum. Our integrated PET/MR study suggests that the widespread structural progressive changes in PD could denote the cortical functional correlates of the degeneration of striatal dopaminergic circuits. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1710-1721, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26846350

  8. Well-defined poly(2-hydroxyl-3-(2-hydroxyethylamino)propyl methacrylate) vectors with low toxicity and high gene transfection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Xu, F J; Chai, M Y; Li, W B; Ping, Y; Tang, G P; Yang, W T; Ma, J; Liu, F S

    2010-06-14

    Successful gene delivery vectors for clinical translation should have high transfection efficiency and minimal toxicity. In this work, well-defined poly(2-hydroxyl-3-(2-hydroxyethylamino)propyl methacrylate) (PGEA) vectors with flanking cationic secondary amine and nonionic hydroxyl units were prepared via the ring-opening reaction of the pendant epoxide groups of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) with the amine moieties of ethanolamine. It was found that PGEA carriers possess very low toxicity (<10% of the toxicity of branched polyethylenimine (PEI, 25 kDa), while exhibiting surprisingly excellent transfection efficiency (higher than or comparable to that of PEI (25 kDa)) in different cell lines. A series of transfection and cytotoxicity assays revealed that PGEAs are highly promising as a new class of safe and efficient gene delivery vectors for future clinical gene therapies. PMID:20426406

  9. Linkage disequilibrium in the insulin gene region: Size variation at the 5{prime} flanking polymorphism and bimodality among {open_quotes}Class I{close_quotes} alleles

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, R.E.; Spielman, R.S.

    1994-09-01

    The 5{prime} flanking polymorphism (5{prime}FP), a hypervariable region at the 5{prime} end of the insulin gene, has {open_quotes}class 1{close_quotes} alleles (650-900 bp long) that are in positive linkage disequilibrium with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). The authors report that precise sizing of the 5{prime}FP yields a bimodal frequency distribution of class 1 allele lengths. Class 1 alleles belonging to the lower component (650-750 bp) of the bimodal distribution were somewhat more highly associated with IDDM than were alleles from the upper component (760-900 bp), but the difference was not statistically significant. They also examined 5{prime}FP length variation in relation to allelic variation at nearby polymorphisms. At biallelic RFLPs on both sides of the 5{prime}FP, they found that one allele exhibits near-total association with the upper component of the 5FP class 1 distribution. Such associations represent a little-known but potentially wide-spread form of linkage disequilibrium. In this type of disequilibrium, a flanking allele has near-complete association with a single mode of VNTR alleles whose lengths represent consecutive numbers of tandem repeats (CNTR). Such extreme disequilibrium between a CNTR mode and flanking alleles may originate and persist because length mutations at some VNTR loci usually add or delete only one or two repeat units. 22 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Genes and gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, N.

    1988-01-01

    Genetics has long been a central topic for biologists, and recent progress has captured the public imagination as well. This book addresses questions that are at the leading edge of this continually advancing discipline. In tune with the increasing emphasis on molecular biology and genetic engineering, this text emphasizes the molecular aspects of gene expression, and the evolution of gene sequence organization and control. It reviews the genetic material of viruses, bacteria, and of higher organisms. Cells and organisms are compared in terms of gene numbers, their arrangements within a cell, and the control mechanisms which regulate the activity of genes.

  11. An efficient method for in vitro gene delivery via regulation of cellular endocytosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jing; Li, Caixia; Chen, Jianlin; Wang, Gang; Gao, Rong; Gu, Zhongwei

    2015-01-01

    Transfection efficiency was the primary goal for in vitro gene delivery mediated by nonviral gene carriers. Here, we report a modified gene transfection method that could greatly increase the efficiency of, and accelerate the process mediated by, 25 kDa branched polyethyleneimine and Lipofectamine™ 2000 in a broad range of cell strains, including tumor, normal, primary, and embryonic stem cells. In this method, the combination of transfection procedure with optimized complexation volume had a determinant effect on gene delivery result. The superiorities of the method were found to be related to the change of cellular endocytosis pathway and decrease of particle size. The efficient and simple method established in this study can be widely used for in vitro gene delivery into cultured cells. We think it may also be applicable for many more nonviral gene delivery materials than polyethyleneimine and liposome. PMID:25767387

  12. The planetary hydraulics analysis based on a multi-resolution stereo DTMs and LISFLOOD-FP model: Case study in Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Schumann, G.; Neal, J. C.; Lin, S.

    2013-12-01

    Earth is the only planet possessing an active hydrological system based on H2O circulation. However, after Mariner 9 discovered fluvial channels on Mars with similar features to Earth, it became clear that some solid planets and satellites once had water flows or pseudo hydrological systems of other liquids. After liquid water was identified as the agent of ancient martian fluvial activities, the valley and channels on the martian surface were investigated by a number of remote sensing and in-suit measurements. Among all available data sets, the stereo DTM and ortho from various successful orbital sensor, such as High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), Context Camera (CTX), and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), are being most widely used to trace the origin and consequences of martian hydrological channels. However, geomorphological analysis, with stereo DTM and ortho images over fluvial areas, has some limitations, and so a quantitative modeling method utilizing various spatial resolution DTMs is required. Thus in this study we tested the application of hydraulics analysis with multi-resolution martian DTMs, constructed in line with Kim and Muller's (2009) approach. An advanced LISFLOOD-FP model (Bates et al., 2010), which simulates in-channel dynamic wave behavior by solving 2D shallow water equations without advection, was introduced to conduct a high accuracy simulation together with 150-1.2m DTMs over test sites including Athabasca and Bahram valles. For application to a martian surface, technically the acceleration of gravity in LISFLOOD-FP was reduced to the martian value of 3.71 m s-2 and the Manning's n value (friction), the only free parameter in the model, was adjusted for martian gravity by scaling it. The approach employing multi-resolution stereo DTMs and LISFLOOD-FP was superior compared with the other research cases using a single DTM source for hydraulics analysis. HRSC DTMs, covering 50-150m resolutions was used to trace rough

  13. BAR expressolog identification: expression profile similarity ranking of homologous genes in plant species.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rohan V; Nahal, Hardeep K; Breit, Robert; Provart, Nicholas J

    2012-09-01

    Large numbers of sequences are now readily available for many plant species, allowing easy identification of homologous genes. However, orthologous gene identification across multiple species is made difficult by evolutionary events such as whole-genome or segmental duplications. Several developmental atlases of gene expression have been produced in the past couple of years, and it may be possible to use these transcript abundance data to refine ortholog predictions. In this study, clusters of homologous genes between seven plant species - Arabidopsis, soybean, Medicago truncatula, poplar, barley, maize and rice - were identified. Following this, a pipeline to rank homologs within gene clusters by both sequence and expression profile similarity was devised by determining equivalent tissues between species, with the best expression profile match being termed the 'expressolog'. Five electronic fluorescent pictograph (eFP) browsers were produced as part of this effort, to aid in visualization of gene expression data and to complement existing eFP browsers at the Bio-Array Resource (BAR). Within the eFP browser framework, these expression profile similarity rankings were incorporated into an Expressolog Tree Viewer to allow cross-species homolog browsing by both sequence and expression pattern similarity. Global analyses showed that orthologs with the highest sequence similarity do not necessarily exhibit the highest expression pattern similarity. Other orthologs may show different expression patterns, indicating that such genes may require re-annotation or more specific annotation. Ultimately, it is envisaged that this pipeline will aid in improvement of the functional annotation of genes and translational plant research. PMID:22607031

  14. Reducible Poly(Oligo-D-Arginine) as an Efficient Carrier of the Thymidine Kinase Gene in the Intracranial Glioblastoma Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Lee, Hyun-Lin; Choi, Eunji; Kim, Yong-Hee; Lee, Minhyung

    2015-11-01

    Gene therapy has been considered as an alternative treatment for glioblastoma therapy. In this study, a glioblastoma-specific suicide gene, pEpo-NI2-SV-TK, was delivered into the intracranial glioblastoma model using reducible poly(oligo-d-arginines) (rPOA). pEpo-NI2-SV-TK has the erythropoietin (Epo) enhancer and the nestin intron 2 (NI2) for glioblastoma specific gene expression. The in vitro studies showed that the rPOA formed stable complexes with pEpo-NI2-SV-TK. In the MTT and TUNEL assays, rPOA showed lower cytotoxicity than polyethylenimine (25 kDa, PEI25k). In addition, the rPOA/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK complex induced higher glioblastoma cell death under hypoxic condition than normoxic condition, suggesting that pEpo-NI2-SV-TK induced gene expression in the hypoxic tumor tissue. For in vivo therapeutic efficacy evaluation, the rPOA/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK complex was injected into the brains of an intracranial glioblastoma rat model. The rPOA/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK injected group had a significantly reduced tumor size, compared with the control and the PEI25k/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK injected group. The TUNEL assay showed that the rPOA-pEpo-NI2-SV-TK complex had more apoptotic cells than the control and PEI25k/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK injected groups. These results suggest that the rPOA is an efficient carrier for pEpo-NI2-SV-TK and increased the therapeutic efficacy in the intracranial glioblastoma models. Therefore, the rPOA/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK complex may be useful for glioblastoma specific gene therapy. PMID:26178805

  15. Studying Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Area What are genes? Genes are sections of DNA that contain instructions for making the molecules—many ... material in an organism. This includes genes and DNA elements that control the activity of genes. Does ...

  16. Intranasal Dopamine Reduces In Vivo [123I]FP-CIT Binding to Striatal Dopamine Transporter: Correlation with Behavioral Changes and Evidence for Pavlovian Conditioned Dopamine Response

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Silva, Maria A.; Mattern, Claudia; Decheva, Cvetana; Huston, Joseph P.; Sadile, Adolfo G.; Beu, Markus; Müller, H.-W.; Nikolaus, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dopamine (DA), which does not cross the blood-brain barrier, has central and behavioral effects when administered via the nasal route. Neither the mechanisms of central action of intranasal dopamine (IN-DA), nor its mechanisms of diffusion and transport into the brain are well understood. We here examined whether IN-DA application influences dopamine transporter (DAT) binding in the dorsal striatum and assessed the extent of binding in relation to motor and exploratory behaviors. We hypothesized that, based on the finding of increased extracellular DA in the striatum induced by application of IN-DA, binding of [123I]FP-CIT to the DAT should be decreased due to competition at the receptor. Methods: Rats were administered 3 mg/kg IN-DA and vehicle (VEH), with IN-DA injection either preceding or following VEH. Then motor and exploratory behaviors (traveled distance, velocity, center time, sitting, rearing, head-shoulder motility, grooming) were assessed for 30 min in an open field prior to administration of [123I]FP-CIT. DAT binding after IN-DA and VEH was measured with small animal SPECT 2 h following administration of the radioligand. Results: (1) After IN-DA application, striatal DAT binding was significantly lower as compared to VEH, indicating that the nasally delivered DA had central action and increased DA levels comparable to that found previously with L-DOPA administration; and (2) DAT binding in response to intranasal VEH was lower when IN-DA application preceded VEH treatment. This finding is suggestive of Pavlovian conditioning of DA at the level of the DAT, since the DA treatment modified (decreased) the binding in response to the subsequent VEH treatment. VEH treatment also reduced motor and exploratory behaviors more when applied before, as compared to when it followed IN-DA application, also indicative of behavioral Pavlovian conditioning akin to that found upon application of various psychostimulant drugs. Conclusions: The results: (a

  17. THE FLUORINE DESTRUCTION IN STARS: FIRST EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE {sup 19}F(p, {alpha}{sub 0}){sup 16}O REACTION AT ASTROPHYSICAL ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G. G.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Mrazek, J.; Piskor, S.; Coc, A.

    2011-10-01

    The {sup 19}F(p, {alpha}){sup 16}O reaction is an important fluorine destruction channel in the proton-rich outer layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and it might also play a role in hydrogen-deficient post-AGB star nucleosynthesis. So far, available direct measurements do not reach the energy region of astrophysical interest (E {sub cm} {approx}< 300 keV), because of the hindrance effect of the Coulomb barrier. The Trojan Horse (TH) method was thus used to access this energy region, by extracting the quasi-free contribution to the {sup 2}H({sup 19}F, {alpha}{sup 16}O)n and the {sup 19}F({sup 3}He, {alpha}{sup 16}O)d reactions. The TH measurement of the {alpha}{sub 0} channel shows the presence of resonant structures not observed before, which cause an increase of the reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures up to a factor of 1.7, with potential consequences for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  18. Modelling the flood-risk extent using LISFLOOD-FP in a complex watershed: case study of Mundeni Aru River Basin, Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarnath, G.; Umer, Y. M.; Alahacoon, N.; Inada, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Flood management is adopting a more risk-based approach, whereby flood risk is the product of the probability and consequences of flooding. Two-dimensional flood inundation modeling is a widely used tool to aid flood-risk management. The aim of this study is to develop a flood inundation model that uses historical flow data to produce flood-risk maps, which will help to identify flood protection measures in the rural areas of Sri Lanka. The LISFLOOD-FP model was developed at the basin scale using available historical data, and also through coupling with a hydrological modelling system, to map the inundation extent and depth. Results from the flood inundation model were evaluated using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images to assess product accuracy. The impacts of flooding on agriculture and livelihoods were analyzed to assess the flood risks. It was identified that most of the areas under paddy cultivation that were located near the middle and downstream part of the river basin are more susceptible to flood risks. This paper also proposes potential countermeasures for future natural disasters to prevent and mitigate possible damages.

  19. Relative stability and phase transitions under pressure of SrTiO3: ab initio FP-LAPW within GGA-PBEsol+TB-mBJ calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benallou, Yassine; Soudini, Belabbas; Amara, Kadda

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we report a density functional study of the structural, electronic and pressure-induced solid-solid phase transitions of SrTiO3. These first-principles calculations have been performed using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method (FP-LAPW) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) developed by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhor for solids (PBEsol). The calculated structural parameters like the lattice parameters, the bulk modulus B and their pressure derivative B‧ are used to analyze the relative stability and phase transitions under pressure of SrTiO3. Calculations were done for the cubic (Pm-3m), tetragonal (I4/mcm, P4/mbm, P4mm) and orthorhombic (Cmcm, Pnma) structures where we found that the tetragonal I4/mcm phase is the most stable structure compared to the other structures at T = 0 K and P = 0 GPa. For the electronic properties calculations, the exchange and correlation effects were treated by the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential to prevent the shortcoming of the underestimation of the energy gaps in both LDA and GGA approximations. The obtained results are compared to available experimental data and to other theoretical calculations.

  20. Dynamic Assessment of Seismic Risk (DASR) by Multi-parametric Observations: Preliminary Results of PRIME experiment within the PRE-EARTHQUAKES EU-FP7 Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramutoli, V.; Inan, S.; Jakowski, N.; Pulinets, S. A.; Romanov, A.; Filizzola, C.; Shagimuratov, I.; Pergola, N.; Ouzounov, D. P.; Papadopoulos, G. A.; Parrot, M.; Genzano, N.; Lisi, M.; Alparlsan, E.; Wilken, V.; Tsybukia, K.; Romanov, A.; Paciello, R.; Zakharenkova, I.; Romano, G.

    2012-12-01

    The integration of different observations together with the refinement of data analysis methods, is generally expected to improve our present knowledge of preparatory phases of earthquakes and of their possible precursors. This is also the main goal of PRE-EARTHQUAKES (Processing Russian and European EARTH observations for earthQUAKE precursors Studies) the FP7 Project which, to this aim, committed together, different international expertise and observational capabilities, in the last 2 years. In the learning phase of the project, different parameters (e.g. thermal anomalies, total electron content, radon concentration, etc.), measured from ground and satellite systems and analyzed by using different data analysis approaches, have been studied for selected geographic areas and specific seismic events in the past. Since July 2012 the PRIME (PRE-EARTHQUAKES Real-time Integration and Monitoring Experiment) started attempting to perform, on the base of independent observations collected and integrated in real-time through the PEG (PRE-EARTHQUAKES Geo-portal), a Dynamic Assessment of Seismic Risk (DASR) on selected geographic areas of Europe (Italy-Greece-Turkey) and Asia (Kamchatka, Sakhalin, Japan). In this paper, results so far achieved as well as the potential and opportunities they open for a worldwide Earthquake Observation System (EQuOS) - as a dedicated component of GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) - will be presented.

  1. Characterization of the native form and the carboxy-terminally truncated halotolerant form of α-amylases from Bacillus subtilis strain FP-133.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shinji; Miyatake, Ayaka; Tanaka, Kosei; Kuntiya, Ampin; Techapun, Charin; Leksawasdi, Noppol; Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Chaiyaso, Thanongsak; Watanabe, Masanori; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2015-06-01

    Two amylases, amylase I and amylase II from Bacillus subtilis strain FP-133, were purified to homogeneity and characterized. Their stabilities toward temperature, pH, and organic solvents, and their substrate specificities toward polysaccharides and oligosaccharides were similar. Under moderately high salt conditions, both amylases were more stable than commercial B. licheniformis amylase, and amylase I retained higher amylase activity than amylase II. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, genomic southern blot analysis, and MALDI-TOFF-MS analysis indicated that the halotolerant amylase I was produced by limited carboxy-terminal truncation of the amylase II peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of amylase II was >95% identical to that of previously reported B. subtilis α-amylases, but their carboxy-terminal truncation points differed. Three recombinant amylases--full-length amylase corresponding to amylase II, an artificially truncated amylase corresponding to amylase I, and an amylase with a larger artificial C-terminal truncation--were expressed in B. subtilis. The artificially truncated recombinant amylases had the same high amylase activity as amylase I under moderately high salt conditions. Sequence comparisons indicated that an increased ratio of Asp/Glu residues in the enzyme may be one factor responsible for increasing halotolerance. PMID:25689045

  2. Tropical Forest Remote Sensing Services for the Democratic Republic of Congo inside the EU FP7 ReCover Project (Final Results 2000-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarpaintner, J.; de la Fuente Blanco, D.; Enssle, F.; Datta, P.; Mazinga, A.; Singa, C.; Mane, L.

    2015-04-01

    'ReCover' was a 3-year EU-FP7 project (Nov. 2010 - Dec. 2013), aiming to develop and improve science based remote sensing services to support tropical forest management and activities to reduce emission from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) in the tropical region (Hame et al., 2012). This is an overview of the final ReCover service delivery of 2000-2012 single-year optical (Landsat, ALOS AVNIR-2, RapidEye) and C-and L-band SAR (Envisat ASAR and ALOS Palsar, respectively) image mosaics, their derived forest/non-forest maps, a multi-sensor forest change map (2000-2010) and a biomass map (based on 2003-2009 ICESat GLAS) o he user of he De ocr ic Repub ic of Congo DRC), he Observatoir Satellitale des Fore s d'Afrique Cen r e OSFAC). The results are an improvement from a first iteration service delivery in 2012 after a critical review and validation process by both, the user and service providers, further method development and research, like a prior statistical data analysis considering temporal/seasonal variability, improved data pre-processing, and through the use of ground reference data collected in March 2013 for classification training. Validation with Kompsat-2 VHR data for the 2010 forest/non-forest maps revealed accuracies of 87% and 88% for optical and radar sensors, respectively.

  3. The fast-spectrum transmutation experimental facility FASTEF: Main design achievements (Part 1: Core and primary system) within the FP7-CDT collaborative project of the European Commission

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruyn, D.; Fernandez, R.; Mansani, L.; Woaye-Hune, A.; Sarotto, M.; Bubelis, E.

    2012-07-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is the flexible experimental accelerator-driven system (ADS) in development at SCK CEN in replacement of its material testing reactor BR2. SCK CEN in association with 17 European partners from industry, research centres and academia, responded to the FP7 (Seventh Framework Programme) call from the European Commission to establish a Central Design Team (CDT) for the design of a Fast Spectrum Transmutation Experimental Facility (FASTEF) able to demonstrate efficient transmutation and associated technology through a system working in subcritical and/or critical mode. The project has started on April 01, 2009 for a period of three years. In this paper, we present the latest configuration of the reactor core and primary system. The FASTEF facility has evolved quite a lot since the intermediate reporting done at the ICAPP'10 and ICAPP'11 conferences 1 2. If it remains a small-scale facility, the core power amounts now up to 100 MWth in critical mode. In a companion paper 3, we present the concept of the reactor building and the plant layout. (authors)

  4. EU-FP7-iMARS: analysis of Mars multi-resolution images using auto-coregistration, data mining and crowd source techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Anton; Muller, Jan-Peter; Tao, Yu; Kim, Jung-Rack; Gwinner, Klaus; Van Gasselt, Stephan; Morley, Jeremy; Houghton, Robert; Bamford, Steven; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Fanara, Lida; Waenlish, Marita; Walter, Sebastian; Steinkert, Ralf; Schreiner, Bjorn; Cantini, Federico; Wardlaw, Jessica; Sprinks, James; Giordano, Michele; Marsh, Stuart

    2016-07-01

    Understanding planetary atmosphere-surface and extra-terrestrial-surface formation processes within our Solar System is one of the fundamental goals of planetary science research. There has been a revolution in planetary surface observations over the last 15 years, especially in 3D imaging of surface shape. This has led to the ability to be able to overlay different epochs back in time to the mid 1970s, to examine time-varying changes, such as the recent discovery of mass movement, tracking inter-year seasonal changes and looking for occurrences of fresh craters. Within the EU FP-7 iMars project, UCL have developed a fully automated multi-resolution DTM processing chain, called the Co-registration ASP-Gotcha Optimised (CASP-GO), based on the open source NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP), which is being applied to the production of planetwide DTMs and ORIs (OrthoRectified Images) from CTX and HiRISE. Alongside the production of individual strip CTX & HiRISE DTMs & ORIs, DLR have processed HRSC mosaics of ORIs and DTMs for complete areas in a consistent manner using photogrammetric bundle block adjustment techniques. A novel automated co-registration and orthorectification chain has been developed and is being applied to level-1 EDR images taken by the 4 NASA orbital cameras since 1976 using the HRSC map products (both mosaics and orbital strips) as a map-base. The project has also included Mars Radar profiles from Mars Express and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter missions. A webGIS has been developed for displaying this time sequence of imagery and a demonstration will be shown applied to one of the map-sheets. Automated quality control techniques are applied to screen for suitable images and these are extended to detect temporal changes in features on the surface such as mass movements, streaks, spiders, impact craters, CO2 geysers and Swiss Cheese terrain. These data mining techniques are then being employed within a citizen science project within the Zooniverse family

  5. EP3/FP dual receptor agonist ONO-9054 administered morning or evening to patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension: results of a randomised crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Michael S; Rowe-Rendleman, Cheryl; Ahmed, Ike; Ross, Douglas T; Fujii, Akifumi; Ouchi, Takafumi; Quach, Christine; Wood, Andrew; Ward, Caroline L

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims The novel prostaglandin E (EP) 3 and prostaglandin F (FP) receptor agonist ONO-9054 is effective in lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with ocular hypertension and open-angle glaucoma when administered once daily. This study compares the effects of morning (AM) versus evening (PM) dosing of ONO-9054 on tolerability and IOP lowering. Methods This was a single-centre, randomised, double-masked, two-sequence, placebo-controlled crossover study in 12 subjects with bilateral primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Two 14-day crossover regimens were separated by a 2-week washout: ONO-9054 (1 drop to each eye) in the morning (07:00) and vehicle in the evening (19:00) and vice versa. IOP was measured multiple times during select days. Ocular examinations also evaluated safety and tolerability. Results Mild ocular hyperaemia, reported by six subjects with PM dosing, was the most frequent adverse event. Mild to moderate dryness was also slightly more frequent after PM dosing. Maximum IOP reduction from baseline occurred on day 2 with decreases from baseline of −7.4 mm Hg (−30.8%) for AM dosing and −9.1 mm Hg, (−38.0%) for PM dosing; after 14 days, mean reduction in IOP was −6.8 mm Hg (−28.6%) for AM dosing and −7.5 mm Hg (−31.0%) for PM dosing. Conclusions PM dosing of ONO-0954 was associated with a slightly increased frequency of mild hyperaemia and mild to moderate dryness. Both dosing schedules provided sustained reduction in IOP. Trial registration number NCT01670266. PMID:26453641

  6. Structural, mechanical, electronic and thermal properties of KZnF3 and AgZnF3 Perovskites: FP-(L)APW+lo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiadsi, S.; Bouafia, H.; Sahli, B.; Abidri, B.; Bouaza, A.; Akriche, A.

    2016-08-01

    This study presents a theoretical prediction of the structural, mechanical, electronic and thermal properties of the zinc-based Perovskites (AgZnF3 and KZnF3) within the framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT) using All-electron self consistent Full Potential Augmented Plane Waves plus local orbital FP-(L)APW + lo method. To make our work comparable and reliable, several functional were used for the exchange-correlation potential. Also, this study intends to provide a basis and an improvement for updating either the values already predicted by other previous work (by using obsolete functional) or to predict them for the first time. GGA-PBE and GGA-PBEsol were used to predict the structural properties of AgZnF3 and KZnF3 Perovskites such as lattice parameter, bulk modulus and its pressure derivative and the cohesive energy. For these properties, the found values are in very good agreement; also those found by GGA-PBEsol are closer to other available previous and experimental results. The electronic properties of these materials are investigated and compared to provide a consolidated prediction by using the modified Becke Johnson potential TB-mBJ with other functional; the values found by this potential are closer to the available proven results and show that these materials exhibit an indirect gap from R to Γ point. The charge densities plot for [110] direction and QTAIM (Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules) theory indicate that ionic character is predominate for (K, Ag, Zn)sbnd F bonds. Finally, the effect of temperature and pressure on the unit cell volume, the heat capacity CV and entropy were studied using the quasi-harmonic Debye model.

  7. Progress on the calibration of channel geometry and friction parameters of the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model using time series of SAR flood images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M.; Neal, J. C.; Hostache, R.; Corato, G.; Bates, P. D.; Chini, M.; Giustarini, L.; Matgen, P.; Wagener, T.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work is to calibrate channel depth and roughness parameters of the LISFLOOD-FP Sub-Grid 2D hydraulic model using SAR image-derived flood extent maps. The aim is to reduce uncertainty in flood model predictions for those rivers where channel geometry is unknown and/or cannot be easily measured. In particular we consider the effectiveness of using real SAR data for calibration and whether the number and timings of SAR acquisitions is of benefit to the final result. Terrain data are processed from 2m LiDAR images and inflows to the model are taken from gauged data. As a test case we applied the method to the River Severn between Worcester and Tewkesbury. We firstly applied the automatic flood mapping algorithm of Giustarini[1] et al. (2013) to ENVISAT ASAR (wide swath mode) flood images; generating a series of flood maps. We then created an ensemble of flood extent maps with the hydraulic model (each model representing a unique parameter set). Where there is a favourable comparison between the modelled flood map and the SAR obtained flood map we may suggest an optimal parameter set. Applying the method to a sequence of SAR acquisitions provides insight into the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of using series of acquired images. To complete the investigation we simultaneously explore parameter 'identifiabilty' within a sequence of available satellite observations by adopting the DYNIA method proposed by Wagener[2] et al. (2003). We show where we might most easily detect the depth and roughness parameters within the SAR acquisition sequence. [1] Giustarini. 2013. 'A Change Detection Approach to Flood Mapping in Urban Areas Using TerraSAR-X'. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 51, no. 4. [2] Wagener. 2003. 'Towards reduced uncertainty in conceptual rainfall-runoff modelling: Dynamic identifiability analysis'. Hydrol. Process. 17, 455-476.

  8. Weighted registration of 123I-FP-CIT SPECT images improves accuracy of binding potential estimates in pathologically low striatal uptake.

    PubMed

    Ciarmiello, Andrea; Giovacchini, Giampiero; Guidotti, Claudio; Meniconi, Martina; Lazzeri, Patrizia; Carabelli, Elena; Mansi, Luigi; Mariani, Giuliano; Volterrani, Duccio; Del Sette, Massimo

    2013-10-01

    To test whether the use of a striatum weighted image may improve registration accuracy and diagnostic outcome in patients with parkinsonian syndromes (PS), weighted images were generated by increasing signal intensity of striatal voxels and used as intermediate dataset for co-registering the brain image onto template. Experimental validation was performed using an anthropomorphic striatal phantom. (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT binding ratios were manually determined in 67 PS subjects and compared to those obtained using unsupervised standard (UWR) and weighted registered (WR) approach. Normalized cost function was used to evaluate the accuracy of phantom and subjects registered images to the template. Reproducibility between unsupervised and manual ratios was assessed by using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland and Altman analysis. Correlation coefficient was used to assess the dependence of semi-quantitative ratios on clinical findings. Weighted method improves accuracy of brain registration onto template as determined by cost function in phantom (0.86 ± 0.06 vs. 0.98 ± 0.02; Student's t-test, P = 0.04) and in subject scans (0.69 ± 0.06 vs. 0.53 ± 0.06; Student's t-test, P < 0.0001). Agreement between manual and unsupervised derived binding ratios as measured by ICC was significantly higher on WR as compared to UWR images (0.91 vs. 0.76). Motor UPDRS score was significantly correlated with manual and unsupervised derived binding potential. In phantom, as well as in subjects studies, correlations were more significant using the WR method (BPm: R(2) = 0.36, P = 0.0001; BPwr: R(2) = 0.368, P = 0.0001; BPuwr: R(2) = 0.300, P = 0.0008). Weighted registration improves accuracy of binding potential estimates and may be a promising approach to enhance the diagnostic outcome of SPECT imaging, correlation with disease severity, and for monitoring disease progression in Parkinsonian syndromes. PMID:23559000

  9. Prediction of phase transition, mechanical and electronic properties of inverse Heusler compound Y2RuPb, via FP-LMTO method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labair, M.; Rached, H.; Rached, D.; Benalia, S.; Abidri, B.; Khenata, R.; Ahmed, R.; Omran, S. Bin; Bouhemadou, A.; Syrotyuk, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Topological insulators (TI) are immensely investigated due to their promising characteristics for spintronics and quantum computing applications. In this regard, although bismuth, telluride, selenide and antimony containing compounds are typically considered as topological insulators, materials with Hg2CuTi-type structure have also shown their potential for TIs as well. Here, we present first principles study of the Y2RuPb compound, pertaining to its structural, mechanical, electrical and the optical properties. Calculations are executed at the level of the parameterized Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA), employing the full-potential (FP) linearized muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) approach, as designed within the density functional theory (DFT). The study is carried out on the Hg2CuTi-type and Cu2MnAl-type structures of the Y2RuPb compound. From our structural calculations, it is found that Y2RuPb is more stable in its Hg2CuTi-type structure; however, the analysis of the mechanical properties reveals its stability in both phases against any kind of elastic deformation. Similarly, Dirac cone shaped surface energy levels found in the predicted electronic band structure of the Y2RuPb compound, and good agreement of the obtained results with Zhang et al., demonstrates that it is a topological insulating material. Additionally, the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function ɛ (ω) and refractive index n (ω), for an energy range up to 14eV, are analyzed as well.

  10. Multiple proteins encoded within the urease gene complex of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Walz, S E; Wray, S K; Hull, S I; Hull, R A

    1988-03-01

    Chromosomal DNA fragments from a uropathogenic isolate of Proteus mirabilis were inserted into the cosmid vector pHC79 to construct a genomic library in Escherichia coli HB101. A urease-positive recombinant cosmid, designated pSKW1, was recovered. Sequential recombinant manipulation of pSKW1 yielded a 10.2-kilobase plasmid, designated pSKW4, which encoded three urease isozymes with electrophoretic mobilities identical to those of the donor P. mirabilis strain. Plasmid pSKW4 gene sequences encode seven proteins designated 68K (apparent molecular weight, of 68,000), 28K, 25K, 22.5K, 18.5K, 7.5K, and 5.2K within the limits of the urease gene complex. Insertion mutations in genes encoding the 68K, 28K, 25K, 22.5K, 7.5K, and 5.2K proteins resulted in complete or partial (22.5K) loss of urease activity. There was no reduction in urease activity when the gene encoding the 18.5K protein was inactivated. PMID:2830226

  11. Genetic Diversity of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus Based on Two Hypervariable Effector Genes in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Puttamuk, Thamrongjet; Zhou, Lijuan; Thaveechai, Niphone; Zhang, Shouan; Armstrong, Cheryl M.; Duan, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening, is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. HLB is associated with three species of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ with ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ (Las) being the most widely distributed around the world, and the only species detected in Thailand. To understand the genetic diversity of Las bacteria in Thailand, we evaluated two closely-related effector genes, lasAI and lasAII, found within the Las prophages from 239 infected citrus and 55 infected psyllid samples collected from different provinces in Thailand. The results indicated that most of the Las-infected samples collected from Thailand contained at least one prophage sequence with 48.29% containing prophage 1 (FP1), 63.26% containing prophage 2 (FP2), and 19.38% containing both prophages. Interestingly, FP2 was found to be the predominant population in Las-infected citrus samples while Las-infected psyllids contained primarily FP1. The multiple banding patterns that resulted from amplification of lasAI imply extensive variation exists within the full and partial repeat sequence while the single band from lasAII indicates a low amount of variation within the repeat sequence. Phylogenetic analysis of Las-infected samples from 22 provinces in Thailand suggested that the bacterial pathogen may have been introduced to Thailand from China and the Philippines. This is the first report evaluating the genetic variation of a large population of Ca. L. asiaticus infected samples in Thailand using the two effector genes from Las prophage regions. PMID:25437428

  12. Genetic diversity of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus based on two hypervariable effector genes in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Puttamuk, Thamrongjet; Zhou, Lijuan; Thaveechai, Niphone; Zhang, Shouan; Armstrong, Cheryl M; Duan, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening, is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. HLB is associated with three species of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' with 'Ca. L. asiaticus' (Las) being the most widely distributed around the world, and the only species detected in Thailand. To understand the genetic diversity of Las bacteria in Thailand, we evaluated two closely-related effector genes, lasAI and lasAII, found within the Las prophages from 239 infected citrus and 55 infected psyllid samples collected from different provinces in Thailand. The results indicated that most of the Las-infected samples collected from Thailand contained at least one prophage sequence with 48.29% containing prophage 1 (FP1), 63.26% containing prophage 2 (FP2), and 19.38% containing both prophages. Interestingly, FP2 was found to be the predominant population in Las-infected citrus samples while Las-infected psyllids contained primarily FP1. The multiple banding patterns that resulted from amplification of lasAI imply extensive variation exists within the full and partial repeat sequence while the single band from lasAII indicates a low amount of variation within the repeat sequence. Phylogenetic analysis of Las-infected samples from 22 provinces in Thailand suggested that the bacterial pathogen may have been introduced to Thailand from China and the Philippines. This is the first report evaluating the genetic variation of a large population of Ca. L. asiaticus infected samples in Thailand using the two effector genes from Las prophage regions. PMID:25437428

  13. The European FP7 ULTimateCO2 project: A comprehensive approach to study the long term fate of CO2 geological storage sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audigane, P.; Brown, S.; Dimier, A.; Pearce, J.; Frykman, P.; Maurand, N.; Le Gallo, Y.; Spiers, C. J.; Cremer, H.; Rutters, H.; Yalamas, T.

    2013-12-01

    The European FP7 ULTimateCO2 project aims at significantly advance our knowledge of specific processes that could influence the long-term fate of geologically stored CO2: i) trapping mechanisms, ii) fluid-rock interactions and effects on mechanical integrity of fractured caprock and faulted systems and iii) leakage due to mechanical and chemical damage in the well vicinity, iv) brine displacement and fluid mixing at regional scale. A realistic framework is ensured through collaboration with two demonstration sites in deep saline sandstone formations: the onshore former NER300 West Lorraine candidate in France (ArcelorMittal GeoLorraine) and the offshore EEPR Don Valley (former Hatfield) site in UK operated by National Grid. Static earth models have been generated at reservoir and basin scale to evaluate both trapping mechanisms and fluid displacement at short (injection) and long (post injection) time scales. Geochemical trapping and reservoir behaviour is addressed through experimental approaches using sandstone core materials in batch reactive mode with CO2 and impurities at reservoir pressure and temperature conditions and through geochemical simulations. Collection of data has been generated from natural and industrial (oil industry) analogues on the fluid flow and mechanical properties, structure, and mineralogy of faults and fractures that could affect the long-term storage capacity of underground CO2 storage sites. Three inter-related lines of laboratory experiments investigate the long-term evolution of the mechanical properties and sealing integrity of fractured and faulted caprocks using Opalinus clay of Mont Terri Gallery (Switzerland) (OPA), an analogue for caprock well investigated in the past for nuclear waste disposal purpose: - Characterization of elastic parameters in intact samples by measuring strain during an axial experiment, - A recording of hydraulic fracture flow properties by loading and shearing samples in order to create a 'realistic

  14. Dry powder aerosols of polyethylenimine (PEI)-based gene vectors mediate efficient gene delivery to the lung.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Corinna; Hasenpusch, Guenther; Uezguen, Senta; Aneja, Manish Kumar; Reinhardt, Dietrich; Kirch, Julian; Schneider, Marc; Claus, Sarah; Friess, Wolfgang; Rudolph, Carsten

    2011-08-25

    Aerosol gene delivery holds great therapeutical potential for many inherited and acquired pulmonary diseases. The physical instability of aqueous suspensions of non-viral vector complexes is a major limitation for their successful application. In this study, we investigated dry powder aerosols as novel gene vector formulations for gene transfer in vitro and murine lungs in vivo. Lyophilization was used to produce dry powder cakes followed by powderization to produce dry powder aerosols. Different sugars, namely lactose, sucrose and trehalose, were tested as lyoprotectants for gene delivery complexes consisting of branched polyethylenimine 25 kDa and plasmid DNA. Biophysical particle characterization demonstrated that lyophilization and powderization in the presence of lyoprotectants were well tolerated. In vitro transfection efficiency remained unaffected by the choice of lyoprotectant and subsequent lyophilization and/or powderization. In vivo screening of powderized samples, by applying the powder with an insufflator, resulted in highest gene expression with lactose as lyoprotectant. Delivering a plasmid coding for murine erythropoietin together with lactose as lyoprotectant resulted in increased blood hematocrit values post application thereby demonstrating the potential of dry powder aerosol as a promising method for pulmonary gene delivery. PMID:21600251

  15. Timing of flagellar gene expression in the Caulobacter cell cycle is determined by a transcriptional cascade of positive regulatory genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, N; Chen, L S; Mullin, D A; Newton, A

    1991-01-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus flagellar (fla) genes are organized in a regulatory hierarchy in which genes at each level are required for expression of those at the next lower level. To determine the role of this hierarchy in the timing of fla gene expression, we have examined the organization and cell cycle regulation of genes located in the hook gene cluster. As shown here, this cluster is organized into four multicistronic transcription units flaN, flbG, flaO, and flbF that contain fla genes plus a fifth transcription unit II.1 of unknown function. Transcription unit II.1 is regulated independently of the fla gene hierarchy, and it is expressed with a unique pattern of periodicity very late in the cell cycle. The flaN, flbG, and flaO operons are all transcribed periodically, and flaO, which is near the top of the hierarchy and required in trans for the activation of flaN and flbG operons, is expressed earlier in the cell cycle than the other two transcription units. We have shown that delaying flaO transcription by fusing it to the II.1 promoter also delayed the subsequent expression of the flbG operon and the 27- and 25-kDa flagellin genes that are at the bottom of the regulatory hierarchy. Thus, the sequence and timing of fla gene expression in the cell cycle are determined in large measure by the positions of these genes in the regulatory hierarchy. These results also suggest that periodic transcription is a general feature of fla gene expression in C. crescentus. Images PMID:1847367

  16. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluations of new steroidal anti-inflammatory antedrugs: 9alpha-Fluoro-11beta,17alpha,21-trihydroxy-3,20-dioxo-pregna-1,4-diene-16alpha-carboxylate (FP16CM) and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwan-Kyun; Ko, Dong-Hoon; You, Zhengqing; Heiman, Ann S; Lee, Henry Joung

    2006-01-01

    In continuing efforts to develop potent anti-inflammatory steroids without systemic adverse effects, methyl 9alpha-fluoro-11beta,17alpha,21-trihydroxy-3,20-dioxo-pregna-1,4-diene-16alpha-carboxylate (FP16CM) and its 16-alkoxycarbonyl derivatives (FP16CE, FP16CP and FP16CB) were synthesized based on the antedrug concept. The steroids were evaluated for their pharmacological activities and adverse systemic effects. All steroidal antedrugs showed both binding affinity to the glucocorticoid receptor in liver cytosol and inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW 264.7 macrophage cell. These compounds also inhibited croton-oil-induced ear edema and showed no systemic effects such as thymus atrophy and suppression of corticosterone level after 5-day treatment. Among those compounds tested, FP16CM showed the highest activities in receptor binding, NO inhibition and ear edema, these activities were comparable to those of prednisolone. Hydrolysis study in plasma showed that FP16CB was hydrolyzed rapidly, with the half-live (T1/2) of 3.2 min and the half-lives of other compounds were between 16.9 and 29.4 min. These results support the antedrug concept, of which the decrease in systemic adverse effects is attributed to fast hydrolysis to inactive metabolite in the systemic circulation. PMID:16280144

  17. InSAR analysis of the crustal deformation affecting the megacity of Istanbul: the results of the FP7 Marsite Project as a GEO Supersite Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solaro, Giuseppe; Bonano, Manuela; Manzo, Mariarosaria

    2016-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is one of the most active faults worldwide, extending approximately 1,200 km from Eastern Turkey to the Northern Aegean Sea. During the 20th century series of damaging earthquakes occurred along the NAF, generally propagated westward towards Istanbul; the last one occurred in 1999 at Izmit, a city 80 km away from Istanbul. Within this scenario, the FP7 MARsite project (New Directions in Seismic Hazard assessment through Focused Earth Observation in Marmara Supersite), supported by EU, intends to collect, share and integrate multidisciplinary data (seismologic, geochemical, surveying, satellite, etc.) in order to carry out assessment, mitigation and management of seismic risk in the region of the Sea of Marmara. In the framework of the MARsite project, we performed the analysis and monitoring of the surface deformation affecting the Istanbul mega city by exploiting the large archives of X-band satellite SAR data, made available through the Supersites Initiatives, and by processing them via the advanced multi-temporal and multi-scale InSAR technique, known as the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) approach. In particular, we applied the SBAS technique to a dataset of 101 SAR images acquired by the TerraSAR-X constellation of the German Space Agency (DLR) over descending orbits and spanning the November 2010 - August 2014 time interval. From,these images, we generated 312 differential interferograms with a maximum spatial separation (perpendicular baseline) between the acquisition orbits of about 500 m., that were used to generate, via the SBAS approach, mean deformation velocity map and corresponding ground time series of the investigated area. The performed InSAR analysis reveals a generalized stability over the Istanbul area, except for some localized displacements, related to subsidence and slope instability phenomena. In particular, we identified: (i) a displacement pattern related to the Istanbul airport, showing a mostly linear

  18. New results on ground deformation in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (southern Poland) obtained during the DORIS Project (EU-FP 7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graniczny, Marek; Colombo, Davide; Kowalski, Zbigniew; Przyłucka, Maria; Zdanowski, Albin

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents application of satellite interferometric methods (persistent scatterer interferometric synthetic aperture radar (PSInSAR™) and differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR)) for observation of ground deformation in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB) in Southern Poland. The presented results were obtained during the DORIS project (EC FP 7, Grant Agreement n. 242212, www.doris-project.eu). Several InSAR datasets for this area were analysed. Most of them were processed by Tele-Rilevamento Europa - T.R.E. s.r.l. Italy. Datasets came from different SAR satellites (ERS 1 and 2, Envisat, ALOS- PALSAR and TerraSAR-X) and cover three different SAR bands (L, C and X). They were processed using both InSAR techniques: DInSAR, where deformations are presented as interferometric fringes on the raster image, and PSInSAR, where motion is indentified on irregular set of persistent scatterer (PS) points. Archival data from the C-band European Space Agency satellites ERS and ENVISAT provided information about ground movement since 1992 until 2010 in two separate datasets (1992-2000 and 2003-2010). Two coal mines were selected as examples of ground motion within inactive mining areas: Sosnowiec and Saturn, where mining ceased in 1995 and 1997, respectively. Despite well pumping after closure of the mines, groundwater rose several dozen meters, returning to its natural horizon. Small surface uplift clearly indicated on satellite interferometric data is related to high permeability of the hydrogeological subregion and insufficient water withdrawal from abandoned mines. The older 1992-2000 PSInSAR dataset indicates values of ground motion ranging from -40.0 to 0.0 mm. The newer 2003-2010 dataset shows values ranging from -2.0 to +7.0 mm. This means that during this period of time subsidence was less and uplift greater in comparison to the older dataset. This is even more evident in the time series of randomly selected PS points from both coal

  19. Development of a flood early warning system and communication with end-users: the Vipava/Vipacco case study in the KULTURisk FP7 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, Giovanna; Caronna, Paolo; Ranzi, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    Within the framework of risk communication, the goal of an early warning system is to support the interaction between technicians and authorities (and subsequently population) as a prevention measure. The methodology proposed in the KULTURisk FP7 project aimed to build a closer collaboration between these actors, in the perspective of promoting pro-active actions to mitigate the effects of flood hazards. The transnational (Slovenia/ Italy) Soča/Isonzo case study focused on this concept of cooperation between stakeholders and hydrological forecasters. The DIMOSHONG_VIP hydrological model was calibrated for the Vipava/Vipacco River (650 km2), a tributary of the Soča/Isonzo River, on the basis of flood events occurred between 1998 and 2012. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) provided the past meteorological forecasts, both deterministic (1 forecast) and probabilistic (51 ensemble members). The resolution of the ECMWF grid is currently about 15 km (Deterministic-DET) and 30 km (Ensemble Prediction System-EPS). A verification was conducted to validate the flood-forecast outputs of the DIMOSHONG_VIP+ECMWF early warning system. Basic descriptive statistics, like event probability, probability of a forecast occurrence and frequency bias were determined. Some performance measures were calculated, such as hit rate (probability of detection) and false alarm rate (probability of false detection). Relative Opening Characteristic (ROC) curves were generated both for deterministic and probabilistic forecasts. These analysis showed a good performance of the early warning system, in respect of the small size of the sample. A particular attention was spent to the design of flood-forecasting output charts, involving and inquiring stakeholders (Alto Adriatico River Basin Authority), hydrology specialists in the field, and common people. Graph types for both forecasted precipitation and discharge were set. Three different risk thresholds were identified

  20. EU-FP7-iMars: Analysis of Mars Multi-Resolution Images using Auto-Coregistration, Data Mining and Crowd Source Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Anton; Oberst, Jürgen; Yershov, Vladimir; Muller, Jan-Peter; Kim, Jung-Rack; Gwinner, Klaus; Van Gasselt, Stephan; Morley, Jeremy; Houghton, Robert; Bamford, Steven; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis

    information employed to generate a time series of terrain relief with corrected ORIs back to 1977. Web-GIS using OGC protocols will be employed to allow visual exploration of changes to the surface. Data mining processing chains are being developed to search for changes in the Martian surface from 1971-2015 and the output of this data mining will be compared against the results from citizen scientists’ measurements in a specialized Zooniverse implementation. The final co-registered data sets will be distributed through both European and US channels in a manner to be decided towards the end of the project. Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under iMars grant agreement n ̊ 607379.

  1. Evidence for increased recombination near the human insulin gene: implication for disease association studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarti, A.; Elbein, S.C.; Permutt, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Haplotypes for four new restriction site polymorphisms (detected by Rsa I, Taq I, HincII, and Sac I) and a previously identified DNA length polymorphism (5'FP), all at the insulin locus, have been studied in US Blacks, African Blacks, Caucasians, and Pima Indians. Black populations are polymorphic for all five markers, whereas the other groups are polymorphic for Rsa I, Taq I, and 5'FP only. The data suggest that approx. = 1 in 550 base pairs is variant in this region. The polymorphisms, even though located within 20 kilobases, display low levels of nonrandom association. Population genetic analysis suggests that recombination within this 20-kilobase segment occurs 24 times more frequently than expected if crossing-over occurred uniformly throughout the human genome. These findings suggest that population association between DNA polymorphisms and disease susceptibility genes near the insulin gene or structural mutations in the insulin gene will be weak. Thus, population studies would probably require large sample sizes to detect association. However, the low levels of nonrandom association increase the information content of the locus for linkage studies, which is the best alternative for discovering disease susceptibility genes.

  2. A novel gene delivery composite system based on biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) polymer and thermosensitive hydrogel for sustained gene release

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Zhao, Hang; Jia, YanPeng; Guo, QingFa; Qu, Ying; Su, Jing; Lu, XiaoLing; Zhao, YongXiang; Qian, ZhiYong

    2016-01-01

    Local anti-oncogene delivery providing high local concentration of gene, increasing antitumor effect and decreasing systemic side effects is currently attracting interest in cancer therapy. In this paper, a novel local sustained anti-oncogene delivery system, PECE thermoresponsive hydrogel containing folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer/DNA (tumor suppressor) complexes, is demonstrated. First, a tumor-targeted biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer based on low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine (PEI) was synthesized and characterized, and the application for targeted gene delivery was investigated. The polymer had slight cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency in vitro compared with PEI 25k, which indicated that FA-PEA was a potential vector for targeted gene delivery. Meanwhile, we successfully prepared a thermoresponsive PECE hydrogel composite containing FA-PEA/DNA complexes which could contain the genes and slowly release the genes into cells. We concluded the folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer would be useful for targeted gene delivery, and the novel gene delivery composite based on biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) polymer and thermosensitive PECE hydrogel showed potential for sustained gene release. PMID:26883682

  3. A novel gene delivery composite system based on biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) polymer and thermosensitive hydrogel for sustained gene release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Zhao, Hang; Jia, Yanpeng; Guo, Qingfa; Qu, Ying; Su, Jing; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang; Qian, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    Local anti-oncogene delivery providing high local concentration of gene, increasing antitumor effect and decreasing systemic side effects is currently attracting interest in cancer therapy. In this paper, a novel local sustained anti-oncogene delivery system, PECE thermoresponsive hydrogel containing folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer/DNA (tumor suppressor) complexes, is demonstrated. First, a tumor-targeted biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer based on low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine (PEI) was synthesized and characterized, and the application for targeted gene delivery was investigated. The polymer had slight cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency in vitro compared with PEI 25k, which indicated that FA-PEA was a potential vector for targeted gene delivery. Meanwhile, we successfully prepared a thermoresponsive PECE hydrogel composite containing FA-PEA/DNA complexes which could contain the genes and slowly release the genes into cells. We concluded the folate-poly (ester amine) (FA-PEA) polymer would be useful for targeted gene delivery, and the novel gene delivery composite based on biodegradable folate-poly (ester amine) polymer and thermosensitive PECE hydrogel showed potential for sustained gene release.

  4. Locus Characterization and Gene Expression of Bovine FNDC5: Is the Myokine Irisin Relevant in Cattle?

    PubMed Central

    Komolka, Katrin; Albrecht, Elke; Schering, Lisa; Brenmoehl, Julia; Hoeflich, Andreas; Maak, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane protein FNDC5 was recently characterized as precursor of an exercise induced myokine named irisin. Previous studies found a relationship between circulating irisin levels and muscle mass in humans. Consequently, we tested the hypothesis whether FNDC5/irisin is involved in the modulation of body composition in cattle. Since information on the bovine FNDC5 locus was scarce, we characterized the gene experimentally as prerequisite for these investigations. We provide here a revised and extended gene model for bovine FNDC5. Although similarly organized like the human and murine loci, a higher variability was observed at transcript level in the bovine locus. FNDC5 mRNA was abundant in bovine skeletal muscle and was detected at lower levels in adipose tissue and liver. There were no expression differences between two groups of bulls highly different in muscularity and adiposity. Full-length FNDC5 protein (25 kDa) was present in bovine skeletal muscle independent of muscularity. Neither FNDC5 nor its putatively secreted peptide irisin were found in circulation of bulls. In contrast, we demonstrated that FNDC5 (25 kDa) and irisin (12 kDa) were present in murine skeletal muscle and that irisin was circulating in murine serum. This indicates fundamental differences in the regulation of FNDC5 and irisin between rodents and cattle. PMID:24498244

  5. Galactosyl conjugated N-succinyl-chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine for targeting gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bo; Wu, De-Qun; Zheng, Hua; Quan, Chang-Yun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi

    2010-12-01

    Through incorporating lactobionic acid (LA) bearing a galactose group to N-succinyl-chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine (NSC-g-PEI), NSC-g-PEI-LA copolymers were synthesized as gene vectors with hepatocyte targeting properties. The molecular weight and composition of NSC-g-PEI-LA copolymers were characterized using gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) respectively. Agarose gel electrophoresis assays showed good DNA binding ability of NSC-g-PEI-LA, and the particle size of the NSC-g-PEI-LA/DNA complexes were between 150 and 400 nm as determined by a Zeta sizer. The NSC-g-PEI-LA/DNA complexes observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) exhibited a compact and spherical morphology. The zeta potentials of these complexes were increased with the weight ratio of NSC-g-PEI-LA/DNA. NSC-g-PEI-LA has a lower cytotoxicity than PEI (25 kDa) and the toxicity decreased with increasing substitution of LA. The transfection efficiency of different complexes was evaluated by luciferase assay. Compared with PEI (25 kDa) and NSC-g-PEI/DNA, NSC-g-PEI-LA showed good transfection activity and cell specificity to HepG2 cells. The results suggested that NSC-g-PEI-LA has the potential to be used as a safe and effective targeting gene vector. PMID:20957247

  6. Beta Decay Study of the T{sub z}=−2{sup 56}Zn Nucleus and the Determination of the Half-Lives of a Few fp-shell Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, B.; Orrigo, S.E.A.; Kucuk, L.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Fujita, Y.; Fujita, H.; Blank, B.; Adachi, T.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Cáceres, L.; France, G. de; Gerbaux, M.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grevy, S. [CENBG, Université Bordeaux 1, UMR 5797 CNRS and others

    2014-06-15

    This paper concerns the experimental study of the β decay properties of few proton-rich fp-shell nuclei. The nuclei were produced at GANIL in fragmentation reactions, separated with the LISE spectrometer and stopped in an implantation detector surrounded by Ge detectors. The β-delayed gammas, β-delayed protons and the exotic β-delayed gamma-proton emission have been studied. Preliminary results are presented. The decay of the T{sub z}=−2 nucleus {sup 56}Zn has been studied in detail. Information from the β-delayed protons and β-delayed gammas has been used to deduce the decay scheme. The exotic beta-delayed gamma-proton decay has been observed for the first time in the fp-shell. The interpretation of the data was made possible thanks to the detailed knowledge of the mirror Charge Exchange (CE) process and the gamma de-excitation of the states in {sup 56}Co, the mirror nucleus of {sup 56}Cu.

  7. Computer-aided diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease based on [123I]FP-CIT SPECT binding potential images, using the voxels-as-features approach and support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Francisco P. M.; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The aim of the present study was to develop a fully-automated computational solution for computer-aided diagnosis in Parkinson syndrome based on [123I]FP-CIT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Approach. A dataset of 654 [123I]FP-CIT SPECT brain images from the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative were used. Of these, 445 images were of patients with Parkinson’s disease at an early stage and the remainder formed a control group. The images were pre-processed using automated template-based registration followed by the computation of the binding potential at a voxel level. Then, the binding potential images were used for classification, based on the voxel-as-feature approach and using the support vector machines paradigm. Main results. The obtained estimated classification accuracy was 97.86%, the sensitivity was 97.75% and the specificity 98.09%. Significance. The achieved classification accuracy was very high and, in fact, higher than accuracies found in previous studies reported in the literature. In addition, results were obtained on a large dataset of early Parkinson’s disease subjects. In summation, the information provided by the developed computational solution potentially supports clinical decision-making in nuclear medicine, using important additional information beyond the commonly used uptake ratios and respective statistical comparisons. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01141023)

  8. Reconstitutable Charged Polymeric (PLGA)2-b-PEI Micelles for Gene Therapeutics Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Deepa; Kang, Han Chang; Bae, You Han

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of creating a charged polymeric micelle-based nucleic acid delivery system that could easily be reconstituted by the addition of water. (PLGA36kDa)2-b-bPEI25kDa (PLGA MW 36kDa, bPEI Mw 25kDa, PLGA:bPEI block ratio = 2) was synthesized and used to prepare cationic micelles. The copolymer retained proton-buffering capability from the bPEI block within the endosomal pH range. Micelle/pDNA complexes retained their particle size (100–150 nm) and surface charge (30–40 mV) following reconstitution. It was found that adding a small amount of low molecular weight bPEI (1.8 kDa) completely shielded pDNA in the micelle/pDNA complexes and enhanced transfection efficiency 50–100 fold for both fresh and reconstituted complexes without affecting complex size. Transfection efficiency for “reconstituted” micelle/pDNA/bPEI1.8kDa (WR 1) complexes was 16-fold higher than its “fresh” counterpart. Although transfection levels achieved using “reconstituted” micelle/pDNA/bPEI1.8kDa complexes were 3.6-fold lower than control “fresh” bPEI25kDa/pDNA (N/P 5) complexes, transfection levels were 39-fold higher than “reconstituted” bPEI25kDa/pDNA (N/P 5) complexes. The micelle/pDNA/bPEI1.8kDa system showed very low cytotoxicity in MCF7 cells even with pDNA doses up to 20 μg, and transfection levels increased linearly with increasing pDNA dose. These results indicate that this PLGA-b-bPEI polymeric micelle-based system is well suited as a reconstitutable gene delivery system, and has high potential for use as a delivery system for gene therapy applications. PMID:21354616

  9. PGMA-based gene carriers with lipid molecules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Yu, Bingran; Hu, Hao; Nizam, Muhammad Naeem; Yuan, Wei; Ma, Jie; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2016-08-19

    Lipids, as the greatest constituent in cell membranes, have been widely used for biomedical applications because of their excellent biological properties. The introduction of membrane lipid molecules into gene vectors would embody greater biocompatibility, cellular uptake and transfection efficiency. In this work, one flexible strategy for readily conjugating lipid molecules with polycations was proposed based on atom transfer radical polymerization to produce a series of cholesterol (CHO)- and phosphatidylinositol (PI)-terminated ethanolamine-functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate)s, namely CHO-PGEAs and PI-PGEAs, as effective gene carriers. CHO-PGEAs and PI-PGEAs truly demonstrated much better transfection performances compared to linear ethanolamine-functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (denoted as BUCT-PGEA) counterparts and traditional standard branched polythylenimine (PEI, 25 kDa). In addition, the good antitumor effects of CHO-PGEA and PI-PGEA were confirmed with suppressor tumor gene p53 systems in vitro and in vivo. The present work could provide a new strategy to develop effective cationic conjugation of lipid molecules for gene therapy. PMID:27374783

  10. Induction of apoptosis in cancer cells through N-acetyl-l-leucine-modified polyethylenimine-mediated p53 gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Liu; Li, Quanshun

    2015-11-01

    Herein, N-acetyl-L-leucine-modified polyethylenimine was successfully constructed through the EDC/NHS-mediated coupling reaction and employed as vectors to accomplish p53 gene delivery using HeLa (p53wt) and PC-3 cells (p53null) as models. Compared with PEI25K, the derivatives exhibited lower cytotoxicity, protein adsorption and hemolytic activity, together with satisfactory pDNA condensation capability and gene transfection efficiency. After p53 transfection, MTT analysis confirmed that the cell proliferation was inhibited. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the derivative-mediated p53 delivery could induce stronger early apoptosis than PEI25K and Lipofectamine(2000). Further, PC-3 cells showed higher sensitivity to the exogenous p53 transfection than HeLa cells. The mechanism for inducing apoptosis was determined to be up-regulation of p53 expression at both mRNA and protein levels using RT-PCR and western blotting analysis. Expression level and activity analysis of caspase-3, -8 and -9, and mitochondrial membrane potential measurement revealed that p53 transfection mediated by these derivatives facilitated early apoptosis of tumor cells via a mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. Thus, the derivatives showed potential as biocompatible carriers for realizing effective tumor gene therapy. PMID:26322477

  11. Enhanced gene delivery by chitosan-disulfide-conjugated LMW-PEI for facilitating osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Li, Zhaoyang; Pan, Haobo; Liu, Wenguang; Lv, Minmin; Leung, Frankie; Lu, William W

    2013-05-01

    Chitosan-disulfide-conjugated LMW-PEI (CS-ss-PEI) was designed to combine the biocompatibility of chitosan and the gene delivery ability of polyethylenimine (PEI) using bio-reducible disulfide for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP2) gene delivery in mediating osteogenic differentiation. It was prepared by conjugating low molecular weight PEI (LMW-PEI) to chitosan through oxidization of thiols introduced for the formation of disulfide linkage. The structure, molecular weight and buffer capacity were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), light scattering and acid-base titration, respectively. The reduction in molecular weight of CS-ss-PEI by the reducing agent indicated its bio-reducible property. With the increment in the LMW-PEI component, the copolymer showed increased DNA binding ability and formed denser nanocomplexes. CS-ss-PEI exhibited low cytotoxicity in COS-1, HepG2 and 293T cells over the different weight ratios. The transfection efficiency of CS-ss-PEI4 was significantly higher than that of PEI 25k and comparable with Lipofectamine in mediating luciferase expression. Its application for BMP2 gene delivery was confirmed in C2C12 cells by BMP2 expression. For inducing in vitro osteogenic differentiation, CS-ss-PEI4 mediated BMP2 gene delivery showed a stronger effect in MG-63 osteoblast cells and stem cells in terms of alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization compared with PEI25k and Lipofectamine. This study provides a potential gene delivery system for orthopedic-related disease. PMID:23395816

  12. Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Bruce J

    2014-01-01

    Applications of gene therapy have been evaluated in virtually every oral tissue, and many of these have proved successful at least in animal models. While gene therapy will not be used routinely in the next decade, practitioners of oral medicine should be aware of the potential of this novel type of treatment that doubtless will benefit many patients with oral diseases. PMID:24372817

  13. Trichoderma genes

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Pamela; Goedegebuur, Frits; Van Solingen, Pieter; Ward, Michael

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  14. High-throughput fluorescence polarization assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of BRCT domains of breast cancer gene 1.

    PubMed

    Lokesh, G L; Rachamallu, Aparna; Kumar, G D Kishore; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2006-05-01

    The C-terminus region of the 1863 residue early onset of breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1) nuclear protein contains a tandem globular carboxy terminus domain termed BRCT. The BRCT repeats in BRCA1 are phosphoserine- and/or phosphothreonine-specific binding modules. The interaction of the BRCT(BRCA1) domains with phosphorylated BRCA1-associated carboxyl terminal helicase (BACH1) is cell cycle regulated and is essential for DNA damage-induced checkpoint control during the transition from the G(2) phase to the M phase of the cell cycle. Development of a competitive, homogeneous, high-throughput fluorescence polarization (FP) assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of BRCT(BRCA1)-BACH1 interaction is reported here. The FP assay was used for measuring binding affinities and inhibition constants of BACH1 peptides and small molecule inhibitors of BRCT(BRCA1) domains, respectively. A fluorescently labeled wild-type BACH1 decapeptide (BDP1) containing the critical phosphoserine, a phenylalanine at (P+3), and a GST-BRCT fusion protein were used to establish the FP assay. BDP1 has a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 1.58+/-0.01microM and a dynamic range (DeltamP) of 164.9+/-1.9. The assay tolerates 20% dimethyl sulfoxide, which enables screening poorly soluble compounds. Under optimized conditions, a Z' factor of 0.87 was achieved in a 384-well format for high-throughput screening. PMID:16500609

  15. The Staphylococcus aureus scdA gene: a novel locus that affects cell division and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, E W; de Jonge, B L; Bayles, K W

    1997-09-01

    A new Staphylococcus aureus gene termed scdA was found upstream of the autolysis regulatory genes, lytS and lytR, and was shown to potentially encode a hydrophilic 25 kDa protein. Analysis of scdA transcription revealed that it is transcribed as a monocistronic message and is lytSR-independent. A role in cell wall metabolism was indicated by examination of the scdA mutant S. aureus KB323, which had a grossly aberrant cellular morphology and formed large cell clusters when grown in liquid culture medium. Furthermore, KB323 exhibited a reduced rate of autolysis and had increased peptidoglycan cross-linking compared to the parental strain, NCTC 8325-4. These data suggest that scdA plays an important role in staphylococcal cell division. PMID:9308171

  16. Mapping of the gene specifying aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase II on the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Okii, M; Iyobe, S; Mitsuhashi, S

    1983-01-01

    We examined the aminoglycoside inactivation enzymes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, seven clinical isolates and seven laboratory strains without plasmids. All strains were found to possess the enzyme aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase II [APH(3')-II]. We isolated an APH(3')-II-deficient mutant from a PAO strain by mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. By plasmid (FP5 or R68.45)-mediated conjugation, we determined the locus of the gene specifying the APH(3')-II between trp-6 and pro-82 on the PAO chromosome and designated this gene aphA. It was concluded that the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to kanamycins, neomycins, paromomycins, ribostamycin, and butirosins was due to this newly determined gene. PMID:6307974

  17. Cross sections for proton induced high energy γ -ray emission (PIGE) in reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O at incident proton energies between 1.5 and 4 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanelas, P.; Cruz, J.; Fonseca, M.; Henriques, A.; Lourenço, F.; Luís, H.; Machado, J.; Pires Ribeiro, J.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Teubig, P.; Velho, P.; Zarza-Moreno, M.; Galaviz, D.; Jesus, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the high energy gamma-rays produced in the reaction 19 F(p, αγ)16 O for incident proton energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV over NaF/Ag and CaF2/Ag thin targets in two different sets of data. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector with an angle of 130° with respect to the beam axis. The cross-sections for the high energy gamma-rays of 6.129, 6.915 and 7.115 MeV have been measured for the whole group between 5 and 7.2 MeV with accuracy better than 10%. A new energy range was covered and more points are included in the cross-sections data base expanding the existing set of data. Results are in agreement with previous measurements in similar conditions.

  18. Brain (18)F-FDG, (18)F-Florbetaben PET/CT, (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT and Cardiac (123)I-MIBG Imaging for Diagnosis of a "Cerebral Type" of Lewy Body Disease.

    PubMed

    Van Der Gucht, Axel; Cleret de Langavant, Laurent; Bélissant, Ophélie; Rabu, Corentin; Cottereau, Anne-Ségolène; Evangelista, Eva; Chalaye, Julia; Bonnot-Lours, Sophie; Fénelon, Gilles; Itti, Emmanuel

    2016-09-01

    A 67-year-old man was referred for fluctuating neuropsychiatric symptoms, featuring depression, delirious episodes, recurrent visual hallucinations and catatonic syndrome associated with cognitive decline. No parkinsonism was found clinically even under neuroleptic treatment. (18)F-FDG PET/CT showed hypometabolism in the posterior associative cortex including the occipital cortex, suggesting Lewy body dementia, but (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT was normal and cardiac (123)I-MIBG imaging showed no signs of sympathetic denervation. Alzheimer's disease was excluded by a normal (18)F-florbetaben PET/CT. This report suggests a rare case of α-synucleinopathy without brainstem involvement, referred to as "cerebral type" of Lewy body disease. PMID:27540431

  19. FP-LAPW investigations of SrS1-xSex, SrS1-xTex and SrSe1-xTex ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labidi, S.; Meradji, H.; Ghemid, S.; Labidi, M.; El Haj Hassan, F.

    2008-11-01

    The ab initio full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within density functional theory (DFT) was applied to study the effect of composition on the structural, electronic, optical and thermodynamic properties of SrS1-xSex, SrS1-xTex and SrSe1-xTex ternary alloys. For exchange-correlation energy and corresponding potential, the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) and Engel-Vosko (EVGGA) have been used. Deviation of the lattice constants from Vegard's law and the bulk modulus from linear concentration dependence (LCD) were observed for the three alloys. The microscopic origins of the gap bowing were explained by using the approach of Zunger and co-workers. The refractive index and optical dielectric constant for the alloys of interest are calculated by using different models. In addition the thermodynamic stability of the alloys was investigated by calculating the critical temperatures of alloys.

  20. [Language gene].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    The human capacity for acquiring speech and language must derive, at least in part, from the genome. Recent advance in the field of molecular genetics finally discovered 'Language Gene'. Disruption of FOXP2 gene, the firstly identified 'language gene' causes severe speech and language disorder. To elucidate the anatomical basis of language processing in the brain, we examined the expression pattern of FOXP2/Foxp2 genes in the monkey and rat brains through development. We found the preferential expression of FOXP2/Foxp2 in the striosomal compartment of the developing striatum. Thus, we suggest the striatum, particularly striosomal system may participate in neural information processing for language and speech. Our suggestion is consistent with the declarative/ procedural model of language proposed by Ullman (1997, 2001), which the procedural memory-dependent mental grammar is rooted in the basal ganglia and the frontal cortex, and the declarative memory-dependent mental lexicon is rooted in the temporal lobe. PMID:17432197

  1. Genes V.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, B.

    1994-12-31

    This fifth edition book encompasses a wide range of topics covering 1,272 pages. The book is arranged into nine parts with a total of 36 chapters. These nine parts include Introduction; DNA as a Store of Information; Translation; Constructing Cells; Control of Prokaryotypic Gene Expression; Perpetuation of DNA; Organization of the Eukaryotypic Genome; Eukaryotypic Transcription and RNA Processing; The Dynamic Genome; and Genes in Development.

  2. Transmission test for linkage disequilibrium: The insulin gene region and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.S.; McGinnis, R.E. ); Ewens, W.J. )

    1993-03-01

    A population association has consistently been observed between insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and the class 1 alleles of the region of tandem-repeat DNA (5[prime] flanking polymorphism [5[prime]FP])adjacent to the insulin gene on chromosome 11p. This finding suggests that the insulin gene region contains a gene or genes contributing to IDDM susceptibility. However, several studies that have sought to show linkage with IDDM by testing for cosegregation in affected sib pairs have failed to find evidence for linkage. As means for identifying genes for complex diseases, both the association and the affected-sib-pairs approaches have limitations. It is well known that population association between a disease and a genetic marker can arise as an artifact of population structure, even in the absence of linkage. On the other hand, linkage studies with modest numbers of affected sib pairs may fail to detect linkage, especially if there is linkage heterogeneity. The authors consider an alternative method to test for linkage with a genetic marker when population association has been found. Using data from families with at least one affected child, they evaluate the transmission of the associated marker allele from a heterozygous parent to an affected offspring. This approach has been used by several investigators, but the statistical properties of the method as a test for linkage have not been investigated. In the present paper they describe the statistical basis for this transmission test for linkage disequilibrium (transmission/disequilibrium test [TDT]). They then show the relationship of this test to tests of cosegregation that are based on the proportion of haplotypes or genes identical by descent in affected sibs. The TDT provides strong evidence for linkage between the 5[prime]FP and susceptibility to IDDM. 27 refs., 6 tabs.

  3. Low Molecular Weight Oligomers with Aromatic Backbone as Efficient Nonviral Gene Vectors.

    PubMed

    Luan, Chao-Ran; Liu, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Ji; Yu, Qing-Ying; Huang, Zheng; Wang, Bing; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2016-05-01

    A series of oligomers were synthesized via ring-opening polymerization. Although the molecular weights of these oligomers are only ∼2.5 kDa, they could efficiently bind and condense DNA into nanoparticles. These oligomers gave comparable transfection efficiency (TE) to PEI 25 kDa, while their TE could even increase with the presence of serum, and up to 65 times higher TE than PEI was obtained. The excellent serum tolerance was also confirmed by TEM, flow cytometry, and BSA adsorption assay. Moreover, structure-activity relationship studies revealed some interesting factors. First, oligomers containing aromatic rings in the backbone showed better DNA binding ability. These materials could bring more DNA cargo into the cells, leading to much better TE. Second, the isomerism of the disubstituted phenyl group on the oligomer backbone has large effect on the transfection. The ortho-disubstituted ones gave at least 1 order of magnitude higher TE than meta- or para-disubstituted oligomers. Gel electrophoresis involving DNase and heparin indicated that the difficulty to release DNA might contribute to the lower TE of the latter. Such clues may help us to design novel nonviral gene vectors with high efficiency and biocompatibility. PMID:27077449

  4. Tris[2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl]isocyanurate cross-linked low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine as gene delivery carriers in cell culture and dystrophic mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingxing; Tucker, Jay D; Lu, Peijuan; Wu, Bo; Cloer, Caryn; Lu, Qilong

    2012-04-18

    Hyperbranched poly(ester amine)s (PEAs) were successfully synthesized by Michael addition reaction between tris[2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl]isocyanurate (TAEI) and low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine (LPEI, M(w) 0.8k, 1.2k, and 2.0k) and evaluated in vitro and in vivo as gene carriers. PEAs effectively condensed plasmid DNA with particle sizes below 200 nm and surface charges between 11.5 and 33.5 mV under tested doses [at the ratios 2-10:1 of polymer/pDNA(w/w)]. The PEAs showed significantly lower cytotoxicities when compared with PEI 25k in two different cell lines. The PEAs (C series) composed of PEI 2k showed higher transgene expression compared to PEAs of PEI 0.8k (A series) or 1.2k (B series). Highest gene transfection efficiency in CHO, C2C12 myoblast, and human skeletal muscle (HSK) cell lines was obtained with TAEI/PEI-2K (C12) at a ratio of 1:2. Both C12, C14(TAEI/PEI-2K at a ratio of 1:4) demonstrated 5-8-fold higher gene expression as compared with PEI 25k in mdx mice in vivo through intramuscular administration. No obvious muscle damage was observed with these new polymers. Higher transfection efficiency and lower toxicity indicate the potential of the biodegradable PEAs as safe and efficient transgene delivery vectors. PMID:22443086

  5. Hepatocyte-targeting gene transfer mediated by galactosylated poly(ethylene glycol)-graft-polyethylenimine derivative

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuqiang; Su, Jing; Cai, Wenwei; Lu, Ping; Yuan, Lifen; Jin, Tuo; Chen, Shuyan; Sheng, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Biscarbamate cross-linked polyethylenimine derivative (PEI-Et) has been reported as a novel nonviral vector for efficient and safe gene transfer in our previous work. However, it had no cell-specificity. To achieve specific delivery of genes to hepatocytes, galactosylated poly(ethylene glycol)-graft-polyethylenimine derivative (GPE) was prepared through modification of PEI-Et with poly(ethylene glycol) and lactobionic acid, bearing a galactose group as a hepatocyte-targeting moiety. The composition of GPE was characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The weight-average molecular weight of GPE measured with a gel permeation chromatography instrument was 9489 Da, with a polydispersity of 1.44. GPE could effectively condense plasmid DNA (pDNA) into nanoparticles. Gel retardation assay showed that GPE/pDNA complexes were completely formed at weigh ratios (w/w) over 3. The particle size of GPE/pDNA complexes was 79–100 nm and zeta potential was 6–15 mV, values which were appropriate for cellular uptake. The morphology of GPE/pDNA complexes under atomic force microscopy appeared spherical and uniform in size, with diameters of 53–65 nm. GPE displayed much higher transfection efficiency than commercially available PEI 25 kDa in BRL-3A cell lines. Importantly, GPE showed good hepatocyte specificity. Also, the polymer exhibited significantly lower cytotoxicity compared to PEI 25 kDa at the same concentration or weight ratio in BRL-3A cell lines. To sum up, our results indicated that GPE might carry great potential in safe and efficient hepatocyte-targeting gene delivery. PMID:23576866

  6. Hepatocyte-targeting gene transfer mediated by galactosylated poly(ethylene glycol)-graft-polyethylenimine derivative.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqiang; Su, Jing; Cai, Wenwei; Lu, Ping; Yuan, Lifen; Jin, Tuo; Chen, Shuyan; Sheng, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Biscarbamate cross-linked polyethylenimine derivative (PEI-Et) has been reported as a novel nonviral vector for efficient and safe gene transfer in our previous work. However, it had no cell-specificity. To achieve specific delivery of genes to hepatocytes, galactosylated poly(ethylene glycol)-graft-polyethylenimine derivative (GPE) was prepared through modification of PEI-Et with poly(ethylene glycol) and lactobionic acid, bearing a galactose group as a hepatocyte-targeting moiety. The composition of GPE was characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The weight-average molecular weight of GPE measured with a gel permeation chromatography instrument was 9489 Da, with a polydispersity of 1.44. GPE could effectively condense plasmid DNA (pDNA) into nanoparticles. Gel retardation assay showed that GPE/pDNA complexes were completely formed at weigh ratios (w/w) over 3. The particle size of GPE/pDNA complexes was 79-100 nm and zeta potential was 6-15 mV, values which were appropriate for cellular uptake. The morphology of GPE/pDNA complexes under atomic force microscopy appeared spherical and uniform in size, with diameters of 53-65 nm. GPE displayed much higher transfection efficiency than commercially available PEI 25 kDa in BRL-3A cell lines. Importantly, GPE showed good hepatocyte specificity. Also, the polymer exhibited significantly lower cytotoxicity compared to PEI 25 kDa at the same concentration or weight ratio in BRL-3A cell lines. To sum up, our results indicated that GPE might carry great potential in safe and efficient hepatocyte-targeting gene delivery. PMID:23576866

  7. Attention Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.

    2007-01-01

    A major problem for developmental science is understanding how the cognitive and emotional networks important in carrying out mental processes can be related to individual differences. The last five years have seen major advances in establishing links between alleles of specific genes and the neural networks underlying aspects of attention. These…

  8. Designer Genes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Miller, Mark

    1983-01-01

    Genetic technologies may soon help fill some of the most important needs of humanity from food to energy to health care. The research of major designer genes companies and reasons why the initial mad rush for biotechnology has slowed are reviewed. (SR)

  9. The identification of 14 new genes for meat quality traits in chicken using a genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Meat quality is an important economic trait in chickens. To identify loci and genes associated with meat quality traits, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of F2 populations derived from a local Chinese breed (Beijing-You chickens) and a commercial fast-growing broiler line (Cobb-Vantress). Results In the present study, 33 association signals were detected from the compressed mixed linear model (MLM) for 10 meat quality traits: dry matter in breast muscle (DMBr), dry matter in thigh muscle (DMTh), intramuscular fat content in breast muscle (IMFBr), meat color lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) values, skin color L*, a* (redness) and b* values, abdominal fat weight (AbFW) and AbFW as a percentage of eviscerated weight (AbFP). Relative expressions of candidate genes identified near significant signals were compared using samples of chickens with High and Low phenotypic values. A total of 14 genes associated with IMFBr, meat color L*, AbFW, and AbFP, were differentially expressed between the High and Low phenotypic groups. These genes are, therefore, prospective candidate genes for meat quality traits: protein tyrosine kinase (TYRO3) and microsomal glutathione S-transferase 1 (MGST1) for IMFBr; collagen, type I, alpha 2 (COL1A2) for meat color L*; and RET proto-oncogene (RET), natriuretic peptide B (NPPB) and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1) for the abdominal fat (AbF) traits. Conclusions Based on the association signals and differential expression of nearby genes, 14 candidate loci and genes for IMFBr, meat L* and b* values, and AbF are identified. The results provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying meat quality traits in chickens. PMID:23834466

  10. Polycation-b-polyzwitterion copolymer grafted luminescent carbon dots as a multifunctional platform for serum-resistant gene delivery and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lu; Li, Yongmao; Zhai, Xinyun; Xu, Bing; Cao, Zhiqiang; Liu, Wenguang

    2014-11-26

    Nanomaterials that integrate functions of imaging and gene delivery have been of great interest due to their potential use in simultaneous diagnosis and therapy. Herein, polycation-b-polysulfobetaine block copolymer, poly[2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate]-b-poly[N-(3-(methacryloylamino) propyl)-N,N-dimethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium hydroxide] (PDMAEMA-b-PMPDSAH) grafted luminescent carbon dots (CDs) were prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and investigated as a multifunctional gene delivery system (denoted as CD-PDMA-PMPD) in which the CD cores acted as good multicolor cell imaging probes, the cationic PDMAEMA acted as a DNA condensing agent, and the outer shell of zwitterionic PMPDSAH block protected the vector against nonspecific interactions with serum components. As revealed by the fluorescent spectrum study, the photoluminescent attributes, especially the tunable emission property, were well inherited from the parent CDs. The CD-PDMA-PMPD could condense plasmid DNA into nanospheres with sizes of approximate 50 nm at a proper complex ratio, posing little cytotoxicity at higher ratios. It was shown that the hybrid vector exhibited significantly suppressed BSA protein adsorption and superior hemocompatibility compared to those of the widely used PEI25k. In the in vitro transfection assay, an increased serum concentration from 10 to 50% caused a dramatic drop in PEI25k transfection performance, whereas the transfection efficiency of CD-PDMA-PMPD was well maintained; CD-PDMA80-PMPD40 showed 13 and 28 times higher transfection efficiencies than PEI25k at 30 and 50% serum concentration, respectively. Intriguingly, the carbon dots in the transfected cells displayed excitation-dependent fluorescent emissions, portending that this polycation-polyzwitterion modified CD will be a promising theranostic vector with excellent stealth performance. PMID:25285670

  11. Characterization of SNAP-25 gene from marine teleostean, Lateolabrax japonicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kui; Huang, Xiaohang; Chai, Yingmei; Gaisano, Herbert Y.

    2007-10-01

    The t-SNARE protein SNAP-25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa) plays an essential role in regulating fusion between the vesicle and plasma membranes during exocytosis. To clone and characterize SNAP-25 gene, the first step in the functional study of SNARE proteins in marine teleostean, was to obtain the cDNA of sea perch SNAP-25 (SPsn25) by RT-PCR and RACE-PCR amplification of a Japanese sea perch. The full-length cDNA of 831bp contains a CDS of 615 bp, coding 204 amino acid residues, and a 5 UTR of 219bp. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that SPsn25 corresponds with SNAP-25a isoform and shares 91.1% identity with SNAP-25a of a goldfish and a zebrafish. The SPsn25 expression in both mRNA and protein levels in the Japanese sea perch had been identified through semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western Blot assay. Together, these data again confirmed the nerve tissue specificity of the fish SNAP-25 gene expression.

  12. Linkage disequilibrium in the insulin gene region is related to the exact number of repeat units present at the 5{prime} flanking polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, R.E.; Spielman, R.S.

    1994-09-01

    Tandem DNA repeat units (RUs) located 5{prime} to the insulin (INS) gene give rise to a {open_quotes}5{prime} flanking polymorphism{close_quotes} (5{prime}FP) with minisatellite alleles belonging to 3 size classes. The shortest or {open_quotes}class 1{close_quotes} alleles (mean length of {approximately}40 RUs) are associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), and the 5{prime}FP is one of several INS region loci in strong linkage disequilibrium with IDDM. We have amplified class 1 alleles and have determined the exact number of RUs in individual class 1 alleles found in parents of 50 IDDM families. We also obtained INS region haplotypes by typing two loci near tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and two loci near insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2). We obtained these results: (1) Class 1 alleles (n=101) were found at every integer length from 30 to 44 RUs, the lengths of smallest and largest class 1 alleles observed. The allele frequency distribution was trimodal with peaks at 31, 40 and 42 RUs; 18%, 34% and 48% of the alleles belonged to the three components, respectively. (2) Allelic variation at each flanking locus was highly associated with the exact number of RUs present at the 5{prime}FP. Our results suggest that creation of new 5{prime}FP or other minisatellite haplotypes may be {open_quotes}constrained{close_quotes} in that flanking alleles usually become associated with a new minisatellite length different by only one or two RUs. Furthermore, since many flanking alleles were associated with a single narrow range of class 1 integer lengths, determining exact RU length may aid in visualizing linkage disequilibrium and allelic associations involving other minisatellite loci.

  13. The Fast-spectrum Transmutation Experimental Facility FASTEF: Main design achievements (part 2: Reactor building design and plant layout) within the FP7-CDT collaborative project of the European Commission

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruyn, D.; Engelen, J.; Ortega, A.; Aguado, M. P.

    2012-07-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is the flexible experimental accelerator-driven system (ADS) in development at SCK-CEN in replacement of its material testing reactor BR2. SCK-CEN in association with 17 European partners from industry, research centres and academia, responded to the FP7 (Seventh Framework Programme) call from the European Commission to establish a Central Design Team (CDT) for the design of a Fast Spectrum Transmutation Experimental Facility (FASTEF) able to demonstrate efficient transmutation and associated technology through a system working in subcritical and/or critical mode. The project has started on April 01, 2009 for a period of three years. In this paper, we present the latest concept of the reactor building and the plant layout. The FASTEF facility has evolved quite a lot since the intermediate reporting done at the ICAPP'10 and ICAPP'11 conferences 1,2. Many iterations have been performed to take into account the safety requirements. The present configuration enables an easy operation and maintenance of the facility, including the possibility to change large components of the reactor. In a companion paper 3, we present the latest configuration of the reactor core and primary system. (authors)

  14. Treating colon cancer with a suicide gene delivered by self-assembled cationic MPEG-PCL micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xingmei; Wang, Pan; Men, Ke; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Meijuan; Gou, Maling; Chen, Lijuan; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-03-01

    Biodegradable cationic micelles show promise for applications in gene delivery. In this article, we used DOTAP to modify monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (MPEG-PCL, MP) micelles in one step, creating novel cationic self-assembled DOTAP and MPEG-PCL hybrid micelles (DMP). These micelles had a mean particle size of 46 +/- 5.6 nm and a zeta potential of 41.8 +/- 0.5 mV, and had the capacity to bind DNA. Compared with PEI25K (the gold standard), DMP micelles had higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity. Moreover, we used DMP to deliver the Survivin-T34A gene (S-T34A, a suicide gene) to treat colon cancer. DMP delivered the Survivin-T34A gene (DMP/S-T34A) and could induce apoptosis in cancer cells, resulting in inhibition of the growth of C-26 colon cancer cells in vitro. An in vivo study indicated that intraperitoneal administration of DMP micelles delivered the Survivin-T34A gene and efficiently inhibited the growth of abdominal metastatic C-26 colon cancer and the malignant ascites. These data suggest that DMP may be a novel gene carrier, and its delivery of the S-T34A gene may have promising applications in the treatment of colon cancer.

  15. Peptide-Mediated Tumor Targeting by a Degradable Nano Gene Delivery Vector Based on Pluronic-Modified Polyethylenimine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhaoyong; Zhan, Shuyu; Fan, Wei; Ding, Xueying; Wu, Xin; Zhang, Wei; Fu, Yinghua; Huang, Yueyan; Huang, Xuan; Chen, Rubing; Li, Mingjuan; Xu, Ningyin; Zheng, Yongxia; Ding, Baoyue

    2016-03-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) is considered to be a promising non-viral gene delivery vector. To solve the toxicity versus efficacy and tumor-targeting challenges of PEI used as gene delivery vector, we constructed a novel non-viral vector DR5-TAT-modified Pluronic-PEI (Pluronic-PEI-DR5-TAT), which was based on the attachment of low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine (LMW-PEI) to the amphiphilic polymer Pluronic to prepare Pluronic-modified LMW-PEI (Pluronic-PEI). This was then conjugated to a multifunctional peptide containing a cell-penetrating peptide (TAT) and a synthetic peptide that would bind to DR5—a receptor that is overexpressed in cancer cells. The vector showed controlled degradation, favorable DNA condensation and protection performance. The Pluronic-PEI-DR5-TAT/DNA complexes at an N/P ratio of 15:1 were spherical nanoparticles of 122 ± 11.6 nm and a zeta potential of about 22 ± 2.8 mV. In vitro biological characterization results indicated that Pluronic-PEI-DR5-TAT/DNA complexes had a higher specificity for the DR5 receptor and were taken up more efficiently by tumor cells than normal cells, compared to complexes formed with PEI 25 kDa or Pluronic-PEI. Thus, the novel complexes showed much lower cytotoxicity to normal cells and higher gene transfection efficiency in tumor cells than that exhibited by PEI 25 kDa and Pluronic-PEI. In summary, our novel, degradable non-viral tumor-targeting vector is a promising candidate for use in gene therapy.

  16. Genes and Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  17. The 2.5 kW advanced technology ion thruster. [design analysis and performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A representative thruster was extensively documented with respect to performance parameters and characteristics at selected ion beam currents in the 0.5 to 2.75 A range, including measurements of thrust losses resulting from doubly-charged ions and ion beam divergence. Corrected total efficiency was shown to be relatively insensitive to operating parameter selection at any given power level. Factors affecting doubly-charged ionization were studied and it was found that the fraction of doubly-charged ions is directly proportional to the discharge chamber propellant utilization. The parameter that most affects this proportionality is the accel aperture diameter (which controls neutral atom loss). Thruster-power conditioner interactions were studied with the result that previous power supply specifications remain satisfactory. Options for reducing the number of power supplies required were demonstrated to be feasible. Gimbal actuator designs were studied with the goal of selecting a particular approach for design and development. The conclusion drawn was that optimum gimbal actuator design depends heavily on the thruster application and consequently the effort was concluded by developing a computer program to aid in specifying the gimbal requirements for the thrust vectoring required in a specific application.

  18. Status of the advanced Stirling conversion system project for 25 kW dish Stirling applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    1991-01-01

    Heat engines were evaluated for terrestrial Solar Distributed Heat Receivers. The Stirling engine was identified as one of the most promising heat engines for terrestrial applications. Technology development is also conducted for Stirling convertors directed toward a dynamic power source for space applications. Space power requirements include high reliability with very long life, low vibration, and high system efficiency. The free-piston Stirling engine has the potential for future high power space conversion systems, either nuclear or solar powered. Although both applications appear to be quite different, their requirements complement each other.

  19. A 2.5 kW advanced technology ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    A program has been conducted in order to improve the performance characteristics of 30 cm thrusters. This program was divided into three distinct, but related tasks: (1) the discharge chamber and component design modifications proposed for inclusion in the engineering model thruster were evaluated and engineering specifications were verified; (2) thrust losses which result from the contributions of double charged ions and nonaxial ion trajectories to the ion beam current were measured and (3) the specification and verification of power processor and control requirements of the engineering model thruster design were demonstrated. Proven design modifications which provide improved efficiencies are incorporated into the engineering model thruster during a structural re-design without introducing additional delay in schedule or new risks. In addition, a considerable amount of data is generated on the relation of double ion production and beam divergence to thruster parameters. Overall thruster efficiency is increased from 68% to 71% at full power, including corrections for double ion and beam divergence thrust losses.

  20. The refrigeration of high temperature superconductors between 25K and 65K

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, R.N.; Scurlock, R.G.; Tavner, A.C.R.

    1996-12-31

    The present state of the art indicates that acceptable j - H characteristics for power applications of the new high Tc superconductors will only be achieved using materials at temperatures below liquid nitrogen temperature. A boiling point of 27.1K and high specific cooling capacity make neon an eminently suitable choice of refrigerant at these temperatures. A cryostat has been constructed which employs a two stage Gifford-McMahon cooler to liquefy neon gas. The cryostat contains up to 5 litres of liquid neon which can be used for {open_quote}in-situ{close_quote} experiments or transfer to another cryostat. Another set of cryostats are being used with liquid nitrogen/oxygen mixtures at reduced pressure for temperatures down to 50K. All these cryostats provide a core facility for characterising and operating high T{sub c} superconductors at Southampton.

  1. High-power and 2.5 kW advanced-technology ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Investigations for improving ion thruster components in the 30 cm engineering model thruster (EMT) resulted in the demonstration of useful techniques for grid short removal and discharge chamber erosion monitoring, establishment of relationships between double ion production and thruster operating parameters, verification of satisfactory specifications on porous tungsten vaporizer material and barium impregnated porous tungsten inserts, demonstration of a new hollow cathode configuration, and specification of magnetic circuit requirements for reproducing desired magnetic mappings. The capacity of a 30 cm EMT to operate at higher beam voltages and currents (higher power) was determined. Operation at 2 A beam current and higher beam voltage is shown to be essentially equivalent to operation at 1.1 kV with regard to efficiency, lifetime and operating conditions. The only additional requirement is an improvement in high voltage insulation and propellant isolator capacity. Operation at minimum voltage and higher beam currents is shown to increase thruster discharge chamber erosion in proportion to beam current. Studies to find alternatives to molybdenum for manufacturing ion optics grids are also reported.

  2. Gene cloning and characterization of the protein encoded by the Neospora caninum bradyzoite-specific antigen gene BAG1.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Narabu, S; Yanai, Y; Hatano, Y; Ito, A; Imai, S; Ike, K

    2013-06-01

    Neospora caninum is an Apicomplexan parasite that causes repeated abortion and stillbirth in cattle. The aim of this study was to clone the gene encoding the N. caninum orthologue (NcBAG1) of the Toxoplasma gondii bradyzoite-specific protein TgBAG1 and characterize its expression pattern in the parasite. Isolation of the full-length 684-bp gene revealed that it shared 78.3% sequence similarity with TgBAG1. NcBAG1 encodes a predicted protein of 227 amino acids with 80.3% similarity to TgBAG1. A putative signal peptide sequence and an invariant GVL motif characteristic of small heat-shock proteins were identified in the predicted N. caninum amino acid sequence. We expressed the NcBAG1 gene as a recombinant glutathione S-transferase fusion protein (rNcBAG1) in Escherichia coli and used the purified 60 kDa protein to obtain a monoclonal antibody (Mab). rNcBAG1 reacted to Mabs specific for NcBAG1 and TgBAG1. No reaction between the NcBAG1 Mab and N. caninum tachyzoites was observed. Although the predicted molecular mass of NcBAG1 is 25 kDa, Western blot analysis of parasite lysates using the NcBAG1 Mab revealed a cross-reactive protein of approximately 30 kDa. Additionally, immunofluorescence assays using the tachyzoite-specific Mab for NcSAG1 and the bradyzoite-specific Mab for TgBAG1 or NcSAG4 revealed NcBAG1-specific expression in bradyzoites in cultures exposed to sodium nitroprusside, a reagent that increases the frequency of bradyzoites. Interestingly, the NcBAG1 protein was identified in the cytoplasm of the bradyzoite-stage parasites. This preliminary analysis of the NcBAG1 gene will assist investigations into the role of this protein in N. caninum . PMID:23245337

  3. Cationized bovine serum albumin as gene carrier: Influence of specific secondary structure on DNA complexibility and gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianwei; Li, Bangbang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Youxiang

    2016-07-01

    In this research, BSA, one of the natural rigid globular proteins with ca. 51% of α-helix secondary structure, was utilized to prepare cationized BSA (cBSA) as gene carrier. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) or polyethylenimine (PEI1800) was grafted to BSA with different grafting levels. Based on the circular dichoism (CD) spectra, all cBSA remained α-helical structure to some degree. This was exciting to endow cBSA with quite different DNA complexibility and cellular biology behavior from the random coiled and flexible polycations such as PEI and poly-l-lysine (PLL). Strangely, the DNA condensability decreased with the increment of TEPA or PEI1800 grafting level. Also, the cBSA could condense DNA effectively to form irregular nanoparticles around 50-200nm above N/P ratio of 10. On account of the excellent hydration of BSA, the cBSA/DNA complexes revealed good colloidal stability under physiological salt condition. Cell culture experiments indicated this BSA-based gene carrier possessed good cellular compatibility. Surprisingly, cBSA/DNA complexes could be uptaken excellently by up to 90% cells. This might be owing to the agitation effect of α-helical structure and the positive potential of these complexes. BSA-PEI1800/DNA complexes with quick endosome escape even had transfection efficiency as high as PEI25k/DNA complexes. Overall, this paper provided us the potential of cBSA as gene carrier and might have some instructions in the design of protein-based gene delivery system. PMID:26998865

  4. Preface to FP-UML 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Juan; Kim, Dae-Kyoo

    The Unified Modeling Language (UML) has been widely accepted as the standard object-oriented (OO) modeling language for modeling various aspects of software and information systems. The UML is an extensible language, in the sense that it provides mechanisms to introduce new elements for specific domains if necessary, such as web applications, database applications, business modeling, software development processes, data warehouses. Furthermore, the latest version of UML 2.0 got even bigger and more complicated with more diagrams for some good reasons. Although UML provides different diagrams for modeling different aspects of a software system, not all of them need to be applied in most cases. Therefore, heuristics, design guidelines, lessons learned from experiences are extremely important for the effective use of UML 2.0 and to avoid unnecessary complication. Also, approaches are needed to better manage UML 2.0 and its extensions so they do not become too complex too manage in the end.

  5. Tropospheric NO2 and HCHO columns derived from ground-based MAX-DOAS system in Guangzhou, China and comparison with satellite observations: First results within the EU FP7 project MarcoPolo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drosoglou, Theano; Kouremeti, Natalia; Bais, Alkis; Zyrichidou, Irene; Li, Shu; Balis, Dimitris; Huang, Zhonghui

    2016-04-01

    A miniature MAX-DOAS system, Phaethon, has been developed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, for ground-based monitoring of column densities of atmospheric gases. Simultaneous measurements with two Phaethon systems at the city centre of Thessaloniki and at a rural location about 30 km away have shown that Phaethon provides NO2 and HCHO tropospheric column measurements of acceptable accuracy under both low and high air-pollution levels. Currently three systems have been deployed in areas with different pollution patterns to support air quality and satellite validation studies. In the framework of the EU FP7 Monitoring and Assessment of Regional air quality in China using space Observations, Project Of Long-term sino-european co-Operation, MarcoPolo project, one of the Phaethon systems has been installed since April 2015 in the Guangzhou region in China. Tropospheric NO2 and HCHO columns derived at Guangzhou during the first 10 months of operation are compared with corresponding retrievals from OMI/Aura and GOME-2/Metop-A and /Metop-B satellite sensors. The area is characterized by humid subtropical monsoon climate and cloud-free conditions are rather rare from early March to mid-October. Despite this limitation and the short period of operation of Phaethon in Guangzhou, the agreement between ground-based and satellite observations is generally good for both NO2 and HCHO. It appears that GOME-2 sensors seem to underestimate the tropospheric NO2, possibly due to their large pixel size, whereas the comparison with OMI data is better, especially when a small cloud fraction (< 0.2) is used for cloud screening.

  6. Compare Gene Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linux environment in serial or parallel mode.

  7. Efficient GLP-1 gene delivery using two-step transcription amplification plasmid system with a secretion signal peptide and arginine-grafted bioreducible polymer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Il; Lee, Minhyung; Kim, Sung Wan

    2012-01-30

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) encoding dual plasmid (pDNA) system (TSTA (SP-GLP-1)) which is composed of pβ-Gal4-p65 and pUAS-SP-GLP-1 was constructed to improve the production and secretion of expressed GLP-1 by combining the advantages of signal peptide (SP) and two-step transcription amplification (TSTA) system. Its potential for GLP-1 gene delivery system was investigated with employment of arginine-grafted bioreducible polymer (ABP) as a gene carrier. Their polyplexes have about 140nm-sizes and 20mV Zeta-potential values. ABP showed no cytotoxicity contrary to PEI25k. It was found in RT-PCR experiments that TSTA-SP pDNA systems showed increased GLP-1 gene transcription level in comparison with mono pDNA system (pβ-GLP-1). It was also observed in GLP-1 ELISA that GLP-1 secretion level of TSTA (SP-GLP-1) pDNA system was 2.7-3.4 times higher than those of pβ-GLP-1 and 1.5-1.7 times than TSTA (GLP-1). Additionally, 2.5-3.5 folds increased level of GLP-1 secretion was found in ABP gene carrier system in comparison with PEI25k. When transfection medium containing secreted GLP-1 was transferred to NIT-1 insulinoma cells, the highest secretion level of insulin was induced in ABP/TSTA (SP-GLP-1) polyplex medium-treated cells. Therefore, this novel system could be utilized as a safe and efficient GLP-1 gene delivery system for type 2 diabetes therapy. PMID:21945681

  8. Gene gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Vijayachandran, Lakshmi S; Thimiri Govinda Raj, Deepak B; Edelweiss, Evelina; Gupta, Kapil; Maier, Josef; Gordeliy, Valentin; Fitzgerald, Daniel J; Berger, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Most essential activities in eukaryotic cells are catalyzed by large multiprotein assemblies containing up to ten or more interlocking subunits. The vast majority of these protein complexes are not easily accessible for high resolution studies aimed at unlocking their mechanisms, due to their low cellular abundance and high heterogeneity. Recombinant overproduction can resolve this bottleneck and baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS) have emerged as particularly powerful tools for the provision of eukaryotic multiprotein complexes in high quality and quantity. Recently, synthetic biology approaches have begun to make their mark in improving existing BEVS reagents by de novo design of streamlined transfer plasmids and by engineering the baculovirus genome. Here we present OmniBac, comprising new custom designed reagents that further facilitate the integration of heterologous genes into the baculovirus genome for multiprotein expression. Based on comparative genome analysis and data mining, we herein present a blueprint to custom design and engineer the entire baculovirus genome for optimized production properties using a bottom-up synthetic biology approach. PMID:23328086

  9. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E.; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L.; Booth, Benjamin W.; Evans-Holm, Martha; Venken, Koen J.T.; Levis, Robert W.; Spradling, Allan C.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2015-03-31

    Here, we document a collection of ~7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstrate reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.

  10. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E.; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L.; et al

    2015-03-31

    Here, we document a collection of ~7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstratemore » reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.« less

  11. Ab-initio DFT FP-LAPW GGA and LDA TB-mBJ and SO theoretical study of structural and elastic properties of Zinc-Blende crystal phase GaAs1-xBix alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezla, S.; Kadri, A.; Zitouni, K.; Djelal, A.; Djermouni, M.; Hallouche, A.; Zaoui, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present an ab-initio theoretical study of structural and elastic properties of GaAs1-xBix alloys in the Zinc-Blende (ZB) phase. We use a recent version of Wien2k package code based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) Full Potential and Linearized Augmented Plane Waves (FP-LAPW) method including recent Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson correction of the exchange potential (TB-mBJ) and the spin-orbit interaction (SO). The calculations are performed within the Local Density Approximation (LDA) as well as the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA). We study first the structural properties of GaAs1-xBix alloys by solving Murnaghan equation of state. Our results show that the ZB phase is the lowest equilibrium crystal structure of GaAs1-xBix in the whole alloy composition range, in agreement with previous theoretical predictions. The variations versus Bi contents of the ZB GaAs1-xBix lattice constant a0, bulk modulus B0 and its pressure derivative B0‧ are also found very close to other theoretical and experimental data, but with much smaller bowing effects indicating a better resolution thanks to TB-mBJ correction. The variations of B0 versus the reverse equilibrium volume of the unit cell (1/V0) are found to be described by the simple linear empirical expression B0 = -0.21068 + 0.16695/V0 which is close to the theoretical prediction for III-V semiconductors with, however, somewhat lower linear coefficients values, suggesting a more metallic behavior. In a second part of this work, we use Birch-Murnaghan approach to study the elastic properties of GaAs1-xBix alloys. The elastic stiffness coefficients, C11, C12 and C44, and their variations versus alloy composition were determined for ZB GaAs1-xBix alloy. Their values in GaAs and GaBi binary compounds are found in very good agreement with available experimental and/or theoretical data. Their variations in GaAs1-xBix alloy show a monotonic decrease with increasing Bi contents, indicating a softening behavior as is

  12. EU-FP7-iMARS: Analysis of Mars Multi-Resolution Images Using Auto-Coregistration Data Mining and Crowd Source Techniques: Processed Results - a First Look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Jan-Peter; Tao, Yu; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Gwinner, Klaus; Willner, Konrad; Fanara, Lida; Waehlisch, Marita; van Gasselt, Stephan; Walter, Sebastian; Steikert, Ralf; Schreiner, Bjoern; Ivanov, Anton; Cantini, Federico; Wardlaw, Jessica; Morley, Jeremy; Sprinks, James; Giordano, Michele; Marsh, Stuart; Kim, Jungrack; Houghton, Robert; Bamford, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Understanding planetary atmosphere-surface exchange and extra-terrestrial-surface formation processes within our Solar System is one of the fundamental goals of planetary science research. There has been a revolution in planetary surface observations over the last 15 years, especially in 3D imaging of surface shape. This has led to the ability to overlay image data and derived information from different epochs, back in time to the mid 1970s, to examine changes through time, such as the recent discovery of mass movement, tracking inter-year seasonal changes and looking for occurrences of fresh craters. Within the EU FP-7 iMars project, we have developed a fully automated multi-resolution DTM processing chain, called the Coregistration ASP-Gotcha Optimised (CASP-GO), based on the open source NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) [Tao et al., this conference], which is being applied to the production of planetwide DTMs and ORIs (OrthoRectified Images) from CTX and HiRISE. Alongside the production of individual strip CTX & HiRISE DTMs & ORIs, DLR [Gwinner et al., 2015] have processed HRSC mosaics of ORIs and DTMs for complete areas in a consistent manner using photogrammetric bundle block adjustment techniques. A novel automated co-registration and orthorectification chain has been developed by [Sidiropoulos & Muller, this conference]. Using the HRSC map products (both mosaics and orbital strips) as a map-base it is being applied to many of the 400,000 level-1 EDR images taken by the 4 NASA orbital cameras. In particular, the NASA Viking Orbiter camera (VO), Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), Context Camera (CTX) as well as the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) back to 1976. A webGIS has been developed [van Gasselt et al., this conference] for displaying this time sequence of imagery and will be demonstrated showing an example from one of the HRSC quadrangle map-sheets. Automated quality control [Sidiropoulos & Muller, 2015] techniques are applied to screen for

  13. Molecular cloning, characterization and differential expression of novel phytocystatin gene during tropospheric ozone stress in maize (Zea mays) leaves.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rafiq; Zuily-Fodil, Yasmine; Passaquet, Chantal; Ali Khan, Sabaz; Repellin, Anne

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a full-length cDNA encoding a novel phytocystatin gene, designated CC14, was identified in maize leaves. The CC14 gene sequence reported in this study has been deposited in the GenBank database (accession number JF290478). The CC14 gene was cloned into an expression vector pET30 EK/LIC and was then transformed into Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) pLysS to produce a recombinant CC14 protein. The recombinant protein was purified by nickel nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography after induction with 1 mM IPTG. The purified CC14 protein was electrophoresed on SDS-PAGE and a protein 25 kDa in size was observed. Antiprotease activities of the purified recombinant CC14 protein against cysteine proteases and commercially available papain were tested. The results showed that CC14 purified protein suppressed 100% activity of papain and 57-86% plant cysteine protease activity. Moreover, an upregulation of CC14 gene expression was observed after 20 days of ozone stress in maize leaves. Together, these observations concurred to conclude that CC14 gene could potentially be used as a basis for the development of transgenic crops and natural pesticides that resist biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:25613048

  14. One-step Conjugation of Glycyrrhetinic Acid to Cationic Polymers for High-performance Gene Delivery to Cultured Liver Cell

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yue; Shi, Bingyang; Lu, Yiqing; Wen, Shihui; Chung, Roger; Jin, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapies represent a promising therapeutic route for liver cancers, but major challenges remain in the design of safe and efficient gene-targeting delivery systems. For example, cationic polymers show good transfection efficiency as gene carriers, but are hindered by cytotoxicity and non-specific targeting. Here we report a versatile method of one-step conjugation of glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) to reduce cytotoxicity and improve the cultured liver cell -targeting capability of cationic polymers. We have explored a series of cationic polymer derivatives by coupling different ratios of GA to polypropylenimine (PPI) dendrimer. These new gene carriers (GA-PPI dendrimer) were systematically characterized by UV-vis,1H NMR titration, electron microscopy, zeta potential, dynamic light-scattering, gel electrophoresis, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. We demonstrate that GA-PPI dendrimers can efficiently load and protect pDNA, via formation of nanostructured GA-PPI/pDNA polyplexes. With optimal GA substitution degree (6.31%), GA-PPI dendrimers deliver higher liver cell transfection efficiency (43.5% vs 22.3%) and lower cytotoxicity (94.3% vs 62.5%, cell viability) than the commercial bench-mark DNA carrier bPEI (25kDa) with cultured liver model cells (HepG2). There results suggest that our new GA-PPI dendrimer are a promising candidate gene carrier for targeted liver cancer therapy. PMID:26902258

  15. One-step Conjugation of Glycyrrhetinic Acid to Cationic Polymers for High-performance Gene Delivery to Cultured Liver Cell.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yue; Shi, Bingyang; Lu, Yiqing; Wen, Shihui; Chung, Roger; Jin, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapies represent a promising therapeutic route for liver cancers, but major challenges remain in the design of safe and efficient gene-targeting delivery systems. For example, cationic polymers show good transfection efficiency as gene carriers, but are hindered by cytotoxicity and non-specific targeting. Here we report a versatile method of one-step conjugation of glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) to reduce cytotoxicity and improve the cultured liver cell -targeting capability of cationic polymers. We have explored a series of cationic polymer derivatives by coupling different ratios of GA to polypropylenimine (PPI) dendrimer. These new gene carriers (GA-PPI dendrimer) were systematically characterized by UV-vis,(1)H NMR titration, electron microscopy, zeta potential, dynamic light-scattering, gel electrophoresis, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. We demonstrate that GA-PPI dendrimers can efficiently load and protect pDNA, via formation of nanostructured GA-PPI/pDNA polyplexes. With optimal GA substitution degree (6.31%), GA-PPI dendrimers deliver higher liver cell transfection efficiency (43.5% vs 22.3%) and lower cytotoxicity (94.3% vs 62.5%, cell viability) than the commercial bench-mark DNA carrier bPEI (25kDa) with cultured liver model cells (HepG2). There results suggest that our new GA-PPI dendrimer are a promising candidate gene carrier for targeted liver cancer therapy. PMID:26902258

  16. Water-Soluble Cationic Polyphosphazenes Grafted with Cyclic Polyamine and Imidazole as an Effective Gene Delivery Vector.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunying; Zhang, Xiao; Du, Changguo; Zhao, Baojing; He, Chunhua; Li, Chao; Qiao, Renzhong

    2016-04-20

    Gene therapy holds immense potential as a future therapeutic strategy for the treatment of numerous genetic diseases which are incurable to date. Nevertheless, safe and efficient gene delivery remains the most challenging aspects of gene therapy. In this study, a series of polyphosphazenes (PPZ) bearing cyclic polyamine and imidazole groups were synthesized and investigated for gene delivery. Agarose gel electrophoresis assays showed that poly(imidazole/1,4,7,10-tetraazyclodocane)phosphazene (Im-PPZ-cyclen) had good binding ability with plasmid DNA (pDNA), yielding positively charged particles with a size around 120-140 nm from a ratio of 10:1 to 5:1 (Im-PPZ-cyclen/pDNA, w/w). The cytotoxicity of Im-PPZ-cyclen assayed by MTT was lower than that of PEI 25 kDa, and was similar to that reported for poly(di-2-dimethylaminoethylamine)phosphazene (poly(di-DMAEA)phosphazene) to some degree. The maximum transfection efficiency of Im-PPZ-cyclen/pDNA complexes against 293 T cells at the ratio of 5:1 (Im-PPZ-cyclen/pDNA, w/w) is close to that of Lipofectamine 2000. The present work may provide a strategy for the design of new cationic polymers with reduced cytotoxicity and be applied to gene delivery as an efficient nonviral vector. PMID:26942629

  17. Markers of tyrosine kinase activity in eosinophilic esophagitis: A pilot study of the FIP1L1-PDGFRα fusion gene, pERK 1/2, and pSTAT5

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.; Bower, Jacquelyn J.; Keku, Temitope O.; Chen, Xiaoxin; Miller, C. Ryan; Woosley, John T.; Orlando, Roy C.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is incompletely understood. In certain eosinophilic diseases, activation of tyrosine kinase after fusion of the Fip1-like-1 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α genes (F-P fusion gene) mediates eosinophilia via downstream effectors such as extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT5). This mechanism has not been examined in EoE. Our aim was to detect the F-P fusion gene, pERK1/2, and pSTAT5 in esophageal tissue from patients with EoE, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and normal controls. Materials and Methods We performed a cross-sectional pilot study comparing patients with steroid-responsive and steroid-refractory EoE, to GERD patients and normal controls. EoE cases were defined by consensus guidelines. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to detect the F-P fusion gene and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed to detect pERK1/2 and pSTAT5 in esophageal biopsies. Results Twenty-nine subjects (median age 30 yrs (range 1–59); 16 male; 24 Caucasian) were included: 8 normal, 6 GERD, and 15 EoE (5 steroid-refractory). On FISH, 98%, 99%, and 99% of the nuclei in the normal, GERD, and EoE groups, respectively, were normal (p=0.42). On IHC, a median of 250, 277, and 479 nuclei/mm2 stained for pERK1/2 in the normal, GERD, and EoE groups, respectively (p=0.07); the refractory EoE patients had the highest degree pERK1/2 staining (846 nuclei/mm2; p=0.07). No trend was seen for pSTAT5. Conclusions The F-P fusion gene was not detected with increased frequency in EoE. Patients with EoE had a trend towards higher levels of pERK1/2, but not STAT5, in the esophageal epithelium, with highest levels in steroid-refractory EoE patients. PMID:21819482

  18. Gene doping: gene delivery for olympic victory

    PubMed Central

    Gould, David

    2013-01-01

    With one recently recommended gene therapy in Europe and a number of other gene therapy treatments now proving effective in clinical trials it is feasible that the same technologies will soon be adopted in the world of sport by unscrupulous athletes and their trainers in so called ‘gene doping’. In this article an overview of the successful gene therapy clinical trials is provided and the potential targets for gene doping are highlighted. Depending on whether a doping gene product is secreted from the engineered cells or is retained locally to, or inside engineered cells will, to some extent, determine the likelihood of detection. It is clear that effective gene delivery technologies now exist and it is important that detection and prevention plans are in place. PMID:23082866

  19. Folic-Acid-Targeted Self-Assembling Supramolecular Carrier for Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Liao, Rongqiang; Yi, Shouhui; Liu, Manshuo; Jin, Wenling; Yang, Bo

    2015-07-27

    A targeting gene carrier for cancer-specific delivery was successfully developed through a "multilayer bricks-mortar" strategy. The gene carrier was composed of adamantane-functionalized folic acid (FA-AD), an adamantane-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) derivative (PEG-AD), and β-cyclodextrin-grafted low-molecular-weight branched polyethylenimine (PEI-CD). Carriers produced by two different self-assembly schemes, involving either precomplexation of the PEI-CD with the FA-AD and PEG-AD before pDNA condensation (Method A) or pDNA condensation with the PEI-CD prior to addition of the FA-AD and PEG-AD to engage host-guest complexation (Method B) were investigated for their ability to compact pDNA into nanoparticles. Cell viability studies show that the material produced by the Method A assembly scheme has lower cytotoxicity than branched PEI 25 kDa (PEI-25KD) and that the transfection efficiency is maintained. These findings suggest that the gene carrier, based on multivalent host-guest interactions, could be an effective, targeted, and low-toxicity carrier for delivering nucleic acid to target cells. PMID:26032689

  20. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers modified with short oligopeptides for early endosomal escape and enhanced gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Le Thi; Mallick, Sudipta; Choi, Joon Sig

    2015-08-15

    Recently, non-viral vectors have become a popular research topic in the field of gene therapy. In this study, we conjugated short oligopeptides to polyamidoamine-generation 4 (PAMAM G4) to achieve higher transfection efficiency. Previous reports have shown that the PAMAM G4-histidine (H)-arginine (R) dendrimer enhances gene delivery by improving cell penetration and internalization mechanisms. Therefore, we synthesized PAMAM G4-H phenylalanine (F) R, PAMAM G4-FHR and PAMAM G4-FR derivatives to determine the best gene carrier with the lowest toxicity. Physicochemical studies were performed to determine mean diameters and surface charge of PAMAM derivatives/pDNA polyplexes. DNA condensation was confirmed using a gel retardation assay. Cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency were analyzed using human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) and human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. Similar levels of transfection were achieved in both cell lines by using gold standard transfection reagent PEI 25 kD. Therefore, our results show that these carriers are promising and may help achieve higher transfection with negligible cytotoxicity. PMID:26187169

  1. Repeated variable prenatal stress alters pre- and postsynaptic gene expression in the rat frontal pole.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Anu K; Koenig, James I; Bilbe, Graeme

    2003-08-01

    Exposure of pregnant women to stress during a critical period of fetal brain development is an environmental risk factor for developing schizophrenia in the adult offspring. We have applied a repeated variable stress paradigm to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats during the last week of gestation coinciding with the second trimester in human brain development. Here we report our findings from a microarray analysis of the frontal pole of the prenatally stressed adult offspring and non-stressed adult controls complemented with measurement of plasma corticosterone levels following exposure to an acute stress. The direction of change of selected genes was confirmed by real time quantitative fluorescence PCR and in situ hybridization. The analysis revealed significant changes in genes associated with the NMDA receptor/postsynaptic density complex and the vesicle exocytosis machinery including NMDA receptor NR1 and NR2A subunits, densin-180, brain enriched guanylate kinase-associated protein, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa, synaphin/complexin and vesicle-associated membrane protein 2/synaptobrevin 2. Interestingly, some of the changes in this animal preparation are analogous to changes observed in schizophrenic and bipolar patients. Our results suggest that application of a repeated variable prenatal stress paradigm during a critical period of fetal brain development reprograms the response of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis to acute stress and results in gene expression changes that may have enduring effects on synaptic function in the offspring during adulthood. PMID:12859686

  2. A novel potential biocompatible hyperbranched polyspermine for efficient lung cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rong-Lin; Jang, Yoon-Jeong; Xing, Lei; Zhang, Bing-Feng; Wang, Feng-Zhen; Cui, Peng-Fei; Cho, Myung-Haing; Jiang, Hu-Lin

    2015-01-15

    The clinical successful application of gene therapy critically depends upon the development of non-toxic and efficient delivery system. Although polycationic non-viral vectors hold great promise in nanomedicine, the exploring of application in clinics still remains a big challenge. To develop a non-toxic and efficient non-viral gene delivery system, two kinds of endogenous substance, citric acid (CA) and spermine (SPE), were used to prepare a new low charge density hyperbranched polyspermine (HPSPE) by one-pot polymerization. The biocompatibility evaluated by hemolytic activity and red blood cell (RBC) aggregation indicated that HPSPE was highly biocompatible without causing hemolysis and RBC aggregation compared with PEI as well as SPE. The MTS assay also demonstrated that the cell viability of HPSPE was above 90% even at 200 μg/mL at different time (24 and 72 h), which much higher than PEI 25K. Besides, HPSPE showed high transfection efficiency without any toxic effect after aerosol delivery to the mice. Moreover, aerosol delivery of HPSPE/Akt1 shRNA significantly reduced tumor size and numbers and efficiently suppressed lung tumorigenesis ultimately in K-ras(LA1) lung cancer model mice. These results suggest that low charge density as well as endogenous substance skeleton endow HPSPE with great potential for toxicity-free and efficient gene therapy. PMID:25448566

  3. Combination of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy and polyethylenimine/p53 gene therapy for the treatment of lung cancer using porous PLGA microparticles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaozheng; Li, Chunjie; Gao, Sai; Zhang, Lingfei; Han, Haobo; Zhang, Jianxu; Shi, Wei; Li, Quanshun

    2014-10-01

    In this study, porous PLGA microparticles for the co-delivery of doxorubicin and PEI25K/p53 were successfully prepared by the water-oil-water emulsion solvent evaporation method, using ammonium bicarbonate as a porogen. The porous microparticles were obtained with a mean diameter of 22.9±11.8μm as determined by laser scattering particle size analysis. The particles' surface porous morphology and distributions of doxorubicin and p53 were systematically characterized by scanning electron microscopy, flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy, revealing that doxorubicin and the plasmid were successfully co-encapsulated. Encapsulation efficiencies of 88.2±1.7% and 36.5±7.5% were achieved for doxorubicin and the plasmid, respectively, demonstrating that the porous structure did not adversely affect payload encapsulation. Microparticles harboring both doxorubicin and PEI25K/p53 exhibited enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis induction compared to those loaded with either agent alone in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Overall, the porous PLGA microparticles provide a promising anticancer delivery system for combined chemotherapy and gene therapy, and have great potential as a tool for sustained local drug delivery by inhalation. PMID:25082753

  4. Autism and Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document defines and discusses autism and how genes play a role in the condition. Answers to the following questions are covered: (1) What are genes? (2) What is autism? (3) What causes autism? (4) Why study genes to learn about autism? (5) How do researchers look for the genes involved in autism? (screen the whole genome; conduct cytogenetic…

  5. Compare Gene Profiles

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linuxmore » environment in serial or parallel mode.« less

  6. Gene expression in enhanced apoptosis of human lymphoma U937 cells treated with the combination of different free radical generators and hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Wada, Shigehito; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Cui, Zheng-Guo; Zhao, Qing-Li; Takasaki, Ichiro; Salunga, Thucydides L; Ogawa, Ryohei; Arai, Toshiyuki; Makino, Keisuke; Furuta, Isao

    2007-01-01

    The effects of various free radicals derived from 6-formylpterin (6-FP), alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) and 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) combined with hyperthermia, on gene expression in similarly enhanced apoptosis of human lymphoma U937 cells were investigated using cDNA microarrays containing approximately 16,600 genes and computational gene expression analysis tools. When the cells were treated for 10 min at 44 degrees C (15% apoptosis level), 39 up-regulated and 3 down-regulated genes were identified. In the up-regulated genes, apoptosis- and unfolded protein response-associated genes were contained. The combined treatment with heat and either chemical enhanced apoptosis level (approximately 30%) and showed a chemical-specific gene expression pattern. Furthermore, the expression levels of selected genes were confirmed by a real-time quantitative PCR. The present results will provide a basis for further understanding the molecular mechanisms in enhancement of heat-induced apoptosis by different intracellular oxidative stress. PMID:17164180

  7. Natural and Anthropogenic Geohazards in Greater London Observed from Geological and ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT Persistent Scatterers Ground Motion Data: Results from the EC FP7-SPACE PanGeo Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigna, Francesca; Jordan, Hannah; Bateson, Luke; McCormack, Harry; Roberts, Claire

    2015-11-01

    We combine geological data and ground motion estimates from satellite ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI) to delineate areas of observed natural and anthropogenic geohazards in the administrative area of Greater London (United Kingdom). This analysis was performed within the framework of the EC FP7-SPACE PanGeo project, and by conforming to the interpretation and geohazard mapping methodology extensively described in the Production Manual (cf. http://www.pangeoproject.eu). We discuss the results of the generation of the PanGeo digital geohazard mapping product for Greater London, and analyse the potential of PSI, geological data and the PanGeo methodology to identify areas of observed geohazards. Based on the analysis of PSI ground motion data sets for the years 1992-2000 and 2002-2010 and geology field campaigns, we identify 25 geohazard polygons, covering a total of ~650 km2. These include not only natural processes such as compaction of deposits on the River Thames flood plain and slope instability, but also anthropogenic instability due to groundwater management and changes in the Chalk aquifer, recent engineering works such as those for the Jubilee Line Extension project and electricity tunnelling in proximity to the River Thames, and the presence of made ground. In many instances, natural and anthropogenic observed geohazards overlap, therefore indicating interaction of different processes over the same areas. In terms of ground area covered, the dominant geohazard is anthropogenic land subsidence caused by groundwater abstraction for a total of ~300 km2, followed by natural compression of River Thames sediments over ~105 km2. Observed ground motions along the satellite line-of-sight are as high as +29.5 and -25.3 mm/year, and indicate a combination of land surface processes comprising ground subsidence and uplift, as well as downslope movements. Across the areas of observed geohazards, urban land cover types from the Copernicus

  8. ETINDE. Improving the role of a methodological approach and ancillary ethnoarchaeological data application for place vulnerability and resilience to a multi-hazard environment: Mt. Cameroon volcano case study [MIA-VITA project -FP7-ENV-2007-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilaria Pannaccione Apa, Maria; Kouokam, Emmanuel; Mbe Akoko, Robert; Peppoloni, Silvia; Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria; Thierry, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    The FP7 MIA-VITA [Mitigate and assess risk from volcanic impact on terrain and human activities] project has been designed to address multidisciplinary aspects of volcanic threat assessment and management from prevention to crisis management recovery. In the socio-economic analysis carried out at Mt. Cameroon Bakweri and Bakossi ethnic groups, ancillary ethnoarchaeological information has been included to point out the cultural interaction between the volcano and its residents. In 2009-2011, ethnoanthropological surveys and interviews for data collection were carried out at Buea, Limbe, West Coast, Tiko and Muyuka sub-divisions adjacent to Mt. Cameroon. One of the outstanding, results from the Bakweri and Bakossi cultural tradition study: natural hazards are managed and produced by supernatural forces, as: Epasa Moto, God of the Mountain (Mt. Cameroon volcano) and Nyango Na Nwana , Goddess of the sea (Gulf of Guinea). In the case of Mount Cameroon, people may seek the spirit or gods of the mountain before farming, hunting and most recently the undertaking of the Mount Cameroon annual race are done. The spirit of this mountain must be seek to avert or stop a volcanic eruption because the eruption is attributed to the anger of the spirit. Among the Northern Bakweri, the association of spirits with the mountain could also be explained in terms of the importance of the mountain to the people. Most of their farming and hunting is done on the Mountain. Some forest products, for instance, wood for building and furniture is obtained from the forest of the mountain; this implies that the people rely on the Mountain for food, game and architecture/furniture etc. In addition, the eruption of the mountain is something which affects the people. It does not only destroy property, it frustrates people and takes away human lives when it occurs. Because of this economic importance of the Mountain and its unexpected and unwanted eruption, the tendency is to believe that it has some

  9. Fluorescent protein-mediated colour polymorphism in reef corals: multicopy genes extend the adaptation/acclimatization potential to variable light environments.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John R; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Oswald, Franz; Edwards, Richard J; Wiedenmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The genomic framework that enables corals to adjust to unfavourable conditions is crucial for coral reef survival in a rapidly changing climate. We have explored the striking intraspecific variability in the expression of coral pigments from the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family to elucidate the genomic basis for the plasticity of stress responses among reef corals. We show that multicopy genes can greatly increase the dynamic range over which corals can modulate transcript levels in response to the light environment. Using the red fluorescent protein amilFP597 in the coral Acropora millepora as a model, we demonstrate that its expression increases with light intensity, but both the minimal and maximal gene transcript levels vary markedly among colour morphs. The pigment concentration in the tissue of different morphs is strongly correlated with the number of gene copies with a particular promoter type. These findings indicate that colour polymorphism in reef corals can be caused by the environmentally regulated expression of multicopy genes. High-level expression of amilFP597 is correlated with reduced photodamage of zooxanthellae under acute light stress, supporting a photoprotective function of this pigment. The cluster of light-regulated pigment genes can enable corals to invest either in expensive high-level pigmentation, offering benefits under light stress, or to rely on low tissue pigment concentrations and use the conserved resources for other purposes, which is preferable in less light-exposed environments. The genomic framework described here allows corals to pursue different strategies to succeed in habitats with highly variable light stress levels. In summary, our results suggest that the intraspecific plasticity of reef corals' stress responses is larger than previously thought. PMID:25496144

  10. Iron-Carbonyl Aqueous Vesicles (MCsomes) by Hydration of [Fe(CO){CO(CH2)5CH3}(Cp)(PPh3)] (FpC6): Highly Integrated Colloids with Aggregation-Induced Self-Enhanced IR Absorption (AI-SEIRA).

    PubMed

    Murshid, Nimer; Wang, Xiaosong

    2015-12-21

    Self-assembly of hydrophobic molecules into aqueous colloids contradicts common chemical intuition, but has been achieved through hydration of [Fe(CO){CO(CH2)5CH3}(Cp)(PPh3)] (FpC6). FpC6 has no surface activity, no NMR signals in D2O and no critical aggregation concentration (CAC) in H2O. The molecule, however, contains both acyl and terminal CO groups that are prone to being hydrated. By adding water to a solution in THF, self-assembly of FpC6 can be initiated through water-carbonyl interactions (WCIs) with the highly polarized acyl CO groups. This aggregation subsequently enhances the hydration of the acyl CO groups and also induces the WCI of otherwise unhydrated terminal CO groups. The resultant metal-carbonyl aggregates have been proved to be bilayer vesicles with iron complexes exposed towards water and alkyl chains forming inner walls (MCsomes). These MCsomes show high structure integration upon dilution due to the hydrophobic nature of the building blocks. The highly polarized CO groups on the surface of the MCsomes result in a negative zeta potential (-65 mV) and create a local electric field, which significantly enhances the IR absorption of CO groups by more than 100-fold. This is the first discovery of aggregation-induced self-enhanced IR absorption (AI-SRIRA) without the assistant of external dielectric substrates. Highly integrated MCsomes are, therefore, promising as a novel group of materials, for example, for IR-based sensing and imaging. PMID:26563745

  11. Modification of Seed Oil Composition in Arabidopsis by Artificial microRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Belide, Srinivas; Petrie, James Robertson; Shrestha, Pushkar; Singh, Surinder Pal

    2012-01-01

    Various post transcriptional gene silencing strategies have been developed and exploited to study gene function or engineer disease resistance. The recently developed artificial microRNA strategy is an alternative method of effectively silencing target genes. The Δ12-desaturase (FAD2), Fatty acid elongase (FAE1), and Fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase B (FATB) were targeted with amiR159b-based constructs in Arabidopsis thaliana to evaluate changes in oil composition when expressed with the seed-specific Brassica napus truncated napin (FP1) promoter. Fatty acid profiles from transgenic homozygous seeds reveal that the targeted genes were silenced. The down-regulation of the AtFAD-2 gene substantially increased oleic acid from the normal levels of ∼15% to as high as 63.3 and reduced total PUFA content (18:2Δ9,12 + 18:3Δ9,12,15 + 20:2Δ11,14 + 20:3Δ11,14,17) from 46.8 to 4.8%. Δ12-desaturase activity was reduced to levels as low as those in the null fad-2-1 and fad-2-2 mutants. Silencing of the FAE1 gene resulted in the reduction of eicosenoic acid (20:1Δ11) to 1.9 from 15.4% and silencing of FATB resulted in the reduction of palmitic acid (16:0) to 4.4% from 8.0%. Reduction in FATB activity is comparable with a FATB knock-out mutant. These results demonstrate for the first time amiR159b constructs targeted against three endogenous seed-expressed genes are clearly able to down-regulate and generate genotypic changes that are inherited stably over three generations. PMID:22866055

  12. Evolution by gene loss.

    PubMed

    Albalat, Ricard; Cañestro, Cristian

    2016-07-01

    The recent increase in genomic data is revealing an unexpected perspective of gene loss as a pervasive source of genetic variation that can cause adaptive phenotypic diversity. This novel perspective of gene loss is raising new fundamental questions. How relevant has gene loss been in the divergence of phyla? How do genes change from being essential to dispensable and finally to being lost? Is gene loss mostly neutral, or can it be an effective way of adaptation? These questions are addressed, and insights are discussed from genomic studies of gene loss in populations and their relevance in evolutionary biology and biomedicine. PMID:27087500

  13. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  14. Functionalization of lignin through ATRP grafting of poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohong; Yin, Hui; Zhang, Zhongxing; Diao, Bishuo; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The biomass kraft lignin was modified into lignin-based macroinitiators (LnMI) through esterification of the alcohol and phenol functional groups on lignin backbone with 2-bromo-isobutyric bromide under mild condition. Then a series of cationic amphiphilic lignin-based graft copolymers were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) starting from the lignin-based macroinitiators. These copolymers, denoted as LnPDMAEMA, had a hyperbranched structure with a hydrophobic backbone of lignin and multiple cationic hydrophilic arms of PDMAEMA. The LnPDMAEMA copolymers were characterized by (1)H NMR and elemental analysis (EA), and studied in terms of their DNA binding capability, formation of nanoparticles with plasmid DNA (pDNA), cytotoxicity, and gene transfection in cultured cells. It was found that all the copolymers could efficiently compact pDNA into nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 100 to 200 nm at N/P ratios of 5 or higher. The cytotoxicity of these copolymers depends greatly on the chain length of PDMAEMA arms, the longer the PAMAEMA chain the higher the cytotoxicity. Luciferase assay was used to study the in vitro gene transfection for the LnPDMAEMA copolymers in different cell lines. The gene transfection efficiency of these copolymers was dependent on the grafted PDMAEMA chain length and N/P ratio. Generally, the transfection efficiency decreased with the increase of PAMAEMA length at N/P ratio of 20 or higher. It is very interesting that one of the LnPDMAEMA copolymers with very short arm length (degree of average DMAEMA units=5.5) showed excellent in vitro transfection efficiency that was comparable or even higher than that of branched PEI (25K). These novel biomass-based LnPDMAEMA hyperbranched copolymers can be a promising nonviral gene vectors for future gene delivery application. PMID:25506805

  15. Inhibition of protein translation by the DISC1-Boymaw fusion gene from a Scottish family with major psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K; Kim, Minjung; Zhou, Lynn; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A; Zhou, Xianjin

    2014-11-01

    The t(1; 11) translocation appears to be the causal genetic lesion with 70% penetrance for schizophrenia, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in a Scottish family. Molecular studies identified the disruption of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene by chromosome translocation at chromosome 1q42. Our previous studies, however, revealed that the translocation also disrupted another gene, Boymaw (also termed DISC1FP1), on chromosome 11. After translocation, two fusion genes [the DISC1-Boymaw (DB7) and the Boymaw-DISC1 (BD13)] are generated between the DISC1 and Boymaw genes. In the present study, we report that expression of the DB7 fusion gene inhibits both intracellular NADH oxidoreductase activities and protein translation. We generated humanized DISC1-Boymaw mice with gene targeting to examine the in vivo functions of the fusion genes. Consistent with the in vitro studies on the DB7 fusion gene, protein translation activity is decreased in the hippocampus and in cultured primary neurons from the brains of the humanized mice. Expression of Gad67, Nmdar1 and Psd95 proteins are also reduced. The humanized mice display prolonged and increased responses to the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, on various mouse genetic backgrounds. Abnormal information processing of acoustic startle and depressive-like behaviors are also observed. In addition, the humanized mice display abnormal erythropoiesis, which was reported to associate with depression in humans. Expression of the DB7 fusion gene may reduce protein translation to impair brain functions and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:24908665

  16. Inhibition of protein translation by the DISC1-Boymaw fusion gene from a Scottish family with major psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K.; Kim, Minjung; Zhou, Lynn; Young, Jared W.; Geyer, Mark A.; Zhou, Xianjin

    2014-01-01

    The t(1; 11) translocation appears to be the causal genetic lesion with 70% penetrance for schizophrenia, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in a Scottish family. Molecular studies identified the disruption of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene by chromosome translocation at chromosome 1q42. Our previous studies, however, revealed that the translocation also disrupted another gene, Boymaw (also termed DISC1FP1), on chromosome 11. After translocation, two fusion genes [the DISC1-Boymaw (DB7) and the Boymaw-DISC1 (BD13)] are generated between the DISC1 and Boymaw genes. In the present study, we report that expression of the DB7 fusion gene inhibits both intracellular NADH oxidoreductase activities and protein translation. We generated humanized DISC1-Boymaw mice with gene targeting to examine the in vivo functions of the fusion genes. Consistent with the in vitro studies on the DB7 fusion gene, protein translation activity is decreased in the hippocampus and in cultured primary neurons from the brains of the humanized mice. Expression of Gad67, Nmdar1 and Psd95 proteins are also reduced. The humanized mice display prolonged and increased responses to the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, on various mouse genetic backgrounds. Abnormal information processing of acoustic startle and depressive-like behaviors are also observed. In addition, the humanized mice display abnormal erythropoiesis, which was reported to associate with depression in humans. Expression of the DB7 fusion gene may reduce protein translation to impair brain functions and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:24908665

  17. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  18. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  19. Reading and Generalist Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Harlaar, Nicole; Plomin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Twin-study research suggests that many (but not all) of the same genes contribute to genetic influence on diverse learning abilities and disabilities, a hypothesis called "generalist genes". This generalist genes hypothesis was tested using a set of 10 DNA markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) found to be associated with early reading…

  20. Accepting Foreign Genes.

    PubMed

    Boto, Luis

    2016-05-01

    Three recent papers underline the importance of the host genomic background in allowing the stable maintenance of horizontally acquired genes. These studies suggest that post-transfer changes in both host genome and acquired genes contribute to the stable integration of foreign genes. PMID:27075565

  1. MSC-based VEGF gene therapy in rat myocardial infarction model using facial amphipathic bile acid-conjugated polyethyleneimine.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-Ho; Joo, Min Kyung; Mok, Hyejung; Lee, Minhyung; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Kim, Sung Wan; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Choi, Donghoon; Kim, Sun Hwa

    2014-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted much attention in regenerative medicine owing to their apparent usefulness as multi-potent replacement cells. The potential of MSC therapy can be further improved by transforming MSCs with therapeutic genes that maximize the efficacy of gene therapy and their own therapeutic ability. Since most conventional transfection methodologies have shown marginal success in delivering exogenous genes into primary cultured cells, efficient gene transfer into primary MSCs is a prerequisite for the development of MSC-based gene therapy strategies to achieve repair and regeneration of damaged tissues. Herein, facially amphipathic bile acid-modified polyethyleneimine (BA-PEI) conjugates were synthesized and used to transfer hypoxia-inducible vascular endothelial growth factor gene (pHI-VEGF) in MSCs for the treatment of rat myocardial infarction. Under the optimized transfection conditions, the BA-PEI conjugates significantly increased the VEGF protein expression levels in rat MSCs, compared with traditional transfection methods such as Lipofectamine™ and branched-PEI (25 kDa). Furthermore, the prepared pHI-VEGF-engineered MSCs (VEGF-MSCs) resulted in improved cell viability, particularly during severe hypoxic exposure in vitro. The transplantation of MSCs genetically modified to overexpress VEGF by BA-PEI enhanced the capillary formation in the infarction region and eventually attenuated left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction in rats. This study demonstrates the applicability of the BA-PEI conjugates for the efficient transfection of therapeutic genes into MSCs and the feasibility of using the genetically engineered MSCs in regenerative medicine for myocardial infarction. PMID:24280192

  2. Amino acid-based cationic lipids with α-tocopherol hydrophobic tail for efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wen-Jing; Zheng, Li-Ting; Su, Rong-Chuan; Liu, Qiang; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2015-11-01

    In this work, three amino acid-based cationic lipids L1-L3 bearing the same α-tocopherol moiety and biodegradable ester bond linkage, but differing in the polar head-group, were prepared and applied as non-viral gene delivery vectors. The physicochemical properties such as size, zeta-potential, stability, and cellular uptake of the lipoplexes formed from lipids L1-L3 as well as the transfection efficacy (TE) were investigated. The results showed that the chemical composition of the cationic head-group clearly affects the physicochemical parameters of the amino acid-based lipids, especially the TE. Besides their low cytotoxicity, these lipoplexes also showed comparable TE to commercially available lipofectamine 2000. In particular, dipeptide lipid L3 gave excellent TE, which was 1.8 times higher than bPEI 25k in the presence of 10% serum in Hela cells. These results demonstrate the promising use of novel dipeptide lipids for safe and efficient gene delivery. PMID:25973654

  3. ModObs: Atmospheric modelling for wind energy, climate and environment applications: exploring added value from new observation technique. Work in progress within a FP6 Marie Curie Research Training Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempreviva, A. M.

    2009-09-01

    The EC FP6 Marie Curie Training Network "ModObs” http://www.modobs.windeng.net addresses the improvement of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) models to investigate the interplay of processes at different temporal and spatial scales, and to explore the added value from new observation techniques. The overall goal is to bring young scientists to work ogether with experienced researchers in developing a better interaction amongst scientific communities of modelers and experimentalists, using a comprehensive approach to "Climate Change”, "Clean Energy assessment” and "Environmental Policies”, issues. This poster describes the work in progress of ten students, funded by the network, under the supervision of a team of scientists within atmospheric physics, engineering and satellite remote sensing and end-users such as companies in the private sector, all with the appropriate expertise to integrate the most advanced research methods and techniques in the following topics. MODELING: GLOBAL-TO-MESO SCALE: Analytical and process oriented numerical models will be used to study the interaction between the atmosphere and the ocean on a regional scale. Initial results indicate an interaction between the intensity of polar lows and the subsurface warm core often present in the Nordic Seas (11). The presence of waves, mainly swell, influence the MABL fluxes and turbulence structure. The regional and global wave effect on the atmosphere will be also studied and quantified (7) MESO-SCALE: Applicability of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) parametrizations in the meso-scale WRF model to marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) over the North Sea is investigated. The most suitable existing PBL parametrization will be additionally improved and used for downscaling North Sea past and future climates (2). Application of the meso-scale model (MM5 and WRF) for the wind energy in off-shore and coastal area. Set-up of the meso-scale model, post-processing and verification of the data

  4. A spermine conjugated stearic acid-g-chitosan oligosaccharide polymer with different types of amino groups for efficient p53 gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Tingting; Wu, Jie; Yi, Hanxi; Liu, Jingwen; Lu, Binbin; Yuan, Ming; Huang, Xuan; Yuan, Hong; Hu, Fuqiang

    2016-09-01

    The effect of various amino groups on gene vector is different. In order to combine their effect in one vector and finally promote the transfection efficiency, a biogenic tetra-amine spermine was introduced to modify the stearic acid-grafted chitosan oligosaccharide (CSOSA) polymer to build a new gene delivery system. The spermine linked CSOSA (SP-CSOSA) polymer consists two types of amino groups with 73.3%, 19.3% of all nitrogen atoms for primary and secondary amine groups, respectively. The SP modified CSOSA showed strong DNA condensation capability and obviously enhanced proton binding ability especially at about pH 5.0, which significantly promoted the escape of SP-CSOSA/pDNA complexes from endo-lysosoms. Moreover, the transfection efficiency at the N/P ratio of 10 could compete with that of Lipofectamine 2000 and PEI 25K, but with lower cytotoxicities. The therapeutic wild type p53 gene transfected by the SP-CSOSA polymer restored the function of aberrant p53 gene and induced obvious cell apoptosis and G1 phase arrest. We concluded that the new vector SP-CSOSA polymer proved to be a potential delivery system for gene therapy. PMID:27289311

  5. [Imprinted genes in plants].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Geng; Yang, Ruo-Fei; Fu, Feng-Ling; Li, Wan-Chen

    2010-12-01

    The expression of imprinted genes is regulated by epigenetic mechanism. In plant endosperm, the allele of imprinted genes is expressed in a pattern of parent-of-origin-dependent. The expression of imprinted genes plays essential roles in the development of embryos and their annexe structures, as well as seed size, reproductive barriers and apomixis. Along with the progress of plant epigenetic research, the exploration of imprinted genes is becoming hotspot in epigenetic research. This review focused on the parental conflict theory about the origin of imprinted genes, and the latest research advances in expression regulation mechanism of plant imprinted genes, using the examples of the important imprinted genes MEA, FIS2, FWA, MPC, and PHE1 in Arabidopsis, and FIEI and FIE2 in maize. PMID:21513148

  6. Retrieval with gene queries

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Aditya K; Srinivasan, Padmini

    2006-01-01

    Background Accuracy of document retrieval from MEDLINE for gene queries is crucially important for many applications in bioinformatics. We explore five information retrieval-based methods to rank documents retrieved by PubMed gene queries for the human genome. The aim is to rank relevant documents higher in the retrieved list. We address the special challenges faced due to ambiguity in gene nomenclature: gene terms that refer to multiple genes, gene terms that are also English words, and gene terms that have other biological meanings. Results Our two baseline ranking strategies are quite similar in performance. Two of our three LocusLink-based strategies offer significant improvements. These methods work very well even when there is ambiguity in the gene terms. Our best ranking strategy offers significant improvements on three different kinds of ambiguities over our two baseline strategies (improvements range from 15.9% to 17.7% and 11.7% to 13.3% depending on the baseline). For most genes the best ranking query is one that is built from the LocusLink (now Entrez Gene) summary and product information along with the gene names and aliases. For others, the gene names and aliases suffice. We also present an approach that successfully predicts, for a given gene, which of these two ranking queries is more appropriate. Conclusion We explore the effect of different post-retrieval strategies on the ranking of documents returned by PubMed for human gene queries. We have successfully applied some of these strategies to improve the ranking of relevant documents in the retrieved sets. This holds true even when various kinds of ambiguity are encountered. We feel that it would be very useful to apply strategies like ours on PubMed search results as these are not ordered by relevance in any way. This is especially so for queries that retrieve a large number of documents. PMID:16630348

  7. Click modification of helical amylose by poly(l-lysine) dendrons for non-viral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jia-Dong; Zhuang, Bao-Xiong; Mai, Kaijin; Chen, Ru-Fu; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Li-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Although amylose as a naturally-occurring helical polysaccharide has been widely used for biomedical applications, few studies have dealt with its chemical modification for non-viral gene delivery. In this work, the click modification of amylose by poly(l-lysine) dendrons was carried out and then characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction and elemental analyses. Such a modified polysaccharide exhibited excellent ability to condense plasmid pMSCV-GFP-PARK2 into compact and spherical nanoparticles. Moreover, it displayed much lower cytotoxicity when compared to branched polyethylenimine (bPEI, 25kDa), a commercially available gene vector. Similar to bPEI, it had a dose-dependent gene transfection activity in human embryonic kidney 293T cells, as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. At each optimized N/P ratio, the percentage of transfected cells by this modified polysaccharide was found to be comparable to that by bPEI. Western blot and cell apoptosis analyses confirmed its effectiveness for the delivery of plasmid pMSCV-GFP-PARK2 to 293T cells. PMID:25686975

  8. Recycling Gene Carrier with High Efficiency and Low Toxicity Mediated by L-Cystine-Bridged Bis(β-cyclodextrin)s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Hui; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Yang, Yang; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2014-12-01

    Constructing safe and effective gene delivery carriers is becoming highly desirable for gene therapy. Herein, a series of supramolecular crosslinking system were prepared through host-guest binding of adamantyl-modified low molecular weight of polyethyleneimine with L-cystine-bridged bis(β-cyclodextrin)s and characterized by 1H NMR titration, electron microscopy, zeta potential, dynamic light-scattering, gel electrophoresis, flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that these nanometersized supramolecular crosslinking systems exhibited higher DNA transfection efficiencies and lower cytotoxicity than the commercial DNA carrier gold standard (25 kDa bPEI) for both normal cells and cancer cells, giving a very high DNA transfection efficiency up to 54% for 293T cells. Significantly, this type of supramolecular crosslinking system possesses a number of enzyme-responsive disulfide bonds, which can be cleaved by reductive enzyme to promote the DNA release but recovered by oxidative enzyme to make the carrier renewable. These results demonstrate that these supramolecular crosslinking systems can be used as promising gene carriers.

  9. Reduction biodegradable brushed PDMAEMA derivatives synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization and click chemistry for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Xu, Yanglin; Yang, Qizhi; Li, Cao; Hennink, Wim E; Zhuo, Renxi; Jiang, Xulin

    2013-08-01

    Novel reducible and degradable brushed poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as non-viral gene delivery vectors. First, alkyne-functionalized poly(aspartic acid) with a disulfide linker between the propargyl group and backbone poly([(propargyl carbamate)-cystamine]-α,β-aspartamide) (P(Asp-SS-AL)) was synthesized. Second, linear low molecular weight (LMW) monoazido-functionalized PDMAEMAs synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization were conjugated to the polypeptide side-chains of P(Asp-SS-AL) via click chemistry to yield high molecular weight (HMW) polyaspartamide-based disulfide-containing brushed PDMAEMAs (PAPDEs). The PAPDEs were able to condense plasmid DNA to form 100 to 200nm polyplexes with positive ζ-potentials. Moreover, in the presence of dithiothreitol the PAPDEs degraded into LMW PDAMEMA, resulting in disintegration of the PAPDE/DNA polyplexes and subsequent release of plasmid DNA. In vitro experiments revealed that the PAPDEs were less cytotoxic and more effective in gene transfection than control 25kDa poly(ethyleneimine) and HMW linear PDMAEMA. In conclusion, reducible and degradable polycations composed of LMW PDMAEMAs coupled to a polypeptide backbone via reduction-sensitive disulfide bonds are effective gene vectors with an excellent cytocompatibility. PMID:23660547

  10. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Four Genes Encoding Ethylene Receptors Associated with Pineapple (Ananas comosus L.) Flowering.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-He; Wu, Qing-Song; Huang, Xia; Liu, Sheng-Hui; Zhang, Hong-Na; Zhang, Zhi; Sun, Guang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous ethylene, or ethephon, has been widely used to induce pineapple flowering, but the molecular mechanism behind ethephon induction is still unclear. In this study, we cloned four genes encoding ethylene receptors (designated AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b). The 5' flanking sequences of these four genes were also cloned by self-formed adaptor PCR and SiteFinding-PCR, and a group of putative cis-acting elements was identified. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b belonged to the plant ERS1s and ETR2/EIN4-like groups. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AcETR2a and AcETR2b (subfamily 2) were more sensitive to ethylene treatment compared with AcERS1a and AcERS1b (subfamily 1). The relative expression of AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b was significantly increased during the earlier period of pineapple inflorescence formation, especially at 1-9 days after ethylene treatment (DAET), whereas AcERS1a expression changed less than these three genes. In situ hybridization results showed that bract primordia (BP) and flower primordia (FP) appeared at 9 and 21 DAET, respectively, and flowers were formed at 37 DAET. AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b were mainly expressed in the shoot apex at 1-4 DAET; thereafter, with the appearance of BP and FP, higher expression of these genes was found in these new structures. Finally, at 37 DAET, the expression of these genes was mainly focused in the flower but was also low in other structures. These findings indicate that these four ethylene receptor genes, especially AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b, play important roles during pineapple flowering induced by exogenous ethephon. PMID:27252725

  11. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Four Genes Encoding Ethylene Receptors Associated with Pineapple (Ananas comosus L.) Flowering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun-He; Wu, Qing-Song; Huang, Xia; Liu, Sheng-Hui; Zhang, Hong-Na; Zhang, Zhi; Sun, Guang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous ethylene, or ethephon, has been widely used to induce pineapple flowering, but the molecular mechanism behind ethephon induction is still unclear. In this study, we cloned four genes encoding ethylene receptors (designated AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b). The 5′ flanking sequences of these four genes were also cloned by self-formed adaptor PCR and SiteFinding-PCR, and a group of putative cis-acting elements was identified. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b belonged to the plant ERS1s and ETR2/EIN4-like groups. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AcETR2a and AcETR2b (subfamily 2) were more sensitive to ethylene treatment compared with AcERS1a and AcERS1b (subfamily 1). The relative expression of AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b was significantly increased during the earlier period of pineapple inflorescence formation, especially at 1–9 days after ethylene treatment (DAET), whereas AcERS1a expression changed less than these three genes. In situ hybridization results showed that bract primordia (BP) and flower primordia (FP) appeared at 9 and 21 DAET, respectively, and flowers were formed at 37 DAET. AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b were mainly expressed in the shoot apex at 1–4 DAET; thereafter, with the appearance of BP and FP, higher expression of these genes was found in these new structures. Finally, at 37 DAET, the expression of these genes was mainly focused in the flower but was also low in other structures. These findings indicate that these four ethylene receptor genes, especially AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b, play important roles during pineapple flowering induced by exogenous ethephon. PMID:27252725

  12. Full deacylation of polyethylenimine dramatically boosts its gene delivery efficiency and specificity to mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Mini; Lu, James J.; Ge, Qing; Zhang, Chengcheng; Chen, Jianzhu; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2005-01-01

    High-molecular-mass polyethylenimines (PEIs) are widely used vectors for nucleic acid delivery. We found that removal of the residual N-acyl moieties from commercial linear 25-kDa PEI enhanced its plasmid DNA delivery efficiency 21 times in vitro, as well as 10,000 times in mice with a concomitant 1,500-fold enhancement in lung specificity. Several additional linear PEIs were synthesized by acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline), yielding the pure polycations. PEI87 and PEI217 exhibited the highest efficiency in vitro: 115-fold and 6-fold above those of the commercial and deacylated PEI25s, respectively; moreover, PEI87 delivered DNA to mouse lung as efficiently as the pure PEI25 but at a lower concentration and with a 200-fold lung specificity. These improvements stem from an increase in the number of protonatable nitrogens, which presumably results in a tighter condensation of plasmid DNA and a better endosomal escape of the PEI/DNA complexes. As a validation of the potential of such linear, fully deacylated PEIs in gene therapy for lung diseases, systemic delivery in mice of the complexes of a short interfering RNA (siRNA) against a model gene, firefly luciferase, and PEI25 or PEI87 afforded a 77% and 93% suppression of the gene expression in the lungs, respectively. Furthermore, a polyplex of a siRNA against the influenza viral nucleocapsid protein gene and PEI87 resulted in a 94% drop of virus titers in the lungs of influenza-infected animals. PMID:15824322

  13. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA): gene structure and characterization of related pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Aurelio; Mezzina, Maria; Gadaleta, Gemma

    2002-05-29

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA or Tfam) is a 25 kDa protein encoded by a nuclear gene and imported to mitochondria, where it functions as a key regulator of mammalian mitochondrial (mt) DNA transcription and replication. The coding sequence of the human mtTFA gene is reported in the literature and the sizes of few introns are known. In this paper we present the genomic structure of the human mtTFA gene along with the complete sequence of its six intronic regions. Three of the introns (I, III, VI) have been found to be less than 600 bp, while the other three were greater than 1.8 kb. In the course of this work, we discovered that, in addition to the active copy, different homologous sequences identified as processed pseudogenes psi h-mtTFA have been isolated and sequenced. Using an 'in silico' mapping approach we determined their locations on chromosomes 7, 11 and X. psi h-mtTFA locations are different from that of the gene, previously reported on chromosome 10. Transcription analysis by means of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction has shown that other than the RNA corresponding to the full-length transcript, an isoform lacking 96 bp is also present. Among the three sequenced pseudogenes only one of them located on chromosome 11 has been found to be transcribed in Jurkat cells under these culture conditions, even though transcription initiation and binding sites for different transcription factors have also been found upstream from the other two pseudogenes. PMID:12095695

  14. Do Housekeeping Genes Exist?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    The searching of human housekeeping (HK) genes has been a long quest since the emergence of transcriptomics, and is instrumental for us to understand the structure of genome and the fundamentals of biological processes. The resolved genes are frequently used in evolution studies and as normalization standards in quantitative gene-expression analysis. Within the past 20 years, more than a dozen HK-gene studies have been conducted, yet none of them sampled human tissues completely. We believe an integration of these results will help remove false positive genes owing to the inadequate sampling. Surprisingly, we only find one common gene across 15 examined HK-gene datasets comprising 187 different tissue and cell types. Our subsequent analyses suggest that it might not be appropriate to rigidly define HK genes as expressed in all tissue types that have diverse developmental, physiological, and pathological states. It might be beneficial to use more robustly identified HK functions for filtering criteria, in which the representing genes can be a subset of genome. These genes are not necessarily the same, and perhaps need not to be the same, everywhere in our body. PMID:25970694

  15. Do housekeeping genes exist?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijuan; Li, Ding; Sun, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    The searching of human housekeeping (HK) genes has been a long quest since the emergence of transcriptomics, and is instrumental for us to understand the structure of genome and the fundamentals of biological processes. The resolved genes are frequently used in evolution studies and as normalization standards in quantitative gene-expression analysis. Within the past 20 years, more than a dozen HK-gene studies have been conducted, yet none of them sampled human tissues completely. We believe an integration of these results will help remove false positive genes owing to the inadequate sampling. Surprisingly, we only find one common gene across 15 examined HK-gene datasets comprising 187 different tissue and cell types. Our subsequent analyses suggest that it might not be appropriate to rigidly define HK genes as expressed in all tissue types that have diverse developmental, physiological, and pathological states. It might be beneficial to use more robustly identified HK functions for filtering criteria, in which the representing genes can be a subset of genome. These genes are not necessarily the same, and perhaps need not to be the same, everywhere in our body. PMID:25970694

  16. Towards Consensus Gene Ages.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J; McWhite, Claire D; Marcotte, Edward M

    2016-01-01

    Correctly estimating the age of a gene or gene family is important for a variety of fields, including molecular evolution, comparative genomics, and phylogenetics, and increasingly for systems biology and disease genetics. However, most studies use only a point estimate of a gene's age, neglecting the substantial uncertainty involved in this estimation. Here, we characterize this uncertainty by investigating the effect of algorithm choice on gene-age inference and calculate consensus gene ages with attendant error distributions for a variety of model eukaryotes. We use 13 orthology inference algorithms to create gene-age datasets and then characterize the error around each age-call on a per-gene and per-algorithm basis. Systematic error was found to be a large factor in estimating gene age, suggesting that simple consensus algorithms are not enough to give a reliable point estimate. We also found that different sources of error can affect downstream analyses, such as gene ontology enrichment. Our consensus gene-age datasets, with associated error terms, are made fully available at so that researchers can propagate this uncertainty through their analyses (geneages.org). PMID:27259914

  17. The gap gene network

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Gap genes are involved in segment determination during the early development of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as well as in other insects. This review attempts to synthesize the current knowledge of the gap gene network through a comprehensive survey of the experimental literature. I focus on genetic and molecular evidence, which provides us with an almost-complete picture of the regulatory interactions responsible for trunk gap gene expression. I discuss the regulatory mechanisms involved, and highlight the remaining ambiguities and gaps in the evidence. This is followed by a brief discussion of molecular regulatory mechanisms for transcriptional regulation, as well as precision and size-regulation provided by the system. Finally, I discuss evidence on the evolution of gap gene expression from species other than Drosophila. My survey concludes that studies of the gap gene system continue to reveal interesting and important new insights into the role of gene regulatory networks in development and evolution. PMID:20927566

  18. Metastasis Suppressor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jinchun; Yang, Qin; Huang, Qihong

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of cancer mortality. Metastasis is a complex process that requires the regulation of both metastasis-promoting and metastasis suppressor genes. The discovery of metastasis suppressor genes contributes significantly to our understanding of metastasis mechanisms and provides prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in clinical cancer management. In this review, we summarize the methods that have been used to identify metastasis suppressors and the potential clinical impact of these genes. PMID:23348381

  19. Towards Consensus Gene Ages

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; McWhite, Claire D.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Correctly estimating the age of a gene or gene family is important for a variety of fields, including molecular evolution, comparative genomics, and phylogenetics, and increasingly for systems biology and disease genetics. However, most studies use only a point estimate of a gene’s age, neglecting the substantial uncertainty involved in this estimation. Here, we characterize this uncertainty by investigating the effect of algorithm choice on gene-age inference and calculate consensus gene ages with attendant error distributions for a variety of model eukaryotes. We use 13 orthology inference algorithms to create gene-age datasets and then characterize the error around each age-call on a per-gene and per-algorithm basis. Systematic error was found to be a large factor in estimating gene age, suggesting that simple consensus algorithms are not enough to give a reliable point estimate. We also found that different sources of error can affect downstream analyses, such as gene ontology enrichment. Our consensus gene-age datasets, with associated error terms, are made fully available at so that researchers can propagate this uncertainty through their analyses (geneages.org). PMID:27259914

  20. History of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. PMID:23618815

  1. [The gene or genes of allergic asthma?].

    PubMed

    Demoly, P; Bousquet, J; Godard, P; Michel, F B

    1993-05-15

    Asthma is a multifactorial disease in which the hereditary component has been demonstrated by familial and identical twin studies. Allergy is important in the aetiology of asthma and is characterized by a hyperreaction to allergens triggering predominantly the immunoglobulines E. The levels of these antibodies are found to be elevated even in non allergic asthmatics. The majority of genetic research in this area is focused on either the genes of the specific immune response or that of the non allergic response. These are the genes of the class II MHC, and the APY gene on chromosome 11q respectively. The modern techniques of molecular genetics and in particular those of inverse genetics have recently contributed to a more comprehensive understanding of this disease. PMID:8316547

  2. Improvement of Cellular Uptake and Transfection Ability of pDNA Using α-Cyclodextrin-Polyamidoamine Conjugates as Gene Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Qin, Linghao; Cao, Duanwen; Huang, Huan; Ji, Gangjian; Feng, Min; Chen, Jianhai; Pan, Shirong

    2016-02-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers are a class of unique nanomaterials which attracted attention because of their extraordinary properties, such as highly branched structure and types of terminal primary groups. In addition, development in PAMAM chemical modification has broadened its biological application especially for drug and gene delivery. In this study, PAMAMs are covalently conjugated onto α-Cyclodextrin (α-CD) via amide bonds obtaining the starburst cationic polymers (CD-PG2). The chemical structure and composition of CD-PG2 was characterized by IH NMR. Physicochemical and biological properties of CD-PG2/pDNA polyplex were evaluated by agarose gel retardation, stability test against DNasecñ, MTT assay, DLS measurement, CLSM observation, LDH leakage test, cellular uptake route analysis and in-vitro cell transfection. Results showed that CD-PG2 can efficiently condense pDNA into nanoscale particles with a narrow size distribution, and protect pDNA form DNase I degradation. Compared with free PEI-25K and commercial product Lipofectamine2000, CD-PG2 shows excellent gene transfection efficiency without serum interference as well as relatively low cytotoxicity. Cellular uptake of CD-PG2/pDNA polyplex is mainly through CME and CvME route and further investigations demonstrate that α-CD can regulate CvME pathway to improve polyplex transfection behavior. In conclusion, CD-PG2 can be considered as a versatile tool for gene delivery, especially for gene transfer in-vivo. PMID:27305760

  3. Characterization of glycol chitosan grafted with low molecular weight polyethylenimine as a gene carrier for human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Yoonhee; Lee, Young Hwa; Lee, Sunray; Han, Jin; Ko, Kyung Soo; Choi, Joon Sig

    2016-11-20

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a great capacity for self-renewal while still maintaining their multipotency, and can differentiate into a variety of cell types. The delivery of genes to a site of injury is a current and interesting field of gene therapy. In the present study, we describe a nonviral gene delivery carrier, glycol chitosan-methyl acrylate-polyethylenimine (GMP) polymer targeted towards human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs). Transfection efficiency, using luciferase (Luc) and a pDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), along with cytotoxicity assays, were performed in human AD-MSCs. The results show that the transfection efficiency of the GMP polymer was similar to that of PEI25kD, and the cytotoxicity was lower. Moreover, human AD-MSCs were treated with the GMP polymer/pDNA polyplex and its cellular uptake and distribution were analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Furthermore, we performed endosomal escape analysis using LysoTracker Red, and found that the conjugated GMP polymer could escape from the endosome to the cytosol. Human AD-MSCs treated with the GMP polymer maintained their potential for osteogenic differentiation and phenotypic expression of human AD-MSCs based on flow cytometry analysis. The present study demonstrates that the GMP polymer can be used as a potential targeted-delivery carrier for effective gene delivery. PMID:27561509

  4. Comparison of prostaglandin F2alpha, bimatoprost (prostamide), and butaprost (EP2 agonist) on Cyr61 and connective tissue growth factor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yanbin; Li, Chen; Guzman, Victor M; Evinger, Albert J; Protzman, Charles E; Krauss, Achim H-P; Woodward, David F

    2003-07-18

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and Cyr61 (cysteine-rich angiogenic protein 61) are members of the CCN gene family that encode multifunctional, extracellular matrix-associated signaling proteins. Because the mechanism of action of certain anti-glaucoma drugs involves extracellular matrix remodeling of ocular ciliary muscle, with a resultant increase in drainage of aqueous humor from the eye, we compared the effects of three pharmacologically distinct ocular hypotensive agents on Cyr61 and CTGF gene expression. Thus, prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) (FP receptor agonist), Butaprost (EP2 receptor agonist), and Bimatoprost (a prostamide) were compared. Using Affymetrix gene chip technology, we first identified that PGF2alpha dramatically up-regulated Cyr61 and CTGF mRNA expression in HEK 293/EBNA cells (hFP-HEK 293/EBNA). Northern blot further confirmed the Cyr61 and CTGF up-regulation is in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PGF2alpha-induced up-regulation of Cyr61 appeared to exclusively involve the Rho pathway, and up-regulation of CTGF was via multiple intracellular pathways. Because prostamide receptors are, to date, defined only at the pharmacological level, Bimatoprost effects on Cyr61 and CTGF were studied in the isolated feline iris sphincter preparation, a tissue highly responsive to prostamides. Both PGF2alpha and Bimatoprost up-regulated Cyr61 mRNA expression in the cat iris tissue. Only PGF2alpha up-regulated CTGF mRNA expression in the cat iris. Therefore, PGF2alpha and Bimatoprost appear to interact with different receptors populations in the cat iris, according to their markedly different effects on CTGF. Activation of prostaglandin EP2 receptors (Gs-coupled) also up-regulated Cyr61 but not CTGF mRNA expression in the isolated cat iris. Similar data were observed in human primary ciliary smooth muscle cells. Thus, despite quite different signal transduction pathways, FP receptor stimulation up-regulates CTGF and Cyr61. The prostamide analog

  5. GENE EXPRESSION NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Gene expression network" is the term used to describe the interplay, simple or complex, between two or more gene products in performing a specific cellular function. Although the delineation of such networks is complicated by the existence of multiple and subtle types of intera...

  6. Your Genes, Your Choices

    MedlinePlus

    Table of Contents Your Genes, Your Choices describes the Human Genome Project, the science behind it, and the ethical, legal, and social issues that are ... Nothing could be further from the truth. Your Genes, Your Choices points out how the progress of ...

  7. What Is a Gene?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a new kind of medicine — so new that scientists are still doing experiments to see if it works. It uses the technology of genetic engineering to treat a disease caused by a gene that has changed in some way. One method being tested is replacing sick genes with healthy ...

  8. Gene expression networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Portier, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of microarrays and next-generation biotechnologies, the use of gene expression data has become ubiquitous in biological research. One potential drawback of these data is that they are very rich in features or genes though cost considerations allow for the use of only relatively small sample sizes. A useful way of getting at biologically meaningful interpretations of the environmental or toxicological condition of interest would be to make inferences at the level of a priori defined biochemical pathways or networks of interacting genes or proteins that are known to perform certain biological functions. This chapter describes approaches taken in the literature to make such inferences at the biochemical pathway level. In addition this chapter describes approaches to create hypotheses on genes playing important roles in response to a treatment, using organism level gene coexpression or protein-protein interaction networks. Also, approaches to reverse engineer gene networks or methods that seek to identify novel interactions between genes are described. Given the relatively small sample numbers typically available, these reverse engineering approaches are generally useful in inferring interactions only among a relatively small or an order 10 number of genes. Finally, given the vast amounts of publicly available gene expression data from different sources, this chapter summarizes the important sources of these data and characteristics of these sources or databases. In line with the overall aims of this book of providing practical knowledge to a researcher interested in analyzing gene expression data from a network perspective, the chapter provides convenient publicly accessible tools for performing analyses described, and in addition describe three motivating examples taken from the published literature that illustrate some of the relevant analyses. PMID:23086841

  9. [Genetic variation and association of prostaglandin F2alpha receptor (PTGFR) gene with sow maternal behaviors in a White Duroc x Erhualian resource population].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu-Qing; Ren, Jun; Zhang, Zhi-Yan; Chen, Cong-Ying

    2010-11-01

    Maternal behaviors of sows around parturition are important for survival of newborn offspring. Failure to establish normal maternal bonds such as maternal infanticide and crushing often occurs in some individuals. It causes both significant economic losses to the pig industry and severe problems of piglet welfare. Prostaglandin F2-alpha not only can stimulate the nest-building behavior of sows before parturition but also plays an important role in reproductive process and maternal behavior through protein FP encoded by the prostaglandin F receptor gene (PTGFR) as its receptor. In this study, genetic variation and association study of PTGFR gene with nest-building behavior, maternal infanticide, and crushing behavior was carried out in a White Duroc x Erhualian resource population. As a result, five synonymous mutations were identified on exon 1 and exon 2. Exon 1 g .250 A>G, Exon 1 g.619 G>A and Exon 2 g.483 T>C were chosen for genotyping in individuals of F0, F1 and 289 F2 sows. Family-based transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) demonstrated that there were no significant associations of 3 SNPs and haplotypes of PTGFR gene with sow nest-building, maternal infanticide and crushing behavior (P > 0.05). Therefore, it can be concluded that PTGFR gene is not the causative candidate gene for sow maternal behaviors. PMID:21513166

  10. 4. AERIAL VIEW OF GENE WASH RESERVOIR AND GENE CAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW OF GENE WASH RESERVOIR AND GENE CAMP LOOKING SOUTHWEST. DAM AND SPILLWAY VISIBLE IN BOTTOM OF PHOTO. - Gene Wash Reservoir & Dam, 2 miles west of Parker Dam, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. Efficient gene delivery to human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells by cationized Porphyra yezoensis polysaccharide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qingtong; Cao, Jin; Chen, Baoding; Deng, Wenwen; Cao, Xia; Chen, Jingjing; Wang, Yan; Wang, Shicheng; Yu, Jiangnan; Xu, Ximing; Gao, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    This study centered on an innovative application of Porphyra yezoensis polysaccharide (PPS) with cationic modification as a safe and efficient nonviral gene vector to deliver a plasmid encoding human Wnt3a (pWnt3a) into human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs). After modification with branched low-molecular-weight (1,200 Da) polyethylenimine, the cationized PPS (CPPS) was combined with pWnt3a to form spherical nanoscale particles (CPPS-pWnt3a nanoparticles). Particle size and distribution indicated that the CPPS-pWnt3a nanoparticles at a CPPS:pWnt3a weight ratio of 40:1 might be a potential candidate for DNA plasmid transfection. A cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that the nanoparticles prepared at a CPPS:pWnt3a weight ratio of 40:1 were nontoxic to HUMSCs compared to those of Lipofectamine 2000 and polyethylenimine (25 kDa). These nanoparticles were further transfected to HUMSCs. Western blotting demonstrated that the nanoparticles (CPPS:pWnt3a weight ratio 40:1) had the greatest transfection efficiency in HUMSCs, which was significantly higher than that of Lipofectamine 2000; however, when the CPPS:pWnt3a weight ratio was increased to 80:1, the nanoparticle-treated group showed no obvious improvement in translation efficiency over Lipofectamine 2000. Therefore, CPPS, a novel cationic polysaccharide derived from P. yezoensis, could be developed into a safe, efficient, nonviral gene vector in a gene-delivery system. PMID:26604758

  12. Agmatine-Containing Bioreducible Polymer for Gene Delivery Systems and Its Dual Degradation Behavior.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Yeong; Ryu, Kitae; Lee, Gyeong Jin; Kim, Kyunghwan; Kim, Tae-Il

    2015-09-14

    Agmatine-containing bioreducible polymer, poly(cystaminebis(acrylamide)-agmatine) (poly(CBA-AG)) was synthesized for gene delivery systems. It could form 200-300 nm sized and positively charged polyplexes with pDNA, which could release pDNA in reducing the environment due to the internal disulfide bonds cleavage. Poly(CBA-AG) also showed a spontaneous degradation behavior in aqueous condition in contrast to the backbone polymer, poly(cystaminebis(acrylamide)-diaminobutane) (poly(CBA-DAB)) lacking guanidine moieties, probably due to the self-catalyzed hydrolysis of internal amide bonds by guanidine moieties. The cytotoxicity of poly(CBA-AG) was cell-dependent but minimal. Poly(CBA-AG) exhibited highly enhanced transfection efficiency in comparison with poly(CBA-DAB) and even higher transfection efficiency than PEI25k. However, cellular uptake efficiency of the polyplexes did not show positive correlation with the transfection efficiency. Confocal microscopy observation revealed that pDNA delivered by poly(CBA-AG) was strongly accumulated in cell nuclei. These results suggested that high transfection efficiency of poly(CBA-AG) may be derived from the efficient pDNA localization in cell nuclei by guanidine moieties and that the polyplexes dissociation via self-catalyzed hydrolysis as well as disulfide bonds cleavage in cytosol also may facilitate the transfection process. Finally, poly(CBA-AG)/pJDK-apoptin polyplex showed a high anticancer activity induced by apoptosis, demonstrating a potential of poly(CBA-AG) as a gene carrier for cancer gene therapy. PMID:26252660

  13. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity of insecticidal crystal protein genes in native Bacillus thuringiensis isolates.

    PubMed

    Mahadeva Swamy, H M; Asokan, R; Mahmood, Riaz; Nagesha, S N

    2013-04-01

    The Western Ghats of Karnataka natural ecosystem are among the most diverse and is one of the eight hottest hotspots of biological diversity in the world, that runs along the western part of India through four states including Karnataka. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains were isolated from soils of Western Ghats of Karnataka and characterized by molecular and analytical methods as a result of which 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Bt strains were isolated from soil samples using sodium acetate selection method. The morphology of crystals was studied using light and phase contrast microscopy. Isolates were further characterized for insecticidal cry gene by PCR, composition of toxins in bacterial crystals by SDS-PAGE cloning, sequencing and evaluation of toxicity was done. As a result 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Majority of the isolates showed the presence of a 55 kDa protein bands on SDS-PAGE while the rest showed 130, 73, 34, and 25 kDa bands. PCR analysis revealed predominance of Coleopteran-active cry genes in these isolates. The variations in the nucleotide sequences, crystal morphology, and mass of crystal protein(s) purified from the Bt isolates revealed genetic and molecular diversity. Three strains containing Coleopteran-active cry genes showed higher activity against larvae Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) than B. thuringiensis subsp. Morrisoni. Results indicated that Bt isolates could be utilized for bioinsecticide production, aiming to reduce the use of chemical insecticide which could be useful to use in integrated pest management to control agriculturally important pests for sustainable crop production. PMID:23207696

  14. Bio-reducible polycations from ring-opening polymerization as potential gene delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing-Ying; Liu, Yan-Hong; Huang, Zheng; Zhang, Ji; Luan, Chao-Ran; Zhang, Qin-Fang; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2016-07-01

    Synthetic polycations show great potential for the construction of ideal non-viral gene delivery systems. Several cationic polymers were synthesized by the epoxide ring-opening polymerization between diepoxide and various polyamines. Disulfide bonds were introduced to afford the polymers bio-reducibility, while the oxygen-rich structure might enhance the serum tolerance and biocompatibility. The polycations have much lower molecular weights than PEI 25 kDa, but still could well bind and condense DNA into nano-sized particles. DNA could be released from the polyplexes by addition of reductive DTT. Compared to PEI, the polycations have less cytotoxicity possibly due to their lower molecular weights and oxygen-rich structure. More significantly, these materials exhibit excellent serum tolerance than PEI, and up to 6 times higher transfection efficiency than PEI could be obtained in the presence of serum. The transfection mediated by was seldom affected even at a high concentration of serum. Much lower protein adsorption of polycations than PEI was proved by bovine serum albumin adsorption experiments. Flow cytometry also demonstrates their good serum resistance ability. PMID:27283791

  15. Cloning and expression of two Pasteurella multocida genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Manoha, F; Chevalier, G; Wróblewski, H; Delamarche, C

    1994-01-01

    A library of cloned Pasteurella multocida (toxigenic strain 9222, serotype D2) genomic sequences was constructed in Escherichia coli by incorporating TaqI digestion fragments into the plasmid vector pUC19. Immunological screening with antibodies directed against porin H, the major protein of the P multocida outer membrane, allowed the identification of a recombinant plasmid containing a 2.9-kbp DNA insert. This plasmid encoded the synthesis of two polypeptides, p25 (25 kDa) and p28 (28 kDa) which were detected in the different compartments of the E coli transformant. The peptide p25 was more abundant in the periplasm whereas p28 was mainly found in the cell envelope and in the cytosol. Immunological analysis indicates that p25, in contrast to p28, is antigenically related to porin H of P multocida. The expression in E coli of the gene encoding p28 was enhanced by induction of the lac promoter. PMID:8031908

  16. Comparative study of polyethylenimines for transient gene expression in mammalian HEK293 and CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Delafosse, Laurence; Xu, Ping; Durocher, Yves

    2016-06-10

    Three commercially available linear polyethylenimines (25kDa LPEI, 40kDa PEI"Max" and PEIpro™) were compared regarding their potency to transfect serum-free growing and suspension-adapted HEK293 and CHO cells. We determined the optimal DNA:PEI ratios for maximal expression of the reporter gene SEAP while monitoring cytotoxicity following transfection. PEIs acylation was determined by (1)H NMR and their apparent size and polydispersity assessed by size-exclusion chromatography. The propensity of PEIs to condense plasmid DNA was evaluated by agarose-gel electrophoresis. The zeta potentials and particle sizes at optimal DNA:PEI ratio were analyzed. Polyplex attachment to the cells and internalization kinetics were monitored. The quantity of PEIpro™ needed to efficiently transfect the cells was significantly lower than with LPEI and PEI"Max" and, interestingly, the maximal amount of internalized PEIpro™-based polyplexes was approximately half of that observed with its counterparts. PEIpro™ was the largest and least polydisperse polymer, but also the most cytotoxic. The optimal transfection conditions were subsequently used to express three monoclonal antibodies at larger-scale. The use of the deacylated PEI"Max" and PEIpro™ resulted in a significant increase of recombinant protein expression compared to LPEI. These findings demonstrate the importance of properly choosing the most suitable polymers to obtain optimal recombinant protein transient expression. PMID:27085888

  17. Genes and Social Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Gene E.; Fernald, Russell D.; Clayton, David F.

    2011-01-01

    What specific genes and regulatory sequences contribute to the organization and functioning of brain circuits that support social behavior? How does social experience interact with information in the genome to modulate these brain circuits? Here we address these questions by highlighting progress that has been made in identifying and understanding two key “vectors of influence” that link genes, brain, and social behavior: 1) social information alters gene readout in the brain to influence behavior; and 2) genetic variation influences brain function and social behavior. We also briefly discuss how evolutionary changes in genomic elements influence social behavior and outline prospects for a systems biology of social behavior. PMID:18988841

  18. Synthesis, characterisation and preliminary investigation of the haemocompatibility of polyethyleneimine-grafted carboxymethyl chitosan for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Mo, Yunfei; Liu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Yuanming; Wang, Changyong; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-05-01

    The development of safe and efficient gene carriers is the key to the clinical success of gene therapy. In the present study, carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) was prepared by chitosan (CS) alkalisation and carboxymethylation reactions. Then polyethyleneimine (PEI) was grafted to the backbone of CMCS by an amidation reaction. The CMCS-PEI copolymer showed strong complexation capability with DNA to form nanoparticles, and achieved lower cytotoxicity and higher transfection efficiency compared with PEI (25 kDa) towards 293T and 3T3 cells. Moreover, the haemocompatibility of the CMCS-PEI copolymer was investigated through the aggregation, morphology and lysis of human red blood cells (RBCs), along with the impact on the clotting function with activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT) and thromboelastographic (TEG) assays. The results demonstrated that the CMCS-PEI copolymer with a concentration lower than 0.05 mg/mL had little impact on the aggregation, morphology or lysis of RBCs, or on blood coagulation. Therefore, the copolymer may be a strong alternative candidate as an effective and safe non-viral vector. PMID:26952412

  19. Engineered glycated amino dendritic polymers as specific nonviral gene delivery vectors targeting the receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Giron-Gonzalez, M Dolores; Morales-Portillo, Arturo; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Lopez-Jaramillo, F Javier; Hernandez-Mateo, Fernando; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Salto-Gonzalez, Rafael

    2014-06-18

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is involved in diabetes or angiogenesis in tumors. Under pathological conditions, RAGE is overexpressed and upon ligand binding and internalization stimulates signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation. In this work, amino dendritic polymers PEI 25 kDa and alkylated derivatives of PAMAM-G2 were engineered by the nonenzymatic Maillard glycation reaction to generate novel AGE-containing gene delivery vectors targeting the RAGE. The glycated dendritic polymers were easily prepared and retained the capability to bind and protect DNA from endonucleases. Furthermore, while glycation decreased the transfection efficiency of the dendriplexes in CHO-k1 cells which do not express RAGE, glycated dendriplexes acted as efficient transfection reagents in CHO-k1 cells which stably express recombinant RAGE. In addition, preincubation with BSA-AGEs, a natural ligand of the RAGE, or dansyl cadaverine, an inhibitor of the RAGE internalization, blocked transfection, confirming their specificity toward RAGE. The results were confirmed in NRK and RAW264.7 cell lines, which naturally express the receptor. The glycated compounds retain their transfection efficiency in the presence of serum and promote in vivo transfection in a mouse model. Accordingly, RAGE is a suitable molecular target for the development of site-directed engineered glycated nonviral gene vectors. PMID:24852962

  20. Autosomal Recessive Hypotrichosis with Woolly Hair Caused by a Mutation in the Keratin 25 Gene Expressed in Hair Follicles.

    PubMed

    Zernov, Nikolay V; Skoblov, Mikhail Y; Marakhonov, Andrey V; Shimomura, Yutaka; Vasilyeva, Tatyana A; Konovalov, Fedor A; Abrukova, Anna V; Zinchenko, Rena A

    2016-06-01

    Hypotrichosis is an abnormal condition characterized by decreased hair density and various defects in hair structure and growth patterns. In particular, in woolly hair, hypotrichosis is characterized by a tightly curled structure and abnormal growth. In this study, we present a detailed comparative examination of individuals affected by autosomal-recessive hypotrichosis (ARH), which distinguishes two types of ARH. Earlier, we demonstrated that exon 4 deletion in the lipase H gene caused an ARH (hypotrichosis 7; MIM: 604379) in populations of the Volga-Ural region of Russia. Screening for this mutation in all affected individuals revealed its presence only in the group with the hypotrichosis 7 phenotype. Other patients formed a separate group of woolly hair-associated ARH, with a homozygous missense mutation c.712G>T (p.Val238Leu) in a highly conserved position of type I keratin KRT25 (K25). Haplotype analysis indicated a founder effect. An expression study in the HaCaT cell line demonstrated a deleterious effect of the p.Val238Leu mutation on the formation of keratin intermediate filaments. Hence, we have identified a previously unreported missense mutation in the KRT25 gene causing ARH with woolly hair. PMID:26902920

  1. VEGF therapeutic gene delivery using dendrimer type bio-reducible polymer into human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyojung; Nam, Kihoon; Nam, Joung-Pyo; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Yong Man; Joo, Wan Seok; Kim, Sung Wan

    2015-12-28

    The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has garnered great attention in the expansive diversity of biomedical research. Despite this broad interest in stem cells, limited incorporation and poor viability are major disadvantages for accomplishing therapeutic success in the field of hMSC-based cell therapy, and an optimal approach for hMSC-based cell therapy using non-viral vectors has not been established. Hence, we examined the possibility of performing gene therapy using the biodegradable polymeric non-viral vector Arginine-grafted poly (cystaminebisacrylamide-diaminohexane) (ABP)-conjugated poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer (PAM-ABP) in hMSCs. PAM-ABP formed compact nanosized polyplexes and showed low cytotoxicity compared to bPEI 25k and Lipofectamine® 2000 in hMSCs. Although the cellular uptake was similar, the transfection efficiency and VEGF expression of PAM-ABP using gWiz-Luc and pβ-VEGF were higher than those of the control groups. Although hMSCs were transfected, their stem cell characteristics were retained. Our results suggest that PAM-ABP has the ability to deliver a therapeutic gene in hMSCs. PMID:26368313

  2. A Family of Bioreducible Poly(disulfide amine)s for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Mei; Xu, Rongzuo; Kim, Sun Hwa; Bull, David A.; Kim, Sung Wan

    2009-01-01

    A family of bioreducible poly(disulfide amine)s, which differ in the length of polymethylene spacer [–(CH2)n–] in the main chain and the side chain, has been synthesized. These bioreducible poly(disulfide amine)s exhibit local environment specific degradability and are associated with lower cytotoxicity than branched poly(ethylenimine) (bPEI, 25kDa). These cationic polymers also show higher buffering capacity and protonation degree than bPEI, facilitating the endosomal escape of carried genetic materials. The transfection efficiency of these agents is polymethylene length dependent. Poly(cystaminebisacrylamide-spermine) [poly(CBA-SP);], poly(cystaminebisacrylamide-bis(3-aminopropyl)-1,3-propanediamine) [poly(CBA-APPD);], and poly(cyxtaminebisacrylamide-bis(3-aminopropyl)-ethylenediamine) [ploy(CBA-APED);] with longer propylene [–(CH2)3–] side spacer, demonstrate higher transfection efficacy than the counterpart poly(cystaminebisacrylamide-bis(2-aminoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine) [poly(CBA-AEPD);] and poly(cystaminebisacrylamide-triethylenetetramine) [poly(CBA-TETA);], which have shorter ethylene [–(CH2)2–] side spacer. The poly(CBA-SP), poly(CBA-APPD), poly(CBA-APED) with the main chain spacer of –(CH2)4–, –(CH2)3–, –(CH2)2– demonstrate similar transfection efficiency, indicating the length of polymer main chain spacer has less influence on transfection efficiency. However, with the same short ethylene [–(CH2)2–] side spacer, poly(CBA-AEPD), with the longer main chain oligomethylene units [–(CH2)3–], showed relatively higher transfection efficiency than poly(CBA-TETA), having shorter main chain oligomethylene units [–(CH2)2–]. Of these polymeric carriers, poly(CBA-SP) demonstrated the highest transfection in the C2C12 cell line, while poly(CBA-APED) showed the highest transfection in the Hela cell line. All of these agents showed greater transfection activity than commercialized bPEI 25kDa. The poly(disulfide amine)s are promising

  3. Experiment K-6-24, K-6-25, K-6-26. Radiation dosimetry and spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A.; Benton, E. R.; Dudkin, V.; Marennyi, A.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation experiments flown by the University of San Francisco on the Cosmos 1887 spacecraft were designed to measure the depth dependence of both total dose and heavy particle flux, dose and dose equivalent, down to very thin shielding. Three experiments were flown and were located both inside and outside the Cosmos 1887 spacecraft. Tissue absorbed dose rates of 264 to 0.028 rad d(-1) under shielding of 0.013 to 3.4 g/sq cm of (7)LiF were found outside the spacecraft and 0.025 rad d(-1) inside. Heavy particle fluxes of 3.43 to 1.03 x 10 to the minus 3rd power cm -2 sub s -1 sub sr -1 under shielding of 0.195 to 1.33 g/sq cm plastic were found outside the spacecraft and 4.25 times 10 to the minus 4th power cm -2 sub s -1 sub sr -1 inside (LET infinity H2O greater than or equal to 4 keV/micron m). The corresponding heavy particle dose equivalent rates outside the spacecraft were 30.8 to 19.8 mrem d(-1) and 11.4 mrem d(-1) inside. The large dose and particle fluxes found at small shielding thicknesses emphasize the importance of these and future measurements at low shielding, for predicting radiation effects on space materials and experiments where shielding is minimal and on astronauts during EVA. The Cosmos 1887 mission contained a variety of international radiobiological investigations to which the measurements apply. The high inclination orbit (62 degrees) of this mission provided a radiation environment which is seldom available to U.S. investigators. The radiation measurements will be compared with those of other research groups and also with those performed on the Shuttle, and will be used to refine computer models employed to calculate radiation exposures on other spacecraft, including the Space Station.

  4. Impacts to Project from {sup 99}Tc Contamination on the K-25 / K-27 Decontamination and Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Paul; Boris, Greg

    2008-01-15

    Like so many good ideas that evolved as the U.S. was learning about nuclear materials, the introduction of recovered uranium from the fuel reprocessing efforts is causing additional headaches in the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the gaseous diffusion plants at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc) is a low-energy beta emitter that is a product of the fission reaction. Its introduction into the in an operating gaseous diffusion plant is of little or no operational or dose concern but creates many issues when planning and conducting the D and D of those facilities. These issues include control of contamination and beta exposure to workers and significant waste management issues when trying to ship and dispose of the waste materials. Technetium-99 is very long lived and mobile in the environment and is therefore has very restrictive concentration limits in wastes going to disposal facilities. The gaseous diffusion process was developed for isotopic enrichment of uranium. Gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) was passed through a series of stages to affect the separation of the fissionable U-235 from U-238. Because of the low concentration of U-235 in naturally occurring uranium ({approx}0.711%), the number of separation stages required to enrich the uranium to a level usable for reactor fuels or nuclear weapons was quite large. For instance, the K-25 Building, where uranium was enriched, is a U-shaped structure approximately one mile in length. Similar sizes of stages were grouped in cells, and up to 14 cells were contained in a single building unit. Multiple building units were arranged in series to process the uranium, with the capability of isolation and bypass of each cell. This arrangement of multiple stages was referred to as the cascades. Since UF{sub 6} is a heavy molecule, lighter gases that were contained in the process gas stream moved at a higher rate than UF{sub 6}. These gases tended to quickly flow to the latter stages of the cascade (also known as the 'top of the cascade'). The removal of certain undesired lighter gases was done in the purge cascades. Technetium forms volatile fluoride compounds under the conditions used to chemically convert uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) in reactor tails to UF{sub 6}. Thus, Tc vaporized and flowed with the process gas in the cascade. However, because Tc is much lighter than U, it rapidly migrated to the top of the cascade and into the purge cascades. Most of the Tc is thought to be located in the purge cascade equipment. The purge cascade equipment is generally located in Area 1 of K-25 and Areas 7 and 8 in K-27. Fourteen building units are now known or believed to be contaminated with {sup 99}Tc. During the demolition activities, the equipment used is expected to become contaminated. To prevent cross-contamination of other wastes with {sup 99}Tc, separate equipment will be used for the southern end of the K-25 east wing. This same demolition equipment will be employed in K-27 to help minimize equipment decontamination efforts at the end of the project. However, because of this sequential schedule, any delays for demolition of the K-25 Building will adversely impact the schedule for K-27. The {sup 99}Tc contamination of the K-25 and K-27 D and D Project is now better known, but considerable planning will still be needed to control migration of this material to meet radiological controls and waste management limits. Since {sup 99}Tc has been an emerging issue over the last decade, the measurement, controls, and ultimately the impacts (e.g., cost and schedule) to the project have caused a significant increase in the planning effort for the D and D of these facilities and are expected to increase the ultimate cost of remediation. The cost increase will not be known until the planning effort is restarted (probably in FY 08-09). The contamination controls to be put in place to minimize the spread of this contaminant are not expected to be fully demonstrated until the demolition of the affected areas later in the project.

  5. Technical and Economical Demands on 25K - 77K Refrigerators for Future HTS — Series Products in Power Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromoll, B.

    2004-06-01

    For the future high temperature superconductivity, HTS, series products new refrigerators are essential. Demands are made on these which are only partly fulfilled by refrigerators available in the market today. This refers to cooling power, initial cost and in particular reliability. Without proper refrigeration techniques it will be almost impossible to bring HTS products to the market. Based on the experiences made by the construction and operation of HTS prototypes within our company, like the 400 kW motor, 1.2 MVA current limiter and 1 MVA traction-transformer provided with refrigerators which are available in the market today, criteria have been established to identify the future technical and economical requirements. These criteria apply to efficiency, maintainability, operation flexibility, feasibility of integration and performance/cost ratio. For the temperature range of 20 K to 77 K cooling with Gifford-McMahon, Pulse Tube, Stirling and Mixture-Cascade refrigerators are applicable. The development potential of these processes are compared for the different applications in future series products. Presented are the necessary steps towards reliable and economic refrigerators from the viewpoint of an equipment manufacturer. These are essential for a market entry in the year 2008.

  6. /sup 3/He constant-volume gas thermometry: calculations for a temperature scale between 0. 8 and 25 K

    SciTech Connect

    Pavese, F.; Steur, P.P.M.

    1987-10-01

    A discussion is presented on the possibilities of a /sup 3/He gas thermometer for defining a temperature scale below 30 K, based on recent new measurements of the virial coefficient. The influence of all corrections of interest is given in comparison with /sup 4/He gas thermometry and with /sup 4/He and /sup 3/He vapor pressure thermometry. It is shown that a /sup 3/He gas thermometer can be operated down to temperatures < 1 K, with an estimated inaccuracy of less than +/- 0.5 mK, thereby obviating the explicit need of the /sup 3/He and /sup 4/He vapor pressure scales below 5K, and directly joining a possible scale based on the /sup 3/He melting curve.

  7. 77 FR 19525 - Specification for 15 kV and 25 kV Primary Underground Power Cable

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... Activities Excluded from Executive Order 12372,'' (50 FR 47034) exempted the Rural Utilities Service loans... related notice titled ``Department Programs and Activities Excluded from Executive Order 12372'' (50 FR... published August 30, 2007, at 72 FR 50081, invited interested parties to submit comments. The National...

  8. Intracavity frequency doubling of a 2,5-kHz pulsed Ti:Al2O3 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, P.; Hanson, F.

    1993-11-01

    An intracavity frequency doubled Ti:Al2O3 laser using a cw-pumped, repetitively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser as pump source is reported. Thus an efficient tunable blue source is obtained that provides a reliable all solid state system based on laser diode pumping.

  9. Production of dioxins and furans for various solid fuels burnt in 25 kW automatic boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopan, František; Horák, Jiří; Krpec, Kamil; Kubesa, Petr; Dej, Milan; Laciok, Vendula

    2016-06-01

    There has been brown coal, black coal and maize straw in a pellet form burnt in an automatic boiler. Production of dibenzodioxins and dibenzofuranes, recomputated through toxicity equivalents, expressed as the emission factor relative to the fuel unit, has differentiated in a range of ca. three orders (0.05 up to 78.9 ng/kg) in dependence on a sort of the used fuel. The measured values have been compared with emission factors used for the emission inventory in the Czech Republic and Poland and with the emission limit applicable for waste incineration plants. The study has proven the influence of chlorine content in fuel on production of dioxins and furanes.

  10. A 25 kW solar photovoltaic flat panel power supply for an electrodialysis water desalination unit in New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, J. R.; Crutcher, J. L.

    1980-06-01

    The stand-alone system consists of a flat panel array employing silicon ribbon solar cells, used in conjunction with a lead-acid battery bank. Electrodialysis is an energy-conservative process for the desalination of water, in which ions are transferred from one solution through a membrane into another solution by imposition of a direct electrical current. The system design is intended to be prototypical of part of the drinking water supply for a remote village. The specific task of this system is to aid in the restoration of an aquifer following a uranium leaching operation.

  11. The effect of therapeutic hypothermia on the expression of inflammatory response genes following moderate traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Truettner, Jessie S; Suzuki, Takamoto; Dietrich, W Dalton

    2005-08-18

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiates a cascade of cellular and molecular responses including both pro- and anti-inflammatory. Although post-traumatic hypothermia has been shown to improve outcome in various models of brain injury, the underlying mechanisms responsible for these effects have not been clarified. In this study, inflammation cDNA arrays and semi-quantitative RT-PCR were used to detect genes that are differentially regulated after TBI. In addition, the effect of post-traumatic hypothermia on the expression of selective genes was also studied. Rats (n = 6-8 per group) underwent moderate fluid-percussion (F-P) brain injury with and without hypothermic treatment (33 degrees C/3 h). RNA from 3-h or 24-h survival was analyzed for the expression of IL1-beta, IL2, IL6, TGF-beta2, growth-regulated oncogene (GRO), migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and MCP (a transcription factor). The interleukins IL-1beta, IL-2, and IL-6 and TGF-beta and GRO were strongly upregulated early and transiently from 2- to 30-fold over sham at 3 h, with normalization by 24 h. In contrast, the expressions of MIF and MCP were both reduced by TBI compared to sham. Post-traumatic hypothermia had no significant effect on the acute expression of the majority of genes investigated. However, the expression of TGF-beta2 at 24 h was significantly reduced by temperature manipulation. The mechanism by which post-traumatic hypothermia is protective may not involve a general genetic response of the inflammatory genes. However, specific genes, including TGF-beta2, may be altered and effect cell death mechanisms after TBI. Hypothermia differentially regulates certain genes and may target more delayed responses underlying the secondary damage following TBI. PMID:15922484

  12. GeneLab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Thompson, Terri G.

    2015-01-01

    NASA GeneLab is expected to capture and distribute omics data and experimental and process conditions most relevant to research community in their statistical and theoretical analysis of NASAs omics data.

  13. Terplex Gene Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Wan

    2005-01-01

    Polymeric gene delivery systems have been developed to overcome problems caused by viral carriers. They are low cytotoxic, have no size limit, are convenient in handling, of low cost and reproducible. A Terplex gene delivery system consisting of plasmid DNA, low density lipoprotein and hydropholized poly-L-lysine was designed and characterized. The plasmid DNA, when formulated with stearyl PLL and LDL, forms a stable and hydrophobicity/charge-balanced Terplex system of optimal size for efficient cellular uptake. DNA is still intact after the Terplex formation. This information is expected to be utilized for the development of improved transfection vector for in vivo gene therapy. Terplex DNA complex showed significantly longer retention in the vascular space than naked DNA. This system was used in the augmentation of myocardial transfection at an infarction site with the VEGF gene. PMID:16243067

  14. Terplex gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Wan

    2005-01-01

    Polymeric gene delivery systems have been developed to overcome problems caused by viral carriers. They are low cytotoxic, have no size limit, are convenient in handling, of low cost and reproducible. A Terplex gene delivery system consisting of plasmid DNA, low density lipoprotein and hydropholized poly-L-lysine was designed and characterized. The plasmid DNA, when formulated with stearyl PLL and LDL, forms a stable and hydrophobicity/charge-balanced Terplex system of optimal size for efficient cellular uptake. DNA is still intact after the Terplex formation. This information is expected to be utilized for the development of improved transfection vector for in vivo gene therapy. Terplex DNA complex showed significantly longer retention in the vascular space than naked DNA. This system was used in the augmentation of myocardial transfection at an infarction site with the VEGF gene. PMID:16240997

  15. Vaginal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; Del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Isla, Arantxazu; Solinís, María Angeles

    2015-09-15

    In the last years, vaginal gene therapy has gained increasing attention mainly for the treatment and control of sexually transmitted infections. DNA delivery has been also suggested to improve reproductive outcomes for women with deficiencies in the female reproductive tract. Although no product has reached clinical phase, preclinical investigations reveal the potential of the vaginal tract as an effective administration route for gene delivery. This review focuses on the main advantages and challenges of vaginal gene therapy, and on the most used nucleic acid delivery systems, including viral and non-viral vectors. Additionally, the advances in the application of vaginal gene therapy for the treatment and/or prevention of infectious diseases such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the human papillomavirus (HPV) or the herpes simplex virus (HSV) are presented. PMID:26189799

  16. "Bad genes" & criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    González-Tapia, María Isabel; Obsuth, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The genetics of the accused is trying to break into the courts. To date several candidate genes have been put forward and their links to antisocial behavior have been examined and documented with some consistency. In this paper, we focus on the so called "warrior gene", or the low-activity allele of the MAOA gene, which has been most consistently related to human behavior and specifically to violence and antisocial behavior. In preparing this paper we had two objectives. First, to summarize and analyze the current scientific evidence, in order to gain an in depth understanding of the state of the issue and determine whether a dominant line of generally accepted scientific knowledge in this field can be asserted. Second, to derive conclusions and put forward recommendations related to the use of genetic information, specifically the presence of the low-activity genotype of the MAOA gene, in modulation of criminal responsibility in European and US courts. PMID:25708001

  17. Fibrinogen gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Fish, Richard J; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2012-09-01

    The Aα, Bβ and γ polypeptide chains of fibrinogen are encoded by a three gene cluster on human chromosome four. The fibrinogen genes (FGB-FGA-FGG) are expressed almost exclusively in hepatocytes where their output is coordinated to ensure a sufficient mRNA pool for each chain and maintain an abundant plasma fibrinogen protein level. Fibrinogen gene expression is controlled by the activity of proximal promoters which contain binding sites for hepatocyte transcription factors, including proteins which influence fibrinogen transcription in response to acute-phase inflammatory stimuli. The fibrinogen gene cluster also contains cis regulatory elements; enhancer sequences with liver activities identified by sequence conservation and functional genomics. While the transcriptional control of this gene cluster is fascinating biology, the medical impetus to understand fibrinogen gene regulation stems from the association of cardiovascular disease risk with high level circulating fibrinogen. In the general population this level varies from about 1.5 to 3.5 g/l. This variation between individuals is influenced by genotype, suggesting there are genetic variants contributing to fibrinogen levels which reside in fibrinogen regulatory loci. A complete picture of how fibrinogen genes are regulated will therefore point towards novel sources of regulatory variants. In this review we discuss regulation of the fibrinogen genes from proximal promoters and enhancers, the influence of acute-phase stimulation, post-transcriptional regulation by miRNAs and functional regulatory variants identified in genetic studies. Finally, we discuss the fibrinogen locus in light of recent advances in understanding chromosomal architecture and suggest future directions for researching the mechanisms that control fibrinogen expression. PMID:22836683

  18. Gene therapy in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Riban, Véronique; Fitzsimons, Helen L.; During, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Results from animal models suggest gene therapy is a promising new approach for the treatment of epilepsy. Several candidate genes such as neuropeptide Y and galanin have been demonstrated in preclinical studies to have a positive effect on seizure activity. For a successful gene therapy-based treatment, efficient delivery of a transgene to target neurons is also essential. To this end, advances have been made in the areas of cell transplantation and in the development of recombinant viral vectors for gene delivery. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors in particular show promise for gene therapy of neurological disorders due to their neuronal tropism, lack of toxicity, and stable persistence in neurons, which results in robust, long-term expression of the transgene. rAAV vectors have been recently used in phase I clinical trials of Parkinson’s disease with an excellent safety profile. Prior to commencement of phase I trials for gene therapy of epilepsy, further preclinical studies are ongoing including evaluation of the therapeutic benefit in chronicmodels of epileptogenesis, as well as assessment of safety intoxicological studies. PMID:18717707

  19. Evidence for homosexuality gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, R.

    1993-07-16

    A genetic analysis of 40 pairs of homosexual brothers has uncovered a region on the X chromosome that appears to contain a gene or genes for homosexuality. When analyzing the pedigrees of homosexual males, the researcheres found evidence that the trait has a higher likelihood of being passed through maternal genes. This led them to search the X chromosome for genes predisposing to homosexuality. The researchers examined the X chromosomes of pairs of homosexual brothers for regions of DNA that most or all had in common. Of the 40 sets of brothers, 33 shared a set of five markers in the q28 region of the long arm of the X chromosome. The linkage has a LOD score of 4.0, which translates into a 99.5% certainty that there is a gene or genes in this area that predispose males to homosexuality. The chief researcher warns, however, that this one site cannot explain all instances of homosexuality, since there were some cases where the trait seemed to be passed paternally. And even among those brothers where there was no evidence that the trait was passed paternally, seven sets of brothers did not share the Xq28 markers. It seems likely that homosexuality arises from a variety of causes.

  20. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  1. 5. OVERHEAD VIEW OF GENE CAMP LOOKING SOUTH. GENE PUMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. OVERHEAD VIEW OF GENE CAMP LOOKING SOUTH. GENE PUMP PLANT IS AT CENTER WITH ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLEX IN FOREGROUND AND RESIDENTIAL AREA BEYOND PLANT. - Gene Pump Plant, South of Gene Wash Reservoir, 2 miles west of Whitsett Pump Plant, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  2. Isolation and overexpression of a gene encoding an extracellular beta-(1,3-1,4)-glucanase from Streptococcus bovis JB1.

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, M S; McCrae, S I; Flint, H J

    1997-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1 was found to produce a 25-kDa extracellular enzyme active against beta-(1,3-1,4)-glucans. A gene was isolated encoding a specific beta-(1,3-1,4)-glucanase that corresponds to this size and belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 16. A 4- to 10-fold increase in supernatant beta-glucanase activity was obtained when the cloned beta-glucanase gene was reintroduced into S. bovis JB1 by use of constructs based on the plasmid vector pTRW10 or pIL253. The beta-(1,3-1,4)-glucanase gene was also expressed upon introduction of the pTRW10 construct pTRWL1R into Lactococcus lactis IL2661 and Enterococcus faecalis JH2-SS, although extracellular activity was 8- to 50-fold lower than that in S. bovis JB1. The beta-(1,3-1,4)-glucanase purified from the culture supernatant of S. bovis JB1 carrying pTRWL1R showed a K(m) of 2.8 mg per ml and a Vmax of 338 mumol of glucose equivalents per min per mg of protein with barley beta-glucan as the substrate. The S. bovis beta-(1,3-1,4)-glucanase may contribute to the ability of this bacterium to utilize starch by degrading structural polysaccharides present in endosperm cell walls. PMID:9327538

  3. Prospects for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ali, Robin R

    2004-01-01

    Inherited retinal disease, which includes conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), affects about 1/3000 of the population in the Western world. It is characterized by gradual loss of vision and results from mutations in any one of 60 or so different genes. There are currently no effective treatments, but many of the genes have now been identified and their functions elucidated, providing a major impetus to develop gene-based treatments. Many of the disease genes are photoreceptor- or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell specific. Since adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors can be used for efficient gene transfer to these two cell types, we are developing AAV-mediated gene therapy approaches for inherited retinal degeneration using animal models that have defects in these cells. The retinal degeneration slow (rds or Prph2Rd2/Rd) mouse, a model of recessive RP, lacks a functional gene encoding peripherin 2, which is a photoreceptor-specific protein required for the formation of outer segment discs. We have previously demonstrated restoration of photoreceptor ultrastructure and function by AAV-mediated gene transfer of peripherin 2. We have now extended our assessment to central visual neuronal responses in order to show an improvement of central visual function. The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat, provides another model of recessive RP. Here the defect is due to a defect in Mertk, a gene that is expressed in the RPE and encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase that is thought to be involved in the recognition and binding of outer segment debris. The gene defect results in the inability of the RPE to phagocytose the shed outer segments from photoreceptor cells. The resulting accumulation of debris between the RPE and the neuroretina leads to progressive loss of photoreceptor cells. AAV-mediated delivery of Mertk to the RPE results in reduction of debris indicating that the phagocytosing function of the RPE is restored and delays the degeneration of the

  4. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, M.; Myers, C.; Faith, J.

    2008-05-01

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  5. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, M. Myers, C. Faith, J.

    2008-05-15

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  6. Biodegradable gadolinium-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers for gene transfection and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaolong; Wang, Gangmin; Shi, Ting; Shao, Zhihong; Zhao, Peng; Shi, Donglu; Ren, Jie; Lin, Chao; Wang, Peijun

    2016-08-01

    Theranostic nano-polyplexes containing gene and imaging agents hold a great promise for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we develop a group of new gadolinium (Gd)-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide)s for gene delivery and T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Cationic poly(urethane amide)s (denoted as CPUAs) having multiple disulfide bonds, urethane and amide linkages were synthesized by stepwise polycondensation reaction between 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl)piperazine and a mixture of di(4-nitrophenyl)-2, 2'-dithiodiethanocarbonate (DTDE-PNC) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride at varied molar ratios. Then, Gd-chelated CPUAs (denoted as GdCPUAs) were produced by chelating Gd(III) ions with DTPA residues of CPUAs. These GdCPUAs could condense gene into nanosized and positively-charged polyplexes in a physiological condition and, however, liberated gene in an intracellular reductive environment. In vitro transfection experiments revealed that the GdCPUA at a DTDE-PNC/DTPA residue molar ratio of 85/15 induced the highest transfection efficiency in different cancer cells. This efficiency was higher than that yielded with 25kDa branched polyethylenimine as a positive control. GdCPUAs and their polyplexes exhibited low cytotoxicity when an optimal transfection activity was detected. Moreover, GdCPUAs may serve as contrast agents for T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The results of this work indicate that biodegradable Gd-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers have high potential for tumor theranostics. PMID:27157741

  7. GeneCards Version 3: the human gene integrator.

    PubMed

    Safran, Marilyn; Dalah, Irina; Alexander, Justin; Rosen, Naomi; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Shmoish, Michael; Nativ, Noam; Bahir, Iris; Doniger, Tirza; Krug, Hagit; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Olender, Tsviya; Golan, Yaron; Stelzer, Gil; Harel, Arye; Lancet, Doron

    2010-01-01

    GeneCards (www.genecards.org) is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of annotative information about human genes, widely used for nearly 15 years. Its gene-centric content is automatically mined and integrated from over 80 digital sources, resulting in a web-based deep-linked card for each of >73,000 human gene entries, encompassing the following categories: protein coding, pseudogene, RNA gene, genetic locus, cluster and uncategorized. We now introduce GeneCards Version 3, featuring a speedy and sophisticated search engine and a revamped, technologically enabling infrastructure, catering to the expanding needs of biomedical researchers. A key focus is on gene-set analyses, which leverage GeneCards' unique wealth of combinatorial annotations. These include the GeneALaCart batch query facility, which tabulates user-selected annotations for multiple genes and GeneDecks, which identifies similar genes with shared annotations, and finds set-shared annotations by descriptor enrichment analysis. Such set-centric features address a host of applications, including microarray data analysis, cross-database annotation mapping and gene-disorder associations for drug targeting. We highlight the new Version 3 database architecture, its multi-faceted search engine, and its semi-automated quality assurance system. Data enhancements include an expanded visualization of gene expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues, an integrated alternative splicing pattern display, and augmented multi-source SNPs and pathways sections. GeneCards now provides direct links to gene-related research reagents such as antibodies, recombinant proteins, DNA clones and inhibitory RNAs and features gene-related drugs and compounds lists. We also portray the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score annotation landscape tool for scoring a gene's functional information status. Finally, we delineate examples of applications and collaborations that have benefited from the GeneCards suite. Database

  8. How old is my gene?

    PubMed Central

    Capra, John A.; Stolzer, Maureen; Durand, Dannie; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    Gene functions, interactions, disease associations, and ecological distributions are all correlated with gene age. However, it is challenging to estimate the intricate series of evolutionary events leading to a modern day gene and then reduce this history to a single age estimate. Focusing on eukaryotic gene families, we introduce a framework in which to compare current strategies for quantifying gene age, discuss key differences between these methods, and highlight several common problems. We argue that genes with complex evolutionary histories do not have a single well-defined age. As a result, care must be taken to articulate the goals and assumptions of any analysis that uses gene age estimates. Recent algorithmic advances offer the promise of gene age estimates that are fast, accurate, and consistent across gene families. This will enable a shift to integrated genome-wide analyses of all events in gene evolutionary histories in the near future. PMID:23915718

  9. Saporin suicide gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zarovni, Natasa; Vago, Riccardo; Fabbrini, Maria Serena

    2009-01-01

    New genes useful in suicide gene therapy are those encoding toxins such as plant ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs), which can irreversibly block protein synthesis, triggering apoptotic cell death. Plasmids expressing a cytosolic saporin (SAP) gene from common soapwort (Saponaria officinalis) are generated by placing the region encoding the mature plant toxin under the control of strong viral promoters and may be placed under tumor-specific promoters. The ability of the resulting constructs to inhibit protein synthesis is tested in cultured tumor cells co-transfected with a luciferase reporter gene. SAP expression driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (pCI-SAP) demonstrates that only 10 ng ofplasmid DNA per 1.6 x 10(4) B16 melanoma cells drastically reduces luciferase reporter activity to 18% of that in control cells (1). Direct intratumoral injections are performed in an aggressive melanoma model. B16 melanoma-bearing mice injected with pCI-SAP complexed with lipofectamine or N-(2,3-dioleoyloxy-1-propyl) trimethylammonium methyl sulfate (DOTAP) show a noteworthy attenuation in tumor growth, and this effect is significantly augmented by repeated administrations of the DNA complexes. Here, we describe in detail this cost-effective and safe suicide gene approach. PMID:19565907

  10. Hox genes and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hrycaj, Steven M.; Wellik, Deneen M.

    2016-01-01

    Hox proteins are a deeply conserved group of transcription factors originally defined for their critical roles in governing segmental identity along the antero-posterior (AP) axis in Drosophila. Over the last 30 years, numerous data generated in evolutionarily diverse taxa have clearly shown that changes in the expression patterns of these genes are closely associated with the regionalization of the AP axis, suggesting that Hox genes have played a critical role in the evolution of novel body plans within Bilateria. Despite this deep functional conservation and the importance of these genes in AP patterning, key questions remain regarding many aspects of Hox biology. In this commentary, we highlight recent reports that have provided novel insight into the origins of the mammalian Hox cluster, the role of Hox genes in the generation of a limbless body plan, and a novel putative mechanism in which Hox genes may encode specificity along the AP axis. Although the data discussed here offer a fresh perspective, it is clear that there is still much to learn about Hox biology and the roles it has played in the evolution of the Bilaterian body plan. PMID:27239281

  11. LQTS gene LOVD database.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Moss, Arthur; Cong, Peikuan; Pan, Min; Chang, Bingxi; Zheng, Liangrong; Fang, Quan; Zareba, Wojciech; Robinson, Jennifer; Lin, Changsong; Li, Zhongxiang; Wei, Junfang; Zeng, Qiang; Qi, Ming

    2010-11-01

    The Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders that predisposes young individuals to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. LQTS is mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of cardiac ion channels (KCNQ1, KCNH2,SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2). Many other genes involved in LQTS have been described recently(KCNJ2, AKAP9, ANK2, CACNA1C, SCNA4B, SNTA1, and CAV3). We created an online database(http://www.genomed.org/LOVD/introduction.html) that provides information on variants in LQTS-associated genes. As of February 2010, the database contains 1738 unique variants in 12 genes. A total of 950 variants are considered pathogenic, 265 are possible pathogenic, 131 are unknown/unclassified, and 292 have no known pathogenicity. In addition to these mutations collected from published literature, we also submitted information on gene variants, including one possible novel pathogenic mutation in the KCNH2 splice site found in ten Chinese families with documented arrhythmias. The remote user is able to search the data and is encouraged to submit new mutations into the database. The LQTS database will become a powerful tool for both researchers and clinicians. PMID:20809527

  12. Engineered Gene Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasty, Jeff

    2003-03-01

    Uncovering the structure and function of gene regulatory networks has become one of the central challenges of the post-genomic era. Theoretical models of protein-DNA feedback loops and gene regulatory networks have long been proposed, and recently, certain qualitative features of such models have been experimentally corroborated. This talk will focus on model and experimental results that demonstrate how a naturally occurring gene network can be used as a ``parts list'' for synthetic network design. The model formulation leads to computational and analytical approaches relevant to nonlinear dynamics and statistical physics, and the utility of such a formulation will be demonstrated through the consideration of specific design criteria for several novel genetic devices. Fluctuations originating from small molecule-number effects will be discussed in the context of model predictions, and the experimental validation of these stochastic effects underscores the importance of internal noise in gene expression. Potential biotech applications will be highlighted within the framework of cellular control schemes. Specifically, the coupling of an oscillating cellular process to a synthetic oscillator will be considered, and the resulting model behavior will be analyzed in the context of synchronization. The underlying methodology highlights the utility of engineering-based methods in the design of synthetic gene regulatory networks.

  13. FunGene: the functional gene pipeline and repository

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Jordan A.; Chai, Benli; Wang, Qiong; Sun, Yanni; Brown, C. Titus; Tiedje, James M.; Cole, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA genes have become the standard molecular markers for microbial community analysis for good reasons, including universal occurrence in cellular organisms, availability of large databases, and ease of rRNA gene region amplification and analysis. As markers, however, rRNA genes have some significant limitations. The rRNA genes are often present in multiple copies, unlike most protein-coding genes. The slow rate of change in rRNA genes means that multiple species sometimes share identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, while many more species share identical sequences in the short 16S rRNA regions commonly analyzed. In addition, the genes involved in many important processes are not distributed in a phylogenetically coherent manner, potentially due to gene loss or horizontal gene transfer. While rRNA genes remain the most commonly used markers, key genes in ecologically important pathways, e.g., those involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling, can provide important insights into community composition and function not obtainable through rRNA analysis. However, working with ecofunctional gene data requires some tools beyond those required for rRNA analysis. To address this, our Functional Gene Pipeline and Repository (FunGene; http://fungene.cme.msu.edu/) offers databases of many common ecofunctional genes and proteins, as well as integrated tools that allow researchers to browse these collections and choose subsets for further analysis, build phylogenetic trees, test primers and probes for coverage, and download aligned sequences. Additional FunGene tools are specialized to process coding gene amplicon data. For example, FrameBot produces frameshift-corrected protein and DNA sequences from raw reads while finding the most closely related protein reference sequence. These tools can help provide better insight into microbial communities by directly studying key genes involved in important ecological processes. PMID:24101916

  14. GeneCards Version 3: the human gene integrator

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Marilyn; Dalah, Irina; Alexander, Justin; Rosen, Naomi; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Shmoish, Michael; Nativ, Noam; Bahir, Iris; Doniger, Tirza; Krug, Hagit; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Olender, Tsviya; Golan, Yaron; Stelzer, Gil; Harel, Arye; Lancet, Doron

    2010-01-01

    GeneCards (www.genecards.org) is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of annotative information about human genes, widely used for nearly 15 years. Its gene-centric content is automatically mined and integrated from over 80 digital sources, resulting in a web-based deep-linked card for each of >73 000 human gene entries, encompassing the following categories: protein coding, pseudogene, RNA gene, genetic locus, cluster and uncategorized. We now introduce GeneCards Version 3, featuring a speedy and sophisticated search engine and a revamped, technologically enabling infrastructure, catering to the expanding needs of biomedical researchers. A key focus is on gene-set analyses, which leverage GeneCards’ unique wealth of combinatorial annotations. These include the GeneALaCart batch query facility, which tabulates user-selected annotations for multiple genes and GeneDecks, which identifies similar genes with shared annotations, and finds set-shared annotations by descriptor enrichment analysis. Such set-centric features address a host of applications, including microarray data analysis, cross-database annotation mapping and gene-disorder associations for drug targeting. We highlight the new Version 3 database architecture, its multi-faceted search engine, and its semi-automated quality assurance system. Data enhancements include an expanded visualization of gene expression patterns in normal and cancer tissues, an integrated alternative splicing pattern display, and augmented multi-source SNPs and pathways sections. GeneCards now provides direct links to gene-related research reagents such as antibodies, recombinant proteins, DNA clones and inhibitory RNAs and features gene-related drugs and compounds lists. We also portray the GeneCards Inferred Functionality Score annotation landscape tool for scoring a gene’s functional information status. Finally, we delineate examples of applications and collaborations that have benefited from the GeneCards suite

  15. The gene transfection efficiency of a folate-PEI600-cyclodextrin nanopolymer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Ng, Samuel S; Tucker, Wesley O; Tsang, Yuk-Kai-Tiu; Man, Kwan; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Chow, Billy K C; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Tang, Gu-Ping; Lin, Marie C

    2009-10-01

    The success of gene therapy relies on a safe and effective gene delivery system. In this communication, we describe the use of folate grafted PEI(600)-CyD (H(1)) as an effective polyplex-forming plasmid delivery agent with low toxicity. The structures of the polymer and polyplex were characterized, and the in vitro transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity, and in vivo transfection of H(1) were examined. We found that folate molecules were successfully grafted to PEI(600)-CyD. At N/P ratios between 5 and 30, the resulting H(1)/DNA polyplexes had diameters less than 120 nm and zeta potentials less than 10 mV. In various tumor cell lines examined (U138, U87, B16, and Lovo), the in vitro transfection efficiency of H(1) was more than 50%, which could be improved by the presence of fetal bovine serum or albumin. The cytotoxicity of H(1) was significantly less than high molecular weight PEI-25 kDa. Importantly, in vivo optical imaging showed that the efficiency of H(1)-mediated transfection (50 microg luciferase plasmid (pLuc), N/P ratio=20/1) was comparable to that of adenovirus-mediated luciferase transduction (1 x 10(9) pfu) in melanoma-bearing mice, and it did not induce any toxicity in the tumor tissue. These results clearly show that H(1) is a safe and effective polyplex-forming agent for both in vitro and in vivo transfection of plasmid DNA and its application warrants further investigation. PMID:19615741

  16. Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Laser Transfection for Efficient siRNA Mediated Gene Knock Down

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Kalies, Stefan; Schieck, Maximilian; Carlson, Regina; Escobar, Hugo Murua; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Laser based transfection methods have proven to be an efficient and gentle alternative to established molecule delivery methods like lipofection or electroporation. Among the laser based methods, gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection bears the major advantage of high throughput and easy usability. This approach uses plasmon resonances on gold nanoparticles unspecifically attached to the cell membrane to evoke transient and spatially defined cell membrane permeabilization. In this study, we explore the parameter regime for gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection for the delivery of molecules into cell lines and prove its suitability for siRNA mediated gene knock down. The developed setup allows easy usage and safe laser operation in a normal lab environment. We applied a 532 nm Nd:YAG microchip laser emitting 850 ps pulses at a repetition rate of 20.25 kHz. Scanning velocities of the laser spot over the sample of up to 200 mm/s were tested without a decline in perforation efficiency. This velocity leads to a process speed of ∼8 s per well of a 96 well plate. The optimal particle density was determined to be ∼6 particles per cell using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Applying the optimized parameters transfection efficiencies of 88% were achieved in canine pleomorphic adenoma ZMTH3 cells using a fluorescent labeled siRNA while maintaining a high cell viability of >90%. Gene knock down of d2-EGFP was demonstrated and validated by fluorescence repression and western blot analysis. On basis of our findings and established mathematical models we suppose a mixed transfection mechanism consisting of thermal and multiphoton near field effects. Our findings emphasize that gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection provides an excellent tool for molecular delivery for both, high throughput purposes and the transfection of sensitive cells types. PMID:23536802

  17. Development of a successive targeting liposome with multi-ligand for efficient targeting gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kun; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Xie, Men; Mao, Chuanbin; Qiu, Liyan; Jin, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background A successful gene delivery system needs to breakthrough several barriers to allow efficient transgenic expression. In the present study, successive targeting liposomes (STL) were constructed by integrating various targeting groups into a nanoparticle to address this issue. Methods Polyethylenimine (PEI) 1800-triamcinolone acetonide (TA) with nuclear targeting capability was synthesized by a two-step reaction. Lactobionic acid was connected with cholesterol to obtain a compound of [(2-lactoylamido) ethylamino]formic acid cholesterol ester (CHEDLA) with hepatocyte-targeting capability. The liposome was modified with PEI 1800-TA and CHEDLA to prepare successive targeting liposome (STL). Its physicochemical properties and transfection efficiency were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results The diameter of STL was approximately 100 nm with 20 mV of potential. The confocal microscopy observation and potential assay verified that lipid bilayer of STL was decorated with PEI 1800-TA. Cytotoxicity of STL was significantly lower than that of PEI 1800-TA and PEI 25K. The transfection efficiency of 10% CHEDLA STL in HepG2 cells was the higher than of the latter two with serum. Its transfection efficiency was greatly reduced with excessive free galactose, indicating that STL was absorbed via galactose receptor-mediated endocytosis. The in vivo study in mice showed that 10% CHEDLA STL had better transgenic expression in liver than the other carriers. Conclusions STL with multi-ligand was able to overcome the various barriers to target nucleus and special cells and present distinctive transgenic expression. Therefore, it has a great potential for gene therapy as a nonviral carrier. PMID:21574214

  18. Human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Wood, R D; Mitchell, M; Sgouros, J; Lindahl, T

    2001-02-16

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered DNA polymerases that bypass damage, but only one system to remove the main DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light. More human DNA repair genes will be found by comparison with model organisms and as common folds in three-dimensional protein structures are determined. Modulation of DNA repair should lead to clinical applications including improvement of radiotherapy and treatment with anticancer drugs and an advanced understanding of the cellular aging process. PMID:11181991

  19. Virus induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis gene homologues in wheat identify genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat, functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for wheat breeding. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited tra...

  20. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  1. Prokaryotic gene prediction using GeneMark and GeneMark.hmm.

    PubMed

    Borodovsky, Mark; Mills, Ryan; Besemer, John; Lomsadze, Alex

    2003-05-01

    In this unit, the GeneMark and GeneMark.hmm programs are presented as two different methods for the in silico prediction of genes in prokaryotes. GeneMark can be used for whole genome analysis as well as for the local analysis of a particular gene and its surrounding regions. GeneMark.hmm makes use of Hidden Markov models to find the transition points (boundaries) between protein coding states and noncoding states and can be efficiently used for larger genome sequences. These methods can be used in conjunction with each other for a higher sensitivity of gene detection. PMID:18428700

  2. Genes and Vocal Learning

    PubMed Central

    White, Stephanie A.

    2009-01-01

    Could a mutation in a single gene be the evolutionary lynchpin supporting the development of human language? A rare mutation in the molecule known as FOXP2 discovered in a human family seemed to suggest so, and its sequence phylogeny reinforced a Chomskian view that language emerged wholesale in humans. Spurred by this discovery, research in primates, rodents and birds suggests that FoxP2 and other language-related genes are interactors in the neuromolecular networks that underlie subsystems of language, such symbolic understanding, vocal learning and theory of mind. The whole picture will only come together through comparative and integrative study into how the human language singularity evolved. PMID:19913899

  3. The gene tree delusion.

    PubMed

    Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John

    2016-01-01

    Higher-level relationships among placental mammals are mostly resolved, but several polytomies remain contentious. Song et al. (2012) claimed to have resolved three of these using shortcut coalescence methods (MP-EST, STAR) and further concluded that these methods, which assume no within-locus recombination, are required to unravel deep-level phylogenetic problems that have stymied concatenation. Here, we reanalyze Song et al.'s (2012) data and leverage these re-analyses to explore key issues in systematics including the recombination ratchet, gene tree stoichiometry, the proportion of gene tree incongruence that results from deep coalescence versus other factors, and simulations that compare the performance of coalescence and concatenation methods in species tree estimation. Song et al. (2012) reported an average locus length of 3.1 kb for the 447 protein-coding genes in their phylogenomic dataset, but the true mean length of these loci (start codon to stop codon) is 139.6 kb. Empirical estimates of recombination breakpoints in primates, coupled with consideration of the recombination ratchet, suggest that individual coalescence genes (c-genes) approach ∼12 bp or less for Song et al.'s (2012) dataset, three to four orders of magnitude shorter than the c-genes reported by these authors. This result has general implications for the application of coalescence methods in species tree estimation. We contend that it is illogical to apply coalescence methods to complete protein-coding sequences. Such analyses amalgamate c-genes with different evolutionary histories (i.e., exons separated by >100,000 bp), distort true gene tree stoichiometry that is required for accurate species tree inference, and contradict the central rationale for applying coalescence methods to difficult phylogenetic problems. In addition, Song et al.'s (2012) dataset of 447 genes includes 21 loci with switched taxonomic names, eight duplicated loci, 26 loci with non-homologous sequences that are

  4. XLMR genes: Update 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, G.; Chiurazzi, P.; Arena, J.F.; Lubs, H.A.

    1994-07-15

    We provide a comprehensive list of all known forms of X-linked mental retardation. It comprises 127 entries, subdivided into 5 categories (syndromes, dominant disorders, and nonspecific mental retardation). Map location of 69 putative loci demonstrates several overlaps, which will only be resolved by more refined mapping or cloning of the respective genes. The ultimate goal of identifying all the genes on the X chromosome whose mutations cause mental retardation will require a concerted effort between clinical and molecular investigators. 74 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Gene therapy: progress and predictions

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Mary; Thrasher, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The first clinical gene delivery, which involved insertion of a marker gene into lymphocytes from cancer patients, was published 25 years ago. In this review, we describe progress since then in gene therapy. Patients with some inherited single-gene defects can now be treated with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been engineered with a viral vector carrying the missing gene. Patients with inherited retinopathies and haemophilia B can also be treated by local or systemic injection of viral vectors. There are also a number of promising gene therapy approaches for cancer and infectious disease. We predict that the next 25 years will see improvements in safety, efficacy and manufacture of gene delivery vectors and introduction of gene-editing technologies to the clinic. Gene delivery may also prove a cost-effective method for the delivery of biological medicines. PMID:26702034

  6. Multidimensional gene search with Genehopper

    PubMed Central

    Munz, Matthias; Tönnies, Sascha; Balke, Wolf-Tilo; Simon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The high abundance of genetic information enables researchers to gain new insights from the comparison of human genes according to their similarities. However, existing tools that allow the exploration of such gene-to-gene relationships, apply each similarity independently. To make use of multidimensional scoring, we developed a new search engine named Genehopper. It can handle two query types: (i) the typical use case starts with a term-to-gene search, i.e. an optimized full-text search for an anchor gene of interest. The web-interface can handle one or more terms including gene symbols and identifiers of Ensembl, UniProt, EntrezGene and RefSeq. (ii) When the anchor gene is defined, the user can explore its neighborhood by a gene-to-gene search as the weighted sum of nine normalized gene similarities based on sequence homology, protein domains, mRNA expression profiles, Gene Ontology Annotation, gene symbols and other features. Each weight can be adjusted by the user, allowing flexible customization of the gene search. All implemented similarities have a low pairwise correlation (max r2 = 0.4) implying a low linear dependency, i.e. any change in a single weight has an effect on the ranking. Thus, we treated them as separate dimensions in the search space. Genehopper is freely available at http://genehopper.ifis.cs.tu-bs.de. PMID:25990726

  7. Multidimensional gene search with Genehopper.

    PubMed

    Munz, Matthias; Tönnies, Sascha; Balke, Wolf-Tilo; Simon, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The high abundance of genetic information enables researchers to gain new insights from the comparison of human genes according to their similarities. However, existing tools that allow the exploration of such gene-to-gene relationships, apply each similarity independently. To make use of multidimensional scoring, we developed a new search engine named Genehopper. It can handle two query types: (i) the typical use case starts with a term-to-gene search, i.e. an optimized full-text search for an anchor gene of interest. The web-interface can handle one or more terms including gene symbols and identifiers of Ensembl, UniProt, EntrezGene and RefSeq. (ii) When the anchor gene is defined, the user can explore its neighborhood by a gene-to-gene search as the weighted sum of nine normalized gene similarities based on sequence homology, protein domains, mRNA expression profiles, Gene Ontology Annotation, gene symbols and other features. Each weight can be adjusted by the user, allowing flexible customization of the gene search. All implemented similarities have a low pairwise correlation (max r(2) = 0.4) implying a low linear dependency, i.e. any change in a single weight has an effect on the ranking. Thus, we treated them as separate dimensions in the search space. Genehopper is freely available at http://genehopper.ifis.cs.tu-bs.de. PMID:25990726

  8. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC by searching the literature published in English using the PubMed database and analyzing clinical trials registered on the Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website (http://www. wiley.co.uk/genmed/ clinical). Viral vectors are main gene delivery tools in gene therapy of cancer, and especially, oncolytic virus shows brighter prospect due to its tumor-targeting property. Efficient therapeutic targets for gene therapy include tumor suppressor gene p53, mutant oncogene K-ras, anti-angiogenesis gene VEGFR, suicide gene HSK-TK, cytosine deaminase and cytochrome p450, multiple cytokine genes and so on. Combining different targets or combination strategies with traditional chemoradiotherapy may be a more effective approach to improve the efficacy of cancer gene therapy. Cancer gene therapy is not yet applied in clinical practice, but basic and clinical studies have demonstrated its safety and clinical benefits. Gene therapy will be a new and promising field for the treatment of PC. PMID:25309069

  9. Association Between a Prognostic Gene Signature and Functional Gene Sets

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Manuela; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Buske, Christian; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Background The development of expression-based gene signatures for predicting prognosis or class membership is a popular and challenging task. Besides their stringent validation, signatures need a functional interpretation and must be placed in a biological context. Popular tools such as Gene Set Enrichment have drawbacks because they are restricted to annotated genes and are unable to capture the information hidden in the signature’s non-annotated genes. Methodology We propose concepts to relate a signature with functional gene sets like pathways or Gene Ontology categories. The connection between single signature genes and a specific pathway is explored by hierarchical variable selection and gene association networks. The risk score derived from an individual patient’s signature is related to expression patterns of pathways and Gene Ontology categories. Global tests are useful for these tasks, and they adjust for other factors. GlobalAncova is used to explore the effect on gene expression in specific functional groups from the interaction of the score and selected mutations in the patient’s genome. Results We apply the proposed methods to an expression data set and a corresponding gene signature for predicting survival in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). The example demonstrates strong relations between the signature and cancer-related pathways. The signature-based risk score was found to be associated with development-related biological processes. Conclusions Many authors interpret the functional aspects of a gene signature by linking signature genes to pathways or relevant functional gene groups. The method of gene set enrichment is preferred to annotating signature genes to specific Gene Ontology categories. The strategies proposed in this paper go beyond the restriction of annotation and deepen the insights into the biological mechanisms reflected in the information given by a signature. PMID:19812786

  10. Old genes experience stronger translational selection than young genes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hongyan; Ma, Lina; Wang, Guangyu; Li, Mengwei; Zhang, Zhang

    2016-09-15

    Selection on synonymous codon usage for translation efficiency and/or accuracy has been identified as a widespread mechanism in many living organisms. However, it remains unknown whether translational selection associates closely with gene age and acts differentially on genes with different evolutionary ages. To address this issue, here we investigate the strength of translational selection acting on different aged genes in human. Our results show that old genes present stronger translational selection than young genes, demonstrating that translational selection correlates positively with gene age. We further explore the difference of translational selection in duplicates vs. singletons and in housekeeping vs. tissue-specific genes. We find that translational selection acts comparably in old singletons and old duplicates and stronger translational selection in old genes is contributed primarily by housekeeping genes. For young genes, contrastingly, singletons experience stronger translational selection than duplicates, presumably due to redundant function of duplicated genes during their early evolutionary stage. Taken together, our results indicate that translational selection acting on a gene would not be constant during all stages of evolution, associating closely with gene age. PMID:27259662

  11. Genes2FANs: connecting genes through functional association networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein-protein, cell signaling, metabolic, and transcriptional interaction networks are useful for identifying connections between lists of experimentally identified genes/proteins. However, besides physical or co-expression interactions there are many ways in which pairs of genes, or their protein products, can be associated. By systematically incorporating knowledge on shared properties of genes from diverse sources to build functional association networks (FANs), researchers may be able to identify additional functional interactions between groups of genes that are not readily apparent. Results Genes2FANs is a web based tool and a database that utilizes 14 carefully constructed FANs and a large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI) network to build subnetworks that connect lists of human and mouse genes. The FANs are created from mammalian gene set libraries where mouse genes are converted to their human orthologs. The tool takes as input a list of human or mouse Entrez gene symbols to produce a subnetwork and a ranked list of intermediate genes that are used to connect the query input list. In addition, users can enter any PubMed search term and then the system automatically converts the returned results to gene lists using GeneRIF. This gene list is then used as input to generate a subnetwork from the user’s PubMed query. As a case study, we applied Genes2FANs to connect disease genes from 90 well-studied disorders. We find an inverse correlation between the counts of links connecting disease genes through PPI and links connecting diseases genes through FANs, separating diseases into two categories. Conclusions Genes2FANs is a useful tool for interpreting the relationships between gene/protein lists in the context of their various functions and networks. Combining functional association interactions with physical PPIs can be useful for revealing new biology and help form hypotheses for further experimentation. Our finding that disease genes in

  12. Gene Manipulation In Cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum, the most abundant metal on earth, is detrimental to plant growth and agricultural production. There are about 2.5 billion hectares of acid soils high in aluminum around the world. Molecular markers linked to aluminum tolerance gene complexes in rye would be of value in marker-mediated ge...

  13. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Rene G.; Apfel, Robert E.; Brandsma, Janet L.

    2002-05-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases both inherited and acquired, such as cystic fibrosis and cancer. The lack of an effective, safe method for the delivery of foreign genes into the cells, a process known as transfection, limits this effort. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection is an attractive method for gene delivery since it is a noninvasive technique, does not introduce any viral particles into the host and can offer very good temporal and spatial control. Previous investigators have shown that sonication increases transfection efficiency with and without ultrasound contrast agents. The mechanism is believed to be via a cavitation process where collapsing bubble nuclei permeabilize the cell membrane leading to increased DNA transfer. The research is focused on the use of pulsed wave high frequency focused ultrasound to transfect DNA into mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the mechanism behind the transfection process is also sought. A summary of some in vitro results to date will be presented, which includes the design of a sonication chamber that allows us to model the in vivo case more accurately.

  14. Resistance gene capture.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Magnus, D A; Mazel, D

    1999-10-01

    Integrons are the primary mechanism for antibiotic-resistance gene capture and dissemination among Gram-negative bacteria. The recent finding of super-integron structures in the genomes of several bacterial species has expanded their role in genome evolution and suggests that they are the source of mobile multi-resistant integrons. PMID:10508722

  15. Naming genes beyond Caenorhabditis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nomenclature of genes in Caenorhabditis elegans is based on long-standing, successful guidelines established in the late 1970s. Over time these guidelines have matured into a comprehensive, systematic nomenclature that is easy to apply, descriptive and therefore highly informative. Recently, a f...

  16. Gene stacking by recombinases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficient methods of stacking genes into plant genomes are needed to expedite transfer of multigenic traits into diverse crops grown in a variety of environments. Over two decades of research has identified several site-specific recombinases that carry out efficient cis and trans recombination betw...

  17. Genes and Vocal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01

    Could a mutation in a single gene be the evolutionary lynchpin supporting the development of human language? A rare mutation in the molecule known as FOXP2 discovered in a human family seemed to suggest so, and its sequence phylogeny reinforced a Chomskian view that language emerged wholesale in humans. Spurred by this discovery, research in…

  18. Polyelectrolyte Complexes of Low Molecular Weight PEI and Citric Acid as Efficient and Nontoxic Vectors for in Vitro and in Vivo Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Giron-Gonzalez, M Dolores; Salto-Gonzalez, Rafael; Lopez-Jaramillo, F Javier; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Jodar-Reyes, Ana Belen; Ortega-Muñoz, Mariano; Hernandez-Mateo, Fernando; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2016-03-16

    Gene transfection mediated by the cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI) is considered a standard methodology. However, while highly branched PEIs form smaller polyplexes with DNA that exhibit high transfection efficiencies, they have significant cell toxicity. Conversely, low molecular weight PEIs (LMW-PEIs) with favorable cytotoxicity profiles display minimum transfection activities as a result of inadequate DNA complexation and protection. To solve this paradox, a novel polyelectrolyte complex was prepared by the ionic cross-linking of branched 1.8 kDa PEI with citric acid (CA). This system synergistically exploits the good cytotoxicity profile exhibited by LMW-PEI with the high transfection efficiencies shown by highly branched and high molecular weight PEIs. The polyectrolyte complex (1.8 kDa-PEI@CA) was obtained by a simple synthetic protocol based on the microwave irradiation of a solution of 1.8 kDa PEI and CA. Upon complexation with DNA, intrinsic properties of the resulting particles (size and surface charge) were measured and their ability to form stable polyplexes was determined. Compared with unmodified PEIs the new complexes behave as efficient gene vectors and showed enhanced DNA binding capability associated with facilitated intracellular DNA release and enhanced DNA protection from endonuclease degradation. In addition, while transfection values for LMW-PEIs are almost null, transfection efficiencies of the new reagent range from 2.5- to 3.8-fold to those of Lipofectamine 2000 and 25 kDa PEI in several cell lines in culture such as CHO-k1, FTO2B hepatomas, L6 myoblasts, or NRK cells, simultaneously showing a negligible toxicity. Furthermore, the 1.8 kDa-PEI@CA polyelectrolyte complexes retained the capability to transfect eukaryotic cells in the presence of serum and exhibited the capability to promote in vivo transfection in mouse (as an animal model) with an enhanced efficiency compared to 25 kDa PEI. Results support the polyelectrolyte complex

  19. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L; Booth, Benjamin W; Evans-Holm, Martha; Venken, Koen JT; Levis, Robert W; Spradling, Allan C; Hoskins, Roger A; Bellen, Hugo J

    2015-01-01

    Here, we document a collection of ∼7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstrate reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05338.001 PMID:25824290

  20. Entrez Gene: gene-centered information at NCBI.

    PubMed

    Maglott, Donna; Ostell, Jim; Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2007-01-01

    Entrez Gene (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=gene) is NCBI's database for gene-specific information. Entrez Gene includes records from genomes that have been completely sequenced, that have an active research community to contribute gene-specific information or that are scheduled for intense sequence analysis. The content of Entrez Gene represents the result of both curation and automated integration of data from NCBI's Reference Sequence project (RefSeq), from collaborating model organism databases and from other databases within NCBI. Records in Entrez Gene are assigned unique, stable and tracked integers as identifiers. The content (nomenclature, map location, gene products and their attributes, markers, phenotypes and links to citations, sequences, variation details, maps, expression, homologs, protein domains and external databases) is provided via interactive browsing through NCBI's Entrez system, via NCBI's Entrez programing utilities (E-Utilities), and for bulk transfer by ftp. PMID:17148475

  1. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  2. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles: Applications in gene delivery and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Majidi, Sima; Zeinali Sehrig, Fatemeh; Samiei, Mohammad; Milani, Morteza; Abbasi, Elham; Dadashzadeh, Kianoosh; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-06-01

    Gene therapy is defined as the direct transfer of genetic material to tissues or cells for the treatment of inherited disorders and acquired diseases. For gene delivery, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are typically combined with a delivery platform to encapsulate the gene, and promote cell uptake. Delivery technologies that have been used with MNPs contain polymeric, viral, as well as non-viral platforms. In this review, we focus on targeted gene delivery using MNPs. PMID:25727710

  4. Dominance from the perspective of gene-gene and gene-chemical interactions.

    PubMed

    Gladki, Arkadiusz; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Kaczanowski, Szymon

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we used genetic interaction (GI) and gene-chemical interaction (GCI) data to compare mutations with different dominance phenotypes. Our analysis focused primarily on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where haploinsufficient genes (HI; genes with dominant loss-of-function mutations) were found to be participating in gene expression processes, namely, the translation and regulation of gene transcription. Non-ribosomal HI genes (mainly regulators of gene transcription) were found to have more GIs and GCIs than haplosufficient (HS) genes. Several properties seem to lead to the enrichment of interactions, most notably, the following: importance, pleiotropy, gene expression level and gene expression variation. Importantly, after these properties were appropriately considered in the analysis, the correlation between dominance and GI/GCI degrees was still observed. Strikingly, for the GCIs of heterozygous strains, haploinsufficiency was the only property significantly correlated with the number of GCIs. We found ribosomal HI genes to be depleted in GIs/GCIs. This finding can be explained by their high variation in gene expression under different genetic backgrounds and environmental conditions. We observed the same distributions of GIs among non-ribosomal HI, ribosomal HI and HS genes in three other species: Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens. One potentially interesting exception was the lack of significant differences in the degree of GIs between non-ribosomal HI and HS genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. PMID:26613610

  5. Avirulence Genes in Cereal Powdery Mildews: The Gene-for-Gene Hypothesis 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Bourras, Salim; McNally, Kaitlin E.; Müller, Marion C.; Wicker, Thomas; Keller, Beat

    2016-01-01

    The gene-for-gene hypothesis states that for each gene controlling resistance in the host, there is a corresponding, specific gene controlling avirulence in the pathogen. Allelic series of the cereal mildew resistance genes Pm3 and Mla provide an excellent system for genetic and molecular analysis of resistance specificity. Despite this opportunity for molecular research, avirulence genes in mildews remain underexplored. Earlier work in barley powdery mildew (B.g. hordei) has shown that the reaction to some Mla resistance alleles is controlled by multiple genes. Similarly, several genes are involved in the specific interaction of wheat mildew (B.g. tritici) with the Pm3 allelic series. We found that two mildew genes control avirulence on Pm3f: one gene is involved in recognition by the resistance protein as demonstrated by functional studies in wheat and the heterologous host Nicotiana benthamiana. A second gene is a suppressor, and resistance is only observed in mildew genotypes combining the inactive suppressor and the recognized Avr. We propose that such suppressor/avirulence gene combinations provide the basis of specificity in mildews. Depending on the particular gene combinations in a mildew race, different genes will be genetically identified as the “avirulence” gene. Additionally, the observation of two LINE retrotransposon-encoded avirulence genes in B.g. hordei further suggests that the control of avirulence in mildew is more complex than a canonical gene-for-gene interaction. To fully understand the mildew–cereal interactions, more knowledge on avirulence determinants is needed and we propose ways how this can be achieved based on recent advances in the field. PMID:26973683

  6. Gene prediction and gene classes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mathé, C; Déhais, P; Pavy, N; Rombauts, S; Van Montagu, M; Rouzé, P

    2000-03-31

    Gene prediction methods for eukaryotic genomes still are not fully satisfying. One way to improve gene prediction accuracy, proven to be relevant for prokaryotes, is to consider more than one model of genes. Thus, we used our classification of Arabidopsis thaliana genes in two classes (CU(1) and CU(2)), previously delineated according to statistical features, in the GeneMark gene identification program. For each gene class, as well as for the two classes combined, a Markov model was developed (respectively, GM-CU(1), GM-CU(2) and GM-all) and then used on a test set of 168 genes to compare their respective efficiency. We concluded from this analysis that GM-CU(1) is more sensitive than GM-CU(2) which seems to be more specific to a gene type. Besides, GM-all does not give better results than GM-CU(1) and combining results from GM-CU(1) and GM-CU(2) greatly improve prediction efficiency in comparison with predictions made with GM-all only. Thus, this work confirms the necessity to consider more than one gene model for gene prediction in eukaryotic genomes, and to look for gene classes in order to build these models. PMID:10751690

  7. GENE METHYLATION CHANGES IN TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES INDUCED BY ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The choice of a dose-response model used for extrapolation can be influenced by knowledge of mechanism of action. We have already showed that arsenic affects methylation of the human p53 gene promoter. Evidence that genes other than the p53 tumor suppressor gene are affected woul...

  8. Eukaryotic gene prediction using GeneMark.hmm-E and GeneMark-ES.

    PubMed

    Borodovsky, Mark; Lomsadze, Alex

    2011-09-01

    This unit describes how to use the gene-finding programs GeneMark.hmm-E and GeneMark-ES for finding protein-coding genes in the genomic DNA of eukaryotic organisms. These bioinformatics tools have been demonstrated to have state-of-the-art accuracy for many fungal, plant, and animal genomes, and have frequently been used for gene annotation in novel genomic sequences. An additional advantage of GeneMark-ES is that the problem of algorithm parameterization is solved automatically, with parameters estimated by iterative self-training (unsupervised training). PMID:21901742

  9. Chapter 15: Disease Gene Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Yana

    2013-01-01

    Disease-causing aberrations in the normal function of a gene define that gene as a disease gene. Proving a causal link between a gene and a disease experimentally is expensive and time-consuming. Comprehensive prioritization of candidate genes prior to experimental testing drastically reduces the associated costs. Computational gene prioritization is based on various pieces of correlative evidence that associate each gene with the given disease and suggest possible causal links. A fair amount of this evidence comes from high-throughput experimentation. Thus, well-developed methods are necessary to reliably deal with the quantity of information at hand. Existing gene prioritization techniques already significantly improve the outcomes of targeted experimental studies. Faster and more reliable techniques that account for novel data types are necessary for the development of new diagnostics, treatments, and cure for many diseases. PMID:23633938

  10. SOX genes: architects of development.

    PubMed Central

    Prior, H. M.; Walter, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Development in higher organisms involves complex genetic regulation at the molecular level. The emerging picture of development control includes several families of master regulatory genes which can affect the expression of down-stream target genes in developmental cascade pathways. One new family of such development regulators is the SOX gene family. The SOX genes are named for a shared motif called the SRY box a region homologous to the DNA-binding domain of SRY, the mammalian sex determining gene. Like SRY, SOX genes play important roles in chordate development. At least a dozen human SOX genes have been identified and partially characterized (Tables 1 and 2). Mutations in SOX9 have recently been linked to campomelic dysplasia and autosomal sex reversal, and other SOX genes may also be associated with human disease. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:8827711

  11. Gene Therapy for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guerra, Humberto; Roth, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy was originally conceived to treat monogenic diseases. The replacement of a defective gene with a functional gene can theoretically cure the disease. In cancer, multiple genetic defects are present and the molecular profile changes during the course of the disease, making the replacement of all defective genes impossible. To overcome these difficulties, various gene therapy strategies have been adopted, including immune stimulation, transfer of suicide genes, inhibition of driver oncogenes, replacement of tumor-suppressor genes that could mediate apoptosis or anti-angiogenesis, and transfer of genes that enhance conventional treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Some of these strategies have been tested successfully in non-small-cell lung cancer patients and the results of laboratory studies and clinical trials are reviewed herein. PMID:27481008

  12. On atavisms and atavistic genes.

    PubMed

    Cantú, J M; Ruiz, C

    1985-01-01

    The authors propose the term atavistic to designate a gene producing an ancestral phenotype (atavism). Several examples are presented, and the possible origin of atavistic genes, as well as their pathological implications discussed. PMID:3879145

  13. Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a family history of ataxia, but diagnostic tests for known ataxia genes cannot explain the ataxia in their family. In recent years, scientists have developed technologies to sequence thousands of genes at the same ...

  14. Gene therapy in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Farjadnia, Mahgol; Naderan, Mohammad; Mohammadpour, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is the most common ectasia of the cornea and is a common reason for corneal transplant. Therapeutic strategies that can arrest the progression of this disease and modify the underlying pathogenesis are getting more and more popularity among scientists. Cumulating data represent strong evidence of a genetic role in the pathogenesis of KC. Different loci have been identified, and certain mutations have also been mapped for this disease. Moreover, Biophysical properties of the cornea create an appropriate candidate of this tissue for gene therapy. Immune privilege, transparency and ex vivo stability are among these properties. Recent advantage in vectors, besides the ability to modulate the corneal milieu for accepting the target gene for a longer period and fruitful translation, make a big hope for stupendous results reasonable. PMID:25709266

  15. Graphene based gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liangzhu; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhuang

    2011-03-01

    Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI-10k polymer. The positively charged GO-PEI complexes are able to further bind with plasmid DNA (pDNA) for intracellular transfection of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene in HeLa cells. While EGFP transfection with PEI-1.2k appears to be ineffective, high EGFP expression is observed using the corresponding GO-PEI-1.2k as the transfection agent. On the other hand, GO-PEI-10k shows similar EGFP transfection efficiency but lower toxicity compared with PEI-10k. Our results suggest graphene to be a novel gene delivery nano-vector with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, promising for future applications in non-viral based gene therapy.Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI

  16. Brains, Genes and Primates

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Callaway, Edward M.; Churchland, Patricia; Caddick, Sarah J.; Feng, Guoping; Homanics, Gregg E.; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Leopold, David A.; Miller, Cory T.; Mitchell, Jude F.; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Moutri, Alysson R.; Movshon, J. Anthony; Okano, Hideyuki; Reynolds, John H.; Ringach, Dario; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Silva, Afonso C.; Strick, Peter L.; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    One of the great strengths of the mouse model is the wide array of genetic tools that have been developed. Striking examples include methods for directed modification of the genome, and for regulated expression or inactivation of genes. Within neuroscience, it is now routine to express reporter genes, neuronal activity indicators and opsins in specific neuronal types in the mouse. However, there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive and behavioral differences between the mouse and the human that, in some areas of inquiry, limit the degree to which insights derived from the mouse can be applied to understanding human neurobiology. Several recent advances have now brought into reach the goal of applying these tools to understanding the primate brain. Here we describe these advances, consider their potential to advance our understanding of the human brain and brain disorders, discuss bioethical considerations, and describe what will be needed to move forward. PMID:25950631

  17. Gene expression technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this volume were assemble to enable the reader to design effective strategies for the expression of cloned genes and cDNAs. More than a compilation of papers describing the multitude of techniques now available for expressing cloned genes, this volume provides a manual that should prove useful for solving the majority of expression problems one likely to encounter. The four major expression systems commonly available to most investigators are stressed: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, yeast, and mammalian cells. Each of these system has its advantages and disadvantages, details of which are found in Chapter 1 and the strategic overviews for the four major sections of the volume. The papers in each of these sections provide many suggestions on how to proceed if initial expression levels are not sufficient.

  18. Eukaryotic gene prediction using GeneMark.hmm.

    PubMed

    Borodovsky, Mark; Lomsadze, Alex; Ivanov, Nikolai; Mills, Ryan

    2003-05-01

    In this unit, eukaryotic GeneMark.hmm is presented as a method for detecting genes in eukaryotic DNA sequences. The eukaryotic GeneMark.hmm uses Markov models of protein coding and noncoding sequences, as well as positional nucleotide frequency matrices for prediction of the translational start, translational termination and splice sites. All these models along with length distributions of exons, introns and intergenic regions are integrated into one Hidden Markov model. The unit describes running the program over the Internet and locally on a Unix machine. It also discusses GeneMarkS EV, which can be used to detect genes in eukaryotic viruses. PMID:18428701

  19. Independent Gene Discovery and Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palsule, Vrushalee; Coric, Dijana; Delancy, Russell; Dunham, Heather; Melancon, Caleb; Thompson, Dennis; Toms, Jamie; White, Ashley; Shultz, Jeffry

    2010-01-01

    A clear understanding of basic gene structure is critical when teaching molecular genetics, the central dogma and the biological sciences. We sought to create a gene-based teaching project to improve students' understanding of gene structure and to integrate this into a research project that can be implemented by instructors at the secondary level…

  20. Time ordering of gene coexpression.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xiaoyan; Müller, Hans-Georg

    2006-10-01

    Temporal microarray gene expression profiles allow characterization of gene function through time dynamics of gene coexpression within the same genetic pathway. In this paper, we define and estimate a global time shift characteristic for each gene via least squares, inferred from pairwise curve alignments. These time shift characteristics of individual genes reflect a time ordering that is derived from ob- served temporal gene expression profiles. Once these time shift characteristics are obtained for each gene, they can be entered into further analyses, such as clustering. We illustrate the proposed methodology using Drosophila embryonic development and yeast cell-cycle gene expression profiles, as well as simulations. Feasibility is demonstrated through the successful recovery of time ordering. Estimated time shifts for Drosophila maternal and zygotic genes provide excellent discrimination between these two categories and confirm known genetic pathways through the time order of gene expression. The application to yeast cell-cycle data establishes a natural time order of genes that is in line with cell-cycle phases. The method does not require periodicity of gene expression profiles. Asymptotic justifications are also provided. PMID:16495429

  1. Gene Porter Bridwell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Gene Porter Bridwell served as the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 6, 1994 until February 3, 1996, when he retired from NASA after thirty-four years service. Bridwell, a Marshall employee since 1962, had been Marshall's Space Shuttle Projects Office Director and Space Station Redesign Team deputy manager. Under Bridwell, Marshall worked to develop its role as a Center of Excellence for propulsion and for providing access to space.

  2. Genes and athletes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dilip R; Greydanus, Donald E

    2002-06-01

    Genetics plays an important role in determining characteristics desired for success in a given sport. Advances in biotechnology pose interesting and perplexing dilemmas for athletes, parents, health care providers, and society at large. Gene therapy holds great prospects for disease prevention and treatment. The same techniques also can be misused for genetic manipulation to enhance athletic prowess. This chapter reviews selective aspects of genotype influence on sport performance, uses and misuses of genetic technology, and ethical as well as legal dilemmas. PMID:11986034

  3. Complementation analysis of triple gene block of Potato virus S (PVS) revealed its capability to support systemic infection and aphid transmissibility of recombinant Potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Matousek, Jaroslav; Schubert, Jörg; Dedic, Petr

    2009-12-01

    Triple gene block (TGB) sequences derived from isolates of ordinary Potato virus S (PVS-O) and Chenopodium-systemic (PVS-CS) were analyzed. Although the TGB sequences did not reveal any specific difference within the 7K protein, some specific differences within the 25K and 12K ORFs were found. In order to investigate a possible functional divergence of PVS-O and PVS-CS TGB variants, these genes were propagated in chimeric Potato virus X (PVX). Both PVS TGB variants partly complemented PVX TGB in Nicotiana benthamiana. The recombinant viruses multiplied to lower titer than the wild-type PVX in N. benthamiana showed attenuated symptoms. Whereas the recombinant PVX variants were also propagated systemically in Nicotiana glutinosa, Celosia argentea, Nicotiana occidentalis and chimeric PVX bearing TGB from PVS-O in Solanum lycopersicum, neither were propagated systemically in Chenopodium quinoa nor in Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun nn and the PVX-resistant Solanum tuberosum cv. Szignal. The potential for recombinant viruses to be transmitted by the aphid Myzus persicae was investigated. Aphid transmission in the recombinant virus was obtained by replacing PVX TGB by TGB from the PVS-CS isolate. These results show the potential function of Carlavirus TGB in aphid transmissibility and underlines the possible biological risks from certain recombinant virus variants. PMID:19748533

  4. Different types of degradable vectors from low-molecular-weight polycation-functionalized poly(aspartic acid) for efficient gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Dou, X B; Hu, Y; Zhao, N N; Xu, F J

    2014-03-01

    Poly(aspartic acid) (PAsp) has been employed as the potential backbone for the preparation of efficient gene carriers, due to its low cytotoxicity, good biodegradability and excellent biocompatibility. In this work, the degradable linear or star-shaped PBLA was first prepared via ring-opining polymerization of β-benzyl-L-aspartate N-carboxy anhydride (BLA-NCA) initiated by ethylenediamine (ED) or ED-functionalized cyclodextrin cores. Then, PBLA was functionalized via aminolysis reaction with low-molecular-weight poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) with one terminal primary amine group (PDMAEMA-NH2), followed by addition of excess ED or ethanolamine (EA) to complete the aminolysis process. The obtained different types of cationic PAsp-based vectors including linear or star PAsp-PDM-NH2 and PAsp-PDM-OH exhibited good condensation capability and degradability, benefiting gene delivery process. In comparison with gold standard polyethylenimine (PEI, ∼ 25 kDa), the cationic PAsp-based vectors, particularly star-shaped ones, exhibited much better transfection performances. PMID:24388816

  5. D-ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase: Cloning and heterologous expression of the spinach gene, and purification and characterization of the recombinant enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.R.; Hartman, F.C.; Lu, T.Y.S.; Larimer, F.W.

    1998-09-01

    The authors have achieved, to their knowledge, the first high-level heterologous expression of the gene encoding D-ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase from any source, thereby permitting isolation and characterization of the epimerase as found in photosynthetic organisms. The extremely labile recombinant spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) enzyme was stabilized by DL-{alpha}-glycerophosphate or ethanol and destabilized by D-ribulose-5-phosphate or 2-mercaptoethanol. Despite this lability, the unprecedentedly high specific activity of the purified material indicates that the structural integrity of the enzyme is maintained throughout isolation. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate and divalent metal cations did not affect epimerase activity, thereby excluding a requirement for the latter in catalysis. As deduced from the sequence of the cloned spinach gene and the electrophoretic mobility under denaturing conditions of the purified recombinant enzyme, its 25-kD subunit size was about the same as that of the corresponding epimerases of yeast and mammals. However, in contrast to these other species, the recombinant spinach enzyme was octameric rather than dimeric, as assessed by gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions. Western-blot analyses with antibodies to the purified recombinant enzyme confirmed that the epimerase extracted from spinach leaves is also octameric.

  6. nanosheets for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Zhongyang; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Renshun; Chen, Huabin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gao, Ling; Wang, Bin; Guo, Zhaoji; Xue, Xiaofeng; Cao, Wei; Guo, Liang

    2014-10-01

    A new class of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 which have fantastic physical and chemical properties, has drawn tremendous attention in different fields recently. Herein, we for the first time take advantage of the great potential of MoS2 with well-engineered surface as a novel type of 2D nanocarriers for gene delivery and therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged MoS2-PEG-PEI is synthesized with lipoic acid-modified polyethylene glycol (LA-PEG) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The amino end of positively charged nanomaterials can bind to the negatively charged small interfering RNA (siRNA). After detection of physical and chemical characteristics of the nanomaterial, cell toxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was investigated as a well-known oncogene, which was a critical regulator of cell cycle transmission at multiple levels. Through knockdown of PLK1 with siRNA carried by novel nanovector, qPCR and Western blot were used to measure the interfering efficiency; apoptosis assay was used to detect the transfection effect of PLK1. All results showed that the novel nanocarrier revealed good biocompatibility, reduced cytotoxicity, as well as high gene-carrying ability without serum interference, thus would have great potential for gene delivery and therapy.

  7. Extracting gene-gene interactions through curve fitting.

    PubMed

    Das, Ranajit; Mitra, Sushmita; Murthy, C A

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a simple and novel curve fitting approach for generating simple gene regulatory subnetworks from time series gene expression data. Microarray experiments simultaneously generate massive data sets and help immensely in the large-scale study of gene expression patterns. Initial biclustering reduces the search space in the high-dimensional microarray data. The least-squares error between fitting of gene pairs is minimized to extract a set of gene-gene interactions, involving transcriptional regulation of genes. The higher error values are eliminated to retain only the strong interacting gene pairs in the resultant gene regulatory subnetwork. Next the algorithm is extended to a generalized framework to enhance its capability. The methodology takes care of the higher-order dependencies involving multiple genes co-regulating a single gene, while eliminating the need for user-defined parameters. It has been applied to the time-series Yeast data, and the experimental results biologically validated using standard databases and literature. PMID:22997274

  8. From SNPs to Genes: Disease Association at the Gene Level

    PubMed Central

    Lehne, Benjamin; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Schlitt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Interpreting Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) at a gene level is an important step towards understanding the molecular processes that lead to disease. In order to incorporate prior biological knowledge such as pathways and protein interactions in the analysis of GWAS data it is necessary to derive one measure of association for each gene. We compare three different methods to obtain gene-wide test statistics from Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) based association data: choosing the test statistic from the most significant SNP; the mean test statistics of all SNPs; and the mean of the top quartile of all test statistics. We demonstrate that the gene-wide test statistics can be controlled for the number of SNPs within each gene and show that all three methods perform considerably better than expected by chance at identifying genes with confirmed associations. By applying each method to GWAS data for Crohn's Disease and Type 1 Diabetes we identified new potential disease genes. PMID:21738570

  9. Foliar biofilms of Burkholderia pyrrocinia FP62 on geraniums

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilm formation on foliar surfaces is commonly associated with plants in water-saturated environments (e.g. tropics or modified environments). On most leaf surfaces bacteria are thought to reside in aggregates with limited production of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) matrix. However, the biocontrol ag...

  10. Leading European Intergovernmental Research Organisations at FP6 Launch Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    EIROforum at "European Research 2002" (Brussels, November 11-13, 2002) Go to the EIROforum website Last year, seven of Europe's leading intergovernmental research organisations set up a high-level co-ordination and collaboration group, known as EIROforum , cf. ESO PR 12/01. They include CERN (particle physics), EMBL (molecular biology), ESA (space activities), ESO (astronomy and astrophysics), ESRF (synchrotron radiation), ILL (neutron source) and EFDA (fusion). All of them have powerful research infrastructures and laboratories which are used by an extensive network of scientists. Together, they represent European spearheads in some of the most crucial basic and applied research fields. The EIROforum organisations will be highly visible at the upcoming EU-conference on "European Research 2002 - The European Research Area and the Framework Programme" , to be held on November 11-13, 2002, at the "Palais du Heysel" in Brussels (Belgium). This meeting will be attended by more than 8000 scientists and decision-makers from all over Europe and serves to launch the 6th EC Framework Programme (2002 - 2006), which will have an important impact on Europe's R&D landscape during the coming years. A joint 400 sq.m. exhibition , featuring the individual EIROforum organisations, their current programmes and many front-line achievements in their respective areas of activity, will be set up at Stand L in Hall 11 . It includes a central area, with a small cinema, displaying information about their current interactions via EIROforum. The stands will be manned throughout the conference by high-level representatives from the seven organisations. On Tuesday, November 12, 2002, 14:00 hrs, a Press Conference will take place at this exhibition stand, in the presence of the European Commissioner for Research, M. Phillippe Busquin, and most of the Directors General (or equivalent) of the EIROforum organisations. The main themes will be the increasingly intense interaction and co-operation between the European Commission and EIROforum, as well as the role of EIROforum and its member organisations within the European Research Area. Moreover, the official signing of the EIROforum Charter by the Directors General on this occasion will signify the formal establishment of EIROforum. Representatives of the EIROforum organisations will also participate in many of the numerous events that will take place during this large conference. Details will be found in the conference programme. The current EIROforum chairperson is Prof. Fotis C. Kafatos (EMBL) . The EIROforum website at http://www.eiroforum.org contains useful information about this unique collaboration. For more details, please contact the respective PR Departments of the organisations (addresses below).

  11. Measurement of {sup 17}F+p reactions at RESOLUT

    SciTech Connect

    Linhardt, L. E.; Baby, L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Gardiner, H.; Johnson, E.; Koschiy, E.; Macon, K. T.; Rasco, B. C.; Rogachev, G.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.; Wiedenhoever, I.

    2012-11-20

    The {sup 14}O({alpha},p){sup 17}F reaction is important for understanding the {alpha}p process that occurs in X-ray bursts, but the rate of this reaction remains uncertain due to the uncertain properties of states in {sup 18}Ne. We measured the {sup 17}F(p,p){sup 17}F and {sup 17}F(p,{alpha}){sup 14}O reactions to study the properties of states in {sup 18}Ne that are important for the {sup 14}O({alpha},p){sup 17}F reaction using {sup 17}F radioactive beams from the RESOLUT facility at Florida State University. Double-sided silicon strip detectors were used to detect light particles, and recoiling heavy ions were detected in coincidence using a gas ionization chamber at forward angles. The performance of the system was first tested using the {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N reaction. This was the first measurement using the ASIC electronics and recoil detector being developed for the Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN). We report on the performance and preliminary results.

  12. The Euratom Seventh Framework Programme FP7 (2007-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbil, R.

    2010-10-01

    The objective of the Seventh Euratom Framework Program in the area of nuclear fission and radiation protection is to establish a sound scientific and technical basis to accelerate practical developments of nuclear energy related to resource efficiency, enhancing safety performance, cost-effectiveness and safer management of long-lived radioactive waste. Key cross-cutting topics such as the nuclear fuel cycle, actinide chemistry, risk analysis, safety assessment, even societal and governance issues are linked to the individual technical areas. Research need to explore new scientific and techno- logical opportunities and to respond in a flexible way to new policy needs that arise. The following activities are to be pursued. (a) Management of radioactive waste, research on partitioning and transmutation and/or other concepts aimed at reducing the amount and/or hazard of the waste for disposal; (b) Reactor systems research to underpin the con- tinued safe operation of all relevant types of existing reactor systems (including fuel cycle facilities), life-time extension, development of new advanced safety assessment methodologies and waste-management aspects of future reactor systems; (c) Radiation protection research in particular on the risks from low doses on medical uses and on the management of accidents; (d) Infrastructures and support given to the availability of, and cooperation between, research infrastructures necessary to maintain high standards of technical achievement, innovation and safety in the European nuclear sector and Research Area. (e) Human resources, mobility and training support to be provided for the retention and further development of scientific competence, human capacity through joint training activities in order to guarantee the availability of suitably qualified researchers, engineers and employees in the nuclear sector over the longer term.

  13. Advances in Gene Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Suda, Takeshi; Zhang, Guisheng; Liu, Dexi

    2011-01-01

    The transfer of genes into cells, both in vitro and in vivo, is critical for studying gene function and conducting gene therapy. Methods that utilize viral and nonviral vectors, as well as physical approaches, have been explored. Viral vector-mediated gene transfer employs replication-deficient viruses such as retro-virus, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus and herpes simplex virus. A major advantage of viral vectors is their high gene delivery efficiency. The nonviral vectors developed so far include cationic liposomes, cationic polymers, synthetic peptides and naturally occurring compounds. These nonviral vectors appear to be highly effective in gene delivery to cultured cells in vitro but are significantly less effective in vivo. Physical methods utilize mechanical pressure, electric shock or hydrodynamic force to transiently permeate the cell membrane to transfer DNA into target cells. They are simpler than viral- and nonviral-based systems and highly effective for localized gene delivery. The past decade has seen significant efforts to establish the most desirable method for safe, effective and target-specific gene delivery, and good progress has been made. The objectives of this review are to (i) explain the rationale for the design of viral, nonviral and physical methods for gene delivery; (ii) provide a summary on recent advances in gene transfer technology; (iii) discuss advantages and disadvantages of each of the most commonly used gene delivery methods; and (iv) provide future perspectives. PMID:22200988

  14. The Gene Wiki: community intelligence applied to human gene annotation.

    PubMed

    Huss, Jon W; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Martone, Michael; Roberts, Donabel; Pizarro, Angel; Valafar, Faramarz; Hogenesch, John B; Su, Andrew I

    2010-01-01

    Annotating the function of all human genes is a critical, yet formidable, challenge. Current gene annotation efforts focus on centralized curation resources, but it is increasingly clear that this approach does not scale with the rapid growth of the biomedical literature. The Gene Wiki utilizes an alternative and complementary model based on the principle of community intelligence. Directly integrated within the online encyclopedia, Wikipedia, the goal of this effort is to build a gene-specific review article for every gene in the human genome, where each article is collaboratively written, continuously updated and community reviewed. Previously, we described the creation of Gene Wiki 'stubs' for approximately 9000 human genes. Here, we describe ongoing systematic improvements to these articles to increase their utility. Moreover, we retrospectively examine the community usage and improvement of the Gene Wiki, providing evidence of a critical mass of users and editors. Gene Wiki articles are freely accessible within the Wikipedia web site, and additional links and information are available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Gene_Wiki. PMID:19755503

  15. Identification of genes and gene products necessary for bacterial bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1984-07-01

    Expression of luminescence in Escherichia coli was recently achieved by cloning genes from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. One DNA fragment on a hybrid plasmid encoded regulatory functions and enzymatic activities necessary for light production. We report the results of a genetic analysis to identify the luminescence genes (lux) that reside on this recombinant plasmid. lux gene mutations were generated by hydroxylamine treatment, and these mutations were ordered on a linear map by complementation in trans with a series of polar transposon insertions on other plasmids. lux genes were defined by complementation of lux gene defects on pairs of plasmids in trans in E. coli. Hybrid plasmids were also used to direct the synthesis of polypeptides in the E. coli minicell system. Seven lux genes and the corresponding gene products were identified from the complementation analysis and the minicell programing experiments. These genes, in the order of their position on a linear map, and the apparent molecular weights of the gene products are luxR (27,000), luxI (25,000), luxC (53,000), luxD (33,000), luxA (40,000), luxB (38,000), and luxE (42,000). From the luminescence phenotypes of E. coli containing mutant plasmids, functions were assigned to these genes: luxA, luxB, luxC, luxD, and luxE encode enzymes for light production and luxR and luxI encode regulatory functions. PMID:6377310

  16. Progress in gene targeting and gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, M.M.; Erven, A.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we localized disease genes involved in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited retinal degeneration, close to the rhodopsin and peripherin genes on 3q and 6p. Subsequently, we and others identified mutations in these genes in RP patients. Currently animal models for human retinopathies are being generated using gene targeting by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Genomic clones for retinal genes including rhodopsin and peripherin have been obtained from a phage library carrying mouse DNA isogenic with the ES cell line (CC1.2). The peripherin clone has been sequenced to establish the genomic structure of the mouse gene. Targeting vectors for rhodopsin and peripherin including a neomycin cassette for positive selection and thymidine kinase genes enabling selection against random intergrants are under construction. Progress in vector construction will be presented. Simultaneously we are developing systems for delivery of gene therapies to retinal tissues utilizing replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5). Efficacy of infection subsequent to various methods of intraocular injection and with varying viral titers is being assayed using an adenovirus construct containing a CMV promoter LacZ fusion as reporter and the range of tissues infected and the level of duration of LacZ expression monitored. Viral constructs with the LacZ reporter gene under the control of retinal specific promoters such as rhodopsin and IRBP cloned into pXCJL.1 are under construction. An update on developments in photoreceptor cell-directed expression of virally delivered genes will be presented.

  17. Gene Circuit Analysis of the Terminal Gap Gene huckebein

    PubMed Central

    Ashyraliyev, Maksat; Siggens, Ken; Janssens, Hilde; Blom, Joke; Akam, Michael; Jaeger, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    The early embryo of Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful model system to study the role of genes in pattern formation. The gap gene network constitutes the first zygotic regulatory tier in the hierarchy of the segmentation genes involved in specifying the position of body segments. Here, we use an integrative, systems-level approach to investigate the regulatory effect of the terminal gap gene huckebein (hkb) on gap gene expression. We present quantitative expression data for the Hkb protein, which enable us to include hkb in gap gene circuit models. Gap gene circuits are mathematical models of gene networks used as computational tools to extract regulatory information from spatial expression data. This is achieved by fitting the model to gap gene expression patterns, in order to obtain estimates for regulatory parameters which predict a specific network topology. We show how considering variability in the data combined with analysis of parameter determinability significantly improves the biological relevance and consistency of the approach. Our models are in agreement with earlier results, which they extend in two important respects: First, we show that Hkb is involved in the regulation of the posterior hunchback (hb) domain, but does not have any other essential function. Specifically, Hkb is required for the anterior shift in the posterior border of this domain, which is now reproduced correctly in our models. Second, gap gene circuits presented here are able to reproduce mutants of terminal gap genes, while previously published models were unable to reproduce any null mutants correctly. As a consequence, our models now capture the expression dynamics of all posterior gap genes and some variational properties of the system correctly. This is an important step towards a better, quantitative understanding of the developmental and evolutionary dynamics of the gap gene network. PMID:19876378

  18. Identifying Gene Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bebek, Gurkan

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we introduce interaction networks by describing how they are generated, where they are stored, and how they are shared. We focus on publicly available interaction networks and describe a simple way of utilizing these resources. As a case study, we used Cytoscape, an open source and easy-to-use network visualization and analysis tool to first gather and visualize a small network. We have analyzed this network’s topological features and have looked at functional enrichment of the network nodes by integrating the gene ontology database. The methods described are applicable to larger networks that can be collected from various resources. PMID:22307715

  19. Computation in gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hur, Asa; Siegelmann, Hava T.

    2004-03-01

    Genetic regulatory networks have the complex task of controlling all aspects of life. Using a model of gene expression by piecewise linear differential equations we show that this process can be considered as a process of computation. This is demonstrated by showing that this model can simulate memory bounded Turing machines. The simulation is robust with respect to perturbations of the system, an important property for both analog computers and biological systems. Robustness is achieved using a condition that ensures that the model equations, that are generally chaotic, follow a predictable dynamics.

  20. Genes for sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, D; Nakano, Y

    1998-05-01

    The mating behavior of Drosophila melanogaster is a stereotyped sequence of fixed action patterns, composed of orientation, tapping, singing, licking, attempted copulation and copulation. Mutations that block a unique aspect of mating behavior were isolated and analyzed at the cellular and molecular levels. The wild-type counterparts of the mutated genes were shown to rescue the phenotypes by their ubiquitous or targeted expression in some of the mutants. This strategy of artificial control of fly behavior opens up an avenue for studies to identify the neural center for individual behavioral actions. PMID:9600058